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Sample records for age-related neuronal loss

  1. Computer Simulations of Loss of Organization of Neurons as a Model for Age-related Cognitive Decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Luis; Fengometidis, Elene; Jones, Frank; Jampani, Srinivas

    2011-03-01

    In normal aging, brains suffer from progressive cognitive decline not linked with loss of neurons common in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. However, in some brain areas neurons have lost positional organization specifically within microcolumns: arrays of interconnected neurons which may constitute fundamental computational units in the brain. This age-related loss of organization, likely a result of micron-sized random displacements in neuronal positions, is hypothesized to be a by-product of the loss of support from the surrounding medium, including dendrites. Using a dynamical model applied to virtual 3D representation of neuronal arrangements, that previously showed loss of organization in brains of cognitively tested rhesus monkeys, the relationship between these displacements and changes to the surrounding dendrite network are presented. The consequences of these displacements on the structure of the dendritic network, with possible disruptions in signal synchrony important to cognitive function, are discussed. NIH R01AG021133.

  2. Age-Related Loss of Calcium Buffering and Selective Neuronal Vulnerability in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Riascos, David; de Leon, Dianne; Baker-Nigh, Alaina; Nicholas, Alexander; Yukhananov, Rustam; Bu, Jing; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Geula, Changiz

    2011-01-01

    The reasons for the selective vulnerability of distinct neuronal populations in neurodegenerative disorders are unknown. The cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain are vulnerable to pathology and loss early in Alzheimer’s disease and in a number of other neurodegenerative disorders of the elderly. In the primate, including man, these neurons are rich in the calcium buffer calbindin-D28K. Here we confirm that these neurons undergo a substantial loss of calbindin in the course of normal aging and report a further loss of calbindin in Alzheimer’s disease both at the level of RNA and protein. Significantly, cholinergic neurons that had lost their calbindin in the course of normal aging were those that selectively degenerated in Alzheimer’s disease. Furthermore, calbindin containing neurons were virtually resistant to the process of tangle formation, a hallmark of the disease. We conclude that the loss of calcium buffering capacity in these neurons and the resultant pathological increase in intracellular calcium are permissive to tangle formation and degeneration. PMID:21874328

  3. Age-related hearing loss: GABA, nicotinic acetylcholine and NMDA receptor expression changes in spiral ganglion neurons of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Tang, X; Zhu, X; Ding, B; Walton, J P; Frisina, R D; Su, J

    2014-02-14

    Age-related hearing loss - presbycusis - is the number one communication disorder and most prevalent neurodegenerative condition of our aged population. Although speech understanding in background noise is quite difficult for those with presbycusis, there are currently no biomedical treatments to prevent, delay or reverse this condition. A better understanding of the cochlear mechanisms underlying presbycusis will help lead to future treatments. Objectives of the present study were to investigate GABAA receptor subunit α1, nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor subunit β2, and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR1 mRNA and protein expression changes in spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) of the CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea, that occur in age-related hearing loss, utilizing quantitative immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques. We found that auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds shifted over 40dB from 3 to 48kHz in old mice compared to young adults. DPOAE thresholds also shifted over 40dB from 6 to 49kHz in old mice, and their amplitudes were significantly decreased or absent in the same frequency range. SGN density decreased with age in basal, middle and apical turns, and SGN density of the basal turn declined the most. A positive correlation was observed between SGN density and ABR wave 1amplitude. mRNA and protein expression of GABAAR α1 and AChR β2 decreased with age in SGNs in the old mouse cochlea. mRNA and protein expression of NMDAR NR1 increased with age in SGNs of the old mice. These findings demonstrate that there are functionally-relevant age-related changes of GABAAR, nAChR, NMDAR expression in CBA mouse SGNs reflecting their degeneration, which may be related to functional changes in cochlear synaptic transmission with age, suggesting biological mechanisms for peripheral age-related hearing loss. PMID:24316061

  4. Rescuing effects of RXR agonist bexarotene on aging-related synapse loss depend on neuronal LRP1.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masaya; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Yamazaki, Yu; Liu, Chia-Chen; Rogers, Justin; Bu, Guojun; Kanekiyo, Takahisa

    2016-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays a critical role in maintaining synaptic integrity by transporting cholesterol to neurons through the low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-1 (LRP1). Bexarotene, a retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist, has been reported to have potential beneficial effects on cognition by increasing brain apoE levels and lipidation. To investigate the effects of bexarotene on aging-related synapse loss and the contribution of neuronal LRP1 to the pathway, forebrain neuron-specific LRP1 knockout (nLrp1(-/-)) and littermate control mice were administered with bexarotene-formulated diet (100mg/kg/day) or control diet at the age of 20-24 months for 8 weeks. Upon bexarotene treatment, levels of brain apoE and ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) were significantly increased in both mice. While levels of PSD95, glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1), and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor NR1 subunit (NR1), which are key postsynaptic proteins that regulate synaptic plasticity, were decreased with aging, they were restored by bexarotene treatment in the brains of control but not nLrp1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that the beneficial effects of bexarotene on synaptic integrity depend on the presence of neuronal LRP1. However, we also found that bexarotene treatment led to the activation of glial cells, weight loss and hepatomegaly, which are likely due to hepatic failure. Taken together, our results demonstrate that apoE-targeted treatment through the RXR pathway has a potential beneficial effect on synapses during aging; however, the therapeutic application of bexarotene requires extreme caution due to its toxic side effects. PMID:26688581

  5. [Presbycusis - Age Related Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Fischer, N; Weber, B; Riechelmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Presbycusis or age related hearing loss can be defined as a progressive, bilateral and symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss due to age related degeneration of inner ear structures. It can be considered a multifactorial complex disorder with environmental and genetic factors. The molecular, electrophysiological and histological damage at different levels of the inner ear cause a progressive hearing loss, which usually affects the high frequencies of hearing. The resulting poor speech recognition has a negative impact on cognitive, emotional and social function in older adults. Recent investigations revealed an association between hearing impairment and social isolation, anxiety, depression and cognitive decline in elderly. These findings emphasize the importance of diagnosis and treating hearing loss in the elderly population. Hearing aids are the most commonly used devices for treating presbycusis. The technical progress of implantable hearing devices allows an effective hearing rehabilitation even in elderly with severe hearing loss. However, most people with hearing impairments are not treated adequately. PMID:27392191

  6. Age-related hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... is no known single cause of age-related hearing loss. Most commonly, it is caused by changes in the inner ear that occur as you grow older. Your genes and loud noise (from rock concerts or music headphones) may play a large role. The following ...

  7. Membrane lipid rafts and neurobiology: age-related changes in membrane lipids and loss of neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Junji; Pearn, Matthew L; Lemkuil, Brian P; Patel, Piyush M; Head, Brian P

    2016-08-15

    A better understanding of the cellular physiological role that plasma membrane lipids, fatty acids and sterols play in various cellular systems may yield more insight into how cellular and whole organ function is altered during the ageing process. Membrane lipid rafts (MLRs) within the plasma membrane of most cells serve as key organizers of intracellular signalling and tethering points of cytoskeletal components. MLRs are plasmalemmal microdomains enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and scaffolding proteins; they serve as a platform for signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization and vesicular trafficking. Within MLRs are the scaffolding and cholesterol binding proteins named caveolin (Cav). Cavs not only organize a multitude of receptors including neurotransmitter receptors (NMDA and AMPA receptors), signalling proteins that regulate the production of cAMP (G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, phosphodiesterases (PDEs)), and receptor tyrosine kinases involved in growth (Trk), but also interact with components that modulate actin and tubulin cytoskeletal dynamics (e.g. RhoGTPases and actin binding proteins). MLRs are essential for the regulation of the physiology of organs such as the brain, and age-related loss of cholesterol from the plasma membrane leads to loss of MLRs, decreased presynaptic vesicle fusion, and changes in neurotransmitter release, all of which contribute to different forms of neurodegeneration. Thus, MLRs provide an active membrane domain that tethers and reorganizes the cytoskeletal machinery necessary for membrane and cellular repair, and genetic interventions that restore MLRs to normal cellular levels may be exploited as potential therapeutic means to reverse the ageing and neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26332795

  8. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... hearing loss. Here are the most common ones: Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Hearing aids ... list of organizations, contact: NIDCD Information Clearinghouse 1 Communication Avenue Bethesda, MD 20892-3456 Toll-free Voice: ( ...

  9. Age-related hair pigment loss.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Humans are social animals that communicate disproportionately via potent genetic signals imbued in the skin and hair, including racial, ethnic, health, gender, and age status. For the vast majority of us, age-related hair pigment loss becomes the inescapable signal of our disappearing youth. The hair follicle (HF) pigmentary unit is a wonderful tissue for studying mechanisms generally regulating aging, often before this becomes evident elsewhere in the body. Given that follicular melanocytes (unlike those in the epidermis) are regulated by the hair growth cycle, this cycle is likely to impact the process of aging in the HF pigmentary unit. The formal identification of melanocyte stem cells in the mouse skin has spurred a flurry of reports on the potential involvement of melanocyte stem cell depletion in hair graying (i.e., canities). Caution is recommended, however, against simple extrapolation of murine data to humans. Regardless, hair graying in both species is likely to involve an age-related imbalance in the tissue's oxidative stress handling that will impact not only melanogenesis but also melanocyte stem cell and melanocyte homeostasis and survival. There is some emerging evidence that the HF pigmentary unit may have regenerative potential, even after it has begun to produce white hair fibers. It may therefore be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some aging-associated changes to maintain melanin production for longer. PMID:26370651

  10. Oxidative stress and age-related neuronal deficits.

    PubMed

    Joseph, J A; Denisova, N; Villalobos-Molina, R; Erat, S; Strain, J

    1996-01-01

    Research from our laboratory has indicated that the loss of sensitivity that occurs in several receptor systems as a function of age may be an index of an increasing inability to respond to oxidative stress (OS). This loss occurs partially as a result of altered signal transduction (ST). Assessments have involved determining the nature of age-related reductions in oxotremorine enhancement of K(+)-evoked dopamine release (K(+)-ERDA) from superfused striatal slices. Using this model, we have found that 1. Reductions can be restored with in vivo administration of the free-radical trapping agent, N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN); 2. Decrements in DA release induced by NO or H2O2 from striatal slices from both young and old animals could be restored with alpha-tocopherol or PBN; 3. ST decrements, such as those seen in aging, could be induced with radiation exposure; and 4. Pre-incubation of the striatal slices with cholesterol decreased subsequent deleterious effects of NO or OH. on DA release. Thus, cholesterol, which increases in neuronal membranes as a function of age, may function as a potent antioxidant and protectant against neuronal damage. These results suggest that therapeutic efforts to restore cognitive deficits in aging and age-related disease might begin with antioxidant reversal of ST decrements. PMID:8871939

  11. The role of mitochondria in age-related hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hengchao; Tang, Jianguo

    2014-02-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), the hearing loss associated with aging, is a vital problem in present society. The severity of hearing loss is possibly associated with the degeneration of cochlear cells. Mitochondria play a key role in the energy supply, cellular redox homeostasis, signaling, and regulation of programmed cell death. In this review, we focus on the central role of mitochondria in ARHL. The mitochondrial redox imbalance and mitochondrial DNA mutation might collaboratively involve in the process of cochlear senescence in response to the aging stress. Subsequent responses, including alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis, mitophagy, apoptosis and paraptosis, participate in the aging process from different respects. PMID:24202185

  12. Pathogenesis of Age-Related Bone Loss in Humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background. Although data from rodent systems are extremely useful in providing insights into possible mechanisms of age-related bone loss, concepts evolving from animal models need to ultimately be tested in humans. Methods. This review provides an update on mechanisms of age-related bone loss in humans based on the author’s knowledge of the field and focused literature reviews. Results. Novel imaging, experimental models, biomarkers, and analytic techniques applied directly to human studies are providing new insights into the patterns of bone mass acquisition and loss as well as the role of sex steroids, in particular estrogen, on bone metabolism and bone loss with aging in women and men. These studies have identified the onset of trabecular bone loss at multiple sites that begins in young adulthood and remains unexplained, at least based on current paradigms of the mechanisms of bone loss. In addition, estrogen appears to be a major regulator of bone metabolism not only in women but also in men. Studies assessing mechanisms of estrogen action on bone in humans have identified effects of estrogen on RANKL expression by several different cell types in the bone microenvironment, a role for TNF-α and IL-1β in mediating effects of estrogen deficiency on bone, and possible regulation of the Wnt inhibitor, sclerostin, by estrogen. Conclusions. There have been considerable advances in our understanding of age-related bone loss in humans. However, there are also significant gaps in knowledge, particularly in defining cell autonomous changes in bone in human studies to test or validate concepts emerging from studies in rodents. Decision Editor: Luigi Ferrucci, MD, PhD PMID:22923429

  13. The Neural Consequences of Age-Related Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Peelle, Jonathan E; Wingfield, Arthur

    2016-07-01

    During hearing, acoustic signals travel up the ascending auditory pathway from the cochlea to auditory cortex; efferent connections provide descending feedback. In human listeners, although auditory and cognitive processing have sometimes been viewed as separate domains, a growing body of work suggests they are intimately coupled. Here, we review the effects of hearing loss on neural systems supporting spoken language comprehension, beginning with age-related physiological decline. We suggest that listeners recruit domain general executive systems to maintain successful communication when the auditory signal is degraded, but that this compensatory processing has behavioral consequences: even relatively mild levels of hearing loss can lead to cascading cognitive effects that impact perception, comprehension, and memory, leading to increased listening effort during speech comprehension. PMID:27262177

  14. Age-related changes to TNF receptors affect neuron survival in the presence of beta-amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jigisha R.; Brewer, Gregory J.

    2007-01-01

    Inflammation including local accumulations of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a part of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology and may exacerbate age-related neurodegeneration. Most studies on TNFα and TNF neuronal receptors are conducted using embryonic neurons. Few studies consider age-related deficits that may occur in neurons. Age-related changes in susceptibility to TNFα through TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) and receptor 2 (TNFR2) expression could increase susceptibility to β-amyloid (1-42, Abeta42). Evidence is conflicting about which receptor mediates survival and/or apoptosis. We determined how aging affects receptor expression in cultured adult rat cortical neurons. Old neurons were more susceptible to Abeta42 toxicity than middle-age neurons and the addition of TNFα was neuroprotective in middle-age, but exacerbated the toxicity from Abeta42 in old neurons. These pathologic and protective responses in old and middle-age neurons respectively correlated with higher starting TNFR1 and TNFR2 mRNA levels in old versus middle-age neurons. Middle-age neurons treated with TNFα plus Abeta42 did not show an increase in either TNFR1 or TNFR2 mRNA but old neurons showed an upregulation in TNFR2 mRNA and not TNFR1 mRNA. Despite these mRNA changes, surface immunoreactivity of both TNFR1 and TNFR2 increased with dose of TNFα in middle-age neurons. However, middle-age neurons treated with TNFα plus Abeta42 showed an upregulation in both TNFR1 and TNFR2 surface expression, whereas old neurons failed to upregulate surface expression of either receptor. These findings support the hypothesis that age-related changes in TNFα surface receptor expression contribute to the neuronal loss associated with inflammation in AD. PMID:18418902

  15. Oxidative Stresses and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Age-Related Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Chisato

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), the progressive loss of hearing associated with aging, is the most common sensory disorder in the elderly population. The pathology of ARHL includes the hair cells of the organ of Corti, stria vascularis, and afferent spiral ganglion neurons as well as the central auditory pathways. Many studies have suggested that the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage, the production of reactive oxygen species, and decreased antioxidant function are associated with subsequent cochlear senescence in response to aging stress. Mitochondria play a crucial role in the induction of intrinsic apoptosis in cochlear cells. ARHL can be prevented in laboratory animals by certain interventions, such as caloric restriction and supplementation with antioxidants. In this review, we will focus on previous research concerning the role of the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathology of ARHL in both animal models and humans and introduce concepts that have recently emerged regarding the mechanisms of the development of ARHL. PMID:25110550

  16. Overexpression of X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptotic Protein (XIAP) reduces age-related neuronal degeneration in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Q; Zeng, S; Liu, A; Chen, Z; Yu, Z; Zhang, R; He, J; Bance, M; Robertson, G; Yin, S; Wang, J

    2014-11-01

    Previously, we showed that age-related hearing loss (AHL) was delayed in C57BL6 mice overexpressing X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptotic Protein (XIAP), and the delayed AHL was associated with attenuated hair cell (HC) loss in XIAP-overexpressing mice. Similar to other reports, the HC loss in aged mice was restricted to the basal turn in this previous study, and occurred slightly at the apical end of the cochlea, showing considerably less spread than the frequency region of hearing loss. In the present study, we examined whether and how AHL is related to the degeneration of neuronal innervation of the cochlea and whether the overexpression of XIAP exerts a protective effect against age-related degeneration in both afferent and efferent cochlear neurites. In contrast to HC loss, degeneration of both afferent and efferent neurites spread to the middle turns of the cochlea. Moreover, XIAP-overexpressing mice lost fewer HC afferent dendrites and efferent axons, as well as fewer spiral ganglion neurons between 3 and 14 months of age in comparison with wild-type littermates. The results suggest that age-related degeneration of cochlear neurites may be independent of HC loss. Further, the inhibition of apoptosis by XIAP appears to reduce degeneration of both afferent and efferent cochlear neurites. PMID:25142138

  17. Overexpression of X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptotic Protein (XIAP) Reduces Age-related Neuronal Degeneration in the Mouse Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Qingwei; Zeng, Shan; Liu, Aiguo; Chen, Zhengnong; Yu, Zhuowei; Zhang, Ruxin; He, jingchun; Bance, Manohar; Robertson, George; Yin, Shankai; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that age-related hearing loss (AHL) was delayed in C57BL6 mice overexpressing X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptotic Protein (XIAP), and the delayed AHL was associated with attenuated hair cell (HC) loss in XIAP-overexpressing mice. Similar to other reports, the HC loss in aged mice was restricted to the basal turn in this previous study, and occurred slightly at the apical end of the cochlea, showing considerably less spread than the frequency region of hearing loss. In the present study, we examined whether and how AHL is related to the degeneration of neuronal innervation of the cochlea and if the overexpression of XIAP exerts a protective effect against age-related degeneration in both afferent and efferent cochlear neurites. In contrast to HC loss, degeneration of both afferent and efferent neurites spread to the middle turns of the cochlea. Moreover, XIAP-overexpressing mice lost fewer HC afferent dendrites and efferent axons, as well as fewer spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) between 3– 14 months of age in comparison to wild-type littermates. The results suggest that age-related degeneration of cochlear neurites may be independent of HC loss. Further, the inhibition of apoptosis by XIAP appears to reduce degeneration of both afferent and efferent cochlear neurites. PMID:25142138

  18. Neural Alterations in Acquired Age-Related Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mudar, Raksha A.; Husain, Fatima T.

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in older adults. Growing evidence suggests that hearing loss is associated with reduced cognitive functioning and incident dementia. In this mini-review, we briefly examine literature on anatomical and functional alterations in the brains of adults with acquired age-associated hearing loss, which may underlie the cognitive consequences observed in this population, focusing on studies that have used structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and event-related electroencephalography. We discuss structural and functional alterations observed in the temporal and frontal cortices and the limbic system. These neural alterations are discussed in the context of common cause, information-degradation, and sensory-deprivation hypotheses, and we suggest possible rehabilitation strategies. Although, we are beginning to learn more about changes in neural architecture and functionality related to age-associated hearing loss, much work remains to be done. Understanding the neural alterations will provide objective markers for early identification of neural consequences of age-associated hearing loss and for evaluating benefits of intervention approaches. PMID:27313556

  19. Caloric restriction impedes age-related decline of mitochondrial function and neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Coman, Daniel; Jiang, Lihong; Rothman, Douglas L; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) prolongs lifespan and retards many detrimental effects of aging, but its effect on brain mitochondrial function and neuronal activity—especially in healthy aging—remains unexplored. Here we measured rates of neuronal glucose oxidation and glutamate–glutamine neurotransmitter cycling in young control, old control (i.e., healthy aging), and old CR rats using in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found that, compared with the young control, neuronal energy production and neurotransmission rates were significantly reduced in healthy aging, but were preserved in old CR rats. The results suggest that CR mitigated the age-related deceleration of brain physiology. PMID:24984898

  20. Age-Related Hearing Loss: Quality of Care for Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li-Korotky, Ha-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), known as presbycusis, is characterized by progressive deterioration of auditory sensitivity, loss of the auditory sensory cells, and central processing functions associated with the aging process. ARHL is the third most prevalent chronic condition in older Americans, after hypertension and arthritis, and is a…

  1. Age-related changes in dopamine transporters and accumulation of 3-nitrotyrosine in rhesus monkey midbrain dopamine neurons: Relevance in selective neuronal vulnerability to degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, N. M.; Kordower, J. H.; Collier, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the strongest risk factor for developing Parkinson’s disease (PD). There is a preferential loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tier of the substantia nigra (vtSN) compared to the dorsal tier and ventral tegmental area (VTA) in PD. Examining age-related and region-specific differences in DA neurons represents a means of identifying factors potentially involved in vulnerability or resistance to degeneration. Nitrative stress is among the factors potentially underlying DA neuron degeneration. We studied the relationship between 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT; a marker of nitrative damage) and DA transporters [DA transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT)] during aging in DA subregions of rhesus monkeys. The percentage of DA neurons containing 3NT increased significantly only in the vtSN with advancing age, and the vtSN had a greater percentage of 3NT-positive neurons when compared to the VTA. The relationship between 3NT and DA transporters was determined by measuring fluorescence intensity of 3NT, DAT and VMAT staining. 3NT intensity increased with advancing age in the vtSN. Increased DAT, VMAT and DAT/VMAT ratios were associated with increased 3NT in individual DA neurons. These results suggest nitrative damage accumulates in midbrain DA neurons with advancing age, an effect exacerbated in the vulnerable vtSN. The capacity of a DA neuron to accumulate more cytosolic DA, as inferred from DA transporter expression, is related to accumulation of nitrative damage. These findings are consistent with a role for aging-related accrual of nitrative damage in the selective vulnerability of vtSN neurons to degeneration in PD. PMID:18598263

  2. Modeling the Mechanical Consequences of Age-Related Trabecular Bone Loss by XFEM Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ruoxun; Zhang, Xianbin; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhengbin; Zhu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The elderly are more likely to suffer from fracture because of age-related trabecular bone loss. Different bone loss locations and patterns have different effects on bone mechanical properties. Extended finite element method (XFEM) can simulate fracture process and was suited to investigate the effects of bone loss on trabecular bone. Age-related bone loss is indicated by trabecular thinning and loss and may occur at low-strain locations or other random sites. Accordingly, several ideal normal and aged trabecular bone models were created based on different bone loss locations and patterns; then, fracture processes from crack initiation to complete failure of these models were observed by XFEM; finally, the effects of different locations and patterns on trabecular bone were compared. Results indicated that bone loss occurring at low-strain locations was more detrimental to trabecular bone than that occurring at other random sites; meanwhile, the decrease in bone strength caused by trabecular loss was higher than that caused by trabecular thinning, and the effects of vertical trabecular loss on mechanical properties were more severe than horizontal trabecular loss. This study provided a numerical method to simulate trabecular bone fracture and distinguished different effects of the possible occurrence of bone loss locations and patterns on trabecular bone. PMID:27403206

  3. Modeling the Mechanical Consequences of Age-Related Trabecular Bone Loss by XFEM Simulation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruoxun; Gong, He; Zhang, Xianbin; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhengbin; Zhu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The elderly are more likely to suffer from fracture because of age-related trabecular bone loss. Different bone loss locations and patterns have different effects on bone mechanical properties. Extended finite element method (XFEM) can simulate fracture process and was suited to investigate the effects of bone loss on trabecular bone. Age-related bone loss is indicated by trabecular thinning and loss and may occur at low-strain locations or other random sites. Accordingly, several ideal normal and aged trabecular bone models were created based on different bone loss locations and patterns; then, fracture processes from crack initiation to complete failure of these models were observed by XFEM; finally, the effects of different locations and patterns on trabecular bone were compared. Results indicated that bone loss occurring at low-strain locations was more detrimental to trabecular bone than that occurring at other random sites; meanwhile, the decrease in bone strength caused by trabecular loss was higher than that caused by trabecular thinning, and the effects of vertical trabecular loss on mechanical properties were more severe than horizontal trabecular loss. This study provided a numerical method to simulate trabecular bone fracture and distinguished different effects of the possible occurrence of bone loss locations and patterns on trabecular bone. PMID:27403206

  4. Functional consequences of age-related morphologic changes to pyramidal neurons of the rhesus monkey prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Coskren, Patrick J.; Luebke, Jennifer I.; Kabaso, Doron; Wearne, Susan L.; Yadav, Aniruddha; Rumbell, Timothy; Hof, Patrick R.; Weaver, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    Layer 3 (L3) pyramidal neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) of rhesus monkeys exhibit dendritic regression, spine loss and increased action potential (AP) firing rates during normal aging. The relationship between these structural and functional alterations, if any, is unknown. To address this issue, morphological and electrophysiological properties of L3 LPFC pyramidal neurons from young and aged rhesus monkeys were characterized using in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and high-resolution digital reconstruction of neurons. Consistent with our previous studies, aged neurons exhibited significantly reduced dendritic arbor length and spine density, as well as increased input resistance and firing rates. Computational models using the digital reconstructions with Hodgkin-Huxley and AMPA channels allowed us to assess relationships between demonstrated age-related changes and to predict physiological changes that have not yet been tested empirically. For example, the models predict that in both backpropagating APs and excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), attenuation is lower in aged versus young neurons. Importantly, when identical densities of passive parameters and voltage- and calcium-gated conductances were used in young and aged model neurons, neither input resistance nor firing rates differed between the two age groups. Tuning passive parameters for each model predicted significantly higher membrane resistance (Rm) in aged versus young neurons. This Rm increase alone did not account for increased firing rates in aged models, but coupling these Rm values with subtle differences in morphology and membrane capacitance did. The predicted differences in passive parameters (or parameters with similar effects) are mathematically plausible, but must be tested empirically. PMID:25527184

  5. Age-related hearing impairment and the triad of acquired hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof) of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise. PMID:26283913

  6. Cumulative Lead Exposure and Age-related Hearing Loss: The VA Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Kyun; Elmarsafawy, Sahar; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Spiro, Avron; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Nie, Huiling; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Although lead has been associated with hearing loss in occupational settings and in children, little epidemiologic research has been conducted on the impact of cumulative lead exposure on age-related hearing loss in the general population. We determined whether bone lead levels, a marker of cumulative lead exposure, are associated with decreased hearing ability in 448 men from the Normative Aging Study, seen between 1962 and 1996 (2,264 total observations). Air conduction hearing thresholds were measured at 0.25 to 8 kHz and pure tone averages (PTA) (mean of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz) were computed. Tibia and patella lead levels were measured using K x-ray fluorescence between 1991 and 1996. In cross-sectional analyses, after adjusting for potential confounders including occupational noise, patella lead levels were significantly associated with poorer hearing thresholds at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 kHz and PTA. The odds of hearing loss significantly increased with patella lead levels. We also found significant positive associations between tibia lead and the rate change in hearing thresholds at 1, 2, and 8 kHz and PTA in longitudinal analyses. Our results suggest that chronic low-level lead exposure may be an important risk factor for age-related hearing loss and reduction of lead exposure could help prevent or delay development of age-related hearing loss. PMID:20638461

  7. Antioxidant-enriched diet does not delay the progression of age-related hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sha, Su-Hua; Kanicki, Ariane; Halsey, Karin; Wearne, Kimberly Anne; Schacht, Jochen

    2012-05-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked to noise- and drug-induced as well as age-related hearing loss. Antioxidants can attenuate the decline of cochlear structure and function after exposure to noise or drugs, but it is debated as to whether they can protect from age-related hearing loss. In a long-term longitudinal study, 10-month-old female CBA/J mice were placed on either a control or antioxidant-enriched diet and monitored through 24 months of age. Supplementation with vitamins A, C, and E, L-carnitine, and α-lipoic acid significantly increased the antioxidant capacity of inner ear tissues. However, by 24 months of age, the magnitude of hearing loss was equal between the two groups. Likewise, there were no significant differences in hair cell loss or degeneration of spiral ganglion cells. We conclude that dietary manipulations can alter cochlear antioxidant capacity but do not ameliorate age-related sensorineural hearing loss in the CBA/J mouse. PMID:22154190

  8. Age-Related Phasic Patterns of Mitochondrial Maintenance in Adult Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Morsci, Natalia S.; Hall, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with cognitive decline and increasing risk of neurodegeneration. Perturbation of mitochondrial function, dynamics, and trafficking are implicated in the pathogenesis of several age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this fundamental importance, the critical understanding of how organismal aging affects lifetime neuronal mitochondrial maintenance remains unknown, particularly in a physiologically relevant context. To address this issue, we performed a comprehensive in vivo analysis of age-associated changes in mitochondrial morphology, density, trafficking, and stress resistance in individual Caenorhabditis elegans neurons throughout adult life. Adult neurons display three distinct stages of increase, maintenance, and decrease in mitochondrial size and density during adulthood. Mitochondrial trafficking in the distal neuronal processes declines progressively with age starting from early adulthood. In contrast, long-lived daf-2 mutants exhibit delayed age-associated changes in mitochondrial morphology, constant mitochondrial density, and maintained trafficking rates during adulthood. Reduced mitochondrial load at late adulthood correlates with decreased mitochondrial resistance to oxidative stress. Revealing aging-associated changes in neuronal mitochondria in vivo is an essential precedent that will allow future elucidation of the mechanistic causes of mitochondrial aging. Thus, our study establishes the critical foundation for the future analysis of cellular pathways and genetic and pharmacological factors regulating mitochondrial maintenance in aging- and disease-relevant conditions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, we address long-standing questions: How does aging affect neuronal mitochondrial morphology, density, trafficking, and oxidative stress resistance? Are these age-related changes amenable to genetic manipulations that slow down the aging process? Our study illustrates that mitochondrial

  9. Effects of chronic estrogen treatment on modulating age-related bone loss in female mice.

    PubMed

    Syed, Farhan A; Mödder, Ulrike Il; Roforth, Matthew; Hensen, Ira; Fraser, Daniel G; Peterson, James M; Oursler, Merry Jo; Khosla, Sundeep

    2010-11-01

    While female mice do not have the equivalent of a menopause, they do undergo reproductive senescence. Thus, to dissociate the effects of aging versus estrogen deficiency on age-related bone loss, we sham-operated, ovariectomized, or ovariectomized and estrogen-replaced female C57/BL6 mice at 6 months of age and followed them to age 18 to 22 months. Lumbar spines and femurs were excised for analysis, and bone marrow hematopoietic lineage negative (lin-) cells (enriched for osteoprogenitor cells) were isolated for gene expression studies. Six-month-old intact control mice were euthanized to define baseline parameters. Compared with young mice, aged/sham-operated mice had a 42% reduction in lumbar spine bone volume/total volume (BV/TV), and maintaining constant estrogen levels over life in ovariectomized/estrogen-treated mice did not prevent age-related trabecular bone loss at this site. By contrast, lifelong estrogen treatment of ovariectomized mice completely prevented the age-related reduction in cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and thickness at the tibial diaphysis present in the aged/sham-operated mice. As compared with cells from young mice, lin- cells from aged/sham-operated mice expressed significantly higher mRNA levels for osteoblast differentiation and proliferation marker genes. These data thus demonstrate that, in mice, age-related loss of cortical bone in the appendicular skeleton, but not loss of trabecular bone in the spine, can be prevented by maintaining constant estrogen levels over life. The observed increase in osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation marker gene expression in progenitor bone marrow cells from aged versus young mice may represent a compensatory mechanism in response to ongoing bone loss. PMID:20499336

  10. Age-related changes in rostral basal forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic projection neurons: Relationship with spatial impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bañuelos, C.; LaSarge, C. L.; McQuail, J. A.; Hartman, J. J.; Gilbert, R. J.; Ormerod, B. K.; Bizon, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Both cholinergic and GABAergic projections from the rostral basal forebrain have been implicated in hippocampal function and mnemonic abilities. While dysfunction of cholinergic neurons has been heavily implicated in age-related memory decline, significantly less is known regarding how age-related changes in co-distributed GABAergic projection neurons contribute to a decline in hippocampal-dependent spatial learning. In the current study, confocal stereology was used to quantify cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunopositive) neurons, GABAergic projection (glutamic decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) immunopositive) neurons, and total (NeuN immunopositive) neurons in the rostral basal forebrain of young and aged rats that were first characterized on a spatial learning task. ChAT immunopositive neurons were significantly but modestly reduced in aged rats. Although ChAT immunopositive neuron number was strongly correlated with spatial learning abilities among young rats, the reduction of ChAT immunopositive neurons was not associated with impaired spatial learning in aged rats. In contrast, the number of GAD67 immunopositive neurons was robustly and selectively elevated in aged rats that exhibited impaired spatial learning. Interestingly, the total number of rostral basal forebrain neurons was comparable in young and aged rats, regardless of their cognitive status. These data demonstrate differential effects of age on phenotypically distinct rostral basal forebrain projection neurons, and implicate dysregulated cholinergic and GABAergic septohippocampal circuitry in age-related mnemonic decline. PMID:22817834

  11. Gulliver meets Descartes: early modern concepts of age-related memory loss.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Daniel

    2003-03-01

    Age-related memory loss was a marginal issue in medical discussions during early modern times and until well into the second half of the 17th century. There are many possible explanations: the lack of similar traditions in antiquity and in the Middle Ages, insufficient physiological and morphological knowledge of the brain, and the underlying conflict between idealistic and materialistic perspectives on the functions of the soul and the conditions of these in old age. After these boundaries had been pushed back by the influence of Cartesianism and Iatromechanism, the problem of age-related memory loss was increasingly regarded as a physical illness and began to receive more attention. This trend first occurred in medicine, before spreading to the literary world, where the novel "Gulliver's Travels" is one clear and famous example. PMID:12785108

  12. Nutrient-rich meat proteins in offsetting age-related muscle loss.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Stuart M

    2012-11-01

    From a health perspective, an underappreciated consequence of the normal aging process is the impacts that the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass, termed sarcopenia, has on health beyond an effect on locomotion. Sarcopenia, refers to the loss of muscle mass, and associated muscle weakness, which occurs in aging and is thought to proceed at a rate of approximately 1% loss per year. However, periods of inactivity due to illness or recovery from orthopedic procedures such as hip or knee replacement are times of accelerated sarcopenic muscle loss from which it may be more difficult for older persons to recover. Some of the consequences of age-related sarcopenia are easy to appreciate such as weakness and, eventually, reduced mobility; however, other lesser recognized consequences include, due to the metabolic role the skeletal muscle plays, an increased risk for poor glucose control and a predisposition toward weight gain. What we currently know is that two stimuli can counter this age related muscle loss and these are physical activity, specifically resistance exercise (weightlifting), and nutrition. The focus of this paper is on the types of dietary protein that people might reasonably consume to offset sarcopenic muscle loss. PMID:22632883

  13. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Loss Disturbs Intracellular Redox Signaling, Resulting in Global Age-Related Pathological Changes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and organ dysfunction, which occur in a progressive and irreversible manner. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) serves as a major antioxidant and neutralizes superoxide radicals throughout the body. In vivo studies have demonstrated that copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-deficient (Sod1−/−) mice show various aging-like pathologies, accompanied by augmentation of oxidative damage in organs. We found that antioxidant treatment significantly attenuated the age-related tissue changes and oxidative damage-associated p53 upregulation in Sod1−/− mice. This review will focus on various age-related pathologies caused by the loss of Sod1 and will discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in Sod1−/− mice. PMID:25276767

  14. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Daghighi, Mojtaba; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Amini, Marzyeh; Mazza, Tommaso; Pazienza, Valerio; Motazacker, Mahdi M; Mahmoudi, Morteza; De Rooij, Felix W M; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-10-01

    Despite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue (AT) and pancreas with T2D for targeting to develop new drugs for DNs therapy. AT-T2D displayed 15 (e.g. SYT4 up-regulated and VGF down-regulated) and pancreas-T2D showed 10 (e.g. BAG3 up-regulated, VAV3 and APOA1 down-regulated) highly differentially expressed genes with neuronal functions as compared to control tissues. ELISA was blindly performed to measure proteins of 5 most differentially expressed genes in 41 human subjects. SYT4 protein was upregulated, VAV3 and APOA1 were down-regulated, and BAG3 remained unchanged in 1- Obese and 2- Obese-T2D without insulin, VGF protein was higher in these two groups as well as in group 3- Obese-T2D receiving insulin than 4-lean subjects. Interaction networks analysis of these 5 genes showed several metabolic pathways (e.g. lipid metabolism and insulin signaling). Pancreas is a novel site for APOA1 synthesis. VGF is synthesized in AT and could be considered as good diagnostic, and even prognostic, marker for age-induced diseases obesity and T2D. This study provides new targets for rational drugs development for the therapy of age-related DNs. PMID:26337083

  15. MHCI promotes developmental synapse elimination and aging-related synapse loss at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Tetruashvily, Mazell M; McDonald, Marin A; Frietze, Karla K; Boulanger, Lisa M

    2016-08-01

    Synapse elimination at the developing neuromuscular junction (NMJ) sculpts motor circuits, and synapse loss at the aging NMJ drives motor impairments that are a major cause of loss of independence in the elderly. Here we provide evidence that at the NMJ, both developmental synapse elimination and aging-related synapse loss are promoted by specific immune proteins, members of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI). MHCI is expressed at the developing NMJ, and three different methods of reducing MHCI function all disrupt synapse elimination during the second postnatal week, leaving some muscle fibers multiply-innervated, despite otherwise outwardly normal synapse formation and maturation. Conversely, overexpressing MHCI modestly accelerates developmental synapse elimination. MHCI levels at the NMJ rise with aging, and reducing MHCI levels ameliorates muscle denervation in aged mice. These findings identify an unexpected role for MHCI in the elimination of neuromuscular synapses during development, and indicate that reducing MHCI levels can preserve youthful innervation of aging muscle. PMID:26802986

  16. I owe you: age-related similarities and differences in associative memory for gains and losses.

    PubMed

    Castel, Alan D; Friedman, Michael C; McGillivray, Shannon; Flores, Cynthia C; Murayama, Kou; Kerr, Tyson; Drolet, Aimee

    2016-09-01

    Older adults often experience associative memory impairments but can sometimes remember important information. The current experiments investigate potential age-related similarities and differences associate memory for gains and losses. Younger and older participants were presented with faces and associated dollar amounts, which indicated how much money the person "owed" the participant, and were later given a cued recall test for the dollar amount. Experiment 1 examined face-dollar amount pairs while Experiment 2 included negative dollar amounts to examine both gains and losses. While younger adults recalled more information relative to older adults, both groups were more accurate in recalling the correct value associated with high-value faces compared to lower-value faces and remembered gist-information about the values. However, negative values (losses) did not have a strong impact on recall among older adults versus younger adults, illustrating important associative memory differences between younger and older adults. PMID:26847137

  17. Understanding the Experience of Age-Related Vestibular Loss in Older Individuals: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Carol; Bridges, John F. P.; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Background Inner ear balance (or vestibular) function declines with age and is associated with decreased mobility and an increased risk of falls in older individuals. We sought to understand the lived experience of older adults with vestibular loss in order to improve care in this population. Methods Qualitative data were derived from semi-structured interviews of individuals aged 65 years or older presenting to the Balance and Falls Prevention Clinic from February 1, 2014 to March 30, 2015 for evaluation of age-related vestibular loss. Transcripts were analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. We created a taxonomy of overarching superordinate themes based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) Framework, and classified key dimensions within each of these themes. Results Sixteen interviews were conducted with individuals (mean age 76.0 years, 75 % female) with age-related vestibular loss. The three superordinate themes and associated key dimensions were (1) body impairment (including depression, fatigue, fear/anxiety, and problems with concentrating and memory); (2) activity limitation and participation restriction (isolation, needing to stop in the middle of activities, reduced participation relative to expectations, reduced ability to drive or travel, and problems with bending/looking up, standing, and walking); and (3) environmental influences (needing help with daily activities). All participants reported difficulty walking. Conclusions Older adults report that vestibular loss impacts their body functioning and restricts their participation in activities. The specific key dimensions uncovered by this qualitative study can be used to evaluate care from the patient's perspective. PMID:26739817

  18. Long-term treatment with aldosterone slows the progression of age-related hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Halonen, Joshua; Hinton, Ashley S; Frisina, Robert D; Ding, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P

    2016-06-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), clinically referred to as presbycusis, is one of the three most prevalent chronic medical conditions of our elderly, with the majority of persons over the age of 60 suffering from some degree of ARHL. The progressive loss of auditory sensitivity and perceptual capability results in significant declines in workplace productivity, quality of life, cognition and abilities to communicate effectively. Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone produced in the adrenal glands and plays a role in the maintenance of key ion pumps, including the Na-K(+)-Cl co-transporter 1 or NKCC1, which is involved in homeostatic maintenance of the endocochlear potential. Previously we reported that aldosterone (1 μM) increases NKCC1 protein expression in vitro and that this up-regulation of NKCC1 was not dose-dependent (dosing range from 1 nM to 100 μM). In the current study we measured behavioral and electrophysiological hearing function in middle-aged mice following long-term systemic treatment with aldosterone. We also confirmed that blood pressure remained stable during treatment and that NKCC1 protein expression was upregulated. Pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response was used as a functional measure of hearing, and the auditory brainstem response was used as an objective measure of peripheral sensitivity. Long-term treatment with aldosterone improved both behavioral and physiological measures of hearing (ABR thresholds). These results are the first to demonstrate a protective effect of aldosterone on age-related hearing loss and pave the way for translational drug development, using aldosterone as a key component to prevent or slow down the progression of ARHL. PMID:27157488

  19. Aging-related gains and losses associated with word production in connected speech.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Paul A; Hess, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Older adults have been observed to use more nonnormative, or atypical, words than younger adults in connected speech. We examined whether aging-related losses in word-finding abilities or gains in language expertise underlie these age differences. Sixty younger and 60 older adults described two neutral photographs. These descriptions were processed into word types, and textual analysis was used to identify interrupted speech (e.g., pauses), reflecting word-finding difficulty. Word types were assessed for normativeness, with nonnormative word types defined as those used by six (5%) or fewer participants to describe a particular picture. Accuracy and precision ratings were provided by another sample of 48 high-vocabulary younger and older adults. Older adults produced more interrupted and, as predicted, nonnormative words than younger adults. Older adults were more likely than younger adults to use nonnormative language via interrupted speech, suggesting a compensatory process. However, older adults' nonnormative words were more precise and trended for having higher accuracy, reflecting expertise. In tasks offering response flexibility, like connected speech, older adults may be able to offset instances of aging-related deficits by maximizing their expertise in other instances. PMID:26963869

  20. Association of Vision Loss in Glaucoma and Age-Related Macular Degeneration with IADL Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Chad; Maul, Eugenio; Chan, Emilie S.; Van Landingham, Suzanne; Ferrucci, Luigi; Friedman, David S.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To determine if glaucoma and/or age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are associated with disability in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). Methods. Glaucoma subjects (n = 84) with bilateral visual field (VF) loss and AMD subjects (n = 47) with bilateral or severe unilateral visual acuity (VA) loss were compared with 60 subjects with normal vision (controls). Subjects completed a standard IADL disability questionnaire, with disability defined as an inability to perform one or more IADLs unassisted. Results. Disability in one or more IADLs was present in 18.3% of controls as compared with 25.0% of glaucoma subjects (P = 0.34) and 44.7% of AMD subjects (P = 0.003). The specific IADL disabilities occurring more frequently in both AMD and glaucoma subjects were preparing meals, grocery shopping, and out-of-home travelling (P < 0.05 for both). In multivariate logistic regression models run adjusting for age, sex, mental status, comorbidity, and years of education, AMD (odds ratio [OR] = 3.4, P = 0.02) but not glaucoma (OR = 1.4, P = 0.45) was associated with IADL disability. However, among glaucoma and control patients, the odds of IADL disability increased 1.6-fold with every 5 dB of VF loss in the better-seeing eye (P = 0.001). Additionally, severe glaucoma subjects (better-eye MD worse than −13.5 dB) had higher odds of IADL disability (OR = 4.2, P = 0.02). Among AMD and control subjects, every Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study line of worse acuity was associated with a greater likelihood of IADL disability (OR = 1.3). Conclusions. VA loss in AMD and severe VF loss in glaucoma are associated with self-reported difficulties with IADLs. These limitations become more likely with increasing magnitude of VA or VF loss. PMID:22491415

  1. Sporadic Visual Acuity Loss in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Benjamin J.; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Huang, Jiayan; Levy, Nicole E.; Maguire, Maureen G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate transient, large visual acuity (VA) decreases, termed sporadic vision loss, during anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Cohort within a randomized clinical trial. Methods Setting Comparison of AMD Treatments Trials (CATT). Study Population 1185 CATT patients. Main Outcome Measures incidence of sporadic vision loss and odds ratio (OR) for association with patient and ocular factors. Sporadic vision loss was a decline of ≥ 15 letters from the previous visit, followed by a return at the next visit to no more than 5 letters worse than the visit before the VA loss. Results There were 143 sporadic vision loss events in 122/1185 (10.3%) patients. Mean VA at two years for those with and without sporadic vision loss was 58.5 (~20/63) and 68.4 (~20/40) letters, respectively (P < 0.001). Among patients treated pro re nata, no injection was given for 27.6% (27/98) of sporadic vision loss events. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that baseline predictors for sporadic vision loss included worse baseline VA (OR 2.92, 95%CI:1.65–5.17 for ≤ 20/200 compared with ≥ 20/40), scar (OR 2.21, 95%CI:1.22–4.01), intraretinal foveal fluid on optical coherence tomography (OR 1.80, 95%CI:1.11–2.91), and medical history of anxiety (OR 1.90, 95%CI:1.12–3.24) and syncope (OR 2.75, 95%CI:1.45–5.22). Refraction decreased the likelihood of sporadic vision loss (OR 0.62, 95%CI:0.42–0.91). Conclusions Approximately 10% of CATT patients had sporadic vision loss. Baseline predictors included AMD-related factors and factors independent of AMD. These data are relevant for clinicians in practice and those involved in clinical trials. PMID:24727261

  2. Hair Cell Overexpression of Islet1 Reduces Age-Related and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingqian; Kantardzhieva, Albena; Scheffer, Deborah; Liberman, M. Charles

    2013-01-01

    Isl1 is a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor that is critical in the development and differentiation of multiple tissues. In the mouse inner ear, Isl1 is expressed in the prosensory region of otocyst, in young hair cells and supporting cells, and is no longer expressed in postnatal auditory hair cells. To evaluate how continuous Isl1 expression in postnatal hair cells affects hair cell development and cochlear function, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the Pou4f3 promoter drives Isl1 overexpression specifically in hair cells. Isl1 overexpressing hair cells develop normally, as seen by morphology and cochlear functions (auditory brainstem response and otoacoustic emissions). As the mice aged to 17 months, wild-type (WT) controls showed the progressive threshold elevation and outer hair cell loss characteristic of the age-related hearing loss (ARHL) in the background strain (C57BL/6J). In contrast, the Isl1 transgenic mice showed significantly less threshold elevation with survival of hair cells. Further, the Isl1 overexpression protected the ear from noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL): both ABR threshold shifts and hair cell death were significantly reduced when compared with WT littermates. Our model suggests a common mechanism underlying ARHL and NIHL, and provides evidence that hair cell-specific Isl1 expression can promote hair cell survival and therefore minimize the hearing impairment that normally occurs with aging and/or acoustic overexposure. PMID:24048839

  3. Is the age-related loss in olfactory sensitivity similar for light and heavy molecules?

    PubMed

    Sinding, Charlotte; Puschmann, Laura; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The process of aging affects olfaction quite early and can lead to a major handicap. One may ask whether olfactory loss is general or if it affects some odors more specifically? We investigated whether an age-related increase in olfactory threshold could be more or less specific to heavy or light molecules, based on the idea that these odors would bind differently to olfactory receptors. One group of 30 older subjects (50-70 years) and one group of 30 young adults (18-30 years) were tested for their threshold to 4 odors. Two odorants were light molecules (<150 g/mol) and the 2 others were heavy molecules (>150 g/mol). Both sets contained a single molecule and a binary mixture. Older subjects performed worse than young adults in an odor identification task, confirming a decline in the olfactory function. As a major result, young adults were as sensitive to light and heavy molecules; on the contrary, older subjects were less sensitive to heavy molecules (single molecule and binary mixture). The results suggest that older people present a heterogeneous olfactory loss more specific to heavier molecules. PMID:24803088

  4. Hypothalamic leptin gene therapy reduces body weight without accelerating age-related bone loss.

    PubMed

    Turner, Russell T; Dube, Michael; Branscum, Adam J; Wong, Carmen P; Olson, Dawn A; Zhong, Xiaoying; Kweh, Mercedes F; Larkin, Iske V; Wronski, Thomas J; Rosen, Clifford J; Kalra, Satya P; Iwaniec, Urszula T

    2015-12-01

    Excessive weight gain in adults is associated with a variety of negative health outcomes. Unfortunately, dieting, exercise, and pharmacological interventions have had limited long-term success in weight control and can result in detrimental side effects, including accelerating age-related cancellous bone loss. We investigated the efficacy of using hypothalamic leptin gene therapy as an alternative method for reducing weight in skeletally-mature (9 months old) female rats and determined the impact of leptin-induced weight loss on bone mass, density, and microarchitecture, and serum biomarkers of bone turnover (CTx and osteocalcin). Rats were implanted with cannulae in the 3rd ventricle of the hypothalamus and injected with either recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding the gene for rat leptin (rAAV-Leptin, n=7) or a control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (rAAV-GFP, n=10) and sacrificed 18 weeks later. A baseline control group (n=7) was sacrificed at vector administration. rAAV-Leptin-treated rats lost weight (-4±2%) while rAAV-GFP-treated rats gained weight (14±2%) during the study. At study termination, rAAV-Leptin-treated rats weighed 17% less than rAAV-GFP-treated rats and had lower abdominal white adipose tissue weight (-80%), serum leptin (-77%), and serum IGF1 (-34%). Cancellous bone volume fraction in distal femur metaphysis and epiphysis, and in lumbar vertebra tended to be lower (P<0.1) in rAAV-GFP-treated rats (13.5 months old) compared to baseline control rats (9 months old). Significant differences in cancellous bone or biomarkers of bone turnover were not detected between rAAV-Leptin and rAAV-GFP rats. In summary, rAAV-Leptin-treated rats maintained a lower body weight compared to baseline and rAAV-GFP-treated rats with minimal effects on bone mass, density, microarchitecture, or biochemical markers of bone turnover. PMID:26487675

  5. Fruits, Nuts, and Brain Aging: Nutritional Interventions Targeting Age-Related Neuronal and Behavioral Deficits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By the year 2050, 30% of the total population of the US will be over 65 years of age. As the aged population expands, the economic burden of care and treatment of those with age-related health disorders also increases, necessitating the immediate implementation of therapeutics to prevent or even rev...

  6. Absence of age-related dopamine transporter loss in current cocaine abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fischman, M.

    1997-05-01

    The brain dopamine (DA) system appears to play a crucial role in the reinforcing properties of cocaine. Using PET we had previously shown significant decreases in DA D2 receptors but no changes in DA transporters (DAT) in detoxified cocaine abusers (>1 month after last cocaine use). This study evaluates DAT availability in current cocaine abusers (15 male and 5 female; age = 36.2{+-}5.3 years old) using PET and [C-11]cocaine, as a DAT ligand, and compares it to that in 18 male and 2 female age matched normal controls. Cocaine abusers had a history of abusing 4.2{+-}2.8 gm /week of cocaine for an average of 11.0{+-}4.9 years and their last use of cocaine was 5.4{+-}8 days prior to PET study. DAT availability was obtained using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest (caudate, pulamen) to that in cerebellum which is a function of Bmax./Kd.+1. DAT availability in cocaine abusers did not differ to that in normals (N) (C= 1.78{+-}0.14, N= 1.77{+-}0.13). In addition, there were no differences between the groups in the distribution volume or the Kl (plasma to brain transfer constant) measures for [C-11]cocaine. However, in the normals but not in the abusers striatal DAT availability decreased with age (C: r = -0.07, p = 0.76; N: r = -0.55, p < 0.01). Though this study fails to show group differences in DAT availability between normals and current cocaine abusers it indicates a blunting of the age-related decline in DAT availability in the cocaine abusers. Future studies in older cocaine abusers at different time after detoxification arc required in order to assess if cocaine slows the loss of DAT with age or whether these changes reflect compensation to increased DAT blockade and recover with detoxification.

  7. Age-related development of a heterozygous phenotype in solitary neurons of the homozygous Brattleboro rat.

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, F; van der Beek, E; Seger, M; Burbach, P; Ivell, R

    1989-01-01

    A single-base deletion in the single-copy vasopressin gene is the cause of diabetes insipidus in the homozygous Brattleboro rat (di/di). It results in the synthesis of an altered vasopressin precursor of which the axonal transport is blocked. Paradoxically, a small number of solitary hypothalamic neurons displays all the immunoreactivities of the wild-type vasopressin precursor (i.e., vasopressin, neurophysin, and a glycopeptide). In the present paper we provide evidence that these neurons have undergone a switch to a genuine heterozygous (di/+) phenotype; i.e., they contain the immunoreactivities of both the wild-type and the mutated vasopressin precursors. In the neural lobe, glycopeptide fibers are also present, showing that axonal transport of the wild-type precursor is restored. Moreover, the number of neurons displaying this di/+ phenotype increases markedly and in a linear way (from 0.1% up to 3% of the vasopressin cells) with age. These findings indicate that after mitotic division has ceased, genomic alterations occur in somatic neurons in vivo. The molecular event generating the di/+ phenotype in the di/di animal could involve a somatic intrachromosomal gene conversion between the homologous exons of the vasopressin and the related oxytocin genes. Images PMID:2762332

  8. Auditory Perceptual Learning in Adults with and without Age-Related Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Karawani, Hanin; Bitan, Tali; Attias, Joseph; Banai, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : Speech recognition in adverse listening conditions becomes more difficult as we age, particularly for individuals with age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Whether these difficulties can be eased with training remains debated, because it is not clear whether the outcomes are sufficiently general to be of use outside of the training context. The aim of the current study was to compare training-induced learning and generalization between normal-hearing older adults and those with ARHL. Methods : Fifty-six listeners (60–72 y/o), 35 participants with ARHL, and 21 normal hearing adults participated in the study. The study design was a cross over design with three groups (immediate-training, delayed-training, and no-training group). Trained participants received 13 sessions of home-based auditory training over the course of 4 weeks. Three adverse listening conditions were targeted: (1) Speech-in-noise, (2) time compressed speech, and (3) competing speakers, and the outcomes of training were compared between normal and ARHL groups. Pre- and post-test sessions were completed by all participants. Outcome measures included tests on all of the trained conditions as well as on a series of untrained conditions designed to assess the transfer of learning to other speech and non-speech conditions. Results : Significant improvements on all trained conditions were observed in both ARHL and normal-hearing groups over the course of training. Normal hearing participants learned more than participants with ARHL in the speech-in-noise condition, but showed similar patterns of learning in the other conditions. Greater pre- to post-test changes were observed in trained than in untrained listeners on all trained conditions. In addition, the ability of trained listeners from the ARHL group to discriminate minimally different pseudowords in noise also improved with training. Conclusions : ARHL did not preclude auditory perceptual learning but there was little generalization to

  9. Molecular Mechanism for Age-Related Memory Loss: The Histone-Binding Protein RbAp48

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Elias; Jones, Sidonie; Kosmidis, Stylianos; Close, Maggie; Kim, Carla; Kovalerchik, Olga; Small, Scott A.; Kandel, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    To distinguish age-related memory loss more explicitly from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), we have explored its molecular underpinning in the dentate gyrus (DG), a subregion of the hippocampal formation thought to be targeted by aging. We carried out a gene expression study in human postmortem tissue harvested from both DG and entorhinal cortex (EC), a neighboring subregion unaffected by aging and known to be the site of onset of AD. Using expression in the EC for normalization, we identified 17 genes that manifested reliable age-related changes in the DG. The most significant change was an age-related decline in RbAp48, a histone-binding protein that modifies histone acetylation. To test whether the RbAp48 decline could be responsible for age-related memory loss, we turned to mice and found that, consistent with humans, RbAp48 was less abundant in the DG of old than in young mice. We next generated a transgenic mouse that expressed a dominant-negative inhibitor of RbAp48 in the adult forebrain. Inhibition of RbAp48 in young mice caused hippocampus-dependent memory deficits similar to those associated with aging, as measured by novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that within the hippocampal formation, dysfunction was selectively observed in the DG, and this corresponded to a regionally selective decrease in histone acetylation. Up-regulation of RbAp48 in the DG of aged wild-type mice ameliorated age-related hippocampus-based memory loss and age-related abnormalities in histone acetylation. Together, these findings show that the DG is a hippocampal subregion targeted by aging, and identify molecular mechanisms of cognitive aging that could serve as valid targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23986399

  10. Molecular mechanism for age-related memory loss: the histone-binding protein RbAp48.

    PubMed

    Pavlopoulos, Elias; Jones, Sidonie; Kosmidis, Stylianos; Close, Maggie; Kim, Carla; Kovalerchik, Olga; Small, Scott A; Kandel, Eric R

    2013-08-28

    To distinguish age-related memory loss more explicitly from Alzheimer's disease (AD), we have explored its molecular underpinning in the dentate gyrus (DG), a subregion of the hippocampal formation thought to be targeted by aging. We carried out a gene expression study in human postmortem tissue harvested from both DG and entorhinal cortex (EC), a neighboring subregion unaffected by aging and known to be the site of onset of AD. Using expression in the EC for normalization, we identified 17 genes that manifested reliable age-related changes in the DG. The most significant change was an age-related decline in RbAp48, a histone-binding protein that modifies histone acetylation. To test whether the RbAp48 decline could be responsible for age-related memory loss, we turned to mice and found that, consistent with humans, RbAp48 was less abundant in the DG of old than in young mice. We next generated a transgenic mouse that expressed a dominant-negative inhibitor of RbAp48 in the adult forebrain. Inhibition of RbAp48 in young mice caused hippocampus-dependent memory deficits similar to those associated with aging, as measured by novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that within the hippocampal formation, dysfunction was selectively observed in the DG, and this corresponded to a regionally selective decrease in histone acetylation. Up-regulation of RbAp48 in the DG of aged wild-type mice ameliorated age-related hippocampus-based memory loss and age-related abnormalities in histone acetylation. Together, these findings show that the DG is a hippocampal subregion targeted by aging, and identify molecular mechanisms of cognitive aging that could serve as valid targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23986399

  11. Sirt1 deficiency protects cochlear cells and delays the early onset of age-related hearing loss in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Chul; Linser, Paul; Park, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Mi-Jung; White, Karessa; Vann, James M; Ding, Dalian; Prolla, Tomas A; Someya, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Hearing gradually declines with age in both animals and humans, and this condition is known as age-related hearing loss (AHL). Here, we investigated the effects of deficiency of Sirt1, a member of the mammalian sirtuin family, on age-related cochlear pathology and associated hearing loss in C57BL/6 mice, a mouse model of early-onset AHL. Sirt1 deficiency reduced age-related oxidative damage of cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons and delayed the early onset of AHL. In cultured mouse inner ear cell lines, Sirt1 knockdown increased cell viability under oxidative stress conditions, induced nuclear translocation of Foxo3a, and increased acetylation status of Foxo3a. This resulted in increased activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. In young wild-type mice, both Sirt1 and Foxo3a proteins resided in the cytoplasm of the supporting cells within the organ of Corti of the cochlea. Therefore, our findings suggest that SIRT1 promotes early-onset AHL through suppressing FOXO3a-mediated oxidative stress resistance in the cochlea of C57BL/6 mice. PMID:27255815

  12. Intrinsic Hippocampal Excitability Changes of Opposite Signs and Different Origins in CA1 and CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Underlie Aging-Related Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Oh, M. Matthew; Simkin, Dina; Disterhoft, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related cognitive deficits have been attributed to dysfunction of neurons due to failures at synaptic or intrinsic loci, or both. Given the importance of the hippocampus for successful encoding of memory and that the main output of the hippocampus is via the CA1 pyramidal neurons, much of the research has been focused on identifying the aging-related changes of these CA1 pyramidal neurons. We and others have discovered that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following a train of action potentials is greatly enlarged in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged animals. This enlarged postburst AHP is a significant factor in reducing the intrinsic excitability of these neurons, and thus limiting their activity in the neural network during learning. Based on these data, it has largely been thought that aging-related cognitive deficits are attributable to reduced activity of pyramidal neurons. However, recent in vivo and ex vivo studies provide compelling evidence that aging-related deficits could also be due to a converse change in CA3 pyramidal neurons, which show increased activity with aging. In this review, we will incorporate these recent findings and posit that an interdependent dynamic dysfunctional change occurs within the hippocampal network, largely due to altered intrinsic excitability in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which ultimately leads to the aging-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27375440

  13. Age-Related Loss of Synaptophysin Immunoreactive Presynaptic Boutons within the Hippocampus of APP751SL, PS1M146L, and APP751SL/PS1M146L Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rutten, Bart P.F.; Van der Kolk, Nicolien M.; Schafer, Stephanie; van Zandvoort, Marc A.M.J.; Bayer, Thomas A.; Steinbusch, Harry W.M.; Schmitz, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Neuron and synapse loss are important features of the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently, we observed substantial age-related hippocampal neuron loss in APP751SL/PS1M146L transgenic mice but not in PS1M146L mice. Here, we investigated APP751SL mice, PS1M146L mice, and APP751SL/PS1M146L mice for age-related alterations in synaptic integrity within hippocampal stratum moleculare of the dentate gyrus (SM), stratum lucidum of area CA3 (SL), and stratum radiatum of area CA1–2 (SR) by analyzing densities and numbers of synaptophysin-immunoreactive presynaptic boutons (SIPBs). Wild-type mice, APP751SL mice and PS1M146L mice showed similar amounts of age-related SIPB loss within SM, and no SIPB loss within SL. Both APP751SL mice and PS1M146L mice showed age-related SIPB loss within SR. Importantly, APP751SL/PS1M146L mice displayed the severest age-related SIPB loss within SM, SL, and SR, even in regions free of extracellular Aβ deposits. Together, these mouse models offer a unique framework to study the impact of several molecular and cellular events caused by mutant APP and/or mutant PS1 on age-related alterations in synaptic integrity. The observation of age-related SIPB loss within SR of PS1M146L mice supports a role of mutant PS1 in neurodegeneration apart from its contribution to alterations in Aβ generation. PMID:15972962

  14. Insulin-like growth factor 2 rescues aging-related memory loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Adam B; Johnson, Sarah A; Iannitelli, Dylan E; Pollonini, Gabriella; Alberini, Cristina M

    2016-08-01

    Aging is accompanied by declines in memory performance, and particularly affects memories that rely on hippocampal-cortical systems, such as episodic and explicit. With aged populations significantly increasing, the need for preventing or rescuing memory deficits is pressing. However, effective treatments are lacking. Here, we show that the level of the mature form of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2), a peptide regulated in the hippocampus by learning, required for memory consolidation and a promoter of memory enhancement in young adult rodents, is significantly reduced in hippocampal synapses of aged rats. By contrast, the hippocampal level of the immature form proIGF-2 is increased, suggesting an aging-related deficit in IGF-2 processing. In agreement, aged compared to young adult rats are deficient in the activity of proprotein convertase 2, an enzyme that likely mediates IGF-2 posttranslational processing. Hippocampal administration of the recombinant, mature form of IGF-2 rescues hippocampal-dependent memory deficits and working memory impairment in aged rats. Thus, IGF-2 may represent a novel therapeutic avenue for preventing or reversing aging-related cognitive impairments. PMID:27318130

  15. Spermidine feeding decreases age-related locomotor activity loss and induces changes in lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Minois, Nadège; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Smith, Terry K; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac

    2014-01-01

    Spermidine is a natural polyamine involved in many important cellular functions, whose supplementation in food or water increases life span and stress resistance in several model organisms. In this work, we expand spermidine's range of age-related beneficial effects by demonstrating that it is also able to improve locomotor performance in aged flies. Spermidine's mechanism of action on aging has been primarily related to general protein hypoacetylation that subsequently induces autophagy. Here, we suggest that the molecular targets of spermidine also include lipid metabolism: Spermidine-fed flies contain more triglycerides and show altered fatty acid and phospholipid profiles. We further determine that most of these metabolic changes are regulated through autophagy. Collectively, our data suggests an additional and novel lipid-mediated mechanism of action for spermidine-induced autophagy. PMID:25010732

  16. Neuronal expression of GalNAc transferase is sufficient to prevent the age-related neurodegenerative phenotype of complex ganglioside-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Denggao; McGonigal, Rhona; Barrie, Jennifer A; Cappell, Joanna; Cunningham, Madeleine E; Meehan, Gavin R; Fewou, Simon N; Edgar, Julia M; Rowan, Edward; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi; Brophy, Peter J; Willison, Hugh J

    2014-01-15

    NAcT(-/-)-Tg(glial) mice. These results indicate that neuronal rather than glial gangliosides are critical to the age-related maintenance of nervous system integrity. PMID:24431446

  17. Regulation of age-related structural integrity in neurons by protein with tau-like repeats (PTL-1) is cell autonomous.

    PubMed

    Chew, Yee Lian; Fan, Xiaochen; Götz, Jürgen; Nicholas, Hannah R

    2014-01-01

    PTL-1 is the sole homolog of the MAP2/MAP4/tau family in Caenorhabditis elegans. Accumulation of tau is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, reducing tau levels has been suggested as a therapeutic strategy. We previously showed that PTL-1 maintains age-related structural integrity in neurons, implying that excessive reduction in the levels of a tau-like protein is detrimental. Here, we demonstrate that the regulation of neuronal ageing by PTL-1 occurs via a cell-autonomous mechanism. We re-expressed PTL-1 in a null mutant background using a pan-neuronal promoter to show that PTL-1 functions in neurons to maintain structural integrity. We next expressed PTL-1 only in touch neurons and showed rescue of the neuronal ageing phenotype of ptl-1 mutant animals in these neurons but not in another neuronal subset, the ventral nerve cord GABAergic neurons. Knockdown of PTL-1 in touch neurons also resulted in premature neuronal ageing in these neurons but not in GABAergic neurons. Additionally, expression of PTL-1 in touch neurons alone was unable to rescue the shortened lifespan observed in ptl-1 mutants, but pan-neuronal re-expression restored wild-type longevity, indicating that, at least for a specific group of mechanosensory neurons, premature neuronal ageing and organismal ageing can be decoupled. PMID:24898126

  18. Dietary Polyphenols, Berries, and Age-Related Bone Loss: A Review Based on Human, Animal, and Cell Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Patrice A.; Lee, Sang Gil; Lee, Sun-Kyeong; Chun, Ock K.

