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Sample records for aged care nurses

  1. Nursing care of the aging foot.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel

    2009-01-01

    Feet are not necessarily the most attractive part of the body as it ages, and given the choice, most older adults would rather ignore them. In fact, many older adults cannot even see them, reach them, or care for them properly. And when they ache or look misshapen and oddly colored; well, that's just part of growing old, isn't it? The feet are important for weight bearing, balance, and mobility. Over an average life span, the feet are subject to considerable stress and trauma. Age-related changes of the foot predispose the older adult to discomfort if not pain, fungal infection, reduced range of motion, and itchy dry skin. More than three fourths of older adults (i.e., those age over 65 years) complain of foot pain that is associated with a significant foot problem and have evidence of arthritic changes on x-ray. Impaired ambulation can make the difference between independence versus dependency on others, engagement versus isolation. Assisted living is about choices. Being unable to get where one wants to go or do what one wants to do because of foot problems is a barrier to full enjoyment of the opportunities in assisted living communities. This article describes foot problems associated with aging, diabetes, nursing assessment of the feet, and nursing interventions in the service of accessing and optimizing choices for quality of life.

  2. A University Program to Improve Nursing Care to the Aged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marten, Marie Lucille

    1978-01-01

    Proposes a series of university nursing education programs developed to increase knowledge and skills relevant to nursing care of elderly and chronically ill persons who reside in nursing homes. Briefly describes five programs intended for persons engaged in long-term care or in preparation for such roles. (EM)

  3. Nursing Students' Intentions to Work in Dementia Care: Influence of Age, Ageism, and Perceived Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Ellen L.; Brown, Patricia M.

    2014-01-01

    Given a projected threefold increase in people living with dementia globally by 2050 (World Health Organization, 2012), attracting nurses to work in this area will be critical to meet demand. This study examined the role of age, positive ageism, negative ageism, and aged-care placement completion in predicting nursing students' intentions to work…

  4. Perceptions and employment intentions among aged care nurses and nursing assistants from diverse cultural backgrounds: A qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fengsong; Tilse, Cheryl; Wilson, Jill; Tuckett, Anthony; Newcombe, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The residential aged care industry faces shortages and high turnover rates of direct care workers. This situation is further complicated by the increasing cultural diversity of residents and staff. To retain direct care workers, it is crucial to explore their perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of care work, and their employment intentions in multicultural environments. A qualitative descriptive study was used to understand perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of residential aged care work for core direct care workers (i.e. nurses and nursing assistants), how these were related to their intentions to stay or leave, and how these varied between nurses and nursing assistants, and between locally and overseas born workers. Individual interviews were conducted between June and September 2013 with 16 direct care workers in an Australian residential aged care facility with a specific focus on people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. It was found that direct care workers' employment intentions were related to their perceptions and management of the rewards and difficulties of care work. Their experiences of care work, the employment characteristics, and the organizational resources that fitted their personality, ability, expectations, and essential needs were viewed as rewards. Evaluating their jobs as meaningful was a shared perception for direct care workers who intended to stay. Individual workers' perceptions of the rewarding aspects of care work served to counterbalance the challenges of care work, and promoted their intentions to stay. Perceptions and employment intentions varied by occupational groups and by cultural backgrounds. Overseas born direct care workers are valuable resources in residential aged care facility rather than a limitation, but they do require organizational support, such as cultural awareness of the management, English language support, a sense of family, and appropriate job responsibility. The findings

  5. The paradox of the Aged Care Act 1997: the marginalisation of nursing discourse.

    PubMed

    Angus, Jocelyn; Nay, Rhonda

    2003-06-01

    This paper examines the marginalisation of nursing discourse, which followed the enactment of the Aged Care Act 1997. This neo-reform period in aged care, dominated by theories of economic rationalism, enshrined legislation based upon market principles and by implication, the provision of care at the cheapest possible price. This paper exposes some of the gaps in the neo-reform period and challenges the assertion that the amalgamation of nursing homes and hostels in such an environment can provide better quality of care and life for residents. It argues that this amalgamation entails a transformation towards a social model of care and fails to address the professional healthcare needs of the acutely sick and complex extreme old person and makes evident new gaps in the provision of aged care services. The paper proceeds to present strategies where the future for nursing practice in aged care necessarily involves a judicious balancing of individual cases alongside economic prescriptions of care and ever-changing public policy initiatives. It concludes that this can be achieved through a more interactive public, professional and advocacy discourse. The methodology involves extensive analysis of public documents including media, academic journals, government reports and interviews with recognised leaders in the field of aged care. The study utilises a critical interpretative framework consistent with the logic of Michel Foucault.

  6. Exploring the role of the mental health nurse in community mental health care for the aged.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Rob; Garlick, Robyn; Happell, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    There is currently considerable discussion about the impact of the aging population on the demand for health care services, however there is considerably less attention paid to the impact of mental health issues on the needs of the aged population. Nurses comprise the largest professional group within the mental health workforce in Australia. The availability of a high quality mental health nursing workforce will therefore be crucial to meeting the health needs of aging clients in the future, accompanied by an increased pressure to increase the proportion of care delivered in the community. There is however, a paucity of literature on the role and contribution of community mental health nurses specialising in the aged care field. The aim of this paper is to present the findings of a project designed to examine the role of mental health nursing within aged persons' community mental health teams in Victoria, Australia, with particular emphasis on the biopsychosocial interventions used. Fifteen participants from three community mental health services in Victoria participated in a focus group interview to share their insights and experiences. Data analysis revealed two main themes, the role of the nurse, and the specific functions of the nurse. This data is presented as a beginning contribution to the paucity of literature currently available in this important area.

  7. Nurse practitioners in aged care: documentary analysis of successful project proposals.

    PubMed

    Clark, Shannon J; Parker, Rhian M; Davey, Rachel

    2014-11-01

    Meeting the primary health care needs of an aging population is an increasing challenge for many Western nations. In Australia, the federal government introduced a program to develop, test, and evaluate nurse practitioner models in aged care settings. In this article, we present a documentary analysis of 32 project proposals awarded funding under the Nurse Practitioner-Aged Care Models of Practice Program. Successfully funded models were diverse and were operated by a range of organizations across Australia. We identified three key priorities as underlying the proposed models: "The right care," "in the right place," and "at the right time." In this article, we explore how these priorities were presented by different applicants in different ways. Through the presentation of their models, the program's applicants identified and proposed to address current gaps in health services. Applicants contrasted their proposed models with available services to create persuasive and competitive applications for funding.

  8. Plotting Careers in Aged Care: Perspectives of Medical, Nursing, Allied Health Students and New Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Natalie; McCall, Louise

    2007-01-01

    The research reported in this article explored the impact of the undergraduate placement experience on medical, nursing, and allied health students' perceptions of careers in aged care. Data were collected from undergraduate students (48) and graduates (26) via individual (46) and group (7) interviews; data were thematically analyzed.…

  9. Infusing Oral Health Care into Nursing Curriculum: Addressing Preventive Health in Aging and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Joan Earle; FitzGerald, Leah; Markham, Young Kee; Glassman, Paul; Guenther, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Access to oral health care is essential for promoting and maintaining overall health and well-being, yet oral health disparities exist among vulnerable and underserved populations. While nurses make up the largest portion of the health care work force, educational preparation to address oral health needs of elders and persons with disabilities is limited across nursing curricula. This descriptive study reports on the interdisciplinary development, implementation, and testing of an oral health module that was included and infused into a graduate nursing curriculum in a three-phase plan. Phase 1 includes evaluation of a lecture presented to eight gerontological nurse practitioner (GNP) students. Phase 2 includes evaluation of GNP students' perceptions of learning, skills, and confidence following a one-time 8-hour practicum infused into 80 required practicum hours. The evaluation data show promise in preparing nurse practitioner students to assess and address preventive oral health needs of persons aging with disabilities such that further infusion and inclusion in a course for nurse practitioners across five specialties will implemented and tested in Phase 3. PMID:22619708

  10. Acts of caring: nurses caring for nurses.

    PubMed

    Longo, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Caring behaviors displayed toward nurses by nurse managers and nurse peers play a significant role in establishing relationships that promote a healthy work environment. A qualitative study was done to identify behaviors perceived to be caring toward nurses. The theoretical background used for the study was Nursing as Caring by Boykin and Schoenhofer. Data were collected from focus groups consisting of registered nurses currently employed in the practice setting. Content analysis was used for the analysis. The overarching category that was identified was tending to a caring environment. The following emergent categories were also found: caring through helping and supporting, caring through appreciating, and acknowledging unappreciated caring. The findings suggest that nurses demonstrate caring behaviors toward their colleagues by coming to know them on both a professional and a personal level. These behaviors form the foundation for an environment that supports a consistent demonstration of caring.

  11. Measuring Nursing Care Value.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    The value of nursing care as well as the contribution of individual nurses to clinical outcomes has been difficult to measure and evaluate. Existing health care financial models hide the contribution of nurses; therefore, the link between the cost and quality o nursing care is unknown. New data and methods are needed to articulate the added value of nurses to patient care. The final results and recommendations of an expert workgroup tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value, including a data model to allow extraction of key information from electronic health records to measure nursing care value, are described. A set of new analytic metrics are proposed.

  12. Learning opportunities in a residential aged care facility: the role of supported placements for first-year nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lea, Emma; Marlow, Annette; Bramble, Marguerite; Andrews, Sharon; Crisp, Elaine; Eccleston, Claire; Mason, Ron; Robinson, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The residential aged care sector is reportedly a less attractive career choice for nursing students than other sectors. Research shows that students are often fearful of working with residents with dementia when they are inadequately supported on clinical placements by aged care staff. Thirty first-year nursing students attended a 2-week placement in one of two Tasmanian aged care facilities as part of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre Teaching Aged Care Facilities Program, which aims to provide students with a quality aged care placement focusing on dementia palliation. Placement experience and dementia knowledge were evaluated through preplacement and postplacement questionnaires and weekly feedback meetings with mentors and students. Students had more positive attitudes related to aged care and higher dementia knowledge at the end of placement. Students described their interactions with residents with dementia and thought that the placement had increased their capacity to provide quality care to these residents. The findings indicate that residential aged care placements can be productive learning environments for novice nursing students.

  13. Using an age-specific nursing model to tailor care to the adolescent surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Janean Carter

    2014-06-01

    A surgical experience can be stressful for any patient. When the patient is an adolescent, however, the surgical experience can create significant stress, which is related to normal adolescent development. Perioperative nursing care should address what adolescent patients perceive as stressful and should provide a safe environment so that a successful surgical outcome can be achieved. To accomplish this, a nursing model specific to perioperative nursing practice should be developed to guide nurses when providing care to adolescents. The Adolescent Perioperative System Stability Model based on the Neuman Systems Model provides a framework for defining scope of practice and organizing nursing care that is appropriate for the adolescent during a surgical experience. In addition to guiding nursing practice, this model provides direction and guidance for future studies of adolescents in the perioperative setting.

  14. [Nursing care of a school-age child with asthma: an ecological system theory approach].

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Yu-Fen; Gau, Bih-Shya

    2012-02-01

    This research applied the Ecological System Theory of Dr. Bronfenbrenner (1979) to evaluate and analyze the impact of a school-age asthmatic child's ecological environment on the child's development. This project ran from March 16th to April 16th, 2010. A full range of data was collected during clinical care, outpatient follow-up services, telephone interviews, home visits, and school visits and then identified and analyzed. Results indicated that the family, household environment, campus, teachers, classmates, physical education program, and medical staffs comprised the most immediate microsystem and that parents, school nurses, teachers, and classmates formed the child's mesosystem. Researchers found a lack of understanding and appreciation in the mesosystem regarding asthmatic patient care needs. Hidden factors in the environment induced asthma, which eventually caused the child to be unable to obtain necessary medical care assistance. The exosystem reflected adequacy of the family social economy. The father's flexible working hours allowed him to allocate more time to childcare responsibilities. The government Asthma Medical Payment program also facilitated effective care. The macrosystem demonstrated parental cognition related to asthma treatment and caring to be deeply influenced by local customs. Thus, rather than using advanced medical treatments, parents preferred to follow traditional Chinese medicinal practices. Evaluation using the Ecological of Human Development Theory showed the subject's ecology environment relationships as based upon a foundation of family and school. Therefore, active family and school support for an asthma management plan appropriate to the subject's needs was critical. Asthma symptoms were better controlled after the child and his parents invested greater effort in mastering asthma management protocols.

  15. [Understanding a hospitalized, school-aged child's stress in the PICU: the application of picture books in nursing care].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Ju; Feng, Jui-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Hospitalization in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) can be a very stressful and sometimes traumatic experience for school-aged children due to illness, painful procedures, unfamiliar environment, and separation from family. We incorporated picture books into PICU nursing care to explore the stress response in a school-aged child with compartment syndrome who was hospitalized in the PICU. Observation, interview and communication with the patient were used to assess her psychological reactions and emotional and behavioral responses to stress related to hospitalization and medical treatment. Autonomy and control were provided and strengthened by giving the patient choices and purposive life plans. Picture books were used to establish rapport and help the patient express her feelings, needs, and desires for parental love and company. This case report highlights the importance of nurses' awareness of children's stresses and needs during hospitalization in the PICU as well as the value of picture books or other age-appropriate tools for this patient population.

  16. [Nursing care wall planning].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Nursing care wall planners are not a tool for assessing workload, but a means of providing coherence and individualised monitoring of care. Its application is focused not only on team organisation, but also on the patient's needs.

  17. [Nursing care in prison].

    PubMed

    Aujard, Ségolène; de Brisoult, Béatrice; Broussard, Daniel; Petitclerc-Roche, Solenne; Lefort, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    In France, nurses practising in the prison environment work in a health care unit, for somatic care, or in a regional medical-psychological unit for large facilities and psychological care. These units belong to the regional hospitals. Located at the heart of the prison, they cater for prisoner-patients. On the frontline, the nurse has specific autonomy and responsibility in this unique context.

  18. Nursing Care: Care of the Perioperative Patient.

    PubMed

    Davis, Harold

    2015-09-01

    This article provides a general overview of nursing care principles including an approach to developing a nursing care plan using the nursing process as its foundation. The nursing process is a problem-solving approach used in planning patient care. This article also focuses on nursing care as it pertains to the respiratory, cardiovascular, and renal systems (fluid balance) as well as care of the recumbent patient. Knowledge of nursing care techniques and risk factors for complications puts the care provider in a position of being proactive rather than reactive to patient care needs.

  19. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care Before you choose a nursing home Expert information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care ... Nearly 1.6 million older Americans live in nursing homes in the United States. The move to ...

  20. Critical care nursing.

    PubMed

    Dracup, K

    1987-01-01

    The research pertaining to the delivery of nursing care in the ICU was reviewed to describe: the impact of the unit structure and organization, including policies and procedures, on patients, nurses, and families; the process of critical care nursing; the outcomes of critical care nursing; some of the ethical issues germane to the care of the critically ill patient. Although these areas of inquiry are quite diverse, a number of similarities can be identified. The most obvious of the similarities was that, with few exceptions, the studies pertaining to delivery of nursing care were performed by researchers from a variety of disciplines other than nursing, including medicine, psychology, public health, and economics. In many instances, such as the studies of patients' stress experiences in ICUs, these efforts enhanced our knowledge of the phenomena and complemented or replicated the efforts of nurse researchers. Unfortunately, in some areas nurse researchers were quite absent, with the result that the studies lacked a nursing perspective. For example, the large body of knowledge related to the effects of critical care on patient outcome reflected medicine's orientation toward cure. While it is important to measure the effect of nursing care in the ICU on patient survival, the effect of nursing efforts on short- and long-term quality of life, functional status, and health maintenance is also critical and remains unknown. Nurse researchers need to build on the data base already acquired about critical care. Even more important, they need to fashion programs of research focused on the concepts central to the discipline of nursing. A second similarity relates to the increasing quality of the reported research over the past decade. In general, early descriptive studies were conducted in a single critical care unit with a small and often biased sample. These gave way to more carefully designed, multicenter studies, although lack of randomization procedures continued to be

  1. [Family oriented nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquin Salvador; Lima-Serrano, Marta; Sáez-Bueno, Africa

    2009-01-01

    Nursing has experienced an important methodological development, in which it gives priority to the individual, although at a socioeconomic level a marked interest is seen in the health care of the family unit and the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) and NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) nursing guidelines, using diagnoses, criteria of results and interventions orientated towards this aim. We consider to the family as an opened system consisted of human elements, with a common history, which they form a functional unit been ruled by own procedure. In this paper we look at those aspects that must be taken into account in nursing assessment of families from a systemic perspective, including some tools for data collection and analysis of information. In addition, we identify specific areas of intervention. We believe that the family must be studied from a nursing care point of view with its own characteristics as opposed to those possessed individually by each of its members. We also believe that, when assessment is centred on the Henderson unaided activities study or the Gordon functional health patterns, they are not useful in assessing the family unit. This work offers an assessment method centred on the family unit, which helps to identify the nursing diagnoses applicable to it. Our proposal, which has been successfully used by nursing students over the last few years, hopes to contribute to quality clinical practice with a tool orientated towards the family.

  2. ICU nurses' experiences in providing terminal care.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Laura; Young, Anne; Symes, Lene; Haile, Brenda; Walsh, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    At least 1 in 5 Americans die while using intensive care service-a number that is expected to increase as society ages. Many of these deaths involve withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining therapies. In these situations, the role of intensive care nurses shifts from providing aggressive care to end-of-life care. While hospice and palliative care nurses typically receive specialized support to cope with death and dying, intensive care nurses usually do not receive this support. Understanding the experiences of intensive care nurses in providing care at the end of life is an important first step to improving terminal care in the intensive care unit (ICU). This phenomenological research study explores the experiences of intensive care nurses who provide terminal care in the ICU. The sample consisted of 18 registered nurses delivering terminal care in an ICU that participated in individual interviews and focus groups. Colaizzi's steps for data analysis were used to identify themes within the context of nursing. Three major themes consisted of (1) barriers to optimal care, (2) internal conflict, and (3) coping. Providing terminal care creates significant personal and professional struggles among ICU nurses.

  3. [Nursing ethics and the access to nursing care].

    PubMed

    Monteverde, Settimio

    2013-08-01

    The increasing number of ethical issues highlighted in everyday nursing care demonstrates the connectedness between nursing ethics and nursing practice. However, what is the role of ethical theories in this context? This question will be examined in this article by analysing the contribution made by the ethics of care, in particular in understandings of gender roles, asymmetries of power, professional knowledge and experience. The adoption and criticism of an emergent nursing ethics is discussed and stated from different viewpoints. The actuality of the caring approach is affirmed by a new reading of the given situation. This article first describes the traditional perception of nurses as marginalised actors in the health sector. By making reference to the current and growing global scarcity of nursing care, it contends that nursing will no longer be marginalised, but instead at the centre of public health attention and reputation. Nevertheless, marginalisation will persist by increasingly affecting the care receivers, especially those groups that are pushed to the fringes by the consequences of the healthcare market, such as persons of extreme old age, suffering from multiple morbidities, or with poor health literacy. Whereas the "classical" understanding of the ethics of care focuses on the nurse-patient relationship and on individual care and understanding of ethics, the new understanding confirms the classical, but adds an understanding of social ethics: caring for the access to care is seen as a main ethical goal of social justice within a nursing ethic.

  4. [Rehabilitation and nursing-care robots].

    PubMed

    Hachisuka, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    In the extremely aged society, rehabilitation staff will be required to provide ample rehabilitation training for more stroke patients and more aged people with disabilities despite limitations in human resources. A nursing-care robot is one potential solution from the standpoint of rehabilitation. The nursing-care robot is defined as a robot which assists aged people and persons with disabilities in daily life and social life activities. The nursing-care robot consists of an independent support robot, caregiver support robot, and life support robot. Although many nursing-care robots have been developed, the most appropriate robot must be selected according to its features and the needs of patients and caregivers in the field of nursing-care.

  5. Putting the 'care' back into aged care.

    PubMed

    Beadnell, Cathy

    2006-04-01

    Aged care is well and truly back on the political agenda in Australia. While the mainstream media has recently exposed a number of horrific cases of alleged abuse in aged care facilities it has done little to highlight the failings of social policy over time or to foster debate on how to improve the care of older Australians. What are the barriers to providing safe and quality aged care to a growing number of our citizens and how do we overcome them? If you relied on the recent media coverage for your impression of aged care you could be forgiven for thinking it is all bad news. But there are facilities providing high quality care and stories of nurses working wonders in the face of adversity. Cathy Beadnell considers some of the broader cultural and workforce issues in aged care.

  6. Nursing perspectives for intensive care.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, P

    1997-06-01

    Within health care, market forces increasingly determine what services have economic value. For nursing to survive this economic onslaught, nurses must clarify their values and roles. While nurses working in intensive care develop useful technical skills and normally work within a constructive multi-disciplinary team framework, they have a potentially unique contribution to care, focusing on the patient as a whole person rather than intervening to solve a problem. The need for both physiological and psychological care creates a need for holistic values, best achieved through humanistic perspectives. Humanistic nursing places patients as people at the centre of nursing care, as illustrated by the limitations of reality orientation compared with the potentials of validation therapy. Intensive care nurses asserting and developing such patient-centred roles offer a valuable way forward for nursing to develop into the 21st century.

  7. Nurses' uniform color and feelings/emotions in school-aged children receiving health care.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M; Burke, Jane; Bena, James F; Morrison, Shannon M; Forney, Jennifer; Krajewski, Susan

    2013-04-01

    Children may fear nurses wearing white uniforms. When emotions and uniform color were studied in 233 children, many positive emotions were most often associated with blue, bold pink-patterned, or yellow-patterned tops (all p ≤ .002). Negative emotions were not associated with uniform top colors (all p < .001). However, after excluding "uniform color does not matter," 8 negative emotions were most often associated with white uniform color (p < .001-.04), and 2 others were most often associated with the yellow-patterned top. Bold pink-patterned and solid blue uniform tops were preferred. In conclusion, children's emotions were associated with nurse uniform color.

  8. Nurses' Perceptions of Quality Care.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Catherine; Powlesland, Jean; Phillips, Cynthia; Raszewski, Rebecca; Johnson, Alexia; Banks-Enorense, Kelly; Agoo, Victor C; Nacorda-Beltran, Rosalind; Halloway, Shannon; Martin, Kathleen; Smith, Lenore D; Walczak, Debra; Warda, Jane; Washington, Barbara J; Welsh, Julie

    Limited research has been conducted on how nurses define or perceive "quality nursing care." We conducted focus groups to identify nurses' perceptions of quality care at a Midwestern academic medical center. Transcripts of the focus group sessions were analyzed using thematic analysis techniques, and 11 themes emerged: Leadership, Staffing, Resources, Timeliness, Effective Communication/Collaboration, Professionalism, Relationship-Based Care, Environment/Culture, Simplicity, Outcomes, and Patient Experience.

  9. Attracting and retaining nurses in HIV care.

    PubMed

    Puplampu, Gideon L; Olson, Karin; Ogilvie, Linda; Mayan, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Attracting and retaining nurses in HIV care is essential to treatment success, preventing the spread of HIV, slowing its progression, and improving the quality of life of people living with HIV. Despite the wealth of studies examining HIV care, few have focused on the factors that influenced nurses' choices to specialize in HIV care. We examined the factors that attracted and retained eight nurses currently working in HIV care in two large Canadian cities. Participants were primarily women between the ages of 20 and 60 years. Interviews were conducted between November 2010 and September 2011 using interpretive description, a qualitative design. Factors that influenced participants to focus their careers in HIV care included both attracting factors and retaining factors. Although more research is needed, this exploration of attracting and retaining factors may motivate others to specialize in HIV nursing, and thus help to promote adequate support for individuals suffering from the disease.

  10. Developing a public health policy-research nexus: an evaluation of Nurse Practitioner models in aged care.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Brenton; Clark, Shannon; Davey, Rachel; Parker, Rhian

    2013-10-01

    A frustration often expressed by researchers and policy-makers in public health is an apparent mismatch between respective priorities and expectations for research. Academics bemoan an oversimplification of their work, a reticence for independent critique and the constant pressure to pursue evaluation funding. Meanwhile, policy-makers look for research reports written in plain language with clear application, which are attuned to current policy settings and produced quickly. In a context where there are calls in western nations for evidence based policy with stronger links to academic research, such a mismatch can present significant challenges to policy program evaluation. The purpose of this paper is to present one attempt to overcome these challenges. Specifically, the paper describes the development of a conceptual framework for a large-scale, multifaceted evaluation of an Australian Government health initiative to expand Nurse Practitioner models of practice in aged care service delivery. In doing so, the paper provides a brief review of key points for the facilitation of a strong research-policy nexus in public health evaluations, as well as describes how this particular evaluation embodies these key points. As such, the paper presents an evaluation approach which may be adopted and adapted by others undertaking public health policy program evaluations.

  11. Growing ambulatory care nurse leaders in a multigenerational workforce.

    PubMed

    Moye, Janet P; Swan, Beth Ann

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory care faces challenges in sustaining a nursing workforce in the future as newly licensed nurses are heavily recruited to inpatient settings and retirements will impact ambulatory care sooner than other areas. Building a diverse team by recruiting nurses of different ages (generations) and skills may result in a more successful and robust organization. Knowledge about generational characteristics and preferences will aid nurse leaders and recruiters in attracting high-quality, talented nurses. Nurses of Generations X and Y can increase their likelihood of success in ambulatory care by better understanding intergenerational issues.

  12. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  13. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nursing care. 409.21 Section 409.21 Public Health... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.21 Nursing care. (a) Basic rule. Medicare pays for nursing care as posthospital SNF care when provided by or under the supervision of a...

  14. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nursing care. 409.21 Section 409.21 Public Health... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.21 Nursing care. (a) Basic rule. Medicare pays for nursing care as posthospital SNF care when provided by or under the supervision of a...

  15. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nursing care. 409.21 Section 409.21 Public Health... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.21 Nursing care. (a) Basic rule. Medicare pays for nursing care as posthospital SNF care when provided by or under the supervision of a...

  16. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nursing care. 409.21 Section 409.21 Public Health... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.21 Nursing care. (a) Basic rule. Medicare pays for nursing care as posthospital SNF care when provided by or under the supervision of a...

  17. Hospital variation in missed nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Tschannen, Dana; Lee, Hyunhwa; Friese, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Quality of nursing care across hospitals is variable, and this variation can result in poor patient outcomes. One aspect of quality nursing care is the amount of necessary care that is omitted. This article reports on the extent and type of nursing care missed and the reasons for missed care. The MISSCARE Survey was administered to nursing staff (n = 4086) who provide direct patient care in 10 acute care hospitals. Missed nursing care patterns as well as reasons for missing care (labor resources, material resources, and communication) were common across all hospitals. Job title (ie, registered nurse vs nursing assistant), shift worked, absenteeism, perceived staffing adequacy, and patient work loads were significantly associated with missed care. The data from this study can inform quality improvement efforts to reduce missed nursing care and promote favorable patient outcomes.

  18. [Neurologically critical patient. Nurses' care].

    PubMed

    López Díaz, Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Handling a neurologically critical patient requires some necessary knowledge and aptitudes in order to avoid risks and complications which could worsen a patient's prognosis. To that end, in this article the author deals with two important points nursing personnel need to bear in mind: the distinct methods and catheters which can be used to monitor intracranial pressure, obtaining an important parameter for evaluation purposes and therapeutic follow-up on these patients, placing special emphasis on ventricular drainage and nursing care, and the operations nurses take when dealing with patients who present a risk of intracranial hypertension, setting up a protocol based on seven necessities in the Virginia Henderson model: breathing, elimination, temperature, hygiene and skin, feeding and hydration, mobility and safety. In each of these necessities, the author studies the problems these patients present, identifying them with a series of diagnoses according to NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), and defining the care or nursing activities for each of them, which will prove essential to prevent cerebral ischemia after suffering a primary cerebral injury due to a "TCE"(Cranial Encephalic Trauma) hemorrhage, etc. Nurses' role in caring for neurologically critical patients proves to be of vital importance since these professionals must be capable of evaluating, preventing, controlling and identifying those risk situations which neurologically critical patients could present, avoiding possible complications, aiding their recuperation, and providing quality health care.

  19. The relationship between electronic nursing care reminders and missed nursing care.

    PubMed

    Piscotty, Ronald J; Kalisch, Beatrice

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore relationships between nurses' perceptions of the impact of health information technology on their clinical practice in the acute care setting, their use of electronic nursing care reminders, and episodes of missed nursing care. The study aims were accomplished with a descriptive design using adjusted correlations. A convenience sample (N = 165) of medical and/or surgical, intensive care, and intermediate care RNs working on acute care hospital units participated in the study. Nurses from 19 eligible nursing units were invited to participate. Adjusted relationships using hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated significant negative relationships between missed nursing care and nursing care reminders and perceptions of health information technology. The adjusted correlations support the hypotheses that there is a relationship between nursing care reminder usage and missed nursing care and a relationship between health information technology and missed nursing care. The relationships are negative, indicating that nurses who rate higher levels of reminder usage and health information technology have decreased reports of missed nursing care. The study found a significant relationship between nursing care reminders usage and decreased amounts of missed nursing care. The findings can be used in a variety of improvement endeavors, such as encouraging nurses to utilize nursing care reminders, aid information system designers when designing nursing care reminders, and assist healthcare organizations in assessing the impact of technology on nursing practice.

  20. Exploring Knowledge and Attitudes toward Aging among Nursing and Non-Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, Meredith Troutman; Clark, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing life expectancies and more years spent living with chronic illnesses mean that increasing numbers of older adults will require nursing care. However, most nurses prefer not to work with older adults, and many nursing students have limited knowledge and negative attitudes towards aging and older adults. This study examined the knowledge…

  1. [Compassionate care for student nurses].

    PubMed

    Cann, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    Nurses are practising in a work environment which is sometimes difficult and which can affect their capacity to supervise students. They may sometimes find themselves taking out their frustration on these students. By being better trained in the specificities of adult learning, frontline professionals and tutors could find it easier to adopt a compassionate care attitude towards nursing students, an essential condition for the development of their skills.

  2. Care: what nurses say and what nurses do.

    PubMed

    Warelow, Philip; Edward, Karen-Leigh; Vinek, Jeanette

    2008-01-01

    Caring is neither simply a set of attitudes or theories, nor does it comprise all that nurses do. Nursing care is determined by the way nurses use knowledge and skills to appreciate the uniqueness of the person they are caring for (changing the care noun into a caring verb). The purpose of this article is to present a range of contemporary nurse theorists' ideas on caring and to examine these ideas using the backdrop of nursing as practiced in both Australia and Canada to demonstrate a range of national and international similarities and theoretical beliefs. Caring relationships set up the conditions of trust that enable the one receiving the care to accept the help offered, underpinning the nurse-patient relationship or the therapeutic relationship. Caring is always specific and relational such as that found in the nurse-patient relationship. We believe that caring theory has much to offer nursing practice worldwide. Caring must be considered in the caring context because the nature of the caring relationship is central to most nursing interventions. Nurses need to be able to actually practice caring rather than just theorize about it-using caring theories to inform their practice.

  3. The personal impact of home-care nursing: an alternative perspective to home-care satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Porter, Eileen J

    2008-04-01

    In this phenomenological study, I aimed to describe the personal impact of home-care nursing and to compare the findings to domains of the construct of home-care satisfaction (HCS). I report data from interviews with 11 women (ages 82 to 96) who had home-care nurses during a 3-year period. None of the women mentioned satisfaction, but when asked about their nurses, they shared memorable incidents exemplifying how home-care nursing was relevant to their personal goals. Using a previously developed descriptive phenomenological method, I discerned this feature of personal-social context (or life-world) as the main finding: Being Aware of What Stands Out for Me About Having a Nurse at Home. This main finding had six descriptors, including Sensing that the Nurse Knows How to Do What Nurses Do and Linking the Nurse's Help to Sustaining Myself Here. I compared the findings to domains of HCS on three parameters, including evaluation of satisfaction versus relevance of nursing activities. I concluded that compared with satisfaction with home care, the personal impact of home-care nursing was a more basic interest to the women and that the perceived relevance of nursing activities is an important standard for appraising that impact. I recommend that researchers use phenomenological methods to discern life-world descriptors of the personal impact of home-care nursing and use those descriptors to develop indicators to measure the personal impact of home-care nursing.

  4. Leveraging data to transform nursing care: insights from nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Nincic, Vera; White, Peggy; Hayes, Laureen; Lo, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    A study was undertaken to gain insight into how nurse leaders are influencing the use of performance data to improve nursing care in hospitals. Two themes emerged: getting relevant, reliable, and timely data into the hands of nurses, and the leaders' ability to "connect the dots" in working with different stakeholders. Study findings may inform nurse leaders in their efforts to leverage data to transform nursing care.

  5. Swedish forensic nursing care: nurses' professional contributions and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Rask, Mikael; Aberg, Jonas

    2002-10-01

    Nurses (registered nurses, RN, and licensed mental nurses, LMN) working in five Swedish forensic psychiatric units filled in a questionnaire designed for general psychiatric nursing, but modified for forensic use. In this report, data regarding how nursing care could contribute to improved care and the organizational changes needed and what knowledge the nurses need, in order to be able to meet the demands in the future, were analysed by means of content analysis. The salient findings were: (i) an interpersonal patient-nurse relationship based on trust, empathy, respect and responsibility for the patients' personal resources and knowledge seems to be the essence of nursing care and a way to improve care; and (ii) the nurses' educational needs emanate from different treatment modalities, how to perform different treatments, how to establish developing relationships and in-service training adapted to the ward-specific problems.

  6. Health Instruction Packages: Nursing Care Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Dorcas S.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are provided in this set of learning modules to teach nurses and nursing students various patient care skills. The first module, "How to Write a Nursing Care Plan" by Dorcas S. Kowalski, discusses three tasks in developing patient care plans: identifying and prioritizing a patient's needs, gathering…

  7. The Professionalism of Critical Care Nurse Fellows After Completion of the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship Program.

    PubMed

    Castro, Emily; Click, Elizabeth; Douglas, Sara; Friedman, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is paramount to the formation and functioning of new graduate critical care nurses. In this project, a sample of 110 new graduate nurses used a descriptive self-report electronic survey with Hall's Professionalism Inventory Scale. A great percentage of these new graduate critical care nurse fellows with high professionalism scores may be related to their participation in the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship orientation program. Perhaps, Nursing Professional Development specialists should incorporate classes on professional advancement planning for new graduate nurses.

  8. [Nursing care in the perspective of complexity for nursing professors].

    PubMed

    Piexak, Diéssica Roggia; Backes, Dirce Stein; Santos, Silvana Sidney Costa

    2013-06-01

    The complex nursing care is essential for understanding the human being as unique and multidimensional. This study aimed at knowing what nursing care means to nurse-teachers in the perspective of complexity. It is a qualitative research, carried out with seven nurse-teachers of a nursing school from central Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data were collected in November 2011, through focus group,from three meetings, systematized with themes which considered the objective of this study. Discursive text analysis was used for data analysis. Results evinced nursing care as unique construction that goes beyond a technical-prescriptive, punctual and linear care. It is concluded that nursing care cannot be conceived as a reductionist action, but as a unique construction, which involves interactions, reflections and self-knowledge.

  9. Skin Care and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Care and Aging How Aging Affects Skin Your skin changes with age. It becomes thinner, ... to make it feel and look better. Dry Skin and Itching Click for more information Many older ...

  10. Attracting and retaining nurses in primary care.

    PubMed

    Drennan, Vari; Andrews, Sarah; Sidhu, Rajinder; Peacock, Richard

    2006-06-01

    There is increasing demand for nurses to work in primary care. This is driven in part by the need to retain current levels but also by the modernisation plans for primary care services, which require new roles for nurses, new ways of working and more nurses in primary care settings. While campaigns for increased recruitment of hospital nurses and doctors has been largely successful in recent years, primary care has still to see the impact. This article reports on a Department of Health (England) funded project that aimed to identify strategies and exemplars to assist primary care trusts (PCTs) and the workforce development confederations (WDCs) in strategic health authorities in attracting and retaining nurses to primary care at registered nurse level. It reports on the range of initiatives identified, the perceived benefits and challenges. It concludes by proposing a strategic model for planning for the recruitment and retention of primary care nurses.

  11. Clinical profile, nursing diagnoses and nursing care for postoperative bariatric surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Steyer, Nathalia Helene; Oliveira, Magáli Costa; Gouvêa, Mara Regina Ferreira; Echer, Isabel Cristina; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-03-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical profile, nursing diagnoses, and nursing care established for postoperative bariatric surgery patients. Method Cross-sectional study carried out in a hospital in southern Brazil with a sample of 143 patients. Data were collected retrospectively from electronic medical records between 2011 and 2012 and analyzed statistically. Results We found a predominance of adult female patients (84%) with class III obesity (59.4%) and hypertension (72%). Thirty-five nursing diagnoses were reported, among which the most frequent were: Acute Pain (99.3%), Risk for perioperative positioning injury (98.6%), and Impaired tissue integrity (93%). The most frequently prescribed nursing care were: to use protection mechanisms in the surgical patient positioning, to record pain as 5th vital sign, and to take vital signs. There was an association between age and comorbidities. Conclusion The nursing diagnoses supported the nursing care prescription, which enables the qualification of nursing assistance.

  12. Nursing Effort and Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Bershadsky, Julie; Degenholtz, Howard B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing home staffing level, care received by individual residents, and resident quality-related care processes and functional outcomes. Design and Methods: Nurses recorded resident care time for 5,314 residents on 156 units in 105 facilities in four states (Colorado,…

  13. Time Spent in Indirect Nursing Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    Part of the FY 83 Army Study Program and intended to augment the FY 81 completed study titled ’ Nursing Care Hours Standards’ by providing valid and...reliable percentages for hospital patient nursing care unit requirements (i.e., direct care, indirect care, and non-productive time). These data

  14. Nursing's role and staffing in accountable care.

    PubMed

    Mensik, Jennifer S

    2013-01-01

    Nurse staffing in a world of health care reform and accountable care is uncertain and creates fear not only for the nurse leaders, but all RNs. As health care reform transforms the environment, so must the role and staffing of nurses. There is still not one right answer or agreed upon manner to nurse staffing of inpatient units. This leaves nurses free to imagine roles and staffing possibilities for the future across the continuum. Including all RNs in conversations, visioning, and problem solving for the future will best prepare the profession for our role in caring for our patients.

  15. Perspectives on Age and Continuing Professional Development for Nurses: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pool, Inge A.; Poell, Rob F.; ten Cate, Th. J.

    2013-01-01

    The need for nurses to participate in continuing professional development (CPD) is growing to keep abreast of rapid changes in nursing care. Concurrently, the nursing workforce is growing older. Ageing leads to changes in biological, psychological, and social functioning. Little is known about the effects of age-related changes on nurses'…

  16. [Nursing care perspectives and foresights

    PubMed

    Lecordier, Didier; Jovic, Ljiljana

    2016-12-01

    As a continuation of its work and of the seminar on nursing sciences education in 2014, the “Association de recherche en soins infirmiers” (Arsi) organized a seminar on the 3rd and-4th of June 2016 in Nantes entitled : “nursing : perspectives and foresights”. More than fifty participants from the francophone area representing various sectors of practice : clinical, teaching, management and students gathered to debate and produce benchmarks to support the development of nursing sciences in France and to draw future directions for clinical practice and training. The successive sessions made it possible to reflect, to confront opinions, to make proposals and to identify the terms of the problematic of care and nursing knowledge today and the methodological elements relating to foresight. At the end of this very creative seminar, new avenues of reflection emerged shifting our usual look at the nurse profession. Orientations for training and practice have been defined with different stakes depending on the level of training and professional commitment. The strong links between professional, scientific and academic discipline have also been clarified, highlighting the importance to hold a high theoretical and scientific requirement, rigorous clinical practice, strong professional commitment and effective leadership.

  17. Knowledge management: organizing nursing care knowledge.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jane A; Willson, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Almost everything we do in nursing is based on our knowledge. In 1984, Benner (From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice. Menlo Park, CA: Addison-Wesley; 1984) described nursing knowledge as the culmination of practical experience and evidence from research, which over time becomes the "know-how" of clinical experience. This "know-how" knowledge asset is dynamic and initially develops in the novice critical care nurse, expands within competent and proficient nurses, and is actualized in the expert intensive care nurse. Collectively, practical "know-how" and investigational (evidence-based) knowledge culminate into the "knowledge of caring" that defines the profession of nursing. The purpose of this article is to examine the concept of knowledge management as a framework for identifying, organizing, analyzing, and translating nursing knowledge into daily practice. Knowledge management is described in a model case and implemented in a nursing research project.

  18. [Nursing care of pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Hautin, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The definition of a pressure ulcer remains very academic. It results from tissue necrosis following ischemia through prolonged arteriolar constriction between two hard surfaces progressing in stages. The nursing care and the use of dressings are therefore adapted to each stage. Today, the treatment of pressure ulcers is complex due to the large number of categories of dressings available. Moreover, the choice of the dressing must take into account the specificities of elderly patients. However, certain basic principles remain essential.

  19. Caring as an Imperative for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Patricia R.; Cullen, Janice A.

    2003-01-01

    An associate nursing degree program threads caring across the curriculum using Watson's framework of interpersonal/transpersonal processes for caring and a taxonomy of affective competencies. Ways of caring are integrated into classroom and clinical experiences. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  20. Delirium and older people: repositioning nursing care.

    PubMed

    Neville, Stephen

    2006-06-01

    Aims.  To critically examine the nursing care offered to older people who have been delirious. Background.  Delirium occurs as a result of physiological imbalances resulting in an alteration in consciousness and cognitive impairment. Delirium is a prevalent and serious cognitive disorder experienced by older people. While there is a vast number of studies published utilizing quantitative methods, there remains a dearth of research relating to delirium in older people from a qualitative perspective. Design.  A qualitative research design that utilized a critical gerontological framework underpinned this study. This framework drew on aspects of postmodernism and Foucault's understanding of discourse. Methods.  Data sources included published documents on delirium, semi-structured taped interviews with people over the age of 65 years who had been delirious (as well as their clinical notes), family members, Registered Nurses and a hospital doctor. A postmodern discourse analytic approach was used to interrogate the 20 sets of data collected. Findings.  Textual analysis revealed the presence of two major discourses impacting on being an older person with delirium. These were identified as a nursing discourse of delirium and a personal discourse of delirium. A nursing discourse of delirium was largely focussed on the biomedical processes that resulted in a delirious episode. Conversely, a personal discourse of delirium highlights that there are other ways of 'knowing' about delirium through considering the narratives of older adults, and their families, when offering a nursing service to this group of people. Relevance to clinical practice.  Nursing needs to critically examine all aspects of nursing care as it applies to older people who have delirium to ensure the rhetorical claims of the profession become the reality for consumers of health services. The use of critical gerontology provides nurses with the tools to challenge the status quo and uncover the

  1. Filipino Nurses' Spirituality and Provision of Spiritual Nursing Care.

    PubMed

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M; Achaso, Romeo H; Cachero, Geifsonne S; Mohammad, Mary Rose A

    2016-12-01

    This study was to explore the perceptions of Filipino nurses' spirituality and the provision of spiritual nursing care. A descriptive, cross-sectional, and quantitative study was adopted for this study. The study was conducted in the Philippines utilizing a convenience sample of 245 nurses. Nurses' Spirituality and Delivery of Spiritual Care (NSDSC) was used as the main instrument. The items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to nurses' perception of spirituality were Item 7, "I believe that God loves me and cares for me," and Item 8, "Prayer is an important part of my life," with mean scores of 4.87 (SD = 1.36) and 4.88 (SD = 1.34), respectively. Items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to the practice of spiritual care were Item 26, "I usually comfort clients spiritually (e.g., reading books, prayers, music, etc.)," and Item 25, "I refer the client to his/her spiritual counselor (e.g., hospital chaplain) if needed," with mean scores of 3.16 (SD = 1.54) and 2.92 (SD = 1.59). Nurse's spirituality correlated significantly with their understanding of spiritual nursing care (r = .3376, p ≤ .05) and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3980, p ≤ .05). Positive significant correlations were found between understanding of spiritual nursing care and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3289, p ≤ .05). For nurses to better provide spiritual nursing care, they must care for themselves through self-awareness, self-reflection, and developing a sense of satisfaction and contentment.

  2. The PRO nurse: advocate for quality care.

    PubMed

    Carroll, M; Maichele, J

    1993-01-01

    Since the inception of the Social Security Amendments of 1983, nurses have assumed expanded roles in ensuring the monitoring of the quality of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. This unique area of nursing practice offers new challenges and employment opportunities for the nurse as a patient advocate. Nurses who are interested in this role may contact state PRO directors or watch for specific recruitment advertisements in nursing magazines.

  3. Dependency in autonomous caring--night nurses' working conditions for caring in nursing.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Christine; Fagerberg, Ingegerd; Asp, Margareta

    2010-06-01

    Few research studies have focused on nurses' working conditions for caring provided at night, and these studies have mainly described nurses' work in hospital settings, not in a municipal, social-care context. In Swedish municipal care, nurses have responsibility for hundreds of older people in need of care. This working condition compromises caring encounters; instead the nurses' caring is mainly mediated through care staff (or relatives). In considering that caring based on caring encounters is fundamental to ethical nursing practice questions leads to the aim: to explore Swedish municipal night nurses' experiences of their working conditions for caring in nursing. All municipal night-duty nurses (n = 7) in a medium-sized community in Sweden participated in interviews, while six of them also wrote diaries. Thematic content analysis has been used in analysing the data. The findings revealed that the nurses experienced their working conditions for caring in nursing in the themes of Dependency in the Organisation and Other Staff, Vocational Responsibility, Deficiency in Conditions for Caring and Autonomous Caring. The findings illustrate privileged, as well as, poor working conditions for caring in nursing. The nurses' role as consultants emerge as their main function. The consultant function implies that nurses do not participate in ordinary bed-side caring, which makes it easier for them to find time for caring in situations that arise when nurses' skills, expertise and authority are called upon. Conversely the consultancy function entails short-term solution of complex caring problems, which can signify deficient caring due to prevailing working conditions. The findings also point to nurses' possible problems in fulfilling their own and vocational demands for ethics in the practice of caring in nursing related to existing working conditions.

