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Sample records for age-related neuronal loss

  1. Age-related hearing loss: prevention of threshold declines, cell loss and apoptosis in spiral ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) -presbycusis - is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease and number one communication disorder of our aged population; and affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Its prevalence is close to that of cardiovascular disease and arthritis, and can be a precursor to dementia. The auditory perceptual dysfunction is well understood, but knowledge of the biological bases of ARHL is still somewhat lacking. Surprisingly, there are no FDA-approved drugs for treatment. Based on our previous studies of human subjects, where we discovered relations between serum aldosterone levels and the severity of ARHL, we treated middle age mice with aldosterone, which normally declines with age in all mammals. We found that hearing thresholds and suprathreshold responses significantly improved in the aldosterone-treated mice compared to the non-treatment group. In terms of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect, additional experiments revealed that spiral ganglion cell survival was significantly improved, mineralocorticoid receptors were upregulated via post-translational protein modifications, and age-related intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were blocked by the aldosterone therapy. Taken together, these novel findings pave the way for translational drug development towards the first medication to prevent the progression of ARHL. PMID:27667674

  2. Age-related hearing loss: prevention of threshold declines, cell loss and apoptosis in spiral ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Frisina, Robert D; Ding, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P

    2016-09-23

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) -presbycusis - is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease and number one communication disorder of our aged population; and affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Its prevalence is close to that of cardiovascular disease and arthritis, and can be a precursor to dementia. The auditory perceptual dysfunction is well understood, but knowledge of the biological bases of ARHL is still somewhat lacking. Surprisingly, there are no FDA-approved drugs for treatment. Based on our previous studies of human subjects, where we discovered relations between serum aldosterone levels and the severity of ARHL, we treated middle age mice with aldosterone, which normally declines with age in all mammals. We found that hearing thresholds and suprathreshold responses significantly improved in the aldosterone-treated mice compared to the non-treatment group. In terms of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect, additional experiments revealed that spiral ganglion cell survival was significantly improved, mineralocorticoid receptors were upregulated via post-translational protein modifications, and age-related intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were blocked by the aldosterone therapy. Taken together, these novel findings pave the way for translational drug development towards the first medication to prevent the progression of ARHL.

  3. Rescuing effects of RXR agonist bexarotene on aging-related synapse loss depend on neuronal LRP1.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masaya; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Yamazaki, Yu; Liu, Chia-Chen; Rogers, Justin; Bu, Guojun; Kanekiyo, Takahisa

    2016-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays a critical role in maintaining synaptic integrity by transporting cholesterol to neurons through the low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-1 (LRP1). Bexarotene, a retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist, has been reported to have potential beneficial effects on cognition by increasing brain apoE levels and lipidation. To investigate the effects of bexarotene on aging-related synapse loss and the contribution of neuronal LRP1 to the pathway, forebrain neuron-specific LRP1 knockout (nLrp1(-/-)) and littermate control mice were administered with bexarotene-formulated diet (100mg/kg/day) or control diet at the age of 20-24 months for 8 weeks. Upon bexarotene treatment, levels of brain apoE and ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) were significantly increased in both mice. While levels of PSD95, glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1), and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor NR1 subunit (NR1), which are key postsynaptic proteins that regulate synaptic plasticity, were decreased with aging, they were restored by bexarotene treatment in the brains of control but not nLrp1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that the beneficial effects of bexarotene on synaptic integrity depend on the presence of neuronal LRP1. However, we also found that bexarotene treatment led to the activation of glial cells, weight loss and hepatomegaly, which are likely due to hepatic failure. Taken together, our results demonstrate that apoE-targeted treatment through the RXR pathway has a potential beneficial effect on synapses during aging; however, the therapeutic application of bexarotene requires extreme caution due to its toxic side effects.

  4. Regional variability in age-related loss of neurons from the primary visual cortex and medial prefrontal cortex of male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Yates, M.A.; Markham, J.A.; Anderson, S.E.; Morris, J.R.; Juraska, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    During aging, changes in the structure of the cerebral cortex of the rat have been seen, but potential changes in neuron number remain largely unexplored. In the present study, stereological methods were used to examine neuron number in the medial prefrontal cortex and primary visual cortex of young adult (85–90 days of age) and aged (19–22 months old) male and female rats in order to investigate any age-related losses. Possible sex differences in aging were also examined since sexually dimorphic patterns of aging have been seen in other measures. An age-related loss of neurons (18–20%), which was mirrored in volume losses, was found to occur in the primary visual cortex in both sexes in all layers except IV. Males, but not females, also lost neurons (15 %) from layer V/VI of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and showed an overall decrease in volume of this region. In contrast, dorsal medial prefrontal cortex showed no age-related changes. The effects of aging clearly differ among regions of the rat brain and to some degree, between the sexes. PMID:18513705

  5. Membrane lipid rafts and neurobiology: age-related changes in membrane lipids and loss of neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Junji; Pearn, Matthew L; Lemkuil, Brian P; Patel, Piyush M; Head, Brian P

    2016-08-15

    A better understanding of the cellular physiological role that plasma membrane lipids, fatty acids and sterols play in various cellular systems may yield more insight into how cellular and whole organ function is altered during the ageing process. Membrane lipid rafts (MLRs) within the plasma membrane of most cells serve as key organizers of intracellular signalling and tethering points of cytoskeletal components. MLRs are plasmalemmal microdomains enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and scaffolding proteins; they serve as a platform for signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization and vesicular trafficking. Within MLRs are the scaffolding and cholesterol binding proteins named caveolin (Cav). Cavs not only organize a multitude of receptors including neurotransmitter receptors (NMDA and AMPA receptors), signalling proteins that regulate the production of cAMP (G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, phosphodiesterases (PDEs)), and receptor tyrosine kinases involved in growth (Trk), but also interact with components that modulate actin and tubulin cytoskeletal dynamics (e.g. RhoGTPases and actin binding proteins). MLRs are essential for the regulation of the physiology of organs such as the brain, and age-related loss of cholesterol from the plasma membrane leads to loss of MLRs, decreased presynaptic vesicle fusion, and changes in neurotransmitter release, all of which contribute to different forms of neurodegeneration. Thus, MLRs provide an active membrane domain that tethers and reorganizes the cytoskeletal machinery necessary for membrane and cellular repair, and genetic interventions that restore MLRs to normal cellular levels may be exploited as potential therapeutic means to reverse the ageing and neurodegenerative processes.

  6. Mechanisms of age-related bone loss.

    PubMed

    Mosekilde, L

    2001-01-01

    The human skeleton is formed and modelled during childhood and youth through the influence of hormones and daily mechanical usage. Around the age of 20-25 years, the skeleton achieves its maximum mass and strength. Thereafter, and throughout adult life, bone is lost at an almost constant rate due to the dynamic bone turnover process: the remodelling process. During this process, small packets of bone are renewed by teams of bone cells coupled together in time and space. In an adult human skeleton there will be 1-2 million active remodelling sites at any time point. The vast number of turnover units combined with a slightly negative balance at the completion of each process leads to the age-related loss of bone mass mentioned above and, concomitantly, to loss of structural continuity and strength. The magnitude of this loss will be determined by hormonal factors, nutrition and mechanical usage. As a consequence of the remodelling process, the bone tissue of the skeleton will always be younger than the age of the individual. However, as a consequence of the remodelling process, osteopenia and osteoporotic fractures will also occur. In this article, the remodelling-induced changes in the human spine will be used as an example of ageing bone.

  7. Inactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in myelinating glial cells results in significant loss of adult spiral ganglion neurons accompanied by age-related hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Wang, S J; Furusho, M; D'Sa, C; Kuwada, S; Conti, L; Morest, D K; Bansal, R

    2009-11-15

    Hearing loss has been attributed to many factors, including degeneration of sensory neurons in the auditory pathway and demyelination along the cochlear nerve. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), which signal through four receptors (Fgfrs), are produced by auditory neurons and play a key role in embryonic development of the cochlea and in neuroprotection against sound-induced injury. However, the role of FGF signaling in the maintenance of normal auditory function in adult and aging mice remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the contribution of glial cells, which myelinate the cochlear nerves, is poorly understood. To address these questions, we generated transgenic mice in which Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 were specifically inactivated in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes but not in neurons. Adult mutant mice exhibited late onset of hearing impairment, which progressed markedly with age. The hearing impairment was accompanied by significant loss of myelinated spiral ganglion neurons. The pathology extended into the cochlear nucleus, without apparent loss of myelin or of the deletion-bearing glial cells themselves. This suggests that perturbation of FGF receptor-mediated glial function leads to the attenuation of glial support of neurons, leading to their loss and impairment of auditory functions. Thus, FGF/FGF receptor signaling provides a potentially novel mechanism of maintaining reciprocal interactions between neurons and glia in adult and aging animals. Dysfunction of glial cells and FGF receptor signaling may therefore be implicated in neurodegenerative hearing loss associated with normal aging.

  8. [Age-related muscle mass loss].

    PubMed

    Czarkowska-Paczek, Bozena; Milczarczyk, Sylwia

    2006-01-01

    One of the signs of advancing age in humans is sarcopenia. The term is used to define the loss of muscle mass and strength that occurs with ageing. Sarcopenia contributes to the decreased capacity of independent living and increased amounts of traumas. Numbers of mechanisms are proposed as a cause of sarcopenia, including changes in protein metabolism, alterations in hormonal and neural functions, impaired regeneration after contraction-induced injuries, mitochondrial abnormalities, oxidative stress and apoptosis in skeletal muscle fibres. Further studies on the mechanisms leading to sarcopenia could provide the basis for prevention and establishment of therapeutic methods that would contribute to an increase in the standard of living among elderly people.

  9. Learning and Aging Related Changes in Intrinsic Neuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Oh, M. Matthew; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2010-01-01

    A goal of many laboratories that study aging is to find a key cellular change(s) that can be manipulated and restored to a young-like state, and thus, reverse the age-related cognitive deficits. We have chosen to focus our efforts on the alteration of intrinsic excitability (as reflected by the postburst afterhyperpolarization, AHP) during the learning process in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We have consistently found that the postburst AHP is significantly reduced in hippocampal pyramidal neurons from young adults that have successfully learned a hippocampus-dependent task. In the context of aging, the baseline intrinsic excitability of hippocampal neurons is decreased and therefore cognitive learning is impaired. In aging animals that are able to learn, neuron changes in excitability similar to those seen in young neurons during learning occur. Our challenge, then, is to understand how and why excitability changes occur in neurons from aging brains and cause age-associated learning impairments. After understanding the changes, we should be able to formulate strategies for reversing them, thus making old neurons function more as they did when they were young. Such a reversal should rescue the age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:20552042

  10. Age-related gene expression changes in substantia nigra dopamine neurons of the rat.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2015-07-01

    Ageing affects most, if not all, functional systems in the body. For example, the somatic motor nervous system, responsible for initiating and regulating motor output to skeletal musculature, is vulnerable to ageing. The nigrostriatal dopamine pathway is one component of this system, with deficits in dopamine signalling contributing to major motor dysfunction, as exemplified in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, while the dopamine deficit in PD is due to degeneration of substantia nigra (SN) dopamine (DA) neurons, it is unclear whether there is sufficient loss of SN DA neurons with ageing to explain observed motor impairments. Instead, evidence suggests that age-related loss of DA neuron function may be more important than frank cell loss. To further elucidate the mechanisms of functional decline, we have investigated age-related changes in gene expression specifically in laser microdissected SN DA neurons. There were significant age-related changes in the expression of genes associated with neurotrophic factor signalling and the regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase activity. Furthermore, reduced expression of the DA neuron-associated transcription factor, Nurr1, may contribute to these changes. Together, these results suggest that altered neurotrophic signalling and tyrosine hydroxylase activity may contribute to altered DA neuron signalling and motor nervous system regulation in ageing.

  11. Nutritional influences on age-related skeletal muscle loss.

    PubMed

    Welch, Ailsa A

    2014-02-01

    Age-related muscle loss impacts on whole-body metabolism and leads to frailty and sarcopenia, which are risk factors for fractures and mortality. Although nutrients are integral to muscle metabolism the relationship between nutrition and muscle loss has only been extensively investigated for protein and amino acids. The objective of the present paper is to describe other aspects of nutrition and their association with skeletal muscle mass. Mechanisms for muscle loss relate to imbalance in protein turnover with a number of anabolic pathways of which the mechanistic TOR pathway and the IGF-1-Akt-FoxO pathways are the most characterised. In terms of catabolism the ubiquitin proteasome system, apoptosis, autophagy, inflammation, oxidation and insulin resistance are among the major mechanisms proposed. The limited research associating vitamin D, alcohol, dietary acid-base load, dietary fat and anti-oxidant nutrients with age-related muscle loss is described. Vitamin D may be protective for muscle loss; a more alkalinogenic diet and diets higher in the anti-oxidant nutrients vitamin C and vitamin E may also prevent muscle loss. Although present recommendations for prevention of sarcopenia focus on protein, and to some extent on vitamin D, other aspects of the diet including fruits and vegetables should be considered. Clearly, more research into other aspects of nutrition and their role in prevention of muscle loss is required.

  12. Activity loss and depression in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of severe vision loss in older persons and is associated with high rates of disability and depression. The authors evaluated 51 patients with bilateral AMD to investigate the interrelationships of disease severity, disability, and depression and focused on loss of valued activities as an emblematic disabling consequence of AMD. They characterized depression by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) score, a syndromal state based on the CES-D, and as a level of distress (Index of Affective Suffering; IAS). Thirty subjects (58.8%) had loss of a valued, discretionary activity. They had worse visual acuity and more depressive symptoms and were represented in higher IAS levels than other subjects. Visual acuity was significantly correlated with IAS levels, but not with CES-D scores or syndromal depression. A regression model demonstrated that activity loss mediated the relationship between visual acuity and IAS level. Affective distress occurs in AMD, largely to the extent that valued activities are relinquished because of vision loss. IAS levels best illuminated this relationship, suggesting the value of this dimension of affective functioning in studies of the consequences of chronic disease.

  13. Manganese-mediated acceleration of age-related hearing loss in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Yajima, Ichiro; Iida, Machiko; Li, Xiang; Oshino, Reina; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y.; Kato, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that manganese (Mn) is known to be a neurotoxic element relevant to age-related disorders, the risk of oral exposure to Mn for age-related hearing loss remains unclear. In this study, we orally exposed wild-type young adult mice to Mn (Mn-exposed WT-mice) at 1.65 and 16.50 mg/L for 4 weeks. Mn-exposed WT-mice showed acceleration of age-related hearing loss. Mn-exposed WT-mice had neurodegeneration of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) with increased number of lipofuscin granules. Mn-exposed WT-mice also had increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (Hif-1α) protein with less hydroxylation at proline 564 and decreased c-Ret protein in SGNs. Mn-mediated acceleration of age-related hearing loss involving neurodegeneration of SGNs was rescued in RET-transgenic mice carrying constitutively activated RET. Thus, oral exposure to Mn accelerates age-related hearing loss in mice with Ret-mediated neurodegeneration of SGNs. PMID:27824154

  14. Age-related hearing loss increases cross-modal distractibility.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Sandmann, Pascale; Bendixen, Alexandra; Thiel, Christiane M

    2014-10-01

    Recent electrophysiological studies have provided evidence that changes in multisensory processing in auditory cortex cannot only be observed following extensive hearing loss, but also in moderately hearing-impaired subjects. How the reduced auditory input affects audio-visual interactions is however largely unknown. Here we used a cross-modal distraction paradigm to investigate multisensory processing in elderly participants with an age-related high-frequency hearing loss as compared to young and elderly subjects with normal hearing. During the experiment, participants were simultaneously presented with independent streams of auditory and visual input and were asked to categorize either the auditory or visual information while ignoring the other modality. Unisensory sequences without any cross-modal input served as control conditions to assure that all participants were able to perform the task. While all groups performed similarly in these unisensory conditions, hearing-impaired participants showed significantly increased error rates when confronted with distracting cross-modal stimulation. This effect could be observed in both the auditory and the visual task. Supporting these findings, an additional regression analysis indicted that the degree of high-frequency hearing loss significantly modulates cross-modal visual distractibility in the auditory task. These findings provide new evidence that already a moderate sub-clinical hearing loss, a common phenomenon in the elderly population, affects the processing of audio-visual information.

  15. Neural Alterations in Acquired Age-Related Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Mudar, Raksha A; Husain, Fatima T

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in older adults. Growing evidence suggests that hearing loss is associated with reduced cognitive functioning and incident dementia. In this mini-review, we briefly examine literature on anatomical and functional alterations in the brains of adults with acquired age-associated hearing loss, which may underlie the cognitive consequences observed in this population, focusing on studies that have used structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and event-related electroencephalography. We discuss structural and functional alterations observed in the temporal and frontal cortices and the limbic system. These neural alterations are discussed in the context of common cause, information-degradation, and sensory-deprivation hypotheses, and we suggest possible rehabilitation strategies. Although, we are beginning to learn more about changes in neural architecture and functionality related to age-associated hearing loss, much work remains to be done. Understanding the neural alterations will provide objective markers for early identification of neural consequences of age-associated hearing loss and for evaluating benefits of intervention approaches.

  16. Loss of Rictor with aging in osteoblasts promotes age-related bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Pinling; Song, Qiancheng; Yang, Cheng; Li, Zhen; Liu, Sichi; Liu, Bin; Li, Mangmang; Deng, Hongwen; Cai, Daozhang; Jin, Dadi; Liu, Anling; Bai, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblast dysfunction is a major cause of age-related bone loss, but the mechanisms underlying changes in osteoblast function with aging are poorly understood. This study demonstrates that osteoblasts in aged mice exhibit markedly impaired adhesion to the bone formation surface and reduced mineralization in vivo and in vitro. Rictor, a specific component of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) that controls cytoskeletal organization and cell survival, is downregulated with aging in osteoblasts. Mechanistically, we found that an increased level of reactive oxygen species with aging stimulates the expression of miR-218, which directly targets Rictor and reduces osteoblast bone surface adhesion and survival, resulting in a decreased number of functional osteoblasts and accelerated bone loss in aged mice. Our findings reveal a novel functional pathway important for age-related bone loss and support for miR-218 and Rictor as potential targets for therapeutic intervention for age-related osteoporosis treatment. PMID:27735936

  17. Loss and gain of Drosophila TDP-43 impair synaptic efficacy and motor control leading to age-related neurodegeneration by loss-of-function phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Diaper, Danielle C.; Adachi, Yoshitsugu; Sutcliffe, Ben; Humphrey, Dickon M.; Elliott, Christopher J.H.; Stepto, Alan; Ludlow, Zoe N.; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Callaerts, Patrick; Dermaut, Bart; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Robinson, Iain M.; Hirth, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic accumulation and nuclear clearance of TDP-43 characterize familial and sporadic forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration, suggesting that either loss or gain of TDP-43 function, or both, cause disease formation. Here we have systematically compared loss- and gain-of-function of Drosophila TDP-43, TAR DNA Binding Protein Homolog (TBPH), in synaptic function and morphology, motor control, and age-related neuronal survival. Both loss and gain of TBPH severely affect development and result in premature lethality. TBPH dysfunction caused impaired synaptic transmission at the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and in the adult. Tissue-specific knockdown together with electrophysiological recordings at the larval NMJ also revealed that alterations of TBPH function predominantly affect pre-synaptic efficacy, suggesting that impaired pre-synaptic transmission is one of the earliest events in TDP-43-related pathogenesis. Prolonged loss and gain of TBPH in adults resulted in synaptic defects and age-related, progressive degeneration of neurons involved in motor control. Toxic gain of TBPH did not downregulate or mislocalize its own expression, indicating that a dominant-negative effect leads to progressive neurodegeneration also seen with mutational inactivation of TBPH. Together these data suggest that dysfunction of Drosophila TDP-43 triggers a cascade of events leading to loss-of-function phenotypes whereby impaired synaptic transmission results in defective motor behavior and progressive deconstruction of neuronal connections, ultimately causing age-related neurodegeneration. PMID:23307927

  18. Loss and gain of Drosophila TDP-43 impair synaptic efficacy and motor control leading to age-related neurodegeneration by loss-of-function phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Diaper, Danielle C; Adachi, Yoshitsugu; Sutcliffe, Ben; Humphrey, Dickon M; Elliott, Christopher J H; Stepto, Alan; Ludlow, Zoe N; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Callaerts, Patrick; Dermaut, Bart; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E; Robinson, Iain M; Hirth, Frank

    2013-04-15

    Cytoplasmic accumulation and nuclear clearance of TDP-43 characterize familial and sporadic forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration, suggesting that either loss or gain of TDP-43 function, or both, cause disease formation. Here we have systematically compared loss- and gain-of-function of Drosophila TDP-43, TAR DNA Binding Protein Homolog (TBPH), in synaptic function and morphology, motor control, and age-related neuronal survival. Both loss and gain of TBPH severely affect development and result in premature lethality. TBPH dysfunction caused impaired synaptic transmission at the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and in the adult. Tissue-specific knockdown together with electrophysiological recordings at the larval NMJ also revealed that alterations of TBPH function predominantly affect pre-synaptic efficacy, suggesting that impaired pre-synaptic transmission is one of the earliest events in TDP-43-related pathogenesis. Prolonged loss and gain of TBPH in adults resulted in synaptic defects and age-related, progressive degeneration of neurons involved in motor control. Toxic gain of TBPH did not downregulate or mislocalize its own expression, indicating that a dominant-negative effect leads to progressive neurodegeneration also seen with mutational inactivation of TBPH. Together these data suggest that dysfunction of Drosophila TDP-43 triggers a cascade of events leading to loss-of-function phenotypes whereby impaired synaptic transmission results in defective motor behavior and progressive deconstruction of neuronal connections, ultimately causing age-related neurodegeneration.

  19. Age-Related Hearing Loss: Quality of Care for Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li-Korotky, Ha-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), known as presbycusis, is characterized by progressive deterioration of auditory sensitivity, loss of the auditory sensory cells, and central processing functions associated with the aging process. ARHL is the third most prevalent chronic condition in older Americans, after hypertension and arthritis, and is a…

  20. Age-related epigenetic regulation in the brain and its role in neuronal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Ha, Jeongsil; Kim, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates many brain functions are mediated by epigenetic regulation of neural genes, and their dysregulations result in neuronal disorders. Experiences such as learning and recall, as well as physical exercise, induce neuronal activation through epigenetic modifications and by changing the noncoding RNA profiles. Animal models, brain samples from patients, and the development of diverse analytical methods have broadened our understanding of epigenetic regulation in the brain. Diverse and specific epigenetic changes are suggested to correlate with neuronal development, learning and memory, aging and age-related neuronal diseases. Although the results show some discrepancies, a careful comparison of the data (including methods, regions and conditions examined) would clarify the problems confronted in understanding epigenetic regulation in the brain. PMID:27866512

  1. Accelerated features of age-related bone loss in zmpste24 metalloproteinase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Daniel; Li, Wei; Akter, Rahima; Henderson, Janet E; Duque, Gustavo

    2009-10-01

    Age-related bone loss is associated with changes in bone cellularity, which include marrow fat infiltration and decreasing levels of osteoblastogenesis. The mechanisms that explain these changes remain unclear. Although nuclear lamina alterations occur in premature aging syndromes that include changes in body fat and severe osteoporosis, the role of proteins of the nuclear lamina in age-related bone loss remains unknown. Using the Zmpste24-null progeroid mice (Zmpste24(-/-)), which exhibit nuclear lamina defects and accumulate unprocessed prelamin A, we identified several alterations in bone cellularity in vivo. We found that defective prelamin A processing induced accelerated features of age-related bone loss including lower osteoblast and osteocyte numbers and higher levels of marrow adipogenesis. In summary, processing of prelamin A could become a new approach to regulate osteoblastogenesis and bone turnover and thus for the prevention and treatment of senile osteoporosis.

  2. A DPOAE assessment of outer hair cell integrity in ears with age-related hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Ueberfuhr, Margarete A; Fehlberg, Hannah; Goodman, Shawn S; Withnell, Robert H

    2016-02-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were used to assess outer hair cell (OHC) integrity in human ears with age-related hearing loss. Sound pressure measurements were made in the ear canal over the stimulus range 40-90 dB SPL (L2), with L1 = 0.45*L2 + 44 with F2 = 2 and 3 or 4 kHz. Model-generated DPOAE I/O functions were fit to DPOAE data to quantify the contribution of loss of nonlinearity (OHC loss) to the hearing loss. Results suggest OHC loss as a contributing cause of age-related hearing, regardless of audiogram configuration. It seems likely that OHC and strial pathology co-exist in ears with AHL.

  3. Age-related neuronal degeneration: complementary roles of nucleotide excision repair and transcription-coupled repair in preventing neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Dick; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; de Waard, Monique C; Haasdijk, Elize D; Brandt, Renata; Vermeij, Marcel; Rijksen, Yvonne; Maas, Alex; van Steeg, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J

    2011-12-01

    Neuronal degeneration is a hallmark of many DNA repair syndromes. Yet, how DNA damage causes neuronal degeneration and whether defects in different repair systems affect the brain differently is largely unknown. Here, we performed a systematic detailed analysis of neurodegenerative changes in mouse models deficient in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR), two partially overlapping DNA repair systems that remove helix-distorting and transcription-blocking lesions, respectively, and that are associated with the UV-sensitive syndromes xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). TCR-deficient Csa(-/-) and Csb(-/-) CS mice showed activated microglia cells surrounding oligodendrocytes in regions with myelinated axons throughout the nervous system. This white matter microglia activation was not observed in NER-deficient Xpa(-/-) and Xpc(-/-) XP mice, but also occurred in Xpd(XPCS) mice carrying a point mutation (G602D) in the Xpd gene that is associated with a combined XPCS disorder and causes a partial NER and TCR defect. The white matter abnormalities in TCR-deficient mice are compatible with focal dysmyelination in CS patients. Both TCR-deficient and NER-deficient mice showed no evidence for neuronal degeneration apart from p53 activation in sporadic (Csa(-/-), Csb(-/-)) or highly sporadic (Xpa(-/-), Xpc(-/-)) neurons and astrocytes. To examine to what extent overlap occurs between both repair systems, we generated TCR-deficient mice with selective inactivation of NER in postnatal neurons. These mice develop dramatic age-related cumulative neuronal loss indicating DNA damage substrate overlap and synergism between TCR and NER pathways in neurons, and they uncover the occurrence of spontaneous DNA injury that may trigger neuronal degeneration. We propose that, while Csa(-/-) and Csb(-/-) TCR-deficient mice represent powerful animal models to study the mechanisms underlying myelin abnormalities in CS, neuron

  4. Modeling the Mechanical Consequences of Age-Related Trabecular Bone Loss by XFEM Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ruoxun; Zhang, Xianbin; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhengbin; Zhu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The elderly are more likely to suffer from fracture because of age-related trabecular bone loss. Different bone loss locations and patterns have different effects on bone mechanical properties. Extended finite element method (XFEM) can simulate fracture process and was suited to investigate the effects of bone loss on trabecular bone. Age-related bone loss is indicated by trabecular thinning and loss and may occur at low-strain locations or other random sites. Accordingly, several ideal normal and aged trabecular bone models were created based on different bone loss locations and patterns; then, fracture processes from crack initiation to complete failure of these models were observed by XFEM; finally, the effects of different locations and patterns on trabecular bone were compared. Results indicated that bone loss occurring at low-strain locations was more detrimental to trabecular bone than that occurring at other random sites; meanwhile, the decrease in bone strength caused by trabecular loss was higher than that caused by trabecular thinning, and the effects of vertical trabecular loss on mechanical properties were more severe than horizontal trabecular loss. This study provided a numerical method to simulate trabecular bone fracture and distinguished different effects of the possible occurrence of bone loss locations and patterns on trabecular bone. PMID:27403206

  5. Age-related changes in ultrastructural features of cathepsin B- and D-containing neurons in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Jung, H; Lee, E Y; Lee, S I

    1999-10-09

    The present study examines age-related changes in the subcellular localization of cathepsin B (cath B) and cathepsin D (cath D), as well as morphological features of the cathepsin-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in rat cerebral cortex. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied at 3 and 26 months. By immunoelectron microscopy cath B- or cath D-immunoreactivities were found in many, but not all, pyramidal neurons. In young rat cerebral cortical neurons, cath B was observed not only in lysosomal systems such as multivesicular bodies, dense bodies, and lipofuscin granules, but also in extralysosomal sites. By contrast, cath D was confined mainly to lysosomal systems in young rats. In aged rats, cath B showed a similar pattern in its subcellular localization compared to the young control, but some of the dense bodies containing cath B was closely apposed to the outer nuclear envelope. These cells exhibited a relatively normal appearance. Regardless of subcellular localization, approximately 10% of cath B-ir neurons displayed ultrastructural disturbances presumed to indicate an early stage of degeneration. The nucleus was indented, nuclear boundary was indistinct, nuclear pore structures appeared separately with high frequency, and the endoplasmic reticulum appeared to be affected. In addition to its presence in lysosomal structures, cath D-immunoreactivity in aged cerebral cortex was noted prominently in the cytosol as diffuse granules. About 37% of cath D-ir cells showed this age-related change. Among the neurons with the diffusely scattered form of cath D, approximately 70% of cells exhibited the degenerating features. These cells were characterized by large amounts of diffuse cath D, reduced cellular size, loss of the nuclear boundary, scattered nuclear pore structures, an often fragmentation of the nucleus, disturbances of endoplasmic reticular system, and in advanced stages, condensed nucleus and poor preservation of almost cytoplasmic organelles. Though some of these features

  6. Age-related hearing impairment and the triad of acquired hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof) of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise. PMID:26283913

  7. Cumulative Lead Exposure and Age-related Hearing Loss: The VA Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Kyun; Elmarsafawy, Sahar; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Spiro, Avron; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Nie, Huiling; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Although lead has been associated with hearing loss in occupational settings and in children, little epidemiologic research has been conducted on the impact of cumulative lead exposure on age-related hearing loss in the general population. We determined whether bone lead levels, a marker of cumulative lead exposure, are associated with decreased hearing ability in 448 men from the Normative Aging Study, seen between 1962 and 1996 (2,264 total observations). Air conduction hearing thresholds were measured at 0.25 to 8 kHz and pure tone averages (PTA) (mean of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz) were computed. Tibia and patella lead levels were measured using K x-ray fluorescence between 1991 and 1996. In cross-sectional analyses, after adjusting for potential confounders including occupational noise, patella lead levels were significantly associated with poorer hearing thresholds at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 kHz and PTA. The odds of hearing loss significantly increased with patella lead levels. We also found significant positive associations between tibia lead and the rate change in hearing thresholds at 1, 2, and 8 kHz and PTA in longitudinal analyses. Our results suggest that chronic low-level lead exposure may be an important risk factor for age-related hearing loss and reduction of lead exposure could help prevent or delay development of age-related hearing loss. PMID:20638461

  8. Age-Related Synapse Loss In Hippocampal CA3 Is Not Reversed By Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michelle M.; Donohue, Howard S.; Linville, M. Constance; Iversen, Elizabeth A.; Newton, Isabel G.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is a reduction of total caloric intake without a decrease in micronutrients or a disproportionate reduction of any one dietary component. While CR attenuates age-related cognitive deficits in tasks of hippocampal-dependent memory, the cellular mechanisms by which CR improves this cognitive decline are poorly understood. Previously, we have reported age-related decreases in key synaptic proteins in the CA3 region of the hippocampus that are stabilized by lifelong CR. In the present study, we examined possible age-related changes in the functional microcircuitry of the synapses in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare (SL-M) of the CA3 region of the hippocampus, and whether lifelong CR might prevent these age-related alterations. We used serial electron microscopy to reconstruct and classify SL-M synapses and their postsynaptic spines. We analyzed synapse number and size as well as spine surface area and volume in young (10 mos.) and old (29 mos) ad libitum fed rats and in old rats that were calorically restricted from 4 months of age. We limited our analysis to SL-M because previous work demonstrated age-related decreases in synaptophysin confined to this specific layer and region of the hippocampus. The results revealed an age-related decrease in macular axo-spinous synapses that was not reversed by CR that occurred in the absence of changes in the size of synapses or spines. Thus, the benefits of CR for CA3 function and synaptic plasticity may involve other biological effects including the stabilization of synaptic proteins levels in the face of age-related synapse loss. PMID:20854882

  9. Gulliver meets Descartes: early modern concepts of age-related memory loss.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Daniel

    2003-03-01

    Age-related memory loss was a marginal issue in medical discussions during early modern times and until well into the second half of the 17th century. There are many possible explanations: the lack of similar traditions in antiquity and in the Middle Ages, insufficient physiological and morphological knowledge of the brain, and the underlying conflict between idealistic and materialistic perspectives on the functions of the soul and the conditions of these in old age. After these boundaries had been pushed back by the influence of Cartesianism and Iatromechanism, the problem of age-related memory loss was increasingly regarded as a physical illness and began to receive more attention. This trend first occurred in medicine, before spreading to the literary world, where the novel "Gulliver's Travels" is one clear and famous example.

  10. Functional consequences of age-related morphologic changes to pyramidal neurons of the rhesus monkey prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Coskren, Patrick J; Luebke, Jennifer I; Kabaso, Doron; Wearne, Susan L; Yadav, Aniruddha; Rumbell, Timothy; Hof, Patrick R; Weaver, Christina M

    2015-04-01

    Layer 3 (L3) pyramidal neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) of rhesus monkeys exhibit dendritic regression, spine loss and increased action potential (AP) firing rates during normal aging. The relationship between these structural and functional alterations, if any, is unknown. To address this issue, morphological and electrophysiological properties of L3 LPFC pyramidal neurons from young and aged rhesus monkeys were characterized using in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and high-resolution digital reconstruction of neurons. Consistent with our previous studies, aged neurons exhibited significantly reduced dendritic arbor length and spine density, as well as increased input resistance and firing rates. Computational models using the digital reconstructions with Hodgkin-Huxley and AMPA channels allowed us to assess relationships between demonstrated age-related changes and to predict physiological changes that have not yet been tested empirically. For example, the models predict that in both backpropagating APs and excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), attenuation is lower in aged versus young neurons. Importantly, when identical densities of passive parameters and voltage- and calcium-gated conductances were used in young and aged model neurons, neither input resistance nor firing rates differed between the two age groups. Tuning passive parameters for each model predicted significantly higher membrane resistance (R m ) in aged versus young neurons. This R m increase alone did not account for increased firing rates in aged models, but coupling these R m values with subtle differences in morphology and membrane capacitance did. The predicted differences in passive parameters (or parameters with similar effects) are mathematically plausible, but must be tested empirically.

  11. Cohesive finite element modeling of age-related toughness loss in human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ani; Vashishth, Deepak

    2006-01-01

    Although the age-related loss of bone quality has been implicated in bone fragility, a mechanistic understanding of the relationship is necessary for developing diagnostic and treatment modalities in the elderly population at risk of fracture. In this study, a finite element based cohesive zone model is developed and applied to human cortical bone in order to capture the experimentally shown rising crack growth behavior and age-related loss of bone toughness. The cohesive model developed here is based on a traction-crack opening displacement relationship representing the fracture processes in the vicinity of a propagating crack. The traction-displacement curve, defining the cohesive model, is composed of ascending and descending branches that incorporate material softening and nonlinearity. The results obtained indicate that, in contrast to initiation toughness, the finite element simulations of crack growth in compact tension (CT) specimens successfully capture the rising R-curve (propagation toughness) behavior and the age-related loss of bone toughness. In close correspondence with the experimentally observed decrease of 14-15% per decade, the finite element simulation results show a decrease of 13% in the R-curve slope per decade. The success of the simulations is a result of the ability of cohesive models to capture and predict the parameters related to bone fracture by representing the physical processes occurring in the vicinity of a propagating crack. These results illustrate that fracture mechanisms in the process zone control bone toughness and any modification to these would cause age-related toughness loss.

  12. Age-related loss of muscle fibres is highly variable amongst mouse skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Sheard, Philip W; Anderson, Ross D

    2012-04-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, attributable in part to muscle fibre loss. We are currently unable to prevent fibre loss because we do not know what causes it. To provide a platform from which to better understand the causes of muscle fibre death we have quantified fibre loss in several muscles of aged C57Bl/6J mice. Comparison of muscle fibre numbers on dystrophin-immunostained transverse tissue sections at 6 months of age with those at 24 months shows a significant fibre loss in extensor digitorum longus and soleus, but not in sternomastoid or cleidomastoid muscles. The muscles of the elderly mice were mostly lighter than their younger counterparts, but fibres in the elderly muscles were of about the same cross-sectional area. This study shows that the contribution of fibre death to sarcopenia is highly variable and that there is no consistent pattern of age-related fibre loss between skeletal muscles.

  13. Age-Related Phasic Patterns of Mitochondrial Maintenance in Adult Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Morsci, Natalia S.; Hall, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with cognitive decline and increasing risk of neurodegeneration. Perturbation of mitochondrial function, dynamics, and trafficking are implicated in the pathogenesis of several age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this fundamental importance, the critical understanding of how organismal aging affects lifetime neuronal mitochondrial maintenance remains unknown, particularly in a physiologically relevant context. To address this issue, we performed a comprehensive in vivo analysis of age-associated changes in mitochondrial morphology, density, trafficking, and stress resistance in individual Caenorhabditis elegans neurons throughout adult life. Adult neurons display three distinct stages of increase, maintenance, and decrease in mitochondrial size and density during adulthood. Mitochondrial trafficking in the distal neuronal processes declines progressively with age starting from early adulthood. In contrast, long-lived daf-2 mutants exhibit delayed age-associated changes in mitochondrial morphology, constant mitochondrial density, and maintained trafficking rates during adulthood. Reduced mitochondrial load at late adulthood correlates with decreased mitochondrial resistance to oxidative stress. Revealing aging-associated changes in neuronal mitochondria in vivo is an essential precedent that will allow future elucidation of the mechanistic causes of mitochondrial aging. Thus, our study establishes the critical foundation for the future analysis of cellular pathways and genetic and pharmacological factors regulating mitochondrial maintenance in aging- and disease-relevant conditions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, we address long-standing questions: How does aging affect neuronal mitochondrial morphology, density, trafficking, and oxidative stress resistance? Are these age-related changes amenable to genetic manipulations that slow down the aging process? Our study illustrates that mitochondrial

  14. Age-Related Neuronal Degeneration: Complementary Roles of Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-Coupled Repair in Preventing Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    de Waard, Monique C.; Haasdijk, Elize D.; Brandt, Renata; Vermeij, Marcel; Rijksen, Yvonne; Maas, Alex; van Steeg, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration is a hallmark of many DNA repair syndromes. Yet, how DNA damage causes neuronal degeneration and whether defects in different repair systems affect the brain differently is largely unknown. Here, we performed a systematic detailed analysis of neurodegenerative changes in mouse models deficient in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR), two partially overlapping DNA repair systems that remove helix-distorting and transcription-blocking lesions, respectively, and that are associated with the UV-sensitive syndromes xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). TCR–deficient Csa−/− and Csb−/− CS mice showed activated microglia cells surrounding oligodendrocytes in regions with myelinated axons throughout the nervous system. This white matter microglia activation was not observed in NER–deficient Xpa−/− and Xpc−/− XP mice, but also occurred in XpdXPCS mice carrying a point mutation (G602D) in the Xpd gene that is associated with a combined XPCS disorder and causes a partial NER and TCR defect. The white matter abnormalities in TCR–deficient mice are compatible with focal dysmyelination in CS patients. Both TCR–deficient and NER–deficient mice showed no evidence for neuronal degeneration apart from p53 activation in sporadic (Csa−/−, Csb−/−) or highly sporadic (Xpa−/−, Xpc−/−) neurons and astrocytes. To examine to what extent overlap occurs between both repair systems, we generated TCR–deficient mice with selective inactivation of NER in postnatal neurons. These mice develop dramatic age-related cumulative neuronal loss indicating DNA damage substrate overlap and synergism between TCR and NER pathways in neurons, and they uncover the occurrence of spontaneous DNA injury that may trigger neuronal degeneration. We propose that, while Csa−/− and Csb−/− TCR–deficient mice represent powerful animal models to study the mechanisms underlying myelin abnormalities

  15. Deterioration of the Medial Olivocochlear Efferent System Accelerates Age-Related Hearing Loss in Pax2-Isl1 Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Chumak, Tetyana; Bohuslavova, Romana; Macova, Iva; Dodd, Nicole; Buckiova, Daniela; Fritzsch, Bernd; Syka, Josef; Pavlinkova, Gabriela

    2016-05-01

    The development, maturation, and maintenance of the inner ear are governed by temporal and spatial expression cascades of transcription factors that form a gene regulatory network. ISLET1 (ISL1) may be one of the major players in this cascade, and in order to study its role in the regulation of inner ear development, we produced a transgenic mouse overexpressing Isl1 under the Pax2 promoter. Pax2-regulated ISL1 overexpression increases the embryonic ISL1(+) domain and induces accelerated nerve fiber extension and branching in E12.5 embryos. Despite these gains in early development, the overexpression of ISL1 impairs the maintenance and function of hair cells of the organ of Corti. Mutant mice exhibit hyperactivity, circling behavior, and progressive age-related decline in hearing functions, which is reflected in reduced otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) followed by elevated hearing thresholds. The reduction of the amplitude of DPOAEs in transgenic mice was first detected at 1 month of age. By 6-9 months of age, DPOAEs completely disappeared, suggesting a functional inefficiency of outer hair cells (OHCs). The timing of DPOAE reduction coincides with the onset of the deterioration of cochlear efferent terminals. In contrast to these effects on efferents, we only found a moderate loss of OHCs and spiral ganglion neurons. For the first time, our results show that the genetic alteration of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent system induces an early onset of age-related hearing loss. Thus, the neurodegeneration of the MOC system could be a contributing factor to the pathology of age-related hearing loss.

  16. Age-related dysfunctions of the autophagy lysosomal pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons under proteasome stress.

    PubMed

    Gavilán, Elena; Pintado, Cristina; Gavilan, Maria P; Daza, Paula; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Castaño, Angélica; Ruano, Diego

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, and autophagy deregulation gives rise to severe disorders. Many of the signaling pathways regulating autophagy under stress conditions are still poorly understood. Using a model of proteasome stress in rat hippocampus, we have characterized the functional crosstalk between the ubiquitin proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosome pathway, identifying also age-related modifications in the crosstalk between both proteolytic systems. Under proteasome inhibition, both autophagy activation and resolution were efficiently induced in young but not in aged rats, leading to restoration of protein homeostasis only in young pyramidal neurons. Importantly, proteasome stress inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3β in young but activated in aged rats. This age-related difference could be because of a dysfunction in the signaling pathway of the insulin growth factor-1 under stress situations. Present data highlight the potential role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the coordination of both proteolytic systems under stress situation, representing a key molecular target to sort out this deleterious effect.

  17. An age-related decline in striatal taurine is correlated with a loss of dopaminergic markers.

    PubMed

    Dawson, R; Pelleymounter, M A; Cullen, M J; Gollub, M; Liu, S

    1999-02-01

    Taurine is present in high concentration in the mammalian brain and is known to decline with aging. The present studies examined the relationship between the loss of striatal neurotransmitters and spatial learning ability in aged male Long-Evans rats. The effects of intrahippocampal infusions of neurotrophic factors-nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-were also examined for their ability to ameliorate the age-related decline in brain amino acid content. Taurine content was found to be significantly reduced in the striatum of aged rats (26 months old) that were impaired in spatial learning performance when compared to young unimpaired rats (5 months old). Aged rats that were behaviorally unimpaired had more modest reductions in taurine. Striatal dopamine content was also significantly reduced in aged learning-impaired rats. There was a significant (p < 0.001) correlation (r=0.61) between the striatal content of taurine and dopamine, but no such correlation was found for other striatal transmitters (glutamate, serotonin, norepinephrine). Treatment with neurotrophins had little effect on the age-related decline in striatal amino acids, although NGF treatment did improve spatial learning. These studies suggest (1) a link between age-related declines in striatal dopamine and taurine and (2) that NGF-induced improvement in spatial learning is not related to mechanisms involving changes in taurine or glutamate content.

  18. Loss of chromosome Y in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: age related or neoplastic phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anurag; Parihar, Mayur; Remani, Arun S; Mishra, Deepak Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Loss of chromosome Y (LOY) in the bone marrow has long been considered as an age-related phenomenon with an incidence of more than 25% in males beyond the age of 80 years. Though reported as an acquired abnormality in myeloid neoplasms, it has rarely been described in B-lymphoblastic leukemia which primarily is a disease of the young. We describe here in three cases of pediatric B-lymphoblastic leukemia with LOY. Conventional cytogenetic studies and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies using centromeric probes for chromosome X and Y on peripheral blood samples ruled out constitutional LOY in all the three cases favoring it to be a neoplastic phenomenon.

  19. Recognition and Control of the Progression of Age-Related Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hong Miao; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Recent breakthroughs have provided notable insights into both the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies for age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Simultaneously, these breakthroughs enhance our knowledge about this neurodegenerative disease and raise the question of whether the disorder is preventable or even treatable. Discoveries relating to ARHL have revealed a unique link between ARHL and the underlying pathologies. Therefore, we need to better understand the pathogenesis or the mechanism of ARHL and learn how to take full advantage of various therapeutic strategies to prevent the progression of ARHL. PMID:23915327

  20. Age-related bone loss in the LOU/c rat model of healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    Duque, Gustavo; Rivas, Daniel; Li, Wei; Li, Ailian; Henderson, Janet E; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2009-03-01

    Inbred albino Louvain (LOU) rats are considered a model of healthy aging due to their increased longevity in the absence of obesity and with a low incidence of common age-related diseases. In this study, we characterized the bone phenotype of male and female LOU rats at 4, 20 and 27 months of age using quantitative micro computed tomographic (mCT) imaging, histology and biochemical analysis of circulating bone biomarkers. Bone quality and morphometry of the distal femora, assessed by mCT, was similar in male and female rats at 4 months of age and deteriorated over time. Histochemical staining of undecalcified bone showed a significant reduction in cortical and trabecular bone by 20 months of age. The reduction in mineralized tissue was accompanied by reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts and a significant increase in marrow adiposity. Biochemical markers of bone turnover, C-telopeptide and osteocalcin, correlated with the age-related bone loss whereas the calciotropic hormones PTH and vitamin D remained unchanged over time. In summary, aged LOU rats exhibit low-turnover bone loss and marrow fat infiltration, which are the hallmarks of senile osteoporosis, and thus represent a novel model in which to study the molecular mechanisms leading to this disorder.

  1. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Daghighi, Mojtaba; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Amini, Marzyeh; Mazza, Tommaso; Pazienza, Valerio; Motazacker, Mahdi M; Mahmoudi, Morteza; De Rooij, Felix W M; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-10-06

    Despite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue (AT) and pancreas with T2D for targeting to develop new drugs for DNs therapy. AT-T2D displayed 15 (e.g. SYT4 up-regulated and VGF down-regulated) and pancreas-T2D showed 10 (e.g. BAG3 up-regulated, VAV3 and APOA1 down-regulated) highly differentially expressed genes with neuronal functions as compared to control tissues. ELISA was blindly performed to measure proteins of 5 most differentially expressed genes in 41 human subjects. SYT4 protein was upregulated, VAV3 and APOA1 were down-regulated, and BAG3 remained unchanged in 1- Obese and 2- Obese-T2D without insulin, VGF protein was higher in these two groups as well as in group 3- Obese-T2D receiving insulin than 4-lean subjects. Interaction networks analysis of these 5 genes showed several metabolic pathways (e.g. lipid metabolism and insulin signaling). Pancreas is a novel site for APOA1 synthesis. VGF is synthesized in AT and could be considered as good diagnostic, and even prognostic, marker for age-induced diseases obesity and T2D. This study provides new targets for rational drugs development for the therapy of age-related DNs.

  2. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans

    PubMed Central

    Daghighi, Mojtaba; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Amini, Marzyeh; Mazza, Tommaso; Pazienza, Valerio; Motazacker, Mahdi M.; Mahmoudi, Morteza; De Rooij, Felix W. M.; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue (AT) and pancreas with T2D for targeting to develop new drugs for DNs therapy. AT-T2D displayed 15 (e.g. SYT4 up-regulated and VGF down-regulated) and pancreas-T2D showed 10 (e.g. BAG3 up-regulated, VAV3 and APOA1 down-regulated) highly differentially expressed genes with neuronal functions as compared to control tissues. ELISA was blindly performed to measure proteins of 5 most differentially expressed genes in 41 human subjects. SYT4 protein was upregulated, VAV3 and APOA1 were down-regulated, and BAG3 remained unchanged in 1- Obese and 2- Obese-T2D without insulin, VGF protein was higher in these two groups as well as in group 3- Obese-T2D receiving insulin than 4-lean subjects. Interaction networks analysis of these 5 genes showed several metabolic pathways (e.g. lipid metabolism and insulin signaling). Pancreas is a novel site for APOA1 synthesis. VGF is synthesized in AT and could be considered as good diagnostic, and even prognostic, marker for age-induced diseases obesity and T2D. This study provides new targets for rational drugs development for the therapy of age-related DNs. PMID:26337083

  3. Understanding the Experience of Age-Related Vestibular Loss in Older Individuals: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Carol; Bridges, John F. P.; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Background Inner ear balance (or vestibular) function declines with age and is associated with decreased mobility and an increased risk of falls in older individuals. We sought to understand the lived experience of older adults with vestibular loss in order to improve care in this population. Methods Qualitative data were derived from semi-structured interviews of individuals aged 65 years or older presenting to the Balance and Falls Prevention Clinic from February 1, 2014 to March 30, 2015 for evaluation of age-related vestibular loss. Transcripts were analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. We created a taxonomy of overarching superordinate themes based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) Framework, and classified key dimensions within each of these themes. Results Sixteen interviews were conducted with individuals (mean age 76.0 years, 75 % female) with age-related vestibular loss. The three superordinate themes and associated key dimensions were (1) body impairment (including depression, fatigue, fear/anxiety, and problems with concentrating and memory); (2) activity limitation and participation restriction (isolation, needing to stop in the middle of activities, reduced participation relative to expectations, reduced ability to drive or travel, and problems with bending/looking up, standing, and walking); and (3) environmental influences (needing help with daily activities). All participants reported difficulty walking. Conclusions Older adults report that vestibular loss impacts their body functioning and restricts their participation in activities. The specific key dimensions uncovered by this qualitative study can be used to evaluate care from the patient's perspective. PMID:26739817

  4. Age-related hearing loss in sea lions and their scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schusterman, Ronald J.; Southall, Brandon; Kastak, David; Reichmuth Kastak, Colleen

    2002-05-01

    Interest in the hearing capabilities of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) was first stimulated by the echolocation hypothesis and more recently by rising concern about coastal noise pollution. During a series of audiometric tests, we measured the absolute hearing sensitivity of two sea lions and two of their human investigators. Aerial hearing curves for each subject were obtained with a go/no-go procedure and standard psychophysics. Additionally, underwater hearing curves were obtained for the sea lions using the same procedures. Underwater, the older sea lion (22-25 years of age) showed hearing losses relative to the younger sea lion (13-16 years) that ranged from 10 dB at lower frequencies to 50 dB near the upper frequency limit. The older sea lions' hearing losses in air were consistent with those measured underwater. The older human (69 years) tested also showed losses relative to the younger human (22 years). These differences ranged from 15 dB at lower frequencies up to 35 dB at the highest frequency tested. The results obtained in this study document age-related hearing losses in sea lions and humans. The findings are consistent with data on presbycusis in other mammalian species, showing that maximum hearing loss occurs at the highest frequencies.

  5. Wistar rats: a forgotten model of age-related hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Juan C.; Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Gabaldón-Ull, María C.; Blanco, José L.; Juiz, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is one of the most frequent sensory impairments in senescence and is a source of important socio-economic consequences. Understanding the pathological responses that occur in the central auditory pathway of patients who suffer from this disability is vital to improve its diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize age-related modifications in auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and to determine whether these functional responses might be accompanied by an imbalance between excitation and inhibition in the cochlear nucleus of Wistar rats. To do so, ABR recordings at different frequencies and immunohistochemistry for the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) were performed in young, middle-aged and old male Wistar rats. The results demonstrate that there was a significant increase in the auditory thresholds, a significant decrease in the amplitudes and an increase in the latencies of the ABR waves as the age of the rat increased. Additionally, there were decreases in VGLUT1 and VGAT immunostaining in the VCN of older rats compared to younger rats. Therefore, the observed age-related decline in the magnitude of auditory evoked responses might be due in part to a reduction in markers of excitatory function; meanwhile, the concomitant reduction in both excitatory and inhibitory markers might reflect a common central alteration in animal models of ARLH. Together, these findings highlight the suitability of the Wistar rat as an excellent model to study ARHL. PMID:24634657

  6. Tooth loss early in life accelerates age-related bone deterioration in mice.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Minori; Kondo, Hiroko; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Tamura, Yasuo; Chen, Huayue; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01

    Both osteoporosis and tooth loss are health concerns that affect many older people. Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disease of the elderly, characterized by low bone mass and microstructural deterioration of bone tissue. Chronic mild stress is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Many studies showed that tooth loss induced neurological alterations through activation of a stress hormone, corticosterone, in mice. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that tooth loss early in life may accelerate age-related bone deterioration using a mouse model. Male senescence-accelerated mouse strain P8 (SAMP8) mice were randomly divided into control and toothless groups. Removal of the upper molar teeth was performed at one month of age. Bone response was evaluated at 2, 5 and 9 months of age. Tooth loss early in life caused a significant increase in circulating corticosterone level with age. Osteoblast bone formation was suppressed and osteoclast bone resorption was activated in the toothless mice. Trabecular bone volume fraction of the vertebra and femur was decreased in the toothless mice with age. The bone quality was reduced in the toothless mice at 5 and 9 months of age, compared with the age-matched control mice. These findings indicate that tooth loss early in life impairs the dynamic homeostasis of the bone formation and bone resorption, leading to reduced bone strength with age. Long-term tooth loss may have a cumulative detrimental effect on bone health. It is important to take appropriate measures to treat tooth loss in older people for preventing and/or treating senile osteoporosis.

  7. Association of Vision Loss in Glaucoma and Age-Related Macular Degeneration with IADL Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Chad; Maul, Eugenio; Chan, Emilie S.; Van Landingham, Suzanne; Ferrucci, Luigi; Friedman, David S.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To determine if glaucoma and/or age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are associated with disability in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). Methods. Glaucoma subjects (n = 84) with bilateral visual field (VF) loss and AMD subjects (n = 47) with bilateral or severe unilateral visual acuity (VA) loss were compared with 60 subjects with normal vision (controls). Subjects completed a standard IADL disability questionnaire, with disability defined as an inability to perform one or more IADLs unassisted. Results. Disability in one or more IADLs was present in 18.3% of controls as compared with 25.0% of glaucoma subjects (P = 0.34) and 44.7% of AMD subjects (P = 0.003). The specific IADL disabilities occurring more frequently in both AMD and glaucoma subjects were preparing meals, grocery shopping, and out-of-home travelling (P < 0.05 for both). In multivariate logistic regression models run adjusting for age, sex, mental status, comorbidity, and years of education, AMD (odds ratio [OR] = 3.4, P = 0.02) but not glaucoma (OR = 1.4, P = 0.45) was associated with IADL disability. However, among glaucoma and control patients, the odds of IADL disability increased 1.6-fold with every 5 dB of VF loss in the better-seeing eye (P = 0.001). Additionally, severe glaucoma subjects (better-eye MD worse than −13.5 dB) had higher odds of IADL disability (OR = 4.2, P = 0.02). Among AMD and control subjects, every Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study line of worse acuity was associated with a greater likelihood of IADL disability (OR = 1.3). Conclusions. VA loss in AMD and severe VF loss in glaucoma are associated with self-reported difficulties with IADLs. These limitations become more likely with increasing magnitude of VA or VF loss. PMID:22491415

  8. Sporadic Visual Acuity Loss in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Benjamin J.; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Huang, Jiayan; Levy, Nicole E.; Maguire, Maureen G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate transient, large visual acuity (VA) decreases, termed sporadic vision loss, during anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Cohort within a randomized clinical trial. Methods Setting Comparison of AMD Treatments Trials (CATT). Study Population 1185 CATT patients. Main Outcome Measures incidence of sporadic vision loss and odds ratio (OR) for association with patient and ocular factors. Sporadic vision loss was a decline of ≥ 15 letters from the previous visit, followed by a return at the next visit to no more than 5 letters worse than the visit before the VA loss. Results There were 143 sporadic vision loss events in 122/1185 (10.3%) patients. Mean VA at two years for those with and without sporadic vision loss was 58.5 (~20/63) and 68.4 (~20/40) letters, respectively (P < 0.001). Among patients treated pro re nata, no injection was given for 27.6% (27/98) of sporadic vision loss events. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that baseline predictors for sporadic vision loss included worse baseline VA (OR 2.92, 95%CI:1.65–5.17 for ≤ 20/200 compared with ≥ 20/40), scar (OR 2.21, 95%CI:1.22–4.01), intraretinal foveal fluid on optical coherence tomography (OR 1.80, 95%CI:1.11–2.91), and medical history of anxiety (OR 1.90, 95%CI:1.12–3.24) and syncope (OR 2.75, 95%CI:1.45–5.22). Refraction decreased the likelihood of sporadic vision loss (OR 0.62, 95%CI:0.42–0.91). Conclusions Approximately 10% of CATT patients had sporadic vision loss. Baseline predictors included AMD-related factors and factors independent of AMD. These data are relevant for clinicians in practice and those involved in clinical trials. PMID:24727261

  9. GRM7 variants associated with age-related hearing loss based on auditory perception.

    PubMed

    Newman, Dina L; Fisher, Laurel M; Ohmen, Jeffrey; Parody, Robert; Fong, Chin-To; Frisina, Susan T; Mapes, Frances; Eddins, David A; Robert Frisina, D; Frisina, Robert D; Friedman, Rick A

    2012-12-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), or presbycusis, is a common condition of the elderly that results in significant communication difficulties in daily life. Clinically, it has been defined as a progressive loss of sensitivity to sound, starting at the high frequencies, inability to understand speech, lengthening of the minimum discernable temporal gap in sounds, and a decrease in the ability to filter out background noise. The causes of presbycusis are likely a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Previous research into the genetics of presbycusis has focused solely on hearing as measured by pure-tone thresholds. A few loci have been identified, based on a best ear pure-tone average phenotype, as having a likely role in susceptibility to this type of hearing loss; and GRM7 is the only gene that has achieved genome-wide significance. We examined the association of GRM7 variants identified from the previous study, which used an European cohort with Z-scores based on pure-tone thresholds, in a European-American population from Rochester, NY (N = 687), and used novel phenotypes of presbycusis. In the present study mixed modeling analyses were used to explore the relationship of GRM7 haplotype and SNP genotypes with various measures of auditory perception. Here we show that GRM7 alleles are associated primarily with peripheral measures of hearing loss, and particularly with speech detection in older adults.

  10. Communicating with assistive listening devices and age-related hearing loss: Perceptions of older Australians.

    PubMed

    Aberdeen, Lucinda; Fereiro, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Age-related hearing loss can impact adversely on the delivery of primary care and cannot necessarily be remedied by hearing aid technology. A study of 20 older Australians living in a Queensland retirement village and residential hostel complex was undertaken to investigate how communication might be advanced through an assistive listening device (ALD). Most participants were women aged over 85 years; almost all had hearing loss and wore hearing aids. Tests with an ALD found very high levels of satisfaction with understanding speech and sound quality amongst participants. However, few had heard previously of ALDs, all required individualised assistance to fit and use the device and rated ease of use less highly. The findings affirm those of previous studies that ALD technology has a role in communication for older hearing impaired people and for hearing rehabilitation. Its potential to enhance quality of life can be facilitated and promoted through nursing practice, but requires professional and consumer education so that it is not overlooked as a communication option.

  11. Communicating with Assistive Listening Devices and Age-Related Hearing Loss: Perceptions of Older Australians.

    PubMed

    Aberdeen, Lucinda; Fereiro, David

    2014-01-31

    Abstract Age-related hearing loss can impact adversely on the delivery of primary care and cannot necessarily be remedied by hearing aid technology. A study of 20 older Australians living in a Queensland retirement village and residential hostel complex was undertaken to investigate how communication might be advanced through an assistive listening device (ALD). Most participants were women aged over 85 years; almost all had hearing loss and wore hearing aids. Tests with an ALD found very high levels of satisfaction with understanding speech and sound quality amongst participants. However, few had heard previously of ALDs, all required individualised assistance to fit and use the device and rated ease of use less highly. The findings affirm those of previous studies that ALD technology has a role in communication for older hearing-impaired people and for hearing rehabilitation. Its potential to enhance quality of life can be facilitated and promoted through nursing practice, but requires professional and consumer education so that it is not overlooked as a communication option.

  12. Melanin precursors prevent premature age-related and noise-induced hearing loss in albino mice.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Contreras, Julio; Zurita, Esther; Cediel, Rafael; Cantero, Marta; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Montoliu, Lluís

    2010-02-01

    Strial melanocytes are required for normal development and correct functioning of the cochlea. Hearing deficits have been reported in albino individuals from different species, although melanin appears to be not essential for normal auditory function. We have analyzed the auditory brainstem responses (ABR) of two transgenic mice: YRT2, carrying the entire mouse tyrosinase (Tyr) gene expression-domain and undistinguishable from wild-type pigmented animals; and TyrTH, non-pigmented but ectopically expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) in melanocytes, which generate the precursor metabolite, L-DOPA, but not melanin. We show that young albino mice present a higher prevalence of profound sensorineural deafness and a poorer recovery of auditory thresholds after noise-exposure than transgenic mice. Hearing loss was associated with absence of cochlear melanin or its precursor metabolites and latencies of the central auditory pathway were unaltered. In summary, albino mice show impaired hearing responses during ageing and after noise damage when compared to YRT2 and TyrTH transgenic mice, which do not show the albino-associated ABR alterations. These results demonstrate that melanin precursors, such as L-DOPA, have a protective role in the mammalian cochlea in age-related and noise-induced hearing loss.

  13. Validity of the Adaptation to Age-related Vision Loss Scale in an Australian Cataract Population

    PubMed Central

    Gothwal, Vijaya K.; Wright, Thomas A.; Lamoureux, Ecosse L.; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The Adaptation to Age-related Vision Loss (AVL) scale was developed to measure the adjustment of older adults who are adapting to late-life vision loss. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the AVL scale satisfies the Rasch model in a cataract population. Methods The 24-item AVL scale (18 negatively and 6 positively coded) was mailed to 436 cataract patients for self-administration whilst they were on the waiting list for cataract surgery at the Flinders Eye Centre, Adelaide, South Australia. Rasch analysis was performed to determine whether the items were measuring a single construct (unidimensionality) as examined with fit statistics and principal components analysis (PCA) of the residuals. The ability of the scale to distinguish between the levels of adaptation of the participants (person separation) was investigated, with a value ≥2.0 established as the minimum acceptable. Results The AVL scale was unable to differentiate sufficiently between participants’ levels of adaptation, indicating poor person separation. One item did not fit the construct, causing misfit. Furthermore, the five positively worded items did not appear either to measure the same construct as other items, resulting in lack of unidimensionality evidenced by PCA. Following the deletion of these items, the AVL scale was one-dimensional but a single item continued to misfit, so it had to be deleted, resulting in an 18-item AVL scale. Even so, the discriminating abilities of the scale continued to be poor. Conclusions The AVL scale is not an appropriate measure of adaptation to vision loss in a cataract population.

