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Sample records for age-standardized relative survival

  1. Human papillomavirus-related esophageal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lanwei; Liu, Shuzheng; Zhang, Shaokai; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Meng; Quan, Peiliang; Sun, Xi-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified to be related to progression of esophageal cancer. However, the results remain controversial. A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was therefore conducted to address this issue. Methods: The electronic databases of MEDLINE and Excerpta Medica database were searched till April 30, 2016. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. Results: Ten studies involving a total of 1184 esophageal cancer cases were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled hazard ratio comparing HPV-positive to HPV-negative esophageal cancers was 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.78–1.37), which was not significantly correlated with improved survival. However, HPV-16-positive patients might have a significantly favorable survival (hazard ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.44–1.21). Conclusion: The meta-analysis indicated that HPV infection may not be of prognostic utility in the evaluation of factors contributing to esophageal cancer. Further large prospective studies are encouraged to stratify survival analysis by HPV type. PMID:27861358

  2. 29 CFR 570.2 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum age standards. 570.2 Section 570.2 Labor... REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION General § 570.2 Minimum age standards. (a) All occupations except in agriculture. (1) The Act, in section 3(1), sets a general 16-year minimum age...

  3. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum age standards. 551.601 Section... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year minimum age. The Act, in section 3(l), sets a general 16-year minimum age, which applies to all...

  4. 29 CFR 570.2 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum age standards. 570.2 Section 570.2 Labor... REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION General § 570.2 Minimum age standards. (a) All occupations except in agriculture. (1) The Act, in section 3(1), sets a general 16-year minimum age...

  5. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum age standards. 551.601 Section... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year minimum age. The Act, in section 3(l), sets a general 16-year minimum age, which applies to all...

  6. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum age standards. 551.601 Section... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year minimum age. The Act, in section 3(l), sets a general 16-year minimum age, which applies to all...

  7. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum age standards. 551.601 Section... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year minimum age. The Act, in section 3(l), sets a general 16-year minimum age, which applies to all...

  8. 29 CFR 570.2 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum age standards. 570.2 Section 570.2 Labor... REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION General § 570.2 Minimum age standards. (a) All occupations except in agriculture. (1) The Act, in section 3(1), sets a general 16-year minimum age...

  9. 29 CFR 570.2 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum age standards. 570.2 Section 570.2 Labor... REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION General § 570.2 Minimum age standards. (a) All occupations except in agriculture. (1) The Act, in section 3(1), sets a general 16-year minimum age...

  10. 29 CFR 570.2 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum age standards. 570.2 Section 570.2 Labor... REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION General § 570.2 Minimum age standards. (a) All occupations except in agriculture. (1) The Act, in section 3(1), sets a general 16-year minimum age...

  11. Model based period analysis of absolute and relative survival with R: data preparation, model fitting and derivation of survival estimates.

    PubMed

    Holleczek, Bernd; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-05-01

    Period analysis is increasingly employed in analyses of long-term survival of patients with chronic diseases such as cancer, as it derives more up-to-date survival estimates than traditional cohort based approaches. It has recently been extended with regression modelling using generalized linear models, which increases the precision of the survival estimates and enables to assess and account for effects of additional covariates. This paper provides a detailed presentation how model based period analysis may be used to derive population-based absolute and relative survival estimates using the freely available R language and statistical environment and already available R programs for period analysis. After an introduction of the underlying regression model and a description of the software tools we provide a step-by-step implementation of two regression models in R and illustrate how estimates and a test for trend over time in relative survival may be derived using data from a population based cancer registry.

  12. Survival and growth of Salmonella in salsa and related ingredients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Guodong; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Tauxe, Robert V; Doyle, Michael P

    2010-03-01

    A large outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul associated with raw jalapeño peppers, serrano peppers, and possibly tomatoes was reported in the United States in 2008. During the outbreak, two clusters of illness investigated among restaurant patrons were significantly associated with eating salsa. Experiments were performed to determine the survival and growth characteristics of Salmonella in salsa and related major ingredients, i.e., tomatoes, jalapeño peppers, and cilantro. Intact and chopped vegetables and different formulations of salsas were inoculated with a five-strain mixture of Salmonella and then stored at 4, 12, and 21 degrees C for up to 7 days. Salmonella populations were monitored during storage. Salmonella did not grow, but survived on intact tomatoes and jalapeño peppers, whereas significant growth at 12 and 21 degrees C was observed on intact cilantro. In general, growth of Salmonella occurred in all chopped vegetables when stored at 12 and 21 degrees C, with chopped jalapeño peppers being the most supportive of Salmonella growth. Regardless of differences in salsa formulation, no growth of Salmonella (initial inoculation ca. 3 log CFU/g) was observed in salsa held at 4 degrees C; however, rapid or gradual decreases in Salmonella populations were only observed in formulations that contained both fresh garlic and lime juice. Salmonella grew at 12 and 21 degrees C in salsas, except for those formulations that contained both fresh garlic and lime juice, in which salmonellae were rapidly or gradually inactivated, depending on salsa formulation. These results highlight the importance of preharvest pathogen contamination control of fresh produce and proper formulation and storage of salsa.

  13. Transcriptional modules related to hepatocellular carcinoma survival: coexpression network analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinsen; Zhou, Yanyan; Miao, Runchen; Chen, Wei; Qu, Kai; Pang, Qing; Liu, Chang

    2016-06-01

    We performed weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to gain insights into the molecular aspects of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Raw microarray datasets (including 488 samples) were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) website. Data were normalized using the RMA algorithm. We utilized the WGCNA to identify the coexpressed genes (modules) after non-specific filtering. Correlation and survival analyses were conducted using the modules, and gene ontology (GO) enrichment was applied to explore the possible mechanisms. Eight distinct modules were identified by the WGCNA. Pink and red modules were associated with liver function, whereas turquoise and black modules were inversely correlated with tumor staging. Poor outcomes were found in the low expression group in the turquoise module and in the high expression group in the red module. In addition, GO enrichment analysis suggested that inflammation, immune, virus-related, and interferon-mediated pathways were enriched in the turquoise module. Several potential biomarkers, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), topoisomerase 2α (TOP2A), and serpin peptidase inhibitor clade C (antithrombin) member 1 (SERPINC1), were also identified. In conclusion, gene signatures identified from the genome-based assays could contribute to HCC stratification. WGCNA was able to identify significant groups of genes associated with cancer prognosis.

  14. Personality drives physiological adjustments and is not related to survival.

    PubMed

    Bijleveld, Allert I; Massourakis, Georgina; van der Marel, Annemarie; Dekinga, Anne; Spaans, Bernard; van Gils, Jan A; Piersma, Theunis

    2014-05-22

    The evolutionary function and maintenance of variation in animal personality is still under debate. Variation in the size of metabolic organs has recently been suggested to cause and maintain variation in personality. Here, we examine two main underlying notions: (i) that organ sizes vary consistently between individuals and cause consistent behavioural patterns, and (ii) that a more exploratory personality is associated with reduced survival. Exploratory behaviour of captive red knots (Calidris canutus, a migrant shorebird) was negatively rather than positively correlated with digestive organ (gizzard) mass, as well as with body mass. In an experiment, we reciprocally reduced and increased individual gizzard masses and found that exploration scores were unaffected. Whether or not these birds were resighted locally over the 19 months after release was negatively correlated with their exploration scores. Moreover, a long-term mark-recapture effort on free-living red knots with known gizzard masses at capture confirmed that local resighting probability (an inverse measure of exploratory behaviour) was correlated with gizzard mass without detrimental effects on survival. We conclude that personality drives physiological adjustments, rather than the other way around, and suggest that physiological adjustments mitigate the survival costs of exploratory behaviour. Our results show that we need to reconsider hypotheses explaining personality variation based on organ sizes and differential survival.

  15. Survival of dusky Canada goose goslings in relation to weather and annual nest success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fondell, T.F.; Miller, David A.; Grand, J.B.; Michael, Anthony R.

    2008-01-01

    The dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) population has been in long-term decline, likely due to reduced breeding productivity, but gosling survival of this population had not been examined. We studied gosling survival in broods of radiomarked adult females on the western Copper River Delta, Alaska, USA, during 1997-1999 and 2001-2003. Survival estimates for dusky Canada goose goslings to 45 days (x- = 0.32) were below estimates from most previous studies of geese. Daily survival of goslings increased with age and decreased with date of hatch. Precipitation during the first 3 days post-hatch was negatively related to gosling survival and this effect increased with date. Annual estimates of gosling survival were positively correlated with annual estimates of nest success, suggesting overlap in factors affecting nest and gosling survival. Nest success probably also directly affected gosling survival, because survival decreased with hatch date and more broods hatched from renests during years with low nest success. Gosling survival appears to play an important role in limiting current productivity of this population. Management directed at increasing nest success would likely also improve gosling survival. We recommend additional research directed at examining sources of gosling mortality and the link between nest success and gosling survival.

  16. Adaptive memory: the survival scenario enhances item-specific processing relative to a moving scenario.

    PubMed

    Burns, Daniel J; Hart, Joshua; Griffith, Samantha E; Burns, Amy D

    2013-01-01

    Nairne, Thompson, and Pandeirada (2007) found that retention of words rated for their relevance to survival is superior to that of words encoded under numerous other deep processing conditions. They suggested that our memory systems might have evolved to confer an advantage for survival-relevant information. Burns, Burns, and Hwang (2011) suggested a two-process explanation of the proximate mechanisms responsible for the survival advantage. Whereas most control tasks encourage only one type of processing, the survival task encourages both item-specific and relational processing. They found that when control tasks encouraged both types of processing, the survival processing advantage was eliminated. However, none of their control conditions included non-survival scenarios (e.g., moving, vacation, etc.), so it is not clear how this two-process explanation would explain the survival advantage when scenarios are used as control conditions. The present experiments replicated the finding that the survival scenario improves recall relative to a moving scenario in both a between-lists and within-list design and also provided evidence that this difference was accompanied by an item-specific processing difference, not a difference in relational processing. The implications of these results for several existing accounts of the survival processing effect are discussed.

  17. Crisis Communication and Management: Surviving a Public Relations Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eramo, Eric M.

    2009-01-01

    Crisis management, or crisis communication, is never a good thing for a business to experience. It is, however, a public relations' professional moment to shine and put their honed skills to good use. A good crisis management plan is not only action during the crisis but preparation and reflection. Hiring a PR firm that deals with crisis…

  18. General Theory of Relativity: Will It Survive the Next Decade?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Paramos, Jorge; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2006-01-01

    The nature of gravity is fundamental to our understanding of our own solar system, the galaxy and the structure and evolution of the Universe. Einstein's general theory of relativity is the standard model that is used for almost ninety years to describe gravitational phenomena on these various scales. We review the foundations of general relativity, discuss the recent progress in the tests of relativistic gravity, and present motivations for high-accuracy gravitational experiments in space. We also summarize the science objectives and technology needs for the laboratory experiments in space with laboratory being the entire solar system. We discuss the advances in our understanding of fundamental physics anticipated in the near future and evaluate discovery potential for the recently proposed gravitational experiments.

  19. Estimation of net survival for cancer patients: Relative survival setting more robust to some assumption violations than cause-specific setting, a sensitivity analysis on empirical data.

    PubMed

    Schaffar, Robin; Rachet, Bernard; Belot, Aurélien; Woods, Laura M

    2017-02-01

    Net survival is the survival that would be observed if the only possible underlying cause of death was the disease under study. It can be estimated with either cause-specific or relative survival data settings, if the informative censoring is properly considered. However, net survival estimators are prone to specific biases related to the data setting itself. We examined which data setting was the most robust against violation of key assumptions (erroneous cause of death and inappropriate life tables). We identified 4285 women in the Geneva Cancer Registry, diagnosed with breast, colorectal, lung cancer and melanoma between 1981 and 1991 and estimated net survival up to 20 years using cause-specific and relative survival settings. We used weights to tackle informative censoring in both settings and performed sensitivity analyses to evaluate the impact of misclassification of cause of death in the cause-specific setting or of using inappropriate life tables on net survival estimates in the relative survival setting. For all the four cancers, net survival was highest when using the cause-specific setting and the absolute difference between the two estimators increased with time since diagnosis. The sensitivity analysis showed that (i) the use of different life tables did not compromise net survival estimation in the relative survival setting, whereas (ii) a small level of misclassification for the cause of death led to a large change in the net survival estimate in the cause-specific setting. The relative survival setting was more robust to the above assumptions violations and is therefore recommended for estimation of net survival.

  20. The Impact of State-Specific Life Tables on Relative Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyunsoon; Scoppa, Steve M.; Weir, Hannah K.; Mariotto, Angela B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Relative survival is based on estimating excess cancer mortality in a study population compared to expected mortality of a comparable population without cancer. In the United States, expected mortality is estimated from national life tables matched by age, sex, race, and calendar year to each individual in the study population. We compared five-year relative survival using state life tables to five-year relative survival using US decennial life tables. We assessed variations by age, race, and cancer site for all cancers combined, lung, colorectal, prostate, and female breast cancers. Methods We used data from 17 National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program registries, including diagnoses from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009 with follow-up through December 31, 2010. Five-year relative survival was calculated using US-based life tables (USLT) and state-specific life tables (SLT). Results Differences in SLT- and USLT-based survival were generally small (SLT < 4 survival percentage points lower than USLT). Differences were higher for states with high SES and low mortality and for prostate cancer. Differences were largest for all cancers combined, colon and rectum, and prostate cancer among males aged 85+ ranging from −10 to −17 survival points for whites and +9 to +17 for blacks. Conclusion Differences between relative survival based on USLT and SLT were small and state-based estimates were less reliable than US-based estimates for older populations aged 85+. Our findings underscore the need to develop more appropriate life tables that better represent the varying mortality patterns in different populations in order to obtain accurate estimates of relative survival. PMID:25417235

  1. Glycan-related gene expression signatures in breast cancer subtypes; relation to survival.

    PubMed

    Potapenko, Ivan O; Lüders, Torben; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Åslaug; Sørlie, Therese; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Lingjærde, Ole C; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Haakensen, Vilde D

    2015-04-01

    Alterations in glycan structures are early signs of malignancy and have recently been proposed to be in part a driving force behind malignant transformation. Here, we explore whether differences in expression of genes related to the process of glycosylation exist between breast carcinoma subtypes - and look for their association to clinical parameters. Five expression datasets of 454 invasive breast carcinomas, 31 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 79 non-malignant breast tissue samples were analysed. Results were validated in 1960 breast carcinomas. 419 genes encoding glycosylation-related proteins were selected. The DCIS samples appeared expression-wise similar to carcinomas, showing altered gene expression related to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and N-glycans when compared to non-malignant samples. In-situ lesions with different aggressiveness potentials demonstrated changes in glycosaminoglycan sulfation and adhesion proteins. Subtype-specific expression patterns revealed down-regulation of genes encoding glycan-binding proteins in the luminal A and B subtypes. Clustering basal-like samples using a consensus list of genes differentially expressed across discovery datasets produced two clusters with significantly differing prognosis in the validation dataset. Finally, our analyses suggest that glycolipids may play an important role in carcinogenesis of breast tumors - as demonstrated by association of B3GNT5 and UGCG genes to patient survival. In conclusion, most glycan-specific changes occur early in the carcinogenic process. We have identified glycan-related alterations specific to breast cancer subtypes including a prognostic signature for two basal-like subgroups. Future research in this area may potentially lead to markers for better prognostication and treatment stratification of breast cancer patients.

  2. Age standardization in mapping adult overweight and obesity trends in the WHO European Region.

    PubMed

    Doak, C M; Wijnhoven, T M A; Schokker, D F; Visscher, T L S; Seidell, J C

    2012-02-01

    This study aims to improve comparability of available data within the World Health Organization (WHO) European Region taking into account differences related to the aging of the population. Surveys were included if they were conducted on adults aged 25-64 years between 1985 and 2010 in the WHO European Region. Overweight/obesity prevalences were adjusted to the European standard population aged 25-64. Data were entered for each of the 5-year categories between 1981 and 2010. Measured height and weight data were available for males in 16 and females in 24 of the 53 countries. The 50-64-year-olds had higher prevalence of overweight and obesity as compared to the 25-49-year-olds. This pattern occurs in every country, by male and female, in almost all surveys. Age-standardized overweight prevalence was higher among males than females in all countries. Trend data showed increases in most countries. Age-standardized maps were based on self-reported data because of insufficient availability of measured data. Results showed more countries with available data as well as the higher category of obesity in the later surveys. Measured values are needed and age adjustment is important in documenting emerging overweight and obesity trends, independent of demographic changes, in the WHO European Region.

  3. Age-standardized Incidence Rates for Leukemia Associated with Consanguineous Marriages in 68 Countries, an Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Consanguineous marriage that defines as a union between biologically related persons has a variety of known deleterious correlations with factors that affect public health within human populations. To investigate the association between the mean of inbreeding coefficient (α) and incidence of leukemia, the present ecological study on 68 countries was carried out. Statistical analysis showed that the age-standardized incidence rate of leukemia positively correlated with log10GNI per capita (r=0.699, df=66, P<0.001) and negatively correlated with log10α (r=−0.609, df=66, P<0.001). Controlling log10GNI per capita, a significant negative correlation between log10α and the age-standardized incidence rate of leukemia was observed (r=−0.392, df=65, P=0.001). The countries were stratified according to their annual GNI per capita, low and high-income countries with GNI per capita less than and more than 10,000$, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that in high-income countries, after controlling for log10GNI per capita, the correlation between the age-standardized incidence rate of leukemia and log10α was still significant (r=−0.600, df=36, P<0.001). It should be noted that there was no significant association between the age-standardized mortality rate due to leukemia and log10α (P>0.05). The present finding indicates that the rate of leukemia, age-standardized for incidence, is lower in countries with a high prevalence of consanguineous marriages. PMID:25960855

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life and Survival of Cholangiocarcinoma Patients in Northeastern Region of Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Woradet, Somkiattiyos; Songserm, Nopparat; Promthet, Supannee; Parkin, Donald Maxwell

    2016-01-01

    In northeast Thailand, cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a major cause of mortality. Patients with CCA have a poor prognosis and short-term survival. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and survival time, and to explore whether change in HRQOL score is related to survival among CCA patients. The study was performed between February 2011 and January 2012, and included 171 patients with newly diagnosed CCA from 5 tertiary hospitals in four provinces of northeast Thailand. The HRQOL was measured at baseline, 1 month, and 2 months after diagnosis by the FACT-Hep questionnaire (Thai version 4). The outcome was survival time from diagnosis. Cox’s proportional hazard model was used to evaluate the association between HRQOL and survival time. A higher overall score on HRQOL was associated with a significantly better survival (HR per 5 units increase in HRQOL was 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88–0.96). Two of the separate domains contributing to the overall HRQOL—functional well-being and hepatobiliary cancer subscale—were found to have independent effects on survival, even after adjustment for potential confounding variables, and the other domains of HRQOL. CCA patient whose HRQOL scores had improved (≥9 units) at the 1st month of follow up had a reduced probability of dying from the disease (HR: 0.56, 0.32–0.95) after adjustment for the same confounding factors. A positive association between HRQOL at diagnosis and survival time was found. An improvement in HRQOL score in the first months after diagnosis further increases survival. PMID:27685448

  5. Survival in gastric cancer in relation to postoperative adjuvant therapy and determinants

    PubMed Central

    Ozden, Sevgi; Ozgen, Zerrin; Ozyurt, Hazan; Gemici, Cengiz; Yaprak, Gokhan; Tepetam, Huseyin; Mayadagli, Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate survival data in patients with gastric cancer in relation to postoperative adjuvant therapy and survival determinants METHODS: A total of 201 patients (mean ± SD age: 56.0 ± 11.9 years, 69.7% were males) with gastric carcinoma who were operated and followed up at Lutfi Kirdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital between 1998 and 2010 were included in this retrospective study. Follow up was evaluated divided into two consecutive periods (before 2008 and 2008-2010, respectively) based on introduction of 3-D conformal technique in radiotherapy at our clinic in 2008. Data on patient demographics, clinical and histopathological characteristics of gastric carcinoma and the type of treatment applied after surgery [postoperative adjuvant treatment protocols including chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and chemotherapy (CT), supportive therapy or follow up without any treatment] were recorded. The median duration and determinants of local recurrence free (LRF) survival, distant metastasis free (DMF) survival and overall survival were evaluated in the overall population as well as with respect to follow up years [1998-2008 (n = 127) vs 2008-2010 (n = 74)]. RESULTS: Median duration for LRF survival, DMF survival and overall survival were 31.9, 24.1 and 31.9 mo, respectively in patients with postoperative adjuvant CRT. No significant difference was noted in median duration for LRF survival, DMF survival and overall survival with respect to treatment protocols in the overall population and also with respect to followed up periods. In the overall population, CT protocols FUFA [5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m2) and leucovorin-folinic acid (FA, 20 mg/m2)] (29.9 mo) and UFT® + Antrex® [a fixed combination of the oral FU prodrug tegafur (flouroprymidine, FT, 300 mg/m2 per day) with FA (Antrex®), 15 mg tablet, two times a day] (42.5 mo) was significantly associated with longer LRF survival times than other CT protocols (P = 0.036), while no difference was noted between CT

  6. Several microRNAs could predict survival in patients with hepatitis B-related liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Ye; Xinghui, Zhao; Chao, Wu; Yi, Zhao; Jinwen, Chen; Ruifang, Gao; Chao, Zhang; Min, Zhao; Chunlei, Guo; Yan, Fang; Lingfang, Du; Long, Shen; Wenzhi, Shen; Xiaohe, Luo; Rong, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs as biomarkers play an important role in the tumorigenesis process, including hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). In this paper, we used The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database to mine hepatitis B-related liver cancer microRNAs that could predict survival in patients with hepatitis B-related liver cancer. There were 93 cases of HBV-HCC and 49 cases of adjacent normal controls included in the study. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis of a liver cancer group versus a normal control group of differentially expressed genes identified eight genes with statistical significance. Compared with the normal liver cell line, hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines had high expression of 8 microRNAs, albeit at different levels. A Cox proportional hazards regression model for multivariate analysis showed that four genes had a significant difference. We established classification models to distinguish short survival time and long survival time of liver cancers. Eight genes (mir9-3, mir10b, mir31, mir519c, mir522, mir3660, mir4784, and mir6883) were identified could predict survival in patients with HBV-HCC. There was a significant correlation between mir10b and mir31 and clinical stages (p < 0.05). A random forests model effectively estimated patient survival times. PMID:28322348

  7. The importance of building construction materials relative to other factors affecting structure survival during wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Brennan, Teresa J.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2017-01-01

    Structure loss to wildfire is a serious problem in wildland-urban interface areas across the world. Laboratory experiments suggest that fire-resistant building construction and design could be important for reducing structure destruction, but these need to be evaluated under real wildfire conditions, especially relative to other factors. Using empirical data from destroyed and surviving structures from large wildfires in southern California, we evaluated the relative importance of building construction and structure age compared to other local and landscape-scale variables associated with structure survival. The local-scale analysis showed that window preparation was especially important but, in general, creating defensible space adjacent to the home was as important as building construction. At the landscape scale, structure density and structure age were the two most important factors affecting structure survival, but there was a significant interaction between them. That is, young structure age was most important in higher-density areas where structure survival overall was more likely. On the other hand, newer-construction structures were less likely to survive wildfires at lower density. Here, appropriate defensible space near the structure and accessibility to major roads were important factors. In conclusion, community safety is a multivariate problem that will require a comprehensive solution involving land use planning, fire-safe construction, and property maintenance.

  8. Local Competition Between Foraging Relatives: Growth and Survival of Bruchid Beetle Larvae.

    PubMed

    Smallegange, Isabel M; Tregenza, Tom

    2008-09-01

    Kin selection theory states that when resources are limited and all else is equal, individuals will direct competition away from kin. However, when competition between relatives is completely local, as is the case in granivorous insects whose larval stages spend their lives within a single seed, this can reduce or even negate the kin-selected benefits. Instead, an increase in competition may have the same detrimental effects on individuals that forage with kin as those that forage with non-kin. In a factorial experiment we assessed the effects of relatedness and competition over food on the survival and on fitness-related traits of the bruchid beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. Relatedness of competitors did not affect the survival of larvae. Larval survival substantially decreased with increasing larval density, and we found evidence that beetles maturing at a larger size were more adversely affected by competition, resulting in lower survival rates. Furthermore, females showed a reduction in their growth rate with increasing larval density, emerging smaller after the same development time. Males increased their growth rate, emerging earlier but at a similar size when food was more limited. Our results add to the growing number of studies that fail to show a relationship between relatedness and a reduction in competition between relatives in closed systems, and emphasize the importance of the scale at which competition between relatives occurs.

  9. Survival potential of Phytophthora infestans sporangia in relation to meteorological factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of meteorological factors coupled with sporangia survival curves may enhance effective management of potato late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans. We utilized a non-parametric density estimation approach to evaluate the cumulative probability of occurrence of temperature and relat...

  10. HIV coinfection shortens the survival of patients with hepatitis C virus-related decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Juan A; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Díaz-García, Fernando; Girón-González, José A; Montero, José L; Torre-Cisneros, Julián; Andrade, Raúl J; González-Serrano, Mercedes; Aguilar, José; Aguilar-Guisado, Manuela; Navarro, José M; Salmerón, Javier; Caballero-Granado, Francisco J; García-García, José A

    2005-04-01

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection on the survival of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related end-stage liver disease (ESLD) is unknown. Because HIV infection is no longer considered an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation in some countries, it has become a priority to address this topic. The objective of this study was to compare the survival of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients with decompensated cirrhosis due to HCV. In a retrospective cohort study, the survival of 1,037 HCV monoinfected and 180 HCV/HIV-coinfected patients with cirrhosis after the first hepatic decompensation was analyzed. Of the group, 386 (37%) HCV-monoinfected and 100 (56%) HCV/HIV-coinfected subjects died during the follow-up. The median survival time of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients was 16 and 48 months, respectively (P < .001). The relative risk (95% CI) of death for HIV-infected patients was 2.26 (1.51-3.38). Other independent predictors of survival were age older than 63 years (2.25 [1.53-3.31]); Child-Turcotte-Pugh class B versus class A (1.95 [1.41-2.68]) and class C versus class A (2.78 [1.66-4.70]); hepatitis D virus infection (1.56 [1.12-4.77]); model for end-stage liver disease score, (1.05 [1.01-1-11]); more than one simultaneous decompensation (1.23 [1.12-3.33]); and the type of the first hepatic decompensation, with a poorer prognosis associated with encephalopathy compared with portal hypertensive gastrointestinal bleeding (2.03 [1.26-3.10]). In conclusion, HIV coinfection reduces considerably the survival of patients with HCV-related ESLD independently of other markers of poor prognosis. This fact must be taken into account to establish the adequate timing of liver transplantation in HIV-coinfected subjects.

  11. A Prospective Study of Survival After In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and its Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Miranzadeh, Sedigheh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Hosseinpour, Nadimeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite several studies, there is no agreement on factors that affect survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the survival rate of in-hospital CPR and its related factors at Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan, Iran, in 2014. Patients and Methods A descriptive study was conducted on all cases of CPR performed in Kashan Shahid Beheshti hospital during a 6-month period in 2014. Through a consecutive sampling method, 250 cases of CPR were studied. A three-part researcher-made instrument was used. The outcome of CPR was documented as either survival to hospital discharge or unsuccessful (death of the patient). Chi-square test, t test, and logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Results Of all CPR cases, 238 (95.2%) were unsuccessful and 12 (4.8%) survived to hospital discharge. Only 2.6% of patients who were resuscitated in medical units survived to hospital discharge, whereas this rate was 11.4% in the emergency department. Only 45 (18%) patients were defibrillated during resuscitation; in 11 patients, defibrillation was performed between 15 to 45 minutes after the initiation of CPR. The mean time from initiation of CPR to the first DC shock was 13.93 ± 8.88 minutes. Moreover, the mean duration of CPR was 35.11 ± 11.42 minutes. The survival rate was higher in the morning shift and lower during the time of shift change (9.4% vs. 0). The duration of CPR and speed of arrival of the CPR team were identified as factors that predicted the outcome of CPR. Conclusions The survival rate after in-hospital CPR was very low. The duration of CPR and the time of initiating CPR effects patients’ outcomes. These findings highlight the crucial role of an organized, skilled, well-established and timely CPR team. PMID:27218061

  12. Fecundity and survival in relation to resistance to oxidative stress in a free-living bird.

    PubMed

    Bize, Pierre; Devevey, Godefroy; Monaghan, Patricia; Doligez, Blandine; Christe, Philippe

    2008-09-01

    Major life history traits, such as fecundity and survival, have been consistently demonstrated to covary positively in nature, some individuals having more resources than others to allocate to all aspects of their life history. Yet, little is known about which resources (or state variables) may account for such covariation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are natural by-products of metabolism and, when ROS production exceeds antioxidant defenses, organisms are exposed to oxidative stress that can have deleterious effects on their fecundity and survival. Using a wild, long-lived bird, the Alpine Swift (Apus melba), we examined whether individual red cell resistance to oxidative stress covaried with fecundity and survival. We found that males that survived to the next breeding season tended to be more resistant to oxidative stress, and females with higher resistance to oxidative stress laid larger clutches. Furthermore, the eggs of females with low resistance to oxidative stress were less likely to hatch than those of females with high resistance to oxidative stress. By swapping entire clutches at clutch completion, we then demonstrated that hatching failure was related to the production of low-quality eggs by females with low resistance to oxidative stress, rather than to inadequate parental care during incubation. Although male and female resistance to oxidative stress covaried with age, the relationships among oxidative stress, survival, and fecundity occurred independently of chronological age. Overall, our study suggests that oxidative stress may play a significant role in shaping fecundity and survival in the wild. It further suggests that the nature of the covariation between resistance to oxidative stress and life history traits is sex specific, high resistance to oxidative stress covarying primarily with fecundity in females and with survival in males.

  13. Relative costs of offspring sex and offspring survival in a polygynous mammal

    PubMed Central

    Clutton-Brock, Tim H.

    2016-01-01

    Costs of reproduction are expected to be ubiquitous in wild animal populations and understanding the drivers of variation in these costs is an important aspect of life-history evolution theory. We use a 43 year dataset from a wild population of red deer to examine the relative importance of two factors that influence the costs of reproduction to mothers, and to test whether these costs vary with changing ecological conditions. Like previous studies, our analyses indicate fitness costs of lactation: mothers whose calves survived the summer subsequently showed lower survival and fecundity than those whose calves died soon after birth, accounting for 5% and 14% of the variation in mothers' survival and fecundity, respectively. The production of a male calf depressed maternal survival and fecundity more than production of a female, but accounted for less than 1% of the variation in either fitness component. There was no evidence for any change in the effect of calf survival or sex with increasing population density. PMID:27601725

  14. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolt production: the relative importance of survival and body growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, G.E.; Letcher, B.H.; Bailey, M.M.; Kinnison, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The complex life history of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) coupled with interacting abiotic and biotic factors leads to extreme demographic variability across the species' range. Our goal was to evaluate the relative importance of survival and body growth in determining smolt production across space and time. We used passive integrated transponder tags and capture-mark-recapture analyses to estimate survival, emigration, and growth for six cohorts of presmolt Atlantic salmon in two streams (three cohorts per stream) in New England, USA. We observed remarkable among-cohort consistency in mean monthly survival during a 17-month period from age-0+ autumn to age-2+ spring yet high variability in monthly survival over shorter time intervals (seasons). Despite this latter variability, survival did not translate into amongcohort differences in proportions of age-2+ versus age-3+ smolts. Alternatively, the high variability across seasons and cohorts in mean individual growth rate did lead to differences in within-cohort proportions of age-2+ versus age-3+ smolts (regardless of stream). We conclude that in our two small study streams, variability in growth and size impacted smolt age and, ultimately, smolt production. Density-dependent effects on growth at the scale of the entire study site represent a possible mechanism underlying our observations.

  15. Relations between nutritional condition and survival of North American elk Cervus elaphus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Cook, J.G.; Cook, R.C.; Hall, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    We related annual and seasonal survival of four populations of elk Cervus elaphus in the Pacific Northwest, USA, to measures and indices of individual nutritional condition. Among populations, for all mortality (human and non-human causes) sources inclusive, annual survival of adult females was correlated with a rump body condition score (rs = 0.627, P = 0.071), and survival over spring-summer-autumn (SSA) was correlated with mean ingesta-free body fat (IFBF; rs = 0.567, P = 0.088) and rump body condition score (rBCS; rs = 0.615, P = 0.050). For non-human mortality sources only, survival through SSA was correlated with IFBF (rs = 0.567, P = 0.088) and rBCS (rs = 0.615, P = 0.050), and survival over winter was correlated with withers body condition score (rs = 0.677, P = 0.045). For human-caused mortality sources only, survival over SSA was correlated with rBCS (rs = 0.696, P = 0.036) and IFBF (rs = 0.696, P = 0.036). For individuals, logistic analysis found that individual likelihood of dying from all mortality sources inclusive was best predicted (??2 = 8.3, P = 0.004, ?? = -1.24) by longissimus dorsi (loin) muscle thickness, a measure of protein catabolism. For only non-human mortality sources, a model (??2 = 16.1, P = 0.0003) containing both loin muscle thickness (??2 = 5.7, P = 0.017, ??= -1.02) and percent ingesta-free body fat (??2 = 4.9, P = 0.027, ?? = -0.35) best predicted individual susceptibility to mortality. Odds ratios indicated that odds of dying increased approximately 3X for each centimeter of loin muscle catabolized and 1.4X for each percent less body fat. No condition indices at the individual level were related to survival from human-caused mortality sources. Our study populations were characterized by low-marginal condition (i.e. mean ingesta-free body fat levels of 5.9-12.3% for lactating cows in late autumn); this likely increased the prominence of measures of muscle catabolism relative to fat accretion in influencing individual elk survival

  16. Pre-diagnostic Sleep Duration and Sleep Quality in Relation to Subsequent Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Amanda I.; Bhatti, Parveen; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Chen, Chu; Crane, Tracy E.; Kroenke, Candyce H.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather; Rissling, Michelle; Snively, Beverly M.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Treggiari, Miriam M.; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2016-01-01

    , Rissling M, Snively BM, Stefanick ML, Treggiari MM, Watson NF. Pre-diagnostic sleep duration and sleep quality in relation to subsequent cancer survival. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(4):495–503. PMID:26612513

  17. Relative humidity preference and survival of starved Formosan subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) at various temperature and relative humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Bal K; Henderson, Gregg

    2011-10-01

    Foraging groups of Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki were tested for their relative humidity (RH) preference in a humidity gradient arena in the laboratory at a constant temperature of 26°C. Five RH levels (9%, 33%, 53%, 75%, and 98%) were maintained in the test arena comprising of a series of closed containers by using dry silica gel, saturated salt solutions, or distilled water alone. Termites gradually aggregated to the highest RH chamber in the arena. After 1 h, a significantly greater percentage of termites (≈46%) aggregated to the highest RH chamber (98%) than to the lower RH chambers (≤75%). After 12 h, > 97% of the termites aggregated to the 98% RH chamber. In survival tests, where termites were exposed to 15 combinatorial treatments of five RH levels (9%, 33%, 53%, 75%, and 98%) and three temperatures (20°C, 28°C, and 36°C) for a week, the survival was significantly influenced by RH, temperature, and their interaction. A significantly higher mortality was observed on termites exposed to ≤75% RH chambers than to 98% RH chamber at the three temperatures and significantly lower survival was found at 36°C than at 28°C or 20°C. The combination of temperature and RH plays an important role in the survival of C. formosanus.

  18. Predictors of survival in hepatitis B virus related decompensated cirrhosis on tenofovir therapy: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Manjita; Rungta, Sumit; Dixit, V K; Shukla, S K; Singh, T B; Jain, A K

    2013-11-01

    Decompensated cirrhosis has low survival rate compared to compensated state. Effective viral suppression due to antiviral therapy (tenofovir) has been shown to slow disease progression and may delay the burden of liver transplantation. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of various prognostic indicators in predicting the 24-months survival in HBV related decompensated cirrhosis after tenofovir therapy and to evaluate the post-treatment outcome. Ninety-six HBV related decompensated patients on antiviral (tenofovir) therapy were prospectively studied for 24months survival and mortality. Cutoff levels for several prognostic indicators were generated by ROC. Prediction of overall probability of mortality was also calculated. The overall probability of survival observed at 12months was 0.947 whereas at 24months it was found to be 0.833. According to Cox proportional hazards model, the univariate analysis revealed cutoff of >7.4logcopies/ml for HBV DNA, >1.2mg/dl for serum creatinine, >3.7mg/dl for total bilirubin, ⩽0.75 for platelets count, >10 for CTP and >20 for MELD as predictors of poor survival. Multivariate analysis showed MELD score of >20 was the most robust predictor of mortality, with 58 times higher risk (HR: 58.73, p<0.001). Post-treatment response with tenofovir for 24months significantly improved the hepatic functions and reverses decompensation and showed incredible efficacy in improvement of hepatic functional status with reduced viremia in a great majority of decompensated cirrhosis subjects having high MELD and HBV DNA level.

  19. Role of Relative Humidity in the Survival of Airborne Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. N.; Bailey, G. D.; Hatch, M. T.

    1968-01-01

    Aerosols of Mycoplasma pneumoniae were studied at several relative humidities at a controlled temperature of 27 C. Production of an experimentally reproducible aerosol required preatomization of the organism in its suspending fluid and was dependent on the type of fluid used in atomization as well as on the procedures used to produce an aerosol. The airborne particles studied were within the range of epidemiological significance, with most being 2 μm or less in diameter. Survival of the airborne mycoplasma in these particles was found to be best at very low and at very high humidities. The most lethal relative humidity levels were at 60 and 80%, at which levels fewer than 1% of the organisms survived over a 4-hr observation period. However, survival of the organism at most relative humidity levels was such that long-term infectivity could be expected from aerosols of M. pneumoniae. Because of the extreme sensitivity of M. pneumoniae at critical humidity levels, control of the airborne transmission of these organisms may be possible in selected spaces. PMID:5686020

  20. Influence of relative humidity and suspending menstrua on survival of Acinetobacter spp. on dry surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Jawad, A; Heritage, J; Snelling, A M; Gascoyne-Binzi, D M; Hawkey, P M

    1996-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are being reported with increasing frequency as a cause of nosocomial infection and have been isolated from the skin of healthy individuals, patients, hospital staff, dry nonbiotic objects, and different pieces of medical equipment. Factors affecting the survival of Acinetobacter spp. under conditions closely similar to those found in the hospital environment were investigated in the present study to help us understand the epidemiology of nosocomial Acinetobacter infection. Bacterial cells were suspended in distilled water or bovine serum albumin and were dried onto glass coverslips and kept at different relative humidities. Cells washed from coverslips were used to determined viable counts. Freshly isolated strains of Acinetobacter spp. belonging to the clinically important Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex were found to be more resistant to drying conditions (e.g., 30 days for A. baumannii 16/49) than American Type Culture Collection strains (e.g., 2 days for A. baumannii ATCC 9955). The majority of strains belonging to the Acb complex had survival times similar to those observed for the gram-positive organism Staphylococcus aureus tested in the experiment. Survival times were prolonged for almost all the strains tested when they were suspended in bovine serum albumin (e.g., 60 days for A. baumannii R 447) compared with those for strains suspended in distilled water (11 days for R 447). The survival times for strains at higher relative humidity (31 or 93%) were longer than those for strains of Acinetobacter kept at a relative humidity of 10% (11 days at 31% relative humidity and 4 days at 10% relative humidity for R447). These findings are consistent with the observed tendency of Acinetobacter spp. to survive on dry surfaces, and they can be transferred not only by moist vectors but also under dry conditions in a hospital environment during nosocomial infection outbreaks. The results obtained in the experiment support

  1. Pintail and mallard survival in California relative to habitat, abundance, and hunting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleskes, J.P.; Yee, J.L.; Yarris, G.S.; Miller, M.R.; Casazza, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of habitat, waterfowl abundance, and hunting on winter survival of waterfowl is not well understood. We studied late August-March survival of 163 after-hatch-year (AHY) and 128 hatch-year (HY) female mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) radiotagged in Sacramento Valley (SACV) and 885 AHY female northern pintails (A. acuta) radiotagged throughout the Central Valley of California, USA, relative to flooded habitat (HAB), January abundance of each species (JMAL or JPIN), hunter-days (HDY), and a hunting pressure index (HPI) that combined these variables. From EARLY (1987-1994) to LATE (1998-2000), HAB increased 39%, JPIN increased 45%, JMAL increased 53%, HDY increased 21%, duck-hunting season increased from 59 days to 100 days, and the female daily bag limit doubled to 2 for mallards but remained 1 for pintails. Survival (?? SE) was greater during LATE versus EARLY for pintails radiotagged in each region (SACV: 93.2 ?? 2.1% vs. 87.6 ?? 3.0%; Suisun Marsh: 86.6 ?? 3.2% vs. 77.0 ?? 3.7%; San Joaquin Valley: 86.6 ?? 3.1% vs. 76.9 ?? 4.1%) but not for SACV mallards (AHY: 70.6 ?? 7.2% to 74.4 ?? 7.7% vs. 80.1 ?? 7.2% to 82.8 ?? 5.6%; HY: 48.7 ?? 9.1% [1999-2000 only] vs. 63.5 ?? 8.8% to 67.6 ?? 8.0%). Most pintail (72%) and mallard (91%) deaths were from hunting, and lower HPI and higher JPIN or JMAL were associated with reduced mortality. Increased HAB was associated with reduced winter mortality for pintails but not for SACV mallards. Pintail survival rates that we measured were within the range reported for other North American wintering areas, and during LATE were higher than most, even though our study duration was 68-110 days longer. Winter survival rates of SACV mallards were also within the reported range. However, with higher bag limits and longer seasons, mallard survival during LATE was lower than in most other wintering areas, especially during 1999-2000, when high winds on opening weekend resulted in high hunting mortality. Habitat conservation and

  2. The AMPK-related kinase SNARK regulates muscle mass and myocyte survival

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Sarah J.; Rivas, Donato A.; So, Kawai; Koh, Ho-Jin; Queiroz, André Lima; Hirshman, Michael F.; Fielding, Roger A.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of skeletal muscle mass is critical for sustaining health; however, the mechanisms responsible for muscle loss with aging and chronic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity, are poorly understood. We found that expression of a member of the AMPK-related kinase family, the SNF1-AMPK-related kinase (SNARK, also known as NUAK2), increased with muscle cell differentiation. SNARK expression increased in skeletal muscles from young mice exposed to metabolic stress and in muscles from healthy older human subjects. The regulation of SNARK expression in muscle with differentiation and physiological stress suggests that SNARK may function in the maintenance of muscle mass. Consistent with this hypothesis, decreased endogenous SNARK expression (using siRNA) in cultured muscle cells resulted in increased apoptosis and decreased cell survival under conditions of metabolic stress. Likewise, muscle-specific transgenic animals expressing a SNARK dominant-negative inactive mutant (SDN) had increased myonuclear apoptosis and activation of apoptotic mediators in muscle. Moreover, animals expressing SDN had severe, age-accelerated muscle atrophy and increased adiposity, consistent with sarcopenic obesity. Reduced SNARK activity, in vivo and in vitro, caused downregulation of the Rho kinase signaling pathway, a key mediator of cell survival. These findings reveal a critical role for SNARK in myocyte survival and the maintenance of muscle mass with age. PMID:26690705

  3. Genetic polymorphisms in the vitamin D pathway in relation to lung cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jinyu; Xu, Fangxiu; Qu, Jinli; Wang, Yu; Gao, Ming; Yu, Herbert; Qian, Biyun

    2015-01-01

    Studies have suggested that vitamin D may have protective effects against cancer development or tumor progression. To search for additional evidence, we investigated the role of genetic polymorphisms involved in the vitamin D pathway in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We evaluated common genetic polymorphisms associated with the vitamin D pathway in relation to NSCLC in a case-control study of 603 newly diagnosed NSCLC patients and 661 matched healthy controls. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped, the expression of CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 were measured in 153 tumor samples and their associations with genotypes and patient survival were also analyzed. In the case-control comparison, we found SNP rs3782130 (CYP27B1), rs7041 (GC), rs6068816 and rs4809957 (CYP24A1) associated with NSCLC risk. The risk of NSCLC was increased with the number of risk alleles. CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 expression were significantly different between tumor and normal tissues in NSCLC. High CYP27B1 expression was associated with better overall survival, and the expression was different by the rs3782130 genotype. The study suggests that some genetic polymorphisms involved in the vitamin D pathway may associate with NSCLC risk, and one of the polymorphisms (rs3782130) may affect gene expression and patient survival. PMID:25544771

  4. Military service, deployments, and exposures in relation to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis etiology and survival.

    PubMed

    Beard, John D; Kamel, Freya

    2015-01-01

    Rates of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have been reported to be higher among US military veterans, who currently number more than 21 million, but the causal factor(s) has not been identified. We conducted a review to examine the weight of evidence for associations between military service, deployments, and exposures and ALS etiology and survival. Thirty articles or abstracts published through 2013 were reviewed. Although the current evidence suggests a positive association with ALS etiology, it is too limited to draw firm conclusions regarding associations between military service and ALS etiology or survival. Some evidence suggests that deployment to the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War may be associated with ALS etiology, but there is currently no strong evidence that any particular military exposure is associated with ALS etiology. Future studies should address the limitations of previous ones, such as reliance on mortality as a surrogate for incidence, a dearth of survival analyses, lack of clinical data, low statistical power, and limited exposure assessment. The Genes and Environmental Exposures in Veterans with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (GENEVA) Study is one such study, but additional research is needed to determine whether military-related factors are associated with ALS and to assess potential prevention strategies.

  5. Survival and harvest-related mortality of white-tailed deer in Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mcdonald, John E.; Destefano, Stephen; Gaughan, Christopher; Mayer, Michael; Woytek, William A.; Christensen, Sonja; Fuller, Todd K.

    2011-01-01

    We monitored 142 radiocollared adult (≥1.0 yr old) white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in 3 study areas of Massachusetts, USA, to estimate annual survival and mortality due to legal hunting. We then applied these rates to deer harvest information to estimate deer population trends over time, and compared these to trends derived solely from harvest data estimates. Estimated adult female survival rates were similar (0.82–0.86), and uniformly high, across 3 management zones in Massachusetts that differed in landscape composition, human density, and harvest regulations. Legal hunting accounted for 16–29% of all adult female mortality. Estimated adult male survival rates varied from 0.55 to 0.79, and legal hunting accounted for 40–75% of all mortality. Use of composite hunting mortality rates produced realistic estimates for adult deer populations in 2 zones, but not for the third, where estimation was hindered by regulatory restrictions on antlerless deer harvest. In addition, the population estimates we calculated were generally higher than those derived from population reconstruction, likely due to relatively low harvest pressure. Legal harvest may not be the dominant form of deer mortality in developed landscapes; thus, estimates of populations or trends that rely solely on harvest data will likely be underestimates.

  6. Military Service, Deployments, and Exposures in Relation to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Etiology and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Beard, John D.; Kamel, Freya

    2015-01-01

    Rates of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have been reported to be higher among US military veterans, who currently number more than 21 million, but the causal factor(s) has not been identified. We conducted a review to examine the weight of evidence for associations between military service, deployments, and exposures and ALS etiology and survival. Thirty articles or abstracts published through 2013 were reviewed. Although the current evidence suggests a positive association with ALS etiology, it is too limited to draw firm conclusions regarding associations between military service and ALS etiology or survival. Some evidence suggests that deployment to the 1990–1991 Persian Gulf War may be associated with ALS etiology, but there is currently no strong evidence that any particular military exposure is associated with ALS etiology. Future studies should address the limitations of previous ones, such as reliance on mortality as a surrogate for incidence, a dearth of survival analyses, lack of clinical data, low statistical power, and limited exposure assessment. The Genes and Environmental Exposures in Veterans with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (GENEVA) Study is one such study, but additional research is needed to determine whether military-related factors are associated with ALS and to assess potential prevention strategies. PMID:25365170

  7. Association between progression-free survival and health-related quality of life in oncology: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kovic, Bruno; Guyatt, Gordon; Brundage, Michael; Thabane, Lehana; Bhatnagar, Neera; Xie, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is an increasing number of new oncology drugs being studied, approved and put into clinical practice based on improvement in progression-free survival, when no overall survival benefits exist. In oncology, the association between progression-free survival and health-related quality of life is currently unknown, despite its importance for patients with cancer, and the unverified assumption that longer progression-free survival indicates improved health-related quality of life. Thus far, only 1 study has investigated this association, providing insufficient evidence and inconclusive results. The objective of this study protocol is to provide increased transparency in supporting a systematic summary of the evidence bearing on this association in oncology. Methods and analysis Using the OVID platform in MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane databases, we will conduct a systematic review of randomised controlled human trials addressing oncology issues published starting in 2000. A team of reviewers will, in pairs, independently screen and abstract data using standardised, pilot-tested forms. We will employ numerical integration to calculate mean incremental area under the curve between treatment groups in studies for health-related quality of life, along with total related error estimates, and a 95% CI around incremental area. To describe the progression-free survival to health-related quality of life association, we will construct a scatterplot for incremental health-related quality of life versus incremental progression-free survival. To estimate the association, we will use a weighted simple regression approach, comparing mean incremental health-related quality of life with either median incremental progression-free survival time or the progression-free survival HR, in the absence of overall survival benefit. Discussion Identifying direction and magnitude of association between progression-free survival and health-related quality of life is critically

  8. A minimum version of log-rank test for testing the existence of cancer cure using relative survival data.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binbing

    2012-01-01

    Cancer survival is one of the most important measures to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and early diagnosis. The ultimate goal of cancer research and patient care is the cure of cancer. As cancer treatments progress, cure becomes a reality for many cancers if patients are diagnosed early and get effective treatment. If a cure does exist for a certain type of cancer, it is useful to estimate the time of cure. For cancers that impose excess risk of mortality, it is informative to understand the difference in survival between cancer patients and the general cancer-free population. In population-based cancer survival studies, relative survival is the standard measure of excess mortality due to cancer. Cure is achieved when the survival of cancer patients is equivalent to that of the general population. This definition of cure is usually called the statistical cure, which is an important measure of burden due to cancer. In this paper, a minimum version of the log-rank test is proposed to test the equivalence of cancer patients' survival using the relative survival data. Performance of the proposed test is evaluated by simulation. Relative survival data from population-based cancer registries in SEER Program are used to examine patients' survival after diagnosis for various major cancer sites.

  9. Multi-state relative survival modelling of colorectal cancer progression and mortality.

    PubMed

    Gilard-Pioc, Séverine; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Mahboubi, Amel; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Dejardin, Olivier; Huszti, Ella; Binquet, Christine; Quantin, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Accurate identification of factors associated with progression of colorectal cancer remains a challenge. In particular, it is unclear which statistical methods are most suitable to separate the effects of putative prognostic factors on cancer progression vs cancer-specific and other cause mortality. To address these challenges, we analyzed 10 year follow-up data for patients who underwent curative surgery for colorectal cancer in 1985-2000. Separate analyses were performed in two French cancer registries. Results of three multivariable models were compared: Cox model with recurrence as a time-dependent variable, and two multi-state models, which separated prognostic factor effects on recurrence vs death, with or without recurrence. Conventional multi-state model analyzed all-cause mortality while new relative survival multi-state model focused on cancer-specific mortality. Among the 2517 and 2677 patients in the two registries, about 50% died without a recurrence, and 28% had a recurrence, of whom almost 90% died. In both multi-state models men had significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence in both registries (HR=0.79; 95% CI: 0.68-0.92 and HR=0.83; 95% CI: 0.71-0.96). However, the two multi-state models identified different prognostic factors for mortality without recurrence. In contrast to the conventional model, in the relative survival analyses gender had no independent association with cancer-specific mortality whereas patients diagnosed with stage III cancer had significantly higher risks in both registries (HR=1.67; 95% CI: 1.27-2.22 and HR=2.38; 95% CI: 1.29-3.27). In conclusion, relative survival multi-state model revealed that different factors may be associated with cancer recurrence vs cancer-specific mortality either after or without a recurrence.

  10. Health-related quality of life as prognostic factor for response, progression-free survival, and survival in women with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Helene; Hatschek, Thomas; Johansson, Hemming; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to, on an exploratory basis, investigate the role of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) at randomization as an independent prognostic factor for response to treatment, progression-free survival (PFS), and survival. In the TEX trial, 287 patients with locally advanced or distant metastatic breast cancer were randomized to either epirubicin and paclitaxel (ET) or epirubicin, paclitaxel, and capecitabine (TEX). Treatment was repeated every 3 weeks. The EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire was used to assess HRQoL before randomization. A total of 252 (88%) patients completed EORTC QLQ-C30 before randomization. Clinical conditions included in the multivariate model were age, number of metastases, ECOG performance status, time between diagnosis and randomization, and treatment arm. Univariate analysis revealed an association between prolonged survival and the HRQoL variables global health, physical functioning, role functioning, fatigue, and pain (P < 0.01). After controlling for clinical conditions, only fatigue remained statistically significant. No statistically significant relationships were found between HRQoL and PFS. In the analysis of the association between HRQoL and response to treatment, role functioning, social functioning, fatigue, nausea/vomiting, and appetite loss remained statistically significant. HRQoL variables could act as important predictors of response to treatment, progression-free survival, and overall survival in women with metastatic breast cancer.

  11. Organochlorine insecticides DDT and chlordane in relation to survival following breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Humberto; Wolff, Mary S.; Engel, Lawrence S.; White, Alexandra J.; Eng, Sybil M.; Cleveland, Rebecca J.; Khankari, Nikhil K.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2015-01-01

    Organochlorine insecticides have been studied extensively in relation to breast cancer incidence and results from two meta-analyses have been null for late-life residues, possibly due to measurement error. Whether these compounds influence survival remains to be fully explored. We examined associations between organochlorine insecticides (p,p’-DDT, its primary metabolite, p,p’-DDE, and chlordane) assessed shortly after diagnosis and survival among women with breast cancer. A population-based sample of women diagnosed with a first primary invasive or in situ breast cancer in 1996–1997 and with available organochlorine blood measures (n=633) were followed for vital status through 2011. After follow-up of 5 and 15 years, we identified 55 and 189 deaths, of which 36 and 74, respectively, were breast cancer-related. Using Cox regression models, we estimated the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lipid-adjusted organochlorine concentrations with all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. At 5 years after diagnosis, the highest tertile of DDT concentration was associated with all-cause (HR=2.19; 95%CI: 1.02, 4.67) and breast cancer-specific (HR=2.72; 95%CI: 1.04, 7.13) mortality. At 15 years, middle tertile concentrations of DDT (HR=1.42; CI 0.99, 2.06) and chlordane (HR=1.42; 95%CI: 0.94, 2.12) were modestly associated with all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. Third tertile DDE concentrations were inversely associated with 15-year all-cause mortality (HR=0.66; 95%CI: 0.44, 0.99). This is the first population-based study in the United States to show that DDT may adversely impact survival following breast cancer diagnosis. Further studies are warranted given the high breast cancer burden and the ubiquity of these chemicals. PMID:26285160

  12. Organochlorine insecticides DDT and chlordane in relation to survival following breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Parada, Humberto; Wolff, Mary S; Engel, Lawrence S; White, Alexandra J; Eng, Sybil M; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Khankari, Nikhil K; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Neugut, Alfred I; Gammon, Marilie D

    2016-02-01

    Organochlorine insecticides have been studied extensively in relation to breast cancer incidence, and results from two meta-analyses have been null for late-life residues, possibly due to measurement error. Whether these compounds influence survival remains to be fully explored. We examined associations between organochlorine insecticides [p,p'-DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), its primary metabolite, p,p'-DDE, and chlordane] assessed shortly after diagnosis and survival among women with breast cancer. A population-based sample of women diagnosed with a first primary invasive or in situ breast cancer in 1996-1997 and with available organochlorine blood measures (n = 633) were followed for vital status through 2011. After follow-up of 5 and 15 years, we identified 55 and 189 deaths, of which 36 and 74, respectively, were breast cancer-related. Using Cox regression models, we estimated the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lipid-adjusted organochlorine concentrations with all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. At 5 years after diagnosis, the highest tertile of DDT concentration was associated with all-cause (HR = 2.19; 95% CI: 1.02, 4.67) and breast cancer-specific (HR = 2.72; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.13) mortality. At 15 years, middle tertile concentrations of DDT (HR = 1.42; 95% CI 0.99, 2.06) and chlordane (HR = 1.42; 95% CI: 0.94, 2.12) were modestly associated with all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. Third tertile DDE concentrations were inversely associated with 15-year all-cause mortality (HR = 0.66; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.99). This is the first population-based study in the United States to show that DDT may adversely impact survival following breast cancer diagnosis. Further studies are warranted given the high breast cancer burden and the ubiquity of these chemicals.

  13. Survival and breeding of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea in relation to sea ice.

    PubMed

    Regehr, Eric V; Hunter, Christine M; Caswell, Hal; Amstrup, Steven C; Stirling, Ian

    2010-01-01

    1. Observed and predicted declines in Arctic sea ice have raised concerns about marine mammals. In May 2008, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed polar bears (Ursus maritimus) - one of the most ice-dependent marine mammals - as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. 2. We evaluated the effects of sea ice conditions on vital rates (survival and breeding probabilities) for polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea. Although sea ice declines in this and other regions of the polar basin have been among the greatest in the Arctic, to date population-level effects of sea ice loss on polar bears have only been identified in western Hudson Bay, near the southern limit of the species' range. 3. We estimated vital rates using multistate capture-recapture models that classified individuals by sex, age and reproductive category. We used multimodel inference to evaluate a range of statistical models, all of which were structurally based on the polar bear life cycle. We estimated parameters by model averaging, and developed a parametric bootstrap procedure to quantify parameter uncertainty. 4. In the most supported models, polar bear survival declined with an increasing number of days per year that waters over the continental shelf were ice free. In 2001-2003, the ice-free period was relatively short (mean 101 days) and adult female survival was high (0.96-0.99, depending on reproductive state). In 2004 and 2005, the ice-free period was longer (mean 135 days) and adult female survival was low (0.73-0.79, depending on reproductive state). Breeding rates and cub litter survival also declined with increasing duration of the ice-free period. Confidence intervals on vital rate estimates were wide. 5. The effects of sea ice loss on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea may apply to polar bear populations in other portions of the polar basin that have similar sea ice dynamics and have experienced similar, or more severe, sea ice declines. Our findings therefore are

  14. Survival and breeding of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea in relation to sea ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Regehr, E.V.; Hunter, C.M.; Caswell, H.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Stirling, I.

    2010-01-01

    1. Observed and predicted declines in Arctic sea ice have raised concerns about marine mammals. In May 2008, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed polar bears (Ursus maritimus) - one of the most ice-dependent marine mammals - as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. 2. We evaluated the effects of sea ice conditions on vital rates (survival and breeding probabilities) for polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea. Although sea ice declines in this and other regions of the polar basin have been among the greatest in the Arctic, to date population-level effects of sea ice loss on polar bears have only been identified in western Hudson Bay, near the southern limit of the species' range. 3. We estimated vital rates using multistate capture-recapture models that classified individuals by sex, age and reproductive category. We used multimodel inference to evaluate a range of statistical models, all of which were structurally based on the polar bear life cycle. We estimated parameters by model averaging, and developed a parametric bootstrap procedure to quantify parameter uncertainty. 4. In the most supported models, polar bear survival declined with an increasing number of days per year that waters over the continental shelf were ice free. In 2001-2003, the ice-free period was relatively short (mean 101 days) and adult female survival was high (0 ∙ 96-0 ∙ 99, depending on reproductive state). In 2004 and 2005, the ice-free period was longer (mean 135 days) and adult female survival was low (0 ∙ 73-0 ∙ 79, depending on reproductive state). Breeding rates and cub litter survival also declined with increasing duration of the ice-free period. Confidence intervals on vital rate estimates were wide. 5. The effects of sea ice loss on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea may apply to polar bear populations in other portions of the polar basin that have similar sea ice dynamics and have experienced similar, or more severe, sea ice declines. Our findings

  15. Wheat floret survival as related to pre-anthesis spike growth.

    PubMed

    González, Fernanda G; Miralles, Daniel J; Slafer, Gustavo A

    2011-10-01

    Further improvements to wheat yield potential will be essential to meet future food demand. As yield is related to the number of fertile florets and grains, an understanding of the basis of their generation is instrumental to raising yield. Based on (i) a strong positive association between the number of fertile florets or grains and spike dry weight at anthesis; and (ii) the finding that floret death occurs when spikes grow at maximum rate, it was always assumed that floret survival depends on the growth of the spike. However, this assumption was recently questioned, suggesting that assimilates diverted to the spike do not determine the number of florets and grains and that the onset of floret death may instead be a developmental process that is not associated with spike growth. In this study, the relationships between the fate of floret primordia and spike growth from six independent experiments that included different growing conditions (greenhouse/field experiments, growing seasons, photoperiod/shading treatments during the floret primordia phase) and diverse cultivar types (winter/spring, semi-dwarf/standard-height, photoperiod sensitive/insensitive) were re-analysed together. Onset of floret death was associated with the beginning of spike growth at the maximum rate in c. 80% of the cases analysed; and the rate of floret death (the main determinant of floret survival) showed a negative quantitative relationship with spike weight at anthesis. As floret death and survival were shown to be linked to pre-anthesis spike growth, the strategy of focusing on traits associated with pre-anthesis spike growth when breeding to increase wheat yield potential further is valuable.

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life and Survival in Liver Transplant Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Tanikella, Rajasekhar; Kawut, Steven M.; Brown, Robert S.; Krowka, Michael J.; Reinen, Jenna; Dinasarapu, Chandrasekhar R.; Trotter, James F.; Roberts, Kari E.; Mohd, Mustafa A.; Arnett, Donna K.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important measure of the effects of chronic liver disease in affected patients that helps guide interventions to improve well-being. However, the relationship between HRQOL and survival in liver transplant candidates remains unclear. We examined whether the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores from the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey were associated with survival in liver transplant candidates. We administered the SF-36 questionnaire (version 2.0) to patients in the Pulmonary Vascular Complications of Liver Disease study, a multicenter prospective cohort of patients evaluated for liver transplantation in 7 academic centers in the United States between 2003 and 2006. Cox proportional hazards models were used with death as the primary outcome and adjustment for liver transplantation as a time-varying covariate. The mean age of the 252 participants was 54 ± 10 years, 64% were male, and 94% were white. During the 422 person years of follow-up, 147 patients (58%) were listed, 75 patients (30%) underwent transplantation, 49 patients (19%) died, and 3 patients were lost to follow-up. Lower baseline PCS scores were associated with an increased mortality rate despite adjustments for age, gender, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, and liver transplantation (P for the trend = 0.0001). The MCS score was not associated with mortality (P for the trend = 0.53). In conclusion, PCS significantly predicts survival in liver transplant candidates, and interventions directed toward improving the physical status may be helpful in improving outcomes in liver transplant candidates. PMID:20104497

  17. [Chronic lymphoid leukemia. Survival in relation to clinical stages. Statistical analysis of 95 cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rozman, C; Montserrat Costa, E; Morey, M; Aranalde, J M; Feliú, E; Grañena, A; Hernández Nieto, L; Nomdedeu, B

    1979-04-10

    The prognosis of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia is very difficult to evaluate. The classification system by stages, which at the present time is the most simple and useful method for the prognosis of this disease, recognizes five degrees of involvement: stage 0 (medullary and peripheral lymphocytosis); stage I (lymphocytosis + enlarged lymph nodes); stage II (lymphocyosis + hepato-and/or splenomegaly); stage III (lymphocytosis + anemia), and stage IV (lymphocytosis + thrombocytopenia). In the present report 95 controlled patients at the Farreras Valentí School of Hematology are analyzed using the classification by stages; there were 19 cases in stage 0; 16 in stage I; 30 in stage II; 21 in stage III, and 9 in stage IV. The mean survival rate in the global series was 63 months and the average 90.9 months. As in other series, it was observed that patients in stages 0 and I have a much better prognosis than those in stages III and IV. Stage II occupies an intermediate position in relation to prognosis, since the actuarial survival figure for this stage can practically be superimposed on that of the global series. The classification of chronic lymphocytic leukemia by stages permits the specification of the therapeutic indications for this condition; it also encourages the search for new modalities of treatment for stages with poor prognosis, since in these cases chronic lymphocytic leukemia behaves in the manner of an acute or subacute hemopathy.

  18. The relative survival of composite free flaps in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Van Genechten, M L V; Batstone, M D

    2016-02-01

    Various composite free flaps are available for reconstruction of bony head and neck defects. The aim of this study was to compare the relative success of four different bony free flaps. One hundred and seventy-three microvascular composite free flap reconstructions for bony defects of the head and neck region, performed over the period April 2008 to April 2015, were reviewed retrospectively. The type of free flap, indication for free flap reconstruction, age at harvesting of the free flap, use of pre- or postoperative radiotherapy, and free flap failure were examined. For the 173 reconstructions performed, 84 fibula free flaps, 43 iliac crest free flaps, 32 scapula free flaps, and 14 osteocutaneous radial forearm free flaps were harvested. The mean age at time of harvesting was 40.7 years for the iliac crest, 57.3 years for the fibula, 64.3 years for the scapula, and 73.9 years for the osteocutaneous radial forearm free flap. No complete free flap failure was documented, nor was there any failure of bony segments. Three fibula flap skin paddles did not survive. No returns to theatre for salvage were required. This study showed no difference in the survival rates of these four types of composite free flap.

