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Sample records for aged care residents

  1. Factors Influencing Residents' Satisfaction in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the important factors influencing residents' satisfaction in residential aged care and to provide a better understanding of their interrelationships. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect the required information, including resident satisfaction, resident dependency…

  2. Resident Satisfaction and Its Components in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the direction and magnitude of the effects among the components of resident satisfaction in residential aged care and to examine if the relationships among satisfaction components vary according to facility type (i.e., nursing home and hostel). Briefly, a hostel is a low-care facility in which…

  3. Resident transfers from aged care facilities to emergency departments: Can they be avoided?

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kelli; Griffiths, Debra L; Crawford, Kimberley; Williams, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective Residents from aged care facilities make up a considerable proportion of ED presentations. There is evidence that many residents transferred from aged care facilities to EDs could be managed by primary care services. The present study aimed to describe the characteristics of residents transferred from residential aged care facilities to EDs, and to evaluate the appropriateness and cost of these presentations. Methods A retrospective review of ED records was undertaken for residents transferred from residential aged care facilities to two EDs in Melbourne, Victoria, in 2012. Data examined included residents' mode and time of arrival to ED, presenting complaint, triage category, procedures within ED, diagnosis, length of stay, and disposition. Data were examined against a previously established tool to identify resident transfers that might be ‘potentially avoidable’. Results There were 2880 resident transfers included in the sample, of which 408 transfers were randomly selected for scrutiny of documentation. Seventy‐one residents (17.4%) were identified as being potentially avoidable transfers. Conclusion Many resident transfers might have been avoided with better primary care services in place. Future strategies to improve resident care might include aged care staff skill mix and the availability of outreach or primary care services. PMID:26095333

  4. A multi-organisation aged care emergency service for acute care management of older residents in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jane; Dilworth, Sophie; Hullick, Carolyn; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Turner, Catherine; Higgins, Isabel

    2015-11-01

    This case study describes a multi-organisation aged care emergency (ACE) service. The service was designed to enable point-of-care assessment and management for older people in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Design of the ACE service involved consultation and engagement of multiple key stakeholders. The ACE service was implemented in a large geographical region of a single Medicare Local (ML) in New South Wales, Australia. The service was developed over several phases. A case control pilot evaluation of one emergency department (ED) and four RACFs revealed a 16% reduction in presentations to the ED as well as reductions in admission to the hospital following ED presentation. Following initial pilot work, the ACE service transitioned across another five EDs and 85 RACFs in the local health district. The service has now been implemented in a further 10 sites (six metropolitan and four rural EDs) across New South Wales. Ongoing evaluation of the implementation continues to show positive outcomes. The ACE service offers a model shown to reduce ED presentations and admissions from RACFs, and provide quality care with a focus on the needs of the older person. PMID:25981903

  5. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities. PMID:24299253

  6. Factors associated with antidepressant use in residents with and without dementia in Australian aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Hiltunen, Henna; Tan, Edwin C. K.; Ilomäki, Jenni; Hilmer, Sarah N.; Visvanathan, Renuka; Emery, Tina; Robson, Leonie; Jones, Mary J.; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Bell, J. Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Depressive symptoms are highly prevalent in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). The prevalence of antidepressant use is increasing but the effectiveness of antidepressants in people with dementia is uncertain. The objective of the study was to investigate factors associated with antidepressant use in residents with and without dementia. Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 383 residents in six Australian RACFs. Data on health status, medications and demographics were collected by trained study nurses from April to August 2014. Logistic regression was used to compute adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with antidepressant use. Analyses were stratified by dementia and depression. Results: Overall, 183 (47.8%) residents used antidepressants. The prevalence of antidepressant use was similar among residents with and without dementia. Clinician-observed pain was inversely associated with antidepressant use in the main analysis (AOR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.32–0.99) and in subanalyses for residents with documented depression (AOR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.27–0.96). In residents with dementia, moderate quality of life was associated with a lower odds of antidepressant use compared with poor quality of life (AOR = 0.35, 95% C I= 0.13–0.95). In residents without dementia, analgesic use was associated with antidepressant use (AOR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.07–5.18). Conclusions: The prevalence of antidepressant use was similar in residents with and without dementia. Clinician-observed pain was inversely associated with antidepressant use but there was no association between self-reported pain and antidepressant use. PMID:27298718

  7. Effects of person-centered care on residents and staff in aged-care facilities: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Brownie, Sonya; Nancarrow, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Background Several residential aged-care facilities have replaced the institutional model of care to one that accepts person-centered care as the guiding standard of practice. This culture change is impacting the provision of aged-care services around the world. This systematic review evaluates the evidence for an impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and nursing staff. Methods We searched Medline, Cinahl, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Proquest, and Expanded Academic ASAP databases for studies published between January 1995 and October 2012, using subject headings and free-text search terms (in UK and US English spelling) including person-centered care, patient-centered care, resident-oriented care, Eden Alternative, Green House model, Wellspring model, long-term care, and nursing homes. Results The search identified 323 potentially relevant articles. Once duplicates were removed, 146 were screened for inclusion in this review; 21 were assessed for methodological quality, resulting in nine articles (seven studies) that met our inclusion criteria. There was only one randomized, controlled trial. The majority of studies were quasi-experimental pre-post test designs, with a control group (n = 4). The studies in this review incorporated a range of different outcome measures (ie, dependent variables) to evaluate the impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and staff. One person-centered intervention, ie, the Eden Alternative, was associated with significant improvements in residents’ levels of boredom and helplessness. In contrast, facility-specific person-centered interventions were found to impact nurses’ sense of job satisfaction and their capacity to meet the individual needs of residents in a positive way. Two studies found that person-centered care was actually associated with an increased risk of falls. The findings from this review need to be interpreted cautiously due to limitations in study designs and the

  8. Planning and Decision Making about the Future Care of Older Group Home Residents and Transition to Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigby, C.; Bowers, B.; Webber, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Planning for future care after the death of parental caregivers and adapting disability support systems to achieve the best possible quality of life for people with intellectual disability as they age have been important issues for more than two decades. This study examined perceptions held by family members, group home staff and…

  9. Exploratory Investigation of Communication Management in Residential-Aged Care: A Comparison of Staff Knowledge, Documentation and Observed Resident-Staff Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michelle K.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a high prevalence of communication difficulty among older people living in residential-aged care. Such functional deficits can have a negative impact on resident quality of life, staff workplace satisfaction and the provision of quality care. Systematic research investigating the nature of communication management in…

  10. Resident Care Guide. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodbridge State School, NJ.

    The third edition of the Woodbridge State School Cottage Life Department Resident Care Guide is explained to be a developmental status scale devised in 1969 as part of a 5-year study for the purposes of measuring the entire population's self-help training abilities. The department is said to serve 954 residents; 424 are non-ambulatory and 530 are…

  11. An Intervention to Improve the Oral Health of Residents in an Aged Care Facility Led by Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinkhorn, F. A.; Weingarten, L.; Boivin, L.; Plain, J.; Kay, M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The growing population of elderly people is impacting on overstretched dental services in many countries, as many individuals are retaining natural teeth and may have dentures or implants, all of which influence the way in which the oral cavity must be cared for. A major difficulty for older residents is their decreasing level of…

  12. An evaluation of Snoezelen(®) compared to 'common best practice' for allaying the symptoms of wandering and restlessness among residents with dementia in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michael; Rayner, Jo-Anne; Tang, Judy; Koch, Susan; While, Christine; O'Keefe, Fleur

    2015-01-01

    Snoezelen has become an increasingly popular therapy in residential aged care facilities in Australia and elsewhere, despite no conclusive evidence of its clinical efficacy. This paper reports on an evaluation of the use of Snoezelen compared to 'common best practice' for allaying the dementia related behaviors of wandering and restlessness in two residential aged care facilities in Victoria, Australia. Sixteen residents had their behavior and responses to Snoezelen or 'common best practice' observed and recorded over three time periods. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed there was a significant improvement in behaviors immediately after the intervention and after 60 min. However, no significant differences were found between residents receiving Snoezelen and 'common best practice' interventions for the reduction of the dementia related behaviors. PMID:26294096

  13. Personal health care of internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Palabindala, Venkataraman; Foster, Paul; Kanduri, Swetha; Doppalapudi, Avanthi; Pamarthy, Amaleswari; Kovvuru, Karthik

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medical residents, as part of their job to balance the demands of their work with caring for themselves so as to be mentally, emotionally, and physically sound to stay clinically competent. While regulatory and legislative attempts at limiting medical resident work hours have materialized but have yet to attain passage, there are fairly little data looking into how residents cope up with their demands and yet attend to their own personal health. Design Anonymous mailed survey. Subjects Three hundred and thirty-seven residents from all internal medicine residency programs within United States. Methods We conducted a survey in the form of a questionnaire that was sent by e-mail to the program directors of various internal medicine residency programs within the United States, and responses were collected between May 19 and June 21, 2009. Response was well appreciated with total number of participants of 337 with even demographical distribution in gender, residency year, AMG/IMG, age group. Seventy-one percent of the residents felt that they would prefer getting admitted to their own hospital for any acute medical or surgical condition. Of the 216 residents who have had received health care in the past, almost half of them chose their own hospital because of the proximity, while 45% did not choose their own hospital despite proximity. Two out of three residents missed their doctors appointments or cancelled them due to demands of medical training. Only half of the residents have a primary care physician and almost 80% of them did not have their yearly health checkup. Close to 30% held back information regarding their social and sexual history from their provider because of privacy and confidentiality concerns. Eighty percent of residents never received information about barriers that physicians may face in obtaining care for their socially embarrassing conditions. Seventy percent felt that their performance then was suboptimal because of that health

  14. Differences in pain measures by mini-mental state examination scores of residents in aged care facilities: examining the usability of the Abbey pain scale-Japanese version.

    PubMed

    Takai, Yukari; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Ko, Ayako; Heilemann, Marysue V

    2014-03-01

    The validity and reliability of the Abbey Pain Scale-Japanese version (APS-J) have been examined. However, the range of cognitive levels for which the APS-J can be accurately used in older adults has not been investigated. This study aimed to examine the differences between total/item scores of the APS-J and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores of residents in aged care facilities who self-reported the presence or absence of pain. This descriptive study included 252 residents in aged care facilities. Self-reported pain, MMSE scores, and item/total APS-J scores for pain intensity were collected. The MMSE scores were used to create four groups on the basis of the cognitive impairment level. Self-reports of pain and the APS-J scores were compared with different MMSE score groups. The total APS-J score for pain intensity as well as scores for individual items such as "vocalization" and "facial expression" were significantly higher in those who reported pain than in those reporting no pain across all MMSE groups. The total APS-J score and item scores for "vocalization," "change in body language," and "behavioral changes" showed significant differences in the four MMSE groups. Pain intensity tended to be overestimated by the APS-J, especially among those with low MMSE scores. The APS-J can be used to assess pain intensity in residents despite their cognitive levels. However, caution is required when using it to compare scores among older adults with different cognitive capacity because of the possibility of overestimation of pain among residents with low cognitive capacity. PMID:23237690

  15. A Rural Primary Care Pediatric Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kairys, Steven; Newell, Priscilla

    1985-01-01

    The primary care pediatric residency program at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has developed a training program in rural primary care. Residents experience the many facets of rural practice and are introduced to community-oriented approaches to child health care. (Author/MLW)

  16. Reducing dehydration in residents of care homes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Lee; Whitelock, Suzan; Bunn, Diane

    Dehydration can have serious consequences for older people and is a particular problem for residents of nursing and care homes. This article, the second in a two-part series, describes how a specialist care home for people with dementia in Great Yarmouth introduced high-quality hydration care to frail residents. By involving all staff and ensuring residents take a litre of fluid by the end of a relaxed and extended breakfast, staff have reduced anxiety and aggression and created a calmer and more sociable atmosphere. This has benefitted residents, visitors and staff, and is reflected in low levels of unplanned hospital admissions and paramedic call-outs. PMID:26492664

  17. A rural primary care pediatric residency program.

    PubMed

    Kairys, S; Newell, P

    1985-10-01

    Rural primary care is often reported in the medical literature as frustrating, lonely, and nonrewarding. Many graduating residents who choose small town practice become quickly disenchanted with the life-style and leave for a more populous territory or subspecialty training. Opportunities to learn how to take advantage of rural settings and establish rewarding community practices are few. The Primary Care Pediatric Residency Program at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has developed a training program in rural primary care. Residents experience over a three-year period the many facets of rural practice and are introduced to community-oriented approaches to child health care. Selected rural pediatric practices within a 45-mile radius of the medical center serve as teaching laboratories in which residents develop the skills necessary to manage children's problems related to school, behavioral disorders, and chronic diseases. PMID:4045973

  18. Resident Medical Care Utilization Patterns in Continuing Care Retirement Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Morris, Shirley; Morris, John N.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an evaluation of medical care service utilization by two elderly cohorts one living in continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) and the other living in traditional community settings. CCRC residents' overall use of Medicare-covered medical services did not differ significantly from that of the traditional community-residing elders. Both groups incurred annual per capita expenditures of approximately $2,000. In their last year of life, however, CCRC residents displayed significantly lower expenditures for hospital care ($3,854 versus $7,268) but higher expenditures for Medicare or non-Medicare-covered nursing home care ($5,565 versus $3,533). PMID:10133107

  19. Improving Health Care for Assisted Living Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Mach, John R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore how medical care is delivered to older people in assisted living (AL) settings and to suggest ways for improving it. Design and Methods: We present a review of the limited research available on health care for older AL residents and on building testable models of better ways to organize primary…

  20. Literacy in the World of the Aged Care Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Linda; Casarotto, Nadia

    Australia's Aged Care Act of 1997 mandates a number of key reforms aimed at ensuring consistency in the quality of care and well-being for all residents of aged care facilities. The law required residential aged care facilities to provide high-quality care within a framework of continuous improvement which requires aged care workers to perform the…

  1. Sexuality and intimacy among care home residents.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Paul; Horne, Maria; Brown, Laura J E; Dickinson, Tommy; Wilson, Christine Brown

    Discussing sexuality and intimacy with older people can be problematic, so it is not uncommon that their needs go unrecognised. This article identifies barriers to addressing sexuality and intimacy needs, and outlines some simple strategies to raise awareness of them among older care home residents and staff, thereby facilitating a discussion to enable such needs to be met. PMID:27141720

  2. On aging and aged care in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Sevo, G; Davidovic, M; Erceg, P; Despotovic, N; Milosevic, D P; Tasic, M

    2015-06-01

    Serbia is a demographically old nation, with 17.4 % of its residents being aged 65 years and older in 2011. The previous two decades of turbulent history have significantly affected the demographic picture of this country, and their ramifications remain visible in Serbia's economic, political, cultural, and health spheres. Major demographic forces behind population aging in Serbia can be attributed to lower fertility rates, migrations, and declining mortality (reflecting improvements in overall health leading to a longer life expectancy). In Serbia, low fertility and migrations appear to play major roles, although the relative contribution of recent migrations cannot be measured with accuracy. Patterns of demographic aging vary considerably across different geographic, socioeconomic, and cultural settings. The common denominator throughout present day Serbia is extensive political and economic transition. One would expect that, given sufficient time, this process will result in improved population health, and yet, at this stage outcomes of major health care reform in Serbia are somewhat perplexing. For the second consecutive year, Serbia's health care system has been ranked at the very bottom of the scale among 34 European countries. It is then no surprise that the elderly represent particularly vulnerable population segment. This paper discusses some of the issues relevant to these demographic patterns of aging and aged care in contemporary Serbia, focusing on the period after 2000. PMID:25943380

  3. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs. PMID:26826073

  4. Residents first. A long-term care facility introduces a social model that puts residents in control.

    PubMed

    Boyd, C

    1994-09-01

    Four years ago the leaders at Providence/Mount St. Vincent, Seattle, decided to scrap the traditional medical model of long-term care and create an environment directed by the residents. The traditional system in nursing homes is designed to foster dependence. Our new social model, in contrast, is almost entirely directed by resident preference and need, and it places a high value on human interaction. So far we are having the most success with our assisted living program, which is built into apartment living as part of the rent. All services are available to all residents when they need them. The residents are forming warm relationships with resident assistants, and the flexible, nonmedical help they receive allows them to age in place. The nursing center has been divided into "neighborhoods" of about 20 residents, each with its own staff. A cross-trained, highly capable staff is essential to support resident independence and choice. In one experimental neighborhood, nonmedical tasks that nurses have traditionally done are now being reallocated to resident assistants, who are paid half as much as nurses. The physical heart of every remodeled neighborhood will be a kitchen, as we strive to create a homelike environment. Purposeful activity is replacing therapy in a void. And residents with cognitive impairments are gradually being integrated with more cognitively aware residents. We believe that in the long run, resident-directed care will be less expensive than the medical model. PMID:10136077

  5. Psychosexual needs and sexual behaviors of nursing care home residents.

    PubMed

    Mroczek, Bożena; Kurpas, Donata; Gronowska, Małgorzata; Kotwas, Artur; Karakiewicz, Beata

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze psychosexual needs of nursing care home residents in Poland. The authors attempted to answer the question 'how do residents satisfy their psychosexual needs?' This survey-based study was performed with respect to the residents' right to privacy and intimacy. The residents were also informed that they could withdraw from the study at any stage. The history was taken from 85 subjects (60% women, 40% men). The mean age was 74.2±11.2. The most important psychosexual needs included: conversation, tenderness, emotional closeness (empathy, understanding), sexual contacts and physical closeness. As the most important elements of the relationship, respondents mentioned mutual respect and conviction that they can rely on their partners. Most respondents felt sexual tension occasionally, others once a week or less frequently. They relieved sexual tension through intimate contacts with their long-term partners, watching erotic films, masturbation, walking and diverting attention to other activities. Every fourth respondent was satisfied with his/her sexual life. The majority of seniors repeated stereotypes about sexuality of the elderly. Almost 71% claimed that sex in elderly people was taboo, 64% said that sex was for young people only, and 51% thought that sex was not important in life. Old age makes little difference to psychosexual needs. Most seniors need closeness manifesting as tenderness and conversations. Many old people are sexually active. Thus, it is worth considering whether people living in cohabitation should not have the possibility of staying together in nursing care home. PMID:23478162

  6. Does Rural Residence Affect Access to Prenatal Care in Oregon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Beth; Grant, Therese; Schiff, Melissa; Kasehagen, Laurin

    2009-01-01

    Context: Identifying how maternal residential location affects late initiation of prenatal care is important for policy planning and allocation of resources for intervention. Purpose: To determine how rural residence and other social and demographic characteristics affect late initiation of prenatal care, and how residence status is associated…

  7. Staff-Resident Perceptual Differences in Long-Term Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory C.; Nehrke, Milton F.

    Staff and residents of settings for the aged often hold substantially different views of their shared environment, and the literature suggests that these perceptual discrepancies transcend such factors as degree of institutional totality, quality of care, and differences in personal characteristics among staff and residents. Despite the…

  8. Putting the 'care' back into aged care.

    PubMed

    Beadnell, Cathy

    2006-04-01

    Aged care is well and truly back on the political agenda in Australia. While the mainstream media has recently exposed a number of horrific cases of alleged abuse in aged care facilities it has done little to highlight the failings of social policy over time or to foster debate on how to improve the care of older Australians. What are the barriers to providing safe and quality aged care to a growing number of our citizens and how do we overcome them? If you relied on the recent media coverage for your impression of aged care you could be forgiven for thinking it is all bad news. But there are facilities providing high quality care and stories of nurses working wonders in the face of adversity. Cathy Beadnell considers some of the broader cultural and workforce issues in aged care. PMID:16629211

  9. Normal versus Pathological Aging: Knowledge of Family Practice Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beall, S. Colleen; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Family physicians may lack discriminatory ability to differentiate normal aging form disease states. To assess such ability, 53 aging-related indicators or symptoms were presented to 65 physicians in 3 family practice residency programs. Respondents classified each symptom as normal aging or disease. On average, residents classified 73.4% of…

  10. Use of calcium, folate, and vitamin D₃-fortified milk for 6 months improves nutritional status but not bone mass or turnover, in a group of Australian aged care residents.

    PubMed

    Grieger, Jessica A; Nowson, Caryl A

    2009-07-01

    In residential care, inadequate calcium and folate intakes and low serum vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations are common. We assessed whether daily provision of calcium, folate, and vitamin D₃-fortified milk for 6 months improved nutritional status (serum micronutrients), bone quality (heel ultrasound), bone turnover markers (parathyroid hormone, C-terminal collagen I telopeptide, terminal propeptide of type I procollagen), and/or muscle strength and mobility in a group of Australian aged care residents. One hundred and seven residents completed the study (mean (SD) age: 79.9 (10.1) years; body weight: 68.4 (15.4) kg). The median (inter-quartile range) volume of fortified milk consumed was 160 (149) ml/day. At the end of the study, the median daily vitamin D intake increased to 10.4 (8.7) μg (P < .001), which is 70% of the adequate intake (15 μg); and calcium density (mg/MJ) was higher over the study period compared with baseline (161 ± 5 mg/MJ vs. 142 ± 4 mg/MJ, P < .001). Serum 25(OH)D concentrations increased by 23 ± 2 nmol/L (83 (107)%, P < .001), yet remained in the insufficient range (mean 45 ± 2 nmol/L). Consumption of greater than the median intake of milk (160 ml/day) (n = 54, 50%) increased serum 25(OH)D levels into the adequate range (53 ± 2 nmol/L) and reduced serum parathyroid hormone by 24% (P = .045). There was no effect on bone quality, bone turnover markers, muscle strength, or mobility. Consumption of fortified milk increased dietary vitamin D intake and raised serum 25(OH)D concentrations, but not to the level thought to reduce fracture risk. If calcium-fortified milk also was used in cooking and milk drinks, this approach could allow residents to achieve a dietary calcium intake close to recommended levels. A vitamin D supplement would be recommended to ensure adequate vitamin D status for all residents. PMID:21184368

  11. Together but apart: Caring for a spouse with dementia resident in a care facility.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Dawn; MacCourt, Penny; Pierce, Joanna; Strudsholm, Tina

    2016-07-01

    This longitudinal, exploratory study was designed to better understand the lived experience of spousal caregivers age 60 and older providing care to partners with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias resident in a care facility. Twenty eight spousal caregivers were interviewed up to three times over a period of 2 years, and long-term care facility staff from four locations across British Columbia (BC), Canada participated in four focus groups. Thematic analysis of interview and focus group transcripts revealed a central, unifying theme 'together but apart'. The results identify key targets for policy makers and service providers to support positive health and well-being outcomes for spousal caregivers providing care to their partners diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia and living in care facilities. PMID:25027632

  12. Relationships, Expertise, Incentives, and Governance: Supporting Care Home Residents' Access to Health Care. An Interview Study From England

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L.; Gordon, Adam L.; Meyer, Julienne; Dening, Tom; Gladman, John R.F.; Iliffe, Steve; Zubair, Maria; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Martin, Finbarr C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what commissioners of care, regulators, providers, and care home residents in England identify as the key mechanisms or components of different service delivery models that support the provision of National Health Service (NHS) provision to independent care homes. Methods Qualitative, semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of people with direct experience of commissioning, providing, and regulating health care provision in care homes and care home residents. Data from interviews were augmented by a secondary analysis of previous interviews with care home residents on their personal experience of and priorities for access to health care. Analysis was framed by the assumptions of realist evaluation and drew on the constant comparative method to identify key themes about what is required to achieve quality health care provision to care homes and resident health. Results Participants identified 3 overlapping approaches to the provision of NHS that they believed supported access to health care for older people in care homes: (1) Investment in relational working that fostered continuity and shared learning between visiting NHS staff and care home staff, (2) the provision of age-appropriate clinical services, and (3) governance arrangements that used contractual and financial incentives to specify a minimum service that care homes should receive. Conclusion The 3 approaches, and how they were typified as working, provide a rich picture of the stakeholder perspectives and the underlying assumptions about how service delivery models should work with care homes. The findings inform how evidence on effective working in care homes will be interrogated to identify how different approaches, or specifically key elements of those approaches, achieve different health-related outcomes in different situations for residents and associated health and social care organizations. PMID:25687930

  13. Family-Oriented Patient Care through the Residency Training Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Ellen M.; Heru, Alison; Grunebaum, Henry; Rolland, John; Sargent, John; Wamboldt, Marianne; McDaniel, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Because family oriented patient care improves patient outcome and reduces family burden, clinical family skills of communication, assessment, alliance, and support are part of core competencies required of all residents. Teaching residents to "think family" as part of core competencies and to reach out to families requires change in the…

  14. Resident- and Facility-Level Predictors of Quality of Life in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Shippee, Tetyana P.; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Kane, Robert L.; Lewis, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Although there is substantial research on quality of care in nursing homes (NH), less is known about what contributes to quality of life (QOL) for NH residents. This study assesses multiple domains of QOL and examines facility- and resident-level correlates for different domains. Design and Methods: Data come from (a) self-reported resident interviews using a multidimensional measure of QOL; (b) resident clinical data from the Minimum Data Set; and (c) facility-level characteristics from Minnesota Department of Human Services. We used factor analysis to confirm domains of QOL, and then employed cross-sectional hierarchical linear modeling to identify significant resident- and facility-level predictors of each domain. Results: We examined six unique domains of QOL: environment, personal attention, food, engagement, negative mood, and positive mood. In multilevel models, resident-level characteristics were more reliable correlates of QOL than facility characteristics. Among resident characteristics, gender, age, marital status, activities of daily living, mood disorders, cognitive limitations, and length of stay consistently predicted QOL domains. Among facility characteristics, size, staff hours, quality of care, and percent of residents on Medicaid predicted multiple QOL domains. Implications: Examining separate domains rather than a single summary score makes associations with predictors more accurate. Resident characteristics account for the majority of variability in resident QOL. Helping residents maintain functional abilities, and providing an engaging social environment may be particularly important in improving QOL. PMID:24352532

  15. Perceptions of long-term care, autonomy, and dignity, by residents, family and care-givers: the Houston experience.

    PubMed

    Boisaubin, Eugene V; Chu, Adeline; Catalano, Janine M

    2007-01-01

    Houston, Texas, is a major U.S. city with, like many, a growing aging population. The purpose of this study and ultimate book chapter is to explore the views and perceptions of long-term care (LTC) residents, family members and health care providers. Individuals primarily in independent living and group residential settings were interviewed and studied. Questions emphasized the concepts of personal autonomy, dignity, quality and location of care and decision making. Although a small sample of participants were involved, consistency was noted. Keeping the elderly in caring and loving home situations (theirs or family) was most preferred. Personal choice and independence were emphasized by residents, but family members needed to act as advocates. We also noted that the legal system emphasizes family control over individual decision making as competency declines with aging. Optimal personal decision making in the residents' best interest also became more difficult with loss of individual mental capacity. PMID:17924271

  16. Conditions for exercising residents' voting rights in long-term care residences: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Bosquet, Antoine; El Massioui, Farid; Mahé, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    To assess voting conditions in long-term care settings, we conducted a multicenter survey after the 2009 European elections in France. A questionnaire about voting procedures and European elections was proposed in 146 out of 884 randomized facilities. Sixty-four percent of facilities answered the questionnaire. Four percent of residents voted (national turnout: 40%), by proxy (58%) or at polling places (42%). Abstention related to procedural issues was reported in 32% of facilities. Sixty-seven percent of establishments had voting procedures, and 53% declared that they assessed residents' capacity to vote. Assistance was proposed to residents for voter registration, for proxy voting, and for voting at polling places, respectively, in 33%, 87%, and 80% of facilities. This survey suggests that residents may be disenfranchised and that more progress should be made to protect the voting rights of residents in long-term care facilities. PMID:25492566

  17. Aging among Persons with Intellectual Disability in Israel in Relation to Type of Residence, Age, and Etiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifshitz, Hefziba; Merrick, Joav

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare aging phenomena of persons with intellectual and developmental disability (ID) aged 40 years and older living in community residence (N=65) with those living with their families (N=43) in Jerusalem, Israel. All 108 persons and care givers were interviewed to ascertain health problems, sensory impairment,…

  18. Resident Characteristics Related to the Lack of Morning Care Provision in Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Durkin, Daniel W.; Rahman, Anna N.; Choi, Leena; Beuscher, Linda; Schnelle, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine usual long-term care (LTC) practices related to 3 aspects of morning care and determine if there were resident characteristics related to the lack of care. Design and Methods: Participants were 169 long-stay residents in 4 community LTC facilities who required staff assistance with either transfer…

  19. Skin Care and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Age Spots and Skin Tags Click for more information Age spots, once called "liver spots," are flat, brown ... surface. They are a common occurrence as people age, especially for women. They are ... options, specific conditions, and related issues. ...

  20. The Relations between the Mental Condition of the Care House Residents and Finger Plethysmograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohashi, Yoko; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Lee, Sangjae

    2011-06-01

    We measured the fingertip pulse waves of some of the elderly living in a care house (a welfare facility for the elderly) four times a day over two days to investigate their mental condition. We analyzed the chaotic information produced by the finger pulse waves using a nonlinear analysis method. The results of our research are as follows: 1) The Largest Lyapunov Exponent (LLE), which synchronizes to mental revitalization, rose when the care house residents felt happy. 2) After moderate movement (a stroll, etc.), the LLE was high. 3) The LLE did not rise when a regular action was carried out non-vigorously to kill time. 4) When residents made contact (a phone call or letter, etc.) with a family member, the LLE was high. 5) The LLE of long-term residents was high. 6) The majority of residents with high LLE moved into the care house in their early seventies. 7) The LLE of short-term residents was low and their sympathetic nerves were high. 8) There was no relativity between the LLE and present age of the care house residents. On this basis, the authors propose that fuller support of care house residents is crucial for the objective ascertainment of their mental condition.