    2014-01-01

    Bone loss during aging has become an increasing public health concern as average life expectancy has increased. One of the most prevalent forms of age-related bone disease today is osteoporosis in which the body slows down bone formation and existing bone is increasingly being resorbed by the body to maintain the calcium balance. Some causes of this bone loss can be attributed to dysregulation of osteoblast and osteoclast activity mediated by increased oxidative stress through the aging process. Due to certain serious adverse effects of the currently available therapeutic agents that limit their efficacy, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has garnered interest as a natural means for the prevention of this debilitating disease. Natural antioxidant supplementation, a type of CAM, has been researched to aid in reducing bone loss caused by oxidative stress. Naturally occurring polyphenols, such as anthocyanins rich in berries, are known to have anti-oxidative properties. Several studies have been reviewed to determine the impact polyphenol intake—particularly that of berries—has on bone health. Studies reveal a positive association of high berry intake and higher bone mass, implicating berries as possible inexpensive alternatives in reducing the risk of age related bone loss. PMID:26784669

  19. Effects of Age and Age-Related Hearing Loss on the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Kelly; Ross, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    It is well documented that aging adversely affects the ability to perceive time-varying acoustic cues. Here we review how physiological measures are being used to explore the effects of aging (and concomitant hearing loss) on the neural representation of temporal cues. Also addressed are the implications of current research findings on the…

  20. Dietary intake of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis H61 delays age-related hearing loss in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Oike, Hideaki; Aoki-Yoshida, Ayako; Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamagishi, Naoko; Tomita, Satoru; Sekiyama, Yasuyo; Wakagi, Manabu; Sakurai, Mutsumi; Ippoushi, Katsunari; Suzuki, Chise; Kobori, Masuko

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (AHL) is a common disorder associated with aging. In this study, we investigated the effect of the intake of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris H61 (strain H61) on AHL in C57BL/6J mice. Measurement of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) demonstrated that female mice at 9 months of age fed a diet containing 0.05% strain H61 for 6 months maintained a significantly lower ABR threshold than control mice. The age-related loss of neurons and hair cells in the cochlea was suppressed by the intake of strain H61. Faecal analysis of bacterial flora revealed that the intake of strain H61 increased the prevalence of Lactobacillales, which is positively correlated with hearing ability in mice. Furthermore, plasma fatty acid levels were negatively correlated with hearing ability. Overall, the results supported that the intake of heat-killed strain H61 for 6 months altered the intestinal flora, affected plasma metabolite levels, including fatty acid levels, and retarded AHL in mice. PMID:27000949

  1. Dietary intake of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis H61 delays age-related hearing loss in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Hideaki; Aoki-Yoshida, Ayako; Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamagishi, Naoko; Tomita, Satoru; Sekiyama, Yasuyo; Wakagi, Manabu; Sakurai, Mutsumi; Ippoushi, Katsunari; Suzuki, Chise; Kobori, Masuko

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (AHL) is a common disorder associated with aging. In this study, we investigated the effect of the intake of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris H61 (strain H61) on AHL in C57BL/6J mice. Measurement of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) demonstrated that female mice at 9 months of age fed a diet containing 0.05% strain H61 for 6 months maintained a significantly lower ABR threshold than control mice. The age-related loss of neurons and hair cells in the cochlea was suppressed by the intake of strain H61. Faecal analysis of bacterial flora revealed that the intake of strain H61 increased the prevalence of Lactobacillales, which is positively correlated with hearing ability in mice. Furthermore, plasma fatty acid levels were negatively correlated with hearing ability. Overall, the results supported that the intake of heat-killed strain H61 for 6 months altered the intestinal flora, affected plasma metabolite levels, including fatty acid levels, and retarded AHL in mice. PMID:27000949

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Age-Related Sleep Loss in the Fruit Fly

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Meagan; Keene, Alex C.

    2013-01-01

    Across phyla, aging is associated with reduced sleep duration and efficiency. Both aging and sleep involve complex genetic architecture and diverse cell types and are heavily influenced by diet and environment. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms of age-dependent changes in sleep will require integrative approaches that go beyond examining these two processes independently. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, provides a genetically amenable system for dissecting the molecular basis of these processes. In this review, we examine the role of metabolism and circadian rhythms in age-dependent sleep loss. PMID:23594925

  3. Aging-related chromatin defects via loss of the NURD complex

    PubMed Central

    Pegoraro, Gianluca; Kubben, Nard; Wickert, Ute; Göhler, Heike; Hoffmann, Katrin; Misteli, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Physiological and premature aging are characterized by multiple defects in chromatin structure and accumulation of persistent DNA damage. Here we identify the NURD remodeling complex as a key modulator of these aging-associated chromatin defects. We demonstrate loss of several NURD components during premature and normal aging and we find aging-associated reduction of HDAC1 activity. Silencing of individual NURD subunits recapitulates some chromatin defects associated with aging and we provide evidence that structural chromatin defects precede DNA damage accumulation. These results outline a molecular mechanism for chromatin defects during aging. PMID:19734887

  4. Likely Age-Related Hearing Loss (Presbycusis) in a Stranded Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis).

    PubMed

    Li, Songhai; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong; Hoffmann-Kuhnt, Matthias; Fernando, Nimal; Taylor, Elizabeth A; Lin, Wenzhi; Chen, Jialin; Ng, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The hearing of a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in Zhuhai, China, was measured. The age of this animal was estimated to be ~40 years. The animal's hearing was measured using a noninvasive auditory evoked potential (AEP) method. The results showed that the high-frequency hearing cutoff frequency of the studied dolphin was ~30-40 kHz lower than that of a conspecific younger individual ~13 year old. The lower high-frequency hearing range in the older dolphin was explained as a likely result of age-related hearing loss (presbycusis). PMID:26611012

  5. Structural basis of growth-related gain and age-related loss of bone strength

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    If bone strength was the only requirement of skeleton, it could be achieved with bulk, but bone must also be light. During growth, bone modelling and remodelling optimize strength, by depositing bone where it is needed, and minimize mass, by removing it from where it is not. The population variance in bone traits is established before puberty and the position of an individual's bone size and mass tracks in the percentile of origin. Larger cross-sections have a comparably larger marrow cavity, which results in a lower volumetric BMD (vBMD), thereby avoiding bulk. Excavation of a marrow cavity thus minimizes mass and shifts the cortex radially, increasing rigidity. Smaller cross-sections are assembled by excavating a smaller marrow cavity leaving a relatively thicker cortex producing a higher vBMD, avoiding the fragility of slenderness. Variation in cellular activity around the periosteal and endocortical envelopes fashions the diverse shapes of adjacent cross-sections. Advancing age is associated with a decline in periosteal bone formation, a decline in the volume of bone formed by each basic multicellular unit (BMU), continued resorption by each BMU, and high remodelling after menopause. Bone loss in young adulthood has modest structural and biomechanical consequences because the negative BMU balance is driven by reduced bone formation, remodelling is slow and periosteal apposition continues shifting the thinned cortex radially. But after the menopause, increased remodelling, worsening negative BMU balance and a decline in periosteal apposition accelerate cortical thinning and porosity, trabecular thinning and loss of connectivity. Interstitial bone, unexposed to surface remodelling becomes more densely mineralized, has few osteocytes and greater collagen cross-linking, and accumulates microdamage. These changes produce the material and structural abnormalities responsible for bone fragility. PMID:18556646

  6. Wnt16 Is Associated with Age-Related Bone Loss and Estrogen Withdrawal in Murine Bone.

    PubMed

    Todd, Henry; Galea, Gabriel L; Meakin, Lee B; Delisser, Peter J; Lanyon, Lance E; Windahl, Sara H; Price, Joanna S

    2015-01-01

    Genome Wide Association Studies suggest that Wnt16 is an important contributor to the mechanisms controlling bone mineral density, cortical thickness, bone strength and ultimately fracture risk. Wnt16 acts on osteoblasts and osteoclasts and, in cortical bone, is predominantly derived from osteoblasts. This led us to hypothesize that low bone mass would be associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression and that Wnt16 expression would be increased by anabolic factors, including mechanical loading. We therefore investigated Wnt16 expression in the context of ageing, mechanical loading and unloading, estrogen deficiency and replacement, and estrogen receptor α (ERα) depletion. Quantitative real time PCR showed that Wnt16 mRNA expression was lower in cortical bone and marrow of aged compared to young female mice. Neither increased nor decreased (by disuse) mechanical loading altered Wnt16 expression in young female mice, although Wnt16 expression was decreased following ovariectomy. Both 17β-estradiol and the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen increased Wnt16 expression relative to ovariectomy. Wnt16 and ERβ expression were increased in female ERα-/- mice when compared to Wild Type. We also addressed potential effects of gender on Wnt16 expression and while the expression was lower in the cortical bone of aged males as in females, it was higher in male bone marrow of aged mice compared to young. In the kidney, which we used as a non-bone reference tissue, Wnt16 expression was unaffected by age in either males or females. In summary, age, and its associated bone loss, is associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression whereas bone loss associated with disuse has no effect on Wnt16 expression. In the artificially loaded mouse tibia we observed no loading-related up-regulation of Wnt16 expression but provide evidence that its expression is influenced by estrogen receptor signaling. These findings suggest that while Wnt16 is not an obligatory contributor to

  7. To unite or divide: mitochondrial dynamics in the murine outer retina that preceded age related photoreceptor loss

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Jaimie Hoh; Jeffery, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function declines with age and is associated with age-related disorders and cell death. In the retina this is critical as photoreceptor energy demands are the greatest in the body and aged cell loss large (~30%). But mitochondria can fuse or divide to accommodate changing demands. We explore ageing mitochondrial dynamics in young (1 month) and old (12 months) mouse retina, investigating changes in mitochondrial fission (Fis1) and fusion (Opa1) proteins, cytochrome C oxidase (COX III), which reflects mitochondrial metabolic status, and heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) that is a mitochondrial chaperon for protein folding. Western blots showed each protein declined with age. However, within this, immunostaining revealed increases of around 50% in Fis1 and Opa1 in photoreceptor inner segments (IS). Electron microscope analysis revealed mitochondrial fragmentation with age and marked changes in morphology in IS, consistent with elevated dynamics. COX III declined by approximately 30% in IS, but Hsp60 reductions were around 80% in the outer plexiform layer. Our results are consistent with declining mitochondrial metabolism. But also with increased photoreceptor mitochondrial dynamics that differ from other retinal regions, perhaps reflecting attempts to maintain function. These changes are the platform for age related photoreceptor loss initiated after 12 months. PMID:26393878

  8. Simulated Interventions to Ameliorate Age-Related Bone Loss Indicate the Importance of Timing.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Carole J; Gartland, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Bone remodeling is the continuous process of bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, in order to maintain homeostasis. The activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts is regulated by a network of signaling pathways, including Wnt, parathyroid hormone (PTH), RANK ligand/osteoprotegrin, and TGF-β, in response to stimuli, such as mechanical loading. During aging there is a gradual loss of bone mass due to dysregulation of signaling pathways. This may be due to a decline in physical activity with age and/or changes in hormones and other signaling molecules. In particular, hormones, such as PTH, have a circadian rhythm, which may be disrupted in aging. Due to the complexity of the molecular and cellular networks involved in bone remodeling, several mathematical models have been proposed to aid understanding of the processes involved. However, to date, there are no models, which explicitly consider the effects of mechanical loading, the circadian rhythm of PTH, and the dynamics of signaling molecules on bone remodeling. Therefore, we have constructed a network model of the system using a modular approach, which will allow further modifications as required in future research. The model was used to simulate the effects of mechanical loading and also the effects of different interventions, such as continuous or intermittent administration of PTH. Our model predicts that the absence of regular mechanical loading and/or an impaired PTH circadian rhythm leads to a gradual decrease in bone mass over time, which can be restored by simulated interventions and that the effectiveness of some interventions may depend on their timing. PMID:27379013

  9. Simulated Interventions to Ameliorate Age-Related Bone Loss Indicate the Importance of Timing

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Carole J.; Gartland, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Bone remodeling is the continuous process of bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, in order to maintain homeostasis. The activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts is regulated by a network of signaling pathways, including Wnt, parathyroid hormone (PTH), RANK ligand/osteoprotegrin, and TGF-β, in response to stimuli, such as mechanical loading. During aging there is a gradual loss of bone mass due to dysregulation of signaling pathways. This may be due to a decline in physical activity with age and/or changes in hormones and other signaling molecules. In particular, hormones, such as PTH, have a circadian rhythm, which may be disrupted in aging. Due to the complexity of the molecular and cellular networks involved in bone remodeling, several mathematical models have been proposed to aid understanding of the processes involved. However, to date, there are no models, which explicitly consider the effects of mechanical loading, the circadian rhythm of PTH, and the dynamics of signaling molecules on bone remodeling. Therefore, we have constructed a network model of the system using a modular approach, which will allow further modifications as required in future research. The model was used to simulate the effects of mechanical loading and also the effects of different interventions, such as continuous or intermittent administration of PTH. Our model predicts that the absence of regular mechanical loading and/or an impaired PTH circadian rhythm leads to a gradual decrease in bone mass over time, which can be restored by simulated interventions and that the effectiveness of some interventions may depend on their timing. PMID:27379013

  10. Age-related striatal BOLD changes without changes in behavioral loss aversion

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Lee, Sang; Gilman, Jodi M.; Kim, Byoung Woo; Lee, Nick; Chamberlain, Laura; Livengood, Sherri L.; Raman, Kalyan; Lee, Myung Joo; Kuster, Jake; Stern, Daniel B.; Calder, Bobby; Mulhern, Frank J.; Blood, Anne J.; Breiter, Hans C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss aversion (LA), the idea that negative valuations have a higher psychological impact than positive ones, is considered an important variable in consumer research. The literature on aging and behavior suggests older individuals may show more LA, although it is not clear if this is an effect of aging in general (as in the continuum from age 20 and 50 years), or of the state of older age (e.g., past age 65 years). We also have not yet identified the potential biological effects of aging on the neural processing of LA. In the current study we used a cohort of subjects with a 30 year range of ages, and performed whole brain functional MRI (fMRI) to examine the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAc) response during a passive viewing of affective faces with model-based fMRI analysis incorporating behavioral data from a validated approach/avoidance task with the same stimuli. Our a priori focus on the VS/NAc was based on (1) the VS/NAc being a central region for reward/aversion processing; (2) its activation to both positive and negative stimuli; (3) its reported involvement with tracking LA. LA from approach/avoidance to affective faces showed excellent fidelity to published measures of LA. Imaging results were then compared to the behavioral measure of LA using the same affective faces. Although there was no relationship between age and LA, we observed increasing neural differential sensitivity (NDS) of the VS/NAc to avoidance responses (negative valuations) relative to approach responses (positive valuations) with increasing age. These findings suggest that a central region for reward/aversion processing changes with age, and may require more activation to produce the same LA behavior as in younger individuals, consistent with the idea of neural efficiency observed with high IQ individuals showing less brain activation to complete the same task. PMID:25983682

  11. Age-related striatal BOLD changes without changes in behavioral loss aversion.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Lee, Sang; Gilman, Jodi M; Kim, Byoung Woo; Lee, Nick; Chamberlain, Laura; Livengood, Sherri L; Raman, Kalyan; Lee, Myung Joo; Kuster, Jake; Stern, Daniel B; Calder, Bobby; Mulhern, Frank J; Blood, Anne J; Breiter, Hans C

    2015-01-01

    Loss aversion (LA), the idea that negative valuations have a higher psychological impact than positive ones, is considered an important variable in consumer research. The literature on aging and behavior suggests older individuals may show more LA, although it is not clear if this is an effect of aging in general (as in the continuum from age 20 and 50 years), or of the state of older age (e.g., past age 65 years). We also have not yet identified the potential biological effects of aging on the neural processing of LA. In the current study we used a cohort of subjects with a 30 year range of ages, and performed whole brain functional MRI (fMRI) to examine the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAc) response during a passive viewing of affective faces with model-based fMRI analysis incorporating behavioral data from a validated approach/avoidance task with the same stimuli. Our a priori focus on the VS/NAc was based on (1) the VS/NAc being a central region for reward/aversion processing; (2) its activation to both positive and negative stimuli; (3) its reported involvement with tracking LA. LA from approach/avoidance to affective faces showed excellent fidelity to published measures of LA. Imaging results were then compared to the behavioral measure of LA using the same affective faces. Although there was no relationship between age and LA, we observed increasing neural differential sensitivity (NDS) of the VS/NAc to avoidance responses (negative valuations) relative to approach responses (positive valuations) with increasing age. These findings suggest that a central region for reward/aversion processing changes with age, and may require more activation to produce the same LA behavior as in younger individuals, consistent with the idea of neural efficiency observed with high IQ individuals showing less brain activation to complete the same task. PMID:25983682

  12. Mutant HSPB1 overexpression in neurons is sufficient to cause age-related motor neuronopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit K.; Renusch, Samantha R.; Naiman, Nicole E.; Gu, Shuping; Sneh, Amita; Arnold, W. David; Sahenk, Zarife; Kolb, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The small heat shock protein HSPB1 is a multifunctional, α-crystallin-based protein that has been shown to be neuroprotective in animal models of motor neuron disease and peripheral nerve injury. Missense mutations in HSPB1 result in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with minimal sensory involvement (CMT2F) and distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 2 (dHMN-II). These disorders are characterized by a selective loss of motor axons in peripheral nerve resulting in distal muscle weakness and often severe disability. To investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of HSPB1 mutations in motor neurons in vivo, we have developed and characterized transgenic PrP-HSPB1 and PrP-HSPB1(R136W) mice. These mice express the human HSPB1 protein throughout the nervous system including in axons of peripheral nerve. Although both mouse strains lacked obvious motor deficits, the PrP-HSPB1(R136W) mice developed an age-dependent motor axonopathy. Mutant mice showed axonal pathology in spinal cord and peripheral nerve with evidence of impaired neurofilament cytoskeleton, associated with organelle accumulation. Accompanying these findings, increases in the number of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, as evidence of impaired axon-Schwann cell interactions, were present. These observations suggest that overexpression of HSPB1(R136W) in neurons is sufficient to cause pathological and electrophysiological changes in mice that are seen in patients with hereditary motor neuropathy. PMID:22521462

  13. An analysis of age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and its significance on osteoarthritis in a Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun-Tae; Kim, Hyun-Je; Ahn, Hee-Yun; Hong, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study was conducted in order to analyze the effects of sarcopenia on age-related osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee in a Korean population. Methods: All the Korean subjects who visited the Yeungnam University Medical Center Health Promotion Center between 2008 and 2012 in order to undergo a routine medical examination were enrolled. A total of 5,723 young, healthy people (2,959 males, 2,764 females) enrolled as normal subjects and 23,473 subjects (13,006 males and 10,467 females) were included for evaluation of the effects of sarcopenia on OA. There were 266 subjects who followed-up bioelectrical impedance analysis at a 4-year interval. Of 327 subjects enrolled in this study, knees with anteroposterior X-rays were assessed according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (K/L) grade. Results: Skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) showed a steady decrease with the advance of age (p < 0.01), but SMI showed strong positive correlation with BMR (r = 0.72, β = 30.96, p < 0.01). During the 4-year interval, BMR showed a significant decrease with aging (p < 0.01), consistently with the decrease of SMI. Knees with normal SMI were prone to be designated as K/L grade 0 or 1; however, subjects with sarcopenia showed a trend toward the higher K/L grade, classified as knee radiological osteoarthritis (ROA) (p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results of this study may indicate that sarcopenia as age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass is interactively correlated with the presence and severity of age-related OA. PMID:26976151

  14. Aging-Related Hyperexcitability in CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Is Mediated by Enhanced A-Type K+ Channel Function and Expression.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Dina; Hattori, Shoai; Ybarra, Natividad; Musial, Timothy F; Buss, Eric W; Richter, Hannah; Oh, M Matthew; Nicholson, Daniel A; Disterhoft, John F

    2015-09-23

    Aging-related impairments in hippocampus-dependent cognition have been attributed to maladaptive changes in the functional properties of pyramidal neurons within the hippocampal subregions. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 pyramidal neurons, with CA3 pyramidal neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing in the hippocampal circuit. Here, we use whole-cell current-clamp to demonstrate that aged rat (29-32 months) CA3 pyramidal neurons fire significantly more action potentials (APs) during theta-burst frequency stimulation and that this is associated with faster AP repolarization (i.e., narrower AP half-widths and enlarged fast afterhyperpolarization). Using a combination of patch-clamp physiology, pharmacology, Western blot analyses, immunohistochemistry, and array tomography, we demonstrate that these faster AP kinetics are mediated by enhanced function and expression of Kv4.2/Kv4.3 A-type K(+) channels, particularly within the perisomatic compartment, of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Thus, our study indicates that inhibition of these A-type K(+) channels can restore the intrinsic excitability properties of aged CA3 pyramidal neurons to a young-like state. Significance statement: Age-related learning deficits have been attributed, in part, to altered hippocampal pyramidal neuronal function with normal aging. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 neurons, with CA3 neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing. Hence, we conducted a series of experiments to identify the cellular mechanisms that underlie the hyperexcitability reported in the CA3 region. Contrary to CA1 neurons, we demonstrate that postburst afterhyperpolarization is not altered with aging and that aged CA3 pyramidal neurons are able to fire significantly more action potentials and that this is associated with

  15. Aging-Related Hyperexcitability in CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Is Mediated by Enhanced A-Type K+ Channel Function and Expression

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Dina; Hattori, Shoai; Ybarra, Natividad; Musial, Timothy F.; Buss, Eric W.; Richter, Hannah; Oh, M. Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related impairments in hippocampus-dependent cognition have been attributed to maladaptive changes in the functional properties of pyramidal neurons within the hippocampal subregions. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 pyramidal neurons, with CA3 pyramidal neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing in the hippocampal circuit. Here, we use whole-cell current-clamp to demonstrate that aged rat (29–32 months) CA3 pyramidal neurons fire significantly more action potentials (APs) during theta-burst frequency stimulation and that this is associated with faster AP repolarization (i.e., narrower AP half-widths and enlarged fast afterhyperpolarization). Using a combination of patch-clamp physiology, pharmacology, Western blot analyses, immunohistochemistry, and array tomography, we demonstrate that these faster AP kinetics are mediated by enhanced function and expression of Kv4.2/Kv4.3 A-type K+ channels, particularly within the perisomatic compartment, of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Thus, our study indicates that inhibition of these A-type K+ channels can restore the intrinsic excitability properties of aged CA3 pyramidal neurons to a young-like state. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Age-related learning deficits have been attributed, in part, to altered hippocampal pyramidal neuronal function with normal aging. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 neurons, with CA3 neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing. Hence, we conducted a series of experiments to identify the cellular mechanisms that underlie the hyperexcitability reported in the CA3 region. Contrary to CA1 neurons, we demonstrate that postburst afterhyperpolarization is not altered with aging and that aged CA3 pyramidal neurons are able to fire significantly more action potentials and that this is associated with

  16. Age-related decline in multiple unit action potentials of cerebral cortex correlates with the number of lipofuscin-containing neurons.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D; Singh, R

    1996-08-01

    The present study examined whether there is any obvious correlation between the density of lipofuscin-containing neurons and the spontaneous neuronal action potentials (Multiple Unit Activity, MUA) in the parietal cortex of the aging rat brain. The results showed that MUA counts were decreased with age while the number of lipofuscin-containing neurons was increased. The cortex with the highest percentage of lipofuscin-containing neurons had the lowest MUA counts while the cortex with the lowest percentage of lipofuscin-containing neurons had the highest MUA counts. The inverse correlation between MUA and lipofuscin-containing neuron number was also evident when the population of the lipofuscin-containing neurons was pharmacologically altered in vivo by the administration of anti-lipofuscin drug centrophenoxine. The inverse relationship between MUA and the lipofuscin-containing neuron numbers is consistent with: (i) the correlations of MUA with age-related changes in lipid peroxidation and biochemically measured lipofuscin concentration, and (ii) the oxidative stress-induced impairments of neuronal electrophysiology. PMID:8979484

  17. Age-related differences in heat loss capacity occur under both dry and humid heat stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Larose, Joanie; Boulay, Pierre; Wright-Beatty, Heather E.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Hardcastle, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the progression of impairments in heat dissipation as a function of age and environmental conditions. Sixty men (n = 12 per group; 20–30, 40–44, 45–49, 50–54, and 55–70 yr) performed four intermittent exercise/recovery cycles for a duration of 2 h in dry (35°C, 20% relative humidity) and humid (35°C, 60% relative humidity) conditions. Evaporative heat loss and metabolic heat production were measured by direct and indirect calorimetry, respectively. Body heat storage was measured as the temporal summation of heat production and heat loss during the sessions. Evaporative heat loss was reduced during exercise in the humid vs. dry condition in age groups 20–30 (−17%), 40–44 (−18%), 45–49 (−21%), 50–54 (−25%), and 55–70 yr (−20%). HE fell short of being significantly different between groups in the dry condition, but was greater in age group 20–30 yr (279 ± 10 W) compared with age groups 45–49 (248 ± 8 W), 50–54 (242 ± 6 W), and 55–70 yr (240 ± 7 W) in the humid condition. As a result of a reduced rate of heat dissipation predominantly during exercise, age groups 40–70 yr stored between 60–85 and 13–38% more heat than age group 20–30 yr in the dry and humid conditions, respectively. These age-related differences in heat dissipation and heat storage were not paralleled by significant differences in local sweating and skin blood flow, or by differences in core temperature between groups. From a whole body perspective, combined heat and humidity impeded heat dissipation to a similar extent across age groups, but, more importantly, intermittent exercise in dry and humid heat stress conditions created a greater thermoregulatory challenge for middle-aged and older adults. PMID:24812643

  18. N-acetyl-cysteine prevents age-related hearing loss and the progressive loss of inner hair cells in γ-glutamyl transferase 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Chen, Guang-Di; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Tian, Cong; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Genetic factors combined with oxidative stress are major determinants of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), one of the most prevalent disorders of the elderly. Dwarf grey mice, Ggt1dwg/dwg, are homozygous for a loss of function mutation of the g-glutamyl transferase 1 gene, which encodes an important antioxidant enzyme critical for the resynthesis of glutathione (GSH). Since GSH reduces oxidative damage, we hypothesized that Ggt1dwg/dwg mice would be susceptible to ARHL. Surprisingly, otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials, which reflect cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function, were largely unaffected in mutant mice, whereas auditory brainstem responses and the compound action potential were grossly abnormal. These functional deficits were associated with an unusual and selective loss of inner hair cells (IHC), but retention of OHC and auditory nerve fibers. Remarkably, hearing deficits and IHC loss were completely prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which induces de novo synthesis of GSH; however, hearing deficits and IHC loss reappeared when treatment was discontinued. Ggt1dwg/dwg mice represent an important new model for investigating ARHL, therapeutic interventions, and understanding the perceptual and electrophysiological consequences of sensory deprivation caused by the loss of sensory input exclusively from IHC. PMID:26977590

  19. N-acetyl-cysteine prevents age-related hearing loss and the progressive loss of inner hair cells in γ-glutamyl transferase 1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Chen, Guang-Di; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Tian, Cong; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors combined with oxidative stress are major determinants of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), one of the most prevalent disorders of the elderly. Dwarf grey mice, Ggt1dwg/dwg, are homozygous for a loss of function mutation of the γ-glutamyl transferase 1 gene, which encodes an important antioxidant enzyme critical for the resynthesis of glutathione (GSH). Since GSH reduces oxidative damage, we hypothesized that Ggt1dwg/dwg mice would be susceptible to ARHL. Surprisingly, otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials, which reflect cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function, were largely unaffected in mutant mice, whereas auditory brainstem responses and the compound action potential were grossly abnormal. These functional deficits were associated with an unusual and selective loss of inner hair cells (IHC), but retention of OHC and auditory nerve fibers. Remarkably, hearing deficits and IHC loss were completely prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which induces de novo synthesis of GSH; however, hearing deficits and IHC loss reappeared when treatment was discontinued. Ggt1dwg/dwgmice represent an important new model for investigating ARHL, therapeutic interventions, and understanding the perceptual and electrophysiological consequences of sensory deprivation caused by the loss of sensory input exclusively from IHC. PMID:26977590

  20. Lipofuscin Redistribution and Loss Accompanied by Cytoskeletal Stress in Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Eyes With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Tolstik, Elen; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zarubina, Anna V.; Heintzmann, Rainer; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) and melanolipofuscin (MLF) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are the principal sources of autofluorescence (AF) signals in clinical fundus–AF imaging. Few details about the subcellular distribution of AF organelles in AMD are available. We describe the impact of aging and AMD on RPE morphology revealed by the distribution of AF LF/MLF granules and actin cytoskeleton in human tissues. Methods. Thirty-five RPE-Bruch's membrane flatmounts from 35 donors were prepared (postmortem: ≤4 hours). Ex vivo fundus examination at the time of accession revealed either absence of chorioretinal pathologies (10 tissues; mean age: 83.0 ± 2.6 years) or stages of AMD (25 tissues; 85.0 ± 5.8 years): early AMD, geographic atrophy, and late exudative AMD. Retinal pigment epithelium cytoskeleton was labeled with AlexaFluor647-Phalloidin. Tissues were imaged on a spinning-disk fluorescence microscope and a high-resolution structured illumination microscope. Results. Age-related macular degeneration impacts individual RPE cells by (1) lipofuscin redistribution by (i) degranulation (granule-by-granule loss) and/or (ii) aggregation and apparent shedding into the extracellular space; (2) enlarged RPE cell area and conversion from convex to irregular and sometimes concave polygons; and (3) cytoskeleton derangement including separations and breaks around subretinal deposits, thickening, and stress fibers. Conclusions. We report an extensive and systematic en face analysis of LF/MLF-AF in AMD eyes. Redistribution and loss of AF granules are among the earliest AMD changes and could reduce fundus AF signal attributable to RPE at these locations. Data can enhance the interpretation of clinical fundus–AF and provide a basis for future quantitative studies. PMID:25758814

  1. Age-related changes in soma size of neurons in the spinal cord motor column of the cat.

    PubMed

    Liu, R H; Bertolotto, C; Engelhardt, J K; Chase, M H

    1996-06-28

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of the aging process on the soma size and number of motoneurons and interneurons in the motor column of the spinal cord of old cats. Neurons in the motor column were divided into small and large populations based on a bimodal distribution of their soma cross-sectional areas. A 17% decrease in the cross-sectional area of small neurons was observed, this decrease was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The cross-sectional area of large neurons decreased by only 6%, which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the number of large, small or of these combined population of ventral horn neurons in the aged cats compared with the control animals. This data suggest that neurons in the motor column are not uniformly affected by the aging process because morphological changes are proportionally greater in small neurons than in large neurons. PMID:8817566

  2. Minocycline reduces neuroinflammation but does not ameliorate neuron loss in a mouse model of neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanshan; Hou, Jinxing; Zhang, Chen; Xu, Congyu; Wang, Long; Zou, Xiaoxia; Yu, Huahong; Shi, Yun; Yin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guiquan

    2015-01-01

    Minocycline is a broad-spectrum tetracycline antibiotic. A number of preclinical studies have shown that minocycline exhibits neuroprotective effects in various animal models of neurological diseases. However, it remained unknown whether minocycline is effective to prevent neuron loss. To systematically evaluate its effects, minocycline was used to treat Dicer conditional knockout (cKO) mice which display age-related neuron loss. The drug was given to mutant mice prior to the occurrence of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, and the treatment had lasted 2 months. Levels of inflammation markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule1 (Iba1) and interleukin6 (IL6), were significantly reduced in minocycline-treated Dicer cKO mice. In contrast, levels of neuronal markers and the total number of apoptotic cells in Dicer cKO mice were not affected by the drug. In summary, inhibition of neuroinflammation by minocycline is insufficient to prevent neuron loss and apoptosis. PMID:26000566

  3. Region specific neuron loss in the aged canine hippocampus is reduced by enrichment.

    PubMed

    Siwak-Tapp, Christina T; Head, Elizabeth; Muggenburg, Bruce A; Milgram, Norton W; Cotman, Carl W

    2008-01-01

    Neuron loss within the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex occurs as a function of age in humans. We first tested the hypothesis that neuron loss occurs in the aged dog. The total unilateral number of neurons in the canine entorhinal cortex and subdivisions of the hippocampus from the left hemisphere were estimated using the optical fractionator. The brains from 5 old (13.0-15.0 years old) and 5 young (3.4-4.5 years old) beagle dogs were analyzed. The hilus of the hippocampus showed a significant loss of neurons (approximately 30%) in the aged dog brain compared to young. Differences were not detected in the remaining hippocampal subfields and entorhinal cortex. We further tested the hypothesis that an antioxidant fortified food or behavioral enrichment would reduce the age-related loss of hilar neurons. Behaviorally enriched aged dogs had more neurons in the hilus (approximately 18%) compared to aged controls. These results suggest that the aged canine hippocampus in the left hemisphere shows selective neuron loss and that behavioral enrichment may reduce this loss. PMID:17092609

  4. Restricted loss of olivocochlear but not vestibular efferent neurons in the senescent gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Radtke-Schuller, Susanne; Seeler, Sabine; Grothe, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of hearing and vertigo are symptoms of age-related auditory and vestibular disorders reflecting multifactorial changes in the peripheral and central nervous system whose interplay remains largely unknown. Originating bilaterally in the brain stem, vestibular and auditory efferent cholinergic projections exert feedback control on the peripheral sensory organs, and modulate sensory processing. We studied age-related changes in the auditory and vestibular efferent systems by evaluating number of cholinergic efferent neurons in young adult and aged gerbils, and in cholinergic trigeminal neurons serving as a control for efferents not related to the inner ear. We observed a significant loss of olivocochlear (OC) neurons in aged compared to young adult animals, whereas the overall number of lateral superior olive (LSO) cells was not reduced in aging. Although the loss of lateral and medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons was uniform and equal on both sides of the brain, there were frequency-related differences within the lateral olivocochlear (LOC) neurons, where the decline was larger in the medial limb of the superior olivary nucleus (high frequency representation) than in the lateral limb (middle-to-low frequency representation). In contrast, neither the number of vestibular efferent neurons, nor the population of motor trigeminal neurons were significantly reduced in the aged animals. These observations suggest differential effects of aging on the respective cholinergic efferent brainstem systems. PMID:25762929

  5. Altered gene expression in dry age-related macular degeneration suggests early loss of choroidal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, S. Scott; Braun, Terry A.; Skeie, Jessica M.; Haas, Christine M.; Sohn, Elliott H.; Stone, Edwin M.; Scheetz, Todd E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in developed countries. The molecular pathogenesis of early events in AMD is poorly understood. We investigated differential gene expression in samples of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choroid from early AMD and control maculas with exon-based arrays. Methods Gene expression levels in nine human donor eyes with early AMD and nine control human donor eyes were assessed using Affymetrix Human Exon ST 1.0 arrays. Two controls did not pass quality control and were removed. Differentially expressed genes were annotated using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID), and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed on RPE-specific and endothelium-associated gene sets. The complement factor H (CFH) genotype was also assessed, and differential expression was analyzed regarding high AMD risk (YH/HH) and low AMD risk (YY) genotypes. Results Seventy-five genes were identified as differentially expressed (raw p value <0.01; ≥50% fold change, mean log2 expression level in AMD or control ≥ median of all average gene expression values); however, no genes were significant (adj. p value <0.01) after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Of 52 genes with decreased expression in AMD (fold change <0.5; raw p value <0.01), 18 genes were identified by DAVID analysis as associated with vision or neurologic processes. The GSEA of the RPE-associated and endothelium-associated genes revealed a significant decrease in genes typically expressed by endothelial cells in the early AMD group compared to controls, consistent with previous histologic and proteomic studies. Analysis of the CFH genotype indicated decreased expression of ADAMTS9 in eyes with high-risk genotypes (fold change = –2.61; raw p value=0.0008). Conclusions GSEA results suggest that RPE transcripts are preserved or elevated in early AMD, concomitant with loss of endothelial cell marker

  6. Memory Loss, Dementia, and Stroke: Implications for Rehabilitation of Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Older adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are not immune to the other diseases of aging. Although AMD is the leading cause of low vision in older Americans, stroke is the leading cause of disability, and dementias affect another 2.5 million older Americans. Each condition alone can significantly impair a person's ability to…

  7. Pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex in post-stroke, vascular and other ageing-related dementias.

    PubMed

    Foster, Vincent; Oakley, Arthur E; Slade, Janet Y; Hall, Roslyn; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Burke, Matthew; Thomas, Alan J; Khundakar, Ahmad; Allan, Louise M; Kalaria, Raj N

    2014-09-01

    Dementia associated with cerebrovascular disease is common. It has been reported that ∼30% of elderly patients who survive stroke develop delayed dementia (post-stroke dementia), with most cases being diagnosed as vascular dementia. The pathological substrates associated with post-stroke or vascular dementia are poorly understood, particularly those associated with executive dysfunction. Three separate yet interconnecting circuits control executive function within the frontal lobe involving the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. We used stereological methods, along with immunohistological and related cell morphometric analysis, to examine densities and volumes of pyramidal neurons of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex in the frontal lobe from a total of 90 elderly subjects (age range 71-98 years). Post-mortem brain tissues from post-stroke dementia and post-stroke patients with no dementia were derived from our prospective Cognitive Function After Stroke study. We also examined, in parallel, samples from ageing controls and similar age subjects pathologically diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, mixed Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, and vascular dementia. We found pyramidal cell volumes in layers III and V in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of post-stroke and vascular dementia and, of mixed and Alzheimer's disease subjects to be reduced by 30-40% compared to post-stroke patients with no dementia and controls. There were no significant changes in neuronal volumes in either the anterior cingulate or orbitofrontal cortices. Remarkably, pyramidal neurons within the orbitofrontal cortex were also found to be smaller in size when compared to those in the other two neocortical regions. To relate the cell changes to cognitive function, we noted significant correlations between neuronal volumes and total CAMCOG, orientation and memory scores and clinical

  8. Severity and pattern of bone mineral loss in endocrine causes of osteoporosis as compared to age-related bone mineral loss

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, D; Dharmshaktu, P; Aggarwal, A; Gaurav, K; Bansal, R; Devru, N; Garga, UC; Kulshreshtha, B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data are scant on bone health in endocrinopathies from India. This study evaluated bone mineral density (BMD) loss in endocrinopathies [Graves’ disease (GD), type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HypoH), hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (HyperH), hypopituitarism, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT)] as compared to age-related BMD loss [postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO), andropause]. Materials and Methods: Retrospective audit of records of patients >30 years age attending a bone clinic from August 2014 to January 2016 was done. Results: Five-hundred and seven records were screened, out of which 420 (females:male = 294:126) were analyzed. A significantly higher occurrence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was noted in T1DM (89.09%), HyperH (85%), and HypoH (79.59%) compared to age-related BMD loss (60.02%; P < 0.001). The occurrence of osteoporosis among females and males was 55.41% and 53.97%, respectively, and of osteopenia among females and males was 28.91% and 32.54%, respectively. In females, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (92%), HyperH (85%), and HypoH (59.26%) compared to PMO (49.34%; P < 0.001). Z score at LS, TF, NOF, and greater trochanter (GT) was consistently lowest in T1DM women. Among men, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (76.67%) and HypoH (54.55%) compared to andropause (45.45%; P = 0.001). Z score at LS, TF, NOF, GT, and TR was consistently lowest in T1DM men. In GD, the burden of osteoporosis was similar to PMO and andropause. BMD difference among the study groups was not significantly different after adjusting for body mass index (BMI) and vitamin D. Conclusion: Low bone mass is extremely common in endocrinopathies, warranting routine screening and intervention. Concomitant vitamin D deficiency compounds the problem. Calcium and vitamin D supplementations may improve bone health in this setting. PMID:27241810

  9. Age-related toxicity of amyloid-beta associated with increased pERK and pCREB in primary hippocampal neurons: reversal by blueberry extract

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Gregory J.; Torricelli, John R.; Lindsey, Amanda L.; Kunz, Elizabeth Z.; Neuman, A.; Fisher, Derek R.; Joseph, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Further clarification is needed to address the paradox that memory formation, aging and neurodegeneration all involve calcium influx, oxyradical production (ROS) and activation of certain signaling pathways. In aged rats and in APP/PS-1 mice, cognitive and hippocampal Ca2+ dysregulation were reversed by food supplementation with a high antioxidant blueberry extract. Here, we studied whether neurons were an important target of blueberry extract and whether the mechanism involved altered ROS signaling through MAPK and CREB, pathways known to be activated in response to amyloid-beta. Primary hippocampal neurons were isolated and cultured from embryonic, middle-age or old-age (24 months) rats. Blueberry extract was found to be equally neuroprotective against amyloid-beta neurotoxicity at all ages. Increases in amyloid-beta toxicity with age were associated with age-related increases in immunoreactivity of neurons to pERK and an age-independent increase in pCREB. Treatment with blueberry extract strongly inhibited these increases in parallel with neuroprotection. Simultaneous labeling for ROS and for glutathione with dichlorofluorescein and monocholorobimane showed a mechanism of action of blueberry extract to involve transient ROS generation with an increase in the redox buffer, glutathione. We conclude that the increased age-related susceptibility of old-age neurons to amyloid-beta toxicity may be due to higher levels of activation of pERK and pCREB pathways that can be protected by blueberry extract through inhibition of both these pathways through an ROS stress response. These results suggest that the beneficial effects of blueberry extract may involve transient stress signaling and ROS protection that may translate into improved cognition in aging rats and APP/PS1 mice given blueberry extract. PMID:19954954

  10. Brain May Compensate for Dopamine Neuron Loss Early in Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Science News Brain May Compensate for Dopamine Neuron Loss Early in Parkinson’s - May 09 2014 Scientists ... at least 25 percent of the brain’s dopamine neurons already have been lost. So why do symptoms ...

  11. Mineralization of the connective tissue: a complex molecular process leading to age-related loss of function.

    PubMed

    Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Mkrtchyan, Garik V; Gneteeva, Tatiana; Buiucli, Sveatoslav; Tancowny, B; Kulka, M; Aliper, Alexander; Zhavoronkov, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Age-related metastatic mineralization of soft tissues has been considered a passive and spontaneous process. Recent data have demonstrated that calcium salt deposition in soft tissues could be a highly regulated process. Although calcification occurs in any tissue type, vascular calcification has been of particular interest due to association with atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and osteoporosis. Different mechanisms underlying calcium apatite accumulation are explored with these age-related disorders. In the case of atherosclerotic plaques, oxy-lipids trigger release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammation that activate calcification processes in aorta intimae. In CKD patients, renal failure alters the balance between calcium and phosphate levels usually regulated by fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), Klotho, and vitamin D, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) begin to explore an osteoblastosteoblast-like phenotype. Calcification could affect extracellular matrix along with VSMCs. Collagen is a major component of extracellular matrix and its modifications accumulate with age. The formation of cross-links between collagen fibers is regulated by the action of lysine hydroxylases and lysyl oxidase and could occur spontaneously. Oxidation-induced advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a major type of spontaneous cross-links that accelerate with age and may result in tissue stiffness, problems with recycling, and potential accumulation of calcium apatite. Applying strategies for clearing the AGEs proposed by de Grey may be more difficult in the highly mineralized extracellular matrix. We performed bioinformatic analysis of the molecular pathways underlying calcification in atherosclerotic and CKD patients, signaling pathways of collagen cross-links formation, and bone mineralization, and we propose new potential targets and review drugs for calcification treatment. PMID:23902273

  12. Age-related loss of hepatic Nrf2 protein homeostasis: Potential role for heightened expression of miR-146a.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric J; Shay, Kate P; Thomas, Nicholas O; Butler, Judy A; Finlay, Liam F; Hagen, Tory M

    2015-12-01

    Nrf2 regulates the expression of numerous anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and metabolic genes. We observed that, paradoxically, Nrf2 protein levels decline in the livers of aged rats despite the inflammatory environment evident in that organ. To examine the cause(s) of this loss, we investigated the age-related changes in Nrf2 protein homeostasis and activation in cultured hepatocytes from young (4-6 months) and old (24-28 months) Fischer 344 rats. While no age-dependent change in Nrf2 mRNA levels was observed (p>0.05), Nrf2 protein content, and the basal and anetholetrithione (A3T)-induced expression of Nrf2-dependent genes were attenuated with age. Conversely, overexpression of Nrf2 in cells from old animals reinstated gene induction. Treatment with A3T, along with bortezomib to inhibit degradation of existing protein, caused Nrf2 to accumulate significantly in cells from young animals (p<0.05), but not old, indicating a lack of new Nrf2 synthesis. We hypothesized that the loss of Nrf2 protein synthesis with age may partly stem from an age-related increase in microRNA inhibition of Nrf2 translation. Microarray analysis revealed that six microRNAs significantly increase >2-fold with age (p<0.05). One of these, miRNA-146a, is predicted to bind Nrf2 mRNA. Transfection of hepatocytes from young rats with a miRNA-146a mimic caused a 55% attenuation of Nrf2 translation that paralleled the age-related loss of Nrf2. Overall, these results provide novel insights for the age-related decline in Nrf2 and identify new targets to maintain Nrf2-dependent detoxification with age. PMID:26549877

  13. Age-Related Benefits of Digital Noise Reduction for Short-Term Word Learning in Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of word learning for children with hearing loss (HL) in quiet and in noise compared to normal-hearing (NH) peers. The effects of digital noise reduction (DNR) were examined for children with HL. Method: Forty-one children with NH and 26 children with HL were grouped by age (8-9 years and 11-12 years). The children…

  14. A Comparative Study of Age-Related Hearing Loss in Wild Type and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Raquel; Cediel, Rafael; Contreras, Julio; Lourdes, Rodriguez-de la Rosa; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Hernandez-Sanchez, Catalina; Zubeldia, Jose M.; Cerdan, Sebastian; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) belongs to the family of insulin-related peptides that fulfils a key role during the late development of the nervous system. Human IGF1 mutations cause profound deafness, poor growth and mental retardation. Accordingly, Igf1−/− null mice are dwarfs that have low survival rates, cochlear alterations and severe sensorineural deafness. Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is a common disorder associated with aging that causes social and cognitive problems. Aging is also associated with a decrease in circulating IGF-I levels and this reduction has been related to cognitive and brain alterations, although there is no information as yet regarding the relationship between presbycusis and IGF-I biodisponibility. Here we present a longitudinal study of wild type Igf1+/+ and null Igf1−/− mice from 2 to 12 months of age comparing the temporal progression of several parameters: hearing, brain morphology, cochlear cytoarchitecture, insulin-related factors and IGF gene expression and IGF-I serum levels. Complementary invasive and non-invasive techniques were used, including auditory brainstem-evoked response (ABR) recordings and in vivo MRI brain imaging. Igf1−/− null mice presented profound deafness at all the ages studied, without any obvious worsening of hearing parameters with aging. Igf1+/+ wild type mice suffered significant age-related hearing loss, their auditory thresholds and peak I latencies augmenting as they aged, in parallel with a decrease in the circulating levels of IGF-I. Accordingly, there was an age-related spiral ganglion degeneration in wild type mice that was not evident in the Igf1 null mice. However, the Igf1−/− null mice in turn developed a prematurely aged stria vascularis reminiscent of the diabetic strial phenotype. Our data indicate that IGF-I is required for the correct development and maintenance of hearing, supporting the idea that IGF-I-based therapies could contribute to prevent or

  15. Age-related hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... EH, Katz PR, Malone ML, eds. Practice of Geriatrics . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2007:chap ... Seshamani M, Kashima ML. Special considerations in managing geriatric patients. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, ...

  16. Biomarkers, mechanisms, and potential prevention of catecholamine neuron loss in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is on biomarkers, mechanisms, and potential treatment of catecholamine neuron loss in Parkinson disease (PD). PD is characterized by a movement disorder from loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons. An intense search is going on for biomarkers of the disease process. Theoretically, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the deaminated DA metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), should be superior to other neurochemical indices of loss of central dopamine. CSF DOPAC is low in PD-even in patients with recent onset of Parkinsonism. Cardiac norepinephrine depletion is as severe as the loss of putamen dopamine. PD importantly involves nonmotor manifestations, including anosmia, dementia, REM behavior disorder, and orthostatic hypotension, and all of these nonmotor features are associated with neuroimaging evidence for cardiac sympathetic denervation, which seems to occur independently of the movement disorder and striatal dopaminergic lesion. Analogy to a bank robber's getaway car conveys the catecholaldehyde hypothesis, according to which buildup of the dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), the immediate product of the action of monoamine oxidase on cytosolic dopamine, causes or contributes to the death of dopamine neurons. Decreased vesicular uptake of dopamine and decreased DOPAL detoxification by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) determine this buildup. Vesicular uptake is also markedly decreased in the heart in PD. Multiple factors influence vesicular uptake and ALDH activity. Evidence is accruing for aging-related induction of positive feedback loops and an autotoxic final common pathway in the death of catecholamine neurons, mediated by metabolites produced continuously in neuronal life. The catecholaldehyde hypothesis also leads to testable experimental therapeutic ideas. PMID:24054148

  17. Differential loss of striatal projection neurons in Huntington disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, A.; Albin, R.L.; Anderson, K.D.; D'Amato, C.J.; Penney, J.B.; Young, A.B. )

    1988-08-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is characterized by the loss of striatal projection neurons, which constitute the vast majority of striatal neurons. To determine whether there is differential loss among different populations of striatal projection neurons, the integrity of the axon terminal plexuses arising from the different populations of substance P-containing and enkephalin-containing striatal projection neurons was studied in striatal target areas by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of 17 HD specimens indicated that in early and middle stages of HD, enkephalin-containing neurons projecting to the external segment of the globus pallidus were much more affected than substance P-containing neurons projecting to the internal pallidal segment. Furthermore, substance P-containing neurons projecting to the substantia nigra pars reticulata were more affected than those projecting to the substantia nigra pars compacta. At the most advanced stages of the disease, projections to all striatal target areas were depleted, with the exception of some apparent sparing of the striatal projection to the substantia nigra pars compacta. These finding may explain some of the clinical manifestations and pharmacology of HD. They also may aid in identifying the neural defect underlying HD and provide additional data with which to evaluate current models of HD pathogenesis.

  18. sFRP4-dependent Wnt signal modulation is critical for bone remodeling during postnatal development and age-related bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, Ryuma; Kitazawa, Riko; Mori, Kiyoshi; Tachibana, Ryosuke; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Imai, Yuuki; Abe, Takaya; Kitazawa, Sohei

    2016-01-01

    sFRP4 is an extracellular Wnt antagonist that fine-tunes its signal activity by direct binding to Wnts. Bone fragility under oxidative stress by diabetes and aging is partly related to the suppression of the Wnt signal through upregulated sFRP4. Here, to explore the functions of sFRP4 as a balancer molecule in bone development and remodeling, we analyzed the sFRP4 knock-in mouse strain. X-gal and immunohistochemically stained signals in sFRP4-LacZ heterozygous mice were detectable in restricted areas, mostly in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, of the femoral diaphysis after neonatal and postnatal stages. Histological and μCT analyses showed increased trabecular bone mass with alteration of the Wnt signal and osteogenic activity in sFRP4 mutants; this augmented the effect of the buildup of trabecular bone during the ageing period. Our results indicate that sFRP4 plays a critical role in bone development and remodeling by regulating osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and that its functional loss prevents age-related bone loss in the trabecular bone area. These findings imply that sFRP4 functions as a key potential endogenous balancer of the Wnt signaling pathway by efficiently having direct influence on both bone formation and bone absorption during skeletal bone development and maintenance through remodeling. PMID:27117872

  19. sFRP4-dependent Wnt signal modulation is critical for bone remodeling during postnatal development and age-related bone loss.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Ryuma; Kitazawa, Riko; Mori, Kiyoshi; Tachibana, Ryosuke; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Imai, Yuuki; Abe, Takaya; Kitazawa, Sohei

    2016-01-01

    sFRP4 is an extracellular Wnt antagonist that fine-tunes its signal activity by direct binding to Wnts. Bone fragility under oxidative stress by diabetes and aging is partly related to the suppression of the Wnt signal through upregulated sFRP4. Here, to explore the functions of sFRP4 as a balancer molecule in bone development and remodeling, we analyzed the sFRP4 knock-in mouse strain. X-gal and immunohistochemically stained signals in sFRP4-LacZ heterozygous mice were detectable in restricted areas, mostly in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, of the femoral diaphysis after neonatal and postnatal stages. Histological and μCT analyses showed increased trabecular bone mass with alteration of the Wnt signal and osteogenic activity in sFRP4 mutants; this augmented the effect of the buildup of trabecular bone during the ageing period. Our results indicate that sFRP4 plays a critical role in bone development and remodeling by regulating osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and that its functional loss prevents age-related bone loss in the trabecular bone area. These findings imply that sFRP4 functions as a key potential endogenous balancer of the Wnt signaling pathway by efficiently having direct influence on both bone formation and bone absorption during skeletal bone development and maintenance through remodeling. PMID:27117872

  20. Deciphering a neuronal circuit that mediates loss of appetite

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Clark, Michael S.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons that co-express agouti-related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) are known to promote feeding and weight gain by integration of various nutritional, hormonal, and neuronal signals1,2. Ablation of these neurons leads to cessation of feeding that is accompanied by Fos activation in most regions where they project3–6. Previous experiments indicate that the ensuing starvation is due to aberrant activation of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and it could be prevented by facilitating GABAA receptor signaling in the PBN within a critical adaptation period5. We hypothesized that loss of GABAergic inhibition from AgRP neurons to the PBN leads to abnormal activation of the PBN, which in turn inhibits feeding. However, the source of the excitatory inputs to the PBN was unknown. Here we show that glutamatergic neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and caudal serotonergic neurons control the excitability of PBN neurons and inhibit feeding. Blockade of 5-HT3 receptor signaling in the rostral NTS by either chronic administration of ondansetron or genetic inactivation of Tph2 in caudal serotonergic neurons that project to the NTS protects against starvation when AgRP neurons are ablated. Moreover, genetic inactivation of glutamatergic signaling by the NTS onto N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors in the PBN prevents starvation. We also demonstrate that suppressing glutamatergic output of the PBN reinstates normal appetite after AgRP neuron ablation, whereas it promotes weight gain without AgRP neuron ablation. Hence, we identify the PBN as an important hub that integrates signals from several brain regions to bidirectionally modulate feeding and body weight. PMID:22419158

  1. Effects of age-related loss of P/Q-type calcium channels in a mice model of peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Sara; Eleuteri, Cecilia; Vacca, Valentina; Strimpakos, Georgios; Mattei, Elisabetta; Severini, Cinzia; Pavone, Flaminia; Luvisetto, Siro

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the role of P/Q-type calcium channels in sciatic nerve regeneration after lesion induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in heterozygous null mutant mice lacking the CaV2.1α1 subunit of these channels (Cacna1a+/-). Compared with wild type, Cacna1a+/- mice showed an initial reduction of the CCI-induced allodynia, indicating a reduced pain perception, but they also evidenced a lack of recovery over time, with atrophy of the injured hindpaw still present 3 months after CCI when wild-type mice fully recovered. In parallel, Cacna1a+/- mice exhibited an early onset of age-dependent loss of P/Q-type channels, which can be responsible for the lack of functional recovery. Moreover, Cacna1a+/- mice showed an early age-dependent reduction of muscular strength, as well as of Schwann cells proliferation and sciatic nerve remyelination. This study demonstrates the important role played by P/Q-type channels in recovery from nerve injury and has important implications for the knowledge of age-related processes. PMID:25150573

  2. Possible age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) and corresponding change in echolocation parameters in a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin.

    PubMed

    Li, Songhai; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong; Hoffmann-Kuhnt, Matthias; Fernando, Nimal; Taylor, Elizabeth A; Lin, Wenzhi; Chen, Jialin; Ng, Timothy

    2013-11-15

    The hearing and echolocation clicks of a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in Zhuhai, China, were studied. This animal had been repeatedly observed in the wild before it was stranded and its age was estimated to be ~40 years. The animal's hearing was measured using a non-invasive auditory evoked potential (AEP) method. Echolocation clicks produced by the dolphin were recorded when the animal was freely swimming in a 7.5 m (width)×22 m (length)×4.8 m (structural depth) pool with a water depth of ~2.5 m. The hearing and echolocation clicks of the studied dolphin were compared with those of a conspecific younger individual, ~13 years of age. The results suggested that the cut-off frequency of the high-frequency hearing of the studied dolphin was ~30-40 kHz lower than that of the younger individual. The peak and centre frequencies of the clicks produced by the older dolphin were ~16 kHz lower than those of the clicks produced by the younger animal. Considering that the older dolphin was ~40 years old, its lower high-frequency hearing range with lower click peak and centre frequencies could probably be explained by age-related hearing loss (presbycusis). PMID:24172886

  3. Hippocampal Neuron Loss Exceeds Amyloid Plaque Load in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Christoph; Rutten, Bart P. F.; Pielen, Andrea; Schäfer, Stephanie; Wirths, Oliver; Tremp, Günter; Czech, Christian; Blanchard, Veronique; Multhaup, Gerd; Rezaie, Payam; Korr, Hubert; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Pradier, Laurent; Bayer, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    According to the “amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease,” β-amyloid is the primary driving force in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. Despite the development of many transgenic mouse lines developing abundant β-amyloid-containing plaques in the brain, the actual link between amyloid plaques and neuron loss has not been clearly established, as reports on neuron loss in these models have remained controversial. We investigated transgenic mice expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein APP751 (KM670/671NL and V717I) and human mutant presenilin-1 (PS-1 M146L). Stereologic and image analyses revealed substantial age-related neuron loss in the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer of APP/PS-1 double-transgenic mice. The loss of neurons was observed at sites of Aβ aggregation and surrounding astrocytes but, most importantly, was also clearly observed in areas of the parenchyma distant from plaques. These findings point to the potential involvement of more than one mechanism in hippocampal neuron loss in this APP/PS-1 double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:15039236

  4. Adult neurogenesis restores dopaminergic neuronal loss in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Lazarini, Françoise; Gabellec, Marie-Madeleine; Moigneu, Carine; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2014-10-22

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis continuously provides new GABA- and dopamine (DA)-containing interneurons for the olfactory bulb (OB) in most adult mammals. DAergic interneurons are located in the glomerular layer (GL) where they participate in the processing of sensory inputs. To examine whether adult neurogenesis might contribute to regeneration after circuit injury in mice, we induce DAergic neuronal loss by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the dorsal GL or in the right substantia nigra pars compacta. We found that a 6-OHDA treatment of the OB produces olfactory deficits and local inflammation and partially decreases the number of neurons expressing the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) near the injected site. Blockade of inflammation by minocycline treatment immediately after the 6-OHDA administration rescued neither TH(+) interneuron number nor the olfactory deficits, suggesting that the olfactory impairments are most likely linked to TH(+) cell death and not to microglial activation. TH(+) interneuron number was restored 1 month later. This rescue resulted at least in part from enhanced recruitment of immature neurons targeting the lesioned GL area. Seven days after 6-OHDA lesion in the OB, we found that the integration of lentivirus-labeled adult-born neurons was biased: newly formed neurons were preferentially incorporated into glomerular circuits of the lesioned area. Behavioral rehabilitation occurs 2 months after lesion. This study establishes a new model into which loss of DAergic cells could be compensated by recruiting newly formed neurons. We propose that adult neurogenesis not only replenishes the population of DAergic bulbar neurons but that it also restores olfactory sensory processing. PMID:25339754

  5. X-Ray induced cataract is preceded by LEC loss, and coincident with accumulation of cortical DNA, and ROS; similarities with age-related cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Zitnik, Galynn; Tsai, Ryan; Wolf, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare age-related cataractous (ARC) changes in unirradiated mice lenses to those induced by head-only X-irradiation of 3 month-old mice. Methods lens epithelial cells (LECs) as well as partially degraded cortical DNA were visualized in fixed sections using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, and in fresh lenses using the vital stain Hoechst 33342. reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity was also visualized directly in fresh lenses using the vital dye Dihydrorhodamine (DHR). In fixed lenses an antibody specific for 8-OH Guanosine (8-OH-G) lesions was used to visualize DNA oxidative adducts from ROS damage. Alpha smooth muscle actin was visualized using specific antibodies to determine if myofibroblasts were present. Fluorescence was quantified using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM). The degree of lens opacity and cataract formation was determined by slit lamp, or from digitalized images of light reflections taken with a low magnification light microscope. Results Using DNA- and ROS-specific vital fluorescent dyes, and laser scanning confocal microscopy we have previously described 4 changes in the aging rodent lenses: 1) a significantly decreased density of surface LECs in lenses from old compared to younger mice and rats; 2) a very large increase in retained cortical nuclei and DNA fragments in the secondary lens fibers of old rodent lenses; 3) increased cortical ROS in old rodent lenses; 4) increased cataract concomitantly with the cortical DNA and ROS increases. In the current study we report that these same 4 changes also occur in an accelerated fashion in mice given head-only X-irradiation at 3 months of age. In addition to vital staining of fresh lenses, we also examined sections from fixed eyes stained with DAPI or hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and found the same loss of surface LECs and accumulation of undigested nuclei and debris in secondary lens fibers occur with age or following X-irradiation. In addition sections from fixed

  6. Selective neuronal loss in ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jean-Claude; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Masayuki; Endres, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    As a sequel of brain ischemia, selective neuronal loss (SNL)—as opposed to pannecrosis (i.e. infarction)—is attracting growing interest, particularly because it is now detectable in vivo. In acute stroke, SNL may affect the salvaged penumbra and hamper functional recovery following reperfusion. Rodent occlusion models can generate SNL predominantly in the striatum or cortex, showing that it can affect behavior for weeks despite normal magnetic resonance imaging. In humans, SNL in the salvaged penumbra has been documented in vivo mainly using positron emission tomography and 11C-flumazenil, a neuronal tracer validated against immunohistochemistry in rodent stroke models. Cortical SNL has also been documented using this approach in chronic carotid disease in association with misery perfusion and behavioral deficits, suggesting that it can result from chronic or unstable hemodynamic compromise. Given these consequences, SNL may constitute a novel therapeutic target. Selective neuronal loss may also develop at sites remote from infarcts, representing secondary ‘exofocal' phenomena akin to degeneration, potentially related to poststroke behavioral or mood impairments again amenable to therapy. Further work should aim to better characterize the time course, behavioral consequences—including the impact on neurological recovery and contribution to vascular cognitive impairment—association with possible causal processes such as microglial activation, and preventability of SNL. PMID:24192635

  7. Upregulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor, Flt-1, in rat hippocampal neurons after envenoming by Phoneutria nigriventer; age-related modulation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; Siqueira Soares, Edilene; Miguel Stávale, Leila; Pierre Irazusta, Silvia; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2012-09-15

    This study characterizes the distribution and quantifies the expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor for the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Flt-1, in the rat hippocampus following intra-peritoneal injection of Phoneutria nigriventer venom (PNV). Post-natal day 14 (P14) and 8-10 weeks (adult) old rats were used and analyses were done at 1, 2, 5 and 24 h after venom exposure and compared with saline-injected counterparts. PNV-injected animals showed hippocampal venules with perivascular edema indicating blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. This was accompanied by significant overexpression of Flt-1 which though was not the same for CA1, CA2, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) hippocampal regions, neither for P14 and adult rats. Regional analysis using GIMP methodology showed that Flt-1 was constitutively distributed more densely in neurons of DG, followed by CA1/CA2 and CA3 of both control P14 and adult animals, without variation over time, but significantly more expressed in P14 than in adults. A time-course analysis showed that Flt-1 upregulation was progressive and that neurons VEGFR1/Flt-1+ of PNV-exposed animals are timely and regionally modulated depending on the hippocampal region, being CA2 the least responsive region regardless animal's age, whilst DG was the most susceptible with adult animals having higher upregulation than neonates. Since VEGF has been reported to confer protection in several pathological processes we suggest that VEGF may be involved in hippocampal neurons response via Flt-1 mediation following PNV envenoming; its higher upregulation in adult envenomed rats may be an indication that Flt-1 neuroprotective mediation is more efficient with age. The Flt-1 upregulation and the incidence of perivascular edema in young animals may indicate a pro-inflammatory role of the receptor. PMID:22659541

  8. Neuronal Nogo-A in New-born Retinal Ganglion Cells: Implication for the Formation of the Age-related Fiber Order in the Optic Tract.

    PubMed

    Su, Dongqiang; Liu, Huaicun; Chan, Sun-On; Wang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Nogo-A is highly expressed in oligodendrocytes in the adult central nervous system (CNS). Recently it was found that Nogo-A is also expressed in some neuronal types during development. Here, we examined the expression pattern of Nogo-A in both the retina and optic tract (OT) of mouse embryos from E12 to E15. After perturbation of its function in the OT for 5 hr in the brain slice culture system using a Nogo-A specific antibody or antagonist of its receptor (NEP1-40), the optic nerve fibers and growth cones were traced with DiI. We showed that most Tuj-1 positive new-born neurons at E12 were Nogo-A positive. At E15, retinal neurons reduced the Nogo-A expression. It was worth noting that some projecting axons expressed Nogo-A along the retinofugal pathway. On the basis of their specific locations within the superficial half of the OT and the colocalization with GAP-43 (a marker for the newly born growth cones and axons), we concluded that those Nogo-A positive axons were the newly arrived retinal fibers. Blocking the function of Nogo-A with Nogo-A antibody or NEP1-40 resulted in the shift of DiI labeled axons and growth cones from the superficial half to the whole depth of the OT. These results indicate that Nogo-A in the newly born retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons are involved in sorting out the newly arrived axons to the subpial region of the OT. Anat Rec, 299:1027-1036, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27273864

  9. Nutrition and age-related eye diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vision loss among the elderly is an important health problem. Approximately one person in three has some form of vision-reducing eye disease by the age of 65 [1]. Age-related cataract, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma are the major diseases resulting in visu...

  10. Vision loss in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN3 disease).

    PubMed

    Ouseph, Madhu M; Kleinman, Mark E; Wang, Qing Jun

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL; also known as CLN3 disease) is a devastating neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder and the most common form of Batten disease. Progressive visual and neurological symptoms lead to mortality in patients by the third decade. Although ceroid-lipofuscinosis, neuronal 3 (CLN3) has been identified as the sole disease gene, the biochemical and cellular bases of JNCL and the functions of CLN3 are yet to be fully understood. As severe ocular pathologies manifest early in disease progression, the retina is an ideal tissue to study in the efforts to unravel disease etiology and design therapeutics. There are significant discrepancies in the ocular phenotypes between human JNCL and existing murine models, impeding investigations on the sequence of events occurring during the progression of vision impairment. This review focuses on current understanding of vision loss in JNCL and discusses future research directions toward molecular dissection of the pathogenesis of the disease and associated vision problems in order to ultimately improve the quality of patient life and cure the disease. PMID:26748992

  11. Progressive Loss of the Orexin Neurons Reveals Dual Effects on Wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Abigail F.; Navidi, William; Tabuchi, Sawako; Terao, Akira; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Scammell, Thomas E.; Diniz Behn, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy is caused by loss of the orexin (also known as hypocretin) neurons. In addition to the orexin peptides, these neurons release additional neurotransmitters, which may produce complex effects on sleep/wake behavior. Currently, it remains unknown whether the orexin neurons promote the initiation as well as the maintenance of wakefulness, and whether the orexin neurons influence initiation or maintenance of sleep. To determine the effects of the orexin neurons on the dynamics of sleep/wake behavior, we analyzed sleep/wake architecture in a novel mouse model of acute orexin neuron loss. Methods: We used survival analysis and other statistical methods to analyze sleep/wake architecture in orexin-tTA ; TetO diphtheria toxin A mice at different stages of orexin neuron degeneration. Results: Progressive loss of the orexin neurons dramatically reduced survival of long wake bouts, but it also improved survival of brief wake bouts. In addition, with loss of the orexin neurons, mice were more likely to wake during the first 30 sec of nonrapid eye movement sleep and then less likely to return to sleep during the first 60 sec of wakefulness. Conclusions: These findings help explain the sleepiness and fragmented sleep that are characteristic of narcolepsy. Orexin neuron loss impairs survival of long wake bouts resulting in poor maintenance of wakefulness, but this neuronal loss also fragments sleep by increasing the risk of awakening at the beginning of sleep and then reducing the likelihood of quickly returning to sleep. Citation: Branch AF, Navidi W, Tabuchi S, Terao A, Yamanaka A, Scammell TE, Diniz Behn C. Progressive loss of the orexin neurons reveals dual effects on wakefulness. SLEEP 2016;39(2):369–377. PMID:26446125

  12. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration What is AMD? Click for more information Age-related macular degeneration, ... the macula allows you to see fine detail. AMD Blurs Central Vision AMD blurs the sharp central ...