  14. Interferon-gamma deficiency protects against aging-related goblet cell loss

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Eugene A.; Henriksson, Johanna Tukler; Wang, Changjun; Barbosa, Flavia L.; Zaheer, Mahira; Zhang, Xiaobo; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a well-recognized risk factor for dry eye. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) has been implicated in conjunctival keratinization and goblet cell loss in dry eye. We investigated the role of IFN-γ in age-related dry eye by evaluating young (8 weeks) and aged (15 months; 15M) C57BL/6 (B6) and IFN-γKO mice. Age effects on the conjunctiva and cornea epithelium were assessed with PAS staining and corneal staining, respectively. Expression of T cell-related cytokines (IL-17A, IFN-γ), chemokines (CXCL10 and CCL20), in the ocular surface epithelium was evaluated by real time PCR. A significant decrease in filled goblet cells was noted in 15M B6 mice and this was significantly lower than age and sex-matched IFN-γKO mice. Aged male B6 had significantly higher IFN-γ, and CXCL10 mRNA in their conjunctiva than female B6 mice. Aged IFN-γKO females had significantly higher IL-17A mRNA in conjunctiva than IFN-γKO males and B6 mice. Corneal barrier dysfunction was observed in 15M female B6 and aged IFN-γKO mice of both sexes; however it was significantly higher in IFN-γKO compared to B6 mice. While there was a significant increase in IL 17A, and CCL20 in corneas of aged female B6 and IFN-γKO mice compared to males, these changes were more evident in aged female IFN-γKO group. Partial resistance of IFN-γKO mice to aging-induced goblet cell loss indicates IFN-γ is involved in the age-related decline in conjunctival goblet cells. Increased corneal IL-17A expression paralleled corneal barrier disruption in aging female of both strains. IFN-γ appears to suppress IL-17A on the ocular surface. PMID:27623073

  15. Hypothalamic leptin gene therapy reduces body weight without accelerating age-related bone loss.

    PubMed

    Turner, Russell T; Dube, Michael; Branscum, Adam J; Wong, Carmen P; Olson, Dawn A; Zhong, Xiaoying; Kweh, Mercedes F; Larkin, Iske V; Wronski, Thomas J; Rosen, Clifford J; Kalra, Satya P; Iwaniec, Urszula T

    2015-12-01

    Excessive weight gain in adults is associated with a variety of negative health outcomes. Unfortunately, dieting, exercise, and pharmacological interventions have had limited long-term success in weight control and can result in detrimental side effects, including accelerating age-related cancellous bone loss. We investigated the efficacy of using hypothalamic leptin gene therapy as an alternative method for reducing weight in skeletally-mature (9 months old) female rats and determined the impact of leptin-induced weight loss on bone mass, density, and microarchitecture, and serum biomarkers of bone turnover (CTx and osteocalcin). Rats were implanted with cannulae in the 3rd ventricle of the hypothalamus and injected with either recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding the gene for rat leptin (rAAV-Leptin, n=7) or a control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (rAAV-GFP, n=10) and sacrificed 18 weeks later. A baseline control group (n=7) was sacrificed at vector administration. rAAV-Leptin-treated rats lost weight (-4±2%) while rAAV-GFP-treated rats gained weight (14±2%) during the study. At study termination, rAAV-Leptin-treated rats weighed 17% less than rAAV-GFP-treated rats and had lower abdominal white adipose tissue weight (-80%), serum leptin (-77%), and serum IGF1 (-34%). Cancellous bone volume fraction in distal femur metaphysis and epiphysis, and in lumbar vertebra tended to be lower (P<0.1) in rAAV-GFP-treated rats (13.5 months old) compared to baseline control rats (9 months old). Significant differences in cancellous bone or biomarkers of bone turnover were not detected between rAAV-Leptin and rAAV-GFP rats. In summary, rAAV-Leptin-treated rats maintained a lower body weight compared to baseline and rAAV-GFP-treated rats with minimal effects on bone mass, density, microarchitecture, or biochemical markers of bone turnover.

  16. Absence of age-related dopamine transporter loss in current cocaine abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fischman, M.

    1997-05-01

    The brain dopamine (DA) system appears to play a crucial role in the reinforcing properties of cocaine. Using PET we had previously shown significant decreases in DA D2 receptors but no changes in DA transporters (DAT) in detoxified cocaine abusers (>1 month after last cocaine use). This study evaluates DAT availability in current cocaine abusers (15 male and 5 female; age = 36.2{+-}5.3 years old) using PET and [C-11]cocaine, as a DAT ligand, and compares it to that in 18 male and 2 female age matched normal controls. Cocaine abusers had a history of abusing 4.2{+-}2.8 gm /week of cocaine for an average of 11.0{+-}4.9 years and their last use of cocaine was 5.4{+-}8 days prior to PET study. DAT availability was obtained using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest (caudate, pulamen) to that in cerebellum which is a function of Bmax./Kd.+1. DAT availability in cocaine abusers did not differ to that in normals (N) (C= 1.78{+-}0.14, N= 1.77{+-}0.13). In addition, there were no differences between the groups in the distribution volume or the Kl (plasma to brain transfer constant) measures for [C-11]cocaine. However, in the normals but not in the abusers striatal DAT availability decreased with age (C: r = -0.07, p = 0.76; N: r = -0.55, p < 0.01). Though this study fails to show group differences in DAT availability between normals and current cocaine abusers it indicates a blunting of the age-related decline in DAT availability in the cocaine abusers. Future studies in older cocaine abusers at different time after detoxification arc required in order to assess if cocaine slows the loss of DAT with age or whether these changes reflect compensation to increased DAT blockade and recover with detoxification.

  17. Dietary and genetic effects on age-related loss of gene silencing reveal epigenetic plasticity of chromatin repression during aging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Du, Guyu; Tobias, Ethan; Wood, Jason G; Whitaker, Rachel; Neretti, Nicola; Helfand, Stephen L

    2013-11-01

    During aging, changes in chromatin state that alter gene transcription have been postulated to result in expression of genes that are normally silenced, leading to deleterious age-related effects on cellular physiology. Despite the prevalence of this hypothesis, it is primarily in yeast that loss of gene silencing with age has been well documented. We use a novel position effect variegation (PEV) reporter in Drosophila melanogaster to show that age-related loss of repressive heterochromatin is associated with loss of gene silencing in metazoans and is affected by Sir2, as it is in yeast. The life span-extending intervention, calorie restriction (CR), delays the age-related loss of gene silencing, indicating that loss of gene silencing is a component of normal aging. Diet switch experiments show that such flies undergo a rapid change in their level of gene silencing, demonstrating the epigenetic plasticity of chromatin during aging and highlighting the potential role of diet and metabolism in chromatin maintenance, Thus, diet and related interventions may be of therapeutic importance for age-related diseases, such as cancer.

  18. Age-related changes in the hippocampus (loss of synaptophysin and glial-synaptic interaction) are modified by systemic treatment with an NCAM-derived peptide, FGL.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Bunmi; Rezaie, Payam; Gabbott, Paul L; Davies, Heather; Colyer, Frances; Cowley, Thelma R; Lynch, Marina; Stewart, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    Altered synaptic morphology, progressive loss of synapses and glial (astrocyte and microglial) cell activation are considered as characteristic hallmarks of aging. Recent evidence suggests that there is a concomitant age-related decrease in expression of the presynaptic protein, synaptophysin, and the neuronal glycoprotein CD200, which, by interacting with its receptor, plays a role in maintaining microglia in a quiescent state. These age-related changes may be indicative of reduced neuroglial support of synapses. FG Loop (FGL) peptide synthesized from the second fibronectin type III module of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), has previously been shown to attenuate age-related glial cell activation, and to 'restore' cognitive function in aged rats. The mechanisms by which FGL exerts these neuroprotective effects remain unclear, but could involve regulation of CD200, modifying glial-synaptic interactions (affecting neuroglial 'support' at synapses), or impacting directly on synaptic function. Light and electron microscopic (EM) analyses were undertaken to investigate whether systemic treatment with FGL (i) alters CD200, synaptophysin (presynaptic) and PSD-95 (postsynaptic) immunohistochemical expression levels, (ii) affects synaptic number, or (iii) exerts any effects on glial-synaptic interactions within young (4 month-old) and aged (22 month-old) rat hippocampus. Treatment with FGL attenuated the age-related loss of synaptophysin immunoreactivity (-ir) within CA3 and hilus (with no major effect on PSD-95-ir), and of CD200-ir specifically in the CA3 region. Ultrastructural morphometric analyses showed that FGL treatment (i) prevented age-related loss in astrocyte-synaptic contacts, (ii) reduced microglia-synaptic contacts in the CA3 stratum radiatum, but (iii) had no effect on the mean number of synapses in this region. These data suggest that FGL mediates its neuroprotective effects by regulating glial-synaptic interaction.

  19. Optimal compensation for neuron loss

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, David GT; Denève, Sophie; Machens, Christian K

    2016-01-01

    The brain has an impressive ability to withstand neural damage. Diseases that kill neurons can go unnoticed for years, and incomplete brain lesions or silencing of neurons often fail to produce any behavioral effect. How does the brain compensate for such damage, and what are the limits of this compensation? We propose that neural circuits instantly compensate for neuron loss, thereby preserving their function as much as possible. We show that this compensation can explain changes in tuning curves induced by neuron silencing across a variety of systems, including the primary visual cortex. We find that compensatory mechanisms can be implemented through the dynamics of networks with a tight balance of excitation and inhibition, without requiring synaptic plasticity. The limits of this compensatory mechanism are reached when excitation and inhibition become unbalanced, thereby demarcating a recovery boundary, where signal representation fails and where diseases may become symptomatic. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12454.001 PMID:27935480

  20. Auditory Perceptual Learning in Adults with and without Age-Related Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Karawani, Hanin; Bitan, Tali; Attias, Joseph; Banai, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : Speech recognition in adverse listening conditions becomes more difficult as we age, particularly for individuals with age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Whether these difficulties can be eased with training remains debated, because it is not clear whether the outcomes are sufficiently general to be of use outside of the training context. The aim of the current study was to compare training-induced learning and generalization between normal-hearing older adults and those with ARHL. Methods : Fifty-six listeners (60–72 y/o), 35 participants with ARHL, and 21 normal hearing adults participated in the study. The study design was a cross over design with three groups (immediate-training, delayed-training, and no-training group). Trained participants received 13 sessions of home-based auditory training over the course of 4 weeks. Three adverse listening conditions were targeted: (1) Speech-in-noise, (2) time compressed speech, and (3) competing speakers, and the outcomes of training were compared between normal and ARHL groups. Pre- and post-test sessions were completed by all participants. Outcome measures included tests on all of the trained conditions as well as on a series of untrained conditions designed to assess the transfer of learning to other speech and non-speech conditions. Results : Significant improvements on all trained conditions were observed in both ARHL and normal-hearing groups over the course of training. Normal hearing participants learned more than participants with ARHL in the speech-in-noise condition, but showed similar patterns of learning in the other conditions. Greater pre- to post-test changes were observed in trained than in untrained listeners on all trained conditions. In addition, the ability of trained listeners from the ARHL group to discriminate minimally different pseudowords in noise also improved with training. Conclusions : ARHL did not preclude auditory perceptual learning but there was little generalization to

  1. Motor neuron targeting of IGF-1 attenuates age-related external Ca2+-dependent skeletal muscle contraction in senescent mice.

    PubMed

    Payne, Anthony M; Messi, María Laura; Zheng, Zhenlin; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2007-04-01

    A population of fast muscle fibers from aging mice is dependent on external Ca(2+) to maintain tetanic force during repeated contractions. We hypothesized that age-related denervation in muscle fibers plays a role in initiating this contractile deficit, and that prevention of denervation by IGF-1 overexpression would prevent external Ca(2+)-dependent contraction in aging mice. IGF-1 overexpression in skeletal muscle prevents age-related denervation, and prevented external Ca(2+)-dependent contraction in this work. To determine if the effects of IGF-1 overexpression are on muscle or nerve, aging mice were injected with a tetanus toxin fragment-C (TTC) fusion protein that targets IGF-1 to spinal cord motor neurons. This treatment prevented external Ca(2+)-dependent contraction. We also show evidence that injections of the IGF-1-TTC fusion protein prevent age-related alterations to the nerve terminals at the neuromuscular junctions. We conclude that the slow age-related denervation of fast muscle fibers underlies dependence on external Ca(2+) to maintain tetanic force in a population of muscle fibers from senescent mice.

  2. Molecular Mechanism for Age-Related Memory Loss: The Histone-Binding Protein RbAp48

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Elias; Jones, Sidonie; Kosmidis, Stylianos; Close, Maggie; Kim, Carla; Kovalerchik, Olga; Small, Scott A.; Kandel, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    To distinguish age-related memory loss more explicitly from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), we have explored its molecular underpinning in the dentate gyrus (DG), a subregion of the hippocampal formation thought to be targeted by aging. We carried out a gene expression study in human postmortem tissue harvested from both DG and entorhinal cortex (EC), a neighboring subregion unaffected by aging and known to be the site of onset of AD. Using expression in the EC for normalization, we identified 17 genes that manifested reliable age-related changes in the DG. The most significant change was an age-related decline in RbAp48, a histone-binding protein that modifies histone acetylation. To test whether the RbAp48 decline could be responsible for age-related memory loss, we turned to mice and found that, consistent with humans, RbAp48 was less abundant in the DG of old than in young mice. We next generated a transgenic mouse that expressed a dominant-negative inhibitor of RbAp48 in the adult forebrain. Inhibition of RbAp48 in young mice caused hippocampus-dependent memory deficits similar to those associated with aging, as measured by novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that within the hippocampal formation, dysfunction was selectively observed in the DG, and this corresponded to a regionally selective decrease in histone acetylation. Up-regulation of RbAp48 in the DG of aged wild-type mice ameliorated age-related hippocampus-based memory loss and age-related abnormalities in histone acetylation. Together, these findings show that the DG is a hippocampal subregion targeted by aging, and identify molecular mechanisms of cognitive aging that could serve as valid targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23986399

  3. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Attenuating Age-Related Bone Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    into anabolic therapies for osteoporosis .1 Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation towards the bone forming osteoblastic lineage decreases as a...research into anabolic therapies for osteoporosis .1 Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation towards the bone forming osteoblastic lineage decreases...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Osteoporosis , both age-related and post-menopausal, is a huge health problem in the United States and indeed

  4. Learn to forget: regulation of age-related memory impairment by neuronal-glial crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Jackson, George R

    2014-11-19

    Dementia is among the most feared complications of aging in the U.S. In this issue of Neuron, Yamazaki et al. (2014) present a tour de force mechanistic analysis of a "hit" from a proteomic screen carried out using a Drosophila mutation that affects memory.

  5. Age-Related Vestibular Loss: Current Understanding and Future Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Qadeer; Seemungal, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system sub-serves a number of reflex and perceptual functions, comprising the peripheral apparatus, the vestibular nerve, the brainstem and cerebellar processing circuits, the thalamic relays, and the vestibular cerebral cortical network. This system provides signals of self-motion, important for gaze and postural control, and signals of traveled distance, for spatial orientation, especially in the dark. Current evidence suggests that certain aspects of this multi-faceted system may deteriorate with age and sometimes with severe consequences, such as falls. Often the deterioration in vestibular functioning relates to how the signal is processed by brain circuits rather than an impairment in the sensory transduction process. We review current data concerning age-related changes in the vestibular system, and how this may be important for clinicians dealing with balance disorders. PMID:28066316

  6. Intrinsic Hippocampal Excitability Changes of Opposite Signs and Different Origins in CA1 and CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Underlie Aging-Related Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Oh, M. Matthew; Simkin, Dina; Disterhoft, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related cognitive deficits have been attributed to dysfunction of neurons due to failures at synaptic or intrinsic loci, or both. Given the importance of the hippocampus for successful encoding of memory and that the main output of the hippocampus is via the CA1 pyramidal neurons, much of the research has been focused on identifying the aging-related changes of these CA1 pyramidal neurons. We and others have discovered that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following a train of action potentials is greatly enlarged in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged animals. This enlarged postburst AHP is a significant factor in reducing the intrinsic excitability of these neurons, and thus limiting their activity in the neural network during learning. Based on these data, it has largely been thought that aging-related cognitive deficits are attributable to reduced activity of pyramidal neurons. However, recent in vivo and ex vivo studies provide compelling evidence that aging-related deficits could also be due to a converse change in CA3 pyramidal neurons, which show increased activity with aging. In this review, we will incorporate these recent findings and posit that an interdependent dynamic dysfunctional change occurs within the hippocampal network, largely due to altered intrinsic excitability in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which ultimately leads to the aging-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27375440

  7. Dietary Polyphenols, Berries, and Age-Related Bone Loss: A Review Based on Human, Animal, and Cell Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Patrice A.; Lee, Sang Gil; Lee, Sun-Kyeong; Chun, Ock K.

    2014-01-01

    Bone loss during aging has become an increasing public health concern as average life expectancy has increased. One of the most prevalent forms of age-related bone disease today is osteoporosis in which the body slows down bone formation and existing bone is increasingly being resorbed by the body to maintain the calcium balance. Some causes of this bone loss can be attributed to dysregulation of osteoblast and osteoclast activity mediated by increased oxidative stress through the aging process. Due to certain serious adverse effects of the currently available therapeutic agents that limit their efficacy, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has garnered interest as a natural means for the prevention of this debilitating disease. Natural antioxidant supplementation, a type of CAM, has been researched to aid in reducing bone loss caused by oxidative stress. Naturally occurring polyphenols, such as anthocyanins rich in berries, are known to have anti-oxidative properties. Several studies have been reviewed to determine the impact polyphenol intake—particularly that of berries—has on bone health. Studies reveal a positive association of high berry intake and higher bone mass, implicating berries as possible inexpensive alternatives in reducing the risk of age related bone loss. PMID:26784669

  8. Mitochondrial angiotensin receptors in dopaminergic neurons. Role in cell protection and aging-related vulnerability to neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Rita; Costa-Besada, Maria A; Iglesias-Gonzalez, Javier; Perez-Costas, Emma; Villar-Cheda, Begoña; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Soto-Otero, Ramon; Lanciego, Jose L; Henrion, Daniel; Franco, Rafael; Labandeira-Garcia, Jose L

    2016-01-01

    The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) was initially considered as a circulating humoral system controlling blood pressure, being kidney the key control organ. In addition to the ‘classical' humoral RAS, a second level in RAS, local or tissular RAS, has been identified in a variety of tissues, in which local RAS play a key role in degenerative and aging-related diseases. The local brain RAS plays a major role in brain function and neurodegeneration. It is normally assumed that the effects are mediated by the cell-surface-specific G-protein-coupled angiotensin type 1 and 2 receptors (AT1 and AT2). A combination of in vivo (rats, wild-type mice and knockout mice) and in vitro (primary mesencephalic cultures, dopaminergic neuron cell line cultures) experimental approaches (confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, laser capture microdissection, transfection of fluorescent-tagged receptors, treatments with fluorescent angiotensin, western blot, polymerase chain reaction, HPLC, mitochondrial respirometry and other functional assays) were used in the present study. We report the discovery of AT1 and AT2 receptors in brain mitochondria, particularly mitochondria of dopaminergic neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors in mitochondria regulates superoxide production, via Nox4, and increases respiration. Mitochondrial AT2 receptors are much more abundant and increase after treatment of cells with oxidative stress inducers, and produce, via nitric oxide, a decrease in mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria from the nigral region of aged rats displayed altered expression of AT1 and AT2 receptors. AT2-mediated regulation of mitochondrial respiration represents an unrecognized primary line of defence against oxidative stress, which may be particularly important in neurons with increased levels of oxidative stress such as dopaminergic neurons. Altered expression of AT1 and AT2 receptors with aging may induce mitochondrial dysfunction, the main risk factor for neurodegeneration

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Age-Related Sleep Loss in the Fruit Fly

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Meagan; Keene, Alex C.

    2013-01-01

    Across phyla, aging is associated with reduced sleep duration and efficiency. Both aging and sleep involve complex genetic architecture and diverse cell types and are heavily influenced by diet and environment. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms of age-dependent changes in sleep will require integrative approaches that go beyond examining these two processes independently. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, provides a genetically amenable system for dissecting the molecular basis of these processes. In this review, we examine the role of metabolism and circadian rhythms in age-dependent sleep loss. PMID:23594925

  10. Likely Age-Related Hearing Loss (Presbycusis) in a Stranded Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis).

    PubMed

    Li, Songhai; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong; Hoffmann-Kuhnt, Matthias; Fernando, Nimal; Taylor, Elizabeth A; Lin, Wenzhi; Chen, Jialin; Ng, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The hearing of a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in Zhuhai, China, was measured. The age of this animal was estimated to be ~40 years. The animal's hearing was measured using a noninvasive auditory evoked potential (AEP) method. The results showed that the high-frequency hearing cutoff frequency of the studied dolphin was ~30-40 kHz lower than that of a conspecific younger individual ~13 year old. The lower high-frequency hearing range in the older dolphin was explained as a likely result of age-related hearing loss (presbycusis).

  11. Shortening-induced torque depression in old men: implications for age-related power loss.

    PubMed

    Power, Geoffrey A; Makrakos, Demetri P; Stevens, Daniel E; Herzog, Walter; Rice, Charles L; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2014-09-01

    Following active muscle shortening, the steady-state isometric torque at the final muscle length is lower than the steady-state torque obtained for a purely isometric contraction at that same final muscle length. This well-documented property of skeletal muscle is termed shortening-induced torque depression (TD). Despite many investigations into the mechanisms of weakness and power loss in old age, the influence of muscle shortening on the history dependence of isometric torque production remains to be elucidated. Thus, it is unclear whether older adults are disadvantaged for torque and power production following a dynamic shortening contraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shortening-induced TD in older adults, and to determine whether shortening-induced TD is related to power loss. Maximal voluntary isometric dorsiflexion contractions (MVC; 10s) in 8 young (25.5±3.7years) and 9 old (76.1±5.4years) men were performed on a HUMAC NORM dynamometer as a reference, and then again following an active shortening of 40° joint excursion (40°PF-0°PF) at angular velocities of 15°/s and 120°/s. Work and instantaneous power were derived during shortening. Shortening-induced TD was calculated and expressed as a percentage by determining the mean torque value over 1s during the isometric steady state of the MVC following shortening, divided by the mean torque value for the same 1s time period during the isometric reference MVC. To assess muscle activation, electromyography (root mean square; EMGRMS) of the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) was calculated at identical time points used in assessing shortening-induced TD, and voluntary activation (VA) was assessed using the interpolated twitch technique. Old were 18% weaker than young for MVC, and ~40% less powerful for 15°/s and 120°/s of shortening. Old produced 37% and 21% less work for 15°/s and 120°/s than young, respectively. Furthermore, old experienced 60% and 70% greater shortening-induced TD

  12. Wnt16 Is Associated with Age-Related Bone Loss and Estrogen Withdrawal in Murine Bone

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Henry; Galea, Gabriel L.; Meakin, Lee B.; Delisser, Peter J.; Lanyon, Lance E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome Wide Association Studies suggest that Wnt16 is an important contributor to the mechanisms controlling bone mineral density, cortical thickness, bone strength and ultimately fracture risk. Wnt16 acts on osteoblasts and osteoclasts and, in cortical bone, is predominantly derived from osteoblasts. This led us to hypothesize that low bone mass would be associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression and that Wnt16 expression would be increased by anabolic factors, including mechanical loading. We therefore investigated Wnt16 expression in the context of ageing, mechanical loading and unloading, estrogen deficiency and replacement, and estrogen receptor α (ERα) depletion. Quantitative real time PCR showed that Wnt16 mRNA expression was lower in cortical bone and marrow of aged compared to young female mice. Neither increased nor decreased (by disuse) mechanical loading altered Wnt16 expression in young female mice, although Wnt16 expression was decreased following ovariectomy. Both 17β-estradiol and the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen increased Wnt16 expression relative to ovariectomy. Wnt16 and ERβ expression were increased in female ERα-/- mice when compared to Wild Type. We also addressed potential effects of gender on Wnt16 expression and while the expression was lower in the cortical bone of aged males as in females, it was higher in male bone marrow of aged mice compared to young. In the kidney, which we used as a non-bone reference tissue, Wnt16 expression was unaffected by age in either males or females. In summary, age, and its associated bone loss, is associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression whereas bone loss associated with disuse has no effect on Wnt16 expression. In the artificially loaded mouse tibia we observed no loading-related up-regulation of Wnt16 expression but provide evidence that its expression is influenced by estrogen receptor signaling. These findings suggest that while Wnt16 is not an obligatory contributor to

  13. Simulated Interventions to Ameliorate Age-Related Bone Loss Indicate the Importance of Timing

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Carole J.; Gartland, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Bone remodeling is the continuous process of bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, in order to maintain homeostasis. The activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts is regulated by a network of signaling pathways, including Wnt, parathyroid hormone (PTH), RANK ligand/osteoprotegrin, and TGF-β, in response to stimuli, such as mechanical loading. During aging there is a gradual loss of bone mass due to dysregulation of signaling pathways. This may be due to a decline in physical activity with age and/or changes in hormones and other signaling molecules. In particular, hormones, such as PTH, have a circadian rhythm, which may be disrupted in aging. Due to the complexity of the molecular and cellular networks involved in bone remodeling, several mathematical models have been proposed to aid understanding of the processes involved. However, to date, there are no models, which explicitly consider the effects of mechanical loading, the circadian rhythm of PTH, and the dynamics of signaling molecules on bone remodeling. Therefore, we have constructed a network model of the system using a modular approach, which will allow further modifications as required in future research. The model was used to simulate the effects of mechanical loading and also the effects of different interventions, such as continuous or intermittent administration of PTH. Our model predicts that the absence of regular mechanical loading and/or an impaired PTH circadian rhythm leads to a gradual decrease in bone mass over time, which can be restored by simulated interventions and that the effectiveness of some interventions may depend on their timing. PMID:27379013

  14. Age-related striatal BOLD changes without changes in behavioral loss aversion.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Lee, Sang; Gilman, Jodi M; Kim, Byoung Woo; Lee, Nick; Chamberlain, Laura; Livengood, Sherri L; Raman, Kalyan; Lee, Myung Joo; Kuster, Jake; Stern, Daniel B; Calder, Bobby; Mulhern, Frank J; Blood, Anne J; Breiter, Hans C

    2015-01-01

    Loss aversion (LA), the idea that negative valuations have a higher psychological impact than positive ones, is considered an important variable in consumer research. The literature on aging and behavior suggests older individuals may show more LA, although it is not clear if this is an effect of aging in general (as in the continuum from age 20 and 50 years), or of the state of older age (e.g., past age 65 years). We also have not yet identified the potential biological effects of aging on the neural processing of LA. In the current study we used a cohort of subjects with a 30 year range of ages, and performed whole brain functional MRI (fMRI) to examine the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAc) response during a passive viewing of affective faces with model-based fMRI analysis incorporating behavioral data from a validated approach/avoidance task with the same stimuli. Our a priori focus on the VS/NAc was based on (1) the VS/NAc being a central region for reward/aversion processing; (2) its activation to both positive and negative stimuli; (3) its reported involvement with tracking LA. LA from approach/avoidance to affective faces showed excellent fidelity to published measures of LA. Imaging results were then compared to the behavioral measure of LA using the same affective faces. Although there was no relationship between age and LA, we observed increasing neural differential sensitivity (NDS) of the VS/NAc to avoidance responses (negative valuations) relative to approach responses (positive valuations) with increasing age. These findings suggest that a central region for reward/aversion processing changes with age, and may require more activation to produce the same LA behavior as in younger individuals, consistent with the idea of neural efficiency observed with high IQ individuals showing less brain activation to complete the same task.

  15. Age-related striatal BOLD changes without changes in behavioral loss aversion

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Lee, Sang; Gilman, Jodi M.; Kim, Byoung Woo; Lee, Nick; Chamberlain, Laura; Livengood, Sherri L.; Raman, Kalyan; Lee, Myung Joo; Kuster, Jake; Stern, Daniel B.; Calder, Bobby; Mulhern, Frank J.; Blood, Anne J.; Breiter, Hans C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss aversion (LA), the idea that negative valuations have a higher psychological impact than positive ones, is considered an important variable in consumer research. The literature on aging and behavior suggests older individuals may show more LA, although it is not clear if this is an effect of aging in general (as in the continuum from age 20 and 50 years), or of the state of older age (e.g., past age 65 years). We also have not yet identified the potential biological effects of aging on the neural processing of LA. In the current study we used a cohort of subjects with a 30 year range of ages, and performed whole brain functional MRI (fMRI) to examine the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAc) response during a passive viewing of affective faces with model-based fMRI analysis incorporating behavioral data from a validated approach/avoidance task with the same stimuli. Our a priori focus on the VS/NAc was based on (1) the VS/NAc being a central region for reward/aversion processing; (2) its activation to both positive and negative stimuli; (3) its reported involvement with tracking LA. LA from approach/avoidance to affective faces showed excellent fidelity to published measures of LA. Imaging results were then compared to the behavioral measure of LA using the same affective faces. Although there was no relationship between age and LA, we observed increasing neural differential sensitivity (NDS) of the VS/NAc to avoidance responses (negative valuations) relative to approach responses (positive valuations) with increasing age. These findings suggest that a central region for reward/aversion processing changes with age, and may require more activation to produce the same LA behavior as in younger individuals, consistent with the idea of neural efficiency observed with high IQ individuals showing less brain activation to complete the same task. PMID:25983682

  16. Age-related hearing loss and ear morphology affect vertical but not horizontal sound-localization performance.

    PubMed

    Otte, Rik J; Agterberg, Martijn J H; Van Wanrooij, Marc M; Snik, Ad F M; Van Opstal, A John

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have attributed deterioration of sound localization in the horizontal (azimuth) and vertical (elevation) planes to an age-related decline in binaural processing and high-frequency hearing loss (HFHL). The latter might underlie decreased elevation performance of older adults. However, as the pinnae keep growing throughout life, we hypothesized that larger ears might enable older adults to localize sounds in elevation on the basis of lower frequencies, thus (partially) compensating their HFHL. In addition, it is not clear whether sound localization has already matured at a very young age, when the body is still growing, and the binaural and monaural sound-localization cues change accordingly. The present study investigated sound-localization performance of children (7-11 years), young adults (20-34 years), and older adults (63-80 years) under open-loop conditions in the two-dimensional frontal hemifield. We studied the effect of age-related hearing loss and ear size on localization responses to brief broadband sound bursts with different bandwidths. We found similar localization abilities in azimuth for all listeners, including the older adults with HFHL. Sound localization in elevation for the children and young adult listeners with smaller ears improved when stimuli contained frequencies above 7 kHz. Subjects with larger ears could also judge the elevation of sound sources restricted to lower frequency content. Despite increasing ear size, sound localization in elevation deteriorated in older adults with HFHL. We conclude that the binaural localization cues are successfully used well into later stages of life, but that pinna growth cannot compensate the more profound HFHL with age.

  17. Nigrostriatal rAAV-mediated GDNF Overexpression Induces Robust Weight Loss in a Rat Model of Age-related Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Manfredsson, Fredric P; Tumer, Nihal; Erdos, Benedek; Landa, Tessa; Broxson, Christopher S; Sullivan, Layla F; Rising, Aaron C; Foust, Kevin D; Zhang, Yi; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S; Scarpace, Philip J; Mandel, Ronald J

    2009-01-01

    Intraventricular administration of glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in primate and humans to study Parkinson's disease (PD) has revealed the potential for GDNF to induce weight loss. Our previous data indicate that bilateral continuous hypothalamic GDNF overexpression via recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) results in significant failure to gain weight in young rats and weight loss in aged rats. Based on these previous results, we hypothesized that because the nigrostriatal tract passes through the lateral hypothalamus, motor hyperactivity mediated by nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) may have been responsible for the previously observed effect on body weight. In this study, we compared bilateral injections of rAAV2/5-GDNF in hypothalamus versus substantia nigra (SN) in aged Brown-Norway X Fisher 344 rats. Nigrostriatal GDNF overexpression resulted in significantly greater weight loss than rats treated in hypothalamus. The nigral or hypothalamic GDNF-induced weight loss was unrelated to motor activity levels of the rats, though some of the weight loss could be attributed to a transient reduction in food intake. Forebrain DA levels did not account for the observed effects on body weight, although GDNF-induced increases in nucleus accumbens DA may have partially contributed to this effect in the hypothalamic GDNF-treated group. However, only nigrostriatal GDNF overexpression induced activation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in a small population of corticotrophin-releasing factor [corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH)] neurons located specifically in the medial parvocellullar division (MPD) of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Activation of these hypothalamic CRH neurons likely accounted for the observed metabolic effects leading to weight loss in obese rats. PMID:19277011

  18. Mutant HSPB1 overexpression in neurons is sufficient to cause age-related motor neuronopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit K.; Renusch, Samantha R.; Naiman, Nicole E.; Gu, Shuping; Sneh, Amita; Arnold, W. David; Sahenk, Zarife; Kolb, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The small heat shock protein HSPB1 is a multifunctional, α-crystallin-based protein that has been shown to be neuroprotective in animal models of motor neuron disease and peripheral nerve injury. Missense mutations in HSPB1 result in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with minimal sensory involvement (CMT2F) and distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 2 (dHMN-II). These disorders are characterized by a selective loss of motor axons in peripheral nerve resulting in distal muscle weakness and often severe disability. To investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of HSPB1 mutations in motor neurons in vivo, we have developed and characterized transgenic PrP-HSPB1 and PrP-HSPB1(R136W) mice. These mice express the human HSPB1 protein throughout the nervous system including in axons of peripheral nerve. Although both mouse strains lacked obvious motor deficits, the PrP-HSPB1(R136W) mice developed an age-dependent motor axonopathy. Mutant mice showed axonal pathology in spinal cord and peripheral nerve with evidence of impaired neurofilament cytoskeleton, associated with organelle accumulation. Accompanying these findings, increases in the number of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, as evidence of impaired axon-Schwann cell interactions, were present. These observations suggest that overexpression of HSPB1(R136W) in neurons is sufficient to cause pathological and electrophysiological changes in mice that are seen in patients with hereditary motor neuropathy. PMID:22521462

  19. Age-related differences in heat loss capacity occur under both dry and humid heat stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Larose, Joanie; Boulay, Pierre; Wright-Beatty, Heather E.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Hardcastle, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the progression of impairments in heat dissipation as a function of age and environmental conditions. Sixty men (n = 12 per group; 20–30, 40–44, 45–49, 50–54, and 55–70 yr) performed four intermittent exercise/recovery cycles for a duration of 2 h in dry (35°C, 20% relative humidity) and humid (35°C, 60% relative humidity) conditions. Evaporative heat loss and metabolic heat production were measured by direct and indirect calorimetry, respectively. Body heat storage was measured as the temporal summation of heat production and heat loss during the sessions. Evaporative heat loss was reduced during exercise in the humid vs. dry condition in age groups 20–30 (−17%), 40–44 (−18%), 45–49 (−21%), 50–54 (−25%), and 55–70 yr (−20%). HE fell short of being significantly different between groups in the dry condition, but was greater in age group 20–30 yr (279 ± 10 W) compared with age groups 45–49 (248 ± 8 W), 50–54 (242 ± 6 W), and 55–70 yr (240 ± 7 W) in the humid condition. As a result of a reduced rate of heat dissipation predominantly during exercise, age groups 40–70 yr stored between 60–85 and 13–38% more heat than age group 20–30 yr in the dry and humid conditions, respectively. These age-related differences in heat dissipation and heat storage were not paralleled by significant differences in local sweating and skin blood flow, or by differences in core temperature between groups. From a whole body perspective, combined heat and humidity impeded heat dissipation to a similar extent across age groups, but, more importantly, intermittent exercise in dry and humid heat stress conditions created a greater thermoregulatory challenge for middle-aged and older adults. PMID:24812643

  20. Aging-Related Hyperexcitability in CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Is Mediated by Enhanced A-Type K+ Channel Function and Expression

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Dina; Hattori, Shoai; Ybarra, Natividad; Musial, Timothy F.; Buss, Eric W.; Richter, Hannah; Oh, M. Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related impairments in hippocampus-dependent cognition have been attributed to maladaptive changes in the functional properties of pyramidal neurons within the hippocampal subregions. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 pyramidal neurons, with CA3 pyramidal neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing in the hippocampal circuit. Here, we use whole-cell current-clamp to demonstrate that aged rat (29–32 months) CA3 pyramidal neurons fire significantly more action potentials (APs) during theta-burst frequency stimulation and that this is associated with faster AP repolarization (i.e., narrower AP half-widths and enlarged fast afterhyperpolarization). Using a combination of patch-clamp physiology, pharmacology, Western blot analyses, immunohistochemistry, and array tomography, we demonstrate that these faster AP kinetics are mediated by enhanced function and expression of Kv4.2/Kv4.3 A-type K+ channels, particularly within the perisomatic compartment, of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Thus, our study indicates that inhibition of these A-type K+ channels can restore the intrinsic excitability properties of aged CA3 pyramidal neurons to a young-like state. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Age-related learning deficits have been attributed, in part, to altered hippocampal pyramidal neuronal function with normal aging. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 neurons, with CA3 neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing. Hence, we conducted a series of experiments to identify the cellular mechanisms that underlie the hyperexcitability reported in the CA3 region. Contrary to CA1 neurons, we demonstrate that postburst afterhyperpolarization is not altered with aging and that aged CA3 pyramidal neurons are able to fire significantly more action potentials and that this is associated with

  1. N-acetyl-cysteine prevents age-related hearing loss and the progressive loss of inner hair cells in γ-glutamyl transferase 1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Chen, Guang-Di; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Tian, Cong; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors combined with oxidative stress are major determinants of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), one of the most prevalent disorders of the elderly. Dwarf grey mice, Ggt1dwg/dwg, are homozygous for a loss of function mutation of the γ-glutamyl transferase 1 gene, which encodes an important antioxidant enzyme critical for the resynthesis of glutathione (GSH). Since GSH reduces oxidative damage, we hypothesized that Ggt1dwg/dwg mice would be susceptible to ARHL. Surprisingly, otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials, which reflect cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function, were largely unaffected in mutant mice, whereas auditory brainstem responses and the compound action potential were grossly abnormal. These functional deficits were associated with an unusual and selective loss of inner hair cells (IHC), but retention of OHC and auditory nerve fibers. Remarkably, hearing deficits and IHC loss were completely prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which induces de novo synthesis of GSH; however, hearing deficits and IHC loss reappeared when treatment was discontinued. Ggt1dwg/dwgmice represent an important new model for investigating ARHL, therapeutic interventions, and understanding the perceptual and electrophysiological consequences of sensory deprivation caused by the loss of sensory input exclusively from IHC. PMID:26977590

  2. N-acetyl-cysteine prevents age-related hearing loss and the progressive loss of inner hair cells in γ-glutamyl transferase 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Chen, Guang-Di; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Tian, Cong; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Genetic factors combined with oxidative stress are major determinants of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), one of the most prevalent disorders of the elderly. Dwarf grey mice, Ggt1dwg/dwg, are homozygous for a loss of function mutation of the g-glutamyl transferase 1 gene, which encodes an important antioxidant enzyme critical for the resynthesis of glutathione (GSH). Since GSH reduces oxidative damage, we hypothesized that Ggt1dwg/dwg mice would be susceptible to ARHL. Surprisingly, otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials, which reflect cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function, were largely unaffected in mutant mice, whereas auditory brainstem responses and the compound action potential were grossly abnormal. These functional deficits were associated with an unusual and selective loss of inner hair cells (IHC), but retention of OHC and auditory nerve fibers. Remarkably, hearing deficits and IHC loss were completely prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which induces de novo synthesis of GSH; however, hearing deficits and IHC loss reappeared when treatment was discontinued. Ggt1dwg/dwg mice represent an important new model for investigating ARHL, therapeutic interventions, and understanding the perceptual and electrophysiological consequences of sensory deprivation caused by the loss of sensory input exclusively from IHC.

  3. Lipofuscin Redistribution and Loss Accompanied by Cytoskeletal Stress in Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Eyes With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Tolstik, Elen; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zarubina, Anna V.; Heintzmann, Rainer; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) and melanolipofuscin (MLF) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are the principal sources of autofluorescence (AF) signals in clinical fundus–AF imaging. Few details about the subcellular distribution of AF organelles in AMD are available. We describe the impact of aging and AMD on RPE morphology revealed by the distribution of AF LF/MLF granules and actin cytoskeleton in human tissues. Methods. Thirty-five RPE-Bruch's membrane flatmounts from 35 donors were prepared (postmortem: ≤4 hours). Ex vivo fundus examination at the time of accession revealed either absence of chorioretinal pathologies (10 tissues; mean age: 83.0 ± 2.6 years) or stages of AMD (25 tissues; 85.0 ± 5.8 years): early AMD, geographic atrophy, and late exudative AMD. Retinal pigment epithelium cytoskeleton was labeled with AlexaFluor647-Phalloidin. Tissues were imaged on a spinning-disk fluorescence microscope and a high-resolution structured illumination microscope. Results. Age-related macular degeneration impacts individual RPE cells by (1) lipofuscin redistribution by (i) degranulation (granule-by-granule loss) and/or (ii) aggregation and apparent shedding into the extracellular space; (2) enlarged RPE cell area and conversion from convex to irregular and sometimes concave polygons; and (3) cytoskeleton derangement including separations and breaks around subretinal deposits, thickening, and stress fibers. Conclusions. We report an extensive and systematic en face analysis of LF/MLF-AF in AMD eyes. Redistribution and loss of AF granules are among the earliest AMD changes and could reduce fundus AF signal attributable to RPE at these locations. Data can enhance the interpretation of clinical fundus–AF and provide a basis for future quantitative studies. PMID:25758814

  4. Reduced responsiveness of kisspeptin neurons to estrogenic positive feedback associated with age-related disappearance of LH surge in middle-age female rats.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Misawa Niki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Matsui, Hisanori; Seki, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Kaori; Chatani, Fumio; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Age-related disappearance of the LH surge is one of major biomarkers of reproductive aging in female rats. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) are proposed as the critical regulator of the preovulatory LH surge in response to estrogenic positive feedback. Here we investigated the possible involvement of the AVPV kisspeptin neurons in the disappearance of the LH surge in middle-age rats. Middle-age rats exhibiting persistent estrus (M-PE) did not show an LH surge although neither Kiss1 mRNA nor peptide in the AVPV was differentially expressed when compared to young rats exhibiting normal estrous cycles (YN). M-PE released LH in response to exogenous kisspeptin in a similar dose-dependent manner as YN, suggesting that their GnRH neurons still maintained responsiveness to kisspeptin. To investigate the estrogenic positive feedback effect on kisspeptin neurons in the AVPV, rats were ovariectomized and supplemented with estradiol (OVX+E2). We performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for Kiss1 mRNA and cFos, respectively, and found that M-PE exhibited a significantly lower percentage of Kiss1 mRNA positive neurons with cFos immunoreactivity, although the total number of kisspeptin neurons was not different from that in cyclic rats. Furthermore, OVX+E2 M-PE did not show the surge-like LH release under high estradiol administration while YN did. Thus our current study suggests that the reduced responsiveness of the AVPV kisspeptin neurons to estrogenic positive feedback presumably results in the decrease in kisspeptin secretion from neurons and eventually causes the age-related disappearance of the LH surge in middle age female rats.

  5. Memory Loss, Dementia, and Stroke: Implications for Rehabilitation of Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Older adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are not immune to the other diseases of aging. Although AMD is the leading cause of low vision in older Americans, stroke is the leading cause of disability, and dementias affect another 2.5 million older Americans. Each condition alone can significantly impair a person's ability to…

  6. Severity and pattern of bone mineral loss in endocrine causes of osteoporosis as compared to age-related bone mineral loss

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, D; Dharmshaktu, P; Aggarwal, A; Gaurav, K; Bansal, R; Devru, N; Garga, UC; Kulshreshtha, B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data are scant on bone health in endocrinopathies from India. This study evaluated bone mineral density (BMD) loss in endocrinopathies [Graves’ disease (GD), type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HypoH), hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (HyperH), hypopituitarism, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT)] as compared to age-related BMD loss [postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO), andropause]. Materials and Methods: Retrospective audit of records of patients >30 years age attending a bone clinic from August 2014 to January 2016 was done. Results: Five-hundred and seven records were screened, out of which 420 (females:male = 294:126) were analyzed. A significantly higher occurrence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was noted in T1DM (89.09%), HyperH (85%), and HypoH (79.59%) compared to age-related BMD loss (60.02%; P < 0.001). The occurrence of osteoporosis among females and males was 55.41% and 53.97%, respectively, and of osteopenia among females and males was 28.91% and 32.54%, respectively. In females, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (92%), HyperH (85%), and HypoH (59.26%) compared to PMO (49.34%; P < 0.001). Z score at LS, TF, NOF, and greater trochanter (GT) was consistently lowest in T1DM women. Among men, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (76.67%) and HypoH (54.55%) compared to andropause (45.45%; P = 0.001). Z score at LS, TF, NOF, GT, and TR was consistently lowest in T1DM men. In GD, the burden of osteoporosis was similar to PMO and andropause. BMD difference among the study groups was not significantly different after adjusting for body mass index (BMI) and vitamin D. Conclusion: Low bone mass is extremely common in endocrinopathies, warranting routine screening and intervention. Concomitant vitamin D deficiency compounds the problem. Calcium and vitamin D supplementations may improve bone health in this setting. PMID:27241810

  7. Minocycline reduces neuroinflammation but does not ameliorate neuron loss in a mouse model of neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanshan; Hou, Jinxing; Zhang, Chen; Xu, Congyu; Wang, Long; Zou, Xiaoxia; Yu, Huahong; Shi, Yun; Yin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guiquan

    2015-05-22

    Minocycline is a broad-spectrum tetracycline antibiotic. A number of preclinical studies have shown that minocycline exhibits neuroprotective effects in various animal models of neurological diseases. However, it remained unknown whether minocycline is effective to prevent neuron loss. To systematically evaluate its effects, minocycline was used to treat Dicer conditional knockout (cKO) mice which display age-related neuron loss. The drug was given to mutant mice prior to the occurrence of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, and the treatment had lasted 2 months. Levels of inflammation markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule1 (Iba1) and interleukin6 (IL6), were significantly reduced in minocycline-treated Dicer cKO mice. In contrast, levels of neuronal markers and the total number of apoptotic cells in Dicer cKO mice were not affected by the drug. In summary, inhibition of neuroinflammation by minocycline is insufficient to prevent neuron loss and apoptosis.

  8. Scanning Ultrasound (SUS) Causes No Changes to Neuronal Excitability and Prevents Age-Related Reductions in Hippocampal CA1 Dendritic Structure in Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Robert John; Leinenga, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Scanning ultrasound (SUS) is a noninvasive approach that has recently been shown to ameliorate histopathological changes and restore memory functions in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Although no overt neuronal damage was reported, the short- and long-term effects of SUS on neuronal excitability and dendritic tree morphology had not been investigated. To address this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in wild-type mice 2 and 24 hours after a single SUS treatment, and one week and 3 months after six weekly SUS treatments, including sham treatments as controls. In both treatment regimes, no changes in CA1 neuronal excitability were observed in SUS-treated neurons when compared to sham-treated neurons at any time-point. For the multiple treatment groups, we also determined the dendritic morphology and spine densities of the neurons from which we had recorded. The apical trees of sham-treated neurons were reduced at the 3 month time-point when compared to one week; however, surprisingly, no longitudinal change was detected in the apical dendritic trees of SUS-treated neurons. In contrast, the length and complexity of the basal dendritic trees were not affected by SUS treatment at either time-point. The apical dendritic spine densities were reduced, independent of the treatment group, at 3 months compared to one week. Collectively, these data suggest that ultrasound can be employed to prevent an age-associated loss of dendritic structure without impairing neuronal excitability. PMID:27727310

  9. Age-related changes in functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, a nucleus important in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mark H; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2016-03-01

    The earlier an individual initiates cigarette smoking, the higher the likelihood of development of dependency to nicotine, the addictive ingredient in cigarettes. One possible mechanism underlying this higher addiction liability is an ontogenetically differential cellular response induced by nicotine in neurons mediating the reinforcing or euphoric effects of this drug, which could arise from age-related differences in the composition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits. In the current study, we examined whether the subunit composition of nAChRs differed between neurons within the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT), a nucleus importantly involved in drug addiction associated behaviours, across two periods of ontogeny in which nicotine-mediated excitatory responses were shown to depend on age. To this end, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices from identified LDT neurons, in combination with nAChR subunit-specific receptor antagonists, were conducted. Comparison of the contribution of different nAChR subunits to acetylcholine (ACh)-induced inward currents indicated that the contributions of the β2 and/or β4 and α7 nAChR subunits alter across age. Taken together, we conclude that across a limited ontogenetic period, there is plasticity in the subunit composition of nAChRs in LDT neurons. In addition, our data indicate, for the first time, functional presence of α6 nAChR subunits in LDT neurons within the age ranges studied. Changes in subunit composition of nAChRs across ontogeny could contribute to the age-related differential excitability induced by nicotine. Differences in the subunit composition of nAChRs within the LDT would be expected to contribute to ontogenetic-dependent outflow from the LDT to target regions, which include reward-related circuitry.

  10. Type A and B monoamine oxidase in age-related neurodegenerative disorders: their distinct roles in neuronal death and survival.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Makoto; Maruyama, Wakako; Inaba-Hasegawa, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, type B monoamine oxidase (MAO-B) has been proposed to play a primary role though generating reactive oxygen species in oxidation of monoamine substrates. MAO-B oxidizes MPTP into MPP+, and an MAO-B inhibitor, deprenyl, prevents the MPTP oxidation and also MPP+neutotoxicity. These results suggest the association of MAO-B with neuronal death in neurodegenerative disorders. On the other hand, deprenyl and rasagiline, selective MAO-B inhibitors, have been proved to protect neuronal cells in cellular and animal models of neurodegeneration. These inhibitors decrease oxidation of the substrates, scavenge oxygen radicals, intervene apoptosis signal pathway in mitochondria and induce pro-survival genes coding anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors. However, the association of MAO-B itself with the neuroprotective function of MAO-B inhibitors remains enigmatic. Recently, the involvement of type A MAO (MAO-A) in neuronal death has been shown by upregulation MAO-A expression in cellular models. MAO-A is a target of an endogenous neurotoxin, Nmethyl( R)salsolinol, and MAO-A knockdown (KO) with short interfering (si)RNA protects neuronal death from apoptosis. In addition, MAO-A mediates the increased expression of genes for anti-apoptotic, pro-survival Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors by MAO-B inhibitors, whereas MAO-B doe not. In this review, we present our recent results on the novel role of MAO-A and MAO-B in neuronal death and also in the neuroprotective gene induction by MAO inhibitors. The future development of new series of neuroprotective drugs is discussed among compounds, which have high affinity to MAO-A and can induce pro-survival genes. MAO-A is expected to play a role in disease-modifying therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Single Low Doses of MPTP Decrease Tyrosine Hydroxylase Expression in the Absence of Overt Neuron Loss.

    PubMed

    Alam, Gelareh; Edler, Melissa; Burchfield, Shelbie; Richardson, Jason R

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common age-related neurodegenerative disease. 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) is a prototypical neurotoxicant used in mice to mimic primary features of PD pathology including striatal dopamine depletion and dopamine neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). In the literature, there are several experimental paradigms involving multiple doses of MPTP that are used to elicit dopamine neuron loss. However, a recent study reported that a single low dose caused significant loss of dopamine neurons. Here, we determined the effect of a single intraperitoneal injection of one of three doses of MPTP (0.1, 2 and 20mg/kg) on dopamine neurons, labeled by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH(+)), and total neuron number (Nissl(+)) in the SNc using unbiased stereological counting. Data reveal a significant loss of neurons in the SNc (TH(+) and Nissl(+-)) only in the group treated with 20mg/kg MPTP. Groups treated with lower dose of MPTP (0.1 and 2mg/kg) only showed significant loss of TH(+) neurons rather than TH(+) and Nissl(+). Striatal dopamine levels were decreased in the groups treated with 2 and 20mg/kg MPTP and striatal terminal markers including, TH and the dopamine transporter (DAT), were only decreased in the groups treated with 20mg/kg MPTP. These data demonstrate that lower doses of MPTP likely result in loss of TH expression rather than actual dopamine neuron loss in the SN. This finding reinforces the need to measure both total neuron number along with TH(+) cells in determining dopamine neuron loss.

  12. Pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex in post-stroke, vascular and other ageing-related dementias.

    PubMed

    Foster, Vincent; Oakley, Arthur E; Slade, Janet Y; Hall, Roslyn; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Burke, Matthew; Thomas, Alan J; Khundakar, Ahmad; Allan, Louise M; Kalaria, Raj N

    2014-09-01

    Dementia associated with cerebrovascular disease is common. It has been reported that ∼30% of elderly patients who survive stroke develop delayed dementia (post-stroke dementia), with most cases being diagnosed as vascular dementia. The pathological substrates associated with post-stroke or vascular dementia are poorly understood, particularly those associated with executive dysfunction. Three separate yet interconnecting circuits control executive function within the frontal lobe involving the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. We used stereological methods, along with immunohistological and related cell morphometric analysis, to examine densities and volumes of pyramidal neurons of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex in the frontal lobe from a total of 90 elderly subjects (age range 71-98 years). Post-mortem brain tissues from post-stroke dementia and post-stroke patients with no dementia were derived from our prospective Cognitive Function After Stroke study. We also examined, in parallel, samples from ageing controls and similar age subjects pathologically diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, mixed Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, and vascular dementia. We found pyramidal cell volumes in layers III and V in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of post-stroke and vascular dementia and, of mixed and Alzheimer's disease subjects to be reduced by 30-40% compared to post-stroke patients with no dementia and controls. There were no significant changes in neuronal volumes in either the anterior cingulate or orbitofrontal cortices. Remarkably, pyramidal neurons within the orbitofrontal cortex were also found to be smaller in size when compared to those in the other two neocortical regions. To relate the cell changes to cognitive function, we noted significant correlations between neuronal volumes and total CAMCOG, orientation and memory scores and clinical

  13. Age-related homeostatic mid-channel proteolysis of neuronal L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, Ioannis E.; Abele-Henckels, Kathryn; Zhang, Wei K.; Lin, Bochao; Yu, Yong; Geyman, Larry; Ehlers, Michael D.; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A.; Yang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural circuitry and brain activity depend critically on proper function of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), whose activity must be tightly controlled. We show that the main body of the pore-forming α1 subunit of neuronal L-type VGCCs, Cav1.2, is proteolytically cleaved, resulting in Cav1.2 fragment-channels that separate but remain on the plasma membrane. This “gmid-channel” proteolysis is regulated by channel activity, involves the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and causes attenuation and biophysical alterations of VGCC currents. Recombinant Cav1.2 fragment-channels mimicking the products of mid-channel proteolysis do not form active channels on their own, but when properly paired, produce currents with distinct biophysical properties. Mid-channel proteolysis increases dramatically with age and can be attenuated with an L-type VGCC blocker in vivo. Mid-channel proteolysis represents a novel form of homeostatic negative-feedback processing of VGCCs that could profoundly affect neuronal excitability, neurotransmission, neuroprotection, and calcium signaling in physiological and disease states. PMID:24908485

  14. Disparate Changes in Plasma and Brainstem Cytokine Levels in Adult and Ageing Rats Associated with Age-Related Changes in Facial Motor Neuron Number, Snout Muscle Morphology, and Exploratory Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Katharesan, Viythia; Lewis, Martin David; Vink, Robert; Johnson, Ian Paul

    2016-01-01

    An overall increase in inflammatory cytokines with age in both the blood and the central nervous system (CNS) has been proposed to explain many aspects of ageing, including decreased motor function and neurodegeneration. This study tests the hypothesis that age-related increases in inflammatory cytokines in the blood and CNS lead to facial motor neuron degeneration. Groups of 3–5 female Sprague-Dawley rats aged 3, 12–18, and 24 months were used. Twelve cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interferon-γ, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor were measured in blood plasma and compared with those in the brainstem after first flushing blood from its vessels. The open-field test was used to measure exploratory behavior, and the morphology of the peripheral target muscle of facial motor neurons quantified. Total numbers of facial motor neurons were determined stereologically in separate groups of 3- and 24-month-old rats. Ageing rats showed a significant 30–42% decrease in blood plasma (peripheral) concentrations of IL-12p70 and TNFα and a significant 43–49% increase in brainstem (central) concentrations of IL-1α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and TNFα. They also showed significant reductions in motor neuron number in the right but not left facial nucleus, reduced exploratory behavior, and increase in peripheral target muscle size. Marginal age-related facial motoneuronal loss occurs in the ageing rat and is characterized by complex changes in the inflammatory signature, rather than a general increase in inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27872607

  15. Disparate Changes in Plasma and Brainstem Cytokine Levels in Adult and Ageing Rats Associated with Age-Related Changes in Facial Motor Neuron Number, Snout Muscle Morphology, and Exploratory Behavior.

    PubMed

    Katharesan, Viythia; Lewis, Martin David; Vink, Robert; Johnson, Ian Paul

    2016-01-01

    An overall increase in inflammatory cytokines with age in both the blood and the central nervous system (CNS) has been proposed to explain many aspects of ageing, including decreased motor function and neurodegeneration. This study tests the hypothesis that age-related increases in inflammatory cytokines in the blood and CNS lead to facial motor neuron degeneration. Groups of 3-5 female Sprague-Dawley rats aged 3, 12-18, and 24 months were used. Twelve cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interferon-γ, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor were measured in blood plasma and compared with those in the brainstem after first flushing blood from its vessels. The open-field test was used to measure exploratory behavior, and the morphology of the peripheral target muscle of facial motor neurons quantified. Total numbers of facial motor neurons were determined stereologically in separate groups of 3- and 24-month-old rats. Ageing rats showed a significant 30-42% decrease in blood plasma (peripheral) concentrations of IL-12p70 and TNFα and a significant 43-49% increase in brainstem (central) concentrations of IL-1α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and TNFα. They also showed significant reductions in motor neuron number in the right but not left facial nucleus, reduced exploratory behavior, and increase in peripheral target muscle size. Marginal age-related facial motoneuronal loss occurs in the ageing rat and is characterized by complex changes in the inflammatory signature, rather than a general increase in inflammatory cytokines.

  16. Age-related changes of NGF, BDNF, parvalbumin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampal CA1 sector.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Natsumi; Abe, Manami; Eto, Risa; Kato, Hiroyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the age-related alterations in nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), parvalbumin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity of the mouse hippocampal CA1 sector. NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from 2 to 50-59 weeks of birth. In contrast, a significant increase in the NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in glial cells of the hippocampal CA1 sector from 40-42 to 50-59 weeks of birth. On the other hand, the number of parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes, except for a significant decrease of nNOS-positive interneurons 2 weeks of birth. Our results indicate that NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was unaltered in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons during aging processes. In contrast, a significant increase in the NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in glial cells of the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes. The present study also shows that the number of parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes, except for a significant decrease of nNOS-positive interneurons 2 weeks of birth. These results demonstrate that the expression of glial NGF and BDNF may play a key role for helping survival and maintenance of pyramidal neurons and neuronal functions in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes. Furthermore, our findings suggest that parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 sector are resistant to aging processes. Moreover, our findings suggest that nitric oxide synthesized by the nNOS may play some role for neuronal growth during postnatal development.

  17. Age-related loss of hepatic Nrf2 protein homeostasis: potential role for heightened expression of miR-146a

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric J.; Shay, Kate P.; Thomas, Nicholas O.; Butler, Judy A.; Finlay, Liam F.; Hagen, Tory M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nrf2 regulates the expression of numerous anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and metabolic genes. We observed that, paradoxically, Nrf2 protein levels decline in the livers of aged rats despite the inflammatory environment evident in that organ. To examine the cause(s) of this loss, we investigated the age-related changes in Nrf2 protein homeostasis and activation in cultured hepatocytes from young (4-6 months) and old (24-28 months) Fischer 344 rats. While no age-dependent change in Nrf2 mRNA levels was observed (p>0.05), Nrf2 protein content, and the basal and anetholetrithione (A3T)-induced expression of Nrf2-dependent genes were attenuated with age. Conversely, overexpression of Nrf2 in cells from old animals reinstated gene induction. Treatment with A3T, along with bortezomib to inhibit degradation of existing protein, caused Nrf2 to accumulate significantly in cells from young animals (p<0.05), but not old, indicating a lack of new Nrf2 synthesis. We hypothesized that the loss of Nrf2 protein synthesis with age may partly stem from an age-related increase in microRNA inhibition of Nrf2 translation. Microarray analysis revealed that six microRNAs significantly increase >2-fold with age (p<0.05). One of these, miRNA-146a, is predicted to bind Nrf2 mRNA. Transfection of hepatocytes from young rats with a miRNA-146a mimic caused a 55% attenuation of Nrf2 translation that paralleled the age-related loss of Nrf2. Overall, these results provide novel insights for the age-related decline in Nrf2 and identify new targets to maintain Nrf2-dependent detoxification with age. PMID:26549877

  18. Loss of CB1 receptors leads to differential age-related changes in reward-driven learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Albayram, Onder; Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor signaling dissociates between reward-associated and aversive memories. The influence of CB1 receptors on the aversion-driven spatial learning in the Morris water maze test is strongly age-dependent: mice with genetic deletion of CB1 receptors (Cnr1−/−) show superior learning when young but inferior learning when old compared to age-matched wild-type mice. Whether the reward-driven spatial learning is influenced in the same way by CB1 receptor signaling as the aversion-driven learning remains unclear. Thus, we examined the performance of Cn1−/− and their wild-type littermates at ages of 2-, 5-, and 12-months-old in the eight-arm radial maze test—a reward-motivated model of spatial learning. Interestingly, 2-months-old Cnr1−/− mice had a superior learning ability to wild-type mice. At the age of 5-months, Cnr1−/− mice showed the same performance as the wild-type littermates. However, 12-months-old Cnr1−/− mice showed significantly impaired performances in each parameter of the test. Accordingly, this study provides compelling support for our previous result that genetic deletion of CB1 receptor leads to early onset of age-related memory decline, similarly affecting both reward and aversion-driven learning. PMID:23227007

  19. Essential roles of mitochondrial depolarization in neuron loss through microglial activation and attraction toward neurons.

    PubMed

    Nam, Min-Kyung; Shin, Hyun-Ah; Han, Ji-Hye; Park, Dae-Wook; Rhim, Hyangshuk

    2013-04-10

    As life spans increased, neurodegenerative disorders that affect aging populations have also increased. Progressive neuronal loss in specific brain regions is the most common cause of neurodegenerative disease; however, key determinants mediating neuron loss are not fully understood. Using a model of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) loss, we found only 25% cell loss in SH-SY5Y (SH) neuronal mono-cultures, but interestingly, 85% neuronal loss occurred when neurons were co-cultured with BV2 microglia. SH neurons overexpressing uncoupling protein 2 exhibited an increase in neuron-microglia interactions, which represent an early step in microglial phagocytosis of neurons. This result indicates that ΔΨm loss in SH neurons is an important contributor to recruitment of BV2 microglia. Notably, we show that ΔΨm loss in BV2 microglia plays a crucial role in microglial activation and phagocytosis of damaged SH neurons. Thus, our study demonstrates that ΔΨm loss in both neurons and microglia is a critical determinant of neuron loss. These findings also offer new insights into neuroimmunological and bioenergetical aspects of neurodegenerative disease.

  20. Age-Related Hearing Loss and Degeneration of Cochlear Hair Cells in Mice Lacking Thyroid Hormone Receptor β1

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Lily; Cordas, Emily; Wu, Xuefeng; Vella, Kristen R.; Hollenberg, Anthony N.