  19. High relative density of lymphatic vessels predicts poor survival in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Miia; Pohjola, Konsta; Laranne, Jussi; Rautiainen, Markus; Huhtala, Heini; Renkonen, Risto; Lemström, Karl; Paavonen, Timo; Toppila-Salmi, Sanna

    2016-12-01

    Tongue cancer has a poor prognosis due to its early metastasis via lymphatic vessels. The present study aimed at evaluating lymphatic vessel density, relative density of lymphatic vessel, and diameter of lymphatic vessels and its predictive role in tongue cancer. Paraffin-embedded tongue and lymph node specimens (n = 113) were stained immunohistochemically with a polyclonal antibody von Willebrand factor, recognizing blood and lymphatic endothelium and with a monoclonal antibody podoplanin, recognizing lymphatic endothelium. The relative density of lymphatic vessels was counted by dividing the mean number of lymphatic vessels per microscopic field (podoplanin) by the mean number of all vessels (vWf) per microscopic field. The high relative density of lymphatic vessels (≥80 %) was associated with poor prognosis in tongue cancer. The relative density of lymphatic vessels predicted poor prognosis in the group of primary tumor size T1-T2 and in the group of non-metastatic cancer. The lymphatic vessel density and diameter of lymphatic vessels were not associated with tongue cancer survival. The relative density of lymphatic vessels might have clinically relevant prognostic impact. Further studies with increased number of patients are needed.

  20. Influence of Age-Related Versus Non-Age-Related Renal Dysfunctionon Survival in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Brisco, Meredith A.; Han, Gang; Laur, Olga; Kula, Alexander J.; Cheng, Susan J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2013-01-01

    Normal aging results in a predictable decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and low GFR is associated with worsened survival. If this survival disadvantage is directly caused by the low GFR, as opposed to the disease causing the low GFR, the risk should be similar regardless of the underlying mechanism. Our objective was to determine if age related declines in estimated GFR (eGFR) carry the same prognostic importance as disease attributable losses in patients with ventricular dysfunction. We analyzed the Studies Of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) limited data set (n=6337). The primary analysis focused on determining if the eGFR mortality relationship differed by the extent the eGFR was consistent with normal ageing. Mean eGFR was 65.7 ± 19.0ml/min/1.73m2. Across the range of age in the population (27 to 80 years), baseline eGFR decreased by 0.67 ml/min/1.73m2 per year (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). The risk of death associated with eGFR was strongly modified by the degree to which the low eGFR could be explained by aging (p interaction <0.0001). For example, in a model incorporating the interaction, uncorrected eGFR was no longer significantly related to mortality (adjusted HR=1.0 per 10 ml/min/1.73m2, 95% CI 0.97–1.1, p=0.53) whereas a disease attributable decrease in eGFR above the median carried significant risk (adjusted HR=2.8, 95% CI 1.6–4.7, p<0.001). In conclusion, in the setting of LV dysfunction, renal dysfunction attributable to normal aging had a limited risk for mortality, suggesting that the mechanism underlying renal dysfunction is critical in determining prognosis. PMID:24216124

  1. Survival trade-offs in plant roots during colonization by closely related beneficial and pathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Hacquard, Stéphane; Kracher, Barbara; Hiruma, Kei; Münch, Philipp C.; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Thon, Michael R.; Weimann, Aaron; Damm, Ulrike; Dallery, Jean-Félix; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Lespinet, Olivier; Sacristán, Soledad; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Kemen, Eric; McHardy, Alice C.; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; O'Connell, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The sessile nature of plants forced them to evolve mechanisms to prioritize their responses to simultaneous stresses, including colonization by microbes or nutrient starvation. Here, we compare the genomes of a beneficial root endophyte, Colletotrichum tofieldiae and its pathogenic relative C. incanum, and examine the transcriptomes of both fungi and their plant host Arabidopsis during phosphate starvation. Although the two species diverged only 8.8 million years ago and have similar gene arsenals, we identify genomic signatures indicative of an evolutionary transition from pathogenic to beneficial lifestyles, including a narrowed repertoire of secreted effector proteins, expanded families of chitin-binding and secondary metabolism-related proteins, and limited activation of pathogenicity-related genes in planta. We show that beneficial responses are prioritized in C. tofieldiae-colonized roots under phosphate-deficient conditions, whereas defense responses are activated under phosphate-sufficient conditions. These immune responses are retained in phosphate-starved roots colonized by pathogenic C. incanum, illustrating the ability of plants to maximize survival in response to conflicting stresses. PMID:27150427

  2. Strategy for improving survival and reducing recurrence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toru

    2013-10-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. With advances in imaging diagnostics, accompanied by better understanding of high-risk patients, HCC is now frequently detected at an early stage; however, the prognosis remains poor. The recurrence rate after treatment of HCC is higher than that associated with cancers of other organs. This may be because of the high incidence of intrahepatic distant recurrence and multicentric recurrence, especially with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) classification has recently emerged as the standard classification system for the clinical management of patients with HCC. According to the BCLC staging system, curative therapies (resection, transplantation, transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, percutaneous ethanol injection therapy, percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation) can improve survival in HCC patients diagnosed at an early stage and offer a potential long-term cure. However, treatment strategies for recurrent disease are not mentioned in the BCLC classification. The strategy for recurrence may differ according to the recurrence pattern, i.e., intrahepatic distant recurrence vs multicentric recurrence. In this article, we review recurrent HCC and the therapeutic strategies for reducing recurrent HCC, especially HCV-related HCC.

  3. Societal integration and age-standardized suicide rates in 21 developed countries, 1955-1989.

    PubMed

    Fernquist, R M; Cutright, P

    1998-01-01

    Gender-specific age-standardized suicide rates for 21 developed countries over seven 5-year periods (1955-59...1985-89) form the two dependent variables. Durkheim's theory of societal integration is the framework used to generate the independent variables, although several recent theories are also examined. The results from a MGLS multiple regression analysis of both male and female rates provide overwhelming support for a multidimensional theory of societal integration and suicide, as first suggested by Durkheim.

  4. Regional differences in population-based cancer survival between six prefectures in Japan: application of relative survival models with funnel plots.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuri; Ioka, Akiko; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Ajiki, Wakiko; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Rachet, Bernard; Coleman, Michel P

    2009-07-01

    We used new methods to examine differences in population-based cancer survival between six prefectures in Japan, after adjustment for age and stage at diagnosis. We applied regression models for relative survival to data from population-based cancer registries covering each prefecture for patients diagnosed with stomach, lung, or breast cancer during 1993-1996. Funnel plots were used to display the excess hazard ratio (EHR) for each prefecture, defined as the excess hazard of death from each cancer within 5 years of diagnosis relative to the mean excess hazard (in excess of national background mortality by age and sex) in all six prefectures combined. The contribution of age and stage to the EHR in each prefecture was assessed from differences in deviance-based R(2) between the various models. No significant differences were seen between prefectures in 5-year survival from breast cancer. For cancers of the stomach and lung, EHR in Osaka prefecture were above the upper 95% control limits. For stomach cancer, the age- and stage-adjusted EHR in Osaka were 1.29 for men and 1.43 for women, compared with Fukui and Yamagata. Differences in the stage at diagnosis of stomach cancer appeared to explain most of this excess hazard (61.3% for men, 56.8% for women), whereas differences in age at diagnosis explained very little (0.8%, 1.3%). This approach offers the potential to quantify the impact of differences in stage at diagnosis on time trends and regional differences in cancer survival. It underlines the utility of population-based cancer registries for improving cancer control.

  5. Synergistic interactions within disturbed habitats between temperature, relative humidity and UVB radiation on egg survival in a diadromous fish.

    PubMed

    Hickford, Michael J H; Schiel, David R

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic impacts, including urbanization, deforestation, farming, and livestock grazing have altered riparian margins worldwide. One effect of changes to riparian vegetation is that the ground-level light, temperature, and humidity environment has also been altered. Galaxias maculatus, one of the most widely distributed fishes of the southern hemisphere, lays eggs almost exclusively beneath riparian vegetation in tidally influenced reaches of rivers. We hypothesized that the survival of these eggs is greatly affected by the micro-environment afforded by vegetation, particularly relating to temperature, humidity and UVB radiation. We experimentally reduced riparian vegetation height and altered shading characteristics, tracked egg survival, and used small ground-level temperature, humidity and UVB sensors to relate survival to ground-level effects around egg masses. The ground-level physical environment was markedly different from the surrounding ambient conditions. Tall dense riparian vegetation modified ambient conditions to produce a buffered temperature regime with constant high relative humidity, generally above 90%, and negligible UVB radiation at ground-level. Where vegetation height was reduced, frequent high temperatures, low humidity, and high UVB irradiances reduced egg survival by up to 95%. Temperature effects on egg survival were probably indirect, through reduced humidity, because developing eggs are known to survive in a wide range of temperatures. In this study, it was remarkable how such small variations in relatively small sites could have such a large effect on egg survival. It appears that modifications to riparian vegetation and the associated changes in the physical conditions of egg laying sites are major mechanisms affecting egg survival. The impacts associated with vegetational changes through human-induced disturbances are complex yet potentially devastating. These effects are particularly important because they affect a very small

  6. Survival of radio-implanted drymarchon couperi (Eastern Indigo Snake) in relation to body size and sex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyslop, N.L.; Meyers, J.M.; Cooper, R.J.; Norton, Terry M.

    2009-01-01

    Drymarchon couperi (eastern indigo snake) has experienced population declines across its range primarily as a result of extensive habitat loss, fragmentation, and degradation. Conservation efforts for D. couperi have been hindered, in part, because of informational gaps regarding the species, including a lack of data on population ecology and estimates of demographic parameters such as survival. We conducted a 2- year radiotelemetry study of D. couperi on Fort Stewart Military Reservation and adjacent private lands located in southeastern Georgia to assess individual characteristics associated with probability of survival. We used known-fate modeling to estimate survival, and an information-theoretic approach, based on a priori hypotheses, to examine intraspecific differences in survival probabilities relative to individual covariates (sex, size, size standardized by sex, and overwintering location). Annual survival in 2003 and 2004 was 0.89 (95% CI = 0.73-0.97, n = 25) and 0.72 (95% CI = 0.52-0.86; n = 27), respectively. Results indicated that body size, standardized by sex, was the most important covariate determining survival of adult D. couperi, suggesting lower survival for larger individuals within each sex. We are uncertain of the mechanisms underlying this result, but possibilities may include greater resource needs for larger individuals within each sex, necessitating larger or more frequent movements, or a population with older individuals. Our results may also have been influenced by analysis limitations because of sample size, other sources of individual variation, or environmental conditions. ?? 2009 by The Herpetologists' League, Inc.

  7. Reduced Long-Term Relative Survival in Females and Younger Adults Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Enger, Tone Bull; Pleym, Hilde; Stenseth, Roar; Greiff, Guri; Wahba, Alexander; Videm, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess long-term survival and mortality in adult cardiac surgery patients. Methods 8,564 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery in Trondheim, Norway from 2000 until censoring 31.12.2014 were prospectively followed. Observed long-term mortality following surgery was compared to the expected mortality in the Norwegian population, matched on gender, age and calendar year. This enabled assessment of relative survival (observed/expected survival rates) and relative mortality (observed/expected deaths). Long-term mortality was compared across gender, age and surgical procedure. Predictors of reduced survival were assessed with multivariate analyses of observed and relative mortality. Results During follow-up (median 6.4 years), 2,044 patients (23.9%) died. The observed 30-day, 1-, 3- and 5-year mortality rates were 2.2%, 4.4%, 8.2% and 13.8%, respectively, and remained constant throughout the study period. Comparing observed mortality to that expected in a matched sample from the general population, patients undergoing cardiac surgery showed excellent survival throughout the first seven years of follow-up (relative survival ≥ 1). Subsequently, survival decreased, which was more pronounced in females and patients undergoing other procedures than isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Relative mortality was higher in younger age groups, females and patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The female survival advantage in the general population was obliterated (relative mortality ratio (RMR) 1.35 (1.19–1.54), p<0.001). Increasing observed long-term mortality seen with ageing was due to population risk, and younger age was independently associated with increased relative mortality (RMR per 5 years 0.81 (0.79–0.84), p<0.001)). Conclusions Cardiac surgery patients showed comparable survival to that expected in the general Norwegian population, underlining the benefits of cardiac surgery in appropriately selected patients. The

  8. Comparison of the partitioning of pesticides relative to the survival and behaviour of exposed amphipods.

    PubMed

    Hellou, Jocelyne; Leonard, Jim; Cook, Art; Doe, Ken; Dunphy, Kathryn; Jackman, Paula; Tremblay, Laurie; Flemming, Joanna Mills

    2009-01-01

    Pesticides sprayed on farmlands can end up in rivers and be transported into estuaries, where they could affect aquatic organisms in freshwater and marine habitats. A series of experiments were conducted using the amphipod Corophium volutator Pallas (Amphipoda, Corophiidae) and single pesticides, namely atrazine (AT), azinphos-methyl (AZ), carbofuran (CA) and endosulfan (EN) that were added to sediments and covered with seawater. Our goal was to compare the concentrations affecting the survival of the animals relative to potential attractant or repellent properties of sediment-spiked pesticides. The avoidance/preference of contaminated/reference sediments by amphipods was examined after 48 and 96 h of exposure using sediments with different organic carbon content. The octanol-water partition coefficients (log K(ow)) ranked the pesticides binding to sediments as EN > AZ > AT > CA. LC(50) and LC(20) covered a wide range of nominal concentrations and ranked toxicity as CA-AZ > EN > AT. Under the experimental set up, only EN initiated an avoidance response and the organic carbon normalised concentration provided consistent results. Using the present data with wide confidence limits, >20% of a population of C. volutator could perish due to the presence of EN before relocation or detecting CA or AZ in sediments by chemical analysis.

  9. Genetic architecture of survival and fitness-related traits in two populations of Atlantic salmon

    PubMed Central

    Houde, A LS; Wilson, C C; Neff, B D

    2013-01-01

    The additive genetic effects of traits can be used to predict evolutionary trajectories, such as responses to selection. Non-additive genetic and maternal environmental effects can also change evolutionary trajectories and influence phenotypes, but these effects have received less attention by researchers. We partitioned the phenotypic variance of survival and fitness-related traits into additive genetic, non-additive genetic and maternal environmental effects using a full-factorial breeding design within two allopatric populations of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Maternal environmental effects were large at early life stages, but decreased during development, with non-additive genetic effects being most significant at later juvenile stages (alevin and fry). Non-additive genetic effects were also, on average, larger than additive genetic effects. The populations, generally, did not differ in the trait values or inferred genetic architecture of the traits. Any differences between the populations for trait values could be explained by maternal environmental effects. We discuss whether the similarities in architectures of these populations is the result of natural selection across a common juvenile environment. PMID:23942281

  10. Apolipoprotein E promotes subretinal mononuclear phagocyte survival and chronic inflammation in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Olivier; Calippe, Bertrand; Lavalette, Sophie; Hu, Shulong J; Raoul, William; Dominguez, Elisa; Housset, Michael; Paques, Michel; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Combadiere, Christophe; Guillonneau, Xavier; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) expresses immunosuppressive signals such as FAS ligand (FASL), which prevents the accumulation of leukocytes in the subretinal space. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with a breakdown of the subretinal immunosuppressive environment and chronic accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs). We show that subretinal MPs in AMD patients accumulate on the RPE and express high levels of APOE. MPs of Cx3cr1−/− mice that develop MP accumulation on the RPE, photoreceptor degeneration, and increased choroidal neovascularization similarly express high levels of APOE. ApoE deletion in Cx3cr1−/− mice prevents pathogenic age- and stress-induced subretinal MP accumulation. We demonstrate that increased APOE levels induce IL-6 in MPs via the activation of the TLR2-CD14-dependent innate immunity receptor cluster. IL-6 in turn represses RPE FasL expression and prolongs subretinal MP survival. This mechanism may account, in part, for the MP accumulation observed in Cx3cr1−/− mice. Our results underline the inflammatory role of APOE in sterile inflammation in the immunosuppressive subretinal space. They provide rationale for the implication of IL-6 in AMD and open avenues toward therapies inhibiting pathogenic chronic inflammation in late AMD. PMID:25604058

  11. Survival of Paecilomyces lilacinus in Selected Carriers and Related Effects on Meloidogyne incognita on Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Enrique; Barker, K. R.; Nelson, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory and microplot experiments were conducted to determine the influence of carrier and storage of Paecilomyces lilacinus on its survival and related protection of tomato against Meloidogyne incognita. Spores of P. lilacinus were prepared in five formulations: alginate pellets (pellets), diatomaceous earth granules (granules), wheat grain, soil, and soil plus chitin. Fungal viability was high in wheat and granules, intermediate in pellets, and low in soil and chitin-amended soil stored at 25 ± 2 C. In 1985 P. lilacinus in field microplots resulted in about a 25% increase in tomato yield and 25% gall suppression, compared with nematodes alone. Greatest suppression of egg development occurred in plots treated with P. lilacinus in pellets, wheat grain, and granules. In 1986 carryover protection of tomato against M. incognita resulted in about a threefold increase in tomato fruit yield and 25% suppression of gall development, compared with plants treated with nematodes alone. Higher numbers of fungus-infected egg masses occurred in plots treated with pellets (32%) than in those treated with chitin-amended soil (24%), wheat (16%), granules (12%), or soil (7%). Numbers of fungal colony-forming units per gram of soil in plots treated with pellets were 10-fold greater than initial levels estimated at planting time in 1986. PMID:19287586

  12. Early marine growth in relation to marine-stage survival rates for Alaska sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farley, Edward V.; Murphy, J.M.; Adkison, Milo D.; Eisner, L.B.; Helle, J.H.; Moss, J.H.; Nielsen, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that larger juvenile sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, have higher marine-stage survival rates than smaller juvenile salmon. We used scales from returning adults (33 years of data) and trawl samples of juveniles (n = 3572) collected along the eastern Bering Sea shelf during August through September 2000-02. The size of juvenile sockeye salmon mirrored indices of their marine-stage survival rate (e.g., smaller fish had lower indices of marine-stage survival rate). However, there was no relationship between the size of sockeye salmon after their first year at sea, as estimated from archived scales, and brood-year survival size was relatively uniform over the time series, possibly indicating size-selective mortality on smaller individuals during their marine residence. Variation in size, relative abundance, and marine-stage survival rate of juvenile sockeye salmon is likely related to ocean conditions affecting their early marine migratory pathways along the eastern Bering Sea shelf.

  13. Movement and survival of an amphibian in relation to sediment and culvert design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeycutt, R.K; Lowe, W.H.; Hossack, Blake R.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat disturbance from stream culverts can affect aquatic organisms by increasing sedimentation or forming barriers to movement. Land managers are replacing many culverts to reduce these negative effects, primarily for stream fishes. However, these management actions are likely to have broad implications for many organisms, including amphibians in small streams. To assess the effects of culverts on movement and survival of the Idaho giant salamander (Dicamptodon aterrimus), we used capture-mark-recapture surveys and measured sediment in streams with 2 culvert types (i.e., unimproved culverts, improved culverts) and in streams without culverts (i.e., reference streams). We predicted culverts would increase stream sediment levels, limit movement, and reduce survival of Idaho giant salamanders. We also determined the effect of sediment levels on survival of salamanders because although sediment is often associated with distribution and abundance of stream amphibians, links with vital rates remain unclear. To estimate survival, we used a spatial Cormack–Jolly–Seber (CJS) model that explicitly incorporated information on movement, eliminating bias in apparent survival estimated from traditional (i.e., non-spatial) CJS models caused by permanent emigration beyond the study area. To demonstrate the importance of using spatial data in studies of wildlife populations, we compared estimates from the spatial CJS to estimates of apparent survival from a traditional CJS model. Although high levels of sediment reduced survival of salamanders, culvert type was unrelated to sediment levels or true survival of salamanders. Across all streams, we documented only 15 movement events between study reaches. All movement events were downstream, and they occurred disproportionately in 1 stream, which precluded measuring the effect of culvert design on movement. Although movement was low overall, the variance among streams was high enough to bias estimates of apparent survival

  14. Survival of postfledging Forster's terns in relation to mercury exposure in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, J.T.; Eagles-Smith, C. A.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Iverson, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    We examined factors influencing mercury concentrations in 90 fledgling Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) and evaluated whether mercury influenced postfledging survival in San Francisco Bay, California. Mercury concentrations (??SE) in chicks 21-29 days old (just before fledging) were 0.33 ?? 0.01 ??g g-1 ww for blood and 6.44 ?? 0.28 ??g g -1 fw for breast feathers. Colony site had an overriding influence on fledgling contamination, however hatching date and age also affected blood, but not feather, mercury concentrations. Blood mercury concentrations decreased by 28% during the 50-day hatching period and increased with chick age by 30% during the last week prior to fledging. Using radio-telemetry, we calculated that cumulative survival during the 35-day postfledging time period was 0.81 ?? 0.09 (SE). Postfledging survival rates increased with size-adjusted mass, and cumulative survival probability was 61% lower for terns with the lowest, compared to the highest, observed masses. Conversely, survival was not influenced by blood mercury concentration, time since fledging, sex, or hatch date. Mercury concentrations in breast feathers of fledglings found dead at nesting colonies also were no different than those in live chicks. Our results indicate that colony site, hatching date, and age influenced mercury concentrations in fledgling Forster's terns, but that mercury did not influence postfledging survival. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  15. Effects of Temperature, Relative Humidity, Absolute Humidity, and Evaporation Potential on Survival of Airborne Gumboro Vaccine Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dijkman, Remco; Fabri, Teun; de Jong, Mart C. M.; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W. G.

    2012-01-01

    Survival of airborne virus influences the extent of disease transmission via air. How environmental factors affect viral survival is not fully understood. We investigated the survival of a vaccine strain of Gumboro virus which was aerosolized at three temperatures (10°C, 20°C, and 30°C) and two relative humidities (RHs) (40% and 70%). The response of viral survival to four metrics (temperature, RH, absolute humidity [AH], and evaporation potential [EP]) was examined. The results show a biphasic viral survival at 10°C and 20°C, i.e., a rapid initial inactivation in a short period (2.3 min) during and after aerosolization, followed by a slow secondary inactivation during a 20-min period after aerosolization. The initial decays of aerosolized virus at 10°C (1.68 to 3.03 ln % min−1) and 20°C (3.05 to 3.62 ln % min−1) were significantly lower than those at 30°C (5.67 to 5.96 ln % min−1). The secondary decays at 10°C (0.03 to 0.09 ln % min−1) tended to be higher than those at 20°C (−0.01 to 0.01 ln % min−1). The initial viral survival responded to temperature and RH and potentially to EP; the secondary viral survival responded to temperature and potentially to RH. In both phases, survival of the virus was not significantly affected by AH. These findings suggest that long-distance transmission of airborne virus is more likely to occur at 20°C than at 10°C or 30°C and that current Gumboro vaccination by wet aerosolization in poultry industry is not very effective due to the fast initial decay. PMID:22156417

  16. hsa-mir-183 is frequently methylated and related to poor survival in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Sumadi Lukman; Krech, Till; Hasemeier, Britta; Schipper, Elisa; Schweitzer, Nora; Vogel, Arndt; Kreipe, Hans; Buurman, Reena; Skawran, Britta; Lehmann, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    AIM To screen clinically relevant microRNAs (miRNAs) silenced by DNA methylation in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS Knockdown of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) using siRNAs and miRNA profiling in HCC cell lines were performed to identify DNA hypermethylation-mediated miRNA downregulation. Confirmation using individual quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assays was then performed followed by DNA methylation quantification at the promoter of the miRNA genes. Quantification of DNA methylation and miRNA expression was then performed in primary HCC tumor samples and related with clinicopathological variables. RESULTS miRNA profiling after DNMT knockdown in HCC cell lines revealed upregulation of miR-23, miR-25 and miR-183. After qRT-PCR confirmation and CpG island methylation quantification of these miRNAs in cell lines, further analysis in primary HCC specimens showed that hsa-miR-183 is hypermethylated in 30% of HCC (n = 40). Expression of mature miR-183 showed an inverse correlation with DNA methylation levels. In HCC cells, DNMT knockdown and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment reduced methylation and stimulated expression of miR-183. In HCC patients, hypermethylation at hsa-miR-183 promoter significantly correlates with poor survival (log-rank test P = 0.03). DNA methylation analysis in healthy liver, benign liver tumors (hepatocellular adenoma and focal nodular hyperplasia) and their corresponding adjacent tissues showed absence of hypermethylation supporting the notion that aberrant methylation at hsa-miR-183 is specific for the malignant transformation of hepatocytes. CONCLUSION Our data indicate that hypermethylation of hsa-miR-183 is a frequent event in HCC and potentially useful as a novel surrogate diagnostic and prognostic marker. PMID:28321157

  17. Study of psychosocial parameters related to the survival rate of renal transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Mongeau, J G; Clermont, M J; Robitaille, P; Plante, A; Jéquier, J C; Godbout, C; Guertin, M C; Beaulieu, M A; Sarrazin, F

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of intelligence, schooling, psychomotor, emotional, and social status on renal graft survival in children. Sixty-two cadaver renal transplant recipients were evaluated retrospectively and the influence of sex, age, weight, and the use of cyclosporin A (CyA) on the success rate of the graft from 1 to 5 years later was analyzed. Psychological and social scores were devised and included as factors predictive of survival of the graft. Univariate analysis showed that the following variables predicted renal graft survival: the use of CyA (P = 0.0002), pre-transplant dialysis (P = 0.04), weight at the time of transplantation (P = 0.072), and psychological scores (P = 0.064). Association analysis demonstrated that pre-transplantation dialysis was only a chance association and therefore the parameter was discarded. Multivariate analysis showed that the predictive parameters were the use of CyA, sex, weight in kilograms, and the psychological score. An equation was then derived from variables that predict the probability that a specific patient's graft will survive more than t months. This equation is the estimated survival distribution function and is as follow: S (t) = Exp {-Exp[-(0.8882x1 - 1.827x2 + 0.037x3 - 0.1746x4) + ln t - 4.7862]} where S (t) = the survival at t months post transplantation, x1 = sex (male 1, female 2), x2 = CyA (yes 1, no 2), x3 = weight in kilograms, and x4 = psychological score. The major impact of psychological factors on renal graft survival was surprising.

  18. Age-standardized incidence rates of primordial cyst (keratocyst) on the Witwatersrand.

    PubMed

    Rachanis, C C; Shear, M

    1978-11-01

    Cases of primordial cysts derived from the records of all the hospital pathology departments and private pathology practices on the Witwatersrand, were recorded for the 10-year period 1965-74. The population at risk (1970 census) was 974,390 Whites and 1,567,280 Blacks. Age-specific morbidity rates for each sex and race were calculated, as well as age-standardized incidence rates standardized against African, World and European standard populations. The age-standardized incidence rates for primordial cysts, standardized against a World standard population, per million per year are 0.61, 0, 4.86 and 3.50 for Black males and females and White males and females, respectively. In the population at risk, primordial cysts are much more common in Whites than in Blacks, the incidence being eight times higher in White males than in Black males. The present study confirms that there is a bimodal age distribution but with a higher incidence of the cyst in the age group 50-64 years than previously suspected. This may be either because a substantial number of cases remain undiagnosed for many years or because there are two groups of primordial cyst: one which is triggered in young patients and the other in older patients.

  19. Results of interlaboratory comparison of fission-track age standards: Fission-track workshop-1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.S.; Duddy, I.R.; Green, P.F.; Hurford, A.J.; Naeser, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    Five samples were made available as standards for the 1984 Fission Track Workshop held in the summer of 1984 (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York). Two zircons, two apatites and a sphene were distributed prior to the meeting to 40 different laboratories. To date, 24 different analysts have reported results. The isotopic ages of the standards ranged from 16.8 to 98.7 Myr. Only the statement that the age of each sample was less than 200 Myr was provided with the set of standards distributed. Consequently, each laboratory was required to use their laboratory's accepted treatment (irradiation level, etching conditions, counting conditions, etc.) for these samples. The results show that some workers have serious problems in achieving accurate age determinations. This emphasizes the need to calibrate experimental techniques and counting procedures against age standards before unknown ages are determined. Any fission-track age determination published or submitted for publication can only be considered reliable if it is supported by evidence of consistent determinations on age standards. Only this can provide the scientific community with the background to build up confidence concerning the validity of the fission-track method. ?? 1985.

  20. Nest survival of clay-colored and vesper sparrows in relation to woodland edge in mixed-grass prairies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, T.A.; Madden, E.M.; Shaffer, T.L.; Pietz, P.J.; Berkey, G.B.; Kadrmas, N.J.

    2006-01-01

    The quantity and quality of northern mixed-grass prairie continues to decline because of conversion to agriculture, invasion of woody and exotic plants, and disruption of important ecological processes that shape grasslands. Declines in grassland bird populations in North Dakota, USA, have coincided with these largely anthropogenic alterations to prairie habitat. In grasslands of north-central and northwestern North Dakota, woody plants have increased due primarily to fire suppression, extirpation of bison (Bos bison), and widescale planting of tree shelter belts. In northern grasslands, effects of woody vegetation on survival of grassland birds are poorly understood, and conclusions are based mainly on studies conducted outside the region. We examined nest survival of clay-colored sparrows (Spizella pallida) and vesper sparrows (Pooecetes gramineus) relative to the distance nests were located from aspen (Populus tremuloides,) woodland edges and relative to other habitat features near the nest. Clay-colored and vesper sparrow nest survival was higher for nests located near woodland edges, nests with greater cover of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis), and nests more concealed by vegetation. Vesper sparrow nest survival increased as the percent cover of tall shrubs near the nest increased. Based on video-camera data, the 13-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus,) was the most common predator of sparrow eggs and young. Thirteen-lined ground squirrels were more common far from woodland edges than near, and this pattern may, in part, explain clay-colored and vesper sparrow nest survival in relation to woodland edges. In contrast to our results, studies conducted in other grassland systems generally report lower nest survival for grassland birds nesting near trees and shrubs. This disparity in results demonstrates the need to identify specific nest predators and their distributions with respect to important habitat features because these data can be

  1. Survival protection by bodyweight in isolated scleroderma-related pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Marini, Carlo; Formichi, Bruno; Bauleo, Carolina; Michelassi, Claudio; Airò, Edoardo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Giuntini, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    In chronic heart failure (CHF) due to systemic cardiovascular disease, obese patients have better survival. Bodyweight versus survival was analyzed post hoc in subjects with limited scleroderma (SSc) and isolated pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), i.e. with CHF due to pulmonary vascular disease. Rheumatologists referred scleroderma subjects for evaluation, and PAH was ascertained by right heart catheterization (RHC). Forty-nine SSc-PAH subjects were stratified by body mass index (BMI): obese 7 (14.3 %), overweight 11 (22.4 %), normal weight 21 (42.9 %), and underweight 10 (20.4 %) for 24-month follow-up and pooled together for long-term 72-month follow-up. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling helped to assess variables associated to survival. At 24 months (17 events), survival increases with BMI across four groups (logrank for trend P = 0.031). By Cox multivariate mortality, best model included: BMI (P = 0.043), low lung diffusion (DLco, P = 0.007), and reduced stroke volume index (SVI, P = 0.017). At 72 month (37 events), higher BMI values were associated with better survival but not significantly (P = 0.076). By multivariate modeling BMI did not enter any model, whereas low DLco entered all (P < 0.001). Also low SVI (P = 0.02) and low mixed venous saturation (SvO2, P = 0.009) were associated with the prognosis. From PAH diagnosis to final event, BMI had small (5.4 %), but significant decline (P < 0.001). This is ascribed to CHF progression, and may explain BMI predictive power weakening. The results suggest BMI decline should be contrasted, DLco is useful for screening and with SVI and SvO2 for assessing prognosis and treatment.

  2. Survival of radio-marked mallards in relation to management of avian botulism.

    PubMed

    Evelsizer, Daniel D; Bollinger, Trent K; Dufour, Kevin W; Clark, Robert G

    2010-07-01

    Avian botulism outbreaks are frequently perpetuated by type C toxin produced by Clostridium botulinum proliferating in decomposing bird carcasses and consumption of toxic maggots from these carcasses by healthy birds. Therefore, removing bird carcasses has been advocated for disease management because availability of toxic maggots should be reduced, increasing duck survival. However, this management is expensive, and its effect on waterfowl mortality under field conditions is unknown. We radio-marked 419 molting mallards on 11 lakes in western Canada during July-August 1999-2001 and monitored them for 30 days, testing whether survival was higher on lakes with carcass removal. Botulism occurred on 10 lakes. On five carcass removal lakes, greater-than-normal effort was made to conduct early, thorough surveillance and immediately remove carcasses; on six nonremoval lakes, no carcasses were removed. In 1999, estimated 30-day survival probabilities ranged from 0.149 (95% CI=0.065-0.304) on one large lake with carcass removal to 0.466 (95% CI=0.270-0.674) and 0.618 (95% CI=0.443-0.767) on two nonremoval lakes. As a result, we conducted work on smaller wetlands thereafter, reasoning that any management benefit would be easier to detect. In 2000, estimated 30-day survival probabilities were 0.313 (95% CI=0.143-0.556) and 0.794 (95% CI=0.609-0.905) on two carcass removal lakes versus 0.525 (95% CI=0.362-0.682) and 0.743 (95% CI=0.564-0.866) on two nonremoval lakes. In 2001, botulism was detected on two nonremoval lakes where survival probabilities were 0.845 (95% CI=0.630-0.946) and 0.942 (95% CI=0.778-0.987), and on one removal lake where survival probability was 1.0 (95% CI=0.99-1.0), but not detected on the other removal lake where no marked birds died from botulism (1.0, 95% CI=0.99-1.0). Survival tended to be higher on lakes with lower carcass density, but when data were organized by carcass removal versus nonremoval, mallard survival was not consistently greater on

  3. Hemoglobin level trajectories in the early treatment period are related with survival outcomes in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Lin; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Lin, Chi-Shy; Li, Yu-Fen; Tzeng, Huey-En

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) levels are reportedly related with treatment outcomes and survival in patients of breast cancer. However, the long-term change in Hb levels after treatment and the effects of Hb on survival remain unknown. This retrospective cohort study enrolled 1931 breast cancer patients with pathological stage I-IV between 1/1/2003 and 12/31/2013. Latent class modeling was used to identify trajectories in monthly Hb levels over time. The primary endpoint was 10-year cancer-related death. We identified 5 distinct Hb trajectories: persistent anemia (5.6 %; n = 109), improved anemia (4.8 %, n = 93), mild anemia (21.0%; n = 406), low normal Hb (46.6 %; n = 899), and normal Hb (21.9%; n = 424). Compared with the normal-Hb group, trajectories with low Hb levels had worst 10-year survival. The adjusted hazard ratios were 1.79(95% CI, 0.91-3.53) for the improved anemia group, 1.09(95% CI, 0.68-1.74) for the mild anemia group, 1.06 (95% CI, 0.71-1.60) for the low normal Hb group, and 2.19(95% CI 1.28-3.75) for the persistent anemia group. Our findings show there are five Hb level trajectories during breast cancer treatment. The anemia Hb level trajectory during the first 12 months after treatment reflect the worst cancer-related 10-year survival in breast cancer patients. PMID:27906669

  4. Assessing the relative importance of local and regional processes on the survival of a threatened salmon population.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica A; Teel, David J; Peterson, William T; Baptista, Antonio M

    2014-01-01

    Research on regulatory mechanisms in biological populations often focuses on environmental covariates. An integrated approach that combines environmental indices with organismal-level information can provide additional insight on regulatory mechanisms. Survival of spring/summer Snake River Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is consistently low whereas some adjacent populations with similar life histories experience greater survival. It is not known if populations with differential survival respond similarly during early marine residence, a critical period in the life history. Ocean collections, genetic stock identification, and otolith analyses were combined to evaluate the growth-mortality and match-mismatch hypotheses during early marine residence of spring/summer Snake River Chinook salmon. Interannual variation in juvenile attributes, including size at marine entry and marine growth rate, was compared with estimates of survival and physical and biological metrics. Multiple linear regression and multi-model inference were used to evaluate the relative importance of biological and physical metrics in explaining interannual variation in survival. There was relatively weak support for the match-mismatch hypothesis and stronger evidence for the growth-mortality hypothesis. Marine growth and size at capture were strongly, positively related to survival, a finding similar to spring Chinook salmon from the Mid-Upper Columbia River. In hindcast models, basin-scale indices (Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO)) and biological indices (juvenile salmon catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) and a copepod community index (CCI)) accounted for substantial and similar portions of variation in survival for juvenile emigration years 1998-2008 (R2>0.70). However, in forecast models for emigration years 2009-2011, there was an increasing discrepancy between predictions based on the PDO (50-448% of observed value) compared with those based on

  5. Assessing the Relative Importance of Local and Regional Processes on the Survival of a Threatened Salmon Population

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica A.; Teel, David J.; Peterson, William T.; Baptista, Antonio M.

    2014-01-01

    Research on regulatory mechanisms in biological populations often focuses on environmental covariates. An integrated approach that combines environmental indices with organismal-level information can provide additional insight on regulatory mechanisms. Survival of spring/summer Snake River Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is consistently low whereas some adjacent populations with similar life histories experience greater survival. It is not known if populations with differential survival respond similarly during early marine residence, a critical period in the life history. Ocean collections, genetic stock identification, and otolith analyses were combined to evaluate the growth-mortality and match-mismatch hypotheses during early marine residence of spring/summer Snake River Chinook salmon. Interannual variation in juvenile attributes, including size at marine entry and marine growth rate, was compared with estimates of survival and physical and biological metrics. Multiple linear regression and multi-model inference were used to evaluate the relative importance of biological and physical metrics in explaining interannual variation in survival. There was relatively weak support for the match-mismatch hypothesis and stronger evidence for the growth-mortality hypothesis. Marine growth and size at capture were strongly, positively related to survival, a finding similar to spring Chinook salmon from the Mid-Upper Columbia River. In hindcast models, basin-scale indices (Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO)) and biological indices (juvenile salmon catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) and a copepod community index (CCI)) accounted for substantial and similar portions of variation in survival for juvenile emigration years 1998–2008 (R2>0.70). However, in forecast models for emigration years 2009–2011, there was an increasing discrepancy between predictions based on the PDO (50–448% of observed value) compared with those

  6. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M. A.; Buckley, D.; Henson, D. B.; Armitage, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value. PMID:9823977

  7. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M A; Buckley, D; Henson, D B; Armitage, N C

    1998-11-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value.

  8. Nest survival relative to patch size in a highly fragmented shortgrass prairie landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, S.K.; Yackel Adams, A.A.; Adams, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the influences of habitat fragmentation on vertebrate populations is essential for the protection and ecological restoration of strategic sites for native species. We examined the effects of prairie fragmentation on avian reproductive success using artificial and natural nests on 26 randomly selected, privately owned patches of shortgrass prairie ranging in size from 7 to 454 ha within a cropland matrix in Washington County, Colorado, summer 2000. Survival trends of artificial and natural nests differed. Daily survival of artificial nests increased with patch size up to about 65 ha and differed little at larger patch sizes, whereas daily survival of Lark Bunting (Calamospiza melanocorys) and Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) nests decreased with increasing size of the grassland patch. We hypothesize that our unexpected findings of lower survival of natural nests with increasing patch sizes and different trends between artificial and natural nests are due to the particular structure of predator communities in our study area and the ways in which individual predators respond to artificial and natural nests. We recommend that the value of small habitat patches in highly fragmented landscapes not be overlooked.

  9. Gene expressions of TRP channels in glioblastoma multiforme and relation with survival.

    PubMed

    Alptekin, M; Eroglu, S; Tutar, E; Sencan, S; Geyik, M A; Ulasli, M; Demiryurek, A T; Camci, C

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer in humans, with a median survival of 10 to 12 months. Glioblastoma is highly malignant since the cells are supported by a great number of blood vessels. Although new treatments have been developed by increasing knowledge of molecular nature of the disease, surgical operation remains the standard of care. The TRP (transient receptor potential) superfamily consists of cation-selective channels that have roles in sensory physiology such as thermo- and osmosensation and in several complex diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, and neuronal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression levels of TRP channel genes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme and to evaluate the relationship between TRP gene expressions and survival of the patients. Thirty-three patients diagnosed with glioblastoma were enrolled to the study. The expression levels of 21 TRP genes were quantified by using qRT-PCR with dynamic array 48 × 48 chip (BioMark HD System, Fluidigm, South San Francisco, CA, USA). TRPC1, TRPC6, TRPM2, TRPM3, TRPM7, TRPM8, TRPV1, and TRPV2 were found significantly higher in glioblastoma patients. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between the overexpression of TRP genes and the survival of the patients. These results demonstrate for the first time that TRP channels contribute to the progression and survival of the glioblastoma patients.

  10. Inventorying the molecular potential of Cupriavidus and Ralstonia strains surviving harsh space-related environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijnendonckx, Kristel; van Houdt, Rob; Provoost, Ann; Bossus, Albert; Ott, C. Mark; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Leys, Natalie

    isolates survived exposure to 2µM AgNO3 for up to 5 weeks. All strains were able to grow on kanamycin (50µg/ml) and chloramphenicol (30 µg/ml and up to 150 µg/ml for the Cupriavidus strains). C. metallidurans IV (0502478) was not able to grow on ampicillin (100µg/ml). All Ralstonia and two Cupriavidus isolates were able to grow on carbenicilllin (100µg/ml). None of the isolates were able to grow on tetracycline (20µg/ml). These antibiotic concentrations are typically used for selection of the relevant resistance markers in a wide range of gram-negative bacteria. In addition, all isolates carried at least one large plasmid. The differences in the plasmid profile might be related to the differences in heavy metal and antibiotic resistance of the isolates. In general, these Ralstonia and Cupriavidus strains seemed to be well adapted to persist in these harsh and oligotrophic spacecraft-related environments. Moreover, these bacteria clearly possessed large plasmids, which are known to carry specific traits, such as metal and antibiotics resistance systems. It is therefore hypothesised that thanks to these plasmids the strains were specifically adapted to their rapid changing environment. These first results justify a more detailed study of the genetic content and the survival and proliferation strategies of these strains to improve the prevention of bacterial contamination, monitoring and disinfection tools for future manned space exploration. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the European Space Agency (ESA-PRODEX) and the Belgian Science Policy (Belspo) through the MISSEX and COMICS projects.

  11. Winter survival of adult female harlequin ducks in relation to history of contamination by the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esler, Daniel; Schmutz, J.A.; Jarvis, R.L.; Mulcahy, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) life-history characteristics make their populations particularly vulnerable to perturbations during nonbreeding periods. The 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill was a major perturbation to nonbreeding habitats of harlequin ducks in Prince William Sound, Alaska, which resulted in population injury. To assess the status of population recovery from the oil spill and to evaluate factors potentially constraining full recovery, we used radiotelemetry to examine survival of adult female harlequin ducks during winters of 1995-96, 1996-97, and 1997-98. We implanted 294 harlequin ducks (154 and 140 in oiled and unoiled areas, respectively) with transmitters and tracked their signals from aircraft during October through March. We examined variation in survival rates relative to area and season (early, mid, and late winter) through comparisons of models using Akaike's information criterion (AIC(c)) values. The 3 models best supported by the data indicated that survival of birds in oiled areas was lower than in unoiled areas. Inclusion of standardized body mass during wing molt in the 3 best models did not improve their fit, indicating that body mass during wing molt did not affect subsequent winter survival. In the model that best fit our data, survival was high in early winter for both areas, lower during mid and late winter seasons, and lowest in oiled areas during mid winter. Cumulative winter survival estimated from this model was 78.0% (SE = 3.3%) in oiled areas and 83.7% (SE = 2.9%) in unoiled areas. We determined that area differences in survival were more likely related to oiling history than intrinsic geographic differences. Based on a demographic model, area differences in survival offer a likely mechanism for observed declines in populations on oiled areas. Concurrent studies indicated that harlequin ducks continued to be exposed to residual Exxon Valdez oil as much as 9 years after the spill. We suggest that oil exposure

  12. Environmental microbiology as related to planetary quarantine. [water activity and temperature effects on bacterial spore survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pflug, I. J.

    1972-01-01

    The survival of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores suspended in solutions of sucrose and glycerol at calculated water activities and varying temperatures was studied. The overall results indicated that as the water activity of the liquid decreased from .99 to .85, the heat resistance of the spores increased. The nature of the substance controlling the water activity, and the history of the spores prior to treatment also had an affect on their heat resistance.

  13. The Human Factors Relating to Escape and Survival from Helicopters Ditching in Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    result, whenever possible, passengers should fly with constant -wear type life preservers and survival suits in the closed-up position. Manufacturers of...smoke and/or fire, or with sudden In-rushing water or darkness in sinking helicopters; - specifically for underwater escape, by minimizing the profile of...rapidly sank. Due to the fact that his Lap Hamess regular constant wear immersion suit was under repair, he was wearing a very bulky, loose fitting

  14. Influence of temperature on survival and water relations of Paederus fuscipes (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae).

    PubMed

    Bong, Lee-Jin; Neoh, Kok-Boon; Jaal, Zairi; Lee, Chow-Yang

    2013-09-01

    The effects of four temperatures (15, 23.5, 28, and 35 degrees C) on the biological characteristics of the rove beetle Paederus fuscipes Curtis were studied, and its cuticular permeability also was measured. Specimens successfully developed to adulthood at each temperature tested, but development time of each preadult stage significantly decreased with increasing temperature. Both egg and L1 stages required at least 80 degree days above a threshold of approximately 10 degrees C to develop to the subsequent stage. The lengthy development time and high survival rate of preadults at 15 degrees C suggests that P. fuscipes can survive in a harsh environment during cold weather by hibernating, and this ability could allow preadults to succeed ecologically in temperate countries. However, adult longevity was short, and no fecundity was recorded at 15 degrees C. At 28 degrees C, P. fuscipes exhibited a high survival rate of adults, which had a longer life span and high fecundity; thus, the population had the highest intrinsic rate of increase (0.0788 +/- 0.0051 d(-1)) and the shortest mean generation time (48.57 +/- 1.43 d) at 28 degrees C. At this temperature, the population might reach a size that could facilitate invasion into residential areas. However, in the absence of a hygric environment, P. fuscipes was unable to survive despite favorable temperature. Unlike in adults and pupae, high cuticular permeability values were found in the larval stages. This indicates that larvae are highly susceptible to desiccation, and it explains why the distribution of P. fuscipes is restricted to moist habitats.

  15. Decreased expression of NDRG1 in glioma is related to tumor progression and survival of patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqian; Chu, Dake; Li, Wei; Chu, Xiaodan; Li, Yunming; Wei, Dun; Li, Haiping

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the expression of NDRG1 gene in glioma samples with different WHO grades and its association with survival. About 168 glioma specimens and 21 normal control tissues were collected. Immunochemistry assay, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were carried out to investigate the expression of NDRG1 and Myc. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox's proportional hazards model were used in survival analysis. Immunohistochemistry showed that Ndrg1 expression was reduced in glioma. NDRG1 mRNA and protein levels were lower in glioma compared to control on real-time PCR and Western blot analysis (P < 0.001). Its expression levels increase from grade IV to grade I glioma on real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry analysis (P < 0.001) and Western blot. On the contrary, the expression of Myc by real-time PCR and Western blot showed the opposite trend of NDRG1. The survival rate of Ndrg1-negative patients was lower than that of Ndrg1-positive patients. We confirmed that the loss of NDRG1 expression was a significant and independent prognostic indicator in glioma by multivariate analysis. NDRG1 may play an inhibitory role during the development of glioma and may be a potential prognosis predictor of glioma.

  16. Sentinel node biopsy in relation to survival in floor of the mouth carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J; Bidaguren, A; McGurk, M; Diaz-Basterra, G; Brunsó, J; Andikoetxea, B; Martín, J C; Barbier, L; Arteagoitia, I; Santamaría, J A

    2014-03-01

    Promising results have been obtained with sentinel node biopsy (SNB) in early oral carcinoma, but the floor of the mouth remains a site at risk of misdiagnosis. A retrospective and prospective study was designed to test the safety of SNB by comparing survival among patients with early stage carcinoma of the floor of the mouth (FOM) undergoing SNB, to a control group managed traditionally by a combination of clinical observation and elective neck dissection (END). A total of 63 patients with early stage carcinoma of the FOM were treated between 1991 and 2005. In the control group, 26 patients were managed with END and nine by close observation. In the test group, 28 patients were managed prospectively with SNB. Regional recurrence occurred in 23% (8/35) of control patients and 25% (7/28) of test patients. Approximately 25% of patients were successfully treated by salvage surgery. Disease-specific survival was 65.5% for control patients and 85% for SNB patients; the difference was not statistically significant. The use of SNB in the management of cancers of the FOM did not adversely affect survival and prevented 69.5% of patients undergoing unnecessary neck dissections, while clinical progress was better in the SNB group than in controls.

  17. Time-related survival effects of two gluconasturtiin hydrolysis products on the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    van Ommen Kloeke, A E Elaine; Jager, Tjalling; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Ellers, Jacintha; van Pomeren, Marinda; Krommenhoek, Thibault; Styrishave, Bjarne; Hansen, Martin; Roelofs, Dick

    2012-11-01

    Glucosinolates are compounds produced by commercial crops which can hydrolyse in a range of natural toxins that may exert detrimental effects on beneficial soil organisms. This study examined the effects of 2-phenylethyl isothiocyanate and 3-phenylpropionitrile on the survival and growth of the woodlouse Porcellio scaber exposed for 28 d. 2-Phenylethyl isothiocyanate dissipated from the soil with half-lives ranging from 19 to 96 h. Exposure through soil showed toxic effects only on survival. The LC50s after 28 d were significantly different at 65.3 mg kg(-1) for 2-phenylethyl isothiocyanate and 155 mg kg(-1) for 3-phenylpropionitrile. A toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic (TKTD) approach, however, revealed that both compounds in fact have very similar effect patterns. The TKTD model was better suited to interpret the survival data than descriptive dose-response analysis (LC(x)), accounting for the fast dissipation of the compounds in the soil. Found effects were within environmentally relevant concentrations. Care should therefore be taken before allowing these natural toxins to enter soil ecosystems in large quantities.

  18. Survival in macaroni penguins and the relative importance of different drivers: individual traits, predation pressure and environmental variability.

    PubMed

    Horswill, Catharine; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Green, Jonathan A; Meredith, Michael P; Forcada, Jaume; Peat, Helen; Preston, Mark; Trathan, Phil N; Ratcliffe, Norman

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the demographic response of free-living animal populations to different drivers is the first step towards reliable prediction of population trends. Penguins have exhibited dramatic declines in population size, and many studies have linked this to bottom-up processes altering the abundance of prey species. The effects of individual traits have been considered to a lesser extent, and top-down regulation through predation has been largely overlooked due to the difficulties in empirically measuring this at sea where it usually occurs. For 10 years (2003-2012), macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) were marked with subcutaneous electronic transponder tags and re-encountered using an automated gateway system fitted at the entrance to the colony. We used multistate mark-recapture modelling to identify the different drivers influencing survival rates and a sensitivity analysis to assess their relative importance across different life stages. Survival rates were low and variable during the fledging year (mean = 0·33), increasing to much higher levels from age 1 onwards (mean = 0·89). We show that survival of macaroni penguins is driven by a combination of individual quality, top-down predation pressure and bottom-up environmental forces. The relative importance of these covariates was age specific. During the fledging year, survival rates were most sensitive to top-down predation pressure, followed by individual fledging mass, and finally bottom-up environmental effects. In contrast, birds older than 1 year showed a similar response to bottom-up environmental effects and top-down predation pressure. We infer from our results that macaroni penguins will most likely be negatively impacted by an increase in the local population size of giant petrels. Furthermore, this population is, at least in the short term, likely to be positively influenced by local warming. More broadly, our results highlight the importance of considering multiple causal effects across

  19. Effect of smokeless tobacco and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens on survival of ultraviolet light-inactivated herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dokko, H.; Min, P.S.; Cherrick, H.M.; Park, N.H. )

    1991-04-01

    Low doses of ultraviolet (UV) light, x-rays, photodynamic treatment, or aflatoxins increase the survival of UV-irradiated virus in cells. This effect is postulated to occur by enhancement of the error-prone cellular repair function, which could also be associated with oncogenic cell transformation. The present study was designed to investigate whether treatment of green monkey kidney cells with water extract of snuff (snuff extract), benzo(a)pyrene, nicotine, or tobacco-specific N'-nitrosamines would result in enhanced survival of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus (HSV). Exposure of the cells with snuff extract, benzo(a)pyrene, N'-nitrosonornicotine, or 4-(N-methyl-N'-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone resulted in an enhancement of survival of UV-irradiated HSV type 1 compared with the control whereas exposure of the cells with nicotine did not. These data indicate that the water-extractable component of snuff and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens increase the cellular repair mechanism and provides for increased survival of UV-irradiated HSV.

  20. Recruitment and survival of immature seabirds in relation to oil spills and climate variability.

    PubMed

    Votier, S C; Birkhead, T R; Oro, D; Trinder, M; Grantham, M J; Clark, J A; McCleery, R H; Hatchwell, B J

    2008-09-01

    1. In long-lived animals with delayed maturity, the non-breeding component of the population may play an important role in buffering the effects of stochastic mortality. Populations of colonial seabirds often consist of more than 50% non-breeders, yet because they spend much of their early life at sea, we understand little about their impact on the demographic process. 2. Using multistate capture-mark-recapture techniques, we analyse a long-term data set of individually identifiable common guillemots, Uria aalge Pont., to assess factors influencing their immature survival and two-stage recruitment process. 3. Analysis of the distribution of ringed common guillemots during the non-breeding season, separated by age classes, revealed that all age classes were potentially at risk from four major oil spills. However, the youngest age class (0-3 years) were far more widely spread than birds 4-6 years old, which were more widely spread than birds aged 6 and over. Therefore the chance of encountering an oil spill was age-dependent. 4. A 2-year compound survival estimate for juvenile guillemots was weakly negatively correlated with winter sea-surface temperature, but was not influenced by oil spills. Non-breeder survival did not vary significantly over time. 5. In years following four oil spills, juvenile recruitment was almost double the value in non-oil-spill years. Recent work from Skomer Island showed a doubling of adult mortality associated with major oil spills, which probably reduced competition at the breeding colony, allowing increased immature recruitment to compensate for these losses. We discuss the implications of compensatory recruitment for assessing the impact of oil pollution incidents.

  1. Heat shock protein expression in relation to reproductive cycle in land snails: Implications for survival.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Tal; Heller, Joseph; Goldenberg, Shoshana; Arad, Zeev

    2011-10-01

    Land snails are subject to daily and seasonal variations in temperature and in water availability and use heat shock proteins (HSPs) as part of their survival strategy. We tested whether the reproductive cycle of land snails affects the endogenous levels of HSPs, and their involvement in the reproductive process. We examined HSP levels in the foot tissue of two Sphincterochila species, S. cariosa and S. zonata, before and after laying eggs, and analyzed the albumen gland (reproductive organ) of both species and eggs of S. cariosa for the presence and quantity of various HSPs. Our study shows reduction in the expression level of Hsp70 isoforms and Hsp90 in S. zonata foot and of Hsp74 in S. cariosa foot during the period preceding egg laying compared to the post-reproductive stage. Hsp70 isoforms and Hsp25 were highly expressed in both large albumen glands and in freshly laid eggs of S. cariosa, whereas large albumen glands of S. zonata expressed mainly Hsp70 isoforms. We conclude that a trade-off between survival and fertility is responsible for the expression level of HSPs in the foot tissue of Sphincterochila snails. Our study shows that HSPs are involved in the reproductive process. We propose that parental provision of HSPs may be part of a "be prepared" strategy of Sphincterochila snails, and that HSPs may play important roles in the survival strategy of land snails during the early life stages. Our observations also highlight the importance of the reproductive status in study of whole organisms, especially when assessing the HSP response to stress.

  2. Lifestyle factors related to mortality and survival: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Rizzuto, D; Fratiglioni, L

    2014-01-01

    As the world's population ages, elderly people are becoming an increasingly important group that merits special attention with regard to health and social issues. Lifestyles affect health and survival at all ages, but the consequences of poor lifestyle behaviors may be different for elderly people than for younger adults. They can also be heavily dependent on exposure earlier in life. Our current state of knowledge is based predominantly on studies conducted among middle-aged adults or young elderly people. Moreover, studies are sparse throughout the entire older age spectrum, from 65 to 90 years. This article summarizes the evidence regarding the impact of lifestyle behaviors on mortality among elderly people. It focuses on behaviors modifiable by individual actions and public health interventions, such as smoking, obesity and sedentary behavior, which predispose numerous people to diseases that rank among the leading causes of death, including heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes and dementia. These factors not only shorten life but, when they occur together, also have a major impact on survival beyond that associated with each single lifestyle factor. We propose an integrated life course model to guide research on longevity to answer questions that remain open and to find new strategies to ensure a longer and healthier life for future generations.

  3. Nest survival of American Coots relative to grazing, burning, and water depths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Jane E.; Buhl, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Water and emergent vegetation are key features influencing nest site selection and success for many marsh-nesting waterbirds. Wetland management practices such as grazing, burning, and water-level manipulations directly affect these features and can influence nest survival. We used model selection and before-after-control-impact approaches to evaluate the effects of water depth and four common land-management practices or treatments, i.e., summer grazing, fall grazing, fall burning, and idle (no active treatment) on nest survival of American coots (Fulica americana) nesting at Grays Lake, a large montane wetland in southeast Idaho. The best model included the variables year × treatment, and quadratic functions of date, water depth, and nest age; height of vegetation at the nest did not improve the best model. However, results from the before-after-control-impact analysis indicate that management practices affected nest success via vegetation and involved interactions of hydrology, residual vegetation, and habitat composition. Nest success in idled fields changed little between pre- and post-treatment periods, whereas nest success declined in fields that were grazed or burned, with the most dramatic declines the year following treatments. The importance of water depth may be amplified in this wetland system because of rapid water-level withdrawal during the nesting season. Water and land-use values for area ranchers, management for nesting waterbirds, and long-term wetland function are important considerations in management of water levels and vegetation.

  4. Prevalence and associated survival of high-risk HPV-related adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xu; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Chen, Chao; Tzamalis, Georgios; Hofmann, Veit M; Keilholz, Ulrich; Hummel, Michael; Albers, Andreas E

    2016-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) is a rare malignancy, but a frequent subtype in minor and major salivary glands. The molecular alterations or biomarkers that underlie its development and progression as well as therapy outcomes are poorly characterized. The main study goal was to investigate reliable biomarkers and patient-related factors that may have impact on recurrence and long-term survival of SACC. The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) in SACC was determined by HPV-DNA genotyping and p16 immunostaining. Epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), p53 and Ki-67 expression were also evaluated. Twenty-eight (42%) of 67 patients were HPV-DNA positive. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that SACC patients with metastases (P=0.03) had a poor overall survival (OS) and a shorter recurrence-free survival (P<0.001). Positive resection margins significantly predicted shorter recurrence-free survival (P=0.01). In the multivariate analysis, non-metastatic disease (P=0.033) and p16 positivity (P=0.005) have shown their prediction value for OS while non-metastatic disease (P=0.002), HPV positivity (P=0.041) and negative resection margin predicted a better recurrence-free survival. The present study documents for the first time the positivity for HPV infection and overexpression of certain markers (p16, Ki-67, EGFR and p53) used in diagnostics in SACC as well as characterizes clinical entities. These factors might be exploited in the future as biomarkers for its prognostic value. Using the clinical and pathological basis for predicting different outcomes could significantly facilitate SACC stratification and potentially directing treatment.

  5. Breast cancer and bone metastases: the association of axial skeleton MRI findings with skeletal-related events and survival.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, Christian B; Schweitzer, Mark E; Di Primio, Gina; Sampaio, Marcos L; Kielar, Ania; Clemons, Mark; Jaberi, Arash

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if bone metastasis characteristics on axial skeleton MRI are associated with either skeletal-related events (SREs) or survival in breast cancer patients. A retrospective review was performed on 247 breast cancer patients with bone metastases identified on axial skeleton MRI. MRI studies were reviewed for metastases T1 signal, signal uniformity, complete vertebral metastatic marrow replacement, metastases quantity, and distribution. Odds ratio (OR) and hazard ratios (HR) were calculated, with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI), to determine association with either future SREs or survival. At the time of analysis, 174 (70 %) patients had developed SREs and 176 (71 %) patients were dead. Features of skeletal metastases associated with SREs included the presence of complete metastatic marrow replacement within any vertebra; OR 2.363 (95 % CI 1.240-4.504, P = 0.0090), and more widely distributed metastases; OR 1.239 (95 % CI 1.070-1.435, P = 0.0040). Features associated with shorter survival included the presence of complete metastatic marrow replacement within any vertebra; HR 1.500 (95 % CI 1.105-2.036, P = 0.0093), and more widely distributed metastases; HR 1.141 (95 % CI 1.047-1.243, P = 0.0027). Metastases T1 signal, signal uniformity, and surprisingly quantity were not associated with SREs or survival. Axial skeleton MRI was able to identify characteristics predictive of future SREs and survival. These characteristics could be used for risk stratification for future trials if prospectively validated.

  6. Hazard regression model and cure rate model in colon cancer relative survival trends: are they telling the same story?

    PubMed

    Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Bossard, Nadine; Belot, Aurelien; Jooste, Valérie; Launoy, Guy; Remontet, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Hazard regression models and cure rate models can be advantageously used in cancer relative survival analysis. We explored the advantages and limits of these two models in colon cancer and focused on the prognostic impact of the year of diagnosis on survival according to the TNM stage at diagnosis. The analysis concerned 9,998 patients from three French registries. In the hazard regression model, the baseline excess death hazard and the time-dependent effects of covariates were modelled using regression splines. The cure rate model estimated the proportion of 'cured' patients and the excess death hazard in 'non-cured' patients. The effects of year of diagnosis on these parameters were estimated for each TNM cancer stage. With the hazard regression model, the excess death hazard decreased significantly with more recent years of diagnoses (hazard ratio, HR 0.97 in stage III and 0.98 in stage IV, P < 0.001). In these advanced stages, this favourable effect was limited to the first years of follow-up. With the cure rate model, recent years of diagnoses were significantly associated with longer survivals in 'non-cured' patients with advanced stages (HR 0.95 in stage III and 0.97 in stage IV, P < 0.001) but had no significant effect on cure (odds ratio, OR 0.99 in stages III and IV, P > 0.5). The two models were complementary and concordant in estimating colon cancer survival and the effects of covariates. They provided two different points of view of the same phenomenon: recent years of diagnosis had a favourable effect on survival, but not on cure.

  7. The NER-related gene GTF2H5 predicts survival in high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamieniak, Marta M.; Muñoz-Repeto, Ivan; Borrego, Salud; Hernando, Susana; Hernández-Agudo, Elena; Heredia Soto, Victoria; Márquez-Rodas, Ivan; Echarri, María José; Lacambra-Calvet, Carmen; Sáez, Raquel; Redondo, Andrés; Benítez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the prognostic and predictive value of the nucleotide excision repair-related gene GTF2H5, which is localized at the 6q24.2-26 deletion previously reported by our group to predict longer survival of high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients. Methods In order to test if protein levels of GTF2H5 are associated with patients' outcome, we performed GTF2H5 immunohistochemical staining in 139 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas included in tissue microarrays. Upon stratification of cases into high- and low-GTF2H5 staining categories (> and ≤ median staining, respectively) Kaplan-Meier and log-rank test were used to estimate patients’ survival and assess statistical differences. We also evaluated the association of GTF2H5 with survival at the transcriptional level by using the on-line Kaplan-Meier plotter tool, which includes gene expression and survival data of 855 high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients from 13 different datasets. Finally, we determined whether stable short hairpin RNA-mediated GTF2H5 downregulation modulates cisplatin sensitivity in the SKOV3 and COV504 cell lines by using cytotoxicity assays. Results Low expression of GTF2H5 was associated with longer 5-year survival of patients at the protein (hazard ratio [HR], 0.52; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.93; p=0.024) and transcriptional level (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.97; p=0.023) in high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients. We confirmed the association with 5-year overall survival (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.78; p=0.0007) and also found an association with progression-free survival (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.96; p=0.026) in a homogenous group of 388 high-stage (stages III-IV using the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging system), optimally debulked high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients. GTF2H5-silencing induced a decrease of the half maximal inhibitory concentration upon cisplatin treatment in GTF2H5-silenced ovarian cancer cells. Conclusion Low

  8. Gender-Related Survival Differences Associated With Polymorphic Variants of Estrogen Receptor Beta (ERβ) in Patients with Metastatic Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Press, Oliver A.; Zhang, Wu; Gordon, Michael A.; Yang, Dongyun; Haiman, Christopher A.; Azuma, Mizutomo; Iqbal, Syma; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen replacement therapy in women has demonstrated a protective effect in the development of colonic carcinomas. Gender-related differences in the development of colonic carcinomas have also been reported. Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is expressed in colon carcinomas and has demonstrated prognostic value in colon cancer patients. This study investigated an ERβ 3’ non-coding polymorphism associated with transcriptional activity to determine clinical outcome in patients with metastatic colon cancer. Genomic DNA from 318 metastatic colon cancer patients, 177 males and 141 females, were collected from 1992 to 2003. These patients were analyzed for CA repeat polymorphism of the ERβ gene. Gender-related survival differences were associated with an ERβ (CA)n repeat polymorphism (P for interaction=0.003, the likelihood ratio test). Female patients with any short <22 (CA)n repeat alleles had shorter overall survival compared to female patients that had both long ≥22 (CA)n repeat alleles. In the male patients the opposite overall survival difference was found. This study supports the role of an ERβ (CA)n repeat polymorphism as a prognostic marker in metastatic colon cancer; however, this prognostic factor had opposite implications based on gender. PMID:20548329

  9. Clinical patterns in extremely preterm (22 to 24 weeks of gestation) infants in relation to survival time and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Shigeo; Arai, Hiroko; Ozawa, Yuri; Kawase, Yasuhiro; Uga, Naoki

    2009-06-01

    We investigated time-related predictors of death or neurological sequelae in extremely preterm infants (EPI) born at 22 to 24 weeks' gestation by categorizing clinical patterns according to their survival time and morbidity. Data on 113 infants born at 22 to 24 weeks' gestation from January 1991 through April 2006 were analyzed by a case-control approach. Cesarean section, Apgar score survived >or= 24 hours, pulmonary hemorrhage and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) were significantly associated with death by day 6. Among those surviving >or= 7 days, sepsis and severe IVH were significantly associated with death. Assessment of survivors at a minimum follow-up period of 2 years revealed that protracted mechanical ventilation was significantly associated with a poor neurological outcome. There are various characteristic key events in relation to the outcome at different ages of life in EPI born at 22 to 24 weeks' gestation. Clinicians and parents should discuss management options for the infant on the basis of these findings.