  13. A Computational Model for the Loss of Neuronal Organization in Microcolumns

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Maxwell; Urbanc, Brigita; Cruz, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A population of neurons in the cerebral cortex of humans and other mammals organize themselves into vertical microcolumns perpendicular to the pial surface. Anatomical changes to these microcolumns have been correlated with neurological diseases and normal aging; in particular, in area 46 of the rhesus monkey brain, the strength of microcolumns was shown to decrease with age. These changes can be caused by alterations in the spatial distribution of the neurons in microcolumns and/or neuronal loss. Using a three-dimensional computational model of neuronal arrangements derived from thin tissue sections and validated in brain tissue from rhesus monkeys, we show that neuronal loss is inconsistent with the findings in aged individuals. In contrast, a model of simple random neuronal displacements, constrained in magnitude by restorative harmonic forces, is consistent with observed changes and provides mechanistic insights into the age-induced loss of microcolumnar structure. Connection of the model to normal aging and disease are discussed. PMID:24853752

  14. Loss of MeCP2 From Forebrain Excitatory Neurons Leads to Cortical Hyperexcitation and Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Peterson, Matthew; Beyer, Barbara; Frankel, Wayne N.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder leading to loss of motor and cognitive functions, impaired social interactions, and seizure at young ages. Defects of neuronal circuit development and function are thought to be responsible for the symptoms of RTT. The majority of RTT patients show recurrent seizures, indicating that neuronal hyperexcitation is a common feature of RTT. However, mechanisms underlying hyperexcitation in RTT are poorly understood. Here we show that deletion of Mecp2 from cortical excitatory neurons but not forebrain inhibitory neurons in the mouse leads to spontaneous seizures. Selective deletion of Mecp2 from excitatory but not inhibitory neurons in the forebrain reduces GABAergic transmission in layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal and somatosensory cortices. Loss of MeCP2 from cortical excitatory neurons reduces the number of GABAergic synapses in the cortex, and enhances the excitability of layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Using single-cell deletion of Mecp2 in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, we show that GABAergic transmission is reduced in neurons without MeCP2, but is normal in neighboring neurons with MeCP2. Together, these results suggest that MeCP2 in cortical excitatory neurons plays a critical role in the regulation of GABAergic transmission and cortical excitability. PMID:24523563

  15. Progranulin deficiency promotes neuroinflammation and neuron loss following toxin-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Lauren Herl; Zhang, Jiasheng; Barmada, Sami J.; Zhou, Ping; Kamiya, Sherry; Sun, Binggui; Min, Sang-Won; Gan, Li; Finkbeiner, Steven; Huang, Eric J.; Farese, Robert V.

    2012-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a widely expressed secreted protein that is linked to inflammation. In humans, PGRN haploinsufficiency is a major inherited cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but how PGRN deficiency causes neurodegeneration is unknown. Here we show that loss of PGRN results in increased neuron loss in response to injury in the CNS. When exposed acutely to 1-methyl-4-(2′-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophine (MPTP), mice lacking PGRN (Grn–/–) showed more neuron loss and increased microgliosis compared with wild-type mice. The exacerbated neuron loss was due not to selective vulnerability of Grn–/– neurons to MPTP, but rather to an increased microglial inflammatory response. Consistent with this, conditional mutants lacking PGRN in microglia exhibited MPTP-induced phenotypes similar to Grn–/– mice. Selective depletion of PGRN from microglia in mixed cortical cultures resulted in increased death of wild-type neurons in the absence of injury. Furthermore, Grn–/– microglia treated with LPS/IFN-γ exhibited an amplified inflammatory response, and conditioned media from these microglia promoted death of cultured neurons. Our results indicate that PGRN deficiency leads to dysregulated microglial activation and thereby contributes to increased neuron loss with injury. These findings suggest that PGRN deficiency may cause increased neuron loss in other forms of CNS injury accompanied by neuroinflammation. PMID:23041626

  16. Olfactory Sensory Activity Modulates Microglial-Neuronal Interactions during Dopaminergic Cell Loss in the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Grier, Bryce D; Belluscio, Leonardo; Cheetham, Claire E J

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) displays robust activity-dependent plasticity throughout life. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the glomerular layer (GL) of the OB are particularly plastic, with loss of sensory input rapidly reducing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production, followed by a substantial reduction in DA neuron number. Here, we asked whether microglia participate in activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons in the mouse OB. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in the number of both DA neurons and their synapses in the OB ipsilateral to the occluded naris (occluded OB) within just 7 days of sensory deprivation. Concomitantly, the volume of the occluded OB decreased, resulting in an increase in microglial density. Microglia in the occluded OB also adopted morphologies consistent with activation. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging and histological analysis we then showed that loss of olfactory input markedly altered microglial-neuronal interactions during the time that DA neurons are being eliminated: both microglial process motility and the frequency of wrapping of DA neuron somata by activated microglia increased significantly in the occluded OB. Furthermore, we found microglia in the occluded OB that had completely engulfed components of DA neurons. Together, our data provide evidence that loss of olfactory input modulates microglial-DA neuron interactions in the OB, thereby suggesting an important role for microglia in the activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons and their synapses. PMID:27471450

  17. Olfactory Sensory Activity Modulates Microglial-Neuronal Interactions during Dopaminergic Cell Loss in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Bryce D.; Belluscio, Leonardo; Cheetham, Claire E. J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) displays robust activity-dependent plasticity throughout life. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the glomerular layer (GL) of the OB are particularly plastic, with loss of sensory input rapidly reducing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production, followed by a substantial reduction in DA neuron number. Here, we asked whether microglia participate in activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons in the mouse OB. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in the number of both DA neurons and their synapses in the OB ipsilateral to the occluded naris (occluded OB) within just 7 days of sensory deprivation. Concomitantly, the volume of the occluded OB decreased, resulting in an increase in microglial density. Microglia in the occluded OB also adopted morphologies consistent with activation. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging and histological analysis we then showed that loss of olfactory input markedly altered microglial-neuronal interactions during the time that DA neurons are being eliminated: both microglial process motility and the frequency of wrapping of DA neuron somata by activated microglia increased significantly in the occluded OB. Furthermore, we found microglia in the occluded OB that had completely engulfed components of DA neurons. Together, our data provide evidence that loss of olfactory input modulates microglial-DA neuron interactions in the OB, thereby suggesting an important role for microglia in the activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons and their synapses. PMID:27471450

  18. Hippocampal adaptive response following extensive neuronal loss in an inducible transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Myczek, Kristoffer; Yeung, Stephen T; Castello, Nicholas; Baglietto-Vargas, David; LaFerla, Frank M

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal loss is a common component of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease) and brain traumas (stroke, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury). One brain region that commonly exhibits neuronal loss in several neurodegenerative disorders is the hippocampus, an area of the brain critical for the formation and retrieval of memories. Long-lasting and sometimes unrecoverable deficits caused by neuronal loss present a unique challenge for clinicians and for researchers who attempt to model these traumas in animals. Can these deficits be recovered, and if so, is the brain capable of regeneration following neuronal loss? To address this significant question, we utilized the innovative CaM/Tet-DT(A) mouse model that selectively induces neuronal ablation. We found that we are able to inflict a consistent and significant lesion to the hippocampus, resulting in hippocampally-dependent behavioral deficits and a long-lasting upregulation in neurogenesis, suggesting that this process might be a critical part of hippocampal recovery. In addition, we provide novel evidence of angiogenic and vasculature changes following hippocampal neuronal loss in CaM/Tet-DTA mice. We posit that angiogenesis may be an important factor that promotes neurogenic upregulation following hippocampal neuronal loss, and both factors, angiogenesis and neurogenesis, can contribute to the adaptive response of the brain for behavioral recovery. PMID:25184527

  19. Evidence for Alzheimer's disease-linked synapse loss and compensation in mouse and human hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Krystina M; Molina-Campos, Elizabeth; Musial, Timothy F; Price, Andrea L; Oh, Kwang-Jin; Wolke, Malerie L; Buss, Eric W; Scheff, Stephen W; Mufson, Elliott J; Nicholson, Daniel A

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with alterations in the distribution, number, and size of inputs to hippocampal neurons. Some of these changes are thought to be neurodegenerative, whereas others are conceptualized as compensatory, plasticity-like responses, wherein the remaining inputs reactively innervate vulnerable dendritic regions. Here, we provide evidence that the axospinous synapses of human AD cases and mice harboring AD-linked genetic mutations (the 5XFAD line) exhibit both, in the form of synapse loss and compensatory changes in the synapses that remain. Using array tomography, quantitative conventional electron microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy for AMPARs, and whole-cell patch-clamp physiology, we find that hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in transgenic mice are host to an age-related synapse loss in their distal dendrites, and that the remaining synapses express more AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Moreover, the number of axonal boutons that synapse with multiple spines is significantly reduced in the transgenic mice. Through serial section electron microscopic analyses of human hippocampal tissue, we further show that putative compensatory changes in synapse strength are also detectable in axospinous synapses of proximal and distal dendrites in human AD cases, and that their multiple synapse boutons may be more powerful than those in non-cognitively impaired human cases. Such findings are consistent with the notion that the pathophysiology of AD is a multivariate product of both neurodegenerative and neuroplastic processes, which may produce adaptive and/or maladaptive responses in hippocampal synaptic strength and plasticity. PMID:25031178

  20. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa’s ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarizes and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics. PMID:26973593

  1. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa's ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarizes and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics. PMID:26973593

  2. Gray matter loss correlates with mesial temporal lobe neuronal hyperexcitability inside the human seizure onset zone

    PubMed Central

    Staba, Richard J.; Ekstrom, Arne D.; Suthana, Nanthia A.; Burggren, Alison; Fried, Itzhak; Engel, Jerome; Bookheimer, Susan Y.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Purpose Patient studies have not provided consistent evidence for interictal neuronal hyperexcitability inside the seizure onset zone (SOZ). We hypothesized that gray matter (GM) loss could have important effects on neuronal firing, and quantifying these effects would reveal significant differences in neuronal firing inside versus outside the SOZ. Methods MRI and computational unfolding of mesial temporal lobe (MTL) subregions was used to construct anatomical maps to compute GM loss in presurgical patients with medically intractable focal seizures in relation to control subjects. In patients, these same maps were used to locate the position of microelectrodes that recorded interictal neuronal activity. Single neuron firing and burst rates were evaluated in relation to GM loss and MTL subregions inside and outside the SOZ. Key findings MTL GM thickness was reduced inside and outside the SOZ in patients with respect to control subjects, yet GM loss was associated more strongly with firing and burst rates in several MTL subregions inside the SOZ. Adjusting single neuron firing and burst rates for the effects of GM loss revealed significantly higher firing rates in the subregion consisting of dentate gyrus and CA2 and CA3 (CA23DG), as well as CA1 and entorhinal cortex (EC) inside versus outside the SOZ where normalized MRI GM loss was ≥1.40 mm. Firing rates were higher in subicular cortex inside the SOZ at GM loss ≥1.97 mm, while burst rates were higher in CA23DG, CA1, and EC inside than outside the SOZ at similar levels of GM loss. Significance The correlation between GM loss and increased firing and burst rates suggests GM structural alterations in MTL subregions are associated with interictal neuronal hyperexcitability inside the SOZ. Significant differences in firing rates and bursting in areas with GM loss inside compared to outside the SOZ indicate that synaptic reorganization following cell loss could be associated with varying degrees of

  3. ACQUISITION AND LOSS OF NEURONAL CA2+/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE DURING NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurons display characteristic schedules by which they acquire and lose the neuron-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein Kinase-Gr (CaM Kinase-Gr) during differentiation. uch schedules are exemplified by patterns of expression of this kinase in the developing cerebellum and ...

  4. Macular degeneration - age-related

    MedlinePlus

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD); AMD ... distorted and wavy. There may be a small dark spot in the center of your vision that ... leafy vegetables, may also decrease your risk of age-related macular degeneration. If you have wet AMD, ...

  5. Selective Loss of Cholinergic Neurons in the Ventral Striatum of Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehericy, Stephane; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Cervera, Pascale; Hersh, Louis B.; Hauw, Jean-Jacques; Ruberg, Merle; Agid, Yves

    1989-11-01

    Cholinergic neurons were studied by immunohistochemistry with an antiserum against human choline acetyltransferase in the caudate nucleus, putamen, and ventral striatum (including the nucleus accumbens) of three patients with Alzheimer disease and three control subjects. Immunoreactive cell bodies were mapped and counted. In the ventral striatum of patients with Alzheimer disease, a 60% decrease in the number of cholinergic neurons was observed, whereas in the caudate nucleus and putamen values for control subjects and patients were similar. To determine whether all neurons in the ventral striatum were affected, neuropeptide Y-containing neurons were also immunostained, mapped, and counted. The number of these neurons was the same in control subjects and patients with Alzheimer disease, indicating that neuronal loss is not generalized in the ventral striatum and may be specific to the cholinergic population.

  6. Effects of neuronal loss in the dynamic model of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, B.-G.; Choi, J.; Choi, M. Y.

    2008-09-01

    We study the phase transitions and dynamic behavior of the dynamic model of neural networks, with an emphasis on the effects of neuronal loss due to external stress. In the absence of loss the overall results obtained numerically are found to agree excellently with the theoretical ones. When the external stress is turned on, some neurons may deteriorate and die; such loss of neurons, in general, weakens the memory in the system. As the loss increases beyond a critical value, the order parameter measuring the strength of memory decreases to zero either continuously or discontinuously, namely, the system loses its memory via a second- or a first-order transition, depending on the ratio of the refractory period to the duration of action potential.

  7. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Clinical Trial of High-Dose Supplementation With Vitamins C and E, Beta Carotene, and Zinc for Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Vision Loss

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Observational and experimental data suggest that antioxidant and/or zinc supplements may delay progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and vision loss. Objective To evaluate the effect of high-dose vitamins C and E, beta carotene, and zinc supplements on AMD progression and visual acuity. Design The Age-Related Eye Disease Study, an 11-center double-masked clinical trial, enrolled participants in an AMD trial if they had extensive small drusen, intermediate drusen, large drusen, noncentral geographic atrophy, or pigment abnormalities in 1 or both eyes, or advanced AMD or vision loss due to AMD in 1 eye. At least 1 eye had best-corrected visual acuity of 20/32 or better. Participants were randomly assigned to receive daily oral tablets containing: (1) antioxidants (vitamin C, 500 mg; vitamin E, 400 IU; and beta carotene, 15 mg); (2) zinc, 80 mg, as zinc oxide and copper, 2 mg, as cupric oxide; (3) antioxidants plus zinc; or (4) placebo. Main Outcome Measures (1)Photographic assessment of progression to or treatment for advanced AMD and (2) at least moderate visual acuity loss from baseline (≥15 letters). Primary analyses used repeated-measures logistic regression with a significance level of .01, unadjusted for covariates. Serum level measurements, medical histories, and mortality rates were used for safety monitoring. Results Average follow-up of the 3640 enrolled study participants, aged 55–80 years, was 6.3 years, with 2.4% lost to follow-up. Comparison with placebo demonstrated a statistically significant odds reduction for the development of advanced AMD with antioxidants plus zinc (odds ratio [OR], 0.72; 99% confidence interval [CI], 0.52–0.98). The ORs for zinc alone and antioxidants alone are 0.75 (99% CI, 0.55–1.03) and 0.80 (99% CI, 0.59–1.09), respectively. Participants with extensive small drusen, nonextensive intermediate size drusen, or pigment abnormalities had only a 1.3% 5-year probability of progression to

  8. Unsuspected early neuronal loss in scrapie-infected mice revealed by morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Scott, J R; Jeffrey, M; Halliday, W G

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine to what extent neuronal loss is a feature of scrapie pathology, using an experimental model in which infectivity and subsequent vacuolar lesions are well characterized but in which neuronal loss has not been previously identified. Intraocular infection with ME7 scrapie directs infection through the major projections of the optic nerve, which include the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) on the contralateral side to the infected eye. Infectivity can be detected in the dLGN at 77 days post-infection and vacuolar lesions are first seen around halfway through the incubation period of 240 days. Morphometric assessment of neuron number in the dLGN was made on gallocyanin stained semi-serial sections from 5 infected and 5 normal brain-injected controls at 4 fifty-day intervals during the incubation period, and on clinically terminal mice. The number of neurons in the dLGN of the infected mice decreased steadily from around 20,000 at 50 days post-infection to under 2,000 in the terminal group. The loss was delayed in the ipsilateral dLGN, although terminal counts were the same for both sides. The onset of neuronal loss was coincident with initial vacuolar changes, and neuronal numbers were inversely proportional to the severity of vacuolation. It is concluded that scrapie infection causes a progressive neuronal loss that can be identified some 30-80 days after infectivity can be detected in the dLGN, long before the onset of clinical disease. PMID:8030955

  9. Cell type-specific transcriptomics of hypothalamic energy-sensing neuron responses to weight-loss

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Fredrick E; Sugino, Ken; Tozer, Adam; Branco, Tiago; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    Molecular and cellular processes in neurons are critical for sensing and responding to energy deficit states, such as during weight-loss. Agouti related protein (AGRP)-expressing neurons are a key hypothalamic population that is activated during energy deficit and increases appetite and weight-gain. Cell type-specific transcriptomics can be used to identify pathways that counteract weight-loss, and here we report high-quality gene expression profiles of AGRP neurons from well-fed and food-deprived young adult mice. For comparison, we also analyzed Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, an intermingled population that suppresses appetite and body weight. We find that AGRP neurons are considerably more sensitive to energy deficit than POMC neurons. Furthermore, we identify cell type-specific pathways involving endoplasmic reticulum-stress, circadian signaling, ion channels, neuropeptides, and receptors. Combined with methods to validate and manipulate these pathways, this resource greatly expands molecular insight into neuronal regulation of body weight, and may be useful for devising therapeutic strategies for obesity and eating disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09800.001 PMID:26329458

  10. Meox2 haploinsufficiency increases neuronal cell loss in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Soto, Ileana; Grabowska, Weronika A; Onos, Kristen D; Graham, Leah C; Jackson, Harriet M; Simeone, Stephen N; Howell, Gareth R

    2016-06-01

    Evidence suggests that multiple genetic and environmental factors conspire together to increase susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The amyloid cascade hypothesis states that deposition of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is central to AD; however, evidence in humans and animals suggests that Aβ buildup alone is not sufficient to cause neuronal cell loss and cognitive decline. Mouse models that express high levels of mutant forms of amyloid precursor protein and/or cleaving enzymes deposit amyloid but do not show neuron loss. Therefore, a double-hit hypothesis for AD has been proposed whereby vascular dysfunction precedes and promotes Aβ toxicity. In support of this, copy number variations in mesenchyme homeobox 2 (MEOX2), a gene involved in vascular development, are associated with severe forms of AD. However, the role of MEOX2 in AD has not been studied. Here, we tested Meox2 haploinsufficiency in B6.APP/PS1 (B6.APB(Tg)) mice, a mouse model of AD. Despite no overt differences in plaque deposition or glial activation, B6.APB(Tg) mice that carry only one copy of Meox2 (B6.APB(Tg).Mx(-/+)) show increased neuronal cell loss, particularly in regions containing plaques, compared with B6.APB(Tg) mice. Neuronal cell loss corresponds with a significant decrease in plaque-associated microvessels, further supporting a synergistic effect of vascular compromise and amyloid deposition on neuronal cell dysfunction in AD. PMID:27143421

  11. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Budzinskaia, M V

    2014-01-01

    The review provides an update on the pathogenesis and new treatment modalities for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The impact of polymorphism in particular genes, including complement factor H (CFH), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2/LOC387715), and serine peptidase (HTRA1), on AMD development is discussed. Clinical presentations of different forms of exudative AMD, that is classic, occult, or more often mixed choroidal neovascularization, retinal angiomatous proliferation, and choroidal polypoidal vasculopathy, are described. Particular attention is paid to the results of recent clinical trials and safety issues around the therapy. PMID:25715554

  12. PARP-1 Inhibition Attenuates Neuronal Loss, Microglia Activation and Neurological Deficits after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Loane, David J.; Zhao, Zaorui; Kabadi, Shruti V.; Hanscom, Marie; Byrnes, Kimberly R.; Faden, Alan I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes neuronal cell death as well as microglial activation and related neurotoxicity that contribute to subsequent neurological dysfunction. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) induces neuronal cell death through activation of caspase-independent mechanisms, including release of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), and microglial activation. Administration of PJ34, a selective PARP-1 inhibitor, reduced cell death of primary cortical neurons exposed to N-Methyl-N'-Nitro-N-Nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), a potent inducer of AIF-dependent cell death. PJ34 also attenuated lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ-induced activation of BV2 or primary microglia, limiting NF-κB activity and iNOS expression as well as decreasing generation of reactive oxygen species and TNFα. Systemic administration of PJ34 starting as late as 24 h after controlled cortical impact resulted in improved motor function recovery in mice with TBI. Stereological analysis demonstrated that PJ34 treatment reduced the lesion volume, attenuated neuronal cell loss in the cortex and thalamus, and reduced microglial activation in the TBI cortex. PJ34 treatment did not improve cognitive performance in a Morris water maze test or reduce neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. Overall, our data indicate that PJ34 has a significant, albeit selective, neuroprotective effect after experimental TBI, and its therapeutic effect may be from multipotential actions on neuronal cell death and neuroinflammatory pathways. PMID:24476502

  13. Age-related cochlear synaptopathy: an early-onset contributor to auditory functional decline.

    PubMed

    Sergeyenko, Yevgeniya; Lall, Kumud; Liberman, M Charles; Kujawa, Sharon G

    2013-08-21

    Aging listeners experience greater difficulty understanding speech in adverse listening conditions and exhibit degraded temporal resolution, even when audiometric thresholds are normal. When threshold evidence for peripheral involvement is lacking, central and cognitive factors are often cited as underlying performance declines. However, previous work has uncovered widespread loss of cochlear afferent synapses and progressive cochlear nerve degeneration in noise-exposed ears with recovered thresholds and no hair cell loss (Kujawa and Liberman 2009). Here, we characterize age-related cochlear synaptic and neural degeneration in CBA/CaJ mice never exposed to high-level noise. Cochlear hair cell and neuronal function was assessed via distortion product otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses, respectively. Immunostained cochlear whole mounts and plastic-embedded sections were studied by confocal and conventional light microscopy to quantify hair cells, cochlear neurons, and synaptic structures, i.e., presynaptic ribbons and postsynaptic glutamate receptors. Cochlear synaptic loss progresses from youth (4 weeks) to old age (144 weeks) and is seen throughout the cochlea long before age-related changes in thresholds or hair cell counts. Cochlear nerve loss parallels the synaptic loss, after a delay of several months. Key functional clues to the synaptopathy are available in the neural response; these can be accessed noninvasively, enhancing the possibilities for translation to human clinical characterization. PMID:23966690

  14. Glutamatergic regulation prevents hippocampal-dependent age-related cognitive decline through dendritic spine clustering

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ana C.; Lambert, Hilary K.; Grossman, Yael S.; Dumitriu, Dani; Waldman, Rachel; Jannetty, Sophia K.; Calakos, Katina; Janssen, William G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The dementia of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) results primarily from degeneration of neurons that furnish glutamatergic corticocortical connections that subserve cognition. Although neuron death is minimal in the absence of AD, age-related cognitive decline does occur in animals as well as humans, and it decreases quality of life for elderly people. Age-related cognitive decline has been linked to synapse loss and/or alterations of synaptic proteins that impair function in regions such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. These synaptic alterations are likely reversible, such that maintenance of synaptic health in the face of aging is a critically important therapeutic goal. Here, we show that riluzole can protect against some of the synaptic alterations in hippocampus that are linked to age-related memory loss in rats. Riluzole increases glutamate uptake through glial transporters and is thought to decrease glutamate spillover to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors while increasing synaptic glutamatergic activity. Treated aged rats were protected against age-related cognitive decline displayed in nontreated aged animals. Memory performance correlated with density of thin spines on apical dendrites in CA1, although not with mushroom spines. Furthermore, riluzole-treated rats had an increase in clustering of thin spines that correlated with memory performance and was specific to the apical, but not the basilar, dendrites of CA1. Clustering of synaptic inputs is thought to allow nonlinear summation of synaptic strength. These findings further elucidate neuroplastic changes in glutamatergic circuits with aging and advance therapeutic development to prevent and treat age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25512503

  15. Glutamatergic regulation prevents hippocampal-dependent age-related cognitive decline through dendritic spine clustering.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana C; Lambert, Hilary K; Grossman, Yael S; Dumitriu, Dani; Waldman, Rachel; Jannetty, Sophia K; Calakos, Katina; Janssen, William G; McEwen, Bruce S; Morrison, John H

    2014-12-30

    The dementia of Alzheimer's disease (AD) results primarily from degeneration of neurons that furnish glutamatergic corticocortical connections that subserve cognition. Although neuron death is minimal in the absence of AD, age-related cognitive decline does occur in animals as well as humans, and it decreases quality of life for elderly people. Age-related cognitive decline has been linked to synapse loss and/or alterations of synaptic proteins that impair function in regions such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. These synaptic alterations are likely reversible, such that maintenance of synaptic health in the face of aging is a critically important therapeutic goal. Here, we show that riluzole can protect against some of the synaptic alterations in hippocampus that are linked to age-related memory loss in rats. Riluzole increases glutamate uptake through glial transporters and is thought to decrease glutamate spillover to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors while increasing synaptic glutamatergic activity. Treated aged rats were protected against age-related cognitive decline displayed in nontreated aged animals. Memory performance correlated with density of thin spines on apical dendrites in CA1, although not with mushroom spines. Furthermore, riluzole-treated rats had an increase in clustering of thin spines that correlated with memory performance and was specific to the apical, but not the basilar, dendrites of CA1. Clustering of synaptic inputs is thought to allow nonlinear summation of synaptic strength. These findings further elucidate neuroplastic changes in glutamatergic circuits with aging and advance therapeutic development to prevent and treat age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25512503

  16. Dizziness and Imbalance in the Elderly: Age-related Decline in the Vestibular System.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-02-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are amongst the most common complaints in older people, and are a growing public health concern since they put older people at a significantly higher risk of falling. Although the causes of dizziness in older people are multifactorial, peripheral vestibular dysfunction is one of the most frequent causes. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction in the elderly, followed by Meniere's disease. Every factor associated with the maintenance of postural stability deteriorates during aging. Age-related deterioration of peripheral vestibular function has been demonstrated through quantitative measurements of the vestibulo-ocular reflex with rotational testing and of the vestibulo-collic reflex with testing of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Age-related decline of vestibular function has been shown to correlate with the age-related decrease in the number of vestibular hair cells and neurons. The mechanism of age-related cellular loss in the vestibular endorgan is unclear, but it is thought that genetic predisposition and cumulative effect of oxidative stress may both play an important role. Since the causes of dizziness in older people are multi-factorial, management of this disease should be customized according to the etiologies of each individual. Vestibular rehabilitation is found to be effective in treating both unilateral and bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Various prosthetic devices have also been developed to improve postural balance in older people. Although there have been no medical treatments improving age-related vestibular dysfunction, new medical treatments such as mitochondrial antioxidants or caloric restriction, which have been effective in preventing age-related hearing loss, should be ienvestigated in the future. PMID:25657851

  17. Dizziness and Imbalance in the Elderly: Age-related Decline in the Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are amongst the most common complaints in older people, and are a growing public health concern since they put older people at a significantly higher risk of falling. Although the causes of dizziness in older people are multifactorial, peripheral vestibular dysfunction is one of the most frequent causes. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction in the elderly, followed by Meniere’s disease. Every factor associated with the maintenance of postural stability deteriorates during aging. Age-related deterioration of peripheral vestibular function has been demonstrated through quantitative measurements of the vestibulo-ocular reflex with rotational testing and of the vestibulo-collic reflex with testing of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Age-related decline of vestibular function has been shown to correlate with the age-related decrease in the number of vestibular hair cells and neurons. The mechanism of age-related cellular loss in the vestibular endorgan is unclear, but it is thought that genetic predisposition and cumulative effect of oxidative stress may both play an important role. Since the causes of dizziness in older people are multi-factorial, management of this disease should be customized according to the etiologies of each individual. Vestibular rehabilitation is found to be effective in treating both unilateral and bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Various prosthetic devices have also been developed to improve postural balance in older people. Although there have been no medical treatments improving age-related vestibular dysfunction, new medical treatments such as mitochondrial antioxidants or caloric restriction, which have been effective in preventing age-related hearing loss, should be ienvestigated in the future. PMID:25657851

  18. TDP-43 pathology and neuronal loss in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Brettschneider, Johannes; Arai, Kimihito; Del Tredici, Kelly; Toledo, Jon B.; Robinson, John L.; Lee, Edward B.; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Irwin, David J.; Fang, Lubin; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Ludolph, Albert C.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Braak, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    We examined the phosphorylated 43-kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (pTDP-43) inclusions as well as neuronal loss in full-length spinal cords and five selected regions of the central nervous system from 36 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 10 age-matched normal controls. The most severe neuronal loss and pTDP-43 lesions were seen in lamina IX motor nuclei columns 4, 6, and 8 of lower cervical segments and in columns 9–11 of lumbosacral segments. Severity of pTDP-43 pathology and neuronal loss correlated closely with gray and white matter oligodendroglial involvement and was linked to onset of disease, with severe involvement of columns 4, 6, and 8 of upper extremity onset cases and severe involvement of columns of 9, 10, and 11 in cases with lower extremity onset. Severe TDP-43 lesions and neuronal loss were observed in stage 4 cases and sometimes included Onuf’s nucleus. Notably, three cases displayed pTDP-43 aggregates in the midbrain oculomotor nucleus, which we had not seen previously even in cases with advanced (i.e., stage 4) pathology. pTDP-43 aggregates were observed in neurons of Clarke’s column in 30.6 % of cases but rarely in the intermediolateral nucleus (IML). Gray matter oligodendroglial pTDP-43 inclusions were present in areas devoid of neuronal pTDP-43 aggregates and neuronal loss. Taken together, our findings indicate that (1) the dorsolateral motor nuclei columns of the cervical and lumbosacral anterior horn may be the earliest foci of pTDP-43 pathology in the spinal cord, (2) gray matter oligodendroglial involvement is an early event in the ALS disease process that possibly heralds subsequent involvement of neurons by pTDP-43 pathology, and (3) in some very advanced cases, there is oculomotor nucleus involvement, which may constitute an additional neuropathological stage (designated here as stage 5) of pTDP-43 pathology in ALS. PMID:24916269

  19. Effects of hypocretin (orexin) neuronal loss on sleep and extracellular adenosine levels in the basal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric; Liu, Meng; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons containing the neuropeptide hypocretin (orexin) are localized only in the lateral hypothalamus from where they innervate multiple regions implicated in arousal, including the basal forebrain. HCRT activation of downstream arousal neurons is likely to stimulate release of endogenous factors. One such factor is adenosine (AD), which in the basal forebrain increases with waking and decreases with sleep, and is hypothesized to regulate the waxing and waning of sleep drive. Does loss of HCRT neurons affect AD levels in the basal forebrain? Is the increased sleep that accompanies HCRT loss a consequence of higher AD levels in the basal forebrain? In the present study, we investigate these questions by lesioning the HCRT neurons (hypocretin-2-saporin) and measuring sleep and extracellular levels of AD in the basal forebrain. In separate groups of rats, the neurotoxin HCRT2-SAP or saline were administered locally to the lateral hypothalamus and 80 days later AD and sleep were assessed. Rats given the neurotoxin had a 94% loss of the HCRT neurons. These rats awake less at night, and had more REM sleep, which is consistent with a HCRT hypofunction. These rats also had more sleep after brief periods of sleep deprivation. However, in the lesioned rats, AD levels did not increase with 6h sleep deprivation, whereas such an increase in AD occurred in rats without lesion of the HCRT neurons. These findings indicate that AD levels do not increase with waking in rats with a HCRT lesion, and that the increased sleep in these rats occurs independently of AD levels in the basal forebrain. PMID:18783368

  20. Neuronal loss of Drosophila NPC1a causes cholesterol aggregation and age-progressive neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Scott E; Woodruff, E A; Liang, Ping; Patten, Meaghan; Broadie, Kendal

    2008-06-25

    The mistrafficking and consequent cytoplasmic accumulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids is linked to multiple neurodegenerative diseases. One class of disease, the sphingolipid storage diseases, includes Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC), caused predominantly (95%) by mutation of the NPC1 gene. A disease model has been established through mutation of Drosophila NPC1a (dnpc1a). Null mutants display early lethality attributable to loss of cholesterol-dependent ecdysone steroid hormone production. Null mutants rescued to adults by restoring ecdysone production mimic human NPC patients with progressive motor defects and reduced life spans. Analysis of dnpc1a null brains shows elevated overall cholesterol levels and progressive accumulation of filipin-positive cholesterol aggregates within brain and retina, as well as isolated cultured brain neurons. Ultrastructural imaging of dnpc1a mutant brains reveals age-progressive accumulation of striking multilamellar and multivesicular organelles, preceding the onset of neurodegeneration. Consistently, electroretinogram recordings show age-progressive loss of phototransduction and photoreceptor synaptic transmission. Early lethality, movement impairments, neuronal cholesterol deposits, accumulation of multilamellar bodies, and age-dependent neurodegeneration are all rescued by targeted neuronal expression of a wild-type dnpc1a transgene. Interestingly, targeted expression of dnpc1a in glia also provides limited rescue of adult lethality. Generation of dnpc1a null mutant neuron clones in the brain reveals cell-autonomous requirements for dNPC1a in cholesterol and membrane trafficking. These data demonstrate a requirement for dNPC1a in the maintenance of neuronal function and viability and show that loss of dNPC1a in neurons mimics the human neurodegenerative condition. PMID:18579730

  1. Neuronal Loss of Drosophila NPC1a Causes Cholesterol Aggregation and Age-Progressive Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Scott E.; Woodruff, E. A.; Liang, Ping; Patten, Meaghan; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    The mistrafficking and consequent cytoplasmic accumulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids is linked to multiple neurodegenerative diseases. One class of disease, the sphingolipid storage diseases, includes Niemann-Pick Disease Type C (NPC) caused predominantly (95%) by mutation of the NPC1 gene. A disease model has been established through mutation of Drosophila NPC1a (dnpc1a). Null mutants display early lethality due to loss of cholesterol-dependent ecdysone steroid hormone production. Null mutants rescued to adults by restoring ecdysone production mimic human NPC patients with progressive motor defects and reduced life spans. Analysis of dnpc1a null brains shows elevated overall cholesterol levels and progressive accumulation of filipin-positive cholesterol aggregates within brain and retina, as well as isolated cultured brain neurons. Ultrastructural imaging of dnpc1a mutant brains reveals age-progressive accumulation of striking multilamellar and multivesicular organelles, preceding the onset of neurodegeneration. Consistently, electroretinogram (ERG) recordings show age-progressive loss of phototransduction and photoreceptor synaptic transmission. Early lethality, movement impairments, neuronal cholesterol deposits, accumulation of multilamellar bodies and age-dependent neurodegeneration are all rescued by targeted neuronal expression of a wildtype dnpc1a transgene. Interestingly, targeted expression of dnpc1a in glia also provides limited rescue of adult lethality. Generation of dnpc1a null mutant neuron clones in the brain reveals cell autonomous requirements for dNPC1a in cholesterol and membrane trafficking. These data demonstrate a requirement for dNPC1a in the maintenance of neuronal function and viability, and show that loss of dNPC1a in neurons mimics the human neurodegenerative condition. PMID:18579730

  2. Loss of Miro1-directed mitochondrial movement results in a novel murine model for neuron disease

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tammy T.; Oh, Sang S.; Weaver, David; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Maxfield, Dane; Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Smith, Nathan K.; Macfarlane, Jane; Saunders, Gerald; Palmer, Cheryl A.; Debattisti, Valentina; Koshiba, Takumi; Pulst, Stefan; Feldman, Eva L.; Hajnóczky, György; Shaw, Janet M.

    2014-01-01

    Defective mitochondrial distribution in neurons is proposed to cause ATP depletion and calcium-buffering deficiencies that compromise cell function. However, it is unclear whether aberrant mitochondrial motility and distribution alone are sufficient to cause neurological disease. Calcium-binding mitochondrial Rho (Miro) GTPases attach mitochondria to motor proteins for anterograde and retrograde transport in neurons. Using two new KO mouse models, we demonstrate that Miro1 is essential for development of cranial motor nuclei required for respiratory control and maintenance of upper motor neurons required for ambulation. Neuron-specific loss of Miro1 causes depletion of mitochondria from corticospinal tract axons and progressive neurological deficits mirroring human upper motor neuron disease. Although Miro1-deficient neurons exhibit defects in retrograde axonal mitochondrial transport, mitochondrial respiratory function continues. Moreover, Miro1 is not essential for calcium-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial movement or mitochondrial calcium buffering. Our findings indicate that defects in mitochondrial motility and distribution are sufficient to cause neurological disease. PMID:25136135

  3. Loss of Miro1-directed mitochondrial movement results in a novel murine model for neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tammy T; Oh, Sang S; Weaver, David; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Maxfield, Dane; Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Smith, Nathan K; Macfarlane, Jane; Saunders, Gerald; Palmer, Cheryl A; Debattisti, Valentina; Koshiba, Takumi; Pulst, Stefan; Feldman, Eva L; Hajnóczky, György; Shaw, Janet M

    2014-09-01

    Defective mitochondrial distribution in neurons is proposed to cause ATP depletion and calcium-buffering deficiencies that compromise cell function. However, it is unclear whether aberrant mitochondrial motility and distribution alone are sufficient to cause neurological disease. Calcium-binding mitochondrial Rho (Miro) GTPases attach mitochondria to motor proteins for anterograde and retrograde transport in neurons. Using two new KO mouse models, we demonstrate that Miro1 is essential for development of cranial motor nuclei required for respiratory control and maintenance of upper motor neurons required for ambulation. Neuron-specific loss of Miro1 causes depletion of mitochondria from corticospinal tract axons and progressive neurological deficits mirroring human upper motor neuron disease. Although Miro1-deficient neurons exhibit defects in retrograde axonal mitochondrial transport, mitochondrial respiratory function continues. Moreover, Miro1 is not essential for calcium-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial movement or mitochondrial calcium buffering. Our findings indicate that defects in mitochondrial motility and distribution are sufficient to cause neurological disease. PMID:25136135

  4. A neuron-glia interaction involving GABA Transaminase contributes to sleep loss in sleepless mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Feng; Maguire, Sarah; Sowcik, Mallory; Luo, Wenyu; Koh, Kyunghee; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is an essential process and yet mechanisms underlying it are not well understood. Loss of the Drosophila quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene increases neuronal excitability and diminishes daily sleep, providing an excellent model for exploring the underpinnings of sleep regulation. Here, we used a proteomic approach to identify proteins altered in sss brains. We report that loss of sleepless post-transcriptionally elevates the CG7433 protein, a mitochondrial γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABAT), and reduces GABA in fly brains. Loss of GABAT increases daily sleep and improves sleep consolidation, indicating that GABAT promotes wakefulness. Importantly, disruption of the GABAT gene completely suppresses the sleep phenotype of sss mutants, demonstrating that GABAT is required for loss of sleep in sss mutants. While SSS acts in distinct populations of neurons, GABAT acts in glia to reduce sleep in sss flies. Our results identify a novel mechanism of interaction between neurons and glia that is important for the regulation of sleep. PMID:24637426

  5. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Garcia Layana, A

    1998-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the occidental world. Patients suffering this process have an important reduction on their quality of life being handicapped to read, to write, to recognise faces of their friends, or even to watch the television. One of the main problems of that disease is the absence of an effective treatment able to revert the process. Laser treatment is only useful in a limited number of patients, and even in these cases recurrent lesions are frequent. These facts and the progressive ageing of our society establish the ARMD as one of the biggest aim of medical investigations for the next century, and currently is focus of attention in the most industrialised countries. One of the most promising pieces of research is focused in the investigation of the risk factors associated with the age-related macular degeneration, in order to achieve a prophylactic treatment avoiding its appearance. Diet elements such as fat ingestion or reduced antioxidant intakes are being investigated as some of these factors, what open a new possibility for a prophylactic treatment. Finally, research is looking for new therapeutic modalities such as selective radiotherapy in order to improve or maintain the vision of these patients. PMID:10420956

  6. Inhibition of microRNA-181 reduces forebrain ischemia-induced neuronal loss

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jeong-mi; Xu, Lijun; Giffard, Rona G

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA), miR-181a, is enriched in the brain, and inhibition of miR-181a reduced astrocyte death in vitro and infarct volume after stroke in vivo. This study investigated the role of miR-181a in neuronal injury in vitro and hippocampal neuronal loss in vivo after forebrain ischemia. miR-181a levels were altered by transfection with mimic or antagomir. N2a cells subjected to serum deprivation and oxidative stress showed less cell death when miR-181a was reduced and increased death when miR-181a increased; protection was associated with increased Bcl-2 protein. In contrast, transfected primary neurons did not show altered levels of cell death when miR-181a levels changed. Naive male rats and rats stereotactically infused with miR-181a antagomir or control were subjected to forebrain ischemia and cornus ammonis (CA)1 neuronal survival and protein levels were assessed. Forebrain ischemia increased miR-181a expression and decreased Bcl-2 protein in the hippocampal CA1 region. miR-181a antagomir reduced miR-181a levels, reduced CA1 neuronal loss, increased Bcl-2 protein, and significantly prevented the decrease of glutamate transporter 1. Thus, miR-181a antagomir reduced evidence of astrocyte dysfunction and increased CA1 neuronal survival. miR-181a inhibition is thus a potential target in the setting of forebrain or global cerebral ischemia as well as focal ischemia. PMID:24002437

  7. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog buserelin causes neuronal loss in rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sand, Elin; Voss, Ulrikke; Hammar, Oskar; Alm, Ragnar; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Ohlsson, Bodil; Ekblad, Eva

    2013-03-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs are given to women undergoing in vitro fertilization. Case reports describing the development of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and auto-antibodies against GnRH after such treatment suggest a strong association between intestinal dysfunction and GnRH analogs. No experimental model for studying such a relationship is currently at hand. Our main goal was to investigate possible enteric neurodegeneration and titers of GnRH antibodies in response to repeated administration of the GnRH analog buserelin in rat. Rats were treated for 1-4 sessions with daily subcutaneous injections of buserelin or saline for 5 days, followed by 3 weeks of recovery. Buserelin treatment caused significant loss of submucous and myenteric neurons in the fundus, ileum, and colon. The loss of enteric neurons can, at least partly, be explained by increased apoptosis. No GnRH- or GnRH-receptor-immunoreactive (IR) enteric neurons but numerous luteinizing hormone (LH)-receptor-IR neurons were detected. After buserelin treatment, the relative number of enteric LH-receptor-IR neurons decreased, whereas that of nitric-oxide-synthase-IR neurons increased. No intestinal inflammation or increased levels of circulating interleukins/cytokines were noted in response to buserelin treatment. Serum GnRH antibody titers were undetectable or extremely low in all rats. Thus, repeated administrations of buserelin induce neurodegeneration in rat gastrointestinal tract, possibly by way of LH-receptor hyperactivation. The present findings suggest that enteric neurodegenerative effects of GnRH analog treatment in man can be mimicked in rat. However, in contrast to man, no production of GnRH auto-antibodies has been noted in rat. PMID:23254679

  8. Silibinin prevents dopaminergic neuronal loss in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease via mitochondrial stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujeong; Park, Hee Ra; Chun, Hye Jeong; Lee, Jaewon

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. The lipophile 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) can cross the blood-brain barrier and is subsequently metabolized into toxic1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP(+) ), which causes mitochondrial dysfunction and the selective cell death of dopaminergic neurons. The present article reports the neuroprotective effects of silibinin in a murine MPTP model of PD. The flavonoid silibinin is the major active constituent of silymarin, an extract of milk thistle seeds, and is known to have hepatoprotective, anticancer, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, silibinin effectively attenuated motor deficit and dopaminergic neuronal loss caused by MPTP. Furthermore, in vitro study confirmed that silibinin protects primary cultured neurons against MPP(+) -induced cell death and mitochondrial membrane disruption. The findings of the present study indicate that silibinin has neuroprotective effects in MPTP-induced models of PD rather than antioxidative or anti-inflammatory effects and that the neuroprotection afforded might be mediated by the stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, these findings suggest that silibinin protects mitochondria in MPTP-induced PD models and that it offers a starting point for the development of treatments that ameliorate the symptoms of PD. PMID:25677261

  9. Progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons induced by inflammatory responses to fipronil.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Park, Youn Sun; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory responses are involved in mechanisms of neuronal cell damage in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the mechanisms whereby inflammatory responses contribute to loss of dopaminergic neurons in fipronil (FPN)-treated rats. After stereotaxic injection of FPN in the substantia nigra (SN), the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons and the levels of TH expression in the SN decreased at 7days, and a significant decrease was observed at 14days with a subsequent reduction in striatal TH expression. Decreases in dopamine (DA) levels, however, began at 3days post-injection, preceding the changes in TH expression. In contrast, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was significantly increased at 3days and persisted for up to 14days post-lesion; these changes in GFAP expression appeared to be inversely correlated with TH expression. Furthermore, we found that FPN administration induced an inflammatory response characterized by increased levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which was mediated by activated microglia following infusion of FPN unilaterally into the SN. Intranigral injection of FPN underwent an inflammatory response with a resultant ongoing loss of dopaminergic neurons, indicating that pesticides may have important implication for the study of PD. PMID:27313094

  10. Myricitrin Ameliorates 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss in the Substantia Nigra of Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Deok; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, resulting from the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) pathway. The cause of DA neuronal loss in PD is still unclear; however, accumulating evidence suggests that treatment with certain flavonoids can induce neuroprotective properties, such as activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models of PD. The bioflavonoid myricitrin is well known for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. However, it is unclear whether systemic treatment with myricitrin can protect neurons against neurotoxin-induced DA degeneration in vivo via the preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the induction of mTORC1 activation. Our results found no significant neuroprotective effect of 30 mg/kg myricitrin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra (SN) of mice. However, myricitrin treatment with 60 mg/kg protected DA neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, myricitrin treatment preserved TH enzyme activity and mTORC1 activation in nigral DA neurons in the SN of 6-OHDA-treated mice, and its treatment suppressed an increase in tumor necrosis factor-α expression in activated microglia. These results suggest that myricitrin may have neuroprotective properties linked to mTORC1 activation, preservation of TH enzyme activity, and anti-neuroinflammation for preventing DA neuronal degeneration in vivo. PMID:26991235

  11. Adult Conditional Knockout of PGC-1α Leads to Loss of Dopamine Neurons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haisong; Kang, Sung-Ung; Zhang, Shuran; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar; Xu, Jinchong; Lee, Yong-Kyu; Kang, Bong-Gu; Lee, Yunjong; Zhang, Jianmin; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C; Pirooznia, Shelia; Andrabi, Shaida A; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Recent studies have implicated a role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator protein-1α (PGC-1α) in PD and in animal or cellular models of PD. The role of PGC-1α in the function and survival of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopamine neurons is not clear. Here we find that there are four different PGC-1α isoforms expressed in SH-SY5Y cells, and these four isoforms are expressed across subregions of mouse brain. Adult conditional PGC-1α knock-out mice show a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons that is accompanied by a reduction of dopamine in the striatum. In human PD postmortem tissue from the SNpc, there is a reduction of PGC-1α isoforms and mitochondria markers. Our findings suggest that all four isoforms of PGC-1α are required for the proper expression of mitochondrial proteins in SNpc DA neurons and that PGC-1α is essential for SNpc DA neuronal survival, possibly through the maintenance of mitochondrial function. PMID:27622213

  12. Adult Conditional Knockout of PGC-1α Leads to Loss of Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haisong; Zhang, Shuran; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar; Xu, Jinchong; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C.; Pirooznia, Shelia; Andrabi, Shaida A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Recent studies have implicated a role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator protein-1α (PGC-1α) in PD and in animal or cellular models of PD. The role of PGC-1α in the function and survival of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopamine neurons is not clear. Here we find that there are four different PGC-1α isoforms expressed in SH-SY5Y cells, and these four isoforms are expressed across subregions of mouse brain. Adult conditional PGC-1α knock-out mice show a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons that is accompanied by a reduction of dopamine in the striatum. In human PD postmortem tissue from the SNpc, there is a reduction of PGC-1α isoforms and mitochondria markers. Our findings suggest that all four isoforms of PGC-1α are required for the proper expression of mitochondrial proteins in SNpc DA neurons and that PGC-1α is essential for SNpc DA neuronal survival, possibly through the maintenance of mitochondrial function. PMID:27622213

  13. Selective alterations of neurons and circuits related to early memory loss in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Llorens-Martín, Maria; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Rabano, Alberto; Hernandez, Felix; Avila, Jesus; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    A progressive loss of episodic memory is a well-known clinical symptom that characterizes Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The beginning of this loss of memory has been associated with the very early, pathological accumulation of tau and neuronal degeneration observed in the entorhinal cortex (EC). Tau-related pathology is thought to then spread progressively to the hippocampal formation and other brain areas as the disease progresses. The major cortical afferent source of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus is the EC through the perforant pathway. At least two main circuits participate in the connection between EC and the hippocampus; one originating in layer II and the other in layer III of the EC giving rise to the classical trisynaptic (ECII → dentate gyrus → CA3 → CA1) and monosynaptic (ECIII → CA1) circuits. Thus, the study of the early pathological changes in these circuits is of great interest. In this review, we will discuss mainly the alterations of the granule cell neurons of the dentate gyrus and the atrophy of CA1 pyramidal neurons that occur in AD in relation to the possible differential alterations of these two main circuits. PMID:24904307

  14. Mapping of Purkinje neuron loss and polyglucosan body accumulation in hereditary cerebellar degeneration in Scottish terriers.

    PubMed

    Urkasemsin, G; Linder, K E; Bell, J S; de Lahunta, A; Olby, N J

    2012-09-01

    A hereditary cerebellar degenerative disorder has emerged in Scottish Terriers. The aims of this study were to describe and quantify polyglucosan body accumulation and quantify Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum of affected and control dogs. The brains of 6 affected Scottish Terriers ranging in age from 8 to 15 years and 8 age-matched control dogs were examined histopathologically. Counts of Purkinje neurons and polyglucosan bodies were performed in control and affected dogs on cerebellar sections stained with periodic acid-Schiff. Affected dogs showed a significant loss of Purkinje neurons compared with control dogs (vermis: P < .0001; hemisphere: P = .0104). The degeneration was significantly more pronounced dorsally than ventrally (P < .0001). There were significantly more polyglucosan bodies in the ventral half of the vermis when compared with the dorsal half (P < .0001) in affected dogs. In addition, there were more polyglucosan bodies in the ventral half of the vermis in affected dogs than in control dogs (P = .0005). Polyglucosan bodies in all affected dogs stained positively with toluidine blue and alcian blue. Immunohistochemically, polyglucosan bodies in affected dogs were positive for neurofilament 200 kD and ubiquitin and negative for glial fibrillary acidic protein, synaptophysin, neurospecific enolase, vimentin, and S100; the bodies were negative for all antigens in control dogs. Ultrastructurally, polyglucosan bodies in 1 affected dog were non-membrane-bound, amorphous structures with a dense core. This study demonstrates significant Purkinje cell loss and increased polyglucosan bodies in the cerebellum of affected Scottish Terriers. PMID:21753036

  15. New neurons in the adult brain: The role of sleep and consequences of sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Meerlo, Peter; Mistlberger, Ralph E.; Jacobs, Barry L.; Heller, H. Craig; McGinty, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Research over the last few decades has firmly established that new neurons are generated in selected areas of the adult mammalian brain, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. The function of adult-born neurons is still a matter of debate. In the case of the hippocampus, integration of new cells in to the existing neuronal circuitry may be involved in memory processes and the regulation of emotionality. In recent years, various studies have examined how the production of new cells and their development into neurons is affected by sleep and sleep loss. While disruption of sleep for a period shorter than one day appears to have little effect on the basal rate of cell proliferation, prolonged restriction or disruption of sleep may have cumulative effects leading to a major decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation, cell survival and neurogenesis. Importantly, while short sleep deprivation may not affect the basal rate of cell proliferation, one study in rats shows that even mild sleep restriction may interfere with the increase in neurogenesis that normally occurs with hippocampus-dependent learning. Since sleep deprivation also disturbs memory formation, these data suggest that promoting survival, maturation and integration of new cells may be an unexplored mechanism by which sleep supports learning and memory processes. Most methods of sleep deprivation that have been employed affect both non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Available data favor the hypothesis that decreases in cell proliferation are related to a reduction in REM sleep, whereas decreases in the number of cells that subsequently develop into adult neurons may be related to reductions in both NREM and REM sleep. The mechanisms by which sleep loss affects different aspects of adult neurogenesis are unknown. It has been proposed that adverse effects of sleep disruption may be mediated by stress and

  16. Neurophysiological assessment of sympathetic cardiovascular activity after loss of postganglionic neurons in the anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Zahner, Matthew R; Liu, Chang-Ning; Okerberg, Carlin V; Opsahl, Alan C; Bobrowski, Walter F; Somps, Chris J

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the degree of sympathetic postganglionic neuronal loss required to impair cardiovascular-related sympathetic activity. To produce neuronal loss separate groups of rats were treated daily with guanethidine for either 5days or 11days, followed by a recovery period. Sympathetic activity was measured by renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Stereology of thoracic (T13) ganglia was performed to determine neuronal loss. Despite loss of more than two thirds of neurons in T13 ganglia in both treated groups no effect on resting blood pressure (BP) or heart rate (HR) was detected. Basal RSNA in rats treated for 5days (0.61±0.10μV∗s) and 11days (0.37±0.08μV∗s) was significantly less than vehicle-treated rats (0.99±0.13μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA by baroreceptor unloading were significantly lower in 5-day (1.09±0.19μV∗s) and 11-day treated rats (0.59±0.11μV∗s) compared with vehicle-treated rats (1.82±0.19μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA to chemoreceptor stimulation were significantly lower in 5-day treated rats (1.54±0.25μV∗s) compared with vehicle-treated rats (2.69±0.23μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA in 11-day treated rats were significantly lower (0.75±0.15μV∗s, p<0.05) compared with both vehicle-treated and 5-day treated rats. A positive correlation of neurons to sympathetic responsiveness but not basal activity was detected. These data suggest that diminished capacity for reflex sympathetic responsiveness rather than basal activity alone must be assessed for complete detection of neurophysiological cardiovascular impairment. PMID:27085835

  17. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Rhesus Macaque Superior Olivary Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Daniel T.; Engle, James R.; Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2014-01-01

    Positive immunoreactivity to the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) and nitric oxide synthase NADPH-diaphorase (NADPHd) is well documented within neurons of the central auditory system of both rodents and primates. These proteins are thought to play roles in the regulation of auditory processing. Studies examining the age-related changes in expression of these proteins have been conducted primarily in rodents but are sparse in primate models. In the brainstem, the superior olivary complex (SOC) is crucial for the computation of sound source localization in azimuth, and one hallmark of age-related hearing deficits is a reduced ability to localize sounds. To investigate how these histochemical markers change as a function of age and hearing loss, we studied eight rhesus macaques ranging in age from 12 to 35 years. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were obtained in anesthetized animals for click and tone stimuli. The brainstems of these same animals were then stained for PV and NADPHd reactivity. Reactive neurons in the three nuclei of the SOC were counted, and the densities of each cell type were calculated. We found that PV and NADPHd expression increased with both age and ABR thresholds in the medial superior olive but not in either the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body or the lateral superior olive. Together these results suggest that the changes in protein expression employed by the SOC may compensate for the loss of efficacy of auditory sensitivity in the aged primate. PMID:25232570

  18. Loss of the liver X receptor LXRα/β in peripheral sensory neurons modifies energy expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Mansuy-Aubert, Virginie; Gautron, Laurent; Lee, Syann; Bookout, Angie L; Kusminski, Christine M; Sun, Kai; Zhang, Yuan; Scherer, Philipp E; Mangelsdorf, David J; Elmquist, Joel K

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neural sensory mechanisms play a crucial role in metabolic regulation but less is known about the mechanisms underlying vagal sensing itself. Recently, we identified an enrichment of liver X receptor alpha and beta (LXRα/β) in the nodose ganglia of the vagus nerve. In this study, we show mice lacking LXRα/β in peripheral sensory neurons have increased energy expenditure and weight loss when fed a Western diet (WD). Our findings suggest that the ability to metabolize and sense cholesterol and/or fatty acids in peripheral neurons is an important requirement for physiological adaptations to WDs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06667.001 PMID:26076474

  19. Blast induces oxidative stress, inflammation, neuronal loss and subsequent short-term memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Cho, H J; Sajja, V S S S; Vandevord, P J; Lee, Y W

    2013-12-01

    Molecular and cellular mechanisms of brain injury after exposure to blast overpressure (BOP) are not clearly known. The present study hypothesizes that pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory pathways in the brain may be responsible for neuronal loss and behavioral deficits following BOP exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and exposed to calibrated BOP of 129.23±3.01kPa while controls received only anesthesia. In situ dihydroethidium fluorescence staining revealed that BOP significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species in the brain. In addition, real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated a significant up-regulation of mRNA and protein expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as interferon-γ and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, in brains collected from BOP-exposed animals compared with the controls. Furthermore, immunoreactivity of neuronal nuclei in brains indicated that fewer neurons were present following BOP exposure. Moreover, novel object recognition paradigm showed a significant impairment in the short-term memory at 2weeks following BOP exposure. These results suggest that pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory environments in the brain could play a potential role in BOP-induced neuronal loss and behavioral deficits. It may provide a foundation for defining a molecular and cellular basis of the pathophysiology of blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT). It will also contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches selectively targeting these pathways, which have great potential in the diagnosis and therapy of BINT. PMID:23999126

  20. LRRK2 knockdown in zebrafish causes developmental defects, neuronal loss, and synuclein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Prabhudesai, Shubhangi; Bensabeur, Fatima Zahra; Abdullah, Rashed; Basak, Indranil; Baez, Solange; Alves, Guido; Holtzman, Nathalia G; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2016-08-01

    Although mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most common cause of genetic Parkinson's disease, their function is largely unknown. LRRK2 is pleiotropic in nature, shown to be involved in neurodegeneration and in more peripheral processes, including kidney functions, in rats and mice. Recent studies in zebrafish have shown conflicting evidence that removal of the LRRK2 WD40 domain may or may not affect dopaminergic neurons and/or locomotion. This study shows that ∼50% LRRK2 knockdown in zebrafish causes not only neuronal loss but also developmental perturbations such as axis curvature defects, ocular abnormalities, and edema in the eyes, lens, and otic vesicles. We further show that LRRK2 knockdown results in significant neuronal loss, including a reduction of dopaminergic neurons. Immunofluorescence demonstrates that endogenous LRRK2 is expressed in the lens, brain, heart, spinal cord, and kidney (pronephros), which mirror the LRRK2 morphant phenotypes observed. LRRK2 knockdown results further in the concomitant upregulation of β-synuclein, PARK13, and SOD1 and causes β-synuclein aggregation in the diencephalon, midbrain, hindbrain, and postoptic commissure. LRRK2 knockdown causes mislocalization of the Na(+) /K(+) ATPase protein in the pronephric ducts, suggesting that the edema might be linked to renal malfunction and that LRRK2 might be associated with pronephric duct epithelial cell differentiation. Combined, our study shows that LRRK2 has multifaceted roles in zebrafish and that zebrafish represent a complementary model to further our understanding of this central protein. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27265751

  1. The effect of inflammatory cell-derived MCP-1 loss on neuronal survival during chronic neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Andrew J.; Tian, Weiming; Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Rizk, Paul J.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Bellamkonda, Ravi; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial implants elicit neurodegeneration via the foreign body response (FBR) that includes BBB leakage, macrophage/microglia accumulation, and reactive astrogliosis, in addition to neuronal degradation that limit their useful lifespan. Previously, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, also CCL2), which plays an important role in monocyte recruitment and propagation of inflammation, was shown to be critical for various aspects of the FBR in a tissue-specific manner. However, participation of MCP-1 in the brain FBR has not been evaluated. Here we examined the FBR to intracortical silicon implants in MCP-1 KO mice at 1, 2, and 8 weeks after implantation. MCP-1 KO mice had a diminished FBR compared to WT mice, characterized by reductions in BBB leakage, macrophage/microglia accumulation, and astrogliosis, and an increased neuronal density. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of MCP-1 in implant-bearing WT mice maintained the increased neuronal density. To elucidate the relative contribution of microglia and macrophages, bone marrow chimeras were generated between MCP-1 KO and WT mice. Increased neuronal density was observed only in MCP-1 knockout mice transplanted with MCP-1 knockout marrow, which indicates that resident cells in the brain are major contributors. We hypothesized that these improvements are the result of a phenotypic switch of the macrophages/microglia polarization state, which we confirmed using PCR for common activation markers. Our observations suggest that MCP-1 influences neuronal loss, which is integral to the progression of neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson disease, via BBB leakage and macrophage polarization. PMID:24881026

  2. Neuronal synaptobrevin promotes longevity in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Jonathan; Haberman, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Neurons have unique challenges relative to other cell types. Unlike most other cells, neurons must remain healthy and functional throughout the lifespan of an animal. Premature neuronal loss underlies many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases. Despite previous research aimed at understanding the mechanisms of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, little is known about the mechanisms that allow neurons to remain functional for the lifetime of a healthy animal. Understanding these cellular and biochemical processes is essential to promote healthful aging and reduce the severity of neurodegenerative disease. Here we discuss our recent identification of neuron-specific proteins that regulate endosome fusion events and the role of endosomes in maintaining healthy neurons. PMID:23740166

  3. Neuronal synaptobrevin promotes longevity in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Jonathan; Haberman, Adam

    2012-11-01

    Neurons have unique challenges relative to other cell types. Unlike most other cells, neurons must remain healthy and functional throughout the lifespan of an animal. Premature neuronal loss underlies many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases. Despite previous research aimed at understanding the mechanisms of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, little is known about the mechanisms that allow neurons to remain functional for the lifetime of a healthy animal. Understanding these cellular and biochemical processes is essential to promote healthful aging and reduce the severity of neurodegenerative disease. Here we discuss our recent identification of neuron-specific proteins that regulate endosome fusion events and the role of endosomes in maintaining healthy neurons. PMID:23740166

  4. Loss of locus coeruleus neurons and reduced startle in parkin null mice

    PubMed Central

    von Coelln, Rainer; Thomas, Bobby; Savitt, Joseph M.; Lim, Kah Leong; Sasaki, Masayuki; Hess, Ellen J.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2004-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder and is characterized pathologically by degeneration of catecholaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta and locus coeruleus, among other regions. Autosomal-recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (ARJP) is caused by mutations in the PARK2 gene coding for parkin and constitutes the most common familial form of PD. The majority of ARJP-associated parkin mutations are thought to be loss of function-mutations; however, the pathogenesis of ARJP remains poorly understood. Here, we report the generation of parkin null mice by targeted deletion of parkin exon 7. These mice show a loss of catecholaminergic neurons in the locus coeruleus and an accompanying loss of norepinephrine in discrete regions of the central nervous system. Moreover, there is a dramatic reduction of the norepinephrine-dependent startle response. The nigrostriatal dopaminergic system does not show any impairment. This mouse model will help gain a better understanding of parkin function and the mechanisms underlying parkin-associated PD. PMID:15249681

  5. Eliminating microglia in Alzheimer's mice prevents neuronal loss without modulating amyloid-β pathology.

    PubMed

    Spangenberg, Elizabeth E; Lee, Rafael J; Najafi, Allison R; Rice, Rachel A; Elmore, Monica R P; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; West, Brian L; Green, Kim N

    2016-04-01

    In addition to amyloid-β plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation is considered a key feature of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Inflammation in Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia surrounding amyloid plaques, implicating their role in disease pathogenesis. Microglia in the healthy adult mouse depend on colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signalling for survival, and pharmacological inhibition of this receptor results in rapid elimination of nearly all of the microglia in the central nervous system. In this study, we set out to determine if chronically activated microglia in the Alzheimer's disease brain are also dependent on CSF1R signalling, and if so, how these cells contribute to disease pathogenesis. Ten-month-old 5xfAD mice were treated with a selective CSF1R inhibitor for 1 month, resulting in the elimination of ∼80% of microglia. Chronic microglial elimination does not alter amyloid-β levels or plaque load; however, it does rescue dendritic spine loss and prevent neuronal loss in 5xfAD mice, as well as reduce overall neuroinflammation. Importantly, behavioural testing revealed improvements in contextual memory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that microglia contribute to neuronal loss, as well as memory impairments in 5xfAD mice, but do not mediate or protect from amyloid pathology. PMID:26921617

  6. Adeno-associated virus-mediated expression of β-hexosaminidase prevents neuronal loss in the Sandhoff mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, Timothy J; Wang, Susan; Bradley, Josephine; Smith, Nicolas J C; Raha, Animesh A; McNair, Rosamund; Ziegler, Robin J; Cheng, Seng H; Cox, Timothy M; Cachón-González, Maria Begoña

    2011-11-15

    Sandhoff disease, a GM2 gangliosidosis caused by a deficiency in β-hexosaminidase, is characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Although loss of neurons in association with lysosomal storage of glycosphingolipids occurs in patients with this disease, the molecular pathways that lead to the accompanying neurological defects are unclear. Using an authentic murine model of GM2 gangliosidosis, we examined the pattern of neuronal loss in the central nervous system and investigated the effects of gene transfer using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing β-hexosaminidase subunits (rAAV2/1-Hex). In 4-month-old Sandhoff mice with neurological deficits, cells staining positively for the apoptotic signature in the TUNEL reaction were found in the ventroposterior medial and ventroposterior lateral (VPM/VPL) nuclei of the thalamus. There was progressive loss of neuronal density in this region with age. Comparable loss of neuronal density was identified in the lateral vestibular nucleus of the brainstem and a small but statistically significant loss was present in the ventral spinal cord. Loss of neurons was not detected in other regions that were analysed. Administration of rAAV2/1-Hex into the brain of Sandhoff mice prevented the decline in neuronal density in the VPM/VPL. Preservation of neurons in the VPM/VPL was variable at the humane endpoint in treated animals, but correlated directly with increased lifespan. Loss of neurons was localized to only a few regions in the Sandhoff brain and was prevented by rAAV-mediated transfer of β-hexosaminidase gene function at considerable distances from the site of vector administration. PMID:21852247

  7. Human neural stem cells improve cognition and promote synaptic growth in two complementary transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease and neuronal loss.