    2015-01-01

    A key function of the thyroid hormone receptor β (Thrb) gene is in the development of auditory function. However, the roles of the 2 receptor isoforms, TRβ1 and TRβ2, expressed by the Thrb gene are unclear, and it is unknown whether these isoforms promote the maintenance as well as development of hearing. We investigated the function of TRβ1 in mice with a Thrbb1 reporter allele that expresses β-galactosidase instead of TRβ1. In the immature cochlea, β-galactosidase was detected in the greater epithelial ridge, sensory hair cells, spiral ligament, and spiral ganglion and in adulthood, at low levels in the hair cells, support cells and root cells of the outer sulcus. Although deletion of all TRβ isoforms causes severe, early-onset deafness, deletion of TRβ1 or TRβ2 individually caused no obvious hearing loss in juvenile mice. However, over subsequent months, TRβ1 deficiency resulted in progressive loss of hearing and loss of hair cells. TRβ1-deficient mice had minimal changes in serum thyroid hormone and thyrotropin levels, indicating that hormonal imbalances were unlikely to cause hearing loss. The results suggest mutually shared roles for TRβ1 and TRβ2 in cochlear development and an unexpected requirement for TRβ1 in the maintenance of hearing in adulthood. PMID:26241124

  1. Age-Related Benefits of Digital Noise Reduction for Short-Term Word Learning in Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of word learning for children with hearing loss (HL) in quiet and in noise compared to normal-hearing (NH) peers. The effects of digital noise reduction (DNR) were examined for children with HL. Method: Forty-one children with NH and 26 children with HL were grouped by age (8-9 years and 11-12 years). The children…

  2. Responsiveness of the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire to Progression to Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Vision Loss, and Lens Opacity

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe the ability of the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ) to detect meaningful change over time (responsiveness) to the primary Age-Related Eye Disease Study outcomes. Methods The 25-item NEI-VFQ plus appendix was administered at 2 visits at 1- to 4-year intervals to 4119 participants in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. Events evaluated were progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD), visual acuity (VA) loss of at least 15 letters, and lens opacity progression. Responsiveness was measured by the t statistic, effect size (ES), responsiveness statistic, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Variance components were used to estimate the contributions of events to variability of the NEI-VFQ score. Results Overall NEI-VFQ score was responsive to AMD progression (t = 14.0; P<.001; ES=0.81) and VA (t = 16.2; P<.001; ES=0.74). Mean changes ranged from 11 to 25 points for the subscales of general vision, near and distance activities, social functioning, mental health, role difficulties, dependency, and driving. The NEI-VFQ was unresponsive to lens opacity progression, although when the event occurred in the eye with the best vision at the first administration, the lens opacity ES was moderate for the color vision (ES = 0.62) and driving subscales (ES=0.66). Progression to advanced AMD and VA loss contributed significantly to the variation in the mean difference in overall VFQ score. Conclusions Changes in the NEI-VFQ overall and subscale scores of 10 points or more are associated with clinically significant changes in vision and AMD. This finding may assist the design of interventional studies of AMD and VA loss that include the NEI-VFQ as an outcome measure. PMID:16157800

  3. Comparison of Progression Rate of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Loss in Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treated with Ranibizumab and Aflibercept

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Magdalena A.; Graf, Nicole; Becker, Matthias D.; Michels, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) loss in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) seem to have a linear progression but might be influenced by the treatment. The purpose of the study is the comparison of RPE loss over three years in patients treated with intravitreal ranibizumab to patients who were switched to aflibercept. Methods. A retrospective analysis with 96 eyes switched to aflibercept was conducted. The progression rate of RPE loss was evaluated in patients who showed atrophy one year prior to switch (n = 17) or on switch date (n = 19). The RPE loss was evaluated by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Further, 22 eyes from patients treated with ranibizumab were compared. Results. The median yearly progression of RPE loss after square root transformation showed no significant difference in the year prior to switch compared to the year after switch (p = 0.854). In patients who received only ranibizumab, the median yearly progression of RPE loss was 0.15 mm/y, for aflibercept patients, 0.13 mm/y. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.172). Conclusions. There seems to be a linear progression rate of RPE loss in patients treated with ranibizumab as well as in patients with aflibercept. No significant increase of progression rate was found after switch to aflibercept. PMID:28316836

  4. miR-29b overexpression induces cochlear hair cell apoptosis through the regulation of SIRT1/PGC-1α signaling: Implications for age-related hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Tao; Wei, Li; Zha, Ding-Jun; Qiu, Jian-Hua; Chen, Fu-Quan; Qiao, Li; Qiu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that the degeneration of cochlear hair cells is the typical cause of presbycusis (or age-related hearing loss). However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate cochlear hair cell apoptosis are not yet fully understood and there is no effective treatment for this disorder. MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) have been increasingly shown to be associated with age-related diseases and are emerging as promising therapeutic targets. In this study, we investigated whether miR-29b is involved in the degeneration of cochlear hair cells. To examine our hypothesis, nuclear staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) were used to quantify the hair cell counts. RT-qPCR and western blot analysis were used to examine miR-29b/sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)/proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) signaling in cochlear hair cells. We found that there was a significant degeneration of cochlear hair cells and a higher expression of miR-29b in aged C57BL/6 mice compared with young mice. There was also an age-related decrease in the expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1α. In the inner ear cell line, HEI-OC1, miR-29b overexpression (by transfection with miR-29b mimic) inhibited SIRT1 and PGC-1α expression, leading to an increase in mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Moreover, the inhibition of miR-29b (by transfection with miR-29b inhibitor) increased SIRT1 and PGC-1α expression, while it decreased apoptosis. Taken together, our findings support a link between age-related cochlear hair cell apoptosis and miR-29b/SIRT1/PGC-1α signaling, which may present an attractive pharmacological target for the development of novel drugs for the treatment of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27635430

  5. Stability against backward balance loss: Age-related modifications following slip-like perturbations of multiple amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Dario; Aprigliano, Federica; Tropea, Peppino; Pasquini, Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Monaco, Vito

    2017-03-01

    Falls are one of the most serious problems in the elderly. Although previous studies clearly link the increased risk of falls with ageing, the mechanisms responsible for the modifications of reactive motor behaviours in response to external perturbations are not yet fully understood. This study investigated how the stability against backward balance loss is affected by aging and intensity of perturbations. The Margin of Stability (MoS) was estimated while eight young and eight elderly adults managed three slip-like perturbations of different intensities while walking at the same normalized speed. A compensatory step was necessary to regain stability. The forward swing phase of the trailing leg was rapidly interrupted and reversed in direction. Results have shown that ageing significantly affects the time required to select the most appropriate biomechanical response: even if the characteristic of the backward step was similar between groups, elderly subjects took more time to reverse the movement of their swinging limb, thus achieving a less efficient action to counteract the backward balance loss (lower MoS both during and at the end of the early compensatory reaction). In addition, young and elderly subjects scaled their reactions with respect to the perturbations intensity in a similar way by increasing the length of their backward step, thus revealing a context-dependent tuning of the biomechanical response that was not affected by aging. These behavioural features can be helpful in identifying the causes of increased fall risk among the elderly in order to define more suited intervention in fall prevention programs.

  6. A Comparative Study of Age-Related Hearing Loss in Wild Type and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Raquel; Cediel, Rafael; Contreras, Julio; Lourdes, Rodriguez-de la Rosa; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Hernandez-Sanchez, Catalina; Zubeldia, Jose M.; Cerdan, Sebastian; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) belongs to the family of insulin-related peptides that fulfils a key role during the late development of the nervous system. Human IGF1 mutations cause profound deafness, poor growth and mental retardation. Accordingly, Igf1−/− null mice are dwarfs that have low survival rates, cochlear alterations and severe sensorineural deafness. Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is a common disorder associated with aging that causes social and cognitive problems. Aging is also associated with a decrease in circulating IGF-I levels and this reduction has been related to cognitive and brain alterations, although there is no information as yet regarding the relationship between presbycusis and IGF-I biodisponibility. Here we present a longitudinal study of wild type Igf1+/+ and null Igf1−/− mice from 2 to 12 months of age comparing the temporal progression of several parameters: hearing, brain morphology, cochlear cytoarchitecture, insulin-related factors and IGF gene expression and IGF-I serum levels. Complementary invasive and non-invasive techniques were used, including auditory brainstem-evoked response (ABR) recordings and in vivo MRI brain imaging. Igf1−/− null mice presented profound deafness at all the ages studied, without any obvious worsening of hearing parameters with aging. Igf1+/+ wild type mice suffered significant age-related hearing loss, their auditory thresholds and peak I latencies augmenting as they aged, in parallel with a decrease in the circulating levels of IGF-I. Accordingly, there was an age-related spiral ganglion degeneration in wild type mice that was not evident in the Igf1 null mice. However, the Igf1−/− null mice in turn developed a prematurely aged stria vascularis reminiscent of the diabetic strial phenotype. Our data indicate that IGF-I is required for the correct development and maintenance of hearing, supporting the idea that IGF-I-based therapies could contribute to prevent or

  7. Coenzyme Q Protects Against Age-Related Alveolar Bone Loss Associated to n-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Rich-Diets by Modulating Mitochondrial Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Varela-Lopez, Alfonso; Bullon, Pedro; Battino, Maurizio; Ramirez-Tortosa, M Carmen; Ochoa, Julio J; Cordero, Mario D; Ramirez-Tortosa, César L; Rubini, Corrado; Zizzi, Antonio; Quiles, José L

    2016-05-01

    An age-dependent model of the periodontium was reproduced to evaluate the effect of life-long feeding on a low coenzyme Q10 dosage in n-6, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid or monounsaturated fatty acid-based diets on periodontal tissues of young and old rats. Results shown that exacerbated age-related alveolar bone loss previously associated to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid diet was attenuated by coenzyme Q10 Gene expression analysis suggests that involved mechanisms might be related to a restored capacity of mitochondria to adapt to aging in gingival cells from rats fed on n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid. In particular, this could be due to an age-related increase of the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis and a better oxidative and respiratory balance in these animals. From the nutritional and clinical point of view, it is noteworthy that supplementation with coenzyme Q10 could counteract the negative effects of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid on alveolar bone loss (a major feature of periodontitis) associated to age.

  8. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration About AMD Click for more ... a leading cause of vision loss among people age 60 and older. It causes damage to the ...

  9. Compromised potassium recycling in the cochlea contributes to conservation of endocochlear potential in a mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haidi; Xiong, Hao; Huang, Qiuhong; Pang, Jiaqi; Zheng, Xuqing; Chen, Lian; Yu, Rongjun; Zheng, Yiqing

    2013-10-25

    The C57BL/6 strain is considered an excellent model to study age-related hearing loss (AHL). Aging C57BL/6 mice are characterized by profound hearing loss but conservation of the endocochlear potential (EP). Here we show 12-month-old C57BL/6 mice display a notable hearing loss at 4, 8, 16 and 32kHz while the EP is maintained at normal level. Morphological examination shows significant outer hair cells loss in the cochlear basal turn and atrophy of the stria vascularis (SV). Fluorescence immunohistochemical studies reveal that potassium channel KCNJ10 and KCNQ1 expression dramatically decreased in the SV. Concomitant with this, mRNA levels of KCNJ10 and KCNQ1 are also reduced. In addition, three other potassium transporters, including α1-Na,K-ATPase, α2-Na,K-ATPase and NKCC1, reduce their expression at mRNA levels as well. These observations suggest that conservation of the EP in aging C57BL/6 mice is attributable to the SV generating a new balance for potassium influx and efflux at a relatively lower level.

  10. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Hearing aids are electronic instruments you wear in or behind your ear ( ... implants. Cochlear (COKE-lee-ur) implants are small electronic devices surgically implanted in the inner ear that ...

  11. Age-related hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ... and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, ...

  12. Age-related hearing loss in individuals and their caregivers: effects of coping on the quality of life among the dyads

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarotto, Sébastien; Baumstarck, Karine; Loundou, Anderson; Hamidou, Zeinab; Aghababian, Valérie; Leroy, Tanguy; Auquier, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) impacts the daily living and quality of life (QoL) of affected individuals and the functioning of family caregivers. In the specific context of voluntary medical checkups, we examined sample dyads (ARHL individual and the caregiver) to determine whether QoL of patients and caregivers is influenced by coping strategies implemented either by themselves or their relatives. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a descriptive/correlative design performed in a French preventive health center (Regional Institute for Prevention of Aging, Marseille, France) for the beneficiaries of pension funds of private sector employees. The samples included beneficiary–caregiver dyads. The beneficiaries had bilateral (mild to moderately severe) ARHL. Self-reported data were collected as follows: QoL using the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire, coping strategies using the Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Scale, and anxiety and mood using visual analog scales. Results The final sample comprised 44 beneficiaries and 44 caregivers. The caregiver was the partner of the beneficiary in 73% of cases. The QoL scores of the social dimension were significantly lower for beneficiaries and caregivers compared with French age- and sex-matched controls. Among beneficiaries and caregivers, coping strategies based on problem solving were the most commonly used strategies. The use of positive thinking strategies was associated with higher QoL scores. The more one member of the dyad used an avoidance coping strategy, the more the other member used a positive thinking strategy. Conclusion This study emphasizes that QoL of individuals with age-related hearing impairment and their natural caregivers is related to the coping strategies that they use. This finding suggests that targeted interventions should be offered to help individuals who experience emotional difficulties to implement more efficient coping strategies

  13. sFRP4-dependent Wnt signal modulation is critical for bone remodeling during postnatal development and age-related bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, Ryuma; Kitazawa, Riko; Mori, Kiyoshi; Tachibana, Ryosuke; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Imai, Yuuki; Abe, Takaya; Kitazawa, Sohei

    2016-01-01

    sFRP4 is an extracellular Wnt antagonist that fine-tunes its signal activity by direct binding to Wnts. Bone fragility under oxidative stress by diabetes and aging is partly related to the suppression of the Wnt signal through upregulated sFRP4. Here, to explore the functions of sFRP4 as a balancer molecule in bone development and remodeling, we analyzed the sFRP4 knock-in mouse strain. X-gal and immunohistochemically stained signals in sFRP4-LacZ heterozygous mice were detectable in restricted areas, mostly in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, of the femoral diaphysis after neonatal and postnatal stages. Histological and μCT analyses showed increased trabecular bone mass with alteration of the Wnt signal and osteogenic activity in sFRP4 mutants; this augmented the effect of the buildup of trabecular bone during the ageing period. Our results indicate that sFRP4 plays a critical role in bone development and remodeling by regulating osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and that its functional loss prevents age-related bone loss in the trabecular bone area. These findings imply that sFRP4 functions as a key potential endogenous balancer of the Wnt signaling pathway by efficiently having direct influence on both bone formation and bone absorption during skeletal bone development and maintenance through remodeling. PMID:27117872

  14. The quality of life impact of peripheral versus central vision loss with a focus on glaucoma versus age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Keith; Law, Simon K; Walt, John; Buchholz, Patricia; Hansen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose It is well accepted that conditions that cause central vision loss (CVL) have a negative impact on functional ability and quality of life (QoL), but the impact of diseases that cause peripheral vision loss (PVL) is less well understood. Focusing on glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), the effects of CVL and PVL on QoL were compared. Methods A systematic literature review of publications reporting QoL in patients with CVL or PVL identified 87 publications using four generic (Short-Form Health Survey-36 and -12, EuroQoL EQ-5D and Sickness Impact Profile) and five vision-specific (National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-51, -39, and -25, Impact of Vision Impairment and Visual Function-14) QoL instruments; 33 and 15 publications reported QoL in ARMD and glaucoma, respectively. Results QoL was impaired to a similar extent by diseases associated with PVL and CVL, but different domains were affected. In contrast to ARMD, mental aspects appeared to be affected more than physical aspects in patients with glaucoma. Conclusions The differential impact upon QoL might be a function of the pathology of the diseases, for example potential for blindness and better ability to perform physical tasks due to retention of central vision may explain these observations in glaucoma. PMID:19684867

  15. Age-related loss of muscle mass and bone strength in mice is associated with a decline in physical activity and serum leptin.

    PubMed

    Hamrick, Mark W; Ding, Ke-Hong; Pennington, Catherine; Chao, Yuh J; Wu, Yii-Der; Howard, Boyd; Immel, David; Borlongan, Cesario; McNeil, Paul L; Bollag, Wendy B; Curl, Walton W; Yu, Jack; Isales, Carlos M

    2006-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying age-related loss of muscle and bone tissue are poorly understood but are thought to involve changes in sex hormone status, physical activity, and circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines. This study attempts to develop an animal model useful for evaluating these mechanisms in vivo. Male C57BL/6 mice were included for study at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 29 months of age. Endocortical mineralizing surface, serum leptin, body weight, and percentage of body fat all increased between 6 and 12 months of age as activity level declined. Serum levels of the inflammatory marker IL-6 increased significantly after 12 months of age, following the observed increase in body weight and percent body fat. Hindlimb muscle mass declined significantly between 18 and 24 months of age, both absolutely and relative to total body mass, with a further decline ( approximately 15%) between 24 and 29 months. Loss of muscle mass after 18 months of age was accompanied by a significant increase in bone resorption, as indicated by serum pyridinoline cross-links, and a significant decrease in fat mass, serum leptin, bone strength, bone mineral density, and vertical cage activity. No significant changes in serum testosterone with aging were detected in the mice, as levels were essentially constant between 6 and 29 months. Our data show that mice lose a significant amount of muscle and bone tissue with age, and this loss of musculoskeletal tissue is accompanied by a drop in serum leptin and preceded by a significant decrease in physical activity.

  16. Is the loss of thalamostriatal neurons protective in parkinsonism?

    PubMed

    Kusnoor, Sheila V; Muly, E Chris; Morgan, James I; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2009-12-01

    Neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease (PD) is more widespread than originally thought. Among the extrastriatal sites in which significant loss of neurons has been reported is the centremedian-parafascicular (CM-PF) complex of the thalamus, which provides one of the three major afferent sources to the striatum. The functional significance of CM-PF loss in PD is unclear. Interestingly, several recent small trials have suggested that deep brain stimulation of the CM-PF improves motor function in PD. We discuss the possible transsynaptic determination of CM-PF loss secondary to nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration, and suggest that expression of the glycoprotein cerebellin1 (Cbln1) in CM-PF neurons may play an important role in striatal synaptic remodeling in parkinsonism.

  17. Possible age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) and corresponding change in echolocation parameters in a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin.

    PubMed

    Li, Songhai; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong; Hoffmann-Kuhnt, Matthias; Fernando, Nimal; Taylor, Elizabeth A; Lin, Wenzhi; Chen, Jialin; Ng, Timothy

    2013-11-15

    The hearing and echolocation clicks of a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in Zhuhai, China, were studied. This animal had been repeatedly observed in the wild before it was stranded and its age was estimated to be ~40 years. The animal's hearing was measured using a non-invasive auditory evoked potential (AEP) method. Echolocation clicks produced by the dolphin were recorded when the animal was freely swimming in a 7.5 m (width)×22 m (length)×4.8 m (structural depth) pool with a water depth of ~2.5 m. The hearing and echolocation clicks of the studied dolphin were compared with those of a conspecific younger individual, ~13 years of age. The results suggested that the cut-off frequency of the high-frequency hearing of the studied dolphin was ~30-40 kHz lower than that of the younger individual. The peak and centre frequencies of the clicks produced by the older dolphin were ~16 kHz lower than those of the clicks produced by the younger animal. Considering that the older dolphin was ~40 years old, its lower high-frequency hearing range with lower click peak and centre frequencies could probably be explained by age-related hearing loss (presbycusis).

  18. Growth hormone prevents neuronal loss in the aged rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Azcoitia, Iñigo; Perez-Martin, Margarita; Salazar, Veronica; Castillo, Carmen; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2005-05-01

    Decline of growth hormone (GH) with aging is associated to memory and cognitive alterations. In this study, the number of neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus has been assessed in male and female Wistar rats at 3, 6, 12, 14, 18, 22 and 24 months of age, using the optical fractionator method. Male rats had more neurons than females at all the ages studied. Significant neuronal loss was observed in both sexes between 22 and 24 months of age. In a second experiment, 22 month-old male and female rats were treated for 10 weeks with 2 mg/kg/day of GH or saline. At 24 months of age, animals treated with GH had more neurons in the hilus than animals treated with saline. These findings indicate that GH is neuroprotective in old animals and that its administration may ameliorate neuronal alterations associated to aging.

  19. Biomarkers, mechanisms, and potential prevention of catecholamine neuron loss in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is on biomarkers, mechanisms, and potential treatment of catecholamine neuron loss in Parkinson disease (PD). PD is characterized by a movement disorder from loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons. An intense search is going on for biomarkers of the disease process. Theoretically, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the deaminated DA metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), should be superior to other neurochemical indices of loss of central dopamine. CSF DOPAC is low in PD-even in patients with recent onset of Parkinsonism. Cardiac norepinephrine depletion is as severe as the loss of putamen dopamine. PD importantly involves nonmotor manifestations, including anosmia, dementia, REM behavior disorder, and orthostatic hypotension, and all of these nonmotor features are associated with neuroimaging evidence for cardiac sympathetic denervation, which seems to occur independently of the movement disorder and striatal dopaminergic lesion. Analogy to a bank robber's getaway car conveys the catecholaldehyde hypothesis, according to which buildup of the dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), the immediate product of the action of monoamine oxidase on cytosolic dopamine, causes or contributes to the death of dopamine neurons. Decreased vesicular uptake of dopamine and decreased DOPAL detoxification by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) determine this buildup. Vesicular uptake is also markedly decreased in the heart in PD. Multiple factors influence vesicular uptake and ALDH activity. Evidence is accruing for aging-related induction of positive feedback loops and an autotoxic final common pathway in the death of catecholamine neurons, mediated by metabolites produced continuously in neuronal life. The catecholaldehyde hypothesis also leads to testable experimental therapeutic ideas.

  20. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision.

  1. X-Ray induced cataract is preceded by LEC loss, and coincident with accumulation of cortical DNA, and ROS; similarities with age-related cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Zitnik, Galynn; Tsai, Ryan; Wolf, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare age-related cataractous (ARC) changes in unirradiated mice lenses to those induced by head-only X-irradiation of 3 month-old mice. Methods lens epithelial cells (LECs) as well as partially degraded cortical DNA were visualized in fixed sections using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, and in fresh lenses using the vital stain Hoechst 33342. reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity was also visualized directly in fresh lenses using the vital dye Dihydrorhodamine (DHR). In fixed lenses an antibody specific for 8-OH Guanosine (8-OH-G) lesions was used to visualize DNA oxidative adducts from ROS damage. Alpha smooth muscle actin was visualized using specific antibodies to determine if myofibroblasts were present. Fluorescence was quantified using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM). The degree of lens opacity and cataract formation was determined by slit lamp, or from digitalized images of light reflections taken with a low magnification light microscope. Results Using DNA- and ROS-specific vital fluorescent dyes, and laser scanning confocal microscopy we have previously described 4 changes in the aging rodent lenses: 1) a significantly decreased density of surface LECs in lenses from old compared to younger mice and rats; 2) a very large increase in retained cortical nuclei and DNA fragments in the secondary lens fibers of old rodent lenses; 3) increased cortical ROS in old rodent lenses; 4) increased cataract concomitantly with the cortical DNA and ROS increases. In the current study we report that these same 4 changes also occur in an accelerated fashion in mice given head-only X-irradiation at 3 months of age. In addition to vital staining of fresh lenses, we also examined sections from fixed eyes stained with DAPI or hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and found the same loss of surface LECs and accumulation of undigested nuclei and debris in secondary lens fibers occur with age or following X-irradiation. In addition sections from fixed

  2. Influence of high and low protein intakes on age-related bone loss in rats submitted to adequate or restricted energy conditions.

    PubMed

    Mardon, Julie; Habauzit, Véronique; Trzeciakiewicz, Anna; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Mercier, Sylvie; Tressol, Jean-Claude; Horcajada, Marie-Noëlle; Demigné, Christian; Coxam, Véronique

    2008-05-01

    Low energy and protein intake has been suggested to contribute to the increased incidence of osteoporosis in the elderly. The impact of dietary protein on bone health is still a matter of debate. Therefore, we examined the effect of the modulation of protein intake under adequate or deficient energy conditions on bone status in 16-month-old male rats. The animals were randomly allocated to six groups (n = 10/group). Control animals were fed a diet providing either a normal-protein content (13%, C-NP) or a high-protein content (26%) (C-HP). The other groups received a 40% protein/energy-restricted diet (PER-NP and PER-HP) or a normal protein/energy-restricted diet (ER-NP and ER-HP). After 5 months of the experiment, protein intake (13% or 26%) did not modulate calcium retention or bone status in those rats, although a low-grade metabolic acidosis was induced with the HP diet. Both restrictions (PER and ER) decreased femoral bone mineral density and fracture load. Plasma osteocalcin and urinary deoxypyridinoline levels were lowered, suggesting a decrease in bone turnover in the PER and ER groups. Circulating insulin-like growth factor-I levels were also lowered by dietary restrictions, together with calcium retention. Adequate protein intake in the ER condition did not elicit any bone-sparing effect compared to PER rats. In conclusion, both energy and protein deficiencies may contribute to age-related bone loss. This study highlights the importance of sustaining adequate energy and protein provision to preserve skeletal integrity in the elderly.

  3. Atrophy and neuron loss: effects of a protein-deficient diet on sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Silvio Pires; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Misawa, Rúbia; Girotti, Priscila Azevedo; Castelucci, Patrìcia; Blazquez, Francisco Hernandez Javier; de Melo, Mariana Pereira; Ribeiro, Antonio Augusto Coppi

    2009-12-01

    Protein deficiency is one of the biggest public health problems in the world, accounting for about 30-40% of hospital admissions in developing countries. Nutritional deficiencies lead to alterations in the peripheral nervous system and in the digestive system. Most studies have focused on the effects of protein-deficient diets on the enteric neurons, but not on sympathetic ganglia, which supply extrinsic sympathetic input to the digestive system. Hence, in this study, we investigated whether a protein-restricted diet would affect the quantitative structure of rat coeliac ganglion neurons. Five male Wistar rats (undernourished group) were given a pre- and postnatal hypoproteinic diet receiving 5% casein, whereas the nourished group (n = 5) was fed with 20% casein (normoproteinic diet). Blood tests were carried out on the animals, e.g., glucose, leptin, and triglyceride plasma concentrations. The main structural findings in this study were that a protein-deficient diet (5% casein) caused coeliac ganglion (78%) and coeliac ganglion neurons (24%) to atrophy and led to neuron loss (63%). Therefore, the fall in the total number of coeliac ganglion neurons in protein-restricted rats contrasts strongly with no neuron losses previously described for the enteric neurons of animals subjected to similar protein-restriction diets. Discrepancies between our figures and the data for enteric neurons (using very similar protein-restriction protocols) may be attributable to the counting method used. In light of this, further systematic investigations comparing 2-D and 3-D quantitative methods are warranted to provide even more advanced data on the effects that a protein-deficient diet may exert on sympathetic neurons. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Age-related alterations in hypothalamic kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin neurons and in pulsatile LH release in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Kunimura, Yuyu; Iwata, Kinuyo; Ishigami, Akihito; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2017-02-01

    Pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinizing hormone (LH) decreases during aging. Kisspeptin (encoded by Kiss1) neurons in the arcuate nucleus coexpress neurokinin B (Tac3) and dynorphin (Pdyn) and are critical for regulating the GnRH/LH pulse. We therefore examined kisspeptin neurons by histochemistry and pulsatile LH release in rats aged 2-3 (Young), 12-13 (Young-Middle), 19-22 (Late-Middle), and 24-26 (Old) months. Total LH concentrations, sampled for 3 hours, decreased in both sexes with aging. In females, numbers of Tac3 and Pdyn neurons were significantly reduced in all aging rats, and numbers of Kiss1 neurons were significantly reduced in Late-Middle and Old rats. In males, numbers of all 3 neuron-types were significantly decreased in all aging rats. GnRH agonist induced LH release in all animals; however, the increased LH concentration in all aging rats was less than that in Young rats. These results suggest that expression of each gene in kisspeptin neurons may be controlled individually during aging, and that reduction of their expression or change in pituitary responsiveness may cause attenuated pulsatile LH secretion.

  5. Long-term dietary strawberry, spinach, or vitamin E supplementation retards the onset of age-related neuronal signal-transduction and cognitive behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Joseph, J A; Shukitt-Hale, B; Denisova, N A; Prior, R L; Cao, G; Martin, A; Taglialatela, G; Bickford, P C

    1998-10-01

    Recent research has indicated that increased vulnerability to oxidative stress may be the major factor involved in CNS functional declines in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, and that antioxidants, e.g., vitamin E, may ameliorate or prevent these declines. Present studies examined whether long-term feeding of Fischer 344 rats, beginning when the rats were 6 months of age and continuing for 8 months, with diets supplemented with a fruit or vegetable extract identified as being high in antioxidant activity, could prevent the age-related induction of receptor-mediated signal transduction deficits that might have a behavioral component. Thus, the following parameters were examined: (1) oxotremorine-enhanced striatal dopamine release (OX-K+-ERDA), (2) cerebellar beta receptor augmentation of GABA responding, (3) striatal synaptosomal 45Ca2+ clearance, (4) carbachol-stimulated GTPase activity, and (5) Morris water maze performance. The rats were given control diets or those supplemented with strawberry extracts (SE), 9.5 gm/kg dried aqueous extract (DAE), spinach (SPN 6.4 gm/kg DAE), or vitamin E (500 IU/kg). Results indicated that SPN-fed rats demonstrated the greatest retardation of age-effects on all parameters except GTPase activity, on which SE had the greatest effect, whereas SE and vitamin E showed significant but equal protection against these age-induced deficits on the other parameters. For example, OX-K+-ERDA enhancement was four times greater in the SPN group than in controls. Thus, phytochemicals present in antioxidant-rich foods such as spinach may be beneficial in retarding functional age-related CNS and cognitive behavioral deficits and, perhaps, may have some benefit in neurodegenerative disease.

  6. Aging causes partial loss of basal forebrain but no loss of pontine reticular cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Karen A; Kent, Caroline; Nicolle, Michelle M; Gallagher, Michela; McKinney, Michael

    2006-11-27

    Cholinergic degeneration occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate whether normal aging causes selective neurodegeneration, we compared counts of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band and pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei of the brainstem in young and aged Long-Evans rats characterized for their spatial learning ability in the Morris water maze. A subset of aged rats (aged-unimpaired) learned the spatial learning task as young rats, whereas another group (age-impaired) showed poorer learning than young animals. In the medial septum/diagonal band, there was a significant loss (-23%, P < 0.02) of cholinergic neurons in aged-impaired animals compared with young subjects. In the brainstem, there were no significant differences in cholinergic cell number in any group. This selective loss of cholinergic neurons may, in part, account for the cognitive deficits observed in aging and, considering previous findings in this model, may be related to oxidative stress.

  7. Cellular interplay between neurons and glia: toward a comprehensive mechanism for excitotoxic neuronal loss in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Alison J.B.; White, Michael G.; Kolson, Dennis L.; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.

    2008-01-01

    Astrocytes perform vital maintenance, functional enhancement, and protective roles for their associated neurons; however these same mechanisms may become deleterious for neurons under some conditions. In this review, we highlight two normally protective pathways, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and an endogenous antioxidant response, which may become neurotoxic when activated in astrocytes during the inflammation associated with neurodegeneration. Stimulation of these multifaceted pathways affects a panoply of cellular processes. Of particular importance is the effect these pathways have on the homeostasis of the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter, glutamate. The endogenous antioxidant response increases extracellular glutamate in the pursuit of making the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, by increasing expression of the xCT subunit of the cystine/glutamate antiporter. Meanwhile, inflammatory mediators such as TNFα reduce levels of membrane-bound glutamate scavenging proteins such as the excitatory amino acid transporters. Together, these cellular activities may result in a net increase in extracellular glutamate that could alter neuronal function and lead to excitotoxicity. Here we discuss the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, which, when excessively stimulated by glutamate, can cause neuronal dysfunction and loss via activation of calpains. While there are other pathways acting in concert or parallel to those we describe here, this review explores a rationale to explain how two protective mechanisms may result in neuronal loss during neurodegeneration. PMID:19122795

  8. Parthanatos Mediates AIMP2 Activated Age Dependent Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yunjong; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Shin, Joo-Ho; Lee, Yun-Il; Ko, Han Seok; Swing, Debbie; Jiang, Haisong; Kang, Sung-Ung; Lee, Byoung Dae; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Donghoon; Tessarollo, Lino; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2013-01-01

    The defining pathogenic feature of Parkinson’s disease is the age dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons. Mutations and inactivation of parkin, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, cause Parkinson’s disease through accumulation of pathogenic substrates. Here we show that transgenic overexpression of the parkin substrate, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex interacting multifunctional protein-2 (AIMP2) leads to a selective, age-dependent progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons via activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1). AIMP2 accumulation in vitro and in vivo results in PARP1 overactivation and dopaminergic cell toxicity via direct association of these proteins in the nucleus providing a new path to PARP1 activation other than DNA damage. Inhibition of PARP1 through gene deletion or drug inhibition reverses behavioral deficits and protects in vivo against dopamine neuron death in AIMP2 transgenic mice. These data indicate that brain permeable PARP inhibitors could be effective in delaying or preventing disease progression in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23974709

  9. Nutrition and age-related eye diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vision loss among the elderly is an important health problem. Approximately one person in three has some form of vision-reducing eye disease by the age of 65 [1]. Age-related cataract, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma are the major diseases resulting in visu...

  10. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mark H; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael L; Leonard, Christopher S; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2014-10-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7-P15), nicotine induced larger intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15-P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells to a greater degree in younger animals, possibly linked to development associated differences found in nicotinic effects on action potential shape and afterhyperpolarization. We conclude that in addition to age-associated alterations of several properties expected to affect resting cell excitability, parameters affecting cell excitability are altered by nicotine differentially across ontogeny. Taken together, our data suggest that nicotine induces a larger excitatory response in cholinergic LDT neurons from the youngest animals, which could result in a greater excitatory output from these cells to target regions involved in development of addiction. Such output would be expected to be promotive of addiction; therefore, ontogenetic differences in nicotine-mediated increases in the excitability of the LDT could contribute to the differential susceptibility to nicotine addiction seen across age.

  11. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Mark H.; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael L.; Leonard, Christopher S.; Kohlmeier, Kristi A.

    2015-01-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on several parameters affecting LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7-P15), nicotine was found to induce larger intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15-P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells to a greater degree in younger animals, possibly linked to development associated differences found in nicotinic effects on action potential shape and afterhyperpolarization. We conclude that in addition to age-associated alterations of several properties expected to affect resting cell excitability, parameters affecting cell excitability are altered by nicotine differentially across ontogeny. Taken together, our data suggest that nicotine induces a larger excitatory response in cholinergic LDT neurons from the youngest animals, which could result in a greater excitatory output from these cells to target regions involved in development of addiction. Such output would be expected to be promotive of addiction; therefore, ontogenetic differences in nicotine-mediated increases in the excitability of the LDT could contribute to the differential susceptibility to nicotine addiction seen across age. PMID:24863041

  12. Age-related eye disease.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Vinod B; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-01

    As with many organs, compromised function of the eye is accompanied with age and has become increasingly prevalent with the aging population. When decreased visual loss becomes significant, patients' ability to perform activities of daily living becomes compromised. This decrease in function is met with morbidity and mortality, as well as a large socioeconomic burden throughout the world. This review summarizes the most common age-related eye diseases, including cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and age-related macular degeneration. Although our understanding of the genetic and biochemical pathways of these diseases is sill at its primitive stages, we have become able to help our patients improve the quality of life as they age.

  13. Recovery of immune competence following sublethal X irradiation of young and old mice: a model for studying age-related loss of immunologic homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.J.; Perkins, E.H.; Makinodan, T.

    1982-01-01

    Age-related alteration in lymphohematopoietic homeostasis was assessed kinetically by determining immunologic and stem-cell regenerating capacities of young (5-7 months), middle-aged (13 months), and old (23-24 months) C3H and C57BL/6 mice following their exposure to 500 R. Immunologic activities were based on the ability of spleen cells to respond to sheep erythrocytes, phytohemagglutinin, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Stem-cell activity was based on the ability of splenic and bone marrow cells to form colonies in vivo. Reflective of age-related homeostatic imbalance was alteration in the (a) time of recovery, (b) rate of regeneration, and (c) capacity of the regenerating system to overshoot the preirradition steady-state level. Most of the immunologic parameters showed a delay in the time of recovery in old mice. In contrast, the time of recovery of stem cells in old mice was equal to or faster than that in young mice. Furthermore, the magnitude of regeneration of stem cells was greater in old than young mice. These results suggest that recovery of immunologic activities in old mice is delayed partly because of the inability of their stem cells to rapidly generate immunocompetent progenies.

  14. Regional age-related changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), messenger RNA levels and activity in SAMP8 brain

    PubMed Central

    Colas, Damien; Gharib, Abdallah; Bezin, Laurent; Morales, Anne; Guidon, Gérard; Cespuglio, Raymond; Sarda, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional molecule synthesized by three isozymes of the NO synthase (NOSs) acting as a messenger/modulator and/or a potential neurotoxin. In rodents, the role of NOSs in sleep processes and throughout aging is now well established. For example, sleep parameters are highly deteriorated in senescence accelerated-prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a useful animal model to study aging or age-associated disorders, while the inducible form of NOS (iNOS) is down-regulated within the cortex and the sleep-structures of the brainstem. Evidence is now increasing for a role of iNOS and resulting oxidative stress but not for the constitutive expressed isozyme (nNOS). To better understand the role of nNOS in the behavioural impairments observed in SAMP8 versus SAMR1 (control) animals, we evaluated age-related variations occurring in the nNOS expression and activity and nitrites/nitrates (NOx-) levels, in three brain areas (n = 7 animals in each group). Calibrated reverse transcriptase (RT) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and biochemical procedures were used. Results We found that the levels of nNOS mRNA decreased in the cortex and the hippocampus of 8- vs 2-month-old animals followed by an increase in 12-vs 8-month-old animals in both strains. In the brainstem, levels of nNOS mRNA decreased in an age-dependent manner in SAMP8, but not in SAMR1. Regional age-related changes were also observed in nNOS activity. Moreover, nNOS activity in hippocampus was found lower in 8-month-old SAMP8 than in SAMR1, while in the cortex and the brainstem, nNOS activities increased at 8 months and afterward decreased with age in SAMP8 and SAMR1. NOx- levels showed profiles similar to nNOS activities in the cortex and the brainstem but were undetectable in the hippocampus of SAMP8 and SAMR1. Finally, NOx- levels were higher in the cortex of 8 month-old SAMP8 than in age-matched SAMR1. Conclusion Concomitant variations occurring in NO levels derived from n

  15. Sequential Loss of LC Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Neurons Results in a Correlation of Dopaminergic Neuronal Number to Striatal Dopamine Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Raskind, Murray A.

    2012-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) are significantly reduced in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and the LC exhibits neuropathological changes early in the disease process. It has been suggested that a loss of LC neurons can enhance the susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to damage. To determine if LC noradrenergic innervation protects dopaminergic neurons from damage, the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was administered to adult male C57Bl/6 mice 3 days after bilateral LC administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA), a time when there is a significant reduction in LC neuronal number and innervation to forebrain regions. To assess if LC loss can affect dopaminergic loss four groups of animals were studied: control, 6OHDA, MPTP, and 6OHDA + MPTP; animals sacrificed 3 weeks after MPTP administration. The number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), and noradrenergic neurons in the LC were determined. Catecholamine levels in striatum were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The loss of LC neurons did not affect the number of dopaminergic neurons in the SN and VTA compared to control; however, LC 6OHDA significantly reduced striatal dopamine (DA; 29% reduced) but not norepinephrine (NE) concentration. MPTP significantly reduced SN and VTA neuronal number and DA concentration in the striatum compared to control; however, there was not a correlation of striatal DA concentration with SN or VTA neuronal number. Administration of 6OHDA prior to MPTP did not enhance MPTP-induced damage despite an effect of LC loss on striatal DA concentration. However, the loss of LC neurons before MPTP resulted now in a correlation between SN and VTA neuronal number to striatal DA concentration. These results demonstrate that the loss of either LC or DA neurons can affect the function of each others systems, indicating the importance of both the noradrenergic and

  16. Sensory neurons do not induce motor neuron loss in a human stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Andrew J; Ebert, Allison D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to paralysis and early death due to reduced SMN protein. It is unclear why there is such a profound motor neuron loss, but recent evidence from fly and mouse studies indicate that cells comprising the whole sensory-motor circuit may contribute to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SMA patients to test whether sensory neurons directly contribute to motor neuron loss. We generated sensory neurons from SMA induced pluripotent stem cells and found no difference in neuron generation or survival, although there was a reduced calcium response to depolarizing stimuli. Using co-culture of SMA induced pluripotent stem cell derived sensory neurons with control induced pluripotent stem cell derived motor neurons, we found no significant reduction in motor neuron number or glutamate transporter boutons on motor neuron cell bodies or neurites. We conclude that SMA sensory neurons do not overtly contribute to motor neuron loss in this human stem cell system.

  17. [Age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Sayen, Alexandra; Hubert, Isabelle; Berrod, Jean-Paul

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. It is the first cause of blindness in patients over 50 in the western world. The disease has been traditionally classified into early and late stages with dry (atrophic) and wet (neovascular) forms: neovascular form is characterized by new blood vessels development under the macula (choroidal neovascularisation) which lead to a rapid decline of vision associated with metamorphopsia and requiring an urgent ophtalmological examination. Optical coherence tomography is now one of the most important part of the examination for diagnosis and treatment. Patient with age related maculopathy should consider taking a dietary supplement such that used in AREDS. The treatment of the wet ARMD has largely beneficied since year 2006 of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) molecules such as ranibizumab or bevacizumab given as repeated intravitreal injections. A systematic follow up each 4 to 8 week in required for several years. There is no effective treatment at the moment for dry AMD. For patients with binocular visual acuity under 60/200 rehabilitation includes low vision specialist, vision aids and psychological support.

  18. Early neurone loss in Alzheimer's disease: cortical or subcortical?

    PubMed

    Arendt, Thomas; Brückner, Martina K; Morawski, Markus; Jäger, Carsten; Gertz, Hermann-Josef

    2015-02-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative disorder where the distribution of pathology throughout the brain is not random but follows a predictive pattern used for pathological staging. While the involvement of defined functional systems is fairly well established for more advanced stages, the initial sites of degeneration are still ill defined. The prevailing concept suggests an origin within the transentorhinal and entorhinal cortex (EC) from where pathology spreads to other areas. Still, this concept has been challenged recently suggesting a potential origin of degeneration in nonthalamic subcortical nuclei giving rise to cortical innervation such as locus coeruleus (LC) and nucleus basalis of Meynert (NbM). To contribute to the identification of the early site of degeneration, here, we address the question whether cortical or subcortical degeneration occurs more early and develops more quickly during progression of AD. To this end, we stereologically assessed neurone counts in the NbM, LC and EC layer-II in the same AD patients ranging from preclinical stages to severe dementia. In all three areas, neurone loss becomes detectable already at preclinical stages and is clearly manifest at prodromal AD/MCI. At more advanced AD, cell loss is most pronounced in the NbM > LC > layer-II EC. During early AD, however, the extent of cell loss is fairly balanced between all three areas without clear indications for a preference of one area. We can thus not rule out that there is more than one way of spreading from its site of origin or that degeneration even occurs independently at several sites in parallel.

  19. Loss of the golgin GM130 causes Golgi disruption, Purkinje neuron loss, and ataxia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyi; Mei, Mei; Li, Qiuling; Pang, Qianqian; Ying, Zhengzhou; Gao, Fei; Lowe, Martin; Bao, Shilai

    2017-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus lies at the heart of the secretory pathway where it is required for secretory trafficking and cargo modification. Disruption of Golgi architecture and function has been widely observed in neurodegenerative disease, but whether Golgi dysfunction is causal with regard to the neurodegenerative process, or is simply a manifestation of neuronal death, remains unclear. Here we report that targeted loss of the golgin GM130 leads to a profound neurological phenotype in mice. Global KO of mouse GM130 results in developmental delay, severe ataxia, and postnatal death. We further show that selective deletion of GM130 in neurons causes fragmentation and defective positioning of the Golgi apparatus, impaired secretory trafficking, and dendritic atrophy in Purkinje cells. These cellular defects manifest as reduced cerebellar size and Purkinje cell number, leading to ataxia. Purkinje cell loss and ataxia first appear during postnatal development but progressively worsen with age. Our data therefore indicate that targeted disruption of the mammalian Golgi apparatus and secretory traffic results in neuronal degeneration in vivo, supporting the view that Golgi dysfunction can play a causative role in neurodegeneration. PMID:28028212

  20. Physical activity as intervention for age-related loss of muscle mass and function: protocol for a randomised controlled trial (the LISA study)

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Christian Skou; Garde, Ellen; Reislev, Nina Linde; Wimmelmann, Cathrine Lawaetz; Bieler, Theresa; Ziegler, Andreas Kraag; Gylling, Anne Theil; Dideriksen, Kasper Juel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Physical and cognitive function decline with age, accelerating during the 6th decade. Loss of muscle power (force×velocity product) is a dominant physical determinant for loss of functional ability, especially if the lower extremities are affected. Muscle strength training is known to maintain or even improve muscle power as well as physical function in older adults, but the optimal type of training for beneficial long-term training effects over several years is unknown. Moreover, the impact of muscle strength training on cognitive function and brain structure remains speculative. The primary aim of this randomised controlled trial is to compare the efficacy of two different 1 year strength training regimens on immediate and long-lasting improvements in muscle power in retirement-age individuals. Secondary aims are to evaluate the effect on muscle strength, muscle mass, physical and cognitive function, mental well-being, health-related quality of life and brain morphology. Methods and analysis The study includes 450 home-dwelling men and women (62–70 years). Participants are randomly allocated to (1) 1 year of supervised, centre-based heavy resistance training, (2) home-based moderate intensity resistance training or (3) habitual physical activity (control). Changes in primary (leg extensor power) and secondary outcomes are analysed according to the intention to treat principle and per protocol at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 10 years. Ethics and dissemination The study is expected to generate new insights into training-induced promotion of functional ability and independency after retirement and will help to formulate national recommendations regarding physical activity schemes for the growing population of older individuals in western societies. Results will be published in scientific peer-reviewed journals, in PhD theses and at public meetings. The study is approved by the Regional Ethical Committee (Capital Region, Copenhagen, Denmark, number H-3

  1. Age-Related Loss in Bone Mineral Density of Rats Fed Lifelong on a Fish Oil-Based Diet Is Avoided by Coenzyme Q10 Addition

    PubMed Central

    Varela-López, Alfonso; Ochoa, Julio J.; Llamas-Elvira, José M.; López-Frías, Magdalena; Planells, Elena; Ramirez-Tortosa, MCarmen; Ramirez-Tortosa, Cesar L.; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio; Quiles, José L.

    2017-01-01

    During aging, bone mass declines increasing osteoporosis and fracture risks. Oxidative stress has been related to this bone loss, making dietary compounds with antioxidant properties a promising weapon. Male Wistar rats were maintained for 6 or 24 months on diets with fish oil as unique fat source, supplemented or not with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), to evaluate the potential of adding this molecule to the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA)-based diet for bone mineral density (BMD) preservation. BMD was evaluated in the femur. Serum osteocalcin, osteopontin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, ostroprotegerin, parathyroid hormone, urinary F2-isoprostanes, and lymphocytes DNA strand breaks were also measured. BMD was lower in aged rats fed a diet without CoQ10 respect than their younger counterparts, whereas older animals receiving CoQ10 showed the highest BMD. F2-isoprostanes and DNA strand breaks showed that oxidative stress was higher during aging. Supplementation with CoQ10 prevented oxidative damage to lipid and DNA, in young and old animals, respectively. Reduced oxidative stress associated to CoQ10 supplementation of this n-3 PUFA-rich diet might explain the higher BMD found in aged rats in this group of animals. PMID:28241421

  2. Age-Related Loss in Bone Mineral Density of Rats Fed Lifelong on a Fish Oil-Based Diet Is Avoided by Coenzyme Q10 Addition.

    PubMed

    Varela-López, Alfonso; Ochoa, Julio J; Llamas-Elvira, José M; López-Frías, Magdalena; Planells, Elena; Ramirez-Tortosa, MCarmen; Ramirez-Tortosa, Cesar L; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio; Quiles, José L

    2017-02-22

    During aging, bone mass declines increasing osteoporosis and fracture risks. Oxidative stress has been related to this bone loss, making dietary compounds with antioxidant properties a promising weapon. Male Wistar rats were maintained for 6 or 24 months on diets with fish oil as unique fat source, supplemented or not with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), to evaluate the potential of adding this molecule to the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA)-based diet for bone mineral density (BMD) preservation. BMD was evaluated in the femur. Serum osteocalcin, osteopontin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, ostroprotegerin, parathyroid hormone, urinary F₂-isoprostanes, and lymphocytes DNA strand breaks were also measured. BMD was lower in aged rats fed a diet without CoQ10 respect than their younger counterparts, whereas older animals receiving CoQ10 showed the highest BMD. F₂-isoprostanes and DNA strand breaks showed that oxidative stress was higher during aging. Supplementation with CoQ10 prevented oxidative damage to lipid and DNA, in young and old animals, respectively. Reduced oxidative stress associated to CoQ10 supplementation of this n-3 PUFA-rich diet might explain the higher BMD found in aged rats in this group of animals.

  3. Long-term administration of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate fails to attenuate age-related oxidative damage or rescue the loss of muscle mass and function associated with aging of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K.; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P.; Nye, Gareth A.; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I.; Griffiths, Richard D.; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is the underlying cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 and over. Considerable evidence indicates that oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the sarcopenic phenotype that occurs with aging. To examine this, we administered the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate {[10-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-3,6-dioxo-1,4-cyclohexadien-1-yl)decyl] triphenylphosphonium; 100 μM} to wild-type C57BL/6 mice for 15 wk (from 24 to 28 mo of age) and investigated the effects on age-related loss of muscle mass and function, changes in redox homeostasis, and mitochondrial organelle integrity and function. We found that mitoquinone mesylate treatment failed to prevent age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with myofiber atrophy or alter a variety of in situ and ex vivo muscle function analyses, including maximum isometric tetanic force, decline in force after a tetanic fatiguing protocol, and single-fiber-specific force. We also found evidence that long-term mitoquinone mesylate administration did not reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or induce significant changes in muscle redox homeostasis, as assessed by changes in 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, protein carbonyl content, protein nitration, and DNA damage determined by the content of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. Mitochondrial membrane potential, abundance, and respiration assessed in permeabilized myofibers were not significantly altered in response to mitoquinone mesylate treatment. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that long-term mitochondria-targeted mitoquinone mesylate administration failed to attenuate age-related oxidative damage in skeletal muscle of old mice or provide any protective effect in the context of muscle aging.—Sakellariou, G. K., Pearson, T., Lightfoot, A. P., Nye, G. A., Wells, N., Giakoumaki, I. I., Griffiths, R. D., McArdle, A., Jackson, M. J. Long-term administration of the

  4. Long-term administration of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate fails to attenuate age-related oxidative damage or rescue the loss of muscle mass and function associated with aging of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P; Nye, Gareth A; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I; Griffiths, Richard D; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2016-11-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is the underlying cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 and over. Considerable evidence indicates that oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the sarcopenic phenotype that occurs with aging. To examine this, we administered the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate {[10-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-3,6-dioxo-1,4-cyclohexadien-1-yl)decyl] triphenylphosphonium; 100 μM} to wild-type C57BL/6 mice for 15 wk (from 24 to 28 mo of age) and investigated the effects on age-related loss of muscle mass and function, changes in redox homeostasis, and mitochondrial organelle integrity and function. We found that mitoquinone mesylate treatment failed to prevent age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with myofiber atrophy or alter a variety of in situ and ex vivo muscle function analyses, including maximum isometric tetanic force, decline in force after a tetanic fatiguing protocol, and single-fiber-specific force. We also found evidence that long-term mitoquinone mesylate administration did not reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or induce significant changes in muscle redox homeostasis, as assessed by changes in 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, protein carbonyl content, protein nitration, and DNA damage determined by the content of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. Mitochondrial membrane potential, abundance, and respiration assessed in permeabilized myofibers were not significantly altered in response to mitoquinone mesylate treatment. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that long-term mitochondria-targeted mitoquinone mesylate administration failed to attenuate age-related oxidative damage in skeletal muscle of old mice or provide any protective effect in the context of muscle aging.-Sakellariou, G. K., Pearson, T., Lightfoot, A. P., Nye, G. A., Wells, N., Giakoumaki, I. I., Griffiths, R. D., McArdle, A., Jackson, M. J. Long-term administration of the

  5. Neuronal loss as evidenced by automated quantification of neuronal density following moderate and severe traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Balança, Baptiste; Bapteste, Lionel; Lieutaud, Thomas; Ressnikoff, Denis; Guy, Rainui; Bezin, Laurent; Marinesco, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes widespread neurological lesions that can be reproduced in animals with the lateral fluid percussion (LFP) model. The characterization of the pattern of neuronal death generated in this model remains unclear, involving both cortical and subcortical brain regions. Here, 7 days after moderate (3 atmospheres absolute [ATA]) or severe (3.8 ATA) LFP, we estimated neuronal loss by using immunohistochemistry together with a computer-assisted automated method for quantifying neuronal density in brain sections. Neuronal counts were performed ipsilateral to the impact, in the parietal cortex ventral to the site of percussion, in the temporal cortex, in the dorsal thalamus, and in the hippocampus. These results were compared with the counts observed at similar areas in sham animals. We found that neuronal density was severely decreased in the temporal cortex (-60%), in the dorsal thalamus (-63%), and in area CA3 of the hippocampus (-36%) of injured animals compared with controls but was not significantly modified in the cortices located immediately ventral to the impact. Total cellular density increased in brain structures displaying neuronal death, suggesting the presence of gliosis. The increase in the severity of LFP did not change the pattern of neuronal injury. This automated method simplified the study of neuronal loss following traumatic brain injury and allowed the identification of a pattern of neuronal loss that spreads from the dorsal thalamus to the temporal cortex, with the most severe lesions being in brain structures remote from the site of impact.

  6. Inactivation of Vhl in Osteochondral Progenitor Cells Causes High Bone Mass Phenotype and Protects Against Age-Related Bone Loss in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Tujun; Xie, Yangli; Huang, Junlan; Luo, Fengtao; Yi, Lingxian; He, Qifen; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that disruption of von Hippel–Lindau gene (Vhl) coincides with activation of hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα) signaling in bone cells and plays an important role in bone development, homeostasis, and regeneration. It is known that activation of HIF1α signaling in mature osteoblasts is central to the coupling between angiogenesis and bone formation. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for the coupling between skeletal angiogenesis and osteogenesis during bone remodeling are only partially elucidated. To evaluate the role of Vhl in bone homeostasis and the coupling between vascular physiology and bone, we generated mice lacking Vhl in osteochondral progenitor cells (referred to as Vhl cKO mice) at postnatal and adult stages in a tamoxifen-inducible manner and changes in skeletal morphology were assessed by micro–computed tomography (µCT), histology, and bone histomorphometry. We found that mice with inactivation of Vhl in osteochondral progenitor cells at the postnatal stage largely phenocopied that of mice lacking Vhl in mature osteoblasts, developing striking and progressive accumulation of cancellous bone with increased microvascular density and bone formation. These were accompanied with a significant increase in osteoblast proliferation, upregulation of differentiation marker Runx2 and osteocalcin, and elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. In addition, we found that Vhl deletion in osteochondral progenitor cells in adult bone protects mice from aging-induced bone loss. Our data suggest that the VHL-mediated signaling in osteochondral progenitor cells plays a critical role in bone remodeling at postnatal/adult stages through coupling osteogenesis and angiogenesis. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:23999831

  7. Age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Lily K; Eaton, Angie

    2013-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after age 50 years. It is a multifactorial disease involving a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, metabolic, and functional factors. Besides smoking, hypertension, obesity, and certain dietary habits, a growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation and the immune system may play a key role in the development of the disease. AMD may progress from the early form to the intermediate form and then to the advanced form, where two subtypes exist: the nonneovascular (dry) type and the neovascular (wet) type. The results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study have shown that for the nonneovascular type of AMD, supplementation with high-dose antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and β-carotene) and zinc is recommended for those with the intermediate form of AMD in one or both eyes or with advanced AMD or vision loss due to AMD in one eye. As for the neovascular type of the advanced AMD, the current standard of therapy is intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. In addition, lifestyle and dietary modifications including improved physical activity, reduced daily sodium intake, and reduced intake of solid fats, added sugars, cholesterol, and refined grain foods are recommended. To date, no study has demonstrated that AMD can be cured or effectively prevented. Clearly, more research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiology as well as to develop prevention and treatment strategies for this devastating disease.

  8. Selective loss of alpha motor neurons with sparing of gamma motor neurons and spinal cord cholinergic neurons in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Powis, Rachael A; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2016-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease characterised primarily by loss of lower motor neurons from the ventral grey horn of the spinal cord and proximal muscle atrophy. Recent experiments utilising mouse models of SMA have demonstrated that not all motor neurons are equally susceptible to the disease, revealing that other populations of neurons can also be affected. Here, we have extended investigations of selective vulnerability of neuronal populations in the spinal cord of SMA mice to include comparative assessments of alpha motor neuron (α-MN) and gamma motor neuron (γ-MN) pools, as well as other populations of cholinergic neurons. Immunohistochemical analyses of late-symptomatic SMA mouse spinal cord revealed that numbers of α-MNs were significantly reduced at all levels of the spinal cord compared with controls, whereas numbers of γ-MNs remained stable. Likewise, the average size of α-MN cell somata was decreased in SMA mice with no change occurring in γ-MNs. Evaluation of other pools of spinal cord cholinergic neurons revealed that pre-ganglionic sympathetic neurons, central canal cluster interneurons, partition interneurons and preganglionic autonomic dorsal commissural nucleus neuron numbers all remained unaffected in SMA mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that α-MNs are uniquely vulnerable among cholinergic neuron populations in the SMA mouse spinal cord, with γ-MNs and other cholinergic neuronal populations being largely spared.

  9. Stress exacerbates neuron loss and microglia proliferation in a rat model of excitotoxic lower motor neuron injury

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Denise A.; Tovar, C. Amy; Guan, Zhen; C.Gensel, John; Lyman, Matthew S.; McTigue, Dana M.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    All individuals experience stress and hormones (e.g., glucocorticoids/GCs) released during stressful events can affect the structure and function of neurons. These effects of stress are best characterized for brain neurons; however, the mechanisms controlling the expression and binding affinity of glucocorticoid receptors in the spinal cord are different than those in the brain. Accordingly, whether stress exerts unique effects on spinal cord neurons, especially in the context of pathology, is unknown. Using a controlled model of focal excitotoxic lower motor neuron injury in rats, we examined the effects of acute or chronic variable stress on spinal cord motor neuron survival and glial activation. New data indicate that stress exacerbates excitotoxic spinal cord motor neuron loss and associated activation of microglia. In contrast, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of astrocytes and NG2+ glia were unaffected or were modestly suppressed by stress. Although excitotoxic lesions cause significant motor neuron loss and stress exacerbates this pathology, overt functional impairment did not develop in the relevant forelimb up to one week post-lesion. These data indicate that stress is a disease-modifying factor capable of altering neuron and glial responses to pathological challenges in the spinal cord. PMID:26100488

  10. Treadmill exercise prevents GABAergic neuronal loss with suppression of neuronal activation in the pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Baek-Vin; Shin, Mal-Soon; Lee, Jae-Min; Seo, Jin-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by seizure and loss of neuronal cells by abnormal rhythmic firing of neurons in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neuronal loss in relation with neuronal activation using pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats. The rats were divided into four groups: control group, control and treadmill exercise group, pilocarpine-induced epilepsy group, and pilocarpine-induced epilepsy and treadmill exercise group. Epilepsy was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 320 mg/kg pilocarpine hydrochloride. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 2 weeks. In the present results, neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA1 region was increased after pilocarpine-induced seizure. Treadmill exercise inhibited hippocampal neuronal loss in the epileptic rats. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) expression in the hippocampal CA1 region was reduced by pilocarpine-induced seizure. Treadmill exercise increased GAD67 expression in the epileptic rats. c-Fos expression in the hippocampal CA1 region was increased in response to epileptic seizure. Treadmill exercise inhibited c-Fos expression in the epileptic rats. Epileptic seizure increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus. Treadmill exercise suppressed BDNF and TrkB expressions in the epileptic rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise prevented GABAergic neuronal loss and inhibited neuronal activation in the hippocampal CA1 region through the down-regulation of BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway. PMID:25960980

  11. A computational model for the loss of neuronal organization in microcolumns.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Maxwell; Urbanc, Brigita; Cruz, Luis

    2014-05-20

    A population of neurons in the cerebral cortex of humans and other mammals organize themselves into vertical microcolumns perpendicular to the pial surface. Anatomical changes to these microcolumns have been correlated with neurological diseases and normal aging; in particular, in area 46 of the rhesus monkey brain, the strength of microcolumns was shown to decrease with age. These changes can be caused by alterations in the spatial distribution of the neurons in microcolumns and/or neuronal loss. Using a three-dimensional computational model of neuronal arrangements derived from thin tissue sections and validated in brain tissue from rhesus monkeys, we show that neuronal loss is inconsistent with the findings in aged individuals. In contrast, a model of simple random neuronal displacements, constrained in magnitude by restorative harmonic forces, is consistent with observed changes and provides mechanistic insights into the age-induced loss of microcolumnar structure. Connection of the model to normal aging and disease are discussed.

  12. Cortical neuron loss in post-traumatic higher brain dysfunction using (123)I-iomazenil SPECT.

    PubMed

    Nakagawara, Jyoji; Kamiyama, Kenji; Takahashi, Masaaki; Nakamura, Hirohiko

    2013-01-01

    In patients with higher brain dysfunction (HBD) after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), diagnostic imaging of cortical neuron loss in the frontal lobes was studied using SPECT with (123)I-iomazenil (IMZ), as a radioligand for central benzodiazepine receptor (BZR). Statistical imaging analysis using three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP) for (123)I-IMZ SPECT was performed in 17 patients. In all patients with HBD defined by neuropsychological tests, cortical neuron loss was indicated in the bilateral medial frontal lobes in 14 patients (83 %). A comparison between the group of 17 patients and the normal database demonstrated common areas of cortical neuron loss in the bilateral medial frontal lobes involving the medial frontal gyrus (MFG) and the anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG). In an assessment of cortical neuron loss in the frontal medial cortex using the stereotactic extraction estimation (SEE) method (level 3), significant cortical neuron loss was observed within bilateral MFG in 9 patients and unilateral MFG in 4, and bilateral ACG in 12 and unilateral ACG in 3. Fourteen patients showed significant cortical neuron loss in bilateral MFG or ACG. In patients with MTBI, HBD seemed to correlate with selective cortical neuron loss within the bilateral MFG or ACG where the responsible lesion could be. 3D-SSP and SEE level 3 analysis for (123)I-IMZ SPECT could be valuable for diagnostic imaging of HBD after MTBI.

  13. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa’s ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarizes and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics. PMID:26973593

  14. Effects of Cdh23 single nucleotide substitutions on age-related hearing loss in C57BL/6 and 129S1/Sv mice and comparisons with congenic strains

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Tian, Cong; Gagnon, Leona H.; Jiang, Haiyan; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard

    2017-01-01

    A single nucleotide variant (SNV) of the cadherin 23 gene (Cdh23c.753A), common to many inbred mouse strains, accelerates age-related hearing loss (AHL) and can worsen auditory phenotypes of other mutations. We used homologous recombination in C57BL/6 NJ (B6N) and 129S1/SvImJ (129S1) embryonic stem cells to engineer mouse strains with reciprocal single base pair substitutions (B6-Cdh23c.753A>G and 129S1-Cdh23c.753G>A). We compared ABR thresholds and cochlear pathologies of these SNV mice with those of congenic (B6.129S1-Cdh23Ahl+ and 129S1.B6-Cdh23ahl) and parental (B6N and 129S1) strain mice. Results verified the protective effect of the Cdh23c.753G allele, which prevented high frequency hearing loss in B6 mice to at least 18 months of age, and the AHL-inducing effect of the Cdh23c.753A allele, which worsened hearing loss in 129S1 mice. ABR thresholds differed between 129S-Cdh23c.753A SNV and 129S1.B6-Cdh23ahl congenic mice, and a linkage backcross involving these strains localized a Chr 10 QTL contributing to the difference. These results illustrate the large effects that strain background and congenic regions have on the hearing loss associated with Cdh23c.753alleles. Importantly, the B6-Cdh23c.753Gstrain can be used to eliminate the confounding influence of the Cdh23c.753Avariant in hearing studies of B6 mice and mutant mice on the B6 background. PMID:28287619

  15. Arctigenin protects against neuronal hearing loss by promoting neural stem cell survival and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinghua; Chen, Mo; Ding, Yan; Wang, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Neuronal hearing loss has become a prevalent health problem. This study focused on the function of arctigenin (ARC) in promoting survival and neuronal differentiation of mouse cochlear neural stem cells (NSCs), and its protection against gentamicin (GMC) induced neuronal hearing loss. Mouse cochlea was used to isolate NSCs, which were subsequently cultured in vitro. The effects of ARC on NSC survival, neurosphere formation, differentiation of NSCs, neurite outgrowth, and neural excitability in neuronal network in vitro were examined. Mechanotransduction ability demonstrated by intact cochlea, auditory brainstem response (ABR), and distortion product optoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) amplitude in mice were measured to evaluate effects of ARC on GMC-induced neuronal hearing loss. ARC increased survival, neurosphere formation, neuron differentiation of NSCs in mouse cochlear in vitro. ARC also promoted the outgrowth of neurites, as well as neural excitability of the NSC-differentiated neuron culture. Additionally, ARC rescued mechanotransduction capacity, restored the threshold shifts of ABR and DPOAE in our GMC ototoxicity murine model. This study supports the potential therapeutic role of ARC in promoting both NSCs proliferation and differentiation in vitro to functional neurons, thus supporting its protective function in the therapeutic treatment of neuropathic hearing loss in vivo.

  16. Overview of age-related ocular conditions.

    PubMed

    Akpek, Esen K; Smith, Roderick A

    2013-05-01

    The United States is an aging society. The number of Americans 65 years or older is expected to more than double over the next 40 years, from 40.2 million in 2010 to 88.5 million in 2050, with aging baby boomers accounting for most of the increase. As the society ages, the prevalence of age-related diseases, including diseases of the eye, will continue to increase. By 2020, age-related macular degeneration, one of the leading causes of vision loss, is expected to affect 2.95 million individuals in the United States. Likewise, the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma, estimated at 2.2 million in 2000, is projected to increase by 50%, to 3.36 million by 2020. As the eye ages, it undergoes a number of physiologic changes that may increase susceptibility to disease. Environmental and genetic factors are also major contributors to the development of age-related ocular diseases. This article reviews the physiology of the aging eye and the epidemiology and pathophysiology of 4 major age-related ocular diseases: age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and dry eye.