  4. Nursing Care Value-Based Financial Models.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2015-01-01

    Nursing care makes up one of the largest expenditures in the health care system, yet patient-level nursing intensity and costs are essentially unknown. Prior efforts to define nursing care value have been stymied by a lack of available data; however, emerging information from electronic health records provide an opportunity to measure nursing care in ways that have not been possible. New metrics using these data will allow improved measurement of cost, quality, and intensity at the level of each nurse and patient across many different settings which can be used to inform operational and clinical decision making. In this article, the initial results and recommendations of an expert panel tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value as part of a larger effort to address evolving issues related to big data and nursing knowledge development are described.

  5. Findings From a Nursing Care Audit Based on the Nursing Process: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Poortaghi, Sarieh; Salsali, Mahvash; Ebadi, Abbas; Rahnavard, Zahra; Maleki, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although using the nursing process improves nursing care quality, few studies have evaluated nursing performance in accordance with nursing process steps either nationally or internationally. Objectives: This study aimed to audit nursing care based on a nursing process model. Patients and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which a nursing audit checklist was designed and validated for assessing nurses’ compliance with nursing process. A total of 300 nurses from various clinical settings of Tehran university of medical sciences were selected. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequencies, Pearson correlation coefficient and independent samples t-tests. Results: The compliance rate of nursing process indicators was 79.71 ± 0.87. Mean compliance scores did not significantly differ by education level and gender. However, overall compliance scores were correlated with nurses’ age (r = 0.26, P = 0.001) and work experience (r = 0.273, P = 0.001). Conclusions: Nursing process indicators can be used to audit nursing care. Such audits can be used as quality assurance tools. PMID:26576448

  6. Caring as therapeutic in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Higgins, B

    1996-03-01

    Caring outcomes in practice depend on a caring teaching-learning process. A transformation in thinking and practice in nursing education, that is congruent with the values of caring is essential to develop the kind of nurses that are needed in today's health care system. A project to implement caring as a nursing therapeutic with associate degree nursing students was initiated in a community college of Western New York in the fall of 1993. Watson's carative factors (1988) and Carper's ways of knowing (1978) were utilized as a framework to develop caring strategies to awaken a caring-consciousness among the students. The goals of the project were to provide a caring space for students to dialogue and share their stories and to experience themselves as caring and cared for; and to value and practice caring by implementing creative, knowledgeable, intentional actions for the ultimate good of the patient.

  7. Nursing Advocacy in a Post-Genomic Age

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Rebekah

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The Human Genome Project will change how health is defined and how disease is prevented, diagnosed and treated. As the largest group of health care providers in contact with patients nurses need to be competent in the science of genetics. Beyond this nurses need to understand the complexities that arise in genomic health care. Ethical, legal and social issues are integral to the delivery of genomic health care and nurses must have an astute understanding of such complexities. What it means to know, to reason and to act in this post-genomic age is explored. PMID:19850180

  8. Perceptions of "Nursing" and "Nursing Care" in the United States by Dutch Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haloburdo, Esther P.; Thompson, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    In the opinions of 11 Dutch nursing students on a study tour of the United States, the U.S. emphasizes technical aspects of nursing and medical over nursing care, lacks team nursing and collegiality, and has a litigious environment. These negative images have implications for the use of U.S. nursing as a benchmark for global education and…

  9. Measuring nursing care and compassion: the McDonaldised nurse?

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, A

    2009-08-01

    In June 2008 the UK government, supported by the Royal College of Nursing, stated that nursing care would be measured for compassion. This paper considers the implications of this statement by critically examining the relationship of compassion to care from a variety of perspectives. It is argued that the current market-driven approaches to healthcare involve redefining care as a pale imitation, even parody, of the traditional approach of the nurse as "my brother's keeper". Attempts to measure such parody can only measure artificial techniques and give rise to a McDonald's-type nursing care rather than heartfelt care. The arguments of this paper, although applied to nursing, also apply to medicine and healthcare generally.

  10. Nursing Care Management: Influence on Bundled Payments.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Shaynie; Luther, Brenda

    Fragmented and uncoordinated care is the third highest driver of U.S. healthcare costs. Although less than 10% of patients experience uncoordinated care, these patients represent 36% of total healthcare costs; care management interaction makes a significant impact on the utilization of healthcare dollars. A literature search was conducted to construct a model of care coordination for elective surgical procedures by collecting best practices for acute, transitions, and post-acute care periods. A case study was used to demonstrate the model developed. Care management defines care coordination as a model of care to address improving patient and caregiver engagement, communication across settings of care, and ultimately improved patient outcomes of care. Nurse-led care coordination in the presurgical, inpatient, and post-acute care settings requires systems change and administrative support to effectively meet the goals of the Affordable Care Act of reducing redundancy and costs while improving the patient experience. Nursing is the lynchpin of care management processes in all settings of care; thus, this model of care coordination for elective surgical admissions can provide nursing care management leaders a comprehensive view of coordinating care for these patient across settings of care during the predetermined time period of care. As bundled payment structures increasingly affect hospital systems, nursing leaders need to be ready to create or improve their care management processes; care coordination is one such process requiring immediate attention.

  11. Multicultural Nursing: Providing Better Employee Care.

    PubMed

    Rittle, Chad

    2015-12-01

    Living in an increasingly multicultural society, nurses are regularly required to care for employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds. An awareness of cultural differences focuses occupational health nurses on those differences and results in better employee care. This article explores the concept of culturally competent employee care, some of the non-verbal communication cues among cultural groups, models associated with completing a cultural assessment, and how health disparities in the workplace can affect delivery of employee care. Self-evaluation of the occupational health nurse for personal preferences and biases is also discussed. Development of cultural competency is a process, and occupational health nurses must develop these skills. By developing cultural competence, occupational health nurses can conduct complete cultural assessments, facilitate better communication with employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and improve employee health and compliance with care regimens. Tips and guidelines for facilitating communication between occupational health nurses and employees are also provided.

  12. Spiritual nursing care: A concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Monareng, Lydia V

    2012-10-08

    Although the concept 'spiritual nursing care' has its roots in the history of the nursing profession, many nurses in practice have difficulty integrating the concept into practice. There is an ongoing debate in the empirical literature about its definition, clarity and application in nursing practice. The study aimed to develop an operational definition of the concept and its application in clinical practice. A qualitative study was conducted to explore and describe how professional nurses render spiritual nursing care. A purposive sampling method was used to recruit the sample. Individual and focus group interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Trustworthiness was ensured through strategies of truth value, applicability, consistency and neutrality. Data were analysed using the NUD*IST power version 4 software, constant comparison, open, axial and selective coding. Tech's eight steps of analysis were also used, which led to the emergence of themes, categories and sub-categories. Concept analysis was conducted through a comprehensive literature review and as a result 'caring presence' was identified as the core variable from which all the other characteristics of spiritual nursing care arise. An operational definition of spiritual nursing care based on the findings was that humane care is demonstrated by showing caring presence, respect and concern for meeting the needs not only of the body and mind of patients, but also their spiritual needs of hope and meaning in the midst of health crisis, which demand equal attention for optimal care from both religious and nonreligious nurses.

  13. Development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model

    PubMed Central

    Garwick, Ann W.; Svavarsdóttir, Erla Kolbrun; Seppelt, Ann M.; Looman, Wendy S.; Anderson, Lori S.; Örlygsdóttir, Brynja

    2015-01-01

    Aim To identify and compare how school nurses in Reykjavik, Iceland and St. Paul, Minnesota coordinated care for youth with asthma (ages 10–18) and to develop an asthma school nurse care coordination model. Background Little is known about how school nurses coordinate care for youth with asthma in different countries. Design A qualitative descriptive study design using focus group data. Methods Six focus groups with 32 school nurses were conducted in Reykjavik (n=17) and St. Paul (n=15) using the same protocol between September 2008 – January 2009. Descriptive content analytic and constant comparison strategies were used to categorize and compare how school nurses coordinated care, which resulted in the development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model. Findings Participants in both countries spontaneously described a similar asthma care coordination process that involved information gathering, assessing risk for asthma episodes, prioritizing health care needs and anticipating and planning for student needs at the individual and school levels. This process informed how they individualized symptom management, case management and/or asthma education. School nurses played a pivotal part in collaborating with families, school and health care professionals to ensure quality care for youth with asthma. Conclusions Results indicate a high level of complexity in school nurses’ approaches to asthma care coordination that were responsive to the diverse and changing needs of students in school settings. The conceptual model derived provides a framework for investigators to use in examining the asthma care coordination process of school nurses in other geographic locations. PMID:25223389

  14. Spiritual Experiences of Muslim Critical Care Nurses.

    PubMed

    Bakir, Ercan; Samancioglu, Sevgin; Kilic, Serap Parlar

    2017-03-24

    The purpose of this study was to determine the experiences and perceptions of intensive care nurses (ICNs) about spirituality and spiritual care, as well as the effective factors, and increase the sensitivity to the subject. In this study, we examined spiritual experiences, using McSherry et al. (Int J Nurs Stud 39:723-734, 2002) Spirituality and spiritual care rating scale (SSCRS), among 145 ICNs. 44.8% of the nurses stated that they received spiritual care training and 64.1% provided spiritual care to their patients. ICNs had a total score average of 57.62 ± 12.00 in SSCRS. As a consequence, it was determined that intensive care nurses participating in the study had insufficient knowledge about spirituality and spiritual care, but only the nurses with sufficient knowledge provided the spiritual care to their patients.

  15. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs

    PubMed Central

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. Method: descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. Results: 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. Conclusion: the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. PMID:27508902

  16. Spirituality in nursing: nurses' perceptions about providing spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    Providing spiritual care is an important foundation of nursing and is a requirement mandated by accreditation organizations. Spiritual care is essential in all clinical areas but particularly in home care and hospice. Clinicians may be unable to respond to spiritual needs because of inadequate education or the assumption that spiritual needs should be addressed by clergy, chaplains, or other "spiritual" care providers. In reality, clinicians in the home may be in the best position to offer spiritual support when caring for patients at home at end of life. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine relationships between spirituality and nurses' providing spiritual care. Professional nurses (n = 69) working in 2 large healthcare organizations completed the Perceptions of Spiritual Care Questionnaire. Approximately, 33% of the nurses worked in home care. Significant correlations were found among those nurses whose reported nursing education programs adequately prepared them to meet spiritual needs and taught ways to incorporate spiritual care into practice and those who did not.

  17. Mentoring: nurturing the critical care nurse.

    PubMed

    Caine, R M

    1990-12-01

    Mentoring is an active process that is currently receiving widespread attention in education, in the corporate world, and increasingly in health care. Job satisfaction of the critical care nurse may be related to the fulfillment of personal needs and goals. The attainment of these needs and goals ultimately will lead to increased job productivity, which in turn will promote cost-effectiveness, an outcome cherished by management. Therefore, recognizing the worth of job satisfaction to the institution and the possibility that mentoring may have an effect on it among the professional staff may be a key to the future of improved health care and cost reduction in an increasingly specialized and technologic health care environment. Certainly, the nursing shortage is no longer news to the lay public or those of us engaged in the practice of nursing. In critical care that shortage is acutely apparent. Attrition of qualified critical care nurses is increasing and various solutions to the shortage have been proposed, some being met with more enthusiasm than others. A more basic solution might be to answer the question, "How can we maintain a high quality of patient care while promoting job satisfaction and instilling a sense of self-worth within the critical care nurse?" Critical care nurses need to play a pivotal role in nurturing and developing other critical care nurses as a means to retain those individuals. How can they do that effectively? Mentoring is one answer.

  18. Pediatric nurse educator shortage: implications for the nursing care of children.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Barbara J; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Rose, Diane; Christy, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Maternal and child health (MCH) nurses are vital to caring for the nation's infants, children, and adolescents. A shortage of pediatric nursing educators has important consequences for the preparation of the next generation of MCH nurses. A Web-based survey of administrators and pediatric nursing faculty from U.S. schools of nursing with baccalaureate and advanced degree programs was conducted to assess perceptions of a pediatric nursing faculty shortage, and implications and solutions to such a shortage. Deans (n = 191) and pediatric faculty (n = 237) from schools of nursing responded to the survey. Institutions are representative of the 660 schools of nursing across the United States. Fifty percent of deans and 70% of pediatric nursing faculty members reported a shortage of pediatric nursing faculty. Large, public institutions (total school student enrollment over 15,000) expressed the most concern. The educational impact of the reported shortage included increased faculty workload, difficulty getting appropriate clinical practice settings, elimination of acute care clinical experiences, and reduction in pediatric content in curricula. Expected retirements of the current workforce (76% were over 45 years of age) without an increase in replacements will deepen the shortage in the coming decade. Pediatric faculty members focused on the need for competitive salaries (particularly compared to clinical salaries) and active mentoring programs as important factors in recruitment and retention of new faculty. Recommendations for stemming the decline in availability of pediatric nursing faculty are provided.

  19. Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Michele J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

  20. Wound Care Nursing: Professional Issues and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Lisa Q.

    2012-01-01

    As the field of wound care advances and seeks validity as a distinctive healthcare specialty, it becomes imperative to define practice competencies for all related professionals in the arena. As such, the myriad nurses practicing wound care in settings across the continuum should be understood for their unique contribution to the wound care team. Furthermore, the hierarchy of wound care nursing with varying levels of licensure, certification, and scope of practice can be clarified to delineate leadership and reimbursement issues to meet current health care challenges. A review of the role of nursing in wound care from a historical and evolutionary perspective helps to characterize the trend towards advanced practice nursing in the wound care specialty. PMID:24527304

  1. Art, science, or both? Keeping the care in nursing.

    PubMed

    Jasmine, Tayray

    2009-12-01

    Nursing is widely considered as an art and a science, wherein caring forms the theoretical framework of nursing. Nursing and caring are grounded in a relational understanding, unity, and connection between the professional nurse and the patient. Task-oriented approaches challenge nurses in keeping care in nursing. This challenge is ongoing as professional nurses strive to maintain the concept, art, and act of caring as the moral center of the nursing profession. Keeping the care in nursing involves the application of art and science through theoretical concepts, scientific research, conscious commitment to the art of caring as an identity of nursing, and purposeful efforts to include caring behaviors during each nurse-patient interaction. This article discusses the profession of nursing as an art and a science, and it explores the challenges associated with keeping the care in nursing.

  2. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  3. Critical care nursing: Embedded complex systems.

    PubMed

    Trinier, Ruth; Liske, Lori; Nenadovic, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Variability in parameters such as heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure defines healthy physiology and the ability of the person to adequately respond to stressors. Critically ill patients have lost this variability and require highly specialized nursing care to support life and monitor changes in condition. The critical care environment is a dynamic system through which information flows. The critical care unit is typically designed as a tree structure with generally one attending physician and multiple nurses and allied health care professionals. Information flow through the system allows for identification of deteriorating patient status and timely interventionfor rescue from further deleterious effects. Nurses provide the majority of direct patient care in the critical care setting in 2:1, 1:1 or 1:2 nurse-to-patient ratios. The bedside nurse-critically ill patient relationship represents the primary, real-time feedback loop of information exchange, monitoring and treatment. Variables that enhance information flow through this loop and support timely nursing intervention can improve patient outcomes, while barriers can lead to errors and adverse events. Examining patient information flow in the critical care environment from a dynamic systems perspective provides insights into how nurses deliver effective patient care and prevent adverse events.

  4. Oncology Nurse Participation in Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Oncology nurses are playing an important role in the provision of survivorship care. Their involvement includes educating and coordinating multidiscipline teams to initiate and provide care to patients and families. Oncology nurses participate in this evolving model of care in a variety of ways. Using the IOM report recommendations for the provision of quality cancer care nurses provide care based on the specific characteristics of individual health care settings and the populations they serve. Evaluating the settings resources and goals for desired survivorship activities as part of the planning process can be the difference between success and failure. Collaborating with local and national resources for cancer survivors can help expand services for a setting in an efficient and cost effective manner. Models of care vary and resources and communication differs among cancer care settings. Survivorship care differs as a result, across different models. Nurses are key to the dissemination and coordination of survivorship activities and are critical in facilitating communication between health care providers, the patients and caregivers. Nurses have a significant role in the dissemination and coordination of information between the patient and other health care providers. Oncology care does not end when treatment ends. PMID:21112849

  5. Technological Advances in Nursing Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Debra Henline

    2015-12-01

    Technology is rapidly changing the way nurses deliver patient care. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 encourages health care providers to implement electronic health records for meaningful use of patient information. This development has opened the door to many technologies that use this information to streamline patient care. This article explores current and new technologies that nurses will be working with either now or in the near future.

  6. An Assessment of Nursing Attitudes toward Computers in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carl, David L.; And Others

    The attitudes and perceptions of practicing nurses, student nurses, and nurse educators toward computerization of health care were assessed using questionnaires sent to two general hospitals and five nursing education programs. The sample consisted of 83 first-year nursing students, 84 second-year nursing students, 52 practicing nurses, and 26…

  7. Sleep and nursing care activities in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Ritmala-Castren, Marita; Virtanen, Irina; Leivo, Sanna; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the quality of sleep of non-intubated patients and the night-time nursing care activities in an intensive care unit. The study also aimed to evaluate the effect of nursing care activities on the quality of sleep. An overnight polysomnography was performed in 21 alert, non-intubated, non-sedated adult patients, and all nursing care activities that involved touching the patient were documented by the bedside nurse. The median (interquartile range) amount of sleep was 387 (170, 486) minutes. The portion of deep non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep varied from 0% to 42% and REM sleep from 0% to 65%. The frequency of arousals and awakenings varied from two to 73 per hour. The median amount of nursing care activities was 0.6/h. Every tenth activity presumably awakened the patient. Patients who had more care activities had more light N1 sleep, less light N2 sleep, and less deep sleep. Nursing care was often performed while patients were awake. However, only 31% of the intervals between nursing care activities were over 90 min. More attention should be paid to better clustering of care activities.

  8. The shortage of nurses and nursing faculty: what critical care nurses can do.

    PubMed

    Siela, Debra; Twibell, K Renee; Keller, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    Nurses are needed more than ever to support the healthcare needs of every American. Nurses make up the greatest single component of hospital staff. In 2004, of the almost 3 million nurses in the United States, 83% were employed in nursing, and 58% of those were employed full-time. However, a severe shortage of nurses exists nationwide, putting the safe, effective healthcare of Americans in jeopardy. The concurrent shortage of nursing faculty has significant impact on the potential for admitting and graduating sufficient numbers of nursing students to address the shortage of prepared nurses. A close examination of the demographics of the 3 million nurses provides a context for an in-depth discussion of strategies that critical care nurses can employ to help alleviate the nursing and nurse faculty shortages.

  9. Development of a nursing workload measurement instrument in burn care.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Alette E E; Leeman, Jolan; Middelkoop, Esther

    2009-11-01

    Existing workload measurement instruments fail to represent specific nursing activities in a setting where patients are characterized by a diversity of cause, location, extent and depth of burns, of age and of history. They also do not include educational levels and appropriate time standards. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable measurement instrument for nursing workload in burn care, in order to match quality of patient care with staffing needs. In the first phase, a time study by semi-structured interviews and observations was used to assess direct and indirect care activities. A total of 34 nursing activities were identified, defined, connected to educational levels and attached to time standards. Two independent raters completed a test computer program by assessing performed nursing activities in 36 patients. This yielded intra-class correlations of 0.82, indicating good reliability. In the second phase, a computer program was developed to process quantity and quality of available staff and the sum of time standards of nursing activities per patient per day and to calculate the balance. After 1 year of running this program, the database was used to distinguish patients' care demand into five care categories. This instrument justifies the investment of time by nursing staff needed for daily activities in the burn unit. It provides quick insight into the balance between care demand and staffing needs and can be used to optimise resource planning.

  10. [Healthcare needs of the aged: perspectives for nursing].

    PubMed

    Lima, Cristina Alves de; Tocantins, Florence Romjin

    2009-01-01

    This study has as central thematic the healthcare need of the aged. It was established as aims: to understand the expectations of the aged one who experiences nursing actions in primary health care and to point out at healthcare need of the aged one in this context. It was developed through the theoretical and methodological approach of the phenomenological sociology of Alfred Schutz. It was used a phenomenology interview with aged persons having as question: which are your expectations about the nursing professionals? Two lived categories emerged: to find the other (human) in the nursing professional attitude and to establish relationships with other persons. The study points out at the importance of the named none-technical nursing actions as health needs.

  11. How Many Sides Does a Coin Have? A Phenomenology of Filipino Nurses' Motivation and Attitudes toward Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dangoy, Reena-Jane D.; David, Kathleen Christian V.; Dayo, Ken Jarrett H.; de Claro, Keisha A.; de Guzman, Giorgio von Gerri G.; de Jesus, Gerald Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Nurses play a significant role in geriatric care. However, as the aging population and demand for geriatric nurses increase worldwide, shortages of nurses seem to arise. This creates the need to assess and address the motivation and attitudes of nurses toward geriatric care. The intent of this qualitative study is to surface the essence or the…

  12. An Intervention to Improve the Oral Health of Residents in an Aged Care Facility Led by Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinkhorn, F. A.; Weingarten, L.; Boivin, L.; Plain, J.; Kay, M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The growing population of elderly people is impacting on overstretched dental services in many countries, as many individuals are retaining natural teeth and may have dentures or implants, all of which influence the way in which the oral cavity must be cared for. A major difficulty for older residents is their decreasing level of…

  13. Meaning of spiritual care: Iranian nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Tirgari, Batool; Iranmanesh, Sedigheh; Ali Cheraghi, Mohammad; Arefi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Spiritual care is an essential component in nursing practice and strongly influenced by the sociocultural context. This article aimed to elucidate the meaning of nurses' experiences of giving spiritual care in southeast of Iran. A phenomenological hermeneutic approach influenced by Ricoeur was used. Eleven staff nurses who were currently working in the 3 major hospitals under the umbrella of the Kerman University of Medical Sciences were interviewed. The meaning of spiritual care was comprehensively understood as meeting patient as a unique being. This can be divided into 3 themes: meeting patient as a being in relationship, meeting patient as a cultural being, and meeting patient as a religious being. The results in this study suggest that education about spirituality and spiritual care should be included in the continuous and in-service education of registered nurses. Spiritual and cultural assessment criteria should be included in this education to improve the provision of holistic care.

  14. Critical care unit design: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Williams, M

    2001-11-01

    The task of designing a new critical care unit is best accomplished with the input of people representing multiple disciplines including architects, engineers, physicians, nurses, and equipment manufacturers. It is imperative that the critical care nursing staff and management take an active role in planning the layout of the unit and patient rooms, as the nurses will be the bedside providers 24 hours a day. The new unit should be designed to offer efficient patient care as well as a healing, comfortable environment for both the patients and their families.

  15. Advanced nurse roles in UK primary care.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, Bonnie; Laurant, Miranda G; Reeves, David

    2006-07-03

    Nurses increasingly work as substitutes for, or to complement, general practitioners in the care of minor illness and the management of chronic diseases. Available research suggests that nurses can provide as high quality care as GPs in the provision of first contact and ongoing care for unselected patients. Reductions in cost are context dependent and rarely achieved. This is because savings on nurses' salaries are often offset by their lower productivity (due to longer consultations, higher patient recall rates, and increased use of tests and investigations). Gains in efficiency are not achieved when GPs continue to provide the services that have been delegated to nurses, instead of focusing on the services that only doctors can provide. Unintended consequences of extending nursing roles include loss of personal continuity of care for patients and increased difficulties with coordination of care as the multidisciplinary team size increases. Rapid access to care is, however, improved. There is a high capital cost involved in moving to multidisciplinary teams because of the need to train staff in new ways of working; revise legislation governing scope of practice; address concerns about legal liability; and manage professional resistance to change. Despite the unintended consequences and the high costs, extending nursing roles in primary care is a plausible strategy for improving service capacity without compromising quality of care or health outcomes for patients.

  16. Nursing students' perceptions about nursing care plans: a Turkish perspective.

    PubMed

    Can, Gulbeyaz; Erol, Ozgul

    2012-02-01

    This descriptive study was planned in order to assess self-perceived sufficiency levels of nursing students at preparing nursing care plans and also determine the effect of these plans on students' occupational development. Sample of the study was consisted of 55 nursing students who were taking oncological training. Data were collected by using Personal Information Form and Student Care Plan Evaluation Form. Non-parametric tests were used in data analysis. Students perceived themselves 'insufficient' although assessing reproductive neurological and cardiovascular systems, respectively, and also interpreting results of hemogram and urine tests. No significant difference was found between the initial and last nursing care plans prepared by the students during clinical training. Sixty % of students reported that preparing and implementing nursing care plans had favourable effects on their occupational development. Results suggest that students should be well prepared before clinical training programmes and also nursing care plans should be revised and used in more proper and practical ways in order to enhance students' occupational development.

  17. Graduate nurses' perceptions of a critical care nurse internship program.

    PubMed

    Eigsti, Janice E

    2009-01-01

    Graduate nurse internship programs (NIPs) have existed for a number of years as tools for recruiting and retaining nurses. A recent literature review uncovers the rare NIP dedicated to orienting the graduate nurse to a critical care environment. Few have addressed the nurse interns' perceptions of these programs. Ongoing evaluation is vital to improving existing programs and giving credence to other hospitals with similar initiatives. A retrospective descriptive design study with the purpose of disclosing the critical care graduate nurse interns' perceptions of the critical care NIP at Elkhart General Hospital, a 330-bed community hospital in Elkhart, Indiana, provided information for this study. Patricia Benner's novice-to-expert model served as the theoretical framework. The critical care NIP questionnaire provided satisfaction scores for program components. Mean scores between groups were explored using the t test. Mean satisfaction score for the overall program was 5.62 (SD = 0.371), with a retention rate of 76.9% (20 of 26). Statistically significant differences in satisfaction scores were not found in this pilot study between nurse interns currently working in critical care and those who are not.

  18. Nurse Communication About Goals of Care.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ferrell, Betty; Goldsmith, Joy; Buller, Haley; Neiman, Tammy

    2016-03-01

    Conversations about goals of care with the patient and family are a critical component of advanced practice in oncology. However, there are often inadequate team structures, training, or resources available to assist advanced practitioners in initiating these conversations. We conducted a study to assess nurses' perceived role and communication tasks in such conversations about goals of care. In a cross-sectional survey of 109 nurses attending a comprehensive 2-day end-of-life nursing education course, nurses were asked to describe how they would participate in a "goals of care" meeting in three different scenarios. They were also asked what changes they desired in their clinical settings. Nurses overwhelmingly described that their primary task and communication role was to assess patient/family understanding. Nurses referenced their team members and team support with the least frequency across scenarios. Team roles, structure, and process were reported as areas in greatest need of change in patient/family goals of care meetings. These findings demonstrate that lack of preparation to function as a team is a barrier for nurses in communicating about goals of care, and there is a demand to move such conversations upstream in oncology care.

  19. Rethinking Teaching Nursing Homes: Potential for Improving Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mezey, Mathy D.; Mitty, Ethel L.; Burger, Sarah Green

    2008-01-01

    To meet the special needs of and provide quality health care to nursing home residents, the health care workforce must be knowledgeable about the aging process. Health professionals are minimally prepared in their academic programs to care for older adults, and few programs have required rotations in geriatrics. Teaching nursing homes (TNHs) have…

  20. EMPLOYEES IN NURSING AND PERSONAL CARE HOMES, UNITED STATES, MAY-JUNE 1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    USING DATA COLLECTED IN A SAMPLE SURVEY OF RESIDENT INSTITUTIONS WHICH PROVIDE NURSING OR PERSONAL CARE TO THE AGED OR CHRONICALLY ILL, EMPLOYEES WERE DESCRIBED IN TERMS OF AGE AND SEX, JOB CATEGORIES, HOURS WORKED PER WEEK, FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STAFF, AND RATIO OF RESIDENTS TO EMPLOYEES. SOME FINDINGS WERE--(1) NURSING AND PERSONAL CARE HOMES…

  1. Unfinished nursing care: An important performance measure for nursing care systems.

    PubMed

    VanFosson, Christopher A; Jones, Terry L; Yoder, Linda H

    2016-01-01

    Performance measurement is a core administrative function and an essential component of organizational quality programs. The prevalence of performance measurement initiatives increased significantly after the release of the Institute of Medicine series on quality. Nursing performance measures are limited in their scope, resulting in an underrepresentation of process measures. Development of performance indicators that reflect how effectively organizational units actually transform nursing resources into nursing services should be a high priority. Unfinished nursing care is a nursing process performance measure that reflects the complexity of the nursing care environment and can be useful in comparing process performance across systems and organizations. Unfinished nursing care is congruent with many of the National Quality Forum requirements for endorsement and warrants further refinement as an important nurse-sensitive performance measure.

  2. Survey of Canadian critical care nurses' experiences of conflict in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marie; Throndson, Karen; Girardin, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance our understanding of Canadian critical care nurses' experiences of and responses to situations of conflict in the ICU. Through a 35-item web-based survey, members of the Canadian Association of Critical Care Nurses were asked questions regarding the types, causes and frequency of conflict experienced, the nursing interventions found most helpful in situations of conflict, and the resources found most helpful in responding to situations of conflict. A total of 241 nurses responded to the survey. The mean age of the nurses was 43 years, and the majority were female (89.2%), direct care providers (66.4%), with greater than 11 years of experience in critical care (58.3%), and working in medical/surgical ICUs (66.4%) in tertiary care hospitals (67.2%). Approximately 51% of the nurses reported being involved in at least one situation of conflict related to the management of a patient in the last week worked. The most common types of conflict encountered were disagreements between the team and family (46.5%) or within the team (35.3%). The nurses acknowledged the importance of clear, consistent and honest communication with patients and families when conflict arises and rank-ordered the resources found most helpful to patients, families, and nurses in conflict situations. Implications for practice and education are discussed and recommendations for future research are outlined.

  3. Nursing Titles and Health Care Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erceg, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Recommends choosing appropriate health care providers for camp, and referring to them by the title their credentials warrant. Explains distinctions among nursing titles and that they vary by state. Discusses developing a health care plan suited to camp's population, program, and location. Presents guidelines required of a health care plan by…

  4. [Nursing care at home and secularism].

    PubMed

    Lecointre, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    The question of secularism, long-time confined to schools and the relationships between the Church and State, is today being raised in the field of public health. Nurses are directly affected and are integrating this dimension of secularism into their care practices. A private practice nurse describes the effect these changes are having on her practice in patients' homes.

  5. [Professionals' training and refusal of nursing care].

    PubMed

    Bay, Corinne

    2016-10-01

    A patient's refusal of nursing care concerns the caregivers. Future professionals must be prepared for it and student nurses are trained to deal with such situations. It is also important to empower patients and support them in their choice. This article presents the example of the Haute École Robert Schuman in Libramont, Belgium.

  6. Missed nursing care: errors of omission.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Landstrom, Gay; Williams, Reg Arthur

    2009-01-01

    This study examines what and why nursing care is missed. A sample of 459 nurses in 3 hospitals completed the Missed Nursing Care (MISSCARE) Survey. Assessment was reported to be missed by 44% of respondents while interventions, basic care, and planning were reported to be missed by > 70% of the survey respondents. Reasons for missed care were labor resources (85%), material resources (56%), and communication (38%). A comparison of the hospitals showed consistency across all 3 hospitals. Associate degree nurses reported more missed care than baccalaureate-prepared and diploma-educated nurses. The results of this study lead to the conclusion that a large proportion of all hospitalized patients are being placed in jeopardy because of missed nursing care or errors of omission. Furthermore, changes in Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations which will eliminate payment for acute care services when any one of a common set of complications occurs, such as pressure ulcers and patient falls, point to serious cost implications for hospitals.

  7. Barriers to Care for Depressed Older People: Perceptions of Aged Care among Medical Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Marita P.; Davison, Tanya; Mellor, David; George, Kuruvilla

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated barriers to detection of depression among older people. Focus groups were conducted with 21 professional carers, 4 nurses, 10 general practitioners, and 7 aged care managers. The results demonstrated that care for older people is primarily focused on physical care. Further, staff resources, a lack of continuity of care,…

  8. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  9. [Hospitality as an expression of nursing care].

    PubMed

    Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho; Waterkemper, Roberta; Kempfer, Silvana Silveira; Carraro, Telma Elisa; Radünz, Vera

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative research whose purpose was to reflect and argue about the relationship between hospitality, care and nursing according to experiences of PhD students. The research was developed from theoretic and practical meeting carried through by disciplines "the care in Nursing and Health" of PhD nursing Program at Santa Catarina Federal University. Its chosen theoretical frame of Hospitality perspective while nursing care. Data were collected applying a semi-structured questionnaire at ten doctoral students. The analysis of the data was carried through under the perspective of the content analysis according to Bardin. Hospitality it is imperative for the individuals adaptation in the hospital context or any area where it is looking for health care.

  10. Rationing home-based nursing care: professional ethical implications.

    PubMed

    Tønnessen, Siri; Nortvedt, Per; Førde, Reidun

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' decisions about priorities in home-based nursing care. Qualitative research interviews were conducted with 17 nurses in home-based care. The interviews were analyzed and interpreted according to a hermeneutic methodology. Nurses describe clinical priorities in home-based care as rationing care to mind the gap between an extensive workload and staff shortages. By organizing home-based care according to tight time schedules, the nurses' are able to provide care for as many patients as possible. Furthermore, legal norms set boundaries for clinical priority decisions, resulting in marginalized care. Hence, rationing care jeopardizes important values in the nurse-patient relationship, in particular the value of individualized and inclusive nursing care. The findings are highly relevant for clinical practice, since they have major implications for provision of nursing care. They revive debates about the protection of values and standards of care, and nurses' role and responsibility when resources are limited.

  11. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care1

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sarah Nilkece Mesquita; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; da Silva, Grazielle Roberta Freitas; Andrade, Elaine Maria Leite Rangel; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; Moura, Renata Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP). METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan. PMID:26039297

  12. Nurse Communication About Goals of Care

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ferrell, Betty; Goldsmith, Joy; Buller, Haley; Neiman, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Conversations about goals of care with the patient and family are a critical component of advanced practice in oncology. However, there are often inadequate team structures, training, or resources available to assist advanced practitioners in initiating these conversations. We conducted a study to assess nurses’ perceived role and communication tasks in such conversations about goals of care. In a cross-sectional survey of 109 nurses attending a comprehensive 2-day end-of-life nursing education course, nurses were asked to describe how they would participate in a "goals of care" meeting in three different scenarios. They were also asked what changes they desired in their clinical settings. Nurses overwhelmingly described that their primary task and communication role was to assess patient/family understanding. Nurses referenced their team members and team support with the least frequency across scenarios. Team roles, structure, and process were reported as areas in greatest need of change in patient/family goals of care meetings. These findings demonstrate that lack of preparation to function as a team is a barrier for nurses in communicating about goals of care, and there is a demand to move such conversations upstream in oncology care. PMID:28090365

  13. [Care, self-care and caring for yourself: a paradigmatic understanding thought for nursing care].

    PubMed

    Silva, Irene de Jesus; de Oliveira, Marilia Fátima Vieira; da Silva, Sílvio Eder Dias; Polaro, Sandra Helena Isse; Radünz, Vera; dos Santos, Evanguelia Kotzias Atherino; de Santana, Mary Elizabeth

    2009-09-01

    This article presents a reflection about care, self-care and caring for oneself and establishes these issues' relations with the paradigms of totality and simultaneity. On the first part of the text, care and its general aspects are contextualized; the second part discusses about care in Martin Heidegger's philosophical perspective; the third part explores self-care on Dorothea Orem's conception; the fourth part considers Michel Foucault's care of oneself. And finally, the fifth part aims to establish the relationship between the concepts of self-care and care of oneself, and the totality and simultaneity paradigms. Self-care and care of oneself are connected to the objectivism of the totality, and to the subjectivism of the simultaneity. These subjects lead nursing to comprehend such paradigmatic inheritance and its implications on the nursing care.

  14. Nursing care and patient outcomes: international evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Robyn B.; Aiken, Linda H.; Clarke, Sean P.; Sloane, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    Countries across the globe are experiencing nursing shortages. In hospitals, supportive practice environments have positive effects on both nurse and patient outcomes. However, these relationships have been established primarily in the US. International studies of the effects of nurse staffing levels and the practice environment on nurse outcomes and the quality of care mirror the findings from the US, thus raising these issues to the international level. The solutions that have been successful in the US for improving practice environment and patient outcomes are solutions that should be successful in any country, thus putting them on a global scale. The Magnet hospital program is one model that has been shown to improve nurse and patient outcomes and is one solution to the shortage of hospital nurses. PMID:18218265

  15. Use of intuition by critical care nurses: a phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Parkhide; Abdi, Alireza; Jalali, Rostam; Salari, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Background Intuition is defined as an irrational unconscious type of knowing. This concept was incorporated into nursing discipline for 3 decades, but nowadays its application is uncertain and ignored by educational institutions. Therefore, this study aimed to explore critical care nurses’ understanding of the use of intuition in clinical practice. Materials and methods In a descriptive phenomenological study, 12 nurses employed in critical care units of the hospitals affiliated with Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, were recruited to a study using purposive, semistructured interviews, which were then written down verbatim. The data were managed by MaxQDA 10 software and analyzed as qualitative, with Colaizzi’s seven-stage approach. Results Of the 12 nurses who participated in the study, seven (58.3%) were female and married, 88.3% (ten) had a Bachelor of Nursing (BSc) degree, and the means ± SD of age, job experience, and critical care experience were 36.66±7.01, 13.75±6.82, and 7.66±3.36 years, respectively. We extracted three main themes, namely “patient conditions”, “nurse readiness”, and “outcome”, and seven subthemes – including “clinical signs”, “patient behaviors”, “prognosis”, “being sensitive”, “desire to act”, “prediction”, and “satisfaction” – integral to understanding the use of intuition in clinical practice by critical care nurses. Conclusion The findings showed that some nurses were attracted by the patients’ conditions and were more intuitive about them, and following their intuition prepared the nurses to under-take more appropriate measures. The positive results that the majority of the nurses experienced convinced them to follow their intuitions more often. PMID:26929677

  16. Nursing role complex in advanced HIV care.

    PubMed

    Kutzen, H S

    1998-01-01

    Nurses in AIDS care need to support patients and promote patient autonomy throughout the continuum of HIV/AIDS. Nurses are essential for assisting patients and family members in making difficult treatment decisions, including choices regarding death. Discussions of end of life issues should be postponed until the patient demonstrates active signs and symptoms of approaching death. These discussions require expert knowledge of subtle cues and knowledge of advancing disease, as well as options for improved symptom management without focusing on curative aspects of care. Through these discussions, the nurse empowers the family in decision making while realizing patients and loved ones are still faced with existential or spiritual crises, psychological pain, and grief associated with terminal illness. Towards the end of life, nursing contacts should increase and be armed with an understanding of palliative care planning with patients with advanced HIV disease.

  17. Care Instability in Nursing Homes; A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Majid; Fadayevatan, Reza; Abedi, Heidar Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of long-term care services has risen and this trend is expected to continue as the population reaches old age. Objectives: This study was performed to assess the caring conditions in nursing homes. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative approach using conventional qualitative content analysis. The study was conducted on 23 Iranian participants including 14 elders and 9 caregivers. Data was collected with unstructured interviews and continued to the point of data saturation. Analysis of data was performed continually and concurrently with data collection through a comparative method. Results: Three themes emerged from 595 open codes including care as unpleasant task, sustained care and insufficient resources. Ten subthemes indicated participants’ experiences and understanding of caring conditions in a nursing home. Conclusions: The prevailing given care was the routine one with a focus on physical aspects, although there was some psychological care given to the older people. The findings of this research are guidelines for managers and care planners in nursing homes who should pay attention to physical and psychological care needs of older people. In addition, it is important to pay close attention to the needs of caregivers and provision of instructions for treatment, supervision and education of caregivers and medical students to provide a better care. PMID:27186382

  18. Selected methods of measuring workload among intensive care nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Katarzyna; Wujtewicz, Maria; Mędrzycka-Dąbrowska, Wioletta

    2012-06-01

    Intensive care units and well-qualified medical staff are indispensable for the proper functioning of every hospital facility. Due to demographic changes and technological progress having extended the average life expectancy, the number of patients hospitalized in intensive care units increases every year [9,10]. Global shortages of nursing staff (including changes in their age structure) have triggered a debate on the working environment and workload the nursing staff are exposed to while performing their duties. This paper provides a critical review of selected methods for the measurement of the workload of intensive care nurses and points out their practical uses. The paper reviews Polish and foreign literature on workload and the measurement tools used to evaluate workload indicators.

  19. [Nursing care: an ethical act].

    PubMed

    Gruat, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Care means taking care, paying extreme attention to others in vulnerable situations, "helping and not hurting". Admitting that ethical care exists would require recognizing that there are also treatments which are not ethical. However, care can only be ethical.

  20. Nursing home care quality: a cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Fagerli, Liv Berit

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore potential differences in how nursing home residents rate care quality and to explore cluster characteristics. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional design was used, with one questionnaire including questions from quality from patients' perspective and Big Five personality traits, together with questions related to socio-demographic aspects and health condition. Residents ( n=103) from four Norwegian nursing homes participated (74.1 per cent response rate). Hierarchical cluster analysis identified clusters with respect to care quality perceptions. χ(2) tests and one-way between-groups ANOVA were performed to characterise the clusters ( p<0.05). Findings Two clusters were identified; Cluster 1 residents (28.2 per cent) had the best care quality perceptions and Cluster 2 (67.0 per cent) had the worst perceptions. The clusters were statistically significant and characterised by personal-related conditions: gender, psychological well-being, preferences, admission, satisfaction with staying in the nursing home, emotional stability and agreeableness, and by external objective care conditions: healthcare personnel and registered nurses. Research limitations/implications Residents assessed as having no cognitive impairments were included, thus excluding the largest group. By choosing questionnaire design and structured interviews, the number able to participate may increase. Practical implications Findings may provide healthcare personnel and managers with increased knowledge on which to develop strategies to improve specific care quality perceptions. Originality/value Cluster analysis can be an effective tool for differentiating between nursing homes residents' care quality perceptions.

  1. Hospice nursing. The concept of palliative care.

    PubMed

    Gurfolino, V; Dumas, L

    1994-09-01

    In this article, some differences are presented between hospice and home care nurses. Issues related to pain control, symptom management, and dehydration are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on the spiritual dimensions of hospice care and the holism implicit in its concept.

  2. Influenza vaccination and decisional conflict among regulated and unregulated direct nursing care providers in long-term-care homes.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Shannon M; Pierrynowski-Gallant, Donna; Chambers, Larry; O'Connor, Annette; Bowman, Sherry; McNeil, Shelly; Strang, Robert; Knoefel, Frank

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether direct nursing care providers have decisional conflict about receiving influenza vaccinations and characteristics associated with decisional conflict. The researchers used a self-administered questionnaire mailed to direct nursing care providers in two long-term-care organizations. Most direct nursing care providers in both organizations (80% and 93%, respectively) intended to get the influenza vaccine. Unregulated direct nursing care providers had more decisional conflict than regulated providers, especially related to feeling uninformed about the pros and cons of influenza vaccination. Unclear valuing of the pros and cons of influenza vaccination was related to the age of the direct care providers in both organizations. Decisional conflict and influenza vaccination practices may be determined, in part, by age and by the culture of a health care organization. A decision aid to improve knowledge and clarify values may improve decision quality and increase influenza vaccination rates.

  3. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. PMID:25386037

  4. Nurse and nurse assistant perceptions of missed nursing care: what does it tell us about teamwork?

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Beatrice J

    2009-11-01

    Missed nursing care is a pervasive problem in acute care hospitals as is dysfunctional nursing teamwork. Given that teamwork has a significant impact on healthcare quality and patient safety, the author reports findings from a study that examined differences in perceptions between RNs and nursing assistants as to the extent of missed nursing care and the reasons for missing that care. Study findings point to a lack of essential elements of teamwork (ie, closed-looped communication, leadership, team orientation, trust, and shared mental models). The author analyzes what this reveals about teamwork between these 2 groups of nursing personnel who work side by side caring for the same patients and offers specific interventions.

  5. [The development and impacts of professional nursing in senior care and senior business management: the perspective of a U.S.-based nurse entrepreneur].

    PubMed

    Chang, Theresa

    2008-10-01

    The three main parts of this article include (1) the process of transition from a clinical nurse to a nurse entrepreneur, (2) senior care business management and social responsibility and (3) the development of senior care business in the future as well as the chances for nursing development. The article analyzes the development of gerontology nursing careers in the United States and Taiwan and the role professional nurses can play in ageing societies. A prospective plan for collaboration between gerontology nurses and long-term care health professionals in the United States and Taiwan concludes the article.

  6. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient.

    PubMed

    Elfving, U

    1980-01-01

    Team work is required in the treatment of the thermally injured patient--nursing staff being part of the team. The nurses are with the patient for 24 hours a day and they have to understand the objectives of all other members of the team involved in the treatment as well as thoroughly mastering their own work. For the nursing staff the care of the thermally injured patient is a challenge. The work demands strong motivation and interest--it includes at times painful treatment, isolation and also constant alertness. It is important that the nursing staff is given continuous training so that they are able to give the required care efficiently and to keep up active interest. Practical work is the best way of getting aquainted with the complex forms of treatment of the thermally injured patient. It also lessens the fear of a badly burned patient. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient consists of good basic care, local attention and active observation. The basic care consists of basic hygiene, diet, observation of the patient's psychological condition, giving emotional support, encouraging initiative physiotherapy and postural treatment.

  7. Retaining nursing faculty beyond retirement age.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Marvel L; Cook, Linda; Salmeron, Lois; Burton, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The number of nursing faculty planning to retire by 2020 is alarming. To develop strategies for retaining faculty, researchers asked: What factors influence the decision by nursing faculty to stay in the workforce past retirement age? What barriers could be removed that would encourage faculty to stay longer? Using Giorgi's analysis method, findings from 6 faculty teaching past retirement age revealed key meaning units and grand themes that match Maslow's Hierarchy of Inborn Needs.