  1. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  2. When Residents Need Health Care: Stigma of the Patient Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moutier, Christine; Cornette, Michelle; Lehrmann, Jon; Geppert, Cynthia; Tsao, Carol; DeBoard, Renee; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Whether and under what circumstances medical residents seek personal health care is a growing concern that has important implications for medical education and patient welfare, but has not been thoroughly investigated. Barriers to obtaining care have been previously documented, but very little empirical work has focused on trainees who…

  3. Living in institutional care: residents' experiences and coping strategies.

    PubMed

    Timonen, Virpi; O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2009-01-01

    Insights into daily living in residential care settings are rare. This article draws on a qualitative dataset (semi-structured interviews and recordings of residents' council meetings) that gives a glimpse of the experiences and coping strategies of (older) people living in residential care. The data highlight the range of unmet needs of the residents, similar to the categories of physiological, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization needs in Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory. Our analysis indicates that "higher" and "lower" needs are closely intertwined and mutually reinforcing and should therefore be accorded equal emphasis by professionals (including social workers) employed within residential care settings. PMID:19860294

  4. Assuring professional pastoral care for every nursing home resident.

    PubMed

    Knight, B

    1999-01-01

    Ministry to persons in nursing homes is built on two mandates: "... He has sent me to bring good news to the oppressed, to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and release to the prisoners; ... to comfort all who mourn ..." (Isaiah 61:1-3). The federal government provides the second: "Quality of Life. A facility must care for its residents in a manner and in an environment that promotes maintenance or enhancement of each resident's quality of life" (OBRA '87, Guidance to Surveyors in Long Term Care Facilities, Code of Federal Regulations, Health Care Financing Administration, 1995, section 483.15, F240). This article discusses both the religious and the U.S. political history of caring for the old and frail. It concludes by describing political efforts in one state to increase the quality of that care and pastoral efforts to support the nursing assistants in long-term care facilities. PMID:10387595

  5. Oral health care in residential aged care services: barriers to engaging health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Lydia; Slack-Smith, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The oral health of older people living in residential aged care facilities has been widely recognised as inadequate. The aim of this paper is to identify barriers to effective engagement of health-care providers in oral care in residential aged care facilities. A literature review was conducted using MEDline, CINAHL, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete and PsychInfo between 2000 and 2013, with a grey literature search of government and non-government organisation policy papers, conference proceedings and theses. Keywords included: dental/oral care, residential aged care, health-care providers, barriers, constraints, and limitations. A thematic framework was used to synthesise the literature according to a series of oral health-care provision barriers, health-care provider barriers, and cross-sector collaborative barriers. A range of system, service and practitioner level barriers were identified that could impede effective communication/collaboration between different health-care providers, residents and carers regarding oral care, and these were further impeded by internal barriers at each level. Findings indicated several areas for investigation and consideration regarding policy and practice improvements. While further research is required, some key areas should be addressed if oral health care in residential aged care services is to be improved. PMID:25155109

  6. Resident-to-Resident Aggression in Long-Term Care Facilities: An Understudied Problem

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Tony; Pillemer, Karl; Lachs, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Resident-to-resident aggression (RRA) between long-term care residents includes negative and aggressive physical, sexual, or verbal interactions that in a community setting would likely be construed as unwelcome and have high potential to cause physical or psychological distress in the recipient. Although this problem potentially has high incidence and prevalence and serious consequences for aggressors and victims, it has received little direct attention from researchers to date. This article reviews the limited available literature on this topic as well as relevant research from related areas including: resident violence toward nursing home staff, aggressive behaviors by elderly persons, and community elder abuse. We present hypothesized risk factors for aggressor, victim, and nursing home environment, including issues surrounding cognitive impairment. We discuss methodological challenges to studying RRA and offer suggestions for future research. Finally, we describe the importance of designing effective interventions, despite the lack currently available, and suggest potential areas of future research. PMID:19750126

  7. Care Perceptions among Residents of LTC Facilities Purporting to Offer Person-Centred Care.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Leeann; MacEntee, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    This study explored qualitatively how residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities feel about and adapt to the care they receive. We interviewed and observed a purposeful selection of elderly residents in seven facilities purporting to provide person-centred care. Interpretative descriptions from 43 personal interviews with 23 participants answered the question: How do residents perceive the care rendered in LTC facilities purporting to offer person-centred care? Three themes emerged: (1) the caring environment; (2) preservation of dignity; and (3) maintenance of personal autonomy. Participants were sympathetic to the nursing staff's workload, but felt distant from the staff. Participants gave examples of poor care and lack of empathy, human indignities, and violations of personal autonomy caused by institutional policies they felt inhibited their ability to receive care based on their preferences. Overall, they challenged the claims of person-centred care, but adapted to cope with an environment that threatened their dignity and autonomy. PMID:27063137

  8. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms. PMID:25171938

  9. Continuity of care. Opportunity for residents to see repeat patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, N. R.; Szafran, O.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the opportunity for first-year family medicine residents to experience continuity of care during family medicine block time and half-day returns. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of patient encounter data during the 1987-1988 and 1991-1992 academic years to determine how much contact residents had with repeat patients. SETTING: Two family medicine teaching centres in Edmonton. PARTICIPANTS: First-year family medicine residents: 24 residents during 1987-1988 and 24 during 1991-1992. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of patient-resident contacts and number of repeat contacts. RESULTS: During the 4-month block time and half-day return, residents had repeat contact with 25.9% and 20.3% of the patients seen. These patients provided 48.3% and 37.7% of all visits at Centres A and B, respectively. CONCLUSION: Increasing block time from 2 to 4 months resulted in only a slight increase in repeat contact with patients. Half-day returns did not appear to enhance the opportunity for continuity of care. PMID:8563505

  10. Aging Q3: an initiative to improve internal medicine residents' geriatrics knowledge, skills, and clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Moran, William P; Zapka, Jane; Iverson, Patty J; Zhao, Yumin; Wiley, M Kathleen; Pride, Pamela; Davis, Kimberly S

    2012-05-01

    A growing number of older adults coupled with a limited number of physicians trained in geriatrics presents a major challenge to ensuring quality medical care for this population. Innovations to incorporate geriatrics education into internal medicine residency programs are needed. To meet this need, in 2009, faculty at the Medical University of South Carolina developed Aging Q(3)-Quality Education, Quality Care, and Quality of Life. This multicomponent initiative recognizes the need for improved geriatrics educational tools and faculty development as well as systems changes to improve the knowledge and clinical performance of residents. To achieve these goals, faculty employ multiple intervention strategies, including lectures, rounds, academic detailing, visual cues, and electronic medical record prompts and decision support. The authors present examples from specific projects, based on care areas including vision screening, fall prevention, and caring for patients with dementia, all of which are based on the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders quality indicators. The authors describe the principles driving the design, implementation, and evaluation of the Aging Q(3) program. They present data from multiple sources that illustrate the effectiveness of the interventions to meet the knowledge, skill level, and behavior goals. The authors also address major challenges, including the maintenance of the teaching and modeling interventions over time within the context of demanding primary care and inpatient settings. This organized, evidence-based approach to quality improvement in resident education, as well as faculty leadership development, holds promise for successfully incorporating geriatrics education into internal medicine residencies. PMID:22450181

  11. Social Support and Successful Aging in Assisted Living Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Laura Odell; Troutman-Jordan, Meredith; Newman, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Successful aging has been associated with adequate social support. However, impaired functionality, increased dependence, multiple comorbidities, and reduced social interactions place older assisted living community (ALC) residents at risk for poorer social support and less successful aging. This cross-sectional descriptive study used the revised…

  12. Regulation and Mindful Resident Care in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Plowman, Donde; Bailey, Donald; Corazzini, Kirsten; Utley-Smith, Queen; Ammarell, Natalie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory oversight is intended to improve the health outcomes of nursing home residents, yet evidence suggests that regulations can inhibit mindful staff behaviors that are associated with effective care. We explored the influence of regulations on mindful staff behavior as it relates to resident health outcomes, and offer a theoretical explanation of why regulations sometimes enhance mindfulness and other times inhibit it. We analyzed data from an in-depth, multiple case study including field notes, interviews, and documents collected in 8 nursing homes. We completed a conceptual/thematic description using the concept of mindfulness to reframe the observations. Shared facility mission strongly impacted staff perceptions of the purpose and utility of regulations. In facilities with a resident-centered culture, regulations increased mindful behavior, whereas in facilities with a cost-focused culture, regulations reduced mindful care practices. When managers emphasized the punitive aspects of regulation we observed a decrease in mindful practices in all facilities. PMID:20479137

  13. Are family medicine residents adequately trained to deliver palliative care?

    PubMed Central

    Mahtani, Ramona; Kurahashi, Allison M.; Buchman, Sandy; Webster, Fiona; Husain, Amna; Goldman, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore educational factors that influence family medicine residents’ (FMRs’) intentions to offer palliative care and palliative care home visits to patients. Design Qualitative descriptive study. Setting A Canadian, urban, specialized palliative care centre. Participants First-year (n = 9) and second-year (n = 6) FMRs. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted with FMRs following a 4-week palliative care rotation. Questions focused on participant experiences during the rotation and perceptions about their roles as family physicians in the delivery of palliative care and home visits. Participant responses were analyzed to summarize and interpret patterns related to their educational experience during their rotation. Main findings Four interrelated themes were identified that described this experience: foundational skill development owing to training in a specialized setting; additional need for education and support; unaddressed gaps in pragmatic skills; and uncertainty about family physicians’ role in palliative care. Conclusion Residents described experiences that both supported and inadvertently discouraged them from considering future engagement in palliative care. Reassuringly, residents were also able to underscore opportunities for improvement in palliative care education. PMID:27035008

  14. Investigating the Scope of Resident Patient Care Handoffs within Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Maya A.; Nahed, Brian V.; Heary, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Handoffs are defined as verbal and written communications during patient care transitions. With the passage of recent ACMGE work hour rules further limiting the hours interns can spend in the hospital, many fear that more handoffs will occur, putting patient safety at risk. The issue of handoffs has not been studied in the neurosurgical literature. Methods A validated, 20-question online-survey was sent to neurosurgical residents in all 98 accredited U.S. neurosurgery programs. Survey results were analyzed using tabulations. Results 449 surveys were completed yielding a 56% response rate. 63% of neurosurgical residents surveyed had not received formal instruction in what constitutes an effective handoff; 24% believe there is high to moderate variability among their co-residents in terms of the quality of the handoff provided; 55% experience three or more interruptions during handoffs on average. 90% of neurosurgical residents surveyed say that handoff most often occurs in a quiet, private area and 56% report a high level of comfort for knowing the potential acute, critical issues affecting a patient when receiving a handoff. Conclusions There needs to be more focused education devoted to learning effective patient-care handoffs in neurosurgical training programs. Increasingly, handing off a patient adequately and safely is becoming a required skill of residency. PMID:22848615

  15. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  16. Resident-Directed Long-Term Care: Staff Provision of Choice during Morning Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Rahman, Annie; Beuscher, Linda; Jani, Victoria; Durkin, Daniel W.; Schnelle, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an observational protocol to assess the quality of staff-resident communication relevant to choice and describe staff-resident interactions as preliminary evidence of the usefulness of the tool to assess current nursing home practices related to offering choice during morning care provision. Design and Methods: This study…

  17. Health Status and ADL Functioning of Older Persons with Intellectual Disability: Community Residence versus Residential Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifshitz, Hefziba; Merrick, Joav; Morad, Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to study differences in aging phenomena among adults with intellectual disability (ID), who live in community residence versus their peers in residential care centers and to determine the contribution of health status, age, gender, etiology and level of ID to the decline in ADL function with age. Our study was based…

  18. Test ordering for preventive health care among family medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Daisy; Schabort, Inge; MacLean, Catherine A.; Asrar, Farhan M.; Khory, Ayesha; Vandermeer, Ben; Allan, G. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine which screening tests family medicine residents order as part of preventive health care. Design A cross-sectional survey. Setting Alberta and Ontario. Participants First- and second-year family medicine residents at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, the University of Calgary in Alberta, and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, during the 2011 to 2012 academic year. Main outcome measures Demographic information, Likert scale ratings assessing ordering attitudes, and selections from a list of 38 possible tests that could be ordered for preventive health care for sample 38-year-old and 55-year-old female and male patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics were calculated. Results A total of 318 of 482 residents (66%) completed the survey. Recommended or appropriate tests were ordered by 82% (for cervical cytology) to 95% (for fasting glucose measurement) of residents. Across the different sample patients, residents ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests per patient, with 58% to 92% ordering at least 1 inappropriate test per patient. The estimated average excess costs varied from $38.39 for the 38-year-old man to $106.46 for the 55-year-old woman. More regular use of a periodic health examination screening template did not improve ordering (P = .88). Conclusion In general, residents ordered appropriate preventive health tests reasonably well but also ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests for each patient. Training programs need to provide better education for trainees around inappropriate screening and work hard to establish good ordering behaviour in preparation for entering practice. PMID:25767171

  19. Relationship-Based Care and Behaviours of Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Johanne; Viau-Guay, Anabelle; Bellemare, Marie; Trudel, Louis; Feillou, Isabelle; Guyon, Anne-Céline

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. In long-term care (LTC), person-centred approaches are encouraged. One such approach, relationship-based care (RBC), aims among other things to reduce residents' agitated behaviours. RBC has been used in numerous Quebec LTC facilities over the past decade but it has never been studied. Objective. Explore correlations between use of RBC by trained caregivers and the frequency of agitated and positive behaviours of residents with cognitive impairments. Methods. Two independent raters observed fourteen caregiver/resident dyads in two LTC facilities during assistance with hygiene and dressing. Checklists were used to quantify caregivers' RBC use and residents' agitated and positive behaviours. Results. Scores for RBC use were high, suggesting good application of the approach by caregivers. Correlation analyses showed that offering residents realistic choices and talking to them during care were associated with both positive and agitated behaviours (P from 0.03 to 0.003). However, many other components of RBC were not associated with residents' behaviours during care. Conclusions. There were only a few quantitative links between the RBC checklist items and the frequency of agitated or positive behaviours. Other studies with a more rigorous research design are needed to better understand the impact of relationship-based care on residents' behaviours. PMID:24523731

  20. Residents Living in Residential Care Facilities: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Office of Disability, Aging, and Long-Term Care Policy. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute. 2005. Spillman BC, Black KJ. The size ...

  1. SCDA task force on a special care dentistry residency.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Jeffery; Vishwanat, Lakshmi; Perry, Maureen; Messura, Judith; Dee, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    The Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) has acted on a proposal regarding the status of training in the care of patients with special needs. Two phases of action were undertaken. Phase 1: (a) examination of the literature on existing training and curricula in the care of patients with special needs and (b) a survey of existing postdoctoral programs in special needs. Phase 2: establish a group of experts who: (a) submitted to the Commission on Dental Accreditation a request to approve a postdoctoral general dentistry residency program in Special Care Dentistry and (b) created suggested accreditation standards for such postdoctoral programs. This article describes efforts by the SCDA to evaluate: The status of existing training of dental students in the care of patients with special needs. The number and characteristics of postdoctoral general dentistry programs offering formal training in the care of patients with special needs. Whether additional training in the care of patients with special needs is needed for dental students and -dentists. Possible actions by SCDA to impact the numbers of dentists trained each year in the care of patients with -special needs. PMID:27113992

  2. Aging alters tissue resident mesenchymal stem cell properties.

    PubMed

    Alt, Eckhard U; Senst, Christiane; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Slakey, Douglas P; Dupin, Charles L; Chaffin, Abigail E; Kadowitz, Philip J; Izadpanah, Reza

    2012-03-01

    Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to participate in tissue regeneration that follows cell turnover, apoptosis, or necrosis. It has been long known that aging impedes an organism's repair/regeneration capabilities. In order to study the age associated changes, the molecular characteristics of adipose tissue derived MSCs (ASCs) from three age groups of healthy volunteers, i.e., young, middle aged, and aged were investigated. The number and multilineage differentiation potential of ASCs declined with age. Aging reduces the proliferative capacity along with increases in cellular senescence. A significant increase in quiescence of G2 and S phase was observed in ASCs from aged donors. The expression of genes related to senescence such as CHEK1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(ink4a) was increased with age, however genes of apoptosis were downregulated. Further, an age-dependent abnormality in the expression of DNA break repair genes was observed. Global microRNA analysis revealed an abnormal expression of mir-27b, mir-106a, mir-199a, and let-7. In ubiquitously distributed adipose tissue (and ASCs), aging brings about important alterations, which might be critical for tissue regeneration and homeostasis. Our findings therefore provide a better understanding of the mechanism(s) involved in stem cell aging and regenerative potential, and this in turn may affect tissue repair that declines with aging. PMID:22265741

  3. Associations of Special Care Units and Outcomes of Residents with Dementia: 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Huabin; Fang, Xiangming; Liao, Youlian; Elliott, Amanda; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We compared the rates of specialized care for residents with Alzheimer's disease or dementia in special care units (SCUs) and other nursing home (NH) units and examined the associations of SCU residence with process of care and resident outcomes. Design and Methods: Data came from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. The indicators of…

  4. Population ageing and dental care.

    PubMed

    Harford, Jane

    2009-04-01

    Population ageing is a fact in both developed and developing countries. The concern about population ageing largely arises from the combination of a greater number of older people requiring greater amounts of healthcare services and pensions, and relatively fewer people working to pay for them. Oral health and dental care are important aspects of health and health care. Lower rates of edentulism and an ageing population mean that older people will feature more prominently in dental services. Traditionally, economic studies of ageing have focused on the fiscal implications of ageing, projecting the increased burden on health and welfare services that accompanies ageing. It assumed that ageing is the major driver of recent changes and those past trends will simply be amplified by faster population ageing in the future. Less work has been done to understand other past drivers of increased healthcare spending and their implications for the future. The conclusion of these reports is usually that population ageing is unaffordable with current policy settings. They have proposed policies to deal with population ageing which focused on increasing workforce participation and worker productivity to increase the tax base and reducing entitlements. However, the affordability question is as much political as a numerical. There are no clearly articulated criteria for affordability and little opportunity for public discourse about what citizens are willing to pay in taxes to support an ageing population. While the reports do not necessarily reflect public opinion, they will certainly shape it. Predicting the future for oral health is more fraught than for general health, as oral health is in the midst of an epidemiological transition from high rates of edentulism and tooth loss to low rates. Changes in the pattern of dental expenditure in the past do not mirror the experience of rapid increases in per capita expenditure on older age groups as regards general health. Dentistry

  5. Lessons Learned from an Osteoporosis Clinical Trial in Frail Long Term Care Residents

    PubMed Central

    Greenspan, S.L.; Nace, D.; Perera, S.; Ferchak, M.; Fiorito, G.; Medich, D.; Zukowski, K.; Adams, D.; Lee, C.; Saul, M.; Resnick, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although osteoporosis affects women of all ages, the impact is most pronounced in frail residents in long term care. Nevertheless, few interventional trials have been performed in this population and few data on therapeutic alternatives are available in this cohort. Purpose We describe the challenges and lessons learned in developing and carrying out a trial in frail long term care residents. Methods The ZEST (Zoledronic acid in frail Elders to STrengthen bone) study was designed to examine the safety and efficacy of a single-dose therapy for osteoporosis in frail residents in long term care in the Pittsburgh area. Women with osteoporosis who were 65 years of age and older and currently not on therapy, were randomized in a blinded fashion to intravenous zoledronic acid or placebo. Follow-up of each participant was planned for 2 years. All participants received appropriate calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Results Seven hundred and thirty-three contacts were made with long term care residents of 9 participating facilities. Of 252 women screened, 181 women were eligible, enrolled, and were randomized. Multiple barriers to research in long term care facilities were encountered but overcome with direct communication, information sessions, in-service trainings and social events. Lessons learned included designing the study in a manner that avoided placing an additional burden on an already overcommitted facility staff, a two-stage consent process to separate screening from randomization, and a flexible examination schedule to accommodate residents while obtaining the necessary outcome measurements. Furthermore, a mobile unit accessible to participants containing state-of-the-art dual x-ray absorptiometry, assessment for vertebral fractures, and phlebotomy equipment allows all assessments to be performed on-site at each facility. Serious adverse events are collected from affiliated hospitals in real time with a novel electronic surveillance system

  6. Does informal care reduce public care expenditure on elderly care? Estimates based on Finland’s Age Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To formulate sustainable long-term care policies, it is critical first to understand the relationship between informal care and formal care expenditure. The aim of this paper is to examine to what extent informal care reduces public expenditure on elderly care. Methods Data from a geriatric rehabilitation program conducted in Finland (Age Study, n = 732) were used to estimate the annual public care expenditure on elderly care. We first constructed hierarchical multilevel regression models to determine the factors associated with elderly care expenditure. Second, we calculated the adjusted mean costs of care in four care patterns: 1) informal care only for elderly living alone; 2) informal care only from a co-resident family member; 3) a combination of formal and informal care; and 4) formal care only. We included functional independence and health-related quality of life (15D score) measures into our models. This method standardizes the care needs of a heterogeneous subject group and enabled us to compare expenditure among various care categories even when differences were observed in the subjects’ physical health. Results Elder care that consisted of formal care only had the highest expenditure at 25,300 Euros annually. The combination of formal and informal care had an annual expenditure of 22,300 Euros. If a person received mainly informal care from a co-resident family member, then the annual expenditure was only 4,900 Euros and just 6,000 Euros for a person living alone and receiving informal care. Conclusions Our analysis of a frail elderly Finnish population shows that the availability of informal care considerably reduces public care expenditure. Therefore, informal care should be taken into account when formulating policies for long-term care. The process whereby families choose to provide care for their elderly relatives has a significant impact on long-term care expenditure. PMID:23947622

  7. Development and evaluation of an aged care specific Advance Care Plan

    PubMed Central

    Silvester, William; Parslow, Ruth A; Lewis, Virginia J; Fullam, Rachael S; Sjanta, Rebekah; Jackson, Lynne; White, Vanessa; Hudson, Rosalie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To report on the quality of advance care planning (ACP) documents in use in residential aged care facilities (RACF) in areas of Victoria Australia prior to a systematic intervention; to report on the development and performance of an aged care specific Advance Care Plan template used during the intervention. Design An audit of the quality of pre-existing documentation used to record resident treatment preferences and end-of-life wishes at participating RACFs; development and pilot of an aged care specific Advance Care Plan template; an audit of the completeness and quality of Advance Care Plans completed on the new template during a systematic ACP intervention. Participants and setting 19 selected RACFs (managed by 12 aged care organisations) in metropolitan and regional areas of Victoria. Results Documentation in use at facilities prior to the ACP intervention most commonly recorded preferences regarding hospital transfer, life prolonging treatment and personal/cultural/religious wishes. However, 7 of 12 document sets failed to adequately and clearly specify the resident's preferences as regards life prolonging medical treatment. The newly developed aged care specific Advance Care Plan template was met with approval by participating RACFs. Of 203 Advance Care Plans completed on the template throughout the project period, 49% included the appointment of a Medical Enduring Power of Attorney. Requests concerning medical treatment were specified in almost all completed documents (97%), with 73% nominating the option of refusal of life-prolonging treatment. Over 90% of plans included information concerning residents’ values and beliefs, and future health situations that the resident would find to be unacceptable were specified in 78% of completed plans. Conclusions Standardised procedures and documentation are needed to improve the quality of processes, documents and outcomes of ACP in the residential aged care sector. PMID:23626906

  8. Current Practices and Opportunities in a Resident Clinic Regarding the Care of Older Adults with Multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Schoenborn, Nancy L.; Boyd, Cynthia M.; McNabney, Matthew; Ray, Anushree; Cayea, Danelle

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Multimorbidity (≥2 chronic conditions) affects more than half of all older adults. The American Geriatrics Society developed and published guiding principles for the care of older adults with multimorbidity in 2012. Improved clinician training in caring for older adults with multimorbidity is needed, but it is not clear what opportunities arise within clinical encounters to apply the guiding principles or how clinicians at all stages of training currently practice in this area. This project aimed to characterize current practice and opportunities for improvement in an internal medicine residency clinic regarding the care of older adults with multimorbidity. DESIGN Qualitative content analysis of audio-recorded clinic visits. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Thirty clinic visits between 21 internal medicine residents and 30 of their primary care patients aged 65 and older with two or more chronic conditions were audio-recorded. Patients’ mean age was 73.6, and they had on average 3.7 chronic conditions and took 12.6 medications. MEASUREMENTS Transcripts of the audio-recorded visit discussions were analyzed using standard techniques of qualitative content analysis to describe the content and frequency of discussions in the clinic visits related to the five guiding principles: patient preferences, interpreting the evidence, prognosis, clinical feasibility, and optimizing therapies. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS All visits except one included discussions that were thematically related to at least one guiding principle, suggesting regular opportunities to apply the guiding principles in primary care encounters with internal medicine residents. Discussions related to some guiding principles occurred much more frequently than others. Patients presented a number of opportunities to incorporate the guiding principles that the residents missed, suggesting target areas for future educational interventions. PMID:26200347

  9. Inpatient Performance of Primary Care Residents: Impact of Reduction in Time on the Ward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Goroll, Allan H.

    1979-01-01

    The inpatient (ward/intensive care unit) performance of primary care medical residents was compared with that of their peers in the standard internal medicine residency program. Nearly identical performances of the two groups suggests that substantial time in the first two years of residency can be devoted successfully to ambulatory training.…

  10. End-of-Life Care Education for Psychiatric Residents: Attitudes, Preparedness, and Conceptualizations of Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, Glendon R.; Hodges, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined psychiatric residents' attitudes, perceived preparedness, experiences, and needs in end-of-life care education. They also examined how residents conceptualized good end-of-life care and dignity. Methods: The authors conducted an electronic survey of 116 psychiatric residents at the University of Toronto. The survey…

  11. Challenging residents to assume maximal responsibilities in homes for the aged.

    PubMed

    Rodstein, M

    1975-07-01

    A program for activating residents of homes for the aged to assume maximal responsibilities is described. Promoting maximal physical and mental health through various modalities including activity programs, appropriate exercise and participation in democratic self-government mechanisms, will result in a happier, healthier population of residents in institutions for the aged. The increased demands on staff time and patience will be compensated for by relief of the too-frequent feelings of hopelessness and boredom endemic among the staff of long-term care facilities. Such programs demand constant effort by all staff members, patients, volunteers and relatives because if they succumb to the usual human dislike of persistency, short-term gains can easily be lost. PMID:1141631

  12. Optimising nutrition in residential aged care: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ekta; Marshall, Skye; Miller, Michelle; Isenring, Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    In developed countries the prevalence of protein-energy malnutrition increases with age and multi-morbidities increase nutritional risk in aged care residents in particular. This paper presents a narrative review of the current literature on the identification, prevalence, associated risk factors, consequences, and management of malnutrition in the residential aged care (RAC) setting. We performed searches of English-language publications on Medline, PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane Library from January 1, 1990 to November 25, 2015. We found that, on average, half of all residents in aged care are malnourished as a result of factors affecting appetite, dietary intake and nutrient absorption. Malnutrition is associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes, including increased risk of infections, falls, pressure ulcers and hospital admissions, all of which can lead to increased health care costs and poorer quality of life. A number of food and nutrition strategies have demonstrated positive nutritional and clinical outcomes in the RAC setting. These strategies extend beyond simply enhancing the nutritional value of foods and hence necessitate the involvement of a range of committed stakeholders. Implementing a nutritional protocol in RAC facilities that comprises routine nutrition screening, assessment, appropriate nutrition intervention, including attention to food service systems, and monitoring by a multidisciplinary team can help prevent decline in residents' nutritional status. Food and nutritional issues should be identified early and managed on admission and regularly in the RAC setting. PMID:27621242

  13. Resident and Family Satisfaction with Incontinence and Mobility Care: Sensitivity to Intervention Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Ouslander, Joseph G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated whether the satisfaction levels of long-term-care residents and their family members concerning incontinence and mobility care were sensitive to an improvement intervention. Design and Methods: A randomized, controlled intervention trial with incontinent long-term-care residents was conducted wherein research staff…

  14. Iodine Status of New Zealand Elderly Residents in Long-Term Residential Care.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jody C; MacDonell, Sue O; Gray, Andrew R; Reid, Malcolm R; Barr, David J; Thomson, Christine D; Houghton, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    In response to the re-emergence of iodine deficiency in New Zealand, in 2009 the government mandated that all commercially made breads be fortified with iodized salt. There has been no evaluation of the impact of the program on iodine status of the elderly, despite this population group being vulnerable to iodine deficiency or excess. The aim of this study was to describe the iodine status of elderly New Zealanders in residential aged-care homes following the implementation of the bread fortification program. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, involving 309 residents (median age 85 years) from 16 aged-care homes throughout NZ. Information on socio-demographic, anthropometric, dietary and health characteristics were collected. Casual spot urine samples were analysed for urinary iodine concentration (UIC). Blood samples were analysed for serum thyroglobulin, thyroglobulin antibodies, and other biochemical indices. The median UIC (MUIC) of the residents was 72 μg/L, indicating mild iodine deficiency, and 29% had a UIC < 50 μg/L. Median thyroglobulin concentration was 18 ng/mL and 26% had elevated thyroglobulin concentration (>40 ng/mL), suggesting iodine insufficiency. Diuretic use was associated with lower MUIC (p = 0.043). Synthetic thyroxine use was associated with lower odds of having a UIC < 50 μg/L (OR 0.32, p = 0.030)) and lower median thyroglobulin (-15.2 ng/mL, p = 0.001), compared with untreated participants. Frailty was associated with elevated thyroglobulin (p = 0.029), whereas anemia was associated with lower thyroglobulin (p = 0.016). Iodine insufficiency persists in New Zealanders residing in residential aged-care homes despite increasing iodine intake from fortified bread. Research is required to establish optimal iodine intake and status in the elderly. PMID:27455319

  15. Iodine Status of New Zealand Elderly Residents in Long-Term Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jody C.; MacDonell, Sue O.; Gray, Andrew R.; Reid, Malcolm R.; Barr, David J.; Thomson, Christine D.; Houghton, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    In response to the re-emergence of iodine deficiency in New Zealand, in 2009 the government mandated that all commercially made breads be fortified with iodized salt. There has been no evaluation of the impact of the program on iodine status of the elderly, despite this population group being vulnerable to iodine deficiency or excess. The aim of this study was to describe the iodine status of elderly New Zealanders in residential aged-care homes following the implementation of the bread fortification program. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, involving 309 residents (median age 85 years) from 16 aged-care homes throughout NZ. Information on socio-demographic, anthropometric, dietary and health characteristics were collected. Casual spot urine samples were analysed for urinary iodine concentration (UIC). Blood samples were analysed for serum thyroglobulin, thyroglobulin antibodies, and other biochemical indices. The median UIC (MUIC) of the residents was 72 μg/L, indicating mild iodine deficiency, and 29% had a UIC < 50 μg/L. Median thyroglobulin concentration was 18 ng/mL and 26% had elevated thyroglobulin concentration (>40 ng/mL), suggesting iodine insufficiency. Diuretic use was associated with lower MUIC (p = 0.043). Synthetic thyroxine use was associated with lower odds of having a UIC < 50 μg/L (OR 0.32, p = 0.030)) and lower median thyroglobulin (−15.2 ng/mL, p = 0.001), compared with untreated participants. Frailty was associated with elevated thyroglobulin (p = 0.029), whereas anemia was associated with lower thyroglobulin (p = 0.016). Iodine insufficiency persists in New Zealanders residing in residential aged-care homes despite increasing iodine intake from fortified bread. Research is required to establish optimal iodine intake and status in the elderly. PMID:27455319

  16. Difficulties of residents in training in end-of-life care. A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Luthy, C; Cedraschi, C; Pautex, S; Rentsch, D; Piguet, V; Allaz, A F