  10. Mucin-1 and its relation to grade, stage and survival in ovarian carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mucin-1 is known to be over-expressed by various human carcinomas and is shed into the circulation where it can be detected in patient’s serum by specific anti-Mucin-1 antibodies, such as the tumour marker assays CA 15–3 and CA 27.29. The prognostic value of Mucin-1 expression in ovarian carcinoma remains uncertain. One aim of this study was to compare the concentrations of Mucin-1 in a cohort of patients with either benign or malignant ovarian tumours detected by CA 15–3 and CA 27.29. Another aim of this study was to evaluate Mucin-1 expression by immunohistochemistry in a different cohort of ovarian carcinoma patients with respect to grade, stage and survival. Methods Patients diagnosed with and treated for ovarian tumours were included in the study. Patient characteristics, histology including histological subtype, tumour stage, grading and follow-up data were available from patient records. Serum Mucin-1 concentrations were measured with ELISA technology detecting CA 15–3 and CA 27.29, Mucin-1 tissue expression was determined by immunohistochemistry using the VU4H5 and VU3C6 anti-Mucin-1 antibodies. Statistical analysis was performed by using SPSS 18.0. Results Serum samples of 118 patients with ovarian tumours were obtained to determine levels of Mucin-1. Median CA 15–3 and CA 27.29 concentrations were significantly higher in patients with malignant disease (p< 0.001) than in patients with benign disease. Paraffin-embedded tissue of 154 patients with ovarian carcinoma was available to determine Mucin-1 expression. The majority of patients presented with advanced stage disease at primary diagnosis. Median follow-up time was 11.39 years. Immunohistochemistry results for VU4H5 showed significant differences with respect to tumour grade, FIGO stage and overall survival. Patients with negative expression had a mean overall survival of 9.33 years compared to 6.27 years for patients with positive Mucin-1 expression. Conclusions This study found

  11. Circulating Biomarkers of One-Carbon Metabolism in Relation to Renal Cell Carcinoma Incidence and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Mattias; Fanidi, Anouar; Muller, David C.; Bassett, Julie K.; Midttun, Øivind; Vollset, Stein Emil; Travis, Ruth C.; Palli, Domenico; Mattiello, Amalia; Sieri, Sabina; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Hallmans, Göran; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; González, Carlos A.; Dorronsoro, Miren; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as).; Ros, Martine M.; Boutron Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Clavel, Françoise; Sánchez, María-José; Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte; Navarro, Carmen; Quiros, J. Ramon; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Aleksandrova, Krassimira; Vineis, Paolo; Gunter, Marc J.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Giles, Graham; Relton, Caroline; Riboli, Elio; Boeing, Heiner; Ueland, Per Magne; Severi, Gianluca; Brennan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background The etiology of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is only partially understood, but a metabolic component appears likely. We investigated biomarkers of one-carbon metabolism and RCC onset and survival. Methods The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) recruited 385747 participants with blood samples between 1992 and 2000, and this analysis included 556 RCC case-control pairs. A subsequent replication study included 144 case-control pairs nested within the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (MCCS). Plasma concentrations of vitamin B2, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, methionine and homocysteine were measured in prediagnostic samples and evaluated with respect to RCC risk using conditional and unconditional logistic regression models, and to all-cause mortality in RCC cases using Cox regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results EPIC participants with higher plasma concentrations of vitamin B6 had lower risk of RCC, the odds ratio comparing the 4th and 1st quartiles (OR4vs1) being 0.40 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.28 to 0.57, P trend < .001. We found similar results after adjusting for potential confounders (adjusted P trend < .001). In survival analysis, the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality in RCC cases when comparing the 4th and 1st quartiles (HR4vs1) of vitamin B6 was 0.57 (95% CI = 0.37 to 0.87, P trend < .001). Subsequent replication of these associations within the MCCS yielded very similar results for both RCC risk (OR4vs1 = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.23 to 0.99, P trend = .07) and all-cause mortality (HR4vs1 = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.27 to 1.17, P trend = .02). No association was evident for the other measured biomarkers. Conclusion Study participants with higher circulating concentrations of vitamin B6 had lower risk of RCC and improved survival following diagnosis in two independent cohorts. PMID:25376861

  12. Predicting Structure-Function Relations and Survival following Surgical and Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction Treatment of Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Mondoñedo, Jarred R.

    2017-01-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (bLVR) are palliative treatments aimed at reducing hyperinflation in advanced emphysema. Previous work has evaluated functional improvements and survival advantage for these techniques, although their effects on the micromechanical environment in the lung have yet to be determined. Here, we introduce a computational model to simulate a force-based destruction of elastic networks representing emphysema progression, which we use to track the response to lung volume reduction via LVRS and bLVR. We find that (1) LVRS efficacy can be predicted based on pre-surgical network structure; (2) macroscopic functional improvements following bLVR are related to microscopic changes in mechanical force heterogeneity; and (3) both techniques improve aspects of survival and quality of life influenced by lung compliance, albeit while accelerating disease progression. Our model predictions yield unique insights into the microscopic origins underlying emphysema progression before and after lung volume reduction. PMID:28182686

  13. Predicting Structure-Function Relations and Survival following Surgical and Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction Treatment of Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Mondoñedo, Jarred R; Suki, Béla

    2017-02-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (bLVR) are palliative treatments aimed at reducing hyperinflation in advanced emphysema. Previous work has evaluated functional improvements and survival advantage for these techniques, although their effects on the micromechanical environment in the lung have yet to be determined. Here, we introduce a computational model to simulate a force-based destruction of elastic networks representing emphysema progression, which we use to track the response to lung volume reduction via LVRS and bLVR. We find that (1) LVRS efficacy can be predicted based on pre-surgical network structure; (2) macroscopic functional improvements following bLVR are related to microscopic changes in mechanical force heterogeneity; and (3) both techniques improve aspects of survival and quality of life influenced by lung compliance, albeit while accelerating disease progression. Our model predictions yield unique insights into the microscopic origins underlying emphysema progression before and after lung volume reduction.

  14. Systematic analysis of RBE and related quantities using a database of cell survival experiments with ion beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; ElsäSser, Thilo; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    For tumor therapy with light ions and for experimental aspects in particle radiobiology the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is an important quantity to describe the increased effectiveness of particle radiation. By establishing and analysing a database of ion and photon cell survival data, some remarkable properties of RBE-related quantities were observed. The database consists of 855 in vitro cell survival experiments after ion and photon irradiation. The experiments comprise curves obtained in different labs, using different ion species, different irradiation modalities, the whole range of accessible energies and linear energy transfers (LETs) and various cell types. Each survival curve has been parameterized using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. The photon parameters, α and β, appear to be slightly anti-correlated, which might point toward an underlying biological mechanism. The RBE values derived from the survival curves support the known dependence of RBE on LET, on particle species and dose. A positive correlation of RBE with the ratio α/β of the photon LQ parameters is found at low doses, which unexpectedly changes to a negative correlation at high doses. Furthermore, we investigated the course of the β coefficient of the LQ model with increasing LET, finding typically a slight initial increase and a final falloff to zero. The observed fluctuations in RBE values of comparable experiments resemble overall RBE uncertainties, which is of relevance for treatment planning. The database can also be used for extensive testing of RBE models. We thus compare simulations with the local effect model to achieve this goal. PMID:23266948

  15. Incidence, mortality and survival of female breast cancer during 2003-2011 in Jiangsu province, China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinran; Han, Renqiang; Zhou, Jinyi; Yu, Hao; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the incidence, mortality and survival status of female breast cancer in Jiangsu province of China. Methods Population-based cancer registry data in Jiangsu province were collected during 2003-2011. Crude rates, age-specific rates, age-standardized rates and annual percent changes of incidence and mortality were calculated to describe the epidemiologic characteristics and time trends. Patients diagnosed from 2003 to 2005 were chosen for analyzing the survival status of breast cancer. Results From 2003 to 2011, 17,605 females were diagnosed with breast cancer and 4,883 died in selected registry areas in Jiangsu province. The crude incidence rate was 25.18/100,000, and the age-standardized rates by Chinese population (ASRC) and by world population (ASRW) were 19.03/100,000 and 17.92/100,000, respectively. During the same period, the crude mortality rate was 6.98/100,000 and the ASRC and ASRW were 4.93/100,000 and 4.80/100,000, respectively. From 2003 to 2011, the incidence and mortality increased with annual percent change of 11.37% and 5.78%, respectively. For survival analysis, 1,392 patients in 7 areas were identified in 2003-2005 and finished 5 years of follow-up. Survival rates were found to decrease with survival years, the 5-year observed survival rate was 45.9% and the relative survival rate was 52.0%. We also found that the survival rate varied across the province, which was lower in the north and higher in the south of Jiangsu province. Conclusions Breast cancer has become a significant public health problem in Jiangsu province and China. More resources should be invested in primary prevention, earlier diagnosis and better health services in order to increase survival rates among Chinese females. PMID:27478317

  16. Aspects of Health-Related Factors and Nutritional Care Needs by Survival Stage among Female Cancer Patients in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eunjoo; Lim, Hyunjung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined diet-related problems and needs associated with nutritional care according to survival stage in Korean female cancer survivors. Methods 186 outpatients (breast or gynecologic cancer survivors) recruited. Subjects were classified as (1) extended stage (ES, 2–5 years from diagnosis) and (2) long-term stage (LS, ≥5 years from diagnosis). Eating habits, changes in health related factors, nutritional needs, and quality of life were investigated. Results 43% of ES survivors had diet-related problems (p = .031); ES group reported dyspepsia and LS group reported anorexia/nausea as the major problem. Half of ES survivors had taste change, decreasing amount of intake, and reduced quality of life (p < .05). The LS group had a greater preference for sweet tastes than the ES group. According to their diagnosis, ES survivors with breast cancer gained weight (27.1%), whereas ES survivors with gynecologic cancer lost their body weight (34.5%) significantly. LS breast cancer patients showed great food preference for vegetables, whereas those with gynecologic cancer showed an increased preference for fish, meat and grain. Approximately 90% of survivors demanded nutritional care regarding restricted foods, preventing recurrence, particularly in ES survivors (p < .01). Moreover, main factors for nutritional care needs were body weight control for breast cancer and food environment for gynecologic cancer. Conclusion Survivors have different aspects of diet-related problems by survival stage as dyspepsia in ES and anorexia in LS. ES stage had changes in dietary patterns and their food consumption have decreased. Most of survivors have demanded nutritional care regardless of survival stage. These features of each stage should be considered to improve their health. PMID:27695041

  17. Impact of Retropharyngeal Adenopathy on Distant Control and Survival in HPV-related Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated with Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Stuart E.; Vainshtein, Jeffrey; Spector, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Mohannad; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Tao, Yebin; Schipper, Matthew; Worden, Francis; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Retropharyngeal adenopathy (RPA) is poor prognostic factor in head and neck (HN) cancer. However, the prognostic significance of RPA in Human Papillomavirus-related (HPV+) oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is unknown. Patients and Methods 185 patients with HPV+ OPC were assessed. Pre-therapy images reviewed by a HN radiologist to determine presence of RPA. Doses to the RPAs were determined from treatment plans. Outcomes analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank tests, and correlations determined using Spearman’s rank analyses. Results 29 (16%) of the HPV+ patients had RPA. At median follow-up 49 months, 5-year overall survival (OS), failure-free survival (FFS) and distant failure-free survival (DFFS) were 57% vs. 81% (P=0.02), 63% vs 80% (P=0.015) and 70% vs 91% (p=0.002) for patients with/without RPA, respectively. No differences observed in local/ regional control rates, exceeding 90% in both groups, and No RPA recurrences were observed. In multivariable analysis, stages T4 or N3, and RPA, were independently, statistically significantly associated with both OS and distant failure, while N2c, age, disease site, and smoking status, were not. Conclusion RPA in HPV+ OPC is an independent prognostic factor for distant failure, translating into worse OS. Patients with RPA may not be suitable candidates for trials of systemic treatment de-escalation. PMID:26094074

  18. Identification of Gene Expression Pattern Related to Breast Cancer Survival Using Integrated TCGA Datasets and Genomic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhenzhen; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin

    2015-01-01

    Several large-scale human cancer genomics projects such as TCGA offered huge genomic and clinical data for researchers to obtain meaningful genomics alterations which intervene in the development and metastasis of the tumor. A web-based TCGA data analysis platform called TCGA4U was developed in this study. TCGA4U provides a visualization solution for this study to illustrate the relationship of these genomics alternations with clinical data. A whole genome screening of the survival related gene expression patterns in breast cancer was studied. The gene list that impacts the breast cancer patient survival was divided into two patterns. Gene list of each of these patterns was separately analyzed on DAVID. The result showed that mitochondrial ribosomes play a more crucial role in the cancer development. We also reported that breast cancer patients with low HSPA2 expression level had shorter overall survival time. This is widely different to findings of HSPA2 expression pattern in other cancer types. TCGA4U provided a new perspective for the TCGA datasets. We believe it can inspire more biomedical researchers to study and explain the genomic alterations in cancer development and discover more targeted therapies to help more cancer patients. PMID:26576432

  19. Tumor LINE-1 methylation level and colorectal cancer location in relation to patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Song, Mingyang; Masugi, Yohei; Shi, Yan; da Silva, Annacarolina; Gu, Mancang; Li, Wanwan; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Baba, Hideo; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal tumors arise with genomic and epigenomic alterations through interactions between neoplastic cells, immune cells, and microbiota that vary along the proximal to distal axis of colorectum. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) hypomethylation in colorectal cancer has been associated with worse clinical outcome. Utilizing 1,317 colon and rectal carcinoma cases in two U.S.-nationwide prospective cohort studies, we examined patient survival according to LINE-1 methylation level stratified by tumor location. Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess a statistical interaction between LINE-1 methylation level and tumor location in colorectal cancer-specific mortality analysis, controlling for potential confounders including microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations. A statistically significant interaction was found between LINE-1 methylation level and tumor location in colorectal cancer-specific mortality analysis (Pinteraction = 0.011). The association of LINE-1 hypomethylation with higher colorectal cancer-specific mortality was stronger in proximal colon cancers (multivariable hazard ratio [HR], 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 2.28) than in distal colon cancers (multivariable HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.72) or rectal cancers (multivariable HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.34). Our data suggest the interactive effect of LINE-1 methylation level and colorectal cancer location on clinical outcome. PMID:27391152

  20. Survival motor neuron (SMN) polymorphism in relation to congenital arthrogryposis in two Piedmont calves (piemontese)

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The term arthrogryposis refers to a symptom complex that is characterised by congenital limb contractures. Arthrogryposis has been reported in man, in farm animals and in pets. Several forms have been reported to have a genetic origin in man. In Brown Swiss and Holstein Friesian cattle, congenital contractures have been recorded and classified as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The survival motor neuron gene (SMN) has been suggested as a candidate gene for SMA. In the last 20 years, the National Association of Piedmont Cattle have recorded arthrogryposis cases. We cloned and sequenced SMN cDNA extracted from the spinal cord samples of two animals: one Piedmont calf showing a severe clinical form of arthrogryposis and one normal Piedmont calf. In the affected calf, more than 50% of the 5'end clones showed a ATG > TTG single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in exon 1 that should determine a Met > Leu aminoacid change (single point mutation M3L). This mutation is associated with a 9 bp increase length of 5'UTR and to a TTC → TTT silent mutation in exon 1. No single point mutation or 5'end polymorphism was shown in healthy animals and in the remaining 50% of the clones from the affected calf. We hypothesise a possible pathogenic effect of the 5'end-exon 1 polymorphism. PMID:12927089

  1. Characterization of the survival ability of Cupriavidus metallidurans and Ralstonia pickettii from space-related environments.

    PubMed

    Mijnendonckx, K; Provoost, A; Ott, C M; Venkateswaran, K; Mahillon, J; Leys, N; Van Houdt, R

    2013-02-01

    Four Cupriavidus metallidurans and eight Ralstonia pickettii isolates from the space industry and the International Space Station (ISS) were characterized in detail. Nine of the 12 isolates were able to form a biofilm on plastics and all were resistant to several antibiotics. R. pickettii isolates from the surface of the Mars Orbiter prior to flight were 2.5 times more resistant to UV-C(254nm) radiation compared to the R. pickettii type strain. All isolates showed moderate to high tolerance against at least seven different metal ions. They were tolerant to medium to high silver concentrations (0.5-4 μM), which are higher than the ionic silver disinfectant concentrations measured regularly in the drinking water aboard the ISS. Furthermore, all isolates survived a 23-month exposure to 2 μM AgNO(3) in drinking water. These resistance properties are putatively encoded by their endogenous megaplasmids. This study demonstrated that extreme resistance is not required to withstand the disinfection and sterilization procedures implemented in the ISS and space industry. All isolates acquired moderate to high tolerance against several stressors and can grow in oligotrophic conditions, enabling them to persist in these environments.

  2. Gene polymorphisms in folate metabolizing enzymes in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: effects on methotrexate-related toxicity and survival

    PubMed Central

    Ongaro, Alessia; De Mattei, Monica; Della Porta, Matteo Giovanni; Rigolin, GianMatteo; Ambrosio, Cristina; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Pellati, Agnese; Masieri, Federica Francesca; Caruso, Angelo; Catozzi, Linda; Gemmati, Donato

    2009-01-01

    Background The antifolate agent methotrexate is an important component of maintenance therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, although methotrexate-related toxicity is often a reason for interruption of chemotherapy. Prediction of toxicity is difficult because of inter-individual variability susceptibility to antileukemic agents. Methotrexate interferes with folate metabolism leading to depletion of reduced folates. Design and Methods The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of polymorphisms for folate metabolizing enzymes with respect to toxicity and survival in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with methotrexate maintenance therapy. To this purpose, we evaluated possible associations between genotype and hematologic and non-hematologic toxicity and effects on survival at 2 years of follow-up in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Results Polymorphisms in the genes encoding for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C>T) and in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR 19 bp deletion) significantly increased the risk of hepatotoxicity in single (odds ratio 5.23, 95% confidence interval 1.13–21.95 and odds ratio 4.57, 95% confidence interval 1.01–20.77, respectively) and in combined analysis (odds ratio 6.82, 95% confidence interval 1.38–33.59). MTHFR 677C>T also increased the risk of leukopenia and gastrointestinal toxicity, whilst thymidylate synthase 28 bp repeat polymorphism increased the risk of anemia (odds ratio 8.48, 95% confidence interval 2.00–36.09). Finally, patients with MTHFR 677TT had a decreased overall survival rate (hazard ratio 2.37, 95% confidence interval 1.46–8.45). Conclusions Genotyping of folate polymorphisms might be useful in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia to optimize methotrexate therapy, reducing the associated toxicity with possible effects on survival. PMID:19648163

  3. Survival in macaroni penguins and the relative importance of different drivers: individual traits, predation pressure and environmental variability

    PubMed Central

    Horswill, Catharine; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Green, Jonathan A; Meredith, Michael P; Forcada, Jaume; Peat, Helen; Preston, Mark; Trathan, Phil N; Ratcliffe, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the demographic response of free-living animal populations to different drivers is the first step towards reliable prediction of population trends. Penguins have exhibited dramatic declines in population size, and many studies have linked this to bottom-up processes altering the abundance of prey species. The effects of individual traits have been considered to a lesser extent, and top-down regulation through predation has been largely overlooked due to the difficulties in empirically measuring this at sea where it usually occurs. For 10 years (2003–2012), macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) were marked with subcutaneous electronic transponder tags and re-encountered using an automated gateway system fitted at the entrance to the colony. We used multistate mark–recapture modelling to identify the different drivers influencing survival rates and a sensitivity analysis to assess their relative importance across different life stages. Survival rates were low and variable during the fledging year (mean = 0·33), increasing to much higher levels from age 1 onwards (mean = 0·89). We show that survival of macaroni penguins is driven by a combination of individual quality, top-down predation pressure and bottom-up environmental forces. The relative importance of these covariates was age specific. During the fledging year, survival rates were most sensitive to top-down predation pressure, followed by individual fledging mass, and finally bottom-up environmental effects. In contrast, birds older than 1 year showed a similar response to bottom-up environmental effects and top-down predation pressure. We infer from our results that macaroni penguins will most likely be negatively impacted by an increase in the local population size of giant petrels. Furthermore, this population is, at least in the short term, likely to be positively influenced by local warming. More broadly, our results highlight the importance of considering multiple causal

  4. Hormonal and metabolic regulation of source-sink relations under salinity and drought: from plant survival to crop yield stability.

    PubMed

    Albacete, Alfonso A; Martínez-Andújar, Cristina; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Securing food production for the growing population will require closing the gap between potential crop productivity under optimal conditions and the yield captured by farmers under a changing environment, which is termed agronomical stability. Drought and salinity are major environmental factors contributing to the yield gap ultimately by inducing premature senescence in the photosynthetic source tissues of the plant and by reducing the number and growth of the harvestable sink organs by affecting the transport and use of assimilates between and within them. However, the changes in source-sink relations induced by stress also include adaptive changes in the reallocation of photoassimilates that influence crop productivity, ranging from plant survival to yield stability. While the massive utilization of -omic technologies in model plants is discovering hundreds of genes with potential impacts in alleviating short-term applied drought and salinity stress (usually measured as plant survival), only in relatively few cases has an effect on crop yield stability been proven. However, achieving the former does not necessarily imply the latter. Plant survival only requires water status conservation and delayed leaf senescence (thus maintaining source activity) that is usually accompanied by growth inhibition. However, yield stability will additionally require the maintenance or increase in sink activity in the reproductive structures, thus contributing to the transport of assimilates from the source leaves and to delayed stress-induced leaf senescence. This review emphasizes the role of several metabolic and hormonal factors influencing not only the source strength, but especially the sink activity and their inter-relations, and their potential to improve yield stability under drought and salinity stresses.

  5. Improved renal allograft survival using the mixed lymphocyte culture for selection of nonidentical living related donors.

    PubMed

    Riggio, R R; Saal, S D; Katz, E B; Tapia, L; White, R; Chami, J; Sheigh, J S; Sullivan, J F; Stenzel, K H; Stubenbord, W T; Whitsell, J C; Rubin, A L

    1975-01-01

    Our results concur with earlier published work, by other groups, showing that LRD-recipient pairs with low MLC stimulation usually have better and more prolonged graft success than do those with higher stimulation. Specific HL-A compatibilities or incompatibilities did not seem to affect these results, nor did the presence of an increased number of common loci, short of increasing the apparent chromosome compatibility. The presence of pre-transplant cytotoxic antibodies, in patients with a high MI, however, may unfavorably affect the LRD transplant. The overall results of our LRD transplant experience is shown in Figure 1, and superimposed upon Figure 2, is the current extrapolation of data showing MLC stimulation and haplotype success. Thus, it appears that graft survival may be improved and more closely approach the levels seen in a full-house, diplotype match, by using the MLC results in considering patients for transplantation. Not all patients with a high MLC, however, (see table) reject their grafts and it is impossible to predict pre-transplant who will develop specific allograft enhancement. Before the MI becomes a specific criteria for transplant selection, additional studies of patient stimulation in MLC should be done. Suppression of stimulation by donor cells in autologous serum, as compared to the response to unrelated controls, might provide pre-transplant clues to the presence of enhancing factors. Such studies could provide an index that would be more meaningful than the MI in AB sera alone. Since overall results from both our series and from the Transplant Registry continue to indicate better long term graft survival for LRD than for cadaver transplants, and since the evidence suggests that a successful transplant offers a patient a better quality of life, as well as decreased morbidity and mortality compared to concomitant time spent on hemodialysis, continued LRD transplants with high MI is warranted in some circumstances with the patient

  6. Relation of prenatal diagnosis with one-year survival rate for infants with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wright, Lydia K; Ehrlich, Alexandra; Stauffer, Nanci; Samai, Cyrus; Kogon, Brian; Oster, Matthew E

    2014-03-15

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart defects (CHDs) is increasingly common, but it is still unclear whether it translates to improved postoperative outcomes. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all infants (aged <1 year) who underwent surgery for CHDs from 2006 to 2011 at a single institution. Primary outcomes were in-hospital and 1-year mortality rates. Secondary outcomes were readmission within 30 days of discharge, postoperative length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, unplanned reoperation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use. We used chi-square analyses, Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and adjusted Cox proportional hazards models to compare outcomes. Of the 1,642 patients with CHDs, 539 (33%) were diagnosed prenatally. Patients with prenatal diagnoses were of a younger age and less weight at the time of surgery, had greater Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery scores, and were more likely to be white, to have an identified syndrome, or to be born at term. Compared with those diagnosed postnatally, those diagnosed prenatally had a significantly higher unadjusted 1-year mortality rate (11% vs 5.5%, respectively, p = 0.03). Controlling for weight, surgical severity, race, age at surgery, prematurity, and the presence or absence of genetic syndrome, patients with prenatal diagnoses had significantly greater mortality at 1 year (adjusted hazard ratio 1.5, p = 0.03), as well as significantly longer intensive care unit and hospital stays. Infants with CHDs diagnosed prenatally had worse outcomes compared with those diagnosed postnatally. Prenatal diagnosis likely captures patients with more severe phenotypes within given surgical risk categories and even within diagnoses and thus may be an important prognostic factor when counseling families.

  7. Ion Movements in Shock in Relation to Survival and Its Modifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    vacuum at -700 C overnight and allowed to warm slowly to room temperature the following morning. Specimens were stored in a dessicator at room...of leukocytes subh as superoxide and related meta- bolites. f. X-ray Microanalysis Typical ion measurements, using x-ray microanalysis, of 4 um...from membrane damage. The toxic products of infiltrated leukocytes such as superoxide and related metabolites may play a possible role in such regional

  8. Effects of relative humidity on development, fecundity and survival of three storage mites.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramos, Ismael; Alvarez-Alfageme, Fernando; Castañera, Pedro

    2007-01-01

    The developmental rate of immature stages and the reproduction of adults of Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank), T. neiswanderi Johnston and Bruce and Acarus farris (Oudemans) were examined at 70, 80 and 90% r.h. and a constant temperature of 25 degrees C. At 70% r.h., T. putrescentiae and A. farris immature stages failed to reach the protonymph stage as 100% of the larvae died, whereas T. neiswanderi was able to complete development. The developmental time of all immature stages for the three species was significantly increased as relative humidity was reduced. The mobile stages were particularly susceptible, as the time needed to complete their development at lower relative humidities suffered greater increases than the egg stage. At 70% r.h., T. putrescentiae and A. farris were not able to lay eggs and only 24% of T. neiswanderi pairs were fertile. The reproductive parameters of the three species at the relative humidities at which they were able to lay eggs showed significant differences, except for the percentage of fertile mating at 80 and 90% r.h. As relative humidity increased, preoviposition period was reduced and fecundity and daily fecundity was increased, whereas the oviposition period showed different patterns for the three species. The intrinsic rate of increase (r ( m )) of T. neiswanderi at 70% r.h. was negative indicating that, at these conditions, mite populations of this species will diminish until they disappear. As relative humidity increased from 80 to 90% r.h. this parameter was almost twofold for both Tyrophagus species. The r ( m ) obtained for A. farris at 90% r.h. was similar to that of T. neiswanderi at the same humidity while at 80% r.h. it was very small so that the population doubling time was more than 84 days. The influence of relative humidity on biology of these mites and its practical application as control measure are discussed.

  9. Aneuploidy related transcriptional changes in endometrial cancer link low expression of chromosome 15q genes to poor survival.

    PubMed

    Mauland, Karen Klepsland; Wik, Elisabeth; Hoivik, Erling A; Kusonmano, Kanthida; Halle, Mari Kyllesø; Berg, Anna; Haugland, Hans Kristian; Øyan, Anne Margrete; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Stefansson, Ingunn Marie; Akslen, Lars A; Krakstad, Camilla; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica Maria Johanna; Salvesen, Helga Birgitte

    2017-02-07

    Aneuploidy is a widely studied prognostic marker in endometrial cancer (EC), however, not implemented in clinical decision-making. It lacks validation in large prospective patient cohorts adjusted for currently standard applied prognostic markers, including estrogen/progesterone receptor status (ER/PR). Also, little is known about aneuploidy-related transcriptional alterations, relevant for understanding its role in EC biology, and as therapeutic target.We included 825 EC patients with available ploidy status and comprehensive clinicopathologic characterization to analyze ploidy as a prognostic marker. For 144 patients, gene expression data were available to explore aneuploidy-related transcriptional alterations.Aneuploidy was associated with high age, FIGO stage and grade, non-endometrioid histology, ER/PR negativity, and poor survival (p-values<0.001). In patients with ER/PR negative tumors, aneuploidy independently predicted poor survival (p=0.03), lymph node metastasis (p=0.007) and recurrence (p=0.002). A prognostic 'aneuploidy signature', linked to low expression of chromosome 15q genes, was identified and validated in TCGA data.In conclusion, aneuploidy adds prognostic information in ER/PR negative EC, identifying high-risk patients that could benefit from more aggressive therapies. The 'aneuploidy signature' equally identifies these aggressive tumors and suggests a link between aneuploidy and low expression of 15q genes. Integrated analyses point at various dysregulated pathways in aneuploid EC, underlining a complex biology.

  10. Long-term survival of Bacillus spores in alcohol and identification of 90% ethanol as relatively more spori/bactericidal.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pious

    2012-02-01

    This study was taken up with a view to generate basic information on spore hardiness to ethanol in various Bacillus species and related genera, and to assess the effectiveness of different levels of ethanol as a bacterial disinfectant. Predominantly spore-bearing cultures of five Bacillus spp. (B. pumilus, B. subtilis, B. megaterium, B. fusiformis and B. flexus) that were isolated from the spent-alcohol used during plant tissue culture work were challenged with aqueous ethanol (25, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90% v/v) in 1 ml volumes at 10¹⁰⁻¹¹ CFU ml⁻¹. Monitoring the spore endurance through spotting and plating revealed prolonged tolerance (>12 months) at different alcohol levels depending on the organism except in 90% where no survival was observed beyond 2-12 months. Spores of related genera like Paenibacillus and Lysinibacillus also showed long-term ethanol survival. Alcohol tolerance of spore-forming organisms depended on the extent of spores and spore hardiness, which in turn varied with the organism, strain, age of culture, growing conditions and other factors as authenticated with ATCC strains of B. pumilus and B. subtilis. Aqueous 90% ethanol caused instant inactivation of vegetative cells in different spore formers and twelve other non-sporulating Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms tested. Taking into account both vegetative cells and spores, the appropriate concentration of ethanol as a disinfectant emerged to be 90% followed by absolute ethanol compared with the generally recommended 70-80% level.

  11. The Survival of Inflectional Morphology in French-Related Creoles: The Role of SLA Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Angelika; Veenstra, Tonjes

    2003-01-01

    In traditional classifications of languages by inflectional subsystems, both creole languages and the results of untutored SLA (interlanguages) are classified as isolating. We focus on remnants of verbal inflectional morphology in French-related creoles and ask: (a) Can the properties of verbal morphology be attributed to SLA, and (b) what does…

  12. Survival potential of Phytophthora infestans in relation to environmental factors and late blight occurrence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is an important crop globally and late blight (Phytophthora infestans) often results in severe crop loss. The cost for late blight control can be in excess of $210 million in the United States. We utilized a non-parametric density distribution analysis of local temperature (Temp) and relative...

  13. The AMPK-related kinase SNARK regulates muscle mass and myocyte survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maintenance of skeletal muscle mass is critical for sustaining health; however, the mechanisms responsible for muscle loss with aging and chronic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity, are poorly understood. We found that expression of a member of the AMPK-related kinase family, the SNF1-AMPK-r...

  14. Non-parametric estimation of relative risk in survival and associated tests.

    PubMed

    Wakounig, Samo; Heinze, Georg; Schemper, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We extend the Tarone and Ware scheme of weighted log-rank tests to cover the associated weighted Mantel-Haenszel estimators of relative risk. Weighting functions previously employed are critically reviewed. The notion of an average hazard ratio is defined and its connection to the effect size measure P(Y > X) is emphasized. The connection makes estimation of P(Y > X) possible also under censoring. Two members of the extended Tarone-Ware scheme accomplish the estimation of intuitively interpretable average hazard ratios, also under censoring and time-varying relative risk which is achieved by an inverse probability of censoring weighting. The empirical properties of the members of the extended Tarone-Ware scheme are demonstrated by a Monte Carlo study. The differential role of the weighting functions considered is illustrated by a comparative analysis of four real data sets.

  15. Anglo-American Relations: Can The ’Special’ Relationship Survive in the New World Order?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-21

    or by the decision by Britain to withdraw from East of Suez. Nonetheless, history shows that no two countries have ever been so completely "mixed up...the greatest confrontations in the history of Anglo-American relations.25 MacMillan played his Polaris card. There was a strong lobby in America to...Britain’s bid to enter the EEC. For the next decade, America became enmeshed in the most disastrous war of its history . Britain remained in suspense

  16. Chromosomal islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: molecular switches for survival and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; McShan, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5′ end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13 to 20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI). Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges. PMID:25161960

  17. Chromosomal islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: molecular switches for survival and virulence.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Scott V; McShan, William M

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5' end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13 to 20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI). Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges.

  18. Social and structural violence and power relations in mitigating HIV risk of drug-using women in survival sex work.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kate; Kerr, Thomas; Allinott, Shari; Chettiar, Jill; Shoveller, Jean; Tyndall, Mark W

    2008-02-01

    High rates of violence among street-level sex workers have been described across the globe, while in cities across Canada the disappearance and victimization of drug-using women in survival sex work is ongoing. Given the pervasive levels of violence faced by sex workers over the last decades, and extensive harm reduction and HIV prevention efforts operating in Vancouver, Canada, this research aimed to explore the role of social and structural violence and power relations in shaping the HIV risk environment and prevention practices of women in survival sex work. Through a participatory-action research project, a series of focus group discussions were conceptualized and co-facilitated by sex workers, community and research partners with a total of 46 women in early 2006. Based on thematic, content and theoretical analysis, the following key factors were seen to both directly and indirectly mediate women's agency and access to resources, and ability to practice HIV prevention and harm reduction: at the micro-level, boyfriends as pimps and the 'everyday violence' of bad dates; at the meso-level, a lack of safe places to take dates, and adverse impacts of local policing; and at the macro-level, dopesickness and the need to sell sex for drugs. Analysis of the narratives and daily lived experiences of women sex workers highlight the urgent need for a renewed HIV prevention strategy that moves beyond a solely individual-level focus to structural and environmental interventions, including legal reforms, that facilitate 'enabling environments' for HIV prevention.

  19. Beta 1-integrin–c-Met cooperation reveals an inside-in survival signalling on autophagy-related endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Barrow-McGee, Rachel; Kishi, Naoki; Joffre, Carine; Ménard, Ludovic; Hervieu, Alexia; Bakhouche, Bakhouche A.; Noval, Alejandro J.; Mai, Anja; Guzmán, Camilo; Robert-Masson, Luisa; Iturrioz, Xavier; Hulit, James; Brennan, Caroline H.; Hart, Ian R.; Parker, Peter J.; Ivaska, Johanna; Kermorgant, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and integrins cooperate to stimulate cell migration and tumour metastasis. Here we report that an integrin influences signalling of an RTK, c-Met, from inside the cell, to promote anchorage-independent cell survival. Thus, c-Met and β1-integrin co-internalize and become progressively recruited on LC3B-positive ‘autophagy-related endomembranes' (ARE). In cells growing in suspension, β1-integrin promotes sustained c-Met-dependent ERK1/2 phosphorylation on ARE. This signalling is dependent on ATG5 and Beclin1 but not on ATG13, suggesting ARE belong to a non-canonical autophagy pathway. This β1-integrin-dependent c-Met-sustained signalling on ARE supports anchorage-independent cell survival and growth, tumorigenesis, invasion and lung colonization in vivo. RTK–integrin cooperation has been assumed to occur at the plasma membrane requiring integrin ‘inside-out' or ‘outside-in' signalling. Our results report a novel mode of integrin–RTK cooperation, which we term ‘inside-in signalling'. Targeting integrin signalling in addition to adhesion may have relevance for cancer therapy. PMID:27336951

  20. Genetic variation in SIPA1 in relation to breast cancer risk and survival after breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Mia M; Hunter, Kent; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M; Driver, Kristy; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark; Peplonska, Beata; Brinton, Louise A; Chanock, Stephen; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2009-04-01

    Genetic variation in SIPA1, signal-induced proliferation-associated gene 1, has been proposed to be associated with aggressive breast tumor characteristics related to metastasis and worse prognosis in humans and rodents. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) located at -3092 (AT, rs3741378), and exon 14 + 14 (C>T, rs746429), and examined them in relation to breast cancer risk and overall survival, stratified by tumor characteristics in 2 independent case-control studies conducted in Poland (1,995 cases, 2,296 controls) and in Britain (2,142 cases, 2,257 controls). Vital status (n = 396 deaths) was available for 911 Polish and 1,919 British breast cancer cases with an average follow-up time of 5.5 years. Overall, we found no significant associations between genetic variants of SIPA1 SNPs and breast cancer risk (per allele odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals (CI): rs931127-0.99, 0.93-1.06; rs3741378-1.03, 0.94-1.13; and, rs74642-0.98, 0.92-1.04). In both studies, SIPA1 polymorphisms were not related to overall mortality (per allele hazard ratios, 95% CI: 1.02, 0.88-1.17; 0.90, 0.72-1.11; 1.04, 0.90-1.21, respectively). Our results do not support a relationship between SIPA1 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk or subsequent survival.

  1. Egg hatch and survival and development of beet webworm (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae at different combinations of temperature and relative humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the role that temperature and humidity play in the population dynamics of the beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis L. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), egg hatchability, survival of 1st - 5th instars, survival of the complete larval stage, survival curves, and larval development rates were inve...

  2. Health Related Quality of Life in Patients with Biliary Atresia Surviving with their Native Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Shikha S.; Alonso, Estella M.; Haber, Barbara; Magee, John C.; Fredericks, Emily; Kamath, Binita; Kerkar, Nanda; Rosenthal, Philip; Shepherd, Ross; Limbers, Christine; Varni, James W.; Robuck, Patricia; Sokol, Ronald J.; Liver, Childhood

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To quantify health related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with biliary atresia with their native livers and compare them with healthy children and patients with biliary atresia post-liver transplant (LT) and to examine the relationship between HRQOL and medical variables. Study design A cross-sectional HRQOL study of patients with biliary atresia with their native livers (ages 2-25 years) was conducted and compared with healthy and post-LT biliary atresia samples using PedsQL™ 4.0 child self and parent proxy reports, a validated measure of physical/psychosocial functioning. Results 221 patients with biliary atresia with native livers (54% female, 67% white) were studied. patient self and parent proxy reports showed significantly poorer HRQOL than healthy children across all domains (p < 0.001), particularly in emotional and psychosocial functioning. Child self and parent proxy HRQOL scores from patients with biliary atresia with their native livers and post-LT biliary atresia were similar across all domains (p=NS). Child self and parent proxy reports showed moderate agreement across all scales, except social functioning (poor to fair agreement). On multivariate regression analysis, black race and elevated total bilirubin were associated with lower Total and Psychosocial HRQOL summary scores. Conclusions HRQOL in patients with biliary atresia with their native livers is significantly poorer than healthy and similar to post-LT biliary atresia children. These findings identify significant opportunities to optimize the overall health of patients with biliary atresia. PMID:23746866

  3. Penalization, bias reduction, and default priors in logistic and related categorical and survival regressions.

    PubMed

    Greenland, Sander; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali

    2015-10-15

    Penalization is a very general method of stabilizing or regularizing estimates, which has both frequentist and Bayesian rationales. We consider some questions that arise when considering alternative penalties for logistic regression and related models. The most widely programmed penalty appears to be the Firth small-sample bias-reduction method (albeit with small differences among implementations and the results they provide), which corresponds to using the log density of the Jeffreys invariant prior distribution as a penalty function. The latter representation raises some serious contextual objections to the Firth reduction, which also apply to alternative penalties based on t-distributions (including Cauchy priors). Taking simplicity of implementation and interpretation as our chief criteria, we propose that the log-F(1,1) prior provides a better default penalty than other proposals. Penalization based on more general log-F priors is trivial to implement and facilitates mean-squared error reduction and sensitivity analyses of penalty strength by varying the number of prior degrees of freedom. We caution however against penalization of intercepts, which are unduly sensitive to covariate coding and design idiosyncrasies.

  4. Brazilian popular healers as effective promoters of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and related child survival strategies.

    PubMed

    Nations, M K; de Sousa, M A; Correia, L L; da Silva, D M

    1988-01-01

    In Ceara State in northeastern Brazil in 1986 infant mortality reached 110-139 per 1000 live births, and 50% of those deaths were due to diarrhea and dehydration. Diarrheal deaths can be prevented by oral rehydration therapy (ORT), which replaces lost fluids and electrolytes with oral rehydration salts (ORS) and water. ORT was known in the 1830s, but only in the 1960s was the importance of sugar, which increases the body's ability to absorb fluid some 25 times, realized. In northeastern Brazil access to ORT has been severely limited by poverty, official incompetence, and bureaucratic restrictions. In 1984 a 2-year research project was initiated in the village of Pacatuba to test the theory that mobilizing and training popular healers in ORT would 1) increase awareness and use of ORS, 2) promote continued feeding during diarrhea, 3) increase breast feeding, and 4) reduce the use of costly and nonindicated drugs. 46 popular healers, including rezadeiras and oradores (prayers), Umbandistas (priests), espiritas (mediums), an herbalist, and a lay doctor, were recruited and trained. Most of these people practiced a mixture of folk medicine and religion and were highly respected in the community. For purposes of survey, Pacatuba was divided into 3 groups, each containing houses at 4 different income levels. The mothers in 204 Group 1 homes were interviewed concerning ORT and diarrhea-related knowledge before intervention, and 226 households in Group 2 were interviewed after intervention. The healers were taught the basic biomedical concept of rehydration and how to mix the ORS -- 7 bottle cap-fulls of sugar and 1 of salt in a liter of unsweetened traditional tea. The healers were also taught how to use the World Health Organization's (WHO) ORS packets (2% glucose, 90 mmol/1 of sodium chloride, 1.5 gm potassium chloride, and 2.9 gm sodium bicarbonate) for cases of moderate to severe dehydration. In addition, the healers were taught the 5 basic health messages: give ORS

  5. Anti-viral therapy to reduce recurrence and improve survival in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toru

    2013-12-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus accounts for approximately 75%-80% of HCC cases worldwide. In particular, chronic HBV infection is a predominant risk factor for HCC in Asia and Africa. Hepatic resection and radiofrequency ablation are increasingly used for the curative treatment of HCC, and good local control can be achieved. However, the high rate of recurrence is a major obstacle to improving prognosis. A high viral load of HBV DNA is the most important correctable risk factor for recurrence. Furthermore, interferon and/or nucleotide analogues may decrease HBV DNA. Therefore, these drugs may decrease recurrence. In this article, treatment strategies for HBV-related HCC are described in order to reduce recurrence and improve survival.

  6. Restored river corridors: first results on the effects of flow variability on vegetation cuttings survival rate and related root architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, N.; Perona, P.; Jiang, Z.; Burlando, P.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding and predicting the evolution of river alluvial bed forms toward a vegetated or a non-vegetated morphology have important implications for restored river corridors and the related ecosystem functioning (see also Schäppi et al, this session). Vegetation recruitment and growth on non-cohesive material of river corridors, such as gravel bars and islands of braided river, depend on the ability of roots to develop and anchor efficiently such to resist against flow erosion. In this work, we study the interannual morphological evolution of a gravel bar island, the survival rate and the growth of a number of plots with different density and orientation of transplanted cuttings (Salix Alba), the space and time dynamics of which depend on erosion and deposition processes due to floods. Our purpose is to identify island locations where the hydrodynamic conditions are more suitable for plants germination, growth and survival in relation to the river hydrograph statistics. This information is a first step to build a stochastic model able to predict the future evolution and progress of the restoration action of the investigated river reach. We focus at the main island of River Thur at Niederneunforn (Canton Thurgau, Switzerland), the restoration success of which is investigated from a mechanistic viewpoint in the research project "REstored CORridor Dynamics" (www.record.ethz.ch). Accordingly, we analyze two recent Digital Elevation Models (1 year difference), which were first corrected to account for the river bathymetry, and then we compare them in order to extract relevant interannual morphological changes. Using a two dimensional numerical hydrodynamic model we simulate several flow conditions ranging from the minimum recorded flow up to the one that completely inundates the island. Hence, we build inundation maps of the island that we associate to the frequency and the submergence duration of every area. We then correlate such results to the observed survival

  7. Lactation weight loss in primiparous sows: consequences for embryo survival and progesterone and relations with metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Hoving, L L; Soede, N M; Feitsma, H; Kemp, B

    2012-12-01

    Our objective was to study reproductive consequences of lactation bodyweight loss occurring in primiparous sows with mild feed restriction and to relate these lactation weight losses and its consequences to metabolic profiles during lactation and subsequent early gestation. After weaning, 47 first-litter sows were retrospectively assigned to a high- (HWL, >13.8%, n= 24) or low (LWL, ≤13.8%, n = 23)-weight loss group. Thirty-six animals received an indwelling jugular vein catheter to determine lactational and gestational profiles of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and urea and gestational profiles of progesterone. At day 35 after insemination, sows were euthanized and their reproductive tract collected. Pregnancy rate was 75% (18/24) for HWL and 96% (22/23) for LWL sows. High-weight loss sows had a lower number of implantation sites (17.2 ± 0.8 vs 19.5 ± 0.7, respectively, p = 0.03) and a lower embryonic survival (65.6 ± 3.4 vs 77.4 ± 2.9%, p = 0.02), resulting in fewer vital embryos (14.9 ± 0.9 vs 16.8 ± 0.7, p = 0.07) than LWL sows. Progesterone peak values were reached later in HWL than in LWL sows (day 13.4 ± 0.5 vs 12.0 ± 0.5, respectively, p = 0.05). Gestational concentrations of IGF-1, NEFA and urea were almost identical for HWL and LWL sows, whilst numerical differences were seen during lactation. The current study shows negative consequences of lactational weight loss in mildly feed-restricted primiparous sows for embryonic survival and shows that these consequences seem only mildly related with metabolic alterations during lactation and not with metabolic alterations during subsequent gestation.

  8. Cancer Incidence and Survival among Adolescents and Young Adults in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Kyeong; Park, Hyeon Jin; Oh, Chang-Mo; Jung, Kyu-Won; Shin, Hee Young; Park, Byung Kiu; Won, Young-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Korea, cancer is the third leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults (AYAs). However, cancer incidence and survival trends among AYAs (15–29 years) have never been studied in Korea. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the incidence and relative survival rates and their trends among AYAs in Korea. Materials and Methods Cancer incidence data from 1999–2010 were obtained from the Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR). Each cancer was classified into subgroups according to the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) AYA site recode. Percent distributions, age-specific incidence rates, age-standardized incidence rates per million, and annual percent changes (APCs) were calculated for AYAs according to sex. Five-year relative survival rates were estimated for cases diagnosed between 1993 and 2010 and followed up to 2011. Results The age-standardized incidence rates of all cancers combined were 196.4 and 367.8 per million for males and females, respectively (male-to-female (M/F) ratio: 0.5). The age-standardized incidence rates increased from 208.7 per million in 1999 to 396.4 per million in 2010, and the APC was 6.3% (P<0.001). The five most common cancers among AYAs were thyroid carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, stomach carcinoma, breast carcinoma, and acute myeloid leukemia. In males, the 5-year relative survival rate improved, from 46.5% in 1993–1995 to 75.9% in 2006–2010. In females, the 5-year relative survival rate also improved, from 66.7% in 1993–1995 to 89.1% in 2006–2010. Conclusions Our study showed increases in cancer incidence and improvements in the 5-year relative survival rate among Korean AYAs. This study also provides additional data regarding temporal and geographic trends in cancer that may enhance future efforts to identify factors affecting cancer incidence and responses to treatment among AYAs. PMID:24789075

  9. Overwinter survival of juvenile lake herring in relation to body size, physiological condition, energy stores, and food ration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pangle, Kevin L.; Sutton, Trent M.; Kinnunen, Ronald E.; Hoff, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Populations of lake herring Coregonus artedi in Lake Superior have exhibited high recruitment variability over the past three decades. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms which influence year-class strength, we conducted a 225-d laboratory experiment to evaluate the effects of body size, physiological condition, energy stores, and food ration on the winter survival of age-0 lake herring. Small (total length (TL) range = 60–85 mm) and large (TL range = 86–110 mm) fish were maintained under thermal and photoperiod regimes that mimicked those in Lake Superior from October through May. Fish in each size-class were maintained at two feeding treatments: brine shrimp Artemiaspp. ad libitum and no food. The mortality of large lake herring (fed, 3.8%; starved, 20.1%) was significantly less than that of small fish (fed, 11.7%; starved, 32.0%). Body condition and crude lipid content declined for all fish over the experiment; however, these variables were significantly greater for large fed (0.68% and 9.8%) and small fed (0.65% and 7.3%) fish than large starved (0.49% and 5.7%) and small starved (0.45% and 4.8%) individuals. Final crude protein and gross energy contents were also significantly greater in large fed lake herring (17.6% and 1,966 cal/g), followed by small fed (17.1% and 1,497 cal/g), large starved (15.4% and 1,125 cal/g), and small starved (13.2% and 799 cal/g) fish. Lake herring that died during the experiment had significantly lower body condition and energy stores relative to those of the surviving fish. These results suggest that the depletion of energy stores contributes to greater winter mortality of small lake herring with limited energy uptake and may partially explain the variability in recruitment observed in Lake Superior.

  10. Expression of melatonin receptors in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) in African American and Caucasian women: relation to survival.

    PubMed

    Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Haus, Erhard; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda; Liu, Yuan; McLendon, Lauren; Busch, Robert; Adams, Amy; Cohen, Cynthia

    2013-02-01

    In the normal rodent breast, the pineal hormone melatonin controls the development of ductal and alveolar tissue. Melatonin counteracts tumor occurrence and tumor cell progression in vivo and in vitro in animal and human breast cancer cell cultures. It acts predominantly through its melatonin MT1 receptor. Our aim was to investigate the presence or absence of the MT1 melatonin receptor in the aggressive triple negative group of human breast carcinoma (TNBC) and its possible relationship to the course of the disease. A total of 167 patients with a ER-, PR-, Her-2/neu- phenotype in which tissue for receptor studies was available were examined. The MT1 receptor immunostain was evaluated semiquantitatively as staining intensity (0, 1, 2, 3), percentage of stained cells and the weighted index (WI) (staining intensity times percentage of stained cells). A score of WI < 60 was regarded as "negative". There was a striking difference in incidence of MT1 positivity and staining intensity between carcinomas in African American (AA) and Caucasian (C) women. The AA showed a higher incidence of MT1 negative tumors (41/84 = 48.8 % in AA, 6/51 = 11.8 % in C) and a lower average WI. MT1 positivity in TNBC was associated with a lower stage and a smaller tumor size at time of diagnosis. In multivariable survival analysis, MT1 negative TNBC in all cases regardless of race showed a significantly higher hazard ratio for disease progression, shorter progression free survival, and disease-related death, and shorter OS. This was especially pronounced in the AA group but did not reach statistical significance in the smaller group of C alone. These results suggest that melatonin or a melatonin receptor agonist may be useful biologic additions in the treatment of some forms of TNBC, especially in AA who generally show a more aggressive course of their disease.

  11. Prediagnostic serum inflammatory markers in relation to breast cancer risk, severity at diagnosis and survival in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wulaningsih, Wahyu; Holmberg, Lars; Garmo, Hans; Malmstrom, Håkan; Lambe, Mats; Hammar, Niklas; Walldius, Göran; Jungner, Ingmar; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation has been linked to cancer but its role in breast cancer is unclear. We investigated common serum markers of inflammation: C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, haptoglobin and white blood cells (WBC) in relation to breast cancer incidence, severity and survival. A total of 155179 women aged 20 and older without any history of cancer were selected from a large Swedish cohort. Hazard ratios (HRs) for breast cancer were estimated with Cox regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Ordered and binomial logistic regression models were used to assess the associations of serum inflammatory markers with breast cancer severity and oestrogen receptor (ER) positivity at diagnosis, on the other. Cumulative incidence functions by levels of inflammatory markers were assessed for early death from breast cancer and all causes. During a mean follow-up of 18.3 years, 6606 women were diagnosed with breast cancer, of whom 1474 died. A positive association with incident breast cancer was seen for haptoglobin ≥ 1.4g/l [HR 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.18] compared to lower levels. No association was observed between inflammatory markers and breast cancer severity or ER positivity. Higher haptoglobin was linked to risk of early death from breast cancer (HR: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.02-1.59), whereas higher risk of early death from all causes was additionally found with CRP ≥ 10mg/l (HR: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.04-1.36) and WBC ≥ 10×10(9)/l (HR: 1.57, 1.14-2.16). Our findings indicate that prediagnostic serum inflammatory markers were weakly linked to incident breast cancer but corresponded to worse survival after diagnosis.

  12. The effect of nitrogen and glyphosate on survival and colonisation of perennial grass species in an agro-ecosystem: does the relative importance of survival decrease with competitive ability?

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Christian; Strandberg, Beate; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kudsk, Per

    2013-01-01

    The ecological success of a plant species is typically described by the observed change in plant abundance or cover, but in order to more fully understand the fundamental plant ecological processes, it is necessary to inspect the underlying processes of survival and colonization and how they are affected by environmental conditions. A general ecological hypothesis on the effect of environmental gradients on demographic parameters is proposed and tested. The hypothesis is that decreasing fitness or competitive ability along an environmental gradient is associated with an increasing importance of survival for regulating the abundance of the species. The tested hypothesis is related to both the stress gradient hypothesis and whether the importance of competition increases along productivity gradients. The combined effect of nitrogen and glyphosate on the survival and colonization probability of two perennial grass species, Festuca ovina and Agrostis capillaris, which are known to differ in their responses to both glyphosate and nitrogen treatments, is calculated using pin-point cover data in permanent frames. We found that the relative importance of survival increased with the level of glyphosate for the glyphosate sensitive A. capillaris and decreased for the glyphosate tolerant F. ovina. Likewise, increasing levels of nitrogen increased the importance of survival for the relative nitrophobic F. ovina. Consequently, the proposed hypothesis was corroborated in this specific study. The proposed method will enable predictions of the effects of agricultural practices on community dynamics in a relatively simple setup eliminating the need to quantify all the interaction among the species in the plant community. The method will be immediately useful for the regulation of non-cultivated buffer strips between agricultural fields and semi-natural and natural biotopes such as hedgerows and waterways.

  13. The ability to survive intracellular freezing in nematodes is related to the pattern and distribution of ice formed.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Méliane R; Wharton, David A

    2016-07-01

    A few species of nematodes can survive extensive intracellular freezing throughout all their tissues, an event that is usually thought to be fatal to cells. How are they able to survive in this remarkable way? The pattern and distribution of ice formed, after freezing at -10°C, can be observed using freeze substitution and transmission electron microscopy, which preserves the former position of ice as white spaces. We compared the pattern and distribution of ice formed in a nematode that survives intracellular freezing well (Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1), one that survives poorly (Panagrellus redivivus) and one with intermediate levels of survival (Plectus murrayi). We also examined Panagrolaimus sp. in which the survival of freezing had been compromised by starvation. Levels of survival were as expected and the use of vital dyes indicated cellular damage in those that survived poorly (starved Panagrolaimus sp. and P. murrayi). In fed Panagrolaimus sp. the intracellular ice spaces were small and uniform, whereas in P. redivivus and starved Panagrolaimus sp. there were some large spaces that may be causing cellular damage. The pattern and distribution of ice formed was different in P. murrayi, with a greater number of individuals having no ice or only small intracellular ice spaces. Control of the size of the ice formed is thus important for the survival of intracellular freezing in nematodes.

  14. Relative influence of human harvest, carnivores, and weather on adult female elk survival across western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brodie, Jedediah; Johnson, Heather; Mitchell, Michael; Zager, Peter; Proffitt, Kelly; Hebblewhite, Mark; Kauffman, Matthew; Johnson, Bruce; Bissonette, John; Bishop, Chad; Gude, Justin; Herbert, Jeff; Hersey, Kent; Hurley, Mark; Lukacs, Paul M.; McCorquodale, Scott; McIntire, Eliot; Nowak, Josh; Sawyer, Hall; Smith, Douglas; White, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    Well-informed management of harvested species requires understanding how changing ecological conditions affect demography and population dynamics, information that is lacking for many species. We have limited understanding of the relative influence of carnivores, harvest, weather and forage availability on elk Cervus elaphus demography, despite the ecological and economic importance of this species. We assessed adult female survival, a key vital rate for population dynamics, from 2746 radio-collared elk in 45 populations across western North America that experience wide variation in carnivore assemblage, harvest, weather and habitat conditions. Proportional hazard analysis revealed that 'baseline' (i.e. not related to human factors) mortality was higher with very high winter precipitation, particularly in populations sympatric with wolves Canis lupus. Mortality may increase via nutritional stress and heightened vulnerability to predation in snowy winters. Baseline mortality was unrelated to puma Puma concolor presence, forest cover or summer forage productivity. Cause-specific mortality analyses showed that wolves and all carnivore species combined had additive effects on baseline elk mortality, but only reduced survival by <2%. When human factors were included, ‘total’ adult mortality was solely related to harvest; the influence of native carnivores was compensatory. Annual total mortality rates were lowest in populations sympatric with both pumas and wolves because managers reduced female harvest in areas with abundant or diverse carnivores. Mortality from native carnivores peaked in late winter and early spring, while harvest-induced mortality peaked in autumn. The strong peak in harvest-induced mortality during the autumn hunting season decreased as the number of native carnivore species increased. Synthesis and applications. Elevated baseline adult female elk mortality from wolves in years with high winter precipitation could affect elk abundance as

  15. Pre-transplant prognostic factors of long-term survival after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with matched related/unrelated donors

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Sophie; Porcher, Raphaël; Xhaard, Alienor; Robin, Marie; Masson, Emeline; Larghero, Jerome; Ribaud, Patricia; Dhedin, Nathalie; Abbes, Sarah; Sicre, Flore; Socié, Gérard; de Latour, Regis Peffault

    2014-01-01

    Mobilized peripheral blood has become the predominant stem cell source for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. In this retrospective single center study of 442 patients with hematologic malignancies, we analyzed prognostic factors for long-term survival after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors. To account for disease/status heterogeneity, patients were risk-stratified according to the Disease Risk Index. Five-year overall survival was similar after transplants with matched related and unrelated donors (45% and 46%, respectively; P=0.49). Because donor age ≥60 years impacted outcome during model building, we further considered 3 groups of donors: matched unrelated (aged <60 years by definition), matched related aged <60 years and matched related aged ≥60 years. In multivariate analysis, the donor type/age group and the graft CD34+ and CD3+ cell doses impacted long-term survival. Compared with matched unrelated donor transplant, transplant from matched related donor <60 years resulted in similar long-term survival (P=0.67) while transplant from matched related donor ≥60 years was associated with higher risks for late mortality (hazard ratio (HR) 4.41; P=0.006) and treatment failure (HR: 6.33; P=0.009). Lower mortality risks were observed after transplant with CD34+ cell dose more than 4.5×106/kg (HR: 0.56; P=0.002) and CD3+ cell dose more than 3×108/kg (HR: 0.61; P=0.01). The Disease Risk Index failed to predict survival. We built an “adapted Disease Risk Index” by modifying risks for myeloproliferative neoplasms and multiple myeloma that improved stratification ability for progression-free survival (P=0.04) but not for overall survival (P=0.82). PMID:24241489

  16. Pre-transplant prognostic factors of long-term survival after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with matched related/unrelated donors.

    PubMed

    Servais, Sophie; Porcher, Raphaël; Xhaard, Alienor; Robin, Marie; Masson, Emeline; Larghero, Jerome; Ribaud, Patricia; Dhedin, Nathalie; Abbes, Sarah; Sicre, Flore; Socié, Gérard; Peffault de Latour, Regis

    2014-03-01

    Mobilized peripheral blood has become the predominant stem cell source for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. In this retrospective single center study of 442 patients with hematologic malignancies, we analyzed prognostic factors for long-term survival after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors. To account for disease/status heterogeneity, patients were risk-stratified according to the Disease Risk Index. Five-year overall survival was similar after transplants with matched related and unrelated donors (45% and 46%, respectively; P=0.49). Because donor age ≥60 years impacted outcome during model building, we further considered 3 groups of donors: matched unrelated (aged <60 years by definition), matched related aged <60 years and matched related aged ≥60 years. In multivariate analysis, the donor type/age group and the graft CD34(+) and CD3(+) cell doses impacted long-term survival. Compared with matched unrelated donor transplant, transplant from matched related donor <60 years resulted in similar long-term survival (P=0.67) while transplant from matched related donor ≥60 years was associated with higher risks for late mortality (hazard ratio (HR) 4.41; P=0.006) and treatment failure (HR: 6.33; P=0.009). Lower mortality risks were observed after transplant with CD34(+) cell dose more than 4.5×10(6)/kg (HR: 0.56; P=0.002) and CD3(+) cell dose more than 3×10(8)/kg (HR: 0.61; P=0.01). The Disease Risk Index failed to predict survival. We built an "adapted Disease Risk Index" by modifying risks for myeloproliferative neoplasms and multiple myeloma that improved stratification ability for progression-free survival (P=0.04) but not for overall survival (P=0.82).

  17. A phenomenological relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model for proton therapy based on all published in vitro cell survival data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Aimee L.; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Proton therapy treatments are currently planned and delivered using the assumption that the proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) relative to photons is 1.1. This assumption ignores strong experimental evidence that suggests the RBE varies along the treatment field, i.e. with linear energy transfer (LET) and with tissue type. A recent review study collected over 70 experimental reports on proton RBE, providing a comprehensive dataset for predicting RBE for cell survival. Using this dataset we developed a model to predict proton RBE based on dose, dose average LET (LETd) and the ratio of the linear-quadratic model parameters for the reference radiation (α/β)x, as the tissue specific parameter. The proposed RBE model is based on the linear quadratic model and was derived from a nonlinear regression fit to 287 experimental data points. The proposed model predicts that the RBE increases with increasing LETd and decreases with increasing (α/β)x. This agrees with previous theoretical predictions on the relationship between RBE, LETd and (α/β)x. The model additionally predicts a decrease in RBE with increasing dose and shows a relationship between both α and β with LETd. Our proposed phenomenological RBE model is derived using the most comprehensive collection of proton RBE experimental data to date. Previously published phenomenological models, based on a limited data set, may have to be revised.

  18. HIV-related proteins prolong macrophage survival through induction of Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhihong; Fan, Xian; Staitieh, Bashar; Bedi, Chetna; Spearman, Paul; Guidot, David M; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2017-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1(TREM-1) is a member of the superimmunoglobulin receptor family. We have previously shown that TREM-1 prolongs survival of macrophages treated with lipoolysaccharide through Egr2-Bcl2 signaling. Recent studies suggest a role for TREM-1 in viral immunity. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) targets the monocyte/macrophage lineage at varying stages of infection. Emerging data suggest that macrophages are key reservoirs for latent HIV even in individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Here, we investigated the potential role of TREM-1 in HIV latency in macrophages. Our data show that human macrophages infected with HIV show an increased expression of TREM-1. In parallel, direct exposure to the HIV-related proteins Tat or gp120 induces TREM-1 expression in macrophages and confers anti-apoptotic attributes.NF-κB p65 silencing identified that these proteins induce TREM-1 in p65-dependent manner. TREM-1 silencing in macrophages exposed to HIV-related proteins led to increased caspase 3 activation and reduced Bcl-2 expression, rendering them susceptible to apotosis. These novel data reveal that TREM-1 may play a critical role in establishing HIV reservoir in macrophages by inhibiting apoptosis. Therefore, targeting TREM-1 could be a novel therapeutic approach to enhance clearance of the HIV reservoir, at least within the macrophage pools. PMID:28181540

  19. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and out-of-field cell survival responses to passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton beam deliveries.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Karl T; McGarry, Conor K; Clasie, Ben; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Schuemann, Jan; Depauw, Nicolas; Tang, Shikui; McMahon, Stephen J; Schettino, Giuseppe; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Lu, Hsaio-Ming; Kooy, Hanne; Paganetti, Harald; Hounsell, Alan R; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M

    2012-10-21

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of passive scattered (PS) and pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton beam delivery techniques for uniform beam configurations was determined by clonogenic survival. The radiobiological impact of modulated beam configurations on cell survival occurring in- or out-of-field for both delivery techniques was determined with intercellular communication intact or physically inhibited. Cell survival responses were compared to those observed using a 6 MV photon beam produced with a linear accelerator. DU-145 cells showed no significant difference in survival response to proton beams delivered by PS and PBS or 6 MV photons taking into account a RBE of 1.1 for protons at the centre of the spread out Bragg peak. Significant out-of-field effects similar to those observed for 6 MV photons were observed for both PS and PBS proton deliveries with cell survival decreasing to 50-60% survival for scattered doses of 0.05 and 0.03 Gy for passive scattered and pencil beam scanned beams respectively. The observed out-of-field responses were shown to be dependent on intercellular communication between the in- and out-of-field cell populations. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a similar RBE between passive and actively scanned proton beams and confirm that out-of-field effects may be important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated photon and proton fields.