  8. Developing the nursing care plans using the "master file of standardized nursing practice terminology" in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wako, Fumiko; Tsuru, Satoko; Omori, Miho; Watanabe, Chitose; Uchiyama, Makiko; Asada, Miwa; Inoue, Kikumi

    2013-01-01

    A common language in nursing facilitates better communication among nurses and healthcare team, assuring better nursing care, hence better patient outcomes. As we developed and disseminated the standardized terminology of nursing which provided nurses with a set of terms to describe nursing observations and nursing actions, we developed a certain number of nursing care plans using the terms in it. The nursing care plans included those for the patients requiring medical (pharmaceutical)/surgical procedures or the patients showing some signs and symptoms. Generally, nurses found that the nursing care plans were useful and flexible enough to allow for the modification according to the needs of each individual patient. In conclusion, the nursing care plans based on the standardized terminology showed its relevance to the clinical settings.

  9. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services for individuals age 65 or older in institutions for... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care...

  10. The courage to care: nurses facing the moral extreme.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Ellen Ben

    2004-01-01

    Many European nurses were caught up in the horror of what happened to Jewish people during the Second World War, trapped in ghettoes and concentration camps. The advanced age of the nurses, however, decreases the number of firsthand accounts available. This paper reports on the experience of nurses in one camp, Westerbork, in the Netherlands, highlighting their work and relating their stories. Facing extreme suffering, they chose to care about others when it would have been easier to distance themselves. Until recently, historians' interest in medical practices in the transit and concentration camps has centered on medicine and sanitation. Utilisation of a nursing framework allows new material that has previously been overlooked to provide a broader understanding of the context of health care within the camps. Westerbork is an ideal camp to study since it had a genuine hospital with medicines and equipment available and a number of wards that provided care. Data collection was through oral interviews, archival documents and literature. The conclusion is that these nurses provide powerful role models of care that are as significant today as they were then.

  11. Continence care is every nurse's business.

    PubMed

    Booth, Joanne

    Maintaining continence lies at the heart of a sense of adulthood and is essential to preserving dignity, a core and universal nursing value. This article explores the reasons why poor continence care was found at Mid Staffordshire Foundation Trust, the changes to the culture of the health service that led to it, and why it is so important for nurses to maintain patients' dignity. Recommendations for changing this culture in the future are discussed.

  12. Cardiovascular genomics: implications for acute and critical care nurses.

    PubMed

    Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Klein, Deborah; Winkelman, Chris

    2013-01-01

    As genomic health care becomes commonplace, nurses will be asked to provide genomic care in all health care settings including acute care and critical care. Three common cardiac conditions are reviewed, Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, to provide acute care and critical care nurses with an overview of these pathologies through the lens of genomics and relevant case studies. This information will help critical care nursing leaders become familiar with genetics related to common cardiac conditions and prepare acute care and critical care nurses for a new phase in patient diagnostics, with greater emphasis on early diagnosis and recognition of conditions before sudden cardiac death.

  13. [Moral distress in nursing care].

    PubMed

    Negrisolo, Adriana; Brugnaro, Luca

    2012-01-01

    In nursing practice, the ability to make decisions regarding patients and to act on them is considered to be an expression of the professional nursing role. Problems may arise when a nurses would like to perform an action they believe morally correct but which are conflictual with the habits, organization or politics of the health structure in which they work. This inevitably produces moral distress in nurses who feel impotent to act as they feel they should. Although a certain amount of moral distress is part and parcel of the nursing profession , when it is excessive or prolonged it may become unacceptable and culminate in burn-out and the relative consequences. The aim of the study was to compare the level of moral stress in 111 Italian nurses working in different Operative Units to identify those clinical situations significantly associated with moral stress using the MDS scale. Similarly to studies performed in the USA, the level of moral stress in the 3 different work contexts was moderate, although some clinical situations were related to significant stress levels.

  14. Transforming nursing care through health literacy ACTS.

    PubMed

    French, Kempa S

    2015-03-01

    Limited patient literacy contributes to poorer health status, increased emergency room and hospital use, higher morbidity and mortality rates, and less use of preventive health services. All patients, however, need health information that is accurate, accessible, and actionable to make informed decisions about their health. A universal health literacy precautions approach is recommended to empower patients through shared decision-making interactions. Consistent use of evidence-based health literacy practices by front-line nurses offers the potential for transformations in nursing care through stronger patient-nurse interactions and health system partnerships.

  15. Nursing with prisoners: the practice of caring, forensic nursing or penal harm nursing?

    PubMed

    Maeve, M K; Vaughn, M S

    2001-12-01

    The number of incarcerated persons in the United States has been increasing dramatically over the last two decades. Incarcerated men and women have increased rates of serious and chronic physical and mental illnesses and therefore require substantial health care efforts. Caring for prisoners is a difficult and often unrewarding experience for health care providers, particularly within a social climate that encourages noncaring behaviors. This article critically analyzes three philosophic stances toward nursing care with prisoners and suggests their philosophic commensurability within traditional nursing practice. Implications for nursing practice, research, and education are discussed.

  16. [Health promotion of lesbian woman: nursing care].

    PubMed

    Sousa, Josueida de Carvalho; Mallmann, Danielli Gavibo; Galindo Neto, Nelson Miguel; de Freitas, Natália Oliveira; de Vasconcelos, Eliane Maria Ribeiro; de Araújo, Ednaldo Cavalcante

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze national and international scientific literature on nursing care for lesbian women. An integrative approach was adopted to review studies from MEDLINE, LILACS, BDENF and SCOPUS databases and SciELO and Cochrane libraries using the keywords: female homosexuality, nursing care, health promotion and women's health. Studies published between 1990 and 2013 in English, Portuguese or Spanish were considered for analysis. After analyzing data, four international studies were selected, being that three were from the United States and one was from Canada. This study revealed a scarcity of Brazilian and international studies and the importance of increasing scientific literature on this topic. Descriptors: Homosexuality, female. Nursing care. Health promotion. Women's health.

  17. [Factors associated with nursing workload in adult intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Leilane Andrade; Padilha, Kátia Grillo

    2007-12-01

    This study was aimed both at analyzing the nursing workload on the first day of admission of patients in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and the factors associated with it. This is a qualitative, retrospective, cross-section study that was carried out in April of 2002 and October of 2004. The data were taken from a database that gathered information from 5 ICUs from two private hospitals and the sample was comprised of 214 adult patients that remained in the ICU for at least 24 hours. The total Nursing Activities Score (NAS) average was 69.9%, and the median 68.0%. According to the median, it was verified that 109 (50.9%) individuals required heavy nursing attention and the remaining 105 (49.1%) required less attention. The severity of the illness, the patient's age and the kind of treatment were not factors associated with nursing workload in the first 24 hours at the ICU.

  18. How Do Students Learn on a Primary Nursing Care Unit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mary Barbera

    1977-01-01

    When a unit's staff changed from a team nursing to a primary nursing approach to care, the role of students gaining experience there changed to that of associate nurse, who is accountable for providing continuity of care to the primary nurses' patients. (Editor/TA)

  19. Precepting student nurses in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Ihlenfeld, Janet T

    2007-01-01

    Nurses in critical care units are often asked to precept a student nurse. To make this a valuable learning experience, careful planning should be done. The preceptor and the nursing faculty member need to collaborate to plan and carry out the nursing experience.

  20. [Nursing care for bariatric surgery patients].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Chun; Chi, Shu-Ching; Pan, Kuei-Ching; Huang, Chin-Kun

    2010-10-01

    The sedentary lifestyle, common to most modern societies, has turned obesity into an increasingly prevalent and universal problem. Obesity correlates positively with many diseases and health risk factors. Medical therapies currently used to treat obesity are generally limited in terms of long-term effectiveness. Bariatric surgery has been demonstrated an effective treatment for morbid obesity. Special nursing care considerations for bariatric surgery include providing wider cuffs for blood pressure checks, preventing deep venous thrombosis and post operation dietary education in order to accommodate changes in the gastrointestinal system. The purposes of this article were to introduce obesity therapy trends as well as to share nursing care principles for those undergoing bariatric surgery.

  1. The impact of teamwork on missed nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Lee, Kyung Hee

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that missed nursing care is a significant problem in acute care hospitals. Other studies have demonstrated that teamwork is a critical element in assuring patient safety and quality of care. The purpose of this study was to determine if the level of nursing teamwork impacts the extent and nature of missed nursing care. A sample of 2 216 nursing staff members on 50 acute care patient care units in 4 hospitals completed the Nursing Teamwork Survey and the MISSCARE Survey. The response rate was 59.7%. Controlling for occupation of staff members (eg, RN/LPN, NA) and staff characteristics (eg, education, shift worked, experience, etc), teamwork alone accounted for about 11% of missed nursing care. The results of this study show that the level of nursing teamwork impacts the nature and extent of missed nursing care. The study results point to a need to invest in methods of enhancing teamwork in these settings.

  2. Nursing Care as Perceived by Nurses Working in Disability Community Settings in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Fotiadou, Elpida; Malliarou, Maria; Zetta, Stella; Gouva, Mary; Kotrotsiou, Evaggelia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction-Aim: The concept of nursing care in learning disability community settings has not been investigated in Greece. The aim of this paper is to investigate how nurses working in learning disability community settings perceive the meaning of nursing care. Material and Methods: The sample consisted of 100 nurses and nursing assistants working in a social care hospice. Participants were asked to answer questions about socio- demographic characteristics of the sample and fill in a questionnaire of care (GR-NDI-24), the “Job-Communication-Satisfaction-Importance” (JCSI) questionnaire and the altruism scale of Ahmed and Jackson. The data analysis was realized with statistical methods of descriptive and inductive statistics. The analysis was made with the use of SPSS (version 19). Results: The majority of the sample was women (78%). The majority of participants were married (66 %), DE graduates (66%) without postgraduate studies (96.7%). The mean age of respondents was 36.98±6.70 years. On the scales of caring and altruism, the mean values were 40.89±15.87 and 28.12±4.16 respectively. Very or fully satisfied with his work was 72% of the sample. The scope of work emerges as the most important factor influencing job satisfaction. The wages and working conditions (73% and 40% respectively) are the parameters of work which gathers the most dissatisfaction, while the salary is emerging as the most important parameter, the improvement of which would provide the highest satisfaction. Marginally statistically significant difference was observed in the range between TE graduates (d=40) and those of the DE grade (d=37), p=0.053. No statistically significant differences were observed in relation to other working and demographic characteristics (p>0.05). Greater care importance was associated with greater job satisfaction (p<0.01), while the latter was associated with high levels of altruism (p<0.05). Conclusion: The scope of work provides high satisfaction to nurses

  3. Developing an electronic nursing record system for clinical care and nursing effectiveness research in a korean home healthcare setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Joo; Lee, Mikyoung; Moorhead, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Increased accountability requirements for the cost and quality of healthcare force nurses to clearly define and verify nursing's contributions to patient outcomes. This demand necessitates documentation of nursing care in a precise manner. An electronic nursing record system is considered a key element that enhances nurses' ability not only to record nursing care provided to patients but also to measure, report, and monitor quality and effectiveness. Home care is a growing field as nurses attempt to meet the demand for long-term care. The development of an electronic record system for home care nursing was the immediate focus of this study. We identified the nursing content required for home care nursing using standardized nursing languages and designed linkages among medical diagnoses, nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, and nursing-sensitive outcomes within the system. Equipping an electronic nursing record system with nursing standards is particularly critical for enhancing nursing practice and for creating refined data to verify nursing effectiveness.

  4. Spirituality and nursing: an Ismaili perspective on holistic nursing care.

    PubMed

    Dhamani, Khairunnisa Aziz

    2014-12-01

    This article seeks to describe a professional, personal, and cultural understanding of spirituality in nursing care. It revisits and refines the many concept clarifications of spirituality in our practice discipline, while reflecting on the potential meanings and learnings from Ismaili tenets and principles within a personal nursing practice. Through a review of mainstream literature in conjunction with nontraditional literature, the implicit is made explicit in terms of similarities and differences, as well as opportunities for further exploration. The summary brings forward the persistent gaps and questions on critical areas such as creating the "place" and "operationalizing" of spirituality. These continue to challenge and intrigue nurses seeking spiritual comfort for both themselves and their clients.

  5. A nurse practitioner patient care team: implications for pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Golden, Julia Rose

    2014-01-01

    The role of the pediatric advanced practice registered nurse continues to evolve within the ever-changing field of health care. In response to increased demand for health care services and because of a variety of changes in the health care delivery system, nurse practitioner patient care teams are an emerging trend in acute care settings. Care provided by nurse practitioner teams has been shown to be effective, efficient, and comprehensive. In addition to shorter hospital stays and reduced costs, nurse practitioner teams offer increased quality and continuity of care, and improved patient satisfaction. Nurse practitioner patient care teams are well suited to the field of pediatric oncology, as patients would benefit from care provided by specialized clinicians with a holistic focus. This article provides health care professionals with information about the use of nurse practitioner patient care teams and implications for use in pediatric oncology.

  6. Critical Care Specialty Elective: Nursing 401A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jepson, Cheri A.

    This course guide describes an elective speciality course on critical/intensive care nursing. A rationale for the course is followed by general information, including a description of the theoretical and clinical course components, an enumeration of major goals and objectives, a detailed outline of the units of instruction, a calendar of…

  7. [Glioblastoma and nursing care in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Lefort, Mathilde

    2017-02-01

    Nurses in neurosurgical departments play a critical role as they are involved in the first stages of the care pathway of patients with glioblastoma. Indeed, surgery enables a definitive histopathological diagnosis to be established and the size of the tumour to be significantly reduced, thereby improving the prognosis.

  8. Emergency Care Skills for Occupational Health Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh. Occupational Information Center.

    Designed for use in community colleges, technical colleges, and technical institutes, this manual contains a course for teaching emergency care skills to both licensed practical and registered nurses employed in occupational health. The manual consists of three sections. In section 1 the need for the course, its content, objectives, length,…

  9. Chronic diarrhoea: investigation, treatment and nursing care.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Chris

    Chronic diarrhoea is a distressing symptom of a number of conditions. This article explains the assessment of patients at the initial outpatient visit through the various investigations and finally medical and surgical treatment. Emphasis is placed on the nursing management of chronic diarrhoea, particularly the treatment of physical effects such as dehydration and perianal skin soreness, and the psychological aspects of care.

  10. Knowledge and Attitude of Medical Nurses toward Oral Health and Oral Health Care of Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Suzana; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Yusoff, Azizah

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the knowledge and attitudes of medical nurses regarding oral health and oral health care of pregnant women. Methods This cross sectional study of 133 nurses in the district of Tumpat, Kelantan (Malaysia) used self-administered questionnaires. Results Most nurses knew that dental plaque is associated with periodontal disease (97.7%). However, most nurses erroneously believed that tooth decay (86.5%) and excessive sugar consumption (87.2%) led to periodontal disease. About half of the nurses knew about the relationship between periodontal disease of pregnant women and low birth weight (43.6%) and preterm birth (48.9%). Many nurses had the misconception that the developing foetus draws calcium from the mothers’ teeth (78.2%). Most nurses had good attitudes toward improving their oral health knowledge (97.0%) and agreed they should help to deliver oral health education to pregnant women (94.0%). Age, length of service as a nurse, and length of service in antenatal care had no effect on the scores for the nurses’ knowledge and attitude regarding oral health and oral health care of pregnant women. Conclusion Medical nurses had limited knowledge about oral health of pregnant women and had some misunderstandings about oral health, although they had good attitudes. Age, length of service as a nurse, and length service in antenatal care had no effect on the knowledge and attitude scores of the nurses. PMID:27540327

  11. Nursing care for people with delirium superimposed on dementia.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Claire; Clarke, Amanda

    2017-03-31

    Nursing and healthcare is changing in response to an ageing population. There is a renewed need for holistic nursing to provide clinically competent, appropriate and timely care for patients who may present with inextricably linked mental and physical health requirements. This article explores the dichotomy in healthcare provision for 'physical' and 'mental' health, and the unique role nurses have when caring for people with delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD). Delirium is prevalent in older people and recognised as 'acute brain failure'. As an acute change in cognition, it presents a unique challenge when occurring in a person with dementia and poses a significant risk of mortality. In this article, dementia is contrasted with delirium and subtypes of delirium presentation are discussed. Nurses can recognise DSD through history gathering, implementation of appropriate care and effective communication with families and the multidisciplinary team. A simple mnemonic called PINCH ME (Pain, INfection, Constipation, deHydration, Medication, Environment) can help identify potential underlying causes of DSD and considerations for care planning. The mnemonic can easily be adapted to different clinical settings and a fictitious scenario is presented to show its application in practice.

  12. The National Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence: An Evolution of a Nursing Initiative to Improve Care of Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Harden, J Taylor; Watman, Rachael A

    2015-06-01

    The mission of the John A. Hartford Foundation is to improve the health of older Americans. This mission has been realized throughout the evolution of the National Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence-an international collaboration between Schools of Nursing and Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing-whose goal is to support research, education, and practice to provide better nursing care for our aging society. The National Hartford Center is the focus of this supplement and an example of the Foundation's grant-making to prepare the nursing workforce to be competent to care for our aging society. This article traces the innovative origin and inception of the National Hartford Center, first as the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) Initiative in 2000 under the leadership of two groundbreaking scholars in nursing and aging sciences: Claire M. Fagin, PhD, RN, and Patricia G. Archbold, DNSc. We continue through to today's leadership and culminate by describing the Center's influence on the gerontological nursing workforce and clinical practice; the paper also includes a brief introduction to the articles, highlighting advances in gerontological nursing science. With funding from the John A. Hartford Foundation, The Atlantic Philanthropies, The Mayday Fund, and a number of creative public and nonprofit partnerships, the National Hartford Center celebrates two decades and its greatest asset-the nearly 300 gerontological nursing leaders, including Archbold nursing pre-docs, Fagin nursing post-docs, and expert faculty, along with its Hartford Centers of Gerontological Nursing Excellence across the country. We trace the transition of BAGNC to the membership-based National Hartford Center and its move to The Gerontological Society of America to become a self-sustaining, autonomous unit. Current needs, challenges, lessons learned, and strategies of the National Hartford Center are examined within the context of sustainability

  13. A residential aged care end-of-life care pathway (RAC EoLCP) for Australian aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Liz; Israel, Fiona J; Charles, Margaret A

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop, implement and evaluate an end-of-life (terminal) care pathway and associated infrastructure suitable for Australian residential aged care facilities that improves resident and health system outcomes. The residential aged care end-of-life care pathway was developed by a multidisciplinary collaboration of government and non-government professionals and incorporated best clinical management for dying residents to guide care and increase palliative care capacity of generalist staff. Implementation included identifying and up-skilling Link Nurses to champion the pathway, networking facilities with specialist palliative care services, delivering education to generalists and commencing a Palliative Care Medication Imprest System in each facility. The primary outcome measure for evaluation was transfer to hospital; secondary measures included staff perceived changes in quality of palliative care provided and family satisfaction with care. Results indicated that the pathway, delivered within a care framework that guides provision of palliative care, resulted in improved resident outcomes and decreased inappropriate transfers to acute care settings.

  14. Primary care clinical placements: The views of Australian registered nurse mentors and pre-registration nursing students (part 2).

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An increased burden of chronic and complex conditions treated in the community and an aging population have exacerbated the primary care workload. Predicted nursing shortages will place further stressors on this workforce. High quality clinical placements may provide a strategic pathway to introduce and recruit new nurses to this speciality. This paper is Part 2 of a two part series reporting the findings of a mixed methods project. Part 1 reported on the qualitative study and Part 2 reports on the quantitative study. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students from a single Australian tertiary institution and 22 primary care Registered Nurse (RN) mentors who supervised student learning completed an online survey. Students largely regarded their primary care placement positively and felt this to be an appropriate learning opportunity. Most RNs were satisfied with mentoring pre-registration nursing students in their setting. Furthermore, the RNs desire to mentor students and the support of general practitioners (GPs) and consumers were seen as key enablers of pre-registration nursing placements. Findings from this study provide a preliminary impression of primary care clinical placements from the perspective of pre-registration nursing students and registered nurse mentors. Further research should examine whether a broader scope of non-traditional health settings such as non-government organisations, charities, pharmacies, welfare and social services can also provide appropriate learning environments for pre-registration nursing students.

  15. Nurses' experiences in spirituality and spiritual care in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka Fai; Yau, Sui Yu

    2010-11-01

    Nurses emphasize spiritual care in maintaining patients' holistic health; however, the provision for spiritual care is found to be inadequate. The limited study in exploring the nurses' perception on applying spiritual care in Hong Kong has been noted. This descriptive phenomenological study investigated the experiences of spirituality and spiritual care in Hong Kong from the nurses' perspective. Ten nurses were purposively invited for an unstructured interview. Thematic analysis was used for data analysis, and three themes emerged: the meaning of spirituality, benefits of applying spiritual care, and difficulties in applying spiritual care. This study provided preliminary insights into the development of spiritual care in Hong Kong.

  16. The Aging Society: A Challenge for Nursing Education. Papers Presented at the Fall 1981 Meeting of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This conference report consists of the texts of nine papers presented at a conference on the need for nursing education programs to respond to the needs of the elderly for specialized nursing care. Included in the volume are the following reports: "The Aging Society and Nursing Education: A National Perspective," by Daniel J. O'Neal,…

  17. Aristotle, nursing and health care ethics.

    PubMed

    Scott, P A

    1995-12-01

    Even a brief consideration of the nature of nursing will indicate that an ethical dimension underlies much, if not all, of nursing practice. It is therefore important that students and practitioners are facilitated in developing an ethical awareness and sensitivity from early in their professional development. This paper argues that Aristotelian virtue theory provides a practice-based focus for health care ethics for a number of reasons. Also, because of his emphasis on the character of the moral agent, and on the importance of perception and emotion in moral decision-making, Aristotelian virtue theory provides a useful supplement to the traditional duty-based approaches to health care ethics analysis, which are increasingly being identified in the literature as having limits to their application within the health care context.

  18. Nurses' satisfaction with medication administration point-of-care technology.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Ann C; Bane, Anne; Fotakis, Sofronia; Duffy, Mary E; Sevigny, Amanda; Poon, Eric G; Gandhi, Tejal K

    2007-01-01

    Efforts to promote safe care prompted the development point-of-care technology, but successful adoption requires acceptance by nursing staff. To assess the satisfaction of nurses who use point-of-care technology that integrates nurse scanning of bar-coded medications with the patient's electronic medication administration record, the authors examined nurses' satisfaction with barcode/electronic medication administration record before and after introduction in an academic medical center.

  19. Nurses' attitudes to palliative care in nursing homes in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lynne; O'Connor, Moira; Blackmore, Amanda Marie

    2002-02-01

    Nursing homes are one of the care settings in Western Australia where older people may spend their final years. Residents should be able to receive palliative care where appropriate, but this type of care is not always available at some nursing homes in the state. This study investigated nurses' attitudes to palliative care in nursing homes by examining their cognitive, affective and behavioural information. A sample of 228 nurses working in nursing homes completed a questionnaire, using a free response methodology. Results showed that participants had either a positive or negative attitude to palliative care. Cognitive and affective information significantly and independently predicted the attitudes of nurse, whereas knowledge of palliative care did not contribute significantly to these attitudes. Nurses currently working in palliative care were more positively disposed towards such care, but this disappeared when they ceased working in the area. There is an emphasis on education in the literature which does not take into account the beliefs and emotions of the nurse. Therefore, there is a need to consider these in undergraduate and postgraduate training for nurses. Current experience is also important in palliative care education. The results obtained from nurses in this study should be incorporated into policy for introducing palliative care into nursing homes and used to provide support and assistance to nurses working in this field.

  20. Investigation and analysis of the caring attitude and behaviour of nurses in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li Li; Ruan, Hong; Xiang, Xian Jing; Jia, Qi

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and analyse the caring attitude and behaviour of clinical nurses in terms of importance, competency and feasibility. The study used a survey design. Data were collected between January and June 2010. Two hundred and sixty clinical nurses were recruited. The caring attitude and behaviour of the nurses were assessed by using a translated version of the original Caring Nurse-Patient Interaction Scale-Short Scale. The subjects considered operative caring behaviour to be more important than expressive caring behaviour. The nurses felt more competent to practise operative caring behaviour in the clinic, and reported that such care was more feasible. The competency scores were positively correlated with age and work seniority. The feasibility scores for the clinical care dimension were positively correlated with age and work seniority. Nurses with a higher positional title had higher competency and feasibility scores. The results suggest that a rich life experience, accumulation of work experience and better competency might promote caring behaviour in nurses.

  1. Person-centred care: Principle of Nursing Practice D.

    PubMed

    Manley, Kim; Hills, Val; Marriot, Sheila

    This is the fifth article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. This article discusses Principle D, the provision of person-centred care.

  2. Arkansas Long Term Care Facility Nursing Assistant Training Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Human Services, Little Rock.

    This curriculum is designed for use in developing training programs for nursing assistants who provide nursing or nursing-related services to residents in long-term care (LTC) facilities. Implementation provisions provide a general overview of the basic requirements found in Arkansas' Nursing Assistant Training Program "Rules and Regulations." The…

  3. The core business of caring: a nursing oxymoron?

    PubMed

    Shields, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Nursing has always regarded caring as its core business. The historical record about caring in nursing is non-specific, and little direct evidence exists about caring as part of nursing. Caring is not restricted to nursing, is possibly influenced by public perceptions of nursing, and can be subverted for maleficent ends. This paper discusses these points, and then moves to explain how caring fares in the Australian health care system. Australia has been blighted by a "cultural cringe" which sees anything from overseas as more valuable than anything Australian. This is as true for nursing, and caring within that, as for any other aspect of Australian life. However, Australia has one of the best health care systems in the world, and nursing as a profession is a world leader. The argument of this paper is that the core business of caring could be under threat in Australia unless nurses recognize their particularly good contribution to the profession and subsequent patient/client care, and celebrate that. Examples are taken from the United Kingdom where there is a crisis of caring within nursing and health. These are used to explain how Australian nursing can avoid the pitfalls and retain caring as its core business.

  4. An evaluation of nursing care in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Karadeniz, G; Yanikkerem, E; Altiparmak, S; Sevil, U; Ertem, G; Esen, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify what hospitalized cancer patients expect from nurses in terms of the care they receive. The specific aims of this study were: (i) to identify those individuals to whom the patients felt closest in the hospital setting and (ii) to evaluate nurses' management of cancer patients during their stay in the hospital. The sample included patients hospitalized at Ege University Hospital and Suat Seren District Hospital, Izmir, Turkey. We found significant differences between the scores of satisfaction and dissatisfaction and gender age, education, occupation, type of cancer and the mode of treatment (p < 0.05). The majority of the cancer patients reported that nursing management was unsatisfactory. Some demographic factors such as cultural and social status affected patients' expectations.

  5. Nursing care time and quality indicators for adult intensive care: correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo Carlos; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this quantitative, correlational and descriptive study was to analyze the time the nursing staff spends to assist patients in Adult Intensive Care Units, as well as to verify its correlation with quality care indicators. The average length of time spent on care and the quality care indicators were identified by consulting management instruments the nursing head of the Unit employs. The average hours of nursing care delivered to patients remained stable, but lower than official Brazilian agencies' indications. The correlation between time of nursing care and the incidence of accidental extubation indicator indicated that it decreases with increasing nursing care delivered by nurses. The results of this investigation showed the influence of nursing care time, provided by nurses, in the outcome of care delivery.

  6. The Filipino Nursing Students' Dilemmas in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Cruz, Andrei Angelo R.; Cruz, Angela Laurice G.; Cruz, Robert Edward D.; Cuarto, Jose Mari Nino L.

    2009-01-01

    The continually rising percentage of the elderly population and the demand for geriatric nursing care are dramatically related. While it is true that most undergraduate programs prepare nurses for the care of geriatric patients, most receive limited academic preparation in the nursing curriculum (Williams & Mezey, 2000). This is particularly…

  7. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  8. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  9. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  10. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  11. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  12. The Impact of the Nursing Practice Environment on Missed Nursing Care

    PubMed Central

    Hessels, Amanda J.; Flynn, Linda; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Cadmus, Edna; Gershon, Robyn R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Missed nursing care is an emerging problem negatively impacting patient outcomes. There are gaps in our knowledge of factors associated with missed nursing care. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the nursing practice environment and missed nursing care in acute care hospitals. Methods This is a secondary analysis of cross sectional data from a survey of over 7.000 nurses from 70 hospitals on workplace and process of care. Ordinary least squares and multiple regression models were constructed to examine the relationship between the nursing practice environment and missed nursing care while controlling for characteristics of nurses and hospitals. Results Nurses missed delivering a significant amount of necessary patient care (10–27%). Inadequate staffing and inadequate resources were the practice environment factors most strongly associated with missed nursing care events. Conclusions This multi-site study examined the risk and risk factors associated with missed nursing care. Improvements targeting modifiable risk factors may reduce the risk of missed nursing care. PMID:27547768

  13. Intelligence Care: A Nursing Care Strategy in Respiratory Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Saadat, Soheil; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Working in respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) is multidimensional that requires nurses with special attributes to involve with the accountability of the critically ill patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the appropriate nursing care strategy in the RICU in order to unify and coordinate the nursing care in special atmosphere of the RICU. Materials and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted on 23 health care providers working in the RICU of Sina and Shariati hospitals affiliated to Tehran university of medical sciences and the RICU of Baqiyatallah university of medical sciences from August 2012 to the end of July 2013. In addition to in-depth semistructured interviews, uninterrupted observations, field notes, logs, patient’s reports and documents were used. Information saturation was determined as an interview termination criterion. Results: Intelligence care emerged as a main theme, has a broad spectrum of categories and subcategories with bridges and barriers, including equality of bridges and barriers (contingency care, forced oriented task); bridges are more than barriers (human-center care, innovative care, cultural care, participatory care, feedback of nursing services, therapeutic-professional communication, specialized and independent care, and independent nurse practice), and barriers are higher than bridges (personalized care, neglecting to provide proper care, ineffectiveness of supportive caring wards, futility care, nurse burnout, and nonethical-nonprofessional communications). Conclusions: Intelligence care is a comprehensive strategy that in addition to recognizing barriers and bridges of nursing care, with predisposing and precipitating forces it can convert barriers to bridges. PMID:26734480

  14. Nursing staff shortage and in-hospital informal care in an oncology hospital in Greece: the nursing staff's perceptions.

    PubMed

    Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina; Lavdaniti, Maria; Psychogiou, Maria; Arsenos, Panagiotis; Paralikas, Theodossios; Triantafylidou, Paraskevi; Georgiadou, Charikleia

    2008-06-01

    There is a broad variety of factors that are contributing to the nursing staff shortage. They include low wages, poor image of nursing, job satisfaction, ageing of the nursing workforce and cost reductions. In the Greek National Health System, there is a policy of open-visiting hours in hospitals. Family members stay with the patients for many hours and provide in-hospital informal care. The purpose of this study is to describe the perceptions of nursing staff about the nursing staff shortage and the in-hospital informal care in a Greek oncology hospital. For the data collection we used a 30-item questionnaire. The majority of the participants (82.9%) stated that most patients have a family member staying longer than the official visiting hours for assisting with care. A main reason according to the nurses' opinion (37.4%) is the nursing staff shortage. In addition, most nurses disagree with relatives providing some of the informal caregiving activities. The findings are consistent with the findings of other studies. They might be of interest to Greek health authorities, to nurses and to Greek citizens in order to implement possible solutions to improve the hospitalization in Greek hospitals.

  15. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    PubMed

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families.

  16. The paradox of palliative care nursing across cultural boundaries.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Jacqueline

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study, using a modified grounded theory approach, was to investigate how palliative care nurses care for people from cultural backgrounds other than their own. Ten palliative care nurses were interviewed. The semi-structured interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Analysis commenced as soon as data began to emerge. The findings show that palliative nursing across cultural boundaries is paradoxical. In endeavouring to treat everyone equally, nurses treated everyone as individuals. They made intense efforts to transcend both cultural and language barriers. The nurses gave of themselves when caring for the patients, but their endeavours were impeded by limited resources and a lack of education. The theory of cross-cultural endeavour in palliative nursing was developed to explain how palliative care nurses care for patients from cultures other than their own.

  17. Occupational health nursing practice through the Human Caring lens.

    PubMed

    Noel, Dianne L

    2010-01-01

    Many health care and academic centers have adopted Watson's Theory of Human Caring as their guiding principle; the theory is also used in other disciplines, such as library science. Human caring theory offers occupational health nurses as structure that not only defines a focus for practice, but also provides a basis for moral and philosophical practice analyses. In particular, nurses may find this theory useful in confirming the definition of "caring" and reconsidering what nursing is all about. More importantly, consideration and application of this theory may lead to research on its applicability to the field of occupational health nursing. This article presents the science and philosophy of human caring, specifically Watson's Theory of Human Caring. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how the theory could be used to evaluate occupational health nursing practice. To demonstrate its possible relevance as an occupational health nursing framework, an analysis of and comparison to existing occupational health nursing guidelines are detailed and discussed.

  18. Adjustment of inpatient care reimbursement for nursing intensity.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Zone-Smith, Laurie; Fischer, Mary H

    2006-11-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has begun an ambitious recalibration of the inpatient prospective payment system, the first since its introduction in 1983. Unfortunately, inpatient nursing care has been overlooked in the new payment system and continues to be treated as a fixed cost and billed at a set per-diem "room and board" fee despite the known variability of nursing intensity across different care settings and diagnoses. This article outlines the historical influences regarding costing, billing, and reimbursement of inpatient nursing care and provides contemporary evidence about the variability of nursing intensity and costs at acute care hospitals in the United States. A remedy is proposed to overcome the existing limitations of the Inpatient Prospective Payment System by creating a new nursing cost center and nursing intensity adjustment by DRG for each routine-and intensive-care day of stay to allow independent costing, billing, and reimbursement of inpatient nursing care.

  19. Revisiting our roots: caring in nursing curriculum design.

    PubMed

    Brown, Loraine P

    2011-11-01

    It is widely accepted that a caring curriculum is integral to nursing education. Caring as a concept is extensively cited in the literature as a core value in nursing education and nursing practice. What is not evident is the curricular designs used by nurse educators to enable students to internalize caring behaviors. The literature supports the internalization of affective learning through hierarchically structured learning objectives, and the movement from emotional to reflexive responses through critical reflection. Krathwohl, Bloom, and Masia's (1964) taxonomy of affective objectives and concepts from Mezirow's (2000) transformational learning theory were used to synthesize the integration of caring affective objectives into the design of the nursing curricula. The expected outcome of such integration is a nursing curriculum that progressively supports the development of nursing students' caring behaviors that are consistent with the ideals of the profession. Examples of hierarchically leveled caring objectives are provided.

  20. Hospitalized children's perspectives on the quality and equity of their nursing care.

    PubMed

    Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A; Gardner, William

    2012-01-01

    Hospitalized children and adolescents (n = 496), aged 6 to 21 years, were asked to evaluate the quality of their nursing care by describing nurse behaviors that they liked and disliked. They named 1673 positive nurse behaviors (12 categories) that made them feel good, happy, safe, and cared about, including "gives me what I need when I need it" (42.3%) and "checks on me often" (34.7%). Six categories of negative nurse behaviors (n = 485), such as "does things to me that hurt or are uncomfortable" (64.1%) and "wakes me up" (24%), made them feel sad, bad, mad, scared, or annoyed.

  1. An electronic dashboard to improve nursing care.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yung-Ming; Hii, Joshua; Chan, Katherine; Sardual, Robert; Mah, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    With the introduction of CPOE systems, nurses in a Singapore hospital were facing difficulties monitoring key patient information such as critical tasks and alerts. Issues include unfriendly user interfaces of clinical systems, information overload, and the loss of visual cues for action due to paperless workflows. The hospital decided to implement an interactive electronic dashboard on top of their CPOE system to improve visibility of vital patient data. A post-implementation survey was performed to gather end-user feedback and evaluate factors that influence user satisfaction of the dashboard. Questionnaires were sent to all nurses of five pilot wards. 106 valid responses were received. User adoption was good with 86% of nurses using the dashboard every shift. Mean satisfaction score was 3.6 out of 5. User satisfaction was strongly and positively correlated to the system's perceived impact on work efficiency and care quality. From qualitative feedback, nurses generally agreed that the dashboard had improved their awareness of critical patient issues without the hassle of navigating a CPOE system. This study shows that an interactive clinical dashboard when properly integrated with a CPOE system could be a useful tool to improve daily patient care.

  2. Pleural effusion: nursing care challenge in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Wing, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Pleural effusion is excess collection of fluid in the pleural cavity. It is a frequent complication of pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and carcinomas of the lung, breast, and ovaries. Regardless of the cause, pleural effusion produces significant effects on the respiratory system, especially when considering the normal age-related changes that compromise the respiratory system. Pleural effusion and the complexity of diagnosis and treatment make planning and delivering care challenging. The article describes the pathophysiology of pleural effusion, its management, and related nursing care priorities.

  3. Using computers for planning and evaluating nursing in the health care services.

    PubMed

    Emuziene, Vilma

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes that the nurses attitudes, using and motivation towards the computer usage significantly influenced by area of nursing/health care service. Today most of the nurses traditionally document patient information in a medical record using pen and paper. Most nursing administrators not currently involved with computer applications in their settings are interested in exploring whether technology could help them with the day-to-day and long - range tasks of planning and evaluating nursing services. The results of this investigation showed that respondents (nurses), as specialists and nursing informatics, make their activity well: they had "positive" attitude towards computers and "good" or "average" computer skills. The nurses overall computer attitude did influence by the age of the nurses, by sex, by professional qualification. Younger nurses acquire informatics skills while in nursing school and are more accepting of computer advancements. The knowledge about computer among nurses who don't have any training in computers' significantly differs, who have training and using the computer once a week or everyday. In the health care services often are using the computers and the automated data systems, data for the statistical information (visit information, patient information) and billing information. In nursing field often automated data systems are using for statistical information, billing information, information about the vaccination, patient assessment and patient classification.

  4. Parenteral nutrition: indications, risks and nursing care.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jane

    Parenteral nutrition is a recognised method of feeding patients with specific clinical conditions, most notably those with various forms of intestinal failure who cannot be fed enterally. However, it has several associated risks including sepsis, and metabolic and electrolyte imbalances. The aim of this article is to enhance nurses' understanding of parenteral nutrition and how this differs from oral or enteral nutrition, indications for use and the potential risks involved. Appropriate vascular access is discussed as well as the clinical monitoring that is required to ensure complications of therapy are detected quickly. A greater understanding of the issues associated with parenteral nutrition allows nurses caring for patients receiving parenteral nutrition to ensure safe and effective care.

  5. [Nursing care for intraoperative positioning injuries].

    PubMed

    Shih, Chia-Wen; Lo, Hui-Min

    2011-10-01

    Few discussions have been published on appropriate surgery positioning. Ensuring the patient is in an appropriate pendulum position allows for optimal surgery scope exposition, puts the anesthetist in the closest proximity to the patient to monitor respiratory ventilation, helps maintain patient physiology security, and prevents surgical injury. A poor surgery pendulum position can result in patient injury. In the short-term, such injuries may cause neurotrosis, while over the long-term they may induce deep tissue pressure sores. This article discusses pendulum position injuries during surgery and provides suggestions for proper nursing care of patients undergoing surgical procedures. Clinical nursing staffs may reference this article to enhance patient care during and after surgery.

  6. Nursing Assistants for Long-Term Care. Performance-Based Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Vocational Education Services.

    This guide is intended to assist students enrolled in programs to train nursing assistants for employment in an Indiana long-term health care facility. The first part discusses human development (growth, aging, and dying); communication with residents; sexuality; legal, ethical, and professional responsibilities of nursing assistants in long-term…

  7. Caring for children in pediatric intensive care units: an observation study focusing on nurses' concerns.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Janet; Forsner, Maria; Castrén, Maaret; Arman, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Children in the pediatric intensive care unit are indisputably in a vulnerable position, dependent on nurses to acknowledge their needs. It is assumed that children should be approached from a holistic perspective in the caring situation to meet their caring needs. The aim of the study was to unfold the meaning of nursing care through nurses' concerns when caring for children in the pediatric intensive care unit. To investigate the qualitative aspects of practice embedded in the caring situation, the interpretive phenomenological approach was adopted for the study. The findings revealed three patterns: medically oriented nursing--here, the nurses attend to just the medical needs, and nursing care is at its minimum, leaving the children's needs unmet; parent-oriented nursing care--here, the nursing care emphasizes the parents' needs in the situation, and the children are viewed as a part of the parent and not as an individual child with specific caring needs; and smooth operating nursing care orientation--here, the nursing care is focused on the child as a whole human being, adding value to the nursing care. The conclusion drawn suggests that nursing care does not always respond to the needs of the child, jeopardizing the well-being of the child and leaving them at risk for experiencing pain and suffering. The concerns present in nursing care has been shown to be the divider of the meaning of nursing care and need to become elucidated in order to improve the cultural influence of what can be seen as good nursing care within the pediatric intensive care unit.

  8. Medical imaging techniques: implications for nursing care.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Alison

    The four basic techniques of medical imaging are X-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance and radionuclide. This article describes imaging techniques that display anatomical structure and those that are better at showing the physiological function of organs and tissues. Safety and preparation relating to nursing practice are discussed. Understanding the purpose and limitations of the different imaging techniques is important for providing best patient care.

  9. Nursing care update: Internal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Internal radiation therapy has been used in treating gynecological cancers for over 100 years. A variety of radioactive sources are currently used alone and in combination with other cancer treatments. Nurses need to be able to provide safe, comprehensive care to patients receiving internal radiation therapy while using precautions to keep the risks of exposure to a minimum. This article discusses current trends and issues related to such treatment for gynecological cancers.20 references.

  10. Nursing care and treatment of patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, B

    Bladder cancer is the second most common urological cancer after prostate cancer in the UK. This article aims to update nurses knowledge about the disease, focusing on diagnosis, treatment and nursing care.

  11. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  12. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  13. Collaborative graduate education: executive nurse practice and health care leadership.

    PubMed

    Elaine, Hardy; DeBasio, Nancy; Warmbrodt, Lynn; Gartland, Myles; Bassett, William; Tansey, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Research College of Nursing and the Rockhurst University Helzberg School of Management Health Care Initiative collaborated to offer the Executive Nurse Practice: Health Care Leadership track to Research College of Nursing graduate students. This effort was not only cost effective, but also offered expert faculty in both the fields of nursing and business. The curriculum is an integration of both fields and faculties from both institutions as they communicate and collaborate each semester to successfully coordinate the track.

  14. International cancer care: what is the role of oncology nursing?

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy

    2010-10-01

    Comprehensive cancer care continues to improve in the United States, but many developing countries carry a high cancer burden. With limited resources, nurses in such countries often are unable to improve cancer detection and treatment or relieve patient suffering. The Oncology Nursing Society has developed collaborative relationships with many international organizations to educate nurses around the world. Global partnerships have the potential to improve cancer care internationally and encourage more oncology nurses to use their expertise and become "citizens of the world."

  15. Nursing Reference Center: a point-of-care resource.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily; Paulaitis, Gediminas Geddy

    2012-01-01

    Nursing Reference Center is a point-of-care resource designed for the practicing nurse, as well as nursing administrators, nursing faculty, and librarians. Users can search across multiple resources, including topical Quick Lessons, evidence-based care sheets, patient education materials, practice guidelines, and more. Additional features include continuing education modules, e-books, and a new iPhone application. A sample search and comparison with similar databases were conducted.

  16. Patient satisfaction with nursing care and its relationship with patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Findik, Ummu Yildiz; Unsar, Serap; Sut, Necdet

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess patient satisfaction with nursing care and the relationship between patient satisfaction and patient characteristics. This cross-sectional study was conducted at a 1100-bed tertiary care teaching hospital in Turkey. Data were collected using the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Care Scales and a patient information form. Overall, data indicated a high level of patient satisfaction. Hospitalization affected the Experience of Nursing Care Scale independently, while the type of ward, sex, income, and education independently affected the Satisfaction with Nursing Care Scale. Patients who underwent surgical procedures, male patients, the 40-59-year-old age group, those who had low levels of education or income, and patients who were hospitalized for long periods were most satisfied. Patients' sex, age, income, duration of hospitalization, and ward type were important factors that affected their satisfaction with nursing care. The characteristics of patients who have a low level of satisfaction with nursing care should be assessed and taken into consideration by nurses.

  17. Do they really care? How trauma patients perceive nurses' caring behaviors.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Alison S; Hayes, Janice S; Clukey, Lory; Curtis, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Applying the theory of Nursing as Caring can help the nurse provide care that is perceived as caring by moderately to severely injured trauma patients. The Caring Behaviors Inventory was administered in a 1-to-1 interview format to hospitalized trauma patients in a level 2 trauma center. Nurses were positively perceived in their caring behaviors with some variation based on gender and ethnicity. The modified Caring Behaviors Inventory is quick to use and is reliable and valid.

  18. Development of a Quantitative Measure of Holistic Nursing Care.

    PubMed

    Kinchen, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    Holistic care has long been a defining attribute of nursing practice. From the earliest years of its formal history, nursing has favored a holistic approach in the care of patients, and such an approach has become more important over time. The expansion of nursing's responsibility in delivering comprehensive primary care, the recognition of the importance of relationship-centered care, and the need for evidence-based legitimation of holistic nursing care and practices to insurance companies, policy-makers, health care providers, and patients highlight the need to examine the holistic properties of nursing care. The Holistic Caring Inventory is a theoretically sound, valid, and reliable tool; however, it does not comprehensively address attributes that have come to define holistic nursing care, necessitating the development of a more current instrument to measure the elements of a holistic perspective in nursing care. The development of a current and more comprehensive measure of holistic nursing care may be critical in demonstrating the importance of a holistic approach to patient care that reflects the principles of relationship-based care, shared decision-making, authentic presence, and pattern recognition.