    PubMed

    Ager, Rahasson R; Davis, Joy L; Agazaryan, Andy; Benavente, Francisca; Poon, Wayne W; LaFerla, Frank M; Blurton-Jones, Mathew

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder, affecting over 35 million people worldwide. Pathologically, AD is characterized by the progressive accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles within the brain. Together, these pathologies lead to marked neuronal and synaptic loss and corresponding impairments in cognition. Current treatments, and recent clinical trials, have failed to modify the clinical course of AD; thus, the development of novel and innovative therapies is urgently needed. Over the last decade, the potential use of stem cells to treat cognitive impairment has received growing attention. Specifically, neural stem cell transplantation as a treatment for AD offers a novel approach with tremendous therapeutic potential. We previously reported that intrahippocampal transplantation of murine neural stem cells (mNSCs) can enhance synaptogenesis and improve cognition in 3xTg-AD mice and the CaM/Tet-DT(A) model of hippocampal neuronal loss. These promising findings prompted us to examine a human neural stem cell population, HuCNS-SC, which has already been clinically tested for other neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we provide the first evidence that transplantation of research grade HuCNS-SCs can improve cognition in two complementary models of neurodegeneration. We also demonstrate that HuCNS-SC cells can migrate and differentiate into immature neurons and glia and significantly increase synaptic and growth-associated markers in both 3xTg-AD and CaM/Tet-DTA mice. Interestingly, improvements in aged 3xTg-AD mice were not associated with altered Aβ or tau pathology. Rather, our findings suggest that human NSC transplantation improves cognition by enhancing endogenous synaptogenesis. Taken together, our data provide the first preclinical evidence that human NSC transplantation could be a safe and effective therapeutic approach for treating AD. PMID:25530343

  8. Loss of Fertility in the Absence of Progesterone Receptor Expression in Kisspeptin Neurons of Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Arnon; Lin, Po-Ching; Cacioppo, Joseph A.; Hannon, Patrick R.; Mahoney, Megan M.; Wolfe, Andrew; Fernandez-Valdivia, Rodrigo; Lydon, John P.; Elias, Carol F.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian steroids, estradiol and progesterone, play central roles in regulating female reproduction by acting as both positive and negative regulators of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in the hypothalamus. Recent studies have identified kisspeptin neurons of the hypothalamus as the target of estrogenic regulation of GnRH secretion. In this study, we aimed to determine the significance of progesterone receptor (PGR) expression in the kisspeptin neurons. To this end, the Pgr gene was selectively ablated in mouse kisspeptin neurons and the reproductive consequence assessed. The hypothalamus of the Pgr deficient female mouse expressed kisspeptin, the pituitary released LH in response to GnRH stimulation, and the ovary ovulated when stimulated with gonadotropins. However, the mutant mouse gradually lost cyclicity, was unable to generate a LH surge in response to rising estradiol, and eventually became infertile. Taken together, these results indicate that the loss of PGR impairs kisspeptin secretory machinery and therefore that PGR plays a critical role in regulating kisspeptin secretion. PMID:27441639

  9. Loss of Outer Retinal Neurons and Circuitry Alterations in the DBA/2J Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; de Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The DBA/2J mouse line develops essential iris atrophy, pigment dispersion, and glaucomatous age-related changes, including an increase of IOP, optic nerve atrophy, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible morphological changes in the outer retina of the DBA/2J mouse concomitant with disease progression and aging, based on the reduction of both the a- and b-waves and photopic flicker ERGs in this mouse line. Methods. Vertically sectioned DBA/2J mice retinas were evaluated at 3, 8, and 16 months of age using photoreceptor, horizontal, and bipolar cell markers. Sixteen-month-old C57BL/6 mice retinas were used as controls. Results. The DBA/2J mice had outer retinal degeneration at all ages, with the most severe degeneration in the oldest retinas. At 3 months of age, the number of photoreceptor cells and the thickness of the OPL were reduced. In addition, there was a loss of horizontal and ON-bipolar cell processes. At 8 months of age, RGC degeneration occurred in patches, and in the outer retina overlying these patches, cone morphology was impaired with a reduction in size as well as loss of outer segments and growth of horizontal and bipolar cell processes into the outer nuclear layer. At 16 months of age, connectivity between photoreceptors and horizontal and bipolar cell processes overlying these patches was lost. Conclusions. Retinal degeneration in DBA/2J mice includes photoreceptor death, loss of bipolar and horizontal cell processes, and loss of synaptic contacts in an aging-dependent manner. PMID:25118265

  10. In vivo monitoring of neuronal loss in traumatic brain injury: a microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    Tisdall, Martin M.; Girbes, Armand R.; Martinian, Lillian; Thom, Maria; Kitchen, Neil; Smith, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes diffuse axonal injury and loss of cortical neurons. These features are well recognized histologically, but their in vivo monitoring remains challenging. In vivo cortical microdialysis samples the extracellular fluid adjacent to neurons and axons. Here, we describe a novel neuronal proteolytic pathway and demonstrate the exclusive neuro-axonal expression of Pavlov’s enterokinase. Enterokinase is membrane bound and cleaves the neurofilament heavy chain at positions 476 and 986. Using a 100 kDa microdialysis cut-off membrane the two proteolytic breakdown products, extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chains NfH476−986 and NfH476−1026, can be quantified with a relative recovery of 20%. In a prospective clinical in vivo study, we included 10 patients with traumatic brain injury with a median Glasgow Coma Score of 9, providing 640 cortical extracellular fluid samples for longitudinal data analysis. Following high-velocity impact traumatic brain injury, microdialysate extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels were significantly higher (6.18 ± 2.94 ng/ml) and detectable for longer (>4 days) compared with traumatic brain injury secondary to falls (0.84 ± 1.77 ng/ml, <2 days). During the initial 16 h following traumatic brain injury, strong correlations were found between extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels and physiological parameters (systemic blood pressure, anaerobic cerebral metabolism, excessive brain tissue oxygenation, elevated brain temperature). Finally, extracellular fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels were of prognostic value, predicting mortality with an odds ratio of 7.68 (confidence interval 2.15–27.46, P = 0.001). In conclusion, this study describes the discovery of Pavlov’s enterokinase in the human brain, a novel neuronal proteolytic pathway that gives rise to specific protein biomarkers (NfH476−986 and NfH476−1026) applicable to in vivo monitoring of diffuse

  11. Ultrastructural development of Rohon-Beard neurons: loss of intramitochondrial granules parallels loss of calcium action potentials.

    PubMed

    Lamborghini, J E; Revenaugh, M; Spitzer, N C

    1979-02-15

    , decrease in parallel with the loss of the Ca++ component of the inward current of the action potential in Rohon-Beard neurons. PMID:762270

  12. Loss of neurons in the rat basal forebrain cholinergic projection system after prolonged intake of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Arendt, T; Henning, D; Gray, J A; Marchbanks, R

    1988-10-01

    A reduction in the number of acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-positive neurons in the basal nucleus of Meynert complex (NbM, Ch 1 to Ch4) to 83% of control values was observed in rat after ethanol intake (20% v/v) for 12 weeks. Activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and AChE in the basal forebrain was simultaneously reduced to 74% and 81% and content of acetylcholine (ACh) to 56% of control values respectively. Neuronal loss showed a gradient over the rostro-caudal extension of the cholinergic projection system being most pronounced in the septal-diagonal band area and reaching 27% in the medial septum (Ch1). Number of AChE-positive neurons was insignificantly reduced in the pedunculopontine nucleus (Ch5) and unchanged in the laterodorsal tegmental gray of the periventricular area (Ch6). ACh content and activity of AChE was significantly reduced in target areas of the NbM such as cortex, hippocampus and amygdala, but changes were less pronounced than in the basal nucleus. The results indicate a neurotoxic effect of prolonged intake of ethanol on cholinergic neurons in the NbM leading to a partial cholinergic denervation of cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. Chronic intake of ethanol in rat is suggested to represent an animal model suitable to test the cholinergic hypothesis of geriatric memory dysfunction and to develop strategies for an amelioration of the impairment in memory and cognitive function in dementing disorders associated with a degeneration in the NbM such as postalcoholic dementia and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:2850095

  13. Loss of RAD-23 Protects Against Models of Motor Neuron Disease by Enhancing Mutant Protein Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Angela M.; Lamitina, Todd; Liachko, Nicole F.; Sabatella, Mariangela; Lu, Jiayin; Zhang, Lei; Ostrow, Lyle W.; Gupta, Preetika; Wu, Chia-Yen; Doshi, Shachee; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Lans, Hannes; Wang, Jiou; Kraemer, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins accumulate and aggregate in neurodegenerative disease. The existence of these deposits reflects a derangement in the protein homeostasis machinery. Using a candidate gene screen, we report that loss of RAD-23 protects against the toxicity of proteins known to aggregate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Loss of RAD-23 suppresses the locomotor deficit of Caenorhabditis elegans engineered to express mutTDP-43 or mutSOD1 and also protects against aging and proteotoxic insults. Knockdown of RAD-23 is further neuroprotective against the toxicity of SOD1 and TDP-43 expression in mammalian neurons. Biochemical investigation indicates that RAD-23 modifies mutTDP-43 and mutSOD1 abundance, solubility, and turnover in association with altering the ubiquitination status of these substrates. In human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord, we find that RAD-23 abundance is increased and RAD-23 is mislocalized within motor neurons. We propose a novel pathophysiological function for RAD-23 in the stabilization of mutated proteins that cause neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this work, we identify RAD-23, a component of the protein homeostasis network and nucleotide excision repair pathway, as a modifier of the toxicity of two disease-causing, misfolding-prone proteins, SOD1 and TDP-43. Reducing the abundance of RAD-23 accelerates the degradation of mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 and reduces the cellular content of the toxic species. The existence of endogenous proteins that act as “anti-chaperones” uncovers new and general targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26490867

  14. A transgenic Alzheimer rat with plaques, tau pathology, behavioral impairment, oligomeric Aβ and frank neuronal loss

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Robert M.; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Weitz, Tara M.; Rentsendorj, Altan; Gate, David; Spivak, Inna; Bholat, Yasmin; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Glabe, Charles G.; Breunig, Joshua J.; Rakic, Pasko; Davtyan, Hayk; Agadjanyan, Michael G.; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge; Bannykh, Serguei; Szekely, Christine A.; Pechnick, Robert N.; Town, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is hallmarked by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and widespread cortical neuronal loss (Selkoe, 2001). The ‘amyloid cascade hypothesis’ posits that cerebral amyloid sets neurotoxic events into motion that precipitate Alzheimer dementia (Hardy and Allsop, 1991). Yet, faithful recapitulation of all AD features in widely used transgenic (Tg) mice engineered to overproduce Aβ peptides has been elusive. We have developed a Tg rat model (line TgF344-AD) expressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APPsw) and presenilin 1 (PS1ΔE9) genes, each independent causes of early-onset familial AD. TgF344-AD rats manifest age-dependent cerebral amyloidosis that precedes tauopathy, gliosis, apoptotic loss of neurons in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and cognitive disturbance. These results demonstrate progressive neurodegeneration of the Alzheimer type in these animals. The TgF344-AD rat fills a critical need for a next-generation animal model to enable basic and translational AD research. PMID:23575824

  15. Gastrointestinal transit is not impaired by regional loss of myenteric neurons in rat jejunum.

    PubMed

    Luck, M S; White, J C; Bass, P

    1993-10-01

    Chronic absence of myenteric neurons from a 5-cm segment of rat jejunum causes alterations in myoelectric activity. Spike potentials characteristic of phase III activity of the migrating motor complex (MMC) are present; however, the number of propagating spike potentials through the myenterically denervated region is reduced. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of the regional loss of myenteric neurons on gastrointestinal transit of a solid marker in the fasted rat. The rate of gastric emptying was not affected by the absence of the myenteric plexus in a 5-cm segment of the jejunum. However, 15 days after either myenteric denervation or vehicle treatment of a segment of jejunum, a more cephalad distribution and decreased rate of intestinal propulsion of the solid marker was observed in the small intestine. This delay in small intestinal transit observed at 15 days was not seen at 48 and 120 days. The decrease in transit at 15 days can be attributed to the handling of the bowel during the surgical procedure. The mouth-to-cecum transit time (MCT) was also not affected by chronic absence of the myenteric plexus. Furthermore, the MCT indicated that bacterial overgrowth, a common manifestation when gut motility is disrupted, did not occur in the small intestine after the experimental destruction of the myenteric plexus. The results of this study indicate that the regional loss of the myenteric plexus does not impair gastrointestinal transit in the fasted rat.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8238349

  16. Ketogenic diet protects against epileptogenesis as well as neuronal loss in amygdaloid-kindling seizures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Yang, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Yao; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Man-Man; Wen, Shu-Qun; Ding, Mei-Ping

    2012-02-01

    Ketogenic diets (KD) have shown beneficial effects in terms of anticonvulsant and anti-epileptogenic properties in several experimental models. However, few studies have investigated the consequences of KD with regards to the anti-epileptogenic and neuroprotective effects in kindling-induced seizures. Here, postnatal day 28 male Sprague-Dawley rats received one of two experimental diets for 4 weeks: (a) a 'classic' 4:1 KD; and (b) a normal regular rodent chow diet (ND). Fully-kindled seizures were achieved by daily electrical stimulation in the amygdala. Seizure stage and after-discharge duration (ADD) were assessed daily. The after-discharge threshold (ADT) was measured every 5 days. The effects of the two diets on neuronal loss were observed before kindling and 20 days after stimulation by Nissl staining. We found that the progression of seizure stage and ADD was delayed by KD. KD prevented the ADT decrease on day 5. The incidence of generalized seizures was lower in the KD group compared to the ND group. The neuronal density was decreased in the ipsilateral hilus of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 area, as well as the contralateral CA1 area before kindling in the KD group. However, KD prevented neuronal loss in the ipsilateral CA1 area 20 days after stimulation. Our data suggest that KD can protect against epileptogenesis by preventing both after-discharge generation and propagation in kindling seizures. In addition, KD also possesses a neuroprotective function during kindling although it changes hippocampal development in early life. PMID:22178860

  17. Age-related changes in the visual pathways: blame it on the axon.

    PubMed

    Calkins, David J

    2013-12-01

    The aging visual system is marked by a decline in some, but not all, key functions. Some of this decline is attributed to changes in the optics of the eye, but other aspects must have a neural basis. Across mammals, with aging there is remarkable persistence of central structures to which retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons project with little or no loss of neurons. Similarly, RGC bodies in the retina are subject to variable age-related loss, with most mammals showing none over time. In contrast, the RGC axon itself is highly vulnerable. Across species, the rate of axon loss in the optic nerve is related inversely to the total number of axons at maturity and lifespan. The result of this scaling is approximately a 40% total decline in axon number. Evidence suggests that the consistent vulnerability of RGC axons to aging arises from their high metabolic demand combined with diminishing resources. Thus, therapeutic interventions that conserve bioenergetics may have potential to abate age-related decline in visual function. PMID:24335066

  18. Mevastatin accelerates loss of synaptic proteins and neurite degeneration in aging cortical neurons in a heme-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Madhuvanthi; Steinert, Joern R; Forsythe, Ian D; Smith, Andrew G; Chernova, Tatyana

    2010-09-01

    The therapeutic use of statins in reducing cholesterol requires careful assessment of potential neuroprotective and/or neurotoxic mechanisms. Chronic treatment with mevastatin (MV) exerts effects on cortical neuron morphology, protein expression and synaptic function in primary culture. MV impaired expression of synaptic proteins, reduced N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) currents and accelerated neurodegeneration associated with aging. The down-regulating effect of MV on neuronal protein expression was additive with aging-associated decline in culture. Induction of Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) by MV was superimposed on age-related up-regulation. Comparison of MV-treated and heme-deficient neurons showed that inhibition of heme synthesis (by succinyl acetone) had similar damaging effect on neurite integrity and MNDAR expression and function but not on expression of the receptor for neuropeptide Y1 (NPY1R). Replacement of heme in heme-deficient cultures restored protein expression but had no effect in those cultures co-treated with MV. Despite the dramatic induction of HMOX1, intracellular heme remained sufficient in MV-treated cultures, consistent with a heme-independent mechanism of MV-induced neurotoxicity and this was confirmed by analysing neurons with lentiviral over-expression of HMOX1. We conclude that MV exerts a neurotoxic effect in cultured neurons in a heme-independent manner. PMID:18951667

  19. Dexamethasone Coated Neural Probes Elicit Attenuated Inflammatory Response and Neuronal Loss Compared to Uncoated Neural Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yinghui; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2007-01-01

    Glial scar formation around implanted silicon neural probes compromises their ability to facilitate long-term recordings. One approach to modulate the tissue reaction around implanted probes in the brain is to develop probe coatings that locally release antiinflammatory drugs. In this study, we developed a nitrocellulose-based coating for the local delivery of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone (DEX). Silicon neural probes with and without nitrocellulose-DEX coatings were implanted into rat brains, and inflammatory response was evaluated 1 week and 4 weeks post implantation. DEX coatings significantly reduced the reactivity of microglia and macrophages one week post implantation as evidenced by ED1 immunostaining. CS56 staining demonstrated that DEX treatment significantly reduced chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) expression one week post implantation. Both at one week and at four week time points, GFAP staining for reactive astrocytes and neurofilament (NF) staining revealed that local DEX treatment significantly attenuated astroglial response and reduced neuronal loss in the vicinity of the probes. Weak ED1, neurocan, and NG2 positive signal was detected four weeks post implantation for both coated and uncoated probes, suggesting a stabilization of the inflammatory response over time in this implant model. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the nitrocellulose-DEX coating can effectively attenuate the inflammatory response to the implanted neural probes, and reduce neuronal loss in the vicinity of the coated probes. Thus anti-inflammatory probe coatings may represent a promising approach to attenuate astroglial scar and reduce neural loss around implanted neural probes. PMID:17376408

  20. Galectin-3 causes enteric neuronal loss in mice after left sided permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, a model of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaowen; Boza-Serrano, Antonio; Turesson, Michelle Foldschak; Deierborg, Tomas; Ekblad, Eva; Voss, Ulrikke

    2016-01-01

    In addition to brain injury stroke patients often suffer gastrointestinal complications. Neuroimmune interactions involving galectin-3, released from microglia in the brain, mediates the post-stroke pro-inflammatory response. We investigated possible consequences of stroke on the enteric nervous system and the involvement of galectin-3. We show that permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) induces loss of enteric neurons in ileum and colon in galectin-3+/+, but not in galectin-3−/−, mice. In vitro we show that serum from galectin-3+/+, but not from galectin-3−/−, mice subjected to pMCAO, caused loss of C57BL/6J myenteric neurons, while myenteric neurons derived from TLR4−/− mice were unaffected. Further purified galectin-3 (10−6 M) caused loss of cultured C57BL/6J myenteric neurons. Inhibitors of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) or AMP activated kinase (AMPK) counteracted both the purified galectin-3 and the galectin-3+/+ pMCAO serum-induced loss in vitro. Combined we show that stroke (pMCAO) triggers central and peripheral galectin-3 release causing enteric neuronal loss through a TLR4 mediated mechanism involving TAK1 and AMPK. Galectin-3 is suggested a target for treatment of post-stroke complications. PMID:27612206

  1. Galectin-3 causes enteric neuronal loss in mice after left sided permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, a model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaowen; Boza-Serrano, Antonio; Turesson, Michelle Foldschak; Deierborg, Tomas; Ekblad, Eva; Voss, Ulrikke

    2016-01-01

    In addition to brain injury stroke patients often suffer gastrointestinal complications. Neuroimmune interactions involving galectin-3, released from microglia in the brain, mediates the post-stroke pro-inflammatory response. We investigated possible consequences of stroke on the enteric nervous system and the involvement of galectin-3. We show that permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) induces loss of enteric neurons in ileum and colon in galectin-3(+/+), but not in galectin-3(-/-), mice. In vitro we show that serum from galectin-3(+/+), but not from galectin-3(-/-), mice subjected to pMCAO, caused loss of C57BL/6J myenteric neurons, while myenteric neurons derived from TLR4(-/-) mice were unaffected. Further purified galectin-3 (10(-6) M) caused loss of cultured C57BL/6J myenteric neurons. Inhibitors of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) or AMP activated kinase (AMPK) counteracted both the purified galectin-3 and the galectin-3(+/+) pMCAO serum-induced loss in vitro. Combined we show that stroke (pMCAO) triggers central and peripheral galectin-3 release causing enteric neuronal loss through a TLR4 mediated mechanism involving TAK1 and AMPK. Galectin-3 is suggested a target for treatment of post-stroke complications. PMID:27612206

  2. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  3. Nutritional antioxidants and age-related cataract and maculopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loss of vision is the second greatest, next to death, fear among the elderly. Age-related cataract (ARC) and maculopathy (ARM) are two major causes of blindness worldwide. There are several important reasons to study relationships between risk for ARC/ARM and nutrition: (1) because it is likely that...

  4. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments

  5. Pik3c3 deletion in pyramidal neurons results in loss of synapses, extensive gliosis and progressive neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liangli; Budolfson, Katie; Wang, Fan

    2010-01-01

    The lipid kinase PIK3C3 (also known as VPS34) regulates multiple aspects of endo-membrane trafficking processes. PIK3C3 is widely expressed by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), and its catalytic product PI3P is enriched in dendritic spines. Here we generated a line of conditional mutant mouse in which Pik3c3 is specifically deleted in hippocampal and in small subsets of cortical pyramidal neurons using the CaMKII-Cre transgene. We found that Pik3c3-deficiency initially causes loss of dendritic spines accompanied with reactive gliosis, which is followed by progressive neuronal degeneration over a period of several months. Layers III and IV cortical neurons are more susceptible to Pik3c3-deletion than hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, in aged conditional Pik3c3 mutant animals, there are extensive gliosis and severe secondary loss of wildtype neurons. Our analyses show that Pik3c3 is essential for CNS neuronal homeostasis and Pik3c3flox/flox;CaMKII-Cre mouse is a useful model for studying pathological changes in progressive forebrain neurodegeneration. PMID:20955765

  6. Pain sensitivity following loss of cholinergic basal forebrain (CBF) neurons in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vierck, C J; Yezierski, R P; Wiley, R G

    2016-04-01

    Flexion/withdrawal reflexes are attenuated by spinal, intracerebroventricular (ICV) and systemic delivery of cholinergic agonists. In contrast, some affective reactions to pain are suppressed by systemic cholinergic antagonism. Attention to aversive stimulation can be impaired, as is classical conditioning of fear and anxiety to aversive stimuli and psychological activation of stress reactions that exacerbate pain. Thus, in contrast to the suppressive effects of cholinergic agonism on reflexes, pain sensitivity and affective reactions to pain could be attenuated by reduced cerebral cholinergic activation. This possibility was evaluated in the present study, using an operant test of escape from nociceptive thermal stimulation (10 °C and 44.5 °C) before and after destruction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. ICV injection of 192 IgG-saporin produced widespread loss of basal forebrain cholinergic innervation of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Post-injection, escape from thermal stimulation was decreased with no indication of recovery for upto 19 weeks. Also, the normal hyperalgesic effect of sound stress was absent after ICV 192-sap. Effects of cerebral cholinergic denervation or stress on nociceptive licking and guarding reflexes were not consistent with the effects on operant escape, highlighting the importance of evaluating pain sensitivity of laboratory animals with an operant behavioral test. These results reveal that basal forebrain cholinergic transmission participates in the cerebral processing of pain, which may be relevant to the pain sensitivity of patients with Alzheimer's disease who have prominent degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. PMID:26812034

  7. Stimulation of the Rat Subthalamic Nucleus is Neuroprotective Following Significant Nigral Dopamine Neuron Loss

    PubMed Central

    Spieles-Engemann, A. L.; Behbehani, M. M.; Collier, T. J.; Wohlgenant, S. L.; Steece-Collier, K.; Paumier, K.; Daley, B. F.; Gombash, S.; Madhavan, L.; Mandybur, G. T.; Lipton, J.W.; Terpstra, B.T.; Sortwell, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is efficacious in treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the impact of STN-DBS on the progression of PD is unknown. Previous preclinical studies have demonstrated that STN-DBS can attenuate the degeneration of a relatively intact nigrostriatal system from dopamine (DA)-depleting neurotoxins. The present study examined whether STN-DBS can provide neuroprotection in the face of prior significant nigral DA neuron loss similar to PD patients at the time of diagnosis. STN-DBS between two and four weeks after intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) provided significant sparing of DA neurons in the SN of rats. This effect was not due to inadvertent lesioning of the STN and was dependent upon proper electrode placement. Since STN-DBS appears to have significant neuroprotective properties, initiation of STN-DBS earlier in the course of PD may provide added neuroprotective benefits in addition to its ability to provide symptomatic relief. PMID:20307668

  8. Herpes simplex virus vectors overexpressing the glucose transporter gene protect against seizure-induced neuron loss.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, M S; Ho, D Y; Dash, R; Sapolsky, R M

    1995-01-01

    We have generated herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors vIE1GT and v alpha 4GT bearing the GLUT-1 isoform of the rat brain glucose transporter (GT) under the control of the human cytomegalovirus ie1 and HSV alpha 4 promoters, respectively. We previously reported that such vectors enhance glucose uptake in hippocampal cultures and the hippocampus. In this study we demonstrate that such vectors can maintain neuronal metabolism and reduce the extent of neuron loss in cultures after a period of hypoglycemia. Microinfusion of GT vectors into the rat hippocampus also reduces kainic acid-induced seizure damage in the CA3 cell field. Furthermore, delivery of the vector even after onset of the seizure is protective, suggesting that HSV-mediated gene transfer for neuroprotection need not be carried out in anticipation of neurologic crises. Using the bicistronic vector v alpha 22 beta gal alpha 4GT, which coexpresses both GT and the Escherichia coli lacZ marker gene, we further demonstrate an inverse correlation between the extent of vector expression in the dentate and the amount of CA3 damage resulting from the simultaneous delivery of kainic acid. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:7638175

  9. Severe dopaminergic neuron loss in rhesus monkey brain impairs morphine-induced conditioned place preference

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ting; Rizak, Joshua Dominic; Wang, Jianhong; Yang, Shangchuan; Ma, Yuanye; Hu, Xintian

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that dopamine (DA) is critical for reward, but the precise role of DA in reward remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine what percentage of dopaminergic neurons in the primate brain is required for the expression of conditioned reward by measuring the performance of DA-deficient rhesus monkeys in a morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Animals with mild Parkinsonian symptoms successfully developed and retained a morphine preference that was equivalent to control monkeys. However, these monkeys could not maintain the preference as well as controls when they retained severe Parkinsonian symptoms. On the other hand, monkeys initially in a severe Parkinsonian state developed a preference for morphine, but this preference was weaker than that of the controls. Histological results showed that the loss of dopaminergic neurons in monkeys that had severe Parkinsonian symptoms was about 80% in comparison to the control monkeys. All these data suggest that a severely impaired DA system alters rewarding-seeking behavior in non-human primates. PMID:26528155

  10. Wogonin Attenuates Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Cognitive Dysfunction in Trimethyltin-Intoxicated Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bombi; Sur, Bongjun; Cho, Seong-Guk; Yeom, Mijung; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    We examined whether wogonin (WO) improved hippocampal neuronal activity, behavioral alterations and cognitive impairment, in rats induced by administration of trimethyltin (TMT), an organotin compound that is neurotoxic to these animals. The ability of WO to improve cognitive efficacy in the TMT-induced neurodegenerative rats was investigated using a passive avoidance test, and the Morris water maze test, and using immunohistochemistry to detect components of the acetylcholinergic system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) expression. Rats injected with TMT showed impairments in learning and memory and daily administration of WO improved memory function, and reduced aggressive behavior. Administration of WO significantly alleviated the TMT-induced loss of cholinergic immunoreactivity and restored the hippocampal expression levels of BDNF and CREB proteins and their encoding mRNAs to normal levels. These findings suggest that WO might be useful as a new therapy for treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27133262

  11. Wogonin Attenuates Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Cognitive Dysfunction in Trimethyltin-Intoxicated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bombi; Sur, Bongjun; Cho, Seong-Guk; Yeom, Mijung; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether wogonin (WO) improved hippocampal neuronal activity, behavioral alterations and cognitive impairment, in rats induced by administration of trimethyltin (TMT), an organotin compound that is neurotoxic to these animals. The ability of WO to improve cognitive efficacy in the TMT-induced neurodegenerative rats was investigated using a passive avoidance test, and the Morris water maze test, and using immunohistochemistry to detect components of the acetylcholinergic system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) expression. Rats injected with TMT showed impairments in learning and memory and daily administration of WO improved memory function, and reduced aggressive behavior. Administration of WO significantly alleviated the TMT-induced loss of cholinergic immunoreactivity and restored the hippocampal expression levels of BDNF and CREB proteins and their encoding mRNAs to normal levels. These findings suggest that WO might be useful as a new therapy for treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27133262

  12. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  13. Toxic gain of function from mutant FUS protein is crucial to trigger cell autonomous motor neuron loss.

    PubMed

    Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Sendscheid, Oliver; El Oussini, Hajer; Jambeau, Mélanie; Sun, Ying; Mersmann, Sina; Wagner, Marina; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Sinniger, Jérome; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Drenner, Kevin; Birling, Marie-Christine; Qiu, Jinsong; Zhou, Yu; Li, Hairi; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Rouaux, Caroline; Shelkovnikova, Tatyana; Witting, Anke; Ludolph, Albert C; Kiefer, Friedemann; Storkebaum, Erik; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-05-17

    FUS is an RNA-binding protein involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Cytoplasmic FUS-containing aggregates are often associated with concomitant loss of nuclear FUS Whether loss of nuclear FUS function, gain of a cytoplasmic function, or a combination of both lead to neurodegeneration remains elusive. To address this question, we generated knockin mice expressing mislocalized cytoplasmic FUS and complete FUS knockout mice. Both mouse models display similar perinatal lethality with respiratory insufficiency, reduced body weight and length, and largely similar alterations in gene expression and mRNA splicing patterns, indicating that mislocalized FUS results in loss of its normal function. However, FUS knockin mice, but not FUS knockout mice, display reduced motor neuron numbers at birth, associated with enhanced motor neuron apoptosis, which can be rescued by cell-specific CRE-mediated expression of wild-type FUS within motor neurons. Together, our findings indicate that cytoplasmic FUS mislocalization not only leads to nuclear loss of function, but also triggers motor neuron death through a toxic gain of function within motor neurons. PMID:26951610

  14. Neuronal loss due to prolonged controlled-current stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    McCreery, Douglas; Pikov, Victor; Troyk, Philip R

    2010-06-01

    Activated iridium microelectrodes were implanted for 450-1282 days in the sensorimotor cortex of seven adult domestic cats and then pulsed for 240 h (8 h per day for 30 days) at 50 Hz. Continuous stimulation at 2 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 100 microC cm(-2) produced no detectable change in neuronal density in the tissue surrounding the microelectrode tips. However, pulsing with a continuous 100% duty cycle at 4 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 200 microC cm(-2) induced loss of cortical neurons over a radius of at least 150 microm from the electrode tips. The same stimulus regimen but with a duty cycle of 50% (1 s of stimulation, and then 1 s without stimulation repeated for 8 h) produced neuronal loss within a smaller radius, approximately 60 microm from the center of the electrode tips. However, there also was significant loss of neurons surrounding the unpulsed electrodes, presumably as a result of mechanical injury due to their insertion into and long-term residence in the tissue, and this was responsible for most of the neuronal loss within 150 microm of the electrodes pulsed with the 50% duty cycle. PMID:20460692

  15. Neuronal loss due to prolonged controlled-current stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Pikov, Victor; Troyk, Philip R.

    2010-06-01

    Activated iridium microelectrodes were implanted for 450-1282 days in the sensorimotor cortex of seven adult domestic cats and then pulsed for 240 h (8 h per day for 30 days) at 50 Hz. Continuous stimulation at 2 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 100 µC cm-2 produced no detectable change in neuronal density in the tissue surrounding the microelectrode tips. However, pulsing with a continuous 100% duty cycle at 4 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 200 µC cm-2 induced loss of cortical neurons over a radius of at least 150 µm from the electrode tips. The same stimulus regimen but with a duty cycle of 50% (1 s of stimulation, and then 1 s without stimulation repeated for 8 h) produced neuronal loss within a smaller radius, approximately 60 µm from the center of the electrode tips. However, there also was significant loss of neurons surrounding the unpulsed electrodes, presumably as a result of mechanical injury due to their insertion into and long-term residence in the tissue, and this was responsible for most of the neuronal loss within 150 µm of the electrodes pulsed with the 50% duty cycle.

  16. MRI and neuropathological validations of the involvement of air pollutants in cortical selective neuronal loss.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, Sohail; Anwar, Khaleeq; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2014-03-01

    Vehicles are a major source of air pollution, especially particulate matter (PM) pollution, throughout the world and auto-rickshaws are considered main contributors to this air pollution. PM, in addition to causing respiratory and cardiovascular disorders, has potential to gain access to the brain and could induce neuroinflammation leading to different neurological disorders. Therefore, in the current project, MRI and immunohistochemistry techniques were adopted to ascertain the neurotoxic potential of the chronic exposure to different PM generated by two-stroke auto-rickshaws (TSA), four-stroke auto-rickshaws (FSA), and aluminum sulfate (AS) solution in rats. The results highlighted that all treated groups followed a pattern of dose-dependent increase in pure cortical neuronal loss, selective neuronal loss (SNL), nuclear pyknosis, karyolysis, and karyorrhexis. Mild to moderate areas of penumbra were also observed with increase in the population of activated microglia and astrocytes, while no alteration in the intensities of T2W MRI signals was perceived in any group. When comparing the findings, TSA possess more neurotoxic potential than FSA and AS, which could be associated with increased concentration of certain elements in TSA emissions. The study concludes that chronic exposure to PM from TSA, FSA, and AS solutions produces diverse neuropathies in the brain, which may lead to different life-threatening neurological disorders like stroke, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's disorders. Government and environmental agencies should take serious notice of this alarming situation, and immediate steps should be implemented to improve the standards of PM emissions from auto-rickshaws. PMID:24234816

  17. Age-Related Changes in Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos-Ewoldsen, Beverly; Black, Sheila R.; Mccown, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related differences in cognitive processes were used to understand age-related declines in creativity. According to the Geneplore model (Finke, Ward, & Smith, 1992), there are two phases of creativity--generating an idea and exploring the implications of the idea--each with different underlying cognitive processes. These two phases are…

  18. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Exacerbates Loss of Lower Motor Neurons and Axons during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yifeng; Stone, Sarrabeth; Cvetanovic, Marija; Lin, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are inflammatory demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases in the central nervous system (CNS). It is believed that MS and EAE are initiated by autoreactive T lymphocytes that recognize myelin antigens; however, the mechanisms responsible for neurodegeneration in these diseases remain elusive. Data indicate that vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) plays a role in the development of MS and EAE. Interestingly, VEGF-A is regarded as a neurotrophic factor in the CNS that promotes neuron survival and neurogenesis in various neurodegenerative diseases by activating VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). In this study, we sought to explore the role of the VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signaling in neurodegeneration in MS and EAE. We showed that the expression of VEGF-A was decreased in the spinal cord during EAE and that VEGFR2 was activated in lower motor neurons in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Interestingly, we found that treatment with SU5416, a selective VEGFR2 inhibitor, starting after the onset of EAE clinical symptoms exacerbated lower motor neuron loss and axon loss in the lumbar spinal cord of mice undergoing EAE, but did not alter Purkinje neuron loss in the cerebellum or upper motor neuron loss in the cerebral cortex. Moreover, SU5416 treatment had a minimal effect on EAE clinical symptoms as well as inflammation, demyelination, and oligodendrocyte loss in the lumbar spinal cord. These results imply the protective effects of the VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signaling on lower motor neurons and axons in the spinal cord in MS and EAE. PMID:27466819

  19. Diapause Formation and Downregulation of Insulin-Like Signaling via DAF-16/FOXO Delays Axonal Degeneration and Neuronal Loss

    PubMed Central

    Calixto, Andrea; Jara, Juan S.; Court, Felipe A.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a key event in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative conditions. We show here that mec-4d triggered axonal degeneration of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons and mammalian axons share mechanistical similarities, as both are rescued by inhibition of calcium increase, mitochondrial dysfunction, and NMNAT overexpression. We then explore whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in axonal degeneration and neuronal demise. C. elegans dauers have enhanced anti-ROS systems, and dauer mec-4d worms are completely protected from axonal degeneration and neuronal loss. Mechanistically, downregulation of the Insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS) pathway protects neurons from degenerating in a DAF-16/FOXO–dependent manner and is related to superoxide dismutase and catalase-increased expression. Caloric restriction and systemic antioxidant treatment, which decrease oxidative damage, protect C. elegans axons from mec-4d-mediated degeneration and delay Wallerian degeneration in mice. In summary, we show that the IIS pathway is essential in maintaining neuronal homeostasis under pro-degenerative stimuli and identify ROS as a key intermediate of neuronal degeneration in vivo. Since axonal degeneration represents an early pathological event in neurodegeneration, our work identifies potential targets for therapeutic intervention in several conditions characterized by axonal loss and functional impairment. PMID:23300463

  20. Review: Axon pathology in age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Adalbert, R; Coleman, M P

    2013-02-01

    'Dying back' axon degeneration is a prominent feature of many age-related neurodegenerative disorders and is widespread in normal ageing. Although the mechanisms of disease- and age-related losses may differ, both contribute to symptoms. Here, we review recent advances in understanding axon pathology in age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and glaucoma. In particular, we highlight the importance of axonal transport, autophagy, traumatic brain injury and mitochondrial quality control. We then place these disease mechanisms in the context of changes to axons and dendrites that occur during normal ageing. We discuss what makes ageing such an important risk factor for many neurodegenerative disorders and conclude that the processes of normal ageing and disease combine at the molecular, cellular or systems levels in a range of disorders to produce symptoms. Pathology identical to disease also occurs at the cellular level in most elderly individuals. Thus, normal ageing and age-related disease are inextricably linked and the term 'healthy ageing' downplays the important contributions of cellular pathology. For a full understanding of normal ageing or age-related disease we must study both processes. PMID:23046254

  1. Differential response of the central noradrenergic nervous system to the loss of locus coeruleus neurons in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Pamela J; White, Sylvia S; Franklin, Allyn; Greenup, J Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Raskind, Murray A; Szot, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is a significant loss of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) in addition to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). The goal of this study was to determine if the surviving LC noradrenergic neurons in PD demonstrate compensatory changes in response to the neuronal loss, as observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) mRNA expression in postmortem LC tissue of control and age-matched PD subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of noradrenergic neurons in the LC of PD subjects. TH mRNA expression/neuron did not differ between control and PD subjects, but DBH mRNA expression/neuron was significantly elevated in PD subjects compared to control. This increase in DBH mRNA expression in PD subjects is not a response to neuronal loss because the amount of DBH mRNA expression/neuron in AD subjects was not significantly different from control. Norepinephrine transporter (NET) binding site concentration in the LC of PD subjects was significantly reduced over the cell body region as well as the peri-LC dendritic zone. In PD subjects, the loss of dendrites from surviving noradrenergic neurons was also apparent with TH-immunoreactivity (IR). This loss of LC dendritic innervation in PD subjects as measured by TH-IR was not due to LC neuronal loss because TH-IR in AD subjects was robust, despite a similar loss of LC neurons. These data suggest that there is a differential response of the noradrenergic nervous system in PD compared to AD in response to the loss of LC neurons. PMID:21147074

  2. Differential response of the central noradrenergic nervous system to the loss of locus coeruleus neurons in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Pamela J; White, Sylvia S; Franklin, Allyn; Greenup, J Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Raskind, Murray A; Szot, Patricia

    2011-02-10

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is a significant loss of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) in addition to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). The goal of this study was to determine if the surviving LC noradrenergic neurons in PD demonstrate compensatory changes in response to the neuronal loss, as observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) mRNA expression in postmortem LC tissue of control and age-matched PD subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of noradrenergic neurons in the LC of PD subjects. TH mRNA expression/neuron did not differ between control and PD subjects, but DBH mRNA expression/neuron was significantly elevated in PD subjects compared to control. This increase in DBH mRNA expression in PD subjects is not a response to neuronal loss because the amount of DBH mRNA expression/neuron in AD subjects was not significantly different from control. Norepinephrine transporter (NET) binding site concentration in the LC of PD subjects was significantly reduced over the cell body region as well as the peri-LC dendritic zone. In PD subjects, the loss of dendrites from surviving noradrenergic neurons was also apparent with TH-immunoreactivity (IR). This loss of LC dendritic innervation in PD subjects as measured by TH-IR was not due to LC neuronal loss because TH-IR in AD subjects was robust, despite a similar loss of LC neurons. These data suggest that there is a differential response of the noradrenergic nervous system in PD compared to AD in response to the loss of LC neurons. PMID:21147074

  3. Intracerebral infusion of a second-generation ciliary neurotrophic factor reduces neuronal loss in rat striatum following experimental intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Del Bigio, M R; Yan, H J; Xue, M

    2001-11-15

    Neuronal and glial cell death in the striatum of a rat model of collagenase-induced intracerebral hemorrhage begins at 1 day and continues for at least 3 weeks. We hypothesized that administration of a neurotrophic agent would reduce neuronal loss in this experimental model. Because it has been shown to protect striatal neurons against excitotoxic injury, a second-generation ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) (AXOKINE) was administered by continuous intracerebral infusion (2 microg/day) beginning 28 h after hemorrhage and continuing for 2 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the hematoma size was comparable in control and treated rats prior to treatment. Counts of medium-sized striatal neurons within 320 microm of the hematoma 8 weeks after the hemorrhage revealed a slight but statistically significant benefit with a 42.5% loss in treated rats compared to 51.7% loss in controls. The results suggest that AXOKINE might be protective of striatal neurons in the vicinity of a hemorrhagic lesion. PMID:11701153

  4. Early phrenic motor neuron loss and transient respiratory abnormalities after unilateral cervical spinal cord contusion.

    PubMed

    Nicaise, Charles; Frank, David M; Hala, Tamara J; Authelet, Michèle; Pochet, Roland; Adriaens, Dominique; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Wright, Megan C; Lepore, Angelo C

    2013-06-15

    Contusion-type cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most common forms of SCI observed in patients. In particular, injuries targeting the C3-C5 region affect the pool of phrenic motor neurons (PhMNs) that innervates the diaphragm, resulting in significant and often chronic respiratory dysfunction. Using a previously described rat model of unilateral midcervical C4 contusion with the Infinite Horizon Impactor, we have characterized the early time course of PhMN degeneration and consequent respiratory deficits following injury, as this knowledge is important for designing relevant treatment strategies targeting protection and plasticity of PhMN circuitry. PhMN loss (48% of the ipsilateral pool) occurred almost entirely during the first 24 h post-injury, resulting in persistent phrenic nerve axonal degeneration and denervation at the diaphragm neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Reduced diaphragm compound muscle action potential amplitudes following phrenic nerve stimulation were observed as early as the first day post-injury (30% of pre-injury maximum amplitude), with slow functional improvement over time that was associated with partial reinnervation at the diaphragm NMJ. Consistent with ipsilateral diaphragmatic compromise, the injury resulted in rapid, yet only transient, changes in overall ventilatory parameters measured via whole-body plethysmography, including increased respiratory rate, decreased tidal volume, and decreased peak inspiratory flow. Despite significant ipsilateral PhMN loss, the respiratory system has the capacity to quickly compensate for partially impaired hemidiaphragm function, suggesting that C4 hemicontusion in rats is a model of SCI that manifests subacute respiratory abnormalities. Collectively, these findings demonstrate significant and persistent diaphragm compromise in a clinically relevant model of midcervical contusion SCI; however, the therapeutic window for PhMN protection is restricted to early time points post-injury. On

  5. Age-related alterations in the sarcolemmal environment are attenuated by lifelong caloric restriction and voluntary exercise.

    PubMed

    Hord, Jeffrey M; Botchlett, Rachel; Lawler, John M

    2016-10-01

    Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, referred to as sarcopenia, is mitigated by lifelong calorie restriction as well as exercise. In aged skeletal muscle fibers there is compromised integrity of the cell membrane that may contribute to sarcopenia. The purpose of this study was to determine if lifelong mild (8%) caloric restriction (CR) and lifelong CR+voluntary wheel running (WR) could ameliorate disruption of membrane scaffolding and signaling proteins during the aging process, thus maintaining a favorable, healthy membrane environment in plantaris muscle fibers. Fischer-344 rats were divided into four groups: 24-month old adults fed ad libitum (OAL); 24-month old on 8% caloric restriction (OCR); 24month old 8% caloric restriction+wheel running (OCRWR); and 6-month old sedentary adults fed ad libitum (YAL) were used to determine age-related changes. Aging resulted in discontinuous membrane expression of dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC) proteins: dystrophin and α-syntrophin. Older muscle also displayed decreased content of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), a key DGC signaling protein. In contrast, OCR and OCRWR provided significant protection against age-related DGC disruption. In conjunction with the age-related decline in membrane DGC patency, key membrane repair proteins (MG53, dysferlin, annexin A6, and annexin A2) were significantly increased in the OAL plantaris. However, lifelong CR and CRWR interventions were effective at maintaining membrane repair proteins near YAL levels of. OAL fibers also displayed reduced protein content of NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (Nox2) subunits (p67phox and p47phox), consistent with a perturbed sarcolemmal environment. Loss of Nox2 subunits was prevented by lifelong CR and CRWR. Our results are therefore consistent with the hypothesis that lifelong CR and WR are effective countermeasures against age-related alterations in the myofiber membrane environment. PMID:27534381

  6. Inhibiting Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 Ameliorates Neuronal Loss in the Ganglion Cell Layer of Rats in Retinal Ischemia/Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tu; You, Qiuting; Chen, Dan; Tong, Jianbin; Shang, Lei; Luo, Jia; Qiu, Yi; Yu, Huimin; Zeng, Leping; Huang, Jufang

    2016-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) is integrally involved in the neuronal degeneration of the central nervous system by promoting glial activation, neuronal apoptosis and damage to the brain-blood barrier. However, whether MMP3 also contributes to the neuronal degeneration induced by retinal ischemia/reperfusion is still uncertain. In the present study, we detected the cellular localization of MMP3 in adult rat retinae and explored the relationship of its expression with neuronal loss in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) in retinal ischemia/reperfusion. We found that MMP3 was widely expressed in many cells throughout the layers of the rat retinae, including Vertebrate neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-, parvalbumin-, calbindin-, protein kinase C-α-, glial fibrillary acidic protein-, glutamine synthetase- and CD11b-positive cells. Furthermore, all rats were treated with high intraocular pressure (HIOP) for 1 h (h) and sacrificed at 6 h, 1 day (d), 3 d, and 7 d after HIOP. Compared to the normal control, the expression of both proenzyme MMP3 and active MMP3 were significantly up-regulated after HIOP treatment without alteration of the laminar distribution pattern. Moreover, inhibiting MMP3 ameliorated the loss of NeuN-positive cells in the GCL following HIOP. In summary, our data demonstrates that MMP3 is expressed in multiple types of neurons and glial cells in normal rat retinae. Simultaneously, the up-regulation of its expression and activity are closely involved in neuronal loss in the GCL in retinal ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:26830289

  7. Loss of Fig4 in both Schwann cells and motor neurons contributes to CMT4J neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, Ilaria; Carbone, Antonietta; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Mironova, Yevgeniya A.; Alberizzi, Valeria; Noseda, Roberta; Rivellini, Cristina; Bianchi, Francesca; Del Carro, Ubaldo; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Lenk, Guy M.; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Giger, Roman J.; Meisler, Miriam H.; Bolino, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of FIG4 are responsible for Yunis-Varón syndrome, familial epilepsy with polymicrogyria, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4J neuropathy (CMT4J). Although loss of the FIG4 phospholipid phosphatase consistently causes decreased PtdIns(3,5)P2 levels, cell-specific sensitivity to partial loss of FIG4 function may differentiate FIG4-associated disorders. CMT4J is an autosomal recessive neuropathy characterized by severe demyelination and axonal loss in human, with both motor and sensory involvement. However, it is unclear whether FIG4 has cell autonomous roles in both motor neurons and Schwann cells, and how loss of FIG4/PtdIns(3,5)P2-mediated functions contribute to the pathogenesis of CMT4J. Here, we report that mice with conditional inactivation of Fig4 in motor neurons display neuronal and axonal degeneration. In contrast, conditional inactivation of Fig4 in Schwann cells causes demyelination and defects in autophagy-mediated degradation. Moreover, Fig4-regulated endolysosomal trafficking in Schwann cells is essential for myelin biogenesis during development and for proper regeneration/remyelination after injury. Our data suggest that impaired endolysosomal trafficking in both motor neurons and Schwann cells contributes to CMT4J neuropathy. PMID:25187576

  8. Loss of Fig4 in both Schwann cells and motor neurons contributes to CMT4J neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vaccari, Ilaria; Carbone, Antonietta; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Mironova, Yevgeniya A; Alberizzi, Valeria; Noseda, Roberta; Rivellini, Cristina; Bianchi, Francesca; Del Carro, Ubaldo; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Lenk, Guy M; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Giger, Roman J; Meisler, Miriam H; Bolino, Alessandra

    2015-01-15

    Mutations of FIG4 are responsible for Yunis-Varón syndrome, familial epilepsy with polymicrogyria, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4J neuropathy (CMT4J). Although loss of the FIG4 phospholipid phosphatase consistently causes decreased PtdIns(3,5)P₂ levels, cell-specific sensitivity to partial loss of FIG4 function may differentiate FIG4-associated disorders. CMT4J is an autosomal recessive neuropathy characterized by severe demyelination and axonal loss in human, with both motor and sensory involvement. However, it is unclear whether FIG4 has cell autonomous roles in both motor neurons and Schwann cells, and how loss of FIG4/PtdIns(3,5)P₂-mediated functions contribute to the pathogenesis of CMT4J. Here, we report that mice with conditional inactivation of Fig4 in motor neurons display neuronal and axonal degeneration. In contrast, conditional inactivation of Fig4 in Schwann cells causes demyelination and defects in autophagy-mediated degradation. Moreover, Fig4-regulated endolysosomal trafficking in Schwann cells is essential for myelin biogenesis during development and for proper regeneration/remyelination after injury. Our data suggest that impaired endolysosomal trafficking in both motor neurons and Schwann cells contributes to CMT4J neuropathy. PMID:25187576

  9. Reversal of age-related increase in brain protein oxidation, decrease in enzyme activity, and loss in temporal and spatial memory by chronic administration of the spin-trapping compound N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, J.M.; Starke-Reed, P.E.; Oliver, C.N.; Landum, R.W.; Cheng, M.S.; Wu, J.F.; Floyd, R.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Oxygen free radicals and oxidative events have been implicated as playing a role in bringing about the changes in cellular function that occur during aging. Brain readily undergoes oxidative damage, so it is important to determine if aging-induced changes in brain may be associated with oxidative events. Previously we demonstrated that brain damage caused by an ischemia/reperfusion insult involved oxidative events. In addition, pretreatment with the spin-trapping compound N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) diminished the increase in oxidized protein and the loss of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity that accompanied ischemia/reperfusion injury in brain. We report here that aged gerbils had a significantly higher level of oxidized protein as assessed by carbonyl residues and decreased GS and neutral protease activities as compared to young adult gerbils. We also found that chronic treatment with the spin-trapping compound PBN caused a decrease in the level of oxidized protein and an increase in both GS and neutral protease activity in aged Mongolian gerbil brain. In contrast to aged gerbils, PBN treatment of young adult gerbils had no significant effect on brain oxidized protein content or GS activity. Male gerbils, young adults (3 months of age) and retired breeders (15-18 months of age), were treated with PBN for 14 days with twice daily dosages of 32 mg/kg. If PBN administration was ceased after 2 weeks, the significantly decreased level of oxidized protein and increased GS and neutral protease activities in old gerbils changed in a monotonic fashion back to the levels observed in aged gerbils prior to PBN administration. We also report that old gerbils make more errors than young animals and that older gerbils treated with PBN made fewer errors in a radial arm maze test for temporal and spatial memory than the untreated aged controls.

  10. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  11. The Role of MAC1 in Diesel Exhaust Particle-induced Microglial Activation and Loss of Dopaminergic Neuron Function

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Shannon; Taetzsch, Thomas; Lull, Melinda E.; Johnson, Jo Anne; McGraw, Constance; Block, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing reports support that air pollution causes neuroinflammation and is linked to central nervous system (CNS) disease/damage. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a major component of urban air pollution, which has been linked to microglial activation and Parkinson’s disease-like pathology. To begin to address how DEP may exert CNS effects, microglia and neuron-glia cultures were treated with either nanometer-sized DEP (<0.22 µM; 50µg/mL), ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 50µg/ml), or DEP extracts (eDEP; from 50 µg/ml DEP) and the effect of microglial activation and dopaminergic (DA) neuron function was assessed. All three treatments showed enhanced amoeboid microglia morphology, increased H2O2 production, and decreased DA uptake. Mechanistic inquiry revealed that the scavenger receptor inhibitor fucoidan blocked DEP internalization in microglia, but failed to alter DEP-induced H2O2 production in microglia. However, pretreatment with the MAC1/CD11b inhibitor antibody blocked microglial H2O2 production in response to DEP. MAC1−/− mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures were protected from DEP-induced loss of DA neuron function, as measured by DA uptake. These findings support that DEP may activate microglia through multiple mechanisms, where scavenger receptors regulate internalization of DEP and the MAC1 receptor is mandatory for both DEP-induced microglial H2O2 production and loss of DA neuron function. PMID:23470120

  12. Age-Related Changes in Processing Simultaneous Amplitude Modulated Sounds Assessed Using Envelope Following Responses.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L

    2016-04-01

    Listening conditions in the real world involve segregating the stimuli of interest from competing auditory stimuli that differ in their sound level and spectral content. It is in these conditions of complex spectro-temporal processing that listeners with age-related hearing loss experience the most difficulties. Envelope following responses (EFRs) provide objective neurophysiological measures of auditory processing. EFRs were obtained to two simultaneous sinusoidally amplitude modulated (sAM) tones from young and aged Fischer-344 rats. One was held at a fixed suprathreshold sound level (sAM1FL) while the second varied in sound level (sAM2VL) and carrier frequency. EFR amplitudes to sAM1FL in the young decreased with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and this reduction was more pronounced when the sAM2VL carrier frequency was spectrally separated from sAM1FL. Aged animals showed similar trends, while having decreased overall response amplitudes compared to the young. These results were replicated using an established computational model of the auditory nerve. The trends observed in the EFRs were shown to be due to the contributions of the low-frequency tails of high-frequency neurons, rather than neurons tuned to the sAM1FL carrier frequency. Modeling changes in threshold and neural loss reproduced some of the changes seen with age, but accuracy improved when combined with an additional decrease representing synaptic loss of auditory nerve neurons. Sound segregation in this case derives primarily from peripheral processing, regardless of age. Contributions by more central neural mechanisms are likely to occur only at low SNRs. PMID:26905273

  13. The timing of neuronal loss across adolescence in the medial prefrontal cortex of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Willing, J; Juraska, J M

    2015-08-20

    Adolescence is a critical period of brain maturation characterized by the reorganization of interacting neural networks. In particular the prefrontal cortex (PFC), a region involved in executive function, undergoes synaptic and neuronal pruning during this time in both humans and rats. Our laboratory has previously shown that rats lose neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and there is an increase in white matter under the frontal cortex between adolescence and adulthood. Female rats lose more neurons during this period, and ovarian hormones may play a role as ovariectomy before adolescence prevents neuronal loss. However, little is known regarding the timing of neuroanatomical changes that occur between early adolescence and adulthood. In the present study, we quantified the number of neurons and glia in the male and female mPFC at multiple time points from preadolescence through adulthood (postnatal days 25, 35, 45, 60 and 90). Females, but not males, lost a significant number of neurons in the mPFC between days 35 and 45, coinciding with the onset of puberty. Counts of GABA immunoreactive cell bodies indicated that the neurons lost were not primarily GABAergic. These results suggest that in females, pubertal hormones may exert temporally specific changes in PFC anatomy. As expected, both males and females gained white matter under the PFC throughout adolescence, though these gains in females were diminished after day 35, but not in males. The differences in cell loss in males and females may lead to differential vulnerability to external influences and dysfunctions of the PFC that manifest in adolescence. PMID:26047728

  14. Abnormal tau induces cognitive impairment through two different mechanisms: synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss

    PubMed Central

    Di, J.; Cohen, L. S.; Corbo, C. P.; Phillips, G. R.; El Idrissi, A.; Alonso, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    The hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau is present in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the causal relationship remains elusive. Few mouse models used to study Alzheimer-like dementia target tau phosphorylation. We created an inducible pseudophosphorylated tau (Pathological Human Tau, PH-Tau) mouse model to study the effect of conformationally modified tau in vivo. Leaky expression resulted in two levels of PH-Tau: low basal level and higher upon induction (4% and 14% of the endogenous tau, respectively). Unexpectedly, low PH-Tau resulted in significant cognitive deficits, decrease in the number of synapses (seen by EM in the CA1 region), reduction of synaptic proteins, and localization to the nucleus. Induction of PH-Tau triggered neuronal death (60% in CA3), astrocytosis, and loss of the processes in CA1. These findings suggest, that phosphorylated tau is sufficient to induce neurodegeneration and that two different mechanisms can induce cognitive impairment depending on the levels of PH-Tau expression. PMID:26888634

  15. Age-related changes in neurochemical components and retinal projections of rat intergeniculate leaflet.

    PubMed

    Fiuza, Felipe P; Silva, Kayo D A; Pessoa, Renata A; Pontes, André L B; Cavalcanti, Rodolfo L P; Pires, Raquel S; Soares, Joacil G; Nascimento Júnior, Expedito S; Costa, Miriam S M O; Engelberth, Rovena C G J; Cavalcante, Jeferson S

    2016-02-01

    Aging leads to several anatomical and functional deficits in circadian timing system. In previous works, we observed morphological alterations with age in hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, one central component of this system. However, there are few data regarding aging effects on other central components of this system, such as thalamic intergeniculate leaflet (IGL). In this context, we studied possible age-related alterations in neurochemical components and retinal projections of rat IGL. For this goal, young (3 months), adult (13 months), and aged (23 months) Wistar rats were submitted to an intraocular injection of neural tracer, cholera toxin subunit b (CTb), 5 days before a tissue fixation process by paraformaldehyde perfusion. Optical density measurements and cell count were performed at digital pictures of brain tissue slices processed by immunostaining for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), enkephalin (ENK), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and CTb, characteristic markers of IGL and its retinal terminals. We found a significant age-related loss in NPY immunoreactive neurons, but not in immunoreactivity to GAD and ENK. We also found a decline of retinal projections to IGL with age. We conclude aging impairs both a photic environmental clue afferent to IGL and a neurochemical expression which has an important modulatory circadian function, providing strong anatomical correlates to functional deficits of the aged biological clock. PMID:26718202

  16. Oocyte cryopreservation for age-related fertility loss.

    PubMed

    Dondorp, W; de Wert, G; Pennings, G; Shenfield, F; Devroey, P; Tarlatzis, B; Barri, P; Diedrich, K

    2012-05-01

    The recent introduction of oocyte vitrification has significantly advanced the outcome of oocyte cryopreservation, leading to clinical results comparable to those achieved in IVF using fresh oocytes, as reported by experienced centres. This has lead to new debate, both in the professional community and in society at large, about the acceptability of offering this technology to reproductively healthy women who want to cryopreserve their oocytes against the threat of time. Given the many demands calling for simultaneous realization in a relatively short period of their lives, many women who want to have children feel to be under considerable pressure. The option of oocyte cryopreservation may in fact give them more breathing space. In this document, it is concluded that the arguments against allowing this application of the technology are not convincing. The recommendations include the need for adequate information of women interested in oocyte cryopreservation, also in order to avoid raising false hopes. The message must remain that women's best chances of having a healthy child are through natural reproduction at a relative early age. Centres offering this service must have the necessary expertise to employ oocyte cryopreservation efficiently with the so far non-standardized protocols. As data about long-term safety is still lacking, centres also have a responsibility to contribute to the collection of these data. PMID:22357771

  17. The role of cognition in age-related hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Craik, Fergus I M

    2007-01-01

    The article presents a commentary on the accompanying six papers from the perspective of a cognitive psychologist. Treisman's (1964, 1969) levels of analysis model of selective attention is suggested as a framework within which the interactions between 'bottom-up' auditory factors and 'top-down' cognitive factors may be understood. The complementary roles of auditory and cognitive aspects of hearing are explored, and their mutually compensatory properties discussed. The findings and ideas reported in the six accompanying papers fit well into such a 'levels of processing' framework, which may therefore be proposed as a model for understanding the effects of aging on speech processing and comprehension. PMID:18236642

  18. Age-Related White Matter Changes

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yun Yun; Mok, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Age-related white matter changes (WMC) are considered manifestation of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and are related to age and vascular risk factors. Most recent studies have shown that WMC are associated with a host of poor outcomes, including cognitive impairment, dementia, urinary incontinence, gait disturbances, depression, and increased risk of stroke and death. Although the clinical relevance of WMC has been extensively studied, to date, only very few clinical trials have evaluated potential symptomatic or preventive treatments for WMC. In this paper, we reviewed the current understanding in the pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical importance, chemical biomarkers, and treatments of age-related WMC. PMID:21876810

  19. Pharmacogenetics and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Brantley, Milam A

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics seeks to explain interpatient variability in response to medications by investigating genotype-phenotype correlations. There is a small but growing body of data regarding the pharmacogenetics of both nonexudative and exudative age-related macular degeneration. Most reported data concern polymorphisms in the complement factor H and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 genes. At this time, the data are not consistent and no definite conclusions may be drawn. As clinical trials data continue to accumulate, these relationships may become more apparent. PMID:22046503

  20. α-Synuclein Blocks ER-Golgi Traffic and Rab1 Rescues Neuron Loss in Parkinson’s Models

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Antony A.; Gitler, Aaron D.; Cashikar, Anil; Haynes, Cole M.; Hill, Kathryn J.; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Liu, Kangning; Xu, Kexiang; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu, Fang; Cao, Songsong; Caldwell, Kim A.; Caldwell, Guy A.; Marsischky, Gerald; Kolodner, Richard D.; LaBaer, Joshua; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Bonini, Nancy M.; Lindquist, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (αSyn) misfolding is associated with several devastating neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s disease (PD). In yeast cells and in neurons αSyn accumulation is cytotoxic, but little is known about its normal function or pathobiology. The earliest defect following αSyn expression in yeast was a block in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–to–Golgi vesicular trafficking. In a genomewide screen, the largest class of toxicity modifiers were proteins functioning at this same step, including the Rab guanosine triphosphatase Ypt1p, which associated with cytoplasmic αSyn inclusions. Elevated expression of Rab1, the mammalian YPT1 homolog, protected against αSyn-induced dopaminergic neuron loss in animal models of PD. Thus, synucleinopathies may result from disruptions in basic cellular functions that interface with the unique biology of particular neurons to make them especially vulnerable. PMID:16794039

  1. Functional Rescue of Dopaminergic Neuron Loss in Parkinson's Disease Mice After Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Altarche-Xifro, Wassim; di Vicino, Umberto; Muñoz-Martin, Maria Isabel; Bortolozzi, Analía; Bové, Jordi; Vila, Miquel; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder, which is due to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and for which no definitive cure is currently available. Cellular functions in mouse and human tissues can be restored after fusion of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells with a variety of somatic cells. Here, after transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the SNpc of two different mouse models of Parkinson's disease, we significantly ameliorated the dopaminergic neuron loss and function. We show fusion of transplanted HSPCs with neurons and with glial cells in the ventral midbrain of Parkinson's disease mice. Interestingly, the hybrids can undergo reprogramming in vivo and survived up to 4weeks after transplantation, while acquiring features of mature astroglia. These newly generated astroglia produced Wnt1 and were essential for functional rescue of the dopaminergic neurons. Our data suggest that glial-derived hybrids produced upon fusion of transplanted HSPCs in the SNpc can rescue the Parkinson's disease phenotype via a niche-mediated effect, and can be exploited as an efficient cell-therapy approach. PMID:27428421

  2. Loss of medial septum cholinergic neurons in THY-Tau22 mouse model: what links with tau pathology?

    PubMed

    Belarbi, K; Burnouf, S; Fernandez-Gomez, F-J; Desmercières, J; Troquier, L; Brouillette, J; Tsambou, L; Grosjean, M-E; Caillierez, R; Demeyer, D; Hamdane, M; Schindowski, K; Blum, D; Buée, L

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder histologically defined by the cerebral accumulation of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is another hallmark of the disease thought to contribute to the cognitive dysfunctions. To this date, the mechanisms underlying cholinergic neurons degeneration remain uncertain. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between neurofibrillary degeneration and cholinergic defects in AD using THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model exhibiting a major hippocampal AD-like tau pathology and hyperphosphorylated tau species in the septohippocampal pathway. Here, we report that at a time THY-Tau22 mice display strong reference memory alterations, the retrograde transport of fluorogold through the septohippocampal pathway is altered. This impairment is associated with a significant reduction in the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunopositive cholinergic neurons in the medial septum. Analysis of nerve growth factor (NGF) levels supports an accumulation of the mature neurotrophin in the hippocampus of THY-Tau22 mice, consistent with a decrease of its uptake or retrograde transport by cholinergic terminals. Finally, our data strongly support that tau pathology could be instrumental in the cholinergic neuronal loss observed in AD. PMID:21605043

  3. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  4. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  5. Age Related Changes in Preventive Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    Health behavior may be influenced by age, beliefs, and symptomatology. To examine age-related health beliefs and behaviors with respect to six diseases (the common cold, colon-rectal cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, and senility), 396 adults (196 males, 200 females) divided into three age groups completed a questionnaire…

  6. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety, and considers directions for future research. PMID:20046818

  7. Neuromuscular contributions to age-related weakness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related physiological change of neuromuscular function is not a linear process and is likely influenced by various biological and behavioral factors (e.g., genetics, nutrition, physical activity level, comorbidities, etc.). These factors contribute to heterogeneity among older adults, which chal...

  8. Genetic and Environmental Underpinnings to Age-Related Ocular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Johanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy are common causes of visual loss. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of these diseases. The modifiable factors related to some of these age-related and visually threatening diseases are smoking, obesity, and dietary factors, and a cardiovascular risk profile. Many common and a few rare genetic factors are associated with AMD. The role of genetic variants for the other diseases are less clear. Interactions between environmental, therapeutic, and genetic factors are being explored. Knowledge of genetic risk and environmental factors, especially for AMD, has grown markedly over the past 2.5 decades and has led to some sight-saving approaches in preventive management. PMID:24335064

  9. Loss of Tau protein affects the structure, transcription and repair of neuronal pericentromeric heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Marcato, Vasco; Sultan, Audrey; Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Loyens, Anne; Talahari, Smail; Bégard, Séverine; Nesslany, Fabrice; Colin, Morvane; Souès, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Bruno; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2016-01-01

    Pericentromeric heterochromatin (PCH) gives rise to highly dense chromatin sub-structures rich in the epigenetic mark corresponding to the trimethylated form of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3) and in heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α), which regulate genome expression and stability. We demonstrate that Tau, a protein involved in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), binds to and localizes within or next to neuronal PCH in primary neuronal cultures from wild-type mice. Concomitantly, we show that the clustered distribution of H3K9me3 and HP1α, two hallmarks of PCH, is disrupted in neurons from Tau-deficient mice (KOTau). Such altered distribution of H3K9me3 that could be rescued by overexpressing nuclear Tau protein was also observed in neurons from AD brains. Moreover, the expression of PCH non-coding RNAs, involved in PCH organization, was disrupted in KOTau neurons that displayed an abnormal accumulation of stress-induced PCH DNA breaks. Altogether, our results demonstrate a new physiological function of Tau in directly regulating neuronal PCH integrity that appears disrupted in AD neurons. PMID:27605042

  10. Loss of Tau protein affects the structure, transcription and repair of neuronal pericentromeric heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Marcato, Vasco; Sultan, Audrey; Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Loyens, Anne; Talahari, Smail; Bégard, Séverine; Nesslany, Fabrice; Colin, Morvane; Souès, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Bruno; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2016-01-01

    Pericentromeric heterochromatin (PCH) gives rise to highly dense chromatin sub-structures rich in the epigenetic mark corresponding to the trimethylated form of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3) and in heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α), which regulate genome expression and stability. We demonstrate that Tau, a protein involved in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), binds to and localizes within or next to neuronal PCH in primary neuronal cultures from wild-type mice. Concomitantly, we show that the clustered distribution of H3K9me3 and HP1α, two hallmarks of PCH, is disrupted in neurons from Tau-deficient mice (KOTau). Such altered distribution of H3K9me3 that could be rescued by overexpressing nuclear Tau protein was also observed in neurons from AD brains. Moreover, the expression of PCH non-coding RNAs, involved in PCH organization, was disrupted in KOTau neurons that displayed an abnormal accumulation of stress-induced PCH DNA breaks. Altogether, our results demonstrate a new physiological function of Tau in directly regulating neuronal PCH integrity that appears disrupted in AD neurons. PMID:27605042

  11. Life and death of neurons in the aging brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. H.; Hof, P. R.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by extensive neuron death that leads to functional decline, but the neurobiological correlates of functional decline in normal aging are less well defined. For decades, it has been a commonly held notion that widespread neuron death in the neocortex and hippocampus is an inevitable concomitant of brain aging, but recent quantitative studies suggest that neuron death is restricted in normal aging and unlikely to account for age-related impairment of neocortical and hippocampal functions. In this article, the qualitative and quantitative differences between aging and Alzheimer's disease with respect to neuron loss are discussed, and age-related changes in functional and biochemical attributes of hippocampal circuits that might mediate functional decline in the absence of neuron death are explored. When these data are viewed comprehensively, it appears that the primary neurobiological substrates for functional impairment in aging differ in important ways from those in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Facts about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... should I follow up after treatment? Loss of Vision Coping with AMD and vision loss can be ... not delay use of these services. What is vision rehabilitation? To cope with vision loss, you must ...

  13. PACAP27 prevents Parkinson-like neuronal loss and motor deficits but not microglia activation induced by prostaglandin J2.