  17. Proteasomal inhibition causes loss of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase neurons.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Anthony H V; Cleeter, Michael W J; Muddle, John R; Workman, Jane M; Cooper, J Mark; King, Rosalind H M

    2006-08-01

    Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasomal system (UPS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The systemic administration of UPS inhibitors has been reported to induce nigrostriatal cell death and model Parkinson's disease pathology in rodents. We administered a synthetic, specific UPS inhibitor (PSI) subcutaneously to rats and quantified substantia nigral tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopaminergic neurons by stereology. PSI caused a 15% decrease in UPS activity at 2 weeks and a 42% reduction in substantia nigra pars compacta tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons at 8 weeks. Systemic inhibition of the UPS warrants further evaluation as a means to model Parkinson's disease.

  18. Widespread heterogeneous neuronal loss across the cerebral cortex in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Nana, Alissa L; Kim, Eric H; Thu, Doris C V; Oorschot, Dorothy E; Tippett, Lynette J; Hogg, Virginia M; Synek, Beth J; Roxburgh, Richard; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by neuronal degeneration in the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex, and a variable symptom profile. Although progressive striatal degeneration is known to occur and is related to symptom profile, little is known about the cellular basis of symptom heterogeneity across the entire cerebral cortex. To investigate this, we have undertaken a double blind study using unbiased stereological cell counting techniques to determine the pattern of cell loss in six representative cortical regions from the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes in the brains of 14 Huntington's disease cases and 15 controls. The results clearly demonstrate a widespread loss of total neurons and pyramidal cells across all cortical regions studied, except for the primary visual cortex. Importantly, the results show that cell loss is remarkably variable both within and between Huntington's disease cases. The results also show that neuronal loss in the primary sensory and secondary visual cortices relate to Huntington's disease motor symptom profiles, and neuronal loss across the associational cortices in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes is related to both Huntington's disease motor and to mood symptom profiles. This finding considerably extends a previous study (Thu et al., Brain, 2010; 133:1094-1110) which showed that neuronal loss in the primary motor cortex was related specifically to the motor symptom profiles while neuronal loss in the anterior cingulate cortex was related specifically to mood symptom profiles. The extent of cortical cell loss in the current study was generally related to the striatal neuropathological grade, but not to CAG repeat length on the HTT gene. Overall our findings show that Huntington's disease is characterized by a heterogeneous pattern of neuronal cell loss across the entire cerebrum which varies with symptom profile.

  19. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Clinical Trial of High-Dose Supplementation With Vitamins C and E, Beta Carotene, and Zinc for Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Vision Loss

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Observational and experimental data suggest that antioxidant and/or zinc supplements may delay progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and vision loss. Objective To evaluate the effect of high-dose vitamins C and E, beta carotene, and zinc supplements on AMD progression and visual acuity. Design The Age-Related Eye Disease Study, an 11-center double-masked clinical trial, enrolled participants in an AMD trial if they had extensive small drusen, intermediate drusen, large drusen, noncentral geographic atrophy, or pigment abnormalities in 1 or both eyes, or advanced AMD or vision loss due to AMD in 1 eye. At least 1 eye had best-corrected visual acuity of 20/32 or better. Participants were randomly assigned to receive daily oral tablets containing: (1) antioxidants (vitamin C, 500 mg; vitamin E, 400 IU; and beta carotene, 15 mg); (2) zinc, 80 mg, as zinc oxide and copper, 2 mg, as cupric oxide; (3) antioxidants plus zinc; or (4) placebo. Main Outcome Measures (1)Photographic assessment of progression to or treatment for advanced AMD and (2) at least moderate visual acuity loss from baseline (≥15 letters). Primary analyses used repeated-measures logistic regression with a significance level of .01, unadjusted for covariates. Serum level measurements, medical histories, and mortality rates were used for safety monitoring. Results Average follow-up of the 3640 enrolled study participants, aged 55–80 years, was 6.3 years, with 2.4% lost to follow-up. Comparison with placebo demonstrated a statistically significant odds reduction for the development of advanced AMD with antioxidants plus zinc (odds ratio [OR], 0.72; 99% confidence interval [CI], 0.52–0.98). The ORs for zinc alone and antioxidants alone are 0.75 (99% CI, 0.55–1.03) and 0.80 (99% CI, 0.59–1.09), respectively. Participants with extensive small drusen, nonextensive intermediate size drusen, or pigment abnormalities had only a 1.3% 5-year probability of progression to

  20. Age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lim, Laurence S; Mitchell, Paul; Seddon, Johanna M; Holz, Frank G; Wong, Tien Y

    2012-05-05

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness worldwide. With ageing populations in many countries, more than 20% might have the disorder. Advanced age-related macular degeneration, including neovascular age-related macular degeneration (wet) and geographic atrophy (late dry), is associated with substantial, progressive visual impairment. Major risk factors include cigarette smoking, nutritional factors, cardiovascular diseases, and genetic markers, including genes regulating complement, lipid, angiogenic, and extracellular matrix pathways. Some studies have suggested a declining prevalence of age-related macular degeneration, perhaps due to reduced exposure to modifiable risk factors. Accurate diagnosis combines clinical examination and investigations, including retinal photography, angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Dietary anti-oxidant supplementation slows progression of the disease. Treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration incorporates intraocular injections of anti-VEGF agents, occasionally combined with other modalities. Evidence suggests that two commonly used anti-VEGF therapies, ranibizumab and bevacizumab, have similar efficacy, but possible differences in systemic safety are difficult to assess. Future treatments include inhibition of other angiogenic factors, and regenerative and topical therapies.

  1. Neuronal loss in familial frontotemporal dementia with ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative inclusions.

    PubMed

    Cairns, N J; Brännström, T; Khan, M N; Rossor, M N; Lantos, P L

    2003-06-01

    The neuronal density in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes was determined in nine cases of familial frontotemporal dementia with ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative inclusions (FTDU). The mean age at onset was 56.9 +/- 2.2 years and the duration of disease was 6.7 +/- 0.5 years. The mean age at death was 63.6 +/- 2.2 years. There was substantial loss (34%) of brain weight (877 +/- 73 g) in the familial cases in comparison with 10 normal aged controls (1326 +/- 50 g, P < 0.001). All of the familial FTDU cases showed atrophy of the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes; neuronal loss; vacuolation in superficial laminae; reactive astrocytosis; and ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions and dystrophic neurites in varying sites and numbers. Neuronal loss was estimated in nine cases of familial FTDU and in 10 aged controls using a stereological probe, the optical "disector," and a computerized stereology system (CAST-Grid, Olympus, Denmark). There was a significant reduction in neuronal density in the frontal lobe (22.3 +/- 3.8 x 10(3)/mm(3)) of familial FTDU in comparison to aged controls (33.1 +/- 1.7 x 10(3) per mm(3), P < 0.05). An estimate of the relative numbers of neurons was calculated by multiplying the numerical density by the cortical thickness, which showed a striking loss of neurons of 56% in the frontal lobe, 52% loss in the temporal lobe, and a 49% loss in the parietal lobe of familial FTDU when compared to controls. This study shows that familial FTDU has profound focal neuronal loss in multiple association areas that relate to the clinical symptoms characteristic of the disease.

  2. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Budzinskaia, M V

    2014-01-01

    The review provides an update on the pathogenesis and new treatment modalities for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The impact of polymorphism in particular genes, including complement factor H (CFH), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2/LOC387715), and serine peptidase (HTRA1), on AMD development is discussed. Clinical presentations of different forms of exudative AMD, that is classic, occult, or more often mixed choroidal neovascularization, retinal angiomatous proliferation, and choroidal polypoidal vasculopathy, are described. Particular attention is paid to the results of recent clinical trials and safety issues around the therapy.

  3. Treadmill exercise alleviates nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease is one of the common brain diseases caused by dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fiber loss in the striatum. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on motor performance, dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers, and α-synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum were evaluated using rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. For the induction of Parkinson rats, 3-mg/kg rotenone was injected, once a day for 14 consecutive days. Treadmill running was conducted for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Rota-rod test for motor balance and coordination and immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and α-synuclein in the nigrostriatum were performed. In the present study, motor balance and coordination was disturbed by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated motor dysfunction in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers was occurred by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. α-Synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum was enhanced by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed α-synuclein expression in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Treadmill exercise improved motor function through preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and fibers and suppression of nigrostriatal formation of Lewy bodies in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. PMID:28349030

  4. Treadmill exercise alleviates nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson disease is one of the common brain diseases caused by dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fiber loss in the striatum. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on motor performance, dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers, and α-synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum were evaluated using rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. For the induction of Parkinson rats, 3-mg/kg rotenone was injected, once a day for 14 consecutive days. Treadmill running was conducted for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Rota-rod test for motor balance and coordination and immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and α-synuclein in the nigrostriatum were performed. In the present study, motor balance and coordination was disturbed by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated motor dysfunction in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers was occurred by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. α-Synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum was enhanced by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed α-synuclein expression in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Treadmill exercise improved motor function through preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and fibers and suppression of nigrostriatal formation of Lewy bodies in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats.

  5. Age-related changes in the central auditory system.

    PubMed

    Ouda, Ladislav; Profant, Oliver; Syka, Josef

    2015-07-01

    Aging is accompanied by the deterioration of hearing that complicates our understanding of speech, especially in noisy environments. This deficit is partially caused by the loss of hair cells as well as by the dysfunction of the stria vascularis. However, the central part of the auditory system is also affected by processes accompanying aging that may run independently of those affecting peripheral receptors. Here, we review major changes occurring in the central part of the auditory system during aging. Most of the information that is focused on age-related changes in the central auditory system of experimental animals arises from experiments using immunocytochemical targeting on changes in the glutamic-acid-decarboxylase, parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin. These data are accompanied by information about age-related changes in the number of neurons as well as about changes in the behavior of experimental animals. Aging is in principle accompanied by atrophy of the gray as well as white matter, resulting in the enlargement of the cerebrospinal fluid space. The human auditory cortex suffers not only from atrophy but also from changes in the content of some metabolites in the aged brain, as shown by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition to this, functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals differences between activation of the central auditory system in the young and old brain. Altogether, the information reviewed in this article speaks in favor of specific age-related changes in the central auditory system that occur mostly independently of the changes in the inner ear and that form the basis of the central presbycusis.

  6. Long-term adrenalectomy causes loss of dentate gyrus and pyramidal neurons in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sapolsky, R M; Stein-Behrens, B A; Armanini, M P

    1991-11-01

    A growing literature suggests that the hippocampus can be damaged by glucocorticoids, the adrenal steroids secreted during stress. Thus, considerable interest was generated by recent reports that prolonged elimination of glucocorticoids by adrenalectomy (ADX) damages hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons. To date, this phenomenon has only been observed in rats of peripubertal age or younger; moreover, reports differ considerably as to the magnitude of the damage induced. Therefore, we examined this issue in rats ADXd at 5 months of age. Three months later, there was a significant 26% loss of dentate neurons in a subset of rats. In agreement with these previous reports, this subset had attenuated weight gain and electrolyte imbalances, suggestive of complete removal of the adrenals and accessory adrenal tissue. As a novel observation, we also observed significant (19%) loss of CA4 pyramidal neurons. Thus, both severe under- or overexposure to glucocorticoids can be deleterious to a number of hippocampal neuron types.

  7. Cell type-specific transcriptomics of hypothalamic energy-sensing neuron responses to weight-loss.

    PubMed

    Henry, Fredrick E; Sugino, Ken; Tozer, Adam; Branco, Tiago; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-09-02

    Molecular and cellular processes in neurons are critical for sensing and responding to energy deficit states, such as during weight-loss. Agouti related protein (AGRP)-expressing neurons are a key hypothalamic population that is activated during energy deficit and increases appetite and weight-gain. Cell type-specific transcriptomics can be used to identify pathways that counteract weight-loss, and here we report high-quality gene expression profiles of AGRP neurons from well-fed and food-deprived young adult mice. For comparison, we also analyzed Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, an intermingled population that suppresses appetite and body weight. We find that AGRP neurons are considerably more sensitive to energy deficit than POMC neurons. Furthermore, we identify cell type-specific pathways involving endoplasmic reticulum-stress, circadian signaling, ion channels, neuropeptides, and receptors. Combined with methods to validate and manipulate these pathways, this resource greatly expands molecular insight into neuronal regulation of body weight, and may be useful for devising therapeutic strategies for obesity and eating disorders.

  8. Cell type-specific transcriptomics of hypothalamic energy-sensing neuron responses to weight-loss

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Fredrick E; Sugino, Ken; Tozer, Adam; Branco, Tiago; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    Molecular and cellular processes in neurons are critical for sensing and responding to energy deficit states, such as during weight-loss. Agouti related protein (AGRP)-expressing neurons are a key hypothalamic population that is activated during energy deficit and increases appetite and weight-gain. Cell type-specific transcriptomics can be used to identify pathways that counteract weight-loss, and here we report high-quality gene expression profiles of AGRP neurons from well-fed and food-deprived young adult mice. For comparison, we also analyzed Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, an intermingled population that suppresses appetite and body weight. We find that AGRP neurons are considerably more sensitive to energy deficit than POMC neurons. Furthermore, we identify cell type-specific pathways involving endoplasmic reticulum-stress, circadian signaling, ion channels, neuropeptides, and receptors. Combined with methods to validate and manipulate these pathways, this resource greatly expands molecular insight into neuronal regulation of body weight, and may be useful for devising therapeutic strategies for obesity and eating disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09800.001 PMID:26329458

  9. Glutamatergic regulation prevents hippocampal-dependent age-related cognitive decline through dendritic spine clustering

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ana C.; Lambert, Hilary K.; Grossman, Yael S.; Dumitriu, Dani; Waldman, Rachel; Jannetty, Sophia K.; Calakos, Katina; Janssen, William G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The dementia of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) results primarily from degeneration of neurons that furnish glutamatergic corticocortical connections that subserve cognition. Although neuron death is minimal in the absence of AD, age-related cognitive decline does occur in animals as well as humans, and it decreases quality of life for elderly people. Age-related cognitive decline has been linked to synapse loss and/or alterations of synaptic proteins that impair function in regions such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. These synaptic alterations are likely reversible, such that maintenance of synaptic health in the face of aging is a critically important therapeutic goal. Here, we show that riluzole can protect against some of the synaptic alterations in hippocampus that are linked to age-related memory loss in rats. Riluzole increases glutamate uptake through glial transporters and is thought to decrease glutamate spillover to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors while increasing synaptic glutamatergic activity. Treated aged rats were protected against age-related cognitive decline displayed in nontreated aged animals. Memory performance correlated with density of thin spines on apical dendrites in CA1, although not with mushroom spines. Furthermore, riluzole-treated rats had an increase in clustering of thin spines that correlated with memory performance and was specific to the apical, but not the basilar, dendrites of CA1. Clustering of synaptic inputs is thought to allow nonlinear summation of synaptic strength. These findings further elucidate neuroplastic changes in glutamatergic circuits with aging and advance therapeutic development to prevent and treat age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25512503

  10. Disruption of LRRK2 Does Not Cause Specific Loss of Dopaminergic Neurons in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Guiqi; Xin, Shengchang; Li, Song; Zhong, Hanbing; Lin, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2 are genetically linked to Parkinson's disease (PD) but its normal biological function is largely unknown. Sheng et al. recently reported that deletion of the WD40 domain of LRRK2 in zebrafish specifically causes PD-like loss of neurons and behavior defect. However, our similar early study and recent confirming experiments using the same reagents reported by Sheng et al. failed to reproduce the phenotype of the loss of dopaminergic neurons, although the mRNA of LRRK2 was molecularly disrupted. Our study suggests that function of LRRK2 and its usefulness to generate zebrafish PD model needs further evaluation. PMID:21698186

  11. DHA-PC and PSD-95 decrease after loss of synaptophysin and before neuronal loss in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Dai; Sugiura, Yuki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Takei, Shiro; Yao, Ikuko; Maesako, Masato; Kinoshita, Ayae; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Kon, Ryo; Sugiyama, Keikichi; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2014-11-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, synaptic disruption, and neuronal loss. Several studies have demonstrated decreases of docosahexaenoic acid-containing phosphatidylcholines (DHA-PCs) in the AD brain. In this study, we used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry in postmortem AD brain to show that PC molecular species containing stearate and DHA, namely PC(18:0/22:6), was selectively depleted in the gray matter of patients with AD. Moreover, in the brain regions with marked amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, the magnitude of the PC(18:0/22:6) reduction significantly correlated with disease duration. Furthermore, at the molecular level, this depletion was associated with reduced levels of the postsynaptic protein PSD-95 but not the presynaptic protein synaptophysin. Interestingly, this reduction in PC(18:0/22:6) levels did not correlate with the degrees of Aβ deposition and neuronal loss in AD. The analysis of the correlations of key factors and disease duration showed that their effects on the disease time course were arranged in order as Aβ deposition, presynaptic disruption, postsynaptic disruption coupled with PC(18:0/22:6) reduction, and neuronal loss.

  12. DHA-PC and PSD-95 decrease after loss of synaptophysin and before neuronal loss in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Dai; Sugiura, Yuki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Takei, Shiro; Yao, Ikuko; Maesako, Masato; Kinoshita, Ayae; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Kon, Ryo; Sugiyama, Keikichi; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, synaptic disruption, and neuronal loss. Several studies have demonstrated decreases of docosahexaenoic acid-containing phosphatidylcholines (DHA-PCs) in the AD brain. In this study, we used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry in postmortem AD brain to show that PC molecular species containing stearate and DHA, namely PC(18:0/22:6), was selectively depleted in the gray matter of patients with AD. Moreover, in the brain regions with marked amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, the magnitude of the PC(18:0/22:6) reduction significantly correlated with disease duration. Furthermore, at the molecular level, this depletion was associated with reduced levels of the postsynaptic protein PSD-95 but not the presynaptic protein synaptophysin. Interestingly, this reduction in PC(18:0/22:6) levels did not correlate with the degrees of Aβ deposition and neuronal loss in AD. The analysis of the correlations of key factors and disease duration showed that their effects on the disease time course were arranged in order as Aβ deposition, presynaptic disruption, postsynaptic disruption coupled with PC(18:0/22:6) reduction, and neuronal loss. PMID:25410733

  13. Dizziness and Imbalance in the Elderly: Age-related Decline in the Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are amongst the most common complaints in older people, and are a growing public health concern since they put older people at a significantly higher risk of falling. Although the causes of dizziness in older people are multifactorial, peripheral vestibular dysfunction is one of the most frequent causes. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction in the elderly, followed by Meniere’s disease. Every factor associated with the maintenance of postural stability deteriorates during aging. Age-related deterioration of peripheral vestibular function has been demonstrated through quantitative measurements of the vestibulo-ocular reflex with rotational testing and of the vestibulo-collic reflex with testing of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Age-related decline of vestibular function has been shown to correlate with the age-related decrease in the number of vestibular hair cells and neurons. The mechanism of age-related cellular loss in the vestibular endorgan is unclear, but it is thought that genetic predisposition and cumulative effect of oxidative stress may both play an important role. Since the causes of dizziness in older people are multi-factorial, management of this disease should be customized according to the etiologies of each individual. Vestibular rehabilitation is found to be effective in treating both unilateral and bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Various prosthetic devices have also been developed to improve postural balance in older people. Although there have been no medical treatments improving age-related vestibular dysfunction, new medical treatments such as mitochondrial antioxidants or caloric restriction, which have been effective in preventing age-related hearing loss, should be ienvestigated in the future. PMID:25657851

  14. Dopamine neuronal loss contributes to memory and reward dysfunction in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Annalisa; Latagliata, Emanuele Claudio; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Cavallucci, Virve; Cutuli, Debora; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Krashia, Paraskevi; Rizzo, Francesca Romana; Marino, Ramona; Federici, Mauro; De Bartolo, Paola; Aversa, Daniela; Dell'Acqua, Maria Concetta; Cordella, Alberto; Sancandi, Marco; Keller, Flavio; Petrosini, Laura; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Coccurello, Roberto; Berretta, Nicola; D'Amelio, Marcello

    2017-04-03

    Alterations of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system are frequently reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and are commonly linked to cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms. However, the cause of DAergic system dysfunction in AD remains to be elucidated. We investigated alterations of the midbrain DAergic system in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD, overexpressing a mutated human amyloid precursor protein (APPswe). Here, we found an age-dependent DAergic neuron loss in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) at pre-plaque stages, although substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) DAergic neurons were intact. The selective VTA DAergic neuron degeneration results in lower DA outflow in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell. The progression of DAergic cell death correlates with impairments in CA1 synaptic plasticity, memory performance and food reward processing. We conclude that in this mouse model of AD, degeneration of VTA DAergic neurons at pre-plaque stages contributes to memory deficits and dysfunction of reward processing.

  15. Neocortical Post-Traumatic Epileptogenesis Is Associated with Loss of GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Avramescu, Sinziana; Nita, Dragos A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The subtle mechanisms of post-traumatic epileptogenesis remain unknown, although the incidence of chronic epilepsy after penetrating cortical wounds is high. Here, we investigated whether the increased frequency of seizures occurring within 6 weeks following partial deafferentation of the suprasylvian gyrus in cats is accompanied with a change in the ratio between the number of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Immuno-histochemical labeling of all neurons with neuronal-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) antibody, and of the GABAergic inhibitory neurons with either gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD 65&67) antibodies, was performed on sections obtained from control and epileptic animals with chronically deafferented suprasylvian gyrus. Quantification of the labeled neurons was performed in control animals and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks following cortical deafferentation, in the suprasylvian and marginal gyri, both ipsi- and contra-lateral to the cortical trauma. In all epileptic animals, the neuronal loss was circumscribed to the deafferented suprasylvian gyrus. Inhibitory GABAergic neurons were particularly more sensitive to cortical deafferentation than excitatory ones, leading to a progressively increasing ratio between excitation and inhibition towards excitation, potentially explaining the increased propensity to seizures in chronic undercut cortex. PMID:19422294

  16. Age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Querques, Giuseppe; Avellis, Fernando Onofrio; Querques, Lea; Bandello, Francesco; Souied, Eric H

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: Is there any new knowledge about the pathogenesis and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)? Results: We now understand better the biochemical and pathological pathways involved in the genesis of AMD. Treatment of exudative AMD is based on intravitreal injection of new antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs for which there does not yet exist a unique recognized strategy of administration. No therapies are actually available for atrophic AMD, despite some experimental new pharmacological approaches. Implementation: strategy of administration, safety of intravitreal injection PMID:21654887

  17. Loss of Mitochondrial Fission Depletes Axonal Mitochondria in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Berthet, Amandine; Margolis, Elyssa B.; Zhang, Jue; Hsieh, Ivy; Zhang, Jiasheng; Hnasko, Thomas S.; Ahmad, Jawad; Edwards, Robert H.; Sesaki, Hiromi; Huang, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Disruptions in mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to the selective degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about the normal functions of mitochondrial dynamics in these neurons, especially in axons where degeneration begins, and this makes it difficult to understand the disease process. To study one aspect of mitochondrial dynamics—mitochondrial fission—in mouse DA neurons, we deleted the central fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). Drp1 loss rapidly eliminates the DA terminals in the caudate–putamen and causes cell bodies in the midbrain to degenerate and lose α-synuclein. Without Drp1, mitochondrial mass dramatically decreases, especially in axons, where the mitochondrial movement becomes uncoordinated. However, in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a subset of midbrain DA neurons characterized by small hyperpolarization-activated cation currents (Ih) is spared, despite near complete loss of their axonal mitochondria. Drp1 is thus critical for targeting mitochondria to the nerve terminal, and a disruption in mitochondrial fission can contribute to the preferential death of nigrostriatal DA neurons. PMID:25339743

  18. Loss of mitochondrial fission depletes axonal mitochondria in midbrain dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Berthet, Amandine; Margolis, Elyssa B; Zhang, Jue; Hsieh, Ivy; Zhang, Jiasheng; Hnasko, Thomas S; Ahmad, Jawad; Edwards, Robert H; Sesaki, Hiromi; Huang, Eric J; Nakamura, Ken

    2014-10-22

    Disruptions in mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to the selective degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about the normal functions of mitochondrial dynamics in these neurons, especially in axons where degeneration begins, and this makes it difficult to understand the disease process. To study one aspect of mitochondrial dynamics-mitochondrial fission-in mouse DA neurons, we deleted the central fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). Drp1 loss rapidly eliminates the DA terminals in the caudate-putamen and causes cell bodies in the midbrain to degenerate and lose α-synuclein. Without Drp1, mitochondrial mass dramatically decreases, especially in axons, where the mitochondrial movement becomes uncoordinated. However, in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a subset of midbrain DA neurons characterized by small hyperpolarization-activated cation currents (Ih) is spared, despite near complete loss of their axonal mitochondria. Drp1 is thus critical for targeting mitochondria to the nerve terminal, and a disruption in mitochondrial fission can contribute to the preferential death of nigrostriatal DA neurons.

  19. Effects of hypocretin (orexin) neuronal loss on sleep and extracellular adenosine levels in the basal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric; Liu, Meng; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons containing the neuropeptide hypocretin (orexin) are localized only in the lateral hypothalamus from where they innervate multiple regions implicated in arousal, including the basal forebrain. HCRT activation of downstream arousal neurons is likely to stimulate release of endogenous factors. One such factor is adenosine (AD), which in the basal forebrain increases with waking and decreases with sleep, and is hypothesized to regulate the waxing and waning of sleep drive. Does loss of HCRT neurons affect AD levels in the basal forebrain? Is the increased sleep that accompanies HCRT loss a consequence of higher AD levels in the basal forebrain? In the present study, we investigate these questions by lesioning the HCRT neurons (hypocretin-2-saporin) and measuring sleep and extracellular levels of AD in the basal forebrain. In separate groups of rats, the neurotoxin HCRT2-SAP or saline were administered locally to the lateral hypothalamus and 80 days later AD and sleep were assessed. Rats given the neurotoxin had a 94% loss of the HCRT neurons. These rats awake less at night, and had more REM sleep, which is consistent with a HCRT hypofunction. These rats also had more sleep after brief periods of sleep deprivation. However, in the lesioned rats, AD levels did not increase with 6h sleep deprivation, whereas such an increase in AD occurred in rats without lesion of the HCRT neurons. These findings indicate that AD levels do not increase with waking in rats with a HCRT lesion, and that the increased sleep in these rats occurs independently of AD levels in the basal forebrain. PMID:18783368

  20. Loss of NEDD4 contributes to RTP801 elevation and neuron toxicity: implications for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Mercè; Martín-Flores, Núria; Pérez-Sisqués, Leticia; Romaní-Aumedes, Joan; Altas, Bekir; Man, Heng-Ye; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Alberch, Jordi; Malagelada, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a disorder characterized by the degeneration of certain neuronal populations in the central and peripheral nervous system. One of the hallmarks of the disease is the toxic accumulation of proteins within susceptible neurons due to major impairment in the degradation/clearance protein systems. RTP801 is a pro-apoptotic protein that is sufficient and necessary to induce neuronal death in cellular and animal models of PD. RTP801 is also upregulated in sporadic and parkin mutant PD brains. Here, we report the role of NEDD4, an E3 ligase involved in α-synuclein degradation and PD pathogenesis, in the regulation of RTP801 protein levels and toxicity. NEDD4 polyubiquitinates RTP801 in a cell-free system and in cellular cultures, and they interact physically. NEDD4 conjugates K63-ubiquitin chains to RTP801 and targets it for degradation. NEDD4 regulates RTP801 protein levels in both cultured cells and in the brain tissue. NEDD4 levels are diminished in nigral neurons from human PD brains. Interestingly, neurotoxin 6-OHDA decreases dramatically NEDD4 protein expression but elevates RTP801 protein levels. Moreover, NEDD4 protects neuronal PC12 cells from both 6-OHDA and RTP801-induced toxicity. In primary cortical neurons, NEDD4 knockdown toxicity is mediated by RTP801 since the double knockdown of RTP801 and NEDD4 abrogates the loss of phospho Ser473-Akt and the appearance of caspase-cleaved spectrin fragments. Thus, NEDD4 ligase regulates RTP801 and is sensitive to PD-associated oxidative stress. This suggests that NEDD4 loss of function in PD could contribute importantly into neuronal death by elevating RTP801. PMID:27494837

  1. Corresponding decrease in neuronal markers signals progressive parvalbumin neuron loss in MAM schizophrenia model.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kathryn M; Grace, Anthony A

    2014-10-01

    Alteration in normal hippocampal (HPC) function attributed to reduced parvalbumin (PV) expression has been consistently reported in schizophrenia patients and in animal models of schizophrenia. However, it is unclear whether there is an overall loss of interneurons as opposed to a reduction in activity-dependent PV content. Co-expression of PV and the constitutively expressed substance P (SP)-receptor protein has been utilized in other models to ascertain the degree of cell survival, as opposed to reduction in activity-dependent PV content, in the HPC. The present study measured the co-expression of PV and SP-receptors in the dentate and dorsal and ventral CA3 subregions of the HPC in the methylazoymethanol acetate (MAM) rat neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. In addition, these changes were compared at the post-natal day 27 (PND27) and post-natal day 240 (PND > 240) time points. Brains from PND27 and PND > 240 MAM (n = 8) and saline (SAL, n = 8) treated offspring were immunohistochemically processed for the co-expression of PV and SP-receptors. The dorsal dentate, dorsal CA3 and ventral CA3 subregions of PND27 and PND > 240 MAM rats demonstrated significant reductions in PV but not SP-receptor expression, signifying a loss of PV-content. In contrast, in the ventral dentate the co-expression of PV and SP-receptors was significantly reduced only in PND > 240 MAM animals, suggesting a reduction in cell number. While MAM-induced reduction of PV content occurs in CA3 of dorsal and ventral HPC, the most substantial loss of interneuron number is localized to the ventral dentate of PND > 240 animals. The disparate loss of PV in HPC subregions likely impacts intra-HPC network activity in MAM rats.

  2. Mitochondrial Abnormality Associates with Type-Specific Neuronal Loss and Cell Morphology Changes in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pienaar, Ilse S.; Elson, Joanna L.; Racca, Claudia; Nelson, Glyn; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Morris, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic neuronal loss in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) associates with abnormal functions, including certain motor and nonmotor symptoms. This realization has led to low-frequency stimulation of the PPN for treating patients with Parkinson disease (PD) who are refractory to other treatment modalities. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PPN neuronal loss and the therapeutic substrate for the clinical benefits following PPN stimulation remain poorly characterized, hampering progress toward designing more efficient therapies aimed at restoring the PPN's normal functions during progressive parkinsonism. Here, we investigated postmortem pathological changes in the PPN of PD cases. Our study detected a loss of neurons producing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their output and glycinergic neurons, along with the pronounced loss of cholinergic neurons. These losses were accompanied by altered somatic cell size that affected the remaining neurons of all neuronal subtypes studied here. Because studies showed that mitochondrial dysfunction exists in sporadic PD and in PD animal models, we investigated whether altered mitochondrial composition exists in the PPN. A significant up-regulation of several mitochondrial proteins was seen in GABAergic and glycinergic neurons; however, cholinergic neurons indicated down-regulation of the same proteins. Our findings suggest an imbalance in the activity of key neuronal subgroups of the PPN in PD, potentially because of abnormal inhibitory activity and altered cholinergic outflow. PMID:24099985

  3. A neuron-glia interaction involving GABA Transaminase contributes to sleep loss in sleepless mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Feng; Maguire, Sarah; Sowcik, Mallory; Luo, Wenyu; Koh, Kyunghee; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is an essential process and yet mechanisms underlying it are not well understood. Loss of the Drosophila quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene increases neuronal excitability and diminishes daily sleep, providing an excellent model for exploring the underpinnings of sleep regulation. Here, we used a proteomic approach to identify proteins altered in sss brains. We report that loss of sleepless post-transcriptionally elevates the CG7433 protein, a mitochondrial γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABAT), and reduces GABA in fly brains. Loss of GABAT increases daily sleep and improves sleep consolidation, indicating that GABAT promotes wakefulness. Importantly, disruption of the GABAT gene completely suppresses the sleep phenotype of sss mutants, demonstrating that GABAT is required for loss of sleep in sss mutants. While SSS acts in distinct populations of neurons, GABAT acts in glia to reduce sleep in sss flies. Our results identify a novel mechanism of interaction between neurons and glia that is important for the regulation of sleep. PMID:24637426

  4. Macular degeneration - age-related

    MedlinePlus

    ... Using light waves to view the retina (optical coherence tomography) A test that measures the pigment in ... never occurs. AMD results in the loss of central vision only. Mild, dry AMD usually does not ...

  5. Grafting of a new target prevents synapse loss in abducens internuclear neurons induced by axotomy.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Temiño, B; de la Cruz, R R; Pastor, A M

    2003-01-01

    The loss of afferent synaptic boutons is a prominent alteration induced by axotomy on adult central neurons. In this work we attempted to prove whether synapse loss could be reverted by reconnection with a new target. We severed the medial longitudinal fascicle of adult cats and then transplanted embryonic cerebellar primordia at the lesion site immediately after lesion. As previously shown, the transected axons from abducens internuclear neurons penetrate and reinnervate the graft [J Comp Neurol 444 (2002) 324]. By immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy we studied the synaptology of abducens internuclear neurons under three conditions: control, axotomy and transplant (2 months of survival time). Semithin sections of the abducens nucleus were immunostained against calretinin, to identify abducens internuclear neurons, and either synaptophysin (SF), to label synaptic terminals, or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to detect the astrocytic reaction. Optical and linear density of SF and GFAP immunostaining were measured. Data revealed a significant decrease in the density of SF-labeled terminals with a parallel increase in GFAP-immunoreactive elements after axotomy. On the contrary, in the transplant group, the density of SF-labeled terminals was found similar to control, and the astrocytic reaction induced by lesion was significantly reduced. At the ultrastructural level, synaptic coverage and linear density of boutons were measured around the somata of abducens internuclear neurons. Whereas a significant reduction in both parameters was found after axotomy, cells of the transplant group received a normal density of synaptic endings. The ratio between F- and S-type boutons was found similar in the three groups. Therefore, these findings indicate that the grafting of a new target can prevent the loss of afferent synaptic boutons produced by the axotomy.

  6. Progressive polyuria without vasopressin neuron loss in a mouse model for familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Arima, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Noriyuki; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Hiroi, Maiko; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Noriaki; Ueda, Masatsugu; Shiota, Akira; Oiso, Yutaka

    2009-05-01

    Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI), an autosomal dominant disorder, is mostly caused by mutations in the gene of neurophysin II (NPII), the carrier protein of arginine vasopressin (AVP). Previous studies suggest that loss of AVP neurons might be the cause of polyuria in FNDI. Here we analyzed knockin mice expressing mutant NPII that causes FNDI in humans. The heterozygous mice manifested progressive polyuria as do patients with FNDI. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that inclusion bodies that were not immunostained with antibodies for mutant NPII, normal NPII, or AVP were present in the AVP cells in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), and that the size of inclusion bodies gradually increased in parallel with the increases in urine volume. Electron microscopic analyses showed that aggregates existed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as in the nucleus of AVP neurons in 1-mo-old heterozygous mice. At 12 mo, dilated ER filled with aggregates occupied the cytoplasm of AVP cells, while few aggregates were found in the nucleus. Analyses with in situ hybridization revealed that expression of AVP mRNA was significantly decreased in the SON in the heterozygous mice compared with that in wild-type mice. Counting cells expressing AVP mRNA in the SON indicated that polyuria had progressed substantially in the absence of neuronal loss. These data suggest that cell death is not the primary cause of polyuria in FNDI, and that the aggregates accumulated in the ER might be involved in the dysfunction of AVP neurons that lead to the progressive polyuria.

  7. Pioglitazone Ameliorates Neuron Loss in the Cortex after Aluminum-Treatment in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Ali; Yazdani, Hajar; Noorafshan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The objective was evaluation of the effects of pioglitazone on medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of the rats exposed to aluminum (Al). Al induces structural changes in several brain regions, including mPFC. Pioglitazone is an agonist of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor gamma. Male rats were randomly assigned to control, Al-treated (10 mg/kg/day), and Al + PIO-treated groups (Al+ 40 mg/kg/day). After 56 days, the right mPFCs were removed. Then, the volume of mPFC and its subdivisions, volume of vessels, and total number of neurons and glia were estimated using stereological methods. The results showed 13–38% decrease in the volume of the mPFC and its subdivisions, mainly in the infralimbic region (P < 0.02). Besides, the volume of the vessels reduced by 47% after Al-treatment (P < 0.02). The total number of the neurons and glial cells was also reduced (40% and 25%, resp.) in the Al-exposed rats in comparison to the control ones (P < 0.02). Treatment of the animals with Al + PIO ameliorated the neuron loss and no improvement was seen in other parameters (P < 0.02). It can be concluded that treatment of the rats with PIO could ameliorate the neuron loss in the mPFC of the Al-treated animals. PMID:26167300

  8. Conditional deletion of Ndufs4 in dopaminergic neurons promotes Parkinson’s disease-like non-motor symptoms without loss of dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Tronche, François; Palmiter, Richard D.; Storm, Daniel R.; Xia, Zhengui

    2017-01-01

    Reduction of mitochondrial complex I activity is one of the major hypotheses for dopaminergic neuron death in Parkinson’s disease. However, reduction of complex I activity in all cells or selectively in dopaminergic neurons via conditional deletion of the Ndufs4 gene, a subunit of the mitochondrial complex I, does not cause dopaminergic neuron death or motor impairment. Here, we investigated the effect of reduced complex I activity on non-motor symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease using conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which Ndufs4 was selectively deleted in dopaminergic neurons (Ndufs4 cKO). This conditional deletion of Ndufs4, which reduces complex I activity in dopamine neurons, did not cause a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), and there was no loss of dopaminergic neurites in striatum or amygdala. However, Ndufs4 cKO mice had a reduced amount of dopamine in the brain compared to control mice. Furthermore, even though motor behavior were not affected, Ndufs4 cKO mice showed non-motor symptoms experienced by many Parkinson’s disease patients including impaired cognitive function and increased anxiety-like behavior. These data suggest that mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons promotes non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and reduces dopamine content in the absence of dopamine neuron loss. PMID:28327638

  9. Cortical regulation of dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in striatal medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Neely, M D; Schmidt, D E; Deutch, A Y

    2007-10-26

    The proximate cause of Parkinson's disease is striatal dopamine depletion. Although no overt toxicity to striatal neurons has been reported in Parkinson's disease, one of the consequences of striatal dopamine loss is a decrease in the number of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Dendrites of these neurons receive cortical glutamatergic inputs onto the dendritic spine head and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra onto the spine neck. This synaptic arrangement suggests that dopamine gates corticostriatal glutamatergic drive onto spines. Using triple organotypic slice cultures composed of ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and cortex of the neonatal rat, we examined the role of the cortex in dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in MSNs. The striatal dopamine innervation was lesioned by treatment of the cultures with the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) or by removing the mesencephalon. Both MPP+ and mesencephalic ablation decreased MSN dendritic spine density. Analysis of spine morphology revealed that thin spines were preferentially lost after dopamine depletion. Removal of the cortex completely prevented dopamine depletion-induced spine loss. These data indicate that the dendritic remodeling of MSNs seen in parkinsonism occurs secondary to increases in corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, and suggest that modulation of cortical activity may be a useful therapeutic strategy in Parkinson's disease.

  10. Morin hydrate promotes inner ear neural stem cell survival and differentiation and protects cochlea against neuronal hearing loss.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Jia, Zhanwei; Zhang, Ying; Ren, Xiumin

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of morin hydrate on neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from mouse inner ear and its potential in protecting neuronal hearing loss. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays were employed to assess the effect of morin hydrate on the viability and proliferation of in vitro NSC culture. The NSCs were then differentiated into neurons, in which neurosphere formation and differentiation were evaluated, followed by neurite outgrowth and neural excitability measurements in the subsequent in vitro neuronal network. Mechanotransduction of cochlea ex vivo culture and auditory brainstem responses threshold and distortion product optoacoustic emissions amplitude in mouse ototoxicity model were also measured following gentamicin treatment to investigate the protective role of morin hydrate against neuronal hearing loss. Morin hydrate improved viability and proliferation, neurosphere formation and neuronal differentiation of inner ear NSCs, and promoted in vitro neuronal network functions. In both ex vivo and in vivo ototoxicity models, morin hydrate prevented gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss. Morin hydrate exhibited potent properties in promoting growth and differentiation of inner ear NSCs into functional neurons and protecting from gentamicin ototoxicity. Our study supports its clinical potential in treating neuronal hearing loss.

  11. Dysfunction in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria crosstalk underlies SIGMAR1 loss of function mediated motor neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Azzedine, Hamid; Chrast, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in Sigma 1 receptor (SIGMAR1) have been previously identified in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and disruption of Sigmar1 in mouse leads to locomotor deficits. However, cellular mechanisms underlying motor phenotypes in human and mouse with disturbed SIGMAR1 function have not been described so far. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches to investigate the role of SIGMAR1 in motor neuron biology. Characterization of Sigmar1(-/-) mice revealed that affected animals display locomotor deficits associated with muscle weakness, axonal degeneration and motor neuron loss. Using primary motor neuron cultures, we observed that pharmacological or genetic inactivation of SIGMAR1 led to motor neuron axonal degeneration followed by cell death. Disruption of SIGMAR1 function in motor neurons disturbed endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contacts, affected intracellular calcium signalling and was accompanied by activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and defects in mitochondrial dynamics and transport. These defects were not observed in cultured sensory neurons, highlighting the exacerbated sensitivity of motor neurons to SIGMAR1 function. Interestingly, the inhibition of mitochondrial fission was sufficient to induce mitochondria axonal transport defects as well as axonal degeneration similar to the changes observed after SIGMAR1 inactivation or loss. Intracellular calcium scavenging and endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition were able to restore mitochondrial function and consequently prevent motor neuron degeneration. These results uncover the cellular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration mediated by loss of SIGMAR1 function and provide therapeutically relevant insight into motor neuronal diseases.

  12. In vivo monitoring of neuronal loss in traumatic brain injury: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Tisdall, Martin M; Girbes, Armand R; Martinian, Lillian; Thom, Maria; Kitchen, Neil; Smith, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes diffuse axonal injury and loss of cortical neurons. These features are well recognized histologically, but their in vivo monitoring remains challenging. In vivo cortical microdialysis samples the extracellular fluid adjacent to neurons and axons. Here, we describe a novel neuronal proteolytic pathway and demonstrate the exclusive neuro-axonal expression of Pavlov's enterokinase. Enterokinase is membrane bound and cleaves the neurofilament heavy chain at positions 476 and 986. Using a 100 kDa microdialysis cut-off membrane the two proteolytic breakdown products, extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chains NfH(476-986) and NfH(476-1026), can be quantified with a relative recovery of 20%. In a prospective clinical in vivo study, we included 10 patients with traumatic brain injury with a median Glasgow Coma Score of 9, providing 640 cortical extracellular fluid samples for longitudinal data analysis. Following high-velocity impact traumatic brain injury, microdialysate extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels were significantly higher (6.18 ± 2.94 ng/ml) and detectable for longer (> 4 days) compared with traumatic brain injury secondary to falls (0.84 ± 1.77 ng/ml, < 2 days). During the initial 16 h following traumatic brain injury, strong correlations were found between extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels and physiological parameters (systemic blood pressure, anaerobic cerebral metabolism, excessive brain tissue oxygenation, elevated brain temperature). Finally, extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels were of prognostic value, predicting mortality with an odds ratio of 7.68 (confidence interval 2.15-27.46, P = 0.001). In conclusion, this study describes the discovery of Pavlov's enterokinase in the human brain, a novel neuronal proteolytic pathway that gives rise to specific protein biomarkers (NfH(476-986) and Nf(H476-1026)) applicable to in vivo monitoring of diffuse axonal injury and

  13. Down-regulation of MIF by NFκB under hypoxia accelerated neuronal loss during stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Zis, Odysseus; Ly, Philip T T; Wu, Yili; Zhang, Shuting; Zhang, Mingming; Cai, Fang; Bucala, Richard; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Song, Weihong

    2014-10-01

    Neuronal apoptosis is one of the major causes of poststroke neurological deficits. Inflammation during the acute phase of stroke results in nuclear translocation of NFκB in affected cells in the infarct area. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) promotes cardiomyocyte survival in mice following heart ischemia. However, the role of MIF during stroke remains limited. In this study, we showed that MIF expression is down-regulated by 0.75 ± 0.10-fold of the control in the infarct area in the mouse brains. Two functional cis-acing NFκB response elements were identified in the human MIF promoter. Dual activation of hypoxia and NFκB signaling resulted in significant reduction of MIF promoter activity to 0.86 ± 0.01-fold of the control. Furthermore, MIF reduced caspase-3 activation and protected neurons from oxidative stress- and in vitro ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis. H2O2 significantly induced cell death with 12.81 ± 0.58-fold increase of TUNEL-positive cells, and overexpression of MIF blocked the H2O2-induced cell death. Disruption of the MIF gene in MIF-knockout mice resulted in caspase-3 activation, neuronal loss, and increased infarct development during stroke in vivo. The infarct volume was increased from 6.51 ± 0.74% in the wild-type mice to 9.07 ± 0.66% in the MIF-knockout mice. Our study demonstrates that MIF exerts a neuronal protective effect and that down-regulation of MIF by NFκB-mediated signaling under hypoxia accelerates neuronal loss during stroke. Our results suggest that MIF is an important molecule for preserving a longer time window for stroke treatment, and strategies to maintain MIF expression at physiological level could have beneficial effects for stroke patients.

  14. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Rhesus Macaque Superior Olivary Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Daniel T.; Engle, James R.; Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2014-01-01

    Positive immunoreactivity to the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) and nitric oxide synthase NADPH-diaphorase (NADPHd) is well documented within neurons of the central auditory system of both rodents and primates. These proteins are thought to play roles in the regulation of auditory processing. Studies examining the age-related changes in expression of these proteins have been conducted primarily in rodents but are sparse in primate models. In the brainstem, the superior olivary complex (SOC) is crucial for the computation of sound source localization in azimuth, and one hallmark of age-related hearing deficits is a reduced ability to localize sounds. To investigate how these histochemical markers change as a function of age and hearing loss, we studied eight rhesus macaques ranging in age from 12 to 35 years. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were obtained in anesthetized animals for click and tone stimuli. The brainstems of these same animals were then stained for PV and NADPHd reactivity. Reactive neurons in the three nuclei of the SOC were counted, and the densities of each cell type were calculated. We found that PV and NADPHd expression increased with both age and ABR thresholds in the medial superior olive but not in either the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body or the lateral superior olive. Together these results suggest that the changes in protein expression employed by the SOC may compensate for the loss of efficacy of auditory sensitivity in the aged primate. PMID:25232570

  15. Evidence for Alzheimer’s disease-linked synapse loss and compensation in mouse and human hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Krystina M.; Molina-Campos, Elizabeth; Musial, Timothy F.; Price, Andrea L.; Oh, Kwang-Jin; Wolke, Malerie L.; Buss, Eric W.; Scheff, Stephen W.; Mufson, Elliott J.; Nicholson, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with alterations in the distribution, number, and size of inputs to hippocampal neurons. Some of these changes are thought to be neurodegenerative, whereas others are conceptualized as compensatory, plasticity-like responses, wherein the remaining inputs reactively innervate vulnerable dendritic regions. Here, we provide evidence that the axospinous synapses of human AD cases and mice harboring AD-linked genetic mutations (the 5XFAD line) exhibit both, in the form of synapse loss and compensatory changes in the synapses that remain. Using array tomography, quantitative conventional electron microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy for AMPARs, and whole-cell patch-clamp physiology, we find that hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in transgenic mice are host to an age-related synapse loss in their distal dendrites, and that the remaining synapses express more AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Moreover, the number of axonal boutons that synapse with multiple spines is significantly reduced in the transgenic mice. Through serial section electron microscopic analyses of human hippocampal tissue, we further show that putative compensatory changes in synapse strength are also detectable in axospinous synapses of proximal and distal dendrites in human AD cases, and that their multiple synapse boutons may be more powerful than those in non-cognitively impaired human cases. Such findings are consistent with the notion that the pathophysiology of AD is a multivariate product of both neurodegenerative and neuroplastic processes, which may produce adaptive and/or maladaptive responses in hippocampal synaptic strength and plasticity. PMID:25031178

  16. Loss of Sleep Affects the Ultrastructure of Pyramidal Neurons in the Adolescent Mouse Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    de Vivo, Luisa; Nelson, Aaron B.; Bellesi, Michele; Noguti, Juliana; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: The adolescent brain may be uniquely affected by acute sleep deprivation (ASD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR), but direct evidence is lacking. We used electron microscopy to examine how ASD and CSR affect pyramidal neurons in the frontal cortex of adolescent mice, focusing on mitochondria, endosomes, and lysosomes that together perform most basic cellular functions, from nutrient intake to prevention of cellular stress. Methods: Adolescent (1-mo-old) mice slept (S) or were sleep deprived (ASD, with novel objects and running wheels) during the first 6–8 h of the light period, chronically sleep restricted (CSR) for > 4 days (using novel objects, running wheels, social interaction, forced locomotion, caffeinated water), or allowed to recover sleep (RS) for ∼32 h after CSR. Ultrastructural analysis of 350 pyramidal neurons was performed (S = 82; ASD = 86; CSR = 103; RS = 79; 4 to 5 mice/group). Results: Several ultrastructural parameters differed in S versus ASD, S versus CSR, CSR versus RS, and S versus RS, although the different methods used to enforce wake may have contributed to some of the differences between short and long sleep loss. Differences included larger cytoplasmic area occupied by mitochondria in CSR versus S, and higher number of secondary lysosomes in CSR versus S and RS. We also found that sleep loss may unmask interindividual differences not obvious during baseline sleep. Moreover, using a combination of 11 ultrastructural parameters, we could predict in up to 80% of cases whether sleep or wake occurred at the single cell level. Conclusions: Ultrastructural analysis may be a powerful tool to identify which cellular organelles, and thus which cellular functions, are most affected by sleep and sleep loss. Citation: de Vivo L, Nelson AB, Bellesi M, Noguti J, Tononi G, Cirelli C. Loss of sleep affects the ultrastructure of pyramidal neurons in the adolescent mouse frontal cortex. SLEEP 2016;39(4):861–874. PMID:26715225

  17. New neurons in the adult brain: The role of sleep and consequences of sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Meerlo, Peter; Mistlberger, Ralph E.; Jacobs, Barry L.; Heller, H. Craig; McGinty, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Research over the last few decades has firmly established that new neurons are generated in selected areas of the adult mammalian brain, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. The function of adult-born neurons is still a matter of debate. In the case of the hippocampus, integration of new cells in to the existing neuronal circuitry may be involved in memory processes and the regulation of emotionality. In recent years, various studies have examined how the production of new cells and their development into neurons is affected by sleep and sleep loss. While disruption of sleep for a period shorter than one day appears to have little effect on the basal rate of cell proliferation, prolonged restriction or disruption of sleep may have cumulative effects leading to a major decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation, cell survival and neurogenesis. Importantly, while short sleep deprivation may not affect the basal rate of cell proliferation, one study in rats shows that even mild sleep restriction may interfere with the increase in neurogenesis that normally occurs with hippocampus-dependent learning. Since sleep deprivation also disturbs memory formation, these data suggest that promoting survival, maturation and integration of new cells may be an unexplored mechanism by which sleep supports learning and memory processes. Most methods of sleep deprivation that have been employed affect both non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Available data favor the hypothesis that decreases in cell proliferation are related to a reduction in REM sleep, whereas decreases in the number of cells that subsequently develop into adult neurons may be related to reductions in both NREM and REM sleep. The mechanisms by which sleep loss affects different aspects of adult neurogenesis are unknown. It has been proposed that adverse effects of sleep disruption may be mediated by stress and

  18. Selective alterations of neurons and circuits related to early memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Llorens-Martín, Maria; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Rabano, Alberto; Hernandez, Felix; Avila, Jesus; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    A progressive loss of episodic memory is a well-known clinical symptom that characterizes Alzheimer's disease (AD). The beginning of this loss of memory has been associated with the very early, pathological accumulation of tau and neuronal degeneration observed in the entorhinal cortex (EC). Tau-related pathology is thought to then spread progressively to the hippocampal formation and other brain areas as the disease progresses. The major cortical afferent source of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus is the EC through the perforant pathway. At least two main circuits participate in the connection between EC and the hippocampus; one originating in layer II and the other in layer III of the EC giving rise to the classical trisynaptic (ECII → dentate gyrus → CA3 → CA1) and monosynaptic (ECIII → CA1) circuits. Thus, the study of the early pathological changes in these circuits is of great interest. In this review, we will discuss mainly the alterations of the granule cell neurons of the dentate gyrus and the atrophy of CA1 pyramidal neurons that occur in AD in relation to the possible differential alterations of these two main circuits.

  19. Selective alterations of neurons and circuits related to early memory loss in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Llorens-Martín, Maria; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Rabano, Alberto; Hernandez, Felix; Avila, Jesus; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    A progressive loss of episodic memory is a well-known clinical symptom that characterizes Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The beginning of this loss of memory has been associated with the very early, pathological accumulation of tau and neuronal degeneration observed in the entorhinal cortex (EC). Tau-related pathology is thought to then spread progressively to the hippocampal formation and other brain areas as the disease progresses. The major cortical afferent source of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus is the EC through the perforant pathway. At least two main circuits participate in the connection between EC and the hippocampus; one originating in layer II and the other in layer III of the EC giving rise to the classical trisynaptic (ECII → dentate gyrus → CA3 → CA1) and monosynaptic (ECIII → CA1) circuits. Thus, the study of the early pathological changes in these circuits is of great interest. In this review, we will discuss mainly the alterations of the granule cell neurons of the dentate gyrus and the atrophy of CA1 pyramidal neurons that occur in AD in relation to the possible differential alterations of these two main circuits. PMID:24904307

  20. Mapping of Purkinje neuron loss and polyglucosan body accumulation in hereditary cerebellar degeneration in Scottish terriers.

    PubMed

    Urkasemsin, G; Linder, K E; Bell, J S; de Lahunta, A; Olby, N J

    2012-09-01

    A hereditary cerebellar degenerative disorder has emerged in Scottish Terriers. The aims of this study were to describe and quantify polyglucosan body accumulation and quantify Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum of affected and control dogs. The brains of 6 affected Scottish Terriers ranging in age from 8 to 15 years and 8 age-matched control dogs were examined histopathologically. Counts of Purkinje neurons and polyglucosan bodies were performed in control and affected dogs on cerebellar sections stained with periodic acid-Schiff. Affected dogs showed a significant loss of Purkinje neurons compared with control dogs (vermis: P < .0001; hemisphere: P = .0104). The degeneration was significantly more pronounced dorsally than ventrally (P < .0001). There were significantly more polyglucosan bodies in the ventral half of the vermis when compared with the dorsal half (P < .0001) in affected dogs. In addition, there were more polyglucosan bodies in the ventral half of the vermis in affected dogs than in control dogs (P = .0005). Polyglucosan bodies in all affected dogs stained positively with toluidine blue and alcian blue. Immunohistochemically, polyglucosan bodies in affected dogs were positive for neurofilament 200 kD and ubiquitin and negative for glial fibrillary acidic protein, synaptophysin, neurospecific enolase, vimentin, and S100; the bodies were negative for all antigens in control dogs. Ultrastructurally, polyglucosan bodies in 1 affected dog were non-membrane-bound, amorphous structures with a dense core. This study demonstrates significant Purkinje cell loss and increased polyglucosan bodies in the cerebellum of affected Scottish Terriers.

  1. Adult Conditional Knockout of PGC-1α Leads to Loss of Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haisong; Zhang, Shuran; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar; Xu, Jinchong; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C.; Pirooznia, Shelia; Andrabi, Shaida A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Recent studies have implicated a role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator protein-1α (PGC-1α) in PD and in animal or cellular models of PD. The role of PGC-1α in the function and survival of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopamine neurons is not clear. Here we find that there are four different PGC-1α isoforms expressed in SH-SY5Y cells, and these four isoforms are expressed across subregions of mouse brain. Adult conditional PGC-1α knock-out mice show a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons that is accompanied by a reduction of dopamine in the striatum. In human PD postmortem tissue from the SNpc, there is a reduction of PGC-1α isoforms and mitochondria markers. Our findings suggest that all four isoforms of PGC-1α are required for the proper expression of mitochondrial proteins in SNpc DA neurons and that PGC-1α is essential for SNpc DA neuronal survival, possibly through the maintenance of mitochondrial function. PMID:27622213

  2. Cannabinoids inhibit network-driven synapse loss between hippocampal neurons in culture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jung; Waataja, Jonathan J.; Thayer, Stanley A.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic pruning and loss of synaptic contacts are early events in many neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are dynamic and appear to differ mechanistically from the cell death process. Cannabinoids modulate synaptic activity and afford protection in some neurotoxicity models. We investigated the effects of cannabinoids on activity-induced changes in the number of synapses between rat hippocampal neurons in culture. Morphology and synapses were visualized by confocal imaging of neurons expressing DsRed2 and postsynaptic density protein 95 fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (PSD95-GFP). Reducing the extracellular Mg2+ concentration to 0.1 mM for 4 hr induced intense synaptic activity that decreased the number of PSD95-GFP puncta by 45 ± 13 %. Synapse loss was an early event, required activation of NMDA receptors and was mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The cannabinoid receptor full agonist (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl] pyrrolo-[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl](1-napthalenyl)methanone monomethanesulfonate (WIN55,212-2; EC50=2.5±0.5 nM) and the partial agonist Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; EC50=9±3 nM) inhibited PSD loss in a manner reversed by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant. The protection was mimicked by inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ channels and WIN55,212-2 did not prevent PSD loss elicited by direct application of glutamate, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. Prolonged exposure to WIN55,212-2, but not THC, desensitized the protective effect. Treating cells that had undergone PSD loss with WIN55,212-2 reversed the loss and enabled recovery of a full compliment of synapses. The modulation of synaptic number by acute and prolonged exposure to cannabinoids may account for some of the effects of these drugs on the plasticity, survival and function of neural networks. PMID:18310474

  3. Accelerated amyloid deposition, neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in double mutant APP/tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ribé, Elena M; Pérez, Mar; Puig, Berta; Gich, Ignasi; Lim, Filip; Cuadrado, Mar; Sesma, Teresa; Catena, Silvia; Sánchez, Belén; Nieto, María; Gómez-Ramos, Pilar; Morán, M Asunción; Cabodevilla, Felipe; Samaranch, Lluis; Ortiz, Lourdes; Pérez, Alberto; Ferrer, Isidro; Avila, Jesús; Gómez-Isla, Teresa

    2005-12-01

    Even though the idea that amyloid beta peptide accumulation is the primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease has become the leading hypothesis, the causal link between aberrant amyloid precursor protein processing and tau alterations in this type of dementia remains controversial. We further investigated the role of beta-amyloid production/deposition in tau pathology and neuronal cell death in the mouse brain by crossing Tg2576 and VLW lines expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein and human mutant tau, respectively. The resulting double transgenic mice showed enhanced amyloid deposition accompanied by neurofibrillary degeneration and overt neuronal loss in selectively vulnerable brain limbic areas. These findings challenge the idea that tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease is merely a downstream effect of amyloid production/deposition and suggest that reciprocal interactions between beta-amyloid and tau alterations may take place in vivo.

  4. The effect of inflammatory cell-derived MCP-1 loss on neuronal survival during chronic neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Andrew J.; Tian, Weiming; Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Rizk, Paul J.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Bellamkonda, Ravi; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial implants elicit neurodegeneration via the foreign body response (FBR) that includes BBB leakage, macrophage/microglia accumulation, and reactive astrogliosis, in addition to neuronal degradation that limit their useful lifespan. Previously, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, also CCL2), which plays an important role in monocyte recruitment and propagation of inflammation, was shown to be critical for various aspects of the FBR in a tissue-specific manner. However, participation of MCP-1 in the brain FBR has not been evaluated. Here we examined the FBR to intracortical silicon implants in MCP-1 KO mice at 1, 2, and 8 weeks after implantation. MCP-1 KO mice had a diminished FBR compared to WT mice, characterized by reductions in BBB leakage, macrophage/microglia accumulation, and astrogliosis, and an increased neuronal density. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of MCP-1 in implant-bearing WT mice maintained the increased neuronal density. To elucidate the relative contribution of microglia and macrophages, bone marrow chimeras were generated between MCP-1 KO and WT mice. Increased neuronal density was observed only in MCP-1 knockout mice transplanted with MCP-1 knockout marrow, which indicates that resident cells in the brain are major contributors. We hypothesized that these improvements are the result of a phenotypic switch of the macrophages/microglia polarization state, which we confirmed using PCR for common activation markers. Our observations suggest that MCP-1 influences neuronal loss, which is integral to the progression of neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson disease, via BBB leakage and macrophage polarization. PMID:24881026

  5. Sulfite leads to neuron loss in the hippocampus of both normal and SOX-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Kocamaz, Erdogan; Adiguzel, Esat; Er, Buket; Gundogdu, Gulşah; Kucukatay, Vural

    2012-08-01

    Sulfites are compounds commonly used as preservatives in foods, beverages and pharmaceuticals. Sulfite is also endogenously generated during the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids and drugs. It has been shown that sulfite is a highly toxic molecule. Many studies have examined the effects of sulfite toxicity, but the effect of ingested sulfite on the number of neurons in the hippocampus has not yet been reported. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of ingested sulfite on pyramidal neurons by counting cells in CA1 and CA3-2 subdivisions of the rat hippocampus. For this purpose, rats were assigned to one of four groups (6 rats per group): control (C), sulfite (S), deficient (D) and deficient+sulfite (DS). Sulfite oxidase deficiency was established by feeding rats a low molybdenum diet and adding 200ppm tungsten (W) to their drinking water. Sulfite (70mg/kg) was also administered to the animals via their drinking water. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were sacrificed by exsanguination under anesthesia, and their brains and livers quickly removed. The livers were used for a SOX activity assay, and the brains were used for neuronal counts in a known fraction of the CA1 and CA3-2 subdivisions of the left hippocampus using the optical fractionator method, which is a stereological method. The results showed that sulfite treatment caused a significant decrease in the total number of pyramidal neurons in three subdivisions of the hippocampus (CA1 and CA3-2) in the S, D and DS groups compared with the control group. It is concluded that exogenous administration of sulfite causes loss of pyramidal neurons in CA1 and CA3-2 subdivisions in both normal and SOX deficient rat hippocampus. This finding provides supporting evidence that sulfite is a neurotoxic molecule.

  6. ZNHIT3 is defective in PEHO syndrome, a severe encephalopathy with cerebellar granule neuron loss.

    PubMed

    Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Laari, Anni; Kousi, Maria; Yang, Yawei J; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Somer, Mirja; Siintola, Eija; Jakkula, Eveliina; Muona, Mikko; Tegelberg, Saara; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Pihko, Helena; Valanne, Leena; Paetau, Anders; Lun, Melody P; Hästbacka, Johanna; Kopra, Outi; Joensuu, Tarja; Katsanis, Nicholas; Lehtinen, Maria K; Palvimo, Jorma J; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina

    2017-03-01

    Progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hypsarrhythmia, and optic atrophy (PEHO) syndrome is an early childhood onset, severe autosomal recessive encephalopathy characterized by extreme cerebellar atrophy due to almost total granule neuron loss. By combining homozygosity mapping in Finnish families with Sanger sequencing of positional candidate genes and with exome sequencing a homozygous missense substitution of leucine for serine at codon 31 in ZNHIT3 was identified as the primary cause of PEHO syndrome. ZNHIT3 encodes a nuclear zinc finger protein previously implicated in transcriptional regulation and in small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particle assembly and thus possibly to pre-ribosomal RNA processing. The identified mutation affects a highly conserved amino acid residue in the zinc finger domain of ZNHIT3. Both knockdown and genome editing of znhit3 in zebrafish embryos recapitulate the patients' cerebellar defects, microcephaly and oedema. These phenotypes are rescued by wild-type, but not mutant human ZNHIT3 mRNA, suggesting that the patient missense substitution causes disease through a loss-of-function mechanism. Transfection of cell lines with ZNHIT3 expression vectors showed that the PEHO syndrome mutant protein is unstable. Immunohistochemical analysis of mouse cerebellar tissue demonstrated ZNHIT3 to be expressed in proliferating granule cell precursors, in proliferating and post-mitotic granule cells, and in Purkinje cells. Knockdown of Znhit3 in cultured mouse granule neurons and ex vivo cerebellar slices indicate that ZNHIT3 is indispensable for granule neuron survival and migration, consistent with the zebrafish findings and patient neuropathology. These results suggest that loss-of-function of a nuclear regulator protein underlies PEHO syndrome and imply that establishment of its spatiotemporal interaction targets will be the basis for developing therapeutic approaches and for improved understanding of cerebellar development.