  20. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and out-of-field cell survival responses to passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton beam deliveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Clasie, Ben; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Schuemann, Jan; Depauw, Nicolas; Tang, Shikui; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schettino, Giuseppe; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Lu, Hsaio-Ming; Kooy, Hanne; Paganetti, Harald; Hounsell, Alan R.; Held, Kathryn D.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-10-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of passive scattered (PS) and pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton beam delivery techniques for uniform beam configurations was determined by clonogenic survival. The radiobiological impact of modulated beam configurations on cell survival occurring in- or out-of-field for both delivery techniques was determined with intercellular communication intact or physically inhibited. Cell survival responses were compared to those observed using a 6 MV photon beam produced with a linear accelerator. DU-145 cells showed no significant difference in survival response to proton beams delivered by PS and PBS or 6 MV photons taking into account a RBE of 1.1 for protons at the centre of the spread out Bragg peak. Significant out-of-field effects similar to those observed for 6 MV photons were observed for both PS and PBS proton deliveries with cell survival decreasing to 50-60% survival for scattered doses of 0.05 and 0.03 Gy for passive scattered and pencil beam scanned beams respectively. The observed out-of-field responses were shown to be dependent on intercellular communication between the in- and out-of-field cell populations. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a similar RBE between passive and actively scanned proton beams and confirm that out-of-field effects may be important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated photon and proton fields

  1. Survival of patients with colorectal cancer in Austria by sex, age, and stage.

    PubMed

    Haidinger, Gerald; Waldhoer, Thomas; Hackl, Monika; Vutuc, Christian

    2006-10-01

    This paper for the first time presents Austrian data on survival of patients, diagnosed from 1998 through 2002, with colon cancer and with rectal cancer. Cumulative relative survival rates were calculated by age, standardized for all ages and stages combined, and by age groups (< 50 years, 50-64 years, and =65 years) according to stages (localized, regional metastases and distant metastases). In carcinoma of the colon 5-year relative survival was 66 % in males and 64 % in females. In carcinoma of the rectum 5-year relative survival was 64 % in males and 67 % in females. Compared to the earlier results from the Tyrol (based on patients diagnosed from 1990 through 1994) the 5-year survival of patients with colon cancer increased from 55 % to 66 % in males and from 58 % to 64 % in females. In patients with rectal cancer 5-year survival increased from 44 % to 64 % in males and from 46 % to 67 % in females. This increase in part can be explained by a positive effect of early detection and of better treatment.

  2. Effects of Delayed Metamorphosis on Larval Survival, Metamorphosis, and Juvenile Performance of Four Closely Related Species of Tropical Sea Urchins (Genus Echinometra)

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Aminur; Yusoff, Fatimah Md.; Arshad, A.; Uehara, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report here, the effects of extended competency on larval survival, metamorphosis, and postlarval juvenile growth of four closely related species of tropical sea urchins, Echinometra sp. A (Ea), E. mathaei (Em), Echinometra sp. C (Ec), and E. oblonga (Eo). Planktotrophic larvae of all four species fed on cultured phytoplankton (Chaetoceros gracilis) attained metamorphic competence within 22–24 days after fertilization. Competent larvae were forced to delay metamorphosis for up to 5 months by preventing them from settling in culture bottles with continuous stirring on a set of 10 rpm rotating rollers and larval survival per monthly intervals was recorded. Larval survival was highest at 24 days, when competence was attained (0 delayed period), and there were no significant differences among the four species. Larvae that had experienced a prolonged delay had reduced survival rate, metamorphosis success, and juvenile survival, but among older larvae, Em had the highest success followed by Ea, Eo, and Ec. Juveniles from larvae of all four species that metamorphosed soon after becoming competent tended to have higher growth rates (test diameter and length of spines) than juveniles from larvae that metamorphosed after a prolonged period of competence with progressively slower growth the longer the prolonged period. Despite the adverse effects of delaying metamorphosis on growth parameters, competent larvae of all four species were able to survive up to 5 months and after metamorphosis grew into 1-month-old juveniles in lab condition. Overall, delayed larvae of Em showed significantly higher larval survival, metamorphosis, and juvenile survival than Ea and Eo, while Ec showed the lowest values in these performances. Em has the most widespread distribution of these species ranging from Africa to Hawaii, while Ec probably has the most restricted distribution. Consequently, differences in distribution may be related to differences in the ability to delay metamorphosis

  3. Effects of delayed metamorphosis on larval survival, metamorphosis, and juvenile performance of four closely related species of tropical sea urchins (genus Echinometra).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Aminur; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Arshad, A; Uehara, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report here, the effects of extended competency on larval survival, metamorphosis, and postlarval juvenile growth of four closely related species of tropical sea urchins, Echinometra sp. A (Ea), E. mathaei (Em), Echinometra sp. C (Ec), and E. oblonga (Eo). Planktotrophic larvae of all four species fed on cultured phytoplankton (Chaetoceros gracilis) attained metamorphic competence within 22-24 days after fertilization. Competent larvae were forced to delay metamorphosis for up to 5 months by preventing them from settling in culture bottles with continuous stirring on a set of 10 rpm rotating rollers and larval survival per monthly intervals was recorded. Larval survival was highest at 24 days, when competence was attained (0 delayed period), and there were no significant differences among the four species. Larvae that had experienced a prolonged delay had reduced survival rate, metamorphosis success, and juvenile survival, but among older larvae, Em had the highest success followed by Ea, Eo, and Ec. Juveniles from larvae of all four species that metamorphosed soon after becoming competent tended to have higher growth rates (test diameter and length of spines) than juveniles from larvae that metamorphosed after a prolonged period of competence with progressively slower growth the longer the prolonged period. Despite the adverse effects of delaying metamorphosis on growth parameters, competent larvae of all four species were able to survive up to 5 months and after metamorphosis grew into 1-month-old juveniles in lab condition. Overall, delayed larvae of Em showed significantly higher larval survival, metamorphosis, and juvenile survival than Ea and Eo, while Ec showed the lowest values in these performances. Em has the most widespread distribution of these species ranging from Africa to Hawaii, while Ec probably has the most restricted distribution. Consequently, differences in distribution may be related to differences in the ability to delay metamorphosis.

  4. Breast Cancer Laterality Does Not Influence Survival in a Large Modern Cohort: Implications for Radiation-Related Cardiac Mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Rutter, Charles E.; Chagpar, Anees B.; Evans, Suzanne B.

    2014-10-01

    Objectives: Radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer has been associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality, based on studies predating treatment planning based on computed tomography. This study assessed the impact of tumor laterality on overall survival (OS) in a large cohort treated with modern techniques, to indirectly determine whether left-sided treatment remains associated with increased cardiac mortality. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for breast cancer with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy were identified in the National Cancer Database, and OS was compared based on tumor laterality using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Separate analyses were performed for noninvasive and invasive carcinoma and for breast-only and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy. Multivariate regression analysis of OS was performed with demographic, pathologic, and treatment variables as covariates to adjust for factors associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Results: We identified 344,831 patients whose cancer was diagnosed from 1998 to 2006 with a median follow-up time of 6.04 years (range, 0-14.17 years). Clinical, tumor, and treatment characteristics were similar between laterality groups. Regional nodal radiation was used in 14.2% of invasive cancers. No OS difference was noted based on tumor laterality for patients treated with breast-only (hazard ratio [HR] 0.984, P=.132) and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy (HR 1.001, P=.957). In multivariate analysis including potential confounders, OS was identical between left and right sided cancers (HR 1.002, P=.874). No significant OS difference by laterality was observed when analyses were restricted to patients with at least 10 years of follow-up (n=27,725), both in patients treated with breast-only (HR 0.955, P=.368) and breast plus regional nodal radiation therapy (HR 0.859, P=.155). Conclusions: Radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer does

  5. A phenomenological relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model for proton therapy based on all published in vitro cell survival data

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Aimee L.; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Proton therapy treatments are currently planned and delivered using the assumption that the proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) relative to photons is 1.1. This assumption ignores strong experimental evidence that suggests the RBE varies along the treatment field, i.e. with linear energy transfer (LET) and with tissue type. A recent review study collected over 70 experimental reports on proton RBE, providing a comprehensive dataset for predicting RBE for cell survival. Using this dataset we developed a model to predict proton RBE based on dose, LET and the ratio of the linear-quadratic model parameters for the reference radiation (α/β)x, as the tissue specific parameter. Methods and Materials The relationship of the RBE on dose, dose average LET (LETd) and (α/β)x was explored using 287 experimental data points. A RBE model based on the linear quadratic model was derived from a nonlinear regression fitting to the data. Results The proposed model predicts that the RBE increases with increasing LETd and decreases with increasing (α/β)x. The model additionally predicts a decrease in RBE with increasing dose. Conclusions The proposed phenomenological RBE model is derived using the most comprehensive collection of proton RBE experimental data to date. The model agrees with previous theoretical predictions on the relationship between RBE, LETd and (α/β)x and also makes predictions on the relationship between RBE and dose. The proposed model shows a relationship between both α and β with LETd. Previously published phenomenological models, based on a limited data set, may have to be revised. PMID:26459756

  6. Repeated Exposure to Low Levels of the Chemical Warfare Agent VX Activates Cell Survival Related Gene in Mouse Brain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    neuronal plasticity and remodeling – cell survival • Brain derived neurotrophic factor ( BDNF ) is modulated: – traumatic brain injury – ischemia – toxin...exposure • BDNF may be important for neuronal plasticity, cell survival and remodeling following brain trauma. Nov 18, 2003 Joint Services Scientific...In situ Hybridization • RNA probes for BDNF were generated by in vitro transcription using Strip-EZTM RNA. • For antisense 33P-UTP labeled BDNF RNA

  7. Role of Glioblastoma Craniotomy Related to Patient Survival: A 10-Year Survey in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Saman; Hussain, Kamran

    2017-04-01

    A total of 270 glioblastoma patients were treated for tumor resection during 2004 to 2014. The following variables were examined: patient age group (PAG) and percent of the extent of resection (EOR) in four types of resections: gross total resection (GTR), subtotal resection (STR), partial resection (PR), and biopsy/decompression (BD). The Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) was used and the average survival time noted. The least survival time (7 months) was noticed in the patient age group 18 to 35 years with biopsy only, whereas, the maximum survival time (14.5 months) was noted with the patient age group 54 to 71 years by gross tumor resection. The largest number of (n = 76) patients had PR (80%) and these patients had an average survival time of 10.5 months. Total 190 patients out of 270, with EOR (100-80%) had a KPS score "0" (80 and above) and total 80 patients out of 270 patients, with EOR (50%) had a KPS score "1" (below 80). The correlation was statistically significant at (p < 0.050) for EOR (%) and KPS score (0/1) only. Correlation analysis showed that the maximum resection has a strong impact on the glioblastoma patient's survival. A lesser EOR correlated with poor quality of life and also a decreased survival of patients.

  8. Socioeconomic deprivation and cancer survival in Germany: an ecological analysis in 200 districts in Germany.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lina; Eberle, Andrea; Emrich, Katharina; Gondos, Adam; Holleczek, Bernd; Kajüter, Hiltraud; Maier, Werner; Nennecke, Alice; Pritzkuleit, Ron; Brenner, Hermann

    2014-06-15

    Although socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival have been demonstrated both within and between countries, evidence on the variation of the inequalities over time past diagnosis is sparse. Furthermore, no comprehensive analysis of socioeconomic differences in cancer survival in Germany has been conducted. Therefore, we analyzed variations in cancer survival for patients diagnosed with one of the 25 most common cancer sites in 1997-2006 in ten population-based cancer registries in Germany (covering 32 million inhabitants). Patients were assigned a socioeconomic status according to the district of residence at diagnosis. Period analysis was used to derive 3-month, 5-year and conditional 1-year and 5-year age-standardized relative survival for 2002-2006 for each deprivation quintile in Germany. Relative survival of patients living in the most deprived district was compared to survival of patients living in all other districts by model-based period analysis. For 21 of 25 cancer sites, 5-year relative survival was lower in the most deprived districts than in all other districts combined. The median relative excess risk of death over the 25 cancer sites decreased from 1.24 in the first 3 months to 1.16 in the following 9 months to 1.08 in the following 4 years. Inequalities persisted after adjustment for stage. These major regional socioeconomic inequalities indicate a potential for improving cancer care and survival in Germany. Studies on individual-level patient data with access to treatment information should be conducted to examine the reasons for these socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival in more detail.

  9. Adult survival selection in relation to multilocus heterozygosity and body size in a tropical bird species, the Zenaida dove, Zenaida aurita.

    PubMed

    Cézilly, Frank; Quinard, Aurélie; Motreuil, Sébastien; Pradel, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Both phenotypic and genetic quality can influence the survival of individuals through time, although their relative influences are rarely addressed simultaneously. Here we used capture-mark-recapture modelling to assess the influence of both multilocus heterozygosity (MLH) and body size on apparent adult survival in a tropical bird species, the Zenaida dove, Zenaida aurita, using a sample of 391 individuals genotyped at 11 microsatellites, while controlling for the effects of sex. No effect of body size on either adult survival or capture rate was found. In the best model, survival was a logit linear function of MLH, whereas detection probability was a sex-dependent logit linear function of the logarithm of field effort, increasing with time and affected by a random individual effect. Using a Bayesian approach, we found that MLH explained 1.14% of the total deviance, as expected from theory and previous studies of heterozygosity-fitness correlations, with no evidence for local effects. However, results from capture-mark-recapture modelling indicated that expected longevity varied from 4.8 years in the least heterozygous individuals (MLH = 0.37) to 10.6 years in the most heterozygous ones (MLH = 1), thus suggesting that MLH had potentially a substantial effect on survival. We discuss our results in relation to current hypotheses about the origin of heterozygosity-fitness correlations.

  10. Trends in net survival from pancreatic cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Bossard, Nadine; Colonna, Marc; Garcia-Velasco, Adelaida; Carulla, Maria; Manfredi, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer represents a real clinical challenge. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from pancreatic cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland) and provide trends in net survival and dynamics of excess mortality rates up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the period 2000-2004 using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. Results were reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modelling strategy. There were little differences between countries in age-standardized net survivals (2000-2004). The 5-year net survival was poor (range: 6-10%). The changes in net survival from 1992 to 2004 were mostly related to early survival and patients aged 60 years. A slight decrease in the excess mortality rate between 1992 and 2004 was observed, limited to the 18 months after diagnosis. This study confirmed that, despite some improvement, survival from pancreatic cancer is still poor throughout European Latin countries. The major improvements in clinical imaging did not result in improvements in prognosis. Development of truly innovative treatments is highly needed to improve prognosis.

  11. Randomized clinical trial: Nucleos(t)ide analogues improved survival of CHB-related HCC patients via reducing severity and progression of malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liwen; Cao, Zhujun; Bao, Rebecca; Zhou, Huijuan; Tang, Weiliang; Lu, Jie; Lin, Lanyi; Xie, Qing; Bao, Shisan; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) to treat Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be explored. Aim To investigate if NAs reduce the severity and progression of CHB-related HCC. Results Among 532 patients, there were 118 or 414 CHB-related HCC with or without NAs therapy, respectively. BCLC scores, serum level of ALT/AST and HBV DNA were compared. During follow-up, the survival period of CHB-related HCC patients with sustained NAs is significantly longer than that with NAs post-HCC and NAs naïve (p < 0.05). Factors significantly associated with the poor overall survival of CHB-related HCC include BCLC scores (hazard ratio, 1.84 [95% confidence interval, 1.57−2.15], p < 0.001), NAs post-HCC or NAs naïve (1.33 [1.07−1.65], p < 0.01), serum AST ≥ 40 IU/L (1.48 [1.03−2.12], p < 0.05) and HBV DNA ≥ 104 copies/ml (1.36 [1.01−1.83], p < 0.001). Methods Outcomes of 532 CHB-related HCC patients with/without NAs were investigated. Overall survival of CHB-related HCC patients, NAs naïve (n = 156), NAs received post-HCC (n = 258) and NAs sustained (n = 118) were determined. Conclusions NAs reduced severity of CHB-related HCC patients. Sustained NAs is an important factor associated with the extended survival of CHB-related HCC patients. PMID:27329718

  12. Source water assessment and nonpoint sources of acutely toxic contaminants: A review of research related to survival and transport of Cryptosporidium parvum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Mark J.; Montemagno, Carlo D.; Jenkins, Michael B.

    1998-12-01

    Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (PL-930123) in 1996 required that public water supply managers identify potential sources of contamination within contributing areas. Nonpoint sources of acutely toxic microbial contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium parvum, challenge current approaches to source identification and management as a first step toward developing management plans for public water supply protection. Little may be known about survival and transport in the field environment, prescribed practices may not be designed to manage such substances, and infective stages may be present in vast numbers and may resist water treatment and disinfection processes. This review summarizes research related to survival and transport of C. parvum oocysts, as an example of an acutely toxic contaminant with nonpoint sources in animal agriculture. It discusses ∥1) significance of infected domesticated animals as potential sources of C. parvum, (2) laboratory and field studies of survival and transport, and (3) approaches to source control in the context of public health protection.

  13. Diabetes mellitus may affect the long-term survival of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma patients after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Deng, Yong-Lin; Liu, Chang; Huang, Li-Hong; Shang, Lei; Chen, Xin-Guo; Wang, Le-Tian; Du, Jin-Zan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Pei-Xiao; Zhang, Hui; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether diabetes mellitus (DM) affects prognosis/recurrence after liver transplantation (LT) for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS A retrospective study was conducted between January 2000 and August 2013 on 1631 patients with HBV-related HCC who underwent LT with antiviral prophylaxis. Patient data were obtained from the China Liver Transplant Registry (https://www.cltr.org/). To compare the outcomes and tumor recurrence in the HBV-related HCC patients with or without DM, statistical analyses were conducted using χ2 tests, Mann-Whitney tests, the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank tests and multivariate step-wise Cox regression analysis. RESULTS Univariate analysis of 1631 patients who underwent LT found overall 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates of 79%, 73% and 71% respectively in the DM patients, and 84%, 78% and 76% in the non-DM patients respectively. Overall survival rate differences after LT between the two groups were significant (P = 0.041), but recurrence-free survival rates were not (P = 0.096). By stratified analysis, the overall survival rates in DM patients for age > 50 years (P = 0.002), the presence of vascular invasion (P = 0.096), tumors ≤ 3 cm (P = 0.047), two to three tumor nodules (P = 0.007), Child-Pugh grade B (P = 0.018), and pre-LT alanine aminotransferase levels between 40 and 80 IU/L (P = 0.017) were significantly lower than in non-DM patients. Additionally, serum α-fetoprotein level > 2000 ng/mL (P = 0.052) was associated with a significant survival difference trend between DM and non-DM patients. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of DM (P < 0.001, HR = 1.591; 95%CI: 1.239-2.041) was an independent predictor associated with poor survival after LT. CONCLUSION HBV-related HCC patients with DM have decreased long-term overall survival and poor LT outcomes. Prevention strategies for HCC patients with DM are recommended. PMID:27920478

  14. Impact of Hyperglycemia on Survival and Infection-Related Adverse Events in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Who Were Receiving Palliative Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yong Joo; Han, Hye-Suk; Jeong, Yusook; Jeong, Jiwon; Lim, Sung-Nam; Choi, Hyung Jin; Jeon, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Tae-Keun; Lee, Sang-Jeon; Lee, Ki Hyeong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Non-metastatic colorectal cancer patients with diabetes have poor overall survival than those without diabetes. However, the effect of hyperglycemia on survival after diagnosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been assessed. Therefore, we assessed the impact of hyperglycemia on the survival and infection-related adverse events (AEs) in patients with metastatic CRC. Materials and Methods We reviewed the records of 206 patients with newly diagnosed metastatic CRC who were treated with palliative chemotherapy from March 2000 to December 2012 at Chungbuk National University Hospital. The mean glucose level of each patient was calculated using all available glucose results. Results The mean glucose levels ranged between 76.8 and 303.5 mg/dL, and patients were categorized into quartiles in accordance to their mean glucose level: group 1 (< 106.7 mg/dL), group 2 (106.7-117.2 mg/dL), group 3 (117.3-142.6 mg/dL), and group 4 (> 142.6 mg/dL). The median overall survival for patients in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 22.6, 20.1, 18.9, and 17.9 months, respectively; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.643). Compared with patients in group 1, those in groups 2, 3, and 4 were at a higher risk of infection-related AEs, according to a multivariate analysis (p=0.002). Conclusion Hyperglycemia was not associated with shorter survival; however, it was associated with infection-related AEs in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic CRC receiving palliative chemotherapy. PMID:25038764

  15. The Ras-related small GTPases RalA and RalB regulate cellular survival after ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Ambrose R.; Snider, Jared L.; Martin, Timothy D.; Graboski, Sarah F.; Der, Channing J.; Cox, Adrienne D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Oncogenic activation of Ras renders cancer cells resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), but the mechanisms have not been fully characterized. The Ras-like small GTPases, RalA and RalB, are downstream effectors of Ras function and are critical for both tumor growth and survival. The Ral effector RalBP1/RLIP76 mediates survival of mice after whole body irradiation but the role of the Ral GTPases themselves in response to IR is unknown. We have investigated the role of RalA and RalB in cellular responses to IR. Methods and Materials RalA, RalB and their major effectors RalBP1 and Sec5 were knocked down by stable expression of shRNAs in the K-Ras-dependent pancreatic cancer-derived cell line MIA PaCa-2. Radiation responses were measured by standard clonogenic survival assays for reproductive survival, γH2AX expression for double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and PARP cleavage for apoptosis. Results Knockdown of K-Ras, RalA or RalB reduced colony-forming ability post-IR and knockdown of either Ral isoform decreased the rate of DSB repair post-IR. However, knockdown of RalB, but not RalA, increased cell death. Surprisingly, neither RalBP1 nor Sec5 suppression affected colony formation post-IR. Conclusions Both RalA and RalB contribute to K-Ras-dependent IR resistance of MIA PaCa-2 cells. Sensitization due to suppressed Ral expression is likely due in part to decreased efficiency of DNA repair (RalA and RalB) and increased susceptibility to apoptosis (RalB). Ral-mediated radioresistance does not depend on either RalBP1 or the exocyst complex, the two best-characterized Ral effectors, and instead may utilize an atypical or novel effector. PMID:20619549

  16. Photosynthesis, carbohydrate storage and survival of a native and an introduced tree species in relation to light and defoliation.

    PubMed

    Gleason, S M; Ares, A

    2004-10-01

    Fraxinus uhdei (Wenz.) Lingelsh (tropical ash), a species introduced to Hawaii from Mexico, invades forests of the endemic tree Acacia koa A.Gray (koa). We examined physiological and morphological characteristics of koa and tropical ash to explore possible mechanisms that may facilitate invasion of koa forests by tropical ash. Seedlings of both species were grown in a greenhouse in three light treatments: 100% photosynthetic photon flux (PPF); 18% PPF; and 2% PPF inside the greenhouse. Light compensation point, maximum CO2 assimilation rate and dark respiration rate of seedlings differed significantly among light treatments, but were similar between species. A defoliation experiment indicated that tropical ash was better able to survive defoliation than koa, especially under high-light conditions. Tropical ash seedlings allocated more carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) to storage per unit PPF than koa seedlings. Total nonstructural carbohydrates were positively correlated with plant survival in both species. The patterns of C and N allocation associated with tropical ash seedlings favor their survival in high light, under intense herbivory and on sites where N availability is seasonal or highly variable. Variation in carbohydrate storage between koa and tropical ash greatly exceeded variation in photosynthetic performance at the leaf level.

  17. Survival and migration behavior of juvenile Coho Salmon in the Klamath River relative to discharge at Iron Gate Dam, Northern California, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, John W.; Juhnke, Steve; Stutzer, Greg; Hetrick, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    discharge at IGD was 1,518 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) and ranged from 1,020 to 2,460 ft3/s. Average daily discharge near the estuary at river kilometer (rkm) 13 was 9,820 ft3/s and ranged from 3,270 to 20,500 ft3/s. This study was based on hatchery fish taken directly from a holding tank at IGH. Wild fish were not available in numbers sufficient for use in 2007. Fish tagging began on April 9 and concluded on May 17, 2007. A total of 246 hatchery coho salmon were tagged and released, split evenly between releases in the Klamath River near IGH (rkm 309) and near the Tree of Heaven campground at rkm 280. The two release sites were used to enable estimation of a relative survival between IGH and the campground using the paired-release design, because potential effects of tagging and handling can be cancelled out with this method. However, the assumption that the survival probabilities of fish from each release site are equal in the reaches they have in common was violated, preventing its use in 2007. All estimates of survival were therefore calculated using the single-release design. The reach-specific estimates of survival were lower in 2007 than in 2006, but a similar survival pattern was evident among reaches in each year. The survival from IGH to rkm 33 was 0.653 [standard error (SE) 0.039] in 2006 and 0.497 (SE 0.044) in 2007. In each year, the reaches with the lowest survivals were upstream of the Scott River, which also is the area with the greatest differences in survivals between years. The reach with the highest survivals were in the Salmon River-to-Trinity River reach (at or near 1.0 in each year). The cause of the difference in survivals in each year were not identified, but could be related to differences in discharge or turbidity, as these are the primary differences between the years. These differences and other effects will be analyzed when the data from all study years (initially planned for 2006 through 2008) are available. Models of su

  18. Biochemical and anatomical responses related to the in vitro survival of the tropical bromeliad Nidularium minutum to low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Camila Pereira; Hayashi, Adriana Hissae; Braga, Marcia Regina; Nievola, Catarina Carvalho

    2013-10-01

    Nidularium minutum is a tropical bromeliad that grows in natural environment with temperatures ranging from 2 to 30 °C. In the present work we cultivated this species in vitro at 5, 10, 15, and 25 °C for 3 and 6 months aiming at assessing biochemical and morphological responses that allow its survival under low temperatures. No survival was observed for plants cultured constantly at 5 °C and the lowest biometric parameters were found for those grown at 10 °C. A thick aquiferous parenchyma, accumulation of reducing sugars, and increased pectin content in the cell walls were observed in plants grown at 10 and 15 °C when compared to those maintained at 25 °C. In plants cultured at 10 °C, leaf bleaching correlated with low chlorophyll content and lower survival rate after 6 months when compared to those grown at 15 °C. The best in vitro culture condition for slow growth and plant acclimatization was found to be at 15 °C. This probably correlated with the immediate availability of carbon to restore growth during acclimatization and also with higher root initiation under this condition. This study brings information about the responses related to functional adaptation to low temperatures in N. minutum cultured in vitro that can also be implicated in its survival under natural conditions. Additionally, it suggests the best temperature to form a minimal growth collection to be used in restocking and conservation programs for endangered tropical bromeliads.

  19. Gene expression profile correlates with T cell infiltration and relative survival in glioblastoma patients vaccinated with dendritic cell immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Robert M.; Soto, Horacio; Konkankit, Vera; Odesa, Sylvia K.; Eskin, Ascia; Yong, William H.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liau, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility, safety, and toxicity of autologous tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccination and toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma. Clinical and immune responses were monitored and correlated with tumor gene expression profiles. Experimental Design Twenty-three patients with glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) were enrolled in this dose-escalation study and received three biweekly injections of glioma lysate-pulsed DCs followed by booster vaccinations with either imiquimod or poly-ICLC adjuvant every three months until tumor progression. Gene expression profiling, IHC, FACS, and cytokine bead arrays were performed on patient tumors and PBMC. Results DC vaccinations are safe and not associated with any dose-limiting toxicity. The median overall survival from the time of initial surgical diagnosis of glioblastoma was 31.4 months, with a one-, two-, and three-year survival rate of 91%, 55% and 47%, respectively. Patients whose tumors had mesenchymal gene expression signatures exhibited increased survival following DC vaccination compared to historical controls of the same genetic subtype. Tumor samples with a mesenchymal gene expression signature had a higher number of CD3+ and CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) compared with glioblastomas of other gene expression signatures (p = 0.006). Conclusion Autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccination in conjunction with TLR agonists is safe as adjuvant therapy in newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma patients. Our results suggest that the mesenchymal gene expression profile may identify an immunogenic subgroup of glioblastoma that may be more responsive to immune-based therapies. PMID:21135147

  20. Type A and B monoamine oxidase in age-related neurodegenerative disorders: their distinct roles in neuronal death and survival.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Makoto; Maruyama, Wakako; Inaba-Hasegawa, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, type B monoamine oxidase (MAO-B) has been proposed to play a primary role though generating reactive oxygen species in oxidation of monoamine substrates. MAO-B oxidizes MPTP into MPP+, and an MAO-B inhibitor, deprenyl, prevents the MPTP oxidation and also MPP+neutotoxicity. These results suggest the association of MAO-B with neuronal death in neurodegenerative disorders. On the other hand, deprenyl and rasagiline, selective MAO-B inhibitors, have been proved to protect neuronal cells in cellular and animal models of neurodegeneration. These inhibitors decrease oxidation of the substrates, scavenge oxygen radicals, intervene apoptosis signal pathway in mitochondria and induce pro-survival genes coding anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors. However, the association of MAO-B itself with the neuroprotective function of MAO-B inhibitors remains enigmatic. Recently, the involvement of type A MAO (MAO-A) in neuronal death has been shown by upregulation MAO-A expression in cellular models. MAO-A is a target of an endogenous neurotoxin, Nmethyl( R)salsolinol, and MAO-A knockdown (KO) with short interfering (si)RNA protects neuronal death from apoptosis. In addition, MAO-A mediates the increased expression of genes for anti-apoptotic, pro-survival Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors by MAO-B inhibitors, whereas MAO-B doe not. In this review, we present our recent results on the novel role of MAO-A and MAO-B in neuronal death and also in the neuroprotective gene induction by MAO inhibitors. The future development of new series of neuroprotective drugs is discussed among compounds, which have high affinity to MAO-A and can induce pro-survival genes. MAO-A is expected to play a role in disease-modifying therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Association of Relatively Low Serum Parathyroid Hormone with Malnutrition-Inflammation Complex and Survival in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dukkipati, Ramanath; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kim, Youngmee; Colman, Sara; Budoff, Matthew J; Nissenson, Allen R.; Sprague, Stuart M.; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2011-01-01

    Background Low serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been implicated as a primary biochemical marker of adynamic bone disease in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who undergo maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) treatment. We hypothesized that the malnutrition-inflammation complex is associated with low PTH levels in these patients and confounds the PTH-survival association. Methods We examined 748 stable MHD outpatients in Southern California and followed them for up to 5 years (10/2001-12/2006). Results In 748 MHD patients, serum PTH <150 pg/ml was more prevalent among non-Blacks and diabetics. There was no association between serum PTH and coronary artery calcification score, bone mineral density or dietary protein or calorie intake. Low serum PTH was associated with markers of protein-energy wasting and inflammation, and this association confounded the relationship between serum PTH and alkaline phosphatase. Although 5-year crude mortality rates were similar across PTH increments, after adjustment for the case-mix and surrogates of malnutrition and inflammation, a moderately low serum PTH in 100 to 150 pg/ml range was associated with the greatest survival compared to other serum PTH levels, i.e., a death hazard ratio of 0.52 (95% confidence interval: 0.29-0.92, p<0.001) compared to PTH of 300 to 600 pg/ml (reference). Conclusions Low serum PTH may be another facet of the malnutrition-inflammation complex in CKD, and after controlling for this confounder, a moderately low PTH in 100 to 150 pg/ml range appears associated with the greatest survival. Limitations of observational studies should be considered. PMID:20199875

  2. Differences in age-standardized mortality rates for avoidable deaths based on urbanization levels in Taiwan, 1971-2008.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian K; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2014-02-05

    The World is undergoing rapid urbanization, with 70% of the World population expected to live in urban areas by 2050. Nevertheless, nationally representative analysis of the health differences in the leading causes of avoidable mortality disaggregated by urbanization level is lacking. We undertake a study of temporal trends in mortality rates for deaths considered avoidable by the Concerted Action of the European Community on Avoidable Mortality for four different levels of urbanization in Taiwan between 1971 and 2008. We find that for virtually all causes of death, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) were lower in more urbanized than less urbanized areas, either throughout the study period, or by the end of the period despite higher rates in urbanized areas initially. Only breast cancer had consistently higher AMSRs in more urbanized areas throughout the 38-year period. Further, only breast cancer, lung cancer, and ischemic heart disease witnessed an increase in ASMRs in one or more urbanization categories. More urbanized areas in Taiwan appear to enjoy better indicators of health outcomes in terms of mortality rates than less urbanized areas. Access to and the availability of rich healthcare resources in urban areas may have contributed to this positive result.

  3. Differences in Age-Standardized Mortality Rates for Avoidable Deaths Based on Urbanization Levels in Taiwan, 1971–2008

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian K.; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2014-01-01

    The World is undergoing rapid urbanization, with 70% of the World population expected to live in urban areas by 2050. Nevertheless, nationally representative analysis of the health differences in the leading causes of avoidable mortality disaggregated by urbanization level is lacking. We undertake a study of temporal trends in mortality rates for deaths considered avoidable by the Concerted Action of the European Community on Avoidable Mortality for four different levels of urbanization in Taiwan between 1971 and 2008. We find that for virtually all causes of death, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) were lower in more urbanized than less urbanized areas, either throughout the study period, or by the end of the period despite higher rates in urbanized areas initially. Only breast cancer had consistently higher AMSRs in more urbanized areas throughout the 38-year period. Further, only breast cancer, lung cancer, and ischemic heart disease witnessed an increase in ASMRs in one or more urbanization categories. More urbanized areas in Taiwan appear to enjoy better indicators of health outcomes in terms of mortality rates than less urbanized areas. Access to and the availability of rich healthcare resources in urban areas may have contributed to this positive result. PMID:24503974

  4. Survival advantage of hemodialysis relative to peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sens, Florence; Schott-Pethelaz, Anne-Marie; Labeeuw, Michel; Colin, Cyrille; Villar, Emmanuel

    2011-11-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) has been proposed as a therapeutic option for patients with end-stage renal disease and associated congestive heart failure (CHF). Here, we compare mortality risks in these patients by dialysis modality by including all patients who started planned chronic dialysis with associated congestive heart failure and were prospectively enrolled in the French REIN Registry. Survival was compared between 933 PD and 3468 hemodialysis (HD) patients using a Kaplan-Meier model, Cox regression, and propensity score analysis. The patients were followed from their first dialysis session and stratified by modality at day 90 or last modality if death occurred prior. There was a significant difference in the median survival time of 20.4 months in the PD group and 36.7 months in the HD group (hazard ratio, 1.55). After correction for confounders, the adjusted hazard ratio for death in PD compared to the HD patients remained significant at 1.48. Subgroup analyses showed that the results were not changed with regard to the New York Heart Association stage, age strata, or estimated glomerular filtration rate strata at first renal replacement therapy. The use of propensity score did not change results (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.55). Thus, mortality risk was higher with PD than with HD among incident patients with end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure. These results may help guide clinical decisions and also highlight the need for randomized clinical trials.

  5. Androgens affect muscle, motor neuron, and survival in a mouse model of SOD1-related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Tanya; Polanco, Maria J; Scaramuzzino, Chiara; Rocchi, Anna; Milioto, Carmelo; Emionite, Laura; Ognio, Emanuela; Sambataro, Fabio; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo; Pennuto, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle atrophy. Epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggest the involvement of androgens in ALS pathogenesis, but the mechanism through which androgens modify the ALS phenotype is unknown. Here, we show that androgen ablation by surgical castration extends survival and disease duration of a transgenic mouse model of ALS expressing mutant human SOD1 (hSOD1-G93A). Furthermore, long-term treatment of orchiectomized hSOD1-G93A mice with nandrolone decanoate (ND), an anabolic androgenic steroid, worsened disease manifestations. ND treatment induced muscle fiber hypertrophy but caused motor neuron death. ND negatively affected survival, thereby dissociating skeletal muscle pathology from life span in this ALS mouse model. Interestingly, orchiectomy decreased androgen receptor levels in the spinal cord and muscle, whereas ND treatment had the opposite effect. Notably, stimulation with ND promoted the recruitment of endogenous androgen receptor into biochemical complexes that were insoluble in sodium dodecyl sulfate, a finding consistent with protein aggregation. Overall, our results shed light on the role of androgens as modifiers of ALS pathogenesis via dysregulation of androgen receptor homeostasis.

  6. Risk Factors Associated With Complication Rates of Becker-Type Expander Implants in Relation to Implant Survival: Review of 314 Implants in 237 Patients.

    PubMed

    Taboada-Suarez, Antonio; Brea-García, Beatriz; Magán-Muñoz, Fernando; Couto-González, Iván; González-Álvarez, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Although autologous tissue reconstruction is the best option for breast reconstruction, using implants is still a reliable and simple method, offering acceptable aesthetic results. Becker-type implants are permanent implants that offer a 1-stage reconstructive option. A retrospective study was carried out in our center reviewing the clinical reports of 237 patients, in whom a total of 314 Becker-type prostheses were implanted. Overall survival was calculated using a Kaplan-Meier estimate. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios. At the end of the study, 214 expanders (68.15%) presented no complications, 40 (12.47%) developed significant capsular contracture, in 27 (8.60%) infection occurred, 24 (7.64%) suffered minor complications, and 9 (2.87%) ruptured. The mean survival time of the expanders was 120.41 months (95% CI: 109.62, 131.19). Radiotherapy, chemotherapy, high Molecular Immunology Borstel, age, mastectomy performed previously to the implant, ductal carcinoma, advanced tumoral stage, experience of the surgeon, and Becker 35-type implants were significantly related to a high number of complications in relation to the survival of the implants. Cox regression analysis revealed that the main risk factors for the survival of expander implants included radiotherapy and surgeon experience. The complication hazard ratio or relative risk caused by these 2 factors was 1.976 and 1.680, respectively. One-stage reconstruction using Becker-type expanders is an appropriate, simple, and reliable option in delayed breast reconstruction in patients who have not received radiotherapy and as long as the procedure is carried out by surgeons skilled in the technique.

  7. The RFC1 80G>A, among Common One-Carbon Polymorphisms, Relates to Survival Rate According to DNA Global Methylation in Primary Liver Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Moruzzi, Sara; Udali, Silvia; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Guarini, Patrizia; Martinelli, Nicola; Conci, Simone; Mazzi, Filippo; Pattini, Patrizia; Tammen, Stephanie A.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Pizzolo, Francesca; Choi, Sang-Woon

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms within one-carbon metabolism genes have been largely studied in relation to cancer risk for the function of this pathway in nucleotide synthesis and DNA methylation. Aims of this study were to explore the possible link among several common functional gene polymorphisms within one-carbon metabolism and survival rate in primary liver cancers, i.e., hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma, and to assess the additional effect of global DNA methylation on survival rate and mortality risk. Forty-seven primary liver cancer patients were genotyped for ten polymorphisms: DHFR 19bp ins/del, TS 2rpt-3rpt, MTHFD1 1958G>A, MTHFR 677C>T, MTR 2756A>G, MTRR 66A>G, RFC1 80G>A, SHMT1 1420C>T, BHMT 716 A>G, TC II 776C>G. Methylation was determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) DNA as methylcytosine (mCyt) content using LC/MS/MS. Among the polymorphisms analysed, the RFC1 80G>A (rs1051266) influenced the survival rate in primary liver cancers. The RFC1 80AA was associated to a significantly reduced survival rate (22.2%) as compared to both GG and GA genotypes (61.5% and 76% respectively, p = 0.005). When the cancer patients were stratified according to the mCyt median value as high (>5.34%) or low (≤5.34%), the concomitant presence of AA genotype and low mCyt level led to a significantly worse survival rate as compared to the G allele carriership (p<0.0001) with a higher Hazard Ratio (HR = 6.62, p = 0.001). The subjects carrying the AA genotype in association with high mCyt did not show a significant difference in survival rate as compared with the G allele carriers (p = 0.919). The RFC1 80G>A polymorphism influenced the survival rate, and the presence of RFC1 80AA genotype with low global methylation in PBMCs DNA was associated with poorer prognosis and higher mortality risk, therefore highlighting novel molecular signatures potentially helpful to define prognostic markers for primary liver cancers. PMID:27936032

  8. Trends in net survival from head and neck cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Uhry, Zoé; de Raucourt, Dominique; Mazzoleni, Guido; Sánchez, Maria-José; Ligier, Karine

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the trends in 1- and 5-year net survival and the trends in the dynamics of the excess mortality rates in head and neck cancers between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland). The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, the net survival was studied over the 2000-2004 period using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. The results are reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. The analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modelling. There were significant differences between countries in 5-year age-standardized net survivals over the 2000-2004 period, ranging from 33 to 34% in France and Portugal from 42 to 44% in Switzerland and Italy, respectively. The age-standardized net survival improved considerably from 1992 to 2004 in Italy, Spain and Switzerland, but not in France because of lack of improvement in the elderly. The increase in net survival was linked to a decrease in the excess mortality rate up to 3-4 years after diagnosis. The net survival from head and neck cancers improved over the study period, but significant differences were still observed in 2004. Differences in sex ratio and anatomical distribution contributed only partially towards these disparities. Differences in stage at diagnosis, time to treatment and/or proportion of human papillomavirus-related cases are also probably involved in the survival disparities observed. Overall, the prognosis of these tumours remains poor.

  9. Possible secondary apatite fission track age standard from altered volcanic ash beds in the middle Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowallis, B.J.; Christiansen, E.H.; Everett, B.H.; Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Miller, D.S.; Deino, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary age standards are valuable in intra- and interlaboratory calibration. At present very few such standards are available for fission track dating that is older than Tertiary. Several altered volcanic ash beds occur in the Middle Jurassic Carmel Formation in southwestern Utah. The formation was deposited in a shallow marine/sabhka environment. Near Gunlock, Utah, eight ash beds have been identified. Sanidines from one of the ash beds (GUN-F) give a single-crystal laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar age of 166.3??0.8 Ma (2??). Apatite and zircon fission track ages range from 152-185 Ma with typically 15-20 Ma errors (2??). Track densities in zircons are high and most grains are not countable. Apatites are fairly common in most of the ash beds and have reasonable track densities ranging between 1.2-1.5 ?? 106 tracks/cm2. Track length distributions in apatites are unimodal, have standard deviations <1??m, and mean track lengths of about 14-14.5 ??m. High Cl apatites (F:Cl:OH ratio of 39:33:28) are particularly abundant and large in ash GUN-F, and are fairly easy to concentrate, but the concentrates contain some siderite, most of which can be removed by sieving. GUN-F shows evidence of some reworking and detriaal contamination based on older single grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses and some rounding of grains, but the apatite population appears to be largely uncontaminated. At present BJK has approximately 12 of apatite separate from GUN-F. ?? 1993.

  10. Reduced expression of ASS is closely related to clinicopathological features and post-resectional survival of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Lin, Ming; Xiong, Fu Xia; Yang, Yu; Nie, Xiu; Zhou, Rou Li

    2010-01-01

    Argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) has previously been proven to be reductively expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and various types of HCC cell lines. Arginine, the product of ASS, has been used as a target in HCC by recombinant human arginase or arginine deiminase, which is now in the phase II clinical trial stage. This study aimed to present the levels of ASS expression in HCCs and its correlation with clinicopathological features and prognosis of HCC patients. Immunohistochemical detection of ASS was performed on samples from 71 patients with HCC. Positive staining was found in 21 HCCs, with a score of 2, as well as in normal liver tissues. Reduced ASS staining was found in 70.4% (50/71) of HCC tissues, including 21 with a score of 0 and 29 with a score of 1. The staining score in cancer tissues was significantly associated with gender, background liver, histopathological differentiation, recurrence, TNM staging and portal vein invasion (P<0.05), but not with age, viral status, tumor size and serum α-fetoprotein level. Patients with a high ASS expression had significantly poorer overall and disease-free survival (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). These data showed that ASS was reductively or negatively expressed in a large portion of HCC, and that ASS levels in HCCs correlated inversely with prognosis. In conclusion, a high expression of ASS may be a novel marker of poor prognosis of patients presenting with HCC.

  11. Association of a cytarabine chemosensitivity related gene expression signature with survival in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Han; Wen, Lu; Tan, Dan; Xie, Pan; Pang, Feng-mei; Zhou, Hong-hao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Zhao-qian; Tang, Jie; Li, Xi; Chen, Xiao-ping

    2017-01-01

    The prognosis of cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) varies greatly among patients. Achievement of complete remission (CR) after chemotherapy is indispensable for a better prognosis. To develop a gene signature predicting overall survival (OS) in CN-AML, we performed data mining procedure based on whole genome expression data of both blood cancer cell lines and AML patients from open access database. A gene expression signature including 42 probes was derived. These probes were significantly associated with both cytarabine half maximal inhibitory concentration values in blood cancer cell lines and OS in CN-AML patients. By using cox regression analysis and linear regression analysis, a chemo-sensitive score calculated algorithm based on mRNA expression levels of the 42 probes was established. The scores were associated with OS in both the training sample (p=5.13 × 10−4, HR=2.040, 95% CI: 1.364-3.051) and the validation sample (p=0.002, HR=2.528, 95% CI: 1.393-4.591) of the GSE12417 dataset from Gene Expression Omnibus. In The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) CN-AML patients, higher scores were found to be associated with both worse OS (p=0.013, HR=2.442, 95% CI: 1.205-4.950) and DFS (p=0.015, HR=2.376, 95% CI: 1.181-4.779). Results of gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that all the significant GO Terms were correlated with cellular component of mitochondrion. In summary, a novel gene set that could predict prognosis of CN-AML was identified presently, which provided a new way to identify genes impacting AML chemo-sensitivity and prognosis. PMID:27903973

  12. High total antioxidant capacity of the porcine seminal plasma (SP-TAC) relates to sperm survival and fertility.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Isabel; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Perez-Patiño, Cristina; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Ceron, Jose J; Martinez, Emilio A; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Roca, Jordi

    2015-12-21

    The study attempted to clarify the role of total antioxidant capacity of seminal plasma (SP-TAC) on boar sperm survival and fertility after artificial insemination (AI). SP-TAC differed (P < 0.001) among boars (n° = 15) and, to a lesser degree, among ejaculates within male (4 ejaculates/boar). SP-TAC also differed (P < 0.001) among ejaculate fractions (43 ejaculates and 3 fractions per ejaculate), of which the sperm-peak portion of the sperm rich ejaculate fraction (SRF) had the highest SP-TAC. SP-TAC was not correlated with sperm quality (motility and viability) or functionality (intracellular ROS generation and lipid peroxidation) of liquid AI-semen samples stored at 17 °C for 72 h (90 AI-samples), but the decline in sperm quality was larger (P < 0.05) in ejaculates with low, compared with high SP-TAC (hierarchically grouped). The SP-TAC differences among ejaculate portions agree with sperm cryosurvival rates (14 ejaculates from 7 boars), showing sperm from sperm-peak portion better (P < 0.01) post-thaw quality and functionality than those from the entire ejaculate (mainly post-SRF). Boars (n° = 18) with high SP-TAC (hierarchically grouped) had higher (P < 0.05) fertility outcomes (5,546 AI-sows) than those with low SP-TAC. Measurement of SP-TAC ought to be a discriminative tool to prognosis fertility in breeding boars.

  13. High total antioxidant capacity of the porcine seminal plasma (SP-TAC) relates to sperm survival and fertility

    PubMed Central

    Barranco, Isabel; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Perez-Patiño, Cristina; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Ceron, Jose J.; Martinez, Emilio A.; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Roca, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The study attempted to clarify the role of total antioxidant capacity of seminal plasma (SP-TAC) on boar sperm survival and fertility after artificial insemination (AI). SP-TAC differed (P < 0.001) among boars (n° = 15) and, to a lesser degree, among ejaculates within male (4 ejaculates/boar). SP-TAC also differed (P < 0.001) among ejaculate fractions (43 ejaculates and 3 fractions per ejaculate), of which the sperm-peak portion of the sperm rich ejaculate fraction (SRF) had the highest SP-TAC. SP-TAC was not correlated with sperm quality (motility and viability) or functionality (intracellular ROS generation and lipid peroxidation) of liquid AI-semen samples stored at 17 °C for 72 h (90 AI-samples), but the decline in sperm quality was larger (P < 0.05) in ejaculates with low, compared with high SP-TAC (hierarchically grouped). The SP-TAC differences among ejaculate portions agree with sperm cryosurvival rates (14 ejaculates from 7 boars), showing sperm from sperm-peak portion better (P < 0.01) post-thaw quality and functionality than those from the entire ejaculate (mainly post-SRF). Boars (n° = 18) with high SP-TAC (hierarchically grouped) had higher (P < 0.05) fertility outcomes (5,546 AI-sows) than those with low SP-TAC. Measurement of SP-TAC ought to be a discriminative tool to prognosis fertility in breeding boars. PMID:26688188

  14. Genetic variation in C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to colon and rectal cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Curtin, Karen; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Duggan, David J.; Samowitz, Wade S.; Peters, Ulrike; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation has been shown to be influenced by genetic variation in the CRP gene. Methods In this study, we test the hypothesis that genetic variation in CRP influences both the risk of developing colon and rectal cancer and survival. Two population-based studies of colon cancer (n=1574 cases, 1970 controls) and rectal (n=791 cases, 999 controls) were conducted. We evaluated four CRP tagSNPs: rs1205 (G>A, 3’ UTR); rs1417938 (T>A, intron); rs1800947 (G>C, L184L); and rs3093075 (C>A, 3’ flanking). Results The CRP rs1205 AA genotype was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer (OR 1.3, 95%CI 1.1-1.7), whereas the rs3093075 A allele was associated with a reduced risk of rectal cancer (OR 0.7, 95%CI 0.5-0.9). The strongest association for the rs1205 polymorphism and colon cancer was observed among those with KRAS2 mutations (OR 1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.0). The CRP rs1205 AA genotype also was associated with an increased risk of CIMP+ rectal tumors (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2-5.3); conversely, the rs1417938 A allele was associated with a reduced risk of CIMP+ rectal tumors (OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3-0.9). We observed interactions between CRP rs1800947 and BMI and family history of CRC in modifying risk of both colon and rectal cancer. Conclusions These data suggest that genetic variation in the CRP gene influences risk of both colon and rectal cancer development. PMID:20949557

  15. Relative abundance, site fidelity, and survival of adult lake trout in Lake Michigan from 1999 to 2001: Implications for future restoration strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bronte, C.R.; Holey, M.E.; Madenjian, C.P.; Jonas, J.L.; Claramunt, R.M.; McKee, P.C.; Toneys, M.L.; Ebener, M.P.; Breidert, B.; Fleischer, G.W.; Hess, R.; Martell, A.W.; Olsen, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    We compared the relative abundance of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush spawners in gill nets during fall 1999–2001 in Lake Michigan at 19 stocked spawning sites with that at 25 unstocked sites to evaluate how effective site-specific stocking was in recolonizing historically important spawning reefs. The abundance of adult fish was higher at stocked onshore and offshore sites than at unstocked sites. This suggests that site-specific stocking is more effective at establishing spawning aggregations than relying on the ability of hatchery-reared lake trout to find spawning reefs, especially those offshore. Spawner densities were generally too low and too young at most sites to expect significant natural reproduction. However, densities were sufficiently high at some sites for reproduction to occur and therefore the lack of recruitment was attributable to other factors. Less than 3% of all spawners could have been wild fish, which indicates that little natural reproduction occurred in past years. Wounding by sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus was generally lower for Seneca Lake strain fish and highest for strains from Lake Superior. Fish captured at offshore sites in southern Lake Michigan had the lowest probability of wounding, while fish at onshore sites in northern Lake Michigan had the highest probability. The relative survival of the Seneca Lake strain was higher than that of the Lewis Lake or the Marquette strains for the older year-classes examined. Survival differences among strains were less evident for younger year-classes. Recaptures of coded-wire-tagged fish of five strains indicated that most fish returned to their stocking site or to a nearby site and that dispersal from stocking sites during spawning was about 100 km. Restoration strategies should rely on site-specific stocking of lake trout strains with good survival at selected historically important offshore spawning sites to increase egg deposition and the probability of natural reproduction in Lake

  16. Pre-diagnostic meat and fibre intakes in relation to colorectal cancer survival in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ward, Heather A; Norat, Teresa; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Jenab, Mazda; Fedirko, Veronika; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Skeie, Guri; Romaguera-Bosch, Dora; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck; Affret, Aurélie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Aleksandrova, Krassimira; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Naccarati, Alessio; Mattiello, Amalia; Peeters, Petra H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Åsli, Lene Angell; Jakszyn, Paula; Ramón Quirós, J; Sánchez, María-José; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, José-María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Jirström, Karin; Ericson, Ulrika; Johansson, Ingegerd; Gylling, Björn; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Stepien, Magdalena; Freisling, Heinz; Murphy, Neil; Cross, Amanda J; Riboli, Elio

    2016-07-01

    Improvements in colorectal cancer (CRC) detection and treatment have led to greater numbers of CRC survivors, for whom there is limited evidence on which to provide dietary guidelines to improve survival outcomes. Higher intake of red and processed meat and lower intake of fibre are associated with greater risk of developing CRC, but there is limited evidence regarding associations with survival after CRC diagnosis. Among 3789 CRC cases in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, pre-diagnostic consumption of red meat, processed meat, poultry and dietary fibre was examined in relation to CRC-specific mortality (n 1008) and all-cause mortality (n 1262) using multivariable Cox regression models, adjusted for CRC risk factors. Pre-diagnostic red meat, processed meat or fibre intakes (defined as quartiles and continuous grams per day) were not associated with CRC-specific or all-cause mortality among CRC survivors; however, a marginal trend across quartiles of processed meat in relation to CRC mortality was detected (P 0·053). Pre-diagnostic poultry intake was inversely associated with all-cause mortality among women (hazard ratio (HR)/20 g/d 0·92; 95 % CI 0·84, 1·00), but not among men (HR 1·00; 95 % CI 0·91, 1·09) (P for heterogeneity=0·10). Pre-diagnostic intake of red meat or fibre is not associated with CRC survival in the EPIC cohort. There is suggestive evidence of an association between poultry intake and all-cause mortality among female CRC survivors and between processed meat intake and CRC-specific mortality; however, further research using post-diagnostic dietary data is required to confirm this relationship.

  17. Increasing Sibling Relative Risk of Survival to Older and Older Ages and the Importance of Precise Definitions of “Aging,” “Life Span,” and “Longevity”

    PubMed Central

    Sebastiani, Paola; Nussbaum, Lisa; Andersen, Stacy L.; Black, Mara J.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a formal definition of human longevity continues to generate confusion about its genetic and nongenetic determinants. In order to characterize how differences in birth year cohorts and percentiles of survival are associated with familial contribution to variation in survival, we estimated sibling relative risk of living to increasingly rare percentiles of survival based on a dataset of 1,917 validated sibships each containing at least one individual living to age 90 years. About 1,042 of the sibships included at least one individual who survived to age 100 and 511 included at least one individual who survived to age 105 and older. We show that sibling relative risk increases with older ages, sex, and earlier birth year cohorts of the proband and siblings of male 90-year-olds (5th percentile of survival) have 1.73 (95% CI: 1.5; 2.0) times the chance of living to age 90, while siblings of both male and female probands who survived to age 105 years (~0.01 percentile of survival) have 35.6 (95%CI: 15.1; 67.7) times the chance of living to age 105 compared with population controls. These results emphasize the importance of consistently defining the longevity phenotype in terms of rarity of survival for appropriate comparisons across studies. PMID:25814633

  18. Incidence and survival of childhood cancer cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2000 in Hiroshima City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hiromi; Nishi, Nobuo; Kuwabara, Masao; Ninomiya, Motoki; Arita, Ken-ichi; Yasui, Wataru; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Kodama, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    There have been few studies on cancer incidence and survival among children in Japan. Childhood cancer cases in Hiroshima City can be ascertained almost perfectly in terms of completeness and validity as both a population-based cancer registry and a tissue registry cover the whole area. We report here recent incidence and survival of childhood cancer in Hiroshima City. Subjects were cancer patients less than 15 years of age in Hiroshima City registered in the Hiroshima City Cancer Registry and/or the Hiroshima Prefecture Tumor Registry (tissue registry) between 1998 and 2000. Cancer incidence in Hiroshima City was calculated for 12 diagnostic groups according to the International Classification of Childhood Cancer, and compared with general incidence in Japan. Five-year survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. There were 63 children who had a cancer newly diagnosed during 1998-2000, with only one death-certificate-only case (1.6%). Age-standardized incidence rates (per million) were 144.3 for boys and 93.9 for girls. Leukemia was the most frequent (29%) among the 12 diagnostic groups. There were 13 cancer deaths during this period and five-year survival was 79% (95% Confidence Interval: 67%-87%). Childhood cancer incidence was slightly higher than that for all of Japan, but the relative distribution of patients by diagnostic group was compatible with the general pattern. Both of these observations might be due to the high quality of the tumor and tissue registries.

  19. Survival of foodborne pathogens at different relative humidities and temperatures and the effect of sanitizers on apples with different surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun-Qi; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Sun-Young

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the effects of factors such as relative humidity (RH) and temperature on pathogen survival on apples with different surface conditions. Apples with different surface conditions (unblemished, bruised, or cut) were inoculated with three pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) and stored at different RH levels (RH 100, 85, or 68%) at 4 °C or 15 °C for 2 days. S. aureus survived most readily on apple surfaces; it had no significant reduction on any of the apple surfaces for any of the three RH levels after 2 days of storage. The reduction levels of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium on unblemished and bruised apple surfaces were higher at RH of 85% and 68% than at RH of 100% at 15 °C; and reduction levels were approximately 3 log(10) CFU/apple at 4 °C in RH of 68%. No significant reduction in any of the three pathogens on cut apple surfaces was observed for any RH level. The effectiveness of chemical sanitizers (chlorine sanitizer and 2% lactic acid) in reducing pathogens (E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and S. aureus) on apple surfaces (unblemished, bruised, or cut) was also evaluated. Treatment with chlorine sanitizer and 2% lactic acid for 5 min significantly reduced pathogen levels on unblemished and bruised apple surfaces but not on cut apple surfaces. In conclusion, the surface conditions of the apple significantly affected pathogen survival and the effectiveness of sanitizing methods.

  20. Relative acute effects of low pH and high iron on the hatching and survival of the water mite (Arrenurus manubriator) and the aquatic insect (Chironomus riparius)

    SciTech Connect

    Rousch, J.M.; Simmons, T.W.; Kerans, B.L.; Smith, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The authors investigated the relative effects of low pH and high iron on a water mite, Arrenurus manubriator and an aquatic insect, Chironomus riparius. Eggs and active stages were exposed in static renewal toxicity tests to pH 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2, made by adding sulfuric acid to reconstituted soft water, or to iron levels of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1,000 mg/L, made by adding ferrous sulfate to soft water at pH 4. Experiments were conducted at 22 C with a 16:8-h photoperiod, and treatments were replicated three times with at least nine individuals per treatment. Data were analyzed with a logistic response function and one-way ANOVA for pH and iron tests, respectively. Egg hatching was reduced at pH 2 for midges and at pH 3 for mites. Iron had no effect on hatching for either species. Survival of midge larvae was partially reduced at pH 4, and survival of mite deutonymphs, larvae, female and male adults was reduced at pH 3. Survival of midge larvae, and mite deutonymphs and male adults was reduced at 400, 200, and 1,000 mg Fe/L, respectively. Mite female adults and larvae were unaffected by iron. Higher metabolic requirements of unfed immature stages, the gelatinous covering of mite and insect eggs, the longer incubation period of mite eggs, and the greater osmoregulatory potential of adult mites may have contributed to the differences observed.

  1. Improvement in Health-Related Quality of Life After Hospitalization Predicts Event-free Survival in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Debra K.; Yamokoski, Laura; Sun, Jie Lena; Conway, Ginger A.; Hartman, Karen A.; Graziano, Judith A.; Grant, Jane; Sun, Jie-Lena; Binanay, Cynthia; Stevenson, Lynne W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is a major clinical outcome for heart failure (HF) patients. We aimed to determine the frequency, durability, and prognostic significance of improved HRQOL after hospitalization for decompensated HF. Methods and Results We analyzed HRQOL, measured serially using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ), for 425 patients who survived to discharge in a multicenter randomized clinical trial of pulmonary artery catheter versus clinical assessment to guide therapy for patients with advanced HF. All patients enrolled had one or more prior HF hospitalizations or chronic high diuretic doses and one or more symptom and one sign of fluid overload at admission. Improvement, defined as a decrease of more than 5 points in MLHFQ total score, occurred in 68% of patients by 1 month and stabilized. The degree of 1 month improvement differed (P<0.0001 group × time interaction) between 6 month survivors and non-survivors. In a Cox regression model, after adjustment for traditional risk factors for HF morbidity and mortality, improvement in HRQOL by 1 month compared to worsening at one month or no change predicted time to subsequent event-free survival (P=0.013). Conclusions In patients hospitalized with severe HF decompensation, HRQOL is seriously impaired but improves substantially within 1 month for most patients and remains improved for 6 months. Patients for whom HRQOL does not improve by 1 month after hospital admission merit specific attention both to improve HRQOL and to address high risk for poor event-free survival. PMID:19879462

  2. Relative survivability of human osteoblasts is enhanced by 39 °C and ascorbic acid after exposure to photopolymerization ingredients.

    PubMed

    Dua, Rupak; Ramaswamy, Sharan

    2013-08-01

    Photopolymerizable hydrogels offer great potential in cartilage tissue engineering due to their ability to conform to irregular defect shapes and be applied in a potentially minimally invasive manner. An important process requirement in the use of photopolymerizable hydrogels is the ability of the suspended cells to withstand low intensity ultraviolet light (UV) exposure (4-5 mW/cm(2)) and photoinitiator concentrations. For cartilage integration with underlying subchondral bone tissue, robust localized osteoblast activity is necessary. Yet, while it is known that osteoblasts do not respond well to UV light, limited work has been conducted to improve their survivability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular cytotoxicity of five different human cell sources at different UV exposure times, with and without a commercially used photoinitiator. We were able to confirm that human osteoblasts were the least tolerant to varying UV exposure times in comparison to bone marrow stem cell, periodontal ligament cell, smooth muscle and endothelial cell lineages. Moreover osteoblasts cultured at 39 °C did not deteriorate in terms of alkaline phosphatase expression or calcium deposition within the extracellular matrix (ECM), but did reduce cell proliferation. We believe however that the lower proliferation diminished osteoblast sensitivity to UV and the photoinitiator. In fact, the relative survivability of osteoblasts was found to be augmented by the combination of a biochemical factor and an elevated incubation temperature; specifically, the use of 50 mg/l of the anti-oxidant, ascorbic acid significantly (P < 0.05) increased the survivability of osteoblasts when cultured at 39 °C. We conclude that ascorbic acid at an incubation temperature of 39 °C can be included in in vitro protocols used to assess cartilage integration with bone ECM. Such inclusion will enhance conditions of the engineered tissue model system in recapitulating in vivo osteoblast activity.

  3. Parents of children surviving a brain tumor: burnout and the perceived disease-related influence on everyday life.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Annika Lindahl

    2010-10-01

    Parents of children diagnosed with a brain tumor often report distress, even after successfully completed cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to examine predictors of burnout (ie stress-induced exhaustion) in parents of children who have had a brain tumor. Twenty-four mothers and 20 fathers completed self-report questionnaires on 2 occasions at an interval of 7 months. Controlling for generic stress, parents' perception of the influence of the disease on everyday life-predicted burnout symptoms. Moreover, parents' appraisal of a disease-related influence on everyday life showed stability, implying that parental stress may be chronic. The findings encourage furthermore investigation of chronic stress among parents of children diagnosed with cancer.