  19. Factors associated with the use of primary care services: the role of practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Morris, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Rising demand for and costs of health care have led to an increasing role of practice nurses in primary care in many countries, including the United Kingdom. Previous research has explored how practice nurse care differs from that provided by general practitioners (GPs) in terms of costs and health outcomes, and has highlighted the importance of matching skills and experience with roles and responsibilities. However, there has been little research to compare the characteristics of patients seen by GPs and practice nurses in primary care. We aim to investigate the factors associated with the use of practice nurse visits, and to compare these with the factors associated with GP use. We jointly model the use of practice nurse and GP visits using a bivariate probit regression model with a large set of covariates taken from two rounds of the Health Survey for England (2001, 2002). We find that practice nurse use is associated with age and gender, health, socioeconomic and supply variables. There are differences in the factors associated with practice nurse and GP use. Chronically ill patients are more likely to see a practice nurse, while acute ill health has a stronger association with the probability of seeing the GP. Practice nurse use is also correlated with a narrower range of health conditions compared with GP use. We also found differences between practice nurse and GP visits with respect to the association with economic activity, ethnic group, number of children, degree of urbanisation, and distance to practice.

  20. Nursing application of Bobath principles in stroke care.

    PubMed

    Passarella, P M; Lewis, N

    1987-04-01

    The nursing approach in the care of stroke patients has a direct impact on functional outcome. Nursing application of Bobath principles in stroke care offers a nursing focus on involvement of the affected side; facilitation of normal tone, posture, and movement; and development of more normal function. A research study evaluating the functional gains of stroke patients demonstrated a significant level of functional improvement in those treated with Bobath principles over stroke patients treated with the traditional nursing approach. Practical methods for applying Bobath principles in patient care activities are described. These therapeutic methods provide nurses with the means to maximize stroke patients' potential and further influence their functional recovery.

  1. Choosing personhood: intentionality and the theory of nursing as caring.

    PubMed

    Schoenhofer, Savina O

    2002-07-01

    Drawing on a story of a nursing situation for practical context, this article explores the meaning of intentionality within the theoretical context of Nursing as Caring. May's definition of intentionality as the structure that gives meaning to experience is interwoven with the concepts of the theory of Nursing as Caring to explore the topic. Mayeroff's concepts of hope and commitment contribute to an understanding of intentionality in relation to Nursing as Caring. The major thesis of this article, that intentionality is consistently choosing personhood as a way of life and the aim of nursing, is demonstrated in the practice situation.

  2. Predictors of nursing workload in elderly patients admitted to intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cleber Ricardo de; Gonçalves, Leilane Andrade; Toffoleto, Maria Cecília; Leão, Karine; Padilha, Kátia Grillo

    2008-01-01

    The age of patients is a controversial issue in admission to intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this study was to compare severity and nursing workload of elderly patients with 60-69, 70-79, and e"80 years of age and to identify predictors of nursing workload in elderly patients. A cross sectional study was performed with a sample of 71 elderly patients admitted to three ICU in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil from October to November 2004. Data were prospectively collected using Nursing Activities Score (NAS) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II). There was no significant difference in nursing workload among the elderly patients age subgroups (p=0.84). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the independent risk factors of high nursing workload were severity, age e"70 years, and to be a surgical ICU patient. Age as an isolated factor should not be discriminative for elderly patients admission to ICU.

  3. Teaching excellence in nursing education: a caring framework.

    PubMed

    Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Enns, Carol L; Ashcroft, Terri J; Davis, Penny L; Harder, B Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Nursing education plays a central role in the ability to practice effectively. It follows that an optimally educated nursing workforce begets optimal patient care. A framework for excellence in nursing education could guide the development of novice educators, establish the basis for evaluating teaching excellence, and provide the impetus for research in this area. However, a review of the social sciences and nursing literature as well as a search for existing models for teaching excellence revealed an apparent dearth of evidence specific to excellence in nursing education. Therefore, we developed the Caring Framework for Excellence in Nursing Education. This framework evolved from a review of the generic constructs that exemplify teaching excellence: excellence in teaching practice, teaching scholarship, and teaching leadership. Nursing is grounded in the ethic of caring. Hence, caring establishes the foundation for this uniquely nursing framework. Because a teaching philosophy is intimately intertwined with one's nursing philosophy and the ethic of caring, it is also fundamental to the caring framework. Ideally, this framework will contribute to excellence in nursing education and as a consequence excellence in nursing practice and optimal patient care.

  4. Status of nurse staffing and nursing care delivery in Pudong, Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jiang; Chen, Li; Yan, Gu; Haiyan, Lu; Wenqin, Ye

    2014-10-27

    Abstract Aim To evaluate nurse staffing levels and nursing care delivery in adult general medical or surgical wards of hospitals in the Pudong district of Shanghai, China. Background Rapid economic development and improved Chinese living standards have spurred increased demands for high quality health care. Thus, the quality of nursing services has become a focus of attention. Design A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used for the study. Methods We used an anonymous survey to collect data from 1614 nurses from 98 wards in seven general hospitals in Pudong, Shanghai. Results During day shifts, the nurse-to-patient ratios were >1:10. However, these ratios were much higher during evening and night shifts. The clinical front-line nursing workforce primarily consisted of nurses with junior college degrees that had limited working experience. Junior nurses with different educational backgrounds, professional levels, and work experiences were assigned almost similar nursing care work as senior nurses. Conclusions In the surveyed hospitals in the Pudong district, nurse staffing levels and skill mix may be inadequate to meet the increasing demands of patient care. The clinical nursing workforce needs to be strengthened and used effectively to enhance the quality and safety of patient care. Relevance to clinical practice We should focus on the quantity and quality of the nursing workforce, as well as nursing skill utilization.

  5. Caring in Correctional Nursing: A Systematic Search and Narrative Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Kirnvir; Hirst, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses are the primary healthcare providers for offenders in correctional facilities. The way in which correctional nurses care for offenders can be difficult in this context. Following a systematic review and narrative synthesis of literature regarding how correctional nurses show caring for offenders three themes emerged: the struggle of custody and caring (conflicting ethical and philosophical ideologies, correctional priorities that override nursing priorities, safety and security), the need to be nonjudgmental (judgmental attitudes can impact care; focus on health not the crime), and the importance of boundaries. Implications for practice focus on recommendations to promote caring in correctional nursing; the outcome of which will potentially enhance quality of care for offenders and improve working environments for nurses.

  6. Negotiating futility, managing emotions: nursing the transition to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Broom, Alex; Kirby, Emma; Good, Phillip; Wootton, Julia; Yates, Patsy; Hardy, Janet

    2015-03-01

    Nurses play a pivotal role in caring for patients during the transition from life-prolonging care to palliative care. This is an area of nursing prone to emotional difficulty, interpersonal complexity, and interprofessional conflict. It is situated within complex social dynamics, including those related to establishing and accepting futility and reconciling the desire to maintain hope. Here, drawing on interviews with 20 Australian nurses, we unpack their accounts of nursing the transition to palliative care, focusing on the purpose of nursing at the point of transition; accounts of communication and strategies for representing palliative care; emotional engagement and burden; and key interprofessional challenges. We argue that in caring for patients approaching the end of life, nurses occupy precarious interpersonal and interprofessional spaces that involve a negotiated order around sentimental work, providing them with both capital (privileged access) and burden (emotional suffering) within their day-to-day work.

  7. Strengthening Nursing Education To Improve End-of-life Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Betty R.; Virani, Rose; Grant, Marcia

    1999-01-01

    As the members of the health care team who spend the most time with patients who are facing death, nurses are aware of the need for improved end-of-life (EOL) care and have identified resources to achieve that goal by improving education. A survey of 725 nursing faculty and state boards indicates an awareness of the need for improved EOL care and…

  8. Design and Implementation of a Caring Curriculum in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Becky

    2009-01-01

    Although the nursing profession has traditionally been associated with compassionate, patient, and caring behaviors, living in this advanced technological environment where patient related skills and tasks are often rushed caring behaviors are sometimes not seen. In order to improve high school nursing assistant student caring behaviors as well…

  9. Magnet nursing services recognition: transforming the critical care environment.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C A

    2001-08-01

    History repeats itself despite the best intentions of those in the nursing profession. Once again there is an emerging shortage of nurses, and critical care units are particularly affected. The work environment in critical care and medical/surgical units is demanding and stressful, but little effort has been made to mitigate the working conditions that cause nurses to leave. It is possible to apply lessons from magnet hospital research spanning the past 18 years to alter the pattern of repeated nursing shortages. The process of receiving the magnet nursing services designation has transformed the work environment for all nurses at the University of California Davis Medical Center. This broadly focused article describes the transformation process and the culture of an institution that values and consequently retains the best nurses to provide outstanding patient care despite the nursing shortage.

  10. Transforming care in nursing: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Calatayud, Mónica; Oroviogoicoechea, Cristina; Saracibar, Maribel; Pumar-Méndez, María J

    2017-04-01

    Although the concept of 'Transforming care' is promising for improving health care, there is no consensus in the field as to its definition. The aim of this concept analysis is to develop a deeper understanding of the term 'Transforming care' within the nursing discipline, in order to facilitate its comprehension, implementation, and evaluation. We performed a comprehensive literature review on electronic databases such as Medline (PubMed), Cinahl (Ebsco), Cochrane Library, PsycINFO (Ovid), Web of Science, Wiley-Blackwell, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink and used Walker and Avant's approach to analyse the concept. From the 20 studies selected for this analysis, 3 main attributes of 'Transforming care' were identified: patient-centredness, evidence-based change, and transformational leadership driven. We suggest an operational definition to facilitate the implementation of the concept in practice. Furthermore, we propose that implementation is guided by the following key ideas: (1) fostering a culture of continuous improvement; (2) encouraging bottom-up initiatives; (3) promoting patient-centred care; and (4) using transformational leadership. Lastly, the evaluation of 'Transforming care' initiatives should assess care processes and professionals' and patients' outcomes.

  11. A taxonomy of nursing care organization models in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last decades, converging forces in hospital care, including cost-containment policies, rising healthcare demands and nursing shortages, have driven the search for new operational models of nursing care delivery that maximize the use of available nursing resources while ensuring safe, high-quality care. Little is known, however, about the distinctive features of these emergent nursing care models. This article contributes to filling this gap by presenting a theoretically and empirically grounded taxonomy of nursing care organization models in the context of acute care units in Quebec and comparing their distinctive features. Methods This study was based on a survey of 22 medical units in 11 acute care facilities in Quebec. Data collection methods included questionnaire, interviews, focus groups and administrative data census. The analytical procedures consisted of first generating unit profiles based on qualitative and quantitative data collected at the unit level, then applying hierarchical cluster analysis to the units’ profile data. Results The study identified four models of nursing care organization: two professional models that draw mainly on registered nurses as professionals to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support to nurses’ professional practice, and two functional models that draw more significantly on licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and assistive staff (orderlies) to deliver nursing services and are characterized by registered nurses’ perceptions that the practice environment is less supportive of their professional work. Conclusions This study showed that medical units in acute care hospitals exhibit diverse staff mixes, patterns of skill use, work environment design, and support for innovation. The four models reflect not only distinct approaches to dealing with the numerous constraints in the nursing care environment, but also different degrees of approximations to an “ideal” nursing professional practice

  12. Nursing care of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, E

    1988-01-01

    Nursing interventions for each of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, muscle rigidity, bradykinesia, tremors at rest and postural reflex abnormalities, are designed to increase the patient's quality of life by minimizing symptoms. Nurses are responsible for planning patient medication schedules to maximize drug effectiveness. Dietary implications include a low-protein regimen for the patient during the day, eliminating foods high in Vitamin B6, high caloric foods, and soft-solid foods offered at frequent feedings. Constipation is addressed by increasing the patient's fiber and fluid intake and by increasing the patient's mobility. Patient mobility is increased when the patient is taught purposeful activities and to concentrate on the way he walks. Communication is facilitated if the patient takes deep breaths before speaking and uses diaphragmatic speech. A telephone receiver which amplifies the patient's voice is also available. Interventions are good only if the patient chooses to implement them; he is the head of the health team planning his care.

  13. [Nursing care of endovascular aneurysm repair patients].

    PubMed

    Fan, Ya-Fen; Chien, Chen-Yen; Yang, Hui-Yuan; Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-04-01

    The treatment of aortic disease previously used conventional open surgery to replace the aorta with artificial vascular prosthesis after resecting the lesioned segment. The recently developed technique of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) uses a stent graft to reinforce the diseased aortic wall while allowing blood flow continuity and preventing further aortic expansion, dissection and aortic rupture. Taiwan's National Health Insurance now covers payment for authorized EVAR procedures, making treatments safer for patients who are elderly, have congestive heart failure, have multiple comorbidities, or have other high-risk factors. EVAR is gradually replacing previous methods to become the primary treatment approach for aortic disease. This article discusses the development of EVAR, indications, operative procedures, complications, postoperative risk factors, and clinical nursing problems. We hope that this article provides new information on nursing care for patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair surgery.

  14. Critical care nursing in acute postoperative neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Christin

    2015-03-01

    The nursing discipline is vital throughout patients' hospital progression. One of the most critical moments in the hospital stay is the postoperative period. Neurosurgical patients require a high level of nursing care and vigilance and additional postoperative monitoring in intensive care units designed specifically for this demographic. In the postoperative setting, patient care must be transferred from anesthesia to nursing in a manner that is continuous and safe. This article focuses on neurosurgical patients in the postoperative period, the assessment of these patients, and critical care nursing, with emphasis on common issues and interventions for this dynamic patient population.

  15. Perceived nursing service quality in a tertiary care hospital, Maldives.

    PubMed

    Nashrath, Mariyam; Akkadechanunt, Thitinut; Chontawan, Ratanawadee

    2011-12-01

    The present study explored nurses' and patients' expectations of nursing service quality, their perception of performance of nursing service quality performed by nurses, and compared nursing service quality, as perceived by nurses and patients. The sample consisted of 162 nurses and 383 patients from 11 inpatient wards/units in a tertiary care hospital in the Maldives. Data were collected using the Service Quality scale, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The results indicated that the highest expected dimension and perceived dimension for nursing service quality was Reliability. The Responsiveness dimension was the least expected dimension and the lowest performing dimension for nursing service quality as perceived by nurses and patients. There was a statistically significant difference between nursing service quality perceived by nurses and patients. The study results could be used by nurse administrators to develop strategies for improving nursing service quality so that nursing service delivery process can be formulated in such a way as to reduce differences of perception between nurses and patients regarding nursing service quality.

  16. Mind-mapped care plans: a remarkable alternative to traditional nursing care plans.

    PubMed

    Mueller, A; Johnston, M; Bligh, D

    2001-01-01

    Nursing care plans have helped students learn problem solving for nursing practice, but creativity and the interrelationship of patient problems are not stimulated by their linear nature. Joining mind mapping with care planning forces connections, engages whole brain thinking, and stimulates creativity. The authors describe mind mapping, infusion of mind-mapped care plans into the curriculum, the teaching/learning process of mapped care plans, and the positive outcomes of mind mapping nursing care plans.

  17. Nursing Care Aesthetic in Iran: A Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Radmehr, Maryam; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Abedsaeedi, Zhila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the emphasis of contemporary nursing theories on the belief that nursing is a science and an art in care, published studies show that only the nursing science has developed. Many experts believe that by recognizing and perceiving this concept, the clinical field can develop aesthetic knowledge in nursing and education of students. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explain clients and nurses perspective of nursing care aesthetics. Patients and Methods: Using an interpretive phenomenology, 12 clients and 14 nurses were interviewed. Participants in this study were purposefully selected and their experiences were analyzed using Van Manen’s hermeneutic phenomenological framework. Results: Emerged themes were as follows: subjective description, overt spirituality, opening desperate impasse, sense of unity, continue to shine, and painful pass and pleasing. According the participants experiences, nursing care aesthetics includes subjective description of spiritual and desirable caring behaviors combined with sense of unity and sympathy between the nurse and the patients, which leads to opening in desperate impasse with creating the feeling of satisfaction and peace in the patient. It is a shining of clinical capabilities and an action beyond what should be combined with a decorating care that leads to a pleasant ending against the pain and suffering of the others for the nurse. Conclusions: Many caring behaviors associate with aesthetic experience for both patients and nurses and despite two different views, findings of this study showed that these experiences were similar in most cases. The aesthetics of nursing care was defined as what reflects the holistic nature of nursing with an emphasis on spirituality and skill. Results of this study are effective in identification of the values existed in nurse caring behaviors and developing of profession by instruction, implementation, and evaluation them. PMID:26339668

  18. Delivery of nursing care in Alabama public schools.

    PubMed

    Terry, Allison J

    2009-02-01

    Many states, including Alabama, allow registered nurses (RNs) in school settings to delegate procedures such as assistance with medication to unlicensed assistive personnel. In Alabama, the Board of Nursing(the Board) is accountable for enforcing the regulations that allow for this action. The Alabama Board of Nursing Administrative Code addresses delegation by school nurses and lists specific tasks that cannot be delegated because they require nursing judgment. As a result of this reporting requirement, Alabama's Center for Nursing, a division of the Board of Nursing, implemented an annual survey of school nurses to determine how nursing care is delivered to students in Alabama public schools. This study investigates the results of this survey and its implications for school nursing both in Alabama and in other states.

  19. Transnational spaces of care: migrant nurses in Norway.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Lise Widding

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that international nurse recruitment from Latvia to Norway is not a win–win situation. The gains and losses of nurse migration are unevenly distributed between sender and receiver countries. On the basis of empirical research and interviews with Latvian nurses and families they left behind, this article argues that nurse migration transforms families and communities and that national health services now become global workplaces. Some decades ago feminist research pointed to the fact that the welfare state was based on a male breadwinner family and women’s unpaid production of care work at home. Today this production of unpaid care is “outsourced” from richer to poorer countries and is related to an emergence of transnational spaces of care. International nurse recruitment and global nurse care chains in Norway increasingly provide the labor that prevents the new adult worker model and gender equality politics from being disrupted in times where families are overloaded with elder care loads.

  20. AAFP and ISFM feline-friendly nursing care guidelines.

    PubMed

    Carney, Hazel C; Little, Susan; Brownlee-Tomasso, Dawn; Harvey, Andrea M; Mattox, Erica; Robertson, Sheilah; Rucinsky, Renee; Manley, Donna Stephens

    2012-05-01

    NURSING CARE: The term nursing care means different things to different people. The authors of these AAFP and ISFM Feline-Friendly Nursing Care Guidelines define nursing care as any interaction between the cat and the veterinary team (veterinarian, technician or nurse, receptionist or other support staff) in the clinic, or between the cat and its owner at home, that promotes wellness or recovery from illness or injury and addresses the patient's physical and emotional wellbeing. Nursing care also helps the sick or convalescing cat engage in activities that it would be unable to perform without help. GUIDELINES RATIONALE: The purpose of the Guidelines is to help all members of the veterinary team understand the basic concepts of nursing care, both in the clinic and at home. This includes methods for keeping the patient warm, comfortable, well nourished, clean and groomed. The Guidelines provide numerous practical tips gleaned from the authors' many years of clinical experience and encourage veterinary team members to look at feline nursing care in ways they previously may not have considered. OVERARCHING GOAL: The primary goal of feline-friendly nursing care is to make the cat feel safe and secure throughout its medical experience.

  1. Rationing of nursing care and nurse-patient outcomes: a systematic review of quantitative studies.

    PubMed

    Papastavrou, Evridiki; Andreou, Panayiota; Efstathiou, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Bedside rationing in nursing care refers to withholding or failure to carry out certain aspects of care because of limited resources such as time, staffing or skill mix. The absence of previous systematic reviews on nursing care rationing leads to a gap of synthesized knowledge on the factors and processes related to rationing and the potential negative consequences on both patients and nurses. The aim of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of the factors and processes related to nursing care rationing. Selected papers were methodologically assessed based on their design, sampling, measurement and statistical analysis. Seventeen quantitative studies were reviewed, and findings were categorized into four themes: elements of nursing care being rationed, causes of rationing, nurse outcomes and patient outcomes. Results revealed that communication with patients and families, patient ambulation, and mouth care were common elements of rationed care. Nurse-patient workload and communication barriers were reported as potential causes of rationing. Patient-related outcomes included patient falls, nosocomial infections and low patient satisfaction levels. Nurse-related outcomes included low job and occupational satisfaction. In addition, rationing appears to be an important organizational variable linked with patient safety and quality of care. This review increases understanding of what is actually occurring at the point of care delivery so that managers will be able to improve processes that lead to high quality of care and better patient and nurse outcomes.

  2. Measuring End-of-Life Care Processes in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan; Norton, Sally A.; Quill, Timothy; Ladwig, Susan; Veazie, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to develop measures of end-of-life (EOL) care processes in nursing homes and to validate the instrument for measuring them. Design and Methods: A survey of directors of nursing was conducted in 608 eligible nursing homes in New York State. Responses were obtained from 313 (51.5% response rate) facilities.…

  3. An instrumental variables approach to post-acute care nursing home quality: is there a dime's worth of evidence that continuing care retirement communities provide higher quality?

    PubMed

    Bowblis, John R; McHone, Heather S

    2013-09-01

    For the affluent elderly, continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) have become a popular option for long term care and other health care needs related to aging. While CCRCs have experienced significant growth over the last few decades, very little is known about the quality of care CCRCs provide. This paper is the first to rigorously study CCRCs on a national scale and the only study that focuses on nursing home quality. Using a national sample from 2005, we determine if the quality of post-acute care provided by CCRC nursing homes is superior to traditional nursing homes. To mimic randomization of patients, instrumental variables analysis is used with relative distance as an exclusion restriction to handle the endogeneity of the type of facility where care is provided. After adjusting for endogeniety, we find that CCRC nursing homes provide post-acute care quality that is similar or lower to traditional nursing homes, depending on the quality measure.

  4. Nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method: support for nursing care management1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Laura Johanson; Leite, Josete Luzia; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; da Silva, Leila Rangel; da Silva, Thiago Privado

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: construct an explanatory theoretical model about nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, based on the meanings and interactions for care management. METHOD: qualitative research, based on the reference framework of the Grounded Theory. Eight nurses were interviewed at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The comparative analysis of the data comprised the phases of open, axial and selective coding. A theoretical conditional-causal model was constructed. RESULTS: four main categories emerged that composed the analytic paradigm: Giving one's best to the Kangaroo Method; Working with the complexity of the Kangaroo Method; Finding (de)motivation to apply the Kangaroo Method; and Facing the challenges for the adherence to and application of the Kangaroo Method. CONCLUSIONS: the central phenomenon revealed that each nurse and team professional has a role of multiplying values and practices that may or may not be constructive, potentially influencing the (dis)continuity of the Kangaroo Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The findings can be used to outline management strategies that go beyond the courses and training and guarantee the strengthening of the care model. PMID:26155013

  5. Viewing eCare through Nurses' Eyes: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Jeffrey Allan

    2013-01-01

    Published research suggests that the future of health care will be dependent on new technologies that serve to decrease the need for increased numbers of critical-care nurses while also increasing the quality of patient care delivery. The eCare technology is one technology that provides this service in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. The…

  6. Experiences of technology integration in home care nursing.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Valdez, R S; Casper, G R; Kossman, S P; Carayon, P; Or, C K L; Burke, L J; Brennan, P F

    2008-11-06

    The infusion of health care technologies into the home leads to substantial changes in the nature of work for home care nurses and their patients. Nurses and nursing practice must change to capitalize on these innovations. As part of a randomized field experiment evaluating web-based support for home care of patients with chronic heart disease, we engaged nine nurses in a dialogue about their experience integrating this modification of care delivery into their practice. They shared their perceptions of the work they needed to do and their perceptions and expectations for patients and themselves in using technologies to promote and manage self-care. We document three overarching themes that identify preexisting factors that influenced integration or represent the consequences of technology integration into home care: doing tasks differently, making accommodations in the home for devices and computers, and being mindful of existing expectations and skills of both nurses and patients.

  7. Integrating Advanced Practice Nurses in Home Care. Recommendations for a Teaching Home Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitty, Ethel; Mezey, Mathy

    1998-01-01

    A telephone survey of home care agencies and providers revealed a need for the following: evidence of the effectiveness of nurse practitioners in home care, regulatory and financial support for nurse practitioner home care, and development of home care agencies as clinical sites for training. (SK)

  8. Increasing survival with HIV: impact on nursing care.

    PubMed

    Halloran, James

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from a rapidly progressive catastrophic illness to a chronic condition. Individuals with HIV are living longer and developing conditions usually associated with aging, as well as complications from pre-existing or subsequently acquired conditions. In addition, toxicities associated with HAART may precipitate or exacerbate comorbid conditions. As opportunistic infections account for fewer admission and lower mortality rates, new patterns of illness are emerging. Complex interactions among multiple, sometimes overlapping conditions require focused yet comprehensive attention in care and management. Nurses will encounter HIV-infected patients in an increasing range of care settings, and an understanding of the range and interaction of potential comorbidities and their treatments with HIV and its treatment will be required to provide safe and effective care.

  9. [Physiological changes and related nursing care issues during hunger strike].

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yeu-Shan; Chen, Shiu-Lien

    2005-08-01

    The use of hunger strike as a tool to assert grievances has been around for ages and has occasionally happened in the world. Hunger strikers' motives may differ, but their tool is the same--the voluntary refusal of food. Fasting not only results in body weight loss, but also in physiological and neurological function changes, and, of course, it may even threaten life. The health care of hunger strikers is complex. It involves medical staff, medical ethics and guidance for the management of the hunger strikers. Improper medical management may not only undermine the hunger striker's dignity but also risk further damage to his or her health. By understanding hunger strikers' physiological changes and related ethical issues, therefore, we aim to identify appropriate forms of nursing care management and guidance for the care of hunger strikers.

  10. Factors Affecting Nurse Staffing in Acute Care Hospitals: A Review and Critique of the Literature. Nurse Planning Information Series 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John P.; And Others

    A critical review of literature on factors affecting nurse staffing in acute care hospitals, with particular regard for the consequences of a movement from team nursing to primary nursing care, was conducted. The literature search revealed a need for more research on the philosophy of nursing and nursing goals and policy as they relate to nurse…

  11. 'Busyness' and the preclusion of quality palliative district nursing care.

    PubMed

    Nagington, Maurice; Luker, Karen; Walshe, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Ethical care is beginning to be recognised as care that accounts for the views of those at the receiving end of care. However, in the context of palliative and supportive district nursing care, the patients' and their carers' views are seldom heard. This qualitative research study explores these views. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 26 patients with palliative and supportive care needs receiving district nursing care, and 13 of their carers. Participants were recruited via community nurses and hospices between September 2010 and October 2011. Post-structural discourse analysis is used to examine how discourses operate on a moral level. One discourse, 'busyness', is argued to preclude a moral form of nursing care. The discourse of friendship is presented to contrast this. Discussion explores Gallagher's 'slow ethics' and challenges the currently accepted ways of measuring to improve quality of care concluding that quality cannot be measured.

  12. [Supervising student nurses in the provision of home care].

    PubMed

    Talon-Chrétien, Marie-Claire; Prigent, Alexane; Thirion, Lucille

    2016-01-01

    The private practice nurse may be required to supervise a student during their provision of care to patients in their home. These situations can be mutually rewarding and open the way for discussion around the quality of care.

  13. Companionship and education: a nursing student experience in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L; Vahl, Cheryl; Eland, Joann

    2005-04-01

    Currently, major deficiencies exist in undergraduate nursing education for end-of-life care. Nursing students report feeling anxious and unprepared to be with patients who are dying. A Palliative Care Companion program that allows undergraduate nursing students to volunteer to spend time with patients at the end of life provides a unique educational opportunity to enhance students' knowledge and attitudes toward palliative care. In addition, the program offers a service to patients and families by providing a nonmedical, caring human presence to patients who may be alone, lonely, or bored. In accordance with tenets of Experiential Learning Theory, a Palliative Care Companion program was developed and revised using feedback from initial participants and facilitators. Data collected during the first two semesters indicated increased knowledge of palliative care, improved attitudes about care at the end of life, and fewer concerns about providing nursing care to dying patients, when participating students were compared to their undergraduate peers.

  14. Care, compassion and courage: the museum of mental health nursing - an ethnographic archaeology.

    PubMed

    Holyoake, D-D

    2014-03-01

    Like a museum with carefully positioned exhibits mental health nursing would look different if the display of fashionable dead things in its cultural lineage were viewed through a different lens. This paper has the aim of using transcribed interview data from mental health nurses to explore how their perception of nursing culture represents a particular historical identity (pseudo names given to ensure confidentiality). The paper discusses five themes about the formation of collective identity and concludes that mental health nurses are theoretically well positioned to develop and rethink social recovery models, ideas about fragmented selves and multiple histories that the postmodern age now curates.

  15. [Care in Heidegger: an ontological possibility for nursing].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marília de Fátima Vieira; Carraro, Telma Elisa

    2011-01-01

    Given the dimensions involving human care, this study aimed at providing a reflection on nursing care as an ontological possibility. In Heidegger we consider the concepts that underlie the foundation of his thought. These reflections offer theoretical resource that allows the recognition that live in the everyday actions of nursing is a challenge that leads us to a new look at the magnitude of care. However, the actions of care should not target only the perspective of a philosopher, but live with that thought in search of reflection, and find, scrutinizing everything you contribute to a nursing care committed to the right, with ethics, and with respect for others.

  16. Practical ethical theory for nurses responding to complexity in care.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Roseanne Moody

    2010-05-01

    In the context of health care system complexity, nurses need responsive leadership and organizational support to maintain intrinsic motivation, moral sensitivity and a caring stance in the delivery of patient care. The current complexity of nurses' work environment promotes decreases in work motivation and moral satisfaction, thus creating motivational and ethical dissonance in practice. These and other work-related factors increase emotional stress and burnout for nurses, prompting both new and seasoned nurse professionals to leave their current position, or even the profession. This article presents a theoretical conceptual model for professional nurses to review and make sense of the ethical reasoning skills needed to maintain a caring stance in relation to the competing values that must coexist among nurses, health care administrators, patients and families in the context of the complex health care work environments in which nurses are expected to practice. A model, Nurses' Ethical Reasoning Skills, is presented as a framework for nurses' thinking through and problem solving ethical issues in clinical practice in the context of complexity in health care.

  17. The impact of spiritual care education upon preparing undergraduate nursing students to provide spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Katherine L; Chang, Esther; Sheehan, Athena; Johnson, Amanda

    2013-09-01

    Spiritual care is an important component of holistic care. In Australia competency statements relating to nursing practice emphasise the need to provide care that addresses the spiritual as well as other aspects of being. However, many nurses feel they are poorly prepared to provide spiritual care. This is attributed largely to lack a of spiritual care education provided in undergraduate nursing programmes. A few higher education providers have responded to this lack of spiritual care education by incorporating specific content related to this area into their undergraduate nursing programme. Minimal international studies have investigated the impact of spiritual care education on undergraduate nursing students and no Australian studies were identified. This review explores spiritual care education in undergraduate nursing programmes and identifies the need for an Australian study.

  18. Nurses eating nurses: the caring profession which fails to nurture its own!

    PubMed

    Davey, Leanne

    2002-10-01

    For many years student nurses were trained in a more disciplined approach with considerable time allocated to working in the hospital environment and specified times allowed for gaining theoretical knowledge throughout their formal training. Nurses therefore gained a tremendous amount of experience and competency in their practical skills. With the introduction of more specialized equipment and technology it was now desirable to improve the professional status of nurses and nursing education. The introduction of university trained nurses has been met with much criticism. Student nurses are now being empowered and informed with theoretical knowledge from many health disciplines that allows them to use a holistic approach to patient care. The changes to nurse education were hoped to improve the professional status of nurses although this transition has not been without problems. Experienced nurses who are already working in stressful conditions with continuous staff shortages and poor recognition of service see the student nurse sometimes as an extra hindrance to their already increasing workload. Student nurses are theoretically competent but lack the clinical expertise and experience to complement this knowledge which can also add to the professional pressure that experience nurses encounter. Most nurses would like to see themselves, as promoters of nursing but are frustrated and disillusioned with their profession. It would seem then that student nurses as a result of this dissatisfaction are often devoured by some nurses instead of being encouraged and nurtured in their enthusiasm for nursing.

  19. The Integrality of Situated Caring in Nursing and the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Olga F.

    2012-01-01

    Much emphasis has been placed on the importance of the environment as a determinant of health; however, little theoretical work in nursing has specifically articulated the importance of the nursing practice environment as a factor in patient outcomes. This work advances the unitary-transformative-caring paradigm by focusing on the concept of integrality and exploring the nursing meta-paradigm concepts (nursing, environment, human being, and health) through integral philosophical inquiry. PMID:22222236

  20. [Care management: nurses' actions in a hospital emergency service].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, José Luís Guedes; Lima, Maria Alice Dias da Silva

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to analyze care management actions performed by nurses in a hospital emergency service. This is a qualiative research of the case study type, carried out with nurses from the Emergency Service of a University Hospital in southern Brazil. The data were collected through participant observation and semi-structured interviews, and analyzed using thematic analysis. The results show nurses' actions in care planning, forecasting and provisioning of resources, supervision, leadership and training of the nursing team. In care planning, there is the execution of the nursing process and the control of the realization of laboratory and radiological tests. The actions of forecasting and provisioning of resources were: elaboration of the monthly schedule of employees, daily distribution of the staff and the management of material resources. Leadership encourages the planning of care, the coordination of the nursing staff and the delegation of activities.

  1. Nurses' experiences caring for incarcerated patients in a perinatal unit.

    PubMed

    Zust, Barbara Lois; Busiahn, Lydia; Janisch, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Studies indicate that psychological support of a mother during labor greatly increases the well-being of the mother and the infant. Nurses caring for incarcerated women in birthing centers, provide the only caring support these women have a possibility of receiving. However, there is a dearth of studies that explore nurses' perception of their role in caring for female offenders. The purpose of this article is to present a study that explored nurses' perception of caring for incarcerated women in a perinatal setting. Findings of the study indicated that nurses have difficulty working around the shackles that tied a laboring offender to the bed, and found the guards in the room to be intrusive. Some nurses advocated for the patients; others felt that the women were getting what they deserved. Most nurses struggled with the emotions of the incarcerated mom leaving behind her newborn upon return to prison.

  2. The importance and challenge of paying for quality nursing care.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Lynn Y; Hassmiller, Susan B; Reinhard, Susan C

    2008-05-01

    Historically, the economic value that nursing brings to the patient care process has not been recognized or quantified. Improving the quality of nursing care through work environment changes or increases in staffing is viewed by many as an added cost, but the benefits in terms of money saved through improved nursing satisfaction and patient outcomes are not considered. This article introduces nine articles that were originally presented at the Economics of Nursing Invitational Conference: Paying for Quality Nursing Care held at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey, June 13 and 14, 2007. Recommendations are to conduct research on the impact of policy and payment changes on the nursing workforce and quality of care and to correct the misalignment of socioeconomic and business case incentives for quality by payment systems and other changes.

  3. Synergizing acute care and palliative care to optimise nursing care in end-stage cardiorespiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia M; Introna, Kate; Cockburn, Jill; Daly, John; Dunford, Mary; Paull, Glenn; Dracup, Kathleen

    2002-05-01

    Advances in the practice of medicine and nursing science have increased survival for patients with chronic cardiorespiratory disease. Parallel to this positive outcome is a societal expectation of longevity and cure of disease. Chronic disease and the inevitability of death creates a dilemma, more than ever before, for the health care professional, who is committed to the delivery of quality care to patients and their families. The appropriate time for broaching the issue of dying and determining when palliative care is required is problematic. Dilemmas occur with a perceived dissonance between acute and palliative care and difficulties in determining prognosis. Palliative care must be integrated within the health care continuum, rather than being a discrete entity at the end of life, in order to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Anecdotally, acute and critical care nurses experience frustration from the tensions that arise between acute and palliative care philosophies. Many clinicians are concerned that patients are denied a good death and yet the moment when care should be oriented toward palliation rather than aggressive management is usually unclear. Clearly this has implications for the type and quality of care that patients receive. This paper provides a review of the extant literature and identifies issues in the end of life care for patients with chronic cardiorespiratory diseases within acute and critical care environments. Issues for refinement of acute and critical care nursing practice and research priorities are identified to create a synergy between these philosophical perspectives.

  4. Technology, cognitive remediation, and nursing: directions for successful cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Vance, David E; McNees, Patrick; Meneses, Karen

    2009-02-01

    Many older adults experience cognitive difficulties and declines as a part of normal aging. Nurses and other health care professionals will require assistance in technologies that can help older patients maintain or improve cognition. Cognitive remediation represents a well-established laboratory approach that augments cognitive functioning in older adults. Emerging technologies allow such cognitive remediation to be self-administered through gaming software, making it convenient, fun, and inexpensive to deliver. As such, guiding older patients, as well as some facilities, in this direction may be a way to help. However, certain caveats and suggestions are warranted.

  5. Culture and religion in nursing: providing culturally sensitive care.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Aysha

    Last month, Aysha Mendes discussed the impact on care of personal beliefs held by both nurses and patients. This month, she delves into the aspects of culture and religion, which form important pieces of this puzzle, as well as the importance of culturally appropriate care provision in nursing practice.

  6. [Recruitment and training of prehospital emergency care nurses in Paris].

    PubMed

    Pladec, Boris Martin le; Menoret, Romuald; Rodes, Raphaël

    2016-11-01

    In collaboration with the ambulance driver and the emergency doctor, the prehospital nurse provides care in a universe which is often difficult and sometimes hostile. Whether they are a nurse from the Samu (urgent medical aid service) or from the Paris fire service, how are they recruited and what training do these emergency care professionals receive?

  7. Nurses bring primary health care to industrial workers.

    PubMed

    Rojas, P; Stark, R; Tembo, P

    1990-01-01

    Progress in bringing health care to the workplace lags considerably behind progress in bringing health care to where people live. Experience in Botswana shows that the family nurse practitioner--a registered nurse midwife with one year of post-basic training--can provide useful preventive and curative services to people in their places of work.

  8. A Pilot Study of Nurses' Experience of Giving Spiritual Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Using spiritual and religious resources gives patients and families strength to cope during a crisis, but nurses often do not offer spiritual care (Kloosterhouse & Ames, 2002). The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore nurses" lived experience of giving spiritual care. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to…

  9. Launching care partners in medical-surgical nursing.

    PubMed

    Cusanza, Sharon

    2012-04-01

    In the wake of health care reform, a large health system developed a new model of medical-surgical nursing care delivery. To facilitate the subsequent culture change, a non-traditional educational approach was used to provide a dynamic experiential venue that included real-time feedback to facilitate nurses' behavioral transformation.

  10. Modesty Among Muslim Women: Implications for Nursing Care.

    PubMed

    Mujallad, Alaa; Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2016-01-01

    Modesty is central to Islamic life. Modesty is exemplified in dress and behavior with persons of the opposite sex. Because ethical nursing care requires respecting patient culture and religiosity, nurses should be able to provide care that respects Muslim interpretations of modesty.

  11. Learning Opportunities for Nurses Working within Home Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Solveig

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore home care nurses' experience of learning in a multicultural environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study was based on qualitative research design. Data were collected through repeated interviews with registered home care nurses working in a multicultural area. The data were analyzed through a…

  12. Patient care in a technological age.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Natalie

    2006-07-01

    In this electronically wired world of the 21 st century, the health care system has tapped into technology available at the touch of a button. Scientific discoveries, high-tech equipment, electronic medical records, Smarticards, and long distance diagnosis using telehealth technology have all been embraced. But Natalie Dragon asks, what are the implications for nurses and the outcomes on patient care?

  13. Nursing workload in public and private intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lilia de Souza; Koike, Karina Mitie; Sardinha, Débora Souza; Padilha, Katia Grillo; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study sought to compare patients at public and private intensive care units according to the nursing workload and interventions provided. Methods This retrospective, comparative cohort study included 600 patients admitted to 4 intensive care units in São Paulo. The nursing workload and interventions were assessed using the Nursing Activities Score during the first and last 24 hours of the patient's stay at the intensive care unit. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, the Mann-Whitney test, and Student's t test were used to compare the patient groups. Results The average Nursing Activities Score upon admission to the intensive care unit was 61.9, with a score of 52.8 upon discharge. Significant differences were found among the patients at public and private intensive care units relative to the average Nursing Activities Score upon admission, as well as for 12 out of 23 nursing interventions performed during the first 24 hours of stay at the intensive care units. The patients at the public intensive care units exhibited a higher average score and overall more frequent nursing interventions, with the exception of those involved in the "care of drains", "mobilization and positioning", and "intravenous hyperalimentation". The groups also differed with regard to the evolution of the Nursing Activities Score among the total case series as well as the groups of survivors from the time of admission to discharge from the intensive care unit. Conclusion Patients admitted to public and private intensive care units exhibit differences in their nursing care demands, which may help managers with nursing manpower planning. PMID:24213086

  14. Caring behaviours of student nurses: Effects of pre-registration nursing education.

    PubMed

    Loke, Jennifer C F; Lee, Kah Wai; Lee, Bryant K; Mohd Noor, Asmah

    2015-11-01

    In an increasing technologised and cost-constrained healthcare environment, the role of pre-registration nursing education in nurturing and developing the professional caring disposition of students is becoming far more critical than before. In view of this growing demand, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Singapore's pre-registration nursing programmes on students' concept of caring. A descriptive quantitative cross-sectional survey collected data using the Caring Behaviour Inventory from first and final year student nurses, nurse lecturers and nurses in practice. The findings based on student surveys indicated a statistically significant reduction in the overall level of caring behaviour in first to final year students. When compared with the findings of lecturers and nurses, less variance to lecturers than to nurses was found amongst the first years' score, and the lowest variance to nurses was demonstrated amongst the final year. A greater reduction was evidenced amongst Singaporean students, which was exaggerated with exposure to pre-enrolled nursing education and magnified with caring job experience. This study indicates more effort is necessary to harness student caring attributes in students' entire educational journey so that expressive caring is not subsumed in the teaching of students to meet demands of complicated contemporary care.

  15. A family nursing educational intervention supports nurses and families in an adult intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Eggenberger, Sandra K; Sanders, Marita

    2016-11-01

    The family experience of critical illness is filled with distress that may have a lasting impact on family coping and family health. A nurse can become a source of comfort that helps the family endure. Yet, nurses often report a lack of confidence in communicating with families and families report troubling relationships with nurses. In spite of strong evidence supporting nursing practice focused on the family, family nursing interventions often not implemented in the critical care setting. This pilot study examined the influence of an educational intervention on nurses' attitudes towards and confidence in providing family care, as well as families' perceptions of support from nurses in an adult critical care setting. An academic-clinical practice partnership used digital storytelling as an educational strategy. A Knowledge to Action Process Framework guided this study. Results of pre-intervention data collection from families and nurses were used to inform the educational intervention. A convenience sample of family members completed the Iceland Family Perceived Support Questionnaire (ICE-FPSQ) to measure perception of support provided by nurses. Video, voice, and narrative stories of nurses describing their experiences caring for family members during a critical illness and family members' experiences with a critically ill family member also guided education plans. When comparing the pre and post results of the Family Nurse Practice Scale (FNPS), nurses reported increased confidence, knowledge, and skill following the educational intervention. Qualitative data from nurses reported satisfaction with the educational intervention. Findings suggest that engaging nurses in educational opportunities focused on families while using storytelling methods encourages empathic understandings. Academic-clinician teams that drive directions show promise in supporting families and nurses in critical care settings. Plans are moving forward to use this study design and methods in

  16. Role and Responsibilities of the School Nurse (Registered Nurse) and the Child with Special Health Care Needs. Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board of Nursing, Baltimore.

    This set of guidelines by the Maryland Board of Nursing presents the role and responsibilities of the school nurse in relation to the child with special health care needs. The introduction identifies four basic issues including necessary level of preparation, who determines what nursing care can be delegated, under what conditions nursing care can…

  17. Nursing and en route care: history in time of war.

    PubMed

    Davis, R Scott; Connelly, Linda K

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the en route caregiver is to provide critical care in military helicopters for wounded Warriors. This care minimizes the effects of the wounds and injuries, and improves morbidity and mortality. This article will focus on the history of Army Nursing en route care. From World War II through Vietnam, and continuing through the War on Terrorism in Iraq and Afghanistan, Army nurses served in providing en route care in military airplanes and helicopters for patients being transported to higher echelons of care. From aid stations on the battlefield to forward surgical teams which provide life, limb, and eyesight saving care, to the next higher level of care in combat support hospitals, these missions require specialized nursing skills to safely care for the high acuity patients. Before the en route care concept existed, there was not a program to train nurses in these critical skills. There was also a void of information about patient outcomes associated with the nursing assessment and care provided during helicopter medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) of such unstable patients, and the consequent impact on the patient's condition after transport. The role of critical care nurses has proven to be essential and irreplaceable in providing full-spectrum care to casualties of war, in particular, the postsurgical patients transferred from one surgical facility to another in theatre. However, we have only recently developed the concepts over the required skill set, training, equipment, functionality, evidenced-based care, and sustainability of nursing in the en route care role. Much of the work to quantify and qualify nursing care has been done by individuals and individual units whose lessons-learned have only recently been captured.

  18. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... professional nurse. (b) Exception. Medicare does not pay for the services of a private duty nurse or attendant. An individual is not considered to be a private duty nurse or attendant if he or she is an...

  19. Where is nursing in the electronic health care record?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Beverly; Petrovskaya, Olga; McIntyre, Marjorie; Frisch, Noreen

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore the possibilities for documenting professional nursing practice in an electronic health record. Recognizing that there are a variety of approaches to electronic documentation, the intent of this discussion is to generate a general rather than a particular approach to this issue. Nurses themselves must determine the ways in which professional nursing care will be captured in the electronic systems used in their facilities. Questions that arise from nursing include: How can nurses balance generalized care and protocol management with the need for documentation of each individual's nursing needs and particular experiences? How can the goals of nursing care be incorporated into the record? How can nursing actions/interventions be clearly communicated to all members of the health care team? In what ways can an electronic record document collaboration with the client to determine individualized outcomes of care and treatment? In considering these questions a number of issues arise: the selection of standardized languages to be used in the records, the title of the record, the tension between coding and text, the accessibility and transferability of the record, the ability to retrieve data on nursing outcomes through data mining techniques, ownership of the record, and privacy/security of the information stored. Although the paper will make no attempt to answer these questions it will draw on relevant journal articles to provide a context for this pivotal change in that way we account for health care practice.