  7. The Loss of Glucose Regulated Protein 78 (GRP78) during Normal Aging or from siRNA Knockdown Augments Human Alpha-Synuclein (α-syn) Toxicity to Rat Nigral Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Salganik, Maxim; Sergeyev, Valeriy G.; Shinde, Vishal; Meyers, Craig A.; Gorbatyuk, Marina S.; Lin, Jonathan H; Zolotukhin, Sergey; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related structural changes and gradual loss of key enzymes significantly affect the ability of the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) to facilitate proper protein folding and maintain homeostasis. In this work we present several lines of evidence supporting the hypothesis that the age-related decline in expression of the ER chaperone glucose regulated protein GRP78 (GRP78) could be related to the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD). We first determined that old (24 month) rats exhibit significantly lower levels of GRP78 protein in the nigrastriatal system as compared to young (2 month) animals. Then using recombinant adeno-associate virus (rAAV) mediated gene transfer, we found that GRP78 down-regulation by specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) aggravates alpha-synuclein (α-syn) neurotoxicity in nigral dopamine (DA) neurons. Moreover, the degree of chaperone decline corresponds with the severity of neurodegeneration. Additionally, comparative analysis of nigral tissues obtained from old and young rats revealed that aging affects the capacity of nigral DA cells to upregulate endogenous GRP78 protein in response to human α–syn neurotoxicity. Finally, we demonstrated that a sustained increase of GRP78 protein over the course of nine months protected aging nigral DA neurons in the α–syn-induced rat model of Parkinson’s-like neurodegeneration. Our data indicate that the ER chaperone GRP78 may have therapeutic potential for preventing and/or slowing age-related neurodegeneration. PMID:25863526

  8. Loss of Outer Retinal Neurons and Circuitry Alterations in the DBA/2J Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; de Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The DBA/2J mouse line develops essential iris atrophy, pigment dispersion, and glaucomatous age-related changes, including an increase of IOP, optic nerve atrophy, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible morphological changes in the outer retina of the DBA/2J mouse concomitant with disease progression and aging, based on the reduction of both the a- and b-waves and photopic flicker ERGs in this mouse line. Methods. Vertically sectioned DBA/2J mice retinas were evaluated at 3, 8, and 16 months of age using photoreceptor, horizontal, and bipolar cell markers. Sixteen-month-old C57BL/6 mice retinas were used as controls. Results. The DBA/2J mice had outer retinal degeneration at all ages, with the most severe degeneration in the oldest retinas. At 3 months of age, the number of photoreceptor cells and the thickness of the OPL were reduced. In addition, there was a loss of horizontal and ON-bipolar cell processes. At 8 months of age, RGC degeneration occurred in patches, and in the outer retina overlying these patches, cone morphology was impaired with a reduction in size as well as loss of outer segments and growth of horizontal and bipolar cell processes into the outer nuclear layer. At 16 months of age, connectivity between photoreceptors and horizontal and bipolar cell processes overlying these patches was lost. Conclusions. Retinal degeneration in DBA/2J mice includes photoreceptor death, loss of bipolar and horizontal cell processes, and loss of synaptic contacts in an aging-dependent manner. PMID:25118265

  9. Human neural stem cells improve cognition and promote synaptic growth in two complementary transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease and neuronal loss.

    PubMed

    Ager, Rahasson R; Davis, Joy L; Agazaryan, Andy; Benavente, Francisca; Poon, Wayne W; LaFerla, Frank M; Blurton-Jones, Mathew

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder, affecting over 35 million people worldwide. Pathologically, AD is characterized by the progressive accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles within the brain. Together, these pathologies lead to marked neuronal and synaptic loss and corresponding impairments in cognition. Current treatments, and recent clinical trials, have failed to modify the clinical course of AD; thus, the development of novel and innovative therapies is urgently needed. Over the last decade, the potential use of stem cells to treat cognitive impairment has received growing attention. Specifically, neural stem cell transplantation as a treatment for AD offers a novel approach with tremendous therapeutic potential. We previously reported that intrahippocampal transplantation of murine neural stem cells (mNSCs) can enhance synaptogenesis and improve cognition in 3xTg-AD mice and the CaM/Tet-DT(A) model of hippocampal neuronal loss. These promising findings prompted us to examine a human neural stem cell population, HuCNS-SC, which has already been clinically tested for other neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we provide the first evidence that transplantation of research grade HuCNS-SCs can improve cognition in two complementary models of neurodegeneration. We also demonstrate that HuCNS-SC cells can migrate and differentiate into immature neurons and glia and significantly increase synaptic and growth-associated markers in both 3xTg-AD and CaM/Tet-DTA mice. Interestingly, improvements in aged 3xTg-AD mice were not associated with altered Aβ or tau pathology. Rather, our findings suggest that human NSC transplantation improves cognition by enhancing endogenous synaptogenesis. Taken together, our data provide the first preclinical evidence that human NSC transplantation could be a safe and effective therapeutic approach for treating AD.

  10. Age-associated loss of selectivity in human olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Nancy E; Gomez, George; Cowart, Beverly J; Kriete, Andres; Pribitkin, Edmund; Restrepo, Diego

    2012-09-01

    We report a cross-sectional study of olfactory impairment with age based on both odorant-stimulated responses of human olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and tests of olfactory threshold sensitivity. A total of 621 OSNs from 440 subjects in 2 age groups of younger (≤ 45 years) and older (≥ 60 years) subjects were investigated using fluorescence intensity ratio fura-2 imaging. OSNs were tested for responses to 2 odorant mixtures, as well as to subsets of and individual odors in those mixtures. Whereas cells from younger donors were highly selective in the odorants to which they responded, cells from older donors were more likely to respond to multiple odor stimuli, despite a loss in these subjects' absolute olfactory sensitivity, suggesting a loss of specificity. This degradation in peripheral cellular specificity may impact odor discrimination and olfactory adaptation in the elderly. It is also possible that chronic adaptation as a result of reduced specificity contributes to observed declines in absolute sensitivity.

  11. Dendrobium alkaloids prevent Aβ25–35-induced neuronal and synaptic loss via promoting neurotrophic factors expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jing; Tian, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Yan-Liu; Li, Li-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuronal and synaptic loss is the most important risk factor for cognitive impairment. Inhibiting neuronal apoptosis and preventing synaptic loss are promising therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this study, we investigate the protective effects of Dendrobium alkaloids (DNLA), a Chinese medicinal herb extract, on β-amyloid peptide segment 25–35 (Aβ25-35)-induced neuron and synaptic loss in mice. Method Aβ25–35(10 µg) was injected into the bilateral ventricles of male mice followed by an oral administration of DNLA (40 mg/kg) for 19 days. The Morris water maze was used for evaluating the ability of spatial learning and memory function of mice. The morphological changes were examined via H&E staining and Nissl staining. TUNEL staining was used to check the neuronal apoptosis. The ultrastructure changes of neurons were observed under electron microscope. Western blot was used to evaluate the protein expression levels of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus and cortex. Results DNLA significantly attenuated Aβ25–35-induced spatial learning and memory impairments in mice. DNLA prevented Aβ25–35-induced neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex, increased the number of Nissl bodies, improved the ultrastructural injury of neurons and increased the number of synapses in neurons. Furthermore, DNLA increased the protein expression of neurotrophic factors BDNF, CNTF and GDNF in the hippocampus and cortex. Conclusions DNLA can prevent neuronal apoptosis and synaptic loss. This effect is mediated at least in part via increasing the expression of BDNF, GDNF and CNTF in the hippocampus and cortex; improving Aβ-induced spatial learning and memory impairment in mice. PMID:27994964

  12. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  13. Loss of Fertility in the Absence of Progesterone Receptor Expression in Kisspeptin Neurons of Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Arnon; Lin, Po-Ching; Cacioppo, Joseph A.; Hannon, Patrick R.; Mahoney, Megan M.; Wolfe, Andrew; Fernandez-Valdivia, Rodrigo; Lydon, John P.; Elias, Carol F.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian steroids, estradiol and progesterone, play central roles in regulating female reproduction by acting as both positive and negative regulators of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in the hypothalamus. Recent studies have identified kisspeptin neurons of the hypothalamus as the target of estrogenic regulation of GnRH secretion. In this study, we aimed to determine the significance of progesterone receptor (PGR) expression in the kisspeptin neurons. To this end, the Pgr gene was selectively ablated in mouse kisspeptin neurons and the reproductive consequence assessed. The hypothalamus of the Pgr deficient female mouse expressed kisspeptin, the pituitary released LH in response to GnRH stimulation, and the ovary ovulated when stimulated with gonadotropins. However, the mutant mouse gradually lost cyclicity, was unable to generate a LH surge in response to rising estradiol, and eventually became infertile. Taken together, these results indicate that the loss of PGR impairs kisspeptin secretory machinery and therefore that PGR plays a critical role in regulating kisspeptin secretion. PMID:27441639

  14. In vivo monitoring of neuronal loss in traumatic brain injury: a microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    Tisdall, Martin M.; Girbes, Armand R.; Martinian, Lillian; Thom, Maria; Kitchen, Neil; Smith, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes diffuse axonal injury and loss of cortical neurons. These features are well recognized histologically, but their in vivo monitoring remains challenging. In vivo cortical microdialysis samples the extracellular fluid adjacent to neurons and axons. Here, we describe a novel neuronal proteolytic pathway and demonstrate the exclusive neuro-axonal expression of Pavlov’s enterokinase. Enterokinase is membrane bound and cleaves the neurofilament heavy chain at positions 476 and 986. Using a 100 kDa microdialysis cut-off membrane the two proteolytic breakdown products, extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chains NfH476−986 and NfH476−1026, can be quantified with a relative recovery of 20%. In a prospective clinical in vivo study, we included 10 patients with traumatic brain injury with a median Glasgow Coma Score of 9, providing 640 cortical extracellular fluid samples for longitudinal data analysis. Following high-velocity impact traumatic brain injury, microdialysate extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels were significantly higher (6.18 ± 2.94 ng/ml) and detectable for longer (>4 days) compared with traumatic brain injury secondary to falls (0.84 ± 1.77 ng/ml, <2 days). During the initial 16 h following traumatic brain injury, strong correlations were found between extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels and physiological parameters (systemic blood pressure, anaerobic cerebral metabolism, excessive brain tissue oxygenation, elevated brain temperature). Finally, extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels were of prognostic value, predicting mortality with an odds ratio of 7.68 (confidence interval 2.15–27.46, P = 0.001). In conclusion, this study describes the discovery of Pavlov’s enterokinase in the human brain, a novel neuronal proteolytic pathway that gives rise to specific protein biomarkers (NfH476−986 and NfH476−1026) applicable to in vivo monitoring of diffuse

  15. Complex correlation between excitatory amino acid-induced increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and subsequent loss of neuronal function in individual neocortical neurons in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Witt, M R; Dekermendjian, K; Frandsen, A; Schousboe, A; Nielsen, M

    1994-01-01

    Primary cultures of cerebral cortical neurons and single-cell imaging of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) with the ratiometric dye fura-2 were used to assess excitatory amino acid (EAA)-induced neurotoxicity; the loss of neuronal function as defined by the ability of the cells to respond to K(+)-induced depolarization by a transient increase in Ca2+ influx was measured. The responsiveness of individual neurons was measured quantitatively as the [Ca2+]i values of the second KCl (2.KCl) stimulation divided by those of the first KCl (1.KCl) stimulation, giving the value of the ratio (2.KCl/1.KCl). Exposure to EAAs led to an increase in [Ca2+]i, but no simple correlation between the increase in [Ca2+]i and neuronal responsiveness could be demonstrated. Rather, below a threshold level of [Ca2+]i (ca. 1 microM), the neuronal responsiveness was largely independent of the glutamate receptor-agonist-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. However, when [Ca2+]i increased above this threshold level, the neurons almost invariably lost the ability to respond to a K(+)-induced depolarization, particularly after exposure to glutamate. Therefore, the cortical neurons were found to be exceptionally vulnerable to the glutamate-induced loss of function when compared with the effect induced by the glutamate receptor subtype-specific agonists, N-methyl-D-aspartate, quisqualate, and 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl) propionate. The findings suggest that the loss of neuronal membrane polarization precedes plasma membrane disruption and is a sensitive marker of EAA-induced neurodegeneration observed at the single-cell level. Images PMID:7527559

  16. Investigations Into Age-related Changes in the Human Mandible().

    PubMed

    Parr, Nicolette M; Passalacqua, Nicholas V; Skorpinski, Katie

    2017-03-02

    While changes in mandibular shape over time are not widely recognized by skeletal biologists, mandibular remodeling and associated changes in gross morphology may result from a number of causes related to mechanical stress such as antemortem tooth loss, changes in bite force, or alterations of masticatory performance. This study investigated the relationship between age-related changes and antemortem tooth loss in adult humans via dry bone measurements. This study examined 10 standard mandibular measurements as well as individual antemortem tooth loss scores using the Eichner Index from a total of 319 female and male individuals with ages ranging from 16 to 99 years. Results indicate that few mandibular measurements exhibited age-related changes, and most were affected by antemortem tooth loss.

  17. A transgenic Alzheimer rat with plaques, tau pathology, behavioral impairment, oligomeric Aβ and frank neuronal loss

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Robert M.; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Weitz, Tara M.; Rentsendorj, Altan; Gate, David; Spivak, Inna; Bholat, Yasmin; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Glabe, Charles G.; Breunig, Joshua J.; Rakic, Pasko; Davtyan, Hayk; Agadjanyan, Michael G.; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge; Bannykh, Serguei; Szekely, Christine A.; Pechnick, Robert N.; Town, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is hallmarked by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and widespread cortical neuronal loss (Selkoe, 2001). The ‘amyloid cascade hypothesis’ posits that cerebral amyloid sets neurotoxic events into motion that precipitate Alzheimer dementia (Hardy and Allsop, 1991). Yet, faithful recapitulation of all AD features in widely used transgenic (Tg) mice engineered to overproduce Aβ peptides has been elusive. We have developed a Tg rat model (line TgF344-AD) expressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APPsw) and presenilin 1 (PS1ΔE9) genes, each independent causes of early-onset familial AD. TgF344-AD rats manifest age-dependent cerebral amyloidosis that precedes tauopathy, gliosis, apoptotic loss of neurons in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and cognitive disturbance. These results demonstrate progressive neurodegeneration of the Alzheimer type in these animals. The TgF344-AD rat fills a critical need for a next-generation animal model to enable basic and translational AD research. PMID:23575824

  18. Characterizing learning deficits and hippocampal neuron loss following transient global cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Richard E; Lee, Jin M; Zipfel, Greg J; Wozniak, David F

    2005-05-10

    The 2-vessel-occlusion + hypotension (2VO + H) model of transient global cerebral ischemia results in neurodegeneration within the CA1 field of the hippocampus, but previous research has failed to demonstrate robust or reliable learning/memory deficits in rats subjected to this treatment. In the present study, sensitive behavioral protocols were developed in an effort to characterize the cognitive impairments following 2VO + H more precisely. Adult rats were exposed to 10 min of bilateral carotid occlusion with simultaneous hypotension. Following recovery, 2VO + H and control rats were subjected to a series of behavioral tests (locomotor activity, sensorimotor battery, water maze [cued, place, learning set], object recognition, and radial arm maze) over an extended recovery period followed by an assessment of neuronal loss in the dorsal hippocampus. The 2VO + H treatment was associated with long-lasting spatial learning deficits in the absence of other behavioral impairments and with neurodegeneration in dorsal hippocampal CA1. Water maze protocols that placed higher memory demands upon the rats (relatively "hard" vs. "easy") were more sensitive for detecting ischemia-induced deficits. We have shown that the use of appropriate behavioral tests (e.g., a relatively difficult place learning task) allowed for the observation of robust spatial learning deficits in a model previously shown to induce relatively subtle behavioral effects. Thus, the 2VO + H model induces both hippocampal neuronal loss and long-term learning deficits in rats, providing a potentially useful model for evaluating therapeutic efficacy.

  19. Loss of RAD-23 Protects Against Models of Motor Neuron Disease by Enhancing Mutant Protein Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Angela M.; Lamitina, Todd; Liachko, Nicole F.; Sabatella, Mariangela; Lu, Jiayin; Zhang, Lei; Ostrow, Lyle W.; Gupta, Preetika; Wu, Chia-Yen; Doshi, Shachee; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Lans, Hannes; Wang, Jiou; Kraemer, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins accumulate and aggregate in neurodegenerative disease. The existence of these deposits reflects a derangement in the protein homeostasis machinery. Using a candidate gene screen, we report that loss of RAD-23 protects against the toxicity of proteins known to aggregate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Loss of RAD-23 suppresses the locomotor deficit of Caenorhabditis elegans engineered to express mutTDP-43 or mutSOD1 and also protects against aging and proteotoxic insults. Knockdown of RAD-23 is further neuroprotective against the toxicity of SOD1 and TDP-43 expression in mammalian neurons. Biochemical investigation indicates that RAD-23 modifies mutTDP-43 and mutSOD1 abundance, solubility, and turnover in association with altering the ubiquitination status of these substrates. In human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord, we find that RAD-23 abundance is increased and RAD-23 is mislocalized within motor neurons. We propose a novel pathophysiological function for RAD-23 in the stabilization of mutated proteins that cause neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this work, we identify RAD-23, a component of the protein homeostasis network and nucleotide excision repair pathway, as a modifier of the toxicity of two disease-causing, misfolding-prone proteins, SOD1 and TDP-43. Reducing the abundance of RAD-23 accelerates the degradation of mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 and reduces the cellular content of the toxic species. The existence of endogenous proteins that act as “anti-chaperones” uncovers new and general targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26490867

  20. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments.

  1. Age-related changes in wavelength discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Shinomori, Keizo; Schefrin, Brooke E.; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Wavelength discrimination functions (420 to 620–650 nm) were measured for four younger (mean 30.9 years) and four older (mean 72.5 years) observers. Stimuli consisted of individually determined isoluminant monochromatic lights (10 Td) presented in each half of a 2° circular bipartite field with use of a Maxwellian-view optical system. A spatial two-alternative forced-choice method was used in combination with a staircase procedure to determine discrimination thresholds across the spectrum. Small but consistent elevations in discrimination thresholds were found for older compared with younger observers. Because the retinal illuminance of the stimuli was equated across all observers, these age-related losses in discrimination are attributable to neural changes. Analyses of these data reveal a significant change in Weber fraction across adulthood for a chromatically opponent pathway receiving primarily antagonistic signals from middle-wavelength-sensitive and long-wavelength-sensitive cones but not for a short-wavelength-sensitive cone pathway. PMID:11205976

  2. Animal models of age related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pennesi, Mark E; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations.

  3. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  4. Age related macular degeneration and visual disability.

    PubMed

    Christoforidis, John B; Tecce, Nicola; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Verolino, Marco; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central blindness or low vision among the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among modifiable environmental risk factors, cigarette smoking has been associated with both the dry and wet forms of AMD and may increase the likelihood of worsening pre-existing AMD. Despite advances, the treatment of AMD has limitations and affected patients are often referred for low vision rehabilitation to help them cope with their remaining eyesight. The characteristic visual impairment for both forms of AMD is loss of central vision (central scotoma). This loss results in severe difficulties with reading that may be only partly compensated by magnifying glasses or screen-projection devices. The loss of central vision associated with the disease has a profound impact on patient quality of life. With progressive central visual loss, patients lose their ability to perform the more complex activities of daily living. Common vision aids include low vision filters, magnifiers, telescopes and electronic aids. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a new subspecialty emerging from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on the usual concepts of research, education, and services for visually impaired patients. Relatively few ophthalmologists practise LVR and fewer still routinely use prismatic image relocation (IR) in AMD patients. IR is a method of stabilizing oculomotor functions with the purpose of promoting better function of preferred retinal loci (PRLs). The aim of vision rehabilitation therapy consists in the achievement of techniques designed to improve PRL usage. The use of PRLs to compensate for diseased foveae has offered hope to these patients in regaining some function. However, in a recently published meta-analysis, prism spectacles were found to be unlikely to be of

  5. Cannabinoids inhibit network-driven synapse loss between hippocampal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jung; Waataja, Jonathan J; Thayer, Stanley A

    2008-06-01

    Dendritic pruning and loss of synaptic contacts are early events in many neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are dynamic and seem to differ mechanistically from the cell death process. Cannabinoids modulate synaptic activity and afford protection in some neurotoxicity models. We investigated the effects of cannabinoids on activity-induced changes in the number of synapses between rat hippocampal neurons in culture. Morphology and synapses were visualized by confocal imaging of neurons expressing DsRed2 and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Reducing the extracellular Mg2+ concentration to 0.1 mM for 4 h induced intense synaptic activity, which decreased the number of PSD95-GFP puncta by 45 +/- 13%. Synapse loss was an early event, required activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and was mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The cannabinoid receptor full agonist WIN55,212-2 [(R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)-methyl] pyrrolo-[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl](1-napthalenyl)-methanone monomethanesulfonate] (EC(50) = 2.5 +/- 0.5 nM) and the partial agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; EC(50) = 9 +/- 3 nM) inhibited PSD loss in a manner reversed by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant [N-piperidino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-3-pyrazole-carboxamide]. The protection was mimicked by inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ channels, and WIN55,212-2 did not prevent PSD loss elicited by direct application of glutamate, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. Prolonged exposure to WIN55,212-2, but not THC, desensitized the protective effect. Treating cells that had undergone PSD loss with WIN55,212-2 reversed the loss and enabled recovery of a full compliment of synapses. The modulation of synaptic number by acute and prolonged exposure to cannabinoids may account for some of the effects of these drugs on the plasticity, survival, and function of neural networks.

  6. Age-Related Changes in Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos-Ewoldsen, Beverly; Black, Sheila R.; Mccown, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related differences in cognitive processes were used to understand age-related declines in creativity. According to the Geneplore model (Finke, Ward, & Smith, 1992), there are two phases of creativity--generating an idea and exploring the implications of the idea--each with different underlying cognitive processes. These two phases are…

  7. Galectin-3 causes enteric neuronal loss in mice after left sided permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, a model of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaowen; Boza-Serrano, Antonio; Turesson, Michelle Foldschak; Deierborg, Tomas; Ekblad, Eva; Voss, Ulrikke

    2016-01-01

    In addition to brain injury stroke patients often suffer gastrointestinal complications. Neuroimmune interactions involving galectin-3, released from microglia in the brain, mediates the post-stroke pro-inflammatory response. We investigated possible consequences of stroke on the enteric nervous system and the involvement of galectin-3. We show that permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) induces loss of enteric neurons in ileum and colon in galectin-3+/+, but not in galectin-3−/−, mice. In vitro we show that serum from galectin-3+/+, but not from galectin-3−/−, mice subjected to pMCAO, caused loss of C57BL/6J myenteric neurons, while myenteric neurons derived from TLR4−/− mice were unaffected. Further purified galectin-3 (10−6 M) caused loss of cultured C57BL/6J myenteric neurons. Inhibitors of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) or AMP activated kinase (AMPK) counteracted both the purified galectin-3 and the galectin-3+/+ pMCAO serum-induced loss in vitro. Combined we show that stroke (pMCAO) triggers central and peripheral galectin-3 release causing enteric neuronal loss through a TLR4 mediated mechanism involving TAK1 and AMPK. Galectin-3 is suggested a target for treatment of post-stroke complications. PMID:27612206

  8. Loss of NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons leads to the development of affective disorder-like symptoms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzębska, Kamila; Walczak, Magdalena; Cieślak, Przemysław Eligiusz; Szumiec, Łukasz; Turbasa, Mateusz; Engblom, David; Błasiak, Tomasz; Parkitna, Jan Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    The role of changes in dopamine neuronal activity during the development of symptoms in affective disorders remains controversial. Here, we show that inactivation of NMDA receptors on dopaminergic neurons in adult mice led to the development of affective disorder-like symptoms. The loss of NMDA receptors altered activity and caused complete NMDA-insensitivity in dopamine-like neurons. Mutant mice exhibited increased immobility in the forced swim test and a decrease in social interactions. Mutation also led to reduced saccharin intake, however the preference of sweet taste was not significantly decreased. Additionally, we found that while mutant mice were slower to learn instrumental tasks, they were able to reach the same performance levels, had normal sensitivity to feedback and showed similar motivation to exert effort as control animals. Taken together these results show that inducing the loss of NMDA receptor-dependent activity in dopamine neurons is associated with development of affective disorder-like symptoms. PMID:27853270

  9. Stochastic Resonance Controlled Upregulation of Internal Noise after Hearing Loss as a Putative Cause of Tinnitus-Related Neuronal Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Patrick; Tziridis, Konstantin; Metzner, Claus; Schilling, Achim; Hoppe, Ulrich; Schulze, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is generally assumed to be a consequence of hearing loss. In animal studies it has been demonstrated that acoustic trauma induced cochlear damage can lead to behavioral signs of tinnitus. In addition it was shown that noise trauma may lead to deafferentation of cochlear inner hair cells (IHC) even in the absence of elevated hearing thresholds, and it seems conceivable that such hidden hearing loss may be sufficient to cause tinnitus. Numerous studies have indicated that tinnitus is correlated with pathologically increased spontaneous firing rates and hyperactivity of neurons along the auditory pathway. It has been proposed that this hyperactivity is the consequence of a mechanism aiming to compensate for reduced input to the auditory system by increasing central neuronal gain, a mechanism referred to as homeostatic plasticity (HP), thereby maintaining mean firing rates over longer timescales for stabilization of neuronal processing. Here we propose an alternative, new interpretation of tinnitus-related development of neuronal hyperactivity in terms of information theory. In particular, we suggest that stochastic resonance (SR) plays a key role in both short- and long-term plasticity within the auditory system and that SR is the primary cause of neuronal hyperactivity and tinnitus. We argue that following hearing loss, SR serves to lift signals above the increased neuronal thresholds, thereby partly compensating for the hearing loss. In our model, the increased amount of internal noise—which is crucial for SR to work—corresponds to neuronal hyperactivity which subsequently causes neuronal plasticity along the auditory pathway and finally may lead to the development of a phantom percept, i.e., subjective tinnitus. We demonstrate the plausibility of our hypothesis using a computational model and provide exemplary findings in human patients that are consistent with that model. Finally we discuss the observed asymmetry in human tinnitus pitch

  10. Loss of Hippocampal Neurons after Kainate Treatment Correlates with Behavioral Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Gisela H.; Quesado, José L.; Soares, Joana I.; do Carmo, Joana M.; Andrade, Pedro A.; Andrade, José P.; Lukoyanov, Nikolai V.

    2014-01-01

    Treating rats with kainic acid induces status epilepticus (SE) and leads to the development of behavioral deficits and spontaneous recurrent seizures later in life. However, in a subset of rats, kainic acid treatment does not induce overt behaviorally obvious acute SE. The goal of this study was to compare the neuroanatomical and behavioral changes induced by kainate in rats that developed convulsive SE to those who did not. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with kainic acid and tested behaviorally 5 months later. Rats that had experienced convulsive SE showed impaired performance on the spatial water maze and passive avoidance tasks, and on the context and tone retention tests following fear conditioning. In addition, they exhibited less anxiety-like behaviors than controls on the open-field and elevated plus-maze tests. Histologically, convulsive SE was associated with marked neuron loss in the hippocampal CA3 and CA1 fields, and in the dentate hilus. Rats that had not experienced convulsive SE after kainate treatment showed less severe, but significant impairments on the spatial water maze and passive avoidance tasks. These rats had fewer neurons than control rats in the dentate hilus, but not in the hippocampal CA3 and CA1 fields. Correlational analyses revealed significant relationships between spatial memory indices of rats and neuronal numbers in the dentate hilus and CA3 pyramidal field. These results show that a part of the animals that do not display intense behavioral seizures (convulsive SE) immediately after an epileptogenic treatment, later in life, they may still have noticeable structural and functional changes in the brain. PMID:24409306

  11. Melatonin inhibits manganese-induced motor dysfunction and neuronal loss in mice: involvement of oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Jiao, Congcong; Mi, Chao; Xu, Bin; Li, Yuehui; Wang, Fei; Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhaofa

    2015-02-01

    Excessive manganese (Mn) induces oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, the relationship between them during Mn neurotoxicity has not been clarified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the probable role of melatonin (MLT) against Mn-induced motor dysfunction and neuronal loss as a result of antagonizing oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Mice were randomly divided into five groups as follows: control, MnCl2, low MLT + MnCl2, median MLT + MnCl2, and high MLT + MnCl2. Administration of MnCl2 (50 mg/kg) for 2 weeks significantly induced hypokinesis, dopaminergic neurons degeneration and loss, neuronal ultrastructural damage, and apoptosis in the substantia nigra and the striatum. These conditions were caused in part by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde accumulation, and dysfunction of the nonenzymatic (GSH) and enzymatic (GSH-Px, superoxide dismutase, quinone oxidoreductase 1, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase) antioxidative defense systems. Mn-induced neuron degeneration, astrocytes, and microglia activation contribute to the changes of oxidative stress markers. Dopamine (DA) depletion and downregulation of DA transporter and receptors were also found after Mn administration, this might also trigger motor dysfunction and neurons loss. Pretreatment with MLT prevented Mn-induced oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration and inhibited the interaction between them. As a result, pretreatment with MLT significantly alleviated Mn-induced motor dysfunction and neuronal loss. In conclusion, Mn treatment resulted in motor dysfunction and neuronal loss, possibly involving an interaction between oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra and the striatum. Pretreatment with MLT attenuated Mn-induced neurotoxicity by means of its antioxidant properties and promotion of the DA system.

  12. Abnormally phosphorylated tau is associated with neuronal and axonal loss in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J M; Hampton, D W; Patani, R; Pryce, G; Crowther, R A; Reynolds, R; Franklin, R J M; Giovannoni, G; Compston, D A S; Baker, D; Spillantini, M G; Chandran, S

    2008-07-01

    The pathological correlate of clinical disability and progression in multiple sclerosis is neuronal and axonal loss; however, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Abnormal phosphorylation of tau is a common feature of some neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. We investigated the presence of tau hyperphosphorylation and its relationship with neuronal and axonal loss in chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (CEAE) and in brain samples from patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. We report the novel finding of abnormal tau phosphorylation in CEAE. We further show that accumulation of insoluble tau is associated with both neuronal and axonal loss that correlates with progression from relapsing-remitting to chronic stages of EAE. Significantly, analysis of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis brain tissue also revealed abnormally phosphorylated tau and the formation of insoluble tau. Together, these observations provide the first evidence implicating abnormal tau in the neurodegenerative phase of tissue injury in experimental and human demyelinating disease.

  13. Cardiac sympathetic denervation precedes neuronal loss in the sympathetic ganglia in Lewy body disease.

    PubMed

    Orimo, Satoshi; Amino, Takeshi; Itoh, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kojo, Tohru; Uchihara, Toshiki; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Mori, Fumiaki; Wakabayashi, Koichi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2005-06-01

    Decreased cardiac uptake of meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) on [123I]MIBG myocardial scintigraphy has been reported in Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). We hypothesized that cardiac sympathetic denervation might account for the pathomechanism. To elucidate the extent, frequency and pattern of cardiac sympathetic nerve involvement in Lewy body disease and related neurodegenerative disorders, we immunohistochemically examined heart tissues from patients with PD (n=11), DLB (n=7), DLB with Alzheimer's disease (DLB/AD; n=4), multiple system atrophy (MSA; n=8), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP; n=5), pure AD (n=10) and control subjects (n=5) together with sympathetic ganglia from patients with PD (n=5) and control subjects (n=4), using an antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). TH-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the hearts had almost entirely disappeared in nearly all the patients with PD, DLB and DLB/AD, whereas they were well preserved in all the patients with PSP and pure AD as well as in all except for one patient with MSA. In PD, neurons in the sympathetic ganglia were preserved in all except for one patient. Decreased cardiac uptake of MIBG in Lewy body disease reflects actual cardiac sympathetic denervation, which precedes the neuronal loss in the sympathetic ganglia.

  14. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester protects against the dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Barros Silva, R; Santos, N A G; Martins, N M; Ferreira, D A S; Barbosa, F; Oliveira Souza, V C; Kinoshita, A; Baffa, O; Del-Bel, E; Santos, A C

    2013-03-13

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a botanical compound abundant in honeybees' propolis. It has anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, immunomodulatory and antitumor properties. Its beneficial effects against neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, have also been suggested and some mechanisms have been proposed. Mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress are critical events in neurodegeneration. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol and the downstream activation of caspase-3 have been suggested as targets of the protective mechanism of CAPE. Most of the studies addressing the protective effect of CAPE have been performed in cell culture. This is the first study to demonstrate the protective effect of CAPE against the dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rats. It also demonstrates, for the first time, the inhibitory effect of CAPE on mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), a mediator of neuronal death that triggers cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and metal chelation was demonstrated in the brain-affected areas of the rats treated with 6-OHDA and CAPE. Additionally, we demonstrated that CAPE does not affect brain mitochondrial function. Based on these findings and on its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, CAPE is a promising compound to treat Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Wogonin Attenuates Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Cognitive Dysfunction in Trimethyltin-Intoxicated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bombi; Sur, Bongjun; Cho, Seong-Guk; Yeom, Mijung; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether wogonin (WO) improved hippocampal neuronal activity, behavioral alterations and cognitive impairment, in rats induced by administration of trimethyltin (TMT), an organotin compound that is neurotoxic to these animals. The ability of WO to improve cognitive efficacy in the TMT-induced neurodegenerative rats was investigated using a passive avoidance test, and the Morris water maze test, and using immunohistochemistry to detect components of the acetylcholinergic system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) expression. Rats injected with TMT showed impairments in learning and memory and daily administration of WO improved memory function, and reduced aggressive behavior. Administration of WO significantly alleviated the TMT-induced loss of cholinergic immunoreactivity and restored the hippocampal expression levels of BDNF and CREB proteins and their encoding mRNAs to normal levels. These findings suggest that WO might be useful as a new therapy for treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27133262

  16. Acute canine distemper encephalitis is associated with rapid neuronal loss and local immune activation.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Penny A; Bastien-Hamel, Louis-Etienne; von Messling, Veronika

    2010-04-01

    For most virus infections of the central nervous system (CNS), immune-mediated damage, the route of inoculation and death of infected cells all contribute to the pathology observed. To investigate the role of these factors in early canine distemper neuropathogenesis, we infected ferrets either intranasally or intraperitoneally with the neurovirulent canine distemper virus strain Snyder Hill. Regardless of the route of inoculation, the virus primarily targeted the olfactory bulb, brainstem, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas only occasional foci were detected in the cortex. The infection led to widespread neuronal loss, which correlated with the clinical signs observed. Increased numbers of activated microglia, reactive gliosis and different pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected in the infected areas, suggesting that the presence and ultimate death of infected cells at early times after infection trigger strong local immune activation, despite the observed systemic immunosuppression.

  17. Reversal of age-related increase in brain protein oxidation, decrease in enzyme activity, and loss in temporal and spatial memory by chronic administration of the spin-trapping compound N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, J.M.; Starke-Reed, P.E.; Oliver, C.N.; Landum, R.W.; Cheng, M.S.; Wu, J.F.; Floyd, R.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Oxygen free radicals and oxidative events have been implicated as playing a role in bringing about the changes in cellular function that occur during aging. Brain readily undergoes oxidative damage, so it is important to determine if aging-induced changes in brain may be associated with oxidative events. Previously we demonstrated that brain damage caused by an ischemia/reperfusion insult involved oxidative events. In addition, pretreatment with the spin-trapping compound N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) diminished the increase in oxidized protein and the loss of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity that accompanied ischemia/reperfusion injury in brain. We report here that aged gerbils had a significantly higher level of oxidized protein as assessed by carbonyl residues and decreased GS and neutral protease activities as compared to young adult gerbils. We also found that chronic treatment with the spin-trapping compound PBN caused a decrease in the level of oxidized protein and an increase in both GS and neutral protease activity in aged Mongolian gerbil brain. In contrast to aged gerbils, PBN treatment of young adult gerbils had no significant effect on brain oxidized protein content or GS activity. Male gerbils, young adults (3 months of age) and retired breeders (15-18 months of age), were treated with PBN for 14 days with twice daily dosages of 32 mg/kg. If PBN administration was ceased after 2 weeks, the significantly decreased level of oxidized protein and increased GS and neutral protease activities in old gerbils changed in a monotonic fashion back to the levels observed in aged gerbils prior to PBN administration. We also report that old gerbils make more errors than young animals and that older gerbils treated with PBN made fewer errors in a radial arm maze test for temporal and spatial memory than the untreated aged controls.

  18. Loss of Npn1 from motor neurons causes postnatal deficits independent from Sema3A signaling.

    PubMed

    Helmbrecht, Michaela S; Soellner, Heidi; Truckenbrodt, Anna M L; Sundermeier, Julia; Cohrs, Christian; Hans, Wolfgang; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Feuchtinger, Annette; Aichler, Michaela; Fouad, Karim; Huber, Andrea B

    2015-03-01

    The correct wiring of neuronal circuits is of crucial importance for the function of the vertebrate nervous system. Guidance cues like the neuropilin receptors (Npn) and their ligands, the semaphorins (Sema) provide a tight spatiotemporal control of sensory and motor axon growth and guidance. Among this family of guidance partners the Sema3A-Npn1 interaction has been shown to be of great importance, since defective signaling leads to wiring deficits and defasciculation. For the embryonic stage these defects have been well described, however, also after birth the organism can adapt to new challenges by compensational mechanisms. Therefore, we used the mouse lines Olig2-Cre;Npn1(cond) and Npn1(Sema-) to investigate how postnatal organisms cope with the loss of Npn1 selectively from motor neurons or a systemic dysfunctional Sema3A-Npn1 signaling in the entire organism, respectively. While in Olig2-Cre(+);Npn1(cond-/-) mice clear anatomical deficits in paw posturing, bone structure, as well as muscle and nerve composition became evident, Npn1(Sema-) mutants appeared anatomically normal. Furthermore, Olig2-Cre(+);Npn1(cond) mutants revealed a dysfunctional extensor muscle innervation after single-train stimulation of the N.radial. Interestingly, these mice did not show obvious deficits in voluntary locomotion, however, skilled motor function was affected. In contrast, Npn1(Sema-) mutants were less affected in all behavioral tests and able to improve their performance over time. Our data suggest that loss of Sema3A-Npn1 signaling is not the only cause for the observed deficits in Olig2-Cre(+);Npn1(cond-/-) mice and that additional, yet unknown binding partners for Npn1 may be involved that allow Npn1(Sema-) mutants to compensate for their developmental deficits.

  19. Neuronal loss due to prolonged controlled-current stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Pikov, Victor; Troyk, Philip R.

    2010-06-01

    Activated iridium microelectrodes were implanted for 450-1282 days in the sensorimotor cortex of seven adult domestic cats and then pulsed for 240 h (8 h per day for 30 days) at 50 Hz. Continuous stimulation at 2 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 100 µC cm-2 produced no detectable change in neuronal density in the tissue surrounding the microelectrode tips. However, pulsing with a continuous 100% duty cycle at 4 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 200 µC cm-2 induced loss of cortical neurons over a radius of at least 150 µm from the electrode tips. The same stimulus regimen but with a duty cycle of 50% (1 s of stimulation, and then 1 s without stimulation repeated for 8 h) produced neuronal loss within a smaller radius, approximately 60 µm from the center of the electrode tips. However, there also was significant loss of neurons surrounding the unpulsed electrodes, presumably as a result of mechanical injury due to their insertion into and long-term residence in the tissue, and this was responsible for most of the neuronal loss within 150 µm of the electrodes pulsed with the 50% duty cycle.

  20. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Low Vision Age-Related Macular Degeneration Vision Simulator AMD Pictures and Videos: What Does Macular Degeneration ... degeneration as part of the body's natural aging process. There are different kinds of macular problems, but ...

  1. Aging-Related Hormone Changes in Men

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Men's health Aging-related hormone changes in men — sometimes called male menopause — are different from those ... to erectile dysfunction and other sexual issues. Make healthy lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet and include physical ...

  2. Glial dysfunction causes age-related memory impairment in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Daisuke; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Ueno, Kohei; Ueno, Taro; Saeki, Shinjiro; Matsuno, Motomi; Naganos, Shintaro; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Hirano, Yukinori; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Masato; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Isobe, Toshiaki; Honda, Yoshiko; Kodama, Tohru; Masuda, Tomoko; Saitoe, Minoru

    2014-11-19

    Several aging phenotypes, including age-related memory impairment (AMI), are thought to be caused by cumulative oxidative damage. In Drosophila, age-related impairments in 1 hr memory can be suppressed by reducing activity of protein kinase A (PKA). However, the mechanism for this effect has been unclear. Here we show that decreasing PKA suppresses AMI by reducing activity of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a glial metabolic enzyme whose amounts increase upon aging. Increased PC activity causes AMI through a mechanism independent of oxidative damage. Instead, increased PC activity is associated with decreases in D-serine, a glia-derived neuromodulator that regulates NMDA receptor activity. D-serine feeding suppresses both AMI and memory impairment caused by glial overexpression of dPC, indicating that an oxidative stress-independent dysregulation of glial modulation of neuronal activity contributes to AMI in Drosophila.

  3. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  4. Adult AMPA GLUA1 receptor subunit loss in 5-HT neurons results in a specific anxiety-phenotype with evidence for dysregulation of 5-HT neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tillmann; Vogt, Miriam A; Gartside, Sarah E; Berger, Stefan M; Lujan, Rafael; Lau, Thorsten; Herrmann, Elke; Sprengel, Rolf; Bartsch, Dusan; Gass, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Both the glutamatergic and serotonergic (5-HT) systems are implicated in the modulation of mood and anxiety. Descending cortical glutamatergic neurons regulate 5-HT neuronal activity in the midbrain raphe nuclei through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. To analyze the functional role of GLUA1-containing AMPA receptors in serotonergic neurons, we used the Cre-ERT2/loxP-system for the conditional inactivation of the GLUA1-encoding Gria1 gene selectively in 5-HT neurons of adult mice. These Gria1(5-HT-/-) mice exhibited a distinct anxiety phenotype but showed no alterations in locomotion, depression-like behavior, or learning and memory. Increased anxiety-related behavior was associated with significant decreases in tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) expression and activity, and subsequent reductions in tissue levels of 5-HT, its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and norepinephrine in the raphe nuclei. However, TPH2 expression and activity as well as monoamine levels were unchanged in the projection areas of 5-HT neurons. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings of 5-HT neurons revealed that, while α1-adrenoceptor-mediated excitation was unchanged, excitatory responses to AMPA were enhanced and the 5-HT1A autoreceptor-mediated inhibitory response to 5-HT was attenuated in Gria1(5-HT-/-) mice. Our data show that a loss of GLUA1 protein in 5-HT neurons enhances AMPA receptor function and leads to multiple local molecular and neurochemical changes in the raphe nuclei that dysregulate 5-HT neuronal activity and induce anxiety-like behavior.

  5. GABAergic Neuron-Specific Loss of Ube3a Causes Angelman Syndrome-Like EEG Abnormalities and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Judson, Matthew C; Wallace, Michael L; Sidorov, Michael S; Burette, Alain C; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M; King, Ian F; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-04-06

    Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs)-all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS.

  6. Genetic reduction of mitochondrial complex I function does not lead to loss of dopamine neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Wook; Choi, Won-Seok; Sorscher, Noah; Park, Hyung Joon; Tronche, François; Palmiter, Richard D; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-09-01

    Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity is hypothesized to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for dopaminergic neuron death in Parkinson's disease. However, loss of complex I activity by systemic deletion of the Ndufs4 gene, one of the subunits comprising complex I, does not cause dopaminergic neuron death in culture. Here, we generated mice with conditional Ndufs4 knockout in dopaminergic neurons (Ndufs4 conditional knockout mice [cKO]) to examine the effect of complex I inhibition on dopaminergic neuron function and survival during aging and on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in vivo. Ndufs4 cKO mice did not show enhanced dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta or dopamine-dependent motor deficits over the 24-month life span. These mice were just as susceptible to MPTP as control mice. However, compared with control mice, Ndufs4 cKO mice exhibited an age-dependent reduction of dopamine in the striatum and increased α-synuclein phosphorylation in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. We also used an inducible Ndufs4 knockout mouse strain (Ndufs4 inducible knockout) in which Ndufs4 is conditionally deleted in all cells in adult to examine the effect of adult onset, complex I inhibition on MPTP sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons. The Ndufs4 inducible knockout mice exhibited similar sensitivity to MPTP as control littermates. These data suggest that mitochondrial complex I inhibition in dopaminergic neurons does contribute to dopamine loss and the development of α-synuclein pathology. However, it is not sufficient to cause cell-autonomous dopaminergic neuron death during the normal life span of mice. Furthermore, mitochondrial complex I inhibition does not underlie MPTP toxicity in vivo in either cell autonomous or nonautonomous manner. These results provide strong evidence that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity is not sufficient to cause dopaminergic neuron

  7. Ozone-induced loss of neuronal M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor function is prevented by cyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Gambone, L.M.; Elbon, C.L.; Fryer, A.D.

    1994-09-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that inflammatory cells mediate the loss of neuronal M{sub 2} muscarinic receptors in the lung after ozone exposure. Pathogen-free guinea pigs treated with cyclophosphamide (30 mg {center_dot} kg{sup {minus}1} {center_dot} day{sup {minus}1} ip for 7 days) before exposure to ozone were compared with untreated ozone-exposed animals. This dose of cyclophosphamide significantly reduced leukocytes in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Twenty-four hours after ozone, muscarinic receptor function was tested in anesthetized animals. In air-exposed guinea pigs, vagally induced bronchoconstriction was attenuated by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (0.1-100 {mu}g/kg iv) and potentiated by the selective M{sub 2} antagonist gallamine (0.1-10 mg/kg iv), indicating that the neuronal M{sub 2} muscarinic receptors were functioning. These responses were significantly reduced after ozone, indicating loss of neuronal M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor function. However, in those animals treated with cyclophosphamide, M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor function was not altered by ozone. These data suggest that ozone-induced loss of neuronal muscarinic receptor function is mediated via inflammatory cells and that the link between ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness and inflammation may be the neuronal M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Early detection of age related macular degeneration: current status.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Roy; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a main cause of severe vision loss in age related macular degeneration (AMD), is crucial in order to preserve vision and the quality of life of patients. This review summarizes current literature on the subject of early detection of CNV, both in the clinic setting and mainly in the patient's home. New technologies are evolving to allow for earlier detection and thus vision preservation in AMD patients.

  9. Suppressing N-Acetyl-l-Aspartate Synthesis Prevents Loss of Neurons in a Murine Model of Canavan Leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jiho; Bannerman, Peter; Guo, Fuzheng; Burns, Travis; Miers, Laird; Croteau, Christopher; Singhal, Naveen K; McDonough, Jennifer A; Pleasure, David

    2017-01-11

    Canavan disease is a leukodystrophy caused by aspartoacylase (ASPA) deficiency. The lack of functional ASPA, an enzyme enriched in oligodendroglia that cleaves N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) to acetate and l-aspartic acid, elevates brain NAA and causes "spongiform" vacuolation of superficial brain white matter and neighboring gray matter. In children with Canavan disease, neuroimaging shows early-onset dysmyelination and progressive brain atrophy. Neuron loss has been documented at autopsy in some cases. Prior studies have shown that mice homozygous for the Aspa nonsense mutation Nur7 also develop brain vacuolation. We now report that numbers of cerebral cortical and cerebellar neurons are decreased and that cerebral cortex progressively thins in Aspa(Nur7/Nur7) mice. This neuronal pathology is prevented by constitutive disruption of Nat8l, which encodes the neuronal NAA-synthetic enzyme N-acetyltransferase-8-like.

  10. Age-related changes in triathlon performances.

    PubMed

    Lepers, R; Sultana, F; Bernard, T; Hausswirth, C; Brisswalter, J

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was two-fold: i) to analyse age-related declines in swimming, cycling, and running performances for Olympic and Ironman triathlons, and ii) to compare age-related changes in these three disciplines between the Olympic and Ironman triathlons. Swimming, cycling, running and total time performances of the top 10 males between 20 and 70 years of age (in 5 years intervals) were analysed for two consecutive world championships (2006 and 2007) for Olympic and Ironman distances. There was a lesser age-related decline in cycling performance (p<0.01) compared with running and swimming after 55 years of age for Olympic distance and after 50 years of age for Ironman distance. With advancing age, the performance decline was less pronounced (p<0.01) for Olympic than for Ironman triathlon in cycling (>55 years) and running (>50 years), respectively. In contrast, an age-related decline in swimming performance seemed independent of triathlon distance. The age-related decline in triathlon performance is specific to the discipline, with cycling showing less declines in performance with age than swimming and running. The magnitude of the declines in cycling and running performance at Ironman distance is greater than at Olympic distance, suggesting that task duration exerts an important influence on the magnitude of the age-associated changes in triathlon performance.

  11. Loss of Fig4 in both Schwann cells and motor neurons contributes to CMT4J neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, Ilaria; Carbone, Antonietta; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Mironova, Yevgeniya A.; Alberizzi, Valeria; Noseda, Roberta; Rivellini, Cristina; Bianchi, Francesca; Del Carro, Ubaldo; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Lenk, Guy M.; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Giger, Roman J.; Meisler, Miriam H.; Bolino, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of FIG4 are responsible for Yunis-Varón syndrome, familial epilepsy with polymicrogyria, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4J neuropathy (CMT4J). Although loss of the FIG4 phospholipid phosphatase consistently causes decreased PtdIns(3,5)P2 levels, cell-specific sensitivity to partial loss of FIG4 function may differentiate FIG4-associated disorders. CMT4J is an autosomal recessive neuropathy characterized by severe demyelination and axonal loss in human, with both motor and sensory involvement. However, it is unclear whether FIG4 has cell autonomous roles in both motor neurons and Schwann cells, and how loss of FIG4/PtdIns(3,5)P2-mediated functions contribute to the pathogenesis of CMT4J. Here, we report that mice with conditional inactivation of Fig4 in motor neurons display neuronal and axonal degeneration. In contrast, conditional inactivation of Fig4 in Schwann cells causes demyelination and defects in autophagy-mediated degradation. Moreover, Fig4-regulated endolysosomal trafficking in Schwann cells is essential for myelin biogenesis during development and for proper regeneration/remyelination after injury. Our data suggest that impaired endolysosomal trafficking in both motor neurons and Schwann cells contributes to CMT4J neuropathy. PMID:25187576

  12. X-linked spinal muscular atrophy in mice caused by autonomous loss of ATP7A in the motor neuron

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Victoria L.; Dale, Jeffery M.; Garcia, Michael L.; Weisman, Gary A.; Lee, Jaekwon; Gitlin, Jonathan D.; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    ATP7A is a copper transporting P-type ATPase that is essential for cellular copper homeostasis. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene result in Menkes disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting in seizures, hypotonia, and failure to thrive due to systemic copper deficiency. Most recently, rare missense mutations in ATP7A that do not impact systemic copper homeostasis have been shown to cause X-linked Spinal Muscular Atrophy type 3 (SMAX3), a distal hereditary motor neuropathy. An understanding of the mechanistic and pathophysiological basis of SMAX3 is currently lacking, in part because the disease-causing mutations have been shown to confer both loss- and gain-of-function properties to ATP7A, and because there is currently no animal model of the disease. In this study, the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted in the motor neurons of mice resulting in a degenerative phenotype consistent with the clinical features in affected patients with SMAX3, including the progressive deterioration of gait, age-dependent muscle atrophy, denervation of neuromuscular junctions, and a loss of motor neuron cell bodies. Taken together these data reveal autonomous requirements for ATP7A that reveal essential roles for copper in the maintenance and function of the motor neuron, and suggest that SMAX3 is caused by a loss of ATP7A function that specifically impacts in the spinal motor neuron. PMID:25639447

  13. X-linked spinal muscular atrophy in mice caused by autonomous loss of ATP7A in the motor neuron.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Victoria L; Dale, Jeffery M; Garcia, Michael L; Weisman, Gary A; Lee, Jaekwon; Gitlin, Jonathan D; Petris, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    ATP7A is a copper-transporting P-type ATPase that is essential for cellular copper homeostasis. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene result in Menkes disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting in seizures, hypotonia and failure to thrive, due to systemic copper deficiency. Most recently, rare missense mutations in ATP7A that do not impact systemic copper homeostasis have been shown to cause X-linked spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (SMAX3), a distal hereditary motor neuropathy. An understanding of the mechanistic and pathophysiological basis of SMAX3 is currently lacking, in part because the disease-causing mutations have been shown to confer both loss- and gain-of-function properties to ATP7A, and because there is currently no animal model of the disease. In this study, the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted in the motor neurons of mice, resulting in a degenerative phenotype consistent with the clinical features in affected patients with SMAX3, including the progressive deterioration of gait, age-dependent muscle atrophy, denervation of neuromuscular junctions and a loss of motor neuron cell bodies. Taken together, these data reveal autonomous requirements for ATP7A that reveal essential roles for copper in the maintenance and function of the motor neuron, and suggest that SMAX3 is caused by a loss of ATP7A function that specifically impacts the spinal motor neuron.

  14. [Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Seitsonen, Sanna; Paimela, Tuomas; Meri, Seppo; Immonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a multiform disease of the macula, the region responsible for detailed central vision. In recent years, plenty of new knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease has been obtained, and the treatment of exudative macular degeneration has greatly progressed. The number of patients with age-related macular degeneration will multiply in the following decades, because knowledge of mechanisms of development of macular degeneration that could be subject to therapeutic measures is insufficient. Central underlying factors are genetic inheritance, exposure of the retina to chronic oxidative stress and accumulation of inflammation-inducing harmful proteins into or outside of retinal cells.

  15. [New aspects in age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Turlea, C

    2012-01-01

    Being the leading cause of blindness in modern world Age Related Macular Degeneration has beneficiated in the last decade of important progress in diagnosis, classification and the discovery of diverse factors who contribute to the etiology of this disease. Treatments have arised who can postpone the irreversible evolution of the disease and thus preserve vision. Recent findings have identified predisposing genetic factors and also inflamatory and imunological parameters that can be modified trough a good and adequate prevention and therapy This articole reviews new aspects of patology of Age Related Macular Degeneration like the role of complement in maintaining inflamation and the role of oxidative stress on different structures of the retina.

  16. Noradrenaline from Locus Coeruleus Neurons Acts on Pedunculo-Pontine Neurons to Prevent REM Sleep and Induces Its Loss-Associated Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khanday, Mudasir Ahmad; Somarajan, Bindu I.; Mehta, Rachna

    2016-01-01

    Normally, rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) does not appear during waking or non-REMS. Isolated, independent studies showed that elevated noradrenaline (NA) levels inhibit REMS and induce REMS loss-associated cytomolecular, cytomorphological, psychosomatic changes and associated symptoms. However, the source of NA and its target in the brain for REMS regulation and function in health and diseases remained to be confirmed in vivo. Using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-siRNA and virus-coated TH-shRNA in normal freely moving rats, we downregulated NA synthesis in locus coeruleus (LC) REM-OFF neurons in vivo. These TH-downregulated rats showed increased REMS, which was prevented by infusing NA into the pedunculo-pontine tegmentum (PPT), the site of REM-ON neurons, normal REMS returned after recovery. Moreover, unlike normal or control-siRNA- or shRNA-injected rats, upon REMS deprivation (REMSD) TH-downregulated rat brains did not show elevated Na-K ATPase (molecular changes) expression and activity. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first in vivo findings in an animal model confirming that NA from the LC REM-OFF neurons (1) acts on the PPT REM-ON neurons to prevent appearance of REMS, and (2) are responsible for inducing REMSD-associated molecular changes and symptoms. These observations clearly show neuro-physio-chemical mechanism of why normally REMS does not appear during waking. Also, that LC neurons are the primary source of NA, which in turn causes some, if not many, REMSD-associated symptoms and behavioral changes. The findings are proof-of-principle for the first time and hold potential to be exploited for confirmation toward treating REMS disorder and amelioration of REMS loss-associated symptoms in patients. PMID:27957531

  17. Aging-related dysregulation of dopamine and angiotensin receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Villar-Cheda, Begoña; Dominguez-Meijide, Antonio; Valenzuela, Rita; Granado, Noelia; Moratalla, Rosario; Labandeira-Garcia, Jose L

    2014-07-01

    It is not known whether the aging-related decrease in dopaminergic function leads to the aging-related higher vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons and risk for Parkinson's disease. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a major role in the inflammatory response, neuronal oxidative stress, and dopaminergic vulnerability via type 1 (AT1) receptors. In the present study, we observed a counterregulatory interaction between dopamine and angiotensin receptors. We observed overexpression of AT1 receptors in the striatum and substantia nigra of young adult dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-deficient mice and young dopamine-depleted rats, together with compensatory overexpression of AT2 receptors or compensatory downregulation of angiotensinogen and/or angiotensin. In aged rats, we observed downregulation of dopamine and dopamine receptors and overexpression of AT1 receptors in aged rats, without compensatory changes observed in young animals. L-Dopa therapy inhibited RAS overactivity in young dopamine-depleted rats, but was ineffective in aged rats. The results suggest that dopamine may play an important role in modulating oxidative stress and inflammation in the substantia nigra and striatum via the RAS, which is impaired by aging.

  18. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  19. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  20. Age Related Changes in Preventive Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    Health behavior may be influenced by age, beliefs, and symptomatology. To examine age-related health beliefs and behaviors with respect to six diseases (the common cold, colon-rectal cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, and senility), 396 adults (196 males, 200 females) divided into three age groups completed a questionnaire…

  1. Human cortex development: estimates of neuronal numbers indicate major loss late during gestation.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, T; de Courten-Myers, G M; Petetot, J M; Xi, G; de los Reyes, E

    1996-03-01

    This morphometric study explores temporal and topographic changes in the estimated neuronal number in human neocortex during the latter half of gestation and early infancy. Neuronal estimates are calculated from standardized measurements of cortical layer thickness and neuronal density in 6 neocortical regions in 9 human brains ranging from 17 weeks of gestation to 13 weeks postnatally. Layer thickness increases linearly with age while the average neuronal density first increases, then reaches a maximum at 20 weeks of gestation, and progressively declines. The sum of layer thickness times layer density estimates the number of neurons in a cortical column with a fixed surface area and a length that is equal to the cortical thickness. To derive an estimate of potentially overproduced neurons, the number of neurons in each cortical column was corrected for surface growth and for cortex gyration. These data show that a large percent of cortical neurons present at 20 weeks of gestation are used to populate the expanding cortex. Nevertheless, the growth-corrected data suggest that a substantial overproduction and secondary reduction of cortical neurons takes place mainly during the last quarter of gestation. The corrected mean number of neurons reaches a maximum at 28 weeks of gestation and then declines by approximately 70% to achieve a stable number of neurons around birth. This estimated number of neurons is significantly higher at 28 to 32 weeks of gestation than at 17 to 20 gestational weeks and at 0 to 13 postnatal weeks. These data imply that physiologic neuronal death (apoptosis) may play a major role in early human cortex development.

  2. Neuroanatomy accounts for age-related changes in risk preferences

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Michael A.; Tymula, Agnieszka; Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Glimcher, Paul W.; Levy, Ifat

    2016-01-01

    Many decisions involve uncertainty, or ‘risk', regarding potential outcomes, and substantial empirical evidence has demonstrated that human aging is associated with diminished tolerance for risky rewards. Grey matter volume in a region of right posterior parietal cortex (rPPC) is predictive of preferences for risky rewards in young adults, with less grey matter volume indicating decreased tolerance for risk. That grey matter loss in parietal regions is a part of healthy aging suggests that diminished rPPC grey matter volume may have a role in modulating risk preferences in older adults. Here we report evidence for this hypothesis and show that age-related declines in rPPC grey matter volume better account for age-related changes in risk preferences than does age per se. These results provide a basis for understanding the neural mechanisms that mediate risky choice and a glimpse into the neurodevelopmental dynamics that impact decision-making in an aging population. PMID:27959326

  3. Facts about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... should I follow up after treatment? Loss of Vision Coping with AMD and vision loss can be ... not delay use of these services. What is vision rehabilitation? To cope with vision loss, you must ...

  4. Loss of corticostriatal and thalamostriatal synaptic terminals precedes striatal projection neuron pathology in heterozygous Q140 Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y P; Wong, T; Bricker-Anthony, C; Deng, B; Reiner, A

    2013-12-01

    Motor slowing, forebrain white matter loss, and striatal shrinkage have been reported in premanifest Huntington's disease (HD) prior to overt striatal neuron loss. We carried out detailed LM and EM studies in a genetically precise HD mimic, heterozygous Q140 HD knock-in mice, to examine the possibility that loss of corticostriatal and thalamostriatal terminals prior to striatal neuron loss underlies these premanifest HD abnormalities. In our studies, we used VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling to detect corticostriatal and thalamostriatal (respectively) terminals in dorsolateral (motor) striatum over the first year of life, prior to striatal projection neuron pathology. VGLUT1+ axospinous corticostriatal terminals represented about 55% of all excitatory terminals in striatum, and VGLUT2+ axospinous thalamostriatal terminals represented about 35%, with VGLUT1+ and VGLUT2+ axodendritic terminals accounting for the remainder. In Q140 mice, a significant 40% shortfall in VGLUT2+ axodendritic thalamostriatal terminals and a 20% shortfall in axospinous thalamostriatal terminals were already observed at 1 month of age, but VGLUT1+ terminals were normal in abundance. The 20% deficiency in VGLUT2+ thalamostriatal axospinous terminals persisted at 4 and 12 months in Q140 mice, and an additional 30% loss of VGLUT1+ corticostriatal terminals was observed at 12 months. The early and persistent deficiency in thalamostriatal axospinous terminals in Q140 mice may reflect a development defect, and the impoverishment of this excitatory drive to striatum may help explain early motor defects in Q140 mice and in premanifest HD. The loss of corticostriatal terminals at 1 year in Q140 mice is consistent with prior evidence from other mouse models of corticostriatal disconnection early during progression, and can explain both the measurable bradykinesia and striatal white matter loss in late premanifest HD.

  5. TDP-43 loss-of-function causes neuronal loss due to defective steroid receptor-mediated gene program switching in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Vanden Broeck, Lies; Naval-Sánchez, Marina; Adachi, Yoshitsugu; Diaper, Danielle; Dourlen, Pierre; Chapuis, Julien; Kleinberger, Gernot; Gistelinck, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Hirth, Frank; Aerts, Stein; Callaerts, Patrick; Dermaut, Bart

    2013-01-31

    TDP-43 proteinopathy is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and related neurodegenerative disorders. Whether TDP-43 neurotoxicity is caused by a novel toxic gain-of-function mechanism of the aggregates or by a loss of its normal function is unknown. We increased and decreased expression of TDP-43 (dTDP-43) in Drosophila. Although upregulation of dTDP-43 induced neuronal ubiquitin and dTDP-43-positive inclusions, both up- and downregulated dTDP-43 resulted in selective apoptosis of bursicon neurons and highly similar transcriptome alterations at the pupal-adult transition. Gene network analysis and genetic validation showed that both up- and downregulated dTDP-43 directly and dramatically increased the expression of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein Map205, resulting in cytoplasmic accumulations of the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and a failure to switch EcR-dependent gene programs from a pupal to adult pattern. We propose that dTDP-43 neurotoxicity is caused by a loss of its normal function.

  6. Prevention of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Simon Chi Yan; Chan, Clement Wai Nang

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the developed world. Although effective treatment modalities such as anti-VEGF treatment have been developed for neovascular AMD, there is still no effective treatment for geographical atrophy, and therefore the most cost-effective management of AMD is to start with prevention. This review looks at current evidence on preventive measures targeted at AMD. Modalities reviewed include (1) nutritional supplements such as the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formula, lutein and zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acid, and berry extracts, (2) lifestyle modifications, including smoking and body-mass-index, and (3) filtering sunlight, i.e. sunglasses and blue-blocking intraocular lenses. In summary, the only proven effective preventive measures are stopping smoking and the AREDS formula. PMID:20862519

  7. Aging-related inflammation in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Greene, M A; Loeser, R F

    2015-11-01

    It is well accepted that aging is an important contributing factor to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). The mechanisms responsible appear to be multifactorial and may include an age-related pro-inflammatory state that has been termed "inflamm-aging." Age-related inflammation can be both systemic and local. Systemic inflammation can be promoted by aging changes in adipose tissue that result in increased production of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα). Numerous studies have shown an age-related increase in blood levels of IL-6 that has been associated with decreased physical function and frailty. Importantly, higher levels of IL-6 have been associated with an increased risk of knee OA progression. However, knockout of IL-6 in male mice resulted in worse age-related OA rather than less OA. Joint tissue cells, including chondrocytes and meniscal cells, as well as the neighboring infrapatellar fat in the knee joint, can be a local source of inflammatory mediators that increase with age and contribute to OA. An increased production of pro-inflammatory mediators that include cytokines and chemokines, as well as matrix-degrading enzymes important in joint tissue destruction, can be the result of cell senescence and the development of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Further studies are needed to better understand the basis for inflamm-aging and its role in OA with the hope that this work will lead to new interventions targeting inflammation to reduce not only joint tissue destruction but also pain and disability in older adults with OA.