  4. Risk factors for skeletal-related events (SREs) and factors affecting SRE-free survival for nonsmall cell lung cancer patients with bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Ulas, Arife; Bilici, Ahmet; Durnali, Ayse; Tokluoglu, Saadet; Akinci, Sema; Silay, Kamile; Oksuzoglu, Berna; Alkis, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal-related events (SREs) for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with bone metastasis lead to serious morbidity. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for SREs in NSCLC patients with bone metastasis and the factors influencing SRE-free survival and overall survival (OS). From 2000 to 2012, we evaluated retrospectively 835 NSCLC patients. Three hundred and thirty-five of them with bone metastasis were included in the study. SREs and the other prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis for SRE-free survival and OS. SREs were detected in 244 patients (72.8 %). The most common SREs were the need for radiotherapy (43.2 %) and malignant hypercalcemia (17.6 %). The median time to first SRE was 3.5 months at the median follow-up of 17 months. A multivariate analysis showed that the presence of bone metastasis at diagnosis (p < 0.001), the number of bone metastasis (p = 0.001), baseline hypercalcemia (p = 0.004), and the presence of palliative radiotherapy (p = 0.04) were independent prognostic factors for SRE-free survival. A logistic regression analysis identified that the presence of bone metastasis at diagnosis [odds ratio (OR), 12.6], number of bone metastasis (OR, 3.05), and baseline hypercalcemia (OR, 0.33) were found to be predictive factors in the developing of SRE. The median OS time for patients with SRE was worse than that for patients without SRE (7 vs 12 months, respectively). For OS, male gender, ECOG performance status (PS), high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, hypoalbuminemia, the presence of bone metastasis at diagnosis, the number of bone metastasis, the presence of SREs, the presence of bisphosphonate therapy, and palliative radiotherapy were independent prognostic indicators for OS by the multivariate analysis. Our results indicated that the frequency of SREs was high and the presence of bone metastasis at the time of diagnosis, baseline hypercalcemia, and multiple bone

  5. Circulating vitamin D in relation to cancer incidence and survival of the head and neck and oesophagus in the EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fanidi, Anouar; Muller, David C.; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per Magne; Vollset, Stein Emil; Relton, Caroline; Vineis, Paolo; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Brustad, Magritt; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Grioni, Sara; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as).; Peeters, Petra H.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Kvaskoff, Marina; Cadeau, Claire; Huerta, José María; Sánchez, Maria-José; Agudo, Antonio; Lasheras, Cristina; Quirós, J. Ramón; Chamosa, Saioa; Riboli, Elio; Travis, Ruth C.; Ward, Heather; Murphy, Neil; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Papatesta, Eleni-Maria; Boeing, Heiner; Kuehn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Steffen, Annika; Johansson, Anders; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that vitamin D play a role in pathogenesis and progression of cancer, but prospective data on head and neck cancer (HNC) and oesophagus cancer are limited. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study recruited 385,747 participants with blood samples between 1992 and 2000. This analysis includes 497 case-control pairs of the head and neck and oesophagus, as well as 443 additional controls. Circulating 25(OH)D3 were measured in pre-diagnostic samples and evaluated in relation to HNC and oesophagus cancer risk and post-diagnosis all-cause mortality. After controlling for risk factors, a doubling of 25(OH)D3 was associated with 30% lower odds of HNC (OR 0.70, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.56–0.88, Ptrend = 0.001). Subsequent analyses by anatomical sub-site indicated clear inverse associations with risk of larynx and hypopharynx cancer combined (OR 0.55, 95CI% 0.39–0.78) and oral cavity cancer (OR 0.60, 95CI% 0.42–0.87). Low 25(OH)D3 concentrations were also associated with higher risk of death from any cause among HNC cases. No clear association was seen with risk or survival for oesophageal cancer. Study participants with elevated circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D3 had decreased risk of HNC, as well as improved survival following diagnosis. PMID:27812016

  6. Circulating vitamin D in relation to cancer incidence and survival of the head and neck and oesophagus in the EPIC cohort.

    PubMed

    Fanidi, Anouar; Muller, David C; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per Magne; Vollset, Stein Emil; Relton, Caroline; Vineis, Paolo; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Brustad, Magritt; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Grioni, Sara; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Peeters, Petra H; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Kvaskoff, Marina; Cadeau, Claire; Huerta, José María; Sánchez, Maria-José; Agudo, Antonio; Lasheras, Cristina; Quirós, J Ramón; Chamosa, Saioa; Riboli, Elio; Travis, Ruth C; Ward, Heather; Murphy, Neil; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Papatesta, Eleni-Maria; Boeing, Heiner; Kuehn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Steffen, Annika; Johansson, Anders; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias

    2016-11-04

    Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that vitamin D play a role in pathogenesis and progression of cancer, but prospective data on head and neck cancer (HNC) and oesophagus cancer are limited. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study recruited 385,747 participants with blood samples between 1992 and 2000. This analysis includes 497 case-control pairs of the head and neck and oesophagus, as well as 443 additional controls. Circulating 25(OH)D3 were measured in pre-diagnostic samples and evaluated in relation to HNC and oesophagus cancer risk and post-diagnosis all-cause mortality. After controlling for risk factors, a doubling of 25(OH)D3 was associated with 30% lower odds of HNC (OR 0.70, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.56-0.88, Ptrend = 0.001). Subsequent analyses by anatomical sub-site indicated clear inverse associations with risk of larynx and hypopharynx cancer combined (OR 0.55, 95CI% 0.39-0.78) and oral cavity cancer (OR 0.60, 95CI% 0.42-0.87). Low 25(OH)D3 concentrations were also associated with higher risk of death from any cause among HNC cases. No clear association was seen with risk or survival for oesophageal cancer. Study participants with elevated circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D3 had decreased risk of HNC, as well as improved survival following diagnosis.

  7. Home-loving boreal hare mitochondria survived several invasions in Iberia: the relative roles of recurrent hybridisation and allele surfing.

    PubMed

    Melo-Ferreira, J; Farelo, L; Freitas, H; Suchentrunk, F; Boursot, P; Alves, P C

    2014-03-01

    Genetic introgression from a resident species into an invading close relative can result from repeated hybridisation along the invasion front and/or allele surfing on the expansion wave. Cases where the phenomenon is massive and systematic, such as for hares (genus Lepus) in Iberia, would be best explained by recurrent hybridisation but this is difficult to prove because the donor populations are generally extinct. In the Pyrenean foothills, Lepus europaeus presumably replaced Lepus granatensis recently and the present species border is parallel to the direction of invasion, so that populations of L. granatensis in the contact zone represent proxies of existing variation before the invasion. Among three pairs of populations sampled across this border, we find less differentiation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) across than along it, as predicted under recurrent hybridisation at the invasion front. Using autosomal microsatellite loci and X- and Y-linked diagnostic loci, we show that admixture across the border is quasi-absent, making it unlikely that lack of interspecific mtDNA differentiation results from ongoing gene flow. Furthermore, we find that the local species ranges are climatically contrasted, making it also unlikely that ongoing ecology-driven movement of the contact account for mtDNA introgression. The lack of mtDNA differentiation across the boundary is mostly due to sharing of mtDNA from a boreal species currently extinct in Iberia (Lepus timidus) whose mitochondria have thus remained in place since the last deglaciation despite successive invasions by two other species. Home-loving mitochondria thus witness past species distribution rather than ongoing exchanges across stabilised contact zones.

  8. Patient HSP70-hom TG haplotype is associated with decreased transplant-related mortality and improved survival after sibling HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inho; Kim, Jin Hee; Rhee, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Won; Cho, Hyeon Jin; Cho, Eun-Young; Lee, Jong-Eun; Hong, Yun-Chul; Park, Sung Sup; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Park, Myoung Hee; Park, Seonyang; Kim, Byoung Kook

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70-hom (HSP70-hom) plays an important role in protein folding and immune responses. Therefore, HSP70-hom gene polymorphisms may act as important factors in predicting the prognosis of patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To evaluate the role of HSP70-hom gene polymorphisms in the prognosis of patients receiving sibling human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched allogeneic HSCT, the HSP70-hom polymorphisms, T2437C and G2763A, were genotyped in 147 patients receiving sibling HLA-matched allogeneic HSCT. Individual diplotypes were estimated from genotype data of the two HSP70-hom polymorphisms using the expectation maximization algorithm. Patients with the 2763GG or GA genotype showed longer overall survival compared with those with the 2763AA genotype, and patients with a TG haplotype (TG/TA, TG/TG or TG/CG) also showed longer overall survival compared with those with a non-TG haplotype (TA/TA or TA/CG) (both G2763A genotype and diplotype, p<0.01). Moreover, the 2437TT genotype was found to be protective for treatment-related death compared with the 2437TC genotype, and a TG haplotype was found to be very protective for treatment-related death compared with a non-TG haplotype (T2437C genotype, p=0.04; and diplotype, p=0.02). Therefore, our results suggest that HSP70-hom polymorphisms play an important role in the prognosis of patients receiving sibling HLA-matched allogeneic HSCT.

  9. An overview of cancer survival in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America: the case for investment in cancer health services.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Swaminathan, R; Jayant, K; Brenner, H

    2011-01-01

    Population-based cancer survival data, a key indicator for monitoring progress against cancer, are reported from 27 population-based cancer registries in 14 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. In China, Singapore, the Republic of Korea, and Turkey, the 5-year age-standardized relative survival ranged from 76-82% for breast, 63-79% for cervical, 71-78% for bladder, and 44-60% for large-bowel cancer. Survival did not exceed 22% for any cancer site in The Gambia, or 13% for any cancer site except breast (46%) in Uganda. For localized cancers of the breast, large bowel, larynx, ovary, urinary bladder and for regional diseases at all sites, higher survival rates were observed in countries with more rather than less developed health services. Inter- and intra-country variations in survival imply that the levels of development of health services and their efficiency to provide early diagnosis, treatment and clinical follow-up care have a profound impact on survival from cancer. These are reliable baseline summary estimates to evaluate improvements in cancer control and emphasise the need for urgent investment to improve awareness, population-based cancer registration, early detection programmes, health-services infrastructure, and human resources in these countries in the future.

  10. Postfledging survival of European starlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krementz, D.G.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that mass at fledging and fledge date within the breeding season affect postfledging survival in European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Nestlings were weighed on day 18 after hatch and tagged with individually identifiable patagial tags. Fledge date was recorded. Marked fledglings were resighted during weekly two-day intensive observation periods for 9 weeks postfledging. Post-fledging survival and sighting probabilities were estimated for each of four groups (early or late fledging by heavy or light fledging mass). Body mass was related to post-fledging survival for birds that fledged early. Results were not clear-cut for relative fledge date, although there was weak evidence that this also influenced survival. Highest survival probability estimates occurred in the EARLY-HEAVY group, while the lowest survival estimate occurred in the LATE-LIGHT group. Sighting probabilities differed significantly among groups, emphasizing the need to estimate and compare survival using models which explicitly incorporate sighting probabilities.

  11. Patron Relations: A Survival Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Bonnie L., Comp.; Downs, Rondi, Comp.

    Recognizing the responsibility of library staff members of maintain a pleasant environment for the public in the library, this manual discusses the library user's and library employee's rights under the law and how to protect them. It is arranged alphabetically by the type of problem or emergency that may be encountered. The procedure for handling…

  12. Differences in Childhood Leukemia Incidence and Survival between Southern Thailand and the United States: A Population-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Demanelis, Kathryn; Sriplung, Hutcha; Meza, Rafael; Wiangnon, Surapon; Rozek, Laura S.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Lupo, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Childhood leukemia incidence and survival varies globally, and this variation may be attributed to environmental risk factors, genetics, and/or disparities in diagnosis and treatment. PROCEDURE We analyzed childhood leukemia incidence and survival trends in children age 0–19 years from 1990 to 2011 in Songkhla, Thailand (n=316) and compared these results to US data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry (n=6,738). We computed relative survival using Ederer II and estimated survival functions using the Kaplan-Meier method. Changes in incidence and five-year survival by year of diagnosis were evaluated using joinpoint regression and are reported as annual percent changes (APC). RESULTS The age-standardized incidence of leukemia was 3.2 and 4.1 cases per 100,000 in Songkhla and SEER-9, respectively. In Songkhla, incidence from 1990–2011 significantly increased for leukemia (APC=1.7%, p=0.031) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (APC=1.8%, p=0.033). Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) incidence significantly increased (APC=4.2%, p=0.044) and was significantly different from the US (p=0.026), where incidence was stable during the same period (APC=0.3%, p=0.541). The overall five-year relative survival for leukemia was lower than that reported in the US (43% vs. 79%). Five-year survival significantly improved by at least 2% per year from 1990–2011 in Songkhla for leukemia, ALL, and AML (p<0.050). CONCLUSIONS While leukemia and ALL incidence increased in Songkhla, differences in leukemia trends, particularly AML incidence, may suggest etiologic or diagnostic differences between Songkhla and the US. This work highlights the importance of evaluating childhood cancer trends in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:25962869

  13. Relation of platelet density to platelet age: survival of low- and high-density 111indium-labeled platelets in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, B.; McFadden, P.R.; Hanson, S.R.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-08-01

    The relationship between platelet density and platelet age has been studied using continuous linear Percoll density gradients and 111In-labeling of autologous platelets in baboons. To investigate changes in platelet density during senescence in the circulation, baboons were infused with 111In-labeled autologous platelets, and blood was collected at one hour postinfusion and twice daily thereafter for six days. Platelets were isolated from these samples in high yield (greater than 95%) and separated in continuous linear Percoll density gradients following density equilibrium centrifugation. Although at one hour postinfusion the density distribution of radiolabeled platelets coincided closely with the distribution of the total platelet population, a detectable symmetrical shift toward higher densities was observed after five days. The relative specific radioactivity (RSR) of high-density platelets (1.064 to 1.067 g/mL) decreased at a slower rate than that of the total platelet population (platelets of all densities), whereas the RSR of low-density platelets (1.053 to 1.056 g/mL) showed a more immediate and rapid decrease. These results give rise to one of two interpretations: (1) low-density platelets have a shorter survival time than more dense platelets and are therefore cleared from the circulation at a faster rate, or (2) platelets of all densities increase in density upon aging in the circulation. To determine the explanation for changing RSR of different density fractions we studied the in vivo disappearance characteristics of low- and high-density 111In-labeled platelets. There were no significant differences between the mean survival times of low-density platelets (5.0 +/- 0.49 days, +/- 1 SD, n = 6), high-density platelets (4.9 +/- 0.56 days, n = 6), or control platelets representing platelets of all densities (4.9 +/- 0.38 days, n = 6).

  14. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a inhibited by pimozide may regulate survival of goat mammary gland epithelial cells by regulating parathyroid hormone-related protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zheng, Huiling; Sun, Yongsen; Yu, Qian; Li, Lihui

    2014-11-10

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a (Stat5a) modulates genes involved in proliferation and survival and plays pivotal roles in regulating the function of the mammary gland during pregnancy, lactation, and involution. However, there is little information about the effects of Stat5a on apoptosis of goat mammary gland epithelial cells (GMECs). In addition, parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a key regulator in cellular calcium transport, mammary gland development and breast tumor biology. This study aimed to explore the interaction of Stat5a and PTHrP in GMEC apoptosis. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that Stat5a was predominantly expressed in the mammary gland, lung, liver and spleen of goats. Treating the GMECs with pimozide, an inhibitor of Stat5a that decreases Stat5a tyrosine phosphorylation, increased PTHrP levels in GMECs in a dose-dependent manner and simultaneously promoted apoptosis of the GMECs. We also demonstrated that PTHrP inhibition induced GMEC apoptosis and restrained cell proliferation. In contrast, PTHrP overexpression protected GMECs from pimozide- and calcium-induced apoptosis, and promoted cell proliferation. Furthermore, pimozide and CaCl2 downregulated the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 mRNA expression, respectively, and these effects were protected by PTHrP overexpression. Interestingly, we also found that Stat5a suppressed the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) which can induce goat mammary epithelial cell migration, but PTHrP increased MMP-9 mRNA level. Thus, Stat5a may regulate GMEC survival by regulating the expression of PTHrP.

  15. Hypothermal effects on survival, energy homeostasis and expression of energy-related genes of swimming crabs Portunus trituberculatus during air exposure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunliang; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Fang; Dong, Shuanglin

    2016-08-01

    Previously, dry or semi-dry approach under the hypothermal condition is proved to be an alternative method in transport of live swimming crabs Portunus trituberculatus. However, we wondered whether this method can improve crab survival when temperature is kept as cool as possible. In this study, we hypothesized that there is a thermal threshold below which dry or semi-dry approach (air exposure) could cause crab physiological disruption and therefore aggravate their mortality. To test the above hypothesis, crabs (23°C) were exposed to air at temperatures ranging from 4 to 16°C. Results showed that crabs had a worse survival and vigor at temperatures below 12°C. Then we tested crab energy metabolism to explore the possible reason. It was shown that total adenine nucleotide and adenylate energy charge in gills were remarkably reduced by air exposure of below 12°C. This increased the need for crabs to re-balance energy metabolism, which was indicated by the upregulation of AMPKα and HIF-1α. Meanwhile, there was a significant increase of the expression of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, V-type ATPase and HSP90 at temperatures below 12°C, while all treatments shared a similar level of hemocyanin, urate and lactate in hemolymph and expression of cytochrome c oxidase and NADH-ubiquinone reductase in gills. These results implied that dry or semi-dry approach below 12°C could exert detrimental effects on P. trituberculatus, and perturbation of energy homeostasis, which is more related with changes of energy-demanding physiological pathways, is a possible reason of crab death and poor vigor.

  16. Stromal immune infiltration in HIV-related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is associated with HIV disease history and patient survival

    PubMed Central

    CHAO, Chun; XU, Lanfang; SILVERBERG, Michael J; MARTÍNEZ-MAZA, Otoniel; CHEN, Lie-Hong; CASTOR, Brandon; ABRAMS, Donald I; ZHA, Hongbin D; HAQUE, Reina; SAID, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding tumor microenvironment and its impact on prognosis of HIV-related lymphomas may provide insight into novel therapeutic strategies. Design We characterized the relationship between infiltrating immune cells with tumor characteristics, HIV disease history and survival in 80 HIV-related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients diagnosed in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (1996–2007) at Kaiser Permanente (KP) California. Eighty HIV-unrelated DLBCL patients were included for comparison. Methods Data on patients’ clinical history were obtained from KP’s electronic health records. The density of stromal CD4+, CD8+ and FOXP3+ T cells and CD68+ macrophages, as well as tumor molecular characteristics were examined using immunohistochemistry. The associations between stromal immune infiltration and patient’s clinical history or tumor characteristics were examined using Kruskal Wallis tests or Peasrons’ correlation coefficient. The effect of stromal immune infiltration on two-year mortality was evaluated in multivariable logistic regression. Results Compared to HIV-unrelated DLBCL, patients with HIV-related DLBCL had significantly reduced stromal CD4+ and FOXP3+ T cells, but increased density of macrophages. Increased density of stromal macrophages was correlated with lower circulating CD4 cell count at DLBCL diagnosis. Tumor molecular characteristics, including BCL6, p53 and cMYC expression, but not EBV infection status, were significantly correlated with stromal immune infiltration, particularly FOXP3+ T cells. A higher density of infiltrating CD8+ T cell was significantly associated with reduced mortality in HIV-related DLBCL patients [odds ratio=0.30 (0.09–0.97) for ≥25% vs. <10%]. Conclusion These data provide evidence for the prognostic significance of cytotoxic T cells in determining outcomes of HIV-related lymphoma. PMID:26355571

  17. Effects of irrigation and air humidity preconditioning on water relations, growth and survival of Rosmarinus officinalis plants during and after transplanting.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Blanco, Maria Jesús; Ferrández, Trinitario; Navarro, Alejandra; Bañon, Sebastián; Alarcón, Juan José

    2004-10-01

    The effect of different irrigation and air humidity conditioning treatments on the morphological and physiological responses of Rosmarinus officinalis in nursery conditions was investigated in order to evaluate the degree of hardening resulting from these conditions. Rosmarinus officinalis seedlings were pot-grown during 4 months in two greenhouses (nursery period), in which two irrigation treatments were used (control and deficit). In one of these greenhouses, air humidity was controlled using a dehumidifying system (low humidity), in the other greenhouse the air conditions were not artificially modified (control humidity). After the nursery period, the plants of all treatments were transplanted and well watered (100% water holding capacity for 1 month, transplanting period). After this period, they received no water (establishment period). At the end of the nursery period it was seen that deficit irrigation had altered the morphology of the R. officinalis plants by reducing plant height, stem diameter, leaf area, total dry weight, and root length, while humidity influenced the parameters related with plant water relations. Low air humidity and deficit irrigation-induced tissue dehydration and lower stomatal conductance values (gs). The plants subjected to deficit irrigation developed leaf osmotic adjustment, which was maintained during the transplanting period. At that time, the plants that had been exposed to deficit irrigation and low humidity showed efficient stomatal regulation (lower gs values). After transplanting and during the establishment period, these plants showed a better water status (higher psil and gs values). Their post-planting survival rate improved as a result of acclimation processes.

  18. Effect of mixed-Bacillus spp isolated from pustulose ark Anadara tuberculosa on growth, survival, viral prevalence and immune-related gene expression in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortiz, Ana Claudia; Angulo, Carlos; Luna-González, Antonio; Álvarez-Ruiz, Píndaro; Mazón-Suástegui, José Manuel; Campa-Córdova, Ángel Isidro

    2016-12-01

    The widespread overuse of antibiotics in aquaculture has led to the emergence of antibiotic-resistance shrimp pathogens, the negative impact on shrimp gut microbiota, and the presence of antimicrobial residues in aquaculture products, with negative consequences on human health. Alternatively, probiotics have positive effects on immunological responses and productive performance of aquatic animals. In this study, three probiotic bacteria, (Bacillus licheniformis MAt32, B. subtilis MAt43 and B. subtilis subsp. subtilis GAtB1), isolated from the Anadara tuberculosa were included in diets for juvenile shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, to evaluate their effects on growth, survival, disease prevalence, and immune-related gene expression. Shrimp naturally infected with WSSV and IHHNV were fed with the basal diet (control, T1) and diets supplemented with four levels of bacilli probiotic mix (1:1:1) at final concentration of (T2) 1 × 10(6), (T3) 2 × 10(6), (T4) 4 × 10(6), and (T5) 6 × 10(6) CFU g(-1) of feed. The specific growth rate of shrimp was significantly higher in T2 than in T1 (control) treatment, and the final growth as well as the survival were similar among treated groups. The prevalence of WSSV and IHHNV infected shrimp was reduced in T2 and T4 treatments, respectively, compared with control. The mRNA expression of proPO gene was higher in treatment T4 than control. The LvToll1 gene was significantly up-regulated in treatments T4 and T5 compared to control. The SOD gene was up-regulated in treatment T5 compared to control. In contrast, the mRNA expression of the Hsp70 gene was down-regulated in treatments T4 and T5 respect to control, and the TGase gene remained unaffected by the level of bacillus probiotic mix. As conclusion, the bacilli probiotic mix (Bacillus spp.) enhanced immune-related gene expression in WSSV and IHHNV naturally infected shrimp. This is the first report of probiotic potential of bacteria isolated from A. tuberculosa on the

  19. Pervasive survival of expressed mitochondrial rps14 pseudogenes in grasses and their relatives for 80 million years following three functional transfers to the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Han Chuan; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2006-01-01

    . Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the nuclear genes are probably the products of three independent transfers. Conclusion The rps14 gene has, most likely, been functionally transferred from the mitochondrion to the nucleus at least three times during the evolution of the Poales. The transfers in Cyperaceae and Poaceae are relatively ancient, occurring in the common ancestor of each family, roughly 80 million years ago, whereas the putative Joinvilleaceae transfer may be the most recent case of functional organelle-to-nucleus transfer yet described in any organism. Remarkably, nearly intact and expressed pseudogenes of rps14 have persisted in the mitochondrial genomes of most lineages of Poaceae and Cyperaceae despite the antiquity of the transfers and of the frameshift and RNA editing mutations that mark the mitochondrial genes as pseudogenes. Such long-term, nearly pervasive survival of expressed, apparent pseudogenes is to our knowledge unparalleled in any genome. Such survival probably reflects a combination of factors, including the short length of rps14, its location immediately downstream of rpl5 in most plants, and low rates of nucleotide substitutions and indels in plant mitochondrial DNAs. Their survival also raises the possibility that these rps14 sequences may not actually be pseudogenes despite their appearance as such. Overall, these findings indicate that intracellular gene transfer may occur even more frequently in angiosperms than already recognized and that pseudogenes in plant mitochondrial genomes can be surprisingly resistant to forces that lead to gene loss and inactivation. PMID:16842621

  20. Hepatoma-derived growth factor: A survival-related protein in prostate oncogenesis and a potential target for vitamin K2.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Aditya; Dasari, Subramanyam; Banerjee, Souresh; Gheewala, Taher; Zheng, Guoxing; Chen, Aoshuang; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Bosland, Maarten C; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar

    2016-11-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a heparin-binding growth factor, which has previously been shown to be expressed in a variety of cancers. HDGF overexpression has also previously been correlated with a poor prognosis in several cancers. The significance of HDGF in prostate cancer, however, has not been investigated. Here, we show that HDGF is overexpressed in both androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells and androgen-insensitive DU145, 22RV1, and PC-3 cells. Forced overexpression enhanced cell viability of RWPE-1 cells, whereas HDGF knockdown reduced cell proliferation in human prostate cancer cells. We also show that HDGF may serve as a survival-related protein as ectopic overexpression of HDGF in RWPE cells up-regulated the expression of antiapoptosis proteins cyclin E and BCL-2, whereas simultaneously down-regulating proapoptotic protein BAX. Western blot analysis also showed that HDGF overexpression modulated the activity of phospho-AKT as well as NF-kB, and these results correlated with in vitro migration and invasion assays. We next assessed the therapeutic potential of HDGF inhibition with a HDGF monoclonal antibody and vitamin k2, showing reduced cell proliferation as well as inhibition of NF-kB expression in HDGF overexpressed RWPE cells treated with a HDGF monoclonal antibody and vitamin K2. Collectively, our results suggest that HDGF is a relevant protein in prostate oncogenesis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target in prostate cancer.

  1. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates expression of nuclear factor-erythroid-2 related transcription factor-1 (Nrf1) and inhibits pro-survival function of Nrf1

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Madhurima; Kwong, Erick K.; Park, Eujean; Nagra, Parminder; Chan, Jefferson Y.

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor-1 (Nrf1) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that is known to regulate antioxidant and cytoprotective gene expression. It was recently shown that Nrf1 is regulated by SCF–Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. However our knowledge of upstream signals that targets Nrf1 for degradation by the UPS is not known. We report here that Nrf1 expression is negatively regulated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) in Fbw7-dependent manner. We show that GSK3 interacts with Nrf1 and phosphorylates the Cdc4 phosphodegron domain (CPD) in Nrf1. Mutation of serine residue in the CPD of Nrf1 to alanine (S350A), blocks Nrf1 from phosphorylation by GSK3, and stabilizes Nrf1. Knockdown of Nrf1 and expression of a constitutively active form of GSK3 results in increased apoptosis in neuronal cells in response to ER stress, while expression of the GSK3 phosphorylation resistant S350A–Nrf1 attenuates apoptotic cell death. Together these data suggest that GSK3 regulates Nrf1 expression and cell survival function in response to stress activation. Highlights: • The effect of GSK3 on Nrf1 expression was examined. • GSK3 destabilizes Nrf1 protein via Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. • GSK3 binds and phosphorylates Nrf1. • Protection from stress-induced apoptosis by Nrf1 is inhibited by GSK3.

  2. Relative biological effects of neutron mixed-beam irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy on cell survival and DNA double-strand breaks in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Kakuji; Kinashi, Yuko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Kitajima, Erika; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biological effects of neutron mixed-beam irradiation used for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is important in order to improve the efficacy of the therapy and to reduce side effects. In the present study, cell viability and DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and their radiosensitive mutant cells (xrs5, Ku80-deficient), following neutron mixed-beam irradiation for BNCT. Cell viability was significantly impaired in the neutron irradiation groups compared to the reference gamma-ray irradiation group. The relative biological effectiveness for 10% cell survival was 3.3 and 1.2 for CHO-K1 and xrs5 cells, respectively. There were a similar number of 53BP1 foci, indicators of DNA-DSBs, in the neutron mixed-beam and the gamma-ray groups. In addition, the size of the foci did not differ between groups. However, neutron mixed-beam irradiation resulted in foci with different spatial distributions. The foci were more proximal to each other in the neutron mixed-beam groups than the gamma-ray irradiation groups. These findings suggest that neutron beams may induce another type of DNA damage, such as clustered DNA-DSBs, as has been indicated for other high-LET irradiation. PMID:22966174

  3. Survival rate of wine-related yeasts during alcoholic fermentation assessed by direct live/dead staining combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Branco, Patrícia; Monteiro, Margarida; Moura, Patrícia; Albergaria, Helena

    2012-08-01

    Real-time detection of microorganisms involved in complex microbial process, such as wine fermentations, and evaluation of their physiological state is crucial to predict whether or not those microbial species will be able to impact the final product. In the present work we used a direct live/dead staining (LDS) procedure combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to simultaneously assess the identity and viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) and Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (Hg) during fermentations performed with single and mixed cultures. The population evolution of both yeasts was determined by plating and by LDS combined with species-specific FISH-probes labeled with Fluorescein. Since the FISH method involves the permeabilization of the cell membrane prior to hybridization and that it may influence the free diffusion of PI in and out of the cells, we optimized the concentration of this dye (0.5 μg of PI per 10(6) cells) for minimal diffusion (less than 2%). Fluorescent cells were enumerated by hemocytometry and flow cytometry. Results showed that the survival rate of Sc during mixed cultures was high throughout the entire process (60% of viable cells at the 9th day), while Hg began to die off at the 2nd day, exhibited 98% of dead cells at the 3rd day (45 g/l of ethanol) and became completely unculturable at the 4th day. However, under single culture fermentation the survival rate and culturability of Hg decreased at a much slower pace, exhibiting at the 7th day (67 g/l of ethanol) 8.7×10(4) CFU/ml and 85% of dead cells. Thus, our work demonstrated that the LDS-FISH method is able to simultaneously assess the viability and identity of these wine-related yeast species during alcoholic fermentation in a fast and reliable way. In order to validate PI-staining as a viability marker during alcoholic fermentation, we evaluated the effect of ethanol on the membrane permeability of Sc and Hg cells, as well as their capacity to recover membrane

  4. Survival of timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) estimated by capture-recapture models in relation to age, sex, color morph, time, and birthplace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, W.S.; Kery, M.; Hines, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Juvenile survival is one of the least known elements of the life history of many species, in particular snakes. We conducted a mark–recapture study of Crotalus horridus from 1978–2002 in northeastern New York near the northern limits of the species' range. We marked 588 neonates and estimated annual age-, sex-, and morph-specific recapture and survival rates using the Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) model. Wild-caught neonates (field-born, n  =  407) and neonates produced by captive-held gravid females (lab-born, n  =  181) allowed comparison of the birthplace, or lab treatment effect, in estimated survival. Recapture rates declined from about 10–20% over time while increasing from young to older age classes. Estimated survival rates (S ± 1 SE) in the first year were significantly higher among field-born (black morph: S  =  0.773 ± 0.203; yellow morph: S  =  0.531 ± 0.104) than among lab-born snakes (black morph: S  =  0.411 ± 0.131; yellow morph: S  =  0.301 ± 0.081). Lower birth weights combined with a lack of field exposure until release apparently contributed to the lower survival rate of lab-born snakes. Subsequent survival estimates for 2–4-yr-old snakes were S  =  0.845 ± 0.084 for the black morph and S  =  0.999 (SE not available) for the yellow morph, and for ≥5-yr-old snakes S  =  0.958 ± 0.039 (black morph) and S  =  0.822 ± 0.034 (yellow morph). The most parsimonious model overall contained an independent time trend for survival of each age, morph, and lab-treatment group. For snakes of the first two age groups (ages 1 yr and 2–4 yr), survival tended to decline over the years for both morphs, while for adult snakes (5 yr and older), survival was constant or even slightly increased. Our data on survival and recapture are among the first rigorous estimates of these parameters in a rattlesnake and among the few yet available for any viperid snake. These data are useful for analyses of the life

  5. Could baseline health-related quality of life (QoL) predict overall survival in metastatic colorectal cancer? The results of the GERCOR OPTIMOX 1 study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health-related quality of life (QoL) has prognostic value in many cancers. A recent study found that the performance of prognostic systems for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) were improvable. We evaluated the independent prognostic value of QoL for overall survival (OS) and its ability to improve two prognostic systems’performance (Köhne and GERCOR models) for patients with mCRC. Methods The EQ-5D questionnaire was self-completed before randomization in the OPTIMOX1, a phase III trial comparing two strategies of FOLFOX chemotherapy which included 620 previously untreated mCRC patients recruited from January 2000 to June 2002 from 56 institutions in five countries. The improvement in models’ performance (after addition of QoL) was studied with Harrell’s C-index and the net reclassification improvement. Results Of the 620 patients, 249 (40%) completed QoL datasets. The Köhne model could be improved by LDH, mobility and pain/discomfort; the C-index rose from 0.54 to 0.67. The associated NRI for 12-month death was 0.23 [0.05; 0.46]. Mobility and pain/discomfort could be added to the GERCOR model: the C-index varied from 0.63 to 0.68. The NRI for 12 months death was 0.35 [0.12; 0.44]. Conclusions Mobility and pain dimensions of EQ5D are independent prognostic factors and could be useful for staging and treatment assignment of mCRC patients. Presented at the 2011 ASCO Annual Meeting (#3632). PMID:24886671

  6. Surviving Companions of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzendorf, W.

    2016-06-01

    Most supernovae should occur in binaries. Massive stars, the progenitors of core collapse supernovae (SN II/Ib/c), have a very high binarity fraction of 80 percent (on average, they have 1.5 companions). Binary systems are also required to produce thermonuclear supernovae (SN Ia). Understanding the role that binarity plays in pre-supernova evolution is one of the great mysteries in supernova research. Finding and studying surviving companions of supernovae has the power to shed light on some of these mysteries. Searching Galactic and nearby supernova remnants for surviving companions is a particularly powerful technique. This might allow to study the surviving companion in great detail possibly enabling a relatively detailed reconstruction of the pre-supernova evolution. In this talk, I will summarize the multitude of theoretical studies that have simulated the impact of the shockwave on the companion star and the subsequent evolution of the survivor. I will then give an overview of the searches that used these theoretical findings to identify surviving companions in nearby supernova remnants as well as their results. Finally, I will give an outlook of new opportunities in the relatively young field.

  7. Surgical Management of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: Impact of Surgery on Survival and Quality of Life—Relation to Chemotherapy, Radiotherapy, and Alternative Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Papaspyros, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive cancer arising from pleural mesothelium. Surgery aims to either cure the disease or control the symptoms. Two surgical procedures exist: extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and pleurectomy/decortication (P/D). In this systematic review we assess current evidence on safety and efficacy of surgery. Methods. Five electronic databases were reviewed from January 1990 to January 2013. Studies were selected according to a predefined protocol. Primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints included quality of life, disease-free survival, disease recurrence, morbidity, and length of hospital stay. Results. Sixteen studies were included. Median survival ranged from 8.1 to 32 months for P/D and from 6.9 to 46.9 months for EPP. Perioperative mortality was 0%–9.8% and 3.2%–12.5%, respectively. Perioperative morbidity was 5.9%–55% for P/D and 10%–82.6% for EPP. Average length of stay was 7 days for P/D and 9 days for EPP. Conclusion. Current evidence cannot definitively answer which procedure (EPP or P/D) is more beneficial in terms of survival and operative risks. This systematic review suggests that surgery in the context of trimodality therapy offers acceptable perioperative outcomes and long-term survival. Centres specialising in MPM management have better results. PMID:24624305

  8. Human papillomavirus, p16INK4A, and Ki-67 in relation to clinicopathological variables and survival in primary carcinoma of the vagina

    PubMed Central

    Hellman, K; Lindquist, D; Ranhem, C; Wilander, E; Andersson, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine human papillomavirus (HPV) status and to investigate p16INK4A and Ki-67 expression and their correlation with clinical parameters and survival in women with primary carcinoma of the vagina (PCV). Methods: The presence of HPV DNA was evaluated by PCR. Genotyping was performed by Luminex in 68 short-term (⩽2 years) and long-term (⩾8 years) PCV survivors. p16INK4A and Ki-67 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Human papillomavirus DNA was detected in 43% of patients, the majority (63%) of whom were HPV16 positive. High p16INK4A expression was significantly correlated with low histopathological grade (P=0.004), HPV positivity (P=0.032), and long-term survival (P=0.045). High Ki-67 expression was negatively correlated with histopathological grade (P<0.001) and tumour size (P=0.047). There was an association between HPV positivity and low histopathological grade, but not between HPV positivity and survival. Conclusion: High p16INK4A expression was associated with long-term survival, but the only independent predictors for survival were tumour size and histopathological grade. Our results indicate that p16INK4A and Ki-67 expression might be useful in tumour grading, and that it might be possible to use p16INK4A expression as a marker for HPV positivity, but this has to be further elucidated. PMID:24525695

  9. Factors related to survival and treatment success in invasive candidiasis or candidemia: a pooled analysis of two large, prospective, micafungin trials.

    PubMed

    Horn, D L; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L; Morris, M I; Ullmann, A J; Wu, C; Buell, D N; Kovanda, L L; Cornely, O A

    2010-02-01

    Crude and attributable mortality rates in patients with candidemia and invasive candidiasis remain unacceptably high. It is important to reach a more complete understanding of the risk factors underlying poor outcomes in patients with invasive Candida infections. Micafungin therapy has been assessed in two phase 3 trials compared to either liposomal amphotericin B or caspofungin. The availability of this large dataset allows the analyses of non-drug factors associated with survival and treatment success. A multivariate regression analysis was performed on data from the two trials separately and as a pooled analysis (N = 1,070). Analysis outcomes were survival at 42 days post-initiation of therapy and treatment success. For the pooled analysis, treatment success was significantly more likely for candidemia than invasive candidiasis. Both survival and treatment success were significantly less likely for the non-removal of catheter versus removal, Asian-Indians versus Caucasians, APACHE II score >20 to 30 versus or=70 years versus <50 years, baseline corticosteroids, and persistent neutropenia. Survival was also significantly less likely for treatment in other regions versus North America and for patients with renal failure at baseline. These findings help to define non-antifungal drug factors that may impact survival and treatment success in invasive candidiasis or candidemia.

  10. Relative survival of four serotypes of Salmonella enterica in low-water activity whey protein powder held at 36 and 70°C at various water activity levels.

    PubMed

    Farakos, S M Santillana; Hicks, J W; Frye, J G; Frank, J F

    2014-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is not able to grow at water activity (aw) levels below 0.94, but it can survive in low-aw foods for long periods of time. Temperature, aw, substrate, and serotype affect its persistence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of temperature and aw on the relative persistence among four serotypes of Salmonella enterica in low-aw whey protein powder. Whey protein powder was equilibrated to aws 0.18 ± 0.02 and 0.54 ± 0.03, inoculated with a cocktail of Salmonella serovars (Agona, Tennessee, Montevideo, and Typhimurium), vacuum sealed, and stored at 36°C for 6 months and at 70°C for 48 h. Presumptive Salmonella colonies (30 to 32) were randomly picked from each plate at the end of each survival study. PCR multiplex serotyping was used to identify the isolates. A multinomial mixed logistic model with Salmonella Tennessee as a reference was used to test for significant differences in frequency distribution of the surviving serotypes. Salmonella Tennessee and Salmonella Agona were the most prevalent surviving serotypes, followed in decreasing order by Salmonella Montevideo and Salmonella Typhimurium. Statistical analysis indicated that temperature (P = 0.003) and aw (P = 0.012) influenced the relative prevalence of the Salmonella serotypes. If other environmental conditions are equal, Salmonella Tennessee is better able to survive than Salmonella Montevideo and Salmonella Typhimurium at higher temperatures and higher aw levels in low-aw whey protein powder held at 36 and 70°C. The relative prevalence of Salmonella Agona to Salmonella Tennessee did not change with increasing temperature (P = 0.211) or aw (P = 0.453). These results should be considered in risk assessment and when developing predictive models for survival of Salmonella in low-aw foods.

  11. Radial fast-neutron fluence gradients during rotating 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation recorded with metallic fluence monitors and geological age standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutte, Daniel; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Koleška, Michal; Jonckheere, Raymond; Unterricker, Sepp

    2015-01-01

    the neutron-irradiation parameter J is one of the major uncertainties in 40Ar/39Ar dating. The associated uncertainty of the individual J-value for a sample of unknown age depends on the accuracy of the age of the geological standards, the fast-neutron fluence distribution in the reactor, and the distances between standards and samples during irradiation. While it is generally assumed that rotating irradiation evens out radial neutron fluence gradients, we observed axial and radial variations of the J-values in sample irradiations in the rotating channels of two reactors. To quantify them, we included three-dimensionally distributed metallic fast (Ni) and thermal- (Co) neutron fluence monitors in three irradiations and geological age standards in three more. Two irradiations were carried out under Cd shielding in the FRG1 reactor in Geesthacht, Germany, and four without Cd shielding in the LVR-15 reactor in Řež, Czech Republic. The 58Ni(nf,p)58Co activation reaction and γ-spectrometry of the 811 keV peak associated with the subsequent decay of 58Co to 58Fe allow one to calculate the fast-neutron fluence. The fast-neutron fluences at known positions in the irradiation container correlate with the J-values determined by mass-spectrometric 40Ar/39Ar measurements of the geological age standards. Radial neutron fluence gradients are up to 1.8 %/cm in FRG1 and up to 2.2 %/cm in LVR-15; the corresponding axial gradients are up to 5.9 and 2.1 %/cm. We conclude that sample rotation might not always suffice to meet the needs of high-precision dating and gradient monitoring can be crucial.

  12. Surviving Cancer

    MedlinePlus

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  13. Human Papillomavirus-16 Infection in Advanced Oral Cavity Cancer Patients Is Related to an Increased Risk of Distant Metastases and Poor Survival

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Kang, Chung-Jan; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yang, Shu-Li; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Chang, Yu-Liang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an oncogenic virus causing oropharyngeal cancers and resulting in a favorable outcome after the treatment. The role of HPV in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains ambiguous. Objective This study aimed to examine the effect of HPV infection on disease control among patients with OSCC following radical surgery with radiation-based adjuvant therapy. Patients and Method We prospectively followed 173 patients with advanced OSCC (96% were stage III/IV) who had undergone radical surgery and adjuvant therapy between 2004 and 2006. They were followed between surgery and death or up to 60 months. Surgical specimens were examined using a PCR-based HPV blot test. The primary endpoints were the risk of relapse and the time to relapse; the secondary endpoints were disease-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Results The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCC was 22%; HPV-16 (9%) and HPV-18 (7%) were the genotypes most commonly encountered. Solitary HPV-16 infection was a poor predictor of 5-year distant metastases (hazard ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.4–8.0; P = 0.005), disease-free survival (P = 0.037), disease-specific survival (P = 0.006), and overall survival (P = 0.010), whereas HPV-18 infection had no impact on 5-year outcomes. The rate of 5-year distant metastases was significantly higher in the HPV-16 or level IV/V metastasis group compared with both the extracapsular spread or tumor depth ≥11-mm group and patients without risk factors (P<0.001). Conclusions HPV infections in advanced OSCC patients are not uncommon and clinically relevant. Compared with HPV-16-negative advanced OSCC patients, those with a single HPV-16 infection are at higher risk of distant metastases and poor survival despite undergoing radiation-based adjuvant therapy and require a more aggressive adjuvant treatment and a more thorough follow-up. PMID:22808258

  14. Incidence and survival of stomach cancer in a high-risk population of Chile

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Katy; Bertran, Enriqueta; Andia, Marcelo E; Ferreccio, Catterina

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the incidence and survival rate of stomach cancer (SC) and its associated factors in a high risk population in Chile. METHODS: The population-based cancer registry of Valdivia, included in the International Agency for Research on Cancer system, covers 356 396 residents of Valdivia Province, Southern Chile. We studied all SC cases entered in this Registry during 1998-2002 (529 cases). Population data came from the Chilean census (2002). Standardized incidence rates per 100 000 inhabitants (SIR) using the world population, cumulative risk of developing cancer before age 75, and rate ratios by sex, age, ethnicity and social factors were estimated. Relative survival (Ederer II method) and age-standardized estimates (Brenner method) were calculated. Specific survival rates (Kaplan-Meier) were measured at 3 and 5 years and survival curves were analyzed with the Logrank and Breslow tests. Survival was studied in relation to demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory results and medical management of the cases. Those variables significantly associated with survival were later included in a Cox multivariate model. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2002, 529 primary gastric cancers occurred in Valdivia (crude incidence rate 29.2 per 100 000 inhabitants). Most cases were male (69.0%), residents of urban areas (57.5%) and Hispanic (83.2%), with a low education level (84.5% < 8 school years). SC SIR was higher in men than women (40.8 and 14.8 respectively, P < 0.001), risk factors were low education RR 4.4 (95% CI: 2.9-6.8) and 1.6, (95% CI: 1.1-2.1) for women and men respectively and Mapuche ethnicity only significant for women (RR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2-3.7). Of all cases, 76.4% were histologically confirmed, 11.5% had a death certificate only (DCO), 56.1% were TNM stage IV; 445 cases (84.1%) were eligible for survival analysis, all completed five years follow-up; 42 remained alive, 392 died of SC and 11 died from other causes. Specific 5-year survival, excluding cases

  15. Dietary lignan intakes in relation to survival among women with breast cancer: the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) Study.

    PubMed

    McCann, Susan E; Thompson, Lilian U; Nie, Jing; Dorn, Joan; Trevisan, Maurizio; Shields, Peter G; Ambrosone, Christine B; Edge, Stephen B; Li, Hsin-Fang; Kasprzak, Christina; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2010-07-01

    Dietary lignan intakes have been associated with reduced breast cancer risks; however, no previous studies have investigated whether lignan intake might be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the association of dietary lignan intakes with survival in 1122 women with primary, incident, histologically confirmed breast cancer identified between 1996 and 2001, and with vital status determined through December 31, 2006. Diet in the 12-24 months before diagnosis was assessed with an extensive food frequency questionnaire, and potential confounders assessed from an extensive epidemiologic interview and abstracted clinical data. Lignan intake was calculated using published food composition data. Hazard ratios (HR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dietary lignan intakes with all cause, and breast cancer mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazards adjusting for age, education, race, total energy intake, tumor stage, and body mass index. Of the 1122 women with complete dietary data, 160 had died by the end of follow-up. Among postmenopausal women only, those in the highest versus lowest quartile of lignan intakes had a statistically significant reduction in the risk of all cause mortality (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.26-0.91) and a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer mortality (HR 0.29, 95% CI 0.11-0.76). Higher intakes of dried beans (HR 0.61, 95% CI 0.36-1.03), but not fruits, vegetables, or grains, were also weakly associated with overall mortality. In summary, our results suggest that higher lignan intakes may be associated with improved survival among postmenopausal women with breast cancer.

  16. Migrational Characteristics, Biological Observations, and Relative Survival of Juvenile Salmonids Entering the Columbia River Estuary, 1966-1983, 1985 Final Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, Earl M.

    1986-04-01

    Natural runs of salmonids in the Columbia River basin have decreased as a result of hydroelectric-dam development, poor land- and forest-management, and over-fishing. This has necessitated increased salmon culture to assure adequate numbers of returning adults. Hatchery procedures and facilities are continually being modified to improve both the efficiency of production and the quality of juveniles produced. Initial efforts to evaluate changes in hatchery procedures were dependent upon adult contributions to the fishery and returns to the hatchery. Procedures were developed for sampling juvenile salmon and steelhead entering the Columbia River estuary and ocean plume. The sampling of hatchery fish at the terminus of their freshwater migration assisted in evaluating hatchery production techniques and identifying migrational or behavioral characteristics that influence survival to and through the estuary. The sampling program attempted to estimate survival of different stocks and define various aspects of migratory behavior in a large river, with flows during the spring freshet from 4 to 17 thousand cubic meters per second (m/sup 3//second).

  17. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for adult Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphocytic leukemia: comparable survival rates but different risk factors between related and unrelated transplantation in first complete remission.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Satoshi; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Kurokawa, Mineo; Iida, Hiroatsu; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Kobayashi, Naoki; Kasai, Masanobu; Mori, Takehiko; Iwato, Koji; Yoshida, Takashi; Onizuka, Makoto; Kawa, Keisei; Morishima, Yasuo; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Miyamura, Koichi

    2010-11-18

    To identify factors to improve the outcomes of related and unrelated allogeneic stem cell transplantations (allo-SCT) for Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphocytic leukemia (Ph(-) ALL) in the first complete remission (CR1), we retrospectively analyzed 1139 Ph(-) ALL patients using the registry data, particularly the details of 641 patients transplanted in CR1. Overall survival was significantly superior among patients transplanted in CR1, but no significant difference was observed between related and unrelated allo-SCTs (related vs unrelated: 65% vs 62% at 4 years, respectively; P = .19). Among patients transplanted in CR1, relapse rates were significantly higher in related allo-SCT compared with unrelated allo-SCT, and multivariate analysis demonstrated that less than 6 months from diagnosis to allo-SCT alone was associated with relapse. On the other hand, nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was significantly higher in unrelated allo-SCT compared with related allo-SCT, and multivariate analysis demonstrated that 10 months or longer from diagnosis to allo-SCT, human leukocyte antigen mismatch, and abnormal karyotype were associated with NRM. In conclusion, our study showed comparable survival rates but different relapse rates, NRM rates, and risk factors between related and unrelated allo-SCTs. After a close consideration of these factors, the outcome of allo-SCT for adult Ph(-) ALL in CR1 could be improved.

  18. Trends of classification, incidence, mortality, and survival of MDS patients in Switzerland between 2001 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Bonadies, Nicolas; Feller, Anita; Rovo, Alicia; Ruefer, Axel; Blum, Sabine; Gerber, Bernhard; Stuessi, Georg; Benz, Rudolf; Cantoni, Nathan; Holbro, Andreas; Schmidt, Adrian; Lehmann, Thomas; Wilk, C Matthias; Arndt, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are emerging disorders of the elderly with an increasing burden on healthcare systems. He we report on the first population-based, epidemiological analysis of patients diagnosed with MDS in Switzerland between 2001 and 2012. The aim of this study was to characterize the extent and limitations of currently available population-based, epidemiological data and formulate recommendations for future health services research. The investigated outcomes comprised trends of annual case frequency, classification of morphological subtypes, incidence, mortality and survival. Annual case frequency increased by 20% (from 263 to 315 cases per year), whereas age-standardized incidence-/mortality-rates remained stable (2.5/1.1 per 100'000 person-years). This observation reflects population growth as well as higher diagnostic awareness and not an increase of age-specific risk. However, it will inevitably influence the future prevalence of MDS and the impact on healthcare systems. Reporting of classification in MDS subtypes was poor with modest improvement from 20% to 39% and increased awareness for mainly higher-risk diseases. Relative survival for all patients at 5-years (RS) ranged between 37 and 40%. Significant better RS was found for younger compared to older higher-risk MDS patients (48% vs. 17%), reflecting the effect of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. However, no survival advantage was found in elderly patients after introduction of hypomethylating agents as standard for care in this patient group. Our data is in line with results from other MDS and cancer registries. It allows formulating recommendations for future collaborative health services research on MDS patients with national and international partners.

  19. Clinical findings in relation to mortality in non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections: patients with Mycobacterium avium complex have better survival than patients with other mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kotilainen, H; Valtonen, V; Tukiainen, P; Poussa, T; Eskola, J; Järvinen, A

    2015-09-01

    We compared the clinical findings and survival in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and other non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). A total of 167 adult non-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with at least one positive culture for NTM were included. Medical records were reviewed. The patients were categorised according to the 2007 American Thoracic Society (ATS) criteria. MAC comprised 59 % of all NTM findings. MAC patients were more often female (70 % vs. 34 %, p < 0.001) and had less fatal underlying diseases (23 % vs. 47 %, p = 0.001) as compared to other NTM patients. Symptoms compatible with NTM infection had lasted for less than a year in 34 % of MAC patients but in 54 % of other NTM patients (p = 0.037). Pulmonary MAC patients had a significantly lower risk of death compared to pulmonary other NTM (hazard ratio [HR] 0.50, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.33-0.77, p = 0.002) or subgroup of other slowly growing NTM (HR 0.55, 95 % CI 0.31-0.99, p = 0.048) or as rapidly growing NTM (HR 0.47, 95 % CI 0.25-0.87, p = 0.02). The median survival time was 13.0 years (95 % CI 5.9-20.1) for pulmonary MAC but 4.6 years (95 % CI 3.4-5.9) for pulmonary other NTM. Serious underlying diseases (HR 3.21, 95 % CI 2.05-5.01, p < 0.001) and age (HR 1.07, 95 % CI 1.04-1.09, p < 0.001) were the significant predictors of mortality and female sex was a predictor of survival (HR 0.38, 95 % CI 0.24-0.59, p < 0.001) in the multivariate analysis. Pulmonary MAC patients had better prognosis than pulmonary other NTM patients. The symptom onset suggests a fairly rapid disease course.

  20. Weight-for-age standard score - distribution and effect on in-hospital mortality: A retrospective analysis in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    George, Antony; Jagannath, Pushpa; Joshi, Shreedhar S.; Jagadeesh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution of weight for age standard score (Z score) in pediatric cardiac surgery and its effect on in-hospital mortality. Introduction: WHO recommends Standard Score (Z score) to quantify and describe anthropometric data. The distribution of weight for age Z score and its effect on mortality in congenital heart surgery has not been studied. Methods: All patients of younger than 5 years who underwent cardiac surgery from July 2007 to June 2013, under single surgical unit at our institute were enrolled. Z score for weight for age was calculated. Patients were classified according to Z score and mortality across the classes was compared. Discrimination and calibration of the for Z score model was assessed. Improvement in predictability of mortality after addition of Z score to Aristotle Comprehensive Complexity (ACC) score was analyzed. Results: The median Z score was -3.2 (Interquartile range -4.24 to -1.91] with weight (mean±SD) of 8.4 ± 3.38 kg. Overall mortality was 11.5%. 71% and 52.59% of patients had Z score < -2 and < -3 respectively. Lower Z score classes were associated with progressively increasing mortality. Z score as continuous variable was associated with O.R. of 0.622 (95% CI- 0.527 to 0.733, P < 0.0001) for in-hospital mortality and remained significant predictor even after adjusting for age, gender, bypass duration and ACC score. Addition of Z score to ACC score improved its predictability for in-hosptial mortality (δC - 0.0661 [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.0169], IDI- 3.83% [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.00042]). Conclusion: Z scores were lower in our cohort and were associated with in-hospital mortality. Addition of Z score to ACC score significantly improves predictive ability for in-hospital mortality. PMID:26139742

  1. Survival dynamics of cystic fibrosis-related Gram-negative bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia) in Dead Sea and Atlantic Ocean waters.

    PubMed

    Shteinberg, Michal; Kis-Papo, Tamar; Millar, Beverley C; Rendall, Jacqueline C; Downey, Damian G; Elborn, J Stuart; Moore, John E

    2015-09-01

    Clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=6) and Burkholderia cenocepacia (n=4) were inoculated in marine brines from the Dead Sea and the Atlantic Ocean and their survival was monitored over a 1 month duration. In Dead Sea samples, all P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia isolates were non-detectable by culture following 24 h incubation, including the non-selective enrichment samples. In the Atlantic Ocean brine, over a 1 month period, mean P. aeruginosa counts decreased by only 0.25 log10 units and mean B. cenocepacia counts decreased by approximately 4 log10 units (10,000 cfu/ml). This study demonstrated that Dead Sea brine exerted a lethal effect within 24 h on planktonic P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia. Thus, the Dead Sea effectively purges these organisms from its environment on a daily basis.

  2. Survival of freeze-dried bacteria.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto-Shinohara, Yukie; Sukenobe, Junji; Imaizumi, Takashi; Nakahara, Toro

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the survival of freeze-dried bacterial species stored at the International Patent Organism Depository (IPOD) and to elucidate the characteristics affecting survival. Bacterial strains were freeze-dried, sealed in ampoules under a vacuum (<1 Pa), and stored in the dark at 5 degrees C. The survival of a variety of species following storage for up to 20 years was analyzed. The survival of freeze-dried species was analyzed in terms of two stages, freeze-drying and storing. Nonmotile genera showed relatively high survival after freeze-drying. Motile genera with peritrichous flagella showed low survival rates after freeze-drying. Vibrio and Aeromonas, which produce numerous flagella, showed very low survival rates. In Lactobacillus, non-trehalose-fermenting species showed better survival rates after freeze-drying than did fermenting species, and those species with teichoic acid in the cell wall showed lower survival rates during storage than species with teichoic acid in the cell membrane. Human pathogenic species of Corynebacterium, Bacillus, Streptococcus, and Klebsiella showed lower survival rates during storage than nonpathogenic species within the same genus. Among Pseudomonas species, P. chlororaphis, the only species tested that forms levan from sucrose, showed the lowest survival rate during storage in the genus. Survival rates of Gram-negative species during storage tended to be lower than those of Gram-positive species, though Chryseobacterium meningosepticum had stable survival during storage. The conclusion is that smooth cell surfaces (i.e., no flagella) and lack of trehalose outside the cytoplasm improved survival rates after freeze-drying. Because desiccation is important for survival during storage, the presence of extracellular polysaccharides or teichoic acids is disadvantageous for long-term survival. The lower survival rates of freeze-dried Gram-negative bacteria compared with those of Gram-positive bacteria

  3. The effect of mother’s age and other related factors on neonatal survival associated with first and second birth in rural, Tanzania: evidence from Ifakara health and demographic surveillance system in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With a view to improve neonatal survival, data on birth outcomes are critical for planning maternal and child health care services. We present information on neonatal survival from Ifakara Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in Tanzania, regarding the influence of mother’s age and other related factors on neonatal survival of first and second births. Methods The study conducted analysis using longitudinal health and demographic data collected from Ifakara HDSS in parts of Kilombero and Ulanga districts in Morogoro region. The analysis included first and second live births that occurred within six years (2004–2009) and the unit of observation was a live birth. A logistic regression model was used to assess the influence of socio-demographic factors on neonates’ survival. Results A total of 18,139 first and second live births were analyzed. We found neonatal mortality rate of 32 per 1000 live births (95% CI: 29/1000-34/1000). Results from logistic regression model indicated increase in risk of neonatal mortality among neonates those born to young mothers aged 13–19 years compared with those whose mother‘s aged 20–34 years (aOR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.34-2.02). We also found that neonates in second birth order were more likely to die than those in first birth order (aOR = 1.85: 95% CI = 1.52-2.26). The risk of neonatal mortality among offspring of women who had a partner co-resident was 18% times lower as compared with offspring of mothers without a partner co-resident in the household (aOR = 0.82: 95% CI = 0.66-0.98). Short birth interval (<33 months) was associated with increased risk of neonatal mortality (aOR = 1.50, 95% CI =1.16-1.96) compared with long birth interval (> = 33 months). Male born neonates were found to have an increased risk (aOR = 1.34, 95% CI =1.13- 1.58) of neonatal mortality as compared to their female counterparts. Conclusions Delaying the age at first birth may be a

  4. No sex-related differences in mortality in bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) exposed to deltamethrin, and surviving bed bugs can recover.

    PubMed

    Feldlaufer, Mark F; Ulrich, Kevin R; Kramer, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    Exposure of a pyrethroid-susceptible strain of bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) to varying concentrations of deltamethrin for 24 h indicated no significant difference in mortality between males, females, and nymphs at 24 nor at 168 h postexposure when bed bugs were removed to untreated surfaces at 24 h. In addition, many bed bugs classified as morbid or moribund at 24 h and removed to untreated surfaces at this time, recovered by 336 h (2 wk) and were capable of feeding when given the opportunity. Adult female bed bugs that survived were able to lay eggs and the resulting nymphs blood-fed. By contrast, all bed bugs classified as morbid or moribund at 24 h that remained on deltamethrin-treated surfaces for 336 h either died or were still classified as morbid or moribund at the end of this time. No bed bugs classified as morbid or moribund blood-fed when given the opportunity at 2 wk, regardless of whether they remained on the treated surfaces or were removed to untreated surfaces. A power analysis demonstrated we would have detected even moderate differences in mortality between males and females, had differences existed. Therefore, using males exclusively in efficacy assays is a suitable strategy to preserve females for laboratory colony purposes. Results also indicated there is little reason to assess efficacy beyond 1 wk, even when bed bugs are exposed for only 24 h.

  5. Identification of the clpB and bipA genes and an evaluation of their expression as related to intracellular survival for the bacterial pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Isla, A; Haussmann, D; Vera, T; Kausel, G; Figueroa, J

    2014-10-10

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the pathogen responsible for salmonid rickettsial septicemia (SRS), a disease that affects a wide variety of marine cultivated fish species and causes economic losses for the aquaculture industry worldwide. Many in vitro studies have reported on the capacity of this microorganism to replicate in the interior of cytoplasmic vesicles from varied fish cell lines. However, the mechanisms used by this bacteria to survive, replicate, and propagate in cell lines, especially in macrophages and monocytes, are unknown. A number of studies have described the diverse proteins in pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila, Coxiella burnetii, and Francisella tularensis which allow these to evade the cellular immune response and replicate in the interior of macrophages in different hosts. Some of these proteins are the virulence factor BipA/TypA and the heat shock protein ClpB, both of which have been widely characterized. The results of the current study present the complete coding sequence of the genes clpB and bipA from the P. salmonis genome. Moreover, the experimental results suggest that during the infectious process of the SHK-1 cellular line in P. salmonis, the pathogen significantly increases the expression of proteins ClpB and BipA. This would permit the pathogen to adapt to the hostile conditions produced by the macrophage and thus evade mechanisms of cellular degradation while facilitating replication in the interior of this salmon cell line.

  6. SU-F-BRD-16: Relative Biological Effectiveness of Double-Strand Break Induction for Modeling Cell Survival in Pristine Proton Beams of Different Dose-Averaged Linear Energy Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, C; Bronk, L; Taleei, R; Guan, F; Patel, D; Titt, U; Mirkovic, D; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R; Stewart, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: High throughput in vitro experiments assessing cell survival following proton radiation indicate that both the alpha and the beta parameters of the linear quadratic model increase with increasing proton linear energy transfer (LET). We investigated the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of double-strand break (DSB) induction as a means of explaining the experimental results. Methods: Experiments were performed with two lung cancer cell lines and a range of proton LET values (0.94 – 19.4 keV/µm) using an experimental apparatus designed to irradiate cells in a 96 well plate such that each column encounters protons of different dose-averaged LET (LETd). Traditional linear quadratic survival curve fitting was performed, and alpha, beta, and RBE values obtained. Survival curves were also fit with a model incorporating RBE of DSB induction as the sole fit parameter. Fitted values of the RBE of DSB induction were then compared to values obtained using Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) software and energy spectra calculated with Geant4. Other parameters including alpha, beta, and number of DSBs were compared to those obtained from traditional fitting. Results: Survival curve fitting with RBE of DSB induction yielded alpha and beta parameters that increase with proton LETd, which follows from the standard method of fitting; however, relying on a single fit parameter provided more consistent trends. The fitted values of RBE of DSB induction increased beyond what is predicted from MCDS data above proton LETd of approximately 10 keV/µm. Conclusion: In order to accurately model in vitro proton irradiation experiments performed with high throughput methods, the RBE of DSB induction must increase more rapidly than predicted by MCDS above LETd of 10 keV/µm. This can be explained by considering the increased complexity of DSBs or the nature of intra-track pairwise DSB interactions in this range of LETd values. NIH Grant 2U19CA021239-35.

  7. Dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI measures of relative cerebral blood volume as a prognostic marker for overall survival in recurrent glioblastoma: results from the ACRIN 6677/RTOG 0625 multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    Schmainda, Kathleen M.; Zhang, Zheng; Prah, Melissa; Snyder, Bradley S.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Sorensen, A. Gregory; Barboriak, Daniel P.; Boxerman, Jerrold L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The study goal was to determine whether changes in relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) derived from dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI are predictive of overall survival (OS) in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) when measured 2, 8, and 16 weeks after treatment initiation. Methods Patients with recurrent GBM (37/123) enrolled in ACRIN 6677/RTOG 0625, a multicenter, randomized, phase II trial of bevacizumab with irinotecan or temozolomide, consented to DSC-MRI plus conventional MRI, 21 with DSC-MRI at baseline and at least 1 postbaseline scan. Contrast-enhancing regions of interest were determined semi-automatically using pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted images. Mean tumor rCBV normalized to white matter (nRCBV) and standardized rCBV (sRCBV) were determined for these regions of interest. The OS rates for patients with positive versus negative changes from baseline in nRCBV and sRCBV were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum and Kaplan–Meier survival estimates with log-rank tests. Results Patients surviving at least 1 year (OS-1) had significantly larger decreases in nRCBV at week 2 (P = .0451) and sRCBV at week 16 (P = .014). Receiver operating characteristic analysis found the percent changes of nRCBV and sRCBV at week 2 and sRCBV at week 16, but not rCBV data at week 8, to be good prognostic markers for OS-1. Patients with positive change from baseline rCBV had significantly shorter OS than those with negative change at both week 2 and week 16 (P = .0015 and P = .0067 for nRCBV and P = .0251 and P = .0004 for sRCBV, respectively). Conclusions Early decreases in rCBV are predictive of improved survival in patients with recurrent GBM treated with bevacizumab. PMID:25646027

  8. Transplantation of unrelated donor umbilical cord blood in 102 patients with malignant and nonmalignant diseases: influence of CD34 cell dose and HLA disparity on treatment-related mortality and survival.

    PubMed

    Wagner, John E; Barker, Juliet N; DeFor, Todd E; Baker, K Scott; Blazar, Bruce R; Eide, Cindy; Goldman, Anne; Kersey, John; Krivit, William; MacMillan, Margaret L; Orchard, Paul J; Peters, Charles; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Ramsay, Norma K C; Davies, Stella M

    2002-09-01

    The potential benefits of unrelated donor marrow transplantation are offset by the immunologic complications of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and infection. Therefore, we used cryopreserved umbilical cord blood (UCB) as a strategy to reduce the risks of GVHD and treatment-related mortality (TRM) and improve survival. Data on 102 patients (median age 7.4 years) who received transplants between 1994 and 2001 for the treatment of malignant (n = 65; 68% were high-risk patients) and nonmalignant (n = 37) diseases were evaluated. Log-rank tests and Cox regression analyses were used to determine the effects of various demographic, graft-related, and treatment factors on engraftment, GVHD, TRM, relapse, and survival. As of October 15, 2001, the median follow-up was 2.7 years (range, 0.3-7.2). Incidences of neutrophil and platelet engraftment were 0.88 (CI, 0.81-0.95) and 0.65 (CI, 0.53-0.77), respectively. Notably, incidences of severe acute and chronic GVHD were 0.11 (CI, 0.05-0.17) and 0.10 (CI, 0.04-0.16), respectively. At 1 year after transplantation, proportions of TRM and survival were 0.30 (CI, 0.21-0.39) and 0.58 (CI, 0.48-0.68), respectively. In Cox regression analyses, CD34 cell dose was the one factor consistently identified as significantly associated with rate of engraftment, TRM, and survival. Despite the low incidence of GVHD, the proportion of patients with leukemia relapse at 2 years was 0.17 (CI, 0.00-0.38) and 0.45 (CI, 0.28-0.61) for patients with standard and high-risk disease, respectively. There is a high probability of survival in recipients of UCB grafts that are disparate in no more than 2 human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) when the grafts contain at least 1.7 x 10(5) CD34(+) cells per kilogram of recipient's body weight. Therefore, graft selection should be based principally on CD34 cell dose when multiple UCB units exist with an HLA disparity of 2 or less.