  20. Hospital Magnet® Designation and Missed Nursing Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Tubbs-Cooley, Heather L; Pickler, Rita H; Mara, Constance A; Othman, Mohammad; Kovacs, Allison; Mark, Barbara A

    2016-12-09

    Missed nursing care is an emerging measure of front-line nursing care effectiveness in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Given Magnet® hospitals' reputations for nursing care quality, missed care comparisons with non-Magnet® hospitals may yield insights about how Magnet® designation influences patient outcomes. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to evaluate the relationship between hospital Magnet® designation and 1) the occurrence of nurse-reported missed care and 2) reasons for missed nursing care between NICU nurses employed in Magnet® and non-Magnet® hospitals. A random sample of certified neonatal intensive care unit nurses was invited to participate in a cross-sectional survey in 2012; data were analyzed from nurses who provided direct patient care (n=230). Logistic regression was used to model relationships between Magnet® designation and reports of the occurrence of and reasons for missed care while controlling for nurse and shift characteristics. There was no relationship between Magnet® designation and missed care occurrence for 34 of 35 types of care. Nurses in Magnet® hospitals were significantly less likely to report tensions and communication breakdowns with other staff, lack of familiarity with policies/procedures, and lack of back-up support from team members as reasons for missed care. Missed nursing care in NICUs occurs regardless of hospital Magnet® recognition. However, nurses' reasons for missed care systematically differ in Magnet® and non-Magnet® hospitals and these differences merit further exploration.

  1. Psychiatric Nurses' Views on Caring: Patients and Canine Companions.

    PubMed

    King, Camille

    2017-03-01

    Psychiatric nurses are expert care providers for individuals with mental health needs. The art of caring spans across multiple species, is important to understand, and is universal whether intentions are toward individuals or animals. Pets are often cared for and viewed as family members. The current research examined psychiatric nurses' views on the similarities and differences of caring for patients and their pet dogs. Twenty-five nurses were interviewed. Similarities of caring for patients and canines included trusting relationships, companionship, daily basic needs, and improved communication through monitored body language. Differences in caring included personal expectations, unconditional love, and professional boundaries. Understanding the concepts of caring for patients and pet dogs will provide the opportunity for insight into familial versus professional relationships, improve communication with others, and strengthen the human-animal bond. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(3), 46-52.].

  2. Phenomenological study of ICU nurses' experiences caring for dying patients.

    PubMed

    King, Phyllis Ann; Thomas, Sandra P

    2013-11-01

    This existential phenomenological study explored caring for the dying based on the philosophical works of Merleau-Ponty. Fourteen critical care nurses were asked to describe lived experiences of caring for dying patients. An encompassing theme of Promises to Keep emerged, with five subthemes, including the following: (a) promise to be truthful: "Nurses are in the game of reality," (b) promise to provide comfort: "I'll make him comfortable," (c) promise to be an advocate: "Just one more day," (d) "Promise that couldn't be kept," and (e) "Promise to remain connected." The essence of intensive care nurses' lived experience of caring for dying patients is captured in the theme Promises to Keep. Nurses accept the reality of death and express strong commitment to making it as comfortable, peaceful, and dignified as possible, despite critical care unit environments that foster a "paradigm of curing" rather than a "paradigm of caring.".

  3. Factors predicting clinical nurses' willingness to care for Ebola virus disease-infected patients: A cross-sectional, descriptive survey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Soo; Choi, Jeong Sil

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors predicting clinical nurses' willingness to care for Ebola virus disease (EVD)-infected patients. Data were collected from 179 nurses employed at 10 hospitals in Korea using self-reporting questionnaires. Only 26.8% of the participants were willing to care for EVD-infected patients. Factors predicting their willingness to provide care were their belief in public service, risk perception, and age. Nurses' willingness to provide care was high when their belief in public service was high, low when their risk perception was high, and low as their age increased. In order to strengthen nurses' willingness to care for EVD-infected patients, education that targets the enhancement of belief in public service should be included in nurse training. Efforts should be directed toward lowering EVD risk perception and developing systematic responses through government-led organized support.

  4. Healthy Aging: Paying for Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... This information in Spanish ( en español ) Paying for health care More information on paying for health care Better ... Coping without insurance More information on paying for health care Explore other publications and websites Age Page: Choosing ...

  5. Trappings of technology: casting palliative care nursing as legal relations.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ann-Claire

    2012-12-01

    Community palliative care nurses in Perth have joined the throng of healthcare workers relying on personal digital assistants (PDAs) to store, access and send client information in 'real time'. This paper is guided by Heidegger's approach to technologies and Habermas' insights into the role of law in administering social welfare programs to reveal how new ethical and legal understandings regarding patient information add to nursing's professional responsibilities. This qualitative research interprets data from interviews with twenty community palliative care nurses about clients' legal rights to informational privacy and confidentiality. It explores nurses' views of their nursing responsibilities regarding clients' legal rights, liability issues, bureaucratic monitoring and enforcement procedures. It concludes that nurses and clients are construed as legal subjects entrenched in legal relations that have magnified since these nurses began using PDAs in 2005/2006.

  6. Care assistant experiences of dementia care in long-term nursing and residential care environments.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Rebecca; Brewer, Gayle

    2016-11-01

    Care assistants have a unique insight into the lives of service users and those factors which may impede or enhance the delivery of high quality dementia oriented care. To address the paucity of research in this area, the present study examined care assistant experiences of dementia care in British long-term residential and nursing environments. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight care assistants and transcripts were analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Super-ordinate themes emerging from the data were psychological wellbeing of the care assistant, barriers to effective dementia care, the dementia reality and organisational issues within the care environment. The study revealed important deficiencies in understanding and varying levels of dementia training. Whilst person centred strategies were being implemented, task orientated care remained dominant. Furthermore, care assistants reported taking the perspectives of those with dementia into account, and actively using these to develop relationship centred care.

  7. The rural community care gerontologic nurse entrepreneur: role development strategies.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Rosalie A

    2005-10-01

    Rural elderly individuals are an underserved population with limited access to health care. There is an increasing need for independent community care nurses to provide assistance to home-based elderly individuals with chronic illnesses to prevent unnecessary medical and placement decisions and, thus, allow them to maintain independence and quality of life. This article describes the rural setting and why community care nurses are needed, and explores strategies for implementing the role of the independent nurse entrepreneur in caring for community-based elderly individuals in rural settings.

  8. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  9. [Transformative Care Rooted in Evidence-Based Nursing].

    PubMed

    Chiang, Li-Chi; Liao, Mei-Nan

    2017-02-01

    As clinical scientists on the interdisciplinary healthcare team, nurses use the art and science of current nursing knowledge to provide evidence-based healthcare to each patient and his/her family. Nurses not only comprise the largest contingent of medical personnel and provide 24-hour patient care but are also professional scientists that develop unique nursing knowledge through reflective practice. Five strategies for expanding the body of current evidence-based nursing scientific knowledge include: (1) reflecting empirically on the practice-service domain, (2) developing nursing knowledge using rigorous methodology, (3) emancipating nursing knowledge using innovative transformation, (4) using collaborative interdisciplinary healthcare that is based in patient-centered care, and (5) initiating innovative transformation in nursing education. Nurses are critical healthcare providers that make important contributions to today's healthcare system. Nursing scientists provide frontline, evidence-based transforming care that deserves to be respected and valued on an equal basis with the care and services that are provided by other medical personnel.

  10. Caring for female patients: The experiences of male nurses.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Brian; Gleeson, Madeline

    This article presents the results of two small qualitative studies, which examined the experiences of six male registered psychiatric nurses (RPN) and five male registered general nurses (RGN) when caring for patients of the opposite sex. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect the data. The focus of the interviews was an attempt to describe the male nurses' experiences of caring for women with a particular emphasis on interventions that involved physical touch. Themes were generated from both studies and the common themes are presented here. Male nurses in this study were often apprehensive about using physical touch and they used coping strategies in response to their fears of being accused of using touch inappropriately. Several factors also influenced the male nurses when using physical touch as an intervention. These findings suggest that learning about caring for female patients needs to be included in the undergraduate curriculum and that further research on the experience of men as nurses is required.

  11. Nursing Activities Score: nursing work load in a burns Intensive Care Unit1

    PubMed Central

    Camuci, Marcia Bernadete; Martins, Júlia Trevisan; Cardeli, Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the nursing work load in a Burns Intensive Care Unit according to the Nursing Activities Score. Method an exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. The Nursing Activities Score was used for data collection between October 2011 and May 2012, totalling 1,221 measurements, obtained from 50 patients' hospital records. Data for qualitative variables was described in tables; for the quantitative variables, calculations using statistical measurements were used. Results the mean score for the Nursing Activities Score was 70.4% and the median was 70.3%, corresponding to the percentage of the time spent on direct care to the patient in 24 hours. Conclusion the Nursing Activities Score provided information which involves the process of caring for patients hospitalized in a Burns Intensive Care Unit, and indicated that there is a high work load for the nursing team of the sector studied. PMID:26107842

  12. Analysis of Emergency Department Nurse Attitudes Toward Caring for Ethnically Diverse Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-31

    assessments of both the patient and the nurse (Charonko, 1992). Transcultural Nursing Madeleine Leininger (1991), in an effort to improve health care to...ethnically diverse clients, stresses the importance of considering cultural needs among patients. The founder of transcultural nursing, Leininger ...other health care services (1991) . Leininger describes transcultural nursing as a blend of nursing and anthropology which attempts to help nurses

  13. Optimizing undergraduate nursing education: demystifying care of older adults in the home setting.

    PubMed

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie

    2006-01-01

    It is a challenge to provide experiences for nursing students that allow them to experience a professional relationship with older adults in the home setting. Home health agencies are under pressure related to productivity demands and may not provide preceptored experiences for students. Nursing students may not know any older adults outside of the institutional setting and consequently may have many misconceptions about what is and is not normal aging. This article describes an undergraduate nursing class and the out-of-classroom assignments that increased student understanding of nursing practice in the home, the effects of the home environment on the care of older adults, and the experiences of older adults living in the community. This article has relevance to nurses because it is important that we participate in creative methods of teaching students to value older adults and how to care for them in the community.

  14. Encounters in Home-Based Nursing Care - Registered Nurses’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The encounter between registered nurses and persons in need of healthcare has been described as fundamental in nursing care. This encounter can take place face-to-face in physical meetings and through meetings via distance-spanning technology. A strong view expressed in the literature is that the face-to-face encounter is important and cannot entirely be replaced by remote encounters. The encounter has been studied in various healthcare contexts but there is a lack of studies with specific focus on the encounter in home-based nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the encounter in home-based nursing care based on registered nurses’ experiences. Individual interviews were performed with 24 nurses working in home-based nursing care. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis and six themes were identified: Follows special rules, Needs some doing, Provides unique information and understanding, Facilitates by being known, Brings energy and relieves anxiety, and Can reach a spirit of community. The encounter includes dimensions of being private, being personal and being professional. A good encounter contains dimensions of being personal and being professional and that there is a good balance between these. This is an encounter between two human beings, where the nurse faces the person with herself and the profession steadily and securely in the back. Being personal and professional at the same time could encourage nurses to focus on doing and being during the encounter in home-based nursing care. PMID:23847697

  15. Leadership, Education and Awareness: A Compassionate Care Nursing Initiative.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Anne H

    2015-03-01

    The Canadian Nurses' Association Code of Ethics (2008) and the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia (CRNNS) Standards of Practice for Registered Nurses (CRNNS 2011) identify the provision of safe, compassionate, competent and ethical care as one of nursing's primary values and ethical responsibilities. While compassion has historically been viewed as the essence of nursing, there is concern that this has become an abstract ideal, rather than a true reflection of nursing practice. This paper describes a compassionate care initiative undertaken by the CRNNS and the initial outcomes of these educational workshops. This work is informed by an exploration of the multiplicity of factors that have brought this issue to the fore for nursing regulators, educators, administrators, the public as well as front-line staff. The two most significant areas of learning reported by workshop participants included understanding the connection between mindfulness, non-judgmental care and compassion/self-compassion and recognizing possibilities for action related to compassionate care, even in the face of personal and environmental constraints. Implications for nursing regulators and leaders include consideration of their roles and responsibilities in supporting nurses to meet professional practice standards, such as provision of compassionate care.

  16. Critical care family needs: nurse-family member confederate pairs.

    PubMed

    Forrester, D A; Murphy, P A; Price, D M; Monaghan, J F

    1990-11-01

    In this study we explored the relationship between critical care family members' perceived needs and the assessment of these needs by a confederate sample of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses. Family needs were measured by using Molter's revised Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Data consisted of 92 confederate pairs of Critical Care Family Needs Inventory responses obtained from 92 family members of adult patients hospitalized in a variety of ICUs and 49 ICU nurses providing direct care for these patients. Paired t tests (two tailed) were calculated to detect significant differences between confederate pairs of family members' perceptions and ICU nurses' assessments of the importance of the needs studied. Family members' perceptions and ICU nurses' assessments of the most and least important critical care family needs were identified. Significant (p less than 0.001 to p less than 0.05) differences were detected between confederate pairs of family members' perceptions and ICU nurses' assessments of the importance of 15 (50%) of the critical care family needs studied. Therefore, it appears that these nurses were only moderately accurate in their assessments of critical care family needs. Implications for nursing practice, education, and research were identified and discussed.

  17. Teaching on spiritual care: The perceived impact on qualified nurses.

    PubMed

    Baldacchino, Donia R

    2011-01-01

    This study unit as part of the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) programme aimed at reviving the spiritual dimension in nursing care. This paper discusses the perceived impact of the study unit Spiritual Coping in Illness and Care on qualified nurses. The paucity of literature demonstrates some benefits perceived by the learners namely, clarification of the concepts of spirituality and spiritual care, self-awareness of personal spirituality and their current clinical practice which neglects the spiritual dimension. The ASSET model [Narayanasamy, A., 1999. ASSET: a model for actioning spirituality and spiritual care education and training in nursing. Nurse Education Today 19, 274-285] guided the teaching of this study unit. The nature of this study unit demanded an exploratory method of teaching to encourage the nurses to be active participants. Qualitative data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire from the three cohort groups of qualified nurses who undertook this study unit in 2003-2004 (A: n=33), 2004-2005 (B: n=35) and 2006-2007 (C: n=35). Learners found the study unit as a resource for updating their knowledge on spirituality in care and increased self-awareness of their own spirituality and nursing care. They acknowledged their role as change agents in order to implement holistic care in collaboration with the multidisciplinary team. Recommendations were proposed to integrate the spiritual dimension in education and patient care.

  18. Nursing care at the end of life: a service learning course for undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Jeffers, Stephanie; Ferry, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    An elective course titled "Nursing Care at the End of Life" was designed for fourth-year nursing students in a baccalaureate nursing program. This course, taught by the authors, was designed to teach students about caring for the dying patient. Students were required to complete service learning with patients in a hospice or hospital setting. Students reported having a positive learning experience and gaining new knowledge and a deeper understanding of the needs of dying patients and their families.

  19. Lactating Rats Retain Nursing Behavior and Maternal Care in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, Megan E.; Ronca, April E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, suckling mammals were flown in space for the first time as part of the NIH.R3 experiment sponsored jointly by NIH (National Institutes of Health) and NASA. Six rat dams and litters (Rattus norvegicus) were launched on an eight-day Space Shuttle mission at each of three postnatal ages (P5, P8, and P15). Dams and litters (N = 10 pups/litter) were housed within modified Animal Enclosure Modules (AEMs). Comparisons were made to ground controls. Dams and litters were videotaped daily in flight. The P8 and P15 flight litters showed excellent survival (99%) and weight gain relative to AEM ground controls, whereas P5 litters showed reduced survival (0% and 60%, respectively) and weight gain (less than 40% AEM). To examine the possibility that failures of maternal care contributed to P5 results, we analyzed the dams' in-flight nursing, licking and retrieving from four video segments ranging from twelve to fifteen minutes in length with control data derived from multiple ground segments. Video analyses revealed clear evidence of maternal care in flight. For P5 dams, frequency and duration of nursing and licking bouts fell within or above one standard deviation of control values. Retrieving was noted in the P5 and P8 groups only. The observed results suggest that factors other than maternal care contributed to the low survival rates and body weight gains of the P5 flight offspring.

  20. How Do Information and Communication Technologies Influence Nursing Care?

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Côté, José; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Hudson, Emilie; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-known advantages of information and communication technologies (ICTs), their overall impact on nursing care has not been synthesized. The objective of this overview of systematic reviews is to summarize the best evidence regarding the effects of ICTs on nursing care. We considered quantitative, qualitative and mixed-method reviews published since January 1995. Two reviewers independently screened the title and abstract of 5515 papers to assess their eligibility. From these, 72 full-text papers were evaluated and 28 publications met the inclusion criteria. Three reviewers extracted and compared their data. Preliminary results show that the following dimensions of nursing care are the most frequently reported: assessment, care planning and evaluation, documentation time, quality of care and patient safety. This overview provides a starting point from which to compare and contrast findings of separate reviews regarding the positive, neutral and negative effects of ICTs on nursing care.

  1. Rising to the challenge of health care reform with entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial nursing initiatives.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anne; Whitaker, Nancy; Whitford, Deirdre

    2012-05-31

    Health reform worldwide is required due to the largely aging population, increase in chronic diseases, and rising costs. To meet these needs, nurses are being encouraged to practice to the full extent of their skills and take significant leadership roles in health policy, planning, and provision. This can involve entrepreneurial or intrapreneurial roles. Although nurses form the largest group of health professionals, they are frequently restricted in their scope of practice. Nurses can help to improve health services in a cost effective way, but to do so, they must be seen as equal partners in health service provision. This article provides a global perspective on evolving nursing roles for innovation in health care. A historical overview of entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship is offered. Included also is discussion of a social entrepreneurship approach for nursing, settings for nurse entre/intrapreneurship, and implications for research and practice.

  2. End-of-life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) Training Program: improving palliative care in critical care.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty R; Dahlin, Constance; Campbell, Margaret L; Paice, Judith A; Malloy, Pam; Virani, Rose

    2007-01-01

    The integration of palliative care in critical care settings is essential to improve care of the dying, and critical care nurses are leaders in these efforts. However, lack of education in providing end-of-life (EOL) care is an obstacle to nurses and other healthcare professionals as they strive to deliver palliative care. Education regarding pain and symptom management, communication strategies, care at the end of life, ethics, and other aspects of palliative care are urgently needed. Efforts to increase EOL care education in most undergraduate and graduate nursing curricula are beginning; yet, most critical care nurses have not received formal training in palliative care. Moreover, educational resources such as critical care nursing textbooks often contain inadequate information on palliative care. The ELNEC-Critical Care program provides a comprehensive curriculum that concentrates on the requirements of those nurses who are working in areas of critical care. Extensive support materials include CD-ROM, binder, Web sites, newsletters, textbooks, and other supplemental items. The ultimate goal is to improve EOL care for patients in all critical care settings and enhance the experience of family members witnessing the dying process of their loved ones.

  3. Evidence based practice: are critical care nurses ready for it?

    PubMed

    Bucknall, T; Copnell, B; Shannon, K; McKinley, D

    2001-08-01

    In the emergence of the evidence based practice movement, critical care nurses have struggled to identify scientific evidence on which to base their clinical practice. While the lack of critical care nursing research is a major concern, other important issues have significantly stalled the implementation of evidence even when it is available. A descriptive study of 274 critical care nurses was undertaken to examine nursing research activity in Victorian critical care units. The study aimed to identify critical care nurses' research skills, the barriers encountered in participation and implementation and the current availability of resources. Results revealed that 42 per cent of the nurses who participated in the study believed that they were not prepared adequately to evaluate research, and less than a third believed they were sufficiently skilled to conduct valid scientific studies. An association was found between nurses' ability to confidently perform research activities and higher academic qualifications. The study found that there is a lack of organisational support and management commitment for the development of evidence based nursing. In order to facilitate the implementation of evidence based practice, clinicians must be made aware of the available resources, be educated and mentored when carrying out and using clinical research, and be supported in professional initiatives that promote evidence based practice. It is argued that this will have positive implications for patient outcomes in the critical care environment.

  4. From Nurse to Nurse Anesthetist: The Influence of Age and Gender on Professional Socialization and Career Commitment of Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugaman, Wynne R.; Lohrer, Donna J.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 1,106 student nurse anesthetists (40% male) showed that increasing age was negatively correlated with socioeconomic rewards. Male gender was positively correlated with administrative/supervisory roles, female gender with holistic patient care. Men achieved socialization more readily in occupational orientation. (SK)

  5. What does the Affordable Care Act mean for nursing?

    PubMed

    Luther, Brenda; Hart, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Nurses are ethically bound to engage in efforts of improving health and healthcare delivery and, even more important, nurses recently have been called out as key leaders in the reform of healthcare delivery, including many components of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, its history, and what healthcare will look like during and after implementation are addressed in this article. A discussion of the role and value of nurses in healthcare reform accompanies knowledge-building and action-oriented resources available to nurses and clients.

  6. [Nursing care to the client with hypertension: a bibliographic review].

    PubMed

    Moura, Denizielle de Jesus Moreira; Bezerra, Sara Taciana Firmino; Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhães; Fialho, Ana Virgínia de Melo

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the nursing care practices to the client with hypertension in the scientific production in the last ten years. It was carried out a bibliographic study, using in the BIREME, the LILACS, SciELO and BDENF's data basis, selecting thirty articles. The results were exposed in charts, tables and graphics, where prevails, in the literature analyzed, the nursing consultation as the more used practice, through the nursing attendance systematization and the Health Education with individual approaches, besides the realization of home visits with family approach. One believes that the systematization of nursing care will contribute in an expressive manner to the adhesion to the antihypertensive treatment.

  7. [Coordinating home assistance and nursing care for global patient management].

    PubMed

    Cerf, Dominique

    Enabling patients to remain in their home is only possible when the different services, both from within and outside the hospital are able to communicate and when the recommended actions are properly coordinated. Entrusting the coordination of the care to the Spasad (polyvalent service for home assistance and nursing care) enables the expectations of the patients and family carers to be analysed. This allows the team to put in place the appropriate actions both in terms of assistance and nursing care.

  8. [Coordinating home assistance and nursing care for global patient management].

    PubMed

    Cerf, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Enabling patients to remain in their home is only possible when the different services, both from within and outside the hospital are able to communicate and when the recommended actions are properly coordinated. Entrusting the coordination of the care to the Spasad (polyvalent service for home assistance and nursing care) enables the expectations of the patients and family carers to be analysed. This allows the team to put in place the appropriate actions both in terms of assistance and nursing care.

  9. The Neurointensive Care Nursery and Evolving Roles for Nursing.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, Susan; Carley, Annette; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal neurocritical care is an emerging subspecialty that combines the expertise of critical care medicine and neurology with that of nursing and other providers in an interprofessional team approach to care. Neurocritical care of the neonate has roots in adult and pediatric practice. It has been demonstrated that adults with acute neurologic conditions who are treated in a specialized neurocritical care unit have reduced morbidity and mortality, as well as decreased length of stay, lower costs, and reduced need for neurosurgical procedures. In pediatrics, neurocritical care has focused on various primary and secondary neurologic conditions complicating critical care that also contribute to mortality, morbidity, and duration of hospitalization. However, the concept of neurocritical care as a subspecialty in pediatric practice is still evolving, and evidence demonstrating improved outcomes is lacking. In the neonatal intensive care nursery, neurocritical care is also evolving as a subspecialty concept to address both supportive and preventive care and optimize neurologic outcomes for an at-risk neonatal patient population. To enhance effectiveness of this care approach, nurses must be prepared to appropriately recognize acute changes in neurologic status, implement protocols that specifically address neurologic conditions, and carefully monitor neurologic status to help prevent secondary injury. The complexity of this team approach to brain-focused care has led to the development of a specialized role: the neurocritical care nurse (neonatal intensive care nursery [NICN] nurse). This article will review key concepts related to neonatal neurocritical care and the essential role of nursing. It will also explore the emerging role of the NICN nurse in supporting early recognition and management of at-risk infants in this neonatal subspecialty practice.

  10. Human resource management strategies for the retention of nurses in acute care settings in hospitals in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Pamela; Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy

    2007-04-01

    It is paramount that there is an adequate nursing workforce supply for now and in the future, to achieve equitable and quality health outcomes and consumer access to healthcare, regardless of geographic location. Nursing forms the largest body of employees in the health care system, spanning all segments of care. A shortage of nurses, particularly in the acute care settings in hospitals, jeopardizes the provision of quality health care to consumers. This article provides a literature review of Australian State and Federal Government reports into nurse retention. All reports discuss staff turnover rates; the average age of nurses; enrolment numbers in nursing courses; workloads; nursing workforce shortfalls and the effect on the work environment; leadership and management styles; organizational culture; change management; the mobility of nursing qualifications both locally and internationally and the critical need to value nurses. Then why has the situation of nurse retention not improved? Possible reasons for the continued nurse shortage and the promise of strategic HRM in addressing nurse retention are discussed.

  11. Nursing Education and the Nuclear Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Susan

    1989-01-01

    Literature of nursing education and baccalaureate nursing education programs were surveyed to investigate the degree to which nurses' professional responsibility for preventing nuclear war is being addressed. It was found that the literature does not adequately reflect the level of activity and interest within nursing education about nuclear…

  12. CARES: AACN's New Competencies and Recommendations for Educating Undergraduate Nursing Students to Improve Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty; Malloy, Pam; Mazanec, Polly; Virani, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Nurses spend the most time of any health care professional caring for patients and families dealing with the challenges of serious illness. The demand for nursing expertise in palliative care is growing as more people are living with chronic, life-limiting illnesses. Nursing faculty must prepare future nurses to meet this demand. The new American Association of Colleges of Nursing Palliative Competencies And Recommendations for Educating undergraduate nursing Students document, released February 2016, identifies the 17 competencies that all undergraduate nursing students should achieve by the time of graduation. This historic document is a revision of the 1998 American Association of Colleges of Nursing Peaceful Death document and is now the guiding framework for undergraduate nursing education. In an effort to support nursing faculty and prepare nursing students to deliver quality palliative care, an innovative, interactive on-line undergraduate End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) curriculum is under development and will be released in January 2017. This new curriculum will meet the competencies and recommendations for achieving those competencies outlined in the Competencies And Recommendations for Educating undergraduate nursing Students document.

  13. Redesigned nursing practice: a case management model for critical care.

    PubMed

    Ritter, J; Fralic, M F; Tonges, M C; McCormac, M

    1992-03-01

    Changes within the health care system necessitate changes in nursing practice. Given the financial environment and the need to balance the cost/quality equation, case management will become increasingly important and has the potential to become the predominant care delivery system of the 1990s. This transition represents a tremendous opportunity for nursing. The CCM role offers many potential advantages and benefits for individual nurses and the profession as a whole. Nurses practicing as case managers have the opportunity to function in a highly professional, independent manner with a great deal of interdisciplinary collaboration. In addition to the challenges and satisfactions of the work itself, the nurse case manager may also enjoy a higher salary and more scheduling control and flexibility. The broader advantages of case management include its benefits to patients and institutions and its fit with current trends in the health care environment. Nurse case managers manage hospital systems to produce optimal clinical outcomes for patients in the shortest time using as few resources as possible. This approach to care delivery places nurses in a position to demonstrate the tremendous contribution they can make to achieving the institution's goal of delivering high-quality, cost-effective care. Thus, case management fits extremely well with current trends in health care financing and outcome measurement. The model described in this article illustrates one approach to implementing these important concepts in a critical care setting.

  14. Competence of nurses in the intensive cardiac care unit

    PubMed Central

    Nobahar, Monir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Competence of nurses is a complex combination of knowledge, function, skills, attitudes, and values. Delivering care for patients in the Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) requires nurses’ competences. This study aimed to explain nurses’ competence in the ICCU. Methods This was a qualitative study in which purposive sampling with maximum variation was used. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 23 participants during 2012–2013. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by using the content-analysis method. Results The main categories were “clinical competence,” comprising subcategories of ‘routine care,’ ‘emergency care,’ ‘care according to patients’ needs,’ ‘care of non-coronary patients’, as well as “professional competence,” comprising ‘personal development,’ ‘teamwork,’ ‘professional ethics,’ and ‘efficacy of nursing education.’ Conclusion The finding of this study revealed dimensions of nursing competence in ICCU. Benefiting from competence leads to improved quality of patient care and satisfaction of patients and nurses and helps elevate nursing profession, improve nursing education, and clinical nursing. PMID:27382450

  15. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care.

  16. Nurses' Error Management in Critical Care Units: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Peyrovi, Hamid; Valiee, Sina

    Nursing errors are common in critical care units, and nurses are in the first line of confrontation. The purpose of this study was to explore the processes of managing nursing errors in critical care units in Iran and to develop a theoretical explanation of the phenomenon. This was a grounded theory study. We recruited a sample of 18 critical care nurses for the study. The sampling method was purposive and then changed to theoretical. The data were collected through in-depth interviews. For data analysis, we employed the constant comparative analysis technique. The core category of the study was "continuous situational analysis." The main categories were situational analysis and error removal. When nurses confronted an error, they opted for analyzing the error situation in terms of the nature of error, probable consequences, monitoring, and life threat. Accordingly, they employed error removal strategies such as self-action, cooperation, notifying, and censoring. These steps happened concurrently, successively, or cyclically. To manage their committed errors, nurses usually go through an informal process. Nurse-managers need to design effective error management strategies and require the practicing nurses to adhere to them. A practical model for effective prevention and management of nursing errors in critical care units is necessary.

  17. Suicidal patients as experienced by psychiatric nurses in inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Carlén, Pontus; Bengtsson, Anita

    2007-08-01

    Psychiatric nurses have a major influence on the lives of patients with suicidal behaviour in inpatient care. Despite this, there is a lack of knowledge about how nurses experience patients with suicidal behaviour in a deeper sense. The aim of this study was to investigate how psychiatric nurses experience patients with suicidal behaviour within an inpatient psychiatric context. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 11 psychiatric nurses, each of whom had more than 5 years of experience caring for patients with suicidal behaviour. Data were analysed using qualitative latent content analysis. Two main themes emerged from the data analysis. These are 'labelled' and 'suffering'. In the nurses' natural attitude, they saw patients as being labelled with different conditions and/or behaviours based on objective signs. These were categorized into different groups or identities such as psychiatric diagnosis, mask wearer, screened-off, or the social, relapsing or determined patient. On reflection, however, the nurses described the patients' suffering in terms related to feelings of hopelessness, meaninglessness, and being out of control. The nurses' experiences of the patients as suffering were based on their subjective reflective experience of the patients. The study gives support to the conclusion that two main logic systems are represented in the care of patients with suicidal behaviour: technical practical and nursing perspectives. In order to ensure that these two logic systems combine, it is necessary for the psychiatric care organization to intervene to support the nurses in reflecting on their everyday work.

  18. Nurses speak out for home care: winning the last great civil rights battle.

    PubMed

    Halamandaris, Val J

    2009-06-01

    In closing, it is clear that home care nurses are a very special breed. They are missionaries, committed to the goal of helping vulnerable Americans manage their health care needs and to preserving the freedoms and the independence that everyone cherishes. As is clear from the vignettes above, their first and last thoughts each day are for the well-being of their patients. They are so busy providing sophisticated care for a raft of complex medical problems common to their patients and filling out Medicare forms that they sometimes forget to take care of themselves. There is no doubt that they make a difference in the lives of patients and their families. Historically, nurses have been reluctant to take time away from caring for patients to take part in politics. As is evident from the summaries above and the stories of nurses from all 50 states that follow, nurses have had a change of heart. They have reached the conclusion that they must advocate for the aged, infirm, disabled and dying patients because patients cannot speak out for themselves. More and more nurses are becoming involved. One out of every 44 voters today is a nurse. Nurses show up at the polls; home care nurses have made it their responsibility to help make sure that homebound person vote by absentee ballot. They are also committed to march, to speak out for home care and hospice in what more and more are coming to call The Last Great Civil Rights Battle. They are also pushing for the inclusion of home and community based long-term care as part of national health care reform. They believe that home care is the answer to keeping the 12 percent of Americans who suffer from multiple chronic diseases and generate 75 percent of U.S. health care costs out of the hospital. The historian Arnold Toynbee put all these issues in perspective when he wrote that it is possible to measure the longevity and the accomplishment of any society by a common yardstick. I heard President John F. Kennedy quote Toynbee in

  19. [Compassionate nursing care: the experience of italian nurses].

    PubMed

    De Carlo, Paola; Guerra, Denise; Rega, Maria Luisa; Galletti, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Scopo. Nella letteratura infermieristica internazionale compassion e compassionate care hanno assunto una notevole importanza e si rivelano essere un fenomeno in divenire. Il concetto di compassionate nursing care risulta poco descritto ed oggettivato nella pratica infermieris-tica nel nostro Paese. Scopo di questo studio è stato di descrivere le esperienze di un campione di infermieri italiani circa il significato di cure infermieristiche compassionevoli. Metodo. È stato condotto uno studio qualitativo. Per la raccolta dei dati sono stati utilizzati i focus group, per analizzare i dati trascritti è stata utilizzata l’analisi di contenuto. Per lo studio è stato individuato un campione propositivo di 21 infermieri, di questi 15 hanno dato la disponibilità a partecipare. Risultati e discussione. Tutti i partecipanti hanno espresso liberamente le loro opinioni. Dall’analisi dei dati relativi alle quattro aree indagate con i focus group: definizione, la propria esperienza, tipologie di pazienti e formazione alle cure infermieristiche compassionevoli sono emersi aspetti contrastanti che variano da accezioni negative e negazione dei termini stessi a significati positivi di amore, carità, empatia, supporto, sostegno, relazione. Interessante ed innovativo è stato l’attribuire l’insegnamento delle cure compassionevoli ai parenti. Conclusioni. E’ risultato difficile per i partecipanti dare una definizione precisa sul significato di cure infermieristiche compassionevoli. E’ emersa la necessità e il desiderio di approfondire questo tema che risulta essere originale e un punto di forza per migliorare l’assistenza infermieristica. Infatti, puntare al recupero di questi valori educando gli infermieri ad erogare cure infermieristiche compassionevoli può sicuramente rappresentare un’implicazione futura per la professione.

  20. Care left undone’ during nursing shifts: associations with workload and perceived quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Jane E; Murrells, Trevor; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Morrow, Elizabeth; Griffiths, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence to show that lower nurse staffing levels in hospitals are associated with worse patient outcomes. One hypothesised mechanism is the omission of necessary nursing care caused by time pressure—‘missed care’. Aim To examine the nature and prevalence of care left undone by nurses in English National Health Service hospitals and to assess whether the number of missed care episodes is associated with nurse staffing levels and nurse ratings of the quality of nursing care and patient safety environment. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 2917 registered nurses working in 401 general medical/surgical wards in 46 general acute National Health Service hospitals in England. Results Most nurses (86%) reported that one or more care activity had been left undone due to lack of time on their last shift. Most frequently left undone were: comforting or talking with patients (66%), educating patients (52%) and developing/updating nursing care plans (47%). The number of patients per registered nurse was significantly associated with the incidence of ‘missed care’ (p<0.001). A mean of 7.8 activities per shift were left undone on wards that are rated as ‘failing’ on patient safety, compared with 2.4 where patient safety was rated as ‘excellent’ (p <0. 001). Conclusions Nurses working in English hospitals report that care is frequently left undone. Care not being delivered may be the reason low nurse staffing levels adversely affects quality and safety. Hospitals could use a nurse-rated assessment of ‘missed care’ as an early warning measure to identify wards with inadequate nurse staffing. PMID:23898215

  1. Evolution of the chronic care role of the registered nurse in primary care.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Candia Baker; Beisel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    High-quality, accessible, and efficient primary care is needed as the U.S. health care system undergoes significant change. Advancing the role of registered nurses in the primary care setting is important to the solution. A large academic health center implemented five initiatives to improve the care of chronically ill patients through the expanded role of RNs in the context of the health care team. Role evolution of nurses in the pilots required some continuing education and some additional nursing support to release the pilot nurses from their usual duties. These strategies allowed the nurses to apply interventions that enhanced the coordination of care and promoted patient self-management skills. Some short-term improvements in health status were realized and barriers to self-care were identified and resolved.

  2. Friends of nursing: a community of caring to promote excellence in nursing practice, education, and research.

    PubMed

    Hitchings, Kim S; Capuano, Terry Ann; Herzog, Mary Ellen

    2012-05-01

    More than 25 years ago, the name "Friends of Nursing" was adopted by an academic, community Magnet(®) hospital to signify a model for community support of nursing. From inception, the intent was to recruit philanthropic dollars to promote recognition of and excellence in nursing practice, education, and research. Although philanthropy in health care settings is common, what is unique about this program is the long-standing, dedicated conceptual framework for nursing philanthropy and the very significant number of philanthropic dollars from literally thousands of donors to support a diverse range of activities to affect and advance the professional excellence of nurses and the quality of patient care. This model has been successfully replicated within a wide variety of other health care organizations and nursing services throughout the United States and abroad.

  3. Israeli breast care nurses as a learning organization

    PubMed Central

    Kadmon, Ilana; Kislev, Livia

    2015-01-01

    This article will look at the theory of a Learning Organization as described by Senge and the Israeli Breast Care Nurses as an example. A description of the theory of a Learning Organization, the role of the Breast Care Nurses in Israel and the relation between the two will be described. Since 1996, the role of the Breast Care Nurse was founded in Israel. At that time, the role with its importance was very hard to be recognized by the health care team and other professionals of the multidisciplinary team for breast cancer patients. Since the role was initiated, it had been developing all over Israel through the support given by the Israel Cancer Association. As a learning organization, the Breast Care Nurses have a few goals: To learn to give patients the most updated and relevant information; to be a part and be seen as equal as the other members of the multidisciplinary team for breast cancer patients; to have knowledge which empowers them as a working group; to enable to teach students, mainly nursing students, in basic and further education and to help continually teach a new generation of nurses. This learning organization involves some formal and informal education. Although oncology nurses do much of the ideas we have described, we suggest using a strict model to help in implementing a Learning Organization. Future research can examine the outcomes of a Learning Organization on oncology nursing. PMID:27981086

  4. [The Development of Long-Term Care Policies and the Impact on Nursing].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiao-Chi; Tsai, Yin-Yin; Yeh, Shin-Ting

    2015-10-01

    The government must reform and enhance current medical and long-term care services in order to respond effectively to societal ageing and labor shortage trends and to ensure sustainable operations. The post-acute care system should be reoriented on the home and community instead of the hospital. The Long Term Care Service Act integrates long-term care services that were previously dispersed amongst different departments, sets up a long-term care development fund, and improves the quality and allocation of long-term care services. Moreover, the Long Term Care Insurance Act will implement a bundle payment system to assist disabled families. The integration of automation and information technology will make long-term care more efficient. Although nurses are more skilled at elderly care and counseling than other community care professionals, nurses generally lack training in business management. Home and community-based services thus require better-trained manpower, opportunities to set care agents, and opportunities to offer flexible caring jobs. Therefore, nurses should strengthen their capabilities in post-acute care, business management, cooperation, and coordination.

  5. [The specificities of communication in child nursing care].

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elena Araujo; Tocantins, Florence Romijn; de Souza, Sônia Regina

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to identify the way nurses communicate with children and to analyze how this communication takes place during nursing care. It is a descriptive study that uses concepts associated with social representations. The authors interviewed 49 nurses who care for children in the hospital setting. Data collection occurred through semi-structured interviews. After thematic analysis, results emphasized the importance of spoken language, behavioral language and professional attitude. As evidenced, communication is presented as a phenomenon separate from child care, transcending the transmission of linear information. It is concluded that, in terms of understanding the communication phenomenon in child care, the way in which communication is presented and translated characterizes the relevance of nursing actions that point to a comprehensive perspective in child care.

  6. Should critical care nurses be ACLS-trained?

    PubMed

    Hagyard-Wiebe, Tammy

    2007-01-01

    The aim of resuscitation is to sustain life with intact neurological functioning and the same quality of life previously experienced by the patient. Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) was designed to achieve this aim. However the requirement for ACLS training for critical care nurses working in Canadian critical care units is inconsistent across the country. The purposes of this article are to explore the evidence surrounding ACLS training for critical care nurses and its impact on resuscitation outcomes, and to review the evidence surrounding ACLS knowledge and skill degradation with strategies to support code blue team efficiency for an effective resuscitation. Using the search terms ACLS training, resuscitation, critical care, and nursing, two databases, CINAHL and MEDLINE, were used. The evidence supports the need for ACLS training for critical care nurses. The evidence also supports organized ongoing refresher courses, multidisciplinary mock code blue practice using technologically advanced simulator mannequins, and videotaped reviews to prevent knowledge and skill degradation for effective resuscitation efforts.

  7. Primary care nursing role and care coordination: an observational study of nursing work in a community health center.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Daren R; St Hilaire, Daniel; Flinter, Margaret

    2012-05-31

    Care coordination is a core element of the Patient-Centered Medical Home and requires an effective, well educated nursing staff. A greater understanding of roles and tasks currently being carried out by nurses in primary care is needed to help practices determine how best to implement care coordination and transform into PCMHs. We conducted an observational study of primary care nursing in a Community Health Center by creating a classification schema for nursing responsibilities, directly observing and tracking nurses' work, and categorizing their activities. Ten nurses in eight different practice sites were observed for a total of 61 hours. The vast majority of nursing time was spent in vaccine and medication administration; telephone work; and charting and paper work, while only 15% of their time was spent in activity that was classified broadly as care coordination. Care coordination work appeared to be subsumed by other daily tasks, many of which could have been accomplished by other, lesser trained members of the health care team. Practices looking to implement care coordination need a detailed look at work flow, task assignments, and a critical assessment of staffing, adhering to the principal of each team member working to the highest level of his or her education and license. Care coordination represents a distinct responsibility that requires dedicated nursing time, separate from the day to day tasks in a busy practice. To fully support these new functions, reimbursement models are needed that support such non visit-based work and provide incentives to coordinate and manage complex cases, achieve improved clinical outcomes and enhance efficiency of the health system. This article describes our study methods, data collection, and analysis, results, and discussion about reorganizing nursing roles to promote care coordination.

  8. Racial Differences in Parental Satisfaction with Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nursing Care

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ashley E.; D’Agostino, Jo Ann; Passarella, Molly; Lorch, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nurses provide parental support and education in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), but it is unknown if satisfaction and expectations about nursing care differ between racial groups. Study Design A prospective cohort was constructed of families with a premature infant presenting to primary care between 1/1/10-1/1/13 (N = 249, 52% white, 42% Black). Responses to questions about satisfaction with the NICU were analyzed in ATLAS.ti using standard qualitative methodology. Results 120 (48%) parents commented on nursing. 57% of the comments were positive, with black parents more negative (58%) than white parents (33%). Black parents were most dissatisfied with how nurses supported them, wanting compassionate and respectful communication. White parents were most dissatisfied with inconsistent nursing care and lack of education about their child. Conclusions Racial differences were found in satisfaction and expectations with neonatal nursing care. Accounting for these differences will improve parental engagement during the NICU stay. PMID:27583386

  9. Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland.

  10. Variations in levels of care between nursing home patients in a public health care system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the setting of a public health service we analyse the distribution of resources between individuals in nursing homes funded by global budgets. Three questions are pursued. Firstly, whether there are systematic variations between nursing homes in the level of care given to patients. Secondly, whether such variations can be explained by nursing home characteristics. And thirdly, how individual need-related variables are associated with differences in the level of care given. Methods The study included 1204 residents in 35 nursing homes and extra care sheltered housing facilities. Direct time spent with patients was recorded. In average each patient received 14.8 hours direct care each week. Multilevel regression analysis is used to analyse the relationship between individual characteristics, nursing home characteristics and time spent with patients in nursing homes. The study setting is the city of Trondheim, with a population of approximately 180 000. Results There are large variations between nursing homes in the total amount of individual care given to patients. As much as 24 percent of the variation of individual care between patients could be explained by variation between nursing homes. Adjusting for structural nursing home characteristics did not substantially reduce the variation between nursing homes. As expected a negative association was found between individual care and case-mix, implying that at nursing home level a more resource demanding case-mix is compensated by lowering the average amount of care. At individual level ADL-disability is the strongest predictor for use of resources in nursing homes. For the average user one point increase in ADL-disability increases the use of resources with 27 percent. Conclusion In a financial reimbursement model for nursing homes with no adjustment for case-mix, the amount of care patients receive does not solely depend on the patients’ own needs, but also on the needs of all the other residents

  11. Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings.

  12. Mental health nurses' diabetes care skills - a training needs analysis.

    PubMed

    Nash, Michael

    2009-05-28

    This article explores mental health nurses' diabetes training needs. A survey of inpatient and community mental health nurses was undertaken using a 16-item self-reporting questionnaire. Two hundred and twenty questionnaires were sent out and 138 returned, providing a response rate of 63%. Analysis shows that mental health nurses are currently involved in a range of diabetes care activities, however, their knowledge and skills may not be up to date. Mental health nurses also report the growing impact of diabetes care on their workload. Areas of identified training needs include taking blood glucose readings, giving dietary advice, liaison with diabetes nurse specialists and weight management. Mental health services and education providers need to consider developing specific training courses for mental health nurses.

  13. [Nursing care in patients undergoing radiological surgery. A case report].