    2009-01-01

    Residents in training are first-line physicians in hospital settings and they are in the process of developing knowledge and mastering clinical skills. They have to confront complex tasks calling upon their personal background, professional identity and relationships with the patients. We conducted a qualitative study investigating the difficulties they perceive in end-of-life care. In all, 24 consecutive residents were presented with a written query asking them to indicate the difficulties they identify in the management of patients hospitalised for end-of-life care. Their responses were submitted to content analysis. Physicians' mean age was 28 +/- 2.2 years, 37% were women, average postgraduate training duration was 2.5 +/- 1.3 years. Content analysis elicited eight categories of difficulties: ability to provide adequate explanations, understand the patients' needs, have sufficient theoretical knowledge, avoid flight, avoid false reassurance, manage provision of time, face one's limits as a physician and be able to help despite everything. Residents' responses showed that they identify the complexity of care in terminally-ill patients early in their training. Their responses pointed to the 'right distance' in-between getting involved and preserving oneself as a dimension of major importance. PMID:18996979

  17. Older care-home residents as collaborators or advisors in research: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Backhouse, Tamara; Kenkmann, Andrea; Lane, Kathleen; Penhale, Bridget; Poland, Fiona; Killett, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background: patient and public involvement (PPI) in research can enhance its relevance. Older care-home residents are often not involved in research processes even when studies are care-home focused. Objective: to conduct a systematic review to find out to what extent and how older care-home residents have been involved in research as collaborators or advisors. Methods: a systematic literature search of 12 databases, covering the period from 1990 to September 2014 was conducted. A lateral search was also carried out. Standardised inclusion criteria were used and checked independently by two researchers. Results: nineteen reports and papers were identified relating to 11 different studies. Care-home residents had been involved in the research process in multiple ways. Two key themes were identified: (i) the differences in residents' involvement in small-scale and large-scale studies and (ii) the barriers to and facilitators of involvement. Conclusions: small-scale studies involved residents as collaborators in participatory action research, whereas larger studies involved residents as consultants in advisory roles. There are multiple facilitators of and barriers to involving residents as PPI members. The reporting of PPI varies. While it is difficult to evaluate the impact of involving care-home residents on the research outcomes, impact has been demonstrated from more inclusive research processes with care-home residents. The review shows that older care-home residents can be successfully involved in the research process. PMID:26790454

  18. Comprehensive care of pain: Developing systems and tools to improve patient care and resident education.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Julie; Devlin, Kwanza; Krohn, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Chronic non-cancer pain is a common condition associated with tremendous risk for morbidity and mortality. In many settings, the management of chronic non-cancer pain by primary care providers, although customary, can be difficult due to inadequate training and conflicts between patient expectations and best practices. Resident physicians, faculty, and staff of this family medicine residency program developed a comprehensive chronic pain management program to address these issues while improving patient outcomes. The program was aligned with evidence-based chronic non-cancer pain management strategies yet tailored to the needs of the providers and patients and the strengths of the clinic. In the end, the societal demand for improved chronic non-cancer pain management resulted in a massive curricular and clinical practice overhaul for this residency program. PMID:27497454

  19. Need or right: Sexual expression and intimacy in aged care.

    PubMed

    Rowntree, Margaret R; Zufferey, Carole

    2015-12-01

    This paper explores how the residential aged care sector could engage with residents' sexual expression and intimacy. It is informed by a study of 19 aged care staff members and 23 community members, and initially designed on the principles of Appreciative Inquiry methodology. The data were collected through focus groups and interviews and analyzed using discourse analysis. We found that staff members mainly conceptualize sexual expression as a need to be met, while community members (current and prospective residents) understand it as a right to be exercised. We conclude that the way in which sexual expression is conceptualized has critical implications for the sector's engagement with this topic. A 'needs' discourse informs policies, procedures and practices that enable staff to meet residents' needs, while a 'rights' discourse shapes policies, practices and physical designs that improve residents' privacy and autonomy, shifting the balance of power towards them. The former approach fits with a nursing home medical model of care, and the latter with a social model of service provision and consumption. PMID:26568211

  20. Pneumonia care and the nursing home: a qualitative descriptive study of resident and family member perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chan Carusone, Soo; Loeb, Mark; Lohfeld, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    Background Nursing home residents are frequently sent to hospital for diagnostic tests or to receive acute health care services. These transfers are both costly and for some, associated with increased risks. Although improved technology allows long-term care facilities to deliver more complex health care on site, if this is to become a trend then residents and family members must see the value of such care. This qualitative study examined resident and family member perspectives on in situ care for pneumonia. Methods A qualitative descriptive study design was used. Participants were residents and family members of residents treated for pneumonia drawn from a larger randomized controlled trial of a clinical pathway to manage nursing home-acquired pneumonia on-site. A total of 14 in-depth interviews were conducted. Interview data were analyzed using the editing style, described by Miller and Crabtree, to identify key themes. Results Both residents and family members preferred that pneumonia be treated in the nursing home, where possible. They both felt that caring and attention are key aspects of care which are more easily accessible in the nursing home setting. However, residents felt that staff or doctors should make the decision whether to hospitalize them, whereas family members wanted to be consulted or involved in the decision-making process. Conclusion These findings suggest that interventions to reduce hospitalization of nursing home residents with pneumonia are consistent with resident and family member preferences. PMID:16430782

  1. Providing and financing aged care in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ergas, Henry; Paolucci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the provision and financing of aged care in Australia. Demand for aged care will increase substantially as a result of population aging, with the number of Australians aged 85 and over projected to increase from 400,000 in 2010 to over 1.8 million in 2051. Meeting this demand will greatly strain the current system, and makes it important to exploit opportunities for increased efficiency. A move to greater beneficiary co-payments is also likely, though its extent may depend on whether aged care insurance and other forms of pre-payment can develop. PMID:22312229

  2. Influence of Place of Residence in Access to Specialized Cancer Care for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Tracy; Duell, Eric J.; Shi, Xun; Demidenko, Eugene; Goodman, David

    2010-01-01

    Context: Disparities in cancer care for rural residents and for African Americans have been documented, but the interaction of these factors is not well understood. Purpose: The authors examined the simultaneous influence of race and place of residence on access to and utilization of specialized cancer care in the United States. Methods: Access to…

  3. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  4. School Age Child Care: A Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ellen; And Others

    This paper examines on-site, school-age child care and the relationship between attendance at on-site, after-school child care programs and familial, environmental, and developmental factors. Topics discussed include: (1) the quality of school-based environments in kindergarten and child care; (2) the socioeconomic status and size of families of…

  5. The potential for deprescribing in care home residents with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Lillan Mo; Kjome, Reidun Lisbet Skeide; Sølvik, Una Ørvim; Houghton, Julie; Desborough, James Antony

    2016-08-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is a common diagnosis in care home residents that is associated with potentially inappropriate prescribing and thus risk of additional suffering. Previous studies found that diabetes medicines can be safely withdrawn in care home residents, encouraging further investigation of the potential for deprescribing amongst these patients. Objectives Describe comorbidities and medicine use in care home residents with Type 2 diabetes; identify number of potentially inappropriate medicines prescribed for these residents using a medicines optimisation tool; assess clinical applicability of the tool. Setting Thirty care homes for older people, East Anglia, UK. Method Data on diagnoses and medicines were extracted from medical records of 826 residents. Potentially inappropriate medicines were identified using the tool 'Optimising Safe and Appropriate Medicines Use'. Twenty percent of results were validated by a care home physician. Main outcome measure Number of potentially inappropriate medicines. Results The 106 residents with Type 2 diabetes had more comorbidities and prescriptions than those without. Over 90 % of residents with Type 2 diabetes had at least one potentially inappropriate medication. The most common was absence of valid indication. The physician unreservedly endorsed 39 % of the suggested deprescribing, and would consider discontinuing all but one of the remaining medicines following access to additional information. Conclusion UK care home residents with Type 2 diabetes had an increased burden of comorbidities and prescriptions. The majority of these patients were prescribed potentially inappropriate medicines. Validation by a care home physician supported the clinical applicability of the medicines optimisation tool. PMID:27241345

  6. Menu Planning in Residential Aged Care—The Level of Choice and Quality of Planning of Meals Available to Residents

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Karen L.; Wright, Olivia R. L.; Capra, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Choice of food is an imperative aspect of quality of life for residents in Residential Aged Care Homes (RACHs), where overall choice and control is diminished upon entering a home to receive care. The purpose of this study was to examine the current strategies of menu planning in a range of RACHs in Australia, and whether this facilitated appropriate levels of choice for residents receiving texture modified and general diets. Methods: The study comprised a National Menu Survey using a new survey instrument collecting general information about the RACH and foodservice system, menu information and staffing information (n = 247); a national menu analysis (n = 161) and an observational case study of 36 meal environments. Results: Choice was low for the entire sample, but particularly for those receiving pureed texture modified diets. Evidence of menu planning to facilitate the inclusion of choice and alternatives was limited. Discussion: Regulation and monitoring of the Australian Aged Care Accreditation Standards needs to be strengthened to mandate improvement of the choice and variety offered to residents, particularly those on pureed texture modified diets. Further research on how menu choice and a lack of variety in meals affects the quality of life residents is needed in this context, but current evidence suggests the effect would be detrimental and undermine resident autonomy and nutritional status. PMID:26371040

  7. Clinimetric Testing in Mexican Elders: Associations with Age, Gender, and Place of Residence

    PubMed Central

    Tavano-Colaizzi, Lorena; Arroyo, Pedro; Loria, Alvar; Pérez-Lizaur, Ana Bertha; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the ability of five clinimetric instruments to discriminate between subjects >60 years of age living at home versus those living in a residency. Methods: Trained nutritionists applied five instruments (cognition/depression/functionality/nutrition/appetite) to 285 subjects with majorities of women (64%), aged <80 years (61%), and home residents (54%). Results: Multivariable regression models were generated for each instrument using age, gender, and residency as independent variables. Age was associated with worsening scores in the five instruments whereas residency showed association in three instruments, and gender in two. Score-age regressions by place of residency showed differences suggesting that Mundet residents had increasingly worse scores with increasing age than home dwellers for cognition, depression, and nutrition. Also, living at home prevented the worsening of depression with increasing age. In contrast, functionality and appetite deteriorated at a similar rate for home and Mundet residents suggesting an inability of these two instruments to discriminate between settings. Score-age regressions by gender suggested that males have less cognitive problems at 60 and 80 years of age but not at 100 years, and better appetite than women at all ages. Conclusion: Increasing age proved to be associated to worsening scores in the five instruments but only three were able to detect differences according to setting. An interesting observation was that living at home appeared to prevent the depression increase with increasing age seen in Mundet residents. PMID:25593910

  8. Day-to-day care: the interplay of CNAs' views of residents & nursing home environments.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lucy Takesue; Wallhagen, Margaret I

    2008-11-01

    This qualitative study identified certified nursing assistants' (CNAs') perspectives of nursing home residents and how these perspectives translate into care practices. Data included observations of and interviews with 27 CNAs in three dissimilar nursing homes. All participants were people of color, and all but 3 were immigrants. CNAs constructed three views of residents: as fictive kin, as a commodity, and as an autonomous person. Although individual CNAs held one primary view of residents in general, select residents were viewed from an alternative perspective, resulting in variations in care practices. These findings suggest that such distinctions, in tandem with structural, organizational, and cultural differences in nursing homes, present opportunities for nursing leadership to affect the visible, everyday practice of nursing CNAs. To target interventions, further research is needed on how CNAs come to differentially view residents and how these differences influence CNAs' care relationships with residents. PMID:19024427

  9. Culture Change in Long-term Care: Participatory Action Research and the Role of the Resident

    PubMed Central

    Shura, Robin; Siders, Rebecca A.; Dannefer, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study's purpose was to advance the process of culture change within long-term care (LTC) and assisted living settings by using participatory action research (PAR) to promote residents’ competence and nourish the culture change process with the active engagement and leadership of residents. Design and Methods: Seven unit-specific PAR groups, each consisting of 4–7 residents, 1–2 family members, and 1–3 staff, met 1 hour per week for 4 months in their nursing home or assisted living units to identify areas in need of improvement and to generate ideas for community change. PAR groups included residents with varied levels of physical and cognitive challenges. Residents were defined as visionaries with expertise based on their 24/7 experience in the facility and prior life experiences. Results: All PAR groups generated novel ideas for creative improvements and reforms in their communities and showed initiative to implement their ideas. Challenges to the process included staff participation and sustainability. Implications: PAR is a viable method to stimulate creative resident-led reform ideas and initiatives in LTC. Residents’ expertise has been overlooked within prominent culture change efforts that have developed and facilitated changes from outside-in and top-down. PAR may be incorporated productively within myriad reform efforts to engage residents’ competence. PAR has indirect positive quality of life benefits as a forum of meaningful social engagement and age integration that may transform routinized and often ageist modes of relationships within LTC. PMID:21163911

  10. Detection of delirium by nurses among long-term care residents with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Voyer, Philippe; Richard, Sylvie; Doucet, Lise; Danjou, Christine; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues

    2008-01-01

    Background Delirium is a prevalent problem in long-term care (LTC) facilities where advanced age and cognitive impairment represent two important risk factors for this condition. Delirium is associated with numerous negative outcomes including increased morbidity and mortality. Despite its clinical importance, delirium often goes unrecognized by nurses. Although rates of nurse-detected delirium have been studied among hospitalized older patients, this issue has been largely neglected among demented older residents in LTC settings. The goals of this study were to determine detection rates of delirium and delirium symptoms by nurses among elderly residents with dementia and to identify factors associated with undetected cases of delirium. Methods In this prospective study (N = 156), nurse ratings of delirium were compared to researcher ratings of delirium. This procedure was repeated for 6 delirium symptoms. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were computed. Logistic regressions were conducted to identify factors associated with delirium that is undetected by nurses. Results Despite a high prevalence of delirium in this cohort (71.5%), nurses were able to detect the delirium in only a minority of cases (13%). Of the 134 residents not identified by nurses as having delirium, only 29.9% of them were correctly classified. Detection rates for the 6 delirium symptoms varied between 39.1% and 58.1%, indicating an overall under-recognition of symptoms of delirium. Only the age of the residents (≥ 85 yrs) was associated with undetected delirium (OR: 4.1; 90% CI: [1.5–11.0]). Conclusion Detection of delirium is a major issue for nurses that clearly needs to be addressed. Strategies to improve recognition of delirium could result in a reduction of adverse outcomes for this very vulnerable population. PMID:18302791

  11. Effect of an Innovative Medicare Managed Care Program on the Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Flood, Shannon; Bershadsky, Boris; Keckhafer, Gail

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to assess the quality of care provided by an innovative Medicare+Choice HMO targeted specifically at nursing home residents and employing nurse practitioners to provide additional primary care over and above that provided by physicians. The underlying premise of the Evercare approach is that the additional primary care will…

  12. Primary Care Clinician Expectations Regarding Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Melinda M.; Bond, Lynne A.; Howard, Alan; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Expectations regarding aging (ERA) in community-dwelling older adults are associated with personal health behaviors and health resource usage. Clinicians' age expectations likely influence patients' expectations and care delivery patterns; yet, limited research has explored clinicians' age expectations. The Expectations Regarding Aging…

  13. The Learners' Perceptions Survey—Primary Care: Assessing Resident Perceptions of Internal Medicine Continuity Clinics and Patient-Centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, John M.; Chang, Barbara K.; Gilman, Stuart C.; Keitz, Sheri A.; Kaminetzky, Catherine P.; Aron, David C.; Baz, Sam; Cannon, Grant W.; Zeiss, Robert A.; Holland, Gloria J.; Kashner, T. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2010, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) implemented a national patient-centered care initiative that organized primary care into interdisciplinary teams of health care professionals to provide patient-centered, continuous, and coordinated care. Objective We assessed the discriminate validity of the Learners' Perceptions Survey—Primary Care (LPS-PC), a tool designed to measure residents' perceptions about their primary and patient-centered care experiences. Methods Between October 2010 and June 2011, the LPS-PC was administered to Loma Linda University Medical Center internal medicine residents assigned to continuity clinics at the VA Loma Linda Healthcare System (VALLHCS), a university setting, or the county hospital. Adjusted differences in satisfaction ratings across settings and over domains (patient- and family-centered care, faculty and preceptors, learning, clinical, work and physical environments, and personal experience) were computed using a generalized linear model. Results Our response rate was 86% (77 of 90). Residents were more satisfied with patient- and family-centered care at the VALLHCS than at either the university or county (P < .001). However, faculty and preceptors (odds ratio [OR]  =  1.53), physical (OR  =  1.29), and learning (OR  =  1.28) environments had more impact on overall resident satisfaction than patient- and family-centered care (OR  =  1.08). Conclusions The LPS-PC demonstrated discriminate validity to assess residents' perceptions of their patient-centered clinical training experience across outpatient primary care settings at an internal medicine residency program. The largest difference in scores was the patient- and family-centered care domain, in which residents rated the VALLHCS much higher than the university or county sites. PMID:24455006

  14. Health and Social Service Needs of the Elderly: A Comparison of Residents of Public Housing and Residents of the Neighboring Community. Institute on Aging Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evashwick, Connie; And Others

    The second part of a study compared health and social service needs of older persons residing in public housing and older persons residing in the neighboring community. A survey was conducted of 461 residents in four buildings supported by the Seattle Housing Authority (SHA) and 422 residents age 62 and older living within five blocks of one…

  15. Medical students' attitudes toward underserved populations: changing associations with choice of primary care versus non-primary care residency.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Sharon; Timm, Craig; Serna, Lisa; Solan, Brian; Kalishman, Summers

    2010-05-01

    The number of medical students entering primary care residencies continues to decrease. The association between student attitudes toward underserved populations and residency choice has received little attention even though primary care physicians see a larger proportion of underserved patients than most other specialists. We evaluated attitudes toward underserved populations in 826 medical students using a standardized survey, and used logistic regression to assess the effect of attitudes, along with other variables, on selection of a primary care residency. We compared results between two groups defined by year of entry to medical school (1993-99 and 2000-05) to determine whether associations differed by time period. Students' attitudes regarding professional responsibility toward underserved populations remained high over the study period; however, there was a statistically. significant association between positive attitudes and primary care residency in the early cohort only. This association was not found in the more recent group. PMID:20453348

  16. Perception of quality of care among residents of public nursing-homes in Spain: a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The quality of care in nursing homes is weakly defined, and has traditionally focused on quantify nursing homes outputs and on comparison of nursing homes’ resources. Rarely the point of view of clients has been taken into account. The aim of this study was to ascertain what means “quality of care” for residents of nursing homes. Methods Grounded theory was used to design and analyze a qualitative study based on in-depth interviews with a theoretical sampling including 20 persons aged over 65 years with no cognitive impairment and eight proxy informants of residents with cognitive impairment, institutionalized at a public nursing home in Spain. Results Our analysis revealed that participants perceived the quality of care in two ways, as aspects related to the persons providing care and as institutional aspects of the care’s process. All participants agreed that aspects related to the persons providing care was a pillar of quality, something that, in turn, embodied a series of emotional and technical professional competences. Regarding the institutional aspects of the care’s process, participants laid emphasis on round-the-clock access to health care services and on professional’s job stability. Conclusions This paper includes perspectives of the nursing homes residents, which are largely absent. Incorporating residents’ standpoints as a complement to traditional institutional criteria would furnish health providers and funding agencies with key information when it came to designing action plans and interventions aimed at achieving excellence in health care. PMID:23809066

  17. Patient Age Influences Perceptions About Health Care Communication

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Wallace, Lorraine S.; Fryer, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study’s objective was to determine if a patient’s age is independently associated with how he/she perceives interactions with health care providers Methods We used a secondary, cross-sectional analysis of nationally representative data from the 2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). We measured the independent association between patient age and six outcomes pertaining to communication and decision-making autonomy, while simultaneously controlling for gender, race, ethnicity, family income, educational attainment, census region, rural residence, insurance status, and usual source of care. Results Compared to patients ≥ 65 years, patients ages 18–64 were less likely to report that their provider “always” listened to them, “always” showed respect for what they had to say, and “always” spent enough time with them. Discussion Patient perceptions of health care interactions vary by age. A better understanding of how and why age is associated with patient-provider communication could be useful to design practice-level interventions that enhance services and also to develop national policies that improve health care delivery and health outcomes. PMID:19184691

  18. Effects of a psycho-educational intervention on direct care workers' communicative behaviors with residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana; Marques, Alda; Sousa, Liliana; Nolan, Mike; Figueiredo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a person-centered care-based psycho-educational intervention on direct care workers' communicative behaviors with people with dementia living in aged-care facilities. An experimental study with a pretest-posttest control-group design was conducted in four aged-care facilities. Two experimental facilities received an 8-week psycho-educational intervention aiming to develop workers' knowledge about dementia, person-centered care competences, and tools for stress management. Control facilities received education only, with no support to deal with stress. In total, 332 morning care sessions, involving 56 direct care workers (female, mean age 44.72 ± 9.02 years), were video-recorded before and 2 weeks after the intervention. The frequency and duration of a list of verbal and nonverbal communicative behaviors were analyzed. Within the experimental group there was a positive change from pre- to posttest on the frequency of all workers' communicative behaviors. Significant treatment effects in favor of the experimental group were obtained for the frequency of inform (p < .01, η(2)partial = 0.09) and laugh (p < .01, η(2)partial = 0.18). Differences between groups emerged mainly in nonverbal communicative behaviors. The findings suggest that a person-centered care-based psycho-educational intervention can positively affect direct care workers' communicative behaviors with residents with dementia. Further research is required to determine the extent of the benefits of this approach. PMID:26400182

  19. What's the diagnosis? Organisational culture and palliative care delivery in residential aged care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rosemary; Boyd, Michal; Foster, Sue; Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn

    2016-07-01

    Organisational culture has been shown to impact on resident outcomes in residential aged care (RAC). This is particularly important given the growing number of residents with high palliative care needs. The study described herein (conducted from January 2013 to March 2014) examined survey results from a convenience sample of 46 managers, alongside interviews with a purposively selected sample of 23 bereaved family members in order to explore the perceptions of organisational culture within New Zealand RAC facilities in one large urban District Health Board. Results of the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) completed by managers indicated a preference for a 'Clan' and the structured 'Hierarchy' culture. Bereaved family interviews emphasised both positive and negative aspects of communication, leadership and teamwork, and relationship with residents. Study results from both managers' OCAI survey scores and next of kin interviews indicate that while the RAC facilities are culturally oriented towards providing quality care for residents, they may face barriers to adopting organisational processes supportive of this goal. PMID:25808936

  20. Care of Aging Parents by Adult Offspring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Barbara D.

    A prevailing myth holds that modern families, characterized by high mobility and individualistic life styles, do not care for their aging members. To assess the quantity and characteristics of the care of noninstitutionalized elderly parents by their adult children, parents and adult child pairs (N=50) responded to interviews. Specific research…

  1. Effectiveness of Advanced Illness Care Teams for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Dennis G.; Toseland, Ronald W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of advanced illness care teams (AICTs) for nursing home residents with advanced dementia. The AICTs used a holistic approach that focused on four domains: (1) medical, (2) meaningful activities, (3) psychological, and (4) behavioral. The authors recruited 118 residents in two nursing homes for this study and…

  2. Attitudes of Medical Students and Residents toward Care of the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muangpaisan, Weerasak; Intalapapron, Somboon; Assantachai, Prasert

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this article examined attitudes toward the care of the elderly between and among medical students and residents in training. Data were collected with a 16-item attitude questionnaire. Participants were medical students in their introduction period (prior to clinical experience) and residents of the Department of Internal…

  3. The Care of Non-English Speaking Background Residents in Mainstream Nursing Homes and Hostels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkons, Rita

    A survey of 104 individuals of non-English-speaking backgrounds (NESBs) living in South Australia nursing homes and personal care homes and staff of 75 institution housing NESB residents is reported. The study's objectives was to determine the culturally-based needs of the residents and the provision of culturally appropriate services to them. The…

  4. Psychotropic Medication of Mentally Retarded Residents in Community Long-Term Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Jeffrey A.; Sprague, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Medicaid billing information was used to examine the administration of psychotropic medication to residents of community long-term care facilities providing mental retardation services. Results indicated 28.9 percent of such residents in Illinois received at least one psychotropic medication with little or no influence of demographic and facility…

  5. Acting as Standardized Patients Enhances Family Medicine Residents' Self-Reported Skills in Palliative Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory…

  6. Exploring the Quality of Life of Younger Residents Living in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Hay, Kara; Chaudhury, Habib

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the characteristics of "quality of life" of younger residents in long-term care facilities. This multimethod study employed in-depth interviews with younger residents, focus groups with staff members and interviews with management team members at two care facilities in British Columbia, Canada. Data analysis revealed three themes: (a) a new chapter in life, (b) experiencing quality of life, and (c) nature of social life. These themes highlight the characteristics of younger residents' quality of life and provide insights into the salient contributing factors. Findings of this study are useful in better understanding aspects of younger residents' quality of life and their psychosocial needs and consequently can guide decision making to provide an appropriate care environment for this population segment in long-term care settings. PMID:24652878

  7. Autonomy, Choice, Patient-Centered Care, and Hip Protectors: The Experience of Residents and Staff in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Sims-Gould, Joanie; McKay, Heather A.; Feldman, Fabio; Scott, Victoria; Robinovitch, Stephen N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine long-term care (LTC) resident and staff perceptions on the decision to use hip protectors and identify the factors that influence attitudes toward hip protector use. Staff (N = 39) and residents (N = 27) at two residential care facilities in British Columbia, Canada were invited to participate in focus groups on fall prevention and hip protector use. A total of 11 focus groups were conducted. Using framework analysis results show that residents and staff shared concerns on aesthetic and comfort issues with hip protectors. Residents also generally felt they did not need, or want to use, hip protectors. However, they also had desire to be cooperative within the LTC environment. Staff underscored their role in advocating for hip protector use and their desire to protect residents from harm. Practice considerations for facilities wishing to promote hip protectors within a patient centered framework are highlighted. PMID:24652886

  8. Advancing educational continuity in primary care residencies: an opportunity for patient-centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2015-05-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce. PMID:25470307

  9. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceived Ability to Direct Patient Care: Impact of Gender and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Christie; Goetz, Sarah; Ward, Earlise

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Physicians are expected to effect patient care by giving orders to members of a healthcare team. Because women are socialized to be less directive than men, the assertive behavior required of new physicians may be experienced differently by male and female residents. We sought to explore the effects of gender and year of training on residents' experiences and perceived ability to direct patient care. Methods This was a mixed-methods, cross-sectional, descriptive study employing a quantitative written survey and qualitative interviews among internal medicine residents at an academic health center. Measurements included questionnaires and interviews about stress, assertiveness, and personal factors that influence their effectiveness in directing patient care. Analyses examined differences by gender and year of training. Results One hundred residents were invited to participate; 65 returned questionnaires, and 16 of these residents were interviewed. Compared with male residents, female residents selected less assertive behaviors for clinical scenarios (p = 0.047) and were more likely to perceive gender as inhibiting their ability to influence patient care (p < 0.01). Stress associated with being assertive varied more with experience than gender. Interviews corroborated these findings and supported the complexity of gender norms for behavior for female residents in a directive leadership position. Conclusions When compared with male peers, female residents reported more gender issues in residency and chose less assertive behaviors in clinical scenarios. Experience mitigated some gender differences. Our findings suggest that discussion of the existing research on prescriptive gender norms for behavior and leadership may be warranted in resident orientation. PMID:19049356

  10. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, P J; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ambulatory care program and the kinds of teaching skills required of tutors. RESULTS: All of the directors responded. Fifteen stated that the ambulatory care program is mandatory, and the other stated that it is an elective. Block rotations are more common than continuity-of-care assignments. In 12 of the programs 10% or less of the overall training time is spent in ambulatory care. In 11 the faculty tutors comprise a mixture of generalists and subspecialists. The tutors simultaneously care for patients and teach residents in the ambulatory care setting in 14 of the schools. Most are paid through fee-for-service billing. The respondents felt that the ideal program should contain a mix of general and subspecialty ambulatory care training. There was no consensus on whether it should be a block or continuity-of-care experience, but the directors felt that consultation and communication skills should be emphasized regardless of which type of experience prevails. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a widespread commitment to provide core internal medicine residents with experience in ambulatory care, there is little uniformity in how this is achieved in Canadian training programs. PMID:8324688

  11. Transforming Perioperative Care: The Case for a Novel Curriculum for Anesthesiology Resident Training.

    PubMed

    Alem, Navid; Cohen, Neal; Cannesson, Maxime; Kain, Zeev

    2016-06-15

    Currently, perioperative health care is undergoing transformative changes. One prospect for the specialty of anesthesiology is a reorientation of resident education to focus more on the entire spectrum of perioperative care as exemplified by the perioperative surgical home (PSH). To advance this novel paradigm for patients and anesthesiologists, one must also consider further incorporating the competencies fundamental to the PSH during residency training. As such, the purpose of this case report is to outline the successful implementation of a comprehensive PSH curriculum for anesthesiology residents. PMID:27166744

  12. Quality of Mental Health Care for Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rome, Vincent F.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high proportion of nursing home residents with a mental illness other than dementia, the quality of mental health care in nursing homes is a major clinical and policy issue. The authors apply Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care based on the triad of structure, process, and outcome-based measures in reviewing the literature on the quality of mental health care in nursing homes. Quality measures used within the literature include mental health consultations and hospitalizations, inappropriate use of medications, and mental health survey deficiencies. Factors related to the resident's welfare (nurse staffing), provider norms (locality), and financial factors (payer mix) were associated with the quality of mental health care. Although future research is necessary, the extant literature suggests that persons with mental illness are frequently admitted to nursing homes and their care is often of poor quality and related to a series of resident and facility factors. PMID:20223943

  13. Effects of Namaste Care on residents who do not benefit from usual activities.

    PubMed

    Simard, Joyce; Volicer, Ladislav

    2010-02-01

    Namaste Care is a program designed to offer meaningful activities to nursing home residents with advanced dementia or those who cannot be engaged in traditional activities. This 7-day-a-week program is staffed by specially trained nursing assistants who provide activities of daily living in an unhurried manner, with a ''loving touch'' approach to care. The program takes place in a room with lowered lighting, soft music playing, and the scent of lavender. Analyses of Minimum Data Set data before the program were implemented and after residents were involved in the program for at least 30 days showed a decrease in residents' withdrawal, social interaction, delirium indicators, and trend for decreased agitation. Namaste Care helps families feel that in spite of the many losses experienced because of the disease process, something special can still help their loved one to feel comforted, cared for, and cared about in a unique loving environment. PMID:19332652

  14. NURSE ASSISTANT MENTAL MODELS, SENSING MAKING, CARE ACTIONS AND CONSEQUENCES FOR NURSING HOME RESIDENTS

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ruth A.; Ammarell, Natalie; Bailey, Donald; Colóon-Emeric, Cathleen; Corazzini, Kirsten N.; Lillie, Melissa; Scotton Piven, Mary Lynn; Utley-Smith, Queen; McDaniel, Reuben R.