  9. A Winter Survival Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The article is a condensation of materials from the winter survival unit of a Canadian snow ecology course. The unit covers: cold physiology, frostbite, snowblindness, hypothermia, winter campout, and survival strategies. (SB)

  10. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-related VAPB P56S mutation differentially affects the function and survival of corticospinal and spinal motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Leonardo; Lai, Chen; Yu, Jia; Chub, Nikolai; Shim, Hoon; Sun, Lixin; Xie, Chengsong; Yang, Wan-Jou; Lin, Xian; O'Donovan, Michael J; Cai, Huaibin

    2013-11-01

    The substitution of Proline with Serine at residue 56 (P56S) of vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB) has been linked to an atypical autosomal dominant form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8 (ALS8). To investigate the pathogenic mechanism of P56S VAPB in ALS, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice that heterologously express human wild-type (WT) and P56S VAPB under the control of a pan-neuronal promoter Thy1.2. While WT VAPB Tg mice did not exhibit any overt motor behavioral phenotypes, P56S VAPB Tg mice developed progressive hyperactivities and other motor abnormalities. VAPB protein was accumulated as large punctate in the soma and proximal dendrites of both corticospinal motor neurons (CSMNs) and spinal motor neurons (SMNs) in P56S VAPB Tg mice. Concomitantly, a significant increase of endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response and the resulting up-regulation of pro-apoptotic factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein expression were observed in the CSMNs and SMNs of P56S VAPB Tg mice. However, only a progressive loss of CSMNs but not SMNs was found in P56S VAPB Tg mice. In SMNs, P56S VAPB promoted a rather selective translocation of VAPB protein onto the postsynaptic site of C-boutons that altered the morphology of C-boutons and impaired the spontaneous rhythmic discharges of SMNs. Therefore, these findings provide new pathophysiological mechanisms of P56S VAPB that differentially affect the function and survival of CSMNs and SMNs in ALS8.

  11. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-related VAPB P56S mutation differentially affects the function and survival of corticospinal and spinal motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aliaga, Leonardo; Lai, Chen; Yu, Jia; Chub, Nikolai; Shim, Hoon; Sun, Lixin; Xie, Chengsong; Yang, Wan-Jou; Lin, Xian; O'Donovan, Michael J.; Cai, Huaibin

    2013-01-01

    The substitution of Proline with Serine at residue 56 (P56S) of vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB) has been linked to an atypical autosomal dominant form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8 (ALS8). To investigate the pathogenic mechanism of P56S VAPB in ALS, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice that heterologously express human wild-type (WT) and P56S VAPB under the control of a pan-neuronal promoter Thy1.2. While WT VAPB Tg mice did not exhibit any overt motor behavioral phenotypes, P56S VAPB Tg mice developed progressive hyperactivities and other motor abnormalities. VAPB protein was accumulated as large punctate in the soma and proximal dendrites of both corticospinal motor neurons (CSMNs) and spinal motor neurons (SMNs) in P56S VAPB Tg mice. Concomitantly, a significant increase of endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response and the resulting up-regulation of pro-apoptotic factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein expression were observed in the CSMNs and SMNs of P56S VAPB Tg mice. However, only a progressive loss of CSMNs but not SMNs was found in P56S VAPB Tg mice. In SMNs, P56S VAPB promoted a rather selective translocation of VAPB protein onto the postsynaptic site of C-boutons that altered the morphology of C-boutons and impaired the spontaneous rhythmic discharges of SMNs. Therefore, these findings provide new pathophysiological mechanisms of P56S VAPB that differentially affect the function and survival of CSMNs and SMNs in ALS8. PMID:23771029

  12. Combined thermotherapy and cryotherapy for efficient virus eradication: relation of virus distribution, subcellular changes, cell survival and viral RNA degradation in shoot tips.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaochun; Cuellar, Wilmer J; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Hirata, Yukimasa; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2008-03-01

    Accumulation of viruses in vegetatively propagated plants causes heavy yield losses. Therefore, supply of virus-free planting materials is pivotal to sustainable crop production. In previous studies, Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) was difficult to eradicate from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) using the conventional means of meristem tip culture. As shown in the present study, it was probably because this pollen-transmitted virus efficiently invades leaf primordia and all meristematic tissues except the least differentiated cells of the apical dome. Subjecting plants to thermotherapy prior to meristem tip culture heavily reduced viral RNA2, RNA3 and the coat protein in the shoot tips, but no virus-free plants were obtained. Therefore, a novel method including thermotherapy followed by cryotherapy was developed for efficient virus eradication. Heat treatment caused subcellular alterations such as enlargement of vacuoles in the more developed, virus-infected cells, which were largely eliminated following subsequent cryotherapy. Using this protocol, 20-36% of the treated shoot tips survived, 30-40% regenerated and up to 35% of the regenerated plants were virus-free, as tested by ELISA and reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Novel cellular and molecular insights into RBDV-host interactions and the factors influencing virus eradication were obtained, including invasion of shoot tips and meristematic tissues by RBDV, enhanced viral RNA degradation and increased sensitivity to freezing caused by thermotherapy, and subcellular changes and subsequent death of cells caused by cryotherapy. This novel procedure should be helpful with many virus-host combinations in which virus eradication by conventional means has proven difficult.

  13. Survivability Versus Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2014-01-01

    Develop Survivability vs Time Model as a decision-evaluation tool to assess various emergency egress methods used at Launch Complex 39B (LC 39B) and in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) on NASAs Kennedy Space Center. For each hazard scenario, develop probability distributions to address statistical uncertainty resulting in survivability plots over time and composite survivability plots encompassing multiple hazard scenarios.

  14. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors.

  15. Surviving Atmospheric Spacecraft Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    In essence, to survival a spacecraft breakup an animal must not experience a lethal event. Much as with surviving aircraft breakup, dissipation of lethal forces via breakup of the craft around the organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. As spacecraft can travel higher and faster than aircraft, it is often assumed that spacecraft breakup is not a survivable event. Similarly, the belief that aircraft breakup or crashes are not survivable events is still prevalent in the general population. As those of us involved in search and rescue know, it is possible to survive both aircraft breakup and crashes. Here we make the first report of an animal, C. elegans, surviving atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications implied for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  16. Can "The New Social Studies" Survive in the Public Schools?: A Case Study of the Perceptions of Significant School Related Groups Regarding Nationalistic Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, David T.

    A review and discussion of the new social studies introduces the problem of whether nationalism and patriotism are "closed areas" or if an open examination of these areas is possible in the public schools. Two sets of hypotheses, one dealing with public school educators and the other with school-related groups, were tested by administration of a…

  17. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control.

  18. [Seed aging and survival mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Grappin, Philippe; Bourdais, Gildas; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Job, Dominique; Ogé, Laurent; Jullien, Marc; Rajjou, Loïc

    2008-01-01

    Aging and death are universal to living systems. In temperate climate latitudes the mature seeds of higher plants are exposed to aging and have developed resistance mechanisms allowing survival and plant propagation. In addition to the physicochemical properties of the seed that confer stress resistance, the protein metabolism contributes importantly to longevity mechanisms. Recently, genetic studies have demonstrated the occurrence of the Protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase repair enzyme in controlling age-related protein damages and seed survival. These protective mechanisms by protein repair are widespread in all kingdoms, so that the use of seeds as models to study these controlling processes offers the prospect of understanding longevity mechanisms better.

  19. Autophagy-related proteins are functionally active in human spermatozoa and may be involved in the regulation of cell survival and motility

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, I. M.; Espino, J.; Bejarano, I.; Gallardo-Soler, A.; Campo, M. L.; Salido, G. M.; Pariente, J. A.; Peña, F. J.; Tapia, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is an evolutionarily highly conserved cellular process that participates in the maintenance of intracellular homeostasis through the degradation of most long-lived proteins and entire organelles. Autophagy participates in some reproductive events; however, there are not reports regarding the role of autophagy in the regulation of sperm physiology. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate whether autophagy-related proteins are present and functionally active in human spermatozoa. Proteins related to autophagy/mitophagy process (LC3, Atg5, Atg16, Beclin 1, p62, m-TOR, AMPKα 1/2, and PINK1) were present in human spermatozoa. LC3 colocalized with p62 in the middle piece of the spermatozoa. Autophagy activation induced a significant increase in motility and a decrease in PINK1, TOM20 expression and caspase 3/7 activation. In contrast, autophagy inhibition resulted in decreased motility, viability, ATP and intracellular calcium concentration whereas PINK1, TOM20 expression, AMPK phosphorylation and caspase 3/7 activation were significantly increased. In conclusion our results show that autophagy related proteins and upstream regulators are present and functional in human spermatozoa. Modification of mitochondrial proteins expression after autophagy activation/inhibition may be indicating that a specialized form of autophagy named mitophagy may be regulating sperm function such as motility and viability and may be cooperating with apoptosis. PMID:27633131

  20. Differential Survival in Europe and the United States: Estimates Based on Subjective Probabilities of Survival

    PubMed Central

    Delavande, Adeline; Rohwedder, Susann

    2013-01-01

    Cross-country comparisons of differential survival by socioeconomic status (SES) are useful in many domains. Yet, to date, such studies have been rare. Reliably estimating differential survival in a single country has been challenging because it requires rich panel data with a large sample size. Cross-country estimates have proven even more difficult because the measures of SES need to be comparable internationally. We present an alternative method for acquiring information on differential survival by SES. Rather than using observations of actual survival, we relate individuals’ subjective probabilities of survival to SES variables in cross section. To show that subjective survival probabilities are informative proxies for actual survival when estimating differential survival, we compare estimates of differential survival based on actual survival with estimates based on subjective probabilities of survival for the same sample. The results are remarkably similar. We then use this approach to compare differential survival by SES for 10 European countries and the United States. Wealthier people have higher survival probabilities than those who are less wealthy, but the strength of the association differs across countries. Nations with a smaller gradient appear to be Belgium, France, and Italy, while the United States, England, and Sweden appear to have a larger gradient. PMID:22042664

  1. Exendin-4 Promotes Survival of Mouse Pancreatic β-Cell Line in Lipotoxic Conditions, through the Extracellular Signal-Related Kinase 1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jianqiu; Wei, Qian; Meng, Xin; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disorder that develops as a result of relatively inappropriate insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Increased levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) are one of the important factors for the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and contribute to defective β-cell proliferation and increased β-cell apoptosis. Recently, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been shown to possess an antiapoptotic effect, by increasing β-cell mass and improving β-cell function. However, their effects on β-cells in vitro against lipotoxicity have not been elucidated completely. In this study, we investigated whether the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 displays prosurvival effects in pancreatic β-cells exposed to chronic elevated FFAs. Results showed that exendin-4 inhibited apoptosis induced by palmitate in MIN6 cells. After 24 h of incubation, exendin-4 caused rapid activation of extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) under lipotoxic conditions. The ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 blocked the antilipotoxic effect of exendin-4 on MIN6 cells. Exendin-4 also inhibited the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. This inhibition is associated with upregulation of BCL-2. Our findings suggested that exendin-4 may exert cytoprotective effects through activation of ERK1/2 and inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. PMID:27656657

  2. SU-F-BRD-13: A Phenomenological Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) Model for Proton Therapy Based On All Published in Vitro Cell Survival Data

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, A; Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy treatments are currently planned and delivered using the assumption that the proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) relative to photons is 1.1. This assumption ignores strong experimental evidence that suggests the RBE varies. A recent review study (Paganetti 2014), collected over 72 experimental reports on proton RBE, providing a comprehensive dataset for predicting proton RBE. Using this dataset we develop a model to predict RBE based on dose, linear energy transfer (LET) and the tissue specific parameter (α/β)x. Methods: The relationship of the RBE on dose, dose average LET (LETd) and (α/β)x was explored using 290 experimental data points. The RBE was calculated for each experimental point for doses ranging from 1 to 10 Gy. An RBE model, based on the linear-quadratic model, was derived using a nonlinear regression fit to the experimental data. Results: The proposed RBE model predicts that the RBE increases with LET and decreases with (α/β)x. The model additionally predicts a decrease in RBE with increasing dose for low (α/β)x values (< 3 Gy). However the model predicts an increase in RBE with increasing dose for large (α/β)x (> 4 Gy). Previous phenomenological models were based on a small subset of experimental data and deviate significantly from our findings. Conclusion: The proposed RBE model is derived using the most comprehensive collection of proton RBE experimental data to date. The model agrees with previous theoretical predictions on the relationship between RBE, LETd and (α/β)x and also makes predictions on the relationship between RBE and dose. The proposed model shows a relationship between α and LETd but no significant relationship between β and LETd. Previously published phenomenological models based on a limited data set might have to be revised.

  3. Aircraft Survivability. Summer 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Survivability Program Office SUMMER 2011 craShworthineSS & personnel casualties Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Aircraft Survivability is published three times a year by the Joint...and stroking seats. The knowledge gained from studying Vietnam crash data was consolidated into the Crash Survival Design Guide (CSDG), which

  4. Aircraft Survivability. Spring 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Surviving an Aircraft Crash with Airbag Restraintsby Thomas Barth Inflatable restraint solutions have improved the survivability of commercial...Surviving an Aircraft Crash with Airbag Restraints by Thomas Barth Transport Aircraft Interiors The AmSafe Aviation Airbag entered service on commercial...all night.” Keithley also noted that, in his early days at BRL, Walt teamed up with a group of like-minded innovators, including Jim Foulk, Roland

  5. Dual-energy precursor and nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 activator treatment additively improve redox glutathione levels and neuron survival in aging and Alzheimer mouse neurons upstream of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debolina; LeVault, Kelsey R; Brewer, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether glutathione (GSH) loss or increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) are more important to neuron loss, aging, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we stressed or boosted GSH levels in neurons isolated from aging 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those from age-matched nontransgenic (non-Tg) neurons. Here, using titrating with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GCL), we observed that GSH depletion increased neuronal death of 3xTg-AD cultured neurons at increasing rates across the age span, whereas non-Tg neurons were resistant to GSH depletion until old age. Remarkably, the rate of neuron loss with ROS did not increase in old age and was the same for both genotypes, which indicates that cognitive deficits in the AD model were not caused by ROS. Therefore, we targeted for neuroprotection activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2) by 18 alpha glycyrrhetinic acid to stimulate GSH synthesis through GCL. This balanced stimulation of a number of redox enzymes restored the lower levels of Nrf2 and GCL seen in 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those of non-Tg neurons and promoted translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus. By combining the Nrf2 activator together with the NADH precursor, nicotinamide, we increased neuron survival against amyloid beta stress in an additive manner. These stress tests and neuroprotective treatments suggest that the redox environment is more important for neuron survival than ROS. The dual neuroprotective treatment with nicotinamide and an Nrf2 inducer indicates that these age-related and AD-related changes are reversible.

  6. S.O.S. Surviving or Surviving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hersh, Richard H.; Whiteman, James

    1973-01-01

    A High School course, General Studies Survival Curriculum, was designed to aid students in problem solving in a complex society. Areas of concern were psychology, consumer economics, environmental studies, law and society, religion and values, ethnic studies, applied aesthetics, creative studies, occupations and futurism. (JB)

  7. Low expression of CXCR1/2 on neutrophils predicts poor survival in patients with hepatitis B virus-related acute-on-chronic liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruonan; Bao, Chunmei; Huang, Huihuang; Lin, Fang; Yuan, Yue; Wang, Siyu; Jin, Lei; Yang, Tao; Shi, Ming; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and proinflammatory cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). But the utility of CXC chemokine receptor expression on PMNs as a biomarker for prediction of disease severity is still uncertain. In this study, we investigated the dynamic expression of CXCR1 and CXCR2 on neutrophils, and found that patients with hepatitis B virus-related ACLF displayed low expression of CXCR1 and CXCR2 on peripheral neutrophils compared with healthy subjects and patients with chronic hepatitis B. This expression pattern was correlated with disease severity. Additionally, increased production of IL-8 in peripheral blood was significantly associated with reduced CXCR1 and CXCR2 expression, as shown by the decreased CXCR1 and CXCR2 expression on neutrophils after treating neutrophils with plasma from ACLF patients. This effect could be overcomed through IL-8 blockage with an anti-IL-8 antibody. We also found that IL-8 production and neutrophil infiltration were coordinately increased in the liver tissue of HBV-ACLF patients, and this increase was associated with liver inflammation. Overall, increased production of IL-8 associated with neutrophils infiltration into the liver and decreased CXCR1/2 expression on peripheral neutrophils. CXCR1 and CXCR2 expression levels could be served as early markers to predict the severity of ACLF. PMID:27974825

  8. Helicobacter pylori AddAB helicase-nuclease and RecA promote recombination-related DNA repair and survival during stomach colonization

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Susan K.; Fero, Jutta; Hansen, Lori M.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Solnick, Jay V.; Smith, Gerald R.; Salama, Nina R.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Helicobacter pylori colonization of the human stomach is characterized by profound disease-causing inflammation. Bacterial proteins that detoxify reactive oxygen species or recognize damaged DNA adducts promote infection, suggesting that H. pylori requires DNA damage-repair for successful in vivo colonization. The molecular mechanisms of repair remain unknown. We identified homologs of the AddAB class of helicase-nuclease enzymes, related to the Escherichia coli RecBCD enzyme, which, with RecA, is required for repair of DNA breaks and homologous recombination. H. pylori mutants lacking addA or addB genes lack detectable ATP-dependent nuclease activity, and the cloned H. pylori addAB genes restore both nuclease and helicase activities to an E. coli recBCD deletion mutant. H. pylori addAB and recA mutants have a reduced capacity for stomach colonization. These mutants are sensitive to DNA damaging agents and have reduced frequencies of apparent gene conversion between homologous genes encoding outer membrane proteins. Our results reveal requirements for double-strand break repair and recombination during both acute and chronic phases of H. pylori stomach infection. PMID:18573180

  9. Survival in Extreme Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Martin; Halsema, James

    1983-01-01

    Explores the psychosocial and environmental configurations involved in the survival of 500 civilians in a Japanese internment camp in the Philippines during World War II. Although conditions were very harsh, the survival rate of this group was better than expected. Discusses available demographic, social organizational, and cultural information.…

  10. Trends in net survival from breast cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Roche, Laurent; Buzzoni, Carlotta; di Costanzo, Francesco; Molinié, Florence; Caldarella, Adele

    2017-01-01

    Survival from breast cancer (BC) is influenced by the timeliness of diagnosis and appropriateness of treatment, and may constitute a measure of the global effectiveness of a healthcare system. As the healthcare systems of several European Latin countries have some similarities, the search for differences in cancer survival may provide interesting information on the efficacy of these systems. The SUDCAN study is a collaboration between the Group for Epidemiology and Cancer Registration in Latin language countries (GRELL) and EUROCARE. BC data from six countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland) were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, we focus on 1- and 5-year age-standardized net survival (NS) from BC by country over the 2000-2004 period. Then, trends in NS over the 1989-2004 period and changes in the pattern of cancer excess mortality rate (EMR) up to 5 years after diagnosis were examined using a multivariate EMR model. There were little differences in age-standardized NS from BC. Over the 2000-2004 period, the 5-year survival ranged between 82 (Spain, Belgium, and Portugal) and 86% (France). There was an increase in age-standardized survival between 1989 and 2004 at 1 year as well as at 5 years. This increase was observed at all ages and in all countries. There was a decrease in the cancer EMR both immediately after diagnosis and by the second and third year of follow-up. There were only minor differences in survival from BC between European Latin countries. The general improvement in NS is presumably because of advances in early cancer diagnosis and improvements in treatment.

  11. Breast cancer survival in the US and Europe: a CONCORD high-resolution study.

    PubMed

    Allemani, Claudia; Sant, Milena; Weir, Hannah K; Richardson, Lisa C; Baili, Paolo; Storm, Hans; Siesling, Sabine; Torrella-Ramos, Ana; Voogd, Adri C; Aareleid, Tiiu; Ardanaz, Eva; Berrino, Franco; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Bolick, Susan; Cirilli, Claudia; Colonna, Marc; Contiero, Paolo; Cress, Rosemary; Crocetti, Emanuele; Fulton, John P; Grosclaude, Pascale; Hakulinen, Timo; Izarzugaza, M Isabel; Malmström, Per; Peignaux, Karin; Primic-Žakelj, Maja; Rachtan, Jadwiga; Safaei Diba, Chakameh; Sánchez, Maria-José; Schymura, Maria J; Shen, Tiefu; Traina, Adele; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tumino, Rosario; Velten, Michel; Vercelli, Marina; Wolf, Holly J; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Wu, Xiaocheng; Coleman, Michel P

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer survival is reportedly higher in the US than in Europe. The first worldwide study (CONCORD) found wide international differences in age-standardized survival. The aim of this study is to explain these survival differences. Population-based data on stage at diagnosis, diagnostic procedures, treatment and follow-up were collected for about 20,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer aged 15-99 years during 1996-98 in 7 US states and 12 European countries. Age-standardized net survival and the excess hazard of death up to 5 years after diagnosis were estimated by jurisdiction (registry, country, European region), age and stage with flexible parametric models. Breast cancers were generally less advanced in the US than in Europe. Stage also varied less between US states than between European jurisdictions. Early, node-negative tumors were more frequent in the US (39%) than in Europe (32%), while locally advanced tumors were twice as frequent in Europe (8%), and metastatic tumors of similar frequency (5-6%). Net survival in Northern, Western and Southern Europe (81-84%) was similar to that in the US (84%), but lower in Eastern Europe (69%). For the first 3 years after diagnosis the mean excess hazard was higher in Eastern Europe than elsewhere: the difference was most marked for women aged 70-99 years, and mainly confined to women with locally advanced or metastatic tumors. Differences in breast cancer survival between Europe and the US in the late 1990s were mainly explained by lower survival in Eastern Europe, where low healthcare expenditure may have constrained the quality of treatment.

  12. Survival after stereotactic biopsy of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, R.J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Taylor, F.H.

    1988-03-01

    For many patients with malignant gliomas in inaccessible or functionally important locations, stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy (RT) may be a more appropriate initial treatment than craniotomy and tumor resection. We studied the long term survival in 91 consecutive patients with malignant gliomas diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy: 64 had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 27 had anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Sixty-four per cent of the GBMs and 33% of the AAs involved deep or midline cerebral structures. The treatment prescribed after biopsy, the tumor location, the histological findings, and the patient's age at presentation (for AAs) were statistically important factors determining patient survival. If adequate RT (tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy) was not prescribed, the median survival was less than or equal to 11 weeks regardless of tumor histology or location. The median survival for patients with deep or midline tumors who completed RT was similar in AA (19.4 weeks) and GBM (27 weeks) cases. Histology was an important predictor of survival only for patients with adequately treated lobar tumors. The median survival in lobar GBM patients who completed RT was 46.9 weeks, and that in lobar AA patients who completed RT was 129 weeks. Cytoreductive surgery had no statistically significant effect on survival. Among the clinical factors examined, age of less than 40 years at presentation was associated with prolonged survival only in AA patients. Constellations of clinical features, tumor location, histological diagnosis, and treatment prescribed were related to survival time.

  13. Survival of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    MARRERO, CARLOS ROMERO; ORTIZ, ANA P.; PÉREZ, CYNTHIA M.; PÉREZ, JAVIER; TORRES, ESTHER A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Blacks and Hispanics in the United States (US) have the lowest survival rates of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mainly associated to the presence of advanced disease at diagnosis when intervention is least beneficial. This study compared the survival distribution and relative survival of HCC in Puerto Rico (PR) during 1988-1992 and 1998-2002. Methods All HCC cases in the PR Central Cancer Registry database for 1988-1992 (n=306) and 1998-2002 (n=333) were identified. Patient characteristics and clinical variables were compared between study periods. Survival by age at diagnosis, sex, tumor stage and treatment was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival curves were compared using the Wilcoxon test. A Cox proportional hazards model was employed to assess the effect of period of diagnosis on survival, after adjusting for confounders. One- and three-year survival rates were also calculated. Results Patients diagnosed during 1998-2002 (median: 3.08 months, 95% CI: 2.30-4.16) had a longer observed survival than those diagnosed from 1988-1992 (median: 1.80 months, 95% CI: 1.44-2.52). A significant interaction was observed between the variables age and period of diagnosis, where only among persons aged ≥ 60 years the risk of HCC death was lower (sex-adjusted HR=O.72; 95%CI: 0.59-0.88) in patients diagnosed during 1998-2002 as compared to those diagnosed during 1988-1992. The overall one- and three-year relative survival during 1998-2002 was approximately 6% (22.4% vs.16.6%) and 2% higher (9.0% vs. 6.7%) respectively, as compared to 1988-1992. Conclusion We observed a temporal improvement in the survival of HCC in PR during the last decade. However, this survival is inferior to the one observed in the US population. Further studies are needed to identify factors that explain these disparities. PMID:19530551

  14. Imaging of single cell responses to ER stress indicates that the relative dynamics of IRE1/XBP1 and PERK/ATF4 signalling rather than a switch between signalling branches determine cell survival.

    PubMed

    Walter, F; Schmid, J; Düssmann, H; Concannon, C G; Prehn, J H M

    2015-09-01

    An accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) mediated via the activation of three transmembrane proteins IRE1, PERK and ATF6. Signalling through these proteins is aimed at enhancing the ER folding capacity and reducing the folding load. If these processes fail to re-establish protein homeostasis within the ER, then cell death prevails via apoptosis. How the shift from pro-survival to pro-apoptotic signalling is regulated remains unclear with both IRE1 and PERK signalling associated with pro-survival as well as pro-apoptotic signalling. To investigate the temporal activation of IRE1 and PERK in live cells and their relationship to cellular fate, we devised single cell reporters for both ER stress signalling branches. SH-SY5Y neural cells stably expressing these fluorescent protein reporter constructs to monitor IRE1-splicing activity and PERK-mediated ATF4-translation were imaged using single cell and high content time lapse live cell microscopy. We could correlate an early onset and attenuation of XBP1 splicing in the IRE1-reporter cells as cytoprotective. Indeed, silencing of IRE1 expression using shRNA inhibited splicing of XBP1 resulting in an early onset of cell death. In contrast, in the PERK-reporter cells, we observed that a slow rate of ATF4-translation and late re-initiation of general translation coincided with cells which were resistant to ER stress-induced cell death. Interestingly, whereas silencing of PERK did not affect overall levels of cell death in response to ER stress, it did increase sensitivity to ER stressors at early time points following treatment. Our results suggest that apoptosis activation in response to ER stress is not caused by a preferential activation of a single UPR branch, or by a switch from one branch to the other. Rather, our data indicated that the relative timing of IRE1 and PERK signalling determines the shift from cell survival to apoptosis.

  15. Survival of falling robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-02-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  16. Survival Through Creative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVito, Alfred

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of the American educational system, outlines the various and developing world crisis, and suggests that teachers need to prepare creative, innovative, independent thinkers who can embrace the problems of the world and survive. (Author/RK)

  17. Survival of falling robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-01-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  18. Aircraft Survivability: Rotorcraft Survivability. Summer 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Published by the Joint Aircraft Survivability Program Office Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Table of Contents A ir cr af t S ur vi va bi li ty • Su m m er 2 01 0 Aircraft...60M program before Milestone B. A program Integrated Program Team (IPT) was formed and met through Milestone C. In 2007, in time for a Full Rate

  19. Trends in net survival from stomach cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Glória, Luísa; Bossard, Nadine; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Mayer-da-Silva, Alexandra; Faivre, Jean; Miranda, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancers are a clinical challenge. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from gastric cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland) and explore the trends in net survival and in the dynamics of the excess mortality rates (EMRs) up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the period 2000-2004 using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. The results are reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These trend analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modelling strategy. There were little differences between countries in age-standardized net survival for stomach cancer (2000-2004). The 5-year net survival ranged between 26 (Spain) and 32% (Italy). There was a small increase in the age-standardized net survival at 1 year between 1992 and 2004. The increase was also observed in the 5-year net survival, except in France, where the increase was less marked. A slight decrease in the EMR between 1992 and 2004 was limited to the 24 months after diagnosis. In addition, the decrease in the EMR was the same whatever the year of diagnosis. There were minor differences in survival from stomach cancer between European Latin countries. A slight improvement in the 5-year net survival was observed in all countries and the major gain was observed during the 24 months after diagnosis. Development of innovative treatments is needed to improve the prognosis.

  20. Survival and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes among Periviable Infants.

    PubMed

    Younge, Noelle; Goldstein, Ricki F; Bann, Carla M; Hintz, Susan R; Patel, Ravi M; Smith, P Brian; Bell, Edward F; Rysavy, Matthew A; Duncan, Andrea F; Vohr, Betty R; Das, Abhik; Goldberg, Ronald N; Higgins, Rosemary D; Cotten, C Michael

    2017-02-16

    Background Data reported during the past 5 years indicate that rates of survival have increased among infants born at the borderline of viability, but less is known about how increased rates of survival among these infants relate to early childhood neurodevelopmental outcomes. Methods We compared survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes among infants born at 22 to 24 weeks of gestation, as assessed at 18 to 22 months of corrected age, across three consecutive birth-year epochs (2000-2003 [epoch 1], 2004-2007 [epoch 2], and 2008-2011 [epoch 3]). The infants were born at 11 centers that participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network. The primary outcome measure was a three-level outcome - survival without neurodevelopmental impairment, survival with neurodevelopmental impairment, or death. After accounting for differences in infant characteristics, including birth center, we used multinomial generalized logit models to compare the relative risk of survival without neurodevelopmental impairment, survival with neurodevelopmental impairment, and death. Results Data on the primary outcome were available for 4274 of 4458 infants (96%) born at the 11 centers. The percentage of infants who survived increased from 30% (424 of 1391 infants) in epoch 1 to 36% (487 of 1348 infants) in epoch 3 (P<0.001). The percentage of infants who survived without neurodevelopmental impairment increased from 16% (217 of 1391) in epoch 1 to 20% (276 of 1348) in epoch 3 (P=0.001), whereas the percentage of infants who survived with neurodevelopmental impairment did not change significantly (15% [207 of 1391] in epoch 1 and 16% [211 of 1348] in epoch 3, P=0.29). After adjustment for changes in the baseline characteristics of the infants over time, both the rate of survival with neurodevelopmental impairment (as compared with death) and the rate of survival without neurodevelopmental impairment (as compared with death) increased over time

  1. Long-term survival in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    João, Cristina; Costa, Carlos; Coelho, Inês; Vergueiro, Maria João; Ferreira, Mafalda; da Silva, Maria Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The survival of multiple myeloma patients has improved very significantly over the last decade. Still median overall survival is inferior to 5 years. A small proportion of patients survive longer than 10 years. In this paper we discuss four cases illustrating the nonhomogeneous clinical presentation and evolution of this subset of patients. Surprisingly, these long survivors do not always have deep responses and some require frequent treatments, which include autologous stem cell transplantation and novel drugs. The authors discuss several aspects of these clinical histories, including treatment options, raising hypothesis on their relation with long survivorship which may be important to have in consideration when studying this subject. PMID:25614805

  2. Survival and severity in dominant cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Marelli, Cecilia; Cazeneuve, Cecile; Charles, Perrine; Tallaksen, Chantal; Forlani, Sylvie; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are known to be genetically and clinically heterogeneous. Whether severity and survival are variable, however, is not known. We, therefore, studied survival and severity in 446 cases and 509 relatives with known mutations. Survival was 68 years [95% CI: 65–70] in 223 patients with polyglutamine expansions versus 80 years [73–84] in 23 with other mutations (P < 0.0001). Disability was also more severe in the former: at age 60, 30% were wheelchair users versus 3% with other SCAs (P < 0.001). This has implications for genetic counseling and the design of therapeutic trials. PMID:25750924

  3. Social class and survival on the S.S. Titanic.

    PubMed

    Hall, W

    1986-01-01

    Passengers' chances of surviving the sinking of the S.S. Titanic were related to their sex and their social class: females were more likely to survive than males, and the chances of survival declined with social class as measured by the class in which the passenger travelled. The probable reasons for these differences in rates of survival are discussed as are the reasons accepted by the Mersey Committee of Inquiry into the sinking.

  4. Surviving atmospheric spacecraft breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; McLamb, William

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft travel higher and faster than aircraft, making breakup potentially less survivable. As with aircraft breakup, the dissipation of lethal forces via spacecraft breakup around an organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. By employing a knowledge of space and aviation physiology, comparative physiology, and search-and-rescue techniques, we were able to correctly predict and execute the recovery of live animals following the breakup of the space shuttle Columbia. In this study, we make what is, to our knowledge, the first report of an animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, surviving the atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft that was supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  5. Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, Hans

    2004-02-01

    Preface; Notation; Part I. Special Relativity: 1. Introduction: inertial systems and Galilei invariance of classical mechanics; 2. Light propagation in moving coordinate systems and Lorentz transformations; 3. Our world as a Minkowski space; 4. Mechanics of special relativity; 5. Optics of plane waves; 6. Four-dimensional vectors and tensors; 7. Electrodynamics in vacuo; 8. Transformation properties of electromagnetic fields: examples; 9. Null vectors and the algebraic properties of electromagnetic field tensors; 10. Charged point particles and their field; 11. Pole-dipole particles and their field; 12. Electrodynamics in media; 13. Perfect fluids and other physical theories; Part II. Riemannian Geometry: 14. Introduction: the force-free motion of particles in Newtonian mechanics; 15. Why Riemannian geometry?; 16. Riemannian space; 17. Tensor algebra; 18. The covariant derivative and parallel transport; 19. The curvature tensor; 20. Differential operators, integrals and integral laws; 21. Fundamental laws of physics in Riemannian spaces; Part III. Foundations of Einstein's Theory of Gravitation: 22. The fundamental equations of Einstein's theory of gravitation; 23. The Schwarzschild solution; 24. Experiments to verify the Schwarzschild metric; 25. Gravitational lenses; 26. The interior Schwarzschild solution; Part IV. Linearized Theory of Gravitation, Far Fields and Gravitational Waves: 27. The linearized Einstein theory of gravity; 28. Far fields due to arbitrary matter distributions and balance equations for momentum and angular momentum; 29. Gravitational waves; 30. The Cauchy problem for the Einstein field equations; Part V. Invariant Characterization of Exact Solutions: 31. Preferred vector fields and their properties; 32. The Petrov classification; 33. Killing vectors and groups of motion; 34. A survey of some selected classes of exact solutions; Part VI. Gravitational Collapse and Black Holes: 35. The Schwarzschild singularity; 36. Gravitational collapse

  6. Trends in net survival from colon cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Jean; Bossard, Nadine; Jooste, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer represents a major public health issue. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from colon cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland) and provide trends in net survival and dynamics of the excess mortality rates up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the 2000-2004 period using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. Results were reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modeling strategy. There were few differences between countries in age-standardized net survivals (2000-2004). During the 2000-2004 period, the 5-year net survival ranged between 57 (Spain and Portugal) and 61% (Belgium and Switzerland). The age-standardized survival at 1 and 5 years after diagnosis increased between 1992 and 2004. This increase was observed at ages 60 and 70, but was less marked at 80. This increase was linked to a marked decrease in the excess mortality rate between 1992 and 2004 until 18 months after diagnosis. Beyond this period, the decrease in the excess mortality rates among countries was modest and nearly the same whatever the year of diagnosis. There were minor differences in survival after colon cancer between European Latin countries. A considerable improvement in the 5-year net survival was observed in all countries, but the gain was mainly limited to the first 18 months after diagnosis. Further improvements are expected through the implementation of mass screening programs.

  7. Metabolic Response of Lymph Nodes Immediately After RT Is Related With Survival Outcome of Patients With Pelvic Node-Positive Cervical Cancer Using Consecutive [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Nah, Byung-Sik; Chung, Woong-Ki; Song, Ho-Chun; Yoo, Su Woong; Song, Ju-Young; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Nam, Taek-Keun

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the metabolic response of uterine cervix and pelvic lymph nodes (LNs) using consecutive {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) immediately after RT and to correlate survival outcome with the metabolic response. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 48 patients with cervical cancer who had positive pelvic LNs by preradiation therapy (pre-RT) PET/CT. All patients underwent PET/CT scans immediately after RT (inter-RT PET/CT) after median 63 Gy to the gross LNs. The metabolic response of the LNs was assessed quantitatively and semiquantitatively by measurement of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}). Results: Classifying the metabolic response of all nodal lesions, 37 patients (77%) had LNs with complete metabolic response on the inter-RT PET/CT (LNCMRi), and 11 patients had a non-LNCMRi, including 4 patients with progressive metabolic disease. The overall 3-year survival rates were 83% for the patients with LNCMRi and 73% for the non-LNCMRi group (P=.038). The disease-free survival for patients with LNCMRi were significantly better than that for the non-LNCMRi group (71% vs 18%, respectively, P<.001). The 3-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 79% for the patients with LNCMRi and 27% for the non-LNCMRi group (P<.001). There were no statistically significant differences in overall survival (76% vs 86%, respectively, P=.954) and disease-free survival rates (58% vs 61%, respectively, P=.818) between the CMR of primary cervical tumor and the non-CMR groups. Conclusions: The results showed a significant correlation between survival outcome and the interim metabolic response of pelvic LNs. CMR of nodal lesion on inter-RT PET/CT had excellent overall survival, disease-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival rates. This suggested that PET/CT immediately after RT can be a useful tool for the evaluation of the interim response of the LNs and identify a subset

  8. The Option for Survival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, R. Stephen

    1971-01-01

    Suggests formula for survival that takes a thermodynamic view which holds that we must recycle waste while the thermodynamic potential still is moderately high. Otherwise they are lost, as helium is lost when it leaves Earth's atmosphere and goes into space. The idea that the Earth is a closed system is a myth; it collapses each time we put our…

  9. Surviving Tight Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Discusses several strategies recommended by small business experts to help for-profit and non-profit child care centers survive a financial crisis. Strategies include: identifying the source of the problem, monitoring cash flow, reducing or deferring expenditures, expediting regular income and exploring new sources of income, patiently working…

  10. Why Books Will Survive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Lane

    1983-01-01

    High prices, paper that self destructs, and competition from computers and video forms may mean hard times ahead for books. The factor most likely to assure the survival of books into the future is that there is simply no experience in life that matches silent reading. (Author/RM)

  11. Survival Learning Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robert M.; Barnes, Marcia M.

    This booklet is designed to provide some starter ideas for teachers to use in developing their own packet of learning materials. The procedures suggested and the examples included are literally starters. "Introduction to Survival Learning Materials" presents some procedures to help teachers get started in developing materials. "Following…

  12. Survivable Local Area Network.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Enhanced availability and survivability of communications between geographically remote locations with a minimum of redundancy of transmission...isolate bus segements on either side of a connection so that if a fault occurs only the segment containing the fault will be affected. The first type

  13. Education for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, James E., Jr.

    In this address, James E. Allen, Jr., Assistant Secretary for Education and U.S. Commissioner of Education, discusses the relationship of education to the problem of ecological destruction. He states that the solutions to the problems of air, water, and soil pollution may be found in redirected education. This "education for survival" can serve to…

  14. Independence and Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, H. Thomas

    Independent schools that are of viable size, well managed, and strategically located to meet competition will survive and prosper past the current financial crisis. We live in a complex technological society with insatiable demands for knowledgeable people to keep it running. The future will be marked by the orderly selection of qualified people,…

  15. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  16. Rigid shells enhance survival of gekkotan eggs.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robin M

    2015-11-01

    The majority of lizards and snakes produce permeable parchment-shelled eggs that require high moisture conditions for successful embryonic development. One clade of gekkotan lizards is an exception; females produce relatively impermeable rigid-shelled eggs that normally incubate successfully under low moisture conditions. I tested the hypothesis that the rigid-shell increases egg survival during incubation, but only under low moisture conditions. To test this hypothesis, I incubated rigid-shelled eggs of Chondrodactylus turneri under low and under high moisture conditions. Eggs were incubated with parchment-shelled eggs of Eublepharis macularius to insure that incubation conditions were suitable for parchment-shelled eggs. Chondrodactylus turneri eggs had very high survival (>90%) when they were incubated under low moisture conditions. In contrast, eggs incubated under high moisture conditions had low survival overall, and lower survival than those of the parchment-shelled eggs of E. macularius. Mortality of C. turneri and E. macularius eggs incubated under high moisture conditions was the result of fungal infection, a common source of egg mortality for squamates under laboratory and field conditions. These observations document high survival of rigid-shelled eggs under low moisture conditions because eggs escape from fungal infection. Highly mineralized rigid shells also make egg survival independent of moisture availability and may also provide protection from small invertebrates in nature. Enhanced egg survival could thus compensate for the low reproductive output of gekkotans that produce rigid-shelled eggs.

  17. A standardized randomized 6-month aerobic exercise-training down-regulated pro-inflammatory genes, but up-regulated anti-inflammatory, neuron survival and axon growth-related genes.

    PubMed

    Iyalomhe, Osigbemhe; Chen, Yuanxiu; Allard, Joanne; Ntekim, Oyonumo; Johnson, Sheree; Bond, Vernon; Goerlitz, David; Li, James; Obisesan, Thomas O

    2015-09-01

    There is considerable support for the view that aerobic exercise may confer cognitive benefits to mild cognitively impaired elderly persons. However, the biological mechanisms mediating these effects are not entirely clear. As a preliminary step towards informing this gap in knowledge, we enrolled older adults confirmed to have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a 6-month exercise program. Male and female subjects were randomized into a 6-month program of either aerobic or stretch (control) exercise. Data collected from the first 10 completers, aerobic exercise (n=5) or stretch (control) exercise (n=5), were used to determine intervention-induced changes in the global gene expression profiles of the aerobic and stretch groups. Using microarray, we identified genes with altered expression (relative to baseline values) in response to the 6-month exercise intervention. Genes whose expression were altered by at least two-fold, and met the p-value cutoff of 0.01 were inputted into the Ingenuity Pathway Knowledge Base Library to generate gene-interaction networks. After a 6-month aerobic exercise-training, genes promoting inflammation became down-regulated, whereas genes having anti-inflammatory properties and those modulating immune function or promoting neuron survival and axon growth, became up-regulated (all fold change≥±2.0, p<0.01). These changes were not observed in the stretch group. Importantly, the differences in the expression profiles correlated with significant improvement in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in the aerobic program as opposed to the stretch group. We conclude that three distinct cellular pathways may collectively influence the training effects of aerobic exercise in MCI subjects. We plan to confirm these effects using rt-PCR and correlate such changes with the cognitive phenotype.

  18. Proteins Involved in HER2 Signalling Pathway, Their Relations and Influence on Metastasis-Free Survival in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Trastuzumab in Adjuvant Setting

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Grela-Wojewoda, Aleksandra; Domagała-Haduch, Małgorzata; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Harazin-Lechowska, Agnieszka; Janecka, Anna; Cedrych, Ida; Majchrzyk, Kaja; Kruczak, Anna; Ryś, Janusz; Niemiec, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Resistance to trastuzumab (which is a standard therapy for breast cancer patients with HER2 overexpression) is associated with higher risk of progression or cancer death, and might be related to activation of signalling cascades (PI3K/AKT/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MAPK) and decreased level of their inhibitors. Material and methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour specimens from 118 HER2-overexpressing breast cancer patients treated with radical local therapy and trastuzumab in adjuvant setting were used for the assessment of: (1) PIK3CA gene mutations (p.H1047R and p.E545K) by qPCR, and (2) expression of Ki-67, EGFR, MUC4, HER3 and PTEN by immunohistochemistry. Results: Lower Ki-67LI was observed in EGFR-immunonegative and in PTEN-immunopositive tumours. MUC4-immunonegative tumours more frequently were PTEN- and HER3-immunonegative. Favourable metastasis-free survival was observed in patients with tumours characterized by Ki-67LI≤50% (p=0.027), HER3 immunonegativity or PTEN immunopositivity (vs. tumours with HER3 expression and lack of PTEN expression, p=0.043), additionally, the trend was observed for patients with pN0+pN1 pathological tumour stage (vs. pN2+pN3) (p=0.086). Cox model revealed that independent negative prognostic factors were: (i) Ki-67LI>50% (p=0.014, RR=4.6, 95% CI 1.4-15.4), (ii) HER3 immunopositivity together with PTEN immunonegativity (p=0.034, RR=3.7, 95% CI 1.1-12.5). Conclusion: The results of our study suggest that combined analysis of HER3 and PTEN expression might bring information on trastuzumab sensitivity in the group of HER2-positive breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab in adjuvant setting. PMID:28123607

  19. Survival of extreme opinions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jiann-wien; Huang, Ding-wei

    2009-12-01

    We study the survival of extreme opinions in various processes of consensus formation. All the opinions are treated equally and subjected to the same rules of changing. We investigate three typical models to reach a consensus in each case: (A) personal influence, (B) influence from surroundings, and (C) influence to surroundings. Starting with uniformly distributed random opinions, our calculated results show that the extreme opinions can survive in both models (A) and (B), but not in model (C). We obtain a conclusion that both personal influence and passive adaptation to the environment are not sufficient enough to eradicate all the extreme opinions. Only the active persuasion to change the surroundings eliminates the extreme opinions completely.

  20. Aircraft Survivability. Fall 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft Survivability Program (JASP) Short Course was held 17-20 May at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA. 52 students attended the...Postgraduate School where he earned his MBA in Financial Management. Jimmy earned his BS in General Science from the United States Naval Academy...Answering these questions requires credible threat models supported by high -fidelity test characterizations of the MANPADS missile threat. Based on

  1. Aircraft Survivability. Spring 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    advancing and applying technology to predict, evaluate , and improve combat survivability of US flight vehicles. John graduated from the University of...support for most of the aircraft and anti-aircraft programs conducted to date under LFT&E statutory requirements. A number of these test and evaluation ...initiatives to improve the state-of-the-art of LFT&E, to place greater emphasis on the evaluation of human casualties, to integrate Battle Damage

  2. Optimizing nest survival and female survival: Consequences of nest site selection for Canada Geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Grand, J.B.; Fondell, T.F.; Anthony, R. Michael

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relationship between attributes of nest sites used by Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) in the Copper River Delta, Alaska, and patterns in nest and female survival. We aimed to determine whether nest site attributes related to nest and female survival differed and whether nest site attributes related to nest survival changed within and among years. Nest site attributes that we examined included vegetation at and surrounding the nest, as well as associations with other nesting birds. Optimal nest site characteristics were different depending on whether nest survival or female survival was examined. Prior to 25 May, the odds of daily survival for nests in tall shrubs and on islands were 2.92 and 2.26 times greater, respectively, than for nests in short shrub sites. Bald Eagles (Halieaeetus leucocephalus) are the major predator during the early breeding season and their behavior was likely important in determining this pattern. After 25 May, when eagle predation is limited due to the availability of alternative prey, no differences in nest survival among the nest site types were found. In addition, nest survival was positively related to the density of other Canada Goose nests near the nest site. Although the number of detected mortalities for females was relatively low, a clear pattern was found, with mortality three times more likely at nest sites dominated by high shrub density within 50 m than at open sites dominated by low shrub density. The negative relationship of nest concealment and adult survival is consistent with that found in other studies of ground-nesting birds. Physical barriers that limited access to nest sites by predators and sites that allowed for early detection of predators were important characteristics of nest site quality for Canada Geese and nest site quality shifted within seasons, likely as a result of shifting predator-prey interactions.

  3. Predicting survival and morbidity-free survival to very old age

    PubMed Central

    Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Franco, Oscar H.; Stricker, Bruno H. C.; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Hofman, Albert; Tiemeier, Henning

    2010-01-01

    As life expectancy continually increases, it is imperative to identify determinants of survival to the extreme end of the lifespan and more importantly to identify factors that increase the chance of survival free of major morbidities. As such, the current study assessed 45 common disease factors as predictors of survival and morbidity-free survival to age 85 years. Within the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort, we evaluated morbidity-free participants who were able to attain age 85 within the study duration (n = 2,008). Risk factors were assessed at baseline (1990–1993), and mortality and morbidities were then collected continuously until mortality or the occurrence of their 85th birthday (average time of 7.9 years). Risk factors included demographic and lifestyle variables, health and morbidity indicators and physiological makers. Major morbidities examined included dementia, cancer, cerebrovascular accident, heart failure and myocardial infarction. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that many of the variables were independently predictive for survival and for morbidity-free ageing to 85 years. These included being female, absence of left ventricular abnormalities, stable body weight, unimpaired instrumental activities of daily living, lower C-RP levels and higher levels of femoral neck bone mineral density and albumin. Relative to non-survival, predictors were stronger for morbidity-free survival than for total survival or survival with morbidity. This suggests that lifespan and healthy survival to older age can be relatively well predicted. Understanding predictors of a long and healthy lifespan is vital for developing primary and secondary preventions to help improve the quality of life of older adults and for reducing the financial burden of the rapidly escalating ageing population. PMID:20514522

  4. Effect of aerosolization on subsequent bacterial survival.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, M V; Marthi, B; Fieland, V P; Ganio, L M

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether aerosolization could impair bacterial survival, Pseudomonas syringae and Erwinia herbicola were aerosolized in a greenhouse, the aerosol was sampled at various distances from the site of release by using all-glass impingers, and bacterial survival was followed in the impingers for 6 h. Bacterial survival subsequent to aerosolization of P. syringae and E. herbicola was not impaired 1 m from the site of release. P. syringae aerosolized at 3 to 15 m from the site of release at a temperature of 12 degrees C and a relative humidity of 80% survived 35- to 65-fold better than P. syringae released at 27 degrees C and a relative humidity of 40%. No difference was observed in the survival of P. syringae and E. herbicola following aerosolization at the same temperature and relative humidity. Bacteria sprayed directly onto bean and oat plants established stable populations at comparable numbers on both plants over an 8-day period following inoculation. Bacteria that inoculated adjacent plants by drifting downwind up to 5 m were detectable at an initial population of 10(2) CFU/g on oats and 10(5) CFU/g on beans 2 h after the spray. However, bacterial populations on both plants were undetectable within 48 h. PMID:2268157

  5. The survival of Coxiella burnetii in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneeva, A. S.; Ul'Yanova, T. Yu.; Tarasevich, I. V.

    2007-05-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a pathogen of Q-fever—a widespread zoonosis. The effective adaptation of C. burnetii to intracellular existence is in contrast with its ability to survive in the environment outside the host cells and its resistance to chemical and physical agents. Its mechanism of survival remains unknown. However, its survival appears to be related to the developmental cycle of the microorganism itself, i.e., to the formation of its dormant forms. The survival of Coxiella burnetii was studied for the first time. The pathogenic microorganism was inoculated into different types of soil and cultivated under different temperatures. The survival of the pathogen was verified using a model with laboratory animals (mice). Viable C. burnetii were found in the soil even 20 days after their inoculation. The relationship between the organic carbon content in the soils and the survival of C. burnetii was revealed. Thus, the results obtained were the first to demonstrate that the soil may serve as a reservoir for the preservation and further spreading of the Q-fever pathogen in the environment, on the one hand, and reduce the risk of epidemics, on the other.

  6. More 'Extreme Preemies' Are Surviving

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2. The number of babies who survived without neurodevelopmental problems at 2 increased from 16 to 20 ... the number of babies who survived and had neurodevelopmental problems didn't change much, from 15 percent ...

  7. Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer Survival rates are often used by doctors ... Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  8. The Survivable Distributed Computing Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    an architecture for a survivable Distributed Computing Environment (SDCE). In essence, the SDCE will be a base upon which survivable distributed...and/or ISIS distributed Computing Environments to provide many of the SDCE requirements.

  9. Statistical description for survival data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Statistical description is always the first step in data analysis. It gives investigator a general impression of the data at hand. Traditionally, data are described as central tendency and deviation. However, this framework does not fit to the survival data (also termed time-to-event data). Such data type contains two components. One is the survival time and the other is the status. Researchers are usually interested in the probability of event at a given survival time point. Hazard function, cumulative hazard function and survival function are commonly used to describe survival data. Survival function can be estimated using Kaplan-Meier estimator, which is also the default method in most statistical packages. Alternatively, Nelson-Aalen estimator is available to estimate survival function. Survival functions of subgroups can be compared using log-rank test. Furthermore, the article also introduces how to describe time-to-event data with parametric modeling. PMID:27867953

  10. Relative survival of four serotypes of Salmonella enterica in low-water activity whey protein powder held at 36 and 70°C at various water activity levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of health burdens in the United States. Although the pathogen is not able to grow at aw levels below 0.94, it can survive in low-moisture foods for long periods of time. Temperature, aw, substrate and serotype affect its persistence. The aim of this study was...

  11. Sirolimus and metformin synergistically inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and improve long-term survival in patients with HCC related to hepatitis B virus induced cirrhosis after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chuan; Peng, Chenghong; Shen, Baiyong; Zhu, Zhecheng; Xu, Ning; Li, Tao; Xie, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents used postoperatively after liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) favor recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, new effective immunosuppressants are needed. This retrospective study assessed combined sirolimus and metformin on survival of HCC patients after LT. In 2001-2013, 133 HCC patients with LT were divided into four groups: sirolimus and metformin combination (Sir+Met), sirolimus monotherapy (Sir), other immunosuppressants in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients without metformin (No Sir with DM), and other immunosuppressants in patients without DM (No Sir without DM). Kaplan-Meier and Log-rank tests were used to assess survival. Cell proliferation and tumor xenograft assays were performed to disclose the mechanisms underlying the sirolimus and metformin effects. The Sir+Met group showed significantly prolonged survival compared to the other groups. The most significant cytotoxicity was seen in the Sir+Met group, with significantly decreased levels of phosphorylated PI3K, AKT, AMPK, mTOR, 4EBP1 and S6K, compared with the other groups. In agreement, Sir+Met had the highest suppressive effect on tumor growth among all groups (P<0.01). In summary, Sir+Met treatment significantly prolonged survival, likely by suppressing cell proliferation. Therefore, this combination could represent a potential routine-regimen for patients post LT. PMID:27577068

  12. Nuclear War Survival Skills

    SciTech Connect

    Kearny, C.H.

    2002-06-24

    The purpose of this book is to provide Americans with information and instructions that will significantly increase their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. It brings together field-tested instructions that, if followed by a large fraction of Americans during a crisis that preceded an attack, could save millions of lives. The author is convinced that the vulnerability of our country to nuclear threat or attack must be reduced and that the wide dissemination of the information contained in this book would help achieve that objective of our overall defense strategy.

  13. Retrieve Tether Survival Probability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cuts of the tether by meteorites and orbital debris , is calculated to be 99.934% for the planned experiment duration of six months or less. This is...due to the unlikely event of a strike by a large piece of orbital debris greater than 1 meter in size cutting all the lines of the tether at once. The...probability of the tether surviving multiple cuts by meteoroid and orbital debris impactors smaller than 5 cm in diameter is 99.9993% at six months

  14. GPO survival strategies.

    PubMed

    Norman, E

    1997-03-01

    Over the last two decades we have witnessed the genesis of a rapidly consolidating market with nearly all healthcare providers now participating in a handful of purchasing organizations either alliance-based or major national GPOs. For a traditional GPO to survive, even thrive in today's rapidly consolidating customer environment, it needs to focus on five essential issues: negotiating agreements, electronically-formatted contract information, sales force and support staff, value-added programs, and equity ownership. This articles discusses these five issues giving suggestions for their implementation.

  15. Long-term trends and survival analysis of esophageal and gastric cancer in Yangzhong, 1991-2013

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hengchuan; Yao, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the long-term trends of the incidence, mortality and survival of upper digestive tract cancers in a high-risk area of China. Methods We extracted esophageal and gastric cancer cases diagnosed from 1991 to 2013 through the Yangzhong Cancer Registry and calculated the crude and age-standardized incidence and mortality rates. Cancer trends were calculated using the Joinpoint Regression Program and were reported using the annual percentage change (APC). The cancer-specific survival rates were evaluated and compared between groups using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results The age-standardized incidence rate of esophageal cancer declined from 107.06 per 100,000 person-years (male: 118.05 per 100,000 person-years; female: 97.42 per 100,000 person-years) in 1991 to 37.04 per 100,000 person-years (male: 46.43 per 100,000 person-years; female: 27.26 per 100,000 person-years) in 2013, with an APC of -2.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): -3.4%, -1.5%) for males and -4.9% (95% CI:-5.8%, -3.9%) for females. The age-standardized incidence rate of gastric cancer was 165.11 per 100,000 person-years (male: 225.39 per 100,000 person-years; female: 113.34 per 100,000 person-years) in 1991 and 53.46 per 100,000 person-years (male: 76.51 per 100,000 person-years; female: 32.43 per 100,000 person-years) in 2013, with the APC of -3.6% (95% CI: -4.5%, -2.7%) for males and -4.8% (95% CI: -5.7%, -3.9%) for females. The median survival time was 3.0 years for patients with esophageal or gastric cancer. Cancer cases detected after 2004 had a better prognosis. Conclusions The age-standardized incidence rates of both esophageal and gastric cancer continuously decreased since 1991 through 2013, whereas the mortality rate remained stable before 2004 and significantly declined following the massive endoscopic screening program initiated in 2004. The survival probability of patients with esophageal and gastric cancer has improved obviously in recent decades. PMID

  16. Improving Survival after Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Søreide, Eldar

    2017-02-01

    Each year, approximately half a million people suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) in Europe: The majority die. Survival after CA varies greatly between regions and countries. The authors give an overview of the important elements necessary to promote improved survival after CA as a function of the chain of survival and formula for survival concepts. The chain of survival incorporates bystanders (who identify warning symptoms, call the emergency dispatch center, initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR]), dispatchers (who identify CA, and instruct and reassure the caller), first responders (who provide high-quality CPR, early defibrillation), paramedics and other prehospital care providers (who continue high-quality CPR, and provide timely defibrillation and advanced life support, transport to CA center), and hospitals (targeted temperature management, percutaneous coronary intervention, delayed prognostication). The formula for survival concept consists of (1) medical science (international guidelines), (2) educational efficiency (e.g., low-dose, high-frequency training for lay people, first responders, and professionals; and (3) local implementation of all factors in the chain of survival and formula for survival. Survival rates after CA can be advanced through the improvement of the different factors in both the chain of survival and the formula for survival. Importantly, the neurologic outcome in the majority of CA survivors has continued to improve.

  17. Motility, Survival and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Gerthoffer, William T.; Schaafsma, Dedmer; Sharma, Pawan; Ghavami, Saeid; Halayko, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle has classically been of interest for its contractile response linked to bronchoconstriction. However, terminally differentiated smooth muscle cells are phenotypically plastic and have multifunctional capacity for proliferation, cellular hypertrophy, migration, and the synthesis of extracellular matrix and inflammatory mediators. These latter properties of airway smooth muscle are important in airway remodeling which is a structural alteration that compounds the impact of contractile responses on limiting airway conductance. In this overview we describe the important signaling components and the functional evidence supporting a view of smooth muscle cells at the core of fibroproliferative remodeling of hollow organs. Signal transduction components and events are summarized that control the basic cellular processes of proliferation, cell survival, apoptosis and cellular migration. We delineate known intracellular control mechanisms and suggest future areas of interest to pursue to more fully understand factors that regulate normal myocyte function and airway remodeling in obstructive lung diseases. PMID:23728975

  18. Survival analysis of aging aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Samuel

    This study pushes systems engineering of aging aircraft beyond the boundaries of empirical and deterministic modeling by making a sharp break with the traditional laboratory-derived corrosion prediction algorithms that have shrouded real-world failures of aircraft structure. At the heart of this problem is the aeronautical industry's inability to be forthcoming in an accurate model that predicts corrosion failures in aircraft in spite of advances in corrosion algorithms or improvements in simulation and modeling. The struggle to develop accurate corrosion probabilistic models stems from a multitude of real-world interacting variables that synergistically influence corrosion in convoluted and complex ways. This dissertation, in essence, offers a statistical framework for the analysis of structural airframe corrosion failure by utilizing real-world data while considering the effects of interacting corrosion variables. This study injects realism into corrosion failures of aging aircraft systems by accomplishing four major goals related to the conceptual and methodological framework of corrosion modeling. First, this work connects corrosion modeling from the traditional, laboratory derived algorithms to corrosion failures in actual operating aircraft. This work augments physics-based modeling by examining the many confounding and interacting variables, such as environmental, geographical and operational, that impact failure of airframe structure. Examined through the lens of censored failure data from aircraft flying in a maritime environment, this study enhances the understanding between the triad of the theoretical, laboratory and real-world corrosion. Secondly, this study explores the importation and successful application of an advanced biomedical statistical tool---survival analysis---to model censored corrosion failure data. This well-grounded statistical methodology is inverted from a methodology that analyzes survival to one that examines failures. Third, this

  19. Statistics of hematologic malignancies in Korea: incidence, prevalence and survival rates from 1999 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeon Jin; Park, Eun-Hye; Jung, Kyu-Won; Kong, Hyun-Joo; Won, Young-Joo; Lee, Joo Young; Yoon, Jong Hyung; Park, Byung-Kiu; Lee, Hyewon; Eom, Hyeon-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Background The nationwide statistical analysis of hematologic malignancies in Korea has not been reported yet. Methods The Korea Central Cancer Registry and the Korean Society of Hematology jointly investigated domestic incidence rates and prevalence of hematologic malignancies occurred between 1999 and 2008, and analyzed survival rates of patients who were diagnosed between 1993 and 2008. Data of hematologic malignancies from 1993 to 2008 were obtained from the Korean National Cancer Incidence Data base. The crude incidence rates, age-specific incidence rates, age-standardized incidence rates, annual percentage change of incidence, and prevalence from 1999-2008 were calculated. Survival rates for patients diagnosed in 1993-2008 were estimated. Results In 2008, a total of 8,006 cases of hematologic malignancies were occurred, which comprised 4.5% of all malignancies. In all genders, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, myeloid leukemia, and multiple myeloma were most frequent diseases. In terms of age, ages between 60 and 69 were most prevalent. From 1999 to 2008, the age-standardized incidence rates increased from 10.2 to 13.7, and the annual percentage change was 3.9%. The 5-year survival rate increased from 38.2% during 1993-1995 to 55.2% during 2004-2008. As of January 2009, number of patients with 10-year prevalence was 33,130, and with 5- to 10-year prevalence was 10,515. Conclusion This is the first nationwide statistical report of hematologic malignancies in Korea. It could be used as the basic information to help investigate epidemiologic characteristics, evaluate progress during the past years, and establish future strategies for hematologic malignancies. Periodic statistical analysis of hematologic malignancies in Korea should be continued. PMID:22479275

  20. Survival rates of birds of tropical and temperate forests: will the dogma survive?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karr, J.R.; Nichols, J.D.; Klimkiewicz, M.K.; Brawn, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Survival rates of tropical forest birds are widely assumed to be high relative to the survival rates of temperate forest birds. Much life-history theory is based on this assumption despite the lack of empirical data to support it. We provide the first detailed comparison of survival rates of tropical and temperate forest birds based on extensive data bases and modern capture-recapture models. We find no support for the conventional wisdom. Because clutch size is only one component of reproductive rate, the frequently assumed, simple association between clutch size and adult survival rates should not necessarily be expected. Our results emphasize the need to consider components of fecundity in addition to clutch size when comparing the life histories of tropical and temperate birds and suggest similar considerations in the development of vertebrate life-history theory.

  1. Controlling chaotic transients: Yorke's game of survival.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Jacobo; D'Ovidio, Francesco; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2004-01-01

    We consider the tent map as the prototype of a chaotic system with escapes. We show analytically that a small, bounded, but carefully chosen perturbation added to the system can trap forever an orbit close to the chaotic saddle, even in presence of noise of larger, although bounded, amplitude. This problem is focused as a two-person, mathematical game between two players called "the protagonist" and "the adversary." The protagonist's goal is to survive. He can lose but cannot win; the best he can do is survive to play another round, struggling ad infinitum. In the absence of actions by either player, the dynamics diverge, leaving a relatively safe region, and we say the protagonist loses. What makes survival difficult is that the adversary is allowed stronger "actions" than the protagonist. What makes survival possible is (i) the background dynamics (the tent map here) are chaotic and (ii) the protagonist knows the action of the adversary in choosing his response and is permitted to choose the initial point x(0) of the game. We use the "slope 3" tent map in an example of this problem. We show that it is possible for the protagonist to survive.