    PubMed

    Armero-Barranco, David; Ruiz-Mateos, María; Alcaraz-Baños, Miguel; Bernal-Páez, Fernando Luis

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old man with medical diagnoses of long-standing diabetes mellitus, chronic ischemia of the lower limbs and intermittent claudication, for which the patient had been treated with minimally invasive radiological surgery. On arrival at the radiology unit, the patient had nursing diagnoses of anxiety and fear. Intraoperatively, the client had nursing diagnoses of pain, urine retention and infection risk. At discharge, a collaboration problem was detected and hemorrhagic risk. The patient received individualized nursing care. Interventions were planned following the nursing intervention classification (NIC) and the expected results for these interventions followed the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) taxonomy. The application of an appropriate nursing care plan contributes to making the patient's hospital stay easier, more comfortable and less traumatic.

  14. Nursing in a technological environment: nursing care in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rosalind; FitzGerald, Mary

    2006-02-01

    Operating room nurses continue to draw criticism regarding the appropriateness of a nursing presence in the operating room. The technological focus of the theatre and the ways in which nurses in the theatre have shaped and reshaped their practice in response to technological change have caused people within and outside the nursing profession to question whether operating room nursing is a technological rather than nursing undertaking. This paper reports findings from an ethnographic study that was conducted in an Australian operating department. The study examined the contribution of nurses to the work of the operating room through intensive observation and ethnographic interviews. This paper uses selected findings from the study to explore the ways in which nurses in theatre interpret their role in terms of caring in a technological environment.

  15. Missed Nursing Care and Unit-Level Nurse Workload in the Acute and Post-Acute Settings.

    PubMed

    Orique, Sabrina B; Patty, Christopher M; Woods, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This study replicates previous research on the nature and causes of missed nursing care and adds an explanatory variable: unit-level nurse workload (patient turnover percentage). The study was conducted in California, which legally mandates nurse staffing ratios. Findings demonstrated no significant relationship between patient turnover and missed nursing care.

  16. A decision model for community nurses providing bereavement care.

    PubMed

    Brownhill, Suzanne; Chang, Esther; Bidewell, John; Johnson, Amanda

    2013-03-01

    Community (district) nurses play a significant role in assisting and supporting bereaved informal carers (family members and friends) of recently decease clients of palliative care. Bereavement care demands a wide range of competencies including clinical decision-making. To date, little has been known about the decision-making role of community nurses in Australia. The aim of this study was to conduct in-depth examination of an existing data set generated from semi-structured interviews of 10 community nurses providing follow-up bereavement care home visits within an area health service of a metropolitan region of Sydney, Australia. A grounded theory approach to data analysis generated a model, which highlights an interaction between 'the relationship','the circumstances' (surrounding the bereavement),'the psychosocial variant', 'the mix of nurses', 'the workload', and 'the support' available for the bereaved and for community nurses, and elements of 'the visit' (central to bereavement care). The role of community nurses in bereavement care is complex, particularly where decision-making is discretionary and contingent on multiple variables that effect the course of the family's grief. The decision model has the potential to inform community nurses in their support of informal carers, to promote reflective practice and professional accountability, ensuring continuing competence in bereavement care.

  17. Home Care Nursing via Computer Networks: Justification and Design Specifications

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    1988-01-01

    High-tech home care includes the use of information technologies, such as computer networks, to provide direct care to patients in the home. This paper presents the justification and design of a project using a free, public access computer network to deliver home care nursing. The intervention attempts to reduce isolation and improve problem solving among home care patients and their informal caregivers. Three modules comprise the intervention: a decision module, a communications module, and an information data base. This paper describes the experimental evaluation of the project, and discusses issues in the delivery of nursing care via computers.

  18. Palliative care in the community: the challenge for district nurses.

    PubMed

    Bliss, J

    2000-08-01

    Palliative care is expanding out of the hospice, and out of the narrow confines of its association with cancer. It should be a part of all care. District nurses are ideally placed to implement and coordinate palliative care in the community, making use of the talents of many other agencies and professionals. However, because of a lack of communication between these agencies, there is confusion about their roles, and many patients may not be receiving optimal care. This article argues that by promoting interagency and interprofessional communication and cooperation, district nurses can strengthen their role at the heart of palliative care provision in the community.

  19. Relationships between nurses and family caregivers: partners in care?

    PubMed

    Ward-Griffin, C; McKeever, P

    2000-03-01

    Increasing reliance on family care of elderly people at home calls for a critical analysis of the relationship between formal and informal caregivers. Although much has been written about how health professionals and family caregivers should relate to one another, we know very little about the relationships that develop between them. Using data from a qualitative study, this article illustrates that relationships between community nurses and family members caring for frail elders are complex, dynamic, and multifaceted. Shifting boundaries in caring work leads to changes in nurse-family caregiver relationships, which can be categorized as four distinct, yet interconnected, types: (1) nurse-helper, (2) worker-worker, (3) manager-worker, and (4) nurse-patient. Each type is described, and implications for nursing practice and research are discussed.

  20. Nurses' lived experience of Reiki for self-care.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experience of nurses who practice Reiki for self-care. In-person interviews were conducted with 11 nurses who met specific study criteria, using open-ended questions to examine the experience of nurses who are Reiki practitioners, to understand their perceptions of Reiki use in self-treatment, and to appreciate its meaning for them. The Colaizzi method was utilized in data analysis and independent decision trail audits were completed to promote study rigor and trustworthiness of results. Thematic categories and major and minor thematic clusters emerged around the topics of daily stress management, self-healing, spirituality, and interconnectedness of self, others, and beyond. Implications of the study findings for nursing practice and nursing education are discussed. Potential applications of study findings to Jean Watson's transpersonal caring theory located within a caring science framework are explored and recommendations for future research are offered.

  1. Secondary insults related to nursing interventions in neurointensive care: a descriptive pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nyholm, Lena; Steffansson, Erika; Fröjd, Camilla; Enblad, Per

    2014-10-01

    The patients at a neurointensive care unit are frequently cared for in many ways, day and night. The aim of this study was to investigate the amount of secondary insults related to oral care, repositioning, endotracheal suctioning, hygienic measures, and simultaneous interventions at a neurointensive care unit with standardized care and maximum attention on avoiding secondary insults. The definition of a secondary insult was intracranial pressure > 20 mm Hg, cerebral perfusion pressure < 60 mm Hg and systolic blood pressure < 100 mm Hg for 5 minutes or more in a 10-minute period starting from when the nursing intervention began. The insult minutes did not have to be consecutive. The study included 18 patients, seven women and 11 men, aged 36-76 years with different neurosurgical diagnoses. The total number of nursing interventions analyzed was 1,717. The most common kind of secondary insults after a nursing measure was high intracranial pressure (n = 93) followed by low cerebral perfusion pressure (n = 43) and low systolic blood pressure (n = 14). Repositioning (n = 39) and simultaneous interventions (n = 32) were the nursing interventions causing most secondary insults. There were substantial variations between the patients; only one patient had no secondary insult. There were, overall, a limited number of secondary insults related to nursing interventions when a standardized management protocol system was applied to reduce the occurrence of secondary insults. Patients with an increased risk of secondary insults should be recognized, and their care and treatment should be carefully planned and performed to avoid secondary insults.

  2. Continuing Professional Development in Nursing: Does Age Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and compare the views of nurses of different ages on continuing professional development (CPD). The authors were interested in possible differences in the use of formal and especially informal CPD practices between nurses of different ages, and likewise in possible differences in attitudes of…

  3. Mobile computing and the quality of home care nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Paré, Guy; Sicotte, Claude; Moreault, Marie-Pierre; Poba-Nzaou, Placide; Nahas, Georgette; Templier, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the introduction of mobile computing on the quality of home care nursing practice in Québec. The software, which structured and organized the nursing activities in patients' homes, was installed sequentially in nine community health centres. The completeness of the nursing notes was compared in 77 paper records (pre-implementation) and 73 electronic records (post-implementation). Overall, the introduction of the software was associated with an improvement in the completeness of the nursing notes. All 137 nurse users were asked to complete a structured questionnaire. A total of 101 completed questionnaires were returned (74% response rate). Overall, the nurses reported a very high level of satisfaction with the quality of clinical information collected. A total of 57 semi-structured interviews were conducted and most nurses believed that the new software represented a user-friendly tool with a clear and understandable structure. A postal questionnaire was sent to approximately 1240 patients. A total of 223 patients returned the questionnaire (approximately 18% response rate). Overall, patients felt that the use of mobile computing during home visits allowed nurses to manage their health condition better and, hence, provide superior care services. The use of mobile computing had positive and significant effects on the quality of care provided by home nurses.

  4. Operational Failures Detected by Frontline Acute Care Nurses.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kathleen R; Engh, Eileen P; Tubbs-Cooley, Heather; Conley, Deborah Marks; Cupit, Tammy; D'Errico, Ellen; DiNapoli, Pam; Fischer, Joleen Lynn; Freed, Ruth; Kotzer, Anne Marie; Lindgren, Carolyn L; Marino, Marie Ann; Mestas, Lisa; Perdue, Jessica; Powers, Rebekah; Radovich, Patricia; Rice, Karen; Riley, Linda P; Rosenfeld, Peri; Roussel, Linda; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A; Searle-Leach, Linda; Shonka, Nicole M; Smith, Vicki L; Sweatt, Laura; Townsend-Gervis, Mary; Wathen, Ellen; Withycombe, Janice S

    2017-03-15

    Frontline nurses encounter operational failures (OFs), or breakdowns in system processes, that hinder care, erode quality, and threaten patient safety. Previous research has relied on external observers to identify OFs; nurses have been passive participants in the identification of system failures that impede their ability to deliver safe and effective care. To better understand frontline nurses' direct experiences with OFs in hospitals, we conducted a multi-site study within a national research network to describe the rate and categories of OFs detected by nurses as they provided direct patient care. Data were collected by 774 nurses working in 67 adult and pediatric medical-surgical units in 23 hospitals. Nurses systematically recorded data about OFs encountered during 10 work shifts over a 20-day period. In total, nurses reported 27,298 OFs over 4,497 shifts, a rate of 6.07 OFs per shift. The highest rate of failures occurred in the category of Equipment/Supplies, and the lowest rate occurred in the category of Physical Unit/Layout. No differences in OF rate were detected based on hospital size, teaching status, or unit type. Given the scale of this study, we conclude that OFs are frequent and varied across system processes, and that organizations may readily obtain crucial information about OFs from frontline nurses. Nurses' detection of OFs could provide organizations with rich, real-time information about system operations to improve organizational reliability. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Involving family systems in critical care nursing: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Leon, Ana M; Knapp, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The literature indicates that involvement of families in critical care settings is effective in meeting the needs of families and patients during a medical crisis. This article presents basic concepts from family systems theory, including cultural considerations useful in developing nursing care plans that integrate family involvement in the care of critically ill patients.

  6. Principle-based concept analysis: Caring in nursing education

    PubMed Central

    Salehian, Maryam; Heydari, Abbas; Aghebati, Nahid; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Mazloom, Seyed Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this principle-based concept analysis was to analyze caring in nursing education and to explain the current state of the science based on epistemologic, pragmatic, linguistic, and logical philosophical principles. Methods A principle-based concept analysis method was used to analyze the nursing literature. The dataset included 46 English language studies, published from 2005 to 2014, and they were retrieved through PROQUEST, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, SCOPUS, and SID scientific databases. The key dimensions of the data were collected using a validated data-extraction sheet. The four principles of assessing pragmatic utility were used to analyze the data. The data were managed by using MAXQDA 10 software. Results The scientific literature that deals with caring in nursing education relies on implied meaning. Caring in nursing education refers to student-teacher interactions that are formed on the basis of human values and focused on the unique needs of the students (epistemological principle). The result of student-teacher interactions is the development of both the students and the teachers. Numerous applications of the concept of caring in nursing education are available in the literature (pragmatic principle). There is consistency in the meaning of the concept, as a central value of the faculty-student interaction (linguistic principle). Compared with other related concepts, such as “caring pedagogy,” “value-based education,” and “teaching excellence,” caring in nursing education does not have exact and clear conceptual boundaries (logic principle). Conclusion Caring in nursing education was identified as an approach to teaching and learning, and it is formed based on teacher-student interactions and sustainable human values. A greater understanding of the conceptual basis of caring in nursing education will improve the caring behaviors of teachers, create teaching-learning environments, and help experts in curriculum development

  7. Nurses' attitudes to sexuality in caring for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cort, E

    The attitudes of hospice nurses towards psychosexual issues in palliative care were surveyed. Sexuality was acknowledged to be both important and relevant in hospice nursing. A high level of awareness of sexual and relationship issues was apparent, reflecting broadly liberal attitudes.

  8. Patients' Anticipation of Stress in Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Shayna; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined anticipation of stresses in 223 patients recently admitted to nursing homes, who completed the stresses in Institutional Care Scale (SIC). Factor analysis revealed five factors significantly related to psychological and physical variables. Suggests using SIC for admission screening in nursing homes. Appendix contains the SIC. (NRB)

  9. Psychiatric Nursing Faculty Practice: Care within the Community Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richie, Mary Fern; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing faculty practice offers the academic nurse opportunity to generate salary support and integrate students into the real world of mental health care. It promotes scholarship and knowledge-building and has a direct impact on the lives of patients. (Author/JOW)

  10. Family Perceptions of Geriatric Foster Family and Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Rose, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Relatives (N=62) of matched pairs of patients in geriatric foster homes and nursing homes rated care provided to their relatives. Significantly more foster family patients had positive pre-placement attitudes than did nursing home patients. Upon follow-up, relatives of foster patients reported seeing more patient improvement, satisfaction,…

  11. Cognitive Workload of Computerized Nursing Process in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Dal Sasso, Grace Marcon; Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to measure the cognitive workload to complete printed nursing process versus computerized nursing process from International Classification Practice of Nursing in intensive care units. It is a quantitative, before-and-after quasi-experimental design, with a sample of 30 participants. Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index. Six cognitive categories were measured. The "temporal demand" was the largest contributor to the cognitive workload, and the role of the nursing process in the "performance" category has excelled that of computerized nursing process. It was concluded that computerized nursing process contributes to lower cognitive workload of nurses for being a support system for decision making based on the International Classification Practice of Nursing. The computerized nursing process as a logical structure of the data, information, diagnoses, interventions and results become a reliable option for health improvement of healthcare, because it can enhance nurse safe decision making, with the intent to reduce damage and adverse events to patients in intensive care.

  12. Nursing education and the nuclear age

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, S.

    1989-05-01

    As reflected in the nursing literature, nurses have only recently begun discussing professional responsibilities for avoidance of nuclear war. The literature of the 1950s and 1960s focused on issues of civil defense. The 1970s were mostly silent, but with the onset of the 1980s a few articles identified the need for the nursing profession to recognize the importance of nuclear war prevention. The responsibility of nursing education for including content about nuclear issues has not been discussed in the professional literature. The author surveyed baccalaureate programs of nursing education to determine whether this lack of discussion was reflected in nursing curricula. Responses indicated that the literature does not adequately reflect the level of activity and interest occurring within nursing education about nuclear issues. Nevertheless, because there is so little discussion in the professional literature, an implicit message is sent that nuclear issues are not of importance and that nurses should not openly address them.24 references.

  13. Intensive Care Nurses' Views and Practices for Eye Care: An International Comparison.

    PubMed

    Güler, Elem Kocaçal; Eşer, İsmet; Fashafsheh, Imad Hussein Deeb

    2016-02-18

    Eye care is an important area of critical care. However, lack of eye care studies is a common issue across the globe. The aim of this study is to determine the views and practices of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses on eye care in Turkey and Palestine. This descriptive study was conducted using a self-administrated questionnaire. The data were collected from 111 nurses in nine kinds of ICUs in two education hospital. Normal saline (75.9%) was the most commonly reported solution for eye hygiene among the Palestinian nurses, and gauze soaked in normal saline or sterile water (64.3%) were the most frequently used supplies by the Turkish nurses. Although both Palestinian and Turkish ICU nurses took some precautions to prevent eye complications in critical patients, there were some gaps and insufficiencies in the eye care of ICU patients. There is a need for continuing training in this area.

  14. Hypertension management: the primary care nursing role.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ehsan Ullah

    2005-03-01

    Hypertension is a prevalent chronic illness that is implicated in many cardiovascular diseases. Practice nurses and the district nursing team have a major role to play in its management. In this article, current British Hypertension Society guidelines are presented and discussed with regards to their evidence base. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.

  15. A critical ethnographic look at paediatric intensive care nurses and the determinants of nurses' job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Paula R

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine key features within the cultural context in a Canadian Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) environment as experienced by nurses and to identify what these influences are and how they shape nurses' intentions to remain at critically ill children's bedsides for the duration of their careers. This is a qualitative study which follows a critical ethnographic approach. Over 20 hours of observation and face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted. Approximately one third of the nursing population at the research site PICU were interviewed (N=31). Participants describe a complex process of becoming an expert PICU nurse that involved several stages. By the time participants became experts in this PICU they believed they had significantly narrowed the power imbalance that exists between nursing and medicine. This study illuminates the role both formal and informal education plays in breaking the power barrier for nurses in the PICU. This level of expertise and mutual respect between professions aids in retaining nurses in the PICU. The lack of autonomy and/or respect shown to nurses by administrators appears to be one of the major stressors in nurses' working lives and can lead to attrition from the PICU. Family Centred Care (FCC) is practiced in paediatrics and certainly accentuated in the PICU as there is usually only one patient assigned per nurse, who thus afforded the time to provide comprehensive care to both the child and the family. This is considered one of the satisfiers for nurses in the PICU and tends to encourage retention of nurses in the PICU. However, FCC was found to be an inadequate term to truly encompass the type of holistic care provided by nurses in the PICU.

  16. Transcultural nursing and a care management partnership project.

    PubMed

    Lazure, G; Vissandjée, B; Pepin, J; Kérouac, S

    1997-09-01

    This paper aims to illustrate how Leininger's Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality has influenced the research process of a study that emerged from a care management partnership between Canadian nursing teachers and Tunisian nurses. The purpose of the study was to investigate the meanings of care as viewed by university hospital-based Tunisian nurses. The qualitative analysis of data gathered through observation-participation and interviews highlights recurrent patterns and reveals three major professional care themes. For Tunisian nurses care means to secure the patient's cooperation towards the medical regimen within established rules in the hospital; to contribute to curing the patient by using current technology as well as by maintaining their technical skills and improving their medical knowledge; to take charge of the patient to assist the physician in treating disease. This study showed that Tunisian nurses emphasize curing rather than widely shared community values such as interdependence, intercommunication, understanding, presence and responsibility for others. Discussion of the study's findings draws upon the perspective provided by Freire's Oppressed Group Theory. In order to promote cultural congruence within the Care Management Partnership Project in Tunisia, the three predicted modes of care within Leininger's theory guide the decisions and actions for future nursing research and partnership activities.

  17. Discovering the nature of advanced nursing practice in high dependency care: a critical care nurse consultant's experience.

    PubMed

    Fairley, Debra

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes how a critical care nurse consultant's clinical role has evolved within a surgical high dependency unit (SHDU) in a large teaching hospitals trust. In order to provide some background to role development, an overview of the research exploring the nature of advanced nursing practice in the context of critical care will be presented. From the outset, advanced nursing practice was not perceived as the acquisition and application of technical procedures usually undertaken by doctors, but possibly an integration of medicine and nursing where holistic nursing assessment is combined with symptom-focused physical examination. A reflective account of practical problems encountered relating to role integration, professional autonomy, legal and consent issues, non-medical prescribing, and role evaluation will be presented. A model of working that can be applied to high dependency units, integrating the role of the advanced nurse practitioner within the clinical team, will be described.

  18. First and Fourth-Year Student's Perceptions about Importance of Nursing Care Behaviors: Socialization toward Caring

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Azimzadeh, Roghaieh; Aminaie, Nasim; Yousefzadeh, Sedigeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The essence of professional nursing is caring and so, nursing education must make caring as a significant part of their curricula. In this regard, little research exists about how nursing students perceive caring. The aim of this study is to investigate the nursing students' perception toward caring and thus, the impact of socialization process on their perception of caring will be determined. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done among all first and fourth-year nursing students (n=230) in Tabriz and Urmia faculties of nursing, 2012. Data were collected using Larson's Caring Questionnaire that assessed the importance of nursing care behaviors (n=50) in six dimensions: "being accessible", "explains and facilitates", "comforts", "anticipates", "trusting relationship" and "monitors and follows through". Results: The importance of caring behaviors was evaluated by the first and fourth-year nursing students in moderate to high level and also, the both groups considered higher ranks for "monitors and follows through" and "being accessible" and lower ranks for "anticipates" and "trusting relationships". The fourth-year students only ranked "explains and facilitates" higher than the first-year students, but the "comforts" dimension is not differed significantly between groups. Conclusion: The findings demonstrated that nursing education in this study has not likely succeeded in producing intended changes in the nursing students' perceptions. It is recommended to exactly find the perceptual changes or in principle the professional socialization process of nursing students, more research using longitudinal designs be conducted to examine the differences in students' perceptions of caring upon entering and completing the nursing program. PMID:25276752

  19. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. Method: descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. Results: the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. Conclusion: the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization. PMID:26487133

  20. Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Peter; van Heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse–physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium. Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses’ ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses’ work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care. Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses’ perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services. PMID:25431563

  1. [Technology in intensive care and its effects on nurses' actions].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the social representations that nurses have about technology applied to intensive care, and relate them to their ways of acting while caring for patients. This qualitative study was performed using social representations as the theoretical-methodological framework. Interviews were performed with 24 nurses, in addition to systematic analysis and thematic content analysis. The results were organized into three categories about the lack of technological knowledge, approach strategies, mastering that knowledge and using it. The knowledge necessary to handle the technology, and the time of experience using that technology guide the nurses' social representations implying on their care attitudes. In conclusion, the staffing policy for an intensive care setting should consider the nurses' experiences and specialized education.

  2. The contrary ideals of individualism and nursing value of care.

    PubMed

    Katims, I

    1995-01-01

    Despite the relational worldview that underpins nursing caring, the cultural value of individualism remains firmly embedded in nursing's conceptual systems. Individualism forms the basis of notions such as autonomy, self-reliance, personal rights and entitlement. When nurses concomitantly espouse the value of care, an orientation that stands in contrast to the predominant societal motif of the autonomous individual, they find themselves having to reconcile contrary ideals. The significance of the coexistence of the values of individualism and care rests upon the capability of each to contrast and sharpen our understanding of the other. The convergent outcome is the empowerment of nurses to refine their understanding of the human condition in illness and health, and to articulate a public practice of care that would temper the fundamental mark of nointerference in the traditional notion of individualism in American culture.

  3. Registered nurse turnover and the changing health care system.

    PubMed

    Jones, C B

    1996-01-01

    Changes in health care delivery and cyclic fluctuations in the registered nurse (RN) labor market affect health care costs, access, and quality. This study provides insight into one factor central to these issues, the job-change behavior of RNs. The theory of human capital provides the foundation to guide investigation, and econometric modeling is used to explore relationships among study variables. Model results show clear differences in job change behavior of nurses employed in hospital and nonhospital settings. These differences are a reflection, not only of individual nurse preferences, but also of wages, working conditions, and opportunities associated with various health care settings. Understanding these relationships is essential to leaders in the nursing profession as they plan for and respond to changes in health care delivery.

  4. American Organization of Nurse Executives Care Innovation and Transformation program: improving care and practice environments.

    PubMed

    Oberlies, Amanda Stefancyk

    2014-09-01

    The American Organization of Nurse Executives conducted an evaluation of the hospitals participating in the Care Innovation and Transformation (CIT) program. A total of 24 hospitals participated in the 2-year CIT program from 2012 to 2013. Reported outcomes include increased patient satisfaction, decreased falls, and reductions in nurse turnover and overtime. Nurses reported statistically significant improvements in 4 domains of the principles and elements of a healthful practice environment developed by the Nursing Organizations Alliance.

  5. Advanced practice nursing in performing arts health care.

    PubMed

    Weslin, Anna T; Silva-Smith, Amy

    2010-06-01

    Performing arts medicine is a growing health care profession specializing in the needs of performing artists. As part of the performing arts venue, the dancer, a combination of athlete and artist, presents with unique health care needs requiring a more collaborative and holistic health care program. Currently there are relatively few advanced practice nurses (APNs) who specialize in performing arts health care. APNs, with focus on collaborative and holistic health care, are ideally suited to join other health care professionals in developing and implementing comprehensive health care programs for the performing artist. This article focuses on the dancer as the client in an APN practice that specializes in performing arts health care.

  6. Nursing care according to women in abortion situations.

    PubMed

    Mariutti, Mariana Gondim; de Almeida, Ana Maria; Panobianco, Marislei Sanches

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to understand how women having an abortion experience the nursing care they receive. The statements of 13 hospitalized women were analyzed through content analysis. The central category "Nursing care experienced in situations of abortion" was constituted from 4 subcategories: care centered in physical needs; fear of judgment in abortion situations; legal aspects defining care; the need for support in abortion situations. These women identified nursing care as based on physical aspects, without contemplating their individuality and specificities. Results indicated the need to create an environment that stimulates listening, helping these women to elaborate their feelings and allowing professionals to behave closer to these women's reality, in order to reduce their own desires and conflicts and contemplate the integrality of care.

  7. Children in foster care: what forensic nurses need to know.

    PubMed

    Hornor, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Children living in foster care are a unique population with specialized healthcare needs. This article will assist forensic nurses and advanced practice forensic nurses, particularly those working in pediatrics, in understanding the needs of children in foster care and implementing a practice plan to better meet their healthcare needs. To that end, a basic understanding of the foster care system is crucial and involves an appreciation of the interface between the legal system and the child welfare system. Most important to providing care to children in foster care is a true understanding of trauma exposure and its potential effects on the lives of children: physically, developmentally, emotionally, and psychologically. This article will assist forensic nurses working with pediatric populations to more fully understand the needs of children in foster care and to develop innovative interventions to appropriately meet their unique needs.

  8. Pioneering the psychiatric nurse role in foster care.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Julie E; Narendorf, Sarah Carter; McMillen, J Curtis

    2013-12-01

    Older youth served in the foster care system have elevated rates of mental health disorders and are high users of mental health services, yet concerns have been raised about the quality of this care. This paper describes the details of a psychiatric nurse's work within a multidisciplinary team to address gaps in care for older youth with psychiatric disorders. We describe the process, outcomes, and lessons learned in developing and piloting a psychiatric nurse intervention for older youth in the foster care system as part of a multidimensional treatment foster care program. Our experiences support further work to develop a role for nursing to improve the quality of mental health treatment in foster care.

  9. Nurse Reported Quality of Care: A Measure of Hospital Quality

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski

    2013-01-01

    As the primary providers of round-the-clock bedside care, nurses are well positioned to report on hospital quality of care. Researchers have not examined how nurses’ reports of quality correspond with standard process or outcomes measures of quality. We assess the validity of evaluating hospital quality by aggregating hospital nurses’ responses to a single item that asks them to report on quality of care. We found that a 10% increment in the proportion of nurses reporting excellent quality of care was associated with lower odds of mortality and failure to rescue; greater patient satisfaction; and higher composite process of care scores for acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, and surgical patients. Nurse reported quality of care is a useful indicator of hospital performance. PMID:22911102

  10. [How is the nursing care process used?].

    PubMed

    Llamas Urrutia, Carmen

    2003-05-01

    The author sets out to know the degree of use of the Nursing Treatment Process (NTP) and its possible relationship with these factors: its profile, knowledge about NTP and the Virginia Henderson Model (VHM), nurses case loads and nurses opinions. The subjects in this study have been nurses in the Sant Martí sanitary district in Barcelona. The methodology used consisted in transversal and qualitative descriptive studies performed in 2001; the use of NTP by means of an audit of at home patient visits, NTP-VHM knowledge and profile by means of an anonymous self-administered questionnaire which had 30 theoretical-practical questions; nurses case load study by means of an analysis of the population attended to by nurse per year and nursing activities; and a qualitative study which used opinion questions and interviews.

  11. Caring for Patients of the Millennial Generation: Considerations for Nurses.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Linda S

    2016-12-12

    Much has been written about teaching students of the Millennial Generation (those born between the years 1980 and 2000) and about intergenerational dynamics in the healthcare workforce. However, little can be found in the literature regarding generation-specific nursing care of Millennial patients. This article presents six categories of considerations for nurses caring for patients of the Millennial Generation based on the characteristics, attitudes, and values that have influenced them as well as the healthcare issues confronting this group of young adults.

  12. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78). Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and quality of care is

  13. Direct care registered nurses' and nursing leaders' review of the clinical competencies needed for the successful nurse of the future: a gap analysis.

    PubMed

    Strong, Margaret; Kane, Irene; Petras, Denise; Johnson-Joy, Cheryl; Weingarten, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Direct care nurses and nurse leaders were surveyed on their perceptions of the appropriateness, importance, and use in daily practice of 10 clinical nursing competencies needed for nurses to be successful in the future. Competencies needed in the 21st century are not based entirely on task-driven motor skills because comprehensive knowledge is essential to care for complex patients. Differences identified between direct care nurses, leaders, and educational levels provide educational opportunities for both groups.

  14. Role transformation of special care unit nurses: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, L A; Kramer, M

    1980-01-01

    To investigate whether special care unit nurses have characteristics different from nurses who work in nonintensive care settings and whether SCU nurses make more effective role transformations than non-SCU nurses, this posthoc descriptive study utilized data from 213 new graduate nurses in their first jobs in eight medical centers across the United States. The 213 nurses were a subsample of 307 new graduate nurses in a parent study that tested effect of a bicultural orientation program in role transformation. The nurses in the subsample worked in one of four nursing areas: medical--surgical, medical--surgical specialty, parent--child, and SCU. They were pretested at six weeks of employment regarding their: professional, bureaucratic, and service role conceptions; total role deprivation; professional, bureaucratic, and bicultural role behavior; self-esteem; and degree of self-actualization. SCU nurses had significantly higher self-actualization scores initially than medical--surgical nurses. Posttesting at nine months of employment included all of the above variables plus measures of empathy and change-agent activity. Performance ratings and resignations were examined at one year of employment. Analyses of variance of the difference scores and posttest-only scores showed no significant differences by type of unit except for self-actualization. To examine the relationship between the degree of specialization and the variables under study, units were rank ordered according to degree of specialization. Nurses working on units which required the most specialization had significantly higher increases in bicultural scores and self-esteem and trends toward higher increases in bureaucratic role conception and higher performance ratings. However, SCU nurses also had the most decrease in professional role conception scores, least increase in self-actualization scores, least amount of empathy with co-workers, and least amount of effective change-agent activity

  15. A mapper's reflection on Dementia Care Mapping with older residents living in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Mansah, Martha; Coulon, Lyn; Brown, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Aim and objective.  This paper explores reflection stemming from a Dementia Care Mapper's own learning and development concerning person-centred care with older residents living in a dementia specific nursing home. Background.  Dementia Care Mapping has been employed in few Australian residential care facilities to promote person-centred care and the well-being of residents. Reflection has also been used selectively in some practices to improve and evaluate the care process. However, contemporary nursing literature has failed to highlight the usefulness of applying reflection following Dementia Care Mapping with older residents. Method.  The mapper's reflections arose from the Dementia Care Mapping observation of five older residents and writing a daily reflective journal. Findings.  From the reflection, a dominant major theme emerged named as the Learning Experience from Mapping Residents with two sub-themes entitled Mapper's Identification of Resident's Unique Needs and Mapper's Empowerment of Clinicians. Dementia Care Mapping recommendations from the mapper's experience highlighted effective approaches to conducting Dementia Care Mapping in residential care facilities. Conclusions.  The valuable process of reflection to Dementia Care Mapping provided the mapper with clinical insights. Further from the mapper's final reflection, a poem entitled Come Back Mind, Come Back to Me was conceived and penned. Relevance to clinical practice.  The mapper's engagement in ongoing reflection incorporated with Dementia Care Mapping has the potential to promote best practice for the care of older people living in aged care facilities.

  16. Caring for adolescent females with anorexia nervosa: registered nurses' perspective.

    PubMed

    King, S J; de Sales Turner

    2000-07-01

    This phenomenological study was undertaken to explore in depth the experiences of registered nurses caring for adolescent anorexic females within paediatric wards of general hospitals in Victoria, Australia. A qualitative design underpinned by the philosophy of Edmund Husserl was employed for this study. Audio taped in-depth interviews with five registered nurses working within the public health care system were conducted. Using Colaizzi's procedural steps of analysis, six themes of meaning were explicated. They were: (a) personal core values of nurses; (b) core values challenged; (c) emotional turmoil; (d) frustration; (e) turning points; and (f) resolution. These themes, when taken together, described the essence of the journey undertaken by registered nurses who cared for adolescent anorexic females. The findings of this study indicated that there is a need for extensive registered nurse preparation, on-going support, and development of education programmes to enable registered nurses to care for these patients with greater understanding. Further, the participants identified the need for new care regimes and protocols to be developed that incorporated new ways of thinking. They also expressed a desire to be have greater involvement in the planned care of their patients.

  17. Critical action research applied in clinical placement development in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily D; Kelton, Moira; Paterson, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop quality clinical placements in residential aged care facilities for undergraduate nursing students undertaking their nursing practicum topics. The proportion of people aged over 65 years is expected to increase steadily from 13% in 2006 to 26% of the total population in Australia in 2051. However, when demand is increasing for a nursing workforce competent in the care of older people, studies have shown that nursing students generally lack interest in working with older people. The lack of exposure of nursing students to quality clinical placements is one of the key factors contributing to this situation. Critical action research built on a partnership between an Australian university and five aged care organisations was utilised. A theoretical framework informed by Habermas' communicative action theory was utilised to guide the action research. Multiple research activities were used to support collaborative critical reflection and inform actions throughout the action research. Clinical placements in eight residential aged care facilities were developed to support 179 nursing students across three year-levels to complete their practicum topics. Findings were presented in three categories described as structures developed to govern clinical placement, learning and teaching in residential aged care facilities.

  18. Testing the bed-blocking hypothesis: does nursing and care home supply reduce delayed hospital discharges?

    PubMed

    Gaughan, James; Gravelle, Hugh; Siciliani, Luigi

    2015-03-01

    Hospital bed-blocking occurs when hospital patients are ready to be discharged to a nursing home, but no place is available, so that hospital care acts as a more costly substitute for long-term care. We investigate the extent to which greater supply of nursing home beds or lower prices can reduce hospital bed-blocking using a new Local Authority (LA) level administrative data from England on hospital delayed discharges in 2009-2013. The results suggest that delayed discharges respond to the availability of care home beds, but the effect is modest: an increase in care home beds by 10% (250 additional beds per LA) would reduce social care delayed discharges by about 6-9%. We also find strong evidence of spillover effects across LAs: more care home beds or fewer patients aged over 65 years in nearby LAs are associated with fewer delayed discharges.

  19. Top Nurse-Management Staffing Collapse and Care Quality in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Selina R.; Corazzini, Kirsten; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Director of nursing turnover is linked to staff turnover and poor quality of care in nursing homes; however the mechanisms of these relationships are unknown. Using a complexity science framework, we examined how nurse management turnover impacts system capacity to produce high quality care. This study is a longitudinal case analysis of a nursing home (n = 97 staff) with 400% director of nursing turnover during the study time period. Data included 100 interviews, observations and documents collected over 9 months and were analyzed using immersion and content analysis. Turnover events at all staff levels were nonlinear, socially mediated and contributed to dramatic care deficits. Federal mandated, quality assurance mechanisms failed to ensure resident safety. High multilevel turnover should be elevated to a sentinel event for regulators. Suggestions to magnify positive emergence in extreme conditions and to improve quality are provided. PMID:24652943

  20. Family Perceptions of Intensive Care Unit Nurses' Roles: A Greek Perspective.

    PubMed

    Malliarou, Maria; Gerogianni, Georgia; Babatsikou, Fotoula; Kotrotsiou, Evaggelia; Zyga, Sofia

    2014-01-13

    This study was done in order to examine the role of the nurse in families with critically ill patients as perceived by family members. A descriptive design was conducted with 93 family members aged 18-53 years from a 6-bed intensive care unit in a Greek Hospital. An anonymous self-completed questionnaire recording demographic data and the questionnaire Family members perception of nurses behavioral role expectation/enactment scale of Hickey and Lewandowski was used. Parametric statistic tests were used to examine the research questions. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients' family members expect nurses to make them feel they can ask whatever they want whenever they want, placing great emphasis on communicating with one another and on participating in decision making to the progress of patient care. The age seems to correlate with the expectation from nurse to meet the role of training on how to handle the patient. Nurses did well with regard to meeting family members' expectations. Most family members assessed positively the role of ICU nurse confirming the need for communication, and clear support of families.

  1. A framework to develop nurses' liver care skills.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Michelle; Greenslade, Lynda

    Following the overview of liver disease in part 1, the second part of this series looks at how a new competency framework was developed for nurses caring for people with or at risk of liver disease to address the increasing burden of the disease across public health, primary care and secondary care. Understanding of liver disease and its risk factors remains poor among many health professionals; a competency framework enables nurses and teams to identify and develop the skills, knowledge and understanding they need to provide high-quality, person-centred care.

  2. The role of patient-centered care in nursing.

    PubMed

    Flagg, Amanda J

    2015-03-01

    Patient-centered care (PCC) has become a key focus in the delivery of health care. It is necessary to gain some perspective of its fit into nursing, which has become physically and mentally demanding in the care of diverse populations. Although there is no agreed-upon definition or classification, there are several key aspects that work with PCC that are discussed in detail. This article provides more clarity to the role of nursing using several aspects of PCC in its many forms to improve the quality of care provided in a way that is both manageable and safe.

  3. Promoting awareness of LGBT issues in aging in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Lim, Fidelindo A; Bernstein, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that up to 10 percent of the American population is lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) and that up to 7 million members of this population are elderly. Both the Institute of Medicine and Healthy People 2020 have addressed the health disparities that affect elderly members of the LGBT community. Nurses are well positioned to bridge health disparities and provide culturally sensitive care across the lifespan, but compared with that of other disciplines, the nursing literature is lacking in content addressing LGBT health. Eliminating health disparities in the care of LGBT elders should be a priority in nursing education.The authors review the issues LGBT elders face and recommend how content related to LGBT aging can be integrated into nursing curricula.

  4. [Essential data set's archetypes for nursing care of endometriosis patients].

    PubMed

    Spigolon, Dandara Novakowski; Moro, Claudia Maria Cabral

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to develop an Essential Data Set for Nursing Care of Patients with Endometriosis (CDEEPE), represented by archetypes. An exploratory applied research with specialists' participation that was carried out at Heath Informatics Laboratory of PUCPR, between February and November of 2010. It was divided in two stages: CDEEPE construction and evaluation including Nursing Process phases and Basic Human Needs, and archetypes development based on this data set. CDEEPE was evaluated by doctors and nurses with 95.9% of consensus and containing 51 data items. The archetype "Perception of Organs and Senses" was created to represents this data set. This study allowed identifying important information for nursing practices contributing to computerization and application of nursing process during care. The CDEEPE was the basis for archetype creation, that will make possible structured, organized, efficient, interoperable, and semantics records.

  5. Impact of provider coordination on nurse and physician perceptions of patient care quality.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Nathalie; Burgess, James F; Meterko, Mark; Restuccia, Joseph D; Alt-White, Anna C; Kaboli, Peter; Charns, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the role of provider coordination on nurse manager and physician perceptions of care quality, while controlling for organizational factors. Findings indicated that nurse-nurse coordination was positively associated with nurse manager perceptions of care quality; neither physician-physician nor physician-nurse coordination was associated with physician perceptions. Organizational factors associated with positive perceptions of care quality included facility support of education for nurses and physicians, and the use of multidisciplinary rounding.

  6. Teaching the Spiritual Dimension of Nursing Care: A Survey of U.S. Baccalaureate Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemmer, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 132 baccalaureate nursing programs indicated that the majority include spiritual dimensions in program philosophy and curriculum, but few had definitions of spirituality and nursing care. Content typically addressed patients' spiritual needs, dying, and holism. Respondents were uncertain about faculty preparation to teach about…

  7. Independent community care gerontological nursing: becoming an entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Rosalie A

    2005-08-01

    Few nurses have the experience of developing an independent practice. This ethnographic study explores the process and challenges of becoming an entrepreneur as described by nurses developing independent practices in community care gerontologic nursing. The process included developing a legal contract, marketing strategies, and reimbursement amounts and strategies. Major barriers to implementing this role identified by the nurses included ignorance and confusion by others about their role, financial issues related to an uncertain income, time management, and legal concerns especially around delegation. These were experienced and dedicated nurses who were also risk-takers and enjoyed the independence of practicing nursing because they believed it was meant to be practiced. Suggestions for research, education, and practice are included.

  8. The Nurse Advocate in End-of-Life Care

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Kathy; Moore, Harold; Rooney, Joan

    2011-01-01

    End-of-life nursing encompasses many aspects of care: pain and symptom management, culturally sensitive practices, assisting patients and their families through the death and dying process, and ethical decisionmaking. Advocacy has been identified as a key core competency for the professional nurse, yet the literature reveals relevant barriers to acquiring this skill. Challenges exist, such as limitations in nursing school curricula on the death and dying process, particularly in multicultural settings; differing policies and practices in healthcare systems; and various interpretations of end-of-life legal language. Patricia Benner's conceptual model of advocacy behaviors in end-of-life nursing provides the framework in which nurses can become effective patient advocates. Developing active listening and effective communication skills can enhance the nurse-patient trust relationship and create a healing environment. PMID:22190882

  9. A Framework for Categorizing Social Interactions Related to End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Almost half of people age 85 and older who die annually in the United States die as nursing home residents, yet because it is not always clear who is close to death, not all residents who might benefit from end-of-life care receive it. The purpose of this study is to develop a framework for organizing social interactions related to…

  10. Nurse care manager contribution to quality of care in a dual-eligible special needs plan.

    PubMed

    Roth, Carol P; Ganz, David A; Nickles, Lorraine; Martin, David; Beckman, Robin; Wenger, Neil S

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the quality of care provided to older patients with complex needs in a dual-eligible, community-based Medicare Special Needs Plan that used a nurse care manager model. Care provided by physicians was substantially supplemented by nurse care managers, as measured by Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders quality indicators. We describe selected nurse care manager activities for six geriatric conditions (falls, dementia, depression, nutrition, urinary incontinence, and end-of-life care) during provision of patient care coordination and management for patients in the highest decile of clinical complexity. We identify areas of high nurse performance (i.e., falls screening, functional assessment, behavioral interventions for dementia problems, advance care planning) and areas of potential missed opportunities (i.e., follow up for new memory problems, targeted dementia counseling, nutrition, and behavioral approaches to urinary incontinence). Increasing the collaborative interaction between nurses providing care in this model and physicians has the potential to enhance nurses' contributions to primary care for vulnerable older adults.

  11. Comparative Study of Job Burnout Among Critical Care Nurses With Fixed and Rotating Shift Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Shamali, Mahdi; Shahriari, Mohsen; Babaii, Atye; Abbasinia, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nurses, as health care providers, are insurmountably obliged to the practice of shift work. Literature has reported shift working as one of the inducing factors of burnout. Despite numerous studies in this area, there are inconsistencies on the relationship between shift working and burnout among nurses, especially in those who work in critical care settings. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the occupational burnout in critical care nurses with and without fixed shift schedules. Patients and Methods: In this comparative study, 130 nurses with rotating shift schedule and 130 nurses with fixed shift schedule from six university hospitals were selected using stratified random sampling. Maslach burnout inventory was used for data collection. Independent samples t-test, chi-square and one-way ANOVA tests were used to analyze the data. Results: Most of the participants were females (62.7%), aged between 22 - 29 years (38.5%), married (59.2%), and had a bachelor degree (86.9%). The mean score of emotional exhaustion was significantly higher in nurses with fixed shift schedules (P < 0.001). However, no significant difference was found between the mean scores of the two groups in the personal accomplishment and depersonalization subscales (P > 0.05). Moreover, no significant difference was found in burnout mean scores between nurses with fixed morning and fixed night shifts (P > 0.05). The means of the emotional exhaustion subscale were significantly different in nurses with different characteristics (P < 0.05) except the gender and working unit. Conclusions: As a result of this study, it was found that critical care nurses with fixed shift schedules display more burnout in emotional exhaustion dimension, compared to those working with rotating shift schedules. PMID:26576442

  12. Oral care in nursing practice: a pragmatic representation.

    PubMed

    Croyère, Nicole; Belloir, Marie-Noelle; Chantler, Lyn; McEwan, Lisa

    2012-09-01

    Oral care for patients receiving non-specialist palliative care has been reported to be lacking in several respects. The present study explored the oral care social representation of nurses and health-care assistants providing non-specialist palliative care. A mixed methodology utilising a questionnaire and focus groups was adopted. The research identified difficulties in providing oral care in this setting. The participants reported managing their emotions around carrying out oral care. They had resources available and were convinced of the positive effects. However, their personal efficacy needed to be reinforced and they needed to receive positive feedback.

  13. Dismantle or Improve ObamaCare? Nurses Must Take Action.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Deborah B

    2014-01-01

    Following the 2014 mid-term elections, what will the next 2 years of Republican leadership do to change the structures still being put into place to meet the goals of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)? Nurses need to be visible by creating partnerships with their new state and federal representatives and by demonstrating collaboration through identified shared values. Nurses must hold all congressional leaders accountable for continuing to improve access to quality and affordable health care, while containing costs and strengthening incentives to provide a client-centered approach to care delivery. As health care reform legislation is a highly charged political battleground, nurses must support legislative changes in the ACA that will strengthen our health care system, not weaken it.

  14. Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Saranto, Kaija; Kinnunen, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process.