    2005-01-01

    In a nursing home case study using observation and interview data, we described two mental models that guided certified nurse assistants (CNAs) in resident care. The Golden Rule guided CNAs to respond to residents as they would want someone to do for them. Mother wit guided CNAs to treat residents as they would treat their own children. These mental models engendered self-control and affection. We found limits to the models in that they led to actions such as infantalization and misinterpretations about potentially undiagnosed conditions such as depression or pain. Further, we found that CNAs were isolated from clinicians; little resident information was exchanged. We suggest ways to alter CNA mental models to give them a better basis for action and strategies for connecting CNAs and clinical professionals to improve information flow about residents. Study results highlight a critical need for registered nurses (RNs) to be involved in frontline care. PMID:16221876

  15. Acting as standardized patients enhances family medicine residents' self-reported skills in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A J

    2015-08-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory palliative care workshop in communication for incoming, first-year trainees. Four months later, FMR-SPs reflected upon their own experiences. Two independent researchers performed thematic analysis of these interviews. Most of the residents were satisfied with their roles. Twelve reported improved understanding of self, their patients, the doctor-patient relationship, and the underlying philosophy of palliative care. They also described improved verbal and non-verbal communication skills. Eleven of 14 residents reflected upon behavioral changes in problem coping styles. All residents indicated an intention to apply the learning in their future work. Encouraging Thai Family Medicine residents, in years one through three, to portray SPs in palliative care appears to be a valuable learning experience for the resident. Future studies to validate whether this learning has been applied in subsequent practice are planned. PMID:25256636

  16. Resident Reactions to Person-Centered Communication by Long-Term Care Staff.

    PubMed

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Sibalija, Jovana; Scotchmer, Emma

    2016-09-01

    Long-term care staff caregivers who are person centered incorporate the life history, preferences, and feelings of residents with dementia during care interactions. Communication is essential for person-centered care. However, little is known about residents' verbal reactions when staff use person-centered communication. Accordingly, this study investigated the impact of person-centered communication and missed opportunities for such communication by staff on resident reactions. Conversations (N = 46) between staff-resident dyads were audio-recorded during routine care tasks over 12 weeks. Staff utterances were coded for person-centered communication and missed opportunities. Resident utterances were coded for positive reactions, such as cooperation, and negative reactions, such as distress. Linear regression analyses revealed that the more staff used person-centered communication, the more likely that residents reacted positively. Additionally, the more missed opportunities in a conversation, the more likely that the residents reacted negatively. Conversation illustrations elaborate on the quantitative findings and implications for staff training are discussed. PMID:26744507

  17. Queues and care: how medical residents organize their work in a busy clinic.

    PubMed

    Finlay, W; Mutran, E J; Zeitler, R R; Randall, C S

    1990-09-01

    How do medical residents organize their work in settings where queue demands are heavy and resources are limited? Under such conditions, a queue theory would predict the delivery of care that is indifferent to clients' needs or that gets rid of clients as quickly as possible. In an exploratory case study of medical residents in a Veterans Administration outpatient clinic, we found instead that the medical residents' work was characterized by a high level of professional commitment: they provided thorough medical examinations and attempted to expedite patient care in other ways. We attribute the residents' professional ethos to opportunities provided in the VA hospital to learn the craft of routine medicine and to be directly responsible for patient care; such opportunities were not available in other settings. PMID:2133482

  18. Medicaid claims history of Florida long-term care facility residents hospitalized for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Baker, J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify patterns of admission, discharge, and readmission between hospital and long-term care facility among a group of Florida long-term care facility residents with pressure ulcers whose care was paid for by Medicaid. A patient-specific, longitudinal claims history database was constructed from data provided by the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. This database was used to determine and analyze hospital admissions for pressure ulcer care among Medicaid recipients cared for in a long-term care facility. Analysis of the data determined that more than half of the Medicaid-covered long-term care facility residents who formed the target study group (54.57%) had multiple hospital admissions associated with pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcer hospital admissions amounted to a program cost of $9.9 million. PMID:8704846

  19. The Bromhead Care Home Service: the impact of a service for care home residents with dementia on hospital admission and dying in preferred place of care.

    PubMed

    Garden, Gill; Green, Suzanne; Pieniak, Susan; Gladman, John

    2016-04-01

    People with dementia have worse outcomes associated with hospital admission, are more likely to have interventions and are less likely to be offered palliative care than people without dementia. Advance care planning for care home residents has been shown to reduce hospital admissions without increasing mortality. Studies have shown that staff confidence in managing delirium, a common reason for admission, improves with training. A service combining education for care home staff and advance care planning for care home residents with dementia was introduced to care homes in Boston, UK. There were improvements in staff confidence in recognition, prevention, management and knowledge of factors associated with delirium and dysphagia. 92% of carers rated the service >9/10. Admissions fell by 37% from baseline in the first year and 55% in the second and third years. All but one resident died in the preferred place of care. PMID:27037378

  20. Health-promoting residential aged care: a pilot project in Austria.

    PubMed

    Krajic, Karl; Cichocki, Martin; Quehenberger, Viktoria

    2015-09-01

    Long-term care for the aged is an area that has not been in the focus of health promotion so far. The paper describes context, concept and project plan of a 2-year pilot project of comprehensive health-promoting setting development in residential aged care in Austria, and provides an overview over main experiences and results. Austria's most relevant health promotion agencies, a specialized scientific institute and Austria's largest provider of aged care acted as partners. The project aimed at developing elements of a comprehensive approach, but also providing evidence for the effectiveness of health promotion. Therefore, the project combined an organizational development approach with a scientific, randomized controlled study on mobility enhancement for residents. A comprehensive settings approach turned out acceptable for the main stakeholders of aged care (owners and management, staff, residents and residents' relatives). Strategy development, based on a systematic needs assessment, found staff health to be of special interest for the organization (ergonomics, workability over life course), and residents' relatives, got more attention. The mobility study was able to achieve positive results on occupational performance, concerning quality-of-life indicators and reached also formerly inactive groups. After the end of the project, health promotion is still on the agenda of the organization; further developments will be monitored. Good support from the policy level and well-established networking between the aged care provider, health promotion agencies and a network for health promotion in health care seems to have been an important resource for success. PMID:24682545

  1. Primary Care Clinician Expectations Regarding Aging

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melinda M.; Bond, Lynne A.; Howard, Alan; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Expectations regarding aging (ERA) in community-dwelling older adults are associated with personal health behaviors and health resource usage. Clinicians’ age expectations likely influence patients’ expectations and care delivery patterns; yet, limited research has explored clinicians’ age expectations. The Expectations Regarding Aging Survey (ERA-12) was used to assess (a) age expectations in a sample of primary care clinicians practicing in the United States and (b) clinician characteristics associated with ERA-12 scores. Design and Methods: This study was a cross-sectional survey of primary care clinicians affiliated with 5 practice-based research networks, October 2008 to June 2009. A total of 374 of the 1,510 distributed surveys were returned (24.8% response rate); 357 analyzed. Mean respondent age was 48.6 years (SD = 11.6; range 23–87 years); 88.0% physicians, 96.0% family medicine, 94.9% White, and 61.9% male. Results: Female clinicians reported higher ERA-12 scores; clinicians’ age expectations decreased with greater years in practice. Among the clinicians, higher ERA-12 scores were associated with higher clinician ratings of the importance of and personal skill in administering preventive counseling and the importance of delivering preventive services. Agreement with individual ERA-12 items varied widely. Implications: Unrealistically high or low ERA could negatively influence the quality of care provided to patients and patients’ own age expectations. Research should examine the etiology of clinicians’ age expectations and their association with older adult diagnoses and treatment. Medical education must incorporate strategies to promote clinician attitudes that facilitate successful patient aging. PMID:21430129

  2. Residence, Kinship and Social Isolation among the Aged Baganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahemow, Nina

    1979-01-01

    Investigated impact of interactions with kin on social integration in old age. A nonrandom sample of aged Baganda in Uganda was interviewed concerning perceptions of loneliness and social isolation. Results show that the majority of subjects did not view old age as a period of loneliness or isolation. (Author)

  3. Challenges and barriers to health care and overall health in older residents of Alaska: evidence from a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Foutz, Julia D.; Cohen, Steven A.; Cook, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 1970 to 2010, the Alaskan population increased from 302,583 to 698,473. During that time, the growth rate of Alaskan seniors (65+) was 4 times higher than their national counterparts. Ageing in Alaska requires confronting unique environmental, sociodemographic and infrastructural challenges, including an extreme climate, geographical isolation and less developed health care infrastructure compared to the continental US. Objective The objective of this analysis is to compare the health needs of Alaskan seniors to those in the continental US. Design We abstracted 315,161 records of individuals age 65+ from the 2013 and 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, of which 1,852 were residents of Alaska. To compare residents of Alaska to residents of the 48 contiguous states we used generalized linear models which allowed us to adjust for demographic differences and survey weighting procedures. We examined 3 primary outcomes – general health status, health care coverage status and length of time since last routine check-up. Results Alaskan seniors were 59% less likely to have had a routine check-up in the past year and 12% less likely to report excellent health status than comparable seniors in the contiguous US. Conclusions Given the growth rate of Alaskan seniors and inherent health care challenges this vulnerable population faces, future research should examine the specific pathways through which these disparities occur and inform policies to ensure that all US seniors, regardless of geographical location, have access to high-quality health services. PMID:27056177

  4. Experiences in end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit: A survey of resident physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Zubair Umer; Muhammed, Fazil; Singh, Charu; Sudhakar, Abish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The practice of intensive care includes withholding and withdrawal of care, when appropriate, and the goals of care change around this time to comfort and palliation. We decided to survey the attitudes, training, and skills of intensive care residents in relation to end-of-life (EoL) care. All residents at our institute who has worked for at least a month in an adult Intensive Care Unit were invited to participate. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Ethics Committee approval, a Likert-scale questionnaire, divided into five composite measures of EoL skills including training and attitude, was handed over to individual residents and completed data were anonymized. Frequency and descriptive analysis was performed for the demographic variables. Central tendency, variability, and reliability were examined for the five composite measures. Scale internal consistency was checked by Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Multivariate forward conditional regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of demographic data or EoL experience to composite measures. Results: Of the 170 eligible residents, we received 120 (70.5%) responses. Conclusions: Internal medicine residents have more experience in caring for dying patients and conducting EoL discussions. Even though majority of participants reported that they are comfortable with the concept of EoL care, this does not always reflect the actual practice in the hospital. There is a need for further training in skills around EoL care. As this is a self-assessment survey, the specific measures of attitudes and skills in EoL are poorly reflected, indicating a need for further research.

  5. Meeting American Geriatrics Society Competencies: Are Residents Meeting Expectations for Quality Care of Older Adults?

    PubMed

    Bynum, Debra L; Wilson, Lindsay A; Ong, Thuan; Callahan, Kathryn E; Dalton, Thomas; Ohuabunwa, Ugochi

    2015-09-01

    In order to determine how often internal medicine and family medicine residents performed specific actions related to the geriatric competencies established by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) when caring for older hospitalized adults, a cross-sectional anonymous survey of residents at the University of North Carolina, University of Washington, Wake Forest University, Duke University, and Emory University was undertaken. Data on frequency of self-reported behaviors were analyzed, with comparisons made for different levels of training, institution, and program. A total of 375 residents responded for an overall response rate of 48%. Residents reported that they often do not demonstrate all of the AGS recommended core competencies when caring for older adults in the hospital setting. Residents report more frequently performing activities that are routinely integrated into hospital systems such as reviewing medication lists, working with an interdisciplinary team, evaluating for inappropriate bladder catheters, and evaluating for pressure ulcers. There were no consistent differences between institutions and only minor differences noted between Family Medicine and Internal Medicine residents. Operationalizing core competencies by integrating them into hospital systems' quality process indicators may prompt more consistent high-quality care and ensure systems support residents' competence. PMID:26313811

  6. Can an individualized and comprehensive care strategy improve urinary incontinence (UI) among nursing home residents?

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukiko; Nagata, Kumiko; Tanaka, Tomoe; Kuwano, Koichi; Endo, Hidetoshi; Otani, Tetsuya; Nakazawa, Minato; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is one of the most common and distressing conditions among nursing home residents. Although scheduled care is usually provided for them, incontinence care should be individualized regarding going to the toilet, changing diapers, and taking food and water. We have developed an individualized and comprehensive care strategy to address the problem. We conducted an intervention study that involved training chiefs of staffs, who in turn trained other staffs, and encouraging residents. A total of 153 elderly subjects selected from 1290 residents in 17 nursing homes were eligible to receive our individualized and comprehensive care. The goals of the care strategy were (i) to complete meal intake; (ii) to take fluids up to 1500 ml/day; (iii) to urinate in a toilet; (iv) to spend over 6h out of bed; and (v) to reduce time spent in wet diapers. We explained the aims of our strategy to the chiefs of staff of each nursing home and instructed them to encourage residents to take an active part in our individualized and comprehensive care strategy for 12 weeks. For 3 days before and after that period, we assessed the changes in fluid volume intake, time spent in wet diapers, size of diaper pads, and urination habits. The result was that fluid volume intake significantly increased (p<0.001) while time spent in wet diapers decreased (p<0.001). The number of residents wearing diapers decreased as did the size of pads during the day (p=0.0017). The proportion of residents using diapers at night was reduced and those using toilets at night increased (p=0.007). This study suggests that such an individualized and comprehensive care strategy can offer a measurable improvement in UI care. PMID:19095315

  7. An Agenda for Residency Training in Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Kurt; Buchsbaum, David

    1984-01-01

    Some of the differences between in-hospital and ambulatory medicine and their implications for the teaching and practice of ambulatory care are explored. The availability of time, the role of patient cooperation, and the decision-making process differ in the two settings. (MLW)

  8. Good clinical practice guidelines for care home residents with diabetes: an executive summary.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A J

    2011-07-01

    A Task and Finish Group of Diabetes UK was convened over 14 months to undertake a systematic review of the original 1999 British Diabetic Association guidance on care home diabetes, incorporate new research findings and produce a set of recommendations that are evidenced-based, practical and implementable within UK care home settings. The anticipation of Diabetes UK is that these guidelines will represent a national policy of good clinical practice for diabetes care within care homes. This executive summary demonstrates how the full guidelines should provide a framework of assessment of the quality of diabetes care within care homes, for use by regulatory bodies who have responsibility for this provision of diabetes care. This document is primarily based on recommendations for adults living within British care home environments and its focus, by virtue of the nature and characteristics of residents, is on older adults. Improvements in diabetes care within residential and nursing homes are likely to follow a sustained commitment by health and social care professionals to ensure that the well-being of residents with diabetes is paramount, that high-quality policies of diabetes care are implemented and monitored and effective diabetes education is a mandatory and integral part of care home staff training. PMID:21672001

  9. Reciprocity of service learning among students and paired residents in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Huei-Lih; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Tu, Chin-Tang; Chen, Shiue; Chang, Su-Hsien

    2014-05-01

    Many intergenerational service learning projects have been designed for service providers and recipients, few studies have analyzed the providers and recipients of such projects in terms of caring behavior. In accordance with the Taiwan Ministry of Education initiative to develop curricular service learning, a service learning project was initiated during a nursing school course before the students performed their clinical practicum. The aim of this mixed method design was to report the development of an intergenerational service learning project and to test its effects both on nursing students paired with residents and residents of facilities. A pre-and post-test with non-randomized control group design was used to evaluate the effects of the project on caring perceived by the residents, and a one-group pre- and post-test design was used to test its effects among nursing students. The analysis included valid questionnaires received from 59 eligible residents and 210 nursing stu`dents. The 20-hour project included pre-service training, service, and an end-of-project presentation. At post-test, the residents showed that perceived caring significantly differed between the intervention group and the control group (F=8.99; p=.004). Paired t test analysis of nursing students also showed significant increases in both caring and attitude scores after the project (t=8.56; p=.000; t=6.35; p=.000). The project significantly affected the caring perceived by the residents and the achievements of the junior nursing students. This experimental study provides information of interest to nursing educators, long-term care administrators, and researchers in elderly care. PMID:22551701

  10. Supporting Children's Transition to School Age Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2016-01-01

    While a great deal of research has focused on children's experiences as they start school, less attention has been directed to their experiences--and those of their families and educators--as they start school age care. This paper draws from a recent research project investigating practices that promote positive transitions to school and school…

  11. School Age Child Care Staff Training Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Jane S.; And Others

    A formative and summative evaluation was made of eight school-age child care (SACC) training workshops conducted in 1989-90 for 190 participants in upstate New York. (The focus of the SACC workshops was to "train the trainers," as well as to provide trainees with quality materials and instruction for future training with their staff members.) All…

  12. Pediatric Residents' Perspective on Family-Clinician Discordance in Primary Care: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Connor, Katherine A; Fenick, Ada M

    2016-01-01

    The engagement of families in health maintenance is associated with better child health outcomes, but demographic discordance between families and clinicians may be a barrier to family engagement. Using a longitudinal qualitative study design, we conducted 15 semi-structured interviews with five pediatric residents who elected to facilitate group well child care (GWCC). Four themes describing residents' perceptions of the role of discordance in family-clinician engagement include: 1) discordance was not a barrier; 2) discordance leads to a lack of engagement and trust; 3) residents transcended discordance in GWCC because either GWCC led residents to change their communication techniques or because, with GWCC, parents have concordant adults in the room; and 4) the education residents obtained in GWCC allowed them to empathize with the families' health-related decisions. Finding ways in which pediatric providers can improve skills in family engagement may be an important step in decreasing health inequities. PMID:27524749

  13. Nutritional and functional status indicators in residents of a long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Grieger, Jessica A; Nowson, Caryl A; Ackland, Leigh M

    2009-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, we determined whether results from the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and Katz Activities of Daily Living (ADL), were associated with nutritional status and mobility in long-term care residents. One hundred and fifteen study participants (mean [SD] age: 80.2 [10.6]) provided informed consent. Fifty eight percent (n = 66) responded to all three questionnaires: 12 were assessed as malnourished (MNA < 17) and 28 were depressed (GDS >or = 6). Higher levels of depression were associated with lower serum zinc (n = 71, r = -.356, p = .001) and associated with a slower Timed Up and Go test (TUG, n = 38, r = .301, p = .030). MNA was also associated with serum zinc (n = 44, r = .307, P = .021). Non responders to questionnaires (n = 36) had a lower BMI (mean difference: -2.5 +/- 1.0 kg/m(2), p = .013) and serum 25(OH)D (-8.7 +/- 3.8 nmol/l, p = .023) vs. responders. The GDS, in addition to the MNA, is useful in identifying poor nutritional status in residential care. Intervention programs that target depression and poor nutritional status could potentially improve overall quality of life, but it is not clear if depression is leading to poor nutritional status or if poor nutrition is leading to depression. PMID:19234994

  14. Teaching disease management care: a senior resident seminar and team project model.

    PubMed

    Frey, Keith; Edwards, Fredrick; Gorman, R Scott

    2002-04-01

    To address the six general competencies outlined by the Accreditation Councilfor Graduate Medical Education, family practice residency programs will need to enhance their future curriculum. This paper describes one approach to teaching three of these core competencies (practice-based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communication skills, and systems-based practice), while enhancing the quality of patient care within the model family practice center Resident involvement in and feedback on this pilot curriculum was positive, and the residents were confident in the skills they developed. PMID:12017135

  15. Nursing Home Stakeholder Views of Resident Involvement in Medical Care Decisions.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Theresa J; Harrison, Tracie C; Goodwin, James S

    2016-04-01

    Demand by nursing home residents for involvement in their medical care, or, patient-centered care, is expected to increase as baby boomers begin seeking long-term care for their chronic illnesses. To explore the needs in meeting this proposed demand, we used a qualitative descriptive method with content analysis to obtain the joint perspective of key stakeholders on the current state of person-centered medical care in the nursing home. We interviewed 31 nursing home stakeholders: 5 residents, 7 family members, 8 advanced practice registered nurses, 5 physicians, and 6 administrators. Our findings revealed constraints placed by the long-term care system limited medical involvement opportunities and created conflicting goals for patient-centered medical care. Resident participation in medical care was perceived as low, but important. The creation of supportive educational programs for all stakeholders to facilitate a common goal for nursing home admission and to provide assistance through the long-term care system was encouraged. PMID:25721717

  16. Age and Sex Variation In Prevalence Of Chronic Medical Conditions In Older Residents of U.S. Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kelly L.; Boscardin, W. John; Steinman, Michael A.; Schwartz, Janice B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To investigate patterns in prevalences of chronic medical conditions over the agespan of long-term stay nursing home residents and between the sexes with data from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS). DESIGN Retrospective, cross-sectional study. SETTING U.S. nursing homes. PARTICIPANTS Nationally representative sample comprising 11,788 long-term stay residents (3003 (25%) men and 8785 women) aged 65 years or older. MEASUREMENTS Clinical Classifications Software (CCS) was used to group ICD-9 codes to identify the 20 most prevalent chronic medical conditions. SAS survey procedures were used to account for design effects of stratification and clustering to generate nationally representative estimates of prevalences of medical conditions. RESULTS Average age was 84 y, with women older than men (85 vs. 81, p=0.02) with 67% of women ages 80–95. Women required more ADL assistance. The most frequent chronic medical conditions were hypertension (53, 56%: men, women), dementia (45, 52%), depression (31, 37%), arthritis (26, 35%), diabetes mellitus (26, 23%), gastrointestinal reflux -GERD (23, 23%), atherosclerosis (24, 20%), congestive heart failure -CHF (18, 21%), cerebrovascular disease (24, 19%) and anemia (17, 20%). Sex differences in prevalences existed for all but constipation, GERD, and hypertension. Diabetes, cerebrovascular disease, and lipid disorders decreased with age in men and women. Atrial fibrillation, anemia, arthritis, CHF, and dementia, and thyroid disease increased with age in both men and women. Age-related patterns differed between the sexes for diabetes, hypertension, and Parkinson’s disease. CONCLUSION The profile of chronic medical conditions varies over the agespan of nursing home residents and differs between men and women. This knowledge should guide educational and care efforts in long-term care. PMID:22463062

  17. Training Gaps for Pediatric Residents Planning a Career in Primary Care: A Qualitative and Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Adam A; Kamin, Carol; Glicken, Anita Duhl; Jones, M. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Background Resident training in pediatrics currently entails similar training for all residents in a fragmented curriculum with relatively little attention to the career plans of individual residents. Objectives To explore strengths and gaps in training for residents planning a career in primary care pediatrics and to present strategies for addressing the gaps. Methods Surveys were sent to all graduates of the University of Colorado Denver Pediatric Residency Program (2003–2006) 3 years after completion of training. Respondents were asked to evaluate aspects of their training, using a 5-point Likert scale and evaluating each item ranging from “not at all well prepared” to “extremely well prepared” for their future career. In addition, focus groups were conducted with practitioners in 8 pediatric practices in Colorado. Sessions were transcribed and hand coded by 2 independent coders. Results Survey data identified training in behavior and development (mean score, 3.72), quality improvement and patient safety strategies (mean, 3.57), and practice management (mean, 2.46) as the weakest aspects of training. Focus groups identified deficiencies in training in mental health, practice management, behavioral medicine, and orthopedics. Deficiencies noted in curriculum structure were lack of residents' long-term continuity of relationships with patients; the need for additional training in knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for primary care (perhaps even a fourth year of training); and a training structure that facilitates greater resident autonomy to foster development of clinical capability and self-confidence. Conclusions Important gaps were identified in the primary care training of pediatric residents. These data support the need to develop more career-focused training. PMID:22942954

  18. Older Residents' Perspectives of Long-Term Care Facilities in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Junqiao; Cao, Yuling; Jia, Shoumei; Wu, Bei

    2016-08-01

    China's formal long-term care (LTC) system is in its developmental stage due to lack of standardized health assessments for resident admission, limited government funding, an acute shortage of qualified staff at all levels, and regional disparities in quality of care. Relocation to LTC facilities changes the lives of older adults because they have to leave behind their homes and previous social networks. The current study aimed to provide an in-depth exploration of 25 older adult residents' lives in four LTC facilities in China. A conventional content analysis approach was used to interpret participant interviews. Residents experienced losses and gains from residential life. Three themes emerged: (a) influences of cultural beliefs, (b) basic care needs fulfilled in LTC facilities, and (c) lack of quality care in LTC facilities. Findings show that residents' basic needs were met in Chinese LTC facilities, but there is room for improvement in delivering quality care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(8), 34-43.]. PMID:27319405

  19. Sexual incidents in an extended care unit for aged men.

    PubMed

    Szasz, G

    1983-07-01

    A survey was conducted among the nursing staff of a 400-bed extended-care unit for aged men by questionnaire to find out what patient behaviors were identified as sexual by the staff and how they reacted to these behaviors. Three types of behavior were identified as sexual and as "causing problems": sex talk (e.g., using foul language); sexual acts (e.g., touching or grabbing, exposing genitalia); and implied sexual behavior (e.g., openly reading pornographic magazines). As many as 25 per cent of the residents were thought to create such incidents. Acceptable sexual behavior identified by the staff were limited to hugging and kissing on the cheek, although their answers implied that residents could need more intimate touching and affection. The survey raised questions about the nature and causes of different types of sexual behavior in the institutionalized elderly and about the roles nursing staff, physicians, and administrators can play in recognizing individual needs while safeguarding both the residents and the staff from the consequences of unacceptable incidents. PMID:6863791

  20. Patient safety, resident well-being and continuity of care with different resident duty schedules in the intensive care unit: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Parshuram, Christopher S.; Amaral, Andre C.K.B.; Ferguson, Niall D.; Baker, G. Ross; Etchells, Edward E.; Flintoft, Virginia; Granton, John; Lingard, Lorelei; Kirpalani, Haresh; Mehta, Sangeeta; Moldofsky, Harvey; Scales, Damon C.; Stewart, Thomas E.; Willan, Andrew R.; Friedrich, Jan O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shorter resident duty periods are increasingly mandated to improve patient safety and physician well-being. However, increases in continuity-related errors may counteract the purported benefits of reducing fatigue. We evaluated the effects of 3 resident schedules in the intensive care unit (ICU) on patient safety, resident well-being and continuity of care. Methods: Residents in 2 university-affiliated ICUs were randomly assigned (in 2-month rotation-blocks from January to June 2009) to in-house overnight schedules of 24, 16 or 12 hours. The primary patient outcome was adverse events. The primary resident outcome was sleepiness, measured by the 7-point Stanford Sleepiness Scale. Secondary outcomes were patient deaths, preventable adverse events, and residents’ physical symptoms and burnout. Continuity of care and perceptions of ICU staff were also assessed. Results: We evaluated 47 (96%) of 49 residents, all 971 admissions, 5894 patient-days and 452 staff surveys. We found no effect of schedule (24-, 16- or 12-h shifts) on adverse events (81.3, 76.3 and 78.2 events per 1000 patient-days, respectively; p = 0.7) or on residents’ sleepiness in the daytime (mean rating 2.33, 2.61 and 2.30, respectively; p = 0.3) or at night (mean rating 3.06, 2.73 and 2.42, respectively; p = 0.2). Seven of 8 preventable adverse events occurred with the 12-hour schedule (p = 0.1). Mortality rates were similar for the 3 schedules. Residents’ somatic symptoms were more severe and more frequent with the 24-hour schedule (p = 0.04); however, burnout was similar across the groups. ICU staff rated residents’ knowledge and decision-making worst with the 16-hour schedule. Interpretation: Our findings do not support the purported advantages of shorter duty schedules. They also highlight the trade-offs between residents’ symptoms and multiple secondary measures of patient safety. Further delineation of this emerging signal is required before widespread system change. Trial

  1. Sustained increase in resident meal time hand hygiene through an interdisciplinary intervention engaging long-term care facility residents and staff.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Marguerite; Harris, Tony; Horn, Terancita; Midamba, Blondelle; Primes, Vickie; Sullivan, Nancy; Shuler, Rosalyn; Zabarsky, Trina F; Deshpande, Abhishek; Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2015-02-01

    Hand hygiene by patients may prevent acquisition and dissemination of health care-associated pathogens, but limited efforts have been made to engage patients in hand hygiene interventions. In a long-term care facility, we found that residents were aware of the importance of hand hygiene, but barriers, such as inaccessible products or difficult to use products, limited compliance. A dramatic and sustained improvement in meal time hand hygiene was achieved through engagement of staff and residents. PMID:25637117

  2. What is Family-Centered Care for Nursing Home Residents With Advanced Dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ruth Palan; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Givens, Jane L.