    PubMed

    Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Machlovi, Saima Ishaq; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E

    2014-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is a major risk factor in Parkinson's disease (PD). Alternative approaches are needed to treat inflammation, as anti-inflammatory drugs such as NSAIDs that inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can produce devastating side effects, including heart attack and stroke. New therapeutic strategies that target factors downstream of COX-2, such as prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2), hold tremendous promise because they will not alter the homeostatic balance offered by COX-2 derived prostanoids. In the current studies, we report that repeated microinfusion of PGJ2 into the substantia nigra of non-transgenic mice, induces three stages of pathology that mimic the slow-onset cellular and behavioral pathology of PD: mild (one injection) when only motor deficits are detectable, intermediate (two injections) when neuronal and motor deficits as well as microglia activation are detectable, and severe (four injections) when dopaminergic neuronal loss is massive accompanied by microglia activation and motor deficits. Microglia activation was evaluated in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) with [(11)C](R)PK11195 to provide a regional estimation of brain inflammation. PACAP27 reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss and motor deficits induced by PGJ2, without preventing microglia activation. The latter could be problematic in that persistent microglia activation can exert long-term deleterious effects on neurons and behavior. In conclusion, this PGJ2-induced mouse model that mimics in part chronic inflammation, exhibits slow-onset PD-like pathology and is optimal for testing diagnostic tools such as PET, as well as therapies designed to target the integrated signaling across neurons and microglia, to fully benefit patients with PD. PMID:24970746

  14. PACAP27 prevents Parkinson-like neuronal loss and motor deficits but not microglia activation induced by prostaglandin J2

    PubMed Central

    Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Machlovi, Saima Ishaq; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a major risk factor in Parkinson disease (PD). Alternative approaches are needed to treat inflammation, as anti-inflammatory drugs such as NSAIDs that inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can produce devastating side effects, including heart attack and stroke. New therapeutic strategies that target factors downstream of COX-2, such as prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2), hold tremendous promise because they will not alter the homeostatic balance offered by COX-2 derived prostanoids. In the current studies, we report that repeated microinfusion of PGJ2 into the substantia nigra of non-transgenic mice, induces three stages of pathology that mimic the slow-onset cellular and behavioral pathology of PD: mild (one injection) when only motor deficits are detectable, intermediate (two injections) when neuronal and motor deficits as well as microglia activation are detectable, and severe (four injections) when dopaminergic neuronal loss is massive accompanied by microglia activation and motor deficits. Microglia activation was evaluated in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) with [11C](R)PK11195 to provide a regional estimation of brain inflammation. PACAP27 reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss and motor deficits induced by PGJ2, without preventing microglia activation. The latter could be problematic in that persistent microglia activation can exert long-term deleterious effects on neurons and behavior. In conclusion, this PGJ2-induced mouse model that mimics in part chronic inflammation, exhibits slow-onset PD-like pathology and is optimal for testing diagnostic tools such as PET, as well as therapies designed to target the integrated signaling across neurons and microglia, to fully benefit patients with PD. PMID:24970746

  15. Changes in neuronal activity and gene expression in guinea-pig auditory brainstem after unilateral partial hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Mulders, W H A M; Rodger, J; Robertson, D

    2009-03-31

    Spontaneous neural hyperactivity in the central auditory pathway is often associated with deafness, the most common form of which is partial hearing loss. We quantified both peripheral hearing loss and spontaneous activity in single neurons of the contralateral inferior colliculus in a guinea-pig model 1 week after a unilateral partial deafness induced by cochlear mechanical lesion. We also measured mRNA levels of candidate genes in the same animals using quantitative real-time PCR. Spontaneous hyperactivity was most marked in the frequency region of the peripheral hearing loss. Expression of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), GABA-A receptor subunit alpha-1 (GABRA1), and potassium channel subfamily K member 15 (KCNK15) was decreased ipsilaterally in the cochlear nucleus and bilaterally in the inferior colliculus. A member of RAB family of small GTPase (RAB3A) was decreased in both ipsilateral cochlear nucleus and contralateral inferior colliculus. RAB3 GTPase activating protein subunit 1 (RAB3GAP1) and glycine receptor subunit alpha-1 (GLRA1) were reduced ipsilaterally in the cochlear nucleus only. These results suggest that a decrease in inhibitory neurotransmission and an increase in membrane excitability may contribute to elevated neuronal spontaneous activity in the auditory brainstem following unilateral partial hearing loss. PMID:19356697

  16. Pathological changes in hippocampal neuronal circuits underlie age-associated neurodegeneration and memory loss: positive clue toward SAD.

    PubMed

    Moorthi, P; Premkumar, P; Priyanka, R; Jayachandran, K S; Anusuyadevi, M

    2015-08-20

    Among vertebrates hippocampus forms the major component of the brain in consolidating information from short-term memory to long-term memory. Aging is considered as the major risk factor for memory impairment in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (SAD) like pathology. Present study thus aims at investigating whether age-specific degeneration of neuronal-circuits in hippocampal formation (neural-layout of Subiculum-hippocampus proper-dentate gyrus (DG)-entorhinal cortex (EC)) results in cognitive impairment. Furthermore, the neuroprotective effect of Resveratrol (RSV) was attempted to study in the formation of hippocampal neuronal-circuits. Radial-Arm-Maze was conducted to evaluate hippocampal-dependent spatial and learning memory in control and experimental rats. Nissl staining of frontal cortex (FC), subiculum, hippocampal-proper (CA1→CA2→CA3→CA4), DG, amygdala, cerebellum, thalamus, hypothalamus, layers of temporal and parietal lobe of the neocortex were examined for pathological changes in young and aged wistar rats, with and without RSV. Hippocampal trisynaptic circuit (EC layerII→DG→CA3→CA1) forming new memory and monosynaptic circuit (EC→CA1) that strengthen old memories were found disturbed in aged rats. Loss of Granular neuron observed in DG and polymorphic cells of CA4 can lead to decreased mossy fibers disturbing neural-transmission (CA4→CA3) in perforant pathway. Further, intensity of nissl granules (stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM)-SR-SO) of CA3 pyramidal neurons was decreased, disturbing the communication in schaffer collaterals (CA3-CA1) during aging. We also noticed disarranged neuronal cell layer in Subiculum (presubiculum (PrS)-parasubiculum (PaS)), interfering output from hippocampus to prefrontal cortex (PFC), EC, hypothalamus, and amygdala that may result in interruption of thought processes. We conclude from our observations that poor memory performance of aged rats as evidenced through radial arm maze (RAM) analysis was due to the

  17. Oral Triphenylmethane Food Dye Analog, Brilliant Blue G, Prevents Neuronal Loss in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Jacob A; Erisir, Alev; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Reducing amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is a promising strategy for developing Alzheimer's Disease (AD) therapeutics. We recently reported that a triphenylmethane food dye analog, Brilliant Blue G (BBG), is a dose-dependent modulator of in vitro amyloid-β aggregation and cytotoxicity in cell-based assays. Following up on this recent work, we sought to further evaluate this novel modulator in a therapeutically-relevant AD transgenic mouse model. BBG was orally administered to APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice for three months in order to assess its biocompatibility, its permeability across the blood-brain barrier, and its efficacy at rescuing AD pathology. The results showed that BBG was well-tolerated, caused no significant weight change/unusual behavior, and was able to significantly cross the AD blood-brain barrier in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice. Immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis of the brain sections revealed that BBG was able to significantly prevent neuronal loss and reduce intracellular APP/Aβ in hippocampal neurons. This is the first report of 1) the effect of Brilliant Blue G on neuronal loss in a transgenic animal model of AD, 2) oral administration of BBG to affect a protein conformation/aggregation disease, and 3) electron microscopic ultrastructural analysis of AD pathology in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice. PMID:26852943

  18. Soybean β-Conglycinin Prevents Age-Related Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, Tohru; Shibata, Rei; Kondo, Kazuhisa; Katahira, Nobuyuki; Kambara, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoko; Nonoyama, Hiroshi; Horibe, Yuichiro; Ueda, Hiromi; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-related complications are associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment. β-Conglycinin (β-CG), one of the main storage proteins in soy, offers multiple health benefits, including anti-obesity and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Here, to elucidate the potential therapeutic application of β-CG, we investigated the effect of β-CG on age-related hearing impairment. Male wild-type mice (age 6 months) were randomly divided into β-CG-fed and control groups. Six months later, the body weight was significantly lower in β-CG-fed mice than in the controls. Consumption of β-CG rescued the hearing impairment observed in control mice. Cochlear blood flow also increased in β-CG-fed mice, as did the expression of eNOS in the stria vascularis (SV), which protects vasculature. β-CG consumption also ameliorated oxidative status as assessed by 4-HNE staining. In the SV, lipofuscin granules of marginal cells and vacuolar degeneration of microvascular pericytes were decreased in β-CG-fed mice, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. β-CG consumption prevented loss of spiral ganglion cells and reduced the frequencies of lipofuscin granules, nuclear invaginations, and myelin vacuolation. Our observations indicate that β-CG ameliorates age-related hearing impairment by preserving cochlear blood flow and suppressing oxidative stress. PMID:26348726

  19. Senescent cells: SASPected drivers of age-related pathologies.

    PubMed

    Ovadya, Yossi; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2014-12-01

    The progression of physiological ageing is driven by intracellular aberrations including telomere attrition, genomic instability, epigenetic alterations and loss of proteostasis. These in turn damage cells and compromise their functionality. Cellular senescence, a stable irreversible cell-cycle arrest, is elicited in damaged cells and prevents their propagation in the organism. Under normal conditions, senescent cells recruit the immune system which facilitates their removal from tissues. Nevertheless, during ageing, tissue-residing senescent cells tend to accumulate, and might negatively impact their microenvironment via profound secretory phenotype with pro-inflammatory characteristics, termed senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Indeed, senescent cells are mostly abundant at sites of age-related pathologies, including degenerative disorders and malignancies. Interestingly, studies on progeroid mice indicate that selective elimination of senescent cells can delay age-related deterioration. This suggests that chronic inflammation induced by senescent cells might be a main driver of these pathologies. Importantly, senescent cells accumulate as a result of deficient immune surveillance, and their removal is increased upon the use of immune stimulatory agents. Insights into mechanisms of senescence surveillance could be combined with current approaches for cancer immunotherapy to propose new preventive and therapeutic strategies for age-related diseases. PMID:25217383

  20. Peripheral nerve injury induces loss of nociceptive neuron-specific Gαi-interacting protein in neuropathic pain rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Fei; Fischer, Gregory; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gαi-interacting protein (GINIP) is expressed specifically in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and functions in modulation of peripheral gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor (GBR). Genetic deletion of GINIP leads to impaired responsiveness to GBR agonist-mediated analgesia in rodent. It is, however, not defined whether nerve injury changes GINIP expression. Results Immunolabeling with validated antibody revealed GINIP expression in ∼40% of total lumbar DRG neurons in normal adult rats. GINIP immunoreactivity was detected in ∼80% of IB4-positive (nonpeptidergic) and ∼30% of CGRP-positive (peptidergic) neurons. GINIP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord dorsal horn was colabeled with IB4 and partially with CGRP. In addition, GINIP was expressed in DRG neurons immunopositive for GBR1, GBR2, Gαi(s), and Gαo and was also extensively colabeled with multiple nociceptive neuronal markers, including Trpv1, NaV1.7, CaV2.2α1b, CaV3.2α1b, TrkA, and Trek2. Peripheral nerve injury by L5 spinal nerve ligation significantly decreased the proportion of GINIP immunoreactivity-positive neurons from 40 ± 8.4% to 0.8 ± 0.1% (p < 0.01, mean ± SD, four weeks after spinal nerve ligation) and the total GINIP protein to 1.3% ± 0.04% of its basal level (p < 0.01, n = 6 animals in each group, two weeks after spinal nerve ligation) in the ipsilateral L5 DRGs. Conclusion Our results show that GINIP is predominantly expressed by small nonpeptidergic nociceptive neurons and that nerve injury triggers loss of GINIP expression. Signal transduction roles of GINIP may be diverse as it colabeled with various subgroups of nociceptive neurons. Future studies may investigate details of the signaling mechanism engaged by GINIP, as well as the pathophysiological significance of lost expression of GINIP in neuropathic pain. PMID:27145804

  1. Acupuncture ameliorates cognitive impairment and hippocampus neuronal loss in experimental vascular dementia through Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Rui; Shi, Guang-Xia; Yang, Jing-Wen; Yan, Chao-Qun; Lin, Li-Ting; Du, Si-Qi; Zhu, Wen; He, Tian; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Xu, Qian; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests acupuncture could exert neuroprotection in the vascular dementia via anti-oxidative effects. However, the involvement of Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidant defense, in acupuncture-induced neuroprotection in vascular dementia remains undetermined. The goal of our study was to investigate the contribution of Nrf2 in acupuncture and its effects on vascular dementia. Morris water maze and Nissl staining were used to assess the effect of acupuncture on cognitive function and hippocampal neurodegeneration in experimental vascular dementia. The distribution of Nrf2 in neurons in hippocampus, the protein expression of Nrf2 in both cytosol and nucleus, and the protein and mRNA levels of its downstream target genes NQO1 and HO-1 were detected by double immunofluorescent staining, Western blotting and realtime PCR analysis respectively. Cognitive function and microglia activation were measured in both wild-type and Nrf2 gene knockout mice after acupuncture treatment. We found that acupuncture could remarkably reverse the cognitive deficits, neuron cell loss, reactive oxygen species production, and decreased cerebral blood flow. It was notable that acupuncture enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in neurons and up-regulate the protein and mRNA levels of Nrf2 and its target genes HO-1 and NQO1. Moreover, acupuncture could significantly down-regulated the over-activation of microglia after common carotid artery occlusion surgery. However, the reversed cognitive deficits, neuron cell loss and microglia activation by acupuncture were abolished in Nrf2 gene knockout mice. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that the neuroprotection of acupuncture in models of vascular dementia was via the Nrf2 activation and Nrf2-dependent microglia activation. PMID:26546103

  2. Age-related eye disease and gender.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, the prevalence of moderate to severe visual impairment and blindness is 285 millions, with 65% of visually impaired and 82% of all blind people being 50 years and older. Meta-analyses have shown that two out of three blind people are women, a gender discrepancy that holds true for both developed and developing countries. Cataract accounts for more than half of all blindness globally and gender inequity in access to cataract surgery is the major cause of the higher prevalence of blindness in women. In addition to gender differences in cataract surgical coverage, population-based studies on the prevalence of lens opacities indicate that women have a higher risk of developing cataract. Laboratory as well as epidemiologic studies suggest that estrogen may confer antioxidative protection against cataractogenesis, but the withdrawal effect of estrogen in menopause leads to increased risk of cataract in women. For the other major age-related eye diseases; glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy, data are inconclusive. Due to anatomic factors, angle closure glaucoma is more common in women, whereas the dominating glaucoma type; primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), is more prevalent in men. Diabetic retinopathy also has a male predominance and vascular/circulatory factors have been implied both in diabetic retinopathy and in POAG. For AMD, data on gender differences are conflicting although some studies indicate increased prevalence of drusen and neovascular AMD in women. To conclude, both biologic and socioeconomic factors must be considered when investigating causes of gender differences in the prevalence of age-related eye disease. PMID:26508081

  3. Complement C3-Deficient Mice Fail to Display Age-Related Hippocampal Decline.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiaoqiao; Colodner, Kenneth J; Matousek, Sarah B; Merry, Katherine; Hong, Soyon; Kenison, Jessica E; Frost, Jeffrey L; Le, Kevin X; Li, Shaomin; Dodart, Jean-Cosme; Caldarone, Barbara J; Stevens, Beth; Lemere, Cynthia A

    2015-09-23

    The complement system is part of the innate immune response responsible for removing pathogens and cellular debris, in addition to helping to refine CNS neuronal connections via microglia-mediated pruning of inappropriate synapses during brain development. However, less is known about the role of complement during normal aging. Here, we studied the role of the central complement component, C3, in synaptic health and aging. We examined behavior as well as electrophysiological, synaptic, and neuronal changes in the brains of C3-deficient male mice (C3 KO) compared with age-, strain-, and gender-matched C57BL/6J (wild-type, WT) control mice at postnatal day 30, 4 months, and 16 months of age. We found the following: (1) region-specific and age-dependent synapse loss in aged WT mice that was not observed in C3 KO mice; (2) age-dependent neuron loss in hippocampal CA3 (but not in CA1) that followed synapse loss in aged WT mice, neither of which were observed in aged C3 KO mice; and (3) significantly enhanced LTP and cognition and less anxiety in aged C3 KO mice compared with aged WT mice. Importantly, CA3 synaptic puncta were similar between WT and C3 KO mice at P30. Together, our results suggest a novel and prominent role for complement protein C3 in mediating aged-related and region-specific changes in synaptic function and plasticity in the aging brain. Significance statement: The complement cascade, part of the innate immune response to remove pathogens, also plays a role in synaptic refinement during brain development by the removal of weak synapses. We investigated whether complement C3, a central component, affects synapse loss during aging. Wild-type (WT) and C3 knock-out (C3 KO) mice were examined at different ages. The mice were similar at 1 month of age. However, with aging, WT mice lost synapses in specific brain regions, especially in hippocampus, an area important for memory, whereas C3 KO mice were protected. Aged C3 KO mice also performed better on

  4. Retrovirus-induced spongiform myeloencephalopathy in mice: regional distribution of infected target cells and neuronal loss occurring in the absence of viral expression in neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, D G; Gravel, C; Robitaille, Y; Jolicoeur, P

    1991-01-01

    The Cas-Br-E murine leukemia virus (MuLV) induces a spongiform myeloencephalopathy resulting in a progressive hindlimb paralysis. We have used in situ hybridization with a Cas-Br-E MuLV-specific probe to study viral expression in the central nervous system. Infected cells were concentrated in regions where spongiform lesions and gliosis are detected (lumbosacral spinal cord, brainstem, deep cerebellar regions), suggesting a causative link between the level of virus expression and the degree of pathological changes in this disease. However, viral expression was not in itself sufficient to cause disease, since significant viral expression was observed in regions that did not exhibit pathological changes (cerebellar cortex, hippocampus, corpus callosum, peripheral nervous system). In both diseased and nondiseased regions, endothelial and glial cells were identified as the main target cells. Neurons in diseased regions did not show viral expression. The regional distribution of the spongiform changes appears to be laid down very early following infection, since expression could be detected at 10 days postinfection in regions that become diseased. These results indicate that nonneuronal cells have distinct properties in various regions of the central nervous system and suggest an indirect mechanism of neuronal loss consequent to viral expression in nonneuronal cells. Images PMID:1847516

  5. Impaired selenoprotein expression in brain triggers striatal neuronal loss leading to coordination defects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Seeher, Sandra; Carlson, Bradley A.; Miniard, Angela C.; Wirth, Eva K.; Mahdi, Yassin; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Driscoll, Donna M.; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Selenocysteine Insertion Sequence (SECIS)-Binding Protein 2 (Secisbp2) binds to SECIS elements located in the 3′-untranslated region of eukaryotic selenoprotein mRNAs. It facilitates incorporation of the rare amino acid selenocysteine in response to UGA codons. Inactivation of Secisbp2 in hepatocytes greatly reduced selenoprotein levels. Neuron-specific inactivation of Secisbp2 (CamK-Cre; Secisbp2fl/fl) reduced cerebral expression of selenoproteins to a lesser extent than inactivation of tRNA[Ser]Sec. This allowed us to study the development of cortical parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons, which are completely lost in tRNA[Ser]Sec mutants. PV+ interneuron density was reduced in the somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. In situ-hybridization for Gad67 confirmed the reduction of GABAergic interneurons. Because of the obvious movement phenotype involving a broad, dystonic gait, we suspected basal ganglia dysfunction. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was normal in substantia nigra neurons and their striatal terminals. However the densities of striatal PV+ and Gad67+ neurons were decreased by 65% and 49%, respectively. Likewise, the density of striatal cholinergic neurons was reduced by 68%. Our observations demonstrate that several classes of striatal interneurons depend on selenoprotein expression. These findings may offer an explanation for the movement phenotype of selenoprotein P-deficient mice and the movement disorder and mental retardation described in a patient carrying SECISBP2 mutations. PMID:24844465

  6. Neonatal chlorpyrifos exposure induces loss of dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Dai, Hongmei; Deng, Yuanying; Tian, Jing; Zhang, Chen; Hu, Zhiping; Bing, Guoying; Zhao, Lingling

    2015-10-01

    Increasing epidemiological and toxicological evidence suggests that pesticides and other environmental exposures may be associated with the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorous pesticide with developmental neurotoxicity. Its neurotoxicity, notably on the monoamine system, suggests that exposure of CPF may induce dopaminergic neuronal injury. We investigated whether neonatal exposure to CPF contributes to initiation and progression of dopaminergic neurotoxicity and explored the possible underlying mechanisms. The newborn rats were administrated 5 mg/kg CPF subcutaneously from postnatal day (PND) 11 to PND 14 daily. The effect of CPF on dopaminergic neurons, microglia, astrocyte, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p. 65 and p. 38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways was analyzed in the substantia nigra of rats at 12h, 24h, 72 h, 16d and 46 d after exposure. CPF-treated rats exhibited significant reduction of dopaminergic neurons at 16d and 46 d after exposure, and a significant increase in the expression of microglia and astrocytes in the substantia nigra after CPF exposure. Intense activation of NF-κB p. 65 and p. 38 MAPK inflammatory signaling pathways was observed. Our findings indicate that neonatal exposure to CPF may induce long-term dopaminergic neuronal damage in the substantia nigra mediated by the activation of inflammatory response via NF-κB p. 65 and p. 38 MAPK pathways in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:26215101

  7. Intranasal insulin protects against substantia nigra dopaminergic neuronal loss and alleviates motor deficits induced by 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Y; Lin, S; Wright, C; Shen, J; Carter, K; Bhatt, A; Fan, L-W

    2016-03-24

    Protection of substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic (DA) neurons by neurotrophic factors (NTFs) is one of the promising strategies in Parkinson's disease (PD) therapy. A major clinical challenge for NTF-based therapy is that NTFs need to be delivered into the brain via invasive means, which often shows limited delivery efficiency. The nose to brain pathway is a non-invasive brain drug delivery approach developed in recent years. Of particular interest is the finding that intranasal insulin improves cognitive functions in Alzheimer's patients. In vitro, insulin has been shown to protect neurons against various insults. Therefore, the current study was designed to test whether intranasal insulin could afford neuroprotection in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-based rat PD model. 6-OHDA was injected into the right side of striatum to induce a progressive DA neuronal lesion in the ipsilateral SN pars compact (SNc). Recombinant human insulin was applied intranasally to rats starting from 24h post lesion, once per day, for 2 weeks. A battery of motor behavioral tests was conducted on day 8 and 15. The number of DA neurons in the SNc was estimated by stereological counting. Our results showed that 6-OHDA injection led to significant motor deficits and 53% of DA neuron loss in the ipsilateral side of injection. Treatment with insulin significantly ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced motor impairments, as shown by improved locomotor activity, tapered/ledged beam-walking performance, vibrissa-elicited forelimb-placing, initial steps, as well as methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior. Consistent with behavioral improvements, insulin treatment provided a potent protection of DA neurons in the SNc against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity, as shown by a 74.8% increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons compared to the vehicle group. Intranasal insulin treatment did not affect body weight and blood glucose levels. In conclusion, our study showed that intranasal insulin provided strong

  8. Increased TRPC5 glutathionylation contributes to striatal neuron loss in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chansik; Seo, Hyemyung; Kwak, Misun; Jeon, Jeha; Jang, Jihoon; Jeong, Eui Man; Myeong, Jongyun; Hwang, Yu Jin; Ha, Kotdaji; Kang, Min Jueng; Lee, Kyu Pil; Yi, Eugene C; Kim, In-Gyu; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Ryu, Hoon; So, Insuk

    2015-10-01

    Aberrant glutathione or Ca(2+) homeostasis due to oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The Ca(2+)-permeable transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channel is predominantly expressed in the brain, which is sensitive to oxidative stress. However, the role of the TRPC channel in neurodegeneration is not known. Here, we report a mechanism of TRPC5 activation by oxidants and the effect of glutathionylated TRPC5 on striatal neurons in Huntington's disease. Intracellular oxidized glutathione leads to TRPC5 activation via TRPC5 S-glutathionylation at Cys176/Cys178 residues. The oxidized glutathione-activated TRPC5-like current results in a sustained increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), activated calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and the calpain-caspase pathway, ultimately inducing striatal neuronal cell death. We observed an abnormal glutathione pool indicative of an oxidized state in the striatum of Huntington's disease transgenic (YAC128) mice. Increased levels of endogenous TRPC5 S-glutathionylation were observed in the striatum in both transgenic mice and patients with Huntington's disease. Both knockdown and inhibition of TRPC5 significantly attenuated oxidation-induced striatal neuronal cell death. Moreover, a TRPC5 blocker improved rearing behaviour in Huntington's disease transgenic mice and motor behavioural symptoms in littermate control mice by increasing striatal neuron survival. Notably, low levels of TRPC1 increased the formation of TRPC5 homotetramer, a highly Ca(2+)-permeable channel, and stimulated Ca(2+)-dependent apoptosis in Huntington's disease cells (STHdh(Q111/111)). Taken together, these novel findings indicate that increased TRPC5 S-glutathionylation by oxidative stress and decreased TRPC1 expression contribute to neuronal damage in the striatum and may underlie neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease. PMID:26133660

  9. Risk Factors for Age-Related Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Paul P.; Keane, Pearse A.; O'Neill, Evelyn C.; Altaie, Rasha W.; Loane, Edward; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John M.; Beatty, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition. PMID:20339564

  10. Memory Loss and Frontal Cognitive Dysfunction in a Patient with Adult-onset Neuronal Intranuclear Inclusion Disease.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kunihiko; Sone, Jun; Fujioka, Yusuke; Masuda, Michihito; Ohdake, Reiko; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Sobue, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID) is an uncommon progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Adult-onset NIID can result in prominent dementia. We herein describe the case of a 74-year-old man who presented with dementia, cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed hyperintensity of the corticomedullary junction. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showed frontal-dominant white matter hyperintensity. NIID was diagnosed from the presence of intranuclear inclusions in a skin biopsy sample. Neuropsychological testing revealed memory loss and frontal cognitive dysfunction, especially in relation to language and executive functions. We were therefore able to confirm the association of NIID with cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27523009

  11. Nutritional interventions protect against age-related deficits in behavior: from animals to humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show impaired performance on motor and cognitive tasks. Similar changes in behavior occur in humans with age, and the development of methods to retard or reverse these age-related neuronal and behavioral deficits could increase healthy aging and decrease health care costs. In the present s...

  12. TrkB gene transfer does not alter hippocampal neuronal loss and cognitive deficits following traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Valeria; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Watson, Deborah J.; Fujimoto, Scott; Royo, Nicolas C.; Marklund, Niklas; Stocchetti, Nino; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The ability of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to attenuate secondary damage and influence behavioral outcome after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains controversial. Because TBI can result in decreased expression of the trkB receptor, thereby preventing BDNF from exerting potential neuroprotective effects, the contribution of both BDNF and its receptor trkB to hippocampal neuronal loss and cognitive dysfunction were evaluated. Methods Full-length trkB was overexpressed in the left hippocampus of adult C57Bl/6 mice using recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2/5 (rAAV 2/5). EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) expression was present at two weeks after AAV-EGFP injection and remained sustained up to four weeks after the injection. At 2 weeks following gene transduction, mice were subjected to parasagittal controlled cortical impact (CCI) brain injury, followed by either BDNF or PBS infusion into the hippocampus. Results No differences were observed in learning ability at two weeks post-injury or in motor function from 48 hours to two weeks among treatment groups. The number of surviving pyramidal neurons in the CA2-CA3 region of the hippocampus was also not different among treatment groups. Conclusions These data suggest that neither overexpression of trkB, BNDF infusion or their combination affects neuronal survival or behavioral outcome following experimental TBI in mice. PMID:18431005

  13. Loss of GABAergic cortical neurons underlies the neuropathology of Lafora disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lafora disease is an autosomal recessive form of progressive myoclonic epilepsy caused by defects in the EPM2A and EPM2B genes. Primary symptoms of the pathology include seizures, ataxia, myoclonus, and progressive development of severe dementia. Lafora disease can be caused by defects in the EPM2A gene, which encodes the laforin protein phosphatase, or in the NHLRC1 gene (also called EPM2B) codifying the malin E3 ubiquitin ligase. Studies on cellular models showed that laforin and malin interact and operate as a functional complex apparently regulating cellular functions such as glycogen metabolism, cellular stress response, and the proteolytic processes. However, the pathogenesis and the molecular mechanism of the disease, which imply either laforin or malin are poorly understood. Thus, the aim of our study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the pathology by characterizing cerebral cortex neurodegeneration in the well accepted murine model of Lafora disease EPM2A-/- mouse. Results In this article, we want to asses the primary cause of the neurodegeneration in Lafora disease by studying GABAergic neurons in the cerebral cortex. We showed that the majority of Lafora bodies are specifically located in GABAergic neurons of the cerebral cortex of 3 months-old EPM2A-/- mice. Moreover, GABAergic neurons in the cerebral cortex of younger mice (1 month-old) are decreased in number and present altered neurotrophins and p75NTR signalling. Conclusions Here, we concluded that there is impairment in GABAergic neurons neurodevelopment in the cerebral cortex, which occurs prior to the formation of Lafora bodies in the cytoplasm. The dysregulation of cerebral cortex development may contribute to Lafora disease pathogenesis. PMID:24472629

  14. Cochlear nucleus neurons redistribute synaptic AMPA and glycine receptors in response to monaural conductive hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Brittany; Moiseff, Andrew; Rubio, María E.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons restore their function in response to external or internal perturbations and maintain neuronal or network stability through a homeostatic scaling mechanism. Homeostatic responses at synapses along the auditory system would be important for adaptation to normal and abnormal fluctuations in the sensory environment. We investigated at the electron microscopic level and after postembedding immunogold labeling whether projection neurons in the cochlear nucleus responded to modifications of auditory nerve activity. After unilaterally reducing the level of auditory inputs by ~ 20 dB by monaural earplugging, auditory nerve synapses on bushy cells somata and basal dendrites of fusiform cells of the ventral and dorsal cochlear nucleus, respectively, upregulated GluR3 AMPA receptor subunit, while inhibitory synapses decreased the expression of GlyRα1 subunit. These changes in expression levels were fully reversible once the earplug was removed, indicating that activity affects the trafficking of receptors at synapses. Excitatory synapses on apical dendrites of fusiform cells (parallel fibers) with different synaptic AMPA receptor subunit composition, were not affected by sound attenuation, as the expression levels of AMPA receptor subunits were the same as in normal hearing littermates. GlyRα1 subunit expression at inhibitory synapses on apical dendrites of fusiform cells was also found unaffected. Furthermore, fusiform and bushy cells of the contralateral side to the earplugging upregulated the GluR3 subunit at auditory nerve synapses. These results show that cochlear nucleus neurons innervated by the auditory nerve, are able to respond to small changes in sound levels by redistributing specific AMPA and glycine receptor subunits. PMID:19646510

  15. Genetic absence of nNOS worsens fetal alcohol effects in mice. II: Microencephaly and neuronal losses

    PubMed Central

    Karacay, Bahri; Mahoney, Jo; Plume, Jeffrey; Bonthius, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure can kill developing neurons, leading to microencephaly and mental retardation. However, not all fetuses are equally vulnerable to alcohol’s neurotoxic effects. While some fetuses are severely affected and are ultimately diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), others have no evidence of neuropathology and are behaviorally normal. These widely different outcomes among alcohol-exposed fetuses are likely due, in part, to genetic differences. Some fetuses possess genotypes that make them much more vulnerable than others to alcohol’s teratogenic effects. However, to date, only one gene has been identified whose mutation can worsen alcohol-induced behavioral deficits in an animal model of FAS. That gene is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). The purpose of this study was to determine whether mutation of nNOS can likewise worsen alcohol-induced microencephaly and lead to permanent neuronal deficits. Methods Wild type and nNOS−/− mice received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4 mg/g) daily over postnatal days (PD) 4–9. Beginning on PD 85, the mice underwent a series of behavioral tests, the results of which are reported in the companion paper. The brains were then weighed, and stereological cell counts were performed on the cerebral cortex and hippocampal formation, which are the brain regions that mediate the aforementioned behavioral tasks. Results Alcohol caused dose-dependent microencephaly, but only in the nNOS−/− mice and not in wild type mice. Alcohol-induced neuronal losses were more severe in the nNOS−/− mice than in the wild type mice in all of the brain regions examined, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampal CA3 subregion, hippocampal CA1 subregion, and dentate gyrus. Conclusions Targeted mutation of the nNOS gene increases the vulnerability of the developing brain to alcohol-induced growth restriction and neuronal losses. This increased neuropathology is associated with worsened behavioral dysfunction

  16. The loss of scents: do defects in olfactory sensory neuron development underlie human disease?

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2015-06-01

    The olfactory system is a fascinating and beguiling sensory system: olfactory sensory neurons detect odors underlying behaviors essential for mate choice, food selection, and escape from predators, among others. These sensory neurons are unique in that they have dendrites contacting the outside world, yet their first synapse lies in the central nervous system. The information entering the central nervous system is used to create odor memories that play a profound role in recognition of individuals, places, and appropriate foods. Here, the structure of the olfactory epithelium is given as an overview to discuss the origin of the olfactory placode, the plasticity of the olfactory sensory neurons, and finally the origins of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuroendocrine cells. For the purposes of this review, the development of the peripheral sensory system will be analyzed, incorporating recently published studies highlighting the potential novelties in development mechanisms. Specifically, an emerging model where the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb develop simultaneously from a continuous neurectoderm patterned at the end of gastrulation, and the multiple origins of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuroendocrine cells associated with the olfactory sensory system development will be presented. Advances in the understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying olfactory sensory system development allows for a more thorough understanding of the potential causes of human disease. PMID:26111003

  17. Distraction can reduce age-related forgetting.

    PubMed

    Biss, Renée K; Ngo, K W Joan; Hasher, Lynn; Campbell, Karen L; Rowe, Gillian

    2013-04-01

    In three experiments, we assessed whether older adults' generally greater tendency to process distracting information can be used to minimize widely reported age-related differences in forgetting. Younger and older adults studied and recalled a list of words on an initial test and again on a surprise test after a 15-min delay. In the middle (Experiments 1a and 2) or at the end (Experiment 3) of the delay, participants completed a 1-back task in which half of the studied words appeared as distractors. Across all experiments, older adults reliably forgot unrepeated words; however, older adults rarely or never forgot the words that had appeared as distractors, whereas younger adults forgot words in both categories. Exposure to distraction may serve as a rehearsal episode for older adults, and thus as a method by which general distractibility may be co-opted to boost memory. PMID:23426890

  18. Consequences of Age-Related Cognitive Declines

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Adult age differences in a variety of cognitive abilities are well documented, and many of those abilities have been found to be related to success in the workplace and in everyday life. However, increased age is seldom associated with lower levels of real-world functioning, and the reasons for this lab-life discrepancy are not well understood. This article briefly reviews research concerned with relations of age to cognition, relations of cognition to successful functioning outside the laboratory, and relations of age to measures of work performance and achievement. The final section discusses several possible explanations for why there are often little or no consequences of age-related cognitive declines in everyday functioning. PMID:21740223

  19. [Age-related changes of sensory system].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Hanyu, Haruo; Umahara, Takahiko

    2013-10-01

    Pathological processes usually superimpose on physiological aging even in the sensory system including visual, hearing, olfactory, taste and somatosensory functions. Representative changes of age-related changes are presbyopia, cataracts, and presbyacusis. Reduced sense of smell is seen in normal aging, but the prominent reduction detected by the odor stick identification test is noticed especially in early stage of Alzheimer or Parkinson disease. Reduced sense of taste is well-known especially in salty sense, while the changes of sweet, bitter, and sour tastes are different among individuals. Finally, deep sensation of vibration and proprioception is decreased with age as well as superficial sensation (touch, temperature, pain). As a result, impaired sensory system could induce deterioration of the activities of daily living and quality of life in the elderly. PMID:24261198

  20. Macular carotenoids and age-related maculopathy.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Eamonn; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John; Au Eong, Kah-Guan; Beatty, Stephan

    2006-11-01

    Lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are concentrated at the macula, where they are collectively known as macular pigment (MP), and where they are believed to play a major role in protecting retinal tissues against oxidative stress. Whilst the exact pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy (ARM) remains unknown, the disruption of cellular processes by oxidative stress may play an important role. Manipulation of dietary intake of L and Z has been shown to augment MP, thereby raising hopes that dietary supplementation with these carotenoids might prevent, delay, or modify the course of ARM. This article discusses the scientific rationale supporting the hypothesis that L and Z are protective against ARM, and presents the recent evidence germane to this theory. PMID:17160199

  1. Medical bioremediation of age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Jacques M; Schloendorn, John; Rittmann, Bruce E; Alvarez, Pedro JJ

    2009-01-01

    Catabolic insufficiency in humans leads to the gradual accumulation of a number of pathogenic compounds associated with age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and macular degeneration. Removal of these compounds is a widely researched therapeutic option, but the use of antibodies and endogenous human enzymes has failed to produce effective treatments, and may pose risks to cellular homeostasis. Another alternative is "medical bioremediation," the use of microbial enzymes to augment missing catabolic functions. The microbial genetic diversity in most natural environments provides a resource that can be mined for enzymes capable of degrading just about any energy-rich organic compound. This review discusses targets for biodegradation, the identification of candidate microbial enzymes, and enzyme-delivery methods. PMID:19358742

  2. [Epidemiology of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Brandl, C; Stark, K J; Wintergerst, M; Heinemann, M; Heid, I M; Finger, R P

    2016-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause of blindness in industrialized societies. Population-based epidemiological investigations generate important data on prevalence, incidence, risk factors, and future trends. This review summarizes the most important epidemiological studies on AMD with a focus on their transferability to Germany including existing evidence for the main risk factors for AMD development and progression. Future tasks, such as the standardization of grading systems and the use of recent retinal imaging technology in epidemiological studies are discussed. In Germany, epidemiological data on AMD are scarce. However, the need for epidemiological research in ophthalmology is currently being addressed by several recently started population-based studies. PMID:27541733

  3. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Reddy, Shantan; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although important progress has been made in understanding age-related macular degeneration (AMD), management of the disease continues to be a challenge. AMD research has led to a widening of available treatment options and improved prognostic perspectives. This essay reviews these treatment options. Design: Interpretative essay. Methods: Literature review and interpretation. Results: Current treatments to preserve vision in patients with non-exudative AMD include antioxidant vitamins and mineral supplementations. Exudative AMD is currently most often treated monthly with anti-VEGF intravitreal injections. However, investigators are beginning to experiment with combination therapy and surgical approaches in an attempt to limit the number of treatment and reduce the financial burden on the health care system. Conclusion: By better understanding the basis and pathogenesis of AMD, newer therapies will continue to be developed that target specific pathways in patients with AMD, with the hoped for outcome of better management of the disease and improved visual acuity. PMID:19668560

  4. HCFC1 loss-of-function mutations disrupt neuronal and neural progenitor cells of the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Lachlan A; Nguyen, Lam Son; Domingo, Deepti; Sun, Ying; Barry, Simon; Hancarova, Miroslava; Plevova, Pavlina; Vlckova, Marketa; Havlovicova, Marketa; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Graziano, Claudio; Pippucci, Tommaso; Bonora, Elena; Sedlacek, Zdenek; Gecz, Jozef

    2015-06-15

    Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations have recently implicated HCFC1 in neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we extend our previous HCFC1 over-expression studies by employing short hairpin RNA to reduce the expression of Hcfc1 in embryonic neural cells. We show that in contrast to over-expression, loss of Hcfc1 favoured proliferation of neural progenitor cells at the expense of differentiation and promoted axonal growth of post-mitotic neurons. To further support the involvement of HCFC1 in neurological disorders, we report two novel HCFC1 missense variants found in individuals with intellectual disability (ID). One of these variants, together with three previously reported HCFC1 missense variants of unknown pathogenicity, were functionally assessed using multiple cell-based assays. We show that three out of the four variants tested result in a partial loss of HCFC1 function. While over-expression of the wild-type HCFC1 caused reduction in HEK293T cell proliferation and axonal growth of neurons, these effects were alleviated upon over-expression of three of the four HCFC1 variants tested. One of these partial loss-of-function variants disrupted a nuclear localization sequence and the resulting protein displayed reduced ability to localize to the cell nucleus. The other two variants displayed negative effects on the expression of the HCFC1 target gene MMACHC, which is responsible for the metabolism of cobalamin, suggesting that these individuals may also be susceptible to cobalamin deficiency. Together, our work identifies plausible cellular consequences of missense HCFC1 variants and identifies likely and relevant disease mechanisms that converge on embryonic stages of brain development. PMID:25740848

  5. Postnatal loss of brainstem serotonin neurones compromises the ability of neonatal rats to survive episodic severe hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Kevin J; Hewitt, Julie C; Li, Aihua; Daubenspeck, John A; Nattie, Eugene E

    2011-11-01

    Pet-1(-/-) mice with a prenatal, genetically induced loss of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) neurones are compromised in their ability to withstand episodic environmental anoxia via autoresuscitation. Given the prenatal role of 5-HT neurones in the development of neural networks, here we ask if a postnatal loss of 5-HT neurones also compromises autoresuscitation. We treated neonatal rat pups at postnatal day (P)2-3 with an intra-cisternal injection of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT; ~40 μg; n = 8) to pharmacologically lesion the 5-HT system, or vehicle (control; n = 14). At P7-10 we exposed unanaesthetized treated and control pups to 15 episodes of environmental anoxia (97% N(2), 3% CO(2)). Medullary 5-HT content was reduced 80% by 5,7-DHT treatment (P < 0.001). Baseline ventilation (V(E)), metabolic rate (V(O(2))), ventilatory equivalent (V(E)/V(O(2))), heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV) and arterial haemoglobin saturation (S(aO(2))) were no different in 5-HT-deficient pups compared to controls. However, only 25% of 5-HT-deficient pups survived all 15 episodes of environmental anoxia, compared to 79% of control littermates (P = 0.007). High mortality of 5,7-DHT-treated pups was associated with delayed onset of gasping (P < 0.001), delayed recovery of HR from hypoxic-induced bradycardia (P < 0.001), and delayed recovery of eupnoea from hypoxic-induced apnoea (P < 0.001). Treatment with 5,7-DHT affected neither the gasping pattern once initiated, nor HR, V(E)/V(O(2)) or S(aO(2)) during the intervening episodes of room air. A significant increase in HRV occurred in all animals with repeated exposure, and in 5-HT-deficient pups this increase occurred immediately prior to death. We conclude that a postnatal loss of brainstem 5-HT content compromises autoresuscitation in response to environmental anoxia. This report provides new evidence in rat pups that 5-HT neurones serve a physiological role in autoresuscitation. Our data may be relevant to

  6. Recessive loss of function of the neuronal ubiquitin hydrolase UCHL1 leads to early-onset progressive neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bilguvar, Kaya; Tyagi, Navneet K.; Ozkara, Cigdem; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Bakircioglu, Mehmet; Choi, Murim; Delil, Sakir; Caglayan, Ahmet O.; Baranoski, Jacob F.; Erturk, Ozdem; Yalcinkaya, Cengiz; Karacorlu, Murat; Dincer, Alp; Johnson, Michele H.; Mane, Shrikant; Chandra, Sreeganga S.; Louvi, Angeliki; Boggon, Titus J.; Lifton, Richard P.; Horwich, Arthur L.; Gunel, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCHL1), a neuron-specific de-ubiquitinating enzyme, is one of the most abundant proteins in the brain. We describe three siblings from a consanguineous union with a previously unreported early-onset progressive neurodegenerative syndrome featuring childhood onset blindness, cerebellar ataxia, nystagmus, dorsal column dysfuction, and spasticity with upper motor neuron dysfunction. Through homozygosity mapping of the affected individuals followed by whole-exome sequencing of the index case, we identified a previously undescribed homozygous missense mutation within the ubiquitin binding domain of UCHL1 (UCHL1GLU7ALA), shared by all affected subjects. As demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, purified UCHL1GLU7ALA, compared with WT, exhibited at least sevenfold reduced affinity for ubiquitin. In vitro, the mutation led to a near complete loss of UCHL1 hydrolase activity. The GLU7ALA variant is predicted to interfere with the substrate binding by restricting the proper positioning of the substrate for tunneling underneath the cross-over loop spanning the catalytic cleft of UCHL1. This interference with substrate binding, combined with near complete loss of hydrolase activity, resulted in a >100-fold reduction in the efficiency of UCHL1GLU7ALA relative to WT. These findings demonstrate a broad requirement of UCHL1 in the maintenance of the nervous system. PMID:23359680

  7. Recessive loss of function of the neuronal ubiquitin hydrolase UCHL1 leads to early-onset progressive neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bilguvar, Kaya; Tyagi, Navneet K; Ozkara, Cigdem; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Bakircioglu, Mehmet; Choi, Murim; Delil, Sakir; Caglayan, Ahmet O; Baranoski, Jacob F; Erturk, Ozdem; Yalcinkaya, Cengiz; Karacorlu, Murat; Dincer, Alp; Johnson, Michele H; Mane, Shrikant; Chandra, Sreeganga S; Louvi, Angeliki; Boggon, Titus J; Lifton, Richard P; Horwich, Arthur L; Gunel, Murat

    2013-02-26

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCHL1), a neuron-specific de-ubiquitinating enzyme, is one of the most abundant proteins in the brain. We describe three siblings from a consanguineous union with a previously unreported early-onset progressive neurodegenerative syndrome featuring childhood onset blindness, cerebellar ataxia, nystagmus, dorsal column dysfuction, and spasticity with upper motor neuron dysfunction. Through homozygosity mapping of the affected individuals followed by whole-exome sequencing of the index case, we identified a previously undescribed homozygous missense mutation within the ubiquitin binding domain of UCHL1 (UCHL1(GLU7ALA)), shared by all affected subjects. As demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, purified UCHL1(GLU7ALA), compared with WT, exhibited at least sevenfold reduced affinity for ubiquitin. In vitro, the mutation led to a near complete loss of UCHL1 hydrolase activity. The GLU7ALA variant is predicted to interfere with the substrate binding by restricting the proper positioning of the substrate for tunneling underneath the cross-over loop spanning the catalytic cleft of UCHL1. This interference with substrate binding, combined with near complete loss of hydrolase activity, resulted in a >100-fold reduction in the efficiency of UCHL1(GLU7ALA) relative to WT. These findings demonstrate a broad requirement of UCHL1 in the maintenance of the nervous system. PMID:23359680

  8. Maneb-induced dopaminergic neuronal death is not affected by loss of mitochondrial complex I activity: Results from primary mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons cultured from individual Ndufs4+/+ and Ndufs4-/- mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Xia, Zhengui

    2014-01-01

    Primary cultures from embryonic mouse ventral mesencephalon are widely used for investigating the mechanisms of dopaminergic neuronal death in Parkinson's disease models. Specifically, single mouse or embryo cultures from littermates can be very useful for comparative studies involving transgenic mice when the neuron cultures are to be prepared before genotyping. However, preparing single mouse embryo culture is technically challenging because of the small number of cells present in the mesencephalon of each embryo (150,000-300,000), of which only 0.5-5% are tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) -positive, dopaminergic neurons. In this study, we optimized the procedure for preparing primary mesencephalic neuron cultures from individual mouse embryos. Mesencephalic neurons that are dissociated delicately, plated on Aclar film coverslips, and incubated in DMEM supplemented with FBS for 5 days and then N2 supplement for 1 day resulted in the best survival of dopaminergic neurons from each embryo. Using this optimized method, we prepared mesencephalic neuron cultures from single Ndufs4+/+ or Ndufs4-/- embryos, and investigated the role of mitochondrial complex I in maneb-induced dopamine neuron death. Our results suggest that maneb toxicity to dopamine neurons is not affected by loss of mitochondrial complex I activity in Ndufs4-/- cultures. PMID:25275677

  9. Hyperlipidemic Diet Causes Loss of Olfactory Sensory Neurons, Reduces Olfactory Discrimination, and Disrupts Odor-Reversal Learning

    PubMed Central

    Thiebaud, Nicolas; Johnson, Melissa C.; Butler, Jessica L.; Bell, Genevieve A.; Ferguson, Kassandra L.; Fadool, Andrew R.; Fadool, James C.; Gale, Alana M.; Gale, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, 65% of Americans are overweight, which leads to well-supported cardiovascular and cognitive declines. Little, however, is known concerning obesity's impact on sensory systems. Because olfaction is linked with ingestive behavior to guide food choice, its potential dysfunction during obesity could evoke a positive feedback loop to perpetuate poor ingestive behaviors. To determine the effect of chronic energy imbalance and reveal any structural or functional changes associated with obesity, we induced long-term, diet-induced obesity by challenging mice to high-fat diets: (1) in an obesity-prone (C57BL/6J) and obesity-resistant (Kv1.3−/−) line of mice, and compared this with (2) late-onset, genetic-induced obesity in MC4R−/− mice in which diabetes secondarily precipitates after disruption of the hypothalamic axis. We report marked loss of olfactory sensory neurons and their axonal projections after exposure to a fatty diet, with a concomitant reduction in electro-olfactogram amplitude. Loss of olfactory neurons and associated circuitry is linked to changes in neuronal proliferation and normal apoptotic cycles. Using a computer-controlled, liquid-based olfactometer, mice maintained on fatty diets learn reward-reinforced behaviors more slowly, have deficits in reversal learning demonstrating behavioral inflexibility, and exhibit reduced olfactory discrimination. When obese mice are removed from their high-fat diet to regain normal body weight and fasting glucose, olfactory dysfunctions are retained. We conclude that chronic energy imbalance therefore presents long-lasting structural and functional changes in the operation of the sensory system designed to encode external and internal chemical information and leads to altered olfactory- and reward-driven behaviors. PMID:24828650

  10. Hyperlipidemic diet causes loss of olfactory sensory neurons, reduces olfactory discrimination, and disrupts odor-reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Thiebaud, Nicolas; Johnson, Melissa C; Butler, Jessica L; Bell, Genevieve A; Ferguson, Kassandra L; Fadool, Andrew R; Fadool, James C; Gale, Alana M; Gale, David S; Fadool, Debra A

    2014-05-14

    Currently, 65% of Americans are overweight, which leads to well-supported cardiovascular and cognitive declines. Little, however, is known concerning obesity's impact on sensory systems. Because olfaction is linked with ingestive behavior to guide food choice, its potential dysfunction during obesity could evoke a positive feedback loop to perpetuate poor ingestive behaviors. To determine the effect of chronic energy imbalance and reveal any structural or functional changes associated with obesity, we induced long-term, diet-induced obesity by challenging mice to high-fat diets: (1) in an obesity-prone (C57BL/6J) and obesity-resistant (Kv1.3(-/-)) line of mice, and compared this with (2) late-onset, genetic-induced obesity in MC4R(-/-) mice in which diabetes secondarily precipitates after disruption of the hypothalamic axis. We report marked loss of olfactory sensory neurons and their axonal projections after exposure to a fatty diet, with a concomitant reduction in electro-olfactogram amplitude. Loss of olfactory neurons and associated circuitry is linked to changes in neuronal proliferation and normal apoptotic cycles. Using a computer-controlled, liquid-based olfactometer, mice maintained on fatty diets learn reward-reinforced behaviors more slowly, have deficits in reversal learning demonstrating behavioral inflexibility, and exhibit reduced olfactory discrimination. When obese mice are removed from their high-fat diet to regain normal body weight and fasting glucose, olfactory dysfunctions are retained. We conclude that chronic energy imbalance therefore presents long-lasting structural and functional changes in the operation of the sensory system designed to encode external and internal chemical information and leads to altered olfactory- and reward-driven behaviors. PMID:24828650

  11. Age-related Changes in Auditory Nerve – Inner Hair Cell Connections, Hair Cell Numbers, Auditory Brain Stem Response and Gap Detection in UM-HET4 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, RA; Dolan, DF; Halsey, K; Kanicki, A; Deng, N; Martin, C; Eberle, J; Kohrman, DC; Miller, RA; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the timing of appearance of three components of age-related hearing loss that determine the pattern and severity of presbycusis: the functional and structural pathologies of sensory cells and neurons and changes in Gap Detection, the latter as an indicator of auditory temporal processing. Using UM-HET4 mice, genetically heterogeneous mice derived from four inbred strains, we studied the integrity of inner and outer hair cells by position along the cochlear spiral, inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections, spiral ganglion neurons, and determined auditory thresholds, as well as pre-pulse and gap inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR). Comparisons were made between mice of 5-7, 22-24 and 27-29 months of age. There was individual variability among mice in the onset and extent of age-related auditory pathology. At 22-24 months of age a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was restricted to the apical third of the cochlea and threshold shifts in auditory brain stem response were minimal. There was also a large and significant loss of inner hair cell – auditory nerve connections and a significant reduction in Gap Detection. The expression of Ntf3 in the cochlea was significantly reduced. At 27-29 months of age there was no further change in the mean number of synaptic connections per inner hair cell or in gap detection, but a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was found across all cochlear turns as well as significantly increased ABR threshold shifts at 4, 12, 24 and 48 kHz. A statistical analysis of correlations on an individual animal basis revealed that neither the hair cell loss nor the ABR threshold shifts correlated with loss of gap detection or with the loss of connections, consistent with independent pathological mechanisms. PMID:25665752

  12. Age-related changes in auditory nerve-inner hair cell connections, hair cell numbers, auditory brain stem response and gap detection in UM-HET4 mice.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, R A; Dolan, D F; Halsey, K; Kanicki, A; Deng, N; Martin, C; Eberle, J; Kohrman, D C; Miller, R A; Schacht, J

    2015-04-30

    This study compared the timing of appearance of three components of age-related hearing loss that determine the pattern and severity of presbycusis: the functional and structural pathologies of sensory cells and neurons and changes in gap detection (GD), the latter as an indicator of auditory temporal processing. Using UM-HET4 mice, genetically heterogeneous mice derived from four inbred strains, we studied the integrity of inner and outer hair cells by position along the cochlear spiral, inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections, spiral ganglion neurons (SGN), and determined auditory thresholds, as well as pre-pulse and gap inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR). Comparisons were made between mice of 5-7, 22-24 and 27-29 months of age. There was individual variability among mice in the onset and extent of age-related auditory pathology. At 22-24 months of age a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was restricted to the apical third of the cochlea and threshold shifts in the auditory brain stem response were minimal. There was also a large and significant loss of inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections and a significant reduction in GD. The expression of Ntf3 in the cochlea was significantly reduced. At 27-29 months of age there was no further change in the mean number of synaptic connections per inner hair cell or in GD, but a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was found across all cochlear turns as well as significantly increased ABR threshold shifts at 4, 12, 24 and 48 kHz. A statistical analysis of correlations on an individual animal basis revealed that neither the hair cell loss nor the ABR threshold shifts correlated with loss of GD or with the loss of connections, consistent with independent pathological mechanisms. PMID:25665752

  13. Age-related axonal swellings precede other neuropathological hallmarks in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Martina; Adalbert, Robert; Janeckova, Lucie; Patrick, Jane; Kohli, Jaskaren; Coleman, Michael P; Conforti, Laura

    2014-10-01

    Axon degeneration precedes cell body death in many age-related neurodegenerative disorders, often determining symptom onset and progression. A sensitive method for revealing axon pathology could indicate whether this is the case also in Huntington's disease (HD), a fatal, devastating neurodegenerative disorder causing progressive deterioration of both physical and mental abilities, and which brain region is affected first. We studied the spatio-temporal relationship between axon pathology, neuronal loss, and mutant Huntingtin aggregate formation in HD mouse models by crossing R6/2 transgenic and HdhQ140 knock-in mice with YFP-H mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein in a subset of neurons. We found large axonal swellings developing age-dependently first in stria terminalis and then in corticostriatal axons of HdhQ140 mice, whereas alterations of other neuronal compartments could not be detected. Although mutant Huntingtin accumulated with age in several brain areas, inclusions in the soma did not correlate with swelling of the corresponding axons. Axon abnormalities were not a prominent feature of the rapid progressive pathology of R6/2 mice. Our findings in mice genetically similar to HD patients suggest that axon pathology is an early event in HD and indicate the importance of further studies of stria terminalis axons in man. PMID:24906892

  14. Glutamatergic neuron-targeted loss of LGI1 epilepsy gene results in seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Huneau, Clément; Marsan, Elise; Lehongre, Katia; Navarro, Vincent; Ishida, Saeko; Dufresnois, Béatrice; Ozkaynak, Ekim; Garrigue, Jérôme; Miles, Richard; Martin, Benoit; Leguern, Eric; Anderson, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Leucin-rich, glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) is a secreted protein linked to human seizures of both genetic and autoimmune aetiology. Mutations in the LGI1 gene are responsible for autosomal dominant temporal lobe epilepsy with auditory features, whereas LGI1 autoantibodies are involved in limbic encephalitis, an acquired epileptic disorder associated with cognitive impairment. We and others previously reported that Lgi1-deficient mice have early-onset spontaneous seizures leading to premature death at 2–3 weeks of age. Yet, where and when Lgi1 deficiency causes epilepsy remains unknown. To address these questions, we generated Lgi1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice using a set of universal Cre-driver mouse lines. Selective deletion of Lgi1 was achieved in glutamatergic pyramidal neurons during embryonic (Emx1-Lgi1cKO) or late postnatal (CaMKIIα-Lgi1cKO) developmental stages, or in gamma amino butyric acidergic (GABAergic) parvalbumin interneurons (PV-Lgi1cKO). Emx1-Lgi1cKO mice displayed early-onset and lethal seizures, whereas CaMKIIα-Lgi1cKO mice presented late-onset occasional seizures associated with variable reduced lifespan. In contrast, neither spontaneous seizures nor increased seizure susceptibility to convulsant were observed when Lgi1 was deleted in parvalbumin interneurons. Together, these data showed that LGI1 depletion restricted to pyramidal cells is sufficient to generate seizures, whereas seizure thresholds were unchanged after depletion in gamma amino butyric acidergic parvalbumin interneurons. We suggest that LGI1 secreted from excitatory neurons, but not parvalbumin inhibitory neurons, makes a major contribution to the pathogenesis of LGI1-related epilepsies. Our data further indicate that LGI1 is required from embryogenesis to adulthood to achieve proper circuit functioning. PMID:25234641

  15. Pyruvate treatment attenuates cerebral metabolic depression and neuronal loss after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Moro, Nobuhiro; Ghavim, Sima S; Harris, Neil G; Hovda, David A; Sutton, Richard L

    2016-07-01

    Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) is known to produce an acute increase in cerebral glucose utilization, followed rapidly by a generalized cerebral metabolic depression. The current studies determined effects of single or multiple treatments with sodium pyruvate (SP; 1000mg/kg, i.p.) or ethyl pyruvate (EP; 40mg/kg, i.p.) on cerebral glucose metabolism and neuronal injury in rats with unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In Experiment 1 a single treatment was given immediately after CCI. SP significantly improved glucose metabolism in 3 of 13 brain regions while EP improved metabolism in 7 regions compared to saline-treated controls at 24h post-injury. Both SP and EP produced equivalent and significant reductions in dead/dying neurons in cortex and hippocampus at 24h post-CCI. In Experiment 2 SP or EP were administered immediately (time 0) and at 1, 3 and 6h post-CCI. Multiple SP treatments also significantly attenuated TBI-induced reductions in cerebral glucose metabolism (in 4 brain regions) 24h post-CCI, as did multiple injections of EP (in 4 regions). The four pyruvate treatments produced significant neuroprotection in cortex and hippocampus 1day after CCI, similar to that found with a single SP or EP treatment. Thus, early administration of pyruvate compounds enhanced cerebral glucose metabolism and neuronal survival, with 40mg/kg of EP being as effective as 1000mg/kg of SP, and multiple treatments within 6h of injury did not improve upon outcomes seen following a single treatment. PMID:27059390

  16. Age-Related Changes in Skeletal Muscle of Cattle.

    PubMed

    Costagliola, A; Wojcik, S; Pagano, T B; De Biase, D; Russo, V; Iovane, V; Grieco, E; Papparella, S; Paciello, O

    2016-03-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, is a multifactorial condition that represents a major healthcare concern for the elderly population. Although its morphologic features have been extensively studied in humans, animal models, and domestic and wild animals, only a few reports about spontaneous sarcopenia exist in other long-lived animals. In this work, muscle samples from 60 healthy Podolica-breed old cows (aged 15-23 years) were examined and compared with muscle samples from 10 young cows (3-6 years old). Frozen sections were studied through standard histologic and histoenzymatic procedures, as well as by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. The most prominent age-related myopathic features seen in the studied material included angular fiber atrophy (90% of cases), mitochondrial alterations (ragged red fibers, 70%; COX-negative fibers, 60%), presence of vacuolated fibers (75%), lymphocytic (predominantly CD8+) inflammation (40%), and type II selective fiber atrophy (40%). Immunohistochemistry revealed increased expression of major histocompatibility complex I in 36 cases (60%) and sarcoplasmic accumulations of β-amyloid precursor protein-positive material in 18 cases (30%). In aged cows, muscle atrophy was associated with accumulation of myostatin. Western blot analysis indicated increased amount of both proteins-myostatin and β-amyloid precursor protein-in muscles of aged animals compared with controls. These findings confirm the presence of age-related morphologic changes in cows similar to human sarcopenia and underline the possible role of amyloid deposition and subsequent inflammation in muscle senescence. PMID:26869152

  17. Inflammation and its role in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Anu; Paterno, Jussi J; Blasiak, Janusz; Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a cellular response to factors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and tissues. Cell-associated and soluble pattern-recognition receptors, e.g. Toll-like receptors, inflammasome receptors, and complement components initiate complex cellular cascades by recognizing or sensing different pathogen and damage-associated molecular patterns, respectively. Cytokines and chemokines represent alarm messages for leukocytes and once activated, these cells travel long distances to targeted inflamed tissues. Although it is a crucial survival mechanism, prolonged inflammation is detrimental and participates in numerous chronic age-related diseases. This article will review the onset of inflammation and link its functions to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of severe vision loss in aged individuals in the developed countries. In this progressive disease, degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) results in the death of photoreceptors, leading to a loss of central vision. The RPE is prone to oxidative stress, a factor that together with deteriorating functionality, e.g. decreased intracellular recycling and degradation due to attenuated heterophagy/autophagy, induces inflammation. In the early phases, accumulation of intracellular lipofuscin in the RPE and extracellular drusen between RPE cells and Bruch's membrane can be clinically detected. Subsequently, in dry (atrophic) AMD there is geographic atrophy with discrete areas of RPE loss whereas in the wet (exudative) form there is neovascularization penetrating from the choroid to retinal layers. Elevations in levels of local and systemic biomarkers indicate that chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of both disease forms. PMID:26852158

  18. Age-related changes in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Townes-Anderson, E; Colantonio, A; St Jules, R S

    1998-05-01

    Tiger salamanders have been used in visual science because of the large size of their cells and the ease of preparation and maintenance of in vitro retinal preparations. We have found that salamanders over 27 cm in length show a variety of visual abnormalities. Compared to smaller animals (15-23 cm), large animals exhibited a decrease in visual responses determined by tests of the optomotor reflex. Small animals responded correctly an average of 84.5% of the time in visual testing at three light levels compared to an average of 68.4% for the large animals with the poorest visual performance at the lowest level of illumination. In addition, large animals contained (i) histological degeneration of the outer retina, in particular, loss and disruption of outer segments and abnormalities of the retinal pigmented epithelium, (ii) loss of cells, including photoreceptors, by apoptosis as evaluated with the TUNEL technique, and (iii) an increase in the number of macrophages and lymphocytes within the retina as determined by morphological examination. These histological changes were present in all large animals and all quadrants of their retinas. In contrast, small animals showed virtually no retinal degeneration, no TUNEL-positive cells, and few immune-like cells in the retina. Since large animals are also older animals. the visual changes are age-related. Loss of visual function and histological degeneration in the outer retina also typify aged human eyes. Thus, we propose that large salamanders serve as an animal model for age-related retinal degeneration. In addition to providing a source of aging retina that is readily accessible to experimental manipulation, the salamander provides a pigmented retina with a mixed (2:1, rod:cone) population of photoreceptors, similar to the degeneration-prone parafoveal region of the human eye. PMID:9631666

  19. Hippocampal expression of myelin-associated inhibitors is induced with age-related cognitive decline and correlates with deficits of spatial learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    VanGuilder, Heather D.; Bixler, Georgina V.; Sonntag, William E.; Freeman, Willard M.

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of cognitive functions including hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory affects nearly half of the aged population. Age-related cognitive decline is associated with synaptic dysfunction that occurs in the absence of neuronal cell loss, suggesting that impaired neuronal signaling and plasticity may underlie age-related deficits of cognitive function. Expression of myelin-associated inhibitors (MAIs) of synaptic plasticity, including the ligands MAG, Nogo-A, and OMgp, and their common receptor, NgR1, was examined in hippocampal synaptosomes and CA1, CA3 and DG subregions derived from adult (12–13 months) and aged (26–28 months) Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats. Rats were behaviorally phenotyped by Morris water maze testing and classified as aged cognitively intact (n=7–8) or aged cognitively impaired (n=7–10) relative to adults (n=5–7). MAI protein expression was induced in cognitively impaired, but not cognitively intact, aged rats and correlated with cognitive performance in individual rats. Immunohistochemical experiments demonstrated that upregulation of MAIs occurs, in part, in hippocampal neuronal axons and somata. While a number of pathways and processes are altered with brain aging, we report a coordinated induction of myelin-associated inhibitors of functional and structural plasticity only in cognitively impaired aged rats. Induction of MAIs may decrease stimulus-induced synaptic strengthening and structural remodeling, ultimately impairing synaptic mechanisms of spatial learning and memory and resulting in cognitive decline. PMID:22269040

  20. Myelin loss and axonal ion channel adaptations associated with gray matter neuronal hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mustafa S; Kole, Maarten H P

    2015-05-01

    Myelination and voltage-gated ion channel clustering at the nodes of Ranvier are essential for the rapid saltatory conduction of action potentials. Whether myelination influences the structural organization of the axon initial segment (AIS) and action potential initiation is poorly understood. Using the cuprizone mouse model, we combined electrophysiological recordings with immunofluorescence of the voltage-gated Nav1.6 and Kv7.3 subunits and anchoring proteins to analyze the functional and structural properties of single demyelinated neocortical L5 axons. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that neurons with demyelinated axons were intrinsically more excitable, characterized by increased spontaneous suprathreshold depolarizations as well as antidromically propagating action potentials ectopically generated in distal parts of the axon. Immunofluorescence examination of demyelinated axons showed that βIV-spectrin, Nav1.6, and the Kv7.3 channels in nodes of Ranvier either dissolved or extended into the paranodal domains. In contrast, while the AIS in demyelinated axons started more closely to the soma, ankyrin G, βIV-spectrin, and the ion channel expression were maintained. Structure-function analysis and computational modeling, constrained by the AIS location and realistic dendritic and axonal morphologies, confirmed that a more proximal onset of the AIS slightly reduced the efficacy of action potential generation, suggesting a compensatory role. These results suggest that oligodendroglial myelination is not only important for maximizing conduction velocity, but also for limiting hyperexcitability of pyramidal neurons. PMID:25948275

  1. Myelin Loss and Axonal Ion Channel Adaptations Associated with Gray Matter Neuronal Hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Mustafa S.