  15. Retaining an aging nurse workforce: perceptions of human resource practices.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Mary Val; McIntosh, Barbara; Rambur, Betty; Naud, Shelly

    2009-01-01

    The expected retirement of the largest cohort of nurses will push the RN workforce below projected need by 2020. The challenges of managing a nursing workforce with the majority of nurses over 45 years of age are now necessitating attention to polices for recruitment and retention of older nurses, particularly in rural areas. This convenience sample study employed a mailed survey to investigate perceptions of nurses in 12 institutions (four hospitals, seven home health agencies, and one nursing home serving a small rural state). The goal was to explore rural RNs' perceptions of intent to stay in their current position, with their organization, and employment as a nurse; organizational and unit-level culture regarding older nurses in the workplace; importance of specific human resource practices/policies to their own intention to stay; and extent to which these human resource practices/policies are currently done. The results indicate that although there are similarities across age cohorts, important differences exist that can be addressed to create career-span sensitive policies and practices. This study provides an indicator of progress or lack of progress in addressing older nurse recruitment and retention, and also offers guidance for differentiating policies and practices for younger and older nurses.

  16. Factors influencing attitudes of nurses in general health care toward patients with comorbid mental illness: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    van der Kluit, Maria Johanna; Goossens, Peter J J

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 40% of patients in general health care settings suffer from a comorbid mental illness. A literature review was conducted to elucidate the factors underlying the different attitudes of nurses in general health care toward the nursing care of these patients. Although lack of knowledge, skills, and additional training with respect to dealing with patients with comorbid mental illness were frequently mentioned as a cause of negative attitudes, their exact relationships remained unclear. A holistic nursing vision, support, and older age were described as having a positive influence on a positive attitude, and workload was described as having a negative influence.

  17. Psychometric evaluation of the Nurse Spiritual Care Therapeutics Scale.

    PubMed

    Mamier, Iris; Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2015-05-01

    To measure nurse-provided spiritual care, robust instrumentation is needed. This study psychometrically evaluated an instrument that operationalizes frequency of nurse-provided spiritual care, the Nurse Spiritual Care Therapeutics Scale (NSCTS). The 17-item NSCTS, with an established content validity index of 0.88, was administered online to registered nurses (RNs) in four hospitals. Responses from 554 RNs (24% response rate), most who identified as Christian, provided evidence for the NSCTS' reliability and validity. Internal reliability was supported by an alpha coefficient of .93. Validity was evidenced by item-total correlations ranging from .40 to .80, low to modest direct correlations between the NSCTS and Daily Spiritual Experience Scale and Duke University Religiosity Index, and strong loadings between 0.41 and 0.84 on one factor (explaining 49.5% of the variance) during exploratory factor analysis.

  18. Medication management for nurses working in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wendy; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Baxter, Pamela; Ploeg, Jenny

    2012-09-01

    In long-term care (LTC), the complexity of residents' conditions and their treatment requirements present challenges for nurses managing medications. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore medication management as described by licensed nurses working in LTC. A total of 22 licensed nurses from 2 LTC facilities located in the Canadian province of Ontario participated in 4 focus groups. Thematic content analysis was used to organize data into themes and a conceptual model was developed. The overarching theme was that nurses are "racing against time" to manage medications and 3 subthemes described how they coped with this important care process: preparing to race, running the race, and finishing the race. Barriers to safe medication management included time restraints, knowledge limitations, interruptions and distractions, and poor communication. The findings can be used to better inform health-care providers and to guide future research. They also have the potential to directly impact outcomes related to safe medication management in LTC.

  19. [Acute care nursing pathology: case report of odynophagia].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fabà, Eva; Sanfeliu-Julià, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Since 2008, the Institut Catala de la Salut (ICS) introduced the nurses management plan for acute pathology, in primary care centres. In the implementation of this system of organization, the ICS introduced various diseases protocols with performance algorithms. To raise awareness of the the practice of acute pathology, we present a clinical case. An urgent consultation of a 30 year-old male, with fever, sore throat and cough, which was managed and resolved by a nurse. The aim of this new management plan is that nursing is the first health professional to take care of patient coming to primary care centre without a scheduled visit, to avoid saturating the general clinic or hospital emergencies. This new organisational system involves an increase in the responsibilities of nursing in the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

  20. Patient Satisfaction with Nursing Care as an Outcome Variable: Dilemmas for Nursing Evaluation Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Chin

    1996-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important indicator of the quality of nursing care. However, it raises numerous dilemmas: lack of consistent conceptualization and a theoretical framework, lack of reliable measurement approaches, and inconsistency of instruments. (SK)

  1. Providing and financing aged care in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ergas, Henry; Paolucci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the provision and financing of aged care in Australia. Demand for aged care will increase substantially as a result of population aging, with the number of Australians aged 85 and over projected to increase from 400,000 in 2010 to over 1.8 million in 2051. Meeting this demand will greatly strain the current system, and makes it important to exploit opportunities for increased efficiency. A move to greater beneficiary co-payments is also likely, though its extent may depend on whether aged care insurance and other forms of pre-payment can develop. PMID:22312229

  2. Caring to death: the murder of patients by nurses.

    PubMed

    Field, John; Pearson, Alan

    2010-06-01

    Beyond the initial 'shock-horror' reaction in the mass media, little attention is paid by nurses or the public to nurses who murder patients. This study used discursive inquiry to uncover social constructions of this phenomenon and their implications for the definition and treatment of such murders. The mass media and professional literature were searched for commentary on cases of nurses who had been convicted of murder between 1980 and 2006. The retrieved texts were subjected to discursive analysis. Discursive constructions included the profile of murderous nurses; types of murders; contexts in which murder occurs; factors that aid detection and apprehension; legal processes and punishment; and reactions of the public, profession, regulators and families. The findings imply that murder of a patient by a nurse might occur in any setting in which nurses care for vulnerable patients--the old, the young, the sick and the disabled. Trust in nurses assists a nurse to murder. Nurses have a responsibility to understand how their workplaces can form crucibles in which murder can take place. The profession needs to acknowledge the possibility of nurses who murder patients and to commence a discussion about what might be done to limit the harm they do.

  3. Clinical wisdom: the essential foundation of "good" nursing care.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Lois A; Grace, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    Clinical wisdom, an essential foundation of nursing care that provides for the "good" of individual patients while taking into account the common good, is a concept that is difficult to define and comprehend. However, understanding what constitutes clinical wisdom is essential for the education of the types of nurses who are most likely to provide leadership that is consistent with the goals of nursing as outlined in the 2005 Code of Ethics for Nurses of the International Council of Nurses and the 2001 Code of Ethics for Nurses With Interpretive Statements of the American Nurses Association. The three key elements of wisdom, derived from the psychology and philosophy literature, are (1) balancing and providing for the good of another and the common good, (2) the use of intellect and affect in problem solving, and (3) the demonstration of experience-based tacit knowing in problematic situations. We conceptualized clinical wisdom as a more specific variant of general wisdom by examining how the core elements described can be linked to wisdom for nursing practice. In doing so, the nature of clinical wisdom is clarified and strategies are suggested to assist nurse educators in developing wise nurses.

  4. Quality care as ethical care: a poststructural analysis of palliative and supportive district nursing care.

    PubMed

    Nagington, Maurice; Walshe, Catherine; Luker, Karen A

    2016-03-01

    Quality of care is a prominent discourse in modern health-care and has previously been conceptualised in terms of ethics. In addition, the role of knowledge has been suggested as being particularly influential with regard to the nurse-patient-carer relationship. However, to date, no analyses have examined how knowledge (as an ethical concept) impinges on quality of care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 patients with palliative and supportive care needs receiving district nursing care and thirteen of their lay carers. Poststructural discourse analysis techniques were utilised to take an ethical perspective on the current way in which quality of care is assessed and produced in health-care. It is argued that if quality of care is to be achieved, patients and carers need to be able to redistribute and redevelop the knowledge of their services in a collaborative way that goes beyond the current ways of working. Theoretical works and extant research are then used to produce tentative suggestions about how this may be achieved.

  5. Long-term care: nursing home quality and safety--2005. End of Year Issue Brief.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Rachel; Bercaw, Lawren

    2005-12-31

    In 2002, the Government Accountability Office reported that more than 1.7 million senior citizens resided in over 17,000 nursing homes across the United States. A 2003 Administration on Aging report predicted that number would increase dramatically as the "baby-boom" generation ages. Accordingly, legislators and nursing home administrators have striven to develop facilities that provide safe, high-quality eldercare to the nations' growing senior population. The Health Policy Tracking Service (HPTS) published a study in January--2005 Health Care Priorities Report--that depicts state lawmakers' concern for nursing home quality and safety. To policymakers, nursing home quality and safety is a very high priority, second only to Medicaid. The HPTS survey also indicated that 38 states planned to address senior facility safety in 2005 by adopting more stringent employee background checks, higher staffing standards and strict licensure requirements

  6. Health care of youth aging out of foster care.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Youth transitioning out of foster care face significant medical and mental health care needs. Unfortunately, these youth rarely receive the services they need because of lack of health insurance. Through many policies and programs, the federal government has taken steps to support older youth in foster care and those aging out. The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Pub L No. 110-354) requires states to work with youth to develop a transition plan that addresses issues such as health insurance. In addition, beginning in 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Pub L No. 111-148) makes youth aging out of foster care eligible for Medicaid coverage until age 26 years, regardless of income. Pediatricians can support youth aging out of foster care by working collaboratively with the child welfare agency in their state to ensure that the ongoing health needs of transitioning youth are met.

  7. Interdisciplinary Care Planning and the Written Care Plan in Nursing Homes: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical review of the history, research evidence, and state-of-the-art technology in interdisciplinary care planning and the written plan of care in American nursing homes. Design and Methods: We reviewed educational and empirical literature. Results: Interdisciplinary care planning and the written care plan are…

  8. [Managing postoperative pain in pediatric nursing: searching for subsides to improve nursing care].

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Fernanda Cristina; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; Leite, Adriana Moraes; Flória-Santos, Milena; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan

    2007-01-01

    This study reports on a literature review about child postoperative pain management by nursing professionals, in the period from 1993 to 2005. Three themes were identified: factors influencing nurses' management of child pain, interventions to relieve child pain, and nurses' assessment and response to children's pain experience. Child pain management is a complex act that involves elements of the dimensions related to the children themselves, health professionals and family members. The lack of studies in this area reveals the need for research, with a view to (re)considering pediatric nursing care.

  9. Multi-level model of missed nursing care in the context of hospital merger.

    PubMed

    Castner, Jessica; Wu, Yow-Wu B; Dean-Baar, Susan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to delineate the multi-level relationships of individual registered nurse (RN) and nursing unit factors on missed nursing care. This was a quantitative model-building study using a descriptive, cross-sectional design. Surveys (N = 553) and administrative unit records from nurses in one hospital system undergoing merger were included. The results showed that 36% of the variation in missed nursing care is due to the unit context, with a corresponding 64% due to individual nurse differences. At the unit level, workload, skill mix, and critical unit type affected the amount of missed nursing care. At the individual nurse level, more experience, supplies problems, communication problems, and involvement in errors of commission all increased the perception of the amount of missed nursing care. Education level was not related to the amount of missed nursing care. The findings highlight the importance of unit- and individual-level interventions to redesign hospital nursing care.

  10. Nursing care of the person having bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Grindel, Mary E; Grindel, Cecelia Gatson

    2006-06-01

    The increasing incidence of morbid obesity suggests that the quantity of bariatric surgical procedures will continue to multiply each year. Bariatric surgery has become an accepted approach to weight management with the additional benefit of resolution of several co-morbidities. However, quality nursing care and effective patient teaching are essential to achieve positive patient outcomes. Nursing care along the continuum of the bariatric surgical experience is key to positive outcomes for these patients. Throughout the process from selection for surgery to follow-up visits in the physician's office, the nurse can have a significant impact on the response of the patient and family to the surgical procedure. During the selection process, the nurse can explain the required diagnostic tests and their rationale and conduct a thorough medical history, informing the physician of pertinent information that might affect the patient's outcomes. Patient and family teaching begins at this stage with information about the peri-operative experience. Bariatric surgery results in a major lifestyle change for the patient. This change will evolve over time as weight is lost, and the patient adjusts to changes in eating patterns, body image, and the perceptions of others. The nurse should see that the patient has appropriate referral information for support services and should follow up to see that the patient and family availed themselves of these services. The patient's stay in acute care is usually very short. Clearly the patient and family need to go home with specific information about drinking/eating, caring for drainage tubes, skin and wound care, ambulation, self-care, and signs and symptoms that require medical attention. Nursing care should include written information and demonstrations of such activities as care of the wounds and drains. The nurse should assure that the patient leaves the hospital with a call number if questions arise at home. Ideally the nurse, patient

  11. Roles of nurse aides and family members in acute patient care in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2004-01-01

    To improve the nursing care quality in acute care hospitals in Taiwan after the 2003 SARS epidemic, the Taipei City Government Department of Health has allocated about US dollars 6 million for nurse aides' salaries and costs for recruitment, training, and administration of this program. Yet, there have been no corresponding changes in payments for nursing services by the National Health Insurance system in Taiwan such as increasing nurse fees for inpatient services. This article examines the roles of nurse aides and family members in providing acute patient care in Taiwan and discusses issues of nursing care quality as related to nurse staffing in acute care hospitals.

  12. Fundamental or foundational obligation? Problematizing the ethical call to spiritual care in nursing.

    PubMed

    Pesut, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Spiritual nursing care is increasingly being cited in the nursing literature as a fundamental ethical obligation. This obligation is based upon the argument that nurses provide holistic care, spirituality is a universal dimension of the person, and so nurses should care for the spiritual dimension. However, the literature on the spiritual dimension in nursing illustrates widely differing foundational assumptions about this important aspect of care. The philosophic categories of humanism, theism, and monism can be used to illustrate the different understandings of the spiritual dimension, and the implications of these understandings for the competence of the nurse and the nature of the nurse-patient interaction in the context of spiritual care.

  13. Day Care for School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diffendal, Elizabeth

    This booklet examines four aspects of day care services for school-age children: (1) national availability and trends, (2) parents' views, (3) program planning, and (4) recommended program models. A nationwide survey of 58 day care programs enrolling school-age children was conducted, and the general findings are presented. Information on parents'…

  14. Nursing leadership: bringing caring back to the future

    PubMed Central

    Kitson, A.

    2001-01-01

    Leadership, whether it is nursing, medical or healthcare leadership, is about knowing how to make visions become reality. The vision that many nurses hold dear to their hearts is one where patients are treated with dignity and respect at all times; where systems are designed for the benefit of individual needs; and where the work performed by nurses and other carers is valued and respected. Achieving such a vision will require a paradigm shift in the philosophy, priorities, policies, and power relationships of the health service. Fundamentally, it will require the rhetoric of patient centred care to become a reality. The following scenario is set in the UK in the year 2012 and describes a health service that is on the pathway to achieving this vision. It tells the story from a nursing perspective and outlines the three key foundation stones that helped nursing achieve the vision of a patient centred health service: (1) development of patient centred care measures as part of performance management and the clinical governance agenda; (2) leadership based on personal growth and development principles; (3) new clinical career and competency framework for nursing. Key Words: nursing leadership; patient centred care; career framework PMID:11700384

  15. Capacity for care: meta-ethnography of acute care nurses' experiences of the nurse-patient relationship

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Jackie; Nicholson, Caroline; Maben, Jill; Pope, Catherine; Flatley, Mary; Wilkinson, Charlotte; Meyer, Julienne; Tziggili, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Aims To synthesize evidence and knowledge from published research about nurses' experiences of nurse-patient relationships with adult patients in general, acute inpatient hospital settings. Background While primary research on nurses' experiences has been reported, it has not been previously synthesized. Design Meta-ethnography. Data sources Published literature from Australia, Europe, and North America, written in English between January 1999–October 2009 was identified from databases: CINAHL, Medline, British Nursing Index and PsycINFO. Review methods Qualitative studies describing nurses' experiences of the nurse-patient relationship in acute hospital settings were reviewed and synthesized using the meta-ethnographic method. Results Sixteen primary studies (18 papers) were appraised as high quality and met the inclusion criteria. The findings show that while nurses aspire to develop therapeutic relationships with patients, the organizational setting at a unit level is strongly associated with nurses' capacity to build and sustain these relationships. The organizational conditions of critical care settings appear best suited to forming therapeutic relationships, while nurses working on general wards are more likely to report moral distress resulting from delivering unsatisfactory care. General ward nurses can then withdraw from attempting to emotionally engage with patients. Conclusion The findings of this meta-ethnography draw together the evidence from several qualitative studies and articulate how the organizational setting at a unit level can strongly influence nurses' capacity to build and sustain therapeutic relationships with patients. Service improvements need to focus on how to optimize the organizational conditions that support nurses in their relational work with patients. PMID:23163719

  16. Teaching the spiritual dimension of nursing care: a survey of U.S. baccalaureate nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Corinne

    2002-11-01

    One hundred thirty-two randomly selected baccalaureate nursing programs in the Unites States responded to a survey exploring how the spiritual dimension of nursing care currently is being taught. The majority of programs included the concept of the spiritual dimension in curricula, but few programs had definitions of spirituality or spiritual nursing care. Content addressed most consistently by programs included assessment of spiritual needs, the needs of dying individuals, and the spiritual dimension as a component of holism or culture. There appeared to be a lack of clarity in the understanding of the concept of spirituality, as well as uncertainty about levels of faculty knowledge and comfort with teaching this topic.

  17. The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

  18. Are Undergraduate Nurses Taught Palliative Care during Their Training?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Field, David

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 46 of 108 nurse educators in the United Kingdom indicated that diploma students received a mean of 7.8 hours and degree students 12.2 hours of palliative care training. Although 82% believed it should be a core component, 67% had difficulty finding qualified teachers. Palliative care knowledge was not formally assessed in most…

  19. [The role of the mobile palliative care team nurse].

    PubMed

    Chrétien, Sophie

    2015-11-01

    The mobile palliative care and support team nurse works in different departments within the hospital. The clinical situation of a patient enables the team to identify in what ways she is declining and thereby participate in the care management in order to favour the patient's return home.

  20. Understanding Nursing Home Worker Conceptualizations about Good Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Gawon

    2013-01-01

    This study explored how direct care workers in nursing homes conceptualize good care and how their conceptualizations are influenced by external factors surrounding their work environment and the relational dynamics between them and residents. Study participants were drawn from a local service employees' union, and in-depth interviews were…

  1. How Nursing Faculty Experience Being Cared for in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehn, Mary Beth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to describe how nursing faculty are cared for in the workplace. Participants were interviewed individually or in a focus group to understand their experience. Following data analysis, the following themes were created: the process of being cared for included connecting, openly sharing,…

  2. [Nursing care adapted to different types of stoma].

    PubMed

    Moutardier, Nelly; Woehrel, Estelle; Sourdaine, Marie-Lise

    2012-05-01

    As soon as the patient leaves the operating theatre, in the recovery room, then in the surgical clinical unit, nurses carry out stoma care and monitor the possible occurrence of complications. Stoma therapists educate patients in caring for the stoma themselves, advise them in the choice of equipment and support them as they regain autonomy.

  3. Dis-ease between nursing and feminism: nurses caring for one another within a feminist framework.

    PubMed

    Keddy, B A

    1993-01-01

    Mental health professionals have the experience and skills necessary to provide care and support to colleagues and peers in these troubled and stressful times. Yet, traditionally nurses have not been supportive of one another. Not receiving much interest from the feminist movement and not willingly to embrace feminist social activism, the nursing profession has suffered as it continues to embrace racist, classist, sexist, and homophobic outdated theories and research practices. Without a collective voice which unites all nurses in a common struggle, issues related to mental health nursing will continue to be viewed in a fragmented way. Until feminist research, theory, and practice become central to the profession's ideology, nurses will continue to be divided among themselves, unable to provide the necessary caring for one another.

  4. Communicating Nursing Care Using the Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 Care Plan.

    PubMed

    Matney, Susan A; Dolin, Gay; Buhl, Lindy; Sheide, Amy

    2016-03-01

    A care plan provides a patient, family, or community picture and outlines the care to be provided. The Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (C-CDA) Release 2 Care Plan Document is used to structure care plan data when sharing the care plan between systems and/or settings. The American Nurses Association has recommended the use of two terminologies, Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for assessments and outcomes and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for problems, procedures (interventions), outcomes, and observation findings within the C-CDA. This article describes C-CDA, introduces LOINC and SNOMED CT, discusses how the C-CDA Care Plan aligns with the nursing process, and illustrates how nursing care data can be structured and encoded within a C-CDA Care Plan.

  5. Reframing Person-Centered Nursing Care for Persons With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Penrod, Janice; Yu, Fang; Kolanowski, Ann; Fick, Donna M.; Loeb, Susan J.; Hupcey, Judith E.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s dementia manifests in a complex clinical presentation that has been addressed from both biomedical and phenomenological perspectives. Although each of these paradigmatic perspectives has contributed to advancement of the science, neither is adequate for theoretically framing a person-centered approach to nursing care. The need-driven dementia-compromised behavior (NDB) model is discussed as an exemplar of midrange nursing theory that promotes the integration of these paradigmatic views to promote a new level of excellence in person-centered dementia care. Clinical application of the NDB promotes a new level of praxis, or thoughtful action, in the care of persons with dementia. PMID:17378465

  6. The role of the nurse executive in health care philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Donell

    2014-01-01

    As the health care landscape continues to change with reform, obtaining funding for clinical initiatives is becoming increasingly difficult. At Catholic Health Initiatives, a number of nurse executives have recognized the need for creative philanthropy to advance specific projects. They have embraced opportunities for partnerships with their hospital foundation chief development officers to leverage philanthropy toward clinical innovations and to improve quality of care. Following are their discussions which reveal just how important nurse and employee involvement is to attracting and using philanthropy dollars in the next era of health care.

  7. Yoga for Self-Care and Burnout Prevention Among Nurses.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gina K; Rollins, Kari; Walker, Danielle; Wong, Lily; Pennings, Jacquelyn

    2015-10-01

    The promotion of self-care and the prevention of burnout among nurses is a public health priority. Evidence supports the efficacy of yoga to improve physical and mental health outcomes, but few studies have examined the influence of yoga on nurse-specific outcomes. The purpose of this pilot-level randomized controlled trial was to examine the efficacy of yoga to improve self-care and reduce burnout among nurses. Compared with controls (n = 20), yoga participants (n = 20) reported significantly higher self-care as well as less emotional exhaustion and depersonalization upon completion of an 8-week yoga intervention. Although the control group demonstrated no change throughout the course of the study, the yoga group showed a significant improvement in scores from pre- to post-intervention for self-care (p < .001), mindfulness (p = .028), emotional exhaustion (p = .008), and depersonalization (p = .007) outcomes. Implications for practice are discussed.

  8. Nursing care of the mechanically ventilated patient in ITU: 1.

    PubMed

    Ashurst, S

    The mechanically ventilated patient often represents the ultimate in vulnerability and demands the highest standards of nursing care. Not only may the patient be unconscious but also the artificial airway is an unnatural invasion of the most innate physiological mechanism--breathing, and the nurse must safeguard this during all aspects of care. Nursing these patients is immensely satisfying and varied. It ranges from caring for the patient's activities of daily living to carrying out the highly technical and invasive monitoring and interventions which require specialist knowledge and skills. This article, the first in a two-part series, covers the types of ventilation, suction therapy, oral and eye care, elimination, body position, physiotherapy and the physiological effects of mechanical ventilation.

  9. [Surgical Center environment and its elements: implications for nursing care].

    PubMed

    Silva, Denise Conceição; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research was to characterize the elements that constitute the environment of the Surgical Center and to analyze its implications for dynamic of care and nursing care. Based on the Environmental Theory's principals. Participated twelve nurses from the Surgical Center of a College Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Data were gathered through the creativity and sensitivity technique "Map-Speaker", semi-structered interviews and participant observation, and were analyzed by thematic categories. The results showed that care can happen directly and indirectly in favor of full client recovery, counting the environment that the integrate in purpose to maintain harmonic and balanced. The nurse interventions aim to maintain the environment in favorable conditions so that a higher standard of care can be promoted.

  10. [Alzheimer's disease and care needs: what do nurses know?].

    PubMed

    Poltroniere, Silvana; Cecchetto, Fátima Helena; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study is to show what nurses from hospitalization units know about Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the demands of care for patients and their families. This is a descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach. The data were collected through semistructured interviews. Data saturation occurred after interviewing eleven nurses in two private hospitals. Six categories emerged from the content analysis: AD characterization, risk factors, ways to diagnose, complications, treatment medication, patient and family care. It was observed that nurses have partial knowledge regarding AD, focusing their care actions only on the clinical change that caused admission. They recognize signs and symptoms but only show themselves as supporting assistants, instead of acting more autonomously in dealing with care needs and family support.

  11. Nurses' Learning Experiences with the Kinaesthetics Care Concept Training in a Nursing Home: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fringer, André; Huth, Martina; Hantikainen, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    In geriatric care, movement support skills of nurses are often limited, resulting in unnecessary functional decline of older adult residents and physical strain of nurses. Kinaesthetics training aims to improve movement competences of nurses and residents. The aim of this qualitative descriptive study is to describe nursing teams' experience with…

  12. Caring labour, intersectionality and worker satisfaction: an analysis of the National Nursing Assistant Study (NNAS).

    PubMed

    Rakovski, Carter C; Price-Glynn, Kim

    2010-03-01

    Caring labour in long-term care settings is increasingly important as the US population ages. Ethnographic research on nursing assistants (NAs) portrays nursing home care as routine and fast paced in facilities that emphasise life maintenance more than care. Recent interview-based and small quantitative studies describe a mix of positive and negative aspects of NA work, including the rewards of caring, despite shortcomings in working conditions and pay. The current study continues this research but, for the first time, using national data. The 2004 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nursing Assistant Study (NNAS) provides survey data from 3,017 NAs working in long-term care facilities across the US. The NNAS results confirm the importance and centrality of caring to NAs' work. NAs motivated by caring for others were significantly more satisfied with their jobs than those motivated by other reasons, such as convenience or salary. Overall, NAs report surprisingly high job satisfaction, particularly with learning new skills, doing challenging work, and organisational support for caring labour. Areas of dissatisfaction were salary, time for reproductive labour, and turnover. Intersectional analysis revealed race and citizenship played a stronger role than gender in worker satisfaction.

  13. Creative nursing: processive care and more?

    PubMed

    Skeet, M; Thompson, R

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe a crisis point which led them from considering a reorientation of the present BSc (Nursing) curriculum at the University of Cape Town, South Africa to undertaking a radical revision of the degree programme. While examining final year students they realized that the nurses' excellent personal qualities apparent in everyday relationships, were not being used in their professional practice on hospital wards. It is suggested that this is due partly to an educational programme which neglected what the students already had (common sense and logic) and what they already knew from life experience and from instinct and intuition. It is also supposed that when hospital wards are their first clinical learning areas, nurses divorce patients and disease from the 'real' world, from the essentials of daily living and from the components of an individualized lifestyle. A staged process of learning experience, to include looking after healthy, elderly and disabled individuals in homes and institutions--with minimal nurse supervision--before exposure to hospital life, is advocated. In its present form the nursing process is seen as limiting the creativity of nursing practice and the authors suggest that further development of this approach is necessary if nursing science is to be interpreted as an art. Finally, the authors outline an experimental curriculum which takes cognisance of their experiences and syllogistic reasoning, together with a brief description of the first few months of its implementation at the University of Cape Town.

  14. Improving Cancer Care Through Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2015-09-01

    Nursing research and nurse researchers have been an integral and significant part of the Oncology Nursing Society's (ONS's) history, as evidenced by the development of the Nursing Research Committee within a few years of ONS's establishment. Ruth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, was the committee's first chairperson in 1979. This was followed by the creation of the Advanced Nursing Research Special Interest Group in 1989 under the leadership of Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN. ONS also began to recognize nurse researchers in 1994 by creating the annual ONS Distinguished Researcher Award to recognize the contributions of a member who has conducted or promoted research that has enhanced the science and practice of oncology nursing. The list of recipients and of their work is impressive and reflects the wide range of our practice areas (see http://bit.ly/1MTC5cp for the recipient list). In addition, the ONS Foundation began funding research in 1981 and has distributed more than $24 million in research grants, research fellowships, and other scholarships, lectures, public education projects, and career development awards (ONS Foundation, 2015). And, in 2006, the Putting Evidence Into Practice resource was unveiled, which provides evidence-based intervention reviews for the 20 most common problems experienced by patients with cancer and their caregivers (www.ons
.org/practice-resources/pep)
.

  15. Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; L Tz N, Kim; Ivarsson, Ann-Britt; Eriksson, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.

  16. Missed nursing care, level of staffing, and job satisfaction: Lebanon versus the United States.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Doumit, Myrna; Lee, Kyung Hee; Zein, Joanna El

    2013-05-01

    Missed nursing care refers to omission of standard required nursing care of patients in acute care hospitals. The objective of this study was to compare the amounts and reasons of missed nursing care, the level of nurse staffing, and job satisfaction between the United States and Lebanon. Several studies in the United States have shown that a significant amount of care is being missed. This study is designed to determine if Lebanon is experiencing a similar phenomenon and what reasons are given for missing nursing care. Findings support that a substantial amount of nursing care is missed in Lebanon, although less than that in the United States (t = 11.53, P < .001), that nurses in Lebanon were less satisfied with being a nurse than are nurses in the United States, and there was no difference in the identification of staffing resources as a reason for missed care in the 2 countries.

  17. Preparing Nurses for a 21st Century Role in Genomics-Based Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lea, Dale Halsey; Monsen, Rita Black

    2003-01-01

    Suggests new practice roles for nurses resulting from genomic research and outlines the proposed position of genomics nurse care coordinator. Discusses national and international initiatives to certify nurses' genetic knowledge and skills for practice. (Contains 22 references.) (SK)

  18. [Responsibility in health care: regarding the time we live as intensive care nurses].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira; Ramos, Flávia Regina Souza

    2011-08-01

    This qualitative investigation was supported by Foucault's analysis with emphasis on the notion of governability, and had the following objectives: to analyze the relationship between techno-biomedicine and bioethics as discourses of the contemporaneousness implied in the production of nurses' subjectivity within the context of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU); and approach the responsibility implied in health care as one of the unfolding strategies of technology of speech of bioethics and biotechnology, creating certain forms of the nurse understanding and intervening in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). From the perspective of the multiple ways that can emerge when analyzing a critical reading of analyzed texts and interviews with nurses, responsibility in health care was unfolded into categories that expressed the responsibility in front of new languages and of nursing as a guardian of certain attributes in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

  19. Hospital Palliative Care Teams and Post-Acute Care in Nursing Facilities: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Joan G

    2017-01-01

    Although palliative care consultation teams are common in U.S. hospitals, follow up and outcomes of consultations for frail older adults discharged to nursing facilities are unclear. To summarize and critique research on the care of patients discharged to nursing facilities following a hospital-based palliative care consult, a systematic search of PubMed, CINAHL, Ageline, and PsycINFO was conducted in February 2016. Data from the articles (N = 12) were abstracted and analyzed. The results of 12 articles reflecting research conducted in five countries are presented in narrative form. Two studies focused on nurse perceptions only, three described patient/family/caregiver experiences and needs, and seven described patient-focused outcomes. Collectively, these articles demonstrate that disruption in palliative care service on hospital discharge and nursing facility admission may result in high symptom burden, poor communication, and inadequate coordination of care. High mortality was also noted. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; 10(1):25-34.].

  20. Impact of technology-based care and management systems on aged care outcomes in Australia.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Tracey; Russell, Frances

    2012-03-01

    This study determined the impact of a computerized care documentation system on client outcomes, regulatory compliance, and staff workloads after 3 years of use. The survey was conducted at an 800-bed aged care facility, and staff using the computerized care system were invited to participate (n = 112). The survey was an adapted version of the Nurses Computer Attitudes to Technology Inventory, which was refined to make it relevant to the aged care workplace. Four multiple regression models were produced, assessing the impact of the computerized care management system on staff and workload; time; accuracy, and regulatory data; and resident care. The analysis showed that the perceived benefits of the computerized system were influenced by personal attitudes towards computer use and feelings of empowerment related to the computer system. Even those with poor computer skills and feelings of insecurity about using computers believed that there were significant benefits to be gained by using the system. This result has implications with regards to the training and recruitment of staff in the aged care sector, as facilities introduce computerized care systems.

  1. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  2. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  3. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  4. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  5. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  6. Pathology of apprenticeships for masters of nursing critical care

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Norouzinezhad, Faezeh; Tayebi, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The increasing complexity of patient care conditions in intensive care units, along with the development of these units, has increased the need for qualified nurses and health professionals. Therefore, due to recent changes and in response to the shortage of capable nurses, a master’s major in intensive care nursing has been created. One of the main challenges of this curriculum is to ensure that graduates have the required competencies. The current study aimed to explain the pathology of apprenticeships for a masters in nursing critical care. Methods This qualitative study was conducted for masters in nursing critical care students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014–2015. The sampling was purposeful. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews with 15 students. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Three categories “ineffective management, unfavorable context for achieving skills, and lack of clinical instructors and sufficient competence” were extracted. Conclusion Preparing settings for entering students such as having an adequate training field and expert educators, providing conditions for orientation of educators and participation in the related workshops, and recruitment of experienced instructors in the apprenticeships field can increase the quality of MS levels. PMID:28243401

  7. MDS Coordinator Relationships and Nursing Home Care Processes

    PubMed Central

    Piven, Mary L.; Bailey, Donald; Ammarell, Natalie; Corazzini, Kirsten; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Utley-Smith, Queen; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how Minimum Data Set (MDS) Coordinators' relationship patterns influence nursing home care processes. The MDS Coordinator potentially interacts with staff across the nursing home to coordinate care processes of resident assessment and care planning. We know little about how MDS Coordinators enact this role or to what extent they may influence particular care processes beyond paper compliance. Guided by complexity science and using two nursing home case studies as examples (pseudonyms Sweet Dell and Safe Harbor), we describe MDS Coordinators' relationship patterns by assessing the extent to which they used and fostered the relationship parameters of good connections, new information flow, and cognitive diversity in their work. Sweet Dell MDS Coordinators fostered new information flow, good connections, and cognitive diversity, which positively influenced assessment and care planning. In contrast, Safe Harbor MDS Coordinators did little to foster good connections, information flow, or cognitive diversity with little influence on care processes. This study revealed that MDS Coordinators are an important new source of capacity for the nursing home industry to improve quality of care. Findings suggest ways to enhance this capacity. PMID:16585806

  8. Being inclusive of diversity in nursing care: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The Australian health care system is responsible for delivering health services to an increasingly diverse health population. Nurses are in a position to positively influence health-related outcomes by actively addressing the differences individuals bring to their health care experiences. By focusing diversity on health inequities, nurses can play an important role in identifying those at risk of poorer health. This paper discusses diversity in the health population through health inequities and proposes directions for nursing practice. These suggested directions include application of a definition of diversity that include health determinants; targeting specific groups with programmes and services designed to reduce health inequalities; engaging in political action to promote effective policy development; preparing nurses at an undergraduate and graduate level to build capacity for addressing diversity and health inequities; and identifying effective interventions through research studies that address inequities in the health population.

  9. The "HUG": an innovative approach to pediatric nursing care.

    PubMed

    Tedder, Jan; Register, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The HUG (Help, Understanding, and Guidance for Young Families) is an innovative approach to pediatric nursing care developed by the authors and designed to support parents in optimizing the health and well-being of their children. Research evidence suggests that there is a gap between what the pediatric world promises and what it delivers and between what parents want from their providers and what they actually get. The HUG is intended to distill aspects of the literature into accessible, memorable, and practical strategies that pediatric nurses at all levels and in varied settings can use. Three HUG strategies are Start Here, Not There; See, Then Share; and Gaze, Then Engage. Nurses' use of the HUG is aimed at helping nurses enhance their relationships with parents, helping parents feel heard and attended to, encouraging parents to share what worries them most, and increasing nurses' job satisfaction.

  10. Intensive Care Unit Nurses' Beliefs About Delirium Assessment and Management.

    PubMed

    Oosterhouse, Kimberly J; Vincent, Catherine; Foreman, Marquis D; Gruss, Valerie A; Corte, Colleen; Berger, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Delirium, the most frequent complication of hospitalized older adults, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs), can result in increased mortality rates and length of stay. Nurses are neither consistently identifying nor managing delirium in these patients. The purpose of this study was to explore ICU nurses' identification of delirium, actions they would take for patients with signs or symptoms of delirium, and beliefs about delirium assessment and management. In this cross-sectional study using qualitative descriptive methods guided by the theory of planned behavior, 30 ICU nurses' responses to patient vignettes depicting different delirium subtypes were explored. Descriptive and content analyses revealed that nurses did not consistently identify delirium; their actions varied in different vignettes. Nurses believed that they needed adequate staffing, balanced workload, interprofessional collaboration, and established policy and protocols to identify and manage delirium successfully. Research is needed to determine if implementing these changes increases recognition and decreases consequences of delirium.

  11. The perception of intuition in clinical practice by Iranian critical care nurses: a phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Parkhide; Abdi, Alireza; Jalali, Rostam; Salari, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Background Intuition as a way of learning in nursing is applied to decision making and judgment in complicated clinical situations. Several studies have been conducted on intuition in clinical settings, but comprehension of this concept is unclear. Moreover, there is a lack of information about intuition in critical care nurses caring for more seriously ill patients. This study aimed to explore Iranian critical care nurses’ understanding of intuition in clinical practice. Methods In a descriptive–phenomenological study, 12 nurses employed in critical care units of the hospitals affiliated to Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences were purposively recruited to the study. A semistructured interview was administered, and then written verbatim. The data were managed by MAXQDA 10 software, and qualitative analysis was undertaken using the seven-stage approach of Colaizzi. Results Of the 12 nurses who participated in the study, 7 (58.3%) were female and married, and 10 (88.3%) held a bachelor’s degree in nursing. The mean and standard deviations of participants’ age, job experience, and critical care experience were 36.66±7.01, 13.75±6.82, and 7.66±3.36 years, respectively. Four main themes and eleven sub-themes were elicited from the qualitative analysis; the main themes including “Understanding intuition as a feeling”, “Understanding intuition as a thought”, “Understanding intuition as receiving signs”, and “Understanding intuition as an alarm”. Because they have trust in their own intuition, the nurses made further assessments and paid more attention to patients. They were also better prepared after receiving intuition alarms to perform the appropriate responses, and acting upon the alarms reduced the nurses’ physical and psychological signs. Conclusion The findings showed how intuition was understood by the critical care nurses; therefore, these results can be considered to form a theoretical basis for designing other studies. Because

  12. Do rural primary health care nurses feel equipped for palliative care?

    PubMed

    Cumming, M; Boreland, F; Perkins, D

    2012-01-01

    Community primary health care nurses in rural and remote settings are required to provide palliative care as part of their generalist role. They have limited access to specialist medical and nursing support and sometimes there are no resident GPs. A study consisting of a mailed survey and follow-up interviews was conducted to explore the experiences of these nurses and to determine how personally and professionally equipped they felt for palliative care service provision. Most participants were registered nurses experienced in nursing and in rural and remote settings, who juggled multiple generalist work roles. They had only occasional palliative care patients, and more than half had provided palliative care for a friend or family member. Some nurses found palliative care rewarding, others preferred not to have to do it. However, even those who did not enjoy working with palliative care patients often went beyond the 'call of duty' to support a home death if that was what the patient wanted. Three-quarters had attended palliative care education in the last 2 years but 88% wanted more education. Barriers to education included competing work roles, work load, geographical isolation and lack of backfill. Support from managers and peers was considered important, as was accessing timely and relevant clinical support.

  13. The bulldozer and the ballet dancer: aspects of nurses' caring approaches in acute psychiatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Björkdahl, A; Palmstierna, T; Hansebo, G

    2010-08-01

    Demanding conditions in acute psychiatric wards inhibit provision of safe, therapeutic care and leave nurses torn between humanistic ideals and the harsh reality of their daily work. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' caring approaches within this context. Data were collected from interviews with nurses working in acute psychiatric intensive care. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis, based on interpretive description. Results revealed a caring-approach continuum on which two approaches formed the main themes: the bulldozer and the ballet dancer. The bulldozer approach functioned as a shield of power that protected the ward from chaos. The ballet dancer approach functioned as a means of initiating relationships with patients. When examining the data from a theoretical perspective of caring and uncaring encounters in nursing, the ballet dancer approach was consistent with a caring approach, while the bulldozer approach was more complex and somewhat aligned with uncaring approaches. Conclusions drawn from the study are that although the bulldozer approach involves a risk for uncaring and harming actions, it also brings a potential for caring. This potential needs to be further explored and nurses should be encouraged to reflect on how they integrate paternalistic nursing styles with person-centred care.

  14. [From bearing arms to nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-10-01

    Having benefited from professional redeployment that has fully met his expectations, a former soldier who has become a nurse shares with us his work in a medical/social organization with residents of areas facing job insecurity.

  15. American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program Approval Overview CSI Academy Chapters Excellence Awards Healthy Work Environments Volunteers Beacon Awards AACN Standards Your Stories AACN ... Nursing Excellence Overview CSI Academy Chapters Excellence Awards Healthy Work ... Awards AACN Standards Your Stories Grants ...

  16. Let's empower practice nurses to improve care.

    PubMed

    2016-04-20

    How many times have we read a report or piece of research that suggests nurses could be taking on more of the work currently performed by doctors? It is invariably accompanied by figures suggesting that the NHS would save squillions of pounds every year if only consultants and GPs let nurses take on more responsibilities. Not only that, but access to services would improve and outcomes would be unaffected or might even be enhanced.

  17. [Cooperation protocols, which concept for nursing care?].

    PubMed

    Le Boeuf, Dominique

    2010-12-01

    The implementation of cooperation protocols as provided for by the "Hospital, patients, health and regions" Law may greatly alter the organisation of healthcare practices. But an excessively limited vision, focused on the medical act to be delegated, might remove the clinical aspect of the nurse's role and reduce it to merely executing prescriptions. The French National Order of Nurses, through the opinions it will give to national health Authorities, wishes to prevent this danger.

  18. [From a nursing care project to a medical-nursing care project. A group vision].

    PubMed

    Inthavong, Karen

    2007-12-01

    The hospital world, in constant development, is becoming more complex and reduces the possibility for the actors to have fixed landmarks. Changes affect the organization, the rhythms and the division of labour in the field of health. The idea of a project of medical nursing care would thus come to offer the possibility of acquiring a global culture, a factor of integration and management of diversity. The notion of collective performance, of putting in coherence skills and means at the service of the treated person would then be federative. The organization in pole which meets a will to replace the current vision of the hospital, which is very fragmented, by a more integrated conception, invites the professionals to cooperate. Management by process which would consist in crossing structuring in pole with the transverse processes of taking care of the patients invites to focus on inter phases. Furthermore, this organization multiplying exchanges and intelligence, by giving initiative to the ground, can allow the Director of the Care to be proactive. To work in network rather than in a pyramidal way is an opportunity. The quality of the cooperation among the actors being determining to move from a logic of territory to a logic of project.

  19. Evaluating strategies for changing acute care nurses' perceptions on end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Barbara G; Melhado, Lolita W; Convertine, Linda; Stecher, Jo

    2008-01-01

    Providing quality care to the dying has become a primary concern in the United States. Eighty percent of deaths still occur in the hospital even though nurses report they do not think that good deaths are routinely possible within a hospital setting due to lack of appropriate education on end-of-life care. The aim of this pilot study was to test the best method for changing acute nurse's perceptions about end-of-life care. A 3-group experimental design tested the efficacy of a nurse-led hospice collaborative. Hypotheses were: (1) nurses who receive classroom instruction will have greater change in perceptions than the control group and (2) nurses who receive a combination of classroom and hospice experiences will demonstrate greater changes than the classroom or control group. No significant differences were found among the 3 groups. However, the intervention group showed increased guilt about not having enough time to spend with the dying.

  20. Masculinity and nursing care: A narrative analysis of male students' stories about care.

    PubMed

    Jordal, Kristin; Heggen, Kristin

    2015-11-01

    Nursing education programmes and the nursing curriculum have been criticised for presenting an outdated and feminised description of care, which has had the effect of marginalising men, as well as hindering a more modern outlook for the profession. This article uses interview-based data from a qualitative study on Norwegian students' experiences in the first year of training. Using a narrative analysis method, the paper explores how male nursing students use stories to describe care and shows how their storytelling illustrates a way for men to negotiate their role in a feminised profession. The paper aims to deepen our understanding of the ways in which male students can challenge this historically female profession to broaden itself by including male-based caregiving as part of nursing care. In addition, the paper highlights the potential of stories and storytelling as a teaching and learning strategy in nursing education.

  1. [Identity's configuration of nurses of a mobile emergency care service].

    PubMed

    de Avelar, Vanessa Luciana Lima Melo; de Paiva, Kely César Martins

    2010-01-01

    This study considers the configuration of the identity of nurses working in a Mobile Emergency Care Service, based on the model of Dubar. This is a qualitative study, in which data were collected mainly through interviews, with nurses and other team members, and analyzed according to the technique of content analysis. About the identity of the nurse, the results point to a different subject, experienced, lonely, closer to the welfare activities, in search of training and recognition, wrapped in complex labor relations. Due the limitations of research and the issues that emerged in the research process, suggestions for future research are aligned at the end of the article.

  2. Graduate nurse perceptions of caring for people with posttraumatic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Searby, Adam; Maude, Phil

    2014-12-01

    : This article reports a qualitative study of the phenomenon of posttraumatic amnesia, a common behavioral sequelae to traumatic brain injury frequently encountered by nurses on trauma wards. Specifically, it focuses on the experiences of newly registered Australian graduate nurses (N = 6) providing care for this patient cohort. An atheoretical qualitative descriptive design (Sandelowski, 2000) has been used to explore graduate nurses' experiences with posttraumatic amnesia. Themes that emerged from the transcripts were perceptions of behavior, difficulties in clinical management, safety, risk of wandering, external support, containment, and advocating for patient safety.

  3. Study on weighting of amount of nursing care using data on index of patient's need for nursing and system approach.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yumiko; Kumamoto, Ichiro

    2005-04-01

    The importance of appropriate staffing of nurses has been emphasized and optimal provision of nursing care has increased in order to improve the quality of nursing service. Since the introduction of the nursing information system in 1987, we have creatively categorized the classification of index of patient's need for nursing to collect ever-objective data on the index of patient's need for nursing and utilized it as an indicator to evaluate the amount of nursing care necessary for patients. We also weighted the index of patient's need for nursing and categorized it into categories A, B, and C based on the accumulated data on the index of patient's need for nursing, and calculated the cost of nursing care by adding the nurse salary data to the weighting. In addition, we developed a system in which measurement of amount of nursing care based on the data on the index of patient's need for nursing and calculation of nursing care cost could be done by utilizing the hospital Data Warehouse (DWH) and adopted a system approach that could contribute to improvement in patient service and make hospital management better.