    2014-01-01

    To understand family members’ perspectives on person- and family-centered end-of-life care provided to nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia, we conducted a qualitative follow-up interview with 16 respondents who had participated in an earlier prospective study, Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advance Dementia at End of Life (CASCADE). Family members of NH residents (N = 16) with advanced dementia participated in semistructured qualitative interviews that inquired about overall NH experience, communication, surrogate decision making, emotional reaction, and recommendations for improvement. Analysis identified 5 areas considered important by family members: (1) providing basic care; (2) ensuring safety and security; (3) creating a sense of belonging and attachment; (4) fostering self-esteem and self-efficacy; and (5) coming to terms with the experience. These themes can provide a framework for creating and testing strategies to meet the goal of person- and family-centered care. PMID:24085250

  3. Uninsurance, Underinsurance, and Health Care Utilization in Mexico by US Border Residents

    PubMed Central

    Su, Dejun; Pratt, William; Stimpson, Jim P.; Wong, Rebeca; Pagán, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the 2008 Cross-Border Utilization of Health Care Survey, we examined the relationship between United States (US) health insurance coverage plans and the use of health care services in Mexico by US residents of the US-Mexico border region. We found immigrants were far more likely to be uninsured than their native-born counterparts (63 versus 27.8 percent). Adults without health insurance coverage were more likely to purchase medications or visit physicians in Mexico compared to insured adults. However, adults with Medicaid coverage were more likely to visit dentists in Mexico compared to uninsured adults. Improving health care access for US residents in the southwestern border region of the country will require initiatives that target not only providing coverage to the large uninsured population but also improving access to health care services for the large underinsured population. PMID:23624848

  4. Family Day Care and the School-Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Michelle Seligson

    This paper provides portions of a workshop discussion at the Wheelock Conference on School-Age Child Care concerning the role of family day care for school-age children. The workshop participants included family day care providers affiliated with the day care system in the Greater Boston area, administrators of a family day care system which also…

  5. The patient handoff: a comprehensive curricular blueprint for resident education to improve continuity of care.

    PubMed

    Wohlauer, Max V; Arora, Vineet M; Horwitz, Leora I; Bass, Ellen J; Mahar, Sean E; Philibert, Ingrid

    2012-04-01

    In 2010, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education released its resident duty hours restrictions, requiring that faculty monitor their residents' patient handoffs to ensure that residents are competent in handoff communications. Although studies have reported the need to improve the effectiveness of the handoff and a variety of curricula have been suggested and implemented, a common method for teaching and evaluating handoff skills has not been developed. Also in 2010, engineers, informaticians, and physicians interested in patient handoffs attended a symposium in Savannah, Georgia, hosted by the Association for Computing Machinery, entitled Handovers and Handoffs: Collaborating in Turns. As a result of this symposium, a workgroup formed to develop practical and readily implementable educational materials for medical educators involved in teaching patient handoffs to residents. In this article, the result of that yearlong collaboration, the authors aim to provide clarity on the definition of the patient handoff, to review the barriers to performing effective handoffs in academic health centers, to identify available solutions to improve handoffs, and to provide a structured approach to educating residents on handoffs via a curricular blueprint. The authors' blueprint was developed to guide educators in customizing handoff education programs to fit their specific, local needs. Hopefully, it also will provide a starting point for future research into improving the patient handoff. Increasingly complex patient care environments require both innovations in handoff education and improvements in patient care systems to improve continuity of care. PMID:22361791

  6. Predictors of regular exercise among older residents of long-term care institutions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Min; Li, Yueh-Ping; Yen, Min-Ling

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply self-efficacy theory to explore predictors of regular exercise among older residents of long-term care institutions. Convenience sampling was used to collect data from 151 older adults residing in three residential care homes in Taiwan. Data collection instruments included a background data sheet, Self Efficacy for Exercise Scale, Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scale and self-reported regular exercise. Results indicated that older residents who exercised regularly had fewer chronic diseases, better perceived health status and functional status, and higher self-efficacy expectations and outcome expectations related to exercise. Older residents with a regular exercise habit prior to institutionalization were more likely to engage in regular exercise. Logistic regression analysis indicated past exercise participation and self-efficacy expectations to be significant positive predictors of regular exercise. To promote regular exercise within this population, these can be potential target areas for interventions. These factors should be targeted in the development and implementation of interventions to promote regular exercise among older residents of long-term care institutions. PMID:25964013

  7. Transmission of MRSA to Healthcare Personnel Gowns and Gloves during Care of Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Roghmann, Mary-Claire; Johnson, J. Kristie; Sorkin, John D.; Langenberg, Patricia; Lydecker, Alison; Sorace, Brian; Levy, Lauren; Mody, Lona

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the frequency of MRSA transmission to gowns and gloves worn by healthcare personnel (HCP) interacting with nursing home residents in order to inform infection prevention policies in this setting Design Observational study Setting and Participants Residents and HCP from 13 community-based nursing homes in Maryland and Michigan Methods Residents were cultured for MRSA at the anterior nares and perianal or perineal skin. HCP wore gowns and gloves during usual care activities. At the end of each activity, a research coordinator swabbed the HCP’s gown and gloves. Results 403 residents were enrolled; 113 were MRSA colonized. Glove contamination was higher than gown contamination (24% vs. 14% of 954 interactions, p<0.01). Transmission varied greatly by type of care from 0% to 24% for gowns and 8% to 37% for gloves. We identified high risk activities (OR >1.0, p< 0.05) including: dressing, transferring, providing hygiene, changing linens and toileting the resident. We identified low risk activities (OR <1.0, p< 0.05) including: giving medications and performing glucose monitoring. Residents with chronic skin breakdown had significantly higher rates of gown and glove contamination. Conclusions MRSA transmission from MRSA positive residents to HCP gown and gloves is substantial with high contact activities of daily living conferring the highest risk. These activities do not involve overt contact with body fluids, skin breakdown or mucous membranes suggesting the need to modify current standards of care involving the use of gowns and gloves in this setting. PMID:26008727

  8. Montessori-based activities for long-term care residents with advanced dementia: effects on engagement and affect.

    PubMed

    Orsulic-Jeras, S; Judge, K S; Camp, C J

    2000-02-01

    Sixteen residents in long-term care with advanced dementia (14 women; average age = 88) showed significantly more constructive engagement (defined as motor or verbal behaviors in response to an activity), less passive engagement (defined as passively observing an activity), and more pleasure while participating in Montessori-based programming than in regularly scheduled activities programming. Principles of Montessori-based programming, along with examples of such programming, are presented. Implications of the study and methods for expanding the use of Montessori-based dementia programming are discussed. PMID:10750318

  9. Creating Better School-Age Care Jobs: Model Work Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Peggy

    Built on the premise that good school-age care jobs are the cornerstone of high-quality services for school-age youth and their families, this guide presents model work standards for school-age care providers. The guide begins with a description of the strengths and challenges of the school-age care profession. The model work standards are…

  10. Patient Safety Culture and the Association with Safe Resident Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kali S.; Hyer, Kathryn; Castle, Nicholas G.; Branch, Laurence G.; Andel, Ross; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Studies have shown that patient safety culture (PSC) is poorly developed in nursing homes (NHs), and, therefore, residents of NHs may be at risk of harm. Using Donabedian's Structure-Process-Outcome (SPO) model, we examined the relationships among top management's ratings of NH PSC, a process of care, and safety outcomes.…

  11. Effect of Resident and Direct-Care Staff Training on Responding during Social Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embregts, Petri J. C. M.

    2002-01-01

    A multi-faceted training package for inappropriate social behavior was evaluated with five children with mild mental retardation and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in a residential program. Residents were individually trained in self-management skills with video feedback. Direct-care staff also received training. Although staff increased…

  12. Mixed Methods Research of Adult Family Care Home Residents and Informal Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanty, Guy C.; Hibel, James

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a mixed methods approach used to explore the experiences of adult family care home (AFCH) residents and informal caregivers (IC). A rationale is presented for using a mixed methods approach employing the sequential exploratory design with this poorly researched population. The unique challenges attendant to the sampling…

  13. First-Year Residents' Caring, Medical Knowledge, and Clinical Judgment in Relation to Laboratory Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 36 first-year Northwestern University (Illinois) medical residents found that students' medical knowledge was a predictor of increased laboratory test use, that clinical judgment was a predictor of decreased laboratory use, and that level of caring was statistically unrelated to amount of laboratory use. (Author/MSE)

  14. Attitudes about Cancer Medicine among Primary Care Residents and Their Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Richard R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A cancer attitude survey is analyzed that was administered to residents and faculty physicians in the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Human Oncology at the University of Wisconsin. Categories surveyed include opinions about the benefits of prevention, risk management, early detection and screening, treatment and care, and…

  15. Factors Affecting Long-Term-Care Residents' Decision-Making Processes as They Formulate Advance Directives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Heather C.; McColl, Mary Ann; Gilbert, Julie; Wong, Jiahui; Murray, Gale; Shortt, Samuel E. D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe factors contributing to the decision-making processes of elderly persons as they formulate advance directives in long-term care. Design and Methods: This study was qualitative, based on grounded theory. Recruitment was purposive and continued until saturation was reached. Nine residents of a…

  16. Using Simulation Technology to Teach Diabetes Care Management Skills to Resident Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Sperl-Hillen, John; O’Connor, Patrick; Ekstrom, Heidi; Rush, William; Asche, Stephen; Fernandes, Omar; Appana, Deepika; Amundson, Gerald; Johnson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulation is widely used to teach medical procedures. Our goal was to develop and implement an innovative virtual model to teach resident physicians the cognitive skills of type 1 and type 2 diabetes management. Methods A diabetes educational activity was developed consisting of (a) a curriculum using 18 explicit virtual cases, (b) a web-based interactive interface, (c) a simulation model to calculate physiologic outcomes of resident actions, and (d) a library of programmed feedback to critique and guide resident actions between virtual encounters. Primary care residents in 10 U.S. residency programs received the educational activity. Satisfaction and changes in knowledge and confidence in managing diabetes were analyzed with mixed quantitative and qualitative methods. Results Pre- and post-education surveys were completed by 92/142 (65%) of residents. Likert scale (five-point) responses were favorably higher than neutral for general satisfaction (94%), recommending to colleagues (91%), training adequacy (91%), and navigation ease (92%). Finding time to complete cases was difficult for 50% of residents. Mean ratings of knowledge (on a five-point scale) posteducational activity improved by +0.5 (p < .01) for use of all available drug classes, +0.9 (p < .01) for how to start and adjust insulin, +0.8 (p < .01) for interpreting blood glucose values, +0.8 (p < .01) for individualizing treatment goals, and +0.7 (p < .01) for confidence in managing diabetes patients. Conclusions A virtual diabetes educational activity to teach cognitive skills to manage diabetes to primary care residents was successfully developed, implemented, and well liked. It significantly improved self-assessed knowledge and confidence in diabetes management. PMID:24124951

  17. Reporting and Charting Residents' Behaviors and Care in an Adult Residential Care Home. Adult Residential Care Home 12, Lesson Plan No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basuel, Terry

    Designed as part of a 40-hour course on adult residential care homes (ARCH's), this lesson plan was developed to explain the importance of and correct procedures for charting (i.e., keeping a written record of observations and care of ARCH residents). The objectives of the 50-minute lesson are to enable students to: (1) list reasons why the…

  18. A protocol for an exploratory phase I mixed-methods study of enhanced integrated care for care home residents with advanced dementia: the Compassion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Margaret; Harrington, Jane; Moore, Kirsten; Davis, Sarah; Kupeli, Nuriye; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Gola, Anna; Candy, Bridget; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Jones, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the UK approximately 700 000 people are living with, and a third of people aged over 65 will die with, dementia. People with dementia may receive poor quality care towards the end of life. We applied a realist approach and used mixed methods to develop a complex intervention to improve care for people with advanced dementia and their family carers. Consensus on intervention content was achieved using the RAND UCLA appropriateness method and mapped to sociological theories of process and impact. Core components are: (1) facilitation of integrated care, (2) education, training and support, (3) investment from commissioners and care providers. We present the protocol for an exploratory phase I study to implement components 1 and 2 in order to understand how the intervention operates in practice and to assess feasibility and acceptability. Methods and analysis An ‘Interdisciplinary Care Leader (ICL)’ will work within two care homes, alongside staff and associated professionals to facilitate service integration, encourage structured needs assessment, develop the use of personal and advance care plans and support staff training. We will use qualitative and quantitative methods to collect data for a range of outcome and process measures to detect effects on individual residents, family carers, care home staff, the intervention team, the interdisciplinary team and wider systems. Analysis will include descriptive statistics summarising process and care home level data, individual demographic and clinical characteristics and data on symptom burden, clinical events and quality of care. Qualitative data will be explored using thematic analysis. Findings will inform a future phase II trial. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was granted (REC reference 14/LO/0370). We shall publish findings at conferences, in peer-reviewed journals, on the Marie Curie Cancer Care website and prepare reports for dissemination by organisations involved with end

  19. Assisted living facility administrator and direct care staff views of resident mental health concerns and staff training needs.

    PubMed

    Dakin, Emily; Quijano, Louise M; McAlister, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    This community needs assessment surveyed 21 administrators and 75 direct care staff at 9 larger and 12 smaller assisted living facilities (ALFs) regarding perceptions of resident mental health concerns, direct care staff capacity to work with residents with mental illness, and direct care staff training needs. Group differences in these perceptions were also examined. Both administrators and directcare staff indicated that direct care staff would benefit from mental health-related training, and direct care staff perceived themselves as being more comfortable working with residents with mental illness than administrators perceived them to be. Implications for gerontological social work are discussed. PMID:21170779

  20. Prevalence and impact of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities, 2011: A nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Joyce, Nina; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M; Zervou, Fainareti N; Besdine, Richard W; Mor, Vincent; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but the epidemiology of CDI in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is unknown.We performed a retrospective cohort study and used US 2011 LTCF resident data from the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims. We extracted CDI cases based on International Classification of Diseases-9 coding, and compared residents with the diagnosis of CDI to those who did not have a CDI diagnosis during their LTCF stay. We estimated CDI prevalence rates and calculated 3-month mortality rates.The study population consisted of 2,190,613 admissions (median age 82 years; interquartile range 76-88; female to male ratio 2:1; >80% whites), 45,500 of whom had a CDI diagnosis. The nationwide CDI prevalence rate was 1.85 per 100 LTCF admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83-1.87). The CDI rate was lower in the South (1.54%; 95% CI 1.51-1.57) and higher in the Northeast (2.29%; 95% CI 2.25-2.33). Older age, white race, presence of a feeding tube, unhealed pressure ulcers, end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, bowel incontinence, prior tracheostomy, chemotherapy, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently related to "high risk" for CDI. Residents with a CDI diagnosis were more likely to be admitted to an acute care hospital (40% vs 31%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be discharged to the community (46% vs 54%, P < 0.001) than those not reported with CDI during stay. Importantly, CDI was associated with higher mortality (24.7% vs 18.1%, P = 0.001).CDI is common among the elderly residents of LTCFs and is associated with significant increase in 3-month mortality. The prevalence is higher in the Northeast and risk stratification can be used in CDI prevention policies. PMID:27495022

  1. Do gerontology nurse specialists make a difference in hospitalization of long-term care residents? Results of a randomized comparison trial.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Michal; Armstrong, Delwyn; Parker, Janet; Pilcher, Carole; Zhou, Lifeng; McKenzie-Green, Barbara; Connolly, Martin J

    2014-10-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities have highly complex care needs and quality of care is of international concern. Maintaining resident wellness through proactive assessment and early intervention is key to decreasing the need for acute hospitalization. The Residential Aged Care Integration Program (RACIP) is a quality improvement intervention to support residential aged care staff and includes on-site support, education, clinical coaching, and care coordination provided by gerontology nurse specialists (GNSs) employed by a large district health board. The effect of the outreach program was evaluated through a randomized comparison of hospitalization 1 year before and after program implementation. The sample included 29 intervention facilities (1,425 residents) and 25 comparison facilities (1,128 residents) receiving usual care. Acute hospitalization rate unexpectedly increased for both groups after program implementation, although the rate of increase was significantly less for the intervention facilities. The hospitalization rate after the intervention increased 59% for the comparison group and 16% for the intervention group (rate ratio (RR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.61-0.86, P < .001). Subgroup analysis showed a significantly lower rate change for those admitted for medical reasons for the intervention group (13% increase) than the comparison group (69% increase) (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.56-0.82, P < .001). Conversely, there was no significant difference in the RR for surgical admissions between the intervention and comparison groups (RR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.68-1.46, P = .99). The integration of GNS expertise through the RACIP intervention may be one approach to support staff to provide optimal care and potentially improve resident health. PMID:25283552

  2. Resident-to-Resident Aggression in Long-Term Care Facilities: Insights from Focus Groups of Nursing Home Residents and Staff

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Tony; Lachs, Mark S.; Bharucha, Ashok J.; Stevens, Scott M.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Nebres, Flor; Pillemer, Karl

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To more fully characterize the spectrum of RRA. DESIGN A focus group study of nursing home staff members and residents who could reliably self-report. SETTING A large urban, not-for-profit long-term care facility in New York City PARTICIPANTS 7 residents and 96 staff members from multiple clinical and non-clinical occupational groups. MEASUREMENTS 16 focus groups were conducted. Content was analyzed with nVivo 7 software for qualitative data. RESULTS 35 different types of physical, verbal and sexual RRA were described, with screaming and/or yelling being the most common. Calling out and making noise were the most frequent of 29 antecedents identified as instigating episodes of RRA. RRA was most frequent in dining and residents’ rooms, and in the afternoon, though it occurred regularly throughout the facility at all times. While no proven strategies exist to manage RRA, staff described 25 self-initiated techniques to address the issue. CONCLUSION RRA is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nursing home settings with important consequences for affected individuals and facilities. Further epidemiologic research is necessary to more fully describe the phenomenon and identify risk factors and preventative strategies. PMID:18637979

  3. Service and its association with matching into a primary care residency

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, Ansab; Schaad, Douglas C; Arnold, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives There is a shortfall in the primary care workforce, and an effort is needed in learning more about what motivates students to work as generalists. There is enthusiasm about service as a potential motivator. The objective is to determine whether there is an association between high participation in service and selection of a primary care residency. Methods This is a retrospective cohort analysis. The service award was used to delineate two groups, recipients and non-recipients, with the recipients considered high service participators. This was associated with residency match data using test of proportions to examine relationships between service and selection of a primary care residency and other secondary factors. Results Of award recipients, 57.3% matched in primary care, compared to 52.8%, though this did not reach statistical significance. Service was linked with induction into Alpha Omega Alpha honor society (23.3% versus 14.6%) and induction into the Gold Humanism Honor Society (22.6%. versus 10.4%), with statistical significance. Conclusion This was an unsuccessful attempt to find a link between service and a primary care career choice, though there is a trend in the direction. The association with induction into the humanism honor society suggests that service is linked with development and/or retention of positively viewed qualities in medical students. PMID:25792861

  4. The social organization of a sedentary life for residents in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Kathleen; Rankin, Janet; Edwards, Nancy; Ploeg, Jenny; Legault, Frances

    2016-06-01

    Worldwide, the literature reports that many residents in long-term care (LTC) homes are sedentary. In Canada, personal support workers (PSWs) provide most of the direct care in LTC homes and could play a key role in promoting activity for residents. The purpose of this institutional ethnographic study was to uncover the social organization of LTC work and to discover how this organization influenced the physical activity of residents. Data were collected in two LTC homes in Ontario, Canada through participant observations with PSWs and interviews with people within and external to the homes. Findings explicate the links between meals, lifts and transfers, and the LTC standards to reveal that physical activity is considered an add-on program in the purview of physiotherapists. Some of the LTC standards which are intended to product good outcomes for residents actually disrupt the work of PSWs making it difficult for them to respond to the physical activity needs of residents. This descriptive ethnographic account is an important first step in trying to find a solution to optimize real activities of daily living into life in LTC. PMID:26314937

  5. Teaching clinical decision-making to pediatric residents in an era of managed care.

    PubMed

    Chessare, J B

    1998-04-01

    The growth of managed care has brought a new focus on physician competency in the appropriate use of resources to help patients. The community of pediatric educators must improve residency curricula and teaching methodologies to ensure that graduates of their programs can effectively and efficiently meet the needs of children and their families. The educational approach in many pediatric residency programs is an implicit apprenticeship model, with which the residents follow the actions of attending physicians with little attention to scrutiny of the clinical evidence for and against diagnostic and treatment strategies. Evidence-based medicine stresses to the trainee the importance of the evaluation of evidence from clinical research and cautions against the use of intuition, unsystematic clinical experience, and untested pathophysiologic reasoning as sufficient for medical decision-making. Managed care also has helped to create a heightened awareness of the need to educate residents to incorporate the preferences of patients and families into diagnostic and treatment decisions. Trainees must know how to balance their duty to maximize the health of populations at the lowest resource use with their duty to each individual patient and family. Changes in the residency curriculum will bring change in educational settings and the structure of rotations. Potential barriers to implementation will include the need for faculty development and financial resources for information technology. PMID:9544180

  6. An occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke related disabilities in UK care homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sackley, Catherine M; Walker, Marion F; Burton, Christopher R; Watkins, Caroline L; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Wilde, Kate; Irvine, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of an established programme of occupational therapy in maintaining functional activity and reducing further health risks from inactivity in care home residents living with stroke sequelae. Design Pragmatic, parallel group, cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 228 care homes (>10 beds each), both with and without the provision of nursing care, local to 11 trial administrative centres across the United Kingdom. Participants 1042 care home residents with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack, including those with language and cognitive impairments, not receiving end of life care. 114 homes (n=568 residents, 64% from homes providing nursing care) were allocated to the intervention arm and 114 homes (n=474 residents, 65% from homes providing nursing care) to standard care (control arm). Participating care homes were randomised between May 2010 and March 2012. Intervention Targeted three month programme of occupational therapy, delivered by qualified occupational therapists and assistants, involving patient centred goal setting, education of care home staff, and adaptations to the environment. Main outcome measures Primary outcome at the participant level: scores on the Barthel index of activities of daily living at three months post-randomisation. Secondary outcome measures at the participant level: Barthel index scores at six and 12 months post-randomisation, and scores on the Rivermead mobility index, geriatric depression scale-15, and EuroQol EQ-5D-3L questionnaire, at all time points. Results 64% of the participants were women and 93% were white, with a mean age of 82.9 years. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups for all measures, personal characteristics, and diagnostic tests. Overall, 2538 occupational therapy visits were made to 498 participants in the intervention arm (mean 5.1 visits per participant). No adverse events attributable to the intervention were recorded. 162 (11%) died

  7. The Patient Handoff: A Comprehensive Curricular Blueprint for Resident Education to Improve Continuity of Care

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, Max V.; Arora, Vineet M.; Horwitz, Leora I.; Bass, Ellen J.; Mahar, Sean E.; Philibert, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education released its resident duty hours restrictions, requiring that faculty monitor their residents’ patient handoffs to ensure that residents are competent in handoff communications. Although studies have reported the need to improve the effectiveness of the handoff and a variety of curricula have been suggested and implemented, a common method for teaching and evaluating handoff skills has not been developed. Also in 2010, engineers, informaticians, and physicians interested in patient handoffs attended a symposium in Savannah, Georgia, hosted by the Association for Computing Machinery, entitled Handovers and Handoffs: Collaborating in Turns. As a result of this symposium, a workgroup formed to develop practical and readily implementable educational materials for medical educators involved in teaching patient handoffs to residents. In this article, the result of that yearlong collaboration, the authors aim to provide clarity on the definition of the patient handoff, to review the barriers to performing effective handoffs in academic health centers, to identify available solutions to improve handoffs, and to provide a structured approach to educating residents on handoffs via a curricular blueprint. The authors’ blueprint was developed to guide educators in customizing handoff education programs to fit their specific, local needs. Hopefully, it also will provide a starting point for future research into improving the patient handoff. Increasingly complex patient care environments require both innovations in handoff education and improvements in patient care systems to improve continuity of care. PMID:22361791

  8. Approaches to School-Age Child Care. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Coltin, Lillian

    This ERIC Digest provides basic information about school-age day care programs. Discussion focuses briefly on options available to families with school-age children, developmental needs of school-age children, characteristics of high quality school-age programs, supportive services for self-care, and ways of improving school-age child care…

  9. [Quality of care among older adults with diabetes mellitus: comparison between community-dwelling adults attended to by home care services and nursing home residents in Dresden].

    PubMed

    Coll-Planas, Laura; Bergmann, Antje; Schwarz, Peter; Guillén-Grima, Francisco; Schulze, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Due to changes in the age structure of the population the number of frail elderly diabetics is rising. This change is accompanied by an increase in nursing care efforts and requirements in both home care services and nursing homes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of care in the home care and nursing home setting concerning the structure, the process and the outcome quality at the institutional and patient level. This is an observational transversal study. At the institutional level a standardised questionnaire of the German Diabetes Research Institute was sent to all nursing homes (37) and home care services (88) in Dresden. At the patient level 37 homebound patients and 46 residents were recruited. A Geriatric assessment and a clinical examination were performed and a blood sample was analysed. Patients with moderate or severe cognitive impairment were excluded. The prevalence of diabetes in home care services was 27.2% and in nursing homes 36.1%. The participation rate among the institutions was 21.6% (n = 27). In 14% (n = 12) of the diabetic patients the HbA1c was above 8% (poor metabolic control) and in 24% (20) it was between 7% and 8% (regular metabolic control). 56.6% (n = 21) of the homebound elderly diabetics and 46.7% (n = 21) of the nursing home residents with diabetes were hospitalized at least once during the last 12 months. Our study showed a high prevalence of diabetes in both types of institutions in Dresden and a high hospitalisation rate of the elderly diabetics, although 62% of the patients had an optimum metabolic control. These facts indicate that the quality of care of frail elderly diabetics concerning the multimorbidity might be further improved. PMID:18269054

  10. Children--The Effect of Rural Residence on Dental Unmet Need for Children with Special Health Care Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Asheley Cockrell; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Mayer, Michelle L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Unmet need for dental care is the most prevalent unmet health care need among children with special health care needs (CSHCN), even though these children are at a greater risk for dental problems. The combination of rural residence and special health care needs may leave rural CSHCN particularly vulnerable to high levels of unmet…

  11. Quality of advance care planning policy and practice in residential aged care facilities in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Silvester, William; Fullam, Rachael S; Parslow, Ruth A; Lewis, Virginia J; Sjanta, Rebekah; Jackson, Lynne; White, Vanessa; Gilchrist, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess existing advance care planning (ACP) practices in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) in Victoria, Australia before a systematic intervention; to assess RACF staff experience, understanding of and attitudes towards ACP. Design Surveys of participating organisations concerning ACP-related policies and procedures, review of existing ACP-related documentation, and pre-intervention survey of RACF staff covering their role, experiences and attitudes towards ACP-related procedures. Setting 19 selected RACFs in Victoria. Participants 12 aged care organisations (representing 19 RACFs) who provided existing ACP-related documentation for review, 12 RACFs who completed an organisational survey and 45 staff (from 19 RACFs) who completed a pre-intervention survey of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. Results Findings suggested that some ACP-related practices were already occurring in RACFs; however, these activities were inconsistent and variable in quality. Six of the 12 responding RACFs had written policies and procedures for ACP; however, none of the ACP-related documents submitted covered all information required to meet ACP best practice. Surveyed staff had limited experience of ACP, and discrepancies between self reported comfort, and levels of knowledge and confidence to undertake ACP-related activities, indicated a need for training and ongoing organisational support. Conclusions Surveyed organisations â policies and procedures related to ACP were limited and the quality of existing documentation was poor. RACF staff had relatively limited experience in developing advance care plans with facility residents, although attitudes were positive. A systematic approach to the implementation of ACP in residential aged care settings is required to ensure best practice is implemented and sustained. PMID:24644755

  12. Resident and family perceptions of the nurse practitioner role in long term care settings: a qualitative descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Research evidence supports the positive impact on resident outcomes of nurse practitioners (NPs) working in long term care (LTC) homes. There are few studies that report the perceptions of residents and family members about the role of the NP in these settings. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of residents and family members regarding the role of the NP in LTC homes. Methods The study applied a qualitative descriptive approach. In-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 35 residents and family members from four LTC settings that employed a NP. Conventional content analysis was used to identify themes and sub-themes. Results Two major themes were identified: NPs were seen as providing resident and family-centred care and as providing enhanced quality of care. NPs established caring relationships with residents and families, providing both informational and emotional support, as well as facilitating their participation in decision making. Residents and families perceived the NP as improving availability and timeliness of care and helping to prevent unnecessary hospitalization. Conclusions The perceptions of residents and family members of the NP role in LTC are consistent with the concepts of person-centred and relationship-centred care. The relationships NPs develop with residents and families are a central means through which enhanced quality of care occurs. Given the limited use of NPs in LTC settings, there is an opportunity for health care policy and decision makers to address service inadequacies through strategic deployment of NPs in LTC settings. NPs can use their expert knowledge and skill to assist residents and families to make informed choices regarding their health care and maintain a positive care experience. PMID:24074157

  13. Learning opportunities in a residential aged care facility: the role of supported placements for first-year nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lea, Emma; Marlow, Annette; Bramble, Marguerite; Andrews, Sharon; Crisp, Elaine; Eccleston, Claire; Mason, Ron; Robinson, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The residential aged care sector is reportedly a less attractive career choice for nursing students than other sectors. Research shows that students are often fearful of working with residents with dementia when they are inadequately supported on clinical placements by aged care staff. Thirty first-year nursing students attended a 2-week placement in one of two Tasmanian aged care facilities as part of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre Teaching Aged Care Facilities Program, which aims to provide students with a quality aged care placement focusing on dementia palliation. Placement experience and dementia knowledge were evaluated through preplacement and postplacement questionnaires and weekly feedback meetings with mentors and students. Students had more positive attitudes related to aged care and higher dementia knowledge at the end of placement. Students described their interactions with residents with dementia and thought that the placement had increased their capacity to provide quality care to these residents. The findings indicate that residential aged care placements can be productive learning environments for novice nursing students. PMID:24972402

  14. Ageing-Related Experiences of Adults with Learning Disability Resident in Rural Areas: One Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wark, Stuart; Canon-Vanry, Miranda; Ryan, Peta; Hussain, Rafat; Knox, Marie; Edwards, Meaghan; Parmenter, Marie; Parmenter, Trevor; Janicki, Matthew; Leggatt-Cook, Chez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Access to support services in rural areas is known to be problematic both in Australia, and in other countries around the world, but the majority of research on the population of people ageing with learning disability has so far focussed on metropolitan residents. The authors report about select aspects of the lived experience of older…

  15. A University Program to Improve Nursing Care to the Aged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marten, Marie Lucille

    1978-01-01

    Proposes a series of university nursing education programs developed to increase knowledge and skills relevant to nursing care of elderly and chronically ill persons who reside in nursing homes. Briefly describes five programs intended for persons engaged in long-term care or in preparation for such roles. (EM)

  16. Measuring the Caregiver Burden of Caring for Community-Residing People with Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongmei; Wang, Xiaocheng; He, Runlian; Liang, Ruifeng; Zhou, Liye

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the direct and indirect effects of patient or caregiver factors on caregiver burden of caring for community-residing people with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with AD from two hospitals and three communities in Taiyuan, China and their caregivers. For this survey, 200 patients with mild AD and their caregivers were selected. Caregivers were asked to provide sociodemographic information including age, gender, relationship with the patient, level of education, and number of contact hours per week with the patient. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Caregivers Burden Inventory. The caregivers also completed other measures including the Positive Aspects of Caregiving, the Family Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve, and the Social Support Rating Scale. The patients with AD completed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; their caregivers completed the Activities of Daily Living Scale and a questionnaire about the patients’ Behavioral and Psychological symptoms of Dementia. The main outcome in this study was caregiver burden. The care receivers’ level of cognitive function, physical function, and behavioral problems were treated as original stress; the primary appraisal variable was measured as the number of hours of caregiving in the previous week reported by the caregiver. Mediator variables included perceived social support, family function, and caregiving experience. Path analysis was used to build the interrelationship among caregiver burden and patient or caregiver factors. Results A lower level of cognitive function in patients (r = −0.28, p<0.001) and longer hours of caregiving (r = 0.17, p = 0.019) were related to increased caregiver burden. Greater social support (r = −0.23, p<0.001), family function (r = −0.17, p = 0.015) and caregiving experience (r = −0.16, p = 0.012) were related to decreased caregiver burden. Social support (r = 0

  17. House Staff Quality Council: One Institution's Experience to Integrate Resident Involvement in Patient Care Improvement Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Jennifer L.; Papaconstantinou, Harry T.; Erwin, John P.; McAllister, Russell Keith; Berry, Tiffany; Wehbe-Janek, Hania

    2013-01-01

    Background Residents and fellows perform a large portion of the hands-on patient care in tertiary referral centers. As frontline providers, they are well suited to identify quality and patient safety issues. As payment reform shifts hospitals to a fee-for-value–type system with reimbursement contingent on quality outcomes, preventive health, and patient satisfaction, house staff must be intimately involved in identifying and solving care delivery problems related to quality, outcomes, and patient safety. Many challenges exist in integrating house staff into the quality improvement infrastructure; these challenges may ideally be managed by the development of a house staff quality council (HSQC). Methods Residents and fellows at Scott & White Memorial Hospital interested in participating in a quality council submitted an application, curriculum vitae, and letter of support from their program director. Twelve residents and fellows were selected based on their prior quality improvement experience and/or their interest in quality and safety initiatives. Results In only 1 year, our HSQC, an Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers National Initiative III project, initiated 3 quality projects and began development of a fourth project. Conclusion Academic medical centers should consider establishing HSQCs to align institutional quality goals with residency training and medical education. PMID:24052771