  8. Functional Rescue of Dopaminergic Neuron Loss in Parkinson's Disease Mice After Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Altarche-Xifro, Wassim; di Vicino, Umberto; Muñoz-Martin, Maria Isabel; Bortolozzi, Analía; Bové, Jordi; Vila, Miquel; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder, which is due to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and for which no definitive cure is currently available. Cellular functions in mouse and human tissues can be restored after fusion of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells with a variety of somatic cells. Here, after transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the SNpc of two different mouse models of Parkinson's disease, we significantly ameliorated the dopaminergic neuron loss and function. We show fusion of transplanted HSPCs with neurons and with glial cells in the ventral midbrain of Parkinson's disease mice. Interestingly, the hybrids can undergo reprogramming in vivo and survived up to 4weeks after transplantation, while acquiring features of mature astroglia. These newly generated astroglia produced Wnt1 and were essential for functional rescue of the dopaminergic neurons. Our data suggest that glial-derived hybrids produced upon fusion of transplanted HSPCs in the SNpc can rescue the Parkinson's disease phenotype via a niche-mediated effect, and can be exploited as an efficient cell-therapy approach.

  9. Loss of medial septum cholinergic neurons in THY-Tau22 mouse model: what links with tau pathology?

    PubMed

    Belarbi, K; Burnouf, S; Fernandez-Gomez, F-J; Desmercières, J; Troquier, L; Brouillette, J; Tsambou, L; Grosjean, M-E; Caillierez, R; Demeyer, D; Hamdane, M; Schindowski, K; Blum, D; Buée, L

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder histologically defined by the cerebral accumulation of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is another hallmark of the disease thought to contribute to the cognitive dysfunctions. To this date, the mechanisms underlying cholinergic neurons degeneration remain uncertain. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between neurofibrillary degeneration and cholinergic defects in AD using THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model exhibiting a major hippocampal AD-like tau pathology and hyperphosphorylated tau species in the septohippocampal pathway. Here, we report that at a time THY-Tau22 mice display strong reference memory alterations, the retrograde transport of fluorogold through the septohippocampal pathway is altered. This impairment is associated with a significant reduction in the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunopositive cholinergic neurons in the medial septum. Analysis of nerve growth factor (NGF) levels supports an accumulation of the mature neurotrophin in the hippocampus of THY-Tau22 mice, consistent with a decrease of its uptake or retrograde transport by cholinergic terminals. Finally, our data strongly support that tau pathology could be instrumental in the cholinergic neuronal loss observed in AD.

  10. Histological studies of neuroprotective effects of Curcuma longa Linn. on neuronal loss induced by dexamethasone treatment in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Issuriya, Acharaporn; Kumarnsit, Ekkasit; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Vongvatcharanon, Uraporn

    2014-10-01

    Long term exposure to dexamethasone (Dx) is associated with brain damage especially in the hippocampus via the oxidative stress pathway. Previously, an ethanolic extract from Curcuma longa Linn. (CL) containing the curcumin constituent has been reported to produce antioxidant effects. However, its neuroprotective property on brain histology has remained unexplored. This study has examined the effects of a CL extract on the densities of cresyl violet positive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive (GFAP-ir) astrocytes in the hippocampus of Dx treated male rats. It showed that 21 days of Dx treatment (0.5mg/kg, i.p. once daily) significantly reduced the densities of cresyl violet positive neurons in the sub-areas CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus, but not in the CA2 area. However, CL pretreatment (100mg/kg, p.o.) was found to significantly restore neuronal densities in the CA1 and dentate gyrus. In addition, Dx treatment also significantly decreased the densities of the GFAP-ir astrocytes in the sub-areas CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus. However, CL pretreatment (100mg/kg, p.o.) failed to protect the loss of astrocytes in these sub-areas. These findings confirm the neuroprotective effects of the CL extract and indicate that the cause of astrocyte loss might be partially reduced by a non-oxidative mechanism. Moreover, the detection of neuronal and glial densities was suitable method to study brain damage and the effects of treatment.

  11. Chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis infection accelerates the occurrence of age-related granules in ApoE– / – mice brains

    PubMed Central

    Singhrao, Sim K.; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Poole, Sophie; Velsko, Irina; Crean, St John; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study explored the origin of age-related granules in the apolipoprotein E gene knockout (ApoE−/−) B6 background mice brains following chronic gingival infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis for 24 weeks. Intracerebral localization of P. gingivalis was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and its protease by immunohistochemistry. The age-related granules were observed by periodic acid–Schiff (PAS), silver impregnation, and immunostaining. FISH showed intracerebral dissemination of P. gingivalis cells (p = 0.001). PAS and silver impregnation demonstrated the presence of larger inclusions restricted to the CA1, CA2, and dentate gyrus sectors of the hippocampus. A specific monoclonal antibody to bacterial peptidoglycan detected clusters of granules with variable sizes in mice brains infected with P. gingivalis (p = 0.004), and also highlighted areas of diffuse punctate staining equating to physical tissue damage. Mouse immunoglobulin G was observed in the capillaries of the cerebral parenchyma of all P. gingivalis–infected brains (p = 0.001), and on pyramidal neurons in some severely affected mice, compared with the sham-infected mice. Gingipains was also observed in microvessels of the hippocampus in the infected mice. This study supports the possibility of early appearance of age-related granules in ApoE−/− mice following inflammation-mediated tissue injury, accompanied by loss of cerebral blood-brain barrier integrity. PMID:28326151

  12. Intracellular Aß triggers neuron loss in the cholinergic system of the APP/PS1KI mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Ditte Z; Bayer, Thomas A; Wirths, Oliver

    2010-07-01

    Loss of cholinergic neurons in the Nucleus Basalis of Meynert in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients was one of the first discoveries of neuron loss in AD. Despite an intense focus on the cholinergic system in AD, the reason for this cholinergic neuron loss is yet unknown. In the present study we examined Abeta-induced pathology and neuron loss in the cholinergic system of the bigenic APP/PS1KI mouse model. Expression of the APP transgene was found in ChAT-positive neurons of motor nuclei accompanied by robust intracellular Abeta accumulation, whereas no APP expressing neurons and thus no intracellular Abeta accumulation were found in neither the forebrain or pons complexes, nor in the caudate putamen. This expression pattern was used as a model system to study the effect of intra- and extracellular Abeta accumulation on neuron loss in the cholinergic system. Stereological quantification revealed a loss of ChAT-positive neurons in APP/PS1KI mice only in the motor nuclei Mo5 and 7N accumulating intracellular Abeta. This study supports the hypothesis of intracellular Abeta accumulation as an early pathological alteration contributing to cell death in AD.

  13. Age-related lesions in the cerebrum in middle-aged female cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Rinya; Yang, Xiuying; Saski, Yuji; Iwashige, Shuichiro; Tanigawa, Yohei; Yoshikawa, Tsuyoshi; Nagaoka, Takaharu; Kamimura, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Horishi

    2010-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans is a progressive neurogenic disease that can be linked with such characteristic pathological findings in the cerebrum as senile plaques (SPs), neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and neuronal loss. In the present study, the authors investigated the age-related morphological changes in 12 middle-aged and 12 young cynomolgus monkeys. Low numbers of neurons and astrocytes in the hippocampal region in cynomolgus monkeys accompanied ageing, and there was a high number of microglial cells; however, no clearly neurotoxic abnormalities due to beta-amyloid were noted before the age of 20 years. The onset of SPs and CAA in the cerebrum in cynomolgus monkeys can occur before the age of 20 years. SPs were almost all categorized as diffuse plaques (DPs); they did not have amyloid cores and were unaccompanied by neuritic degeneration. In cynomolgus monkeys, SPs (DPs) occur before the appearance of CAA. From the above, it was concluded that cynomolgus monkeys showed pathological changes due to ageing similar to those related to Alzheimer's disease in humans, even before they were 20 years old.

  14. Loss of Mecp2 in substantia nigra dopamine neurons compromises the nigrostriatal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gantz, Stephanie C.; Ford, Christopher P.; Neve, Kim A.; Williams, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding-protein 2 (MeCP2) result in Rett Syndrome (RTT), an X-linked disorder that disrupts neurodevelopment. Girls with RTT exhibit motor deficits similar to Parkinson’s disease, suggesting defects in the nigrostriatal pathway. This study examined age-dependent changes in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) from wild type, pre-symptomatic, and symptomatic Mecp2+/− mice. Mecp2+ neurons in the SN in Mecp2+/− mice were indistinguishable in morphology, resting conductance, and dopamine current density from neurons in wild type mice. However, the capacitance, total dendritic length, and resting conductance of Mecp2− neurons were less than that of Mecp2+ neurons as early as four weeks after birth, prior to overt symptoms. These differences were maintained throughout life. In symptomatic Mecp2+/− mice, the current induced by activation of D2 dopamine autoreceptors was significantly less in Mecp2− neurons than Mecp2+ neurons, although D2 receptor density was unaltered in Mecp2+/− mice. Electrochemical measurements revealed that significantly less dopamine was released after stimulation of striatum in adult Mecp2+/− mice compared to wild type. The decrease in size and function of Mecp2− neurons observed in adult Mecp2+/− mice was recapitulated in dopamine neurons from symptomatic Mecp2−/y males. These results show that mutation in Mecp2 results in cell-autonomous defects in the SN early in life and throughout adulthood. Ultimately, dysfunction in terminal dopamine release and D2 autoreceptor dependent currents in dopamine neurons from symptomatic females support the idea that decreased dopamine transmission due to heterogeneous Mecp2 expression contributes to the Parkinsonian features of RTT in Mecp2+/− mice. PMID:21880923

  15. Postnatal Loss of Neuronal and Glial Neurofascins Differentially Affects Node of Ranvier Maintenance and Myelinated Axon Function.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Anna M; Saifetiarova, Julia; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2017-01-01

    Intricate molecular interactions between neurons and glial cells underlie the creation of unique domains that are essential for saltatory conduction of action potentials by myelinated axons. Previously, the cell surface adhesion molecule Neurofascin (Nfasc) has been shown to have a dual-role in the establishment of axonal domains from both the glial and neuronal interface. While the neuron-specific isoform of Neurofascin (NF186) is indispensable for clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels at nodes of Ranvier; the glial-specific isoform of Neurofascin (NF155) is required for myelinating glial cells to organize the paranodal domain. Although many studies have addressed the individual roles of NF155 and NF186 in assembling paranodes and nodes, respectively; critical questions about their roles in the maintenance and long-term health of the myelinated axons remain, which we aimed to address in these studies. Here using spatiotemporal ablation of Neurofascin in neurons alone or together with myelinating glia, we report that loss of NF186 individually from postnatal mice leads to progressive nodal destabilization and axonal degeneration. While individual ablation of paranodal NF155 does not disrupt nodes of Ranvier; loss of NF186 combined with NF155 causes more accelerated nodal destabilization than loss of NF186 alone, providing strong evidence regarding a supporting role for paranodes in nodal maintenance. In both cases of NF186 loss, myelinating axons show ultrastructural changes and degeneration. Our studies reveal that long-term maintenance of nodes and ultimately the health of axons is correlated with the stability of NF186 within the nodal complex and the presence of auxiliary paranodes.

  16. Postnatal Loss of Neuronal and Glial Neurofascins Differentially Affects Node of Ranvier Maintenance and Myelinated Axon Function

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Anna M.; Saifetiarova, Julia; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2017-01-01

    Intricate molecular interactions between neurons and glial cells underlie the creation of unique domains that are essential for saltatory conduction of action potentials by myelinated axons. Previously, the cell surface adhesion molecule Neurofascin (Nfasc) has been shown to have a dual-role in the establishment of axonal domains from both the glial and neuronal interface. While the neuron-specific isoform of Neurofascin (NF186) is indispensable for clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels at nodes of Ranvier; the glial-specific isoform of Neurofascin (NF155) is required for myelinating glial cells to organize the paranodal domain. Although many studies have addressed the individual roles of NF155 and NF186 in assembling paranodes and nodes, respectively; critical questions about their roles in the maintenance and long-term health of the myelinated axons remain, which we aimed to address in these studies. Here using spatiotemporal ablation of Neurofascin in neurons alone or together with myelinating glia, we report that loss of NF186 individually from postnatal mice leads to progressive nodal destabilization and axonal degeneration. While individual ablation of paranodal NF155 does not disrupt nodes of Ranvier; loss of NF186 combined with NF155 causes more accelerated nodal destabilization than loss of NF186 alone, providing strong evidence regarding a supporting role for paranodes in nodal maintenance. In both cases of NF186 loss, myelinating axons show ultrastructural changes and degeneration. Our studies reveal that long-term maintenance of nodes and ultimately the health of axons is correlated with the stability of NF186 within the nodal complex and the presence of auxiliary paranodes. PMID:28217083

  17. Age-Related Deterioration of Perineuronal Nets in the Primary Auditory Cortex of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brewton, Dustin H.; Kokash, Jamiela; Jimenez, Oliva; Pena, Eloy R.; Razak, Khaleel A.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in inhibitory neurotransmission in sensory cortex may underlie deficits in sensory function. Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are extracellular matrix components that ensheath some inhibitory neurons, particularly parvalbumin positive (PV+) interneurons. PNNs may protect PV+ cells from oxidative stress and help establish their rapid spiking properties. Although PNN expression has been well characterized during development, possible changes in aging sensory cortex have not been investigated. Here we tested the hypothesis that PNN+, PV+ and PV/PNN co-localized cell densities decline with age in the primary auditory cortex (A1). This hypothesis was tested using immunohistochemistry in two strains of mice (C57BL/6 and CBA/CaJ) with different susceptibility to age-related hearing loss and at three different age ranges (1–3, 6–8 and 14–24 months old). We report that PNN+ and PV/PNN co-localized cell densities decline significantly with age in A1 in both mouse strains. In the PNN+ cells that remain in the old group, the intensity of PNN staining is reduced in the C57 strain, but not the CBA strain. PV+ cell density also declines only in the C57, but not the CBA, mouse suggesting a potential exacerbation of age-effects by hearing loss in the PV/PNN system. Taken together, these data suggest that PNN deterioration may be a key component of altered inhibition in the aging sensory cortex, that may lead to altered synaptic function, susceptibility to oxidative stress and processing deficits. PMID:27877127

  18. Loss of Tau protein affects the structure, transcription and repair of neuronal pericentromeric heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Marcato, Vasco; Sultan, Audrey; Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Loyens, Anne; Talahari, Smail; Bégard, Séverine; Nesslany, Fabrice; Colin, Morvane; Souès, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Bruno; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2016-01-01

    Pericentromeric heterochromatin (PCH) gives rise to highly dense chromatin sub-structures rich in the epigenetic mark corresponding to the trimethylated form of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3) and in heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α), which regulate genome expression and stability. We demonstrate that Tau, a protein involved in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), binds to and localizes within or next to neuronal PCH in primary neuronal cultures from wild-type mice. Concomitantly, we show that the clustered distribution of H3K9me3 and HP1α, two hallmarks of PCH, is disrupted in neurons from Tau-deficient mice (KOTau). Such altered distribution of H3K9me3 that could be rescued by overexpressing nuclear Tau protein was also observed in neurons from AD brains. Moreover, the expression of PCH non-coding RNAs, involved in PCH organization, was disrupted in KOTau neurons that displayed an abnormal accumulation of stress-induced PCH DNA breaks. Altogether, our results demonstrate a new physiological function of Tau in directly regulating neuronal PCH integrity that appears disrupted in AD neurons. PMID:27605042

  19. Preventing painful age-related bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michelle L; Chartier, Stephane R; Mitchell, Stefanie A

    2016-01-01

    Age-related bone fractures are usually painful and have highly negative effects on a geriatric patient’s functional status, quality of life, and survival. Currently, there are few analgesic therapies that fully control bone fracture pain in the elderly without significant unwanted side effects. However, another way of controlling age-related fracture pain would be to preemptively administer an osteo-anabolic agent to geriatric patients with high risk of fracture, so as to build new cortical bone and prevent the fracture from occurring. A major question, however, is whether an osteo-anabolic agent can stimulate the proliferation of osteogenic cells and build significant amounts of new cortical bone in light of the decreased number and responsiveness of osteogenic cells in aging bone. To explore this question, geriatric and young mice, 20 and 4 months old, respectively, received either vehicle or a monoclonal antibody that sequesters sclerostin (anti-sclerostin) for 28 days. From days 21 to 28, animals also received sustained administration of the thymidine analog, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), which labels the DNA of dividing cells. Animals were then euthanized at day 28 and the femurs were examined for cortical bone formation, bone mineral density, and newly borne BrdU+ cells in the periosteum which is a tissue that is pivotally involved in the formation of new cortical bone. In both the geriatric and young mice, anti-sclerostin induced a significant increase in the thickness of the cortical bone, bone mineral density, and the proliferation of newly borne BrdU+ cells in the periosteum. These results suggest that even in geriatric animals, anti-sclerostin therapy can build new cortical bone and increase the proliferation of osteogenic cells and thus reduce the likelihood of painful age-related bone fractures. PMID:27837171

  20. Age-related eye disease and gender.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, the prevalence of moderate to severe visual impairment and blindness is 285 millions, with 65% of visually impaired and 82% of all blind people being 50 years and older. Meta-analyses have shown that two out of three blind people are women, a gender discrepancy that holds true for both developed and developing countries. Cataract accounts for more than half of all blindness globally and gender inequity in access to cataract surgery is the major cause of the higher prevalence of blindness in women. In addition to gender differences in cataract surgical coverage, population-based studies on the prevalence of lens opacities indicate that women have a higher risk of developing cataract. Laboratory as well as epidemiologic studies suggest that estrogen may confer antioxidative protection against cataractogenesis, but the withdrawal effect of estrogen in menopause leads to increased risk of cataract in women. For the other major age-related eye diseases; glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy, data are inconclusive. Due to anatomic factors, angle closure glaucoma is more common in women, whereas the dominating glaucoma type; primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), is more prevalent in men. Diabetic retinopathy also has a male predominance and vascular/circulatory factors have been implied both in diabetic retinopathy and in POAG. For AMD, data on gender differences are conflicting although some studies indicate increased prevalence of drusen and neovascular AMD in women. To conclude, both biologic and socioeconomic factors must be considered when investigating causes of gender differences in the prevalence of age-related eye disease.

  1. Pathophysiology of age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Giuseppina; Chiappelli, Martina; De Martinis, Massimo; Franco, Vito; Ginaldi, Lia; Guiglia, Rosario; Licastro, Federico; Lio, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    A Symposium regarding the Pathophysiology of Successful and Unsuccessful Ageing was held in Palermo, Italy on 7-8 April 2009. Three lectures from that Symposium by G. Campisi, L. Ginaldi and F. Licastro are here summarized. Ageing is a complex process which negatively impacts on the development of various bodily systems and its ability to function. A long life in a healthy, vigorous, youthful body has always been one of humanity's greatest dreams. Thus, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of age-related diseases is urgently required to improve our understanding of maintaining good health in the elderly and to program possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:19737378

  2. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling diseases. This article discusses the effect of depression on vision-related disability in patients with AMD, suggests methods for screening for depression, and summarizes interventions for preventing depression in this high-risk group.

  3. [Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)].

    PubMed

    Michels, Stephan; Kurz-Levin, Malaika

    2009-03-01

    Today age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause for legal blindness in western industrialized countries. The prevalence of this disease rises with increasing age. A multifactorial pathogenesis of AMD is postulated including genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. The most relevant modifiable risk factor is smoking. Up to today there is no cure of this chronic disease. Prophylaxis, including a healthy diet and antioxidants as nutrional supplements for selected patients, aims to slow down the disease progression. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of the neovascular form of the disease using inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

  4. Neuronal loss and cytoskeletal disruption following intrahippocampal administration of the metabolic inhibitor malonate: lack of protection by MK-801.

    PubMed

    Pang, Z; Umberger, G H; Geddes, J W

    1996-02-01

    Impaired energy metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis of late-onset neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease by increasing neuronal vulnerability to excitotoxic damage through the NMDA receptor. The effects of metabolic impairment on the striatum have been extensively examined, but relatively little is known regarding the vulnerability of the hippocampus. To examine the effect of metabolic impairment on the hippocampal formation, malonate (0.25-2.5 mumol), a reversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, was administered by stereotaxic injection into the hippocampus of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Neuronal loss was assessed by Nissl stain, and immunocytochemistry was used to examine cytoskeletal disruption. Malonate produced a dose-dependent lesion in which CA1 pyramidal neurons were most vulnerable, followed by CA3 and dentate gyrus. Cytoskeletal alterations included the loss of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and dendritic MAP1B immunoreactivity, whereas axonal MAP1B and tau proteins were relatively spared. Spatially and temporally correlated with the loss of MAP2 was an increase in the immunoreactivity of calpain-cleaved spectrin. A similar pattern of neuronal damage and cytoskeletal disruption was produced by intrahippocampal injection of quinolinate (0.1 mumol), an NMDA agonist. Although these results are consistent with the hypothesis that metabolic impairment results in excitotoxic death, MK-801 (dizocilipine maleate), a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, did not attenuate the lesions produced by malonate but was effective against quinolinate. The results suggest that NMDA receptor activation is not required for malonate-induced damage in the hippocampal formation.

  5. Life and death of neurons in the aging brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. H.; Hof, P. R.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by extensive neuron death that leads to functional decline, but the neurobiological correlates of functional decline in normal aging are less well defined. For decades, it has been a commonly held notion that widespread neuron death in the neocortex and hippocampus is an inevitable concomitant of brain aging, but recent quantitative studies suggest that neuron death is restricted in normal aging and unlikely to account for age-related impairment of neocortical and hippocampal functions. In this article, the qualitative and quantitative differences between aging and Alzheimer's disease with respect to neuron loss are discussed, and age-related changes in functional and biochemical attributes of hippocampal circuits that might mediate functional decline in the absence of neuron death are explored. When these data are viewed comprehensively, it appears that the primary neurobiological substrates for functional impairment in aging differ in important ways from those in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Environmental enrichment fails to rescue working memory deficits, neuron loss, and neurogenesis in APP/PS1KI mice.

    PubMed

    Cotel, Marie-Caroline; Jawhar, Sadim; Christensen, Ditte Z; Bayer, Thomas A; Wirths, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Environmental enrichment has been used in a variety of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, with conflicting results. Here we studied the influence of environmental enrichment in a severely affected AD mouse model, showing a multiplicity of pathological alterations including hippocampal neuron loss. APP/PS1KI and wild type (WT) control mice were housed under standard conditions or in enriched cages equipped with various objects and running wheels. Amyloid plaque load, motor and working memory performance, axonopathy, as well as CA1 neuron number and hippocampal neurogenesis were assessed. Although a partial improvement in motor performance was observed, 4 months of enriched housing showed no beneficial effects in terms of working memory, Aβ plaque pathology, or neuron loss in APP/PS1KI mice. In addition, no changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and even an aggravation of the axonal phenotype were detected with a tendency toward a premature death. The APP/PS1KI model represents a model for mild to severe AD showing early behavioral deficits starting at 2 months of age with fast deterioration. Therefore our data might suggest that physical activity and enriched environment might be more beneficial in patients with mild cognitive impairment than in patients with incipient AD.

  7. MMP-3 contributes to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal loss, BBB damage, and neuroinflammation in an MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chung, Young Cheul; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Bok, Eugene; Yune, Tae Young; Maeng, Sungho; Jin, Byung Kwan

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) participates in the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease with blood brain barrier (BBB) damage and infiltration of peripheral immune cells. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining of brain sections from MPTP-treated mice showed that MPTP induced significant degeneration of nigrostriatal DA neurons. Moreover, FITC-labeled albumin detection and immunostaining revealed that MPTP caused damage to the BBB and increased the number of ED-1- and CD-3-immunopositive cells in the substantia nigra (SN). Genetic ablation of MMP-3 reduced the nigrostriatal DA neuron loss and improved motor function. This neuroprotective effect afforded by MMP-3 deletion was associated with the suppression of BBB disruption and a decrease in the number of ED-1- and CD-3-immunopositive cells in the SN. These data suggest that MMP-3 could play a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases such as PD in which BBB damage and neuroinflammation are implicated.

  8. Developments in age-related macular degeneration: Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Steven R

    2009-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness of Americans over age 65 years. Severe loss of vision is usually due to exudative ARMD, of which there are about 200,000 new cases in the United States annually. Until recently, only a small fraction of patients benefited from treatment, but advances in the early diagnosis of the disease and major developments in therapy have substantially improved the prognosis of patients with ARMD. Because visual loss substantially reduces quality of life, effective management of ARMD will have increasing public health importance as the population ages. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends that people over age 65 years should have a comprehensive eye examination every 1 to 2 years to check for cataracts, macular degeneration, glaucoma, and other conditions. Those who complain of difficulty reading, driving at night, or adapting from sunlight to indoor lighting might have macular degeneration.

  9. Update on geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Biarnés, Marc; Monés, Jordi; Alonso, Jordi; Arias, Luis

    2011-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause of legal blindness in older patients in developed countries, and geographic atrophy (GA) represents the advanced form of dry AMD. Although it accounts for one third of the cases of late AMD and is responsible for 20% of the cases of severe visual loss due to the disorder. GA currently lacks effective treatment, whereas antiangiogenic therapies have been shown to be successful in managing choroidal neovascularization, the other form of late AMD. Recent advances in GA epidemiology, etiology, genetics, and imaging techniques have renewed the interest in this entity, which is a cause of progressive visual loss even in treated patients with neovascular AMD. This knowledge has triggered many clinical trials targeting different molecules shown to be associated with the disease, and it is hoped that this research will translate into effective drugs for GA in the near future.

  10. Peripheral nerve injury induces loss of nociceptive neuron-specific Gαi-interacting protein in neuropathic pain rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Fei; Fischer, Gregory; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gαi-interacting protein (GINIP) is expressed specifically in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and functions in modulation of peripheral gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor (GBR). Genetic deletion of GINIP leads to impaired responsiveness to GBR agonist-mediated analgesia in rodent. It is, however, not defined whether nerve injury changes GINIP expression. Results Immunolabeling with validated antibody revealed GINIP expression in ∼40% of total lumbar DRG neurons in normal adult rats. GINIP immunoreactivity was detected in ∼80% of IB4-positive (nonpeptidergic) and ∼30% of CGRP-positive (peptidergic) neurons. GINIP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord dorsal horn was colabeled with IB4 and partially with CGRP. In addition, GINIP was expressed in DRG neurons immunopositive for GBR1, GBR2, Gαi(s), and Gαo and was also extensively colabeled with multiple nociceptive neuronal markers, including Trpv1, NaV1.7, CaV2.2α1b, CaV3.2α1b, TrkA, and Trek2. Peripheral nerve injury by L5 spinal nerve ligation significantly decreased the proportion of GINIP immunoreactivity-positive neurons from 40 ± 8.4% to 0.8 ± 0.1% (p < 0.01, mean ± SD, four weeks after spinal nerve ligation) and the total GINIP protein to 1.3% ± 0.04% of its basal level (p < 0.01, n = 6 animals in each group, two weeks after spinal nerve ligation) in the ipsilateral L5 DRGs. Conclusion Our results show that GINIP is predominantly expressed by small nonpeptidergic nociceptive neurons and that nerve injury triggers loss of GINIP expression. Signal transduction roles of GINIP may be diverse as it colabeled with various subgroups of nociceptive neurons. Future studies may investigate details of the signaling mechanism engaged by GINIP, as well as the pathophysiological significance of lost expression of GINIP in neuropathic pain. PMID:27145804

  11. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Rhesus Macaque Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Daniel T.; Engle, James R.; Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemical changes in the expression of various proteins within the central auditory system have been associated with natural aging. These changes may compensate in part for the loss of auditory sensitivity arising from two phenomena of the aging auditory system: cochlear histopathologies and increased excitability of central auditory neurons. Recent studies in the macaque monkey have revealed age-related changes in the density of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase (NADPHd) and parvalbumin (PV)-positive cells within the inferior colliculus and superior olivary complex. The cochlear nucleus (CN), which is the first central auditory nucleus, remains unstudied. Since the CN participates in the generation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and receives direct innervation from the cochlea, it serves as an ideal nucleus to compare the relationship between these neurochemical changes and the physiological and peripheral changes of the aging auditory system. We used stereological sampling to calculate the densities of NADPHd and PV reactive neurons within the three subdivisions of the CN in middle-aged and aged rhesus macaques. Regression analyses of these values with ABR properties and cochlear histopathologies revealed relationships between these cell types and the changing characteristics of the aging auditory system. Our results indicate that NADPHd expression does change with age in a specific subdivision of the CN, but PV does not. Conversely, PV expression correlated with ABR amplitudes and outer hair cell loss in the cochlea, but NADPHd did not. These results indicate that NADPHd and PV may take part in distinct compensatory efforts of the aging auditory system. PMID:24127432

  12. Altered Levels of Visinin-Like Protein 1 Correspond to Regional Neuronal Loss in Alzheimer Disease and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Caitlin M; MacDonald, Matthew L; Schempf, Tadhg A; Vatsavayi, Anil V; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Koppel, Jeremy L; Ding, Ying; Sun, Mai; Kofler, Julia K; Lopez, Oscar L; Yates, Nathan A; Sweet, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have implicated the neuronal calcium-sensing protein visinin-like 1 protein (Vilip-1) as a peripheral biomarker in Alzheimer disease (AD), but little is known about expression of Vilip-1 in the brains of patients with AD. We used targeted and quantitative mass spectrometry to measure Vilip-1 peptide levels in the entorhinal cortex (ERC) and the superior frontal gyrus (SF) from cases with early to moderate stage AD, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and cognitively and neuropathologically normal elderly controls. We found that Vilip-1 levels were significantly lower in the ERC, but not in SF, of AD subjects compared to normal controls. In FTLD cases, Vilip-1 levels in the SF were significantly lower than in normal controls. These findings suggest a unique role for cerebrospinal fluid Vilip-1 as a biomarker of ERC neuron loss in AD.

  13. [Treatment options for age-related infertility].

    PubMed

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle

    2010-06-20

    There has been a consistent trend towards delayed childbearing in most Western countries. Treatment options for age-related infertility includes controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilization (IVF). A sharp decline in pregnancy rate with advancing female age is noted with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) including IVF. Evaluation and treatment of infertility should not be delayed in women 35 years and older. No treatment other than oocyte donation has been shown to be effective for women over 40 and for those with compromised ovarian reserve, but its pratice is not easy in France hence the procreative tourism. As an increasing number of couples choose to postpone childbearing, they should be informed that maternal age is an important risk factor for failure to conceive.

  14. Medical bioremediation of age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Jacques M; Schloendorn, John; Rittmann, Bruce E; Alvarez, Pedro JJ

    2009-01-01

    Catabolic insufficiency in humans leads to the gradual accumulation of a number of pathogenic compounds associated with age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and macular degeneration. Removal of these compounds is a widely researched therapeutic option, but the use of antibodies and endogenous human enzymes has failed to produce effective treatments, and may pose risks to cellular homeostasis. Another alternative is "medical bioremediation," the use of microbial enzymes to augment missing catabolic functions. The microbial genetic diversity in most natural environments provides a resource that can be mined for enzymes capable of degrading just about any energy-rich organic compound. This review discusses targets for biodegradation, the identification of candidate microbial enzymes, and enzyme-delivery methods. PMID:19358742

  15. Nutritional interventions protect against age-related deficits in behavior: from animals to humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show impaired performance on motor and cognitive tasks. Similar changes in behavior occur in humans with age, and the development of methods to retard or reverse these age-related neuronal and behavioral deficits could increase healthy aging and decrease health care costs. In the present s...

  16. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Damico, Francisco Max; Gasparin, Fabio; Scolari, Mariana Ramos; Pedral, Lycia Sampaio; Takahashi, Beatriz Sayuri

    2012-01-01

    Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and geographic atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification) and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, aim to prevent apoptosis of retinal cells. Oxidative stress and depletion of essential micronutrients are targeted by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation. Visual cycle modulators reduce the activity of the photoreceptors and retinal accumulation of toxic fluorophores and lipofuscin. Eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration present chronic inflammation and potential treatments include corticosteroid and complement inhibition. We review the current concepts and rationale of dry age-related macular degeneration treatment that will most likely include a combination of drugs targeting different pathways involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

  17. Remarkable reductions of PAKs in the brain tissues of scrapie-infected rodent possibly linked closely with neuron loss.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ge; Tian, Chan; Wang, Hui; Xu, Yin; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Shi, Qi; Gao, Chen; Chen, Cao; Fan, Xue-Yu; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Kang; Ren, Ke; Xue, Ming-Ming; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Prion diseases are irreversible progressive neurodegenerative diseases characterized in the brain by PrP(Sc) deposits, neuronal degeneration, gliosis and by cognitive, behavioral and physical impairments, leading to severe incapacity and inevitable death. Proteins of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family are noted for roles in gene transcription, cytoskeletal dynamics, cell cycle progression and survival signaling. In the present study, we aimed to identify the potential roles of PAKs during prion infection, utilizing the brains of scrapie agent-infected hamsters. Western blots and immunohistochemical assays showed that brain levels of PAK3 and PAK1, as well as their upstream activator Rac/cdc42 and downstream substrate Raf1, were remarkably reduced at terminal stage. Double-stained immunofluorescent assay demonstrated that PAK3 was expressed mainly in neurons. Dynamic analyses of the brain samples collected at the different time points during the incubation period illustrated successive decreases of PAK3, PAK1 and Raf1, especially phosphor Raf1, which correlated well with neuron loss. Rac/cdc42 in the brain tissues increased at early stage and reached to the top at mid-late stage, but diminished at final stage. Unlike the alteration of PAKs in vivo, PAK3 and PAK1, as well as Rac/cdc42 and Raf1 in the prion-infected cell line SMB-S15 remained unchanged compared with those of its normal cell line SMB-PS. Our data here indicate that the functions of PAKs and their associated signaling pathways are seriously affected in the brains of prion disease, which appear to associate closely with the extensive neuron loss.

  18. Loss of sensory input increases the intrinsic excitability of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Breton, Jean-Didier; Stuart, Greg J

    2009-11-01

    Development of the cortical map is experience dependent, with different critical periods in different cortical layers. Previous work in rodent barrel cortex indicates that sensory deprivation leads to changes in synaptic transmission and plasticity in layer 2/3 and 4. Here, we studied the impact of sensory deprivation on the intrinsic properties of layer 5 pyramidal neurons located in rat barrel cortex using simultaneous somatic and dendritic recording. Sensory deprivation was achieved by clipping all the whiskers on one side of the snout. Loss of sensory input did not change somatic active and resting membrane properties, and did not influence dendritic action potential (AP) backpropagation. In contrast, sensory deprivation led to an increase in the percentage of layer 5 pyramidal neurons showing burst firing. This was associated with a reduction in the threshold for generation of dendritic calcium spikes during high-frequency AP trains. Cell-attached recordings were used to assess changes in the properties and expression of dendritic HCN channels. These experiments indicated that sensory deprivation caused a decrease in HCN channel density in distal regions of the apical dendrite. To assess the contribution of HCN down-regulation on the observed increase in dendritic excitability following sensory deprivation, we investigated the impact of blocking HCN channels. Block of HCN channels removed differences in dendritic calcium electrogenesis between control and deprived neurons. In conclusion, these observations indicate that sensory loss leads to increased dendritic excitability of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, they suggest that increased dendritic calcium electrogenesis following sensory deprivation is mediated in part via down-regulation of dendritic HCN channels.

  19. Increased TRPC5 glutathionylation contributes to striatal neuron loss in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chansik; Seo, Hyemyung; Kwak, Misun; Jeon, Jeha; Jang, Jihoon; Jeong, Eui Man; Myeong, Jongyun; Hwang, Yu Jin; Ha, Kotdaji; Kang, Min Jueng; Lee, Kyu Pil; Yi, Eugene C; Kim, In-Gyu; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Ryu, Hoon; So, Insuk

    2015-10-01

    Aberrant glutathione or Ca(2+) homeostasis due to oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The Ca(2+)-permeable transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channel is predominantly expressed in the brain, which is sensitive to oxidative stress. However, the role of the TRPC channel in neurodegeneration is not known. Here, we report a mechanism of TRPC5 activation by oxidants and the effect of glutathionylated TRPC5 on striatal neurons in Huntington's disease. Intracellular oxidized glutathione leads to TRPC5 activation via TRPC5 S-glutathionylation at Cys176/Cys178 residues. The oxidized glutathione-activated TRPC5-like current results in a sustained increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), activated calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and the calpain-caspase pathway, ultimately inducing striatal neuronal cell death. We observed an abnormal glutathione pool indicative of an oxidized state in the striatum of Huntington's disease transgenic (YAC128) mice. Increased levels of endogenous TRPC5 S-glutathionylation were observed in the striatum in both transgenic mice and patients with Huntington's disease. Both knockdown and inhibition of TRPC5 significantly attenuated oxidation-induced striatal neuronal cell death. Moreover, a TRPC5 blocker improved rearing behaviour in Huntington's disease transgenic mice and motor behavioural symptoms in littermate control mice by increasing striatal neuron survival. Notably, low levels of TRPC1 increased the formation of TRPC5 homotetramer, a highly Ca(2+)-permeable channel, and stimulated Ca(2+)-dependent apoptosis in Huntington's disease cells (STHdh(Q111/111)). Taken together, these novel findings indicate that increased TRPC5 S-glutathionylation by oxidative stress and decreased TRPC1 expression contribute to neuronal damage in the striatum and may underlie neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease.

  20. Lack of dystrophin leads to the selective loss of superior cervical ganglion neurons projecting to muscular targets in genetically dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, M Egle; Leone, Lucia; Lombardi, Loredana; Paggi, Paola

    2005-12-01

    Autonomic imbalance is a pathological aspect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we show that the sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG) of mdx mice, which lack dystrophin (Dp427), has 36% fewer neurons than that of wild-type animals. Cell loss occurs around P10 and affects those neurons innervating muscular targets (heart and iris), which, differently from the submandibular gland (non-muscular target), are precociously damaged by the lack of Dp427. In addition, although we reveal altered axonal defasciculation in the submandibular gland and reduced terminal sprouting in all SCG target organs, poor adrenergic innervation is observed only in the heart and iris. These alterations, detected as early as P5, when neuronal loss has not yet occurred, suggest that in mdx mice the absence of Dp427 directly impairs the axonal growth and terminal sprouting of sympathetic neurons. However, when these intrinsic alterations combine with structural and/or functional damages of muscular targets, neuronal death occurs.

  1. Inflammation and its role in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Anu; Paterno, Jussi J; Blasiak, Janusz; Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a cellular response to factors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and tissues. Cell-associated and soluble pattern-recognition receptors, e.g. Toll-like receptors, inflammasome receptors, and complement components initiate complex cellular cascades by recognizing or sensing different pathogen and damage-associated molecular patterns, respectively. Cytokines and chemokines represent alarm messages for leukocytes and once activated, these cells travel long distances to targeted inflamed tissues. Although it is a crucial survival mechanism, prolonged inflammation is detrimental and participates in numerous chronic age-related diseases. This article will review the onset of inflammation and link its functions to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of severe vision loss in aged individuals in the developed countries. In this progressive disease, degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) results in the death of photoreceptors, leading to a loss of central vision. The RPE is prone to oxidative stress, a factor that together with deteriorating functionality, e.g. decreased intracellular recycling and degradation due to attenuated heterophagy/autophagy, induces inflammation. In the early phases, accumulation of intracellular lipofuscin in the RPE and extracellular drusen between RPE cells and Bruch's membrane can be clinically detected. Subsequently, in dry (atrophic) AMD there is geographic atrophy with discrete areas of RPE loss whereas in the wet (exudative) form there is neovascularization penetrating from the choroid to retinal layers. Elevations in levels of local and systemic biomarkers indicate that chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of both disease forms.

  2. Raspberry supplementation alleviates age-related motor dysfunction in select populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related declines in balance, muscle strength and coordination often lead to a higher incidence of falling. Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of distress, pain, injury, loss of confidence, and ultimately, loss of independence and death. Previous studies in our laboratory have demons...

  3. Global Motor Unit Number Index sum score for assessing the loss of lower motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Stephan; Duprat, Lauréline; Grapperon, Aude-Marie; Verschueren, Annie; Delmont, Emilien; Attarian, Shahram

    2017-02-06

    Introduction Our objective was to propose a motor unit number index (MUNIX) global sum score in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to estimate the loss of functional motor units. Methods MUNIX was assessed for 18 ALS patients and 17 healthy controls in seven muscles: the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), tibialis anterior (TA), deltoid, trapezius, submental complex (SMC) and orbicularis oris. Results MUNIX was significantly lower in ALS patients than in healthy controls for the APB, ADM, TA and the trapezius muscles. The MUNIX sum score of 4 muscles (ADM + APB + Trapezius + TA) was lower in ALS patients (P = 0.01) and was correlated with clinical scores. Discussion The global MUNIX sum score proposed in this study estimates the loss of lower motor neurons in several body regions including the trapezius, and is correlated with clinical impairment in ALS patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Disruption of raphé serotonergic neural projections to the cortex: a potential pathway contributing to remote loss of brainstem neurons following neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reinebrant, Hanna E; Wixey, Julie A; Buller, Kathryn M

    2012-12-01

    Neuronal injury is a key feature of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. However, the mechanisms underpinning neuronal losses, such as in the brainstem, are poorly understood. One possibility is that disrupted neural connections between the cortex and brainstem may compromise the survival of neuronal cell bodies in the brainstem. We investigated whether brainstem raphé serotonergic neurons that project to the cortex are lost after HI. We also tested if neuroinflammation has a role in disrupting brainstem raphé projections. Postnatal day 3 (P3) rats underwent unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by hypoxia (6% oxygen for 30 min). A retrograde tracer, choleratoxin b, was deposited in the motor cortex on P38. On P45 we found that retrogradely labelled neurons in the dorsal raphé dorsal, ventrolateral, interfascicular, caudal and ventral nuclei were lost after P3 HI. All retrogradely labelled neurons in the raphé nuclei were serotonergic. Numbers of retrogradely labelled neurons were also reduced in the ventromedial thalamus and basolateral amygdala. Minocycline treatment (45 mg/kg 2 h post-HI, 22.5 mg/kg daily P4-P9) attenuated losses of retrogradely labelled neurons in the dorsal raphé ventrolateral, interfascicular and ventral raphé nuclei, and the ventromedial thalamus. These results indicate that raphé neurons projecting to the cortex constitute a population of serotonergic neurons that are lost after P3 HI. Furthermore, neuroinflammation has a role in the disruption of raphé and thalamic neural projections. Future studies investigating the cellular mechanisms of axonal degeneration may reveal new targets for interventions to prevent neuronal losses after neonatal HI.

  5. Contributions of Mouse and Human Hematopoietic Cells to Remodeling of the Adult Auditory Nerve After Neuron Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Nishimoto, Eishi; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N; Noble, Kenyaria V; Barth, Jeremy L; LaRue, Amanda C; Ando, Kiyoshi; Schulte, Bradley A

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral auditory nerve (AN) carries sound information from sensory hair cells to the brain. The present study investigated the contribution of mouse and human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to cellular diversity in the AN following the destruction of neuron cell bodies, also known as spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Exposure of the adult mouse cochlea to ouabain selectively killed type I SGNs and disrupted the blood-labyrinth barrier. This procedure also resulted in the upregulation of genes associated with hematopoietic cell homing and differentiation, and provided an environment conducive to the tissue engraftment of circulating stem/progenitor cells into the AN. Experiments were performed using both a mouse-mouse bone marrow transplantation model and a severely immune-incompetent mouse model transplanted with human CD34+ cord blood cells. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of recipient mice demonstrated that ouabain injury promoted an increase in the number of both HSC-derived macrophages and HSC-derived nonmacrophages in the AN. Although rare, a few HSC-derived cells in the injured AN exhibited glial-like qualities. These results suggest that human hematopoietic cells participate in remodeling of the AN after neuron cell body loss and that hematopoietic cells can be an important resource for promoting AN repair/regeneration in the adult inner ear. PMID:27600399

  6. Statistical physics of age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in the aging RPE. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the RPE the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  7. Age-related crosslink in skin collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Mechanic, G.

    1986-05-01

    A stable crosslinking amino acid was isolated from mature bovine skin collagen and its structure was identified as histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C-NMR. This newly identified crosslink has a linkage between C-2 histidine and C-6 of lysine in the latter's portion of hydroxylysinonorleucine. Quantitative studies using various aged samples of cow and human skin collagen indicated that this acid-heat stable nonreducible compound was the major age-related crosslink. In case of cow skin collagen, for example, during early embryonic development (3 and 5 month old embryos) the content of HHL stayed less than 0.01 residue/mole of collagen, however from the middle of gestation period (7 month old embryo) through the maturation stage it showed rapid increase with age and reached approximately 0.5 residues/mole of collagen in the 3 year old animal. Small increments (up to 0.65 res/mole of collagen) were observed in the 9 year old cow. The amounts of the crosslink unlike pyridinoline do not decrease with aging. Similar patterns were observed in human skin collagen.

  8. Physics of Age Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    2009-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. In this talk I will discuss a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in AMD [K.I. Mazzitello, C.M. Arizmendi, Fereydoon Family, H. E. Grossniklaus, Physical Review E (2009)]. I will also present an overview of our theoretical and computational efforts in modeling some other aspects of the physics of AMD, including CNV and the breakdown of Bruch's membrane [Ongoing collaboration with Abbas Shirinifard and James A. Glazier, Biocomplexity Institute and Department of Physics, Indiana University, Y. Jiang, Los Alamos, and Hans E. Grossniklaus, Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University].

  9. Loss of GABAergic cortical neurons underlies the neuropathology of Lafora disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lafora disease is an autosomal recessive form of progressive myoclonic epilepsy caused by defects in the EPM2A and EPM2B genes. Primary symptoms of the pathology include seizures, ataxia, myoclonus, and progressive development of severe dementia. Lafora disease can be caused by defects in the EPM2A gene, which encodes the laforin protein phosphatase, or in the NHLRC1 gene (also called EPM2B) codifying the malin E3 ubiquitin ligase. Studies on cellular models showed that laforin and malin interact and operate as a functional complex apparently regulating cellular functions such as glycogen metabolism, cellular stress response, and the proteolytic processes. However, the pathogenesis and the molecular mechanism of the disease, which imply either laforin or malin are poorly understood. Thus, the aim of our study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the pathology by characterizing cerebral cortex neurodegeneration in the well accepted murine model of Lafora disease EPM2A-/- mouse. Results In this article, we want to asses the primary cause of the neurodegeneration in Lafora disease by studying GABAergic neurons in the cerebral cortex. We showed that the majority of Lafora bodies are specifically located in GABAergic neurons of the cerebral cortex of 3 months-old EPM2A-/- mice. Moreover, GABAergic neurons in the cerebral cortex of younger mice (1 month-old) are decreased in number and present altered neurotrophins and p75NTR signalling. Conclusions Here, we concluded that there is impairment in GABAergic neurons neurodevelopment in the cerebral cortex, which occurs prior to the formation of Lafora bodies in the cytoplasm. The dysregulation of cerebral cortex development may contribute to Lafora disease pathogenesis. PMID:24472629

  10. Exploring age-related brain degeneration in meditation practitioners.

    PubMed

    Luders, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of research suggests that meditation practices are associated with substantial psychological as well as physiological benefits. In searching for the biological mechanisms underlying the beneficial impact of meditation, studies have revealed practice-induced alterations of neurotransmitters, brain activity, and cognitive abilities, just to name a few. These findings not only imply a close link between meditation and brain structure, but also suggest possible modulating effects of meditation on age-related brain atrophy. Given that normal aging is associated with significant loss of brain tissue, meditation-induced growth and/or preservation might manifest as a seemingly reduced brain age in meditators (i.e., cerebral measures characteristic of younger brains). Surprisingly, there are only three published studies that have addressed the question of whether meditation diminishes age-related brain degeneration. This paper reviews these three studies with respect to the brain attributes studied, the analytical strategies applied, and the findings revealed. The review concludes with an elaborate discussion on the significance of existing studies, implications and directions for future studies, as well as the overall relevance of this field of research.

  11. N-Acetylaspartate, a marker of both cellular dysfunction and neuronal loss: its relevance to studies of acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Demougeot, C; Garnier, P; Mossiat, C; Bertrand, N; Giroud, M; Beley, A; Marie, C

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate the contribution of cellular dysfunction and neuronal loss to brain N-acetylaspartate (NAA) depletion, NAA was measured in brain tissue by HPLC and UV detection in rats subjected to cerebral injury, associated or not with cell death. When lesion was induced by intracarotid injection of microspheres, the fall in NAA was related to the degree of embolization and to the severity of brain oedema. When striatal lesion was induced by local injection of malonate, the larger the lesion volume, the higher the NAA depletion. However, reduction of brain oedema and striatal lesion by treatment with the lipophilic iron chelator dipyridyl (20 mg/kg, 1 h before and every 8 h after embolization) and the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine (100 mg/kg given 1 h before malonate and then every 9 h), respectively, failed to ameliorate the fall in NAA. Moreover, after systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid, a marked reversible fall in NAA striatal content was observed despite the lack of tissue necrosis. Overall results show that cellular dysfunction can cause higher reductions in NAA level than neuronal loss, thus making of NAA quantification a potential tool for visualizing the penumbra area in stroke patients.

  12. Recessive loss of function of the neuronal ubiquitin hydrolase UCHL1 leads to early-onset progressive neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bilguvar, Kaya; Tyagi, Navneet K; Ozkara, Cigdem; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Bakircioglu, Mehmet; Choi, Murim; Delil, Sakir; Caglayan, Ahmet O; Baranoski, Jacob F; Erturk, Ozdem; Yalcinkaya, Cengiz; Karacorlu, Murat; Dincer, Alp; Johnson, Michele H; Mane, Shrikant; Chandra, Sreeganga S; Louvi, Angeliki; Boggon, Titus J; Lifton, Richard P; Horwich, Arthur L; Gunel, Murat

    2013-02-26

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCHL1), a neuron-specific de-ubiquitinating enzyme, is one of the most abundant proteins in the brain. We describe three siblings from a consanguineous union with a previously unreported early-onset progressive neurodegenerative syndrome featuring childhood onset blindness, cerebellar ataxia, nystagmus, dorsal column dysfuction, and spasticity with upper motor neuron dysfunction. Through homozygosity mapping of the affected individuals followed by whole-exome sequencing of the index case, we identified a previously undescribed homozygous missense mutation within the ubiquitin binding domain of UCHL1 (UCHL1(GLU7ALA)), shared by all affected subjects. As demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, purified UCHL1(GLU7ALA), compared with WT, exhibited at least sevenfold reduced affinity for ubiquitin. In vitro, the mutation led to a near complete loss of UCHL1 hydrolase activity. The GLU7ALA variant is predicted to interfere with the substrate binding by restricting the proper positioning of the substrate for tunneling underneath the cross-over loop spanning the catalytic cleft of UCHL1. This interference with substrate binding, combined with near complete loss of hydrolase activity, resulted in a >100-fold reduction in the efficiency of UCHL1(GLU7ALA) relative to WT. These findings demonstrate a broad requirement of UCHL1 in the maintenance of the nervous system.

  13. Hyperlipidemic Diet Causes Loss of Olfactory Sensory Neurons, Reduces Olfactory Discrimination, and Disrupts Odor-Reversal Learning

    PubMed Central

    Thiebaud, Nicolas; Johnson, Melissa C.; Butler, Jessica L.; Bell, Genevieve A.; Ferguson, Kassandra L.; Fadool, Andrew R.; Fadool, James C.; Gale, Alana M.; Gale, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, 65% of Americans are overweight, which leads to well-supported cardiovascular and cognitive declines. Little, however, is known concerning obesity's impact on sensory systems. Because olfaction is linked with ingestive behavior to guide food choice, its potential dysfunction during obesity could evoke a positive feedback loop to perpetuate poor ingestive behaviors. To determine the effect of chronic energy imbalance and reveal any structural or functional changes associated with obesity, we induced long-term, diet-induced obesity by challenging mice to high-fat diets: (1) in an obesity-prone (C57BL/6J) and obesity-resistant (Kv1.3−/−) line of mice, and compared this with (2) late-onset, genetic-induced obesity in MC4R−/− mice in which diabetes secondarily precipitates after disruption of the hypothalamic axis. We report marked loss of olfactory sensory neurons and their axonal projections after exposure to a fatty diet, with a concomitant reduction in electro-olfactogram amplitude. Loss of olfactory neurons and associated circuitry is linked to changes in neuronal proliferation and normal apoptotic cycles. Using a computer-controlled, liquid-based olfactometer, mice maintained on fatty diets learn reward-reinforced behaviors more slowly, have deficits in reversal learning demonstrating behavioral inflexibility, and exhibit reduced olfactory discrimination. When obese mice are removed from their high-fat diet to regain normal body weight and fasting glucose, olfactory dysfunctions are retained. We conclude that chronic energy imbalance therefore presents long-lasting structural and functional changes in the operation of the sensory system designed to encode external and internal chemical information and leads to altered olfactory- and reward-driven behaviors. PMID:24828650

  14. [Molecular genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, É V; Churashov, S V; Kamilova, T A

    2013-01-01

    Visual loss due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is caused by one or both forms of advanced disease: "wet" (neovascular) or "dry" (geographic atrophy). Immune system plays a central role in pathogenesis and progression of both AMD forms. Main genetic polymorphisms associated with risk of AMD development and progression were found to be genes that regulate inflammation especially in complement factor H gen (1q31 locus) and 10q26 locus (PLEKHAI/ARMS2/HTRA1). Association of response to treatment and genotype was shown in patients with AMD. Complete characterization of both common and rare alleles that influence AMD risk is necessary for accurate determination of individual genetic risk as well as identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Glutamatergic neuron-targeted loss of LGI1 epilepsy gene results in seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Huneau, Clément; Marsan, Elise; Lehongre, Katia; Navarro, Vincent; Ishida, Saeko; Dufresnois, Béatrice; Ozkaynak, Ekim; Garrigue, Jérôme; Miles, Richard; Martin, Benoit; Leguern, Eric; Anderson, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Leucin-rich, glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) is a secreted protein linked to human seizures of both genetic and autoimmune aetiology. Mutations in the LGI1 gene are responsible for autosomal dominant temporal lobe epilepsy with auditory features, whereas LGI1 autoantibodies are involved in limbic encephalitis, an acquired epileptic disorder associated with cognitive impairment. We and others previously reported that Lgi1-deficient mice have early-onset spontaneous seizures leading to premature death at 2–3 weeks of age. Yet, where and when Lgi1 deficiency causes epilepsy remains unknown. To address these questions, we generated Lgi1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice using a set of universal Cre-driver mouse lines. Selective deletion of Lgi1 was achieved in glutamatergic pyramidal neurons during embryonic (Emx1-Lgi1cKO) or late postnatal (CaMKIIα-Lgi1cKO) developmental stages, or in gamma amino butyric acidergic (GABAergic) parvalbumin interneurons (PV-Lgi1cKO). Emx1-Lgi1cKO mice displayed early-onset and lethal seizures, whereas CaMKIIα-Lgi1cKO mice presented late-onset occasional seizures associated with variable reduced lifespan. In contrast, neither spontaneous seizures nor increased seizure susceptibility to convulsant were observed when Lgi1 was deleted in parvalbumin interneurons. Together, these data showed that LGI1 depletion restricted to pyramidal cells is sufficient to generate seizures, whereas seizure thresholds were unchanged after depletion in gamma amino butyric acidergic parvalbumin interneurons. We suggest that LGI1 secreted from excitatory neurons, but not parvalbumin inhibitory neurons, makes a major contribution to the pathogenesis of LGI1-related epilepsies. Our data further indicate that LGI1 is required from embryogenesis to adulthood to achieve proper circuit functioning. PMID:25234641

  16. No neuronal loss, but alterations of the GDNF system in asymptomatic diverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, Thilo; Lange, Christina; Hohmeier, Ines; Cossais, François; Ebsen, Michael; Vogel, Ilka; Böttner, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Background Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor known to promote the survival and maintenance of neurons not only in the developing but also in the adult enteric nervous system. As diverticular disease (DD) is associated with reduced myenteric neurons, alterations of the GDNF system were studied in asymptomatic diverticulosis (diverticulosis) and DD. Methods Morphometric analysis for quantifying myenteric ganglia and neurons were assessed in colonic full-thickness sections of patients with diverticulosis and controls. Samples of tunica muscularis (TM) and laser-microdissected myenteric ganglia from patients with diverticulosis, DD and controls were analyzed for mRNA expression levels of GDNF, GFRA1, and RET by RT-qPCR. Myenteric protein expression of both receptors was quantified by fluorescence-immunohistochemistry of patients with diverticulosis, DD, and controls. Results Although no myenteric morphometric alterations were found in patients with diverticulosis, GDNF, GFRA1 and RET mRNA expression was down-regulated in the TM of patients with diverticulosis as well as DD. Furthermore GFRA1 and RET myenteric plexus mRNA expression of patients with diverticulosis and DD was down-regulated, whereas GDNF remained unaltered. Myenteric immunoreactivity of the receptors GFRα1 and RET was decreased in both asymptomatic diverticulosis and DD patients. Conclusion Our data provide evidence for an impaired GDNF system at gene and protein level not only in DD but also during early stages of diverticula formation. Thus, the results strengthen the idea of a disturbed GDNF-responsiveness as contributive factor for a primary enteric neuropathy involved in the pathogenesis and disturbed intestinal motility observed in DD. PMID:28152033

  17. Evidence that the loss of Purkinje cells and deep cerebellar nuclei neurons in homozygous weaver is not related to neurogenetic patterns.

    PubMed

    Martí, J; Wills, K V; Ghetti, B; Bayer, S A

    2001-10-01

    To determine whether the neurogenetic patterns of Purkinje cells and deep cerebellar nuclei neurons were normal in weaver homozygotes and whether the degeneration of those neuronal types was linked to their time of origin, [3H] thymidine autoradiography was applied on sections of homozygous weaver mice and normal controls on postnatal day 90. The experimental animals were the offspring of pregnant dams injected with [3H] thymidine on embryonic days 11-12, 12-13, 13-14 and 14-15. The results show that the onset of neurogenesis, its pattern of peaks and valleys, and its total span were similar between wild type and homozygous weaver in the cerebellar areas analyzed, indicating that the loss of Purkinje cells and deep cerebellar nuclei neurons is not related to neurogenetic patterns. In weaver homozygotes, the loss of Purkinje cells and deep cerebellar nuclei neurons followed a lateral to medial gradient of increasing severity. Thus, the vermis and the fastigial nucleus, which are medially located, presented the most important neuron loss, whereas in the lateral hemisphere and the dentate nucleus, neuron loss was spared.

  18. Association of Age Related Macular Degeneration and Age Related Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Hassan; Pourakbari, Malihe Shahidi; Entezari, Morteza; Yarmohammadi, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and sensory neural hearing impairment (SHI). Methods: In this case-control study, hearing status of 46 consecutive patients with ARMD were compared with 46 age-matched cases without clinical ARMD as a control group. In all patients, retinal involvements were confirmed by clinical examination, fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). All participants were examined with an otoscope and underwent audiological tests including pure tone audiometry (PTA), speech reception threshold (SRT), speech discrimination score (SDS), tympanometry, reflex tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR). Results: A significant (P = 0.009) association was present between ARMD, especially with exudative and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) components, and age-related hearing impairment primarily involving high frequencies. Patients had higher SRT and lower SDS against anticipated presbycusis than control subjects. Similar results were detected in exudative, CNV and scar patterns supporting an association between late ARMD with SRT and SDS abnormalities. ABR showed significantly prolonged wave I and IV latency times in ARMD (P = 0.034 and 0.022, respectively). Average latency periods for wave I in geographic atrophy (GA) and CNV, and that for wave IV in drusen patterns of ARMD were significantly higher than controls (P = 0.030, 0.007 and 0.050, respectively). Conclusion: The association between ARMD and age-related SHI may be attributed to common anatomical components such as melanin in these two sensory organs. PMID:27195086

  19. Nitroxide pharmaceutical development for age-related degeneration and disease

    PubMed Central

    Zarling, Jacob A.; Brunt, Vienna E.; Vallerga, Anne K.; Li, Weixing; Tao, Albert; Zarling, David A.; Minson, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide small molecule agents are in development as preventative or therapeutic pharmaceutical drugs for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease, which are two major diseases of aging. These aging diseases are associated with patient genetics, smoking, diet, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. Nitroxide drugs preventing aging-, smoking-, high sugar or high fat diet-, or radiation- and other environmental-induced pathophysiological conditions in aging disease are reviewed. Tempol (TP), Tempol Hydroxylamine (TP-H), and TP-H prodrug (OT-551) are evaluated in (1) non-smokers versus smokers with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction, rapidly reversed by cutaneous TP; (2) elderly cancer patients at risk for radiation-induced skin burns or hair loss, prevented by topical TP; and (3) elderly smoker or non-smoker AMD patients at risk for vision loss, prevented by daily eye drops of OT-551. The human data indicates safety and efficacy for these nitroxide drugs. Both TP and TP-H topically penetrate and function in skin or mucosa, protecting and treating radiation burns and hair loss or smoking-induced cutaneous vascular dysfunction. TP and TP-H do not penetrate the cornea, while OT-551 does effectively penetrate and travels to the back of the eye, preserving visual acuity and preserving normal and low light luminance in dry AMD smokers and non-smoker patients. Topical, oral, or injectable drug formulations are discussed. PMID:26594225

  20. Nitroxide pharmaceutical development for age-related degeneration and disease.

    PubMed

    Zarling, Jacob A; Brunt, Vienna E; Vallerga, Anne K; Li, Weixing; Tao, Albert; Zarling, David A; Minson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide small molecule agents are in development as preventative or therapeutic pharmaceutical drugs for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease, which are two major diseases of aging. These aging diseases are associated with patient genetics, smoking, diet, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. Nitroxide drugs preventing aging-, smoking-, high sugar or high fat diet-, or radiation- and other environmental-induced pathophysiological conditions in aging disease are reviewed. Tempol (TP), Tempol Hydroxylamine (TP-H), and TP-H prodrug (OT-551) are evaluated in (1) non-smokers versus smokers with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction, rapidly reversed by cutaneous TP; (2) elderly cancer patients at risk for radiation-induced skin burns or hair loss, prevented by topical TP; and (3) elderly smoker or non-smoker AMD patients at risk for vision loss, prevented by daily eye drops of OT-551. The human data indicates safety and efficacy for these nitroxide drugs. Both TP and TP-H topically penetrate and function in skin or mucosa, protecting and treating radiation burns and hair loss or smoking-induced cutaneous vascular dysfunction. TP and TP-H do not penetrate the cornea, while OT-551 does effectively penetrate and travels to the back of the eye, preserving visual acuity and preserving normal and low light luminance in dry AMD smokers and non-smoker patients. Topical, oral, or injectable drug formulations are discussed.

  1. Impact of age related macular degeneration on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, J B; Lamoureux, E L; Keeffe, J E

    2006-01-01

    Aims To describe the impact of age related macular degeneration (AMD) on quality of life and explore the association with vision, health, and demographic variables. Methods Adult participants diagnosed with AMD and with impaired vision (visual acuity <6/12) were assessed with the Impact of Vision Impairment (IVI) questionnaire. Participants rated the extent that vision restricted participation in activities affecting quality of life and completed the Short Form General Health Survey (SF‐12) and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results The mean age of the 106 participants (66% female) was 83.6 years (range 64–98). One quarter had mild vision impairment, (VA<6/12–6/18) and 75% had moderate or severely impaired vision. Participants reported from at least “a little” concern on 23 of the 32 IVI items including reading, emotional health, mobility, and participation in relevant activities. Those with mild and moderate vision impairment were similarly affected but significantly different from those with severe vision loss (p<0.05). Distance vision was associated with IVI scores but not age, sex, or duration of vision loss. Conclusion AMD affects many quality of life related activities and not just those related to reading. Referral to low vision care services should be considered for people with mild vision loss and worse. PMID:16622089

  2. Myelin Loss and Axonal Ion Channel Adaptations Associated with Gray Matter Neuronal Hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Mustafa S.