  4. [Systematized care in cardiac preoperative: theory of human caring in the perspective of nurses and users].

    PubMed

    Amorim, Thais Vasconselos; Arreguy-Sena, Cristina; Alves, Marcelo da Silva; Salimena, Anna Maria de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    This is a case study research that aimed to know, with the adoption of the Theory of Human Caring, the meanings of therapeutic interpersonal relationship between nurse and user on the preoperative nursing visit after the experience of the surgical process. The convenience sample was composed of three nurses and three users of an institution that has updated records to perform highly complex cardiovascular surgery, comprising nine combinations of therapeutic interactions. It was used instruments, structured according to the theory of Jean Watson and North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, Nursing Intervention Classification and Nursing Outcomes Classification taxonomies. The legal and ethical aspects of research involving human subjects were assured. The results revealed three clusters to grasp the significance of preoperative visits by users and five clusters to capture the perception of nurses when they experience this clinical experience.

  5. Physical and psychosocial nursing care for patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M E; Pheifer, W G

    1993-06-01

    As suggested earlier we have chosen in this article to discuss only a small group of key physical and psychosocial concerns and needs associated with HIV and AIDS. These were the issues most frequently discussed by a study group of people living with HIV. We recognize, however, that holistic nursing intervention considers the totality of the individual living with HIV: body, mind, and spirit. It is to that end that the discussed nursing diagnoses and interventions are directed. Ultimately, the successful identification of and intervention in HIV related problems rests in the unique relationship between nurse and patient sharing as collaborators in the healing experience. The body of contemporary nursing and behavioral science research in the area of HIV/AIDS continues to grow. Presently the National Center for Nursing Research is supporting studies focusing on such areas as the use of designated versus general care settings for HIV patient care, quality of nursing care in HIV/AIDS, the effects of nurse-managed home care for AIDS patients, stress and coping in caregivers of AIDS children, the testing of interventions for black women with AIDS, and prevention studies (National Center for Nursing Research, personal communication, 1992). Nevertheless, as the HIV pandemic continues to grow and expand its demographic parameters, more research, particularly with such populations as women and children, is urgently needed. Studies exploring prevention issues and symptom management also are most important. Some suggestions for future study include examination of cultural variables associated with coping with HIV and AIDS; longitudinal research on surviving HIV over time; intervention studies to test specific nursing therapeutics in various settings such as hospital, home, and clinic; and finally, research describing the impact of HIV and AIDS on family functioning and adaptation. It is only through continued study of the impact of HIV, on both the individual living with HIV

  6. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth.

  7. Critical care nurses' perceptions of their roles in family-team conflicts related to treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marie Patricia; Throndson, Karen; Dyck, Felicia

    2012-03-01

    Conflict over treatment plans is a cause of concern for those working in critical care environments. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe critical care nurses' perceptions of their roles in situations of conflict between family members and health-care providers in intensive care units. Using a qualitative descriptive design, 12 critical care nurses were interviewed individually and 4 experienced critical care nurses participated in focus group interviews. The roles described by the nurses were as follows: providing safe, competent, quality care to patients; building or restoring relationships of trust with families; and supporting other nurses. The nurses highlighted the level of stress when conflict arises, the need to be cautious in providing care and communicating with family members, and the need for support for nurses. More research related to working in situations of conflict is required, as is enhanced education for critical care nurses.

  8. Primary Care Clinician Expectations Regarding Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Melinda M.; Bond, Lynne A.; Howard, Alan; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Expectations regarding aging (ERA) in community-dwelling older adults are associated with personal health behaviors and health resource usage. Clinicians' age expectations likely influence patients' expectations and care delivery patterns; yet, limited research has explored clinicians' age expectations. The Expectations Regarding Aging…

  9. Knowledge of and attitudes towards palliative care among multinational nurses in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abudari, Gassan; Zahreddine, Hassan; Hazeim, Hassan; Assi, Mohammad Al; Emara, Sania

    2014-09-01

    Background Palliative care is not yet integrated into the health-care system in Saudi Arabia. King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre-Riyadh (KFSH&RC-Riyadh) is a tertiary care facility and regional cancer centre in Saudia Arabia with a highly multinational nursing workforce. Little is known about these nurses' knowledge of and attitudes towards palliative care. Aim To determine the palliative care knowledge and attitudes of the nursing workforce of KFSH&RC-Riyadh and any influencing factors. Method A questionnaire including demographic data, the Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses (PCQN), and Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying scale (FATCOD) was completed by 395 staff nurses from 19 countries. Results The nurses scored a mean of 111.66 out of 150 on the FATCOD scale and of 9.06 out of 20 on the PCQN. These scores indicate moderate attitudes towards but a knowledge deficit regarding palliative care. The nurses' palliative care training and years of nursing experience significantly affected the scores. The level of palliative care integration in the nurses' home countries was the most significant factor in multiple regression tests. Conclusion Palliative care integration into the health-care system of the country in which nurses train significantly influences their knowledge of and attitudes towards palliative care. Incorporating palliative care into nursing education might promote positive attitudes towards palliative care in nurses while enhancing their knowledge and skills.

  10. Assessment of nursing care using indicators generated by software1

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Paula Souza; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado; Tannure, Meire Chucre

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the efficacy of the Nursing Process in an Intensive Care Unit using indicators generated by software. METHOD: cross-sectional study using data collected for four months. RNs and students daily registered patients, took history (at admission), performed physical assessments, and established nursing diagnoses, nursing plans/prescriptions, and assessed care delivered to 17 patients using software. Indicators concerning the incidence and prevalence of nursing diagnoses, rate of effectiveness, risk diagnoses, and rate of effective prevention of complications were computed. RESULTS: the Risk for imbalanced body temperature was the most frequent diagnosis (23.53%), while the least frequent was Risk for constipation (0%). The Risk for Impaired skin integrity was prevalent in 100% of the patients, while Risk for acute confusion was the least prevalent (11.76%). Risk for constipation and Risk for impaired skin integrity obtained a rate of risk diagnostic effectiveness of 100%. The rate of effective prevention of acute confusion and falls was 100%. CONCLUSION: the efficacy of the Nursing Process using indicators was analyzed because these indicators reveal how nurses have identified patients' risks and conditions, and planned care in a systematized manner. PMID:26039293

  11. Caring for newborns in the presence of their parents: the experience of nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Santin, Karine Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura

    2011-01-01

    The nurse has a key role in involving parents in the care of newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to comprehend how the nurses experience the care provided to newborns in the presence of the parents. This is a qualitative study using social phenomenology, with the participation of seven nurses, interviewed between January and February 2009. The nurses perceived the needs of parents; had positive expectations regarding the care provided and acknowledge themselves to be the link between them, helping them to live with the hospitalized child. However, in emergencies, the nurses had difficulties in caring for the neonate in the presence of the parents. The nurses positively evaluated the presence of parents in the neonatal intensive care unit, involving them permanently in the care of the newborn. The study evokes the emergence of a care context (nurse/neonate/parents) that precedes the proximity between the subjects and the demands presented by them.

  12. Meeting new health care challenges with a proven innovation: nurse-managed health care clinics.

    PubMed

    Link, Denise G; Perry, Diane; Cesarotti, Evelyn L

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in January 2014, millions of Americans will enroll in health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act. Some of these individuals were obtaining health care in safety net health clinics, emergency departments, or urgent care centers; many were going without needed care and will be new to the health care system. In addition to these newly insured, the ranks of older Americans and persons in need of chronic disease management will be on the rise. The way in which health care is delivered will have to change in order for the health care workforce to meet the demand for their services without sacrificing quality or access. Nurse practitioners and registered nurses have the education and skills to provide health promotion, disease prevention, and chronic disease management services that will make up a sizable portion of the demand. Amending state practice acts so that the authority to practice matches the ability to practice and opening provider panels to advanced practice nurses will provide opportunities to establish or expand sustainable nurse-led primary care practices in health care shortage areas. Along with these changes, models of health care delivery that incorporate differentiated practice roles and shared interprofessional responsibility for providing care will maximize the capacity of the system to provide the health care that people need.

  13. An alphabetical mnemonic teaching strategy for constructing nursing care plans.

    PubMed

    El Hussein, Mohamed Toufic; Jakubec, Sonya L

    2015-01-01

    The strategy of mnemonics has long been used as an aid to learning biology, physiology, pathophysiology, and health assessment in nursing. An application of an alphabetical mnemonics strategy to teaching and learning nursing processes and constructing care plans has been explored for patients with increased intracranial pressure (ICP), hepatic failure, and chronic renal failure. A specific application of this strategy for teaching care planning for patients with ICP is described. Student feedback appears to be positive, and reviews of the teaching-learning experience have received approval in students' evaluation of instruction. The mnemonics strategy presented has the potential for applicability and transferability to other areas of nursing care planning and other course contexts.

  14. [Meaning of managing intensive care units for the nursing professional].

    PubMed

    Martins, Júlia Trevisan; Robazzi, Maria Lúicia do Carmo Cruz; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Garanhani, Mara Lúcia; Haddad, Maria do Carmo Lourenço

    2009-03-01

    This study had the aim of understanding the meaning of being a nurse in a management position in Intensive Care Units as well as the feelings coming from this function. Eight nurses from the University Hospital of Parand, Brazil, were interviewed. This is a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study in which the dejourian theoretical framework was used. The data were gathered from January to March of 2007 through semi-structured interviews, which were then transcribed categorized and subcategorized. The data were analyzed by the analysis of content approach. It was observed that managing means: to provide the patient with care, to manage the nursing assistance as well as the health team. The feelings of pleasure are related to: taking care of the patient, developing team work, the results of the work and the external acknowledgement.

  15. [Outsourced services and their consequences for nursing care].

    PubMed

    Zamberlan, Cláudia; de Siqueira, Heidi Crecência Heckler

    2005-01-01

    This experience report intends to turn visible and to share with other professionals a practical experiment. The influence of outsourced services is emphasized in the process of nursing care, focusing the difficulties found, in the same institution, in the units not outsourced related to nursing care and problem resolution of clients submitted to hemodynamics procedures that are hospitalized after the intervention and/or return to common units of the Institution which services are outsourced. The experience evidences the need of a integrated team between the two services, using the continuing education as a way to rescue fundamental knowledge for clients' integral care, as well as a more committed profession with the being and making nursing.

  16. [Attitudes of nurses towards families: validation of the scale Families' Importance in Nursing Care--Nurses Attitudes].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Palmira da Conceição M; Fernandes, Henriqueta Ilda V; Vilar, Ana Isabel S P; Figueiredo, Maria Henriqueta de J S; Ferreira, Maria Margarida Silva R S; Martinho, Maria Júlia C M; Figueiredo, Maria do Céu A B; Andrade, Luísa Maria da C; de Carvalho, José Carlos M; Martins, Maria Manuela Ferreira P da S

    2011-12-01

    The attitudes of nurses towards families determine the care process. With this study, we aimed to obtain an instrument that would allow us to learn about this variable. Hence, our purpose was to perform the cross-cultural adaptation and evaluate the psychometric features of the Portuguese version of the instrument Families' Importance in Nursing Care - Nurses Attitudes (FINC-NA), which aims to evaluate the attitudes of nurses towards the importance of involving the patient's family in the nursing care. The method recommended by the literature was followed. The sample consisted of 136 nurses working in primary health care. The results obtained in the reliability tests showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's Alpha=0.87). The psychometric study permits us to state that the Portuguese version of the FINC-NA, which in Portuguese is referred to as A importância das famílias nos cuidados de enfermagem - atitudes dos enfermeiros (IFCE-AE), is a reliable and valid tool.

  17. Finding the voice of clinical experience: participatory action research with registered nurses in developing a child critical care nursing curriculum.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Minette; Britton, Margretta; Clow, Sheila E

    2005-04-01

    The voice of clinical nurses is important to find and hear in the design of curricula. A participative action research project proposed to add this voice to the design of a new Critical Care Child Nursing programme at the University of Cape Town (UCT). Nurses' experiences of nursing critically ill children and their perceived learning needs in this context, were the central focus of the study. Participants were registered nurses working in the paediatric intensive care unit at the Red Cross Children's Hospital (a specialist hospital), which offers secondary and tertiary care in the Cape Town region and beyond. Data were gathered in five focussed group discussions. Findings indicate that the Critical Care Child Nurse needs not only a specialised knowledge base and acutely developed assessment skills, but also astute interpersonal skills. The nurse's professional identity and integration into the multidisciplinary team need exploring. Together with the development of interpersonal skills, the nurse needs to engage the child and family.

  18. Procedural, Educational and Caring Aspects of Nursing and Health Care Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, June C.

    Nurses are prime users of medical devices in patient care and must be aware of four safety issues: safety of the patient, the information, the personnel, and the device. Thus, nurses need to be able to understand and communicate in the language of technological devices. With formal coursework in the use of instruments being limited, agency…

  19. Indicators for Evaluating the Performance and Quality of Care of Ambulatory Care Nurses.

    PubMed

    Rapin, Joachim; D'Amour, Danielle; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2015-01-01

    The quality and safety of nursing care vary from one service to another. We have only very limited information on the quality and safety of nursing care in outpatient settings, an expanding area of practice. Our aim in this study was to make available, from the scientific literature, indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate the performance of nursing care in outpatient settings and to integrate those indicators into the theoretical framework of Dubois et al. (2013). We conducted a scoping review in three databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE) and the bibliographies of selected articles. From a total of 116 articles, we selected 22. The results of our study not only enable that framework to be extended to ambulatory nursing care but also enhance it with the addition of five new indicators. Our work offers nurses and managers in ambulatory nursing units indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate performance. For researchers, it presents the current state of knowledge on this construct and a framework with theoretical foundations for future research in ambulatory settings. This work opens an unexplored field for further research.

  20. Indicators for Evaluating the Performance and Quality of Care of Ambulatory Care Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rapin, Joachim; D'Amour, Danielle; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2015-01-01

    The quality and safety of nursing care vary from one service to another. We have only very limited information on the quality and safety of nursing care in outpatient settings, an expanding area of practice. Our aim in this study was to make available, from the scientific literature, indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate the performance of nursing care in outpatient settings and to integrate those indicators into the theoretical framework of Dubois et al. (2013). We conducted a scoping review in three databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE) and the bibliographies of selected articles. From a total of 116 articles, we selected 22. The results of our study not only enable that framework to be extended to ambulatory nursing care but also enhance it with the addition of five new indicators. Our work offers nurses and managers in ambulatory nursing units indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate performance. For researchers, it presents the current state of knowledge on this construct and a framework with theoretical foundations for future research in ambulatory settings. This work opens an unexplored field for further research. PMID:26380108

  1. A Pilot Study To Measure the Caring Efficacy of Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Judith

    2003-01-01

    Results of the Coates Caring Efficacy Scale for 193 preentry to final-semester nursing students indicated that mean scores were higher than in Coates' sample of novice student nurses. Students were able to articulate the role of caring in nursing. Even preentry students scored well, suggesting that factors other than nursing education contribute…

  2. Peaceful Death: Recommended Competencies and Curricular Guidelines for End-of-Life Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    A group of health care ethicists and palliative care experts convened by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing developed a set of competencies that should be achieved through nursing curricula. The purpose of the 15 competency statements is to assist nurse educators in incorporating end-of-life content into nursing curricula. Every…

  3. Nursing Workload and the Changing Health Care Environment: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the health care environment have impacted nursing workload, quality of care, and patient safety. Traditional nursing workload measures do not guarantee efficiency, nor do they adequately capture the complexity of nursing workload. Review of the literature indicates nurses perceive the quality of their work has diminished. Research has…

  4. Long-Term Care Planning Study: Strengths and Learning Needs of Nursing Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruttenden, Kathleen E.

    2006-01-01

    This planning study was designed and conducted in a predominantly rural Canadian province to examine the strengths and learning needs of four categories of nursing staff practising in New Brunswick nursing homes. Participants included directors of care, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and resident attendants. The nursing homes ranged…

  5. [The association between adverse events and nursing care: measurement problems].

    PubMed

    Palese, Alvisa

    2011-01-01

    The association between adverse events and nursing care: measurement problems. Staffing of RNs below target levels has been associated with increased adverse events, included mortality. Some events may be directly associated to lack of surveillance or care, others occur as a result of neglected care and cannot be associated to the shift with levels of nurses below the target. However, a close look to negative events, neglecting positive events provides an incomplete view. Such studies have been criticized because they have not shown a direct link between the level of staffing and individual patient experiences, often did not control for sill mix and did not explore in depth what nurses do and what are their priorities when there is an higher workload. Often these studies present data with mean values ignoring that nurse staffing is not the same across an entire hospital and nursing care is delivered in geographically-based units, with wide variation in staffing levels. A future challenge of research is to combine a descriptive-quantitative approach with the collection of more qualitative data and prospective designs.

  6. Attitudes of older Egyptians towards nursing care at home: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Boggatz, Thomas; Farid, Tamer; Mohammedin, Ahmed; Dassen, Theo

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the attitudes of older Egyptians towards receiving nursing care at home and to identify the characteristics that allow differentiating between various types of these attitudes. The number of older persons in Egypt requiring nursing care is increasing. Care was traditionally provided by the family, but the social network is changing in bigger cities. Beside geriatric homes, older Egyptians can refer to private helpers and a small number of home care services. Structured guideline interviews were performed with 33 Egyptians above 60 years of age. Participants were chosen by purposeful sampling. Twelve of them received home care. Interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis according to Mayring. Participants could be classified under three main categories of care seeking types: (1) insufficient income, (2) sufficient income and family dependent decision about care, (3) sufficient income and independent decision about care. Variations under these categories were due to differences in the social network and the perceived self-help abilities. Examples for the influence of factors which explained variations were not identified in every category to the same extent. Some types of care seeking that exist in reality may be missing in this study. Findings suggest the hypothesis that care seeking of older Egyptians is related to their social status. Those with insufficient income seem to reject home care whereas independent personalities with sufficient income may be the main winners of this offer.

  7. Caring in context: caring practices in a sample of Hong Kong nurses.

    PubMed

    Arthur, D; Pang, S; Wong, T

    1998-12-01

    In an effort to place the international literature and research in nursing in a Chinese cultural context a study was commenced to examine the caring practices of nurses in Hong Kong. In view of a recent study (Wilkes & Wallis, 1993) which utilised Roach's 5Cs of caring (Roach, 1987, 1992), a pilot study was commenced on a sample of 77 Hong Kong Registered Nurses studying a Diploma of Nursing. An open ended questionnaire was designed which asked nurses to respond to questions about caring in general and the 5Cs: compassion, competence, confidence, conscience and commitment. The questions asked what each of the concepts meant to them as a nurse. Data was analysed into themes based on key words for each of the six areas revealing that the sample of Hong Kong nurses viewed caring in a similar light to those in overseas studies. The sample highlighted compassion and competence as their major features and it is suggested that methodological problems may have inhibited a deeper analysis of their caring attributes and behaviours. When asked to expand on the 5 Cs in terms of their own practice they were able to supply themes which were closely related to Roach's definitions but which may have been more 'textbook' in their origin and certainly lacked a richness of response. The paucity of responses in terms of clarity and richness of data, followed by discussions with the participants led to conclusions about the methodological issues of cross-cultural research and recommendations for future research are made. Highlighted are the problems with attempting to use concepts such as the 5 Cs across cultures and the problems encountered with translation of concepts related to caring from Chinese into English, and vice-versa. The study has provided some insights into the concepts of caring in Hong Kong Chinese nurses. In the light of advances in China and unification of previously separate countries these findings provide and offer insights into nursing in China and are encouraging

  8. [Assessment of the association between nursing care services, hypertension, and Alzheimer's disease in elderly patients with late-stage diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Seiji; Kondo, Yasuko; Kitagawa, Chihiro; Katsuta, Sayaka

    2013-12-01

    In an aging society with fewer children, diabetes self-control is difficult for elderly patients. Under these circumstances, it is expected that living in care homes for the elderly and institutions where nursing care services could be provided will help improve the prognosis of diabetic patients. Therefore, we assessed whether HbA(1c). levels (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program : NGSP) in 121 elderly patients with late-stage diabetes receiving home medical care in our clinic from March 2008 to March 2013 improved with nursing care services.

  9. Research on ethics in nursing care for older people: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Suhonen, Riitta; Stolt, Minna; Launis, Veikko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this review was to analyse the empirical studies that focus on ethics in nursing care for older people, scoping the need and areas for further study. A search of the MEDLINE and CINAHL databases (earliest to August 2009) was conducted using the the keywords: ethic* and nursing or care or caring and elderly or aged or older. After a four-stage process, 71 empirical articles were included in the review, with informants ranging from elderly people to relatives, caregivers, managers and students in care settings. The review focuses on the concepts, contexts, methods and validity of these studies. Based on the analysis, the reviewed research seems to be fragmented and multifaceted, focussing on selected issues such as autonomy, self-determination and informed consent. No large research programs or research traditions were found so it was not possible to draw any conclusions about suitable methods, study designs or instruments of measurement for use in this research area.

  10. Community nurses working in piloted primary care teams: Irish Republic.

    PubMed

    Burke, Triona; O'Neill, Catherine

    2010-08-01

    Primary care health services in the Irish Republic have undergone fundamental transformation with the establishment of multidisciplinary primary care teams nationwide. Primary care teams provide a community-based health service delivered through a range of health professionals in an integrated way. As part of this initiative ten pilot teams were established in 2003. This research was undertaken in order to gain an understanding of nurse's experiences of working in a piloted primary care team. The methodology used was a focus group approach. The findings from this study illustrated how community nurse's roles and responsibilities have expanded within the team. The findings also highlighted the benefits and challenges of working as a team with various other community-based health-care disciplines.

  11. Promoting palliative care worldwide through international nursing education.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Pam; Paice, Judith; Coyle, Nessa; Coyne, Patrick; Smith, Thomas; Ferrell, Betty

    2014-10-01

    Many challenges exist when providing international education to those who care for people at the end of life. Though issues related to culture and language may vary, the one commonality that crosses all nations is that its people die. In general, societies seek to provide the best care they are trained to give. Many have few resources to provide this care well. Traditions of the past influence norms and dictate policies and procedures of the present. Since its inception in 2000, the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium Project has provided palliative care education to nurses and other members of the interdisciplinary team in six of the seven continents. This article describes the efforts of this project to improve education around the globe, with the goal of providing excellent, compassionate palliative care, irrespective of location, financial status, political views, religion, race, and/or ethnicity.

  12. Reducing health care's carbon footprint--the power of nursing.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Aliria

    2012-11-01

    Global warming and environmentalism continue to be national and international issues as their complexities and implications become better understood. One ironic contributor to the degradation of the environment is the health care system. Serving as clinical laboratories, hotels, restaurants, and offices that never close, U.S. hospitals produce more than 2 million tons of waste annually. Although the consequences and significance of health care's carbon footprint are undeniable, strategies to reduce this impact are challenging. This article discusses how the role, traits, and knowledge of nurses combined with their positions in the health care system make them key players in creating an environmentally sustainable health care industry. With an analysis of environmental action versus inaction, this article explores how nurses at the forefront of health care are equipped to change practice that will reach far beyond the bedside.

  13. The potential for nurse practitioners in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Mandy M; Fraser, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    In Canada, health care reform is underway to address escalating costs, access and quality of care issues, and existing personnel shortages in various health disciplines. One response of the nursing profession to these stimuli has been the development of the advanced practice nurse, namely, the nurse practitioner (NP). NPs are in an excellent position to address current shortcomings through increasing points of access to the health care system, providing an emphasis on education and disease prevention, and delivering high-quality, cost-effective care in a multitude of practice settings. With an emphasis on the social determinants of health, NPs are in a prime position to provide care to underserved and vulnerable populations across Canada. Despite the potential for NPs to be instrumental in health care reform, there is a lack of support and regulation necessary for their optimal use. Barriers to mobilizing NPs in Canada exist and impede the integration of NPs into the Canadian health care system, which has both quality of care and social justice implications.

  14. Efficacy of the end-of-life nursing care continuing education program for nurses in general wards in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Saori; Moriyama, Michiko; Ohno, Yumiko

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to examine effectiveness of the End-of-life nursing care continuing education program for general ward nurses. A nonrandomized, before-after trial was conducted. The program was implemented for 25 nurses. The contents of the program consisted of the family assessment, general symptom management and practical use of theories and models regarding end-of-life nursing care. The primary outcome, implementation ability of end-of-life nursing care, was significantly improved after the program; improvements continued even at 2 months after. Similar results were obtained for nurses' confidence and knowledge concerning end-of-life nursing care. As for attitude toward end-of-life care, participants' scores were further elevated after the program. The participants rated the usefulness of the program as high. The effectiveness of the program was suggested from these results. In the future, this program should be widely used for in-service training.

  15. Everyday Excellence: A Framework for Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury; Specht, Janet Pringle; Karlman, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Registered nurses make measurable contributions to the health and wellness of persons living in nursing homes. However, most nursing homes do not employ adequate numbers of professional nurses with specialized training in the nursing care of older adults to positively impact resident outcomes. As a result, many people never receive excellent geriatric nursing while living in a long-term care facility. Nurses have introduced various professional practice models into health care institutions as tools for leading nursing practice, improving client outcomes, and achieving organizational goals. Problematically, few professional practice models have been implemented in nursing homes. This article introduces an evidence-based framework for professional nursing practice in long-term care. The Everyday Excellence framework is based upon eight guiding principles: Valuing, Envisioning, Peopling, Securing, Learning, Empowering, Leading, and Advancing Excellence. Future research will evaluate the usefulness of this framework for professional nursing practice. PMID:20077966

  16. The use of social network methodological framework in nursing care to breastfeeding women.

    PubMed

    Souza, Maria Helena do Nascimento; Souza, Ivis Emília de Oliveira; Tocantins, Florence Romijn

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the contribution of the social network methodological framework in nursing care delivered to women who breastfeed their children up to six months of age. This qualitative study aimed to elaborate the social network map of 20 women through tape-recorded interview. Social network analysis evidenced a 'strong' bond between these women and members from their primary network, especially friends, neighbors, mothers or with the child's father, who were reported as the people most involved in the breastfeeding period. The contribution of this framework to nursing practice is discussed, especially in care and research processes. We believe that nurses' appropriation of this framework can be an important support for efficacious actions, as well as to favor a broader perspective on the social context people experience.

  17. The pediatric nephrology nurse as clinical care coordinator.

    PubMed

    Frank, R

    1997-06-01

    The discipline of pediatric nephrology addresses a wide range of conditions of varying severity. The most benign conditions include orthostatic proteinuria, and thin basement nephropathy. The most challenging diagnosis in the field is chronic renal failure, particularly if the patient is an infant. Nurses trained in pediatric nephrology provide care to this entire spectrum of patients within the context of their family. The varied responsibilities and specialized training of the pediatric nephrology nurse as described in this article can serve as a prototype for the independent role of clinical care coordinator.

  18. Nursing care for end-stage liver disease.

    PubMed

    Clements, Amanda; Greenslade, Lynda

    Nurses are seeing more and more patients with liver disease, many of whom are under 65. Most common causes are avoidable and, as liver disease may take up to 30 years to develop, identifying those at risk is key. Patients with liver disease often have a fluctuating course of complications that needs a team approach to care. Improving end-of-life care can also reduce the number of these patients who die in hospital. This article, the first in a two-part series, explores some common complications of liver disease and best practice for nurses treating patients with end-stage liver disease.

  19. Getting the basics right. Care delivery in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Grando, Victoria; Conn, Vicki; Zwygart-Staffacher, Mary; Hicks, Lanis; Flesner, Marcia; Scott, Jill; Manion, Pam; Minner, Donna; Porter, Rose; Maas, Meridean

    2003-11-01

    In this study, the key exemplar processes of care in facilities with good resident outcomes were described. It follows that with description of these processes, it is feasible to teach facilities about the basics of care and the ways to systematically approach care so they can adopt these care processes and improve resident outcomes. However, for this to happen key organizational commitments must be in place for staff to consistently provide the basics of care. Nursing leadership must have a consistent presence over time, they must be champions of using team and group processes involving staff throughout the facility, and they must actively guide quality improvement processes. Administrative leadership must be present and express the expectation that high quality care is expected for residents, and that workers are expected to contribute to the quality improvement effort. If facilities are struggling with achieving average or poor resident outcomes, they must first make an effort to find nursing and administrative leaders who are willing to stay with the organization. These leaders must be skilled with team and group processes for decision-making and how to implement and use a quality improvement program to improve care. These leaders must be skilled at building employee relations and at retention strategies so residents are cared for by consistent staff who know them. The results of this study illustrate the simplicity of the basics of care that residents in nursing facilities need. The results also illustrate the complexity of the care processes and the organizational systems that must be in place to achieve good outcomes. Achieving these outcomes is the challenge facing those currently working in and leading nursing facilities.

  20. Literacy in the World of the Aged Care Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Linda; Casarotto, Nadia

    Australia's Aged Care Act of 1997 mandates a number of key reforms aimed at ensuring consistency in the quality of care and well-being for all residents of aged care facilities. The law required residential aged care facilities to provide high-quality care within a framework of continuous improvement which requires aged care workers to perform the…

  1. Development of an Acuity-Based Nurse Staffing System for the Post Anesthesia Care Unit.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    MEDCOM). The strong positive correlation (r > .90) between daily direct nursing care hours and patient volume supported the development of a general...regression model that was used to estimate daily direct nursing care hours from patient volume information.

  2. Advanced Nursing Directives: Integrating Validated Clinical Scoring Systems into Nursing Care in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    deForest, Erin Kate; Thompson, Graham Cameron

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to improve the quality and flow of care provided to children presenting to the emergency department the implementation of nurse-initiated protocols is on the rise. We review the current literature on nurse-initiated protocols, validated emergency department clinical scoring systems, and the merging of the two to create Advanced Nursing Directives (ANDs). The process of developing a clinical pathway for children presenting to our pediatric emergency department (PED) with suspected appendicitis will be used to demonstrate the successful integration of validated clinical scoring systems into practice through the use of Advanced Nursing Directives. Finally, examples of 2 other Advanced Nursing Directives for common clinical PED presentations will be provided. PMID:22778944

  3. [Nursing care systems and complex thought in nursing education: document analysis].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Josilaine Porfírio; Garanhani, Mara Lucia; Guariente, Maria Helena Dantas de Menezes

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the inclusion of the subject Nursing Care Systems (NCS) in nursing education. This study was based on qualitative desk research and it was conducted in a nursing programme in southern Brazil that offers an integrated curriculum with NCS as a cross-cutting theme. Data were collected from September to December 2012, by examining 15 planning and development workbooks on the cross-disciplinary modules of the programme. Analysis was divided into four stages: exploratory, selective, analytic and interpretive reading. The adopted theoretical framework was Complex Thought of Edgar Morin, according to the principles of relevant knowledge. Results were arranged into two categories: NCS as a crosscutting theme in nursing education: the context, the global and the multidimensional; and strategies for teaching, learning and assessment of NCS: the complex. The study contributes to the debate on the importance of teaching NCS as a crosscutting theme in nursing education.

  4. Impact of enhanced ventilator care bundle checklist on nursing documentation in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Malouf-Todaro, Nabia; Barker, James; Jupiter, Daniel; Tipton, Phyllis Hart; Peace, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a hospital-acquired infection that may develop in patients 48 hours after mechanical ventilation. The project goal was to determine whether a ventilator-associated pneumonia care bundle checklist embedded into an existing electronic health record would increase completeness of nursing documentation in an intensive care unit setting. With the embedded checklist, there were significant improvements in nursing documentation and a decreased incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

  5. The effects of death education on nurses' attitudes toward caring for terminally ill persons and their families.

    PubMed

    Frommelt, K H

    1991-01-01

    This study sought to determine the effectiveness of an education program on nurses' attitudes toward caring for terminally ill persons and their family members. The program, based on the hospice concept of care, included a didactic section based on Kubler-Ross' stages of death and dying, and a role-play model designed by the researcher. Data were collected from 34 licensed nurses, aged 18 to 65, practicing in the midwestern United States. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was designed by the researcher to assess nurses' attitudes. The FATCOD was found to be a valid and reliable tool. All nurses completed the tool before and after the education program (pre-test, post-test). Compared by a t-test, the scores for the nurses were significantly higher after participation in the educational program. The t-value was found to be 2.97, significant at the less than 0.01 level, 2-tailed probability = 0.006. These findings support the hypothesis that nurses have a more positive attitude toward caring for terminally ill persons and their family members after participation in the program, than the same nurses had before participating in the program. Demographic information including age, years of experience in nursing, highest degree held, basic type of nursing preparation and previous education on death and dying were analyzed to determine their relationship to the nurses' attitudes. The only information which demonstrated any significant relationship to the nurses' attitudes was that of previous education on death and dying. These were computed by an analysis of variance (ANOVA) F = 3.22, F prob = 0.04, significant at less than 0.05 level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Effectiveness of counseling provided by primary care doctors and nurses in increasing glaucoma screening rates.

    PubMed

    Rezner, Witold; Rezner, Anna; Dutkiewicz, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. An effective screening that can prevent glaucoma-related blindness largely depends on successful recruitment. This study was to assess the effectiveness of one-on-one counseling carried out by primary care doctors and nurses to increase glaucoma screening rates. Material and Methods. The study, carried out in an urban primary care center, involved 308 persons aged 35-87 years who were assigned to a doctor's, nurse's, or control group (N = 109, 110, and 89, resp.). Interventions by doctors and nurses included a brief one-on-one counseling session, while only a screening history was taken from controls. The number of people in each group with a positive screening status was assessed by telephone interview three months after the visit. Results. The percentage of persons in the nurse's counseling group who claimed being subjected to screening was more than four times higher than in the control group (20.9% versus 4.5%, P = 0.002). The doctor's interventions resulted in almost a tripled screening rate as compared to the control group (12.8% versus 4.5%, P = 0.052). There was no significant difference between screening rates in doctor's and nurse's groups (P = 0.212). Conclusions. In the studied population, counseling provided by nurses proved to be an efficacious method to encourage patients to undergo glaucoma screening.

  7. Effectiveness of Counseling Provided by Primary Care Doctors and Nurses in Increasing Glaucoma Screening Rates

    PubMed Central

    Rezner, Anna; Dutkiewicz, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. An effective screening that can prevent glaucoma-related blindness largely depends on successful recruitment. This study was to assess the effectiveness of one-on-one counseling carried out by primary care doctors and nurses to increase glaucoma screening rates. Material and Methods. The study, carried out in an urban primary care center, involved 308 persons aged 35–87 years who were assigned to a doctor's, nurse's, or control group (N = 109, 110, and 89, resp.). Interventions by doctors and nurses included a brief one-on-one counseling session, while only a screening history was taken from controls. The number of people in each group with a positive screening status was assessed by telephone interview three months after the visit. Results. The percentage of persons in the nurse's counseling group who claimed being subjected to screening was more than four times higher than in the control group (20.9% versus 4.5%, P = 0.002). The doctor's interventions resulted in almost a tripled screening rate as compared to the control group (12.8% versus 4.5%, P = 0.052). There was no significant difference between screening rates in doctor's and nurse's groups (P = 0.212). Conclusions. In the studied population, counseling provided by nurses proved to be an efficacious method to encourage patients to undergo glaucoma screening. PMID:25386358

  8. Critical care nurses' use of decision-making strategies.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Leanne M

    2003-07-01

    Effective decision-making has the potential to facilitate improvements in health care. This paper reports several aspects of a study which used "thinking aloud" within a concept attainment framework to examine the decision-making processes of expert critical care nurses in relation to haemodynamic monitoring. The purpose of this study was to examine whether hypotheses were used in the decision-making process and, if so, were hypotheses deactivated when no longer relevant. In addition, the strategies that were used during the decision-making process were examined. Eight expert critical care nurses consented to participate in the study after ethics clearance was obtained from both the University and Hospital ethics committees. The majority of expert critical care nurse participants in this study demonstrated extensive use of hypotheses to explain the relationship between attributes and concepts. There was no evidence of specific deactivation of hypotheses when they were no longer relevant. Participants demonstrated use of a range of decision-making strategies, with a Focus Gambling Strategy being the most common. The reason for using different decision-making strategies was not clear and may represent variation between decision-makers or between scenarios for each individual decision-maker. Recommendations are made to help improve critical care nurses' decision-making.

  9. Nurse practitioner workforce: a substantial supply of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Lucero, Robert; Rauch, Lindsay; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    For about 5 decades, nurse practitioners (NPs) have been utilized to deliver primary care, traditionally in underserved areas or to vulnerable populations. However, over the years, this workforce has experienced a steady growth and has expanded its reach to provide primary care in diverse settings. An additional 32 million patients will have access to primary care with full implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. It is unlikely that the scarce supply of primary care physicians will be able to properly meet the demand and the health care needs of the nation. NPs face challenges but practice, policy, and research recommendations for better utilizing NPs in primary care can mediate the workforce shortages and meet the demand for care.

  10. [A paradigmatic glance on nursing care -- a walk to complex care].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ana Lúcia; Ciampone, Maria Helena

    2003-12-01

    The text addresses the Cartesian paradigms (modern) and the complexity paradigm (post-modern of Edgar Morin) aiming to deepen reflection on the theme and understanding to improve nursing. To this end, the authors discuss the model of care of methodical nursing in the Cartesian paradigm defining it as producer of an authoritarian, fragmented and linear care. They point the need to rethink that model because it restricts the autonomy of the people/patient moving in the direction of complex care that provides for customers/actors' participation in their health care planning.

  11. Use of scores to calculate the nursing workload in a pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Campagner, Andriza Oliveira Moschetta; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos; Piva, Jefferson Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the performance of the Nursing Activities Score in a pediatric intensive care unit, compare its scores expressed as time spent on nursing activities to the corresponding ones calculated using the Simplified Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System, and correlate the results obtained by both instruments with severity, morbidity and mortality. Methods Prospective, observational, and analytical cohort study conducted at a type III general pediatric intensive care unit. The study participants were all the children aged 29 days to 12 years admitted to the investigated pediatric intensive care unit from August 2008 to February 2009. Results A total of 545 patients were studied, which corresponded to 2,951 assessments. The average score of the Simplified Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System was 28.79±10.37 (915±330 minutes), and that of the Nursing Activities Score was 55.6±11.82 (802±161 minutes). The number of minutes that resulted from the conversion of the Simplified Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System score was higher compared to that resulting from the Nursing Activities Score for all the assessments (p<0.001). The correlation between the instruments was significant, direct, positive, and moderate (R=0.564). Conclusions The agreement between the investigated instruments was satisfactory, and both instruments also exhibited satisfactory discrimination of mortality; for that purpose, the best cutoff point was 16 nursing hours/patient day. PMID:24770687

  12. Oral health perceptions of paediatric palliative care nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Couch, Elizabeth; Mead, Jean Marie; Walsh, Margaret M

    2013-01-01

    Systematic oral care reduces oral complications among children in paediatric palliative care (PPC), yet little is known about the oral health perceptions of PPC nursing staff. This qualitative cross-sectional study used semi-structured interviews based on phenomenography to explore PPC nursing staff's perceptions of oral health and the relationship of oral care to comfort and quality of life. A purposive sample of nine nursing staff employed at a California PPC facility participated. Five themes emerged from the analysis of the interviews: signs of oral health, reasons for oral care, adaptation of oral care on a case-by-case basis, barriers to providing oral care, and facilitators of improving oral care. The perceived importance of oral health was the underlining similarity between the themes. A need for further research in the area of oral PPC is indicated. Collaboration with dental professionals may be needed to create oral PPC guidelines that fit the complex needs of children with life-limiting illnesses.

  13. Health care change: challenge for nurse administrators.

    PubMed

    Bonalumi, N; Fisher, K

    1999-01-01

    Nursing administrators facing reorganization understand the difficulties and resistance that accompany organizational change. This article discusses resilience, a critical character trait for successfully managing change. Understanding the change process can assist those charged with the challenge of leading organizational change to manage the journey more effectively.

  14. Introducing Psychiatric Care into Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakauye, Kenneth M.; Camp, Cameron J.

    1992-01-01

    Consultation-liaison psychiatry program in teaching nursing home helped implement six guiding principles, including make patient human to the staff; assume no behavior is random; look for depression or psychosis as source of problems; reduce medications and medication doses; create more homelike environment; and use conditions in which learning…

  15. Nurses’ Practice Environment and Their Job Satisfaction: A Study on Nurses Caring for Older Adults in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Dong, Weizhen; Mauk, Kristen; Li, Peiying; Wan, Jin; Yang, Guang; Fang, Lyuying; Huan, Wan; Chen, Chun; Hao, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine the job satisfaction of nurses who are caring for older adults in healthcare settings in Shanghai, and to explore the underlying factors in order to explain and predict nurses’ job satisfaction. Background China has the largest elderly population in the world, and its population is aging rapidly. Studies on job satisfaction of nurses providing care for the elderly in China can help to identify problem areas and develop strategies for the improvement of nurses’ working conditions. However, to date, this subject matter has not been thoroughly studied in the Chinese context. Previous studies in other countries show that many factors impact nurses’ job satisfaction, with the practice environment being a critical factor. There is a serious nursing shortage in China, especially in the big cities such as Shanghai. Given the increasing care demand of the aging population, learning about the job satisfaction level among nurses who are caring for older adults can provide essential information to help attract and retain nurses in this specialty area. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 444 nurses in 22 elderly care institutions in Shanghai. The Chinese version of the Index of Work Satisfaction (IWS) and the Nursing Practice Environment Scale were instruments used. Inferential statistical tests used to analyze the data included Spearman correlation analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and hierarchical regression tests. Results The average overall IWS (part B) score was 135.21 ± 19.34. Personality, job and organizational characteristics were found to be the most influential factors, and the practice environment was identified as having the strongest impact on job satisfaction (Beta = 0.494). Conclusion Job satisfaction level among nurses who are caring for older adults in Shanghai is moderate, but the data suggest that this could be greatly increased if the nursing practice environment was improved. PMID:26380980

  16. The influence of managed care on U.S. baccalaureate nursing education programs.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Susan E

    2006-02-01

    The transformation of health care into managed care has raised many issues and concerns for nurse educators. The milieu in which nurses currently practice reflects the restructuring shaped by managed care principles. The shift from acute care to expanded community services has changed the way health care is provided within hospital settings. The organization of nursing programs has been affected by this shift, and the ramifications of these external forces on curriculum structure have altered the way nursing students are educated. This article presents research demonstrating the changes in the structure of the curricula for baccalaureate nursing education in 2001, which were caused by health care reform in effect since 1994.

  17. Assisted Living Expansion and the Market for Nursing Home Care

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C; Stevenson, David G; Cornell, Portia Y

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the effect of market-level changes in assisted living supply on nursing home utilization and resident acuity. Data Sources Primary data on the supply of assisted living over time were collected from 13 states from 1993 through 2007 and merged with nursing home-level data from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting System and market-level information from the Area Resource File. Study Design Least squares regression specification incorporating market and time-fixed effects. Principal Findings A 10 percent increase in assisted living capacity led to a 1.4 percent decline in private-pay nursing home occupancy and a 0.2–0.6 percent increase in patient acuity. Conclusions Assisted living serves as a potential substitute for nursing home care for some healthier individuals with greater financial resources, suggesting implications for policy makers, providers, and consumers. PMID:22578039

  18. Nurses' clinical practice in primary care: a process under construction.

    PubMed

    Matumoto, Silvia; Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Kawata, Lauren Suemi; Mishima, Silvana Martins; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to present the re-signification process of the meanings of nurses' clinical practice in primary care from the perspective of extended clinic and permanent education. An intervention research was carried out with the approval of an ethics committee. Nine nurses participated in reflection groups from September to December 2008 in Ribeirão Preto-SP-Brazil. The redefinition process of the meanings proposed by the institutional analysis was mapped. The results point out that the nurses perceive differences in clinical work, by acknowledging the sense of user-centered clinical practice; daily limits and tensions and the need for support from managers and the team to deal with users' problems and situations. They identify the necessity to open space in the schedule to do that. It was concluded that nurses' clinical practice is being consolidated, and that collective analysis processes permit learning and the reconstruction of practices.

  19. Interaction between community pharmacists and community nurses in dementia care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Veronica M

    2016-04-01

    There has been little research that explores the interaction between community pharmacists and community nurses and how this interaction could benefit people affected by dementia. Using information taken from a larger study, this article presents the views of community pharmacists and one community nurse on how their communication, information sharing and team integration may improve care for this patient group. The community pharmacists reported positive attitudes to supporting people affected by dementia, but they highlighted barriers to integrated team working. In contrast, the community nurse conveyed the belief that the community pharmacist was an integrated member of the community health team. Community pharmacists and community nurses are keen to interact with each other to support people affected by dementia, but this interaction stops short of collaborative, integrated team working. Further research is needed to address this issue.

  20. Promoting Safe Nursing Care by Bringing Visibility to the Disciplinary Aspects of Interdisciplinary Care

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Gail; Yakel, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The provision of safe and effective interdisciplinary care requires making the unique and interdependent aspects of disciplinary care visible and understandable. Ideally, the electronic health record (EHR) should capture both disciplinary and interdisciplinary care. This paper reports on a “real time” pilot of a technology supported method of documenting, communicating, and tracking the nursing component of the patient’s plan of care for eventual integration into an EHR. An intensive care unit tested the intervention that included the adoption and use of the NANDA, NOC, and NIC terminologies. Multiple methods were used to evaluate the impact of the care planning method for a 12 month period. We found that the increased visibility of nursing care promoted greater awareness and understanding (collective mind) of care and in turn enhanced continuity. The results of the pilot were used to further refine our theoretical framework and method for the multi-site study currently underway. PMID:16779067