    2015-01-01

    Myelination and voltage-gated ion channel clustering at the nodes of Ranvier are essential for the rapid saltatory conduction of action potentials. Whether myelination influences the structural organization of the axon initial segment (AIS) and action potential initiation is poorly understood. Using the cuprizone mouse model, we combined electrophysiological recordings with immunofluorescence of the voltage-gated Nav1.6 and Kv7.3 subunits and anchoring proteins to analyze the functional and structural properties of single demyelinated neocortical L5 axons. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that neurons with demyelinated axons were intrinsically more excitable, characterized by increased spontaneous suprathreshold depolarizations as well as antidromically propagating action potentials ectopically generated in distal parts of the axon. Immunofluorescence examination of demyelinated axons showed that βIV-spectrin, Nav1.6, and the Kv7.3 channels in nodes of Ranvier either dissolved or extended into the paranodal domains. In contrast, while the AIS in demyelinated axons started more closely to the soma, ankyrin G, βIV-spectrin, and the ion channel expression were maintained. Structure–function analysis and computational modeling, constrained by the AIS location and realistic dendritic and axonal morphologies, confirmed that a more proximal onset of the AIS slightly reduced the efficacy of action potential generation, suggesting a compensatory role. These results suggest that oligodendroglial myelination is not only important for maximizing conduction velocity, but also for limiting hyperexcitability of pyramidal neurons. PMID:25948275

  2. Decreased neuron loss and memory dysfunction in pilocarpine-treated rats pre-exposed to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Do Val-da Silva, Raquel Araujo; Peixoto-Santos, José Eduardo; Scandiuzzi, Renata Caldo; Balista, Priscila Alves; Bassi, Mirian; Glass, Mogens Lesner; Romcy-Pereira, Rodrigo Neves; Galvis-Alonso, Orfa Yineth; Leite, João Pereira

    2016-09-22

    Preconditioning can induce a cascade of cellular events leading to neuroprotection against subsequent brain insults. In this study, we investigated the chronic effects of hypoxic preconditioning on spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS), neuronal death, and spatial memory performance in rats subjected to pilocarpine (Pilo)-induced status epilepticus (SE). Rats underwent a short hypoxic episode (7% O2+93% N2; 30min on two consecutive days) preceding a 4-h SE (HSE group). Control groups were rats submitted to SE only (SE), rats subjected to hypoxia only (H) or normoxia-saline (C). Animals were monitored for the occurrence of SRS, and spatial memory performance was evaluated in the radial-arm maze. Hippocampal sections were analyzed for cell death and mossy fiber sprouting at 1 or 60days after SE. Compared to SE group, HSE had increased SE latency, reduced number of rats with SRS, reduced mossy fiber sprouting at 60days, and reduced cell death in the hilus and the CA3 region 1 and 60days after SE. Additionally, HSE rats had better spatial memory performance than SE rats. Our findings indicated that short hypoxic preconditioning preceding SE promotes long-lasting protective effects on neuron survival and spatial memory. PMID:27373771

  3. Loss of MeCP2 in Parvalbumin-and Somatostatin-Expressing Neurons in Mice Leads to Distinct Rett Syndrome-like Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Ure, Kerstin; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-11-18

    Inhibitory neurons are critical for proper brain function, and their dysfunction is implicated in several disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, and Rett syndrome. These neurons are heterogeneous, and it is unclear which subtypes contribute to specific neurological phenotypes. We deleted Mecp2, the mouse homolog of the gene that causes Rett syndrome, from the two most populous subtypes, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) and somatostatin-positive (SOM+) neurons. Loss of MeCP2 partially impairs the affected neuron, allowing us to assess the function of each subtype without profound disruption of neuronal circuitry. We found that mice lacking MeCP2 in either PV+ or SOM+ neurons have distinct, non-overlapping neurological features: mice lacking MeCP2 in PV+ neurons developed motor, sensory, memory, and social deficits, whereas those lacking MeCP2 in SOM+ neurons exhibited seizures and stereotypies. Our findings indicate that PV+ and SOM+ neurons contribute complementary aspects of the Rett phenotype and may have modular roles in regulating specific behaviors. PMID:26590342

  4. Auditory brain-stem evoked potentials in cat after kainic acid induced neuronal loss. II. Cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zaaroor, M; Starr, A

    1991-01-01

    Auditory brain-stem potentials (ABRs) were studied in cats for up to 6 weeks after kainic acid had been injected unilaterally into the cochlear nucleus (CN) producing extensive neuronal destruction. The ABR components were labeled by the polarity at the vertex (P, for positive) and their order of appearance (the arabic numerals 1, 2, etc.). Component P1 can be further subdivided into 2 subcomponents, P1a and P1b. The assumed correspondence between the ABR components in cat and man is indicated by providing human Roman numeral designations in parentheses following the feline notation, e.g., P2 (III). To stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection, the ABR changes consisted of a loss of components P2 (III) and P3 (IV), and an attenuation and prolongation of latency of components P4 (V) and P5 (VI). The sustained potential shift from which the components arose was not affected. Wave P1a (I) was also slightly but significantly attenuated compatible with changes of excitability of nerve VIII in the cochlea secondary to cochlear nucleus destruction. Unexpectedly, to stimulation of the ear contralateral to the injection side, waves P2 (III), P3 (IV), and P4 (V) were also attenuated and delayed in latency but to a lesser degree than to stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection. Changes in binaural interaction of the ABR following cochlear nucleus lesions were similar to those produced in normal animals by introducing a temporal delay of the input to one ear. The results of the present set of studies using kainic acid to induce neuronal loss in auditory pathway when combined with prior lesion and recording experiments suggest that each of the components of the ABR requires the integrity of an anatomically diffuse system comprising a set of neurons, their axons, and the neurons on which they terminate. Disruption of any portion of the system will alter the amplitude and/or the latency of that component. PMID:1716569

  5. Massive CA1/2 Neuronal Loss with Intraneuronal and N-Terminal Truncated Aβ42 Accumulation in a Novel Alzheimer Transgenic Model

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Caty; Sergeant, Nicolas; Itier, Jean-Michel; Blanchard, Véronique; Wirths, Oliver; van der Kolk, Nicolien; Vingtdeux, Valérie; van de Steeg, Evita; Ret, Gwenaëlle; Canton, Thierry; Drobecq, Hervé; Clark, Allan; Bonici, Bruno; Delacourte, André; Benavides, Jesús; Schmitz, Christoph; Tremp, Günter; Bayer, Thomas A.; Benoit, Patrick; Pradier, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a substantial degeneration of pyramidal neurons and the appearance of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Here we present a novel transgenic mouse model, APPSLPS1KI that closely mimics the development of AD-related neuropathological features including a significant hippocampal neuronal loss. This transgenic mouse model carries M233T/L235P knocked-in mutations in presenilin-1 and overexpresses mutated human β-amyloid (Aβ) precursor protein. Aβx-42 is the major form of Aβ species present in this model with progressive development of a complex pattern of N-truncated variants and dimers, similar to those observed in AD brain. At 10 months of age, an extensive neuronal loss (>50%) is present in the CA1/2 hippocampal pyramidal cell layer that correlates with strong accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ and thioflavine-S-positive intracellular material but not with extracellular Aβ deposits. A strong reactive astrogliosis develops together with the neuronal loss. This loss is already detectable at 6 months of age and is PS1KI gene dosage-dependent. Thus, APPSLPS1KI mice further confirm the critical role of intraneuronal Aβ42 in neuronal loss and provide an excellent tool to investigate therapeutic strategies designed to prevent AD neurodegeneration. PMID:15466394

  6. Auditory brain-stem evoked potentials in cat after kainic acid induced neuronal loss. I. Superior olivary complex.

    PubMed

    Zaaroor, M; Starr, A

    1991-01-01

    Auditory brain-stem potentials (ABRs) were studied in cats for up to 45 days after kainic acid had been injected unilaterally or bilaterally into the superior olivary complex (SOC) to produce neuronal destruction while sparing fibers of passage and the terminals of axons of extrinsic origin connecting to SOC neurons. The components of the ABR in cat were labeled by their polarity at the vertex (P, for positive) and their order of appearance (the arabic numerals 1, 2, etc.). Component P1 can be further subdivided into 2 subcomponents labeled P1a and P1b. The correspondences we have assumed between the ABR components in cat and man are indicated by providing a Roman numeral designation for the human component in parentheses following the feline notation, e.g., P4 (V). With bilateral SOC destruction, there was a significant and marked attenuation of waves P2 (III), P3 (IV), P4 (V), P5 (VI), and the sustained potential shift (SPS) amounting to as much as 80% of preoperative values. Following unilateral SOC destruction the attenuation of many of these same ABR components, in response to stimulation of either ear, was up to 50%. No component of the ABR was totally abolished even when the SOC was lesioned 100% bilaterally. In unilaterally lesioned cats with extensive neuronal loss (greater than 75%) the latencies of the components beginning at P3 (IV) were delayed to stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection site but not to stimulation of the ear contralateral to the injection. Binaural interaction components of the ABR were affected in proportion to the attenuation of the ABR. These results are compatible with multiple brain regions contributing to the generation of the components of the ABR beginning with P2 (III) and that components P3 (IV), P4 (V), and P5 (VI) and the sustained potential shift depend particularly on the integrity of the neurons of the SOC bilaterally. The neurons of the lateral subdivision (LSO) and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body

  7. Age-related macular degeneration: choroidal ischaemia?

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, D Jackson; Silverman, Ronald H; Rondeau, Mark J; Lloyd, Harriet O; Khanifar, Aziz A; Chan, R V Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aim Our aim is to use ultrasound to non-invasively detect differences in choroidal microarchitecture possibly related to ischaemia among normal eyes and those with wet and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Prospective case series of subjects with dry AMD, wet AMD and age-matched controls. Methods Digitised 20 MHz B-scan radiofrequency ultrasound data of the region of the macula were segmented to extract the signal from the retina and choroid. This signal was processed by a wavelet transform, and statistical modelling was applied to the wavelet coefficients to examine differences among dry, wet and non-AMD eyes. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate a multivariate classifier. Results In the 69 eyes of 52 patients, 18 did not have AMD, 23 had dry AMD and 28 had wet AMD. Multivariate models showed statistically significant differences between groups. Multiclass ROC analysis of the best model showed an excellent volume-under-curve of 0.892±0.17. The classifier is consistent with ischaemia in dry AMD. Conclusions Wavelet augmented ultrasound is sensitive to the organisational elements of choroidal microarchitecture relating to scatter and fluid tissue boundaries such as seen in ischaemia and inflammation, allowing statistically significant differentiation of dry, wet and non-AMD eyes. This study further supports the association of ischaemia with dry AMD and provides a rationale for treating dry AMD with pharmacological agents to increase choroidal perfusion. ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT00277784. PMID:23740965

  8. Statistical physics of age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in the aging RPE. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the RPE the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  9. Physics of Age Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    2009-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. In this talk I will discuss a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in AMD [K.I. Mazzitello, C.M. Arizmendi, Fereydoon Family, H. E. Grossniklaus, Physical Review E (2009)]. I will also present an overview of our theoretical and computational efforts in modeling some other aspects of the physics of AMD, including CNV and the breakdown of Bruch's membrane [Ongoing collaboration with Abbas Shirinifard and James A. Glazier, Biocomplexity Institute and Department of Physics, Indiana University, Y. Jiang, Los Alamos, and Hans E. Grossniklaus, Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University].

  10. Age-related crosslink in skin collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Mechanic, G.

    1986-05-01

    A stable crosslinking amino acid was isolated from mature bovine skin collagen and its structure was identified as histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C-NMR. This newly identified crosslink has a linkage between C-2 histidine and C-6 of lysine in the latter's portion of hydroxylysinonorleucine. Quantitative studies using various aged samples of cow and human skin collagen indicated that this acid-heat stable nonreducible compound was the major age-related crosslink. In case of cow skin collagen, for example, during early embryonic development (3 and 5 month old embryos) the content of HHL stayed less than 0.01 residue/mole of collagen, however from the middle of gestation period (7 month old embryo) through the maturation stage it showed rapid increase with age and reached approximately 0.5 residues/mole of collagen in the 3 year old animal. Small increments (up to 0.65 res/mole of collagen) were observed in the 9 year old cow. The amounts of the crosslink unlike pyridinoline do not decrease with aging. Similar patterns were observed in human skin collagen.

  11. Neural stem cells could serve as a therapeutic material for age-related neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Suksuphew, Sarawut; Noisa, Parinya

    2015-01-01

    Progressively loss of neural and glial cells is the key event that leads to nervous system dysfunctions and diseases. Several neurodegenerative diseases, for instance Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease, are associated to aging and suggested to be a consequence of deficiency of neural stem cell pool in the affected brain regions. Endogenous neural stem cells exist throughout life and are found in specific niches of human brain. These neural stem cells are responsible for the regeneration of new neurons to restore, in the normal circumstance, the functions of the brain. Endogenous neural stem cells can be isolated, propagated, and, notably, differentiated to most cell types of the brain. On the other hand, other types of stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells can also serve as a source for neural stem cell production, that hold a great promise for regeneration of the brain. The replacement of neural stem cells, either endogenous or stem cell-derived neural stem cells, into impaired brain is highly expected as a possible therapeutic mean for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, clinical features and current routinely treatments of age-related neurodegenerative diseases are documented. Noteworthy, we presented the promising evidence of neural stem cells and their derivatives in curing such diseases, together with the remaining challenges to achieve the best outcome for patients. PMID:25815135

  12. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Bradley D.; Huang, Yanhua H.; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8 h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD. PMID:21962531

  13. Geminin loss causes neural tube defects through disrupted progenitor specification and neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    ES, Patterson; LE, Waller; KL, Kroll

    2014-01-01

    Geminin is a nucleoprotein that can directly bind chromatin regulatory complexes to modulate gene expression during development. Geminin knockout mouse embryos are preimplantation lethal by the 32-cell stage, precluding in vivo study of Geminin's role in neural development. Therefore, here we used a conditional Geminin allele in combination with several Cre-driver lines to define an essential role for Geminin during mammalian neural tube (NT) formation and patterning. Geminin was required in the NT within a critical developmental time window (embryonic day 8.5–10.5), when NT patterning and closure occurs. Geminin excision at these stages resulted in strongly diminished expression of genes that mark and promote dorsal NT identities and decreased differentiation of ventral motor neurons, resulting in completely penetrant NT defects, while excision after embryonic day 10.5 did not result in NT defects. When Geminin was deleted specifically in the spinal NT, both NT defects and axial skeleton defects were observed, but neither defect occurred when Geminin was excised in paraxial mesenchyme, indicating a tissue autonomous requirement for Geminin in developing neuroectoderm. Despite a potential role for Geminin in cell cycle control, we found no evidence of proliferation defects or altered apoptosis. Comparisons of gene expression in the NT of Geminin mutant versus wild-type siblings at embryonic day 10.5 revealed decreased expression of key regulators of neurogenesis, including neurogenic bHLH transcription factors and dorsal interneuron progenitor markers. Together, these data demonstrate a requirement for Geminin for NT patterning and neuronal differentiation during mammalian neurulation in vivo. PMID:24995796

  14. Tau loss attenuates neuronal network hyperexcitability in mouse and Drosophila genetic models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Holth, Jerrah K.; Bomben, Valerie C.; Reed, J. Graham; Inoue, Taeko; Younkin, Linda; Younkin, Steven G.; Pautler, Robia G.; Botas, Juan; Noebels, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal network hyperexcitability underlies the pathogenesis of seizures and is a component of some degenerative neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently, the microtubule binding protein tau has been implicated in the regulation of network synchronization. Genetic removal of Mapt, the gene encoding tau, in AD models overexpressing amyloid-beta (Aβ) decreases hyperexcitability and normalizes the excitation/inhibition imbalance. Whether this effect of tau removal is specific to Aβ mouse models remains to be determined. Here we examined tau as an excitability modifier in the non-AD nervous system using genetic deletion of tau in mouse and Drosophila models of hyperexcitability. Kcna1−/− mice lack Kv1.1 delayed rectifier currents and exhibit severe spontaneous seizures, early lethality, and megencephaly. Young Kcna1−/− mice retained wild-type levels of Aβ, tau, and tau phospho-Thr231. Decreasing tau in Kcna1−/− mice reduced hyperexcitability and alleviated seizure-related comorbidities. Tau reduction decreased Kcna1−/− video-EEG recorded seizure frequency and duration as well as normalized Kcna1−/− hippocampal network hyperexcitability in vitro. Additionally, tau reduction increased Kcna1−/− survival and prevented megencephaly and hippocampal hypertrophy, as determined by MRI. Bang-sensitive Drosophila mutants display paralysis and seizures in response to mechanical stimulation, providing a complementary excitability assay for epistatic interactions. We found that tau reduction significantly decreased seizure sensitivity in two independent bang-sensitive mutant models, kcc and eas. Our results indicate that tau plays a general role in regulating intrinsic neuronal network hyperexcitability independently of Aβ overexpression and suggest that reducing tau function could be a viable target for therapeutic intervention in seizure disorders and antiepileptogenesis. PMID:23345237

  15. Hyperthermia aggravates status epilepticus-induced epileptogenesis and neuronal loss in immature rats.

    PubMed

    Suchomelova, L; Lopez-Meraz, M L; Niquet, J; Kubova, H; Wasterlain, C G

    2015-10-01

    This study tightly controlled seizure duration and severity during status epilepticus (SE) in postnatal day 10 (P10) rats, in order to isolate hyperthermia as the main variable and to study its consequences. Body temperature was maintained at 39 ± 1 °C in hyperthermic SE rats (HT+SE) or at 35 ± 1 °C in normothermic SE animals (NT+SE) during 30 min of SE, which was induced by lithium-pilocarpine (3 mEq/kg, 60 mg/kg) and terminated by diazepam and cooling to NT. All video/EEG measures of SE severity were similar between HT+SE and NT+SE pups. At 24h, neuronal injury was present in the amygdala in the HT+SE group only, and was far more severe in the hippocampus in HT+SE than NT+SE pups. Separate groups of animals were monitored four months later for spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Only HT+SE animals developed convulsive SRS. Both HT+SE and NT+SE animals developed electrographic SRS (83% vs. 55%), but SRS frequency and severity were higher in hyperthermic animals (12.5 ± 3.5 vs. 4.2 ± 2.0 SRS/day). The density of hilar neurons was lower, thickness of the amygdala and perirhinal cortex was reduced, and lateral ventricles were enlarged in HT+SE over NT+SE littermates and HT/NT controls. In this model, hyperthermia greatly increased the epileptogenicity of SE and its neuropathological sequelae. PMID:26259902

  16. ACUTE EXPOSURE TO TRIS (2-CHLOROETHYL) PHOSPHATE HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONAL LOSS AND IMPAIRS LEARNING IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult female, Fischer 344 rats were exposed to 275 mg/kg of tris(2- chloroethyl)phosphate (TRCP) by gavage. RCP produced consistent signs of convulsive activity within 60-90 minutes after dosing and extensive loss of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells when examined 7 days after dosi...

  17. Neuronal Correlates of Risk-Seeking Attitudes to Anticipated Losses in Binge Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Worbe, Yulia; Irvine, Michael; Lange, Iris; Kundu, Prantik; Howell, Nicholas A.; Harrison, Neil A.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Voon, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal decision making under risk is associated with a number of psychiatric disorders. Here, we focus on binge drinkers (BD), characterized by repeated episodes of heavy alcohol intoxication. Previous studies suggest a decreased sensitivity to aversive conditioning in BD. Here, we asked whether BD might be characterized by enhanced risk seeking related to decreased sensitivity to the anticipation of negative outcomes. Methods Using an anticipatory risk-taking task (40 BD and 70 healthy volunteers) and an adapted version of this task for functional magnetic resonance imaging (21 BD and 21 healthy volunteers), we assessed sensitivity to reward and loss across risk probabilities. Results In the behavioral task, BD showed a higher number of risky choices in high-risk losses. In the neuroimaging task, the high-risk attitude in the loss condition was associated with greater activity in dorsolateral prefrontal, lateral orbitofrontal, and superior parietal cortices in BD. Explicit exposure of BD to the probability and magnitude of loss, via introduction of feedback, resulted in a subsequent decrease in risky choices. This change in risk attitude in BD was associated with greater activity in inferior frontal gyrus, which also correlated with the percentage of decrease in risky choices after feedback presentation, suggesting a possible role for cognitive control toward risk-seeking attitudes. Conclusions Our findings suggest that a decrease in sensitivity to the anticipation of high-risk negative outcomes might underlie BD behavior. Presentation of explicit feedback of probability and loss in BD can potentially modify risk-taking attitudes, which have important public health implications and suggest possible therapeutic targets. PMID:24387822

  18. Loss of γ-tubulin, GCP-WD/NEDD1 and CDK5RAP2 from the Centrosome of Neurons in Developing Mouse Cerebral and Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Satoshi; Shigematsu, Momoko; Hirata, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the centrosome of neurons does not have microtubule nucleating activity. Microtubule nucleation requires γ-tubulin as well as its recruiting proteins, GCP-WD/NEDD1 and CDK5RAP2 that anchor γ-tubulin to the centrosome. Change in the localization of these proteins during in vivo development of brain, however, has not been well examined. In this study we investigate the localization of γ-tubulin, GCP-WD and CDK5RAP2 in developing cerebral and cerebellar cortex with immunofluorescence. We found that γ-tubulin and its recruiting proteins were localized at centrosomes of immature neurons, while they were lost at centrosomes in mature neurons. This indicated that the loss of microtubule nucleating activity at the centrosome of neurons is due to the loss of γ-tubulin-recruiting proteins from the centrosome. RT-PCR analysis revealed that these proteins are still expressed after birth, suggesting that they have a role in microtubule generation in cell body and dendrites of mature neurons. Microtubule regrowth experiments on cultured mature neurons showed that microtubules are nucleated not at the centrosome but within dendrites. These data indicated the translocation of microtubule-organizing activity from the centrosome to dendrites during maturation of neurons, which would explain the mixed polarity of microtubules in dendrites. PMID:26633906

  19. Loss of γ-tubulin, GCP-WD/NEDD1 and CDK5RAP2 from the Centrosome of Neurons in Developing Mouse Cerebral and Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Satoshi; Shigematsu, Momoko; Hirata, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kensuke

    2015-10-29

    It has been recently reported that the centrosome of neurons does not have microtubule nucleating activity. Microtubule nucleation requires γ-tubulin as well as its recruiting proteins, GCP-WD/NEDD1 and CDK5RAP2 that anchor γ-tubulin to the centrosome. Change in the localization of these proteins during in vivo development of brain, however, has not been well examined. In this study we investigate the localization of γ-tubulin, GCP-WD and CDK5RAP2 in developing cerebral and cerebellar cortex with immunofluorescence. We found that γ-tubulin and its recruiting proteins were localized at centrosomes of immature neurons, while they were lost at centrosomes in mature neurons. This indicated that the loss of microtubule nucleating activity at the centrosome of neurons is due to the loss of γ-tubulin-recruiting proteins from the centrosome. RT-PCR analysis revealed that these proteins are still expressed after birth, suggesting that they have a role in microtubule generation in cell body and dendrites of mature neurons. Microtubule regrowth experiments on cultured mature neurons showed that microtubules are nucleated not at the centrosome but within dendrites. These data indicated the translocation of microtubule-organizing activity from the centrosome to dendrites during maturation of neurons, which would explain the mixed polarity of microtubules in dendrites. PMID:26633906

  20. GENETICS OF HUMAN AGE RELATED DISORDERS.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, I; Thukral, N; Hasija, Y

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable biological phenomenon. The incidence of age related disorders (ARDs) such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, dementia, osteoporosis, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases increase rapidly with aging. ARDs are becoming a key social and economic trouble for the world's elderly population (above 60 years), which is expected to reach 2 billion by 2050. Advancement in understanding of genetic associations, particularly through genome wide association studies (GWAS), has revealed a substantial contribution of genes to human aging and ARDs. In this review, we have focused on the recent understanding of the extent to which genetic predisposition may influence the aging process. Further analysis of the genetic association studies through pathway analysis several genes associated with multiple ARDs have been highlighted such as apolipoprotein E (APOE), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cadherin 13 (CDH13), CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 1 (CDKAL-1), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), indicating that these genes could play a pivotal role in ARD causation. These genes were found to be significantly enriched in Jak-STAT signalling pathway, asthma and allograft rejection. Further, interleukin-6 (IL-6), insulin (INS), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), estrogen receptor1 (ESR1), transforming growth factor, beta 1(TGFB1) and calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were found to be highly interconnected in network analysis. We believe that extensive research on the presence of common genetic variants among various ARDs may facilitate scientists to understand the biology behind ARDs causation. PMID:26856084

  1. Retinal phagocytes in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Young

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in industrial countries. Vision loss caused by AMD results from geographic atrophy (dry AMD) and/or choroidal neovascularization (wet AMD). Presently, the etiology and pathogenesis of AMD is not fully understood and there is no effective treatment. Oxidative stress in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is considered to be one of the major factors contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD. Also retinal glia, as scavengers, are deeply related with diseases and could play a role. Therefore, therapeutic approaches for microglia and Müller glia, as well as RPE, may lead to new strategies for AMD treatment. This review summarizes the pathological findings observed in RPE cells, microglia and Müller glia of AMD murine models. PMID:26052551

  2. Treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: Current therapies

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Albert J; Scholl, Stefan; Kirchhof, Janna

    2009-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is now the leading cause of blindness and severe vision loss among people over the age of 40 in the Western world. Its prevalence is certain to increase substantially as the population ages. Treatments currently available for the disease include laser photocoagulation, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and intravitreal injections of corticosteroids and anti-angiogenic agents. Many studies have reported the benefits of each of these treatments, although none is without its risks. No intervention actually cures AMD, nor the neovascularization associated with it. However, its symptoms are treated with varying degrees of success. Some treatments stabilize or arrest the progress of the disease. Others have been shown to reverse some of the damage that has already been done. These treatments can even lead to visual improvement. This paper will review the major classes of drugs and therapies designed to treat this condition. PMID:19668562

  3. Cytochrome c release precedes mitochondrial membrane potential loss in cerebellar granule neuron apoptosis: lack of mitochondrial swelling.

    PubMed

    Wigdal, Susan S; Kirkland, Rebecca A; Franklin, James L; Haak-Frendscho, Mary

    2002-09-01

    It has been suggested that release of cytochrome c (Cyt c) from mitochondria during apoptotic death is through opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore followed by swelling-induced rupture of the mitochondrial outer membrane. However, this remains controversial and may vary with cell type and model system. We determined that in mouse cerebellar granule neurons, Cyt c redistribution preceded the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential during the apoptotic process, suggesting that the pore did not open prior to release. Furthermore, when mitochondria were morphologically assessed by electron microscopy, they were not obviously swollen during the period of Cyt c release. This indicates that the pore mechanism of action, if any, is not through mitochondrial outer membrane rupture. While bongkrekic acid, an inhibitor of pore opening, modestly delayed apoptotic death, it also caused a significant (p < 0.05) suppression of protein synthesis. An equivalent suppression of protein synthesis by cycloheximide had a similar delaying effect, suggesting that bongkrekic acid was acting non-specifically. These findings suggest that mitochondrial permeability transition pore is not involved in Cyt c release from mitochondria during the apoptotic death of cerebellar granule neurons. PMID:12358750

  4. Expression of A152T human tau causes age-dependent neuronal dysfunction and loss in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sumihiro; Djukic, Biljana; Taneja, Praveen; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Lo, Iris; Davis, Allyson; Craft, Ryan; Guo, Weikun; Wang, Xin; Kim, Daniel; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Gill, T Michael; Masliah, Eliezer; Mucke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    A152T-variant human tau (hTau-A152T) increases risk for tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Comparing mice with regulatable expression of hTau-A152T or wild-type hTau (hTau-WT), we find age-dependent neuronal loss, cognitive impairments, and spontaneous nonconvulsive epileptiform activity primarily in hTau-A152T mice. However, overexpression of either hTau species enhances neuronal responses to electrical stimulation of synaptic inputs and to an epileptogenic chemical. hTau-A152T mice have higher hTau protein/mRNA ratios in brain, suggesting that A152T increases production or decreases clearance of hTau protein. Despite their functional abnormalities, aging hTau-A152T mice show no evidence for accumulation of insoluble tau aggregates, suggesting that their dysfunctions are caused by soluble tau. In human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) transgenic mice, co-expression of hTau-A152T enhances risk of early death and epileptic activity, suggesting copathogenic interactions between hTau-A152T and amyloid-β peptides or other hAPP metabolites. Thus, the A152T substitution may augment risk for neurodegenerative diseases by increasing hTau protein levels, promoting network hyperexcitability, and synergizing with the adverse effects of other pathogenic factors. PMID:26931567

  5. Increased novelty seeking and decreased harm avoidance in rats showing Type 2-like behaviour following basal forebrain neuronal loss.

    PubMed

    Johansson, A K; Hansen, S

    2001-01-01

    Previous research has shown that excitotoxic lesions of the septum, ventral striatum and adjacent areas increase alcohol intake and defensive aggression in the rat. This behavioural constellation resembles that observed in early-onset Type 2 alcoholism. Due to the fact that the prototypical Type 2 alcoholic scores high on novelty seeking and low on harm avoidance, we studied these temperamental traits in rats with basal forebrain lesions. In comparison with controls, such rats showed more exploration (nose-poking) of a hole-board (indicating increased novelty seeking) and less risk assessment behaviour (stretched attend posturing) in an unfamiliar arena (indicating reduced harm avoidance). In both tests the experimental rats showed signs of motor restlessness. The results obtained indicate that basal forebrain neuronal loss may be associated with an enhanced exploratory responsiveness to novel stimuli together with a relative freedom of anticipatory anxiety. PMID:11704616

  6. Vision Loss, Sudden

    MedlinePlus

    ... of age-related macular degeneration. Spotlight on Aging: Vision Loss in Older People Most commonly, vision loss ... Some Causes and Features of Sudden Loss of Vision Cause Common Features* Tests Sudden loss of vision ...

  7. Application of multispectral imaging detects areas with neuronal myelin loss, without tissue labelling.

    PubMed

    Vazgiouraki, Eleftheria; Papadakis, Vassilis M; Efstathopoulos, Paschalis; Lazaridis, Iakovos; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Fotakis, Costas; Gravanis, Achille

    2016-04-01

    The application of multispectral imaging to discriminate myelinated and demyelinated areas of neural tissue is herein presented. The method is applied through a custom-made, multispectral imaging monochromator, coupled to a commercially available microscope. In the present work, a series of spinal cord sections were analysed derived from mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental model widely used to study multiple sclerosis (MS). The multispectral microscope allows imaging of local areas with loss of myelin without the need of tissue labelling. Imaging with the aforementioned method and system is compared in a parallel way with conventional methods (wide-field and confocal fluorescence microscopies). The diagnostic sensitivity of our method is 90.4% relative to the 'gold standard' method of immunofluorescence microscopy. The presented method offers a new platform for the possible future development of anin vivo, real-time, non-invasive, rapid imaging diagnostic tool of spinal cord myelin loss-derived pathologies. PMID:26510556

  8. Association of Age Related Macular Degeneration and Age Related Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Hassan; Pourakbari, Malihe Shahidi; Entezari, Morteza; Yarmohammadi, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and sensory neural hearing impairment (SHI). Methods: In this case-control study, hearing status of 46 consecutive patients with ARMD were compared with 46 age-matched cases without clinical ARMD as a control group. In all patients, retinal involvements were confirmed by clinical examination, fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). All participants were examined with an otoscope and underwent audiological tests including pure tone audiometry (PTA), speech reception threshold (SRT), speech discrimination score (SDS), tympanometry, reflex tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR). Results: A significant (P = 0.009) association was present between ARMD, especially with exudative and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) components, and age-related hearing impairment primarily involving high frequencies. Patients had higher SRT and lower SDS against anticipated presbycusis than control subjects. Similar results were detected in exudative, CNV and scar patterns supporting an association between late ARMD with SRT and SDS abnormalities. ABR showed significantly prolonged wave I and IV latency times in ARMD (P = 0.034 and 0.022, respectively). Average latency periods for wave I in geographic atrophy (GA) and CNV, and that for wave IV in drusen patterns of ARMD were significantly higher than controls (P = 0.030, 0.007 and 0.050, respectively). Conclusion: The association between ARMD and age-related SHI may be attributed to common anatomical components such as melanin in these two sensory organs. PMID:27195086

  9. Loss of functional A-type potassium channels in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons from a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Routh, Brandy N; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2013-12-11

    Despite the critical importance of voltage-gated ion channels in neurons, very little is known about their functional properties in Fragile X syndrome: the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. Using three complementary approaches, we investigated the physiological role of A-type K(+) currents (I(KA)) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Direct measurement of I(KA) using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings revealed that there was significantly less I(KA) in the dendrites of CA1 neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Interestingly, the midpoint of activation for A-type K(+) channels was hyperpolarized for fmr1-/y neurons compared with wild-type, which might partially compensate for the lower current density. Because of the rapid time course for recovery from steady-state inactivation, the dendritic A-type K(+) current in CA1 neurons from both wild-type and fmr1-/y mice is likely mediated by K(V)4 containing channels. The net effect of the differences in I(KA) was that back-propagating action potentials had larger amplitudes producing greater calcium influx in the distal dendrites of fmr1-/y neurons. Furthermore, CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice had a lower threshold for LTP induction. These data suggest that loss of I(KA) in hippocampal neurons may contribute to dendritic pathophysiology in Fragile X syndrome. PMID:24336711

  10. Disruption of subcellular Arc/Arg 3.1 mRNA expression in striatal efferent neurons following partial monoamine loss induced by methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Barker-Haliski, Melissa L.; Oldenburger, Katharina; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2012-01-01

    The immediate-early gene Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein) is provocative in the context of neuroplasticity because of its experience-dependent regulation and mRNA transport to and translation at activated synapses. Normal rats have more preproenkephalin-negative (ppe-neg; presumed striatonigral) neurons with cytoplasmic Arc mRNA than ppe-positive (ppe-pos; striatopallidal) neurons, despite equivalent numbers of these neurons showing novelty-induced transcriptional activation of Arc. Furthermore, rats with partial monoamine loss induced by methamphetamine (METH) show impaired Arc mRNA expression in both ppe-neg and ppe-pos neurons relative to normal animals following response-reversal learning. In this study, Arc expression induced by exposure to a novel environment was used to assess transcriptional activation and cytoplasmic localization of Arc mRNA in striatal efferent neuron subpopulations subsequent to METH-induced neurotoxicity. Partial monoamine depletion significantly altered Arc expression. Specifically, basal Arc expression was elevated, but novelty-induced transcriptional activation was abolished. Without novelty-induced Arc transcription, METH-pretreated rats also had fewer neurons with cytoplasmic Arc mRNA expression, with the effect being greater for ppe-neg neurons. Thus, METH-induced neurotoxicity substantially alters striatal efferent neuron function at the level of Arc transcription, suggesting a long-term shift in basal ganglia neuroplasticity processes subsequent to METH-induced neurotoxicity. Such changes potentially underlie striatally-based learning deficits associated with METH-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22978492

  11. Eye Conditions in Older Adults: Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iroku-Malize, Tochi; Kirsch, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes a progressive loss of photoreceptors in the macula. It is the most common cause of legal blindness in the United States, and some form of AMD is thought to affect more than 9 million individuals. Risk factors include older age, smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, white race, female sex, and a family history of AMD. There are two types of advanced AMD: nonexudative (dry or geographic atrophy) and exudative (wet or neovascular). Both cause progressive central vision loss with intact peripheral vision. Nonexudative AMD accounts for 80% to 90% of all advanced cases, and more than 90% of patients with severe vision loss have exudative AMD. On ophthalmoscopic examination, early findings include drusen (ie, yellow deposits in the retina). Prominent choroidal vessels, subretinal edema, and/or hemorrhage are seen in wet AMD. Regular eye examinations, visual field testing, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography are used for diagnosis and to guide management. There is no specific therapy for dry AMD, but antioxidant supplementation may be helpful. Intravitreal injection of a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor is the treatment of choice for wet AMD. Optical aids and devices can help to maximize function for patients with AMD. PMID:27348529

  12. Nitroxide pharmaceutical development for age-related degeneration and disease

    PubMed Central

    Zarling, Jacob A.; Brunt, Vienna E.; Vallerga, Anne K.; Li, Weixing; Tao, Albert; Zarling, David A.; Minson, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide small molecule agents are in development as preventative or therapeutic pharmaceutical drugs for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease, which are two major diseases of aging. These aging diseases are associated with patient genetics, smoking, diet, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. Nitroxide drugs preventing aging-, smoking-, high sugar or high fat diet-, or radiation- and other environmental-induced pathophysiological conditions in aging disease are reviewed. Tempol (TP), Tempol Hydroxylamine (TP-H), and TP-H prodrug (OT-551) are evaluated in (1) non-smokers versus smokers with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction, rapidly reversed by cutaneous TP; (2) elderly cancer patients at risk for radiation-induced skin burns or hair loss, prevented by topical TP; and (3) elderly smoker or non-smoker AMD patients at risk for vision loss, prevented by daily eye drops of OT-551. The human data indicates safety and efficacy for these nitroxide drugs. Both TP and TP-H topically penetrate and function in skin or mucosa, protecting and treating radiation burns and hair loss or smoking-induced cutaneous vascular dysfunction. TP and TP-H do not penetrate the cornea, while OT-551 does effectively penetrate and travels to the back of the eye, preserving visual acuity and preserving normal and low light luminance in dry AMD smokers and non-smoker patients. Topical, oral, or injectable drug formulations are discussed. PMID:26594225

  13. Age-Related Changes in the Misinformation Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Rachel; Hayne, Harlene

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments examined relation between age-related changes in retention and age-related changes in the misinformation effect. Found large age-related retention differences when participants were interviewed immediately and after 1 day, but after 6 weeks, differences were minimal. Exposure to misleading information increased commission errors.…

  14. Netrin-1 rescues neuron loss by attenuating secondary apoptosis in ipsilateral thalamic nucleus following focal cerebral infarction in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liao, S-J; Gong, Q; Chen, X-R; Ye, L-X; Ding, Q; Zeng, J-S; Yu, J

    2013-02-12

    Neurological deficit following cerebral infarction correlates with not only primary injury, but also secondary neuronal apoptosis in remote loci connected to the infarction. Netrin-1 is crucial for axonal guidance by interacting with its receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and uncoordinated gene 5H (UNC5H). DCC and UNC5H are also dependence receptors inducing cell apoptosis when unbound by netrin-1. The present study is to investigate the role of netrin-1 and its receptors in ipsilateral ventroposterior thalamic nucleus (VPN) injury secondary to stroke in hypertensive rats. Renovascular hypertensive Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of netrin-1 (600 ng/d for 7 days) or vehicle (IgG/Fc) was given 24h after MCAO. Neurological function was evaluated by postural reflex 8 and 14 days after MCAO. Then, immunoreactivity was determined in the ipsilateral VPN for NeuN, glial fibrillary acidic protein, netrin-1 and its receptors (DCC and UNC5H2), apoptosis was detected with Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and the expressions of caspase-3, netrin-1, DCC, and UNC5H2 were quantified by western blot analysis. MCAO resulted in the impaired postural reflex after 8 and 14 days, with decreased NeuN marked neurons and increased TUNEL-positive cells, as well as an up-regulation in the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and UNC5H2 protein in the ipsilateral VPN, without significant change in DCC or netrin-1 expression. By exogenous netrin-1 infusion, the number of neurons was increased in the ipsilateral VPN, and both TUNEL-positive cell number and caspase-3 protein level were reduced, while UNC5H2 expression remained unaffected, simultaneously, the impairment of postural reflex was improved. Taken together, the present study indicates that exogenous netrin-1 could rescue neuron loss by attenuating secondary apoptosis in the

  15. VMAT1 Deletion Causes Neuronal Loss in the Hippocampus and Neurocognitive Deficits in Spatial Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Multani, Pushpinder K.; Hodge, Rachel; Estévez, Marcel A.; Abel, Ted; Kung, Hank; Alter, Mark; Brookshire, Bethany; Lucki, Irwin; Nall, Aleksandra H.; Talbot, Konrad; Doyle, Glenn A.; Lohoff, Falk W.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT) are involved in presynaptic storage and release of neurotransmitters. While it was thought initially that only VMAT2 is brain expressed and VMAT1 is present only in the periphery, recent data has challenged the exclusive expression of VMAT2 in brain. To further elucidate the role of VMAT1 brain expression and its potential role in neuropsychiatric disorders, we have investigated mice lacking VMAT1. Comparison of wildtype and knock-out (KO) mice using qPCR and immunohistochemistry documents the expression of VMAT1 in the brain. Deletion of VMAT1 leads to increased hippocampal apoptosis and reduced neurogenesis as assessed by caspase-3-labeling and BrdU-labeling. Behavioral data show that mice lacking VMAT1 have neurocognitive deficits. VMAT2 expression is not altered in VMAT1 KO mice, suggesting a distinct role of VMAT1. Our data support VMAT1 brain expression and suggest that VMAT1 plays a key role in survival of hippocampal neurons and thus might contribute to neurocognitive deficits observed in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:23201251

  16. Rosiglitazone attenuates inflammation and CA3 neuronal loss following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Rose, Marie E; Culver, Sherman; Ma, Xiecheng; Dixon, C Edward; Graham, Steven H

    2016-04-15

    Rosiglitazone, a potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonist, has been shown to confer neuroprotective effects in stroke and spinal cord injury, but its role in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still controversial. Using a controlled cortical impact model in rats, the current study was designed to determine the effects of rosiglitazone treatment (6 mg/kg at 5 min, 6 h and 24 h post injury) upon inflammation and histological outcome at 21 d after TBI. In addition, the effects of rosiglitazone upon inflammatory cytokine transcription, vestibulomotor behavior and spatial memory function were determined at earlier time points (24 h, 1-5 d, 14-20 d post injury, respectively). Compared with the vehicle-treated group, rosiglitazone treatment suppressed production of TNFα at 24 h after TBI, attenuated activation of microglia/macrophages and increased survival of CA3 neurons but had no effect on lesion volume at 21 d after TBI. Rosiglitazone-treated animals had improved performance on beam balance testing, but there was no difference in spatial memory function as determined by Morris water maze. In summary, this study indicates that rosiglitazone treatment in the first 24 h after TBI has limited anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in rat traumatic injury. Further study using an alternative dosage paradigm and more sensitive behavioral testing may be warranted. PMID:26947332

  17. Is There a Molecular Logic that Sustains Neuronal Functional Integrity and Survival?: Lipid Signaling is Necessary for Neuroprotective Neuronal Transcriptional Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2015-01-01

    A challenge to civilization is the growing incidence in the loss of sight and cognition due to increased life expectancy. Therefore, we are confronted with a rise in the occurrence of photoreceptor- and neuronal-survival failure, as reflected mainly by age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nervous system development is driven by neuronal apoptotic cell death and, thereafter, for the entire lifespan of an organism, neurons are post-mitotic cells. In neurodegenerative diseases, apoptosis and other forms of cells death lead to selective neuronal loss. Although age is the main risk factor, not everyone develops these diseases during aging. Despite decades of important findings about neuronal cell death, the specific mechanisms that regulate neuronal survival remain incompletely understood. PMID:25236258

  18. Sex-dependent modulation of age-related cognitive decline by the L-type calcium channel gene Cacna1c (Cav 1.2).

    PubMed

    Zanos, Panos; Bhat, Shambhu; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Smith, Robert J; Tonelli, Leonardo H; Gould, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Increased calcium influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels has been implicated in the neuronal dysfunction underlying age-related memory declines. The present study aimed to test the specific role of Cacna1c (which encodes Cav 1.2) in modulating age-related memory dysfunction. Short-term, spatial and contextual/emotional memory was evaluated in young and aged, wild-type as well as mice with one functional copy of Cacna1c (haploinsufficient), using the novel object recognition, Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks, respectively. Hippocampal expression of Cacna1c mRNA was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Ageing was associated with object recognition and contextual/emotional memory deficits, and a significant increase in hippocampal Cacna1c mRNA expression. Cacna1c haploinsufficiency was associated with decreased Cacna1c mRNA expression in both young and old animals. However, haploinsufficient mice did not manifest an age-related increase in expression of this gene. Behaviourally, Cacna1c haploinsufficiency prevented object recognition deficits during ageing in both male and female mice. A significant correlation between higher Cacna1c levels and decreased object recognition performance was observed in both sexes. Also, a sex-dependent protective role of decreased Cacna1c levels in contextual/emotional memory loss has been observed, specifically in male mice. These data provide evidence for an association between increased hippocampal Cacna1c expression and age-related cognitive decline. Additionally, they indicate an interaction between the Cacna1c gene and sex in the modulation of age-related contextual memory declines. PMID:25989111

  19. Loss of inhibitory tone on spinal cord dorsal horn spontaneously and nonspontaneously active neurons in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Maria Carmen; Dhanasobhon, Dhanasak; Yalcin, Ipek; Schlichter, Rémy; Cordero-Erausquin, Matilde

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity of inhibitory transmission in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) is believed to be a key mechanism responsible for pain hypersensitivity in neuropathic pain syndromes. We evaluated this plasticity by recording responses to mechanical stimuli in silent neurons (nonspontaneously active [NSA]) and neurons showing ongoing activity (spontaneously active [SA]) in the SDH of control and nerve-injured mice (cuff model). The SA and NSA neurons represented 59% and 41% of recorded neurons, respectively, and were predominantly wide dynamic range (WDR) in naive mice. Nerve-injured mice displayed a marked decrease in the mechanical threshold of the injured paw. After nerve injury, the proportion of SA neurons was increased to 78%, which suggests that some NSA neurons became SA. In addition, the response to touch (but not pinch) was dramatically increased in SA neurons, and high-threshold (nociceptive specific) neurons were no longer observed. Pharmacological blockade of spinal inhibition with a mixture of GABAA and glycine receptor antagonists significantly increased responses to innocuous mechanical stimuli in SA and NSA neurons from sham animals, but had no effect in sciatic nerve-injured animals, revealing a dramatic loss of spinal inhibitory tone in this situation. Moreover, in nerve-injured mice, local spinal administration of acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, restored responses to touch similar to those observed in naive or sham mice. These results suggest that a shift in the reversal potential for anions is an important component of the abnormal mechanical responses and of the loss of inhibitory tone recorded in a model of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:26934510

  20. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  1. Improved word recognition for observers with age-related maculopathies using compensation filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, Teri B.

    1988-01-01

    A method for improving word recognition for people with age-related maculopathies, which cause a loss of central vision, is discussed. It is found that the use of individualized compensation filters based on an person's normalized contrast sensitivity function can improve word recognition for people with age-related maculopathies. It is shown that 27-70 pct more magnification is needed for unfiltered words compared to filtered words. The improvement in word recognition is positively correlated with the severity of vision loss.

  2. Anatomic Alterations in Aging and Age-Related Diseases of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Nickerson, John M.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Bergman, Louise A. M. K.; Berglin, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We described anatomic age-related changes in the human eye to determine potential areas of investigation that may lead to identifying eyes at risk for age-related disease. Methods. A descriptive review of anatomic changes in the eye related to aging was performed in the context of current areas of investigation. The review was performed specifically for differing anatomic ocular structures, including cornea, trabecular meshwork, lens, uveal tract, Bruch's membrane, retina, RPE, vitreous, sclera, and optic nerve. Results. Age-related changes occur in all ocular tissues. The cornea flattens and there is an attrition of endothelial cells. The shape of the trabecular meshwork changes and there is a loss of trabecular endothelium. The lens grows and becomes cataractous. The ciliary body becomes collagenized, there are choroidal vascular changes, and Bruch's membrane thickens. Retinal vessels become hyalinized and there is a loss of rods before cones in the macula. RPE morphometric changes occur with aging. The vitreous becomes liquefied and there is a loss of vitreous compartmentalization. The sclera becomes rigid and may become calcified. The optic nerve exhibits structural changes with age. Conclusions. There are numerous anatomic age-related changes in the human eye. Current areas of investigation related to these changes include adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy imaging of the RPE mosaic in the context of aging, and drug delivery devices that overcome age-related alterations to retinal and macular perfusion. PMID:24335063

  3. Exercise Counteracts Aging-Related Memory Impairment: A Potential Role for the Astrocytic Metabolic Shuttle

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Pei-Chun; Calkins, Marcus J.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cognitive impairment has become one of the most common health threats in many countries. The biological substrate of cognition is the interconnection of neurons to form complex information processing networks. Experience-based alterations in the activities of these information processing networks lead to neuroadaptation, which is physically represented at the cellular level as synaptic plasticity. Although synaptic plasticity is known to be affected by aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well described. Astrocytes, a glial cell type that is infrequently investigated in cognitive science, have emerged as energy suppliers which are necessary for meeting the abundant energy demand resulting from glutamatergic synaptic activity. Moreover, the concerted action of an astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle is essential for cognitive function; whereas, energetic incoordination between astrocytes and neurons may contribute to cognitive impairment. Whether altered function of the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle links aging to reduced synaptic plasticity is unexplored. However, accumulated evidence documents significant beneficial effects of long-term, regular exercise on cognition and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, exercise increases the effectiveness of astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle by upregulation of astrocytic lactate transporter levels. This review summarizes previous findings related to the neuronal activity-dependent astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle. Moreover, we discuss how aging and exercise may shape the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle in cognition-associated brain areas. PMID:27047373

  4. Exercise Counteracts Aging-Related Memory Impairment: A Potential Role for the Astrocytic Metabolic Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Pei-Chun; Calkins, Marcus J; Wu, Shih-Ying; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cognitive impairment has become one of the most common health threats in many countries. The biological substrate of cognition is the interconnection of neurons to form complex information processing networks. Experience-based alterations in the activities of these information processing networks lead to neuroadaptation, which is physically represented at the cellular level as synaptic plasticity. Although synaptic plasticity is known to be affected by aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well described. Astrocytes, a glial cell type that is infrequently investigated in cognitive science, have emerged as energy suppliers which are necessary for meeting the abundant energy demand resulting from glutamatergic synaptic activity. Moreover, the concerted action of an astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle is essential for cognitive function; whereas, energetic incoordination between astrocytes and neurons may contribute to cognitive impairment. Whether altered function of the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle links aging to reduced synaptic plasticity is unexplored. However, accumulated evidence documents significant beneficial effects of long-term, regular exercise on cognition and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, exercise increases the effectiveness of astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle by upregulation of astrocytic lactate transporter levels. This review summarizes previous findings related to the neuronal activity-dependent astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle. Moreover, we discuss how aging and exercise may shape the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle in cognition-associated brain areas. PMID:27047373

  5. Age-Related Tissue Stiffening: Cause and Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Tissue elasticity is severely compromised in aging skin, lungs, and blood vessels. In the vascular and pulmonary systems, respectively, loss of mechanical function is linked to hypertension, which in turn is a risk factor for heart and renal failure, stroke, and aortic aneurysms, and to an increased risk of mortality as a result of acute lung infections. Recent Advances Although cellular mechanisms were thought to play an important role in mediating tissue aging, the reason for the apparent sensitivity of elastic fibers to age-related degradation remained unclear. We have recently demonstrated that compared with type I collagen, a key component of the elastic fiber system, the cysteine-rich fibrillin microfibril is highly susceptible to direct UV exposure in a cell-free environment. We hypothesized therefore that, as a consequence of both their remarkable longevity and cysteine-rich composition, many elastic fiber-associated components will be susceptible to the accumulation of damage by both direct UV radiation and reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidation. Critical Issues Although elastic fiber remodeling is a common feature of aging dynamic tissues, the inaccessibility of most human tissues has hampered attempts to define the molecular causes. Clinical Care Relevance Although, currently, the localized repair of damaged elastic fibers may be effected by the topical application of retinoids and some cosmetic products, future studies may extend the application of systemic transforming growth factor β antagonists, which can prevent cardiovascular remodeling in murine Marfan syndrome, to aging humans. Acellular mechanisms may be key mediators of elastic fiber remodeling and hence age-related tissue stiffening. PMID:24527318

  6. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  7. Caspase-2 Deficiency Enhances Aging-Related Traits in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingpei; Padalecki, Susan S; Chaudhuri, Asish R; Waal, Eric De; Goins, Beth A; Grubbs, Barry; Ikeno, Yuji; Richardson, Arlan; Mundy, Gregory R; Herman, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Alteration of apoptotic activity has been observed in a number of tissues in aging mammals, but it remains unclear whether and/or how apoptosis may affect aging. Caspase-2 is a member of the cysteine protease family that plays a critical role in apoptosis. To understand the impact of compromised apoptosis function on mammalian aging, we conducted a comparative study on caspase-2 deficient mice and their wild-type littermates with a specific focus on the aging-related traits at advanced ages. We found that caspase-2 deficiency enhanced a number of traits commonly seen in premature aging animals. Loss of caspase-2 was associated with shortened maximum lifespan, impaired hair growth, increased bone loss, and reduced body fat content. In addition, we found that the livers of caspase-2 deficient mice had higher levels of oxidized proteins than those of age-matched wild-type mice, suggesting that caspase-2 deficiency compromised the animal's ability to clear oxidatively damaged cells. Collectively, these results suggest that caspase-2 deficiency affects aging in the mice. This study thus demonstrates for the first time that disruption of a key apoptotic gene has a significant impact on aging. PMID:17188333

  8. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits.

    PubMed

    Masoud, S T; Vecchio, L M; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, M M; Nguyen, L T; Bermejo, M K; Kile, B; Sotnikova, T D; Siesser, W B; Gainetdinov, R R; Wightman, R M; Caron, M G; Richardson, J R; Miller, G W; Ramsey, A J; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with l-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25447236

  9. Brimonidine suppresses loss of retinal neurons and visual function in a murine model of optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoli; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Atsuko; Noro, Takahiko; Azuchi, Yuriko; Semba, Kentaro; Harada, Chikako; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Harada, Takayuki

    2015-04-10

    Optic neuritis is inflammation of the optic nerve and is strongly associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating syndrome of the central nervous system. It leads to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and can cause severe vision loss. Brimonidine (BMD) is a selective α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that is used clinically for the treatment of glaucoma. BMD lowers intraocular pressure, but recent evidence suggests that its therapeutic efficacy may also mediate through mechanisms independent of modulation of intraocular pressure. In this study, we examined the effects of topical administration of BMD on retinal degeneration during optic neuritis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. EAE was induced with MOG35-55 in C57BL/6J mice and BMD eyedrops were applied daily. In the EAE retina, the number of RGCs was significantly decreased and this effect was suppressed with BMD treatment. Consistent with histological analyses, the visual impairment observed in EAE mice was inhibited with BMD treatment, indicating the functional significance of the neuroprotective effect of BMD. Furthermore, BMD increased the expression level of basic fibroblast growth factor in the EAE retina, particularly in Müller glial cells and RGCs. Our findings suggest that topical administration of BMD may be available for RGC protection during optic neuritis, as well as for glaucoma. PMID:25736951

  10. Aluminum chloride induces neuroinflammation, loss of neuronal dendritic spine and cognition impairment in developing rat.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Haoran; Huang, Wanyue; Xu, Feibo; Zhuang, Cuicui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Li, Yanfei

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) is present in the daily life of humans, and the incidence of Al contamination increased in recent years. Long-term excessive Al intake induces neuroinflammation and cognition impairment. Neuroinflammation alter density of dendritic spine, which, in turn, influence cognition function. However, it is unknown whether increased neuroinflammation is associated with altered density of dendritic spine in Al-treated rats. In the present study, AlCl3 was orally administrated to rat at 50, 150 and 450 mg/kg for 90d. We examined the effects of AlCl3 on the cognition function, density of dendritic spine in hippocampus of CA1 and DG region and the mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, MHC II, CX3CL1 and BNDF in developing rat. These results showed exposure to AlCl3 lead to increased mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and MCH II, decreased mRNA levels of CX3CL1 and BDNF, decreased density of dendritic spine and impaired learning and memory in developing rat. Our results suggest AlCl3 can induce neuroinflammation that may result in loss of spine, and thereby leads to learning and memory deficits. PMID:26946116

  11. Increased mitochondrial DNA deletions in substantia nigra dopamine neurons of the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2014-01-01

    The dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN), which constitute the origin of the nigrostriatal system, are vulnerable to age-related degenerative processes. For example, in humans there is a relatively small age-related loss of neurons but a marked decline of the dopaminergic phenotype associated with impaired voluntary motor control. However, the mechanisms responsible for the dysfunction and degeneration of SN dopamine neurons remain poorly understood. One potential contributor is mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting from an increased abundance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations such as deletions. Human studies have identified relatively high levels of mtDNA deletions in these cells in both aging and Parkinson's disease (>35%), with a higher abundance of deletions (>60%) in individual neurons with mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether similar mtDNA mutations occur in other species such as the rat. In the present study, we quantified mtDNA deletion abundance in laser microdissected SN dopaminergic neurons from young and old F344 rats. Our results indicate that mtDNA deletions accumulated with age, with approximately 20% more mtDNA deletions in SN dopaminergic neurons from old compared to young animals. Thus, while rat SN dopaminergic neurons do accumulate mtDNA deletions with aging, this does not reflect the deletion burden in humans, and other mechanisms may be operating to compensate for age-related mtDNA damage in the rat SN dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25612740

  12. White Matter Neurons in Young Adult and Aged Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Farzad; Wang, Xiyue; Rosene, Douglas L.; Rockland, Kathleen S.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and non-human primates (NHP), white matter neurons (WMNs) persist beyond early development. Their functional importance is largely unknown, but they have both corticothalamic and corticocortical connectivity and at least one subpopulation has been implicated in vascular regulation and sleep. Several other studies have reported that the density of WMNs in humans is altered in neuropathological or psychiatric conditions. The present investigation evaluates and compares the density of superficial and deep WMNs in frontal (FR), temporal (TE), and parietal (Par) association regions of four young adult and four aged male rhesus monkeys. A major aim was to determine whether there was age-related neuronal loss, as might be expected given the substantial age-related changes known to occur in the surrounding white matter environment. Neurons were visualized by immunocytochemistry for Neu-N in coronal tissue sections (30 μm thickness), and neuronal density was assessed by systematic random sampling. Per 0.16 mm2 sampling box, this yielded about 40 neurons in the superficial WM and 10 in the deep WM. Consistent with multiple studies of cell density in the cortical gray matter of normal brains, neither the superficial nor deep WM populations showed statistically significant age-related neuronal loss, although we observed a moderate decrease with age for the deep WMNs in the frontal region. Morphometric analyses, in contrast, showed significant age effects in soma size and circularity. In specific, superficial WMNs were larger in FR and Par WM regions of the young monkeys; but in the TE, these were larger in the older monkeys. An age effect was also observed for soma circularity: superficial WMNs were more circular in FR and Par of the older monkeys. This second, morphometric result raises the question of whether other age-related morphological, connectivity, or molecular changes occur in the WMNs. These could have multiple impacts, given the wide range of putative

  13. Neuronal loss and decreased GLT-1 expression observed in the spinal cord of Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs with canine degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, M; Uchida, K; Yamato, O; Inaba, M; Uddin, M M; Nakayama, H

    2014-05-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is frequently found in Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) dogs. Canine DM is potentially a spontaneous animal model for human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because of similar lesions and the involvement of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation. However, the ventral horn lesion in DM has not been characterized in detail. Glutamate excitotoxicity due to deficiency of the glutamine-glutamate cycle has been implicated in neuron death in ALS. Thus, we examined 5 PWC dogs with an SOD1 mutation that were affected by DM, 5 non-DM PWC dogs, and 5 Beagle dogs without neurologic signs to assess the neuronal changes and the expression levels of 2 glial excitatory amino acid transporters (glutamate transporter 1 [GLT-1] and glutamate/aspartate transporter [GLAST]). The number of neurons in the spinal ventral horns of the DM dogs was significantly decreased, whereas no change was found in the cell size. Chromatolysis, lipofuscin-laden neurons, and marked synapse loss were also observed. GLT-1 expression was strikingly decreased in DM dogs, whereas GLAST expression showed no significant change. The results indicate that excitotoxicity related to the reduced expression of GLT-1, but not GLAST, may be involved in neuron loss in DM, as in human ALS, whereas intraneuronal events may differ between the 2 diseases. PMID:23839236

  14. Psychosocial Intervention for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Hans-Werner; Kammerer, Annette; Holz, Frank; Miller, Daniel; Becker, Stefanie; Kaspar, Roman; Himmelsbach, Ines

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated an emotion-focused and a problem-focused intervention designed for patients with age-related macular degeneration. It found a limited decrease in depression in the emotion-focused group and an increase in active problem orientation and in adaptation to vision loss in the problem-focused group.

  15. Introduction to the issue regarding research regarding age related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blindness is the second greatest fear among the elderly. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among the elderly in most industrialized nations. AMD first compromises central high acuity vision. Subsequently, all vision may be lost. AMD is a progressive retinal d...

  16. Dendritic regression dissociated from neuronal death but associated with partial deafferentation in aging rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Flood, D G; Coleman, P D

    1993-01-01

    As neurons are lost in normal aging, the dendrites of surviving neighbor neurons may proliferate, regress, or remain unchanged. In the case of age-related dendritic regression, it has been difficult to distinguish whether the regression precedes neuronal death or whether it is a consequence of loss of afferent supply. The rat supraoptic nucleus (SON) represents a model system in which there is no age-related loss of neurons, but in which there is an age-related loss of afferents. The magnocellular neurosecretory neurons of the SON, that produce vasopressin and oxytocin for release in the posterior pituitary, were studied in male Fischer 344 rats at 3, 12, 20, 27, 30, and 32 months of age. Counts in Nissl-stained sections showed no neuronal loss with age, and confirmed similar findings in other strains of rat and in mouse and human. Nucleolar size increased between 3 and 12 months of age, due, in part, to nucleolar fusion, and was unchanged between 12 and 32 months of age, indicating maintenance of general cellular function in old age. Dendritic extent quantified in Golgi-stained tissue increased between 3 and 12 months of age, was stable between 12 and 20 months, and decreased between 20 and 27 months. We interpret the increase between 3 and 12 months as a late maturational change. Dendritic regression between 20 and 27 months was probably the result of deafferentation due to the preceding age-related loss of the noradrenergic input to the SON from the ventral medulla. PMID:7507575

  17. Parent-of-origin genetic background affects the transcriptional levels of circadian and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Tinarelli, Federico; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Nicassio, Francesco; Tucci, Valter

    2014-01-01

    Sleep homoeostasis refers to a process in which the propensity to sleep increases as wakefulness progresses and decreases as sleep progresses. Sleep is tightly organized around the circadian clock and is regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The homoeostatic response of sleep, which is classically triggered by sleep deprivation, is generally measured as a rebound effect of electrophysiological measures, for example delta sleep. However, more recently, gene expression changes following sleep loss have been investigated as biomarkers of sleep homoeostasis. The genetic background of an individual may affect this sleep-dependent gene expression phenotype. In this study, we investigated whether parental genetic background differentially modulates the expression of genes following sleep loss. We tested the progeny of reciprocal crosses of AKR/J and DBA/2J mouse strains and we show a parent-of-origin effect on the expression of circadian, sleep and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep deprivation. Thus, we further explored, by in silico, specific functions or upstream mechanisms of regulation and we observed that several upstream mechanisms involving signalling pathways (i.e. DICER1, PKA), growth factors (CSF3 and BDNF) and transcriptional regulators (EGR2 and ELK4) may be differentially modulated by parental effects. This is the first report showing that a behavioural manipulation (e.g. sleep deprivation) in adult animals triggers specific gene expression responses according to parent-of-origin genomic mechanisms. Our study suggests that the same mechanism may be extended to other behavioural domains and that the investigation of gene expression following experimental manipulations should take seriously into account parent-of-origin effects. PMID:24446504

  18. Age-related changes in dentate gyrus cell numbers, neurogenesis, and associations with cognitive impairments in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Laura B; Heyworth, Nadine C; Shwe, Yamin; Moore, Tara L; Rosene, Douglas L

    2015-01-01

    The generation of new neurons in the adult mammalian brain is well-established for the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). However, the role of neurogenesis in hippocampal function and cognition, how it changes in aging, and the mechanisms underlying this are yet to be elucidated in the monkey brain. To address this, we investigated adult neurogenesis in the DG of 42 rhesus monkeys (39 cognitively tested) ranging in age from young adult to the elderly. We report here that there is an age-related decline in proliferation and a delayed development of adult neuronal phenotype. Additionally, we show that many of the new neurons survive throughout the lifetime of the animal and may contribute to a modest increase in total neuron number in the granule cell layer of the DG over the adult life span. Lastly, we find that measures of decreased adult neurogenesis are only modestly predictive of age-related cognitive impairment. PMID:26236203

  19. Age-related changes in dentate gyrus cell numbers, neurogenesis, and associations with cognitive impairments in the rhesus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Ngwenya, Laura B.; Heyworth, Nadine C.; Shwe, Yamin; Moore, Tara L.; Rosene, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of new neurons in the adult mammalian brain is well-established for the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). However, the role of neurogenesis in hippocampal function and cognition, how it changes in aging, and the mechanisms underlying this are yet to be elucidated in the monkey brain. To address this, we investigated adult neurogenesis in the DG of 42 rhesus monkeys (39 cognitively tested) ranging in age from young adult to the elderly. We report here that there is an age-related decline in proliferation and a delayed development of adult neuronal phenotype. Additionally, we show that many of the new neurons survive throughout the lifetime of the animal and may contribute to a modest increase in total neuron number in the granule cell layer of the DG over the adult life span. Lastly, we find that measures of decreased adult neurogenesis are only modestly predictive of age-related cognitive impairment. PMID:26236203

  20. Pcdh19 Loss-of-Function Increases Neuronal Migration In Vitro but is Dispensable for Brain Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Daniel T.; Homan, Claire C.; Jaehne, Emily J.; Piltz, Sandra G.; Haines, Bryan P.; Baune, Bernhard T.; Jolly, Lachlan A.; Hughes, James N.; Gecz, Jozef; Thomas, Paul Q.