    2015-01-01

    Myelination and voltage-gated ion channel clustering at the nodes of Ranvier are essential for the rapid saltatory conduction of action potentials. Whether myelination influences the structural organization of the axon initial segment (AIS) and action potential initiation is poorly understood. Using the cuprizone mouse model, we combined electrophysiological recordings with immunofluorescence of the voltage-gated Nav1.6 and Kv7.3 subunits and anchoring proteins to analyze the functional and structural properties of single demyelinated neocortical L5 axons. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that neurons with demyelinated axons were intrinsically more excitable, characterized by increased spontaneous suprathreshold depolarizations as well as antidromically propagating action potentials ectopically generated in distal parts of the axon. Immunofluorescence examination of demyelinated axons showed that βIV-spectrin, Nav1.6, and the Kv7.3 channels in nodes of Ranvier either dissolved or extended into the paranodal domains. In contrast, while the AIS in demyelinated axons started more closely to the soma, ankyrin G, βIV-spectrin, and the ion channel expression were maintained. Structure–function analysis and computational modeling, constrained by the AIS location and realistic dendritic and axonal morphologies, confirmed that a more proximal onset of the AIS slightly reduced the efficacy of action potential generation, suggesting a compensatory role. These results suggest that oligodendroglial myelination is not only important for maximizing conduction velocity, but also for limiting hyperexcitability of pyramidal neurons. PMID:25948275

  3. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Bradley D.; Huang, Yanhua H.; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8 h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD. PMID:21962531

  4. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Winters, Bradley D; Huang, Yanhua H; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M

    2011-10-28

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD.

  5. Massive CA1/2 Neuronal Loss with Intraneuronal and N-Terminal Truncated Aβ42 Accumulation in a Novel Alzheimer Transgenic Model

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Caty; Sergeant, Nicolas; Itier, Jean-Michel; Blanchard, Véronique; Wirths, Oliver; van der Kolk, Nicolien; Vingtdeux, Valérie; van de Steeg, Evita; Ret, Gwenaëlle; Canton, Thierry; Drobecq, Hervé; Clark, Allan; Bonici, Bruno; Delacourte, André; Benavides, Jesús; Schmitz, Christoph; Tremp, Günter; Bayer, Thomas A.; Benoit, Patrick; Pradier, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a substantial degeneration of pyramidal neurons and the appearance of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Here we present a novel transgenic mouse model, APPSLPS1KI that closely mimics the development of AD-related neuropathological features including a significant hippocampal neuronal loss. This transgenic mouse model carries M233T/L235P knocked-in mutations in presenilin-1 and overexpresses mutated human β-amyloid (Aβ) precursor protein. Aβx-42 is the major form of Aβ species present in this model with progressive development of a complex pattern of N-truncated variants and dimers, similar to those observed in AD brain. At 10 months of age, an extensive neuronal loss (>50%) is present in the CA1/2 hippocampal pyramidal cell layer that correlates with strong accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ and thioflavine-S-positive intracellular material but not with extracellular Aβ deposits. A strong reactive astrogliosis develops together with the neuronal loss. This loss is already detectable at 6 months of age and is PS1KI gene dosage-dependent. Thus, APPSLPS1KI mice further confirm the critical role of intraneuronal Aβ42 in neuronal loss and provide an excellent tool to investigate therapeutic strategies designed to prevent AD neurodegeneration. PMID:15466394

  6. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  7. Loss of MeCP2 in Parvalbumin-and Somatostatin-Expressing Neurons in Mice Leads to Distinct Rett Syndrome-like Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Ure, Kerstin; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-11-18

    Inhibitory neurons are critical for proper brain function, and their dysfunction is implicated in several disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, and Rett syndrome. These neurons are heterogeneous, and it is unclear which subtypes contribute to specific neurological phenotypes. We deleted Mecp2, the mouse homolog of the gene that causes Rett syndrome, from the two most populous subtypes, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) and somatostatin-positive (SOM+) neurons. Loss of MeCP2 partially impairs the affected neuron, allowing us to assess the function of each subtype without profound disruption of neuronal circuitry. We found that mice lacking MeCP2 in either PV+ or SOM+ neurons have distinct, non-overlapping neurological features: mice lacking MeCP2 in PV+ neurons developed motor, sensory, memory, and social deficits, whereas those lacking MeCP2 in SOM+ neurons exhibited seizures and stereotypies. Our findings indicate that PV+ and SOM+ neurons contribute complementary aspects of the Rett phenotype and may have modular roles in regulating specific behaviors.

  8. Geminin loss causes neural tube defects through disrupted progenitor specification and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Ethan S; Waller, Laura E; Kroll, Kristen L

    2014-09-01

    Geminin is a nucleoprotein that can directly bind chromatin regulatory complexes to modulate gene expression during development. Geminin knockout mouse embryos are preimplantation lethal by the 32-cell stage, precluding in vivo study of Geminin's role in neural development. Therefore, here we used a conditional Geminin allele in combination with several Cre-driver lines to define an essential role for Geminin during mammalian neural tube (NT) formation and patterning. Geminin was required in the NT within a critical developmental time window (embryonic day 8.5-10.5), when NT patterning and closure occurs. Geminin excision at these stages resulted in strongly diminished expression of genes that mark and promote dorsal NT identities and decreased differentiation of ventral motor neurons, resulting in completely penetrant NT defects, while excision after embryonic day 10.5 did not result in NT defects. When Geminin was deleted specifically in the spinal NT, both NT defects and axial skeleton defects were observed, but neither defect occurred when Geminin was excised in paraxial mesenchyme, indicating a tissue autonomous requirement for Geminin in developing neuroectoderm. Despite a potential role for Geminin in cell cycle control, we found no evidence of proliferation defects or altered apoptosis. Comparisons of gene expression in the NT of Geminin mutant versus wild-type siblings at embryonic day 10.5 revealed decreased expression of key regulators of neurogenesis, including neurogenic bHLH transcription factors and dorsal interneuron progenitor markers. Together, these data demonstrate a requirement for Geminin for NT patterning and neuronal differentiation during mammalian neurulation in vivo.

  9. Improved word recognition for observers with age-related maculopathies using compensation filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, Teri B.

    1988-01-01

    A method for improving word recognition for people with age-related maculopathies, which cause a loss of central vision, is discussed. It is found that the use of individualized compensation filters based on an person's normalized contrast sensitivity function can improve word recognition for people with age-related maculopathies. It is shown that 27-70 pct more magnification is needed for unfiltered words compared to filtered words. The improvement in word recognition is positively correlated with the severity of vision loss.

  10. Sex-dependent modulation of age-related cognitive decline by the L-type calcium channel gene Cacna1c (Cav 1.2).

    PubMed

    Zanos, Panos; Bhat, Shambhu; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Smith, Robert J; Tonelli, Leonardo H; Gould, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Increased calcium influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels has been implicated in the neuronal dysfunction underlying age-related memory declines. The present study aimed to test the specific role of Cacna1c (which encodes Cav 1.2) in modulating age-related memory dysfunction. Short-term, spatial and contextual/emotional memory was evaluated in young and aged, wild-type as well as mice with one functional copy of Cacna1c (haploinsufficient), using the novel object recognition, Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks, respectively. Hippocampal expression of Cacna1c mRNA was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Ageing was associated with object recognition and contextual/emotional memory deficits, and a significant increase in hippocampal Cacna1c mRNA expression. Cacna1c haploinsufficiency was associated with decreased Cacna1c mRNA expression in both young and old animals. However, haploinsufficient mice did not manifest an age-related increase in expression of this gene. Behaviourally, Cacna1c haploinsufficiency prevented object recognition deficits during ageing in both male and female mice. A significant correlation between higher Cacna1c levels and decreased object recognition performance was observed in both sexes. Also, a sex-dependent protective role of decreased Cacna1c levels in contextual/emotional memory loss has been observed, specifically in male mice. These data provide evidence for an association between increased hippocampal Cacna1c expression and age-related cognitive decline. Additionally, they indicate an interaction between the Cacna1c gene and sex in the modulation of age-related contextual memory declines.

  11. Application of multispectral imaging detects areas with neuronal myelin loss, without tissue labelling.

    PubMed

    Vazgiouraki, Eleftheria; Papadakis, Vassilis M; Efstathopoulos, Paschalis; Lazaridis, Iakovos; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Fotakis, Costas; Gravanis, Achille

    2016-04-01

    The application of multispectral imaging to discriminate myelinated and demyelinated areas of neural tissue is herein presented. The method is applied through a custom-made, multispectral imaging monochromator, coupled to a commercially available microscope. In the present work, a series of spinal cord sections were analysed derived from mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental model widely used to study multiple sclerosis (MS). The multispectral microscope allows imaging of local areas with loss of myelin without the need of tissue labelling. Imaging with the aforementioned method and system is compared in a parallel way with conventional methods (wide-field and confocal fluorescence microscopies). The diagnostic sensitivity of our method is 90.4% relative to the 'gold standard' method of immunofluorescence microscopy. The presented method offers a new platform for the possible future development of an in vivo, real-time, non-invasive, rapid imaging diagnostic tool of spinal cord myelin loss-derived pathologies.

  12. Cholesterol contributes to dopamine-neuronal loss in MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease: Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Giri, Anirudha; Sandhir, Rajat

    2017-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a known contributor to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease while its role in the occurrence of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is only conjecture and far from conclusive. Altered antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial functions are the key mechanisms in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the midbrain in PD. Hypercholesterolemia is reported to cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain in rodents. However, the impact of hypercholesterolemia on the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in animal models of PD remains elusive. We tested the hypothesis that hypercholesterolemia in MPTP model of PD would potentiate dopaminergic neuron loss in SN by disrupting mitochondrial functions and antioxidant homeostasis. It is evident from the present study that hypercholesterolemia in naïve animals caused dopamine neuronal loss in SN with subsequent reduction in striatal dopamine levels producing motor impairment. Moreover, in the MPTP model of PD, hypercholesterolemia exacerbated MPTP-induced reduction of striatal dopamine as well as dopaminergic neurons in SN with motor behavioral depreciation. Activity of mitochondrial complexes, mainly complex-I and III, was impaired severely in the nigrostriatal pathway of hypercholesterolemic animals treated with MPTP. Hypercholesterolemia caused oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal pathway with increased generation of hydroxyl radicals and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes, which were further aggravated in the hypercholesterolemic mice with Parkinsonism. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of increased vulnerability of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in PD with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:28170429

  13. Tau Pathology Induces Excitatory Neuron Loss, Grid Cell Dysfunction, and Spatial Memory Deficits Reminiscent of Early Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongjun; Rodriguez, Gustavo A; Herman, Mathieu; Emrani, Sheina; Nahmani, Eden; Barrett, Geoffrey; Figueroa, Helen Y; Goldberg, Eliana; Hussaini, S Abid; Duff, Karen E

    2017-02-08

    The earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by the formation of mature tangles in the entorhinal cortex and disorientation and confusion when navigating familiar places. The medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) contains specialized neurons called grid cells that form part of the spatial navigation system. Here we show in a transgenic mouse model expressing mutant human tau predominantly in the EC that the formation of mature tangles in old mice was associated with excitatory cell loss and deficits in grid cell function, including destabilized grid fields and reduced firing rates, as well as altered network activity. Overt tau pathology in the aged mice was accompanied by spatial memory deficits. Therefore, tau pathology initiated in the entorhinal cortex could lead to deficits in grid cell firing and underlie the deterioration of spatial cognition seen in human AD.

  14. Minocycline mitigates motor impairments and cortical neuronal loss induced by focal ischemia in rats chronically exposed to ethanol during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gedeão Batista; Fontes, Enéas de Andrade; de Carvalho, Sabrina; da Silva, Josiane Batista; Fernandes, Luanna Melo Pereira; Oliveira, Maria Cristina Souza Pereira; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Gomes-Leal, Walace; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues; Maia, Cristiane Socorro Ferraz

    2014-05-02

    Ethanol is an important risk factor for the occurrence of cerebral ischemia contributing to poor prognosis and inefficacy of drug treatments for stroke-related symptoms. Females have a higher lifetime risk for stroke than males. Moreover, female gender has been associated with increased ethanol consumption during adolescence. In the present study, we investigated whether chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence may potentiate the motor impairments and cortical damage induced by focal ischemia in female rats. We also addressed whether these effects can be mitigated by minocycline, which has been shown to be neuroprotective against different insults in the CNS. Female rats were treated with distilled water or ethanol (6.5 g/kg/day, 22.5% w/v) for 55 days by gavage. Focal ischemia was induced by microinjections of endothelin-1 (ET-1) into the motor cortex. Animals of both groups were treated daily with minocycline (25-50 mg/kg, i.p.) or sterile saline (i.p.) for 5 days, and motor function was assessed using open field, inclined plane and rotarod tests. Chronic ethanol exposure exacerbated locomotor activity and motor coordination impairments induced by focal ischemia in rats. Moreover, histological analysis revealed that microinjections of ET-1 induced pyramidal neuron loss and microglial activation in the motor cortex. Minocycline reversed the observed motor impairments, microglial activation and pyramidal neuron loss in the motor cortex of ischemic rats even in those exposed to ethanol. These results suggest that minocycline induces neuroprotection and functional recovery in ischemic female rats intoxicated with ethanol during adolescence. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying this protective effect may be related to the modulation of neuroinflammation.

  15. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  16. Combination of chronic stress and ovariectomy causes conditioned fear memory deficits and hippocampal cholinergic neuronal loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Takuma, K; Mizoguchi, H; Funatsu, Y; Hoshina, Y; Himeno, Y; Fukuzaki, E; Kitahara, Y; Arai, S; Ibi, D; Kamei, H; Matsuda, T; Koike, K; Inoue, M; Nagai, T; Yamada, K

    2012-04-05

    We have recently found that the combination of ovariectomy (OVX) and chronic restraint stress (CS) causes hippocampal pyramidal cell loss and cognitive dysfunction in female rats and that estrogen replacement prevents the OVX/CS-induced morphological and behavioral changes. In this study, to clarify the mechanisms underlying the OVX/CS-mediated memory impairment further, we examined the roles of cholinergic systems in the OVX/CS-induced memory impairment in mice. Female Slc:ICR strain mice were randomly divided into two groups: OVX and sham-operated groups. Two weeks after the operation, the mice of each group were further assigned to CS (6 h/day) or non-stress group. Following the 3-week-stress period, all mice were subjected to contextual fear conditioning, and context- and tone-dependent memory tests were conducted 1 or 24 h after the conditioning. Overburden with 3 weeks of CS from 2 weeks after OVX impaired context- and tone-dependent freezing and the OVX/CS caused significant Nissl-stained neuron-like cell loss in the hippocampal CA3 region, although OVX and CS alone did not cause such behavioral and histological changes. Replacement of 17β-estradiol for 5 weeks after OVX suppressed OVX/CS-induced memory impairment and hippocampal Nissl-positive cell loss. Furthermore, the OVX/CS mice exhibited a significant decrease in choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus compared with other groups. The cholinesterase inhibitors donepezil and galantamine ameliorated OVX/CS-induced memory impairment. These data suggest that cholinergic dysfunction may be involved in the OVX/CS-induced conditioned fear memory impairment. Overall, our findings suggest that the OVX/CS mouse model is useful to study the mechanisms underlying estrogen loss-induced memory deficits.

  17. Netrin-1 rescues neuron loss by attenuating secondary apoptosis in ipsilateral thalamic nucleus following focal cerebral infarction in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liao, S-J; Gong, Q; Chen, X-R; Ye, L-X; Ding, Q; Zeng, J-S; Yu, J

    2013-02-12

    Neurological deficit following cerebral infarction correlates with not only primary injury, but also secondary neuronal apoptosis in remote loci connected to the infarction. Netrin-1 is crucial for axonal guidance by interacting with its receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and uncoordinated gene 5H (UNC5H). DCC and UNC5H are also dependence receptors inducing cell apoptosis when unbound by netrin-1. The present study is to investigate the role of netrin-1 and its receptors in ipsilateral ventroposterior thalamic nucleus (VPN) injury secondary to stroke in hypertensive rats. Renovascular hypertensive Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of netrin-1 (600 ng/d for 7 days) or vehicle (IgG/Fc) was given 24h after MCAO. Neurological function was evaluated by postural reflex 8 and 14 days after MCAO. Then, immunoreactivity was determined in the ipsilateral VPN for NeuN, glial fibrillary acidic protein, netrin-1 and its receptors (DCC and UNC5H2), apoptosis was detected with Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and the expressions of caspase-3, netrin-1, DCC, and UNC5H2 were quantified by western blot analysis. MCAO resulted in the impaired postural reflex after 8 and 14 days, with decreased NeuN marked neurons and increased TUNEL-positive cells, as well as an up-regulation in the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and UNC5H2 protein in the ipsilateral VPN, without significant change in DCC or netrin-1 expression. By exogenous netrin-1 infusion, the number of neurons was increased in the ipsilateral VPN, and both TUNEL-positive cell number and caspase-3 protein level were reduced, while UNC5H2 expression remained unaffected, simultaneously, the impairment of postural reflex was improved. Taken together, the present study indicates that exogenous netrin-1 could rescue neuron loss by attenuating secondary apoptosis in the

  18. Abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial loss and mutant huntingtin oligomers in Huntington's disease: implications for selective neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Reddy, Arubala P.; Manczak, Maria; Calkins, Marcus J.; Mao, Peizhong; Tagle, Danilo A.; Hemachandra Reddy, P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between mutant huntingtin (Htt) and mitochondrial dynamics in the progression of Huntington's disease (HD). We measured the mRNA levels of electron transport chain genes, and mitochondrial structural genes, Drp1 (dynamin-related protein 1), Fis1 (fission 1), Mfn1 (mitofusin 1), Mfn2 (mitofusin 2), Opa1 (optric atrophy 1), Tomm40 (translocase of outermembrane 40) and CypD (cyclophilin D) in grade III and grade IV HD patients and controls. The mutant Htt oligomers and the mitochondrial structural proteins were quantified in the striatum and frontal cortex of HD patients. Changes in expressions of the electron transport chain genes were found in HD patients and may represent a compensatory response to mitochondrial damage caused by mutant Htt. Increased expression of Drp1 and Fis1 and decreased expression of Mfn1, Mfn2, Opa1 and Tomm40 were found in HD patients relative to the controls. CypD was upregulated in HD patients, and this upregulation increased as HD progressed. Significantly increased immunoreactivity of 8-hydroxy-guanosine was found in the cortical specimens from stage III and IV HD patients relative to controls, suggesting increased oxidative DNA damage in HD patients. In contrast, significantly decreased immunoreactivities of cytochrome oxidase 1 and cytochrome b were found in HD patients relative to controls, indicating a loss of mitochondrial function in HD patients. Immunoblotting analysis revealed 15, 25 and 50 kDa mutant Htt oligomers in the brain specimens of HD patients. All oligomeric forms of mutant Htt were significantly increased in the cortical tissues of HD patients, and mutant Htt oligomers were found in the nucleus and in mitochondria. The increase in Drp1, Fis1 and CypD and the decrease in Mfn1 and Mfn2 may be responsible for abnormal mitochondrial dynamics that we found in the cortex of HD patients, and may contribute to neuronal damage in HD patients. The presence of mutant Htt

  19. Abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial loss and mutant huntingtin oligomers in Huntington's disease: implications for selective neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Reddy, Arubala P; Manczak, Maria; Calkins, Marcus J; Mao, Peizhong; Tagle, Danilo A; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between mutant huntingtin (Htt) and mitochondrial dynamics in the progression of Huntington's disease (HD). We measured the mRNA levels of electron transport chain genes, and mitochondrial structural genes, Drp1 (dynamin-related protein 1), Fis1 (fission 1), Mfn1 (mitofusin 1), Mfn2 (mitofusin 2), Opa1 (optric atrophy 1), Tomm40 (translocase of outermembrane 40) and CypD (cyclophilin D) in grade III and grade IV HD patients and controls. The mutant Htt oligomers and the mitochondrial structural proteins were quantified in the striatum and frontal cortex of HD patients. Changes in expressions of the electron transport chain genes were found in HD patients and may represent a compensatory response to mitochondrial damage caused by mutant Htt. Increased expression of Drp1 and Fis1 and decreased expression of Mfn1, Mfn2, Opa1 and Tomm40 were found in HD patients relative to the controls. CypD was upregulated in HD patients, and this upregulation increased as HD progressed. Significantly increased immunoreactivity of 8-hydroxy-guanosine was found in the cortical specimens from stage III and IV HD patients relative to controls, suggesting increased oxidative DNA damage in HD patients. In contrast, significantly decreased immunoreactivities of cytochrome oxidase 1 and cytochrome b were found in HD patients relative to controls, indicating a loss of mitochondrial function in HD patients. Immunoblotting analysis revealed 15, 25 and 50 kDa mutant Htt oligomers in the brain specimens of HD patients. All oligomeric forms of mutant Htt were significantly increased in the cortical tissues of HD patients, and mutant Htt oligomers were found in the nucleus and in mitochondria. The increase in Drp1, Fis1 and CypD and the decrease in Mfn1 and Mfn2 may be responsible for abnormal mitochondrial dynamics that we found in the cortex of HD patients, and may contribute to neuronal damage in HD patients. The presence of mutant Htt

  20. The therapeutic potential of cell identity reprogramming for the treatment of aging-related neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek K; He, Miao; Zhang, Chun-Li; Zheng, Jialin C

    2016-02-01

    Neural cell identity reprogramming strategies aim to treat age-related neurodegenerative disorders with newly induced neurons that regenerate neural architecture and functional circuits in vivo. The isolation and neural differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells provided the first in vitro models of human neurodegenerative disease. Investigation into the molecular mechanisms underlying stem cell pluripotency revealed that somatic cells could be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and these cells could be used to model Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington disease, and Parkinson disease. Additional neural precursor and direct transdifferentiation strategies further enabled the induction of diverse neural linages and neuron subtypes both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we highlight neural induction strategies that utilize stem cells, iPSCs, and lineage reprogramming to model or treat age-related neurodegenerative diseases, as well as, the clinical challenges related to neural transplantation and in vivo reprogramming strategies.

  1. Loss of functional A-type potassium channels in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons from a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Routh, Brandy N; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2013-12-11

    Despite the critical importance of voltage-gated ion channels in neurons, very little is known about their functional properties in Fragile X syndrome: the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. Using three complementary approaches, we investigated the physiological role of A-type K(+) currents (I(KA)) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Direct measurement of I(KA) using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings revealed that there was significantly less I(KA) in the dendrites of CA1 neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Interestingly, the midpoint of activation for A-type K(+) channels was hyperpolarized for fmr1-/y neurons compared with wild-type, which might partially compensate for the lower current density. Because of the rapid time course for recovery from steady-state inactivation, the dendritic A-type K(+) current in CA1 neurons from both wild-type and fmr1-/y mice is likely mediated by K(V)4 containing channels. The net effect of the differences in I(KA) was that back-propagating action potentials had larger amplitudes producing greater calcium influx in the distal dendrites of fmr1-/y neurons. Furthermore, CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice had a lower threshold for LTP induction. These data suggest that loss of I(KA) in hippocampal neurons may contribute to dendritic pathophysiology in Fragile X syndrome.

  2. Loss of Functional A-Type Potassium Channels in the Dendrites of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons from a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Brandy N.; Johnston, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Despite the critical importance of voltage-gated ion channels in neurons, very little is known about their functional properties in Fragile X syndrome: the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. Using three complementary approaches, we investigated the physiological role of A-type K+ currents (IKA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Direct measurement of IKA using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings revealed that there was significantly less IKA in the dendrites of CA1 neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Interestingly, the midpoint of activation for A-type K+ channels was hyperpolarized for fmr1-/y neurons compared with wild-type, which might partially compensate for the lower current density. Because of the rapid time course for recovery from steady-state inactivation, the dendritic A-type K+ current in CA1 neurons from both wild-type and fmr1-/y mice is likely mediated by KV4 containing channels. The net effect of the differences in IKA was that back-propagating action potentials had larger amplitudes producing greater calcium influx in the distal dendrites of fmr1-/y neurons. Furthermore, CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice had a lower threshold for LTP induction. These data suggest that loss of IKA in hippocampal neurons may contribute to dendritic pathophysiology in Fragile X syndrome. PMID:24336711

  3. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Produces Neuron Loss That Can Be Rescued by Modulating Microglial Activation Using a CB2 Receptor Inverse Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Deng, Yunping; Del Mar, Nobel; Guley, Natalie M.; Moore, Bob M.; Honig, Marcia G.; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that mild TBI created by focal left-side cranial blast in mice produces widespread axonal injury, microglial activation, and a variety of functional deficits. We have also shown that these functional deficits are reduced by targeting microglia through their cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptors using 2-week daily administration of the CB2 inverse agonist SMM-189. CB2 inverse agonists stabilize the G-protein coupled CB2 receptor in an inactive conformation, leading to increased phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and thus bias activated microglia from a pro-inflammatory M1 to a pro-healing M2 state. In the present study, we showed that SMM-189 boosts nuclear pCREB levels in microglia in several brain regions by 3 days after TBI, by using pCREB/CD68 double immunofluorescent labeling. Next, to better understand the basis of motor deficits and increased fearfulness after TBI, we used unbiased stereological methods to characterize neuronal loss in cortex, striatum, and basolateral amygdala (BLA) and assessed how neuronal loss was affected by SMM-189 treatment. Our stereological neuron counts revealed a 20% reduction in cortical and 30% reduction in striatal neurons bilaterally at 2–3 months post blast, with SMM-189 yielding about 50% rescue. Loss of BLA neurons was restricted to the blast side, with 33% of Thy1+ fear-suppressing pyramidal neurons and 47% of fear-suppressing parvalbuminergic (PARV) interneurons lost, and Thy1-negative fear-promoting pyramidal neurons not significantly affected. SMM-189 yielded 50–60% rescue of Thy1+ and PARV neuron loss in BLA. Thus, fearfulness after mild TBI may result from the loss of fear-suppressing neuron types in BLA, and SMM-189 may reduce fearfulness by their rescue. Overall, our findings indicate that SMM-189 rescues damaged neurons and thereby alleviates functional deficits resulting from TBI, apparently by selectively modulating microglia

  4. Accelerated age-related cognitive decline and neurodegeneration, caused by deficient DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Borgesius, Nils Z; de Waard, Monique C; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Omrani, Azar; Zondag, Gerben C M; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Melton, David W; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Jaarsma, Dick; Elgersma, Ype

    2011-08-31

    Age-related cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases are a growing challenge for our societies with their aging populations. Accumulation of DNA damage has been proposed to contribute to these impairments, but direct proof that DNA damage results in impaired neuronal plasticity and memory is lacking. Here we take advantage of Ercc1(Δ/-) mutant mice, which are impaired in DNA nucleotide excision repair, interstrand crosslink repair, and double-strand break repair. We show that these mice exhibit an age-dependent decrease in neuronal plasticity and progressive neuronal pathology, suggestive of neurodegenerative processes. A similar phenotype is observed in mice where the mutation is restricted to excitatory forebrain neurons. Moreover, these neuron-specific mutants develop a learning impairment. Together, these results suggest a causal relationship between unrepaired, accumulating DNA damage, and age-dependent cognitive decline and neurodegeneration. Hence, accumulated DNA damage could therefore be an important factor in the onset and progression of age-related cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Sensory defects in Necdin deficient mice result from a loss of sensory neurons correlated within an increase of developmental programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Andrieu, David; Meziane, Hamid; Marly, Fabienne; Angelats, Corinne; Fernandez, Pierre-Alain; Muscatelli, Françoise

    2006-01-01

    Background The human NECDIN gene is involved in a neurodevelopmental disorder, Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Previously we reported a mouse Necdin knock-out model with similar defects to PWS patients. Despite the putative roles attributed to Necdin, mainly from in vitro studies, its in vivo function remains unclear. In this study, we investigate sensory-motor behaviour in Necdin deficient mice. We reveal cellular defects and analyse their cause. Results We report sensory differences in Necdin deficient mice compared to wild type animals. These differences led us to investigate sensory neuron development in Necdin deficient mouse embryos. First, we describe the expression pattern of Necdin in developing DRGs and report a reduction of one-third in specified sensory neurons in dorsal roots ganglia and show that this neuronal loss is achieved by E13.5, when DRGs sensory neurons are specified. In parallel, we observed an increase of 41% in neuronal apoptosis during the wave of naturally occurring cell death at E12.5. Since it is assumed that Necdin is a P75NTR interactor, we looked at the P75NTR-expressing cell population in Necdin knock-out embryos. Unexpectedly, Necdin loss of function has no effect on p75NTR expressing neurons suggesting no direct genetic interaction between Necdin and P75NTR in this context. Although we exclude a role of Necdin in axonal outgrowth from spinal sensory neurons in early developmental stages; such a role could occur later in neuronal differentiation. Finally we also exclude an anti-proliferative role of Necdin in developing sensory neurons. Conclusion Overall, our data show clearly that, in early development of the nervous system, Necdin is an anti-apoptotic or survival factor. PMID:17116257

  6. Loss of GCN5 leads to increased neuronal apoptosis by upregulating E2F1- and Egr-1-dependent BH3-only protein Bim.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanna; Ma, Shanshan; Xia, Yong; Lu, Yangpeng; Xiao, Shiyin; Cao, Yali; Zhuang, Sidian; Tan, Xiangpeng; Fu, Qiang; Xie, Longchang; Li, Zhiming; Yuan, Zhongmin

    2017-01-26

    Cellular acetylation homeostasis is a kinetic balance precisely controlled by histone acetyl-transferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities. The loss of the counterbalancing function of basal HAT activity alters the precious HAT:HDAC balance towards enhanced histone deacetylation, resulting in a loss of acetylation homeostasis, which is closely associated with neuronal apoptosis. However, the critical HAT member whose activity loss contributes to neuronal apoptosis remains to be identified. In this study, we found that inactivation of GCN5 by either pharmacological inhibitors, such as CPTH2 and MB-3, or by inactivation with siRNAs leads to a typical apoptosis in cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Mechanistically, the BH3-only protein Bim is transcriptionally upregulated by activated Egr-1 and E2F1 and mediates apoptosis following GCN5 inhibition. Furthermore, in the activity withdrawal- or glutamate-evoked neuronal apoptosis models, GCN5 loses its activity, in contrast to Bim induction. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of GCN5 suppresses Bim induction and apoptosis. Interestingly, the loss of GCN5 activity and the induction of Egr-1, E2F1 and Bim are involved in the early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in rats. HDAC inhibition not only significantly rescues Bim expression and apoptosis induced by either potassium deprivation or GCN5 inactivation but also ameliorates these events and EBI in SAH rats. Taken together, our results highlight a new mechanism by which the loss of GCN5 activity promotes neuronal apoptosis through the transcriptional upregulation of Bim, which is probably a critical event in triggering neuronal death when cellular acetylation homeostasis is impaired.

  7. Exercise Counteracts Aging-Related Memory Impairment: A Potential Role for the Astrocytic Metabolic Shuttle

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Pei-Chun; Calkins, Marcus J.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cognitive impairment has become one of the most common health threats in many countries. The biological substrate of cognition is the interconnection of neurons to form complex information processing networks. Experience-based alterations in the activities of these information processing networks lead to neuroadaptation, which is physically represented at the cellular level as synaptic plasticity. Although synaptic plasticity is known to be affected by aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well described. Astrocytes, a glial cell type that is infrequently investigated in cognitive science, have emerged as energy suppliers which are necessary for meeting the abundant energy demand resulting from glutamatergic synaptic activity. Moreover, the concerted action of an astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle is essential for cognitive function; whereas, energetic incoordination between astrocytes and neurons may contribute to cognitive impairment. Whether altered function of the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle links aging to reduced synaptic plasticity is unexplored. However, accumulated evidence documents significant beneficial effects of long-term, regular exercise on cognition and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, exercise increases the effectiveness of astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle by upregulation of astrocytic lactate transporter levels. This review summarizes previous findings related to the neuronal activity-dependent astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle. Moreover, we discuss how aging and exercise may shape the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle in cognition-associated brain areas. PMID:27047373

  8. Deletion of Pofut1 in mouse skeletal myofibers induces muscle aging-related phenotypes in cis and in trans.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Deborah A; Singhal, Neha; Kim, Mi-Lyang; Cramer, Megan L; Crowe, Kelly E; Xu, Rui; Jia, Ying; Adair, Jessica; Martinez-Pena Y Valenzuela, Isabel; Akaaboune, Mohammed; White, Peter; Janssen, Paulus M; Martin, Paul T

    2017-03-06

    Sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass and strength during normal aging, involves coordinate changes in skeletal myofibers and the cells that contact them, including satellite cells and motor neurons. Here we show that Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1), a gene that encodes a glycosyltransferase required for NotchR-mediated cell-cell signaling, has reduced expression in aging skeletal muscle. Moreover, premature postnatal deletion of Pofut1 in skeletal myofibers can induce aging-related phenotypes in cis within skeletal myofibers and in trans within satellite cells and within motor neurons via the neuromuscular junction. Changed phenotypes include reduced skeletal muscle size and strength, decreased myofiber size and increased slow (type 1) fiber density, increased muscle degeneration and regeneration in aged muscles, decreased satellite cell self-renewal and regenerative potential, and increased neuromuscular fragmentation and occasional denervation. Pofut1 deletion in skeletal myofibers reduced NotchR signaling in young adult muscles, but this effect was lost with age. Increasing muscle NotchR signaling also reduced muscle size. Gene expression studies point to regulation of cell cycle genes, muscle myosins, NotchR and Wnt pathway genes, and connective tissue growth factor by Pofut1 in skeletal muscle, with additional effects on α dystroglycan glycosylation.

  9. Protect Your Eyes: Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Facts and Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    PROTECT YOUR EYES Age-Related Macular Degeneration ( AMD ) FACTS & PREVENTION TIPS A LEADING CAUSE OF VISION LOSS IN THE U.S . AMD is a ... Black 2% Other 89% White As the population ages, the number of cases is expected to increase ...

  10. Introduction to the issue regarding research regarding age related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blindness is the second greatest fear among the elderly. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among the elderly in most industrialized nations. AMD first compromises central high acuity vision. Subsequently, all vision may be lost. AMD is a progressive retinal d...

  11. Psychosocial Intervention for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Hans-Werner; Kammerer, Annette; Holz, Frank; Miller, Daniel; Becker, Stefanie; Kaspar, Roman; Himmelsbach, Ines

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated an emotion-focused and a problem-focused intervention designed for patients with age-related macular degeneration. It found a limited decrease in depression in the emotion-focused group and an increase in active problem orientation and in adaptation to vision loss in the problem-focused group.

  12. Sirt3 Protects Dopaminergic Neurons from Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Shi, Han; Deng, Han-Xiang; Gius, David; Schumacker, Paul T; James Surmeier, D; Ma, Yong-Chao

    2017-03-24

    Age-dependent elevation in mitochondrial oxidative stress is widely posited to be a major factor underlying the loss of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, mechanistic links between aging and oxidative stress are not well understood. Sirtuin-3 (Sirt3) is a mitochondrial deacetylase that could mediate this connection. Indeed, genetic deletion of Sirt3 increased oxidative stress and decreased the membrane potential of mitochondria in SNc dopaminergic neurons. This change was attributable to increased acetylation and decreased activity of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Site directed mutagenesis of lysine 68 to glutamine (K68Q), mimicking acetylation, decreased MnSOD activity in SNc dopaminergic neurons, whereas mutagenesis of lysine 68 to arginine (K68R), mimicking deacetylation, increased activity. Introduction of K68R MnSOD rescued mitochondrial redox status and membrane potential of SNc dopaminergic neurons from Sirt3 knockouts. Moreover, deletion of DJ-1, which helps orchestrate nuclear oxidant defenses, and Sirt3 in mice led to a clear age-related loss of SNc dopaminergic neurons. Lastly, K68 acetylation of MnSOD was significantly increased in the SNc of PD patients. Taken together, our studies suggest that an age-related decline in Sirt3 protective function is a major factor underlying increasing mitochondrial oxidative stress and loss of SNc dopaminergic neurons in PD.

  13. Aluminum chloride induces neuroinflammation, loss of neuronal dendritic spine and cognition impairment in developing rat.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Haoran; Huang, Wanyue; Xu, Feibo; Zhuang, Cuicui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Li, Yanfei

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) is present in the daily life of humans, and the incidence of Al contamination increased in recent years. Long-term excessive Al intake induces neuroinflammation and cognition impairment. Neuroinflammation alter density of dendritic spine, which, in turn, influence cognition function. However, it is unknown whether increased neuroinflammation is associated with altered density of dendritic spine in Al-treated rats. In the present study, AlCl3 was orally administrated to rat at 50, 150 and 450 mg/kg for 90d. We examined the effects of AlCl3 on the cognition function, density of dendritic spine in hippocampus of CA1 and DG region and the mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, MHC II, CX3CL1 and BNDF in developing rat. These results showed exposure to AlCl3 lead to increased mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and MCH II, decreased mRNA levels of CX3CL1 and BDNF, decreased density of dendritic spine and impaired learning and memory in developing rat. Our results suggest AlCl3 can induce neuroinflammation that may result in loss of spine, and thereby leads to learning and memory deficits.

  14. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits.

    PubMed

    Masoud, S T; Vecchio, L M; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, M M; Nguyen, L T; Bermejo, M K; Kile, B; Sotnikova, T D; Siesser, W B; Gainetdinov, R R; Wightman, R M; Caron, M G; Richardson, J R; Miller, G W; Ramsey, A J; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with l-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease.

  15. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and L-DOPA reversible motor deficits

    PubMed Central

    Masoud, ST; Vecchio, LM; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, MM; Nguyen, LT; Bermejo, MK; Kile, B; Sotnikova, TD; Siesser, WB; Gainetdinov, RR; Wightman, RM; Caron, MG; Richardson, JR; Miller, GW; Ramsey, AJ; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with L-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and LDOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25447236

  16. Stereotactic radiotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Mahdy; Kurz, Maximilian; Holzhey, Annekatrin; Melchert, Corinna; Rades, Dirk; Grisanti, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is a new approach to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). The INTREPID trial suggested that SRT could reduce the frequency of regular intravitreal injections (IVIs) with antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs, which are necessary to control disease activity. However, the efficacy of SRT in nAMD and resulting morphological changes have not been validated under real-life circumstances, an issue, which we would like to address in this retrospective analysis. Patients who met the INTREPID criteria for best responders were eligible for SRT. A total of 32 eyes of 32 patients were treated. Thereafter, patients were examined monthly for 12 months and received pro re nata IVI of aflibercept or ranibizumab. Outcome measures were: mean number of injections, best-corrected visual acuity, and morphological changes of the outer retina-choroid complex as well as patient safety. Mean number of IVI decreased by almost 50% during the 12 months after SRT compared to the year before, whereas visual acuity increased by one line (logMAR). Morphological evaluation showed that most changes affect outer retinal layers. Stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduced IVI retreatment in nAMD patients under real-life circumstances. Therefore, SRT might be the first step to stop visual loss as a result of IVI undertreatment, which is a major risk. PMID:28033280

  17. Oxidative modification of proteins: age-related changes.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Bulbul; Chakravarti, Deb N

    2007-01-01

    Aging is a complex biological phenomenon which involves progressive loss of different physiological functions of various tissues of living organisms. It is the inevitable fate of life and is a major risk factor for death and different pathological disorders. Based on a wide variety of studies performed in humans as well as in various animal models and microbial systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to play a key role in the aging process. The production of ROS is influenced by cellular metabolic activities as well as environmental factors. ROS can react with all major biological macromolecules such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. Since, in general, proteins are the key molecules that play the ultimate role in various structural and functional aspects of living organisms, this review will focus on the age-related oxidative modifications of proteins as well as on mechanism for removal or repair of the oxidized proteins. The topics covered include protein oxidation as a marker of oxidative stress, experimental evidence indicating the role of ROS in protein oxidation, protein carbonyl content, enzymatic degradation of oxidized proteins, and effects of caloric restriction on protein oxidation in the context of aging. Finally, we will discuss different strategies which have been or can be undertaken to slow down the oxidative damage of proteins and the aging process.

  18. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forest, David L.; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD). A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease. PMID:26035859

  19. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease. PMID:23209345

  20. Mechanism of inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  1. Effect of NCAM on aged-related deterioration in vision.

    PubMed

    Luke, Margaret Po-Shan; LeVatte, Terry L; O'Reilly, Amanda M; Smith, Benjamin J; Tremblay, François; Brown, Richard E; Clarke, David B

    2016-05-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is involved in developmental processes and age-associated cognitive decline; however, little is known concerning the effects of NCAM in the visual system during aging. Using anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays, we analyzed age-related changes in visual function of NCAM deficient (-/-) and wild-type mice. Anatomical analyses indicated that aging NCAM -/- mice had fewer retinal ganglion cells, thinner retinas, and fewer photoreceptor cell layers than age-matched controls. Electroretinogram testing of retinal function in young adult NCAM -/- mice showed a 2-fold increase in a- and b-wave amplitude compared with wild-type mice, but the retinal activity dropped dramatically to control levels when the animals reached 10 months. In behavioral tasks, NCAM -/- mice had no visual pattern discrimination ability and showed premature loss of vision as they aged. Together, these findings demonstrate that NCAM plays significant roles in the adult visual system in establishing normal retinal anatomy, physiology and function, and in maintaining vision during aging.

  2. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index.

  3. Wet age related macular degeneration management and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Malciolu Radu; Alexandra, Nica Maria

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is referred to as the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in developed countries, with a profound effect on the quality of life. The neovascular form of AMD is characterized by the formation of subretinal choroidal neovascularization, leading to sudden and severe visual loss. Research has identified the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological component in neovascular AMD and its intraocular inhibition as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The introduction of anti-VEGF as a standard treatment in wet AMD has led to a great improvement in the prognosis of patients, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of cases. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by a difficulty in maintaining the treatment schedule due to the increase in the amount of patients, stress of monthly assessments, as well as the associated economic burden. Therefore, treatment strategies have evolved from fixed monthly dosing, to individualized regimens, aiming for comparable results, with fewer injections. One such protocol is called "pro re nata", or "treat and observe". Patients are given a loading dose of 3 monthly injections, followed by an as-needed decision to treat, based on the worsening of visual acuity, clinical evidence of the disease activity on fundoscopy, or OCT evidence of retinal thickening in the presence of intra or subretinal fluid. A different regimen is called "treat and extend", in which the interval between injections is gradually increased, once the disease stabilization is achieved. This paper aims to review the currently available anti-VEGF agents--bevacizumab, ranibizumab, aflibercept, and the aforementioned treatment strategies.

  4. Age-related changes in dentate gyrus cell numbers, neurogenesis, and associations with cognitive impairments in the rhesus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Ngwenya, Laura B.; Heyworth, Nadine C.; Shwe, Yamin; Moore, Tara L.; Rosene, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of new neurons in the adult mammalian brain is well-established for the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). However, the role of neurogenesis in hippocampal function and cognition, how it changes in aging, and the mechanisms underlying this are yet to be elucidated in the monkey brain. To address this, we investigated adult neurogenesis in the DG of 42 rhesus monkeys (39 cognitively tested) ranging in age from young adult to the elderly. We report here that there is an age-related decline in proliferation and a delayed development of adult neuronal phenotype. Additionally, we show that many of the new neurons survive throughout the lifetime of the animal and may contribute to a modest increase in total neuron number in the granule cell layer of the DG over the adult life span. Lastly, we find that measures of decreased adult neurogenesis are only modestly predictive of age-related cognitive impairment. PMID:26236203

  5. Slowing Down: Age-Related Neurobiological Predictors of Processing Speed

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Processing speed, or the rate at which tasks can be performed, is a robust predictor of age-related cognitive decline and an indicator of independence among older adults. This review examines evidence for neurobiological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, which is guided in part by our source based morphometry findings that unique patterns of frontal and cerebellar gray matter predict age-related variation in processing speed. These results, together with the extant literature on morphological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, suggest that specific neural systems undergo declines and as a result slow processing speed. Future studies of processing speed – dependent neural systems will be important for identifying the etiologies for processing speed change and the development of interventions that mitigate gradual age-related declines in cognitive functioning and enhance healthy cognitive aging. PMID:21441995

  6. Parent-of-origin genetic background affects the transcriptional levels of circadian and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Tinarelli, Federico; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Nicassio, Francesco; Tucci, Valter

    2014-01-01

    Sleep homoeostasis refers to a process in which the propensity to sleep increases as wakefulness progresses and decreases as sleep progresses. Sleep is tightly organized around the circadian clock and is regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The homoeostatic response of sleep, which is classically triggered by sleep deprivation, is generally measured as a rebound effect of electrophysiological measures, for example delta sleep. However, more recently, gene expression changes following sleep loss have been investigated as biomarkers of sleep homoeostasis. The genetic background of an individual may affect this sleep-dependent gene expression phenotype. In this study, we investigated whether parental genetic background differentially modulates the expression of genes following sleep loss. We tested the progeny of reciprocal crosses of AKR/J and DBA/2J mouse strains and we show a parent-of-origin effect on the expression of circadian, sleep and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep deprivation. Thus, we further explored, by in silico, specific functions or upstream mechanisms of regulation and we observed that several upstream mechanisms involving signalling pathways (i.e. DICER1, PKA), growth factors (CSF3 and BDNF) and transcriptional regulators (EGR2 and ELK4) may be differentially modulated by parental effects. This is the first report showing that a behavioural manipulation (e.g. sleep deprivation) in adult animals triggers specific gene expression responses according to parent-of-origin genomic mechanisms. Our study suggests that the same mechanism may be extended to other behavioural domains and that the investigation of gene expression following experimental manipulations should take seriously into account parent-of-origin effects. PMID:24446504

  7. Parent-of-origin genetic background affects the transcriptional levels of circadian and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Tinarelli, Federico; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Nicassio, Francesco; Tucci, Valter

    2014-03-05

    Sleep homoeostasis refers to a process in which the propensity to sleep increases as wakefulness progresses and decreases as sleep progresses. Sleep is tightly organized around the circadian clock and is regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The homoeostatic response of sleep, which is classically triggered by sleep deprivation, is generally measured as a rebound effect of electrophysiological measures, for example delta sleep. However, more recently, gene expression changes following sleep loss have been investigated as biomarkers of sleep homoeostasis. The genetic background of an individual may affect this sleep-dependent gene expression phenotype. In this study, we investigated whether parental genetic background differentially modulates the expression of genes following sleep loss. We tested the progeny of reciprocal crosses of AKR/J and DBA/2J mouse strains and we show a parent-of-origin effect on the expression of circadian, sleep and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep deprivation. Thus, we further explored, by in silico, specific functions or upstream mechanisms of regulation and we observed that several upstream mechanisms involving signalling pathways (i.e. DICER1, PKA), growth factors (CSF3 and BDNF) and transcriptional regulators (EGR2 and ELK4) may be differentially modulated by parental effects. This is the first report showing that a behavioural manipulation (e.g. sleep deprivation) in adult animals triggers specific gene expression responses according to parent-of-origin genomic mechanisms. Our study suggests that the same mechanism may be extended to other behavioural domains and that the investigation of gene expression following experimental manipulations should take seriously into account parent-of-origin effects.

  8. White Matter Neurons in Young Adult and Aged Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Farzad; Wang, Xiyue; Rosene, Douglas L.; Rockland, Kathleen S.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and non-human primates (NHP), white matter neurons (WMNs) persist beyond early development. Their functional importance is largely unknown, but they have both corticothalamic and corticocortical connectivity and at least one subpopulation has been implicated in vascular regulation and sleep. Several other studies have reported that the density of WMNs in humans is altered in neuropathological or psychiatric conditions. The present investigation evaluates and compares the density of superficial and deep WMNs in frontal (FR), temporal (TE), and parietal (Par) association regions of four young adult and four aged male rhesus monkeys. A major aim was to determine whether there was age-related neuronal loss, as might be expected given the substantial age-related changes known to occur in the surrounding white matter environment. Neurons were visualized by immunocytochemistry for Neu-N in coronal tissue sections (30 μm thickness), and neuronal density was assessed by systematic random sampling. Per 0.16 mm2 sampling box, this yielded about 40 neurons in the superficial WM and 10 in the deep WM. Consistent with multiple studies of cell density in the cortical gray matter of normal brains, neither the superficial nor deep WM populations showed statistically significant age-related neuronal loss, although we observed a moderate decrease with age for the deep WMNs in the frontal region. Morphometric analyses, in contrast, showed significant age effects in soma size and circularity. In specific, superficial WMNs were larger in FR and Par WM regions of the young monkeys; but in the TE, these were larger in the older monkeys. An age effect was also observed for soma circularity: superficial WMNs were more circular in FR and Par of the older monkeys. This second, morphometric result raises the question of whether other age-related morphological, connectivity, or molecular changes occur in the WMNs. These could have multiple impacts, given the wide range of putative

  9. Increased calcium in neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum is not associated with cell loss in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Tuckett, Emma; Gosetti, Troy; Hayes, Alan; Rybalka, Emma; Verghese, Elizabeth

    2015-09-09

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disease resulting from mutation of the X-linked dystrophin gene. In addition to skeletal muscle pathology, cognitive deficits have been identified in patients with DMD. There is a lack of research investigating the pathological mechanisms underlying the neurological deficits apparent in DMD. The current study assessed whether increases in calcium contributed towards neuronal cell loss or histopathological changes in the genetically homologous mdx mouse model of DMD in sections from the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum at 24 days, 12 weeks and 9 months of age. Alizarin S staining showed a significant increase in calcium-positive neurons in the mdx cerebral cortex at 24 days and 9 months and the cerebellum at 24 days, 12 weeks and 9 months compared with age-matched controls. However, neuronal cell counts of haemotoxylin and eosin-stained sections showed that altered calcium levels did not lead to neuronal cell loss. A better understanding of how the disruption of calcium regulation affects the function of neurons may explain the neurological deficits apparent in mdx mice and patients with DMD.

  10. Impaired neurogenesis, neuronal loss, and brain functional deficits in the APPxPS1-Ki mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Faure, A; Verret, L; Bozon, B; El Tannir El Tayara, N; Ly, M; Kober, F; Dhenain, M; Rampon, C; Delatour, B

    2011-03-01

    Amyloid-β peptide species accumulating in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease are assumed to have a neurotoxic action and hence to be key actors in the physiopathology of this neurodegenerative disease. We have studied a new mouse mutant (APPxPS1-Ki) line developing both early-onset brain amyloid-β deposition and, in contrast to most of transgenic models, subsequent neuronal loss. In 6-month-old mice, we observed cell layer atrophies in the hippocampus, together with a dramatic decrease in neurogenesis and a reduced brain blood perfusion as measured in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. In these mice, neurological impairments and spatial hippocampal dependent memory deficits were also substantiated and worsened with aging. We described here a phenotype of APPxPS1-Ki mice that summarizes several neuroanatomical alterations and functional deficits evocative of the human pathology. Such a transgenic model that displays strong face validity might be highly beneficial to future research on AD physiopathogeny and therapeutics.

  11. Loss of neuronal GSK3β reduces dendritic spine stability and attenuates excitatory synaptic transmission via β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, S M; Dorostkar, M M; Aramuni, G; Schön, C; Filser, S; Pöschl, J; Kremer, A; Van Leuven, F; Ovsepian, S V; Herms, J

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric diseases, such as bipolar disorder, depression, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome or anxiety disorder. Many drugs employed to treat these conditions inhibit GSK3β either directly or indirectly. We studied how conditional knockout of GSK3β affected structural synaptic plasticity. Deletion of the GSK3β gene in a subset of cortical and hippocampal neurons in adult mice led to reduced spine density. In vivo imaging revealed that this was caused by a loss of persistent spines, whereas stabilization of newly formed spines was reduced. In electrophysiological recordings, these structural alterations correlated with a considerable drop in the frequency and amplitude of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor-dependent miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. Expression of constitutively active β-catenin caused reduction in spine density and electrophysiological alterations similar to GSK3β knockout, suggesting that the effects of GSK3β knockout were mediated by the accumulation of β-catenin. In summary, changes of dendritic spines, both in quantity and in morphology, are correlates of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity; thus, these results may help explain the mechanism of action of psychotropic drugs inhibiting GSK3β. PMID:24912492

  12. Structural and molecular myelination deficits occur prior to neuronal loss in the YAC128 and BACHD models of Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Roy Tang Yi; Hong, Xin; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Huang, Yihui; Tan, Liang Juin; Xie, Yuanyun; To, Xuan Vinh; Guo, Ling; Rajendran, Reshmi; Novati, Arianna; Calaminus, Carsten; Riess, Olaf; Hayden, Michael R.; Nguyen, Huu P.; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Pouladi, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    White matter (WM) atrophy is a significant feature of Huntington disease (HD), although its aetiology and early pathological manifestations remain poorly defined. In this study, we aimed to characterize WM-related features in the transgenic YAC128 and BACHD models of HD. Using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), we demonstrate that microstructural WM abnormalities occur from an early age in YAC128 mice. Similarly, electron microscopy analysis of myelinated fibres of the corpus callosum indicated that myelin sheaths are thinner in YAC128 mice as early as 1.5 months of age, well before any neuronal loss can be detected. Transcript levels of myelin-related genes in striatal and cortical tissues were significantly lower in YAC128 mice from 2 weeks of age, and these findings were replicated in differentiated primary oligodendrocytes from YAC128 mice, suggesting a possible mechanistic explanation for the observed structural deficits. Concordant with these observations, we demonstrate reduced expression of myelin-related genes at 3 months of age and WM microstructural abnormalities using DT-MRI at 12 months of age in the BACHD rats. These findings indicate that WM deficits in HD are an early phenotype associated with cell-intrinsic effects of mutant huntingtin on myelin-related transcripts in oligodendrocytes, and raise the possibility that WM abnormalities may be an early contributing factor to the pathogenesis of HD. PMID:27126634

  13. Mitochondrial ROS regulate oxidative damage and mitophagy but not age-related muscle fiber atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K.; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P.; Nye, Gareth A.; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I.; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Griffiths, Richard D.; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function is a major contributor to morbidity and has a profound effect on the quality of life of older people. The potential role of age-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cumulative oxidative stress as the underlying cause of muscle aging remains a controversial topic. Here we show that the pharmacological attenuation of age-related mitochondrial redox changes in muscle with SS31 is associated with some improvements in oxidative damage and mitophagy in muscles of old mice. However, this treatment failed to rescue the age-related muscle fiber atrophy associated with muscle atrophy and weakness. Collectively, these data imply that the muscle mitochondrial redox environment is not a key regulator of muscle fiber atrophy during sarcopenia but may play a key role in the decline of mitochondrial organelle integrity that occurs with muscle aging. PMID:27681159

  14. Apparent loss and hypertrophy of interneurons in a mouse model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis: evidence for partial response to insulin-like growth factor-1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J D; Messer, A; Feng, A K; Chua-Couzens, J; Mobley, W C

    1999-04-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are progressive neurodegenerative disorders with onset from infancy to adulthood that are manifested by blindness, seizures, and dementia. In NCL, lysosomes accumulate autofluorescent proteolipid in the brain and other tissues. The mnd/mnd mutant mouse was first characterized as exhibiting adult-onset upper and lower motor neuron degeneration, but closer examination revealed early, widespread pathology similar to that seen in NCL. We used the autofluorescent properties of accumulated storage material to map which CNS neuronal populations in the mnd/mnd mouse show NCL-like pathological changes. Pronounced, early accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment was found in subpopulations of GABAergic neurons, including interneurons in the cortex and hippocampus. Staining for phenotypic markers normally present in these neurons revealed progressive loss of staining in the cortex and hippocampus of mnd/mnd mice, with pronounced hypertrophy of remaining detectable interneurons. In contrast, even in aged mutant mice, many hippocampal interneurons retained staining for glutamic acid decarboxylase. Treatment with insulin-like growth factor-1 partially restored interneuronal number and reduced hypertrophy in some subregions. These results provide the first evidence for the involvement of interneurons in a mouse model of NCL. Moreover, our findings suggest that at least some populations of these neurons persist in a growth factor-responsive state.

  15. The relevance of aging-related changes in brain function to rehabilitation in aging-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Bruce; McGregor, Keith M.; Nocera, Joe R.; Drucker, Jonathan H.; Tran, Stella M.; Butler, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging on rehabilitation of aging-related diseases are rarely a design consideration in rehabilitation research. In this brief review we present strong coincidental evidence from these two fields suggesting that deficits in aging-related disease or injury are compounded by the interaction between aging-related brain changes and disease-related brain changes. Specifically, we hypothesize that some aphasia, motor, and neglect treatments using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in stroke patients may address the aging side of this interaction. The importance of testing this hypothesis and addressing the larger aging by aging-related disease interaction is discussed. Underlying mechanisms in aging that most likely are relevant to rehabilitation of aging-related diseases also are covered. PMID:26074807

  16. Age-related changes in glial cells of dopamine midbrain subregions in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Nicholas M; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Collier, Timothy J

    2010-06-01

    Aging remains the strongest risk factor for developing Parkinson's disease (PD), and there is selective vulnerability in midbrain dopamine (DA) neuron degeneration in PD. By tracking normal aging-related changes with an emphasis on regional specificity, factors involved in selective vulnerability and resistance to degeneration can be studied. Towards this end, we sought to determine whether age-related changes in microglia and astrocytes in rhesus monkeys are region-specific, suggestive of involvement in regional differences in vulnerability to degeneration that may be relevant to PD pathogenesis. Gliosis in midbrain DA subregions was measured by estimating glia number using unbiased stereology, assessing fluorescence intensity for proteins upregulated during activation, and rating morphology. With normal aging, microglia exhibited increased staining intensity and a shift to more activated morphologies preferentially in the vulnerable substantia nigra-ventral tier (vtSN). Astrocytes did not exhibit age-related changes consistent with an involvement in regional vulnerability in any measure. Our results suggest advancing age is associated with chronic mild inflammation in the vtSN, which may render these DA neurons more vulnerable to degeneration.

  17. Blockade of Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate channels decreases oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced Zn2+ accumulation and neuronal loss in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong Z; Sensi, Stefano L; Ogoshi, Fumio; Weiss, John H

    2002-02-15

    Synaptic release of Zn2+ and its translocation into postsynaptic neurons probably contribute to neuronal injury after ischemia or epilepsy. Studies in cultured neurons have revealed that of the three major routes of divalent cation entry, NMDA channels, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs), and Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate (Ca-A/K) channels, Ca-A/K channels exhibit the highest permeability to exogenously applied Zn2+. However, routes through which synaptically released Zn2+ gains entry to postsynaptic neurons have not been characterized in vivo. To model ischemia-induced Zn2+ movement in a system approximating the in vivo situation, we subjected mouse hippocampal slice preparations to controlled periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Timm's staining revealed little reactive Zn2+ in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of slices exposed in the presence of O2 and glucose. However, 15 min of OGD resulted in marked labeling in both regions. Whereas strong Zn2+ labeling persisted if both the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the VSCC blocker Gd3+ were present during OGD, the presence of either the Ca-A/K channel blocker 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (NAS) or the extracellular Zn2+ chelator Ca2+ EDTA substantially decreased Zn2+ accumulation in pyramidal neurons of both subregions. In parallel experiments, slices were subjected to 5 min OGD exposures as described above, followed 4 hr later by staining with the cell-death marker propidium iodide. As in the Timm's staining experiments, substantial CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neuronal damage occurred despite the presence of MK-801 and Gd3+, whereas injury was decreased by NAS or by Ca2+ EDTA (in CA1).

  18. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Eveline S; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E; Yeo, Gene W; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-02-19

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43(Q331K) and TDP-43(M337V)), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43-dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43(Q331K), but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43(Q331K) enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage.

  19. Genotype-specific effects of Mecp2 loss-of-function on morphology of Layer V pyramidal neurons in heterozygous female Rett syndrome model mice.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Leslie; Stuss, David P; McPhee, David; Delaney, Kerry R

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a progressive neurological disorder primarily caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The heterozygous female brain consists of mosaic of neurons containing both wild-type MeCP2 (MeCP2+) and mutant MeCP2 (MeCP2-). Three-dimensional morphological analysis was performed on individually genotyped layer V pyramidal neurons in the primary motor cortex of heterozygous (Mecp2(+/-) ) and wild-type (Mecp2(+/+) ) female mice ( > 6 mo.) from the Mecp2(tm1.1Jae) line. Comparing basal dendrite morphology, soma and nuclear size of MeCP2+ to MeCP2- neurons reveals a significant cell autonomous, genotype specific effect of Mecp2. MeCP2- neurons have 15% less total basal dendritic length, predominantly in the region 70-130 μm from the cell body and on average three fewer branch points, specifically loss in the second and third branch orders. Soma and nuclear areas of neurons of mice were analyzed across a range of ages (5-21 mo.) and X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) ratios (12-56%). On average, MeCP2- somata and nuclei were 15 and 13% smaller than MeCP2+ neurons respectively. In most respects branching morphology of neurons in wild-type brains (MeCP2 WT) was not distinguishable from MeCP2+ but somata and nuclei of MeCP2 WT neurons were larger than those of MeCP2+ neurons. These data reveal cell autonomous effects of Mecp2 mutation on dendritic morphology, but also suggest non-cell autonomous effects with respect to cell size. MeCP2+ and MeCP2- neuron sizes were not correlated with age, but were correlated with XCI ratio. Unexpectedly the MeCP2- neurons were smallest in brains where the XCI ratio was highly skewed toward MeCP2+, i.e., wild-type. This raises the possibility of cell non-autonomous effects that act through mechanisms other than globally secreted factors; perhaps competition for synaptic connections influences cell size and morphology in the genotypically mosaic brain of RTT model mice.

  20. Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors Past Issues / Summer ... learn more about the effects of sustained low-calorie diets in humans on factors affecting aging. This ...

  1. Amyloid beta-peptide impairs ion-motive ATPase activities: evidence for a role in loss of neuronal Ca2+ homeostasis and cell death.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Hensley, K; Butterfield, D A; Mattson, M P

    1995-09-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) that accumulates as insoluble plaques in the brain in Alzheimer's disease can be directly neurotoxic and can increase neuronal vulnerability to excitotoxic insults. The mechanism of A beta toxicity is unclear but is believed to involve generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of calcium homeostasis. We now report that exposure of cultured rat hippocampal neurons to A beta 1-40 or A beta 25-35 causes a selective reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity which precedes loss of calcium homeostasis and cell degeneration. Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity was reduced within 30 min of exposure to A beta 25-35 and declined to less than 40% of basal level by 3 hr. A beta did not impair other Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activities or Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Experiments with ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase, demonstrated that impairment of this enzyme was sufficient to induce an elevation of [Ca2+]i and neuronal injury. Impairment of Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity appeared to be causally involved in the elevation of [Ca2+]i and neurotoxicity since suppression of Na+ influx significantly reduced A beta- and ouabain-induced [Ca2+]i elevation and neuronal death. Neuronal degeneration induced by ouabain appeared to be of an apoptotic form as indicated by nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. The antioxidant free radical scavengers vitamin E and propylgallate significantly attenuated A beta-induced impairment of Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity, elevation of [Ca2+]i and neurotoxicity, suggesting a role for ROS. Finally, exposure of synaptosomes from postmortem human hippocampus to A beta resulted in a significant and specific reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities, without affecting other Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activities or Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These data suggest that impairment of ion-motive ATPases may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuronal injury in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Changes in Neuronal Oscillations Accompany the Loss of Hippocampal LTP that Occurs in an Animal Model of Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Kalweit, Alexander N.; Amanpour-Gharaei, Bezhad; Colitti-Klausnitzer, Jens; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2017-01-01

    The first-episode of psychosis is followed by a transient time-window of ca. 60 days during which therapeutic interventions have a higher likelihood of being effective than interventions that are started with a greater latency. This suggests that, in the immediate time-period after first-episode psychosis, functional changes occur in the brain that render it increasingly resistant to intervention. The precise mechanistic nature of these changes is unclear, but at the cognitive level, sensory and hippocampus-based dysfunctions become increasingly manifest. In an animal model of first-episode psychosis that comprises acute treatment of rats with the irreversible N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-antagonist, MK801, acute but also chronic deficits in long-term potentiation (LTP) and spatial memory occur. Neuronal oscillations, especially in the form of information transfer through θ and γ frequency oscillations are an intrinsic component of normal information processing in the hippocampus. Changes in θ-γ coupling and power are known to accompany deficits in hippocampal plasticity. Here, we examined whether changes in δ, θ, α, β and γ oscillations, or θ-γ coupling accompany the chronic loss of LTP that is observed in the MK801-animal model of psychosis. One and 4 weeks after acute systemic treatment of adult rats with MK801, a potent loss of hippocampal in vivo LTP was evident compared to vehicle-treated controls. Overall, the typical pattern of θ-γ oscillations that are characteristic for the successful induction of LTP was altered. In particular, θ-power was lower and an uncoupling of θ-γ oscillations was evident in MK801-treated rats. The alterations in network oscillations that accompany LTP deficits in this animal model may comprise a mechanism through which disturbances in sensory information processing and hippocampal function occur in psychosis. These data suggest that the hippocampus is likely to comprise a very early locus of functional

  3. Neurogenesis in a rat model of age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Bizon, J L; Lee, H J; Gallagher, M

    2004-08-01

    Age-related decrements in hippocampal neurogenesis have been suggested as a basis for learning impairment during aging. In the current study, a rodent model of age-related cognitive decline was used to evaluate neurogenesis in relation to hippocampal function. New hippocampal cell survival was assessed approximately 1 month after a series of intraperitoneal injections of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Correlational analyses between individual measures of BrdU-positive cells and performance on the Morris water maze task provided no indication that this measure of neurogenesis was more preserved in aged rats with intact cognitive abilities. On the contrary, among aged rats, higher numbers of BrdU-positive cells in the granule cell layer were associated with a greater degree of impairment on the learning task. Double-labelling studies confirmed that the majority of the BrdU+ cells were of the neuronal phenotype; the proportion of differentiated neurons was not different across a broad range of cognitive abilities. These data demonstrate that aged rats that maintain cognitive function do so despite pronounced reductions in hippocampal neurogenesis. In addition, these findings suggest the interesting possibility that impaired hippocampal function is associated with greater survival of newly generated hippocampal neurons at advanced ages.