  18. The paradox of the Aged Care Act 1997: the marginalisation of nursing discourse.

    PubMed

    Angus, Jocelyn; Nay, Rhonda

    2003-06-01

    This paper examines the marginalisation of nursing discourse, which followed the enactment of the Aged Care Act 1997. This neo-reform period in aged care, dominated by theories of economic rationalism, enshrined legislation based upon market principles and by implication, the provision of care at the cheapest possible price. This paper exposes some of the gaps in the neo-reform period and challenges the assertion that the amalgamation of nursing homes and hostels in such an environment can provide better quality of care and life for residents. It argues that this amalgamation entails a transformation towards a social model of care and fails to address the professional healthcare needs of the acutely sick and complex extreme old person and makes evident new gaps in the provision of aged care services. The paper proceeds to present strategies where the future for nursing practice in aged care necessarily involves a judicious balancing of individual cases alongside economic prescriptions of care and ever-changing public policy initiatives. It concludes that this can be achieved through a more interactive public, professional and advocacy discourse. The methodology involves extensive analysis of public documents including media, academic journals, government reports and interviews with recognised leaders in the field of aged care. The study utilises a critical interpretative framework consistent with the logic of Michel Foucault. PMID:12755862

  19. Deprescribing psychotropic medications in aged care facilities: the potential role of family members.

    PubMed

    Plakiotis, Christos; Bell, J Simon; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Pond, Dimity; O'Connor, Daniel W

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread concern in Australia and internationally at the high prevalence of psychotropic medication use in residential aged care facilities. It is difficult for nurses and general practitioners in aged care facilities to cease new residents' psychotropic medications when they often have no information about why residents were started on the treatment, when and by whom and with what result. Most existing interventions have had a limited and temporary effect and there is a need to test different strategies to overcome the structural and practical barriers to psychotropic medication cessation or deprescribing. In this chapter, we review the literature regarding psychotropic medication deprescribing in aged care facilities and present the protocol of a novel study that will examine the potential role of family members in facilitating deprescribing. This project will help determine if family members can contribute information that will prove useful to clinicians and thereby overcome one of the barriers to deprescribing medications whose harmful effects often outweigh their benefits. We wish to understand the knowledge and attitudes of family members regarding the prescribing and deprescribing of psychotropic medications to newly admitted residents of aged care facilities with a view to developing and testing a range of clinical interventions that will result in better, safer prescribing practices. PMID:25416108

  20. Hearing and vision screening tools for long-term care residents with dementia: protocol for a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    McGilton, Katherine S; Höbler, Fiona; Campos, Jennifer; Dupuis, Kate; Labreche, Tammy; Guthrie, Dawn M; Jarry, Jonathan; Singh, Gurjit; Wittich, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hearing and vision loss among long-term care (LTC) residents with dementia frequently goes unnoticed and untreated. Despite negative consequences for these residents, there is little information available about their sensory abilities and care assessments and practices seldom take these abilities or accessibility needs into account. Without adequate knowledge regarding such sensory loss, it is difficult for LTC staff to determine the level of an individual's residual basic competence for communication and independent functioning. We will conduct a scoping review to identify the screening measures used in research and clinical contexts that test hearing and vision in adults aged over 65 years with dementia, aiming to: (1) provide an overview of hearing and vision screening in older adults with dementia; and (2) evaluate the sensibility of the screening tools. Methods and analysis This scoping review will be conducted using the framework by Arksey and O'Malley and furthered by methodological enhancements from cited researchers. We will conduct electronic database searches in CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We will also carry out a ‘grey literature’ search for studies or materials not formally published, both online and through interview discussions with healthcare professionals and research clinicians working in the field. Our aim is to find new and existing hearing and vision screening measures used in research and by clinical professionals of optometry and audiology. Abstracts will be independently reviewed twice for acceptance by a multidisciplinary team of researchers and research clinicians. Ethics and dissemination This review will inform health professionals working with this growing population. With the review findings, we aim to develop a toolkit and an algorithmic process to select the most appropriate hearing and vision screening assessments for LTC residents with dementia that will facilitate accurate testing and can

  1. Transitioning Toward Competency: A Resident-Faculty Collaborative Approach to Developing a Transitions of Care EPA in an Internal Medicine Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Brian; Englander, Honora; Kent, Kyle; Desai, Sima; Obley, Adam; Harmon, David; Kansagara, Devan

    2014-01-01

    Background Residency training and evaluation are moving toward competency-based models. Managing transitions of care is 1 of 16 entrustable professional activities (EPAs) that signal readiness for independent internal medicine practice. Methods for developing EPAs are evolving within the medical education community. Objective We describe a process for developing a transitions-of-care EPA for internal medicine inpatient and ambulatory settings using an iterative, consensus-building, resident-faculty collaborative approach. Methods We used an independent rank-ordering process and successive consensus group meetings to cull an initial list of 142 developmental Milestones to the 15 most relevant to transitions of care for internal medicine patients in an academic medical center and affiliated Veterans Administration hospital. Four senior internal medicine residents and 4 internal medicine faculty members representing inpatient and ambulatory practice settings identified examples of specific tasks and evaluative techniques for each Milestone. Results We demonstrate a feasible resident-faculty collaboration to develop transitions of care as an EPA for an internal medicine training program. Inclusion of residents along with faculty provided broader insights as well as an important learning opportunity for trainees. Conclusions Our process demonstrated the feasibility of designing an EPA, but questions remain about how entrustment-based evaluation can be implemented in clinical settings. Our framework may serve as a foundation for EPA development in other areas of clinical practice. PMID:26140133

  2. Attitude and Knowledge of Indian Emergency Care Residents towards Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Padhy, Biswa Mohan; Bhadauria, Hemant Singh; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Several studies carried out in developed countries have reported disproportionately high usage of acid suppressive drugs, especially proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). However, systematic assessment of attitude and practices of health care providers towards the use of these drugs in developing countries is lacking. In this study, we assessed the knowledge, attitude, and preferences of resident doctors posted in the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital in North India, towards the use of PPIs. Methods. A questionnaire based survey was carried out. Results. Fifty resident doctors responded to the questionnaire. Thirty-six percent reported prescribing acid suppressive drugs for majority of their patients, while 12% prescribed them to almost all patients they attended. Acute gastritis was the most common indication for prescribing PPI/H2 blockers (50%). The majority of respondents (92%) regarded PPIs as their first choice in acid suppressive agents and 58% administered it through intravenous route. Knowledge about PPI related adverse effects was low. Conclusions. Emergency care residents in India also tend to overuse PPIs in a manner similar to their counterparts in developed countries. Specific measures may be helpful in preventing such practices.

  3. Interprofessional education in practice: Evaluation of a work integrated aged care program.

    PubMed

    Lawlis, Tanya; Wicks, Alison; Jamieson, Maggie; Haughey, Amy; Grealish, Laurie

    2016-03-01

    Health professional clinical education is commonly conducted in single discipline modes, thus limiting student collaboration skills. Aged care residential facilities, due to the chronic and complex health care needs of residents, provide an ideal placement to provide a collaborative experience. Interprofessional education is widely acknowledged as the pedagogical framework through which to facilitate collaboration. The aim of the evaluation was to assess student attitudes towards collaboration after active involvement in an interprofessional education program. Students studying nursing, occupational therapy, and aged care were invited to complete a version of the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale before and after participating in a three-week pilot interprofessional program. A positive change in student attitudes towards other health professionals and the importance of working in interprofessional teams was reported with significant differences between two statements indicated: Learning with health-care students before qualifications would improve relationships after qualifications; and I learned a lot from the students from the other disciplines. The innovative pilot project was found to enhance student learning in interprofessional teams and the aged care environment. Further development of this and similar interprofessional programs is required to develop sustainable student projects that have health benefits for residents in aged care residential facilities. PMID:26733460

  4. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sangeeta; Hutchison, James; Group, Canadian Critical Care Trials

    2016-01-01

    Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians' professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees. PMID:27610029

  5. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sangeeta; Menon, Kusum; Piquette, Dominique; Gottesman, Ronald; Hutchison, James; Gilfoyle, Elaine; Group, Canadian Critical Care Trials

    2016-01-01

    Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians' professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees. PMID:27610029

  6. Change in Care Dependency and Nursing Care Problems in Nursing Home Residents with and without Dementia: A 2-Year Panel Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Over time, chronic conditions like dementia can lead to care dependency and nursing care problems, often necessitating nursing home admission. This panel study (2012–2014) aims to explore changes in care dependency and nursing care problems (incontinence, malnutrition, decubitus, falls and restraints) in residents with and without dementia over time. In total, nine Austrian nursing homes participated, including 258 residents (178 with, 80 without dementia) who completed all five measurements. Data were collected with the International Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems questionnaire, the Care Dependency Scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination-2. Repeated measures ANOVA and crosstabs were used to analyse changes. The results showed that care dependency in dementia residents increased significantly for all 15 items of the Care Dependency Scale, with the highest increase being residents’ day-/night pattern, contact with others, sense of rules/values and communication. In contrast, care dependency in residents without dementia increased for four of the 15 items, with the highest increase being for continence, followed by getting (un)dressed. With respect to the assessed nursing care problems, residents with dementia and those without only differed significantly in terms of an increase in urinary- (12.3% vs. 14.2%), fecal- (17.4% vs. 10%), and double incontinence (16.7% vs. 11.9%). The results indicated that residents with dementia experienced increased care dependency in different areas than residents without dementia. Furthermore, residents with dementia experienced a lower increase in urinary incontinence but a higher increase in fecal- and double incontinence. These results help professionals to identify areas for improvement in dementia care. PMID:26513358

  7. Impediments to applying the 'dignity of risk' principle in residential aged care services.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Joseph E; Davis, Marie-Claire

    2013-09-01

    This discussion paper identifies four core factors currently impeding the application of the dignity of risk principle in residential aged care settings in Victoria, Australia: the fluctuating decision-making ability of residents; multiple participants in decision-making; discordance between espoused values and actions; and confusion and fear around legal responsibilities of care providers. Potential solutions identified include a conceptual shift in approach and consensus between key stakeholders, as well as more tangible solutions such as education and point-of-care decision support tools. PMID:24028460

  8. Intentions to Quit Work among Care Staff Working in the Aged Care Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karantzas, Gery C.; Mellor, David; McCabe, Marita P.; Davison, Tanya E.; Beaton, Paul; Mrkic, Dejan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The aged care industry experiences high rates of staff turnover. Staff turnover has significant implications for the quality of care provided to care recipients and the financial costs to care agencies. In this study, we applied a model of intention to quit to identify the contextual and personal factors that shape aged care…

  9. Impact of Point-of-Care Ultrasound Training on Surgical Residents' Confidence

    PubMed Central

    Kotagal, Meera; Quiroga, Elina; Ruffatto, Benjamin J.; Adedipe, Adeyinka A.; Backlund, Brandon H.; Nathan, Robert; Roche, Anthony; Sajed, Dana; Shah, Sachita

    2016-01-01

    Objective Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is a vital tool for diagnosis and management of critically ill patients, particularly in resource-limited settings where access to diagnostic imaging may be constrained. We aimed to develop a novel POCUS training curriculum for surgical practice in the United States and in resource-limited settings in low- and middle-income countries and to determine its effect on surgical resident self-assessments of efficacy and confidence. Design We conducted an observational cohort study evaluating a POCUS training course that comprised 7 sessions of 2 hours each with didactics and proctored skills stations covering ultrasound applications for trauma (Focused Assessement with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) examination), obstetrics, vascular, soft tissue, regional anesthesia, focused echocardiography, and ultrasound guidance for procedures. Surveys on attitudes, prior experience, and confidence in point-of-care ultrasound applications were conducted before and after the course. Setting General Surgery Training Program in Seattle, Washington. Participants A total of 16 residents participated in the course; 15 and 10 residents completed the precourse and postcourse surveys, respectively. Results The mean composite confidence score from pretest compared with posttest improved from 23.3 (±10.2) to 37.8 (±6.7). Median confidence scores (1-6 scale) improved from 1.5 to 5.0 in performance of FAST (p < 0.001). Residents reported greater confidence in their ability to identify pericardial (2 to 4, p = 0.009) and peritoneal fluid (2 to 4.5, p < 0.001), to use ultrasound to guide procedures (3.5 to 4.0, p = 0.008), and to estimate ejection fraction (1 to 4, p = 0.004). Both before and after training, surgical residents overwhelmingly agreed with statements that ultrasound would improve their US-based practice, make them a better surgical resident, and improve their practice in resource-limited settings. Conclusions After a POCUS course designed

  10. The 2014 United States National Residency Match Program data for primary care programs: a review.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    The paper focuses on the past five years of National Residency Match Program (NRMP) information in the Unites States with a comparison point of twenty years ago utilized because of a referenced article. It is well known to our students going through the match that it is more competitive than in prior years. To rank enough programs for your field, take Step 2 early to maximize your score, to get quality letters and to practice mock interviews. The 99% match rate has remained steady over the past five years despite an increase in all primary care disciplines particularly Internal Medicine. Family Medicine and Internal Medicine work with, on average, about half U.S. seniors and half from other groups including Osteopathic and IMG (U.S. citizen and non-U.S. citizen). This can create a holistic experience for residents with a sharing of ideas from students from varied backgrounds. While the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program appear as an initial success, the student's goal should be to avoid such a step altogether. The key twenty years ago and today is the existence of appropriate numbers of resident and faculty role models. This is a stressful goal considering the demands on faculty for billing and patient care due to the shiftwork nature of the new work hours. PMID:25579787

  11. Development of a diabetes care management curriculum in a family practice residency program.

    PubMed

    Nuovo, Jim; Balsbaugh, Thomas; Barton, Sue; Davidson, Ellen; Fox-Garcia, Jane; Gandolfo, Angela; Levich, Bridget; Seibles, Joann

    2004-01-01

    Improving the quality of care for patients with chronic illness has become a high priority. Implementing training programs in disease management (DM) so the next generation of physicians can manage chronic illness more effectively is challenging. Residency training programs have no specific mandate to implement DM training. Additional barriers at the training facility include: 1) lack of a population-based perspective for service delivery; 2) weak support for self-management of illness; 3) incomplete implementation due to physician resistance or inertia; and 4) few incentives to change practices and behaviors. In order to overcome these barriers, training programs must take the initiative to implement DM training that addresses each of these issues. We report the implementation of a chronic illness management curriculum based on the Improving Chronic Illness Care (ICIC) Model. Features of this process included both patient care and learner objectives. These were: development of a multidisciplinary diabetes DM team; development of a patient registry; development of diabetes teaching clinics in the family practice center (nutrition, general management classes, and one-on-one teaching); development of a group visit model; and training the residents in the elements of the ICIC Model, ie, the community, the health system, self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Barriers to implementing these curricular changes were: the development of a patient registry; buy-in from faculty, residents, clinic leadership, staff, and patients for the chronic care model; the ability to bill for services and maintain clinical productivity; and support from the health system key stakeholders for sustainability. Unique features of each training site will dictate differences in emphasis and structure; however, the core principles of the ICIC Model in enhancing self-management may be generalized to all sites. PMID:15671788

  12. Hospitalized Patients' Perceptions of Resident Fatigue, Duty Hours, and Continuity of Care

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, Brian C.; Hyman, Charles H.; Ghaderi, Kimeya F.; Rodriguez-Srednicki, Joshua; Thompson, Jordan M.; Fischer, Staci A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Physicians' perceptions of duty hour regulations have been closely examined, yet patient opinions have been largely unstudied to date. Objective We studied patient perceptions of residency duty hours, fatigue, and continuity of care following implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 2011 Common Program Requirements. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered between June and August 2013 to inpatients at a large academic medical center and an affiliated community hospital. Adult inpatients on teaching medical and surgical services were eligible for inclusion in the study. Results Survey response rate was 71.3% (513 of 720). Most respondents (57.1%, 293 of 513) believed residents should not be assigned to shifts longer than 12 hours, and nearly half (49.7%, 255 of 513) wanted to be notified if a resident caring for them had worked longer than 12 hours. Most patients (63.2%, 324 of 513) believed medical errors commonly occurred because of fatigue, and fewer (37.4%, 192 of 513; odds ratio, 0.56; P < .01) believed medical errors commonly occurred as a result of transfers of care. Given the choice between a familiar physician who “may be tired from a long shift” or a “fresh” physician who had received sign-out, more patients chose the fresh but unfamiliar physician (57.1% [293 of 513] versus 42.7% [219 of 513], P < .01). Conclusions In a survey about physician attributes relevant to medical errors and patient safety, adult inpatients in a large and diverse sample reported greater concern about fatigue and working hours than about continuity of care. PMID:26140114

  13. The impact of a Continuum of Care Resident Pharmacist on heart failure readmissions and discharge instructions at a community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of a Continuum of Care Resident Pharmacist on (1) heart failure 30-day hospital readmissions and (2) compliance with Joint Commission Heart Failure core measure 1 at a community hospital. Methods: The Continuum of Care Network led by a Continuum of Care Resident Pharmacist was established in August 2011. The Continuum of Care Resident Pharmacist followed Continuum of Care Network patients and retrospectively collected data from August 2011 to December 2012. Thirty-day readmission rates for Continuum of Care Network heart failure patients versus non-Continuum of Care Network heart failure patients were compared and analyzed. Joint Commission Heart Failure core measure 1 compliance rates were retrospectively collected from January 2011 and compared to data after establishment of the Continuum of Care Network. Results: In all, 162 Continuum of Care Network patients and 470 non-Continuum of Care Network patients were discharged with a diagnosis of heart failure from August 2011 to December 2012. Continuum of Care Network heart failure patients had a lower 30-day all-cause readmission rate compared to non-Continuum of Care Network heart failure patients (12% versus 24%, respectively; p = 0.005). In addition, Heart Failure core measure 1 compliance rates improved from the 80th percentile to the 90th percentile after implementation of the Continuum of Care Network (p = 0.004). The top three interventions performed by the Continuum of Care Resident Pharmacist were discharge counseling (74.1%), providing a MedActionPlan™ (68.5%), and resolving medication reconciliation discrepancies (64.8%). Conclusion: The study findings suggest that a Continuum of Care Resident Pharmacist contributed to lowered heart failure readmission rates and improved Heart Failure core measure 1 compliance rates. Future randomized, controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26770775

  14. Communicating for Quality in School Age Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartmel, Jennifer; Grieshaber, Susan

    2014-01-01

    School Age Care (SAC) services have existed in Australia for over 100 years but they have tended to take a back seat when compared with provision for school-aged children and those under school age using early childhood education and care (ECEC) services. Many SAC services are housed in shared premises and many children attending preparatory or…

  15. School-Age Child Care Trend Report: Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2007-01-01

    According to the author, school-age care is the fastest growing segment of the early childhood arena and possibly the least visible. While programs have been serving school-age children in out-of-school hours since the turn of the century, it is only in recent years that professionals have started to view school-age care as a distinct discipline…

  16. The Actively Caring for People Movement at Virginia Tech and Beyond: Cultivating Compassion and Relationships in Residence Halls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Shane M.; Mullins, Taris G.; Geller, E. Scott; Shushok, Frank, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    A professor and a group of student leaders initiated the Actively Caring for People (AC4P) Movement to establish a more civil, compassionate, and inclusive culture by inspiring intentional acts of kindness. This article explores the AC4P Movement in a first-year residence hall at Virginia Tech and a second-year residence hall at University of…

  17. Orientation behaviors in residents relocated to a redesigned dementia care unit.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Margaret C; MacLean, Jill; Borrie, Michael; Geiger, Julia

    2004-01-01

    This descriptive study took advantage of a scheduled environmental renovation in a secured dementia care unit. A convenience sample of 19 residents who were relocated to the unit completed a performance-based orientation task involving locating their own room. The study included a brief structured interview and tests of psychological function (cognition, depression, and visual-spatial ability) two months after admission. Intrusions (uninvited entry into another resident's room) were tracked for one week. Eighty-four percent of participants were able to find their own rooms during the orientation task. The majority of participants reported use of color (n = 13) and structure (n = 12) as cues for locating their rooms. Thirty-eight percent of those who could find their own rooms also intruded into others' rooms; these intrusions were most commonly related to seeking social interaction. The results attest to the importance of understanding the multiple factors that determine environmental use in this population. PMID:15002345

  18. Dientes! Community dental clinic: dental care for low-income residents of Santa Cruz County.

    PubMed

    Balzer, J; Webb, C

    1998-05-01

    Dientes! is a private nonprofit community dental clinic that was established in 1994 to provide dental care for low-income residents of Santa Cruz County. Its founders were successful in securing support from a diverse group of community agencies, including city and county governments, philanthropic foundations, the dental community, and corporate and individual donors. Dientes! provides approximately 250 visits per month in a three-chair clinic in Santa Cruz; a school-based program in Watsonville began March 1998. The major challenge facing Dientes! is to establish a reliable financial base that will allow the program to better meet the needs of low-income county residents over the long term. PMID:10528572

  19. Aging in poverty: making the case for comprehensive care management.

    PubMed

    Judd, Rebecca G; Moore, Brenda A

    2011-10-01

    A model for holistic care management that would enhance outcomes for economically vulnerable older adults who receive an array of disjointed services administered through the older Americans Act (OAA) and local Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) is proposed. Fragmented service delivery is typically wasteful and ineffectual, but comprehensive care management that includes an autonomous care manager, a single interagency plan of care and ongoing monitoring that is client-centered may protect those aging in poverty from negative health outcomes. PMID:21967136

  20. Prevalence and impact of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D.; Joyce, Nina; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M.; Zervou, Fainareti N.; Besdine, Richard W.; Mor, Vincent; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but the epidemiology of CDI in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is unknown. We performed a retrospective cohort study and used US 2011 LTCF resident data from the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims. We extracted CDI cases based on International Classification of Diseases-9 coding, and compared residents with the diagnosis of CDI to those who did not have a CDI diagnosis during their LTCF stay. We estimated CDI prevalence rates and calculated 3-month mortality rates. The study population consisted of 2,190,613 admissions (median age 82 years; interquartile range 76–88; female to male ratio 2:1; >80% whites), 45,500 of whom had a CDI diagnosis. The nationwide CDI prevalence rate was 1.85 per 100 LTCF admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83–1.87). The CDI rate was lower in the South (1.54%; 95% CI 1.51–1.57) and higher in the Northeast (2.29%; 95% CI 2.25–2.33). Older age, white race, presence of a feeding tube, unhealed pressure ulcers, end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, bowel incontinence, prior tracheostomy, chemotherapy, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently related to “high risk” for CDI. Residents with a CDI diagnosis were more likely to be admitted to an acute care hospital (40% vs 31%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be discharged to the community (46% vs 54%, P < 0.001) than those not reported with CDI during stay. Importantly, CDI was associated with higher mortality (24.7% vs 18.1%, P = 0.001). CDI is common among the elderly residents of LTCFs and is associated with significant increase in 3-month mortality. The prevalence is higher in the Northeast and risk stratification can be used in CDI prevention policies. PMID:27495022

  1. Age and individual sleep characteristics affect cognitive performance in anesthesiology residents after a 24-hour shift.

    PubMed

    Tadinac, Meri; Sekulić, Ante; Hromatko, Ivana; Mazul-Sunko, Branka; Ivancić, Romina

    2014-03-01

    Previous research has shown that both shift work and sleep deprivation have an adverse influence on various aspects of human cognitive performance. The aim of this study was to explore changes in cognitive functioning and subjective sleepiness of anesthesiology residents after a 24-hour shift. Twenty-six anesthesiology residents completed a set of psychological instruments at the beginning and at the end of the shift, as well as a questionnaire regarding information about the shift, Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and Circadian Type Questionnaire. There was a significant decline in cognitive performance measured by the Auditory Verbal Learning Test after the shift. The effect was stronger in older participants and in those with high scores on rigidity of sleep scale and low scores on the ability to overcome sleepiness scale. There were no differences in the digits forward test (a measure of concentration), while digits backward test (a measure of working memory) even showed an improved performance after the shift. Although participants reported being significantly sleepier after the shift, the subjective sleepiness did not correlate with any of the objective measures of cognitive performance. In conclusion, the performance in short tasks involving concentration and working memory was not impaired, while performance in long-term and monotone tasks declined after sleep deprivation, and the magnitude of this decline depended on the specific individual characteristics of sleep and on age Surprisingly, age seemed to have an important impact on cognitive functions after shift work even in the relatively age-homogeneous population of young anesthesiology residents. PMID:24974663

  2. Improving the Quality of Care of Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents in France.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Yves; Mathieu, Celine; Piau, Christine; Cayla, Françoise; Bouget, Catherine; Vellas, Bruno; de Souto Barreto, Philipe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the Impact d'une démarche QUAlité sur l'évolution des pratiques et le déclin fonctionnel des Résidents en Établissement d'hébergement pour personnes âgées dépendantes (IQUARE) study was to examine the effects of a global intervention comprising professional support and education for nursing home (NH) staff on quality indicators (QIs) and functional decline and emergency department (ED) transfers of residents. One hundred seventy-five NHs in France (a total of 6,275 residents randomly selected from NHs) volunteered and were enrolled in a nonrandomized controlled multicenter individually customize trial with 18-month follow-up. NHs were allocated to a quality audit and feedback intervention (control group: 90 NHs, 3,258 residents) or to the quality audit and feedback intervention plus collaborative work meetings between a hospital geriatrician and NH staff (experimental group: 85 NHs, 3,017 residents). At the NH level, prevalence of assessment of kidney function, cognitive function, risk of pressure ulcers, behavioral disturbances, depression, pain, weight measurement, and transfer to the ED were recorded. Ability to perform basic activities of daily living was assessed at the resident level. At baseline, NH QIs were generally low (with large standard deviations), and annual rate of transfer to the ED was high (~20%) and similar in both groups. The intervention had a significant positive effect on the prevalence of assessment of pressure ulcer risk, depression, pain, and prevalence of ED transfers. It had no significant effect on functional decline. Large-scale efforts to improve QIs involving collaboration between hospital and NH providers and based on audit and collaborative discussion are feasible and improve some aspects of quality of care in NHs. PMID:26782872

  3. Effects of Dementia-Care Mapping on Residents and Staff of Care Homes: A Pragmatic Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Geertje; Draskovic, Irena; Adang, Eddy M. M.; Donders, Rogier; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of dementia-care mapping (DCM) for institutionalised people with dementia has been demonstrated in an explanatory cluster-randomised controlled trial (cRCT) with two DCM researchers carrying out the DCM intervention. In order to be able to inform daily practice, we studied DCM effectiveness in a pragmatic cRCT involving a wide range of care homes with trained nursing staff carrying out the intervention. Methods Dementia special care units were randomly assigned to DCM or usual care. Nurses from the intervention care homes received DCM training and conducted the 4-months DCM-intervention twice during the study. The primary outcome was agitation, measured with the Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory (CMAI). The secondary outcomes included residents’ neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs) and quality of life, and staff stress and job satisfaction. The nursing staff made all measurements at baseline and two follow-ups at 4-month intervals. We used linear mixed-effect models to test treatment and time effects. Results 34 units from 11 care homes, including 434 residents and 382 nursing staff members, were randomly assigned. Ten nurses from the intervention units completed the basic and advanced DCM training. Intention-to-treat analysis showed no statistically significant effect on the CMAI (mean difference between groups 2·4, 95% CI −2·7 to 7·6; p = 0·34). More NPSs were reported in the intervention group than in usual care (p = 0·02). Intervention staff reported fewer negative and more positive emotional reactions during work (p = 0·02). There were no other significant effects. Conclusions Our pragmatic findings did not confirm the effect on the primary outcome of agitation in the explanatory study. Perhaps the variability of the extent of implementation of DCM may explain the lack of effect. Trial Registration Dutch Trials Registry NTR2314. PMID:23844003

  4. A National Study of Residential Care for the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mor, Vincent; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A national survey of Residential Care Home programs revealed that most facilities were family owned and operated. A provider survey revealed that homes regulated by departments of health were more institutional than were homes regulated by integrated, social service departments. Elderly residents had high satisfaction. (Author/ABB)

  5. Sexuality and Aging: Implications for Long Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkley, Nancy E.

    With increasing emphasis on treating the whole person, on the maintenance of an individual's former life style, and on patients' rights, long-term care personnel need to become aware that many nursing home residents experience needs related to their sexuality. A model two-day workshop is presented wlth a focus on the following topics: (1) a broad…

  6. Determinants of Medical and Health Care Expenditure Growth for Urban Residents in China: A Systematic Review Article

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, Xiaolong; CAI, Qiong; WANG, Jin; LIU, Yun

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, medical and health care consumption has risen, making health risk an important determinant of household spending and welfare. We aimed to examine the determinants of medical and health care expenditure to help policy-makers in the improvement of China’s health care system, benefiting the country, society and every household. This paper employs panel data from China’s provinces from 2001 to 2011 with all possible economic variations and studies the determinants of medical and healthcare expenditure for urban residents. CPI (consumer price index) of medical services and the resident consumption level of urban residents have positive influence on medical and health care expenditures for urban residents, while the local medical budget, the number of health institutions, the incidence of infectious diseases, the year-end population and the savings of urban residents will not have effect on medical and health care expenditure for urban residents. This paper proposed three relevant policy suggestions for Chinese governments based on the findings of the research. PMID:26171351

  7. Determinants of Medical and Health Care Expenditure Growth for Urban Residents in China: A Systematic Review Article.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Cai, Qiong; Wang, Jin; Liu, Yun

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, medical and health care consumption has risen, making health risk an important determinant of household spending and welfare. We aimed to examine the determinants of medical and health care expenditure to help policy-makers in the improvement of China's health care system, benefiting the country, society and every household. This paper employs panel data from China's provinces from 2001 to 2011 with all possible economic variations and studies the determinants of medical and healthcare expenditure for urban residents. CPI (consumer price index) of medical services and the resident consumption level of urban residents have positive influence on medical and health care expenditures for urban residents, while the local medical budget, the number of health institutions, the incidence of infectious diseases, the year-end population and the savings of urban residents will not have effect on medical and health care expenditure for urban residents. This paper proposed three relevant policy suggestions for Chinese governments based on the findings of the research. PMID:26171351

  8. [Elderly residents in homes for the aged: adjustment in the light of Callista Roy].