    2016-01-01

    Protocadherin 19 (Pcdh19) is an X-linked gene belonging to the protocadherin superfamily, whose members are predominantly expressed in the central nervous system and have been implicated in cell-cell adhesion, axon guidance and dendrite self-avoidance. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in humans result in the childhood epilepsy disorder PCDH19 Girls Clustering Epilepsy (PCDH19 GCE) indicating that PCDH19 is required for brain development. However, understanding PCDH19 function in vivo has proven challenging and has not been studied in mammalian models. Here, we validate a murine Pcdh19 null allele in which a β-Geo reporter cassette is expressed under the control of the endogenous promoter. Analysis of β-Geo reporter activity revealed widespread but restricted expression of PCDH19 in embryonic, postnatal and adult brains. No gross morphological defects were identified in Pcdh19+/β-Geo and Pcdh19Y/β-Geo brains and the location of Pcdh19 null cells was normal. However, in vitro migration assays revealed that the motility of Pcdh19 null neurons was significantly elevated, potentially contributing to pathogenesis in patients with PCDH19 mutations. Overall our initial characterization of Pcdh19+/β-Geo, Pcdh19β-Geo/β-Geo and Pcdh19Y/β-Geomice reveals that despite widespread expression of Pcdh19 in the CNS, and its role in human epilepsy, its function in mice is not essential for brain development. PMID:27240640

  1. Neurodegeneration. C9ORF72 repeat expansions in mice cause TDP-43 pathology, neuronal loss, and behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Chew, Jeannie; Gendron, Tania F; Prudencio, Mercedes; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Lee, Chris W; Jansen-West, Karen; Kurti, Aishe; Murray, Melissa E; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bauer, Peter O; Whitelaw, Ena C; Rousseau, Linda; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Stetler, Caroline; Daughrity, Lillian M; Perkerson, Emilie A; Desaro, Pamela; Johnston, Amelia; Overstreet, Karen; Edbauer, Dieter; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis W; Fryer, John D; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2015-06-01

    The major genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a G4C2 repeat expansion in C9ORF72. Efforts to combat neurodegeneration associated with "c9FTD/ALS" are hindered by a lack of animal models recapitulating disease features. We developed a mouse model to mimic both neuropathological and clinical c9FTD/ALS phenotypes. We expressed (G4C2)66 throughout the murine central nervous system by means of somatic brain transgenesis mediated by adeno-associated virus. Brains of 6-month-old mice contained nuclear RNA foci, inclusions of poly(Gly-Pro), poly(Gly-Ala), and poly(Gly-Arg) dipeptide repeat proteins, as well as TDP-43 pathology. These mouse brains also exhibited cortical neuron and cerebellar Purkinje cell loss, astrogliosis, and decreased weight. (G4C2)66 mice also developed behavioral abnormalities similar to clinical symptoms of c9FTD/ALS patients, including hyperactivity, anxiety, antisocial behavior, and motor deficits. PMID:25977373

  2. Loss of neuronal GSK3β reduces dendritic spine stability and attenuates excitatory synaptic transmission via β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ochs, S M; Dorostkar, M M; Aramuni, G; Schön, C; Filser, S; Pöschl, J; Kremer, A; Van Leuven, F; Ovsepian, S V; Herms, J

    2015-04-01

    Central nervous glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric diseases, such as bipolar disorder, depression, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome or anxiety disorder. Many drugs employed to treat these conditions inhibit GSK3β either directly or indirectly. We studied how conditional knockout of GSK3β affected structural synaptic plasticity. Deletion of the GSK3β gene in a subset of cortical and hippocampal neurons in adult mice led to reduced spine density. In vivo imaging revealed that this was caused by a loss of persistent spines, whereas stabilization of newly formed spines was reduced. In electrophysiological recordings, these structural alterations correlated with a considerable drop in the frequency and amplitude of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor-dependent miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. Expression of constitutively active β-catenin caused reduction in spine density and electrophysiological alterations similar to GSK3β knockout, suggesting that the effects of GSK3β knockout were mediated by the accumulation of β-catenin. In summary, changes of dendritic spines, both in quantity and in morphology, are correlates of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity; thus, these results may help explain the mechanism of action of psychotropic drugs inhibiting GSK3β. PMID:24912492

  3. Impaired neurogenesis, neuronal loss, and brain functional deficits in the APPxPS1-Ki mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Faure, A; Verret, L; Bozon, B; El Tannir El Tayara, N; Ly, M; Kober, F; Dhenain, M; Rampon, C; Delatour, B

    2011-03-01

    Amyloid-β peptide species accumulating in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease are assumed to have a neurotoxic action and hence to be key actors in the physiopathology of this neurodegenerative disease. We have studied a new mouse mutant (APPxPS1-Ki) line developing both early-onset brain amyloid-β deposition and, in contrast to most of transgenic models, subsequent neuronal loss. In 6-month-old mice, we observed cell layer atrophies in the hippocampus, together with a dramatic decrease in neurogenesis and a reduced brain blood perfusion as measured in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. In these mice, neurological impairments and spatial hippocampal dependent memory deficits were also substantiated and worsened with aging. We described here a phenotype of APPxPS1-Ki mice that summarizes several neuroanatomical alterations and functional deficits evocative of the human pathology. Such a transgenic model that displays strong face validity might be highly beneficial to future research on AD physiopathogeny and therapeutics. PMID:19398247

  4. Tau deposition drives neuropathological, inflammatory and behavioral abnormalities independently of neuronal loss in a novel mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Casey; Kang, Silvia S.; Carlomagno, Yari; Lin, Wen-Lang; Yue, Mei; Kurti, Aishe; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Jansen-West, Karen; Perkerson, Emilie; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Rousseau, Linda; Phillips, Virginia; Bu, Guojun; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Fryer, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant tau protein accumulation drives neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation in several neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, efforts to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and assess the efficacy of therapeutic targets are limited by constraints of existing models of tauopathy. In order to generate a more versatile mouse model of tauopathy, somatic brain transgenesis was utilized to deliver adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) encoding human mutant P301L-tau compared with GFP control. At 6 months of age, we observed widespread human tau expression with concomitant accumulation of hyperphosphorylated and abnormally folded proteinase K resistant tau. However, no overt neuronal loss was observed, though significant abnormalities were noted in the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD95. Neurofibrillary pathology was also detected with Gallyas silver stain and Thioflavin-S, and electron microscopy revealed the deposition of closely packed filaments. In addition to classic markers of tauopathy, significant neuroinflammation and extensive gliosis were detected in AAV1-TauP301L mice. This model also recapitulates the behavioral phenotype characteristic of mouse models of tauopathy, including abnormalities in exploration, anxiety, and learning and memory. These findings indicate that biochemical and neuropathological hallmarks of tauopathies are accurately conserved and are independent of cell death in this novel AAV-based model of tauopathy, which offers exceptional versatility and speed in comparison with existing transgenic models. Therefore, we anticipate this approach will facilitate the identification and validation of genetic modifiers of disease, as well as accelerate preclinical assessment of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26276810

  5. Quantitative investigations on the human entorhinal area: left-right asymmetry and age-related changes.

    PubMed

    Heinsen, H; Henn, R; Eisenmenger, W; Götz, M; Bohl, J; Bethke, B; Lockemann, U; Püschel, K

    1994-08-01

    The total nerve cell numbers in the right and in the left human entorhinal areas have been calculated by volume estimations with the Cavalieri principle and by cell density determinations with the optical disector. Thick gallocyanin-stained serial frozen sections through the parahippocampal gyrus of 22 human subjects (10 female, 12 male) ranging from 18 to 86 years were analysed. The laminar composition of gallocyanin (Nissl)-stained sections could easily be compared with Braak's (1972, 1980) pigmentoarchitectonic study, and Braak's nomenclature of the entorhinal laminas was adopted. Cell-sparse laminae dissecantes can more clearly be distinguished in Nissl than in aldehydefuchsin preparations. These cell-poor dissecantes, lamina dissecans externa (dis-ext), lamina dissecans 1 (dis-1) and lamina dissecans 2 (dis-2), were excluded from nerve cell number determinations. An exact delineation of the entorhinal area is indispensable for any kind of quantitative investigation. We have defined the entorhinal area by the presence of pre-alpha cell clusters and the deeper layers of lamina principalis externa (pre-beta and gamma) separated from lamina principalis interna (pri) by lamina dissecans 1 (dis-1). The human entorhinal area is quantitatively characterized by a left-sided (asymmetric) higher pre-alpha cell number and an age-related nerve cell loss in pre as well as pri layers. At variance with other CNS cortical and subcortical structures, the neuronal number of the entorhinal area appears to decrease continuously from the earliest stages analysed, although a secular trend has to be considered. The asymmetry in pre-alpha cell number is discussed in the context of higher human mental capabilities, especially language. PMID:7818090

  6. UV-induced retinal proteome changes in the rat model of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Klobučar, Marko; Sedić, Mirela; Micek, Vedran; Gehrig, Peter; Grossman, Jonas; Pavelić, Krešimir; Vojniković, Božidar

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by irreversible damage of photoreceptors in the central posterior part of the retina, called the macula and is the most common cause of vision loss in those aged over 50. A growing body of evidence shows that cumulative long-term exposure to UV radiation may be harmful to the retina and possibly leads to AMD irrespective of age. In spite of many research efforts, cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to UV-induced retinal damage and possibly retinal diseases such as AMD are not completely understood. In the present study we explored damage mechanisms accounting for UV-induced retinal phototoxicity in the rats exposed to UVA and UVB irradiation using a proteomics approach. Our study showed that UV irradiation induces profound changes in the retinal proteomes of the rats associated with the disruption of energy homeostasis, oxidative stress, DNA damage response and structural and functional impairments of the interphotoreceptor matrix components and their cell surface receptors such as galectins. Two small leucine-rich proteoglycans, biglycan and lumican, were identified as phototoxicity biomarkers associated with UV-induced disruption of interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM). In addition, UVB induced activation of Src kinase, which could account for cytoskeletal rearrangements in the retina was observed at the proteomics level. Pharmacological intervention either to target Src kinase with the aim of preventing cytoskeletal rearrangements in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neuronal retina or to help rebuild damaged IPM may provide fresh avenues of treatment for patients suffering from AMD. PMID:26071645

  7. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forest, David L.; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD). A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease. PMID:26035859

  8. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease. PMID:23209345

  9. Effect of NCAM on aged-related deterioration in vision.

    PubMed

    Luke, Margaret Po-Shan; LeVatte, Terry L; O'Reilly, Amanda M; Smith, Benjamin J; Tremblay, François; Brown, Richard E; Clarke, David B

    2016-05-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is involved in developmental processes and age-associated cognitive decline; however, little is known concerning the effects of NCAM in the visual system during aging. Using anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays, we analyzed age-related changes in visual function of NCAM deficient (-/-) and wild-type mice. Anatomical analyses indicated that aging NCAM -/- mice had fewer retinal ganglion cells, thinner retinas, and fewer photoreceptor cell layers than age-matched controls. Electroretinogram testing of retinal function in young adult NCAM -/- mice showed a 2-fold increase in a- and b-wave amplitude compared with wild-type mice, but the retinal activity dropped dramatically to control levels when the animals reached 10 months. In behavioral tasks, NCAM -/- mice had no visual pattern discrimination ability and showed premature loss of vision as they aged. Together, these findings demonstrate that NCAM plays significant roles in the adult visual system in establishing normal retinal anatomy, physiology and function, and in maintaining vision during aging. PMID:27103522

  10. Promising new treatments for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Michels, Stephan; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2006-07-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from existing blood vessels, is responsible for vision loss in a variety of ophthalmic diseases. In neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause for legal blindness in many industrialised countries, abnormal blood vessels grow in the macula and cause blindness. There are a number of factors important in the angiogenic cascade but VEGF-A has been implicated in recent years as the major factor responsible for neovascular and exudative diseases of the eye. Numerous antiangiogenic drugs are in development but anti-VEGF drugs have shown great promise in treating neovascular AMD and other ocular diseases, and many of these drugs have been adopted from oncology where antiangiogenic therapy is gaining wide acceptance. For the first time in neovascular AMD, anti-VEGF drugs have brought the hope of vision improvement to a significant proportion of patients. This review provides an overview on angiogenic mechanisms, potential antiangiogenic treatment strategies and different antiangiogenic drugs with special focus on neovascular AMD. PMID:16787141

  11. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. PMID:26572116

  12. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Eveline S; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E; Yeo, Gene W; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-02-19

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43(Q331K) and TDP-43(M337V)), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43-dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43(Q331K), but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43(Q331K) enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage. PMID:23382207

  13. Wet age related macular degeneration management and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Malciolu Radu; Alexandra, Nica Maria

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is referred to as the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in developed countries, with a profound effect on the quality of life. The neovascular form of AMD is characterized by the formation of subretinal choroidal neovascularization, leading to sudden and severe visual loss. Research has identified the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological component in neovascular AMD and its intraocular inhibition as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The introduction of anti-VEGF as a standard treatment in wet AMD has led to a great improvement in the prognosis of patients, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of cases. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by a difficulty in maintaining the treatment schedule due to the increase in the amount of patients, stress of monthly assessments, as well as the associated economic burden. Therefore, treatment strategies have evolved from fixed monthly dosing, to individualized regimens, aiming for comparable results, with fewer injections. One such protocol is called "pro re nata", or "treat and observe". Patients are given a loading dose of 3 monthly injections, followed by an as-needed decision to treat, based on the worsening of visual acuity, clinical evidence of the disease activity on fundoscopy, or OCT evidence of retinal thickening in the presence of intra or subretinal fluid. A different regimen is called "treat and extend", in which the interval between injections is gradually increased, once the disease stabilization is achieved. This paper aims to review the currently available anti-VEGF agents--bevacizumab, ranibizumab, aflibercept, and the aforementioned treatment strategies. PMID:27220225

  14. Genotype-specific effects of Mecp2 loss-of-function on morphology of Layer V pyramidal neurons in heterozygous female Rett syndrome model mice

    PubMed Central

    Rietveld, Leslie; Stuss, David P.; McPhee, David; Delaney, Kerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a progressive neurological disorder primarily caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The heterozygous female brain consists of mosaic of neurons containing both wild-type MeCP2 (MeCP2+) and mutant MeCP2 (MeCP2-). Three-dimensional morphological analysis was performed on individually genotyped layer V pyramidal neurons in the primary motor cortex of heterozygous (Mecp2+/-) and wild-type (Mecp2+/+) female mice ( > 6 mo.) from the Mecp2tm1.1Jae line. Comparing basal dendrite morphology, soma and nuclear size of MeCP2+ to MeCP2- neurons reveals a significant cell autonomous, genotype specific effect of Mecp2. MeCP2- neurons have 15% less total basal dendritic length, predominantly in the region 70–130 μm from the cell body and on average three fewer branch points, specifically loss in the second and third branch orders. Soma and nuclear areas of neurons of mice were analyzed across a range of ages (5–21 mo.) and X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) ratios (12–56%). On average, MeCP2- somata and nuclei were 15 and 13% smaller than MeCP2+ neurons respectively. In most respects branching morphology of neurons in wild-type brains (MeCP2 WT) was not distinguishable from MeCP2+ but somata and nuclei of MeCP2 WT neurons were larger than those of MeCP2+ neurons. These data reveal cell autonomous effects of Mecp2 mutation on dendritic morphology, but also suggest non-cell autonomous effects with respect to cell size. MeCP2+ and MeCP2- neuron sizes were not correlated with age, but were correlated with XCI ratio. Unexpectedly the MeCP2- neurons were smallest in brains where the XCI ratio was highly skewed toward MeCP2+, i.e., wild-type. This raises the possibility of cell non-autonomous effects that act through mechanisms other than globally secreted factors; perhaps competition for synaptic connections influences cell size and morphology in the genotypically mosaic brain of RTT model mice. PMID:25941473

  15. Age-related changes in glial cells of dopamine midbrain subregions in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Nicholas M.; Kordower, Jeffrey H.; Collier, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging remains the strongest risk factor for developing Parkinson’s disease (PD), and there is selective vulnerability in midbrain DA neuron degeneration in PD. By tracking normal aging-related changes with an emphasis on regional specificity, factors involved in selective vulnerability and resistance to degeneration can be studied. Towards this end, we sought to determine whether age-related changes in microglia and astrocytes in rhesus monkeys are region-specific, suggestive of involvement in regional differences in vulnerability to degeneration that may be relevant to PD pathogenesis. Gliosis in midbrain DA subregions was measured by estimating glia number using unbiased stereology, assessing fluorescence intensity for proteins upregulated during activation, and rating morphology. With normal aging, microglia exhibited increased staining intensity and a shift to more activated morphologies preferentially in the vulnerable substantia nigra-ventral tier (vtSN). Astrocytes did not exhibit age-related changes consistent with an involvement in regional vulnerability in any measure. Our results suggest advancing age is associated with chronic mild inflammation in the vtSN, which may render these DA neurons more vulnerable to degeneration. PMID:18715678

  16. Pentylentetrazole-induced loss of blood-brain barrier integrity involves excess nitric oxide generation by neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Danjo, Sonoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masatomo; Nakamura, Yu; Itoh, Kouichi

    2013-09-12

    Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major pathophysiological consequences of epilepsy. The increase in the permeability caused by BBB failure is thought to contribute to the development of epileptic outcomes. We developed a method by which the BBB permeability can be demonstrated by gadolinium-enhanced T1 weighted imaging (GdET1WI). The present study examined the changes in the BBB permeability in mice with generalized convulsive seizures (GCS) induced by acute pentylentetrazole (PTZ) injection. At 15min after PTZ-induced GCS, the BBB temporarily leaks BBB-impermeable contrast agent into the parenchyma of the diencephalon, hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice, and the loss of BBB integrity was gradually recovered by 24h. The temporary BBB failure is a critical link to the glutamatergic activities that occur following the injection of PTZ. PTZ activates the glutamatergic pathway via the NMDA receptor, then nitric oxide (NO) is generated by NMDA receptor-coupled neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). To examine the influence of nNOS-derived NO induced by PTZ on the increases of the BBB permeability, GdET1WI was performed using conventional nNOS gene-deficient mice with or without PTZ injection. The failure of the BBB induced by PTZ was completely protected by nNOS deficiency in the brain. These results suggest that nNOS-derived excess NO in the glutamatergic pathway plays a key role in the failure of the BBB during PTZ-induced GCS. The levels of NO synthetized by nNOS in the brain may represent an important target for the future development of drugs to protect the BBB. PMID:23831997

  17. Transiently Increasing cAMP Levels Selectively in Hippocampal Excitatory Neurons during Sleep Deprivation Prevents Memory Deficits Caused by Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; Tudor, Jennifer C.; Ferri, Sarah L.; Baumann, Arnd; Meerlo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to sleep loss. Although previous work has indicated that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP signaling, it remains to be determined whether the cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation are caused by attenuated cAMP signaling in the hippocampus. Further, it is unclear which cell types are responsible for the memory impairments associated with sleep deprivation. Transgenic approaches lack the spatial resolution to manipulate specific signaling pathways selectively in the hippocampus, while pharmacological strategies are limited in terms of cell-type specificity. Therefore, we used a pharmacogenetic approach based on a virus-mediated expression of a Gαs-coupled Drosophila octopamine receptor selectively in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons in vivo. With this approach, a systemic injection with the receptor ligand octopamine leads to increased cAMP levels in this specific set of hippocampal neurons. We assessed whether transiently increasing cAMP levels during sleep deprivation prevents memory consolidation deficits associated with sleep loss in an object–location task. Five hours of total sleep deprivation directly following training impaired the formation of object–location memories. Transiently increasing cAMP levels in hippocampal neurons during the course of sleep deprivation prevented these memory consolidation deficits. These findings demonstrate that attenuated cAMP signaling in hippocampal excitatory neurons is a critical component underlying the memory deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks associated with sleep deprivation. PMID:25411499

  18. Importance of genetics in fetal alcohol effects: null mutation of the nNOS gene worsens alcohol-induced cerebellar neuronal losses and behavioral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Bonthius, Daniel J.; Winters, Zachary; Karacay, Bahri; Bousquet, Samantha Larimer; Bonthius, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is a major target of alcohol-induced damage in the developing brain. However, the cerebella of some children are much more seriously affected than others by prenatal alcohol exposure. As a consequence of in utero alcohol exposure, some children have substantial reductions in cerebellar volume and corresponding neurodevelopmental problems, including microencephaly, ataxia, and balance deficits, while other children who were exposed to similar alcohol quantities are spared. One factor that likely plays a key role in determining the impact of alcohol on the fetal cerebellum is genetics. However, no specific gene variant has yet been identified that worsens cerebellar function as a consequence of developmental alcohol exposure. Previous studies have revealed that mice carrying a homozygous mutation of the gene for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS−/− mice) have more severe acute alcohol-induced neuronal losses from the cerebellum than wild type mice. Therefore, the goals of this study were to determine whether alcohol induces more severe cerebellum-based behavioral deficits in nNOS−/− mice than in wild type mice and to determine whether these worsened behavior deficits are associated with worsened cerebellar neuronal losses. nNOS−/− mice and their wild type controls received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4 mg/g) daily over postnatal days 4–9. In adulthood, the mice underwent behavioral testing, followed by neuronal quantification. Alcohol caused dose-related deficits in rotarod and balance beam performance in both nNOS−/− and wild type mice. However, the alcohol-induced behavioral deficits were substantially worse in the nNOS−/− mice than in wild type. Likewise, alcohol exposure led to losses of Purkinje cells and cerebellar granule cells in mice of both genotypes, but the cell losses were more severe in the nNOS−/− mice than in wild type. Behavioral performances were correlated with neuronal number in the nNOS−/− mice, but not

  19. The relevance of aging-related changes in brain function to rehabilitation in aging-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Bruce; McGregor, Keith M.; Nocera, Joe R.; Drucker, Jonathan H.; Tran, Stella M.; Butler, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging on rehabilitation of aging-related diseases are rarely a design consideration in rehabilitation research. In this brief review we present strong coincidental evidence from these two fields suggesting that deficits in aging-related disease or injury are compounded by the interaction between aging-related brain changes and disease-related brain changes. Specifically, we hypothesize that some aphasia, motor, and neglect treatments using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in stroke patients may address the aging side of this interaction. The importance of testing this hypothesis and addressing the larger aging by aging-related disease interaction is discussed. Underlying mechanisms in aging that most likely are relevant to rehabilitation of aging-related diseases also are covered. PMID:26074807

  20. The role of insulin in the vascular contributions to age-related dementia.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy M; Craft, Suzanne

    2016-05-01

    In addition to its well-known role in energy metabolism in the body, insulin is a vasoactive hormone that regulates peripheral and cerebral blood flow and neuronal function. Vascular and metabolic dysfunctions are emerging risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-related dementias, and recent evidence suggests that the two pathways are constitutive and interrelated. As a result, an emphasis on correcting metabolic disorders is emerging as an important strategy in the treatment and prevention of age-related cognitive impairment and AD. We review the evidence regarding the unique and interactive effects of vascular and metabolic disorders in pathological brain aging, with special consideration of the role of insulin dysregulation in promoting AD pathologic processes and vascular brain injury. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26657615

  1. Arginine vasopressin neuronal loss results from autophagy-associated cell death in a mouse model for familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, D; Arima, H; Morishita, Y; Wenjun, L; Azuma, Y; Ito, Y; Suga, H; Goto, M; Banno, R; Sugimura, Y; Shiota, A; Asai, N; Takahashi, M; Oiso, Y

    2014-01-01

    Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) characterized by progressive polyuria is mostly caused by mutations in the gene encoding neurophysin II (NPII), which is the carrier protein of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Although accumulation of mutant NPII in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) could be toxic for AVP neurons, the precise mechanisms of cell death of AVP neurons, reported in autopsy studies, remain unclear. Here, we subjected FNDI model mice to intermittent water deprivation (WD) in order to promote the phenotypes. Electron microscopic analyses demonstrated that, while aggregates are confined to a certain compartment of the ER in the AVP neurons of FNDI mice with water access ad libitum, they were scattered throughout the dilated ER lumen in the FNDI mice subjected to WD for 4 weeks. It is also demonstrated that phagophores, the autophagosome precursors, emerged in the vicinity of aggregates and engulfed the ER containing scattered aggregates. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that expression of p62, an adapter protein between ubiquitin and autophagosome, was elicited on autophagosomal membranes in the AVP neurons, suggesting selective autophagy induction at this time point. Treatment of hypothalamic explants of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) transgenic mice with an ER stressor thapsigargin increased the number of GFP-LC3 puncta, suggesting that ER stress could induce autophagosome formation in the hypothalamus of wild-type mice as well. The cytoplasm of AVP neurons in FNDI mice was occupied with vacuoles in the mice subjected to WD for 12 weeks, when 30-40% of AVP neurons are lost. Our data thus demonstrated that autophagy was induced in the AVP neurons subjected to ER stress in FNDI mice. Although autophagy should primarily be protective for neurons, it is suggested that the organelles including ER were lost over time through autophagy, leading to autophagy

  2. Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News From NIH Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of ... project sponsored by the NIH's National Institute on Aging (NIA) to learn more about the effects of ...

  3. Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors Past Issues / Summer ... learn more about the effects of sustained low-calorie diets in humans on factors affecting aging. This ...

  4. Neuronal Store-Operated Calcium Entry and Mushroom Spine Loss in Amyloid Precursor Protein Knock-In Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Wu, Lili; Pchitskaya, Ekaterina; Zakharova, Olga; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common reason for elderly dementia in the world. We proposed that memory loss in AD is related to destabilization of mushroom postsynaptic spines involved in long-term memory storage. We demonstrated previously that stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2)-regulated neuronal store-operated calcium entry (nSOC) in postsynaptic spines play a key role in stability of mushroom spines by maintaining activity of synaptic Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII). Furthermore, we demonstrated previously that the STIM2–nSOC–CaMKII pathway is downregulated in presenilin 1 M146V knock-in (PS1–M146V KI) mouse model of AD, leading to loss of hippocampal mushroom spines in this model. In the present study, we demonstrate that hippocampal mushroom postsynaptic spines are also lost in amyloid precursor protein knock-in (APPKI) mouse model of AD. We demonstrated that loss of mushroom spines occurs as a result of accumulation of extracellular β-amyloid 42 in APPKI culture media. Our results indicate that extracellular Aβ42 acts by overactivating mGluR5 receptor in APPKI neurons, leading to elevated Ca2+ levels in endoplasmic reticulum, compensatory downregulation of STIM2 expression, impaired synaptic nSOC, and reduced CaMKII activity. Pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 or overexpression of STIM2 rescued synaptic nSOC and prevented mushroom spine loss in APPKI hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that downregulation of synaptic STIM2–nSOC–CaMKII pathway causes loss of mushroom synaptic spines in both presenilin and APPKI mouse models of AD. We propose that modulators/activators of this pathway may have a potential therapeutic value for treatment of memory loss in AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A direct connection between amyloid-induced synaptic mushroom spine loss and neuronal store-operated calcium entry pathway is shown. These results provide strong support for the calcium hypothesis of neurodegeneration and further validate the

  5. Loss of translation elongation factor (eEF1A2) expression in vivo differentiates between Wallerian degeneration and dying-back neuronal pathology

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Lyndsay M; Thomson, Derek; Conklin, Annalijn; Wishart, Thomas M; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2008-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration and dying-back pathology are two well-known cellular pathways capable of regulating the breakdown and loss of axonal and synaptic compartments of neurons in vivo. However, the underlying mechanisms and molecular triggers of these pathways remain elusive. Here, we show that loss of translation elongation factor eEF1A2 expression in lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibres in homozygous Wasted mice triggered a dying-back neuropathy. Synaptic loss at the neuromuscular junction occurred in advance of axonal pathology and by a mechanism morphologically distinct from Wallerian degeneration. Dying-back pathology in Wasted mice was accompanied by reduced expression levels of the zinc finger protein ZPR1, as found in other dying-back neuropathies such as spinal muscular atrophy. Surprisingly, experimental nerve lesion revealed that Wallerian degeneration was significantly delayed in homozygous Wasted mice; morphological assessment revealed that ∼80% of neuromuscular junctions in deep lumbrical muscles at 24 h and ∼50% at 48 h had retained motor nerve terminals following tibial nerve lesion. This was in contrast to wild-type and heterozygous Wasted mice where < 5% of neuromuscular junctions had retained motor nerve terminals at 24 h post-lesion. These data show that eEF1A2 expression is required to prevent the initiation of dying-back pathology at the neuromuscular junction in vivo. In contrast, loss of eEF1A2 expression significantly inhibited the initiation and progression of Wallerian degeneration in vivo. We conclude that loss of eEF1A2 expression distinguishes mechanisms underlying dying-back pathology from those responsible for Wallerian degeneration in vivo and suggest that eEF1A2-dependent cascades may provide novel molecular targets to manipulate neurodegenerative pathways in lower motor neurons. PMID:19094180

  6. Age-related changes in the misinformation effect.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, R; Hayne, H

    2001-08-01

    In these experiments, we examined the relation between age-related changes in retention and age-related changes in the misinformation effect. Children (5- and 6- and 11- and 12-year-olds) and adults viewed a video, and their memory was assessed immediately, 1 day, or 6 weeks later (Experiment 1). There were large age-related differences in retention when participants were interviewed immediately and after 1 day, but after the 6-week delay, age-related differences in retention were minimal. In Experiment 2, 11- and 12-year-olds and adults were exposed to neutral, leading, and misleading postevent information 1 day or 6 weeks after they viewed the video. Exposure to misleading information increased the number of commission errors, particularly when participants were asked about peripheral aspects of the video. At both retention intervals, children were more likely than adults to incorporate the misleading postevent information into their subsequent verbal accounts. These findings indicate that age-related changes in the misinformation effect are not predicted by age-related changes in retention. PMID:11511130

  7. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  8. A multi-ingredient dietary supplement abolishes large-scale brain cell loss, improves sensory function, and prevents neuronal atrophy in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Lemon, J A; Aksenov, V; Samigullina, R; Aksenov, S; Rodgers, W H; Rollo, C D; Boreham, D R

    2016-06-01

    Transgenic growth hormone mice (TGM) are a recognized model of accelerated aging with characteristics including chronic oxidative stress, reduced longevity, mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, muscle wasting, and elevated inflammatory processes. Growth hormone/IGF-1 activate the Target of Rapamycin known to promote aging. TGM particularly express severe cognitive decline. We previously reported that a multi-ingredient dietary supplement (MDS) designed to offset five mechanisms associated with aging extended longevity, ameliorated cognitive deterioration and significantly reduced age-related physical deterioration in both normal mice and TGM. Here we report that TGM lose more than 50% of cells in midbrain regions, including the cerebellum and olfactory bulb. This is comparable to severe Alzheimer's disease and likely explains their striking age-related cognitive impairment. We also demonstrate that the MDS completely abrogates this severe brain cell loss, reverses cognitive decline and augments sensory and motor function in aged mice. Additionally, histological examination of retinal structure revealed markers consistent with higher numbers of photoreceptor cells in aging and supplemented mice. We know of no other treatment with such efficacy, highlighting the potential for prevention or amelioration of human neuropathologies that are similarly associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular dysfunction. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:382-404, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27199101

  9. The Difference that Age Makes: Cultural Factors that Shape Older Adults' Responses to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogk, Marja

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests that approaching vision loss from age-related macular degeneration from a sociocultural perspective, specifically considering perceptions of aging, blindness, disability, and generational viewpoints and norms, may be critical to understanding older adults' responses to vision loss and visual rehabilitation.

  10. Influence of Age-Related Versus Non-Age-Related Renal Dysfunctionon Survival in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Brisco, Meredith A.; Han, Gang; Laur, Olga; Kula, Alexander J.; Cheng, Susan J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2013-01-01

    Normal aging results in a predictable decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and low GFR is associated with worsened survival. If this survival disadvantage is directly caused by the low GFR, as opposed to the disease causing the low GFR, the risk should be similar regardless of the underlying mechanism. Our objective was to determine if age related declines in estimated GFR (eGFR) carry the same prognostic importance as disease attributable losses in patients with ventricular dysfunction. We analyzed the Studies Of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) limited data set (n=6337). The primary analysis focused on determining if the eGFR mortality relationship differed by the extent the eGFR was consistent with normal ageing. Mean eGFR was 65.7 ± 19.0ml/min/1.73m2. Across the range of age in the population (27 to 80 years), baseline eGFR decreased by 0.67 ml/min/1.73m2 per year (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). The risk of death associated with eGFR was strongly modified by the degree to which the low eGFR could be explained by aging (p interaction <0.0001). For example, in a model incorporating the interaction, uncorrected eGFR was no longer significantly related to mortality (adjusted HR=1.0 per 10 ml/min/1.73m2, 95% CI 0.97–1.1, p=0.53) whereas a disease attributable decrease in eGFR above the median carried significant risk (adjusted HR=2.8, 95% CI 1.6–4.7, p<0.001). In conclusion, in the setting of LV dysfunction, renal dysfunction attributable to normal aging had a limited risk for mortality, suggesting that the mechanism underlying renal dysfunction is critical in determining prognosis. PMID:24216124

  11. Age-related hearing decline in individuals with and without occupational noise exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hederstierna, Christina; Rosenhall, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the pattern of age-related hearing decline in individuals with and without self-reported previous occupational noise exposure. This was a prospective, population-based, longitudinal study of individuals aged 70-75 years, from an epidemiological investigation, comprising three age cohorts. In total there were 1013 subjects (432 men and 581 women). Participants were tested with pure tone audiometry, and they answered a questionnaire to provide information regarding number of years of occupational noise exposure. There were no significant differences in hearing decline, at any frequency, for those aged 70-75 years between the noise-exposed (N= 62 men, 22 women) and the nonexposed groups (N = 96 men, 158 women). This study supports the additive model of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and age-related hearing loss (ARHL). The concept of different patterns of hearing decline between persons exposed and not exposed to noise could not be verified. PMID:26780958

  12. Loss of C9ORF72 impairs autophagy and synergizes with polyQ Ataxin-2 to induce motor neuron dysfunction and cell death.

    PubMed

    Sellier, Chantal; Campanari, Maria-Letizia; Julie Corbier, Camille; Gaucherot, Angeline; Kolb-Cheynel, Isabelle; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Ruffenach, Frank; Page, Adeline; Ciura, Sorana; Kabashi, Edor; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2016-06-15

    An intronic expansion of GGGGCC repeats within the C9ORF72 gene is the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD). Ataxin-2 with intermediate length of polyglutamine expansions (Ataxin-2 Q30x) is a genetic modifier of the disease. Here, we found that C9ORF72 forms a complex with the WDR41 and SMCR8 proteins to act as a GDP/GTP exchange factor for RAB8a and RAB39b and to thereby control autophagic flux. Depletion of C9orf72 in neurons partly impairs autophagy and leads to accumulation of aggregates of TDP-43 and P62 proteins, which are histopathological hallmarks of ALS-FTD SMCR8 is phosphorylated by TBK1 and depletion of TBK1 can be rescued by phosphomimetic mutants of SMCR8 or by constitutively active RAB39b, suggesting that TBK1, SMCR8, C9ORF72, and RAB39b belong to a common pathway regulating autophagy. While depletion of C9ORF72 only has a partial deleterious effect on neuron survival, it synergizes with Ataxin-2 Q30x toxicity to induce motor neuron dysfunction and neuronal cell death. These results indicate that partial loss of function of C9ORF72 is not deleterious by itself but synergizes with Ataxin-2 toxicity, suggesting a double-hit pathological mechanism in ALS-FTD. PMID:27103069

  13. Age-related change of technetium-99m-HMDP distribution in the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Kigami, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Ohnishi, Hideo

    1996-05-01

    To understand age-related changes of whole-body and regional skeletal metabolism, it is important to investigate the mechanisms of age-related bone loss and to develop suitable treatments for it. Bone biopsies show metabolism of the particular site examined while biochemical markers for bone metabolism reflect total skeletal metabolis. Bone scintigraphy is a convenient and simple way to analyze whole-body and regional skeletal metabolism. We attempted to study and understand age-related changes in bone metabolism by quantifying the bone scan and correlating it with biochemical bone metabolic markers. The whole-body skeletal uptake (WBSU) and whole-body skeletal tracer distribution pattern were studied in men and women by bone scintigraphy using {sup 99m}Tc-hydroxy-methane-diphosphonate (HMDP). Bone scans were performed using a standard protocol and quantified by setting regions of interest (ROIs) on selected regions. WBSU and the skeletal distribution pattern were compared with simultaneously obtained serum biochemical markers. WBSU showed an increase with age in both sexes, but in women, uptake in the head and legs increased more relatively than in the thoracic region, while in men no such tendency was observed. Increase of WBSU and relative increase of uptakes in the head demonstrated a weak correlation with the serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and type 1 collagen metabolites. These results show an age-related increase of skeletal turnover and sex-dependent regional skeletal metabolism. The age-related changes seen in bone scintigrams might be a sign of progressive bone loss, reflecting changes in local bone matabolism. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Can DRYAD explain age-related associative memory deficits?

    PubMed

    Smyth, Andrea C; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe

    2016-02-01

    A recent interesting theoretical account of aging and memory judgments, the DRYAD (density of representations yields age-related deficits; Benjamin, 2010; Benjamin, Diaz, Matzen, & Johnson, 2012), attributes the extensive findings of disproportional age-related deficits in memory for source, context, and associations, to a global decline in memory fidelity. It is suggested that this global deficit, possibly due to a decline in attentional processes, is moderated by weak representation of contextual information to result in disproportional age-related declines. In the current article, we evaluate the DRYAD model, comparing it to specific age-related deficits theories, in particular, the ADH (associative deficit hypothesis, Naveh-Benjamin, 2000). We question some of the main assumptions/hypotheses of DRYAD in light of data reported in the literature, and we directly assess the role of attention in age-related deficits by manipulations of divided attention and of the instructions regarding what to pay attention to in 2 experiments (one from the literature and a new one). The results of these experiments fit the predictions of the ADH and do not support the main assumption/hypotheses of DRYAD. PMID:25961878

  15. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26292978

  16. Simvastatin inhibits the activation of p21ras and prevents the loss of dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anamitra; Roy, Avik; Matras, Joanna; Brahmachari, Saurav; Gendelman, Howard E.; Pahan, Kalipada

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is second only to Alzheimer's disease as the most common devastating human neurodegenerative disorder. Despite intense investigation, no interdictive therapy is available for PD. We investigated whether simvastatin, an FDA-approved cholesterol-lowering drug, could protect against nigrostriatal degeneration following 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) intoxication to model PD in mice. First, MPP+ induced the activation of p21ras and NF-κB in mouse microglial cells. Inhibition of MPP+-induced activation of NF-κB by Δp21ras, a dominant-negative mutant of p21ras, supported the involvement of p21ras in MPP+-induced microglial activation of NF-κB. Interestingly, simvastatin attenuated activation of both p21ras and NF-κB in MPP+-stimulated microglial cells. Consistently, we found a very rapid activation of p21ras in vivo in the substantia nigra pars compacta of MPTP-intoxicated mice. However, after oral administration, simvastatin entered into the nigra, reduced nigral activation of p21ras, attenuated nigral activation of NF-κB, inhibited nigral expression of proinflammatory molecules, and suppressed nigral activation of glial cells. These findings paralleled dopaminergic neuronal protection, normalized striatal neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Similarly, pravastatin, another cholesterol-lowering drug, suppressed microglial inflammatory responses and protected dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-intoxicated mice; but at levels less than simvastatin. Furthermore, both the statins administered 2 days after initiation of the disease were still capable of inhibiting the demise of dopaminergic neurons and concomitant loss of neurotransmitters suggesting that statins are capable of slowing down the progression of neuronal loss in the MPTP mouse model. Therefore, we conclude that statins may be of therapeutic benefit for PD patients. PMID:19864567

  17. Pathophysiology of ageing, longevity and age related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bürkle, Alexander; Caselli, Graziella; Franceschi, Claudio; Mariani, Erminia; Sansoni, Paolo; Santoni, Angela; Vecchio, Giancarlo; Witkowski, Jacek M; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-01-01

    On April 18, 2007 an international meeting on Pathophysiology of Ageing, Longevity and Age-Related Diseases was held in Palermo, Italy. Several interesting topics on Cancer, Immunosenescence, Age-related inflammatory diseases and longevity were discussed. In this report we summarize the most important issues. However, ageing must be considered an unavoidable end point of the life history of each individual, nevertheless the increasing knowledge on ageing mechanisms, allows envisaging many different strategies to cope with, and delay it. So, a better understanding of pathophysiology of ageing and age-related disease is essential for giving everybody a reasonable chance for living a long and enjoyable final part of the life. PMID:17683521

  18. Loss of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in synapses of tonic firing substantia gelatinosa neurons in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yishen; Derkach, Victor A; Smith, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Synapses transmitting nociceptive information in the spinal dorsal horn undergo enduring changes following peripheral nerve injury. Indeed, such injury alters the expression of the GluA2 subunit of glutamatergic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the substantia gelatinosa and this predicts altered channel conductance and calcium permeability, leading to an altered function of excitatory synapses. We therefore investigated the functional properties of synaptic AMPA receptors in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons following 10-20d chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve; a model of neuropathic pain. We measured their single-channel conductance and sensitivity to a blocker of calcium permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), IEM1460 (50μM). In putative inhibitory, tonic firing neurons, CCI reduced the average single-channel conductance of synaptic AMPAR from 14.4±3.5pS (n=12) to 9.2±1.0pS (n=10, p<0.05). IEM1460 also more effectively antagonized evoked, spontaneous and miniature EPSCs in tonic neurons from sham operated animals than in those from animals that had been subjected to CCI. By contrast, CCI did not change the effectiveness of IEM1460 in delay firing neurons although average single channel conductance was increased from 7.6±1.2pS (n=11) to 12.2±1.5pS (n=10, p<0.01). CCI thus elicits plastic changes in a specific set of glutamatergic synapses of substantia gelatinosa due to subunit recomposition and loss of GluA2-lacking CP-AMPAR. These insights reveal a molecular mechanism of nerve injury acting at synapses of inhibitory neurons to reduce their drive and therefore inhibitory tone in the spinal cord, therefore contributing to the central sensitization associated with neuropathic pain. PMID:26948545

  19. Microglia-Derived Cytokines/Chemokines Are Involved in the Enhancement of LPS-Induced Loss of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurons in DJ-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chia-Hung; Lee, Ming-Jen; Liou, Houng-Chi; Liou, Horng-Huei; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of DJ-1 (PARK7) has been linked to the development of early-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. This study is aimed to compare the sensitivity of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge between DJ-1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice, and explore the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Our results found that the basal levels of interferon (IFN)-γ (the hub cytokine) and interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC) (a downstream mediator) were elevated in the substantia nigra of DJ-1 KO mice and in microglia cells with DJ-1 deficiency, and the release of cytokine/chemokine was greatly enhanced following LPS administration in the DJ-1 deficient conditions. In addition, direct intranigral LPS challenge caused a greater loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine content in DJ-1 KO mice than in WT mice. Furthermore, the sensitization of microglia cells to LPS challenge to release IFN-γ and I-TAC was via the enhancement of NF-κB signaling, which was antagonized by NF-κB inhibitors. LPS-induced increase in neuronal death in the neuron-glia co-culture was enhanced by DJ-1 deficiency in microglia, which was antagonized by the neutralizing antibodies against IFN-γ or I-TAC. These results indicate that DJ-1 deficiency sensitizes microglia cells to release IFN-γ and I-TAC and causes inflammatory damage to dopaminergic neurons. The interaction between the genetic defect (i.e. DJ-1) and inflammatory factors (e.g. LPS) may contribute to the development of PD. PMID:26982707

  20. Impact of age-related neuroglial cell responses on hippocampal deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Joseph O.; Rezaie, Payam; Gabbott, Paul L.; Stewart, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is one of the greatest risk factors for the development of sporadic age-related neurodegenerative diseases and neuroinflammation is a common feature of this disease phenotype. In the immunoprivileged brain, neuroglial cells, which mediate neuroinflammatory responses, are influenced by the physiological factors in the microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS). These physiological factors include but are not limited to cell-to-cell communication involving cell adhesion molecules, neuronal electrical activity and neurotransmitter and neuromodulator action. However, despite this dynamic control of neuroglial activity, in the healthy aged brain there is an alteration in the underlying neuroinflammatory response notably seen in the hippocampus, typified by astrocyte/microglia activation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production and signaling. These changes may occur without any overt concurrent pathology, however, they typically correlate with deteriorations in hippocamapal or cognitive function. In this review we examine two important phenomenons, firstly the relationship between age-related brain deterioration (focusing on hippocampal function) and underlying neuroglial response(s), and secondly how the latter affects molecular and cellular processes within the hippocampus that makes it vulnerable to age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25972808

  1. Calcium dysregulation and neuroinflammation: Discrete and integrated mechanisms for age-related synaptic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sama, Diana M.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the best biomarkers of age-related cognitive decline are closely linked to synaptic function and plasticity. This review highlights several age-related synaptic alterations as they relate to Ca2+ dyshomeostasis, through elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and neuroinflammation, through production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Though distinct in many ways, Ca2+ and neuroinflammatory signaling mechanisms exhibit extensive cross-talk and bidirectional interactions. For instance, cytokine production in glial cells is strongly dependent on the Ca2+ dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, which shows elevated activity in animal models of aging and disease. In turn, pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF, can augment the expression/activity of L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels in neurons, leading to Ca2+ dysregulation, hyperactive calcineurin activity, and synaptic depression. Thus, in addition to discussing unique contributions of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and neuroinflammation, this review emphasizes how these processes interact to hasten age-related synaptic changes. PMID:23751484

  2. Age-related deficits in a forebrain-dependent task, trace-eyeblink conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Galvez, Roberto; Cua, Sabrina; Disterhoft, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Trace-eyeblink conditioning is a forebrain-dependent learning paradigm that has assisted in our understanding of age-related hippocampal neuronal plasticity; however, the hippocampus is not believed to be the permanent site for most long-term-memory storage. Studies in adult subjects have suggested the neocortex as one such site. Whisker plucking studies have further suggested that the ability for plasticity in the neocortex declines with age. Mice were trained in trace- and delay-eyeblink conditioning with whisker or auditory stimulation as the conditioned stimulus to examine possible age-related behavioral and neocortical abnormalities. Whisker stimulation was determined to be a more effective stimulus for examining age-related behavioral abnormalities in C57 mice. Additionally, neocortical barrel expansion, observed in trace conditioned adult mice and rabbits, does not occur in mice conditioned on a delay paradigm or in old mice unable to learn the whisker trace association. Abnormalities in neocortical memory storage in the elderly could contribute to normal age-dependent declines in associative learning abilities. PMID:20018411

  3. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Paul K.; Bowl, Michael R.; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E.; Simon, Michelle M.; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V.; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E.; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H.; Foster, Russell G.; Jackson, Ian J.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  4. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  5. Amyloid beta-peptide impairs ion-motive ATPase activities: evidence for a role in loss of neuronal Ca2+ homeostasis and cell death.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Hensley, K; Butterfield, D A; Mattson, M P

    1995-09-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) that accumulates as insoluble plaques in the brain in Alzheimer's disease can be directly neurotoxic and can increase neuronal vulnerability to excitotoxic insults. The mechanism of A beta toxicity is unclear but is believed to involve generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of calcium homeostasis. We now report that exposure of cultured rat hippocampal neurons to A beta 1-40 or A beta 25-35 causes a selective reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity which precedes loss of calcium homeostasis and cell degeneration. Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity was reduced within 30 min of exposure to A beta 25-35 and declined to less than 40% of basal level by 3 hr. A beta did not impair other Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activities or Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Experiments with ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase, demonstrated that impairment of this enzyme was sufficient to induce an elevation of [Ca2+]i and neuronal injury. Impairment of Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity appeared to be causally involved in the elevation of [Ca2+]i and neurotoxicity since suppression of Na+ influx significantly reduced A beta- and ouabain-induced [Ca2+]i elevation and neuronal death. Neuronal degeneration induced by ouabain appeared to be of an apoptotic form as indicated by nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. The antioxidant free radical scavengers vitamin E and propylgallate significantly attenuated A beta-induced impairment of Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity, elevation of [Ca2+]i and neurotoxicity, suggesting a role for ROS. Finally, exposure of synaptosomes from postmortem human hippocampus to A beta resulted in a significant and specific reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities, without affecting other Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activities or Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These data suggest that impairment of ion-motive ATPases may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuronal injury in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:7666206

  6. Glutamatergic treatment strategies for age-related memory disorders.

    PubMed

    Müller, W E; Scheuer, K; Stoll, S

    1994-01-01

    Age-related changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have been found in cortical areas and in the hippocampus of many species. On the basis of a variety of experimental observations it has been suggested that the decrease of NMDA receptor density might be one of the causative factors of the cognitive decline with aging. Based on these findings several strategies have been developed to improve cognition by compensating the NMDA receptor deficits in aging. The most promising approaches are the indirect activation of glutamatergic neurotransmission by agonists of the glycine site or the restoration of the age-related deficit of receptor density by several nootropics. PMID:7997073

  7. Calorie Restriction Alleviates Age-Related Decrease in Neural Progenitor Cell Division in the Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Park, June-Hee; Glass, Zachary; Sayed, Kasim; Michurina, Tatyana V.; Lazutkin, Alexander; Mineyeva, Olga; Velmeshev, Dmitry; Ward, Walter F.; Richardson, Arlan; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2013-01-01

    Production of new neurons from stem cells is important for cognitive function, and the reduction of neurogenesis in the aging brain may contribute to the accumulation of age-related cognitive deficits. Restriction of calorie intake and prolonged treatment with rapamycin have been shown to extend the lifespan of animals and delay the onset of age-related decline in tissue and organ function. Using a reporter line in which neural stem and progenitor cells are marked by the expression of GFP, we examined the effect of prolonged exposure to calorie restriction (CR) or rapamycin on hippocampal neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation in aging mice. We show that CR increases the number of dividing cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of female mice. The majority of these cells corresponded to Nestin-GFP-expressing neural stem or progenitor cells; however, this increased proliferative activity of stem and progenitor cells did not result in a significant increase in the number of doublecortin-positive newborn neurons. Our results suggest that restricted calorie intake may increase the number of divisions that neural stem and progenitor cells undergo in the aging brain of females. PMID:23773068

  8. The 6-OHDA mouse model of Parkinson's disease - Terminal striatal lesions provide a superior measure of neuronal loss and replacement than median forebrain bundle lesions.

    PubMed

    Bagga, V; Dunnett, S B; Fricker, R A

    2015-07-15

    Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway produce side-biased motor impairments that reflect the motor deficits seen in Parkinson's disease (PD). This toxin-induced model in the rat has been used widely, to evaluate possible therapeutic strategies, but has not been well established in mice. With the advancements in mouse stem cell research we believe the requirement for a mouse model is essential for the therapeutic potential of these and other mouse-derived cells to be efficiently assessed. This aim of this study focused on developing a mouse model of PD using the 129 P2/OLA Hsd mouse strain as this is widely used in the generation of mouse embryonic stem cells. Both unilateral 6-OHDA medial forebrain bundle (MFB) and striatal lesion protocols were compared, with mice analysed for appropriate drug-induced rotational bias. Results demonstrated that lesioned mice responded to d-amphetamine with peak rotation dose at 5mg/kg and 10mg/kg for MFB and striatal lesions respectively. Apomorphine stimulation produced no significant rotational responses, at any dose, in either the MFB or striatal 6-OHDA lesioned mice. Analysis of dopamine neuron loss revealed that the MFB lesion was unreliable with little correlation between dopamine neuron loss and rotational asymmetry. Striatal lesions however were more reliable, with a strong correlation between dopamine neuron loss and rotational asymmetry. Functional recovery of d-amphetamine-induced rotational bias was shown following transplantation of E13 mouse VM tissue into the lesioned striatum; confirming the validity of this mouse model. PMID:25841616

  9. Deciphering the Molecular Profile of Plaques, Memory Decline and Neuron Loss in Two Mouse Models for Alzheimer’s Disease by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bouter, Yvonne; Kacprowski, Tim; Weissmann, Robert; Dietrich, Katharina; Borgers, Henning; Brauß, Andreas; Sperling, Christian; Wirths, Oliver; Albrecht, Mario; Jensen, Lars R.; Kuss, Andreas W.; Bayer, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the central research questions on the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the elucidation of the molecular signatures triggered by the amyloid cascade of pathological events. Next-generation sequencing allows the identification of genes involved in disease processes in an unbiased manner. We have combined this technique with the analysis of two AD mouse models: (1) The 5XFAD model develops early plaque formation, intraneuronal Aβ aggregation, neuron loss, and behavioral deficits. (2) The Tg4–42 model expresses N-truncated Aβ4–42 and develops neuron loss and behavioral deficits albeit without plaque formation. Our results show that learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze and fear conditioning tasks in Tg4–42 mice at 12 months of age are similar to the deficits in 5XFAD animals. This suggested that comparative gene expression analysis between the models would allow the dissection of plaque-related and -unrelated disease relevant factors. Using deep sequencing differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and subsequently verified by quantitative PCR. Nineteen DEGs were identified in pre-symptomatic young 5XFAD mice, and none in young Tg4–42 mice. In the aged cohort, 131 DEGs were found in 5XFAD and 56 DEGs in Tg4–42 mice. Many of the DEGs specific to the 5XFAD model belong to neuroinflammatory processes typically associated with plaques. Interestingly, 36 DEGs were identified in both mouse models indicating common disease pathways associated with behavioral deficits and neuron loss. PMID:24795628

  10. Loss of UBE3A from TH-expressing neurons suppresses GABA co-release and enhances VTA-NAc optical self-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Berrios, Janet; Stamatakis, Alice M.; Kantak, Pranish A.; McElligott, Zoe A.; Judson, Matthew C.; Aita, Megumi; Rougie, Marie; Stuber, Garret D.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated reward-seeking behaviours are governed by dopaminergic ventral tegmental area projections to the nucleus accumbens. In addition to dopamine, these mesoaccumbal terminals co-release other neurotransmitters including glutamate and GABA, whose roles in regulating motivated behaviours are currently being investigated. Here we demonstrate that loss of the E3-ubiquitin ligase, UBE3A, from tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing neurons impairs mesoaccumbal, non-canonical GABA co-release and enhances reward-seeking behaviour measured by optical self-stimulation. PMID:26869263

  11. Delivery strategies for treatment of age-related ocular diseases: From a biological understanding to biomaterial solutions.

    PubMed

    Delplace, Vianney; Payne, Samantha; Shoichet, Molly

    2015-12-10

    Age-related ocular diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, result in life-long functional deficits and enormous global health care costs. As the worldwide population ages, vision loss has become a major concern for both economic and human health reasons. Due to recent research into biomaterials and nanotechnology major advances have been gained in the field of ocular delivery. This review provides a summary and discussion of the most recent strategies employed for the delivery of both drugs and cells to the eye to treat a variety of age-related diseases. It emphasizes the current challenges and limitations to ocular delivery and how the use of innovative materials can overcome these issues and ultimately provide treatment for age-related degeneration and regeneration of lost tissues. This review also provides critical considerations and an outlook for future studies in the field of ophthalmic delivery. PMID:26435454

  12. The Experience of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Elaine Y. H.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Hassell, Jennifer B.; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative article describes the impact of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) among 15 participants: how a person makes sense of ARMD, the effect of ARMD on the person's quality of life, the psychological disturbances associated with the limitations of ARMD, and the influence of ARMD on social interactions. Such in-depth appreciation of…

  13. Neuroanatomical Substrates of Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    There are many reports of relations between age and cognitive variables and of relations between age and variables representing different aspects of brain structure and a few reports of relations between brain structure variables and cognitive variables. These findings have sometimes led to inferences that the age-related brain changes cause the…

  14. Age-Related Differences in Moral Identity across Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krettenauer, Tobias; Murua, Lourdes Andrea; Jia, Fanli

    2016-01-01

    In this study, age-related differences in adults' moral identity were investigated. Moral identity was conceptualized a context-dependent self-structure that becomes differentiated and (re)integrated in the course of development and that involves a broad range of value-orientations. Based on a cross-sectional sample of 252 participants aged 14 to…

  15. Neuroimaging explanations of age-related differences in task performance

    PubMed Central

    Steffener, Jason; Barulli, Daniel; Habeck, Christian; Stern, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    Advancing age affects both cognitive performance and functional brain activity and interpretation of these effects has led to a variety of conceptual research models without always explicitly linking the two effects. However, to best understand the multifaceted effects of advancing age, age differences in functional brain activity need to be explicitly tied to the cognitive task performance. This work hypothesized that age-related differences in task performance are partially explained by age-related differences in functional brain activity and formally tested these causal relationships. Functional MRI data was from groups of young and old adults engaged in an executive task-switching experiment. Analyses were voxel-wise testing of moderated-mediation and simple mediation statistical path models to determine whether age group, brain activity and their interaction explained task performance in regions demonstrating an effect of age group. Results identified brain regions whose age-related differences in functional brain activity significantly explained age-related differences in task performance. In all identified locations, significant moderated-mediation relationships resulted from increasing brain activity predicting worse (slower) task performance in older but not younger adults. Findings suggest that advancing age links task performance to the level of brain activity. The overall message of this work is that in order to understand the role of functional brain activity on cognitive performance, analysis methods should respect theoretical relationships. Namely, that age affects brain activity and brain activity is related to task performance. PMID:24672481

  16. Glycosaminoglycans in the Human Cornea: Age-Related Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Elena; Pacella, Fernanda; De Paolis, Giulio; Parisella, Francesca Romana; Turchetti, Paolo; Anello, Giulia; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate possible age-related changes in glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the human cornea. The substances today called GAGs were previously referred to as mucopolysaccharides. METHODS Samples of human cornea were taken from 12 younger (age 21 ± 1.2) and 12 older (age 72 ± 1.6) male subjects. Samples were weighed, homogenized, and used for biochemical and molecular analyses. All the quantitative results were statistically analyzed. RESULTS The human cornea appears to undergo age-related changes, as evidenced by our biochemical and molecular results. The total GAG and hyaluronic acid counts were significantly higher in the younger subjects than in the older subjects. The sulfated heavy GAGs, such as chondroitin, dermatan, keratan, and heparan sulfate, were lower in the younger subjects than in the older subjects. DISCUSSION GAGs of the human cornea undergo numerous age-related changes. Their quantity is significantly altered in the elderly in comparison with younger subjects. GAGs play an important role in age-related diseases of the human cornea. PMID:25674020

  17. PPARα agonist, fenofibrate, ameliorates age-related renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Nim; Lim, Ji Hee; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Cheol Whee; Chang, Yoon Sik; Choi, Bum Soon

    2016-08-01

    The kidney ages quickly compared with other organs. Expression of senescence markers reflects changes in the energy metabolism in the kidney. Two important issues in aging are mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. PPARα plays a major role as a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in various processes. In this study, 18-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups, the control group (n=7) and the fenofibrate-treated group (n=7) was fed the normal chow plus fenofibrate for 6months. The PPARα agonist, fenofibrate, improved renal function, proteinuria, histological change (glomerulosclerosis and tubular interstitial fibrosis), inflammation, and apoptosis in aging mice. This protective effect against age-related renal injury occurred through the activation of AMPK and SIRT1 signaling. The activation of AMPK and SIRT1 allowed for the concurrent deacetylation and phosphorylation of their target molecules and decreased the kidney's susceptibility to age-related changes. Activation of the AMPK-FOXO3a and AMPK-PGC-1α signaling pathways ameliorated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that activation of PPARα and AMPK-SIRT1 signaling may have protective effects against age-related renal injury. Pharmacological targeting of PPARα and AMPK-SIRT1 signaling molecules may prevent or attenuate age-related pathological changes in the kidney. PMID:27130813

  18. Age-Related Differences in the Production of Textual Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Andrea; Boewe, Anke; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Narratives produced by 69 healthy Italian adults were analyzed for age-related changes of microlinguistic, macrolinguistic and informative aspects. The participants were divided into five age groups (20-24, 25-39, 40-59, 60-74, 75-84). One single-picture stimulus and two cartoon sequences were used to elicit three stories per subject. Age-related…

  19. APOLIPOPROTEIN E GENE AND EARLY AGE-RELATED MACULOPATHY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene and early age-related maculopathy (ARM) in middle-aged persons. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: Participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (n = 10139; age range, 49-73 ye...

  20. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  1. Age-Related Factors in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twyford, Charles William

    The convergence of several lines of psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic research suggests possible explanations for age-related influences on language acquisition. These factors, which include cognitive development, sociocultural context, affective factors, and language input, can be helpful to language educators. By being alert to the cognitive…

  2. Nutritional influences on epigenetics and age-related disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional epigenetics has emerged as a novel mechanism underlying gene–diet interactions, further elucidating the modulatory role of nutrition in aging and age-related disease development. Epigenetics is defined as a heritable modification to the DNA that regulates chromosome architecture and modu...

  3. Prolongevity hormone FGF21 protects against immune senescence by delaying age-related thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Youm, Yun-Hee; Horvath, Tamas L; Mangelsdorf, David J; Kliewer, Steven A; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2016-01-26

    Age-related thymic degeneration is associated with loss of naïve T cells, restriction of peripheral T-cell diversity, and reduced healthspan due to lower immune competence. The mechanistic basis of age-related thymic demise is unclear, but prior evidence suggests that caloric restriction (CR) can slow thymic aging by maintaining thymic epithelial cell integrity and reducing the generation of intrathymic lipid. Here we show that the prolongevity ketogenic hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a member of the endocrine FGF subfamily, is expressed in thymic stromal cells along with FGF receptors and its obligate coreceptor, βKlotho. We found that FGF21 expression in thymus declines with age and is induced by CR. Genetic gain of FGF21 function in mice protects against age-related thymic involution with an increase in earliest thymocyte progenitors and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Importantly, FGF21 overexpression reduced intrathymic lipid, increased perithymic brown adipose tissue, and elevated thymic T-cell export and naïve T-cell frequencies in old mice. Conversely, loss of FGF21 function in middle-aged mice accelerated thymic aging, increased lethality, and delayed T-cell reconstitution postirradiation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Collectively, FGF21 integrates metabolic and immune systems to prevent thymic injury and may aid in the reestablishment of a diverse T-cell repertoire in cancer patients following HSCT. PMID:26755598

  4. Age-Related Changes in 1/f Neural Electrophysiological Noise

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Mark A.; Case, John; Lepage, Kyle Q.; Tempesta, Zechari R.; Knight, Robert T.; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with performance decrements across multiple cognitive domains. The neural noise hypothesis, a dominant view of the basis of this decline, posits that aging is accompanied by an increase in spontaneous, noisy baseline neural activity. Here we analyze data from two different groups of human subjects: intracranial electrocorticography from 15 participants over a 38 year age range (15–53 years) and scalp EEG data from healthy younger (20–30 years) and older (60–70 years) adults to test the neural noise hypothesis from a 1/f noise perspective. Many natural phenomena, including electrophysiology, are characterized by 1/f noise. The defining characteristic of 1/f is that the power of the signal frequency content decreases rapidly as a function of the frequency (f) itself. The slope of this decay, the noise exponent (χ), is often <−1 for electrophysiological data and has been shown to approach white noise (defined as χ = 0) with increasing task difficulty. We observed, in both electrophysiological datasets, that aging is associated with a flatter (more noisy) 1/f power spectral density, even at rest, and that visual cortical 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related impairments in visual working memory. These results provide electrophysiological support for the neural noise hypothesis of aging. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding the neurobiological origins of age-related cognitive decline is of critical scientific, medical, and public health importance, especially considering the rapid aging of the world's population. We find, in two separate human studies, that 1/f electrophysiological noise increases with aging. In addition, we observe that this age-related 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related working memory decline. These results significantly add to this understanding and contextualize a long-standing problem in cognition by encapsulating age-related cognitive decline within a neurocomputational model of 1/f noise

  5. Higher nigrostriatal dopamine neuron loss in early than late onset Parkinson's disease?--a [99mTc]-TRODAT-1 SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ming Chi; Franco de Andrade, Luiz Augusto; Amaro, Edson; Felicio, Andre Carvalho; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Wagner, Jairo; Hoexter, Marcelo Queiroz; Lin, Li Fu; Fu, Ying Kai; Mari, Jair Jesus; Tufik, Sergio; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca

    2007-04-30

    Early-onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD) is distinct from the classic late-onset PD (LOPD) because of its slower disease progression. The aim of this study was to compare dopamine neuronal loss in EOPD with that of LOPD with the same disease duration, through dopamine transporter (DAT) estimation. Fourteen patients, seven EOPD (<50 years) and seven LOPD, matched for disease duration were scanned with [(99m)Tc]-TRODAT-1-SPECT (INER-Taiwan), and were assessed with standard PD scales. EOPD patients had 34% lower striatal DAT binding potential (BP) compared with that of LOPD patients (BP = 0.29 +/- 0.12, BP = 0.44 +/- 0.12, P < 0.02) with similar PD severity. These results suggest that EOPD patients have greater dopamine density loss than LOPD patients without motor-symptom worsening. PMID:17290452

  6. Peptidergic Agonists of Activity-Dependent Neurotrophic Factor Protect Against Prenatal Alcohol-Induced Neural Tube Defects and Serotonin Neuron Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng C.; Fang, Yuan; Goodlett, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Prenatal alcohol exposure via maternal liquid diet consumption by C57BL/6 (B6) mice causes conspicuous midline neural tube deficit (dysraphia) and disruption of genesis and development of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the raphe nuclei, together with brain growth retardation. The current study tested the hypothesis that concurrent treatment with either an activity-dependent neurotrophic factor (ADNF) agonist peptide [SALLRSIPA, (SAL)] or an activity-dependent neurotrophic protein (ADNP) agonist peptide [NAPVSIPQ, (NAP)] would protect against these alcohol-induced deficits in brain development. Methods Timed-pregnant B6 dams consumed alcohol from embryonic day 7 (E7, before the onset of neurulation) until E15. Fetuses were obtained on E15 and brain sections processed for 5-HT immunocytochemistry, for evaluation of morphologic development of the brainstem raphe and its 5-HT neurons. Additional groups were treated either with SAL or NAP daily from E7 to E15 to assess the potential protective effects of these peptides. Measures of incomplete occlusion of the ventral canal and the frequency and extent of the openings in the rhombencephalon were obtained to assess fetal dysraphia. Counts of 5-HT-immunostained neurons were also obtained in the rostral and caudal raphe. Results Prenatal alcohol exposure resulted in abnormal openings along the midline and delayed closure of ventral canal in the brainstem. This dysraphia was associated with reductions in the number of 5-HT neurons both in the rostral raphe nuclei (that gives rise to ascending 5-HT projections) and in the caudal raphe (that gives rise to the descending 5-HT projections). Concurrent treatment of the alcohol-consuming dams with SAL prevented dysraphia and protected against the alcohol-induced reductions in 5-HT neurons in both the rostral and caudal raphe. NAP was less effective in protecting against dysraphia and did not protect against 5-HT loss in the rostral raphe, but did protect against loss in

  7. Loss of enteric dopaminergic neurons and associated changes in colon motility in an MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Grant; Noorian, Ali Reza; Taylor, Georgia; Anitha, Mallappa; Bernhard, Doug; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Greene, James G.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction is the most common non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Symptoms of GI dysmotility include early satiety and nausea from delayed gastric emptying, bloating from poor small bowel coordination, and constipation and defecatory dysfunction from impaired colonic transit. Understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of these symptoms in PD patients has been hampered by the lack of investigation into GI symptoms and pathology in PD animal models. We report that the prototypical parkinsonian neurotoxin, MPTP (1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine), is a selective dopamine neuron toxin in the enteric nervous system (ENS). When examined 10 days after treatment, there was a 40% reduction of dopamine neurons in the ENS of C57Bl/6 mice administered MPTP (60 mg/kg). There were no differences in the density of cholinergic or nitric oxide neurons. Electrophysiological recording of neural-mediated muscle contraction in isolated colon from MPTP-treated animals confirmed a relaxation defect associated with dopaminergic degeneration. Behaviorally, MPTP induced a transient increase in colon motility, but no changes in gastric emptying or small intestine transit. These results provide the first comprehensive assessment of gastrointestinal pathophysiology in an animal model of PD. They provide insight into the impact of dopaminergic dysfunction on gastrointestinal motility and a benchmark for assessment of other PD model systems. PMID:17586496

  8. Classification of wet aged related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Anam; Mir, Fouwad Jamil; Yasin, Ubaid Ullah; Khan, Shoab A.

    2013-12-01

    Wet Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a type of age related macular degeneration. In order to detect Wet AMD we look for Pigment Epithelium detachment (PED) and fluid filled region caused by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). This form of AMD can cause vision loss if not treated in time. In this article we have proposed an automated system for detection of Wet AMD in Optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images. The proposed system extracts PED and CNV from OCT images using segmentation and morphological operations and then detailed feature set are extracted. These features are then passed on to the classifier for classification. Finally performance measures like accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are calculated and the classifier delivering the maximum performance is selected as a comparison measure. Our system gives higher performance using SVM as compared to other methods.

  9. Acute Seizures in Old Age Leads to a Greater Loss of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons, an Increased Propensity for Developing Chronic TLE and a Severe Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Kuruba, Ramkumar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2011-02-01

    ability for spatial learning but had memory retrieval dysfunction after AS activity. Thus, AS activity in old age results in a greater loss of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, an increased propensity for developing robust chronic TLE, and a severe cognitive dysfunction. PMID:21339903

  10. Loss of Nogo receptor homolog NgR2 alters spine morphology of CA1 neurons and emotionality in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, Sarah C.; Sartori, Simone B.; Lehmann, Julian; Sah, Anupam; Singewald, Nicolas; Bandtlow, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms which stabilize dendrites and dendritic spines are essential for regulation of neuronal plasticity in development and adulthood. The class of Nogo receptor proteins, which are critical for restricting neurite outgrowth inhibition signaling, have been shown to have roles in developmental, experience and activity induced plasticity. Here we investigated the role of the Nogo receptor homolog NgR2 in structural plasticity in a transgenic null mutant for NgR2. Using Golgi-Cox staining to analyze morphology, we show that loss of NgR2 alters spine morphology in adult CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus, significantly increasing mushroom-type spines, without altering dendritic tree complexity. Furthermore, this shift is specific to apical dendrites in distal CA1 stratum radiatum (SR). Behavioral alterations in NgR2−/− mice were investigated using a battery of standardized tests and showed that whilst there were no alterations in learning and memory in NgR2−/− mice compared to littermate controls, NgR2−/− displayed reduced fear expression in the contextual conditioned fear test, and exhibited reduced anxiety- and depression-related behaviors. This suggests that the loss of NgR2 results in a specific phenotype of reduced emotionality. We conclude that NgR2 has role in maintenance of mature spines and may also regulate fear and anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:24860456

  11. Dietary compound score and risk of age-related macular degeneration in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Because foods provide many nutrients, which may interact with each other to modify risk for multifactorial diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we sought to develop a composite scoring system to summarize the combined effect of multiple dietary nutrients on AMD risk. Th...