  2. Improvement in High-Grade Osteosarcoma Survival

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Giun-Yi; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Chen, Paul C-H; Wu, Hung-Ta H.; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare survival before and after 2004 and define the prognostic factors for high-grade osteosarcomas beyond those of typical young patients with localized extremity disease. Few studies have reported the long-term treatment outcomes of high-grade osteosarcoma in Taiwan. A total of 202 patients with primary high-grade osteosarcoma who received primary chemotherapy at Taipei Veterans General Hospital between January 1995 and December 2011 were retrospectively evaluated and compared by period (1995–2003 vs 2004–2011). Patients of all ages and tumor sites and those following or not following controlled protocols were included in analysis of demographic, tumor-related, and treatment-related variables and survival. Overall survival and progression-free survival at 5 years were, respectively, 67.7% and 48% for all patients (n = 202), 77.3% and 57.1% for patients without metastasis (n = 157), and 33.9% and 14.8% for patients with metastasis (n = 45). The survival rates of patients treated after 2004 were significantly higher (by 13%–16%) compared with those of patients treated before 2004, with an accompanying 30% increase in histological good response rate (P = .002). Factors significantly contributing to inferior survival in univariate and multivariate analyses were diagnosis before 2004, metastasis at diagnosis, and being a noncandidate for a controlled treatment protocol. By comparison with the regimens used at our institution before 2004, the current results support the effectiveness of the post-2004 regimens, which consisted of substantially reduced cycles of high-dose methotrexate and a higher dosage of ifosfamide per cycle, cisplatin, and doxorubicin, for treating high-grade osteosarcoma in Asian patients. PMID:27082623

  3. Survival mechanisms in Antarctic lakes.

    PubMed Central

    Laybourn-Parry, Johanna

    2002-01-01

    In Antarctic lakes, organisms are confronted by continuous low temperatures as well as a poor light climate and nutrient limitation. Such extreme environments support truncated food webs with no fish, few metazoans and a dominance of microbial plankton. The key to success lies in entering the short Antarctic summer with actively growing populations. In many cases, the most successful organisms continue to function throughout the year. The few crustacean zooplankton remain active in the winter months, surviving on endogenous energy reserves and, in some cases, continuing development. Among the Protozoa, mixotrophy is an important nutritional strategy. In the extreme lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, planktonic cryptophytes are forced to sustain a mixotrophic strategy and cannot survive by photosynthesis alone. The dependence on ingesting bacteria varies seasonally and with depth in the water column. In the Vestfold Hills, Pyramimonas, which dominates the plankton of some of the saline lakes, also resorts to mixotrophy, but does become entirely photosynthetic at mid-summer. Mixotrophic ciliates are also common and the entirely photosynthetic ciliate Mesodinium rubrum has a widespread distribution in the saline lakes of the Vestfold Hills, where it attains high concentrations. Bacteria continue to grow all year, showing cycles that appear to be related to the availability of dissolved organic carbon. In saline lakes, bacteria experience sub-zero temperatures for long periods of the year and have developed biochemical adaptations that include anti-freeze proteins, changes in the concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids in their membranes and suites of low-temperature enzymes. PMID:12171649

  4. Long-term schisandrin B treatment mitigates age-related impairments in mitochondrial antioxidant status and functional ability in various tissues, and improves the survival of aging C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kam Ming; Chen, Na; Leung, Hoi Yan; Leong, Eriol P K; Poon, Michel K T; Chiu, Po Yee

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial decay is a major cause of aging, leading to the subsequent death of aerobic organisms including humans. In the present study, we examined the effects of supplementation with schisandrin B (Sch B, a dibenzocyclooctadiene derivative isolated from the fruit of Schisandra chinensis), administered at 0.012% (w/w) of diet, starting from the age of 36 weeks, on age-dependent changes in mouse mitochondrial antioxidant status and functional ability in various tissues (brain, heart, liver, and kidney) up to the age of 120 weeks. We also monitored survival of male and female C57BL/6J mice. Aging caused progressive impairment in mitochondrial antioxidant status in various tissues, as evidenced by decreases in reduced glutathione and alpha-tocopherol levels, and Mn-superoxide dismutase activity. Impairments in mitochondrial antioxidant status were invariably associated with increases in mitochondria-driven reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in tissue homogenates, as well as decreased mitochondrial ATP-generation capacities (ATP-GCs), in all tested tissues. Diet supplementation with Sch B ameliorated impairment in mitochondrial antioxidant status during aging. The effects were more pronounced in younger than in older mice, when compared to age-matched non-supplemented controls. Sch B supplementation also suppressed mitochondria-driven ROS production and enhanced mitochondrial ATP-GC in various tissues during aging. The beneficial effects of Sch B supplementation on mitochondrial antioxidant status and functional ability were paralleled by survival improvement in aging male mice, when compared with controls. Sch B supplementation also improved the survival in female mice. In conclusion, long-term Sch B supplementation mitigated age-dependent impairments in mitochondrial antioxidant capacity and functional ability, thereby retarding the aging process in mice, particularly during early aging.

  5. Sequential population-based studies over 25 years on the incidence and survival of acute de novo leukemias in Estonia and in a well-defined region of western Sweden during 1982-2006: a survey of patients aged ≥65 years.

    PubMed

    Punab, Mari; Palk, Katrin; Varik, Mirja; Laane, Edward; Everaus, Hele; Holmberg, Erik; Hulegårdh, Erik; Wennström, Lovisa; Safai-Kutti, Soodabeh; Stockelberg, Dick; Kutti, Jack

    2013-03-01

    Estonia regained independence in 1991 after five decades of occupation by the Soviet Union. The present population-based survey was carried out over five consecutive 5-year study periods (1982-2006) on the incidence and survival of de novo acute leukemia patients aged ≥65 years at diagnosis in Estonia and in a well-defined area in western Sweden. During the study period of retrospective work (1982-1996), the first 10 years were carried out while Estonia was still under the mentorship of the Soviet Union. Over these years, Estonian hematologists did not have access to therapeutic measures readily available to Swedish hematologists, and the results for survival for western Swedish patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) far exceeded those of their Estonian counterparts. However, the results for acute lymphoblastic leukemia were equally dismal in the two countries. Subsequent prospective population-based studies were carried out during the years 1997-2006. A gradual improvement as to long-term relative survival of the Estonian AML patients was observed. When studying 2002-2006, no difference as regards relative survival at 5 years was anymore present between the two countries. Over the first 20 years of our population-based studies, it was repeatedly observed that the age-standardized incidence rate particularly for de novo AML was considerably higher for the western Swedish as compared to the Estonian cohorts. During the last 5-year study period (2002-2006), no such difference between the two countries was present, indicating that some true changes in the reporting procedure in Estonia had occurred.

  6. Bacterial survival in turfgrass as predicted from the UV environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter-Shea, Elizabeth; Yuen, Gary; Hubbard, Kenneth; Horst, Garald

    2002-01-01

    Phylloplane microorganism survival is presumably affected by ultraviolet radiation (UV) penetrating into plant canopies, but little field data exist relating microorganism population dynamics to canopy UV level. Recent advances in field measurements involving the use of biological dosimeters and miniature radiometers make possible data sets for use in assessing the impact of UV on phylloplane microbe survival. The objective of this study was to compare field survival of a bacterial species, applied to turfgrass as a biological disease control agent, with predicted survival based on the prevailing UV-B environment under natural and attenuated UV conditions. Derived survival curves and radiation penetration equations (based on radiometer and biodosimeter field measurements of UV-B transmittance) were applied to predict bacterial survival within a turfgrass canopy at different leaf area indices. Due to the range in UV levels within a canopy, as indicated by the maximum (sunfleck areas) and minimum (shaded areas) transmitted irradiance values, bacterial survival can vary; predicted bacterial survival based only on average light penetration tended to underestimate survival. Further study should address contributions due to microenvironmental effects (e.g., canopy temperature, leaf wetness, and canopy structure), the spatial distribution of bacterium leaf microsites and bacterium survival on leaf surfaces.

  7. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Eun H.; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V.

    2017-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans. PMID:28241407

  8. Tlingit Survival Practices and Stories with Activity Folder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Frank

    Students learn Tlingit survival practices and lore in this booklet of stories and learning activities. Five readings discuss fire making methods, edible wild foods, weather conditions, and shelter; information is related to the resources of Southeast Alaska and to typical survival situations; e.g., storms at sea and dense fogs. Narratives relate…

  9. On the Plasticity of the Survival Processing Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroneisen, Meike; Erdfelder, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Nairne, Thompson, and Pandeirada (2007) discovered a strong and rather general memory advantage for word material processed in a survival-related context. One possible explanation of this effect conceives survival processing as a special form of encoding: Nature specifically "tuned" our memory systems to process and remember…

  10. Surviving a Suicide Attempt

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al Maqbali, Mandhar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors) and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support). All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor. PMID:27602193

  11. Determination of Survivable Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Niehaus, J. E.; Ruff, G. A.; Urban, D. L.; Takahashi, F.; Easton, J. W.; Abbott, A. A.; Graf, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    At NASA, there exists no standardized design or testing protocol for spacecraft fire suppression systems (either handheld or total flooding designs). An extinguisher's efficacy in safely suppressing any reasonable or conceivable fire is the primary benchmark. That concept, however, leads to the question of what a reasonable or conceivable fire is. While there exists the temptation to over-size' the fire extinguisher, weight and volume considerations on spacecraft will always (justifiably) push for the minimum size extinguisher required. This paper attempts to address the question of extinguisher size by examining how large a fire a crew member could successfully survive and extinguish in the confines of a spacecraft. The hazards to the crew and equipment during an accidental fire include excessive pressure rise resulting in a catastrophic rupture of the vehicle skin, excessive temperatures that burn or incapacitate the crew (due to hyperthermia), carbon dioxide build-up or other accumulation of other combustion products (e.g. carbon monoxide). Estimates of these quantities are determined as a function of fire size and mass of material burned. This then becomes the basis for determining the maximum size of a target fire for future fire extinguisher testing.

  12. Incidence and survival rates of ovarian cancer in low-income women in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Abuidris, Dafalla O.; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Elhaj, Ahmed M.; Eltayeb, Elgaylani Abdallah; Elsanousi, Mohamed; Ibnoof, Rehab S.; Mohammed, Sulma I.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the second most common gynecological cancer worldwide. Little is known about the disease in Sudan. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the incidence rate, age and stage at diagnosis, and median survival time of patients presenting at the National Cancer Institute-University of Gezira (NCI-UG), Sudan. Data were collected in a prospective study of women with ovarian cancer over a period of eleven years of follow-up (between 2000 and 2011). Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the distribution of the demographics of the sample. The direct method was used to compute the age-standardized rate (ASR) using data from the 1966 and 2000 World Standard Populations (WSPs). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival functions and the median survival time. Log-rank tests were used to statistically compare between the survival functions. There were steady increases in ovarian cancer incidence rates between 2000 and 2009, with a slight decline noted in 2010 and 2011. The patients' age range was 9–90. The age-specific incidence rate increased greatly in women aged 55 years or older. The majority of the patients had stage III or IV disease. The annual ASR using WSPs 1966 and 2000 as standard populations were 3.3 and 3.7 per 100,000 women, respectively. The median survival time was 31 months (95% confidence interval, 19–43). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 38%. In Sudan, ovarian cancer affects postmenopausal women, akin to what is reported in the developed world with high incidence rates. Presenting with advanced stage disease is the predominant factor that results in a short survival time for women. PMID:28105363

  13. Incidence and survival trends for childhood cancer in Osaka, Japan, 1973-2001.

    PubMed

    Baba, Sachiko; Ioka, Akiko; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Noda, Hiroyuki; Ajiki, Wakiko; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2010-03-01

    Mortality for childhood cancer has declined in Osaka, as well as all over Japan, since the 1970s, but whether this decline can be explained by trends of incidence or survival of childhood cancer has not been examined. A total of 5960 malignant tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2001 in children <15 years of age were registered at the Osaka Cancer Registry in Japan. The time trends for childhood cancer were analyzed over 29 years for incidence and 20 years for survival. Leukemia was the most common among childhood cancer for both sexes and accounted for one-third of all cases. The age-standardized annual incidence rate of all tumors was highest in 1988-1992: 155.1 per million for males and 135.9 for females. Five-year survival for all tumors improved from 50.1% in 1978-1982 to 73.0% in 1993-1997 for males and from 52.3% to 76.3% for females. Thus, the constant decline in mortality in childhood cancer was primarily due to improved survival between the 1970s and 1980s and reduced incidence after the 1990s.

  14. Postfledging survival of Laysan ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Citta, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Precise and unbiased estimates of demographic parameters are necessary for effective population monitoring and to parameterize population models (e.g., population viability analyses). This is especially important for endangered species, where recovery planning and managers' decisions can influence species persistence. In this study, we used mark–recapture methods to estimate survival of fledged juveniles (hatch-yr [HY]) and adult (after-hatch-yr [AHY]) Laysan ducks (Anas laysanensis), an endangered anatid restricted to Laysan Island in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands. To better understand population dynamics, we examined how survival varied as a function of Laysan duck density during 1998–2004. Using random effects models, we also quantified process variation in survival, thereby quantifying the appropriate source of variation for future population models. The dataset supported variation in survival that was time (yr), age (AHY vs. HY), and sex specific. Due to small sample sizes, we did not examine time specificity in the survival of HY ducks. Survival of HY ducks was 0.832 (SE = 0.087) for females (n = 21) and 0.999 (SE < 0.001) for males (n = 15) during 1998–2001. Trends in time and density lacked support as sources of variation in the survival of AHY ducks during 1998–2004. After-hatch-year survival ranged from 0.792 (SE = 0.033) to 0.999 (SE < 0.001). Where we modeled survival as a random effect, annual survival for AHY females was 0.881 (SE = 0.017) and process variation (σS) was 0.034. For AHY males, annual survival (μS) was 0.906 (SE = 0.019) and process variation (σS) was 0.040. This information will improve existing population viability analysis models for Laysan ducks. We believe that monitoring the source and translocation populations will be paramount for increasing our understanding of Laysan duck dynamics, recovery planning, and population management.

  15. Hypervelocity impact survivability experiments for carbonaceous impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, Luann; Bada, Jeffrey; Macklin, John; Radicatidibrozolo, Filippo; Fleming, R. H.; Erlichman, Jozef

    1993-01-01

    We performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments using carbon-bearing impactors (diamond, graphite, fullerenes, phthalic acid crystals, and Murchison meteorite) into Al plate at velocities between 4.2 and 6.1 km/s. These tests were made to do the following: (1) determine the survivability of carbon forms and organize molecules in low hypervelocity impact; (2) characterize carbonaceous impactor residues; and (3) determine whether or not fullerenes could form from carbonaceous impactors, under our experimental conditions, or survive as impactors. An analytical protocol of field emission SEM imagery, SEM-EDX, laser Raman spectroscopy, single and 2-stage laser mass spectrometry, and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) found the following: (1) diamonds did not survive impact at 4.8 km/s, but were transformed into various forms of disordered graphite; (2) intact, well-ordered graphite impactors did survive impact at 5.9 km/sec, but were only found in the crater bottom centers; the degree of impact-induced disorder in the graphite increases outward (walls, rims, ejecta); (3) phthalic acid crystals were destroyed on impact (at 4.2 km/s, although a large proportion of phthalic acid molecules did survive impact); (4) fullerenes did not form as products of carbonaceous impactors (5.9 - 6.1 km/s, fullerene impactor molecules mostly survived impact at 5.9 km/s; and (5) two Murchison meteorite samples (launched at 4.8 and 5.9 km/s) show preservation of some higher mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with the non-impacted sample. Each impactor type shows unique impactor residue morphologies produced at a given impact velocity. An expanded methodology is presented to announce relatively new analytical techniques together with innovative modifications to other methods that can be used to characterize small impact residues in LDEF craters, in addition to other acquired extraterrestrial samples.

  16. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  17. Reproductive ecology of Emperor Geese: Survival of adult females

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Margaret R.

    1992-01-01

    Life history theory predicts a decrease in survival with increased reproductive effort of individuals. This relationship, however, is highly variable among and within species. I studied the nesting success and survival of adult female Emperor Geese during 1982-1986 and found no direct evidence that differential reproductive effort as measured by the number of eggs laid or hatching success had a significant negative effect on survival to the next breeding season. Incubated clutch size, hatched clutch size, number of parasitic eggs, nest initiation date, hatch date, and mass at hatch were not related to subsequent survival. Of the factors I examined, only an attempt to nest the previous season was related to survival of a female. I suggest that the higher probability of survival among non-nesting adult female Emperor Geese was primarily related to hunting pressure on the nesting area between spring and fall migration. The probability of survival was increased for females with larger clutches, suggesting a positive relationship between brood size and survival.

  18. Marketing child survival.

    PubMed

    Grant, J P

    1984-01-01

    Growth monitoring charts, packets of oral rehydration salts (ORS), and vaccines, are inexpensive, life-saving, growth-protecting technologies which can enable parents to protect their children against the worst effects of poverty. Similarly, a matrix of current and easily understandable information about pregnancy, breast feeding, weaning, feeding during and immediately after illness, child spacing, and preparing and using home-made oral rehydration solutions, also could empower parents to protect the lives and the health of their children. The question arises as to how can these technologies and this information be put at the disposal of millions of families in the low-income world. The initial task of the Child Survival and Development Revolution is the communication of what is now possible, yet little is known about how to communicate information whose principal value is to the poor. There are 2 large-scale precedents: the Green Revolution, which in many instances succeeded in putting into the hands of thousands of small and large farmers the techniques and the knowledge which enabled them to double and treble the yields from their lands; and the campaign to put the knowledge and the means of family planning at the disposal of many millions of people. There are 2 lessons to be learned from these precedents: they have shown that the way to promote a people's technology and to put information at the disposal of the majority is by mobilizing all possible resources and working through all possible channels both to create the demand and to meet it; and neither the Green Revolution nor the family planning movement rally took off until they were viewed as political and economic priorities and given the full support of the nation's political leadership. Nowhere are these 2 lessons more clearly illustrated than in present-day Indonesia. Because the campaign for family planning was given high personal and political priority by the President, and because 85% of all family

  19. Mathematics and Global Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Richard H.

    This resource was written to provide students with an awareness of critical issues facing the world today. In courses for college students, it can motivate their study of mathematics, teach them how to solve mathematical problems related to current global issues, provide coherence to mathematical studies through a focus on issues of human…

  20. Aircraft Crash Survival Design Guide. Volume 5. Aircraft Postcrash Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Crash Locator Beacons Crashworthiness Emergency Escape Postcrash Survival Aircraft Interior Materials Crashworthy Fuel Systems Ditching Postorash Fire...behavior of interip~r materials , ditching survival, emergency escape, and ~ crash loc tor beacons. ow - SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGIEtfhn Pata...IGNITION SOURCE CONTROL TERMS.... . . 21 2.4 INTERIOR MATERIALS SELECTION TERMS . . . 22 2.5 DITCHING AND EMERGENCY ESCAPE TERMS. . . 23 CHAPTER 3. POSTCRASH

  1. Trends in net survival from ovarian cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Uhry, Zoé; Salmerón, Diego; Sánchez-Zapata, María-Isabel; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Navarro, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    European Latin countries have some similarities in their health systems. It is thus interesting to look at their differences in cancer survival (here, ovarian cancer) through monitoring of specific indicators of quality care. The aim of this SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the trends in 1 and 5-year net survival from ovarian cancer and the trends in the excess mortality rates between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland). The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, the net survival was studied over the 2000-2004 period using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. The results are reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland, and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. The analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modelling. Over the period 2000-2004, there were slight differences in the 5-year age-standardized net survivals from ovarian cancer; they ranged from 36% in Spain to 42% in Belgium. Net survival was much higher in young than in old age groups, but this difference was more marked in Spain and less marked in France. Between 1992 and 2004, the net survival increased in all countries, mainly in young and middle-aged women. However, the differences in 5-year net survival between these countries were larger in 2004 than in 1992. Slight differences were observed in survival from ovarian cancer between the six European Latin countries. A considerable improvement in survival was observed in all countries, especially in young and middle-aged women. This study highlights the need for further monitoring of ovarian cancer outcomes.

  2. A survival guide for leaders.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Ronald A; Linsky, Marty

    2002-06-01

    Let's face it, to lead is to live dangerously. While leadership is often viewed as an exciting and glamorous endeavor, one in which you inspire others to follow you through good times and bad, such a portrayal ignores leadership's dark side: the inevitable attempts to take you out of the game. This is particularly true when a leader must steer an organization through difficult change. When the status quo is upset, people feel a sense of profound loss and dashed expectations. They may need to undergo a period of feeling incompetent or disloyal. It's no wonder they resist the change and often try to eliminate its visible agent. This "survival guide" offers a number of techniques--relatively straightforward in concept but difficult to execute--for protecting yourself as you lead such a change initiative. Adapted from the book Leadership on the Line: Staying Alive Through the Dangers of Leading (Harvard Business School Press, 2002), the article has two main parts. The first looks outward, offering tactical advice about relating to your organization and the people in it. It is designed to protect you from those who would push you aside before you complete your initiatives. The second looks inward, focusing on your own needs and vulnerabilities. It is designed to keep you from bringing yourself down. The hard truth is that it is not possible to experience the rewards and joys of leadership without experiencing the pain as well. But staying in the game and bearing that pain is worth it, not only for the positive changes you can make in the lives of others but also for the meaning it gives your own.

  3. Notch Signaling Functions in Retinal Pericyte Survival

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F.; Primo, Vincent; Graham, Mark; James, Alexandra; Manent, Jan; D'Amore, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pericytes, the vascular cells that constitute the outer layer of capillaries, have been shown to have a crucial role in vascular development and stability. Loss of pericytes precedes endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular degeneration in small-vessel diseases, including diabetic retinopathy. Despite their clinical relevance, the cellular pathways controlling survival of retinal pericytes remain largely uncharacterized. Therefore, we investigated the role of Notch signaling, a master regulator of cell fate decisions, in retinal pericyte survival. Methods. A coculture system of ligand-dependent Notch signaling was developed using primary cultured retinal pericytes and a mesenchymal cell line derived from an inducible mouse model expressing the Delta-like 1 Notch ligand. This model was used to examine the effect of Notch activity on pericyte survival using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and a light-induced cell death assay. The effect of Notch gain- and loss-of-function was analyzed in monocultures of retinal pericytes using antibody arrays to interrogate the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. Results. Primary cultured retinal pericytes differentially expressed key molecules of the Notch pathway and displayed strong expression of canonical Notch/RBPJK (recombination signal-binding protein 1 for J-kappa) downstream targets. A gene expression screen using gain- and loss-of-function approaches identified genes relevant to cell survival as downstream targets of Notch activity in retinal pericytes. Ligand-mediated Notch activity protected retinal pericytes from light-induced cell death. Conclusions. Our results have identified signature genes downstream of Notch activity in retinal pericytes and suggest that tight regulation of Notch signaling is crucial for pericyte survival. PMID:25015359

  4. Staying Alive: Problems of Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim, Bill

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an approach to the teaching of biological diversity using the theme of survival. Teaching methods for this approach and the advantages of its use are discussed. A suggested course outline is included. (CW)

  5. Native American Prison Survival Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence

    1980-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of the "survival schools" concept and adult education techniques to the incarcerated Indian, teaching both the acceptance of "Indianism" and the skills and attitudes for coping with the dominant culture. (SK)

  6. The Survival of the Wisest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salk, Jonas

    1975-01-01

    Suggests that humans differ from other living organisms in the ability to exercise learned behavior and the individual will, which may allow people to make the changes in values necessary to survive on this planet. (DW)

  7. Survivability of Deterministic Dynamical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, Frank; Schultz, Paul; Grabow, Carsten; Heitzig, Jobst; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The notion of a part of phase space containing desired (or allowed) states of a dynamical system is important in a wide range of complex systems research. It has been called the safe operating space, the viability kernel or the sunny region. In this paper we define the notion of survivability: Given a random initial condition, what is the likelihood that the transient behaviour of a deterministic system does not leave a region of desirable states. We demonstrate the utility of this novel stability measure by considering models from climate science, neuronal networks and power grids. We also show that a semi-analytic lower bound for the survivability of linear systems allows a numerically very efficient survivability analysis in realistic models of power grids. Our numerical and semi-analytic work underlines that the type of stability measured by survivability is not captured by common asymptotic stability measures. PMID:27405955

  8. Customer service skills for survival.

    PubMed

    McAtee, L F

    1999-11-01

    As APICS practitioners, we all must share a common goal. How can we contribute to our company's success? Success can be measured in positive terms of market share, growth, profitability, return on investment, or some combination thereof. Each company must establish its own definition of success. For the purposes of this article, success will be equated to one word that we can all readily identify with: survival. What skills do we need to survive in the marketplace of the next millennium?

  9. Survival of Microorganisms in Nature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-07

    number) Survival of bacteria; Death of bacteria; Cysts; Dormancy; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Azotobacter; Chemotaxis; Micrococcus luteus ; Predation...attracted to and rapidly destroys (lyses) added Micrococcus luteus cells. There is also attack of predator on predator in this system. DO 1 DIT1 473 Oor I OV...and on laboratory media. 4 1 SUMMARY OF IMPORTANT RESULTS Micrococcus luteus was shown to survive only poorly in soil (Casida, 1980a). This was

  10. Evolutionary history and distance dependence control survival of dipterocarp seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Robert; Press, Malcolm C; Scholes, Julie D

    2010-01-01

    One important hypothesis to explain tree-species coexistence in tropical forests suggests that increased attack by natural enemies near conspecific trees gives locally rare species a competitive advantage. Host ranges of natural enemies generally encompass several closely related plant taxa suggesting that seedlings should also do poorly around adults of closely related species. We investigated the effects of adult Parashorea malaanonan on seedling survival in a Bornean rain forest. Survival of P. malaanonan seedlings was highest at intermediate distances from parent trees while heterospecific seedlings were unaffected by distance. Leaf herbivores did not drive this relationship. Survival of seedlings was lowest for P. malaanonan, and increased with phylogenetic dissimilarity from this species, suggesting that survival of close relatives of common species is reduced. This study suggests that distance dependence contributes to species coexistence and highlights the need for further investigation into the role of shared plant enemies in community dynamics.

  11. National trends in incidence and survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Norway for 1953-2012: a systematic analysis of population-based data.

    PubMed

    Lenartova, Andrea; Johannesen, Tom Børge; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland

    2016-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a disease of the elderly, and despite major advances in treatment, remains incurable. The Cancer Registry of Norway has registered data on patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia since 1953. We aimed to analyze trends in incidence and survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Norway. We identified 7664 patients reported with chronic lymphocytic leukemia to the registry between 1953 and 2012. We gathered information on sex, age at diagnosis, date of death and basis for diagnosis. The age-standardized incidence increased from 0.6/100.000 person-years in 1953 to 3.1/100,000 person-years in 2012. We found a significant decrease in median age between 1993-2002 and 2003-2012 (75 vs. 72 years, 95%CI: 2.52-3.98, P < 0.001). Men were diagnosed at a significantly younger age than women. Immunophenotyping has become the most important diagnostic method after 2002. Median observed survival increased from 3 years in 1952-1963 to 8.5 years in 2003-2012. Five- and 10-year age-standardized net survival increased throughout the whole period across age groups and reached 79% and 57%, respectively. Median observed survival was significantly shorter in men than in women in 1993-2002 (4.9 vs. 6.1 years, P < 0.001). The gap between survival rates for men and women was diminishing in 2003-2012 in patients younger than 60 years while it remained considerable in older patients. Despite an aging Norwegian population, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients become younger at diagnosis. A fourfold increase in incidence, a prolonged survival, and major changes in diagnostic methods in Norway were observed.

  12. [Endometriosis and surviving adolescence].

    PubMed

    Belaisch, J; Allart, J-P

    2006-03-01

    Endometriosis is a recurrent and painful disease which sometimes disturbs severely the quality of life of women who suffer from it. It is then logical to include a psychological back-up to its medical and surgical treatment. Nevertheless this support is not often offered to patients. One can hypothesize another and completely different way of seeing the problem: the mood swings and depression of endometriotic patients could possibly be, at least in some of them, the cause of the graft of endometrial cells and not the effect of pain and infertility. The mechanism of the development of endometriotic lesions could be related to a lowering of immune defences due to an alteration of the psycho-neuro-endocrino-immunologic network, resulting from difficult life experiences which mostly happen during adolescence. This concept may have beneficial effects for the patient whose case would be more understood in depth. But very few medical teams consider it worthwhile to include in their practices.

  13. Multiple Weather Factors Affect Apparent Survival of European Passerine Birds

    PubMed Central

    Salewski, Volker; Hochachka, Wesley M.; Fiedler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and the potential for

  14. Multiple weather factors affect apparent survival of European passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Salewski, Volker; Hochachka, Wesley M; Fiedler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and the potential for

  15. Factors influencing wild turkey hen survival in southcentral Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, M.W.; Garner, D.L.; Klaas, E.E.

    1999-01-01

    A decline in the population of eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) in southcentral Iowa necessitated more current estimates of population parameters. Survival of 126 eastern wild turkey hens in southcentral Iowa was investigated during 1993-96. Estimates of annual survival averaged 0.676 ?? 0.048% (x?? ?? SE) for adults and 0.713 ?? 0.125 for subadults. Mammalian predators, primarily coyotes (Canis latrans) and red fox (Vulpes fulva) accounted for 64% of all documented mortality. Age-specific annual survival distributions differed within years (P < 0.03), but no difference was detected in survival between age classes across years (P = 0.49). Based on chronological dates, survival of adult hens differed among seasons across years (P = 0.03). However, seasonal survival was not different when estimates were based on hen behavior (p = 0.48). Risk of mortality for hens increased by 2.0% for every 100-m increase in dispersal distance, decreased by 2.0% for every 10-ha increase in home range size, and decreased by 3.5% for each 1.0% increase in proportion of home range in woody cover. Although the exact cause of the population decline remains unknown, we suggest it was more likely related to a decrease in production than changes in hen survival. Declining turkey populations would likely benefit more from management designed to increase reproduction rather than hen survival.

  16. Probabilistic Survivability Versus Time Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2015-01-01

    This technical paper documents Kennedy Space Centers Independent Assessment team work completed on three assessments for the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program to assist the Chief Safety and Mission Assurance Officer (CSO) and GSDO management during key programmatic reviews. The assessments provided the GSDO Program with an analysis of how egress time affects the likelihood of astronaut and worker survival during an emergency. For each assessment, the team developed probability distributions for hazard scenarios to address statistical uncertainty, resulting in survivability plots over time. The first assessment developed a mathematical model of probabilistic survivability versus time to reach a safe location using an ideal Emergency Egress System at Launch Complex 39B (LC-39B); the second used the first model to evaluate and compare various egress systems under consideration at LC-39B. The third used a modified LC-39B model to determine if a specific hazard decreased survivability more rapidly than other events during flight hardware processing in Kennedys Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB).Based on the composite survivability versus time graphs from the first two assessments, there was a soft knee in the Figure of Merit graphs at eight minutes (ten minutes after egress ordered). Thus, the graphs illustrated to the decision makers that the final emergency egress design selected should have the capability of transporting the flight crew from the top of LC 39B to a safe location in eight minutes or less. Results for the third assessment were dominated by hazards that were classified as instantaneous in nature (e.g. stacking mishaps) and therefore had no effect on survivability vs time to egress the VAB. VAB emergency scenarios that degraded over time (e.g. fire) produced survivability vs time graphs that were line with aerospace industry norms.

  17. Trends in net survival from esophageal cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Launoy, Guy; Bossard, Nadine; Castro, Clara; Manfredi, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents a major clinical challenge because of its poor prognosis. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from esophageal cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland) and report the trends in net survival and the dynamics of excess mortality rates (EMRs) up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the period 2000-2004 using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. The results were reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These trend analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modeling strategy. There were some differences between countries in age-standardized net survival (2000-2004). The 5-year net survival ranged between 9 (Spain) and 21% (Belgium). The small increase in net survival from 1992 and 2004 was mostly observed at ages 55 and 65, but was less marked at age 75. There was a slight decrease in EMR between 1992 and 2004 until ∼24 months after diagnosis. Beyond this period, the decrease in the EMR was moderate and the same in all countries irrespective of the year of diagnosis. Some improvement in the 5-year net survival was observed in all countries limited to the 24 months after diagnosis. However, survival differences between countries persisted. Further improvement is expected from innovative treatments.

  18. Adaptive Memory: Survival Processing Increases Both True and False Memory in Adults and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otgaar, Henry; Smeets, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that processing information in a survival context can enhance the information's memorability. The current study examined whether survival processing can also decrease the susceptibility to false memories and whether the survival advantage can be found in children. In Experiment 1, adults rated semantically related words in a…

  19. Estimating the loss in expectation of life due to cancer using flexible parametric survival models.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Dickman, Paul W; Eloranta, Sandra; Lambe, Mats; Lambert, Paul C

    2013-12-30

    A useful summary measure for survival data is the expectation of life, which is calculated by obtaining the area under a survival curve. The loss in expectation of life due to a certain type of cancer is the difference between the expectation of life in the general population and the expectation of life among the cancer patients. This measure is used little in practice as its estimation generally requires extrapolation of both the expected and observed survival. A parametric distribution can be used for extrapolation of the observed survival, but it is difficult to find a distribution that captures the underlying shape of the survival function after the end of follow-up. In this paper, we base our extrapolation on relative survival, because it is more stable and reliable. Relative survival is defined as the observed survival divided by the expected survival, and the mortality analogue is excess mortality. Approaches have been suggested for extrapolation of relative survival within life-table data, by assuming that the excess mortality has reached zero (statistical cure) or has stabilized to a constant. We propose the use of flexible parametric survival models for relative survival, which enables estimating the loss in expectation of life on individual level data by making these assumptions or by extrapolating the estimated linear trend at the end of follow-up. We have evaluated the extrapolation from this model using data on four types of cancer, and the results agree well with observed data.

  20. 22 CFR 19.11-7 - Annuity payable to surviving child or children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Annuity payable to surviving child or children... payable to surviving child or children. (a) If a participant who has at least 18 months of civilian..., annuities are payable to a surviving child or children, as defined in § 19.2(e) as follows: (1)...

  1. 22 CFR 19.11-7 - Annuity payable to surviving child or children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Annuity payable to surviving child or children... payable to surviving child or children. (a) If a participant who has at least 18 months of civilian..., annuities are payable to a surviving child or children, as defined in § 19.2(e) as follows: (1)...

  2. 22 CFR 19.11-7 - Annuity payable to surviving child or children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Annuity payable to surviving child or children... payable to surviving child or children. (a) If a participant who has at least 18 months of civilian..., annuities are payable to a surviving child or children, as defined in § 19.2(e) as follows: (1)...

  3. 22 CFR 19.11-7 - Annuity payable to surviving child or children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Annuity payable to surviving child or children... payable to surviving child or children. (a) If a participant who has at least 18 months of civilian..., annuities are payable to a surviving child or children, as defined in § 19.2(e) as follows: (1)...

  4. 22 CFR 19.11-7 - Annuity payable to surviving child or children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annuity payable to surviving child or children... payable to surviving child or children. (a) If a participant who has at least 18 months of civilian..., annuities are payable to a surviving child or children, as defined in § 19.2(e) as follows: (1)...

  5. Survival and Recurrence Rate after Treatment for Primary Spinal Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Wonik

    2013-01-01

    Objective We have limited understanding on the presentation and survival of primary spinal sarcomas. The survival, recurrence rate, and related prognostic factors were investigated after treatment for primary sarcomas of the spine. Methods Retrospective analysis of medical records and radiological data was done for 29 patients in whom treatment was performed due to primary sarcoma of the spine from 2000 to 2010. As for treatment method, non-radical operation, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy were simultaneously or sequentially combined. Overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), ambulatory function, and pain status were analyzed. In addition, factors affecting survival and recurrence were analyzed : age (≤42 or ≥43), gender, tumor histologic type, lesion location (mobile spine or rigid spine), weakness at diagnosis, pain at diagnosis, ambulation at diagnosis, initial treatment, radiation therapy, kind of irradiation, surgery, chemotherapy and distant metastasis. Results Median OS was 60 months, the recurrence rate was 79.3% and median PFS was 26 months. Patients with distant metastasis showed significantly shorter survival than those without metastasis. No factors were found to be significant relating to recurrence. Prognostic factor associated with walking ability was the presence of weakness at diagnosis. Conclusion Primary spinal sarcomas are difficult to cure and show high recurrence rate. However, the development of new treatment methods is improving survival. PMID:23826479

  6. Survival analysis and Cox regression.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Parejo, N; Rodríguez del Águila, M M; Pérez-Vicente, S

    2011-01-01

    The data provided by clinical trials are often expressed in terms of survival. The analysis of survival comprises a series of statistical analytical techniques in which the measurements analysed represent the time elapsed between a given exposure and the outcome of a certain event. Despite the name of these techniques, the outcome in question does not necessarily have to be either survival or death, and may be healing versus no healing, relief versus pain, complication versus no complication, relapse versus no relapse, etc. The present article describes the analysis of survival from both a descriptive perspective, based on the Kaplan-Meier estimation method, and in terms of bivariate comparisons using the log-rank statistic. Likewise, a description is provided of the Cox regression models for the study of risk factors or covariables associated to the probability of survival. These models are defined in both simple and multiple forms, and a description is provided of how they are calculated and how the postulates for application are checked - accompanied by illustrating examples with the shareware application R.

  7. [A test for sperm cell survival in peritoneal fluid].

    PubMed

    Radwan, J; Niwald, W; Bielak, A; Pawlicki, J; Banaszczyk, R; Makuła, D

    1995-06-01

    The role of the peritoneal fluid in the physiology of reproduction, as well as in the transportation and survival of gametes, is little known. The authors have examined interactions between spermatozoa and the peritoneal fluid, collected during laparoscopy in the, so-called, survival test, from 42 infertile couples. The studied survival of spermatozoa in the peritoneal fluid was relatively high--19% after 48 hours--longer than in Menezo B2 fluid. Values of the test have been indicated, especially in cases of endometriosis-caused and idiopathic infertility.

  8. Inbreeding and homozygosity in breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Hauke; Filho, Miguel Inacio da Silva; Woltmann, Andrea; Johansson, Robert; Eyfjörd, Jorunn E; Hamann, Ute; Manjer, Jonas; Enquist-Olsson, Kerstin; Henriksson, Roger; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Chen, Bowang; Huhn, Stefanie; Hemminki, Kari; Lenner, Per; Försti, Asta

    2015-11-12

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) help to understand the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on breast cancer (BC) progression and survival. We performed multiple analyses on data from a previously conducted GWAS for the influence of individual SNPs, runs of homozygosity (ROHs) and inbreeding on BC survival. (I.) The association of individual SNPs indicated no differences in the proportions of homozygous individuals among short-time survivors (STSs) and long-time survivors (LTSs). (II.) The analysis revealed differences among the populations for the number of ROHs per person and the total and average length of ROHs per person and among LTSs and STSs for the number of ROHs per person. (III.) Common ROHs at particular genomic positions were nominally more frequent among LTSs than in STSs. Common ROHs showed significant evidence for natural selection (iHS, Tajima's D, Fay-Wu's H). Most regions could be linked to genes related to BC progression or treatment. (IV.) Results were supported by a higher level of inbreeding among LTSs. Our results showed that an increased level of homozygosity may result in a preference of individuals during BC treatment. Although common ROHs were short, variants within ROHs might favor survival of BC and may function in a recessive manner.

  9. Medical Advances and Racial/ethnic Disparities in Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tehranifar, Parisa; Neugut, Alfred I.; Phelan, Jo C.; Link, Bruce G.; Liao, Yuyan; Desai, Manisha; Terry, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although advances in early detection and treatment of cancer improve overall population survival, these advances may not benefit all population groups equally, and may heighten racial/ethnic (R/E) differences in survival. METHODS We identified cancer cases in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, who were ≥ 20 years and diagnosed with one invasive cancer in 1995–1999 (n=580,225). We used 5-year relative survival rates (5Y-RSR) to measure the degree to which mortality from each cancer is amenable to medical interventions (amenability index). We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate survival differences between each R/E minority group relative to whites, by the overall amenability index, and three levels of amenability (non-amenable, partly and mostly amenable cancers, corresponding to cancers with 5Y-RSR <40%, 40–69% and ≥ 70%, respectively), adjusting for gender, age, disease stage and county-level poverty concentration. RESULTS As amenability increased, R/E differences in cancer survival increased for African Americans, American Indians/Native Alaskans and Hispanics relative to whites. For example, the hazard rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) for African Americans vs. whites from non-amenable, partly amenable and mostly amenable cancers were 1.05 (1.03, 1.07), 1.38 (1.34,1.41), and 1.41 (1.37, 1.46), respectively. Asians/Pacific Islanders had similar or longer survival relative to whites across amenability levels; however, several subgroups experienced increasingly poorer survival with increasing amenability. CONCLUSIONS Cancer survival disparities for most R/E minority populations widen as cancers become more amenable to medical interventions. Efforts in developing cancer control measures must be coupled with specific strategies for reducing the expected disparities. PMID:19789367

  10. Diverse microbial species survive high ammonia concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Laura C.; Cockell, Charles S.; Summers, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    Planetary protection regulations are in place to control the contamination of planets and moons with terrestrial micro-organisms in order to avoid jeopardizing future scientific investigations relating to the search for life. One environmental chemical factor of relevance in extraterrestrial environments, specifically in the moons of the outer solar system, is ammonia (NH3). Ammonia is known to be highly toxic to micro-organisms and may disrupt proton motive force, interfere with cellular redox reactions or cause an increase of cell pH. To test the survival potential of terrestrial micro-organisms exposed to such cold, ammonia-rich environments, and to judge whether current planetary protection regulations are sufficient, soil samples were exposed to concentrations of NH3 from 5 to 35% (v/v) at -80°C and room temperature for periods up to 11 months. Following exposure to 35% NH3, diverse spore-forming taxa survived, including representatives of the Firmicutes (Bacillus, Sporosarcina, Viridibacillus, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus and Brevibacillus) and Actinobacteria (Streptomyces). Non-spore forming organisms also survived, including Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas) and Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) that are known to have environmentally resistant resting states. Clostridium spp. were isolated from the exposed soil under anaerobic culture. High NH3 was shown to cause a reduction in viability of spores over time, but spore morphology was not visibly altered. In addition to its implications for planetary protection, these data show that a large number of bacteria, potentially including spore-forming pathogens, but also environmentally resistant non-spore-formers, can survive high ammonia concentrations.

  11. Surviving at a distance: organ specific metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of metastasis in a vital organ is the final stage of cancer progression and the main culprit of cancer related mortality. Once established, metastasis is devastating, yet only a small proportion of the cancer cells that leave a tumor succeed at infiltrating, surviving, and ultimately overtaking a distant organ. The bottlenecks that challenge cancer cells in newly invaded microenvironments are organ specific and consequently demand distinct mechanisms for metastatic colonization. Here we review the metastatic traits that allow cancer cells to colonize distinct organ sites. PMID:26693180

  12. Medieval Sport: Quest for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Douglas C.

    Since the Middle Ages, sport has survived because of its masochistic and sadistic components. The Greeks, who organized athletic contests into the Olympic Games in 776 B.C., emphasized the relationship between the mind and the body and fair competition, rather than putting emphasis on winning or losing. The Romans preferred the spectacle of…

  13. The Primary Teacher's Survival Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyda, Pamela A.

    This guide for primary school teachers presents commonly asked questions and answers. Chapter 1, "How Do I Set Up My Classroom?" discusses desk and furniture arrangement. Chapter 2, "How Do I Survive the First Days of School?" offers tips for meeting and greeting students, establishing routines, and presenting activities.…

  14. Cool echidnas survive the fire.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Julia; Cooper, Christine Elizabeth; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-04-13

    Fires have occurred throughout history, including those associated with the meteoroid impact at the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) boundary that eliminated many vertebrate species. To evaluate the recent hypothesis that the survival of the K-Pg fires by ancestral mammals was dependent on their ability to use energy-conserving torpor, we studied body temperature fluctuations and activity of an egg-laying mammal, the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), often considered to be a 'living fossil', before, during and after a prescribed burn. All but one study animal survived the fire in the prescribed burn area and echidnas remained inactive during the day(s) following the fire and substantially reduced body temperature during bouts of torpor. For weeks after the fire, all individuals remained in their original territories and compensated for changes in their habitat with a decrease in mean body temperature and activity. Our data suggest that heterothermy enables mammals to outlast the conditions during and after a fire by reducing energy expenditure, permitting periods of extended inactivity. Therefore, torpor facilitates survival in a fire-scorched landscape and consequently may have been of functional significance for mammalian survival at the K-Pg boundary.

  15. Wilderness Survival and Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Matt

    Outdoor education is often delivered through games and activities such as nature hikes or observing an ecosystem within a 1-foot circle on the ground. Often, participants look closely at the earth only for that brief moment. Wilderness survival is another way to teach about the outdoors. It offers skills that encourage participants to become more…

  16. Wilderness Emergency: Surviving the Unexpected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fear, Gene

    In any unexpected survival experience, one must accept the situation with just what one has at the moment it happens, where it happens, and how it happens. Problem solving must be based on known body enemies that threaten life, their priority of influence, and their severity of threat to life. Solutions will depend on the body's energy supply,…

  17. Reading As a Survival Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blosser, Patricia E.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a technique for the development of survival reading activity packets for the science classroom. The reading packets described include labels from different food and medicine products and from magazine and newspaper articles. Three types of questions were used with each packet: factual, interpretive, and application. (DS)

  18. Survival rates in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilmott, R W; Tyson, S L; Dinwiddie, R; Matthew, D J

    1983-01-01

    Life tables were calculated for 273 British children with cystic fibrosis for the period 1974-9. There was a marked improvement in survival rates in the meconium ileus group compared with the 1969-73 data, but there was little improvement in patients presenting later with other symptoms. PMID:6639137

  19. Life: A Question of Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlitt, Dorothy M.; And Others

    The purpose of this textbook is to provide junior high school students with the knowledge they will need to effect the changes that must be made for survival, to provide an environment that can sustain and flourish life, and understand and appreciate the aesthetic, social, and scientific implications of environmental problems. Organized around…

  20. Trends in net survival from kidney cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mangone, Lucia; Bossard, Nadine; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Pezzarossi, Annamaria; Roncaglia, Francesca; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Kidney cancer is a frequent malignant disease. To date, there is no evidence on the effectiveness of early detection and, in most cases, surgery represents the only standard treatment. So far, there is no standardized therapy for localized and locally advanced renal tumors; however, the recent introduction of target therapy has significantly improved the prognosis of metastatic disease. Therefore, survival differences in Europe are deemed to involve differences in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from kidney cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland) and provide trends in net survival and dynamics of excess mortality rates up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the 2000-2004 period using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analysis, the study period was specific to each country. The results are reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland, and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modeling strategy. In 2000-2004, the 5-year net survival ranged between 59% (Spain) and 67% (France and Italy) in men and between 60% (Spain) and 73% (Portugal) in women. There was an increase in the age-standardized net survival between 1992 and 2004 at 1 year, as well as at 5 years, in all age groups and countries. Irrespective of the year of diagnosis, the excess mortality rate decreased with time elapsed since diagnosis. There are some differences in survival from kidney cancer between European Latin countries, but a considerable improvement was observed in most countries.

  1. Childhood cancer survival in France, 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Brigitte; Goujon, Stéphanie; Guissou, Sandra; Guyot-Goubin, Aurélie; Desmée, Solène; Désandes, Emmanuel; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports the latest survival data for French childhood cancer patients at the national level. Data from the two French National Registries of Childhood Cancer (Haematopoietic Malignancies and Solid Tumours) were used to describe survival outcomes for 15,479 children diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2008 in mainland France. The overall survival was 91.7% at 1 year, 86.9% at 2 years and 81.6% at 5 years. Relative survival did not differ from overall survival even for infants. Survival was lower among infants for lymphoblastic leukaemia and astrocytoma, but higher for neuroblastoma. For all cancers considered together, 5-year survival increased from 79.5% in the first (2000-2002) diagnostic period to 83.2% in the last (2006-2008) period. The improvement was significant for leukaemia, both myeloid and lymphoid, central nervous system tumours (ependymoma) and neuroblastoma. The results remained valid in the multivariate analysis, and, for all cancers combined, the risk of death decreased by 20% between 2000-2002 and 2006-2008. The figures are consistent with various international estimates and are the result of progress in treatment regimens and collaborative clinical trials. The challenge for the French registries is now to study the long-term follow-up of survivors to estimate the incidence of long-term morbidities and adverse effects of treatments.

  2. Survival Probability of Beneficial Mutations in Bacterial Batch Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Lindi M.; Zhu, Anna Dai

    2015-01-01

    The survival of rare beneficial mutations can be extremely sensitive to the organism’s life history and the trait affected by the mutation. Given the tremendous impact of bacteria in batch culture as a model system for the study of adaptation, it is important to understand the survival probability of beneficial mutations in these populations. Here we develop a life-history model for bacterial populations in batch culture and predict the survival of mutations that increase fitness through their effects on specific traits: lag time, fission time, viability, and the timing of stationary phase. We find that if beneficial mutations are present in the founding population at the beginning of culture growth, mutations that reduce the mortality of daughter cells are the most likely to survive drift. In contrast, of mutations that occur de novo during growth, those that delay the onset of stationary phase are the most likely to survive. Our model predicts that approximately fivefold population growth between bottlenecks will optimize the occurrence and survival of beneficial mutations of all four types. This prediction is relatively insensitive to other model parameters, such as the lag time, fission time, or mortality rate of the population. We further estimate that bottlenecks that are more severe than this optimal prediction substantially reduce the occurrence and survival of adaptive mutations. PMID:25758382

  3. Survival probability of beneficial mutations in bacterial batch culture.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Lindi M; Zhu, Anna Dai

    2015-05-01

    The survival of rare beneficial mutations can be extremely sensitive to the organism's life history and the trait affected by the mutation. Given the tremendous impact of bacteria in batch culture as a model system for the study of adaptation, it is important to understand the survival probability of beneficial mutations in these populations. Here we develop a life-history model for bacterial populations in batch culture and predict the survival of mutations that increase fitness through their effects on specific traits: lag time, fission time, viability, and the timing of stationary phase. We find that if beneficial mutations are present in the founding population at the beginning of culture growth, mutations that reduce the mortality of daughter cells are the most likely to survive drift. In contrast, of mutations that occur de novo during growth, those that delay the onset of stationary phase are the most likely to survive. Our model predicts that approximately fivefold population growth between bottlenecks will optimize the occurrence and survival of beneficial mutations of all four types. This prediction is relatively insensitive to other model parameters, such as the lag time, fission time, or mortality rate of the population. We further estimate that bottlenecks that are more severe than this optimal prediction substantially reduce the occurrence and survival of adaptive mutations.

  4. Plasticity and rectangularity in survival curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2011-09-01

    Living systems inevitably undergo a progressive deterioration of physiological function with age and an increase of vulnerability to disease and death. To maintain health and survival, living systems should optimize survival strategies with adaptive interactions among molecules, cells, organs, individuals, and environments, which arises plasticity in survival curves of living systems. In general, survival dynamics in a population is mathematically depicted by a survival rate, which monotonically changes from 1 to 0 with age. It would be then useful to find an adequate function to describe complicated survival dynamics. Here we describe a flexible survival function, derived from the stretched exponential function by adopting an age-dependent shaping exponent. We note that the exponent is associated with the fractal-like scaling in cumulative mortality rate. The survival function well depicts general features in survival curves; healthy populations exhibit plasticity and evolve towards rectangular-like survival curves, as examples in humans or laboratory animals.

  5. Plasticity and rectangularity in survival curves

    PubMed Central

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2011-01-01

    Living systems inevitably undergo a progressive deterioration of physiological function with age and an increase of vulnerability to disease and death. To maintain health and survival, living systems should optimize survival strategies with adaptive interactions among molecules, cells, organs, individuals, and environments, which arises plasticity in survival curves of living systems. In general, survival dynamics in a population is mathematically depicted by a survival rate, which monotonically changes from 1 to 0 with age. It would be then useful to find an adequate function to describe complicated survival dynamics. Here we describe a flexible survival function, derived from the stretched exponential function by adopting an age-dependent shaping exponent. We note that the exponent is associated with the fractal-like scaling in cumulative mortality rate. The survival function well depicts general features in survival curves; healthy populations exhibit plasticity and evolve towards rectangular-like survival curves, as examples in humans or laboratory animals. PMID:22355622

  6. Medical Aspects of Survival: Training for Aircrew

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    availability of technical medical assistance within a reasonable period if time . The Survival Situation. There is no type "survival situation...enhance practicality. Survival Factors . Despite the variation among individual survival situations, factors may be categorized as follows : a...magnitude of the medical problem in survival is indicated by past experiences where some 60 % of all survivors were already injured by the time they

  7. Comparison of social support content within online communities for high- and low-survival-rate cancers.

    PubMed

    Buis, Lorraine R; Whitten, Pamela

    2011-08-01

    People experiencing cancer use the Internet for many reasons, particularly for social support. This study sought to determine how social support content within online support communities for different cancers varied according to cancer survival rate. A quantitative content analysis was conducted on 3717 posts from eight online communities focused on cancers with high and low 5-year relative survival rates. Using Optimal Matching Theory, we predicted that low-survival-rate communities would have more emotional support content than high-survival-rate communities, and high-survival-rate communities would have more informational support content than low-survival-rate communities. Emotional support content was consistently more common than informational support. Overall, high-survival-rate communities had a greater proportion of posts containing emotional support content (75%) than low-survival-rate communities (66%) (χ1 = 20.89 [n = 2235], P < .001). Furthermore, low-survival-rate communities had a greater proportion of posts containing informational support content (46%) than high-survival-rate communities (36%) (χ1 = 21.13 [n = 2235], P< .001). Although the relationships between survival rate and support types were significant, they were not as hypothesized. Deviations from theoretically predicted results suggest that individuals experiencing low-survival-rate cancers may have a greater desire for informational support online than individuals experiencing high-survival-rate cancers.

  8. Aircraft Crash Survival Design Guide. Volume 5. Aircraft Postcrash Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    mine specific relationships between crash forces, structur:- failures . crao1 fires, and injuries. A series of reports covering this effort was prepared...regardless of the degree of failure of the sur- rounding structure. Success of such a system depends on proper selection of materials and design techniques...provided. 31 Another factor that can govern whether or not a fuel tank will survive a given impact is the method of failure experienced by the

  9. Survivability Modeling & Simulation(Aircraft Survivability, Fall 2009)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Mumford Please welcome Carey "Chip" Mumford to the...capabilities and updated penetration equations. COVART Chip Mumford A ir cr af t S ur vi va bi li ty • Fa ll 2 00 9 • h tt ps :/ /j as po .w pa fb...Beach, FL MAY JASP Aircraft Combat Survivability Short Course 4–7 May 2010 NPS, Monterey, CA SpecOps West 2010 10–12 May 2010 Ft. Lewis , WA

  10. Epsin Family Member 3 and Ribosome-Related Genes Are Associated with Late Metastasis in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer and Long-Term Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using a Genome-Wide Identification and Validation Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Karolina; Marchan, Rosemarie; Cadenas, Cristina; Heimes, Anne-Sophie; Almstedt, Katrin; Lebrecht, Antje; Sicking, Isabel; Battista, Marco J.; Micke, Patrick; Schmidt, Marcus; Hengstler, Jan G.; Rahnenführer, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Background In breast cancer, gene signatures that predict the risk of metastasis after surgical tumor resection are mainly indicative of early events. The purpose of this study was to identify genes linked to metastatic recurrence more than three years after surgery. Methods Affymetrix HG U133A and Plus 2.0 array datasets with information on metastasis-free, disease-free or overall survival were accessed via public repositories. Time restricted Cox regression models were used to identify genes associated with metastasis during or after the first three years post-surgery (early- and late-type genes). A sequential validation study design, with two non-adjuvantly treated discovery cohorts (n = 409) and one validation cohort (n = 169) was applied and identified genes were further evaluated in tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients (n = 923), as well as in patients with non-small cell lung (n = 1779), colon (n = 893) and ovarian (n = 922) cancer. Results Ten late- and 243 early-type genes were identified in adjuvantly untreated breast cancer. Adjustment to clinicopathological factors and an established proliferation-related signature markedly reduced the number of early-type genes to 16, whereas nine late-type genes still remained significant. These nine genes were associated with metastasis-free survival (MFS) also in a non-time restricted model, but not in the early period alone, stressing that their prognostic impact was primarily based on MFS more than three years after surgery. Four of the ten late-type genes, the ribosome-related factors EIF4B, RPL5, RPL3, and the tumor angiogenesis modifier EPN3 were significantly associated with MFS in the late period also in a meta-analysis of tamoxifen-treated breast cancer cohorts. In contrast, only one late-type gene (EPN3) showed consistent survival associations in more than one cohort in the other cancer types, being associated with worse outcome in two non-small cell lung cancer cohorts. No late-type gene was validated

  11. Survival of Salmonella Newport in oysters.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Christopher M; Armstrong, Alexandra E; Evans, Sanford; Mild, Rita M; Langdon, Christopher J; Joens, Lynn A

    2011-08-02

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of laboratory-confirmed foodborne illness in the United States and raw shellfish consumption is a commonly implicated source of gastrointestinal pathogens. A 2005 epidemiological study done in our laboratory by Brands et al., showed that oysters in the United States are contaminated with Salmonella, and in particular, a specific strain of the Newport serovar. This work sought to further investigate the host-microbe interactions between Salmonella Newport and oysters. A procedure was developed to reliably and repeatedly expose oysters to enteric bacteria and quantify the subsequent levels of bacterial survival. The results show that 10 days after an exposure to Salmonella Newport, an average concentration of 3.7 × 10(3)CFU/g remains within the oyster meat, and even after 60 days there still can be more than 10(2)CFU/g remaining. However, the strain of Newport that predominated in the market survey done by Brands et al. does not survive within oysters or the estuarine environment better than any other strains of Salmonella we tested. Using this same methodology, we compared Salmonella Newport's ability to survive within oysters to a non-pathogenic strain of E. coli and found that after 10 days the concentration of Salmonella was 200-times greater than that of E. coli. We also compared those same strains of Salmonella and E. coli in a depuration process to determine if a constant 120 L/h flux of clean seawater could significantly reduce the concentration of bacteria within oysters and found that after 3 days the oysters retained over 10(4)CFU/g of Salmonella while the oysters exposed to the non-pathogenic strain of E. coli contained 100-times less bacteria. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that any of the clinically relevant serovars of Salmonella can survive within oysters for significant periods of time after just one exposure event. Based on the drastic differences in survivability between Salmonella and a non

  12. Cancer incidence and survival in adolescents and young adults in France, 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Desandes, Emmanuel; Lacour, Brigitte; Belot, Aurélien; Molinie, Florence; Delafosse, Patricia; Tretarre, Brigitte; Velten, Michel; Sauleau, Erik-André; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Ganry, Olivier; Bara, Simona; Grosclaude, Pascale; Troussard, Xavier; Bouvier, Véronique; Brugieres, Laurence; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to describe cancer incidence (2000-2008) and survival (2000-2004) in France in adolescents and young adults (AYA). All cases of cancer diagnosed in 15-24 years, recorded by all French population-based registries (14% of the French population), over the 2000-2008 period, were included. Incidence change over time was described with the conventional annual percentage change (cAPC). The survival of cases diagnosed (2000-2004) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 1022 in adolescents and 1396 in young adults were diagnosed. Overall incidence rates were 219.4/10(6) in 15-19 year olds and 293.1/10(6) in 20-24 year olds. The most frequently diagnosed cancers in male AYA were malignant gonadal germ-cell tumors and Hodgkin's disease, and were melanoma, thyroid carcinoma, and Hodgkin's disease in females. The age-standardized rates appeared stable over time in AYA, with a cAPC of +2.0% (P = 0.68). The 5-year overall survival for all cancers was different between genders and age groups, with 78.8% (95%CI: 75.6-82.0) for males and 85.2% (95%CI: 82.2-88.1) for females (P = 0.01), and 78.5% (95%CI: 75.0-82.1) in 15-19 year olds and 84.3% (95% CI: 81.6-87.0) in 20-24 year olds (P = 0.02). Noteworthy, the frequency and the distribution of tumor types in AYA are unique and different from the observed at any other age group. Survival in French AYA has improved over time. Epidemiological data might reflect major trends in the risk factors and preventive interventions. Thus, further research into etiology of cancers affecting AYA should become key priorities for cancer control among AYA.

  13. Survival of female American Woodcock breeding in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longcore, J.R.; McAuley, D.G.; Sepik, G.F.; Pendleton, G.W.; McAuley, Daniel G.; Bruggink, John G.; Sepik, Greg F.

    2000-01-01

    During 1986-1989, 89 female American woodcock (Scolopax minor) included in this study were radio-marked and survival estimated for the period 1 Aprii-15 June. Eleven woodcock died: five (45%) were killed by mammals, two (18%) by unknown predators, and one (9%) by a raptor; two (18%) died from entanglement in the transmitter harness; and 1 (9%) collided with a vehicle. Survival varied among years from 0.700 (1986) to 0.900 (1989) with a 4-year mean (95% CI) of 0.826. Survival did not differ between age classes (P = 0.900), or among years (P > 0.14), except for higher (P = 0.025) survival (0.875) in 1987 than in 1988 (0.735). A composite survival estimate--based on telemetry studies for the breeding, post-breeding, and winter periods-- was 0.363 for immatures and 0.474 for adults. Mean weights were not different between second year and after second year age classes (P = 0.167), but weight was related to woodcock capture date (P = 0.001). Survival for female woodcock was not related to mean snow depth or to mean, minimum temperature in winter or spring. Habitat use was different between females that died and those that lived, but sample size was small.

  14. Allergies, obesity, other risk factors and survival from pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Olson, Sara H; Chou, Joanne F; Ludwig, Emmy; O'Reilly, Eileen; Allen, Peter J; Jarnagin, William R; Bayuga, Sharon; Simon, Jennifer; Gonen, Mithat; Reisacher, William R; Kurtz, Robert C

    2010-11-15

    Survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains extremely poor, approximately 5% at 5 years. Risk factors include smoking, high body mass index (BMI), family history of pancreatic cancer, and long-standing diabetes; in contrast, allergies are associated with reduced risk. Little is known about associations between these factors and survival. We analyzed overall survival in relation to risk factors for 475 incident cases who took part in a hospital based case-control study. Analyses were conducted separately for those who did (160) and did not (315) undergo tumor resection. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to describe survival according to smoking, BMI, family history, diabetes, and presence of allergies. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for covariates. There was no association with survival based on smoking, family history, or history of diabetes in either group. Among patients with resection, those with allergies showed nonstatistically significant longer survival, a median of 33.1 months (95% CI: 19.0-52.5) vs. 21.8 months (95% CI: 18.0-33.1), p = 0.25. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.43-1.23), p = 0.23. Among patients without resection, those with self-reported allergies survived significantly longer than those without allergies: 13.3 months (95% CI: 10.6-16.9) compared to 10.4 months (95% CI: 8.8-11.0), p = 0.04, with an adjusted HR of 0.68 (95% CI: 0.49-0.95), p = 0.02. Obesity was nonsignificantly associated with poorer survival, particularly in the resected group (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: 0.76-3.44). The mechanisms underlying the association between history of allergies and improved survival are unknown. These novel results need to be confirmed in other studies.

  15. Survival of women with breast cancer in Kaunas Region, Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Ivanauskienė, Rugilė; Gedminaitė, Jurgita; Juozaitytė, Elona; Vanagas, Giedrius; Simoliūnienė, Renata; Padaiga, Zilvinas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The assessment of breast cancer survival rates and comparison with those of other countries may help to deepen knowledge among decision makers in the health care system and to improve the inequalities in accessibility to early detection and effective treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate breast cancer survival rates in Kaunas region, Lithuania, and to compare them with those in the selected European countries. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A retrospective study was carried out using medical records and data gathered from the Lithuanian Cancer Registry. A group of 240 patients with primary breast cancer diagnosed in 2008 in Kaunas region was analyzed. All causes of death were included in the analysis. The closing date of follow-up was September 30, 2010. Survival was determined using the life-table method and the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the effects of prognostic risk factors on survival. RESULTS. The median age of the patients was 63 years (range, 28-95). The 1-year and 2-year cumulative survival for breast cancer patients in Kaunas region, Lithuania, was 94.2% and 90.1%, respectively. As expected, the survival of patients with diagnosed advanced disease (stage III and IV) was significantly worse than that of patients with stage I (P<0.001) and II (P=0.003) disease. The screening group (aged 50-69 years) showed better survival in comparison with the group older than 69 years. Age, T4 tumor, and distant metastasis were the prognostic factors significantly associated with an increased relative mortality risk of breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS. Compared to the European survival rates, the 1-year and 2-year survival of patients with breast cancer in Lithuania was found to be similar to most European countries.

  16. Hypoxia and dehydroepiandrosterone in old age: a mouse survival study

    PubMed Central

    Debonneuil, Edouard H; Quillard, Janine; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile

    2006-01-01

    Background Survival remains an issue in pulmonary hypertension, a chronic disorder that often affects aged human adults. In young adult mice and rats, chronic 50% hypoxia (11% FIO2 or 0.5 atm) induces pulmonary hypertension without threatening life. In this framework, oral dehydroepiandrosterone was recently shown to prevent and reverse pulmonary hypertension in rats within a few weeks. To evaluate dehydroepiandrosterone therapy more globally, in the long term and in old age, we investigated whether hypoxia decreases lifespan and whether dehydroepiandrosterone improves survival under hypoxia. Methods 240 C57BL/6 mice were treated, from the age of 21 months until death, by normobaric hypoxia (11% FIO2) or normoxia, both with and without dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (25 mg/kg in drinking water) (4 groups, N = 60). Survival, pulmonary artery and heart remodeling, weight and blood patterns were assessed. Results In normoxia, control mice reached the median age of 27 months (median survival: 184 days). Hypoxia not only induced cardiopulmonary remodeling and polycythemia in old animals but also induced severe weight loss, trembling behavior and high mortality (p < 0.001, median survival: 38 days). Under hypoxia however, dehydroepiandrosterone not only significantly reduced cardiopulmonary remodeling but also remarkably extended survival (p < 0.01, median survival: 126 days). Weight loss and trembling behavior at least partially remained, and polycythemia completely, the latter possibly favorably participating in blood oxygenation. Interestingly, at the dose used, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate was detrimental to long-term survival in normoxia (p < 0.05, median survival: 147 days). Conclusion Dehydroepiandrosterone globally reduced what may be called an age-related frailty induced by hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. This interestingly recalls an inverse correlation found in the prospective PAQUID epidemiological study, between dehydroepiandrosterone blood levels and

  17. Estimating survival rates with age-structure data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udevitz, M.S.; Ballachey, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    We developed a general statistical model that provides a comprehensive framework for inference about survival rates based on standing age-structure and ages-at-death data. Previously available estimators are maximum likelihood under the general model, but they use only 1 type of data and require the assumption of a stable age structure and a known population growth rate. We used the general model to derive new survival rate estimators that use both types of data and require only the assumption of a stable age structure or a known population growth rate. Our likelihood-based approach allows use of standard model-selection procedures to test hypotheses about age-structure stability, population growth rates, and age-related patterns in survival. We used this approach to estimate survival rates for female sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

  18. Camouflage predicts survival in ground-nesting birds

    PubMed Central

    Troscianko, Jolyon; Wilson-Aggarwal, Jared; Stevens, Martin; Spottiswoode, Claire N.