    PubMed

    Freitas, Maria Célia de; Guedes, Maria Vilani Cavalcante; de Galiza, Francisca Tereza; Nogueira, Jéssica de Menezes; Onofre, Marília Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the adaptation of elderly individuals voluntarily reside in Institution for the Aged (LTCF) in the city of Fortaleza-CE, based on the theoretical model of Roy. Descriptive study, in a IPLI involving thirteen elderly residents. Data collect was through interviews in the months of October and December 2011 and organized by thematic content analysis. The following themes has emerged: I Physical subdivided into body sensation and body image; Staff and I, subdivided into self-consistency and auto ideal be moral-ethical-spiritual. Thus, the option to live in ILPI not effectively changed the lives of elderly people. They managed to adapt to the local and coexist well with internal and external stimuli. PMID:25590880

  9. Age and residency duration of loggerhead turtles at a North Pacific bycatch hotspot using skeletochronology

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewicz, Calandra N. Turner; Seminoff, Jeffrey A.; Avens, Larisa; Goshe, Lisa R.; Peckham, S. Hoyt; Rguez-Baron, Juan M.; Bickerman, Kalyn; Kurle, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    For migratory marine animals, like sea turtles, effective conservation can be challenging because key demographic information such as duration of life stages and exposure to spatially explicit threats in different habitats are often unknown. In the eastern Pacific near the Baja California Peninsula (BCP), Mexico, tens of thousands of endangered North Pacific loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) concentrate at a foraging area known to have high rates of fishery bycatch. Because stage survivorship of loggerheads in the BCP will vary significantly depending on the number of years spent in this region, we applied skeletochronology to empirically estimate residency duration in this loggerhead hotspot. The observed age distribution obtained from skeletochronology analysis of 146 dead-stranded loggerheads ranged from three to 24 years old, suggesting a BCP residency of >20 years. Given the maximum estimated age and a one-year migration to western Pacific nesting beaches, we infer age-at-maturation for BCP loggerheads at ~25 years old. We also examine survivorship at varying BCP residency durations by applying our findings to current annual mortality estimates. Predicted survivorship of loggerheads spending over 20 years in this BCP foraging habitat is less than 10%, and given that ~43,000 loggerhead turtles forage here, a significant number of turtles are at extreme risk in this region. This is the first empirical evidence supporting estimated age-at-maturation for BCP North Pacific loggerheads, and the first estimates of BCP stage survivorship. Our findings emphasize the urgent need for continued and effective international conservation efforts to minimize bycatch of this endangered species. PMID:25848136

  10. School's Out! Group Day Care for the School Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Elizabeth; Milich, Cynthia

    This report on group day care is designed to: (1) examine the kinds of group programs for school-age children which exist in Los Angeles County, (2) describe the conditions necessary for program operation, and (3) consider the issue of quality as it relates to community expansion of day care services for children of school age. The report is…

  11. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. In addition to meeting... residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  12. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. In addition to meeting... residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  13. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. In addition to meeting... residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  14. Sense of Community within Oxford House Recovery Housing: Impact of Resident Age and Income.

    PubMed

    Graham, B C; Jason, L A; Ferrari, J F

    2009-01-01

    The experience of psychological sense of community (PSOC) can play an important role in the substance abuse recovery process. This study explored the relationship between PSOC and setting-level variables of age and income amongst residents living in Oxford House, a communal, self-governed recovery housing model (n = 70). Age and income variables were not related to an overall PSOC or components such as shared common mission or feelings of reciprocal responsibility. However, both age and income variables were significant predictors of the harmony felt within these houses. The role that PSOC may play in recovery facilities and other co-housing arrangements was discussed, and implications for future research and application were outlined. PMID:20657670

  15. Semelparous Penna Ageing Model with Parental Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehsenfeld, K. M.; Sá Martins, J. S.; de Oliveira, S. Moss; Bernardes, A. T.

    In this paper we study the importance of parental care for the survival of semelparous species, that reproduce only once in life. We perform our simulations for sexual and asexual reproductions and show that catastrophic senescence (death soon after reproduction) is delayed if parental care is considered.

  16. Sense of Coherence among Older Adult Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities in Taiwan: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jueng, Ruo-Nan; Tsai, Der-Chong; Chen, I-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background Growing evidence shows that sense of coherence (SOC) is related to health promotion. Knowledge of SOC among older adults in Taiwan is limited. The present study aimed to investigate SOC status and its relationship to personal and environmental factors among older adult residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) in northeastern Taiwan. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed in Yilan, Taiwan. With face-to-face interviews, we obtained data from 104 LTCF residents (aged 65 years and older) using the Chinese version of Antonovsky's short 13-item SOC scale. We also collected the information on personal characteristics, physical and social environmental resources. Multiple linear regression was used to analyze factors potentially influencing SOC. Results Of the participants, the mean score (±standard deviation) of SOC was 58.3 (±8.8), while scores on SOC subscales (comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness) were 23.4 ±4.5, 17.9 ±3.8, and 17.0 ±3.2, respectively. Education level, activities of daily living and number of LTCF staff were found to be independently associated with SOC status after adjusting for demographic characteristics, health status, and environmental resources. In addition, interactions between personal and environmental factors had a crucial influence on SOC status. Conclusions Participants in this study had relatively low SOC scores compared to their counterparts in Western countries. In addition to personal factors, environmental factors can play a significant role in SOC status among older adult LTCF residents. Comprehensive evaluation of SOC status should consider person-environment interaction effects. PMID:26751949

  17. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  18. Perspective: beyond counting hours: the importance of supervision, professionalism, transitions of care, and workload in residency training.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Daniel J; Slovin, Sara R; Riebschleger, Meredith P; Englander, Robert; Hicks, Patricia J; Carraccio, Carol

    2012-07-01

    The medical education community's conversations about residents' duty hours have long focused solely on the number of those hours. In July 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) enacted its most recent iteration of standards regarding duty hours. Those standards, as well as a 2008 Institute of Medicine report, look beyond the quantity of duty hours to address their quality as well. Indeed, the majority of the 2011 ACGME standards specify requirements for the qualitative components of residents' working and learning environments, including supervision of residents; professionalism, personal responsibility, and patient safety; transitions of care; and clinical responsibilities (including workload). The authors believe that focusing on these qualitative (rather than quantitative) components of the resident's working and learning environment provides the greatest promise for balancing patient care with resident education, thus optimizing the safety and effectiveness of both. For each of the four qualitative components that the authors discuss (enhancing supervision, nurturing professionalism and personal responsibility, ensuring safe transitions of care, and optimizing workloads and cognitive loads), they offer agendas for faculty development, educational program planning, and research. Thus, the authors call on the medical education community to expand its discussion beyond counting duty hours to focus on these critical issues that ensure quality resident education and patient care and to implement necessary strategies to address them. PMID:22622207

  19. Depletion of fat-resident Treg cells prevents age-associated insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Sagar P; Myoung Suh, Jae; Fang, Sungsoon; Liu, Sihao; Zhang, Yang; Cheng, Albert; Zhou, Carmen; Liang, Yuqiong; LeBlanc, Mathias; Liddle, Christopher; Atkins, Annette R; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M; Zheng, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Age-associated insulin resistance (IR) and obesity-associated IR are two physiologically distinct forms of adult-onset diabetes. While macrophage-driven inflammation is a core driver of obesity-associated IR, the underlying mechanisms of the obesity-independent yet highly prevalent age-associated IR are largely unexplored. Here we show, using comparative adipo-immune profiling in mice, that fat-resident regulatory T cells, termed fTreg cells, accumulate in adipose tissue as a function of age, but not obesity. Supporting the existence of two distinct mechanisms underlying IR, mice deficient in fTreg cells are protected against age-associated IR, yet remain susceptible to obesity-associated IR and metabolic disease. By contrast, selective depletion of fTreg cells via anti-ST2 antibody treatment increases adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. These findings establish that distinct immune cell populations within adipose tissue underlie ageing- and obesity-associated IR, and implicate fTreg cells as adipo-immune drivers and potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of age-associated IR. PMID:26580014

  20. Self-reported functional and general health status among older respondents in China: the impact of age, gender, and place of residence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bei; Yue, Yuwen; Mao, Zongfu

    2015-03-01

    This study made comparisons of self-reported functional and general health status between Chinese women and men in different age-groups in rural and urban settings and examined multiple factors relating to these health statuses in older adults. This study included a sample of 4017 respondents, aged 55 years and older, from the Hubei subsample of the Chinese National Health Service Survey III in 2003. The results illustrate that the differences in self-rated functional and general health status between genders and between urban and rural areas diminished with age. Access to health care was strongly associated with health status. The quality of the local environment, measured by access to tap water, was a significant factor for rural residents. Our study suggests that improving access to health care services and reducing environmental health risks are critical for improving physical functioning, psychological functioning, and self-rated general health for older adults in China. PMID:22199153

  1. [Social representations on aging by primary care health workers].

    PubMed

    Mendes, Cristina Katya Torres Teixeira; Alves, Maria do Socorro Costa Feitosa; Silva, Antonia Oliveira; Paredes, Maria Adelaide Silva; Rodrigues, Tatyanni Peixoto

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to get to know the social representations on aging developed by primary care health workers. This is an exploratory study involving 204 primary health care workers, in the city of João Pessoa, in the state of Paraíba. For data collection we used a semi-structured interview. The data obtained from 204 interviews was analyzed with the help of the Alceste software version 2010. The results indicated five classes or categories: vision of aging,psychosocial dimensions, a time of doubts, aging as a process, and aging versus disease, with positive content: joy, care, children, retirement, caregiver rights, maturity and wisdom, as well as negative factors: impairments, decadence, neglect, fragility, limitation, wrinkles, dependency and disease. It was observed that these meanings associated with aging express the need for total and humanized elderly care. PMID:23405821

  2. Perceptions and employment intentions among aged care nurses and nursing assistants from diverse cultural backgrounds: A qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fengsong; Tilse, Cheryl; Wilson, Jill; Tuckett, Anthony; Newcombe, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The residential aged care industry faces shortages and high turnover rates of direct care workers. This situation is further complicated by the increasing cultural diversity of residents and staff. To retain direct care workers, it is crucial to explore their perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of care work, and their employment intentions in multicultural environments. A qualitative descriptive study was used to understand perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of residential aged care work for core direct care workers (i.e. nurses and nursing assistants), how these were related to their intentions to stay or leave, and how these varied between nurses and nursing assistants, and between locally and overseas born workers. Individual interviews were conducted between June and September 2013 with 16 direct care workers in an Australian residential aged care facility with a specific focus on people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. It was found that direct care workers' employment intentions were related to their perceptions and management of the rewards and difficulties of care work. Their experiences of care work, the employment characteristics, and the organizational resources that fitted their personality, ability, expectations, and essential needs were viewed as rewards. Evaluating their jobs as meaningful was a shared perception for direct care workers who intended to stay. Individual workers' perceptions of the rewarding aspects of care work served to counterbalance the challenges of care work, and promoted their intentions to stay. Perceptions and employment intentions varied by occupational groups and by cultural backgrounds. Overseas born direct care workers are valuable resources in residential aged care facility rather than a limitation, but they do require organizational support, such as cultural awareness of the management, English language support, a sense of family, and appropriate job responsibility. The findings

  3. [HOLDING OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED CLINICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR ANESTHESIOLOGY AND INTENSIVE CARE CLINICAL RESIDENCY IN STATE GRADUATES CERTIFICATION].

    PubMed

    Schegolev, A V; Andreenko, A A; Ershov, E N; Lahin, R E; Makarenko, E P

    2016-01-01

    The modern system of medical education requires objective methods to assess clinical competence of medical specialists. Application of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) during the final certification of graduates of clinical residency allows to evaluate the theoretical knowledge, manual skills. Enabling simulation scenarios in the program makes it possible to objectively evaluate the important non-technical skills of anesthesiologists, identify gaps in the system of training and modify it. The experience of the objective structured clinical examination as part of the state certification of graduates of clinical residency of the Department ofAnesthesiology and Intensive Care, Military MedicalAcademy after C M Kirov allows us to consider this technique in an objective way a comprehensive assessment of the competence of health professionals. Students confirmed its highly realistic, they have revealed the presence of emotional stress during the simulation sessions, the majority agreed that the simulation session increased the level of their readiness to address these situations in clinical practice. Staff of the department is planning to testing and introduction rating scales into a system of assessment, to improved exam program, increasing the number of clinical scenarios for simulation sessions. PMID:27192861

  4. Verbal and nonverbal indicators of quality of communication between care staff and residents in ethnoculturally and linguistically diverse long-term care settings.

    PubMed

    Small, Jeff; Chan, Sing Mei; Drance, Elisabeth; Globerman, Judith; Hulko, Wendy; O'Connor, Deborah; Perry, JoAnn; Stern, Louise; Ho, Lorraine

    2015-09-01

    Linguistic and ethnocultural diversity in long-term residential care is a growing trend in many urban settings. When long-term care staff and residents do not share the same language or ethnocultural background, the quality of their communication and care are jeopardized. There is very little research addressing how staff and residents communicate when they experience a mismatch in their language and ethnocultural backgrounds. Thus, the goals of the present study were to 1) document the verbal and nonverbal behaviours used by staff and residents in diverse interactions, and 2) identify and account for behaviours that either promoted or detracted from positive communication by drawing on principles from 'Communication Accommodation Theory'. Two long-term care facilities in British Columbia Canada were selected due to the diverse linguistic and ethnocultural backgrounds of their staff and residents. Twenty-seven staff and 27 residents consented to being video-recorded during routine activities (e.g., mealtimes, recreational activities). The recorded observations were transcribed, translated, and coded using qualitative descriptive and interpretive analyses. A number of verbal and nonverbal behaviours were identified and interpreted in relation to whether they promoted or detracted from positive communication. The findings point to considering a variety of proactive strategies that staff and administrators could employ to effectively accommodate to language and ethnocultural diversity in long-term care practice. PMID:26260486

  5. Ready for Discharge? A Survey of Discharge Transition-of-Care Education and Evaluation in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Gallahue, Fiona E; Betz, Amy E; Druck, Jeffrey; Jones, Jonathan S; Burns, Boyd; Hern, Gene

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to assess current education and practices of emergency medicine (EM) residents as perceived by EM program directors to determine if there are deficits in resident discharge handoff training. This survey study was guided by the Kern model for medical curriculum development. A six-member Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD) Transitions of Care task force of EM physicians performed these steps and constructed a survey. The survey was distributed to program residency directors via the CORD listserve and/or direct contact. There were 119 responses to the survey, which were collected using an online survey tool. Over 71% of the 167 American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited EM residency programs were represented. Of those responding, 42.9% of programs reported formal training regarding discharges during initial orientation and 5.9% reported structured curriculum outside of orientation. A majority (73.9%) of programs reported that EM residents were not routinely evaluated on their discharge proficiency. Despite the ACGME requirements requiring formal handoff curriculum and evaluation, many programs do not provide formal curriculum on the discharge transition of care or evaluate EM residents on their discharge proficiency. PMID:26594283

  6. We can work it out: Group decision-making builds social identity and enhances the cognitive performance of care residents.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Catherine; Alexander Haslam, S; Knight, Craig; Gleibs, Ilka; Ysseldyk, Renate; McCloskey, Lauren-Grace

    2014-02-01

    Group-based interventions have been argued to slow the cognitive decline of older people residing in care by building social identification and thereby increasing motivation and engagement. The present study explored the identity-cognition association further by investigating the impact of a group decision-making intervention on cognition. Thirty-six care home residents were assigned to one of three conditions: an Intervention in which they made decisions about lounge refurbishment as a group, a Comparison condition in which staff made these decisions, or a no-treatment Control. Cognitive function, social identification, home satisfaction, and lounge use were measured before and after the intervention. Participants in the Intervention condition showed significant increases on all measures, and greater improvement than participants in both Comparison and Control conditions. Consistent with social identity theorizing, these findings point to the role of group activity and social identification in promoting cognitive integrity and well-being among care residents. PMID:24387094

  7. Dermatological disease in the older age group: a cross-sectional study in aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Maneka S; Vandal, Alain C; Jarrett, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of dermatological disease in aged care facilities, and the relationship between cognitive or physical disability and significant disease. Setting 2 large aged care facilities in Auckland, New Zealand, each providing low and high level care. Participants All 161 residents of the facilities were invited to participate. The only exclusion criterion was inability to obtain consent from the individual or designated guardian. 88 participants were recruited—66 females (75%), 22 males (25%) with average age 87.1 years (SD 5.5 years). Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary—presence of significant skin disease (defined as that which in the opinion of the investigators needed treatment or was identified as a patient concern) diagnosed clinically on full dermatological examination by a dermatologist or dermatology trainee. Secondary—functional and cognitive status (Rehabilitation Complexity Scale and Abbreviated Mental Test Score). Results 81.8% were found to have at least one significant condition. The most common disorders were onychomycosis 42 (47.7%), basal cell carcinoma 13 (14.8%), asteototic eczema 11 (12.5%) and squamous cell carcinoma in situ 9 (10.2%). Other findings were invasive squamous cell carcinoma 7 (8%), bullous pemphigoid 2 (2.3%), melanoma 2 (2.3%), lichen sclerosus 2 (2.3%) and carcinoma of the breast 1 (1.1%). Inflammatory disease was more common in those with little physical disability compared with those with serious physical disability (OR 3.69; 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6, p=0.04). No significant association was found between skin disease and cognitive impairment. Conclusions A high rate of dermatological disease was found. Findings ranged from frequent but not life-threatening conditions (eg, onychomycosis), to those associated with a significant morbidity (eg, eczema, lichen sclerosus and bullous pemphigoid), to potentially life-threatening (eg, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma and breast cancer

  8. Raising the Bar for the Care of Seriously Ill Patients: Results of a National Survey to Define Essential Palliative Care Competencies for Medical Students and Residents

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Kristen G.; Chittenden, Eva H.; Sullivan, Amy M.; Periyakoil, Vyjeyanth S.; Morrison, Laura J.; Carey, Elise C.; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra; Block, Susan D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Given the shortage of palliative care specialists in the U.S., to ensure quality of care for patients with serious, life-threatening illness, generalist-level palliative care competencies need to be defined and taught. The purpose of this study was to define essential competencies for medical students and internal medicine and family medicine (IM/FM) residents through a national survey of palliative care experts. Method Proposed competencies were derived from existing Hospice and Palliative Medicine fellowship competencies, and revised to be developmentally appropriate for students and residents. In spring 2012, the authors administered a web-based, national cross-sectional survey of palliative care educational experts to assess ratings and rankings of proposed competencies and competency domains. Results The authors identified 18 comprehensive palliative care competencies for medical students and IM/FM residents, respectively. Over 95% of survey respondents judged the competencies as comprehensive and developmentally appropriate (survey response rate=72%, 71/98). Using predefined cut-off criteria, experts identified 7 medical student and 13 IM/FM resident competencies as essential. Communication and pain/symptom management were rated as the most critical domains. Conclusions This national survey of palliative care experts defines comprehensive and essential palliative care competencies for medical students and IM/FM residents that are specific, measurable, and can be used to report educational outcomes; provide a sequence for palliative care curricula in undergraduate and graduate medical education; and highlight the importance of educating medical trainees in communication and pain management. Next steps include seeking input and endorsement from stakeholders in the broader medical education community. PMID:24979171

  9. Preparing for an epidemic: cancer care in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population was charged with evaluating and proposing recommendations on how to improve the quality of cancer care, with a specific focus on the aging population. Based on their findings, the IOM committee recently released a report highlighting their 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care. Based on those recommendations, this article highlights ways to improve evidence-based care and addresses rising costs in health care for older adults with cancer. The IOM highlighted three recommendations to address the current research gaps in providing evidence-based care in older adults with cancer, which included (1) studying populations which match the age and health-risk profile of the population with the disease, (2) legislative incentives for companies to include patients that are older or with multiple morbidities in new cancer drug trials, and (3) expansion of research that contributes to the depth and breadth of data available for assessing interventions. The recommendations also highlighted the need to maintain affordable and accessible care for older adults with cancer, with an emphasis on finding creative solutions within both the care delivery system and payment models in order to balance costs while preserving quality of care. The implementation of the IOM's recommendations will be a key step in moving closer to the goal of providing accessible, affordable, evidence-based, high-quality care to all patients with cancer. PMID:24857069

  10. Understanding and improving communication processes in an increasingly multicultural aged care workforce.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Pam; Horner, Barbara; Fyfe, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how culture shapes relationships in aged care and the extent to which the residential aged care sector supports a cohesive multicultural workforce. An exploratory methodology utilising semi-structured questionnaires collected data from 58 participants comprising: staff who provide direct care to residents; managers; and family members from six residential care facilities in Perth, Western Australia. Communication issues emerged as an over-arching theme, and included interpersonal communication, the effect of cultural norms on communication and the impact of informal and formal workplace policies relating to spoken and written language. Sixty percent of participants from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) background had experienced negative reactions from residents with dementia, linked to visible cultural difference. They used a range of coping strategies including ignoring, resilience and avoidance in such situations. CaLD participants also reported prejudicial treatment from non-CaLD staff. The findings highlight the need for organisations to incorporate explicit processes which address the multiple layers of influence on cross cultural communication: internalised beliefs and values; moderating effects of education, experience and social circumstance; and factors external to the individuals, including workplace culture and the broader political economy, to develop a cohesive multicultural workplace. PMID:25661853

  11. How to Select Anti-Aging Skin Care Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... zone Video library Find a dermatologist How to select anti-aging skin care products Dermatologists share their ... make a noticeable difference. When shopping for sunscreen, select one that offers all of the following: Broad ...

  12. Surviving the Silver Tsunami: Training a Health Care Workforce to Care for North Carolina's Aging Population.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Mitchell T

    2016-01-01

    North Carolina's aging population will require a health care workforce prepared to meet patients' complex care needs. The keys to training this workforce include continuing to mobilize the state's educational infrastructure to provide interprofessional, community-based experiences and maximizing exposure to new models of care. PMID:26961830

  13. School-Age Child Care. Fastback 454.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBuffe, James R.; Hargreaves, Sherran A.

    Currently at least 5 million children--some estimates are as high as 15 million--are left unsupervised before or after school for 3 or more hours a day. In response to the problems of these latchkey children, many public schools are now developing some form of school-based or school-related before- and after-school child care programs. The purpose…

  14. Comprehensive Care Plan Development Using Resident Assessment Instrument Framework: Past, Present, and Future Practices

    PubMed Central

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Corazzini, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Development of the comprehensive care plan (CCP) is a requirement for nursing homes participating in the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs, referred to as skilled nursing facilities. The plan must be developed within the context of the comprehensive interdisciplinary assessment framework—the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI). Consistent compliance with this requirement has been difficult to achieve. To improve the quality of CCP development within this framework, an increased understanding of complex factors contributing to inconsistent compliance is required. In this commentary, we examine the history of the comprehensive care plan; its development within the RAI framework; linkages between the RAI and registered nurse staffing; empirical evidence of the CCP’s efficacy; and the limitations of extant standards of practices in CCP development. Because of the registered nurse’s educational preparation, professional practice standards, and licensure obligations, the essential contributions of professional nurses in CCP development are emphasized. Recommendations for evidence-based micro and macro level practice changes with the potential to improve the quality of CCP development and regulatory compliance are presented. Suggestions for future research are given. PMID:27417811

  15. Schools Out! Family Day Care for the School Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Elizabeth; Milich, Cynthia

    This paper presents a study of family day care services for school age children. The study involved telephone and home interviews concerning services provided by a sample of 247 family day care mothers from the Los Angeles area. The paper is divided into two parts. Part I describes the results of the interviews in numerical form and includes short…

  16. Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals' experiences of supporting resident's well-being processes within the frame of residential care homes (RCH).

    PubMed

    Lundin, Anette; Berg, Lars-Erik; Hellström Muhli, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being. The phenomenon is seen from the eldercarers' meaning-making through their lifeworld perspective at a residential care home. Based on primary empirical interview material with twelve professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being creates certain ambiguities in the professionals' meaning-making. In practice, it balances between the older persons' (from hereon called residents) needs and the conditions of the eldercare organization. The ambiguities (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older persons vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents' need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents' need for routine vs. the eldercarers' not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the eldercarers' choice of handling supportive care for older persons' well-being (the how). They have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and their own presence and time. In performing supportive care for older persons' well-being, the eldercarers have to consider aspects concerning the resident's lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organization. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the care of older residents are manifested in the importance of 'the little things', and the eldercarer's ability to give receptive attention, which requires presence. PMID:27131273

  17. Psychosomatic Primary Care in Gynecology–Assessment and Acceptance by Residents for Obstetrics and Gynecology in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schott, S.; Lermann, J.; Rauchfuß, M.; Ortmann, O.; Ditz, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The course “Psychosomatic Primary Care” has been part of the training curriculum of obstetrics and gynecology in Germany since 2003. The aim of the course is to train up physicians, whose prior training primarily focussed on somatic care, to enable them to offer care also taking into account biopsychosocial aspects. Taking the guidelines for psychotherapy as a template, the aim of psychosomatic primary care is to recognize the etiological links between psychological and somatic factors which contribute to diseases. The necessity for a compulsory course as part of training in gynecology was recently critically discussed. Major points discussed included the question whether the current forms of teaching, consisting of courses, are outdated and whether the required skills should be part of regular daily training. Method: A 3-part online questionnaire consisting of 30 items was developed and sent to 2431 residents in the period from September to December 2012 through the online mailing list of the DGGG. Results: The 540 residents who responded to the questionnaire were predominantly female (83.3 %) with an average age of 30 years; 50.3 % were in their 1st to their 4th year of training. Over the longer term, the majority of respondents (56.1 %) hoped to continue working in a hospital and regularly (84.6 %) attended teaching courses voluntarily. 70.9 % of them had already attended the course “Psychosomatic Primary Care”. Of the group who had completed the course, 29.4 % were satisfied with the offer. The main criticism directed against the course was its scope which 24.1 % considered completely inadequate. 24.5 % considered the course to be an important part of training, while 16.5 % would have preferred that the course be abolished. 18 % of respondents reported that psychosomatic medicine did not feature regularly in their daily clinical routine. Perspective: Because of the huge gap between what is currently offered and the

  18. The 2030 Problem: Caring for Aging Baby Boomers

    PubMed Central

    Knickman, James R; Snell, Emily K

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the coming challenges of caring for large numbers of frail elderly as the Baby Boom generation ages. Study Setting A review of economic and demographic data as well as simulations of projected socioeconomic and demographic patterns in the year 2030 form the basis of a review of the challenges related to caring for seniors that need to be faced by society. Study Design A series of analyses are used to consider the challenges related to caring for elders in the year 2030: (1) measures of macroeconomic burden are developed and analyzed, (2) the literatures on trends in disability, payment approaches for long-term care, healthy aging, and cultural views of aging are analyzed and synthesized, and(3)simulations of future income and assets patterns of the Baby Boom generation are developed. Principal Findings The economic burden of aging in 2030 should be no greater than the economic burden associated with raising large numbers of baby boom children in the 1960s. The real challenges of caring for the elderly in 2030 will involve: (1) making sure society develops payment and insurance systems for long-term care that work better than existing ones, (2) taking advantage of advances in medicine and behavioral health to keep the elderly as healthy and active as possible, (3) changing the way society organizes community services so that care is more accessible, and (4) altering the cultural view of aging to make sure all ages are integrated into the fabric of community life. Conclusions To meet the long-term care needs of Baby Boomers, social and public policy changes must begin soon. Meeting the financial and social service burdens of growing numbers of elders will not be a daunting task if necessary changes are made now rather than when Baby Boomers actually need long-term care. PMID:12236388

  19. Mother, daughter, patient, nurse: women's emotion work in aged care.

    PubMed

    Gattuso, S; Bevan, C

    2000-04-01

    This paper examines emotion work within the predominantly female environment of aged-care nursing, identifying phenomena which must be accounted for in a theory of emotional labour. These phenomena include the blurring of public and private in women's experiences and maternal models of care. Initial findings demonstrate the high levels of stress experienced by staff, related to emotional labour and to conflicts around the erosion of care standards. Sixteen women, from rural Australia, participated in the first stage of the research. The oldest was in her sixties, the youngest in her thirties. Length of aged-care experience ranged from 2 to 33 years. Although most of the women expected to still be in aged care in 5 years' time, they were negative in their attitudes to personal ageing, suggesting an ambivalence in their feelings about working in aged care. Three women nurses are the particular focus of this paper. Their narratives illustrate the intersection of private and public caring in nurses' lives and the implications of this for emotional labour. Phenomena such as dual caring, conflicts in insider-outsider roles, and transference are revealed in their narratives. We argue that the welfare of the recipient of gerontic nursing is linked to the well-being of the nurse-carer but that a cultural change is needed so as to recognize and value emotion work. However, endorsing Staden, we agree that such a change is dependent on the politicization of 'caring'. There is also need for further and broader research concerning the nature of emotional labour and the ethics of care. PMID:10759986

  20. Factors contributing to nonadherence to follow-up appointments in a resident glaucoma clinic versus primary eye care clinic

    PubMed Central

    Fudemberg, Scott J; Lee, Brian; Waisbourd, Michael; Murphy, Rachel A; Dai, Yang; Leiby, Benjamin E; Hark, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the rate of adherence to follow-up appointment recommendations in a resident glaucoma clinic with no mechanism for reminders, compared to a resident cataract and primary eye care (CPEC) clinic in which telephone reminders were used, and to identify factors that contribute to adherence in each patient group. Methods This retrospective cohort study included subjects in the CPEC clinic who received telephone reminders and those in the glaucoma clinic who did not. Each sample was selected to have a similar proportion of follow-up recommendations for 1, 3, and 6 months. Subjects were considered adherent if they returned within a specified timeframe. Results A total of 144 subjects from the glaucoma clinic and 151 subjects from the CPEC clinic were included. There was no significant difference between follow-up adherence rates of patients who received telephone reminders and those who did not (odds ratio [OR] =1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79–2.32, P=0.28). Patients who were on more than two ocular medications were more likely to return for follow-up (OR=3.11, 95% CI 1.53–6.35, P=0.0018). Subjects between the ages 50 and 80 years were more likely to be adherent compared to their younger and older peers (P=0.02). Conclusion The follow-up adherence of patients in a CPEC clinic who received telephone reminders was similar to patients in a glaucoma clinic who did not receive any intervention to increase their adherence. Younger (⩽50 years old) and elderly (⩾80 years old) subjects, as well as patients using less than two glaucoma medications, were less likely to adhere to their follow-up appointments. PMID:26811672

  1. Supporting residents’ expression of sexuality: the initial construction of a sexuality assessment tool for residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sexuality is a key component of quality of life and well-being and a need to express one’s sexuality continues into old age. Staff and families in residential aged care facilities often find expressions of sexuality by residents, particularly those living with dementia, challenging and facilities often struggle to address individuals’ needs in this area. This paper describes the development of an assessment tool which enables residential aged care facilities to identify how supportive their organisation is of all residents’ expression of their sexuality, and thereby improve where required. Methods Multi-phase design using qualitative methods and a Delphi technique. Tool items were derived from the literature and verified by qualitative interviews with aged care facility staff, residents and families. The final item pool was confirmed via a reactive Delphi process. Results A final item pool of sixty-nine items grouped into seven key areas allows facilities to score their compliance with the areas identified as being supportive of older people’s expression of their sexuality in a residential aged care environment. Conclusions The sexuality assessment tool (SexAT) guides practice to support the normalization of sexuality in aged care homes and assists facilities to identify where enhancements to the environment, policies, procedures and practices, information and education/training are required. The tool also enables facilities to monitor initiatives in these areas over time. PMID:24980463

  2. They know!—Do they? A qualitative study of residents and relatives views on advance care planning, end-of-life care, and decision-making in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Bollig, Georg; Gjengedal, Eva; Rosland, Jan Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residents living in long-term care facilities are a vulnerable population. For many residents, a nursing home is their place of death. Palliative care and end-of-life decisions are important components of their care provision. Aim: To study the views of cognitively able residents and relatives on advance care planning, end-of-life care, and decision-making in nursing homes. Design: A qualitative study with in-depth interviews with nursing home residents and focus group interviews with relatives of nursing home residents. Analysis is based on interpretive description. Setting/participants: In total, 43 informants from nine nursing homes participated in the study (25 nursing home residents and 18 relatives). All included residents had capacity to provide informed consent and lived in long-term care. Results: The main findings of this study were the differing views about decision-making and advance care planning of residents and relatives. Residents do trust relatives and staff to make important decisions for them. The relatives are in contrast insecure about the residents’ wishes and experience decision-making as a burden. The majority of the residents had not participated in advance care planning. None of the residents stated challenges connected to end-of-life care or mentioned the wish for euthanasia. Conclusion: Although most residents seem to be satisfied with decision-making and end-of life care, there is a need for systematic advance care planning. Advance care planning could help to explore future wishes for care and ease decision-making for the relatives, physicians, and staff and should be offered to all cognitively able nursing homes residents. PMID:26396227

  3. Grip on challenging behaviour: a multidisciplinary care programme for managing behavioural problems in nursing home residents with dementia. Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Behavioural problems are common in nursing home residents with dementia and they often are burdensome for both residents and nursing staff. In this study, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new care programme for managing behavioural problems will be evaluated. Methods/Design The care programme is based on Dutch national guidelines. It will consist of four steps: detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation. A stepped wedge design will be used. A total of 14 dementia special care units will implement the care programme. The primary outcome is behavioural problems. Secondary outcomes will include quality of life, prescription rate of antipsychotics, use of physical restraints and workload and job satisfaction of nursing staff. The effect of the care programme will be estimated using multilevel linear regression analysis. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective will also be carried out. Discussion The care programme is expected to be cost-effective and effective in decreasing behavioural problems, workload of nursing staff and in increasing quality of life of residents. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR). Trial number: NTR 2141 PMID:21338502

  4. Laboratory-confirmed influenza B infection in immunized long-term care facility residents receiving oseltamivir prophylaxis in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Winter, Anne-Luise; Peci, Adriana; Eshaghi, Alireza; Baird, Michelle; Memari, Nader; Kristjanson, Erik; Balogun, Elizabeth; Higgins, Rachel R; Li, Aimin; Farrell, David J; Gubbay, Jonathan B

    2013-11-01

    We report on an influenza B outbreak in an Ontario long-term care facility in which 2 immunized residents receiving oseltamivir prophylaxis for at least 5 days developed laboratory-confirmed influenza B infection. All isolates were tested for the most common oseltamivir resistance, and none of them had resistance identified. PMID:24113612

  5. Factors that Influence Physical Activity in Long-Term Care: Perspectives of Residents, Staff, and Significant Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Kathleen; Edwards, Nancy; Guitard, Paulette; Murray, Mary Ann; Caswell, Wenda; Perrier, Marie Josee

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity has been linked to positive health outcomes for frail seniors. However, our understanding of factors that influence the physical activity of residents in the long-term care (LTC) setting is limited. This article describes our work with focus groups, one component of a multi-component study that examined factors influencing the…

  6. Patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections in older residents of long-term care facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: To describe patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among elderly residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). DESIGN: Data from a prospective, randomized, controlled study conducted from April 1998 through August 2001 to investigate the effect of vitamin ...