  12. Mood and memory deficits in a model of Gulf War illness are linked with reduced neurogenesis, partial neuron loss, and mild inflammation in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Vipan K; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2013-11-01

    Impairments in mood and cognitive function are the key brain abnormalities observed in Gulf war illness (GWI), a chronic multisymptom health problem afflicting ∼25% of veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War-1. Although the precise cause of GWI is still unknown, combined exposure to a nerve gas prophylaxis drug pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and pesticides DEET and permethrin during the war has been proposed as one of the foremost causes of GWI. We investigated the effect of 4 weeks of exposure to Gulf war illness-related (GWIR) chemicals in the absence or presence of mild stress on mood and cognitive function, dentate gyrus neurogenesis, and neurons, microglia, and astrocytes in the hippocampus. Combined exposure to low doses of GWIR chemicals PB, DEET, and permethrin induced depressive- and anxiety-like behavior and spatial learning and memory dysfunction. Application of mild stress in the period of exposure to chemicals exacerbated the extent of mood and cognitive dysfunction. Furthermore, these behavioral impairments were associated with reduced hippocampal volume and multiple cellular alterations such as chronic reductions in neural stem cell activity and neurogenesis, partial loss of principal neurons, and mild inflammation comprising sporadic occurrence of activated microglia and significant hypertrophy of astrocytes. The results show the first evidence of an association between mood and cognitive dysfunction and hippocampal pathology epitomized by decreased neurogenesis, partial loss of principal neurons, and mild inflammation in a model of GWI. Hence, treatment strategies that are efficacious for enhancing neurogenesis and suppressing inflammation may be helpful for alleviation of mood and cognitive dysfunction observed in GWI. PMID:23807240

  13. Age-related changes of auditory brainstem responses in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chi-Wing; Navarro, Xochi; Engle, James R; Recanzone, Gregg H

    2015-07-01

    Nonhuman primates, compared with humans and rodents, have historically been far less used for studies of age-related hearing loss, primarily because of their long life span and high cost of maintenance. Strong similarities in genetics, anatomy, and neurophysiology of the auditory nervous system between humans and monkeys, however, could provide fruitful opportunities to enhance our understanding of hearing loss. The present study used a common, noninvasive technique for testing hearing sensitivity in humans, the auditory brainstem response (ABR), to assess the hearing of 48 rhesus macaques from 6 to 35 yr of age to clicks and tone stimuli between 0.5 and 16.0 kHz. Old monkeys, particularly those above 21.5 yr of age, had missing ABR waveforms at high frequencies. Regression analyses revealed that ABR threshold increased as a function of age at peaks II and IV simultaneously. In the suprathreshold hearing condition (70 dB peak sound pressure level), ABR-based audiograms similarly varied as a function of age such that old monkeys had smaller peak amplitudes and delayed latencies at low, middle, and high frequencies. Peripheral hearing differences remained a major influence associated with age-related changes in audiometric functions of old monkeys at a comparable sensation level across animals. The present findings suggest that hearing loss occurs in old monkeys across a wide range of frequencies and that these deficits increase in severity with age. Parallel to prior studies in monkeys, we found weak effects of sex on hearing, and future investigations are necessary to clarify its role in age-related hearing loss. PMID:25972589

  14. Age-related changes of auditory brainstem responses in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chi-Wing; Navarro, Xochi; Engle, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates, compared with humans and rodents, have historically been far less used for studies of age-related hearing loss, primarily because of their long life span and high cost of maintenance. Strong similarities in genetics, anatomy, and neurophysiology of the auditory nervous system between humans and monkeys, however, could provide fruitful opportunities to enhance our understanding of hearing loss. The present study used a common, noninvasive technique for testing hearing sensitivity in humans, the auditory brainstem response (ABR), to assess the hearing of 48 rhesus macaques from 6 to 35 yr of age to clicks and tone stimuli between 0.5 and 16.0 kHz. Old monkeys, particularly those above 21.5 yr of age, had missing ABR waveforms at high frequencies. Regression analyses revealed that ABR threshold increased as a function of age at peaks II and IV simultaneously. In the suprathreshold hearing condition (70 dB peak sound pressure level), ABR-based audiograms similarly varied as a function of age such that old monkeys had smaller peak amplitudes and delayed latencies at low, middle, and high frequencies. Peripheral hearing differences remained a major influence associated with age-related changes in audiometric functions of old monkeys at a comparable sensation level across animals. The present findings suggest that hearing loss occurs in old monkeys across a wide range of frequencies and that these deficits increase in severity with age. Parallel to prior studies in monkeys, we found weak effects of sex on hearing, and future investigations are necessary to clarify its role in age-related hearing loss. PMID:25972589

  15. Mice doubly-deficient in lysosomal hexosaminidase A and neuraminidase 4 show epileptic crises and rapid neuronal loss.

    PubMed

    Seyrantepe, Volkan; Lema, Pablo; Caqueret, Aurore; Dridi, Larbi; Bel Hadj, Samar; Carpentier, Stephane; Boucher, Francine; Levade, Thierry; Carmant, Lionel; Gravel, Roy A; Hamel, Edith; Vachon, Pascal; Di Cristo, Graziella; Michaud, Jacques L; Morales, Carlos R; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2010-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is a severe lysosomal disorder caused by mutations in the HexA gene coding for the α-subunit of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase A, which converts G(M2) to G(M3) ganglioside. Hexa(-/-) mice, depleted of β-hexosaminidase A, remain asymptomatic to 1 year of age, because they catabolise G(M2) ganglioside via a lysosomal sialidase into glycolipid G(A2), which is further processed by β-hexosaminidase B to lactosyl-ceramide, thereby bypassing the β-hexosaminidase A defect. Since this bypass is not effective in humans, infantile Tay-Sachs disease is fatal in the first years of life. Previously, we identified a novel ganglioside metabolizing sialidase, Neu4, abundantly expressed in mouse brain neurons. Now we demonstrate that mice with targeted disruption of both Neu4 and Hexa genes (Neu4(-/-);Hexa(-/-)) show epileptic seizures with 40% penetrance correlating with polyspike discharges on the cortical electrodes of the electroencephalogram. Single knockout Hexa(-/-) or Neu4(-/-) siblings do not show such symptoms. Further, double-knockout but not single-knockout mice have multiple degenerating neurons in the cortex and hippocampus and multiple layers of cortical neurons accumulating G(M2) ganglioside. Together, our data suggest that the Neu4 block exacerbates the disease in Hexa(-/-) mice, indicating that Neu4 is a modifier gene in the mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, reducing the disease severity through the metabolic bypass. However, while disease severity in the double mutant is increased, it is not profound suggesting that Neu4 is not the only sialidase contributing to the metabolic bypass in Hexa(-/-) mice. PMID:20862357

  16. The suprachiasmatic nucleus: age-related decline in biological rhythms.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takahiro J; Takasu, Nana N; Nakamura, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with changes in sleep duration and quality, as well as increased rates of pathologic/disordered sleep. While several factors contribute to these changes, emerging research suggests that age-related changes in the mammalian central circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) may be a key factor. Prior work from our group suggests that circadian output from the SCN declines because of aging. Furthermore, we have previously observed age-related infertility in female mice, caused by a mismatch between environmental light-dark cycles and the intrinsic, internal biological clocks. In this review, we address regulatory mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in mammals and summarize recent literature describing the effects of aging on the circadian system. PMID:26915078

  17. Age-related percutaneous penetration part 1: skin factors.

    PubMed

    Konda, S; Meier-Davis, S R; Cayme, B; Shudo, J; Maibach, H I

    2012-05-01

    Changes in the skin that occur in the elderly may put them at increased risk for altered percutaneous penetration from pharmacotherapy along with potential adverse effects. Skin factors that may have a role in age-related percutaneous penetration include blood flow, pH, skin thickness, hair and pore density, and the content and structure of proteins, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), water, and lipids. Each factor is examined as a function of increasing age along with its potential impact on percutaneous penetration. Additionally, topical drugs that successfully overcome the barrier function of the skin can still fall victim to cutaneous metabolism, thereby producing metabolites that may have increased or decreased activity. This overview discusses the current data and highlights the importance of further studies to evaluate the impact of skin factors in age-related percutaneous penetration. PMID:22622279

  18. Veterans have less age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    McLay, R N; Lyketsos, C G

    2000-08-01

    Military service involves exposure to a number of stresses, both psychological and physical. On the other hand, military personnel generally maintain excellent fitness, and veterans have increased access to education and health care. The overall effect on age-related cognitive decline, whether for good or ill, of having served in the armed forces has not been investigated previously. In this study, we examined a diverse population of 208 veterans and 1,216 civilians followed as part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study in 1981, 1982, and 1993 to 1996. We examined change in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score after a median of 11.5 years. Veterans were found to have significantly less decrease in MMSE scores at follow-up even after sex, race, and education were taken into account. These results suggest an overall positive effect of military service on the rate of age-related cognitive decline. PMID:10957857

  19. Idiom understanding in adulthood: examining age-related differences.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pei-Fang; Nippold, Marilyn A

    2014-03-01

    Idioms are figurative expressions such as hold your horses, kick the bucket, and lend me a hand, which commonly occur in everyday spoken and written language. Hence, the understanding of these expressions is essential for daily communication. In this study, we examined idiom understanding in healthy adults in their 20s, 40s, 60s and 80s (n=30 per group) to determine if performance would show an age-related decline. Participants judged their own familiarity with a set of 20 idioms, explained the meaning of each, described a situation in which the idiom could be used, and selected the appropriate interpretation from a set of choices. There was no evidence of an age-related decline on any tasks. Rather, the 60s group reported greater familiarity and offered better explanations than did the 20s group. Moreover, greater familiarity with idioms was associated with better understanding in adults. PMID:24405225

  20. Age-Related Hyperkyphosis: Its Causes, Consequences, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Katzman, Wendy B.; Wanek, Linda; Shepherd, John A.; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related postural hyperkyphosis is an exaggerated anterior curvature of the thoracic spine, sometimes referred to as Dowager’s hump or gibbous deformity. This condition impairs mobility,2,31 and increases the risk of falls33 and fractures.26 The natural history of hyperkyphosis is not firmly established. Hyperkyphosis may develop from either muscle weakness and degenerative disc disease, leading to vertebral fractures and worsening hyperkyphosis, or from initial vertebral fractures that precipitate its development. PMID:20511692

  1. Dietary Approaches that Delay Age-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Everitt, Arthur V; Hilmer, Sarah N; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Jamieson, Hamish A; Truswell, A Stewart; Sharma, Anita P; Mason, Rebecca S; Morris, Brian J; Le Couteur, David G

    2006-01-01

    Reducing food intake in lower animals such as the rat decreases body weight, retards many aging processes, delays the onset of most diseases of old age, and prolongs life. A number of clinical trials of food restriction in healthy adult human subjects running over 2–15 years show significant reductions in body weight, blood cholesterol, blood glucose, and blood pressure, which are risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Lifestyle interventions that lower energy balance by reducing body weight such as physical exercise can also delay the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In general, clinical trials are suggesting that diets high in calories or fat along with overweight are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers, and dementia. There is a growing literature indicating that specific dietary constituents are able to influence the development of age-related diseases, including certain fats (trans fatty acids, saturated, and polyunsaturated fats) and cholesterol for cardiovascular disease, glycemic index and fiber for diabetes, fruits and vegetables for cardiovascular disease, and calcium and vitamin D for osteoporosis and bone fracture. In addition, there are dietary compounds from different functional foods, herbs, and neutraceuticals such as ginseng, nuts, grains, and polyphenols that may affect the development of age-related diseases. Long-term prospective clinical trials will be needed to confirm these diet—disease relationships. On the basis of current research, the best diet to delay age-related disease onset is one low in calories and saturated fat and high in wholegrain cereals, legumes, fruits and vegetables, and which maintains a lean body weight. Such a diet should become a key component of healthy aging, delaying age-related diseases and perhaps intervening in the aging process itself. Furthermore, there are studies suggesting that nutrition in childhood

  2. Smoking and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Velilla, Sara; García-Medina, José Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo; Pons-Vázquez, Sheila; Pinazo-Durán, M. Dolores; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; Arévalo, J. Fernando; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the main socioeconomical health issues worldwide. AMD has a multifactorial etiology with a variety of risk factors. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for AMD development and progression. The present review summarizes the epidemiological studies evaluating the association between smoking and AMD, the mechanisms through which smoking induces damage to the chorioretinal tissues, and the relevance of advising patients to quit smoking for their visual health. PMID:24368940

  3. Dietary approaches that delay age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Everitt, Arthur V; Hilmer, Sarah N; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Jamieson, Hamish A; Truswell, A Stewart; Sharma, Anita P; Mason, Rebecca S; Morris, Brian J; Le Couteur, David G

    2006-01-01

    Reducing food intake in lower animals such as the rat decreases body weight, retards many aging processes, delays the onset of most diseases of old age, and prolongs life. A number of clinical trials of food restriction in healthy adult human subjects running over 2-15 years show significant reductions in body weight, blood cholesterol, blood glucose, and blood pressure, which are risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Lifestyle interventions that lower energy balance by reducing body weight such as physical exercise can also delay the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In general, clinical trials are suggesting that diets high in calories or fat along with overweight are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers, and dementia. There is a growing literature indicating that specific dietary constituents are able to influence the development of age-related diseases, including certain fats (trans fatty acids, saturated, and polyunsaturated fats) and cholesterol for cardiovascular disease, glycemic index and fiber for diabetes, fruits and vegetables for cardiovascular disease, and calcium and vitamin D for osteoporosis and bone fracture. In addition, there are dietary compounds from different functional foods, herbs, and neutraceuticals such as ginseng, nuts, grains, and polyphenols that may affect the development of age-related diseases. Long-term prospective clinical trials will be needed to confirm these diet-disease relationships. On the basis of current research, the best diet to delay age-related disease onset is one low in calories and saturated fat and high in wholegrain cereals, legumes, fruits and vegetables, and which maintains a lean body weight. Such a diet should become a key component of healthy aging, delaying age-related diseases and perhaps intervening in the aging process itself. Furthermore, there are studies suggesting that nutrition in childhood and

  4. Age-related changes in the adaptability of neuromuscular output.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Steven; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2009-05-01

    The aging process is associated with a general decline in biological function. One characteristic that researchers believe represents this diminished functioning of the aging neuromuscular system is increased physiological tremor. The present study is constructed to assess what age-related differences exist in the dynamics of tremor and forearm muscle activity under postural conditions in which the number of arm segments involved in the task was altered. The authors predicted that any alteration in the tremor or electromyographic (EMG) output of these two groups would provide a clearer understanding of the differential effects of aging or task dynamics on physiological function. Results reveal no age-related differences in finger tremor or forearm extensor muscle EMG activity under conditions in which participants were only required to extend their index finger against gravity. However, when participants had to hold their entire upper limb steady against gravity, the authors observed significant increases in forearm EMG activity, finger-tremor amplitude, power in the 8-12-Hz range, and signal regularity between the 2 age groups. The selective changes in signal regularity, EMG activity, and 8-12-Hz tremor amplitude under more challenging postural demands support the view that the age-related changes in neuromuscular dynamics are not fully elucidated when single task demands are utilized. PMID:19366659

  5. Topography of age-related changes in sleep spindles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas; Lafortune, Marjolaine; Godbout, Jonathan; Barakat, Marc; Robillard, Rebecca; Poirier, Gaétan; Bastien, Célyne; Carrier, Julie

    2013-02-01

    Aging induces multiple changes to sleep spindles, which may hinder their alleged functional role in memory and sleep protection mechanisms. Brain aging in specific cortical regions could affect the neural networks underlying spindle generation, yet the topography of these age-related changes is currently unknown. In the present study, we analyzed spindle characteristics in 114 healthy volunteers aged between 20 and 73 years over 5 anteroposterior electroencephalography scalp derivations. Spindle density, amplitude, and duration were higher in young subjects than in middle-aged and elderly subjects in all derivations, but the topography of age effects differed drastically. Age-related decline in density and amplitude was more prominent in anterior derivations, whereas duration showed a posterior prominence. Age groups did not differ in all-night spindle frequency for any derivation. These results show that age-related changes in sleep spindles follow distinct topographical patterns that are specific to each spindle characteristic. This topographical specificity may provide a useful biomarker to localize age-sensitive changes in underlying neural systems during normal and pathological aging. PMID:22809452

  6. Hypermnesia: age-related differences between young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Widner, R L; Otani, H; Smith, A D

    2000-06-01

    Hypermnesia is a net improvement in memory performance that occurs across tests in a multitest paradigm with only one study session. Our goal was to identify possible age-related differences in hypermnesic recall. We observed hypermnesia for young adults using verbal (Experiment 1) as well as pictorial (Experiment 2) material, but no hypermnesia for older adults in either experiment. We found no age-related difference in reminiscence (Experiments 1 and 2), though there was a substantial difference in intertest forgetting (Experiments 1 and 2). Older, relative to young, adults produced more forgetting, most of which occurred between Tests 1 and 2 (Experiments 1 and 2). Furthermore, older, relative to young, adults produced more intrusions. We failed to identify a relationship between intrusions and intertest forgetting. We suggest that the age-related difference in intertest forgetting may be due to less efficient reinstatement of cues at test by older adults. The present findings reveal that intertest forgetting plays a critical role in hypermnesic recall, particularly for older adults. PMID:10946539

  7. Age-related differences in working memory updating components.

    PubMed

    Linares, Rocío; Bajo, M Teresa; Pelegrina, Santiago

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate possible age-related changes throughout childhood and adolescence in different component processes of working memory updating (WMU): retrieval, transformation, and substitution. A set of numerical WMU tasks was administered to four age groups (8-, 11-, 14-, and 21-year-olds). To isolate the effect of each of the WMU components, participants performed different versions of a task that included different combinations of the WMU components. The results showed an expected overall decrease in response times and an increase in accuracy performance with age. Most important, specific age-related changes in the retrieval component were found, demonstrating that the effect of retrieval on accuracy was larger in children than in adolescents or young adults. These findings indicate that the availability of representations from outside the focus of attention may change with age. Thus, the retrieval component of updating could contribute to the age-related changes observed in the performance of many updating tasks. PMID:26985577

  8. Hhip haploinsufficiency sensitizes mice to age-related emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lao, Taotao; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Yun, Jeong; Qiu, Weiliang; Guo, Feng; Huang, Chunfang; Mancini, John Dominic; Gupta, Kushagra; Laucho-Contreras, Maria E; Naing, Zun Zar Chi; Zhang, Li; Perrella, Mark A; Owen, Caroline A; Silverman, Edwin K; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Genetic variants in Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) have consistently been associated with the susceptibility to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary function levels, including the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), in general population samples by genome-wide association studies. However, in vivo evidence connecting Hhip to age-related FEV1 decline and emphysema development is lacking. Herein, using Hhip heterozygous mice (Hhip(+/-)), we observed increased lung compliance and spontaneous emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice starting at 10 mo of age. This increase was preceded by increases in oxidative stress levels in the lungs of Hhip(+/-) vs. Hhip(+/+) mice. To our knowledge, these results provide the first line of evidence that HHIP is involved in maintaining normal lung function and alveolar structures. Interestingly, antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine treatment in mice starting at age of 5 mo improved lung function and prevented emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice, suggesting that N-acetyl cysteine treatment limits the progression of age-related emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice. Therefore, reduced lung function and age-related spontaneous emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice may be caused by increased oxidative stress levels in murine lungs as a result of haploinsufficiency of Hhip. PMID:27444019

  9. Aging-Related Dysfunction of Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons Produces Conflict in Action Selection.

    PubMed

    Matamales, Miriam; Skrbis, Zala; Hatch, Robert J; Balleine, Bernard W; Götz, Jürgen; Bertran-Gonzalez, Jesus

    2016-04-20

    For goal-directed action to remain adaptive, new strategies are required to accommodate environmental changes, a process for which parafascicular thalamic modulation of cholinergic interneurons in the striatum (PF-to-CIN) appears critical. In the elderly, however, previously acquired experience frequently interferes with new learning, yet the source of this effect has remained unexplored. Here, combining sophisticated behavioral designs, cell-specific manipulation, and extensive neuronal imaging, we investigated the involvement of the PF-to-CIN pathway in this process. We found functional alterations of this circuit in aged mice that were consistent with their incapacity to update initial goal-directed learning, resulting in faulty activation of projection neurons in the striatum. Toxicogenetic ablation of CINs in young mice reproduced these behavioral and neuronal defects, suggesting that age-related deficits in PF-to-CIN function reduce the ability of older individuals to resolve conflict between actions, likely contributing to impairments in adaptive goal-directed action and executive control in aging. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27100198

  10. Loss of the thyroid hormone-binding protein Crym renders striatal neurons more vulnerable to mutant huntingtin in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Francelle, Laetitia; Galvan, Laurie; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Guillermier, Martine; Houitte, Diane; Bonvento, Gilles; Petit, Fanny; Jan, Caroline; Dufour, Noëlle; Hantraye, Philippe; Elalouf, Jean-Marc; De Chaldée, Michel; Déglon, Nicole; Brouillet, Emmanuel

    2015-03-15

    The mechanisms underlying preferential atrophy of the striatum in Huntington's disease (HD) are unknown. One hypothesis is that a set of gene products preferentially expressed in the striatum could determine the particular vulnerability of this brain region to mutant huntingtin (mHtt). Here, we studied the striatal protein µ-crystallin (Crym). Crym is the NADPH-dependent p38 cytosolic T3-binding protein (p38CTBP), a key regulator of thyroid hormone (TH) T3 (3,5,3'-triiodo-l-thyronine) transportation. It has been also recently identified as the enzyme that reduces the sulfur-containing cyclic ketimines, which are potential neurotransmitters. Here, we confirm the preferential expression of the Crym protein in the rodent and macaque striatum. Crym expression was found to be higher in the macaque caudate than in the putamen. Expression of Crym was reduced in the BACHD and Knock-in 140CAG mouse models of HD before onset of striatal atrophy. We show that overexpression of Crym in striatal medium-size spiny neurons using a lentiviral-based strategy in mice is neuroprotective against the neurotoxicity of an N-terminal fragment of mHtt in vivo. Thus, reduction of Crym expression in HD could render striatal neurons more susceptible to mHtt suggesting that Crym may be a key determinant of the vulnerability of the striatum. In addition our work points to Crym as a potential molecular link between striatal degeneration and the THs deregulation reported in HD patients. PMID:25398949

  11. Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Psychosocial Intervention Program for Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birk, Tanja; Hickl, Susanne; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Miller, Daniel; Kammerer, Annette; Holz, Frank; Becker, Stefanie; Volcker, Hans E.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The psychosocial needs of patients suffering from severe visual loss associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) are generally ignored in the clinical routine. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a psychosocial intervention program for ARMD patients. This intervention program was based on six modules…

  12. Psychosocial Adaptation to Visual Impairment and Its Relationship to Depressive Affect in Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolman, Jennifer; Hill, Robert D.; Kleinschmidt, Julia J.; Gregg, Charles H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In this study we examined psychosocial adaptation to vision loss and its relationship to depressive symptomatology in legally blind older adults with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Design and Methods: The 144 study participants were outpatients of a large regional vision clinic that specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of…

  13. Depressive-like behavior observed with a minimal loss of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons following administration of 6-hydroxydopamine is associated with electrophysiological changes and reversed with precursors of norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Miguelez, Cristina; Wang, Yangqing; Vidaurrazaga, Igor; Ugedo, Luisa; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W; Raskind, Murray A

    2016-02-01

    Depression is a common co-morbid condition most often observed in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dysfunction of the central noradrenergic nervous system is an important component in depression. In AD, locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons are significantly reduced pathologically and the reduction of LC neurons is hypothesized to begin very early in the progression of the disorder; however, it is not known if dysfunction of the noradrenergic system due to early LC neuronal loss is involved in mediating depression in early AD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine in an animal model if a loss of noradrenergic LC neurons results in depressive-like behavior. The LC noradrenergic neuronal population was reduced by the bilateral administration of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) directly into the LC. Forced swim test (FST) was performed three weeks after the administration of 6-OHDA (5, 10 and 14 μg/μl), animals administered the 5 μg/μl of 6-OHDA demonstrated a significant increase in immobility, indicating depressive-like behavior. This increase in immobility at the 5 μg/μl dose was observed with a minimal loss of LC noradrenergic neurons as compared to LC neuronal loss observed at 10 and 14 μg/μl dose. A significant positive correlation between the number of surviving LC neurons after 6-OHDA and FST immobile time was observed, suggesting that in animals with a minimal loss of LC neurons (or a greater number of surviving LC neurons) following 6-OHDA demonstrated depressive-like behavior. As the 6-OHDA-induced loss of LC neurons is increased, the time spent immobile is reduced. Depressive-like behavior was also observed with the 5 μg/μl dose of 6-OHDA with a second behavior test, sucrose consumption. FST increased immobility following 6-OHDA (5 μg/μl) was reversed by the administration of a single dose of L-1-3-4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) or l-threo-3

  14. Genetic and Functional Dissection of HTRA1 and LOC387715 in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jiexi; Lu, Fang; Sun, Xufang; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Kevin; Davey, Lisa; Chen, Haoyu; London, Nyall; Muramatsu, Daisuke; Salasar, Francesca; Carmona, Ruben; Kasuga, Daniel; Wang, Xiaolei; Bedell, Matthew; Dixie, Manjuxia; Zhao, Peiquan; Yang, Ruifu; Gibbs, Daniel; Liu, Xiaoqi; Li, Yan; Li, Cai; Li, Yuanfeng; Campochiaro, Betsy; Constantine, Ryan; Zack, Donald J.; Campochiaro, Peter; Fu, Yinbin; Li, Dean Y.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Zhang, Kang

    2010-01-01

    A common haplotype on 10q26 influences the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and encompasses two genes, LOC387715 and HTRA1. Recent data have suggested that loss of LOC387715, mediated by an insertion/deletion (in/del) that destabilizes its message, is causally related with the disorder. Here we show that loss of LOC387715 is insufficient to explain AMD susceptibility, since a nonsense mutation (R38X) in this gene that leads to loss of its message resides in a protective haplotype. At the same time, the common disease haplotype tagged by the in/del and rs11200638 has an effect on the transcriptional upregulation of the adjacent gene, HTRA1. These data implicate increased HTRA1 expression in the pathogenesis of AMD and highlight the importance of exploring multiple functional consequences of alleles in haplotypes that confer susceptibility to complex traits. PMID:20140183

  15. [Forensic medical assessment of vascular and neuronal lesions in the brain associated with acute blood loss and anemia].

    PubMed

    Indiaminov, S I

    2010-01-01

    Brain tissues available for examination in the present study were obtained from 30 subjects who died from the blood loss following injuries to blood vessels and internal organs inflicted by sharp objects. The study revealed variable character of tanatogenesis induced by acute blood loss and anemia. Tanatogenesis associated with injuries to the heart and major blood vessels is most likely due to the deficiency of blood in the microcirculatory system developing in the terminal period. The main tanatogenic factors in subjects with multiple injuries to peripheral vessels are vascular dystonia and abnormal rheological properties of blood. PMID:20394188

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is associated with age-related decline in hippocampal volume.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Voss, Michelle W; Chaddock, Laura; Heo, Susie; McLaren, Molly; Pence, Brandt D; Martin, Stephen A; Vieira, Victoria J; Woods, Jeffrey A; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F

    2010-04-14

    Hippocampal volume shrinks in late adulthood, but the neuromolecular factors that trigger hippocampal decay in aging humans remains a matter of speculation. In rodents, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes the growth and proliferation of cells in the hippocampus and is important in long-term potentiation and memory formation. In humans, circulating levels of BDNF decline with advancing age, and a genetic polymorphism for BDNF has been related to gray matter volume loss in old age. In this study, we tested whether age-related reductions in serum levels of BDNF would be related to shrinkage of the hippocampus and memory deficits in older adults. Hippocampal volume was acquired by automated segmentation of magnetic resonance images in 142 older adults without dementia. The caudate nucleus was also segmented and examined in relation to levels of serum BDNF. Spatial memory was tested using a paradigm in which memory load was parametrically increased. We found that increasing age was associated with smaller hippocampal volumes, reduced levels of serum BDNF, and poorer memory performance. Lower levels of BDNF were associated with smaller hippocampi and poorer memory, even when controlling for the variation related to age. In an exploratory mediation analysis, hippocampal volume mediated the age-related decline in spatial memory and BDNF mediated the age-related decline in hippocampal volume. Caudate nucleus volume was unrelated to BDNF levels or spatial memory performance. Our results identify serum BDNF as a significant factor related to hippocampal shrinkage and memory decline in late adulthood. PMID:20392958

  17. Age-related anabolic resistance after endurance-type exercise in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Durham, William J.; Casperson, Shanon L.; Dillon, Edgar L.; Keske, Michelle A.; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Sanford, Arthur P.; Hickner, Robert C.; Grady, James J.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle loss is thought to stem from suboptimal nutrition and resistance to anabolic stimuli. Impaired microcirculatory (nutritive) blood flow may contribute to anabolic resistance by reducing delivery of amino acids to skeletal muscle. In this study, we employed contrast-enhanced ultrasound, microdialysis sampling of skeletal muscle interstitium, and stable isotope methodology, to assess hemodynamic and metabolic responses of older individuals to endurance type (walking) exercise during controlled amino acid provision. We hypothesized that older individuals would exhibit reduced microcirculatory blood flow, interstitial amino acid concentrations, and amino acid transport when compared with younger controls. We report for the first time that aging induces anabolic resistance following endurance exercise, manifested as reduced (by ∼40%) efficiency of muscle protein synthesis. Despite lower (by ∼40–45%) microcirculatory flow in the older than in the younger participants, circulating and interstitial amino acid concentrations and phenylalanine transport into skeletal muscle were all equal or higher in older individuals than in the young, comprehensively refuting our hypothesis that amino acid availability limits postexercise anabolism in older individuals. Our data point to alternative mediators of age-related anabolic resistance and importantly suggest correction of these impairments may reduce requirements for, and increase the efficacy of, dietary protein in older individuals. Durham, W. J., Casperson, S. L., Dillon, E. L., Keske, M. A., Paddon-Jones, D., Sanford, A. P., Hickner, R. C., Grady, J. J., Sheffield-Moore, M. Age-related anabolic resistance after endurance-type exercise in healthy humans. PMID:20547663

  18. Loss of collapsin response mediator protein 4 suppresses dopaminergic neuron death in an 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tonouchi, Aine; Nagai, Jun; Togashi, Kentaro; Goshima, Yoshio; Ohshima, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Several lines of evidence suggest that neurodegeneration in PD is accelerated by a vicious cycle in which apoptosis in dopaminergic neurons triggers the activation of microglia and harmful inflammatory processes that further amplify neuronal death. Recently, we demonstrated that the deletion of collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4) suppresses inflammatory responses and cell death in a mouse model of spinal cord injury, leading to improved functional recovery. We thus hypothesized that Crmp4-/- mice may have limited inflammatory responses and a decrease in the loss of SNc dopaminergic neurons in an 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD mouse model. We observed CRMP4 expression in neurons, astrocytes, and microglia/macrophages following the injection of 25 mg/kg MPTP. We compared the number of dopaminergic neurons and the inflammatory response in SNc between Crmp4+/+ and Crmp4-/- mice after MPTP injection. Limited loss of SNc dopaminergic neurons and decreased activations of microglia and astrocytes were observed in Crmp4-/- mice. These results suggest that CRMP4 is a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of PD patients. We demonstrated that genetic CRMP4 deletion delays a vicious cycle of inflammation and neurodegeneration in a Parkinson's disease mouse model. MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) injection to wild-type mice induces collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4) up-regulation in neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. CRMP4-deficient mice show reduced inflammation and suppressed dopaminergic neuronal death after MPTP injection. These findings suggest that CRMP4 deletion may be a new therapeutic strategy against Parkinson's diseases. PMID:26991935

  19. Loss of the thyroid hormone-binding protein Crym renders striatal neurons more vulnerable to mutant huntingtin in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Francelle, Laetitia; Galvan, Laurie; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Guillermier, Martine; Houitte, Diane; Bonvento, Gilles; Petit, Fanny; Jan, Caroline; Dufour, Noëlle; Hantraye, Philippe; Elalouf, Jean-Marc; De Chaldée, Michel; Déglon, Nicole; Brouillet, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying preferential atrophy of the striatum in Huntington's disease (HD) are unknown. One hypothesis is that a set of gene products preferentially expressed in the striatum could determine the particular vulnerability of this brain region to mutant huntingtin (mHtt). Here, we studied the striatal protein µ-crystallin (Crym). Crym is the NADPH-dependent p38 cytosolic T3-binding protein (p38CTBP), a key regulator of thyroid hormone (TH) T3 (3,5,3′-triiodo-l-thyronine) transportation. It has been also recently identified as the enzyme that reduces the sulfur-containing cyclic ketimines, which are potential neurotransmitters. Here, we confirm the preferential expression of the Crym protein in the rodent and macaque striatum. Crym expression was found to be higher in the macaque caudate than in the putamen. Expression of Crym was reduced in the BACHD and Knock-in 140CAG mouse models of HD before onset of striatal atrophy. We show that overexpression of Crym in striatal medium-size spiny neurons using a lentiviral-based strategy in mice is neuroprotective against the neurotoxicity of an N-terminal fragment of mHtt in vivo. Thus, reduction of Crym expression in HD could render striatal neurons more susceptible to mHtt suggesting that Crym may be a key determinant of the vulnerability of the striatum. In addition our work points to Crym as a potential molecular link between striatal degeneration and the THs deregulation reported in HD patients. PMID:25398949

  20. Loss of CDKL5 impairs survival and dendritic growth of newborn neurons by altering AKT/GSK-3β signaling.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Claudia; Trazzi, Stefania; Torricella, Roberta; Viggiano, Rocchina; De Franceschi, Marianna; Amendola, Elena; Gross, Cornelius; Calzà, Laura; Bartesaghi, Renata; Ciani, Elisabetta

    2014-10-01

    Mutations in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been identified in a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by early-onset intractable seizures, severe developmental delay, intellectual disability, and Rett's syndrome-like features. Since the physiological functions of CDKL5 still need to be elucidated, in the current study we took advantage of a new Cdkl5 knockout (KO) mouse model in order to shed light on the role of this gene in brain development. We mainly focused on the hippocampal dentate gyrus, a region that largely develops postnatally and plays a key role in learning and memory. Looking at the process of neurogenesis, we found a higher proliferation rate of neural precursors in Cdkl5 KO mice in comparison with wild type mice. However, there was an increase in apoptotic cell death of postmitotic granule neuron precursors, with a reduction in total number of granule cells. Looking at dendritic development, we found that in Cdkl5 KO mice the newly-generated granule cells exhibited a severe dendritic hypotrophy. In parallel, these neurodevelopmental defects were associated with impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory. Looking at the mechanisms whereby CDKL5 exerts its functions, we identified a central role of the AKT/GSK-3β signaling pathway. Overall our findings highlight a critical role of CDKL5 in the fundamental processes of brain development, namely neuronal precursor proliferation, survival and maturation. This evidence lays the basis for a better understanding of the neurological phenotype in patients carrying mutations in the CDKL5 gene. PMID:24952363

  1. Recent developments in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Frank G.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Fleckenstein, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of visual loss in the elderly, with increasing prevalence due to increasing life expectancy. While the introduction of anti-VEGF therapy has improved outcomes, there are still major unmet needs and gaps in the understanding of underlying biological processes. These include early, intermediate, and atrophic disease stages. Recent studies have assessed therapeutic approaches addressing various disease-associated pathways, including complement inhibitors. Drug-delivery aspects are also relevant, as many agents have to be administered repeatedly. Herein, relevant pathogenetic factors and underlying mechanisms as well as recent and potential therapeutic approaches are reviewed. PMID:24691477

  2. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters.

    PubMed

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-10-13

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  3. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters

    PubMed Central

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  4. Age-related changes in the thickness of cortical zones in humans.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Scott M; Brickhouse, Michael; Pascual, Belen; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2011-10-01

    Structural neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that all regions of the cortex are not affected equally by aging, with frontal regions appearing especially susceptible to atrophy. The "last in, first out" hypothesis posits that aging is, in a sense, the inverse of development: late-maturing regions of the brain are preferentially vulnerable to age-related loss of structural integrity. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing age-related changes in regional cortical thickness via three methods: (1) an exploratory linear regression of cortical thickness and age across the entire cortical mantle (2) an analysis of age-related differences in the thickness of zones of cortex defined by functional/cytoarchitectural affiliation (including primary sensory/motor, unimodal association, heteromodal association, and paralimbic zones), and (3) an analysis of age-related differences in the thickness of regions of cortex defined by surface area expansion in the period between birth and early adulthood. Subjects were grouped as young (aged 18-29, n = 138), middle-aged (aged 30-59, n = 80), young-old (aged 60-79, n = 60), and old-old (aged 80+, n = 38). Thinning of the cortex between young and middle-aged adults was greatest in heteromodal association cortex and regions of high postnatal surface area expansion. In contrast, thinning in old-old age was greatest in primary sensory/motor cortices and regions of low postnatal surface area expansion. In sum, these results lead us to propose a sequential "developmental-sensory" model of aging, in which developmental factors influence cortical vulnerability relatively early in the aging process, whereas later-in more advanced stages of aging-factors specific to primary sensory and motor cortices confer vulnerability. This model offers explicitly testable hypotheses and suggests the possibility that normal aging may potentially allow for multiple opportunities for intervention to promote the structural integrity of the cerebral

  5. Age-dependent loss of cholinergic neurons in learning and memory-related brain regions and impaired learning in SAMP8 mice with trigeminal nerve damage.

    PubMed

    He, Yifan; Zhu, Jihong; Huang, Fang; Qin, Liu; Fan, Wenguo; He, Hongwen

    2014-11-15

    The tooth belongs to the trigeminal sensory pathway. Dental damage has been associated with impairments in the central nervous system that may be mediated by injury to the trigeminal nerve. In the present study, we investigated the effects of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve, an important peripheral nerve in the trigeminal sensory pathway, on learning and memory behaviors and structural changes in related brain regions, in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Inferior alveolar nerve transection or sham surgery was performed in middle-aged (4-month-old) or elderly (7-month-old) senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. When the middle-aged mice reached 8 months (middle-aged group 1) or 11 months (middle-aged group 2), and the elderly group reached 11 months, step-down passive avoidance and Y-maze tests of learning and memory were performed, and the cholinergic system was examined in the hippocampus (Nissl staining and acetylcholinesterase histochemistry) and basal forebrain (choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry). In the elderly group, animals that underwent nerve transection had fewer pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions, fewer cholinergic fibers in the CA1 and dentate gyrus, and fewer cholinergic neurons in the medial septal nucleus and vertical limb of the diagonal band, compared with sham-operated animals, as well as showing impairments in learning and memory. Conversely, no significant differences in histology or behavior were observed between middle-aged group 1 or group 2 transected mice and age-matched sham-operated mice. The present findings suggest that trigeminal nerve damage in old age, but not middle age, can induce degeneration of the septal-hippocampal cholinergic system and loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and ultimately impair learning ability. Our results highlight the importance of active treatment of trigeminal nerve damage in elderly patients and those with Alzheimer's disease, and indicate that

  6. Age-dependent loss of cholinergic neurons in learning and memory-related brain regions and impaired learning in SAMP8 mice with trigeminal nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    He, Yifan; Zhu, Jihong; Huang, Fang; Qin, Liu; Fan, Wenguo; He, Hongwen

    2014-01-01

    The tooth belongs to the trigeminal sensory pathway. Dental damage has been associated with impairments in the central nervous system that may be mediated by injury to the trigeminal nerve. In the present study, we investigated the effects of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve, an important peripheral nerve in the trigeminal sensory pathway, on learning and memory behaviors and structural changes in related brain regions, in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Inferior alveolar nerve transection or sham surgery was performed in middle-aged (4-month-old) or elderly (7-month-old) senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. When the middle-aged mice reached 8 months (middle-aged group 1) or 11 months (middle-aged group 2), and the elderly group reached 11 months, step-down passive avoidance and Y-maze tests of learning and memory were performed, and the cholinergic system was examined in the hippocampus (Nissl staining and acetylcholinesterase histochemistry) and basal forebrain (choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry). In the elderly group, animals that underwent nerve transection had fewer pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions, fewer cholinergic fibers in the CA1 and dentate gyrus, and fewer cholinergic neurons in the medial septal nucleus and vertical limb of the diagonal band, compared with sham-operated animals, as well as showing impairments in learning and memory. Conversely, no significant differences in histology or behavior were observed between middle-aged group 1 or group 2 transected mice and age-matched sham-operated mice. The present findings suggest that trigeminal nerve damage in old age, but not middle age, can induce degeneration of the septal-hippocampal cholinergic system and loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and ultimately impair learning ability. Our results highlight the importance of active treatment of trigeminal nerve damage in elderly patients and those with Alzheimer's disease, and indicate that

  7. Young blood reverses age-related impairments in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity in mice.

    PubMed

    Villeda, Saul A; Plambeck, Kristopher E; Middeldorp, Jinte; Castellano, Joseph M; Mosher, Kira I; Luo, Jian; Smith, Lucas K; Bieri, Gregor; Lin, Karin; Berdnik, Daniela; Wabl, Rafael; Udeochu, Joe; Wheatley, Elizabeth G; Zou, Bende; Simmons, Danielle A; Xie, Xinmin S; Longo, Frank M; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-06-01

    As human lifespan increases, a greater fraction of the population is suffering from age-related cognitive impairments, making it important to elucidate a means to combat the effects of aging. Here we report that exposure of an aged animal to young blood can counteract and reverse pre-existing effects of brain aging at the molecular, structural, functional and cognitive level. Genome-wide microarray analysis of heterochronic parabionts--in which circulatory systems of young and aged animals are connected--identified synaptic plasticity-related transcriptional changes in the hippocampus of aged mice. Dendritic spine density of mature neurons increased and synaptic plasticity improved in the hippocampus of aged heterochronic parabionts. At the cognitive level, systemic administration of young blood plasma into aged mice improved age-related cognitive impairments in both contextual fear conditioning and spatial learning and memory. Structural and cognitive enhancements elicited by exposure to young blood are mediated, in part, by activation of the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (Creb) in the aged hippocampus. Our data indicate that exposure of aged mice to young blood late in life is capable of rejuvenating synaptic plasticity and improving cognitive function. PMID:24793238

  8. Young blood reverses age-related impairments in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Villeda, Saul A; Plambeck, Kristopher E; Middeldorp, Jinte; Castellano, Joseph M; Mosher, Kira I; Luo, Jian; Smith, Lucas K; Bieri, Gregor; Lin, Karin; Berdnik, Daniela; Wabl, Rafael; Udeochu, Joe; Wheatley, Elizabeth G; Zou, Bende; Simmons, Danielle A; Xie, Xinmin S; Longo, Frank M; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-01-01

    As human lifespan increases, a greater fraction of the population is suffering from age-related cognitive impairments, making it important to elucidate a means to combat the effects of aging1,2. Here we report that exposure of an aged animal to young blood can counteract and reverse pre-existing effects of brain aging at the molecular, structural, functional and cognitive level. Genome-wide microarray analysis of heterochronic parabionts—in which circulatory systems of young and aged animals are connected—identified synaptic plasticity–related transcriptional changes in the hippocampus of aged mice. Dendritic spine density of mature neurons increased and synaptic plasticity improved in the hippocampus of aged heterochronic parabionts. At the cognitive level, systemic administration of young blood plasma into aged mice improved age-related cognitive impairments in both contextual fear conditioning and spatial learning and memory. Structural and cognitive enhancements elicited by exposure to young blood are mediated, in part, by activation of the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (Creb) in the aged hippocampus. Our data indicate that exposure of aged mice to young blood late in life is capable of rejuvenating synaptic plasticity and improving cognitive function. PMID:24793238

  9. Age-related changes in Egr1 transcription and DNA methylation within the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Penner, M R; Parrish, R R; Hoang, L T; Roth, T L; Lubin, F D; Barnes, C A

    2016-08-01

    Aged animals show functional alterations in hippocampal neurons that lead to deficits in synaptic plasticity and changes in cognitive function. Transcription of immediate-early genes (IEGs), including Egr1, is necessary for processes such as long-term potentiation and memory consolidation. Here, we show an age-related reduction in the transcription of Egr1 in the dentate gyrus following spatial behavior, whereas in the area CA1, Egr1 is reduced at rest, but its transcription can be effectively driven by spatial behavior to levels equivalent to those observed in adult animals. One mechanism possibly contributing to these aging-related changes is an age-associated, CpG site-specific change in methylation in DNA associated with the promoter region of the Egr1 gene. Our results add to a growing body of work demonstrating that complex transcriptional and epigenetic changes in the hippocampus significantly contribute to brain and cognitive aging. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26972614

  10. Moringa oleifera mitigates memory impairment and neurodegeneration in animal model of age-related dementia.

    PubMed

    Sutalangka, Chatchada; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-mee, Wipawee

    2013-01-01

    To date, the preventive strategy against dementia is still essential due to the rapid growth of its prevalence and the limited therapeutic efficacy. Based on the crucial role of oxidative stress in age-related dementia and the antioxidant and nootropic activities of Moringa oleifera, the enhancement of spatial memory and neuroprotection of M. oleifera leaves extract in animal model of age-related dementia was determined. The possible underlying mechanism was also investigated. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180-220 g, were orally given M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg at a period of 7 days before and 7 days after the intracerebroventricular administration of AF64A bilaterally. Then, they were assessed memory, neuron density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, and AChE in hippocampus. The results showed that the extract improved spatial memory and neurodegeneration in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus of hippocampus together with the decreased MDA level and AChE activity but increased SOD and CAT activities. Therefore, our data suggest that M. oleifera leaves extract is the potential cognitive enhancer and neuroprotectant. The possible mechanism might occur partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the enhanced cholinergic function. However, further explorations concerning active ingredient(s) are still required. PMID:24454988

  11. Moringa oleifera Mitigates Memory Impairment and Neurodegeneration in Animal Model of Age-Related Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sutalangka, Chatchada; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-mee, Wipawee

    2013-01-01

    To date, the preventive strategy against dementia is still essential due to the rapid growth of its prevalence and the limited therapeutic efficacy. Based on the crucial role of oxidative stress in age-related dementia and the antioxidant and nootropic activities of Moringa oleifera, the enhancement of spatial memory and neuroprotection of M. oleifera leaves extract in animal model of age-related dementia was determined. The possible underlying mechanism was also investigated. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–220 g, were orally given M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg at a period of 7 days before and 7 days after the intracerebroventricular administration of AF64A bilaterally. Then, they were assessed memory, neuron density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, and AChE in hippocampus. The results showed that the extract improved spatial memory and neurodegeneration in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus of hippocampus together with the decreased MDA level and AChE activity but increased SOD and CAT activities. Therefore, our data suggest that M. oleifera leaves extract is the potential cognitive enhancer and neuroprotectant. The possible mechanism might occur partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the enhanced cholinergic function. However, further explorations concerning active ingredient(s) are still required. PMID:24454988

  12. Age-related changes in mouse bone permeability.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Oyen, Michelle L; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-03-21

    The determination of lacunar-canalicular permeability is essential for understanding local fluid flow in bone, which may indicate how bone senses changes in the mechanical environment to regulate mechano-adaptation. The estimates of lacunar-canalicular permeability found in the literature vary by up to eight orders of magnitude, and age-related permeability changes have not been measured in non-osteonal mouse bone. The objective of this study is to use a poroelastic approach based on nanoindentation data to characterize lacunar-canalicular permeability in murine bone as a function of age. Nine wild type C57BL/6 mice of different ages (2, 7 and 12 months) were used. Three tibiae from each age group were embedded in epoxy resin, cut in half and indented in the longitudinal direction in the mid-cortex using two spherical fluid indenter tips (R=238 μm and 500 μm). Results suggest that the lacunar-canalicular intrinsic permeability of mouse bone decreases from 2 to 7 months, with no significant changes from 7 to 12 months. The large indenter tip imposed larger contact sizes and sampled larger ranges of permeabilities, particularly for the old bone. This age-related difference in the distribution was not seen for indents with the smaller radius tip. We conclude that the small tip effectively measured lacunar-canalicular permeability, while larger tip indents were influenced by vascular permeability. Exploring the age-related changes in permeability of bone measured by nanoindentation will lead to a better understanding of the role of fluid flow in mechano-transduction. This understanding may help indicate alterations in bone adaptation and remodeling. PMID:24433671

  13. IgG and complement deposition and neuronal loss in cats and humans with epilepsy and voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies.

    PubMed

    Klang, Andrea; Schmidt, Peter; Kneissl, Sibylle; Bagó, Zoltán; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Moloney, Teresa; Bien, Christian G; Halász, Péter; Bauer, Jan; Pákozdy, Akos

    2014-05-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKC-complex) antibody (Ab) encephalitis is a well-recognized form of limbic encephalitis in humans, usually occurring in the absence of an underlying tumor. The patients have a subacute onset of seizures, magnetic resonance imaging findings suggestive of hippocampal inflammation, and high serum titers of Abs against proteins of the VGKC-complex, particularly leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1). Most patients are diagnosed promptly and recover substantially with immunotherapies; consequently, neuropathological data are limited. We have recently shown that feline complex partial cluster seizures with orofacial involvement (FEPSO) in cats can also be associated with Abs against VGKC-complexes/LGI1. Here we examined the brains of cats with FEPSO and compared the neuropathological findings with those in a human with VGKC-complex-Ab limbic encephalitis. Similar to humans, cats with VGKC-complex-Ab and FEPSO have hippocampal lesions with only moderate T-cell infiltrates but with marked IgG infiltration and complement C9neo deposition on hippocampal neurons, associated with neuronal loss. These findings provide further evidence that FEPSO is a feline form of VGKC-complex-Ab limbic encephalitis and provide a model for increasing understanding of the human disease. PMID:24709680

  14. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Advances in Management and Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Miller, Joan W; Kim, Ivana K

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in older populations in industrialized nations. AMD is a late-onset deterioration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in the central retina caused by various environmental and genetic factors. Great strides in our understanding of AMD pathogenesis have been made in the past several decades, which have translated into revolutionary therapeutic agents in recent years. In this review, we describe the clinical and pathologic features of AMD and present an overview of current diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:26239130

  15. Age-related macular degeneration: Complement in action.

    PubMed

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Strauss, Erich C; Yaspan, Brian L

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host-defense against common pathogens but must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation and tissue damage. Polymorphisms in genes encoding two important negative regulators of the alternative complement pathway, complement factor H (CFH) and complement factor I (CFI), are associated with the risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population. In this review, we will discuss the genetic basis of AMD and the potential impact of complement de-regulation on disease pathogenesis. Finally, we will highlight recent therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling complement activation in patients with AMD. PMID:26742632

  16. Effects of Vitreomacular Adhesion on Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eui Chun; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we review the association between vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analyses have shown that eyes with neovascular AMD are twice as likely to have VMA as normal eyes. VMA in neovascular AMD may induce inflammation, macular traction, decrease in oxygenation, sequestering of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and other cytokines or may directly stimulate VEGF production. VMA may also interfere with the treatment effects of anti-VEGF therapy, which is the standard treatment for neovascular AMD, and releasing VMA can improve the treatment response to anti-VEGF treatment in neovascular AMD. We also reviewed currently available methods of relieving VMA. PMID:26425354

  17. Present and Possible Therapies for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in the elderly population worldwide and is defined as a chronic, progressive disorder characterized by changes occurring within the macula reflective of the ageing process. At present, the prevalence of AMD is currently rising and is estimated to increase by a third by 2020. Although our understanding of the several components underpinning the pathogenesis of this condition has increased significantly, the treatment options for this condition remain substantially limited. In this review, we outline the existing arsenal of therapies available for AMD and discuss the additional role of further novel therapies currently under investigation for this debilitating disease. PMID:25097787

  18. [Diagnostic Criteria for Atrophic Age-related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kanji; Shiraga, Fumio; Ishida, Susumu; Kamei, Motohiro; Yanagi, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic criteria for dry age-related macular degeneration is described. Criteria include visual acuity, fundscopic findings, diagnostic image findings, exclusion criteria and classification of severity grades. Essential findings to make diagnosis as "geographic atrophy" are, 1) at least 250 μm in diameter, 2) round/oval/cluster-like or geographic in shape, 3) sharp delineation, 4) hypopigmentation or depigmentation in retinal pigment epithelium, 5) choroidal vessels are more visible than in surrounding area. Severity grades were classified as mild, medium and severe by relation of geographic atrophy to the fovea and attendant findings. PMID:26571627

  19. [Glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration intricacy].

    PubMed

    Valtot, F

    2008-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness among the elderly in Western nations. Age is also a well-known and well-evidenced risk factor for glaucoma. With increasing longevity and the rising prevalence of older people around the world, more and more patients will have glaucoma and AMD. Clinical evaluation of these patients still poses problems for clinicians. It is very important to order the right tests at the right time to distinguish glaucomatous defects from those caused by retinal lesions, because appropriate therapy has a beneficial effect on slowing or halting damage. PMID:18957915

  20. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Advances in Management and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in older populations in industrialized nations. AMD is a late-onset deterioration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in the central retina caused by various environmental and genetic factors. Great strides in our understanding of AMD pathogenesis have been made in the past several decades, which have translated into revolutionary therapeutic agents in recent years. In this review, we describe the clinical and pathologic features of AMD and present an overview of current diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:26239130

  1. Squalamine lactate for exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Brian; Desai, Avinash; Garcia, Charles A; Thomas, Edgar; Gast, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Squalamine lactate inhibits angiogenesis by a long-lived, intracellular mechanism of action. The drug is taken up into activated endothelial cells through caveolae, small invaginations in the cellular membrane. Subsequently, the drug binds to and "chaperones" calmodulin to an intracellular membrane compartment and blocks angiogenesis at several levels. A series of basic investigations, preclinical studies, and human clinical trials have begun to establish the proof of concept, efficacy, and safety parameters for use of squalamine lactate as a therapeutic agent for exudative age-related macular degeneration and several types of malignancies. PMID:16935213

  2. Coenzyme Q10 prevents peripheral neuropathy and attenuates neuron loss in the db-/db- mouse, a type 2 diabetes model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tie-Jun Sten; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Zeberg, Hugo; Nilsson, Johanna; Grünler, Jacob; Liu, Su-Xing; Xiang, Qiong; Persson, Jonas; Fried, Kaj J; Catrina, Sergiu Bogdan; Watanabe, Masahiko; Arhem, Peter; Brismar, Kerstin; Hökfelt, Tomas G M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common complication in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Here we studied some phenotypic features of a well-established animal model of type 2 diabetes, the leptin receptor-deficient db(-)/db(-) mouse, and also the effect of long-term (6 mo) treatment with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an endogenous antioxidant. Diabetic mice at 8 mo of age exhibited loss of sensation, hypoalgesia (an increase in mechanical threshold), and decreases in mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, and sciatic nerve conduction velocity. All these changes were virtually completely absent after the 6-mo, daily CoQ10 treatment in db(-)/db(-) mice when started at 7 wk of age. There was a 33% neuronal loss in the lumbar 5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of the db(-)/db(-) mouse versus controls at 8 mo of age, which was significantly attenuated by CoQ10. There was no difference in neuron number in 5/6-wk-old mice between diabetic and control mice. We observed a strong down-regulation of phospholipase C (PLC) β3 in the DRGs of diabetic mice at 8 mo of age, a key molecule in pain signaling, and this effect was also blocked by the 6-mo CoQ10 treatment. Many of the phenotypic, neurochemical regulations encountered in lumbar DRGs in standard models of peripheral nerve injury were not observed in diabetic mice at 8 mo of age. These results suggest that reactive oxygen species and reduced PLCβ3 expression may contribute to the sensory deficits in the late-stage diabetic db(-)/db(-) mouse, and that early long-term administration of the antioxidant CoQ10 may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes neuropathy. PMID:23267110

  3. Dopaminergic neuron loss and up-regulation of chaperone protein mRNA induced by targeted over-expression of alpha-synuclein in mouse substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    St Martin, Jessie L; Klucken, Jochen; Outeiro, Tiago F; Nguyen, Paul; Keller-McGandy, Christine; Cantuti-Castelvetri, Ippolita; Grammatopoulos, Tom N; Standaert, David G; Hyman, Bradley T; McLean, Pamela J

    2007-03-01

    Several transgenic mouse lines with altered alpha-synuclein expression have been developed that show a variety of Parkinson's disease-like symptoms without specific loss of dopaminergic neurons. Targeted over-expression of human alpha-synuclein using viral-vector mediated gene delivery into the substantia nigra of rats and non-human primates leads to dopaminergic cell loss and the formation of alpha-synuclein aggregates reminiscent of Lewy bodies. In the context of these recent findings, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to over-express wild type human alpha-synuclein in the substantia nigra of mice. We hypothesized that this over-expression would recapitulate pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease, creating a mouse model to further characterize the disease pathogenesis. Recombinant AAV expressing alpha-synuclein was stereotaxically injected into the substantia nigra of mice, leading to a 25% reduction of dopaminergic neurons after 24 weeks of transduction. Furthermore, examination of mRNA levels of stress-related proteins using laser capture microdissection and quantitative PCR revealed a positive correlation of Hsp27 expression with the extent of viral transduction at 4 weeks and a positive correlation of Hsp40, Hsp70 and caspase 9 with the extent of viral transduction at 24 weeks. Taken together, our findings suggest that targeted over-expression of alpha-synuclein can induce pathology at the gross anatomical and molecular level in the substantia nigra, providing a mouse model in which upstream changes in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis can be further elucidated. PMID:17241127

  4. Neutralization of RANTES and Eotaxin Prevents the Loss of Dopaminergic Neurons in a Mouse Model of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Goutam; Rangasamy, Suresh B; Roy, Avik; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-07-15

    Parkinson disease (PD) is second only to Alzheimer disease as the most common human neurodegenerative disorder. Despite intense investigation, no interdictive therapy is available for PD. Recent studies indicate that both innate and adaptive immune processes are active in PD. Accordingly, we found a rapid increase in RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) and eotaxin, chemokines that are involved in T cell trafficking, in vivo in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the serum of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-intoxicated mice. RANTES and eotaxin were also up-regulated in the substantia nigra pars compacta of post-mortem PD brains as compared with age-matched controls. Therefore, we investigated whether neutralization of RANTES and eotaxin could protect against nigrostriatal degeneration in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Interestingly, after peripheral administration, functional blocking antibodies against RANTES and eotaxin reduced the infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells into the nigra, attenuated nigral expression of proinflammatory molecules, and suppressed nigral activation of glial cells. These findings paralleled dopaminergic neuronal protection, normalized striatal neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Therefore, we conclude that attenuation of the chemokine-dependent adaptive immune response may be of therapeutic benefit for PD patients. PMID:27226559

  5. Forebrain deletion of the dystonia protein torsinA causes dystonic-like movements and loss of striatal cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Samuel S; Darr, Katherine; Holley, Sandra M; Cepeda, Carlos; Mabrouk, Omar S; Wong, Jenny-Marie T; LeWitt, Tessa M; Paudel, Reema; Houlden, Henry; Kennedy, Robert T; Levine, Michael S; Dauer, William T

    2015-01-01

    Striatal dysfunction plays an important role in dystonia, but the striatal cell types that contribute to abnormal movements are poorly defined. We demonstrate that conditional deletion of the DYT1 dystonia protein torsinA in embryonic progenitors of forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic neurons causes dystonic-like twisting movements that emerge during juvenile CNS maturation. The onset of these movements coincides with selective degeneration of dorsal striatal large cholinergic interneurons (LCI), and surviving LCI exhibit morphological, electrophysiological, and connectivity abnormalities. Consistent with the importance of this LCI pathology, murine dystonic-like movements are reduced significantly with an antimuscarinic agent used clinically, and we identify cholinergic abnormalities in postmortem striatal tissue from DYT1 dystonia patients. These findings demonstrate that dorsal LCI have a unique requirement for torsinA function during striatal maturation, and link abnormalities of these cells to dystonic-like movements in an overtly symptomatic animal model. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08352.001 PMID:26052670

  6. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune privileged tissue due to its unique anatomical and physiological properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergo low levels of activation (para-inflammation). In many cases, this para-inflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), this para-inflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal para-inflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors and old age. Dysregulated para-inflammation (chronic inflammation) in AMD damages the blood retina barrier (BRB), resulting in the breach of retinal immune privilege leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in AMD, and explores the difference between beneficial para-inflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of AMD. PMID:26292978

  7. Fertility preservation for age-related fertility decline.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Dominic; Cobo, Ana; Silber, Sherman

    2014-10-01

    Cryopreservation of eggs or ovarian tissue to preserve fertility for patients with cancer has been studied since 1994 with R G Gosden's paper describing restoration of fertility in oophorectomised sheep, and for decades previously by others in smaller mammals. Clinically this approach has shown great success. Many healthy children have been born from eggs cryopreserved with the Kuwayama egg vitrification technique for non-medical (social) indications, but until now very few patients with cancer have achieved pregnancy with cryopreserved eggs. Often, oncologists do not wish to delay cancer treatment while the patient goes through multiple ovarian stimulation cycles to retrieve eggs, and the patient can only start using the oocytes after full recovery from cancer. Ovarian stimulation and egg retrieval is not a barrier for patients without cancer who wish to delay childbearing, which makes oocyte cryopreservation increasingly popular to overcome an age-related decline in fertility. Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is an option if egg cryopreservation is ruled out. More than 35 babies have been born so far with cryopreserved ovarian tissue in patients with cancer who have had a complete return of hormonal function, and fertility to baseline. Both egg and ovarian tissue cryopreservation might be ready for application to the preservation of fertility not only in patients with cancer but also in countering the increasing incidence of age-related decline in female fertility. PMID:25283572

  8. Age-related mutations and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mason, C C; Khorashad, J S; Tantravahi, S K; Kelley, T W; Zabriskie, M S; Yan, D; Pomicter, A D; Reynolds, K R; Eiring, A M; Kronenberg, Z; Sherman, R L; Tyner, J W; Dalley, B K; Dao, K-H; Yandell, M; Druker, B J; Gotlib, J; O'Hare, T; Deininger, M W

    2016-04-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a hematologic malignancy nearly confined to the elderly. Previous studies to determine incidence and prognostic significance of somatic mutations in CMML have relied on candidate gene sequencing, although an unbiased mutational search has not been conducted. As many of the genes commonly mutated in CMML were recently associated with age-related clonal hematopoiesis (ARCH) and aged hematopoiesis is characterized by a myelomonocytic differentiation bias, we hypothesized that CMML and aged hematopoiesis may be closely related. We initially established the somatic mutation landscape of CMML by whole exome sequencing followed by gene-targeted validation. Genes mutated in ⩾10% of patients were SRSF2, TET2, ASXL1, RUNX1, SETBP1, KRAS, EZH2, CBL and NRAS, as well as the novel CMML genes FAT4, ARIH1, DNAH2 and CSMD1. Most CMML patients (71%) had mutations in ⩾2 ARCH genes and 52% had ⩾7 mutations overall. Higher mutation burden was associated with shorter survival. Age-adjusted population incidence and reported ARCH mutation rates are consistent with a model in which clinical CMML ensues when a sufficient number of stochastically acquired age-related mutations has accumulated, suggesting that CMML represents the leukemic conversion of the myelomonocytic-lineage-biased aged hematopoietic system. PMID:26648538

  9. Current therapeutic developments in atrophic age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative disorder of the central retina, is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. The underlying mechanism of the advanced form of dry AMD, also named geographic atrophy (GA) or atrophic AMD, remains unclear. Consequently, no cure is available for dry AMD or GA. The only prevention option currently available is the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation, which has been demonstrated to slow down the progression of dry AMD. This review summarises recent advances in therapy for dry AMD and GA. Building on the new understanding of the disease and recent technological breakthroughs, numerous ongoing clinical trials have the goal of meeting the need to cure AMD. Therapeutic agents are being developed to target the key features of the disease, including inhibiting the complement pathway and other inflammatory pathways, reducing oxidative stress and protecting retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, inhibiting lipofuscin and visual cycle, regenerating RPE cells from stem cells and restoring choroidal blood flow. Some of these therapeutic options, especially the stem cell-based therapy, hold great promise, which brings great hope for this devastating blinding disease. PMID:26553922

  10. Age-related Cardiac Disease Model of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ocorr, Karen; Akasaka, Takeshi; Bodmer, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    We have begun to study the genetic basis of deterioration of cardiac function in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as an age-related cardiac disease model. For this purpose we have developed heart function assays in Drosophila and found that the fly's cardiac performance, as that of the human heart, deteriorates with age: aging fruit flies exhibit a progressive increase in electrical pacing-induced heart failure as well as in arrhythmias. The insulin receptor and associated pathways have a dramatic and heart-autonomous influence on age-related cardiac performance in flies, suggestive of potentially similar mechanisms in regulating cardiac aging in vertebrates. Compromised KCNQ and KATP ion channel functions also seem to contribute to the decline in heart performance in aging flies, suggesting that the corresponding vertebrate gene functions may similarly decline with age, in addition to their conserved role in protecting against arrhythmias and hypoxia/ischemia, respectively. The fly heart is thus emerging as a promising genetic model for studying the age-dependent decline in organ function. PMID:17125816

  11. Long noncoding RNAs in aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2016-03-01

    Aging is the universal, intrinsic, genetically-controlled, evolutionarily-conserved and time-dependent intricate biological process characterised by the cumulative decline in the physiological functions and their coordination in an organism after the attainment of adulthood resulting in the imbalance of neurological, immunological and metabolic functions of the body. Various biological processes and mechanisms along with altered levels of mRNAs and proteins have been reported to be involved in the progression of aging. It is one of the major risk factors in the patho-physiology of various diseases and disorders. Recently, the discovery of pervasive transcription of a vast pool of heterogeneous regulatory noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including small ncRNAs (sncRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), in the mammalian genome have provided an alternative way to study and explore the missing links in the aging process, its mechanism(s) and related diseases in a whole new dimension. The involvement of small noncoding RNAs in aging and age-related diseases have been extensively studied and recently reviewed. However, lncRNAs, whose function is far less explored in relation to aging, have emerged as a class of major regulators of genomic functions. Here, we have described some examples of known as well as novel lncRNAs that have been implicated in the progression of the aging process and age-related diseases. This may further stimulate research on noncoding RNAs and the aging process. PMID:26655093

  12. Age-related differences in electroencephalogram connectivity and network topology.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Volf, Nina V; Belousova, Ludmila V

    2015-05-01

    To better understand age-related differences in brain function and behavior, connectivity between brain regions was estimated from electroencephalogram source time series in eyes closed versus eyes open resting condition. In beta band, decrease of connectivity upon eyes opening was more pronounced in younger than in older participants. The extent of this decrease was associated with reaction time in attention tasks, and this relationship was fully mediated by participants' age, implying that physiological processes, which lead to age-related slowing, include changes in beta reactivity. Graph-theoretical analysis showed a decrease of modularity and clustering in beta and gamma band networks in older adults, implying that age makes brain networks more random. The overall number of nodes identified as hubs in posterior cortical regions decreased in older participants. At the same time, increase of connectedness of anterior nodes, probably reflecting compensatory activation of the anterior attentional system, was observed in beta-band network of older adults. These findings show that normal aging mostly affects interactions in beta band, which are probably involved in attentional processes. PMID:25766772

  13. Age-related changes to the production of linguistic prosody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Daniel R.

    The production of speech prosody (the rhythm, pausing, and intonation associated with natural speech) is critical to effective communication. The current study investigated the impact of age-related changes to physiology and cognition in relation to the production of two types of linguistic prosody: lexical stress and the disambiguation of syntactically ambiguous utterances. Analyses of the acoustic correlates of stress: speech intensity (or sound-pressure level; SPL), fundamental frequency (F0), key word/phrase duration, and pause durat