    2016-01-01

    Evading detection by predators is crucial for survival. Camouflage is therefore a widespread adaptation, but despite substantial research effort our understanding of different camouflage strategies has relied predominantly on artificial systems and on experiments disregarding how camouflage is perceived by predators. Here we show for the first time in a natural system, that survival probability of wild animals is directly related to their level of camouflage as perceived by the visual systems of their main predators. Ground-nesting plovers and coursers flee as threats approach, and their clutches were more likely to survive when their egg contrast matched their surrounds. In nightjars – which remain motionless as threats approach – clutch survival depended on plumage pattern matching between the incubating bird and its surrounds. Our findings highlight the importance of pattern and luminance based camouflage properties, and the effectiveness of modern techniques in capturing the adaptive properties of visual phenotypes. PMID:26822039

  19. 12-year survival of composite vs. amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Opdam, N J M; Bronkhorst, E M; Loomans, B A C; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2010-10-01

    Information about the long-term clinical survival of large amalgam and composite restorations is still lacking. This retrospective study compares the longevity of three- and four-/five-surface amalgam and composite restorations relative to patients' caries risk. Patient records from a general practice were used for data collection. We evaluated 1949 large class II restorations (1202 amalgam/747 composite). Dates of placement, replacement, and failure were recorded, and caries risk of patients was assessed. Survival was calculated from Kaplan-Meier statistics. After 12 years, 293 amalgam and 114 composite restorations had failed. Large composite restorations showed a higher survival in the combined population and in the low-risk group. For three-surface restorations in high-risk patients, amalgam showed better survival.

  20. Aircraft fires, smoke toxicity, and survival.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, A K; Sanders, D C

    1996-03-01

    In-flight fires in modern aircraft are rare, but post-crash fires do occur. Cabin occupants frequently survive initial forces of such crashes but are incapacitated from smoke inhalation. According to an international study, there were 95 fire-related civil passenger aircraft accidents worldwide over a 26-yr period, claiming approximately 2400 lives. Between 1985 and 1991, about 16% (32 accidents) of all U.S. transport aircraft accidents involved fire and 22% (140 fatalities) of the deaths in these accidents resulted from fire/smoke toxicity. Our laboratory analyses of postmortem blood samples (1967-93) indicate that 360 individuals in 134 fatal fire-related civil aircraft (air carrier and general aviation) accidents had carboxyhemoglobin saturation levels (> or = 20%), with or without blood cyanide, high enough to impair performance. Combustion toxicology is now moving from a descriptive to a mechanistic phase. Methods for gas analyses have been developed and combustion/animal-exposure assemblies have been constructed. Material/fire-retardant toxicity and interactions between smoke gases are being studied. Relationships between gas exposure concentrations, blood levels, and incapacitation onset are being established in animal models. Continuing basic research in smoke toxicity will be necessary to understand its complexities, and thus enhance aviation safety and fire survival chances.

  1. The association between post-traumatic stress-related symptoms, resilience, current stress and past exposure to violence: a cross sectional study of the survival of Quechua women in the aftermath of the Peruvian armed conflict

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The long lasting resilience of individuals and communities affected by mass violence has not been given equal prominence as their suffering. This has often led to psychosocial interventions in post-conflict zones being unresponsive to local realities and ill-equipped to foster local strengths. Responding to the renewed interest in resilience in the field of violence and health, this study examines the resilience and post-traumatic responses of Indigenous Quechua women in the aftermath of the political violence in Peru (1980–2000). Methods A cross-sectional study examined the relationship between resilience, post-traumatic responses, exposure to violence during the conflict and current life stress on 151 Quechua women participants. Purposive and convenience sampling strategies were used for recruitment in Ayacucho, the area most exposed to violence. The study instruments were translated to Quechua and Spanish and cross-culturally validated. Data was analyzed using hierarchical regression analysis. A locally informed trauma questionnaire of local idioms of distress was also included in the analysis. Findings Sixty percent of women (n = 91) were recruited from Ayacucho city and the rest from three rural villages; the mean age was 45 years old. Despite high levels of exposure to violence, only 9.3% of the sample presented a level of symptoms that indicated possible PTSD. Resilience did not contribute to the overall variance of post-traumatic stress related symptoms, which was predicted by past exposure to violence, current life stress, age, and schooling (R2 = .421). Resilience contributed instead to the variance of avoidance symptoms (Stand β = −.198, t = −2.595, p = 0.010) while not for re-experiencing or arousal symptoms. Conclusions These findings identified some of the pathways in which resilience and post-traumatic responses interrelate in the aftermath of violence; yet, they also point to the complexity of their

  2. Window survivability in endoatmospheric environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, Stewart B.; Majeski, Judith A.; Mills, J. S.

    1993-06-01

    An optical seeker window has been shown to survive hypersonic, endoatmospheric environments such as those encountered during Theater Defense or National Missile Defense engagements. The two periods most critical to the window are shroud removal and the subsequent cooling during acquisition and homing. The loads encountered during shroud removal are predicted by applying scaling functions to wind tunnel data. A nonlinear dynamic transient stress analysis is shown to match the wind tunnel strain measurements. The predicted stresses are then input into a Weibull statistical method to predict the probability of window survival during shroud separation. After the shroud is away, the window requires cooling to prevent excessive distortion caused by rapid heating. Analyses show that deflections of the window are small. The thermally induced stresses are low compared to stresses during shroud removal.

  3. Environmental Survival of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Y.-L.; Martin, L.E.; Stephens, D.S.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Neisseria meningitidis is transmitted through the inhalation of large human respiratory droplets, but the risk from contaminated environmental surfaces is controversial. Compared to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumanni, meningococcal viability after desiccation on plastic, glass or metal surfaces decreased rapidly; but viable meningococci were present for up to 72 hours. Encapsulation did not provide an advantage for meningococcal environmental survival on environmental surfaces. PMID:23574798

  4. Dispersion as a Survival Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Valdivino Vargas; Machado, Fábio Prates; Roldán-Correa, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We consider stochastic growth models to represent population subject to catastrophes. We analyze the subject from different set ups considering or not spatial restrictions, whether dispersion is a good strategy to increase the population viability. We find out it strongly depends on the effect of a catastrophic event, the spatial constraints of the environment and the probability that each exposed individual survives when a disaster strikes.

  5. Does Random Dispersion Help Survival?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinazi, Rinaldo B.

    2015-04-01

    Many species live in colonies that prosper for a while and then collapse. After the collapse the colony survivors disperse randomly and found new colonies that may or may not make it depending on the new environment they find. We use birth and death chains in random environments to model such a population and to argue that random dispersion is a superior strategy for survival.

  6. Survival and complications in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Borgna-Pignatti, C; Cappellini, M D; De Stefano, P; Del Vecchio, G C; Forni, G L; Gamberini, M R; Ghilardi, R; Origa, R; Piga, A; Romeo, M A; Zhao, H; Cnaan, A

    2005-01-01

    The life expectancy of patients with thalassemia major has significantly increased in recent years, as reported by several groups in different countries. However, complications are still frequent and affect the patients' quality of life. In a recent study from the United Kingdom, it was found that 50% of the patients had died before age 35. At that age, 65% of the patients from an Italian long-term study were still alive. Heart disease is responsible for more than half of the deaths. The prevalence of complications in Italian patients born after 1970 includes heart failure in 7%, hypogonadism in 55%, hypothyroidism in 11%, and diabetes in 6%. Similar data were reported in patients from the United States. In the Italian study, lower ferritin levels were associated with a lower probability of experiencing heart failure and with prolonged survival. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are common and affect virtually all patients. Hepatitis C virus antibodies are present in 85% of multitransfused Italian patients, 23% of patients in the United Kingdom, 35% in the United States, 34% in France, and 21% in India. Hepatocellular carcinoma can complicate the course of hepatitis. A survey of Italian centers has identified 23 such cases in patients with a thalassemia syndrome. In conclusion, rates of survival and complication-free survival continue to improve, due to better treatment strategies. New complications are appearing in long-term survivors. Iron overload of the heart remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality.

  7. Yolk androgens reduce offspring survival.

    PubMed Central

    Sockman, K W; Schwabl, H

    2000-01-01

    Females may favour some offspring over others by differential deposition of yolk hormones. In American kestrels (Falco sparverius), we found that yolks of eggs laid late in the sequence of a clutch had more testosterone (T) and androstenedione (A4) than yolks of first-laid eggs. To investigate the effects of these yolk androgens on nestling 'fitness', we injected both T and A4 into the yolks of first-laid eggs and compared their hatching time, nestling growth and nestling survival with those of first-laid eggs in which we injected vehicle as a control. Compared to controls, injection of T and A4 at a dose intended to increase their levels to those of later-laid eggs delayed hatching and reduced nestling growth and survival rates. Yolk androgen treatment of egg 1 had no effect on survival of siblings hatching from subsequently laid eggs. The adverse actions of yolk androgen treatment in the kestrel are in contrast to the favourable actions of yolk T treatment found previously in canaries (Serinus canaria). Additional studies are necessary in order to determine whether the deposition of yolk androgens is an adaptive form of parental favouritism or an adverse by-product of endocrine processes during egg formation. Despite its adaptive significance, such 'transgenerational' effects of steroid hormones may have helped to evolutionarily shape the hormonal mechanisms regulating reproduction. PMID:10983830

  8. Proline Mechanisms of Stress Survival

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xinwen; Zhang, Lu; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The imino acid proline is utilized by different organisms to offset cellular imbalances caused by environmental stress. The wide use in nature of proline as a stress adaptor molecule indicates that proline has a fundamental biological role in stress response. Understanding the mechanisms by which proline enhances abiotic/biotic stress response will facilitate agricultural crop research and improve human health. Recent Advances: It is now recognized that proline metabolism propels cellular signaling processes that promote cellular apoptosis or survival. Studies have shown that proline metabolism influences signaling pathways by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the mitochondria via the electron transport chain. Enhanced ROS production due to proline metabolism has been implicated in the hypersensitive response in plants, lifespan extension in worms, and apoptosis, tumor suppression, and cell survival in animals. Critical Issues: The ability of proline to influence disparate cellular outcomes may be governed by ROS levels generated in the mitochondria. Defining the threshold at which proline metabolic enzyme expression switches from inducing survival pathways to cellular apoptosis would provide molecular insights into cellular redox regulation by proline. Are ROS the only mediators of proline metabolic signaling or are other factors involved? Future Directions: New evidence suggests that proline biosynthesis enzymes interact with redox proteins such as thioredoxin. An important future pursuit will be to identify other interacting partners of proline metabolic enzymes to uncover novel regulatory and signaling networks of cellular stress response. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 998–1011. PMID:23581681

  9. Recent cancer survival in Germany: an analysis of common and less common cancers.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lina; Castro, Felipe A; Gondos, Adam; Krilaviciute, Agne; Barnes, Benjamin; Eberle, Andrea; Emrich, Katharina; Hentschel, Stefan; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-06-01

    The monitoring of cancer survival by population-based cancer registries is a prerequisite to evaluate the current quality of cancer care. Our study provides 1-, 5- and 10-year relative survival as well as 5-year relative survival conditional on 1-year survival estimates and recent survival trends for Germany using data from 11 population-based cancer registries, covering around one-third of the German population. Period analysis was used to estimate relative survival for 24 common and 11 less common cancer sites for the period 2007-2010. The German and the United States survival estimates were compared using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results 13 database. Trends in cancer survival in Germany between 2002-2004 and 2008-2010 were described. Five-year relative survival increased in Germany from 2002-2004 to 2008-2010 for most cancer sites. Among the 24 most common cancers, largest improvements were seen for multiple myeloma (8.0% units), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (6.2% units), prostate cancer (5.2% units) and colorectal cancer (4.6% units). In 2007-2010, the survival disadvantage in Germany compared to the United States was largest for cancers of the mouth/pharynx (-11.0% units), thyroid (-6.8% units) and prostate (-7.5% units). Although survival estimates were much lower for elderly patients in both countries, differences in age patterns were observed for some cancer sites. The reported improvements in cancer survival might reflect advances in the quality of cancer care on the population level as well as increased use of screening in Germany. The survival differences across countries and the survival disadvantage in the elderly require further investigation.

  10. Winter survival of female American black ducks on the Atlantic coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Costanzo, G.R.; Stotts, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    We used radio telemetry to monitor the winter survival and cause-specific mortality of 227 female American black ducks captured in New Jersey and Virginia, 1983-1985. Mean survival rate for 19 December - 15 February was 0.65. Survival from hunting and nonhunting risk was 0.84 and 0.78, respectively. Causes of nonhunting mortality included predation and emaciation. There were no consistent patterns in survivorship in relation to mean daily temperature, although the timing of the onset of low temperatures and storms may have influenced movement patterns. Our estimated survival rates are consistent with estimates from other studies of seasonal and annual survival.

  11. Does the thought of death contribute to the memory benefit of encoding with a survival scenario?

    PubMed

    Bugaiska, Aurélia; Mermillod, Martial; Bonin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Four studies tested whether the thought of death contributes to the survival processing advantage found in memory tests (i.e., the survival effect). In the first study, we replicated the "Dying To Remember" (DTR) effect identified by Burns and colleagues whereby activation of death thoughts led to better retention than an aversive control situation. In Study 2, we compared an ancestral survival scenario, a modern survival scenario and a "life-after-death" scenario. The modern survival scenario and the dying scenario led to higher levels of recall than the ancestral scenario. In Study 3, we used a more salient death-thought scenario in which people imagine themselves on death row. Results showed that the "death-row" scenario yielded a level of recall similar to that of the ancestral survival condition. We also collected ratings of death-related thoughts (Studies 3 and 4) and of survival-related and planning thoughts (Study 4). The ratings indicated that death-related thoughts were induced more by the dying scenarios than by the survival scenarios, whereas the reverse was observed for both survival-related and planning thoughts. The findings are discussed in the light of two contrasting views of the influence of mortality salience in the survival effect.

  12. Progressive supranuclear palsy: progression and survival.

    PubMed

    Arena, Julieta E; Weigand, Stephen D; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Hassan, Anhar; Eggers, Scott D; Höglinger, Günter U; Litvan, Irene; Josephs, Keith A

    2016-02-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by postural instability and falls, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, parkinsonism with poor levodopa response, pseudobulbar palsy, and frontal release signs. The natural history of the disease has been previously described. However, the time frame of appearance of clinical milestones and how these symptoms may relate to survival in PSP are unknown. The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of symptoms at different stages of PSP and to estimate the time of appearance of clinical symptoms characteristic of the disease. Second, we determined the association between clinical symptoms and survival. We prospectively studied 35 PSP patients during assessments scheduled every 6 months for up to 2 years. We estimated symptoms prevalence and the association between symptoms and survival. The median age of onset was 65.9 years (IQR 60.6-70.0), and the median time from onset to first assessment was 3.0 years (IQR 2.4-3.9). The most commonly reported symptoms at baseline were: motor (100%) followed by cognitive/behavioral (89%), systemic and bulbar (80%), and sleep disturbances (60%). Slowness of movement, falls, neck stiffness and difficulty looking up/down had high prevalence from baseline, while balance and gait impairment were less common at baseline but increased in prevalence over time. The presence of sleep disturbances, and possibly hallucinations, was associated with increased death risk. Improved recognition of the clinical spectrum and milestones of PSP advances knowledge of the disease, helps earlier diagnosis, and allows prognostic predictions.

  13. Inherited Determinants of Ovarian Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Ellen L.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Armasu, Sebastian M.; White, Kristin L.; Keeney, Gary L.; Cliby, William A.; Rider, David N.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Jones, Monica B.; Peethambaram, Prema P.; Lancaster, Johnathan M.; Olson, Janet E.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Hartmann, Lynn C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Due to variation of outcome among cases, we sought to examine whether overall survival in ovarian cancer was associated with common inherited variants in 227 candidate genes from ovarian cancer-related pathways including angiogenesis, inflammation, detoxification, glycosylation, one-carbon transfer, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, and cellular senescence. Experimental Design Blood samples were obtained from 325 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic from 1999 to 2006. During a median follow-up of 3.8 years (range, 0.1 – 8.6 years), 157 deaths were observed. Germline DNA was analyzed at 1,416 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). For all patients, and for 203 with serous subtype, we assessed the overall significance of each gene and pathway, and estimated risk of death via hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results Variation within angiogenesis was most strongly associated with survival time overall (p=0.03) and among patients with serous cancer (p=0.05), particularly for EIF2B5 rs4912474 (all patients HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.54-0.89, p=0.004), VEGFC rs17697305 (serous subtype HR 2.29, 95% CI 1.34-3.92, p=0.003), and four SNPs in VHL. Variation within the inflammation pathway was borderline significant (all patients, p=0.09), and SNPs in CCR3, IL1B, IL18, CCL2, and ALOX5 which correlated with survival time are worthy of follow-up. Conclusion An extensive multiple-pathway assessment found evidence that inherited differences may play a role in outcome of ovarian cancer patients, particularly in genes within the angiogenesis and inflammation pathways. Our work supports efforts to target such mediators for therapeutic gain. PMID:20103664

  14. Incidence and Survival Patterns of Sinonasal Undifferentiated Carcinoma in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Kyle J.; Lehmann, Ashton E.; Remenschneider, Aaron; Dedmon, Matthew; Meier, Josh; Gray, Stacey T.; Lin, Derrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine trends in sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma (SNUC) survival patterns in the United States. Design Retrospective review of national database. Participants All cases of SNUC in the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results program from 1973 to 2010 were examined. Main Outcome Measures Age-adjusted incidence and survival rates were calculated and stratified by demographic information and treatment modality. Cohort analysis was performed to analyze survival patterns over time. Results A total of 318 SNUC cases were identified. Age-adjusted incidence rate (IR) was 0.02 per 100,000. Incidence was greater in males (IR: 0.03) than females (IR: 0.01; p = 0.03). Overall 5- and 10-year relative survival rate was 34.9% and 31.3%, respectively. Overall median survival was 22.1 months. Median survival following surgery combined with radiation was 41.9 months. Five-year relative survival rate following surgery, radiation, or surgery combined with radiation was 38.7%, 36.0%, and 39.1%, respectively. Median survival from 1973–1986 and 1987–2010 was 14.5 and 23.5 months, respectively. Conclusions This study provides new data regarding survival patterns of SNUC in the United States, confirming survival benefit with surgery and radiation as well as identifying a trend toward improved survival in recent decades. PMID:25844294

  15. Biofilm formation enhances Helicobacter pylori survivability in vegetables.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chow Goon; Loke, Mun Fai; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Ho, Bow

    2017-04-01

    To date, the exact route and mode of transmission of Helicobacter pylori remains elusive. The detection of H. pylori in food using molecular approaches has led us to postulate that the gastric pathogen may survive in the extragastric environment for an extended period. In this study, we show that H. pylori prolongs its survival by forming biofilm and micro-colonies on vegetables. The biofilm forming capability of H. pylori is both strain and vegetable dependent. H. pylori strains were classified into high and low biofilm formers based on their highest relative biofilm units (BU). High biofilm formers survived longer on vegetables compared to low biofilm formers. The bacteria survived better on cabbage compared to other vegetables tested. In addition, images captured on scanning electron and confocal laser scanning microscopes revealed that the bacteria were able to form biofilm and reside as micro-colonies on vegetable surfaces, strengthening the notion of possible survival of H. pylori on vegetables for an extended period of time. Taken together, the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm on vegetables (a common food source for human) potentially plays an important role in its survival, serving as a mode of transmission of H. pylori in the extragastric environment.

  16. Hormone receptor status and survival of medullary breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Asude; Odabas, Hatice; Kaya, Serap; Bozkurt, Oktay; Degirmenci, Mustafa; Topcu, Turkan O.; Aytekin, Aydın; Arpaci, Erkan; Avci, Nilufer; Pilanci, Kezban N.; Cinkir, Havva Y.; Bozkaya, Yakup; Cirak, Yalcin; Gumus, Mahmut

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the relationship between clinical features, hormonal receptor status, and survival in patients who were diagnosed with medullary breast cancer (MBC). Methods: Demographic characteristics, histopathological features, and survival statuses of 201 patients diagnosed with MBC between 1995 and 2015 were retrospectively recorded. Survival analyses were conducted with uni- and multivariate cox regression analysis. Results: Median follow-up time was 54 (4-272) months. Median patient age at the time of diagnosis was 47 years old (26-90). Of the patients, 91.5% were triple negative. Five-year recurrence free survival time (RFS) rate was 87.4% and overalll survival (OS) rate 95.7%. For RFS, progesterone receptor (PR) negativity, atypical histopathological evaluation, absence of lymphovascular invasion, smaller tumor, lower nodal involvement were found to be favourable prognostic factors by univariate analysis (p<0.05). The PR negativity and smaller tumor were found to be favourable factors by univariate analysis (p<0.05). However, none of these factors were determined as significant independent prognostic factors for OS (p>0.05). Conclusion: Turkish MBC patients exhibited good prognosis, which was comparable with survival outcomes achieved in the literature. The PR negativity was related to a better RFS and OS rates. PMID:28133688

  17. Effect of lead poisoning on spectacled eider survival rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grand, James B.; Flint, Paul L.; Petersen, Margaret R.; Moran, Christine L.

    1998-01-01

    Spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) populations on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (Y-K Delta), Alaska, declined rapidly through the 1980s, and low adult female survival was suggested as the likely cause of the decline. We used mark-resighting techniques to study annual survival rates of adult female spectacled eiders at 2 sites on the Y-K Delta during 1993-96. Our data suggest survival rates may differ among sites. However, a model fit to a subset of data on females for which we knew lead levels in blood suggests lead exposure influences survival. Adult females exposed to lead prior to hatching their eggs survived at a much lower rate (0.44 ?? 0.10) each year than females not exposed to lead before hatch (0.78 ?? 0.05). We suggest most mortality from lead exposure occurs over winter, and the related reduction in adult survival may be impeding recovery of local populations. We encourage managers to curtail input of lead shot into the environment.

  18. Time-specific patterns of nest survival for ducks and passerines breeding in North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, Terry L.; Grant, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    In many bird species, survival can vary with the age of the nest, with the date a nest was initiated, or among years within the same nesting area. A literature review showed that patterns of survival vary in relation to nest age and date and are often contradictory. Inconsistencies could be a result of temporal variation in the environment or life-history differences among species. We examined patterns of nest survival in relation to nest age, date, and year for several duck and passerine species nesting at a single location in North Dakota during 1998–2003. We predicted that if environment shaped nest survival patterns, then temporal patterns in survival might be similar among three species of upland nesting ducks, and also among three species of grassland passerines nesting at the same site. We expected that survival patterns would differ between ducks and passerines because of relatively disparate life histories and differences in predators that prey on their nests. Nest survival was rarely constant among years, seasonally, or with age of the nest for species that we studied. As predicted, the pattern of survival was similar among duck species, driven mainly by differences in nest survival associated with nest initiation date. The pattern of survival also was similar among passerine species, but nest survival was more influenced by nest age than by date. Our findings suggest that some but not all variation in temporal patterns of nest survival in grassland birds reported in the literature can be explained on the basis of temporal environmental variation. Because patterns of survival were dissimilar among ducks and passerines, it is likely that mechanisms such as predation or brood parasitism have variable influences on productivity of ducks and passerines nesting in the same area. Our results indicate that biologists and managers should not assume that temporal environmental variations, especially factors that affect nest survival, act similarly on all

  19. Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162498.html Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study Weak social ties linked to higher ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Loneliness may impede long-term breast cancer survival, a new study suggests. In the years ...

  20. Kidney Transplant Survival Up Among Babies, Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163937.html Kidney Transplant Survival Up Among Babies, Kids Patients under age ... News) -- Survival rates for children who get kidney transplants have improved significantly over the last half-century, ...

  1. Surviving the Sudden Death of a Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monument Request Information Get Involved Surviving the Sudden Death of a Baby Home Grieving Families Surviving the ... Candle on For Families Who Have Experienced the Death of a Baby The numbers are staggering. Every ...

  2. Survival by Stage of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Survival by Stage of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Survival rates are often used by ... Your Doctor About Soft Tissue Sarcomas? More In Soft Tissue Sarcoma About Soft Tissue Sarcoma Causes, Risk ...

  3. Desmin Related Disease: A Matter of Cell Survival Failure

    PubMed Central

    Capetanaki, Yassemi; Papathanasiou, Stamatis; Diokmetzidou, Antigoni; Vatsellas, Giannis; Tsikitis, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of the highly organized striated muscle tissue requires a cell-wide dynamic network that through interactions with all vital cell structures, provides an effective mechanochemical integrator of morphology and function, absolutely necessary for intra- and intercellular coordination of all muscle functions. A good candidate for such a system is the desmin intermediate filament cytoskeletal network. Human desmin mutations and post-translational modifications cause disturbance of this network, thus leading to loss of function of both desmin and its binding partners, as well as potential toxic effects of the formed aggregates. Both loss of normal function and gain of toxic function are linked to mitochondrial defects, cardiomyocyte death, muscle degeneration and development of skeletal myopathy and cardiomyopathy. PMID:25680090

  4. [Microorganisms surviving in drinking water systems and related problems].

    PubMed

    Aulicino, F A; Pastoni, F

    2004-01-01

    Drinking water in distribution systems may show abnormal values of some parameters, such as turbidity, and may support particular phenomena, such as bacterial regrowth or presence of Viable Not Culturable (VNC) bacteria. Turbidity can provide shelter for opportunistic microorganisms and pathogens. The Milwaukee outbreak (400,000 people) is one example of waterborne disease caused by the presence of pathogens (Cryptosporidium) in drinking water characterized by high and intermittent levels of turbidity. Bacterial regrowth in drinking water distribution systems may cause high increments of microorganisms such as heterotrophic bacteria, coliforms and pathogens. Microorganisms isolated from biofilm including Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Legionella may have a significant health hazard especially in hospital areas. The presence of VNC bacteria in drinking water may represent a problem for their discussed role in infectious diseases, but also for the possibility of a considerable underestimation of true microbial concentrations in drinking waters. To study this kind of problems is necessary to apply suitable methods for drinking water analyses.

  5. Bibliography of Joint Aircraft Survivability Reports and Related Documents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    Selected Threats 53 73106-50 (U) JTCG/AS-74- T -009 Vulnerability Tests on Operating Power Train Components of an 53 Intermediate-Size Helicopter (U) 27...determining digital flight control system ( DFCS ) vulnerability to high power microwave (11PM) radiation. The test techniques and levels were determined...flight controls compared to the baseline 3000 psi system. 46 WU 505-08-21 JTCG/AS-82- T -002 UNCLASSIFIED Title: Development and Testing of Dry

  6. Caloric restriction improves health and survival of rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Julie A.; Colman, Ricki J.; Beasley, T. Mark; Allison, David B.; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Roth, George S.; Ingram, Donald K.; Weindruch, Richard; de Cabo, Rafael; Anderson, Rozalyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition extends lifespan and delays the onset of age-related disorders in most species but its impact in nonhuman primates has been controversial. In the late 1980s two parallel studies were initiated to determine the effect of CR in rhesus monkeys. The University of Wisconsin study reported a significant positive impact of CR on survival, but the National Institute on Aging study detected no significant survival effect. Here we present a direct comparison of longitudinal data from both studies including survival, bodyweight, food intake, fasting glucose levels and age-related morbidity. We describe differences in study design that could contribute to differences in outcomes, and we report species specificity in the impact of CR in terms of optimal onset and diet. Taken together these data confirm that health benefits of CR are conserved in monkeys and suggest that CR mechanisms are likely translatable to human health. PMID:28094793

  7. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Yaicha D.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Timofeeff, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea—microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  8. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Winters, Yaicha D; Lowenstein, Tim K; Timofeeff, Michael N

    2015-11-12

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea-microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  9. Survival of charmonia in a hot environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Iván; Siddikov, M.

    2015-02-01

    A colorless c ¯c dipole emerging from a heavy ion collision and developing the charmonium wave function can be broken up by final state interactions (FSI) propagating through the hot medium created in the collision. We single out two mechanisms of charmonium attenuation: (i) Debye color screening, called melting; and (ii) color-exchange interaction with the medium, called absorption. The former problem was treated so far only for charmonia at rest embedded in the medium, while in practice their transverse momenta at the LHC are quite high, =7 -10 GeV2. We demonstrate that a c ¯c dipole may have a large survival probability even at infinitely high temperature. We develop a procedure of Lorentz boosting of the Schrödinger equation to a moving reference frame and perform the first realistic calculations of the charmonium survival probability employing the path-integral technique, incorporating both melting and absorption. These effects are found to have comparable magnitudes. We also calculated the FSI suppression factor for the radial excitation ψ (2 S ) and found it to be stronger than for J /ψ , except large pT, where ψ (2 S ) is relatively enhanced. The azimuthal asymmetry parameter v2 is also calculated.

  10. The dying child and surviving family members.

    PubMed

    Shrier, D K

    1980-12-01

    This overview of death and dying focuses on the dying child and surviving family members. Children's concepts of death at different developmental stages are reviewed. These range from an inability to distinguish death from other forms of separation prior to age 3, through partial concepts of death until, by age 10 to 15 years, children are able to conceptualize death as universal, inevitable and final. The importance of adults assisting in the child's growing comprehension of death is stressed. The stages of grief and mourning, as outlined by Kubler-Ross, are reviewed from the perspective of the child and family: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Recognition is given to the variations in coping styles among different family members. The special circumstances related to the death of an infant and the impact of the death of a child on the surviving siblings are discussed. Specific helpful interventions to assist families in coping with mourning are described. The death of a child remains one of the most painful and difficult events for a family and its physician to accept.

  11. Testing for handling bias in survival estimation for black brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedinger, J.S.; Lindberg, M.S.; Rexstad, E.A.; Chelgren, N.D.; Ward, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    We used an ultrastructure approach in program SURVIV to test for, and remove, bias in survival estimates for the year following mass banding of female black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans). We used relative banding-drive size as the independent variable to control for handling effects in our ultrastructure models, which took the form: S = S0(1 - ??D), where ?? was handling effect and D was the ratio of banding-drive size to the largest banding drive. Brant were divided into 3 classes: goslings, initial captures, and recaptures, based on their state at the time of banding, because we anticipated the potential for heterogeneity in model parameters among classes of brant. Among models examined, for which ?? was not constrained, a model with ?? constant across classes of brant and years, constant survival rates among years for initially captured brant but year-specific survival rates for goslings and recaptures, and year- and class-specific detection probabilities had the lowest Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Handling effect, ??, was -0.47 ?? 0.13 SE, -0.14 ?? 0.057, and -0.12 ?? 0.049 for goslings, initially released adults, and recaptured adults. Gosling annual survival in the first year ranged from 0.738 ?? 0.072 for the 1986 cohort to 0.260 ?? 0.025 for the 1991 cohort. Inclusion of winter observations increased estimates of first-year survival rates by an average of 30%, suggesting that permanent emigration had an important influence on apparent survival, especially for later cohorts. We estimated annual survival for initially captured brant as 0.782 ?? 0.013, while that for recaptures varied from 0.726 ?? 0.034 to 0.900 ?? 0.062. Our analyses failed to detect a negative effect of handling on survival of brant, which is consistent with an hypothesis of substantial inherent heterogeneity in post-fledging survival rates, such that individuals most likely to die as a result of handling also have lower inherent survival probabilities.

  12. Teacher Survival Rates--A Current Look

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Jonathan H.; Anderson, Barry D.

    1978-01-01

    To examine how survival rates change with time, each cohort of new entrants to the public school teaching profession between 1968 and 1976 was examined. Results replicated Charters' downward sloping survival curve, although the curve has shifted up steadily through time. The survival rate differential between men and women is decreasing over time.…

  13. Survival Regression Modeling Strategies in CVD Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Barkhordari, Mahnaz; Padyab, Mojgan; Sardarinia, Mahsa; Hadaegh, Farzad; Azizi, Fereidoun; Bozorgmanesh, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Background A fundamental part of prevention is prediction. Potential predictors are the sine qua non of prediction models. However, whether incorporating novel predictors to prediction models could be directly translated to added predictive value remains an area of dispute. The difference between the predictive power of a predictive model with (enhanced model) and without (baseline model) a certain predictor is generally regarded as an indicator of the predictive value added by that predictor. Indices such as discrimination and calibration have long been used in this regard. Recently, the use of added predictive value has been suggested while comparing the predictive performances of the predictive models with and without novel biomarkers. Objectives User-friendly statistical software capable of implementing novel statistical procedures is conspicuously lacking. This shortcoming has restricted implementation of such novel model assessment methods. We aimed to construct Stata commands to help researchers obtain the aforementioned statistical indices. Materials and Methods We have written Stata commands that are intended to help researchers obtain the following. 1, Nam-D’Agostino X2 goodness of fit test; 2, Cut point-free and cut point-based net reclassification improvement index (NRI), relative absolute integrated discriminatory improvement index (IDI), and survival-based regression analyses. We applied the commands to real data on women participating in the Tehran lipid and glucose study (TLGS) to examine if information relating to a family history of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD), waist circumference, and fasting plasma glucose can improve predictive performance of Framingham’s general CVD risk algorithm. Results The command is adpredsurv for survival models. Conclusions Herein we have described the Stata package “adpredsurv” for calculation of the Nam-D’Agostino X2 goodness of fit test as well as cut point-free and cut point-based NRI, relative

  14. Sun Exposure and Melanoma Survival: A GEM Study

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Marianne; Reiner, Anne S.; Paine, Susan; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Kricker, Anne; Goumas, Chris; Cust, Anne E.; Thomas, Nancy E.; Groben, Pamela A.; From, Lynn; Busam, Klaus; Orlow, Irene; Marrett, Loraine D.; Gallagher, Richard P.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Rosso, Stefano; Zanetti, Roberto; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Dwyer, Terry; Venn, Alison; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Begg, Colin B.

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously reported a significant association between higher ultraviolet radiation exposure before diagnosis and greater survival with melanoma in a population-based study in Connecticut. We sought to evaluate the hypothesis that sun exposure prior to diagnosis was associated with greater survival in a larger, international population-based study with more detailed exposure information. Methods We conducted a multi-center, international population-based study in four countries – Australia, Italy, Canada and the United States – with 3,578 cases of melanoma with an average of 7.4 years of follow-up. Measures of sun exposure included sunburn, intermittent exposure, hours of holiday sun exposure, hours of water-related outdoor activities, ambient UVB dose, histological solar elastosis and season of diagnosis. Results Results were not strongly supportive of the earlier hypothesis. Having had any sunburn in one year within 10 years of diagnosis was inversely associated with survival; solar elastosis – a measure of lifetime cumulative exposure – was not. Additionally, none of the intermittent exposure measures – water related activities and sunny holidays - were associated with melanoma-specific survival. Estimated ambient UVB dose was not associated with survival. Conclusion Although there was an apparent protective effect of sunburns within 10 years of diagnosis, there was only weak evidence in this large, international, population-based study of melanoma that sun exposure prior to diagnosis is associated with greater melanoma-specific survival. Impact This study adds to the evidence that sun exposure prior to melanoma diagnosis has little effect on survival with melanoma. PMID:25069694

  15. Estimating net survival: the importance of allowing for informative censoring.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Coraline; Remontet, Laurent; Bossard, Nadine; Roche, Laurent; Belot, Aurélien

    2012-04-13

    Net survival, the one that would be observed if cancer were the only cause of death, is the most appropriate indicator to compare cancer mortality between areas or countries. Several parametric and non-parametric methods have been developed to estimate net survival, particularly when the cause of death is unknown. These methods are based either on the relative survival ratio or on the additive excess hazard model, the latter using the general population mortality hazard to estimate the excess mortality hazard (the hazard related to net survival). The present work used simulations to compare estimator abilities to estimate net survival in different settings such as the presence/absence of an age effect on the excess mortality hazard or on the potential time of follow-up, knowing that this covariate has an effect on the general population mortality hazard too. It showed that when age affected the excess mortality hazard, most estimators, including specific survival, were biased. Only two estimators were appropriate to estimate net survival. The first is based on a multivariable excess hazard model that includes age as covariate. The second is non-parametric and is based on the inverse probability weighting. These estimators take differently into account the informative censoring induced by the expected mortality process. The former offers great flexibility whereas the latter requires neither the assumption of a specific distribution nor a model-building strategy. Because of its simplicity and availability in commonly used software, the nonparametric estimator should be considered by cancer registries for population-based studies.

  16. Excess Body Weight and Colorectal Cancer Survival: The Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Harmon, Brook E.; Little, Melissa A.; Ollberding, Nicholas J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Wilkens, Lynne R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Excess body weight is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and may also adversely affect survival in CRC patients. Methods This study examined the relation of body mass index (BMI), which was self-reported at cohort entry and after 5.7±0.8 years, with CRC-specific and all-cause survival among 4,204 incident cases of invasive CRC in the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC). Cox regression analysis with age as time metric and BMI as time-varying exposure was applied to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) while adjusting for relevant covariates. Results Over 6.0±4.7 years of follow-up, 1,976 all-cause and 1,095 CRC-specific deaths were recorded. The mean time interval between cohort entry and diagnosis was 7.6±4.7 years. No association with CRC-specific survival was detected in men (HR5units=0.94; 95%CI 0.84–1.04) or women (HR5units=0.98; 95%CI 0.89–1.08). In men, all-cause survival also showed no relation with BMI (HR5unit=0.97; 95%CI 0.90–1.06), whereas it was reduced in women (HR5units=1.10; 95%CI 1.03–1.18). Interactions of BMI with ethnicity were only significant for obesity. Obese Latino and overweight Native Hawaiian men as well as overweight African American women, experienced significantly better CRC-specific survival than whites. Overweight Japanese men and African American women had better all-cause survival and obese Latino women had the lowest all-cause survival (HRobese=1.74; 95%CI 1.08–2.80). Conclusions This analysis detected little evidence for an adverse effect of excess body weight on CRC-specific survival, but all-cause survival was reduced in women. These findings suggest that adiposity may be less important for CRC survival than as an etiologic factor. PMID:26358830

  17. Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon during Barge Transport

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Skalski, J. R.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-12-01

    To mitigate for fish losses related to passage through the Federal Columbia River Power System, an extensive fish transportation program using barges and trucks to move fish around and downstream of dams and reservoirs was implemented in 1981. Population modeling and other analyses to support Pacific salmon recovery efforts have assumed that the survival of juvenile salmonids during the transportation experience was 98%. To estimate survival during barge transport from Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River to a release area downstream of Bonneville Dam, a distance of 470 km, we used a novel adaptation of a release-recapture model with acoustic-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) smolts. A total of 1,494 yearling Chinook salmon were surgically implanted with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponders (PIT) and divided into three groups. The three tagged groups consisted of; (1) a group which was released into the raceway with the population of fish which were later loaded into transportation barges (R{sub B}), (2) a group which was held in a net-pen suspended within the general barge population until 5-6 h prior to barge evacuation, at which time they were confirmed to be alive and then released into the general barge population (R{sub A}), and (3) to validate a model assumption, a group which was euthanized and released into the barge population 2-8 h prior to barge evacuation (R{sub D}). Six replicates of these groups were loaded onto fish transport barges that departed Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River between 29 April and 13 May, 2010. Acoustic receiver arrays between 70 and 220 km downstream of the barge evacuation site were used to detect tagged fish and served as the basis for estimation of survival within the barge. Tag-life-corrected estimates of reach survival were calculated for barged and control fish in each of the six replicate trials. The ratio of survival from

  18. The role of Hispanic ethnicity in pediatric Wilms' tumor survival.

    PubMed

    Amirian, E Susan

    2013-05-01

    Wilms' tumors (WT) constitute approximately 6-14% of all childhood cancers and about 95% of all pediatric renal malignancies. While prognostic factors for this malignancy are relatively well-defined, few studies have specifically examined the role of Hispanic ethnicity in pediatric WT survival. The purpose of this study was to compare WT survival among non-Hispanic white (NHW), non-Hispanic black (NHB), and Hispanic cases using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. WT cases (ICD-O-3 histological code 8960) under age 20 were isolated from a recent subset of the SEER dataset (1990-2009). Demographics and tumor characteristics were compared by race/ethnicity, and 5- and 10-year survival probabilities were calculated. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess the effects of race/ethnicity on WT survival, adjusting for relevant covariates. Hispanic ethnicity was significantly associated with WT-specific mortality hazard, controlling for age, sex, diagnosis/treatment era, laterality, SEER stage, cancer-directed surgery, and radiation therapy (HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.02-2.25). The results of this study suggest that Hispanic pediatric WT cases may have a higher risk of WT-related death, compared to NHW cases. Additional research on racial/ethnic disparities in WT survival is warranted.

  19. Crossover studies with survival outcomes.

    PubMed

    Buyze, Jozefien; Goetghebeur, Els

    2013-12-01

    Crossover designs are well known to have major advantages when comparing the effect of two treatments which do not interact. With a right-censored survival endpoint, however, this design is quickly abandoned in favour of the more costly parallel design. Motivated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention studies which lacked power, we evaluate what may be gained in this setting and compare parallel with crossover designs. In a heterogeneous population, we find and explain a substantial increase in power for the crossover study using a non-parametric logrank test. With frailties in a proportional hazards model, crossover designs equally lead to substantially smaller variance for the subject-specific hazard ratio (HR), while the population-averaged HR sees negligible gain. Its efficiency benefit is recovered when the population-averaged HR is reconstructed from estimated subject-specific hazard rates. We derive the time point for treatment crossover that optimizes efficiency and end with the analysis of two recent HIV prevention trials. We find that a Cellulose sulphate trial could have hardly gained efficiency from a crossover design, while a Nonoxynol-9 trial stood to gain substantial power. We conclude that there is a role for effective crossover designs in important classes of survival problems.

  20. Improving fish survival through turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.W. )

    1993-04-01

    Much of what is known about fish passage through hydroturbines has been developed by studying migratory species of fish passing through large Kaplan turbine units. A review of the literature on previous fish passage research presented in the accompanying story illustrates that studies have focused on determining mortality levels, rather than identifying the causal mechanism involved. There is a need for understanding how turbine designs could be altered to improve fish passage conditions, how to retrofit existing units, and how proposed hydro plant operational changes may affect fish survival. The US Army Corps of Engineers has developed a research program to define biologically based engineering criteria for improving fish passage conditions. Turbine designs incorporating these criteria can be evaluated for their effects on fish survival, engineering issues, costs, and power production. The research program has the following objectives: To gain a thorough knowledge of the mechanisms of fish mortality; To define the biological sensitivities of key fish species to these mechanisms of mortality; To develop new turbine design criteria to reduce fish mortality; To construct prototype turbine designs, and to test these designs for fish passage, hydro-mechanical operation, and power production; and To identify construction and power costs associated with new turbine designs.

  1. Racial Patterns of Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Incidence and Survival in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Scott V.; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare incidence and survival of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) subtypes among US racial/ethnic groups. Methods Patients with PTCL (age ≥ 15 years; 2000 to 2012) were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries. Race/ethnicity was categorized as non-Hispanic white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic white, or American Indian/Alaskan native. Age-standardized annual incidence rates and incidence rate ratios were estimated with 95% CIs, and case-case odds ratios were estimated by race/ethnicity using polytomous regression. Survival was estimated from SEER follow-up data with Cox regression. Results Thirteen thousand one hundred seven patients with PTCL were identified. Annual PTCL incidence was highest in blacks and lowest in Native Americans. Compared with non-Hispanic whites, blacks had a higher incidence of PTCL not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and a lower incidence of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL); Asians/Pacific Islanders had a higher incidence of AITL, extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma and NK-cell leukemia (ENKCL), and ATLL and a lower incidence of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma; Hispanics had a higher incidence of AITL and ENKCL; and Native Americans had a lower incidence of PTCL-NOS (all P < .05). The ratio of ENKCL to PCTL-NOS among Native Americans, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic whites was approximately three- to four-fold the same ratio among non-Hispanic whites. Survival varied significantly by race/ethnicity (P < .001), with blacks in particular experiencing shorter survival for most subtypes. Conclusion Striking variation in incidence, proportions of PTCL subtypes, and survival was observed. Aspects of these PTCL subtype patterns, such as for ENKCL and ATLL, were similar to corresponding global populations. Despite the small population size and limited number of Native American

  2. Basic Facts of Breast Cancer in Korea in 2014: The 10-Year Overall Survival Progress

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Hwa; Min, Sun Young; Kim, Zisun; Yoon, Chan Seok; Jung, Kyu-Won; Nam, Seok Jin; Oh, Se Jeong; Lee, Seeyoun; Park, Byeong-Woo; Lim, Woosung

    2017-01-01

    We, the Korean Breast Cancer Society (KBCS), present the facts and the trends of breast cancer in Korea in 2014. Data on the total number of newly diagnosed patients was obtained from the Korea Central Cancer Registry database, other data were collected from the KBCS online registry database, and the overall survival data of patients were updated from Statistics Korea. A total of 21,484 female patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014. The crude incidence rate and the age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) of breast cancer in female patients, including carcinoma in situ, were 83.4 cases and 63.9 cases per 100,000 women, respectively. The ASR showed an annual increase of 6.1% from 1999 to 2014; however, although the increase of the ASR had slowed since 2008, the incidence rate itself continuously increased. The proportion of early breast cancer increased consistently, and the pathological features changed accordingly. While breast-conserving surgery was mainly performed, the proportion of total mastectomy was slightly increased. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries increased rapidly. The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates for all stages of breast cancer patients were 91.2% and 84.8%, respectively. The overall survival rate of Korean patients with breast cancer was extremely high, compared with other developed countries. Thus, we consider that the clinical characteristics of breast cancer have changed over the past decade. A nationwide registry data will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:28382089

  3. Survival Skills: Mastering the Human Aspects of Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a four-year Illinois project to identify twelve topics that can be developed into instructional modules for teaching occupational survival skills. Topics include working in an organization, understanding self/others, motivation, interpersonal relations, on-the-job communications, creativity, authority/responsibility, problem solving,…

  4. Looking to the Future: Will Behavior Analysis Survive and Prosper?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Behavior analysis as a discipline currently is doing relatively well. How it will do in the future is unclear and depends on how the field, and the world at large, changes. Five current characteristics of the discipline that appear to reduce the probability that it will survive and prosper are discussed and suggestions for improvement are offered.…

  5. Circadian timing of single daily 'meal' affects survival of mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, W.; Cadotte, L.; Halberg, F.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that the survival of young mice after abrupt restriction to a single 4-hr span of daily food accessibility can depend on the temporal placement of this feeding span in relation to the lighting regimen. Housing conditions are an important codeterminant of this response.

  6. Apes in the Anthropocene: flexibility and survival.

    PubMed

    Hockings, Kimberley J; McLennan, Matthew R; Carvalho, Susana; Ancrenaz, Marc; Bobe, René; Byrne, Richard W; Dunbar, Robin I M; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; McGrew, William C; Williamson, Elizabeth A; Wilson, Michael L; Wood, Bernard; Wrangham, Richard W; Hill, Catherine M

    2015-04-01

    We are in a new epoch, the Anthropocene, and research into our closest living relatives, the great apes, must keep pace with the rate that our species is driving change. While a goal of many studies is to understand how great apes behave in natural contexts, the impact of human activities must increasingly be taken into account. This is both a challenge and an opportunity, which can importantly inform research in three diverse fields: cognition, human evolution, and conservation. No long-term great ape research site is wholly unaffected by human influence, but research at those that are especially affected by human activity is particularly important for ensuring that our great ape kin survive the Anthropocene.

  7. The Survival Effect in Memory: Does It Hold into Old Age and Non-Ancestral Scenarios?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lixia; Lau, Karen P. L.; Truong, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The survival effect in memory refers to the memory enhancement for materials encoded in reference to a survival scenario compared to those encoded in reference to a control scenario or with other encoding strategies [1]. The current study examined whether this effect is well maintained in old age by testing young (ages 18–29) and older adults (ages 65–87) on the survival effect in memory for words encoded in ancestral and/or non-ancestral modern survival scenarios relative to a non-survival control scenario. A pilot study was conducted to select the best matched comparison scenarios based on potential confounding variables, such as valence and arousal. Experiment 1 assessed the survival effect with a well-matched negative control scenario in both young and older adults. The results showed an age-equivalent survival effect across an ancestral and a non-ancestral modern survival scenario. Experiment 2 replicated the survival effect in both age groups with a positive control scenario. Taken together, the data suggest a robust survival effect that is well preserved in old age across ancestral and non-ancestral survival scenarios. PMID:24788755

  8. Predicting survival time for cold exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    1995-06-01

    The prediction of survival time (ST) for cold exposure is speculative as reliable controlled data of deep hypothermia are unavailable. At best, guidance can be obtained from case histories of accidental exposure. This study describes the development of a mathematical model for the prediction of ST under sedentary conditions in the cold. The model is based on steady-state heat conduction in a single cylinder comprised of a core and two concentric annular shells representing the fat plus skin and the clothing plus still boundary layer, respectively. The ambient condition can be either air or water; the distinction is made by assigning different values of insulation to the still boundary layer. Metabolic heat production ( M) is comprised of resting and shivering components with the latter predicted by temperature signals from the core and skin. Where the cold exposure is too severe for M to balance heat loss, ST is largely determined by the rate of heat loss from the body. Where a balance occurs, ST is governed by the endurance time for shivering. End of survival is marked by the deep core temperature reaching a value of 30° C. The model was calibrated against survival data of cold water (0 to 20° C) immersion and then applied to cold air exposure. A sampling of ST predictions for the nude exposure of an average healthy male in relatively calm air (1 km/h wind speed) are the following: 1.8, 2.5, 4.1, 9.0, and >24 h for -30, -20, -10, 0, and 10° C, respectively. With two layers of loose clothing (average thickness of 1 mm each) in a 5 km/h wind, STs are 4.0, 5.6, 8.6, 15.4, and >24 h for -50, -40, -30, -20, and -10° C. The predicted STs must be weighted against the extrapolative nature of the model. At present, it would be prudent to use the predictions in a relative sense, that is, to compare or rank-order predicted STs for various combinations of ambient conditions and clothing protection.

  9. Survival of Salmonella enterica in poultry feed is strain dependent.

    PubMed

    Andino, Ana; Pendleton, Sean; Zhang, Nan; Chen, Wei; Critzer, Faith; Hanning, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Feed components have low water activity, making bacterial survival difficult. The mechanisms of Salmonella survival in feed and subsequent colonization of poultry are unknown. The purpose of this research was to compare the ability of Salmonella serovars and strains to survive in broiler feed and to evaluate molecular mechanisms associated with survival and colonization by measuring the expression of genes associated with colonization (hilA, invA) and survival via fatty acid synthesis (cfa, fabA, fabB, fabD). Feed was inoculated with 1 of 15 strains of Salmonella enterica consisting of 11 serovars (Typhimurium, Enteriditis, Kentucky, Seftenburg, Heidelberg, Mbandanka, Newport, Bairely, Javiana, Montevideo, and Infantis). To inoculate feed, cultures were suspended in PBS and survival was evaluated by plating samples onto XLT4 agar plates at specific time points (0 h, 4 h, 8 h, 24 h, 4 d, and 7 d). To evaluate gene expression, RNA was extracted from the samples at the specific time points (0, 4, 8, and 24 h) and gene expression measured with real-time PCR. The largest reduction in Salmonella occurred at the first and third sampling time points (4 h and 4 d) with the average reductions being 1.9 and 1.6 log cfu per g, respectively. For the remaining time points (8 h, 24 h, and 7 d), the average reduction was less than 1 log cfu per g (0.6, 0.4, and 0.6, respectively). Most strains upregulated cfa (cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis) within 8 h, which would modify the fluidity of the cell wall to aid in survival. There was a weak negative correlation between survival and virulence gene expression indicating downregulation to focus energy on other gene expression efforts such as survival-related genes. These data indicate the ability of strains to survive over time in poultry feed was strain dependent and that upregulation of cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis and downregulation of virulence genes were associated with a response to desiccation stress.

  10. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  11. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, James; Buden, David; Williams, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometeorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length.

  12. Surviving Scientific Academia . . . and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd

    2016-02-03

    It's been 16 years since I first took a physics class at Weber State University. Since them, I've survived graduate school in Nuclear Engineering, and a postdoc appointment doing nuclear nonproliferation. Now I'm a Technical Staff Member at Los Alamos National Laboratory working with nuclear data, the physics behind the numerical simulations of nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. Along the way, I've learned a few things. First, scientific computing is everywhere in science. If you are not writing codes, you will be analyzing their output, and generally there will be more output than a human can correctly and accurately interpret in a timely manner. Second, a career in science or engineering can be very rewarding with opportunities to collaborate with and generate friendships with very bright people from all over the world.

  13. Survival Data and Regression Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    We start this chapter by introducing some basic elements for the analysis of censored survival data. Then we focus on right censored data and develop two types of regression models. The first one concerns the so-called accelerated failure time models (AFT), which are parametric models where a function of a parameter depends linearly on the covariables. The second one is a semiparametric model, where the covariables enter in a multiplicative form in the expression of the hazard rate function. The main statistical tool for analysing these regression models is the maximum likelihood methodology and, in spite we recall some essential results about the ML theory, we refer to the chapter "Logistic Regression" for a more detailed presentation.

  14. Quorum protection, growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Macreadie, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    For the growth of a cell culture, one inoculates not with one cell but with a quorum of cells. This most often a requirement, not just a convenience, and most of us take this for granted without question. Here this observation is re-examined to understand why a quorum may be required to grow cells. The importance of quorums may be widespread in the aspects of microbiology they affect. It is very likely that quorums are connected with and have a large impact on the determination of Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations. It is also possible that low cell density may adversely affect cell survival, however, this is an area where even less is known. The need for a quorum might affect other aspects of microbial cell culture, cell isolation and cell preservation. Effects also extend to mammalian cell culture. Here I seek to review studies that have been documented and speculate on how the information might be utilized in the future. PMID:28357274

  15. On Modeling of Adversary Behavior and Defense for Survivability of Military MANET Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Research Laboratory Computational and Information Sciences Directorate jinhee.cho@us.army.mil Abstract— In this paper we develop a methodology...adversary modeling, defense behavior modeling, survivability. 1. INTRODUCTION In this paper we address the survivability issue of a military mobile ad...defenders, the actions being the attack/defense strategies identified in the paper , and the payoff for each outcome being related to system survivability

  16. Stratification of ALS patients' survival: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Marin, Benoît; Couratier, Philippe; Arcuti, Simona; Copetti, Massimiliano; Fontana, Andrea; Nicol, Marie; Raymondeau, Marie; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Preux, Pierre Marie

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and patient risk stratification are areas of considerable research interest. We aimed (1) to describe the survival of a representative cohort of French ALS patients, and (2) to identify covariates associated with various patterns of survival using a risk classification analysis. ALS patients recruited in the FRALim register (2000-2013) were included. Time-to-death analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox model. A recursive partitioning and amalgamation (RECPAM) algorithm analysis identified subgroups of patients with different patterns of survival. Among 322 patients, median survival times were 26.2 and 15.6 months from time of onset and of diagnosis, respectively. Four groups of patients were identified, depending on their baseline characteristics and survival (1) ALSFRS-R slope >0.46/month and definite or probable ALS (median survival time (MST) 10.6 months); (2) ALSFRS-R slope >0.46/month and possible or probable laboratory-supported ALS (MST: 18.1 months); (3) ALSFRS-R slope ≤0.46/month and definite or probable ALS (MST: 22.5 months), and (4) ALSFRS-R slope ≤0.46/month and possible or probable laboratory-supported ALS (MST: 37.6 months). Median survival time is among the shortest ever reported by a worldwide population-based study. This is probably related to the age structure of the patients (the oldest identified to date), driven by the underlying population (30 % of subjects older than 60 years). Further research in the field of risk stratification could help physicians better anticipate prognosis of ALS patients, and help improve the design of randomized controlled trials.

  17. Modelling geographically referenced survival data with a cure fraction.

    PubMed

    Cooner, Freda; Banerjee, Sudipto; McBean, A Marshall

    2006-08-01

    The emergence of geographical information systems and related softwares nowadays enables medical databases to incorporate the geographical information on patients, allowing studies in spatial associations. Public health administrators and researchers are often interested in detecting variation in survival patterns by region or county in order to understand the possible factors that contribute towards such spatial discrepancies. These issues have led statisticians to develop survival models that account for spatial clustering and variation. Additionally, with rapid developments in medical and health sciences, researchers increasingly encounter data sets where a substantial portion of patients are cured. Models accounting for cure in the population assist in the prognosis of potentially terminal diseases. This article proposes a Bayesian modelling framework that models spatial associations for areally referenced survival data using a general class of cure models proposed by Cooner et al. The special models we outline are alternatives to the traditional proportional hazards models and can be fitted using standard Bayesian software such as WinBUGS.

  18. Survival Association Rule Mining Towards Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gyorgy J.; Schrom, John; Castro, M. Regina; Li, Peter W.; Caraballo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is a growing epidemic that often leads to severe complications. Effective preventive measures exist and identifying patients at high risk of diabetes is a major health-care need. The use of association rule mining (ARM) is advantageous, as it was specifically developed to identify associations between risk factors in an interpretable form. Unfortunately, traditional ARM is not directly applicable to survival outcomes and it lacks the ability to compensate for confounders and to incorporate dosage effects. In this work, we propose Survival Association Rule (SAR) Mining, which addresses these shortcomings. We demonstrate on a real diabetes data set that SARs are naturally more interpretable than the traditional association rules, and predictive models built on top of these rules are very competitive relative to state of the art survival models and substantially outperform the most widely used diabetes index, the Framingham score. PMID:24551408

  19. Young fire ant workers feign death and survive aggressive neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassill, Deby L.; Vo, Kim; Becker, Brandie

    2008-07-01

    Feigning death is a method of self-defense employed among a wide range of prey species when threatened by predator species. This paper reports on death-feigning behavior by the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, during intraspecific aggression among neighboring fire ant workers. Days-old workers responded to aggression by death feigning, weeks-old workers responded by fleeing and months-old workers responded by fighting back. By feigning death, days-old workers were four times more likely to survive aggression than older workers. From a proximate perspective, retaliation by young workers against aggressive older workers is certain to fail. With their relatively soft exoskeleton, young workers would be prone to injury and death and unable to execute an effective attack of biting or stinging older workers with harder exoskeletons. From an ultimate perspective, death feigning allows young workers to survive and contribute to brood care and colony growth, both of which are essential to queen survival and fitness.

  20. Young fire ant workers feign death and survive aggressive neighbors.

    PubMed

    Cassill, Deby L; Vo, Kim; Becker, Brandie

    2008-07-01

    Feigning death is a method of self-defense employed among a wide range of prey species when threatened by predator species. This paper reports on death-feigning behavior by the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, during intraspecific aggression among neighboring fire ant workers. Days-old workers responded to aggression by death feigning, weeks-old workers responded by fleeing and months-old workers responded by fighting back. By feigning death, days-old workers were four times more likely to survive aggression than older workers. From a proximate perspective, retaliation by young workers against aggressive older workers is certain to fail. With their relatively soft exoskeleton, young workers would be prone to injury and death and unable to execute an effective attack of biting or stinging older workers with harder exoskeletons. From an ultimate perspective, death feigning allows young workers to survive and contribute to brood care and colony growth, both of which are essential to queen survival and fitness.

  1. Weights, growth, and survival of timber wolf pups in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Ballenberghe, V.; Mech, L.D.

    1975-01-01

    Weights, growth rates, canine tooth lengths, and survival data were obtained from 73 wild wolf (Canis lupus) pups that were 8 to 28 weeks old when live-trapped in three areas of northern Minnesota from 1969 to 1972. Relative weights of wild pups are expressed as percentages of a standard weight curve based on data from captive pups of similar age. These relative weights varied greatly within litters, between litters, and between years; extremes of 31 to 144 percent of the standard were observed. Growth rates ranging from 0.05 to 0.23 kilograms per day were observed, and similar variations in general devel pment and in replacement and growth of canine teeth were noted. Survival data based on radio-tracking and tag returns indicated that pups with relative weights less than 65 percent of standard have a poor chance of survival, whereas pups of at least 80 percent of standard weight have a high survivability. Pups born in 1972 were especially underweight, probably a result of declining white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) densities in the interior of the Superior National Forest study area.

  2. Coyote removal, understory cover, and survival of white-tailed deer neonates: Coyote Control and Fawn Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgo, John C.; Vukovich, Mark; Ray, H. Scott; Shaw, Christopher E.; Ruth, Charles

    2014-09-01

    Predation by coyotes (Canis latrans) on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) neonates has led to reduced recruitment in many deer populations in southeastern North America. This low recruitment combined with liberal antlerless deer harvest has resulted in declines in some deer populations, and consequently, increased interest in coyote population control. We investigated whether neonate survival increased after coyote removal, whether coyote predation on neonates was additive to other mortality sources, and whether understory vegetation density affected neonate survival. We monitored neonate survival for 4 years prior to (2006–2009) and 3 years during (2010–2012) intensive coyote removal on 3 32-km2 units on the United States Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site, South Carolina. We removed 474 coyotes (1.63 coyotes/km2 per unit per year), reducing coyote abundance by 78% from pre-removal levels. The best model (wi = 0.927) describing survival probability among 216 radio-collared neonates included a within-year quadratic time trend variable, date of birth, removal treatment, and a varying removal year effect. Under this model, survival differed between pre-treatment and removal periods and it differed among years during the removal period, being >100% greater than pre-treatment survival (0.228) during the first removal year (0.513), similar to pre-treatment survival during the second removal year (0.202), and intermediate during the third removal year (0.431). Despite an initial increase, the overall effect of coyote removal on neonate survival was modest. Mortality rate attributable to coyote predation was lowest during the first removal year (0.357) when survival was greatest, but the mortality rate from all other causes did not differ between the pretreatment period and any year during removals, indicating that coyote predation acted as an additive source of mortality. Survival probability was not related to

  3. Linking habitat selection and predation risk to spatial variation in survival.

    PubMed

    DeCesare, Nicholas J; Hebblewhite, Mark; Bradley, Mark; Hervieux, David; Neufeld, Lalenia; Musiani, Marco

    2014-03-01

    A central assumption underlying the study of habitat selection is that selected habitats confer enhanced fitness. Unfortunately, this assumption is rarely tested, and in some systems, gradients of predation risk may more accurately characterize spatial variation in vital rates than gradients described by habitat selection studies. Here, we separately measured spatial patterns of both resource selection and predation risk and tested their relationships with a key demographic trait, adult female survival, for a threatened ungulate, woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou Gmelin). We also evaluated whether exposure to gradients in both predation risk and resource selection value was manifested temporally through instantaneous or seasonal effects on survival outcomes. We used Cox proportional hazards spatial survival modelling to assess the relative support for 5 selection- and risk-based definitions of habitat quality, as quantified by woodland caribou adult female survival. These hypotheses included scenarios in which selection ideally mirrored survival, risk entirely drove survival, non-ideal selection correlated with survival but with additive risk effects, an ecological trap with maladaptive selection and a non-spatial effect of annual variation in weather. Indeed, we found positive relationships between the predicted values of a resource selection function (RSF) and survival, yet subsequently incorporating an additional negative effect of predation risk greatly improved models further. This revealed a positive, but non-ideal relationship between selection and survival. Gradients in these covariates were also shown to affect individual survival probability at multiple temporal scales. Exposure to increased predation risk had a relatively instantaneous effect on survival outcomes, whereas variation in habitat suitability predicted by an RSF had both instantaneous and longer-term seasonal effects on survival. Predation risk was an additive source of hazard

  4. Gender, social norms, and survival in maritime disasters.

    PubMed

    Elinder, Mikael; Erixson, Oscar

    2012-08-14

    Since the sinking of the Titanic, there has been a widespread belief that the social norm of "women and children first" (WCF) gives women a survival advantage over men in maritime disasters, and that captains and crew members give priority to passengers. We analyze a database of 18 maritime disasters spanning three centuries, covering the fate of over 15,000 individuals of more than 30 nationalities. Our results provide a unique picture of maritime disasters. Women have a distinct survival disadvantage compared with men. Captains and crew survive at a significantly higher rate than passengers. We also find that: the captain has the power to enforce normative behavior; there seems to be no association between duration of a disaster and the impact of social norms; women fare no better when they constitute a small share of the ship's complement; the length of the voyage before the disaster appears to have no impact on women's relative survival rate; the sex gap in survival rates has declined since World War I; and women have a larger disadvantage in British shipwrecks. Taken together, our findings show that human behavior in life-and-death situations is best captured by the expression "every man for himself."

  5. Diversity and Relatedness Enhance Survival in Colour Polymorphic Grasshoppers

    PubMed Central

    Caesar, Sofia; Karlsson, Magnus; Forsman, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that different resource utilization and behaviour by alternative phenotypes may reduce competition and enhance productivity and individual performance in polymorphic, as compared with monomorphic, groups of individuals. However, firm evidence that members of more heterogeneous groups benefit from enhanced survival has been scarce or lacking. Furthermore, benefits associated with phenotypic diversity may be counterbalanced by costs mediated by reduced relatedness, since closely related individuals typically are more similar. Pygmy grasshoppers (Tetrix subu