  4. Transiently increasing cAMP levels selectively in hippocampal excitatory neurons during sleep deprivation prevents memory deficits caused by sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Havekes, Robbert; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; Tudor, Jennifer C; Ferri, Sarah L; Baumann, Arnd; Meerlo, Peter; Abel, Ted

    2014-11-19

    The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to sleep loss. Although previous work has indicated that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP signaling, it remains to be determined whether the cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation are caused by attenuated cAMP signaling in the hippocampus. Further, it is unclear which cell types are responsible for the memory impairments associated with sleep deprivation. Transgenic approaches lack the spatial resolution to manipulate specific signaling pathways selectively in the hippocampus, while pharmacological strategies are limited in terms of cell-type specificity. Therefore, we used a pharmacogenetic approach based on a virus-mediated expression of a Gαs-coupled Drosophila octopamine receptor selectively in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons in vivo. With this approach, a systemic injection with the receptor ligand octopamine leads to increased cAMP levels in this specific set of hippocampal neurons. We assessed whether transiently increasing cAMP levels during sleep deprivation prevents memory consolidation deficits associated with sleep loss in an object-location task. Five hours of total sleep deprivation directly following training impaired the formation of object-location memories. Transiently increasing cAMP levels in hippocampal neurons during the course of sleep deprivation prevented these memory consolidation deficits. These findings demonstrate that attenuated cAMP signaling in hippocampal excitatory neurons is a critical component underlying the memory deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks associated with sleep deprivation.

  5. Chronic alcoholism in the absence of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and cirrhosis does not result in the loss of serotonergic neurons from the median raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baker, K G; Halliday, G M; Kril, J J; Harper, C G

    1996-09-01

    Previous studies have identified alcohol, thiamine deficiency and liver disease as contributing to the neuropathology of alcohol-related brain damage. In order to examine the effects of alcohol toxicity and thiamine deficiency on serotonergic neurons in the median raphe nucleus (MnR), alcoholic and previously published Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) cases without liver disease, were compared with age-matched non-alcoholic controls. While there was no difference between the estimated number of serotonergic neurons in either controls or alcoholics without WKS (means of 63,010 +/- 8,900 and 59,560 +/- 8,010 respectively), a substantial loss of serotonergic neurons was previously found in WKS cases (mean of 19,050 +/- 13,140). Further analysis revealed a significant difference in the maximum daily alcohol consumption between these groups. However, analysis of covariance showed that the number or serotonergic neurons in the MnR did not correlate with the amount of alcohol consumed. Therefore, our results suggest that cell loss in the MnR can be attributed to thiamine deficiency rather than alcohol per se.

  6. Transiently Increasing cAMP Levels Selectively in Hippocampal Excitatory Neurons during Sleep Deprivation Prevents Memory Deficits Caused by Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; Tudor, Jennifer C.; Ferri, Sarah L.; Baumann, Arnd; Meerlo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to sleep loss. Although previous work has indicated that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP signaling, it remains to be determined whether the cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation are caused by attenuated cAMP signaling in the hippocampus. Further, it is unclear which cell types are responsible for the memory impairments associated with sleep deprivation. Transgenic approaches lack the spatial resolution to manipulate specific signaling pathways selectively in the hippocampus, while pharmacological strategies are limited in terms of cell-type specificity. Therefore, we used a pharmacogenetic approach based on a virus-mediated expression of a Gαs-coupled Drosophila octopamine receptor selectively in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons in vivo. With this approach, a systemic injection with the receptor ligand octopamine leads to increased cAMP levels in this specific set of hippocampal neurons. We assessed whether transiently increasing cAMP levels during sleep deprivation prevents memory consolidation deficits associated with sleep loss in an object–location task. Five hours of total sleep deprivation directly following training impaired the formation of object–location memories. Transiently increasing cAMP levels in hippocampal neurons during the course of sleep deprivation prevented these memory consolidation deficits. These findings demonstrate that attenuated cAMP signaling in hippocampal excitatory neurons is a critical component underlying the memory deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks associated with sleep deprivation. PMID:25411499

  7. Delayed dominant-negative TNF gene therapy halts progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Harms, Ashley S; Barnum, Christopher J; Ruhn, Kelly A; Varghese, Steve; Treviño, Isaac; Blesch, Armin; Tansey, Malú G

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder typified by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Recent evidence indicates that neuroinflammation may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of PD, particularly tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We have previously shown that soluble TNF (solTNF) is required to mediate robust degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or lipopolysaccharide. What remains unknown is whether TNF inhibition can attenuate the delayed and progressive phase of neurodegeneration. To test this, rats were injected in the SNpc with lentivirus encoding dominant-negative TNF (lenti-DN-TNF) 2 weeks after receiving a 6-OHDA lesion. Remarkably, when examined 5 weeks after the initial 6-OHDA lesion, no further loss of nigral DA neurons was observed. Lenti-DN-TNF also attenuated microglial activation. Together, these data suggest that TNF is likely a critical mediator of nigral DA neuron death during the delayed and progressive phase of neurodegeneration, and that microglia may be the principal cell type involved. These promising findings provide compelling reasons to perform DN-TNF gene transfer studies in nonhuman primates with the long-term goal of using it in the clinic to prevent the delayed and progressive degeneration of DA neurons that gives rise to motor symptoms in PD.

  8. Delayed Dominant-Negative TNF Gene Therapy Halts Progressive Loss of Nigral Dopaminergic Neurons in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Ashley S; Barnum, Christopher J; Ruhn, Kelly A; Varghese, Steve; Treviño, Isaac; Blesch, Armin; Tansey, Malú G

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder typified by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Recent evidence indicates that neuroinflammation may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of PD, particularly tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We have previously shown that soluble TNF (solTNF) is required to mediate robust degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or lipopolysaccharide. What remains unknown is whether TNF inhibition can attenuate the delayed and progressive phase of neurodegeneration. To test this, rats were injected in the SNpc with lentivirus encoding dominant-negative TNF (lenti-DN-TNF) 2 weeks after receiving a 6-OHDA lesion. Remarkably, when examined 5 weeks after the initial 6-OHDA lesion, no further loss of nigral DA neurons was observed. Lenti-DN-TNF also attenuated microglial activation. Together, these data suggest that TNF is likely a critical mediator of nigral DA neuron death during the delayed and progressive phase of neurodegeneration, and that microglia may be the principal cell type involved. These promising findings provide compelling reasons to perform DN-TNF gene transfer studies in nonhuman primates with the long-term goal of using it in the clinic to prevent the delayed and progressive degeneration of DA neurons that gives rise to motor symptoms in PD. PMID:20959812

  9. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Peter X; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  10. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  11. The Difference that Age Makes: Cultural Factors that Shape Older Adults' Responses to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogk, Marja

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests that approaching vision loss from age-related macular degeneration from a sociocultural perspective, specifically considering perceptions of aging, blindness, disability, and generational viewpoints and norms, may be critical to understanding older adults' responses to vision loss and visual rehabilitation.

  12. Thyroid hormone reduces the loss of axotomized sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve transection in adult rat.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Michel; Kraftsik, Rudolf; Glauser, Liliane; Kuntzer, Thierry; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Barakat-Walter, Ibtissam

    2003-11-01

    We have shown that a local administration of thyroid hormones (T3) at the level of transected rat sciatic nerve induced a significant increase in the number of regenerated axons. To address the question of whether local administration of T3 rescues the axotomized sensory neurons from death, in the present study we estimated the total number of surviving neurons per dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in three experimental group animals. Forty-five days following rat sciatic nerve transection, the lumbar (L4 and L5) DRG were removed from PBS-control, T3-treated as well as from unoperated rats, and serial sections (1 microm) were cut. The physical dissector method was used to estimate the total number of sensory neurons in the DRGs. Our results revealed that in PBS-control rats transection of sciatic nerve leads to a significant (P < 0.001) decrease in the mean number of sensory neurons (8743.8 +/- 748.6) compared with the number of neurons in nontransected ganglion (mean 13,293.7 +/- 1368.4). However, administration of T3 immediately after sciatic nerve transection rescues a great number of axotomized neurons so that their mean neuron number (12,045.8 +/- 929.8) is not significantly different from the mean number of neurons in the nontransected ganglion. In addition, the volume of ganglia showed a similar tendency. These results suggest that T3 rescues a high number of axotomized sensory neurons from death and allows these cells to grow new axons. We believe that the relative preservation of neurons is important in considering future therapeutic approaches of human peripheral nerve lesion and sensory neuropathy.

  13. Influence of Age-Related Versus Non-Age-Related Renal Dysfunctionon Survival in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Brisco, Meredith A.; Han, Gang; Laur, Olga; Kula, Alexander J.; Cheng, Susan J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2013-01-01

    Normal aging results in a predictable decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and low GFR is associated with worsened survival. If this survival disadvantage is directly caused by the low GFR, as opposed to the disease causing the low GFR, the risk should be similar regardless of the underlying mechanism. Our objective was to determine if age related declines in estimated GFR (eGFR) carry the same prognostic importance as disease attributable losses in patients with ventricular dysfunction. We analyzed the Studies Of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) limited data set (n=6337). The primary analysis focused on determining if the eGFR mortality relationship differed by the extent the eGFR was consistent with normal ageing. Mean eGFR was 65.7 ± 19.0ml/min/1.73m2. Across the range of age in the population (27 to 80 years), baseline eGFR decreased by 0.67 ml/min/1.73m2 per year (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). The risk of death associated with eGFR was strongly modified by the degree to which the low eGFR could be explained by aging (p interaction <0.0001). For example, in a model incorporating the interaction, uncorrected eGFR was no longer significantly related to mortality (adjusted HR=1.0 per 10 ml/min/1.73m2, 95% CI 0.97–1.1, p=0.53) whereas a disease attributable decrease in eGFR above the median carried significant risk (adjusted HR=2.8, 95% CI 1.6–4.7, p<0.001). In conclusion, in the setting of LV dysfunction, renal dysfunction attributable to normal aging had a limited risk for mortality, suggesting that the mechanism underlying renal dysfunction is critical in determining prognosis. PMID:24216124

  14. Cortical regulation of striatal medium spiny neuron dendritic remodeling in parkinsonism: modulation of glutamate release reverses dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Bonnie G; Neely, M Diana; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2010-10-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) receive glutamatergic afferents from the cerebral cortex and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra (SN). Striatal dopamine loss decreases the number of MSN dendritic spines. This loss of spines has been suggested to reflect the removal of tonic dopamine inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, with increased glutamate release culminating in MSN spine loss. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. We first determined in vivo if decortication reverses or prevents dopamine depletion-induced spine loss by placing motor cortex lesions 4 weeks after, or at the time of, 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the SN. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after cortical lesions. Motor cortex lesions significantly reversed the loss of MSN spines elicited by dopamine denervation; a similar effect was observed in the prevention experiment. We then determined if modulating glutamate release in organotypic cocultures prevented spine loss. Treatment of the cultures with the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 to suppress corticostriatal glutamate release completely blocked spine loss in dopamine-denervated cultures. These studies provide the first evidence to show that MSN spine loss associated with parkinsonism can be reversed and point to suppression of corticostriatal glutamate release as a means of slowing progression in Parkinson's disease.

  15. Arginine vasopressin neuronal loss results from autophagy-associated cell death in a mouse model for familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, D; Arima, H; Morishita, Y; Wenjun, L; Azuma, Y; Ito, Y; Suga, H; Goto, M; Banno, R; Sugimura, Y; Shiota, A; Asai, N; Takahashi, M; Oiso, Y

    2014-03-27

    Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) characterized by progressive polyuria is mostly caused by mutations in the gene encoding neurophysin II (NPII), which is the carrier protein of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Although accumulation of mutant NPII in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) could be toxic for AVP neurons, the precise mechanisms of cell death of AVP neurons, reported in autopsy studies, remain unclear. Here, we subjected FNDI model mice to intermittent water deprivation (WD) in order to promote the phenotypes. Electron microscopic analyses demonstrated that, while aggregates are confined to a certain compartment of the ER in the AVP neurons of FNDI mice with water access ad libitum, they were scattered throughout the dilated ER lumen in the FNDI mice subjected to WD for 4 weeks. It is also demonstrated that phagophores, the autophagosome precursors, emerged in the vicinity of aggregates and engulfed the ER containing scattered aggregates. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that expression of p62, an adapter protein between ubiquitin and autophagosome, was elicited on autophagosomal membranes in the AVP neurons, suggesting selective autophagy induction at this time point. Treatment of hypothalamic explants of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) transgenic mice with an ER stressor thapsigargin increased the number of GFP-LC3 puncta, suggesting that ER stress could induce autophagosome formation in the hypothalamus of wild-type mice as well. The cytoplasm of AVP neurons in FNDI mice was occupied with vacuoles in the mice subjected to WD for 12 weeks, when 30-40% of AVP neurons are lost. Our data thus demonstrated that autophagy was induced in the AVP neurons subjected to ER stress in FNDI mice. Although autophagy should primarily be protective for neurons, it is suggested that the organelles including ER were lost over time through autophagy, leading to autophagy

  16. Age-related change of technetium-99m-HMDP distribution in the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Kigami, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Ohnishi, Hideo

    1996-05-01

    To understand age-related changes of whole-body and regional skeletal metabolism, it is important to investigate the mechanisms of age-related bone loss and to develop suitable treatments for it. Bone biopsies show metabolism of the particular site examined while biochemical markers for bone metabolism reflect total skeletal metabolis. Bone scintigraphy is a convenient and simple way to analyze whole-body and regional skeletal metabolism. We attempted to study and understand age-related changes in bone metabolism by quantifying the bone scan and correlating it with biochemical bone metabolic markers. The whole-body skeletal uptake (WBSU) and whole-body skeletal tracer distribution pattern were studied in men and women by bone scintigraphy using {sup 99m}Tc-hydroxy-methane-diphosphonate (HMDP). Bone scans were performed using a standard protocol and quantified by setting regions of interest (ROIs) on selected regions. WBSU and the skeletal distribution pattern were compared with simultaneously obtained serum biochemical markers. WBSU showed an increase with age in both sexes, but in women, uptake in the head and legs increased more relatively than in the thoracic region, while in men no such tendency was observed. Increase of WBSU and relative increase of uptakes in the head demonstrated a weak correlation with the serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and type 1 collagen metabolites. These results show an age-related increase of skeletal turnover and sex-dependent regional skeletal metabolism. The age-related changes seen in bone scintigrams might be a sign of progressive bone loss, reflecting changes in local bone matabolism. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration.

  18. Loss of phase-locking in non-weakly coupled inhibitory networks of type-I model neurons.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myongkeun; Matveev, Victor

    2009-04-01

    Synchronization of excitable cells coupled by reciprocal inhibition is a topic of significant interest due to the important role that inhibitory synaptic interaction plays in the generation and regulation of coherent rhythmic activity in a variety of neural systems. While recent work revealed the synchronizing influence of inhibitory coupling on the dynamics of many networks, it is known that strong coupling can destabilize phase-locked firing. Here we examine the loss of synchrony caused by an increase in inhibitory coupling in networks of type-I Morris-Lecar model oscillators, which is characterized by a period-doubling cascade and leads to mode-locked states with alternation in the firing order of the two cells, as reported recently by Maran and Canavier (J Comput Nerosci, 2008) for a network of Wang-Buzsáki model neurons. Although alternating-order firing has been previously reported as a near-synchronous state, we show that the stable phase difference between the spikes of the two Morris-Lecar cells can constitute as much as 70% of the unperturbed oscillation period. Further, we examine the generality of this phenomenon for a class of type-I oscillators that are close to their excitation thresholds, and provide an intuitive geometric description of such "leap-frog" dynamics. In the Morris-Lecar model network, the alternation in the firing order arises under the condition of fast closing of K( + ) channels at hyperpolarized potentials, which leads to slow dynamics of membrane potential upon synaptic inhibition, allowing the presynaptic cell to advance past the postsynaptic cell in each cycle of the oscillation. Further, we show that non-zero synaptic decay time is crucial for the existence of leap-frog firing in networks of phase oscillators. However, we demonstrate that leap-frog spiking can also be obtained in pulse-coupled inhibitory networks of one-dimensional oscillators with a multi-branched phase domain, for instance in a network of quadratic integrate

  19. Bile Acids Reduce Prion Conversion, Reduce Neuronal Loss, and Prolong Male Survival in Models of Prion Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Leonardo M.; Campeau, Jody; Norman, Grant; Kalayil, Marian; Van der Merwe, Jacques; McKenzie, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders associated with the conversion of cellular prion protein (PrPC) into its aberrant infectious form (PrPSc). There is no treatment available for these diseases. The bile acids tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) have been recently shown to be neuroprotective in other protein misfolding disease models, including Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases, and also in humans with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here, we studied the therapeutic efficacy of these compounds in prion disease. We demonstrated that TUDCA and UDCA substantially reduced PrP conversion in cell-free aggregation assays, as well as in chronically and acutely infected cell cultures. This effect was mediated through reduction of PrPSc seeding ability, rather than an effect on PrPC. We also demonstrated the ability of TUDCA and UDCA to reduce neuronal loss in prion-infected cerebellar slice cultures. UDCA treatment reduced astrocytosis and prolonged survival in RML prion-infected mice. Interestingly, these effects were limited to the males, implying a gender-specific difference in drug metabolism. Beyond effects on PrPSc, we found that levels of phosphorylated eIF2α were increased at early time points, with correlated reductions in postsynaptic density protein 95. As demonstrated for other neurodegenerative diseases, we now show that TUDCA and UDCA may have a therapeutic role in prion diseases, with effects on both prion conversion and neuroprotection. Our findings, together with the fact that these natural compounds are orally bioavailable, permeable to the blood-brain barrier, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved for use in humans, make these compounds promising alternatives for the treatment of prion diseases. IMPORTANCE Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that are transmissible to humans and other mammals. There are no disease-modifying therapies available, despite decades

  20. Activin A Inhibits MPTP and LPS-Induced Increases in Inflammatory Cell Populations and Loss of Dopamine Neurons in the Mouse Midbrain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stayte, Sandy; Rentsch, Peggy; Tröscher, Anna R.; Bamberger, Maximilian; Li, Kong M.; Vissel, Bryce

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta region and a subsequent loss of dopamine within the striatum. A promising avenue of research has been the administration of growth factors to promote the survival of remaining midbrain neurons, although the mechanism by which they provide neuroprotection is not understood. Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, has been shown to be a potent anti-inflammatory following acute brain injury and has been demonstrated to play a role in the neuroprotection of midbrain neurons against MPP+-induced degeneration in vitro. We hypothesized that activin A may offer similar anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in in vivo mouse models of Parkinson’s disease. We found that activin A significantly attenuated the inflammatory response induced by both MPTP and intranigral administration of lipopolysaccharide in C57BL/6 mice. We found that administration of activin A promoted survival of dopaminergic and total neuron populations in the pars compacta region both 8 days and 8 weeks after MPTP-induced degeneration. Surprisingly, no corresponding protection of striatal dopamine levels was found. Furthermore, activin A failed to protect against loss of striatal dopamine transporter expression in the striatum, suggesting the neuroprotective action of activin A may be localized to the substantia nigra. Together, these results provide the first evidence that activin A exerts potent neuroprotection and anti-inflammatory effects in the MPTP and lipopolysaccharide mouse models of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28121982

  1. Pathophysiology of ageing, longevity and age related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bürkle, Alexander; Caselli, Graziella; Franceschi, Claudio; Mariani, Erminia; Sansoni, Paolo; Santoni, Angela; Vecchio, Giancarlo; Witkowski, Jacek M; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-01-01

    On April 18, 2007 an international meeting on Pathophysiology of Ageing, Longevity and Age-Related Diseases was held in Palermo, Italy. Several interesting topics on Cancer, Immunosenescence, Age-related inflammatory diseases and longevity were discussed. In this report we summarize the most important issues. However, ageing must be considered an unavoidable end point of the life history of each individual, nevertheless the increasing knowledge on ageing mechanisms, allows envisaging many different strategies to cope with, and delay it. So, a better understanding of pathophysiology of ageing and age-related disease is essential for giving everybody a reasonable chance for living a long and enjoyable final part of the life. PMID:17683521

  2. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatment and future options.

    PubMed

    Moutray, Tanya; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2011-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of visual impairment among older adults in the developed world. Epidemiological studies have revealed a number of genetic, ocular and environmental risk factors for this condition, which can be addressed by disease reduction strategies. We discuss the various treatment options for dry and exudative age-related macular degeneration available and explain how the recommended treatment depends on the exact type, location and extent of the degeneration. Currently, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition therapy is the best available treatment for exudative age-related macular degeneration but is limited by the need for repeated intravitreal injections. The current treatment regime is being refined through research on optimal treatment frequency and duration and type of anti-VEGF drug. Different modes of drug delivery are being developed and in the future other methods of VEGF inhibition may be used.

  3. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Paul K.; Bowl, Michael R.; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E.; Simon, Michelle M.; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V.; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E.; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H.; Foster, Russell G.; Jackson, Ian J.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  4. Progressive loss of glutamic acid decarboxylase, parvalbumin, and calbindin D28K immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of adult rat with experimental hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Y; Chakrabortty, S; Drake, J M; Hattori, T

    1997-02-01

    The authors investigated functional neuronal changes in experimental hydrocephalus using immunohistochemical techniques for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and two neuronal calcium-binding proteins: parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin D28K (CaBP). Hydrocephalus was induced in 16 adult Wistar rats by intracisternal injection of a kaolin solution, which was confirmed microscopically via atlantooccipital dural puncture. Four control rats received the same volume of sterile saline. Immunohistochemical staining for GAD, PV, and CaBP, and Nissl staining were performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after the injection. Hydrocephalus occurred in 90% of kaolin-injected animals with various degrees of ventricular dilation. In the cerebral cortex, GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons initially lost their stained processes together with a concomitant loss of homogeneous neuropil staining, followed by the reduction of their total number. With progressive ventricular dilation, GAD- and PV-IR axon terminals on the cortical pyramidal cells disappeared, whereas the number of CaBP-IR pyramidal cells decreased, and ultimately in the most severe cases of hydrocephalus, GAD, PV, and CaBP immunoreactivity were almost entirely diminished. In the hippocampus, GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-IR interneurons demonstrated a reduction of their processes and terminals surrounding the pyramidal cells, with secondary reduction of CaBP-IR pyramidal and granular cells. On the other hand, Nissl staining revealed almost no morphological changes induced by ischemia or neuronal degeneration even in the most severe cases of hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus results in the progressive functional impairment of GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-IR neuronal systems in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, often before there is evidence of morphological injury. The initial injury of cortical and hippocampal interneurons suggests that the functional deafferentation from intrinsic projection fibers may be the initial neuronal event

  5. CKD increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Yin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Wang, Jie Jin

    2008-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the United States and often coexists with chronic kidney disease. Both conditions share common genetic and environmental risk factors. A total of 1183 participants aged 54+ were examined in the population-based, prospective cohort Blue Mountains Eye Study (Australia) to determine if chronic kidney disease increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) based on the Cockcroft-Gault equation) was present in 24% of the population (286 of 1183). The 5-yr incidence of early age-related macular degeneration was 3.9% in participants with no/mild chronic kidney disease (35 of 897) and 17.5% in those with moderate chronic kidney disease (50 of 286). After adjusting for age, sex, cigarette smoking, hypertension, complement factor H polymorphism, and other risk factors, persons with moderate chronic kidney disease were 3 times more likely to develop early age-related macular degeneration than persons with no/mild chronic kidney disease (odds ratio = 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8 to 5.7, P < 0.0001). Each SD (14.8 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) decrease in Cockcroft-Gault estimated glomerular filtration rate was associated with a doubling of the adjusted risk for early age-related macular degeneration (odds ratio = 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 2.8, P < 0.0001). In conclusion, persons with chronic kidney disease have a higher risk of early age-related macular degeneration, suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms between the two conditions.

  6. Age-related decline in emotional prosody discrimination: acoustic correlates.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rachel L C; Kingston, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    It is now accepted that older adults have difficulty recognizing prosodic emotion cues, but it is not clear at what processing stage this ability breaks down. We manipulated the acoustic characteristics of tones in pitch, amplitude, and duration discrimination tasks to assess whether impaired basic auditory perception coexisted with our previously demonstrated age-related prosodic emotion perception impairment. It was found that pitch perception was particularly impaired in older adults, and that it displayed the strongest correlation with prosodic emotion discrimination. We conclude that an important cause of age-related impairment in prosodic emotion comprehension exists at the fundamental sensory level of processing.

  7. Calcium dysregulation and neuroinflammation: Discrete and integrated mechanisms for age-related synaptic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sama, Diana M.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the best biomarkers of age-related cognitive decline are closely linked to synaptic function and plasticity. This review highlights several age-related synaptic alterations as they relate to Ca2+ dyshomeostasis, through elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and neuroinflammation, through production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Though distinct in many ways, Ca2+ and neuroinflammatory signaling mechanisms exhibit extensive cross-talk and bidirectional interactions. For instance, cytokine production in glial cells is strongly dependent on the Ca2+ dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, which shows elevated activity in animal models of aging and disease. In turn, pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF, can augment the expression/activity of L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels in neurons, leading to Ca2+ dysregulation, hyperactive calcineurin activity, and synaptic depression. Thus, in addition to discussing unique contributions of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and neuroinflammation, this review emphasizes how these processes interact to hasten age-related synaptic changes. PMID:23751484

  8. Hypothalamic ΔFosB prevents age-related metabolic decline and functions via SNS

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Kenichi; Rowe, Glenn C.; Gori, Francesca; Baron, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The ventral hypothalamus (VHT) integrates several physiological cues to maintain glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Aging is associated with increased glucose intolerance but the underlying mechanisms responsible for age-related metabolic decline, including neuronal signaling in the VHT, remain elusive. We have shown that mice with VHT-targeted overexpression of ΔFosB, a splice variant of the AP1 transcription factor FosB, exhibit increased energy expenditure, leading to decreased adiposity. Here, we show that VHT-targeted overexpression of ΔFosB also improves glucose tolerance, increases insulin sensitivity in target organs and thereby suppresses insulin secretion. These effects are also observed by the overexpression of dominant negative JunD, demonstrating that they occur via AP1 antagonism within the VHT. Furthermore, the improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity persisted in aged animals overexpressing ΔFosB in the VHT. These beneficial effects on glucose metabolism were abolished by peripheral sympathectomy and α-adrenergic, but not β-adrenergic, blockade. Taken together, our results show that antagonizing AP1 transcription activity in the VHT leads to a marked improvement in whole body glucose homeostasis via activation of the SNS, conferring protection against age-related impairment in glucose metabolism. These findings may open novel avenues for therapeutic intervention in diabetes and age-related glucose intolerance. PMID:28121620

  9. Impact of age-related neuroglial cell responses on hippocampal deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Joseph O.; Rezaie, Payam; Gabbott, Paul L.; Stewart, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is one of the greatest risk factors for the development of sporadic age-related neurodegenerative diseases and neuroinflammation is a common feature of this disease phenotype. In the immunoprivileged brain, neuroglial cells, which mediate neuroinflammatory responses, are influenced by the physiological factors in the microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS). These physiological factors include but are not limited to cell-to-cell communication involving cell adhesion molecules, neuronal electrical activity and neurotransmitter and neuromodulator action. However, despite this dynamic control of neuroglial activity, in the healthy aged brain there is an alteration in the underlying neuroinflammatory response notably seen in the hippocampus, typified by astrocyte/microglia activation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production and signaling. These changes may occur without any overt concurrent pathology, however, they typically correlate with deteriorations in hippocamapal or cognitive function. In this review we examine two important phenomenons, firstly the relationship between age-related brain deterioration (focusing on hippocampal function) and underlying neuroglial response(s), and secondly how the latter affects molecular and cellular processes within the hippocampus that makes it vulnerable to age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25972808

  10. Future time perspective and awareness of age-related change: Examining their role in predicting psychological well-being.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Allyson; Gabrian, Martina; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Diehl, Manfred

    2016-09-01

    This study examined how 2 distinct facets of perceived personal lifetime-future time perspective (FTP) and awareness of age-related change (AARC)-are associated with another, and how they may interact to predict psychological well-being. To better understand associations among subjective perceptions of lifetime, aging, and well-being, we tested a series of models to investigate questions of directionality, indirect effects, and conditional processes among FTP, AARC-Gains, AARC-Losses, and psychological well-being. In all models, we tested for differences between middle-aged and older adults, and between adults from the United States and Germany. Analyses were conducted within a structural equation modeling framework on a cross-national, 2.5-year longitudinal sample of 537 community-residing adults (age 40-98 years). Awareness of age-related losses (AARC-Losses) at Time 1 predicted FTP at Time 2, but FTP did not predict AARC-Gains or AARC-Losses. Furthermore, future time perspective mediated the association between AARC-Losses and well-being. Moderation analyses revealed a buffering effect of awareness of age-related gains (AARC-Gains) in which perceptions of more age-related gains diminished the negative effect of a limited future time perspective on well-being. Effects were robust across age groups and countries. Taken together, these findings suggest that perceived age-related loss experiences may sensitize individuals to perceive a more limited future lifetime which may then lead to lower psychological well-being. In contrast, perceived age-related gains may function as a resource to preserve psychological well-being, in particular when time is perceived as running out. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Association of N-cadherin levels and downstream effectors of Rho GTPases with dendritic spine loss induced by chronic stress in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Patricia; Muñoz, Mauricio; García-Rojo, Gonzalo; Ulloa, José L; Bravo, Javier A; Márquez, Ruth; García-Pérez, M Alexandra; Arancibia, Damaris; Araneda, Karina; Rojas, Paulina S; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela; Mora, Sergio; Aliaga, Esteban; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2015-10-01

    Chronic stress promotes cognitive impairment and dendritic spine loss in hippocampal neurons. In this animal model of depression, spine loss probably involves a weakening of the interaction between pre- and postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules, such as N-cadherin, followed by disruption of the cytoskeleton. N-cadherin, in concert with catenin, stabilizes the cytoskeleton through Rho-family GTPases. Via their effector LIM kinase (LIMK), RhoA and ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC) GTPases phosphorylate and inhibit cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing molecule, favoring spine growth. Additionally, RhoA, through Rho kinase (ROCK), inactivates myosin phosphatase through phosphorylation of the myosin-binding subunit (MYPT1), producing actomyosin contraction and probable spine loss. Some micro-RNAs negatively control the translation of specific mRNAs involved in Rho GTPase signaling. For example, miR-138 indirectly activates RhoA, and miR-134 reduces LIMK1 levels, resulting in spine shrinkage; in contrast, miR-132 activates RAC1, promoting spine formation. We evaluated whether N-cadherin/β-catenin and Rho signaling is sensitive to chronic restraint stress. Stressed rats exhibit anhedonia, impaired associative learning, and immobility in the forced swim test and reduction in N-cadherin levels but not β-catenin in the hippocampus. We observed a reduction in spine number in the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, with no effect on the levels of miR-132 or miR-134. Although the stress did not modify the RAC-LIMK-cofilin signaling pathway, we observed increased phospho-MYPT1 levels, probably mediated by RhoA-ROCK activation. Furthermore, chronic stress raises the levels of miR-138 in accordance with the observed activation of the RhoA-ROCK pathway. Our findings suggest that a dysregulation of RhoA-ROCK activity by chronic stress could potentially underlie spine loss in hippocampal neurons.

  12. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Eveline S.; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C.; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B.; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A.; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M.; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E.; Yeo, Gene W.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2013-01-01

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43Q331K and TDP-43M337V), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43–dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43Q331K, but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43Q331K enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage. PMID:23382207

  13. Neuron-specific expression of CuZnSOD prevents the loss of muscle mass and function that occurs in homozygous CuZnSOD-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Davis, Carol S; Shi, Yun; Ivannikov, Maxim V; Zhang, Yiqiang; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Macleod, Gregory T; Richardson, Arlan; Van Remmen, Holly; Jackson, Malcolm J; McArdle, Anne; Brooks, Susan V

    2014-04-01

    Deletion of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in Sod1(-/-) mice leads to accelerated loss of muscle mass and force during aging, but the losses do not occur with muscle-specific deletion of CuZnSOD. To determine the role of motor neurons in the muscle decline, we generated transgenic Sod1(-/-) mice in which CuZnSOD was expressed under control of the synapsin 1 promoter (SynTgSod1(-/-) mice). SynTgSod1(-/-) mice expressed CuZnSOD in brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerve, but not in other tissues. Sciatic nerve CuZnSOD content in SynTgSod1(-/-) mice was ~20% that of control mice, but no reduction in muscle mass or isometric force was observed in SynTgSod1(-/-) mice compared with control animals, whereas muscles of age-matched Sod1(-/-) mice displayed 30-40% reductions in mass and force. In addition, increased oxidative damage and adaptations in stress responses observed in muscles of Sod1(-/-) mice were absent in SynTgSod1(-/-) mice, and degeneration of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) structure and function occurred in Sod1(-/-) mice but not in SynTgSod1(-/-) mice. Our data demonstrate that specific CuZnSOD expression in neurons is sufficient to preserve NMJ and skeletal muscle structure and function in Sod1(-/-) mice and suggest that redox homeostasis in motor neurons plays a key role in initiating sarcopenia during aging.

  14. Passive transfer of narcolepsy: anti-TRIB2 autoantibody positive patient IgG causes hypothalamic orexin neuron loss and sleep attacks in mice.

    PubMed

    Katzav, Aviva; Arango, Maria T; Kivity, Shaye; Tanaka, Susumu; Givaty, Gili; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Honda, Makoto; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-09-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy (a sudden weakening of posture muscle tone usually triggered by emotion) caused by the loss of orexin neurons in the hypothalamus. Autoimmune mechanisms are implicated in narcolepsy by increased frequency of specific HLA alleles and the presence of specific autoantibody (anti-Tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2) antibodies) in the sera of patients with narcolepsy. Presently, we passively transferred narcolepsy to naïve mice by injecting intra-cerebra-ventricularly (ICV) pooled IgG positive for anti-TRIB2 antibodies. Narcolepsy-IgG-injected mice had a loss of the NeuN (neuronal marker), synaptophysin (synaptic marker) and orexin-positive neurons in the lateral hypothalamus area in narcolepsy compared to control-IgG-injected mice and these changes were associated with narcolepsy-like immobility attacks at four weeks post injection and with hyperactivity and long term memory deficits in the staircase and novel object recognition tests. Similar behavioral and cognitive deficits are observed in narcoleptic patients. This is the first report of passive transfer of experimental narcolepsy to naïve mice induced by autoantibodies and supports the autoimmune pathogenesis in narcolepsy.

  15. Recombinant human TNF-binding protein-1 (rhTBP-1) treatment delays both symptoms progression and motor neuron loss in the wobbler mouse.

    PubMed

    Bigini, Paolo; Repici, Mariaelena; Cantarella, Giuseppina; Fumagalli, Elena; Barbera, Sara; Cagnotto, Alfredo; De Luigi, Ada; Tonelli, Rossella; Bernardini, Renato; Borsello, Tiziana; Mennini, Tiziana

    2008-03-01

    TNF-alpha overexpression may contribute to motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We investigated the intracellular pathway associated with TNF-alpha in the wobbler mouse, a murine model of ALS, at the onset of symptoms. TNF-alpha and TNFR1 overexpression and JNK/p38MAPK phosphorylation occurred in neurons and microglia in early symptomatic mice, suggesting that this activation may contribute to motor neuron damage. The involvement of TNF-alpha was further confirmed by the protective effect of treatment with rhTNF-alpha binding protein (rhTBP-1) from 4 to 9 weeks of age. rhTBP-1 reduced the progression of symptoms, motor neuron loss, gliosis and JNK/p38MAPK phosphorylation in wobbler mice, but did not reduce TNF-alpha and TNFR1 levels. rhTBP-1 might possibly bind TNF-alpha and reduce the downstream phosphorylation of two main effectors of the neuroinflammatory response, p38MAPK and JNK.

  16. Loss of MeCP2 disrupts cell autonomous and autocrine BDNF signaling in mouse glutamatergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Charanya; Wu, Yuan-Ju; Vadhvani, Mayur; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Eickholt, Britta; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the MECP2 gene cause the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). Previous studies have shown that altered MeCP2 levels result in aberrant neurite outgrowth and glutamatergic synapse formation. However, causal molecular mechanisms are not well understood since MeCP2 is known to regulate transcription of a wide range of target genes. Here, we describe a key role for a constitutive BDNF feed forward signaling pathway in regulating synaptic response, general growth and differentiation of glutamatergic neurons. Chronic block of TrkB receptors mimics the MeCP2 deficiency in wildtype glutamatergic neurons, while re-expression of BDNF quantitatively rescues MeCP2 deficiency. We show that BDNF acts cell autonomous and autocrine, as wildtype neurons are not capable of rescuing growth deficits in neighboring MeCP2 deficient neurons in vitro and in vivo. These findings are relevant for understanding RTT pathophysiology, wherein wildtype and mutant neurons are intermixed throughout the nervous system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19374.001 PMID:27782879

  17. A Context for Teaching Aging-Related Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David K.

    1999-01-01

    Describes two points of view regarding age-related public programs (Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security): that of devolutionists who would curtail them and safety netters who maintain the government's role is indispensable. Uses Relative Deprivation theory as a framework for teaching public policy about aging. (SK)

  18. Glycosaminoglycans in the Human Cornea: Age-Related Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Elena; Pacella, Fernanda; De Paolis, Giulio; Parisella, Francesca Romana; Turchetti, Paolo; Anello, Giulia; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate possible age-related changes in glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the human cornea. The substances today called GAGs were previously referred to as mucopolysaccharides. METHODS Samples of human cornea were taken from 12 younger (age 21 ± 1.2) and 12 older (age 72 ± 1.6) male subjects. Samples were weighed, homogenized, and used for biochemical and molecular analyses. All the quantitative results were statistically analyzed. RESULTS The human cornea appears to undergo age-related changes, as evidenced by our biochemical and molecular results. The total GAG and hyaluronic acid counts were significantly higher in the younger subjects than in the older subjects. The sulfated heavy GAGs, such as chondroitin, dermatan, keratan, and heparan sulfate, were lower in the younger subjects than in the older subjects. DISCUSSION GAGs of the human cornea undergo numerous age-related changes. Their quantity is significantly altered in the elderly in comparison with younger subjects. GAGs play an important role in age-related diseases of the human cornea. PMID:25674020

  19. Nutritional influences on epigenetics and age-related disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional epigenetics has emerged as a novel mechanism underlying gene–diet interactions, further elucidating the modulatory role of nutrition in aging and age-related disease development. Epigenetics is defined as a heritable modification to the DNA that regulates chromosome architecture and modu...

  20. Age-Related Differences in Moral Identity across Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krettenauer, Tobias; Murua, Lourdes Andrea; Jia, Fanli

    2016-01-01

    In this study, age-related differences in adults' moral identity were investigated. Moral identity was conceptualized a context-dependent self-structure that becomes differentiated and (re)integrated in the course of development and that involves a broad range of value-orientations. Based on a cross-sectional sample of 252 participants aged 14 to…

  1. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  2. Neuroanatomical Substrates of Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    There are many reports of relations between age and cognitive variables and of relations between age and variables representing different aspects of brain structure and a few reports of relations between brain structure variables and cognitive variables. These findings have sometimes led to inferences that the age-related brain changes cause the…

  3. [Impact of thymic function in age-related immune deterioration].

    PubMed

    Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; de la Fuente, Mónica; Guerrero, Juan Miguel; Leal, Manuel; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Age-related biological deterioration also includes immune system deterioration and, in consequence, a rise in the incidence and prevalence of infections and cancers, as well as low responses to vaccination strategies. Out of all immune cell subsets, T-lymphocytes seem to be involved in most of the age-related defects. Since T-lymphocytes mature during their passage through the thymus, and the thymus shows an age-related process of atrophy, thymic regression has been proposed as the triggering event of this immune deterioration in elderly people. Historically, it has been accepted that the young thymus sets the T-lymphocyte repertoire during the childhood, whereupon atrophy begins until the elderly thymus is a non-functional evolutionary trace. However, a rising body of knowledge points toward the thymus functioning during adulthood. In the elderly, higher thymic function is associated with a younger immune system, while thymic function failure is associated with all-cause mortality. Therefore, any new strategy focused on the improvement of the elderly quality of life, especially those trying to influence the immune system, should take into account, together with peripheral homeostasis, thymus function as a key element in slowing down age-related decline.

  4. Age-Related Health Stereotypes and Illusory Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madey, Scott F.; Chasteen, Alison L.

    2004-01-01

    This experiment investigated how age-related health stereotypes affect people's judgments of younger and older patients' medical compliance. Previous research has shown that stereotypes of young adults include healthy components, but stereotypes of older adults include both healthy and unhealthy components (Hummert, 1990). We predicted that…

  5. Age-Related Differences in Idiom Production in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Peggy S.; Hyun, Jungmoon; O'Connor Wells, Barbara; Anema, Inge; Goral, Mira; Monereau-Merry, Marie-Michelle; Rubino, Daniel; Kuckuk, Raija; Obler, Loraine K.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether idiom production was vulnerable to age-related difficulties, we asked 40 younger (ages 18-30) and 40 older healthy adults (ages 60-85) to produce idiomatic expressions in a story-completion task. Younger adults produced significantly more correct idiom responses (73%) than did older adults (60%). When older adults generated…

  6. The Experience of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Elaine Y. H.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Hassell, Jennifer B.; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative article describes the impact of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) among 15 participants: how a person makes sense of ARMD, the effect of ARMD on the person's quality of life, the psychological disturbances associated with the limitations of ARMD, and the influence of ARMD on social interactions. Such in-depth appreciation of…

  7. Prolongevity hormone FGF21 protects against immune senescence by delaying age-related thymic involution

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yun-Hee; Horvath, Tamas L.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2016-01-01

    Age-related thymic degeneration is associated with loss of naïve T cells, restriction of peripheral T-cell diversity, and reduced healthspan due to lower immune competence. The mechanistic basis of age-related thymic demise is unclear, but prior evidence suggests that caloric restriction (CR) can slow thymic aging by maintaining thymic epithelial cell integrity and reducing the generation of intrathymic lipid. Here we show that the prolongevity ketogenic hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a member of the endocrine FGF subfamily, is expressed in thymic stromal cells along with FGF receptors and its obligate coreceptor, βKlotho. We found that FGF21 expression in thymus declines with age and is induced by CR. Genetic gain of FGF21 function in mice protects against age-related thymic involution with an increase in earliest thymocyte progenitors and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Importantly, FGF21 overexpression reduced intrathymic lipid, increased perithymic brown adipose tissue, and elevated thymic T-cell export and naïve T-cell frequencies in old mice. Conversely, loss of FGF21 function in middle-aged mice accelerated thymic aging, increased lethality, and delayed T-cell reconstitution postirradiation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Collectively, FGF21 integrates metabolic and immune systems to prevent thymic injury and may aid in the reestablishment of a diverse T-cell repertoire in cancer patients following HSCT. PMID:26755598

  8. Metabolomics of human brain aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Naudí, Alba; Ferrer, Isidre; Pamplona, Reinald

    2014-07-01

    Neurons in the mature human central nervous system (CNS) perform a wide range of motor, sensory, regulatory, behavioral, and cognitive functions. Such diverse functional output requires a great diversity of CNS neuronal and non-neuronal populations. Metabolomics encompasses the study of the complete set of metabolites/low-molecular-weight intermediates (metabolome), which are context-dependent and vary according to the physiology, developmental state, or pathologic state of the cell, tissue, organ, or organism. Therefore, the use of metabolomics can help to unravel the diversity-and to disclose the specificity-of metabolic traits and their alterations in the brain and in fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, thus helping to uncover potential biomarkers of aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the current applications of metabolomics in studies of CNS aging and certain age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Neurometabolomics will increase knowledge of the physiologic and pathologic functions of neural cells and will place the concept of selective neuronal vulnerability in a metabolic context.

  9. Treatment with dexamethasone and vitamin D3 attenuates neuroinflammatory age-related changes in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michelle; Piazza, Alessia; Nolan, Yvonne; Lynch, Marina A

    2007-10-01

    Among the changes which occur in the brain with age is an increase in hippocampal concentration of proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and an increase in IL-1beta-induced signaling. Here we demonstrate that the increase in IL-1beta concentration is accompanied by an increase in expression of IL-1 type I receptor (IL-1RI) and an age-related increase in microglial activation, as shown by increased expression of the cell surface marker, major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) and increased MHCII staining. The evidence indicates that these age-related changes were abrogated in hippocampus of aged rats treated with dexamethasone and vitamin D3. Similarly, the age-related increases in activation of the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), as well as caspase-3 and PARP were all attenuated in hippocampal tissue prepared from rats that received dexamethasone and vitamin D3. The data indicate that dexamethasone and vitamin D3 ameliorated the age-related increase in IFNgamma and suggest that IFNgamma may be the trigger leading to microglial activation, since it increases MHCII mRNA and IL-1beta release from cultured glia. In parallel with its ability to decrease microglial activation in vivo, we report that treatment of cultured glia with dexamethasone and vitamin D3 blocked the lipopolysaccharide increased MHCII mRNA and IL-1beta concentration, while the IL-1beta-induced increases in activation of JNK and caspase 3 in cultured neurons were also reversed by treatment with dexamethasone and vitamin D3. The data suggest that the antiinflammatory effect of dexamethasone and vitamin D3 derives from their ability to downreguate microglial activation.

  10. Age-Related Changes in 1/f Neural Electrophysiological Noise.

    PubMed

    Voytek, Bradley; Kramer, Mark A; Case, John; Lepage, Kyle Q; Tempesta, Zechari R; Knight, Robert T; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-09-23

    Aging is associated with performance decrements across multiple cognitive domains. The neural noise hypothesis, a dominant view of the basis of this decline, posits that aging is accompanied by an increase in spontaneous, noisy baseline neural activity. Here we analyze data from two different groups of human subjects: intracranial electrocorticography from 15 participants over a 38 year age range (15-53 years) and scalp EEG data from healthy younger (20-30 years) and older (60-70 years) adults to test the neural noise hypothesis from a 1/f noise perspective. Many natural phenomena, including electrophysiology, are characterized by 1/f noise. The defining characteristic of 1/f is that the power of the signal frequency content decreases rapidly as a function of the frequency (f) itself. The slope of this decay, the noise exponent (χ), is often <-1 for electrophysiological data and has been shown to approach white noise (defined as χ = 0) with increasing task difficulty. We observed, in both electrophysiological datasets, that aging is associated with a flatter (more noisy) 1/f power spectral density, even at rest, and that visual cortical 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related impairments in visual working memory. These results provide electrophysiological support for the neural noise hypothesis of aging. Significance statement: Understanding the neurobiological origins of age-related cognitive decline is of critical scientific, medical, and public health importance, especially considering the rapid aging of the world's population. We find, in two separate human studies, that 1/f electrophysiological noise increases with aging. In addition, we observe that this age-related 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related working memory decline. These results significantly add to this understanding and contextualize a long-standing problem in cognition by encapsulating age-related cognitive decline within a neurocomputational model of 1/f noise-induced deficits in

  11. Age-related changes in cerebellar and hypothalamic function accompany non-microglial immune gene expression, altered synapse organization, and excitatory amino acid neurotransmission deficits

    PubMed Central

    Bonasera, Stephen J.; Arikkath, Jyothi; Boska, Michael D.; Chaudoin, Tammy R.; DeKorver, Nicholas W.; Goulding, Evan H.; Hoke, Traci A.; Mojtahedzedah, Vahid; Reyelts, Crystal D.; Sajja, Balasrinivasa; Schenk, A. Katrin; Tecott, Laurence H.; Volden, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe age-related molecular and neuronal changes that disrupt mobility or energy balance based on brain region and genetic background. Compared to young mice, aged C57BL/6 mice exhibit marked locomotor (but not energy balance) impairments. In contrast, aged BALB mice exhibit marked energy balance (but not locomotor) impairments. Age-related changes in cerebellar or hypothalamic gene expression accompany these phenotypes. Aging evokes upregulation of immune pattern recognition receptors and cell adhesion molecules. However, these changes do not localize to microglia, the major CNS immunocyte. Consistent with a neuronal role, there is a marked age-related increase in excitatory synapses over the cerebellum and hypothalamus. Functional imaging of these regions is consistent with age-related synaptic impairments. These studies suggest that aging reactivates a developmental program employed during embryogenesis where immune molecules guide synapse formation and pruning. Renewed activity in this program may disrupt excitatory neurotransmission, causing significant behavioral deficits. PMID:27689748

  12. Beta-amyloid oligomers induce early loss of presynaptic proteins in primary neurons by caspase-dependent and proteasome-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bong Geum; In, Sua; Choi, Boyoung; Kim, Min-Ju

    2014-11-12

    Beta-amyloid is a major pathogenic molecule for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and can be aggregated into a soluble oligomer, which is a toxic intermediate, before amyloid fibril formation. Beta-amyloid oligomers are associated closely with early synaptic loss in AD. However, it is still unknown which synaptic proteins are involved in the synaptotoxicity, and a direct comparison among the synaptic proteins should also be addressed. Here, we investigated changes in the expression of several presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins in primary neurons after treatment with a low-molecular weight and a high-molecular weight beta-amyloid oligomer. Both oligomers induced early neuronal dysfunction after 4 h and significantly reduced presynaptic protein (synaptophysin, syntaxin, synapsin, and synaptotagmin) expression. However, the expression of postsynaptic proteins (PSD95, NMDAR2A/B, and GluR2/3), except NMDAR1 was not reduced, and some protein expression levels were increased. Glutamate treatment, which is correlated with postsynaptic activation, showed more postsynaptic-specific protein loss compared with beta-amyloid oligomer treatment. Finally, the caspase inhibitor zVAD and the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 attenuated presynaptic protein loss. Thus, our data showed changes in synaptic proteins by beta-amyloid oligomers, which provides an understanding of early synaptotoxicity and suggests new approaches for AD treatment.

  13. Dysregulated TGF-β Production Underlies the Age-Related Vulnerability to Chikungunya Virus

    PubMed Central

    Uhrlaub, Jennifer L.; Pulko, Vesna; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Coleman, Gary D.; Lindo, John F.; Vickers, Ivan; Anzinger, Joshua J.; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging global pathogen with pandemic potential, which causes fever, rash and debilitating arthralgia. Older adults over 65 years are particularly susceptible to severe and chronic CHIKV disease (CHIKVD), accounting for >90% of all CHIKV-related deaths. There are currently no approved vaccines or antiviral treatments available to limit chronic CHIKVD. Here we show that in old mice excessive, dysregulated TGFβ production during acute infection leads to a reduced immune response and subsequent chronic disease. Humans suffering from CHIKV infection also exhibited high TGFβ levels and a pronounced age-related defect in neutralizing anti-CHIKV antibody production. In vivo reduction of TGFβ levels minimized acute joint swelling, restored neutralizing antibody production and diminished chronic joint pathology in old mice. This study identifies increased and dysregulated TGFβ secretion as one key mechanism contributing to the age-related loss of protective anti-CHIKV-immunity leading to chronic CHIKVD. PMID:27736984

  14. Classification of wet aged related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Anam; Mir, Fouwad Jamil; Yasin, Ubaid Ullah; Khan, Shoab A.

    2013-12-01

    Wet Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a type of age related macular degeneration. In order to detect Wet AMD we look for Pigment Epithelium detachment (PED) and fluid filled region caused by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). This form of AMD can cause vision loss if not treated in time. In this article we have proposed an automated system for detection of Wet AMD in Optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images. The proposed system extracts PED and CNV from OCT images using segmentation and morphological operations and then detailed feature set are extracted. These features are then passed on to the classifier for classification. Finally performance measures like accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are calculated and the classifier delivering the maximum performance is selected as a comparison measure. Our system gives higher performance using SVM as compared to other methods.

  15. Microglia-Derived Cytokines/Chemokines Are Involved in the Enhancement of LPS-Induced Loss of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurons in DJ-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chia-Hung; Lee, Ming-Jen; Liou, Houng-Chi; Liou, Horng-Huei; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of DJ-1 (PARK7) has been linked to the development of early-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. This study is aimed to compare the sensitivity of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge between DJ-1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice, and explore the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Our results found that the basal levels of interferon (IFN)-γ (the hub cytokine) and interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC) (a downstream mediator) were elevated in the substantia nigra of DJ-1 KO mice and in microglia cells with DJ-1 deficiency, and the release of cytokine/chemokine was greatly enhanced following LPS administration in the DJ-1 deficient conditions. In addition, direct intranigral LPS challenge caused a greater loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine content in DJ-1 KO mice than in WT mice. Furthermore, the sensitization of microglia cells to LPS challenge to release IFN-γ and I-TAC was via the enhancement of NF-κB signaling, which was antagonized by NF-κB inhibitors. LPS-induced increase in neuronal death in the neuron-glia co-culture was enhanced by DJ-1 deficiency in microglia, which was antagonized by the neutralizing antibodies against IFN-γ or I-TAC. These results indicate that DJ-1 deficiency sensitizes microglia cells to release IFN-γ and I-TAC and causes inflammatory damage to dopaminergic neurons. The interaction between the genetic defect (i.e. DJ-1) and inflammatory factors (e.g. LPS) may contribute to the development of PD. PMID:26982707

  16. Loss of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in synapses of tonic firing substantia gelatinosa neurons in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yishen; Derkach, Victor A; Smith, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Synapses transmitting nociceptive information in the spinal dorsal horn undergo enduring changes following peripheral nerve injury. Indeed, such injury alters the expression of the GluA2 subunit of glutamatergic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the substantia gelatinosa and this predicts altered channel conductance and calcium permeability, leading to an altered function of excitatory synapses. We therefore investigated the functional properties of synaptic AMPA receptors in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons following 10-20d chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve; a model of neuropathic pain. We measured their single-channel conductance and sensitivity to a blocker of calcium permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), IEM1460 (50μM). In putative inhibitory, tonic firing neurons, CCI reduced the average single-channel conductance of synaptic AMPAR from 14.4±3.5pS (n=12) to 9.2±1.0pS (n=10, p<0.05). IEM1460 also more effectively antagonized evoked, spontaneous and miniature EPSCs in tonic neurons from sham operated animals than in those from animals that had been subjected to CCI. By contrast, CCI did not change the effectiveness of IEM1460 in delay firing neurons although average single channel conductance was increased from 7.6±1.2pS (n=11) to 12.2±1.5pS (n=10, p<0.01). CCI thus elicits plastic changes in a specific set of glutamatergic synapses of substantia gelatinosa due to subunit recomposition and loss of GluA2-lacking CP-AMPAR. These insights reveal a molecular mechanism of nerve injury acting at synapses of inhibitory neurons to reduce their drive and therefore inhibitory tone in the spinal cord, therefore contributing to the central sensitization associated with neuropathic pain.

  17. Enhanced sensitivity of hippocampal pyramidal neurons from mdx mice to hypoxia-induced loss of synaptic transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Mehler, M F; Haas, K Z; Kessler, J A; Stanton, P K

    1992-01-01

    The gene at the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy locus encodes dystrophin, a member of a protein superfamily that links the actin cytoskeleton to transmembrane plasmalemmal proteins. In mature skeletal myocytes, the absence of dystrophin is associated with decreased membrane stability, altered kinetics of several calcium channels, and increased intracellular calcium concentration. In the central nervous system, dystrophin is restricted to specific neuronal populations that show heightened susceptibility to excitotoxic damage and is localized in proximal dendrites and the neuronal somata. We report that CA1 pyramidal neurons in a hippocampal slice preparation from a dystrophin-deficient mouse genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (the mdx mouse) exhibit significant increased susceptibility to hypoxia-induced damage to synaptic transmission. This selective vulnerability was substantially ameliorated by pretreatment with diphenylhydantoin, an anticonvulsant that blocks both sodium-dependent action potentials and low-threshold transient calcium conductances. These findings suggest that dystrophin deficiency could predispose susceptible neuronal populations to cumulative hypoxic insults that may contribute to the development of cognitive deficits in Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy patients and that the effects of such periods of hypoxia may be pharmacologically remediable. PMID:1549609

  18. Dietary compound score and risk of age-related macular degeneration in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Because foods provide many nutrients, which may interact with each other to modify risk for multifactorial diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we sought to develop a composite scoring system to summarize the combined effect of multiple dietary nutrients on AMD risk. Th...

  19. Glucocorticoid-induced loss of DNA methylation in non-neuronal cells and potential involvement of DNMT1 in epigenetic regulation of Fkbp5.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoju; Ewald, Erin R; Huo, Yuqing; Tamashiro, Kellie L; Salvatori, Roberto; Sawa, Akira; Wand, Gary S; Lee, Richard S

    2012-04-13

    Glucocorticoids may play a significant role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses. Abnormalities in plasma cortisol levels, glucocorticoid sensitivity, and HPA-axis function often accompany clinical symptoms of stress-related illnesses such as PTSD and depression. Of particular interest are genetic association studies that link single nucleotide polymorphisms of HPA-axis genes with illnesses only in the context of an early-life trauma exposure such as child abuse. These studies suggest that dysregulation of HPA-axis function can have lasting repercussions in shaping mood and anxiety, long after termination of the traumatic experience. As persistent glucocorticoid-induced loss of DNA methylation in FK506 binding protein 5 (Fkbp5) was previously observed in the hippocampus and blood and in the neuronal cell line HT-22, we asked whether these epigenetic alterations occur in non-neuronal, HPA-axis relevant cells. We used the pituitary adenoma cell line AtT-20 to demonstrate that the intronic enhancer region of Fkbp5 undergoes loss of DNA methylation in response to dexamethasone treatment in a dose-dependent manner. We also focused on the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus to test whether these changes would be enriched in a region implicated in the HPA-axis stress response, neurogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. We observed an increase in enrichment of DNA methylation loss in the dentate gyrus, as compared to whole hippocampal tissues that were similarly treated with glucocorticoids. We then asked whether DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1), a methyltransferase enzyme involved in maintaining DNA methylation following cell division, is involved in the observed epigenetic alterations. We found a dose-dependent decrease of Dnmt1 expression in the AtT-20 cells following dexamethasone treatment, and a similar decrease in corticosterone-treated mouse hippocampus. Taken together, we provide evidence that these glucocorticoid-induced epigenetic alterations have a broader

  20. Donepezil plus estradiol treatment enhances learning and delay-dependent memory performance by young ovariectomized rats with partial loss of septal cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, R B; Chipman, A M; Nelson, D

    2011-04-01

    Effects of estrogen therapy on cognitive performance appear to diminish with age and time following the loss of ovarian function. We hypothesize that this is due to a reduction in basal forebrain cholinergic function and that treatment with a cholinergic enhancer can reverse the effect. This study tested whether combining the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil with estradiol treatment can enhance/restore estradiol effects on cognitive performance in young ovariectomized rats with selective lesions of septal cholinergic neurons. 192IgG-saporin was injected directly into the medial septum to produce selective cholinergic lesions. Rats were then treated with donepezil (Don, daily injections of 3mg/kg/day, i.p.) or vehicle, and then with 17β-estradiol (E2, administered by silastic capsule implanted s.c.) or an empty capsule. Rats were trained on a delayed matching-to-position (DMP) T-maze task which previous studies have shown is sensitive to ovariectomy and estrogen replacement. Results show that neither estradiol nor donepezil alone significantly enhanced acquisition of the DMP task in rats with cholinergic lesions. Combination therapy was effective, however, depending on the severity of the lesion. Don+E2 significantly enhanced acquisition of the task in rats with partial lesions (<50% loss of cholinergic neurons), but not in rats with severe lesions. This effect was due largely to a reduction in perseverative behavior. Don+E2 also improved working memory in rats with partial lesions, as evidenced by significantly better performance than controls during increased intertrial delays. These findings suggest that even partial loss of septal cholinergic neurons can reduce effects of estrogen therapy on cognitive performance, and demonstrate that combining a cholinesterase inhibitor with estrogen therapy can help to restore beneficial effects on performance. We propose that combination therapy may have similar beneficial effects in women, particularly in older women who

  1. Deciphering the Molecular Profile of Plaques, Memory Decline and Neuron Loss in Two Mouse Models for Alzheimer’s Disease by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bouter, Yvonne; Kacprowski, Tim; Weissmann, Robert; Dietrich, Katharina; Borgers, Henning; Brauß, Andreas; Sperling, Christian; Wirths, Oliver; Albrecht, Mario; Jensen, Lars R.; Kuss, Andreas W.; Bayer, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the central research questions on the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the elucidation of the molecular signatures triggered by the amyloid cascade of pathological events. Next-generation sequencing allows the identification of genes involved in disease processes in an unbiased manner. We have combined this technique with the analysis of two AD mouse models: (1) The 5XFAD model develops early plaque formation, intraneuronal Aβ aggregation, neuron loss, and behavioral deficits. (2) The Tg4–42 model expresses N-truncated Aβ4–42 and develops neuron loss and behavioral deficits albeit without plaque formation. Our results show that learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze and fear conditioning tasks in Tg4–42 mice at 12 months of age are similar to the deficits in 5XFAD animals. This suggested that comparative gene expression analysis between the models would allow the dissection of plaque-related and -unrelated disease relevant factors. Using deep sequencing differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and subsequently verified by quantitative PCR. Nineteen DEGs were identified in pre-symptomatic young 5XFAD mice, and none in young Tg4–42 mice. In the aged cohort, 131 DEGs were found in 5XFAD and 56 DEGs in Tg4–42 mice. Many of the DEGs specific to the 5XFAD model belong to neuroinflammatory processes typically associated with plaques. Interestingly, 36 DEGs were identified in both mouse models indicating common disease pathways associated with behavioral deficits and neuron loss. PMID:24795628

  2. Loss of neurons in rostral ventromedial medulla that express neurokinin-1 receptors decreases the development of hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Khasabov, S G; Simone, D A

    2013-10-10

    It is well known that neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) are involved in descending modulation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. It has been shown that activation of neurokinin-1 receptors (NK-1Rs) in the RVM, which are presumably located on pain facilitating ON cells, produces hyperalgesia whereas blockade of NK-1Rs attenuates hyperalgesia. To obtain a better understanding of the functions of NK-1R expressing neurons in the RVM, we selectively ablated these neurons by injecting the stable analog of substance P (SP), Sar(9),Met(O2)(11)-Substance P, conjugated to the ribosomal toxin saporin (SSP-SAP) into the RVM. Rats received injections of SSP-SAP (1 μM) or an equal volume of 1 μM of saporin conjugated to artificial peptide (Blank-SAP). Stereological analysis of NK-1R- and NeuN-labeled neurons in the RVM was determined 21-24 days after treatment. Withdrawal responses to mechanical and heat stimuli applied to the plantar hindpaw were determined 5-28 days after treatment. Withdrawal responses were also determined before and after intraplantar injection of capsaicin (acute hyperalgesia) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) (prolonged hyperalgesia). The proportion of NK-1R-labeled neurons in the RVM was 8.8 ± 1.3% in naïve rats and 8.1 ± 0.8% in rats treated with Blank-SAP. However, injection of SSP-SAP into the RVM resulted in a 90% decrease in NK-1R-labeled neurons. SSP-SAP did not alter withdrawal responses to mechanical or heat stimuli under normal conditions, and did not alter analgesia produced by morphine administered into the RVM. In contrast, the duration of nocifensive behaviors produced by capsaicin and mechanical and heat hyperalgesia produced by capsaicin and CFA were decreased in rats pretreated with SSP-SAP as compared to those that received Blank-SAP. These data support our earlier studies using NK-1R antagonists in the RVM and demonstrate that RVM neurons that possess the NK-1R do not play a significant role in

  3. Age-related changes of auditory brainstem responses in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chi-Wing; Navarro, Xochi; Engle, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates, compared with humans and rodents, have historically been far less used for studies of age-related hearing loss, primarily because of their long life span and high cost of maintenance. Strong similarities in genetics, anatomy, and neurophysiology of the auditory nervous system between humans and monkeys, however, could provide fruitful opportun