  7. The development of the MIBBO: A measure of resident preferences for physical activity in long term care settings.

    PubMed

    Kleynen, Melanie; Braun, Susy M; van Vijven, Kim; van Rossum, Erik; Beurskens, Anna J

    2015-01-01

    Offering physical activities matching with the preferences of residents in long-term care facilities could increase compliance and contribute to client-centered care. A measure to investigate meaningful activities by using a photo-interview has been developed ("MIBBO"). In two pilot studies including 133 residents living on different wards in long-term care facilities, feasibility, most chosen activities, and consistency of preferences were investigated. It was possible to conduct the MIBBO on average in 30 min with the majority (86.4%) of residents. The most frequently chosen activities were: gymnastics and orchestra (each 28%), preparing a meal (31%), walking (outside, 33%), watering plants (38%), and feeding pets (40%). In a retest one week after the initial interview 69.4% agreement of chosen activities was seen. The MIBBO seems a promising measure to help health care professionals in identifying residents' preferred activities. Future research should focus on the implementation of the tailored activity plan, incorporating it into the daily routine. PMID:25784078

  8. Risk factors for fecal colonization with multiple distinct strains of Escherichia coli among long-term care facility residents.

    PubMed

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Maslow, Joel N

    2009-05-01

    Of 49 long-term care facility residents, 21 (43%) were colonized with 2 or more distinct strains of Escherichia coli. There were no significant risk factors for colonization with multiple strains of E. coli. These results suggest that future efforts to efficiently identify the diversity of colonizing strains will be challenging. PMID:19292660

  9. Risk Factors for Fecal Colonization with Multiple Distinct Strains of Escherichia coli Among Long-Term Care Facility Residents

    PubMed Central

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Maslow, Joel N.

    2009-01-01

    Of 49 long-term care facility residents, 21 (43%) were colonized with two or more distinct strains of Escherichia coli. There were no significant risk factors for colonization with multiple strains of E. coli. These results suggest future efforts to efficiently identify diversity of colonizing strains will be challenging. PMID:19292660

  10. Old age, disability and care in public health.

    PubMed

    Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2015-12-01

    Aging of the population profoundly changes the scope of action of public health, altering the profile of morbidity-mortality and increasing the demand for chronic care. In the aging population, disability serves as an indicator of health and a guideline for actions and policies. This enquiry, with a qualitative approach, based on interpretative anthropology and the emic perspective, aims to understand the way of thinking and acting of old people in the face of 'old age with disability' and their relationships with public health. Individual interviews were held at the subject's homes, using a semi-structured script, with 57 old people living in the city, including participants from the cohort of Bambuí. Collection and analysis of the data was oriented by the methodology of Signs, Meanings and Actions, making possible anthropological investigation of the representations and concrete behaviors associated with disability in old age in the local culture. Two categories relating to the relationships between old age, disability and public healthcare emerged from the analysis: (i) experience of care in old age with disability; and (ii) the fear of lack of care. The results reveal that public health needs to review its concepts about disability in old age and incorporate disability into the agenda of the functional dimension of health and care for old age. PMID:26691789

  11. Responding to vulnerability in old age: patient-centred care.

    PubMed

    Abley, Clare

    Patient-centred care is a term widely used in health policy and is familiar to staff as a principle or commonly agreed approach to care. However, nursing and multidisciplinary teams often do not agree how it should be provided for older patients. This article outlines three different models of patient-centred care applicable to the care of older people. The article also explores the concept of vulnerability in old age, highlighting differences between the perspectives of older people and those of professionals and how clinical practice can be improved to achieve a more patient-centred approach. The links between patient-centred care and vulnerability in old age are considered along with the implications of this for clinical practice. PMID:23240515

  12. Health care users residing on the Mexican border. What factors determine choice of the U.S. or Mexican health system?

    PubMed

    Guendelman, S

    1991-05-01

    Using multivariate analytic techniques, this article examines the factors influencing choice of the Mexican or U.S. health care system by service users residing on the Mexican border. Data were obtained from a 1987 binational health survey of 660 households, conducted in Tijuana. The sample consisted of 1,162 household members who reported having used health services in the U.S. and/or Mexico in the 6 months prior to the interview. The findings indicate that out of all the health care users in a 6-month interval, 7% sought services in the United States and 93% sought services only in Mexico. A weighted logistic regression on entry into care shows that, after adjusting for all the other variables in the model, U.S. insurance coverage, transportation, older age, and male gender were the most significant predictors. U.S. insurance, the strongest predictor of access, was associated with a labor history and legal residence across the border. Among U.S. users, the average number of visits was 2.6 (SD = 2.7). Sex, transportation, and socioeconomic status were significant predictors of volume of visits, in a weighted least squares regression analysis. The probability of more contacts among women is linked to their reproductive needs. An increasing use of U.S. health care is expected as a consequence of the new immigration law. PMID:2020207

  13. Demographics, Management, Preventive Health Care and Disease in Aged Horses.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Joanne L

    2016-08-01

    Gerontology has become increasingly important in equine veterinary medicine, with aged animals representing a significant proportion of the equine population. Horses are defined as geriatric or aged from age 15 years onwards but can have a life span of more than 40 years. Despite a high level of owner concern for the well-being of their geriatric animal, provision of preventive health care may be suboptimal. Owners seem to under-recognize some of the most prevalent diseases identified in geriatric horses. This review focuses on the demographic characteristics of the equine geriatric population and management and preventive care practices of older horses. PMID:27449388

  14. Randomized, Controlled Trial of High-Dose Influenza Vaccine Among Frail Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Nace, David A.; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Ross, Ted M.; Saracco, Stacey; Churilla, Roberta M.; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite vaccination, residents of long-term-care facilities (LTCFs) remain at high risk of influenza-related morbidity and mortality. More-effective vaccine options for this population are needed. Methods. We conducted a single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial comparing high-dose (HD) to standard-dose (SD) inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in 205 frail, elderly residents of LTCFs during the 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 influenza seasons. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers were measured at baseline and 30 and 180 days following vaccination. Results. A total of 187 subjects (91%) completed the study. The mean age was 86.7 years. Geometric mean titers (GMTs) were significantly higher (P < .05) at day 30 for HD recipients, compared with SD recipients, for all comparisons except influenza A(H1N1) during 2012–2013 (the HD formulation was noninferior to the SD formulation for influenza A[H1N1] during 2012–2013). GMTs for HD and SD recipients during 2011–2012 were as follows: influenza A(H1N1), 78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 45–136) and 27 (95% CI, 17–44), respectively; influenza A(H3N2), 26 (95% CI, 17–40) and 10 (95% CI, 7–15), respectively; and influenza B, 26 (95% CI, 19–35) and 14 (95% CI, 11–18), respectively. During 2012–2013, GMTs for HD and SD recipients were as follows: influenza A(H1N1), 46 (95% CI, 33–63) and 50 (95% CI, 37–67); influenza A(H3N2), 23 (95% CI, 18–31) and 14 (95% CI, 11–18), respectively; and influenza B, 26 (95% CI, 21–32) and 17 (95% CI, 14–22), respectively. GMTs were significantly higher at day 180 for HD recipients, compared with SD recipients, for influenza A(H3N2) in both years (P < .001). Conclusions. Among frail, elderly residents of LTCFs, HD influenza vaccine produced superior responses for all strains except influenza A(H1N1) in 2012–2013. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01654224. PMID:25525051

  15. Asthma in Medicaid managed care enrollees residing in New York City: results from a post-World Trade Center disaster survey.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Victoria L; Radigan, Marleen S; Roohan, Patrick J; Anarella, Joseph P; Gesten, Foster C

    2005-03-01

    The collapse of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, released a substantial amount of respiratory irritants into the air. To assess the asthma status of Medicaid managed care enrollees who may have been exposed, the New York State Department of Health, Office of Managed Care, conducted a mail survey among enrollees residing in New York City. All enrollees, aged 5-56 with persistent asthma before September 11, 2001, were surveyed during summer 2002. Administrative health service utilization data from the Medicaid Encounter Data System were used to validate and supplement survey responses. A total of 3,664 enrollees responded. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed to examine factors associated with self-reported worsened asthma post September 11, 2001, and with emergency department/inpatient hospitalizations related to asthma from September 11, 2001, through December 31, 2001. Forty-five percent of survey respondents reported worsened asthma post 9/11. Respondents who reported worsened asthma were significantly more likely to have utilized health services for asthma than those who reported stable or improved asthma. Residence in both lower Manhattan (adjusted OR = 2.28) and Western Brooklyn (adjusted OR = 2.40) were associated with self-reported worsened asthma. However, only residents of Western Brooklyn had an elevated odds ratio for emergency department/inpatient hospitalizations with diagnoses of asthma post 9/11 (adjusted OR = 1.52). Worsened asthma was reported by a significant proportion of this low-income, largely minority population and was associated with the location of residence. Results from this study provide guidance to health care organizations in the development of plans to ensure the health of people with asthma during disaster situations. PMID:15738333

  16. Phenomenological perspectives on self-care in aging

    PubMed Central

    Söderhamn, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Self-care is a central concept in health care and may be considered as a means to maintain, restore, and improve one’s health and well-being. When performed effectively, self-care contributes not only to human functioning but also to human structural integrity and human development (ie, to a dynamic and holistic state of health). Self-care as a clinical concept is relevant for health care professionals, and it should be meaningful to investigate it at a philosophical level and to further elaborate upon this concept. The aim of this article is to discuss and elaborate upon a phenomenological perspective on self-care in aging that is relevant for the health sciences. Self-care may be preliminarily regarded as a fundamental perspective for the conscious older individual, and as a way of being in the world with both the objective body and with the lived body. The lived body is the personal center of perception and the field of action, and it is also the center of self-care. The potentiality or ability for self-care activity and self-care activity itself are structures given to perception, with self-care ability as an integral part of the lived body. The actualization of self-care ability comes about through a certain meaning, which can be regarded as an important driving force. It is constituted by communication, a healthy lifestyle, and by building meaning and socializing. Successful self-care involves having contacts with the health care system, being conscious of a sound lifestyle, being physically and mentally active, being engaged, having social contacts with family and others, as well as being satisfied, positive, and being able to look forward. One fundamental cornerstone is serenity on behalf of the individual. Self-care can facilitate transitions, and it may also be an outcome of transitions. PMID:23807842

  17. Improving nutrition care for nursing home residents using the INRx process.

    PubMed

    Crogan, Neva L; Alvine, Ceanne; Pasvogel, Alice

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the Individual Nutrition Rx (INRx) assessment process and report findings on elder nutritional status, common nutrition problems identified by the INRx process, resolution outcomes from each problem, and the most efficacious approaches used to address the identified nutrition problems. The study used a two-group prospective quasi-experimental design with measures taken at baseline and at 6 months. Participants in the treatment group (n = 41) received the 6-month INRx assessment process, while residents in the comparison group (n = 40) received routine care specific to their nursing home. The most frequent nutritional problems identified were appetite change, poor positioning while eating, and problems with oral status. A total of 39 approaches were recommended by the interdisciplinary research team. Serum albumin and prealbumin, and depression scores were all significantly improved post intervention. The problems, approaches, and outcomes identified during the INRx process support the premise that interdisciplinary teams following the INRx process can assess complex nutritional problems and influence outcomes for older adults living in nursing homes. PMID:18032218

  18. Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies

    PubMed Central

    Grall, Kristi H; Panchal, Ashish R; Chuffe, Eliud; Stoneking, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. Materials and methods We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; P<0.001). Conclusion Implementation of a longitudinal, integrated Spanish-immersion curriculum is feasible and improves language skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settings. PMID:26929679

  19. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR...: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. In addition to meeting the... of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  20. Length of residence, age and patterns of medicinal plant knowledge and use among women in the urban Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper explores patterns of women’s medicinal plant knowledge and use in an urban area of the Brazilian Amazon. Specifically, this paper examines the relationship between a woman’s age and her use and knowledge of medicinal plants. It also examines whether length of residence in three different areas of the Amazon is correlated with a woman’s use and knowledge of medicinal plants. Two of the areas where respondents may have resided, the jungle/seringal and farms/colonias, are classified as rural. The third area (which all of the respondents resided in) was urban. Methods This paper utilizes survey data collected in Rio Branco, Brazil. Researchers administered the survey to 153 households in the community of Bairro da Luz (a pseudonym). The survey collected data on phytotherapeutic knowledge, general phytotherapeutic practice, recent phytotherapeutic practice and demographic information on age and length of residence in the seringal, on a colonia, and in a city. Bivariate correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the inter-relationships among the key variables. Three dependent variables, two measuring general phytotherapeutic practice and one measuring phytotherapeutic knowledge were regressed on the demographic factors. Results The results demonstrate a relationship between a woman’s age and medicinal plant use, but not between age and plant knowledge. Additionally, length of residence in an urban area and on a colonia/farm are not related to medicinal plant knowledge or use. However, length of residence in the seringal/jungle is positively correlated with both medicinal plant knowledge and use. Conclusions The results reveal a vibrant tradition of medicinal plant use in Bairro da Luz. They also indicate that when it comes to place of residence and phytotherapy the meaningful distinction is not rural versus urban, it is seringal versus other locations. Finally, the results suggest that phytotherapeutic knowledge and use should be

  1. Principles for communicating with aging health-care consumers.

    PubMed

    Schewe, C D; Spotts, H E

    1990-01-01

    The health-care marketplace is aging by leaps and bounds and bringing with it new and different medical needs. As costs soar and public assistance programs dwindle in impact, health-care providers will need better marketing strategies to bring treatments to patients/consumers. This article looks at the research findings of behavioral scientists and offers guidelines for effective communication with aging audiences. Health-care providers can use these findings to design more effective advertising, promotional brochures, newsletters, and a host of other communication tools targeted at an older market. Health-care managers and other professionals should find the guidelines useful in their daily interactions with patients and colleagues. PMID:10107270

  2. Reducing and managing faecal incontinence in people with advanced dementia who are resident in care homes: protocol for a realist synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Rycroft Malone, Jo; Norton, Christine; Harari, Danielle; Harwood, Rowan; Roe, Brenda; Russell, Bridget; Fader, Mandy; Buswell, Marina; Drennan, Vari M; Bunn, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Faecal incontinence (FI) is the involuntary loss of liquid or solid stool that is a social or hygienic problem. The prevalence of FI in residents of care homes is high, but it is not an inevitable consequence of old age or dementia. There is good evidence on risk factors, but few studies provide evidence about effective interventions. There is a need to understand how, why, and in what circumstances particular programmes to reduce and manage FI are effective (or not) for people with dementia. The purpose of this review is to identify which (elements of the) interventions could potentially be effective, and examine the barriers and facilitators to the acceptability, uptake and implementation of interventions designed to address FI in people with dementia who are resident in care homes. Methods and analysis A realist synthesis approach to review the evidence will be used which will include studies on continence, person-centred care, implementation research in care homes, workforce and research on care home culture. An iterative four-stage approach is planned. Phase 1: development of an initial programme theory or theories that will be ‘tested’ through a first scoping of the literature and consultation with five stakeholder groups (care home providers, user representatives, academics and practice educators, clinicians with a special interest in FI and continence specialists). Phase 2: a systematic search and analysis of published and unpublished evidence to test and develop the programme theories identified in phase 1. Phase 3: validation of programme theory/ies with a purposive sample of participants from phase 1. Ethics and dissemination The overall protocol does not require ethical review. The University research ethics committee will review interviews conducted as part of phase 1 and 3. The final fourth phase will synthesise and develop recommendations for practice and develop testable hypotheses for further research. PMID:26163032

  3. Effect of daily application of a 0.05% chlorhexidine solution on the incidence of (aspiration) pneumonia in care home residents: design of a multicentre cluster randomised controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hollaar, Vanessa; van der Maarel-Wierink, Claar; van der Putten, Gert-Jan; de Swart, Bert; de Baat, Cees

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pneumonia is an important cause of death in care home residents. Dysphagia and poor oral health are significant risk factors for developing aspiration pneumonia. Oral hygiene care reduces the number of oral bacteria and the risk of aspiration pneumonia. However, it is not clear yet which oral hygiene care intervention is most efficacious in reducing the risk of aspiration pneumonia. The aim of the study is to assess whether the application of a 0.05% chlorhexidine-containing solution in addition to the usual daily oral hygiene care reduces the incidence of pneumonia in physically disabled care home residents with dysphagia. Methods and analysis The study was designed as a multicentre cluster randomised controlled clinical trial, with care homes as units of randomisation. During 1 year, 500 physically disabled care home residents with dysphagia will be followed. The intervention consists of applying a 0.05% chlorhexidine-containing solution twice daily, immediately after the usual oral hygiene care, whereas the control group receives no application after the usual oral hygiene care. The primary outcome is the incidence of pneumonia diagnosed by a physician, using a set of strictly described criteria. The effect of the intervention on the incidence of pneumonia will be determined using a Cox regression analysis. The secondary outcomes are correlations between incidence of pneumonia, age, gender, diagnosed diseases, dysphagia severity, care dependency, actually used medication, number of teeth and implants present and the presence of removable dentures. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from the Medical Ethical Committee of Radboud university medical centre: NL.nr: 41990.091.12. Written and informed consent will be obtained from all participating care homes and residents. The study's findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number The trial has been registered in the Netherlands in the National Trial

  4. Advance care planning for nursing home residents with dementia: policy vs. practice.

    PubMed

    2016-05-27

    Despite the potential benefits of ACP for nursing home residents with dementia, the authors of this study highlight that hardly any research has focused on the involvement of residents/families in ACP and that ACP is rarely realised for these people. Their research aimed to evaluate the ACP policy for people with dementia in nursing homes and to gain insight into the involvement of residents with dementia and their families in ACP. PMID:27231078

  5. Weathering the storm: challenges to nurses providing care to nursing home residents during hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Hyer, Kathryn; Brown, Lisa M; Christensen, Janelle J; Thomas, Kali S

    2009-11-01

    This article documents the experience of 291 Florida nursing homes during the 2004 hurricane season. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, the authors described and compared the challenges nurses encountered when evacuating residents with their experiences assisting residents of facilities that sheltered in place. The primary concerns for evacuating facilities were accessing appropriate evacuation sites for residents and having ambulance transportation contracts honored. The main issue for facilities that sheltered in place was the length of time it took for power to be restored. Barriers to maintaining resident health during disasters for those who evacuated or sheltered in place are identified. PMID:19875034

  6. A Systematic Review of Interventions to Change Staff Care Practices in Order to Improve Resident Outcomes in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lee-Fay; Fletcher, Jennifer; Goodenough, Belinda; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; MacAndrew, Margaret; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed interventions that attempted to change staff practice to improve long-term care resident outcomes. Methods Studies met criteria if they used a control group, included 6 or more nursing home units and quantitatively assessed staff behavior or resident outcomes. Intervention components were coded as including education material, training, audit and feedback, monitoring, champions, team meetings, policy or procedures and organizational restructure. Results Sixty-three unique studies were broadly grouped according to clinical domain—oral health (3 studies), hygiene and infection control (3 studies), nutrition (2 studies), nursing home acquired pneumonia (2 studies), depression (2 studies) appropriate prescribing (7 studies), reduction of physical restraints (3 studies), management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (6 studies), falls reduction and prevention (11 studies), quality improvement (9 studies), philosophy of care (10 studies) and other (5 studies). No single intervention component, combination of, or increased number of components was associated with greater likelihood of positive outcomes. Studies with positive outcomes for residents also tended to change staff behavior, however changing staff behavior did not necessarily improve resident outcomes. Studies targeting specific care tasks (e.g. oral care, physical restraints) were more likely to produce positive outcomes than those requiring global practice changes (e.g. care philosophy). Studies using intervention theories were more likely to be successful. Program logic was rarely articulated, so it was often unclear whether there was a coherent connection between the intervention components and measured outcomes. Many studies reported barriers relating to staff (e.g. turnover, high workload, attitudes) or organizational factors (e.g. funding, resources, logistics). Conclusion Changing staff practice in nursing homes is possible but complex

  7. An evidence-based program to improve analgesic practice and pain outcomes in residential aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Savvas, Steven M; Toye, Chris M; Beattie, Elizabeth R A; Gibson, Stephen J

    2014-08-01

    Pain is common in individuals living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs), and a number of obstacles have been identified as recurring barriers to adequate pain management. To address this, the Australian Pain Society developed 27 recommendations for comprehensive good practice in the identification, assessment, and management of pain. This study reviewed preexisting pain management practice at five Australian RACFs and identified changes needed to implement the recommendations and then implemented an evidence-based program that aimed to facilitate better pain management. The program involved staff training and education and revised in-house pain-management procedures. Reviews occurred before and after the program and included the assessment of 282 residents for analgesic use and pain status. Analgesic use improved after the program (P<.001), with a decrease in residents receiving no analgesics (from 15% to 6%) and an increase in residents receiving around-the-clock plus as-needed analgesics (from 24% to 43%). There were improvements in pain relief for residents with scores indicative of pain, with Abbey pain scale (P=.005), Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia Scale (P=.001), and Non-communicative Patient's Pain Assessment Instrument scale (P<.001) scores all improving. Although physical function declined as expected, Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Survey bodily pain scores also showed improvement (P=.001). Better evidence-based practice and outcomes in RACFs can be achieved with appropriate training and education. Investing resources in the aged care workforce using this program improved analgesic practice and pain relief in participating sites. Further attention to the continued targeted pain management training of aged care staff is likely to improve pain-focused care for residents. PMID:25040607

  8. Exploring Innovative Solutions for Quality of Life and Care of Bed-Ridden Nursing Home Residents through Codesign Sessions

    PubMed Central

    van Hoof, J.; Wetzels, M. H.; Dooremalen, A. M. C.; Overdiep, R. A.; Nieboer, M. E.; Eyck, A. M. E.; van Gorkom, P. J. L. M.; Zwerts-Verhelst, E. L. M.; Aarts, S.; Vissers-Luijcks, C.; van der Voort, C. S.; Moonen, M. J. G. A.; van de Vrande, H. A.; van Dijck-Heinen, C. J. M. L.; Wouters, E. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Bed-ridden nursing home residents are in need of environments which are homelike and facilitate the provision of care. Design guidance for this group of older people is limited. This study concerned the exploration and generation of innovative environmental enrichment scenarios for bed-ridden residents. This exploration was conducted through a combination of participatory action research with user-centred design involving 56 professional stakeholders in interactive work sessions. This study identified numerous design solutions, both concepts and products that are available on the marketplace and that on a higher level relate to improvements in resident autonomy and the supply of technological items and architectural features. The methodology chosen can be used to explore the creative potential of stakeholders from the domain of healthcare in product innovation. PMID:26543647

  9. Exploring Innovative Solutions for Quality of Life and Care of Bed-Ridden Nursing Home Residents through Codesign Sessions.

    PubMed

    van Hoof, J; Wetzels, M H; Dooremalen, A M C; Overdiep, R A; Nieboer, M E; Eyck, A M E; van Gorkom, P J L M; Zwerts-Verhelst, E L M; Aarts, S; Vissers-Luijcks, C; van der Voort, C S; Moonen, M J G A; van de Vrande, H A; van Dijck-Heinen, C J M L; Wouters, E J M

    2015-01-01

    Bed-ridden nursing home residents are in need of environments which are homelike and facilitate the provision of care. Design guidance for this group of older people is limited. This study concerned the exploration and generation of innovative environmental enrichment scenarios for bed-ridden residents. This exploration was conducted through a combination of participatory action research with user-centred design involving 56 professional stakeholders in interactive work sessions. This study identified numerous design solutions, both concepts and products that are available on the marketplace and that on a higher level relate to improvements in resident autonomy and the supply of technological items and architectural features. The methodology chosen can be used to explore the creative potential of stakeholders from the domain of healthcare in product innovation. PMID:26543647

  10. Preparing family physicians for the care of patients with severe and persistent mental illness: Examples from two U.S. residency programs.

    PubMed

    Romain, Amy M; Muench, John; Phillips, Julie P

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with severe and persistent mental illness have increased morbidity and mortality and significant barriers to accessing health care. Although primary care providers deliver most health care for this population, residency training programs generally lack specialized training in this area. This article describes the approaches of two family medicine residency programs in addressing this educational gap. Each program collaborated with external organizations to create service models that would enhance patient access, while immersing residents in the care of patients with severe and persistent mental illness. Residents educated in these programs gain experience with an underserved population, practice advanced skills in managing complex medical and psychiatric illness, and increase knowledge from collaborative work in unique care settings. Further implementation of programs like these, and rigorous study of such programs, could have significant benefits for family medicine education and the care of patients with severe and persistent mental illness. PMID:26142287

  11. A comment on the use of flushing time, residence time, and age as transport time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsen, N.E.; Cloern, J.E.; Lucas, L.V.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    Applications of transport time scales are pervasive in biological, hydrologic, and geochemical studies yet these times scales are not consistently defined and applied with rigor in the literature. We compare three transport time scales (flushing time, age, and residence time) commonly used to measure the retention of water or scalar quantities transported with water. We identify the underlying assumptions associated with each time scale, describe procedures for computing these time scales in idealized cases, and identify pitfalls when real-world systems deviate from these idealizations. We then apply the time scale definitions to a shallow 378 ha tidal lake to illustrate how deviations between real water bodies and the idealized examples can result from: (1) non-steady flow; (2) spatial variability in bathymetry, circulation, and transport time scales; and (3) tides that introduce complexities not accounted for in the idealized cases. These examples illustrate that no single transport time scale is valid for all time periods, locations, and constituents, and no one time scale describes all transport processes. We encourage aquatic scientists to rigorously define the transport time scale when it is applied, identify the underlying assumptions in the application of that concept, and ask if those assumptions are valid in the application of that approach for computing transport time scales in real systems.

  12. Effect of resident handoffs on length of hospital and intensive care unit stay in a neurosurgical population: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Elizabeth N; Davis, Matthew C; Agee, Bonita S; Oster, Robert A; Markert, James M

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Handoffs and services changes are potentially modifiable sources of medical error and delays in transition of care. This cohort study assessed the relationship between resident service handoffs and length of stay for neurosurgical patients. METHODS All patients admitted to the University of Alabama at Birmingham neurosurgical service between July 1, 2012, and July 1, 2014, were retrospectively identified. A service handoff was defined as any point when a resident handed off coverage of a service for longer than 1 weekend. A conditional probability distribution was constructed to adjust length of stay for the increasing probability of a random handoff. The Student t-test and ANCOVA were used to assess relationships between resident service handoffs and length of hospital stay, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS A total of 3038 patients met eligibility criteria and were included in the statistical analyses. Adjusted length of hospital stay (5.32 vs 3.53 adjusted days) and length of ICU stay (4.38 vs 2.96 adjusted days) were both longer for patients who experienced a service handoff, with no difference in mortality. In the ANCOVA model, resident service handoff remained predictive of both length of hospital stay (p < 0.001) and length of ICU stay (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Occurrence of a resident service handoff is an independent predictor of length of hospital and ICU stay in neurosurgical patients. This finding is novel in the neurosurgical literature. Future research might identify mechanisms for improving continuity of care and mitigating the effect of resident handoffs on patient outcomes. PMID:26684784

  13. Non-Resident Fathers' Relationships with Their Secondary School Age Children: Determinants and Children's Mental Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flouri, Eirini

    2006-01-01

    Data from 520 British secondary school age children were used to explore determinants of and mental health outcomes (measured with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) from their non-resident fathers' relationships (child-reported father's involvement and frequency of contact) with them. Frequency of contact was negatively related to time…

  14. The Effect of the Lowered Age of Majority and Relaxed Dormitory Policies on Drug Usage by Dormitory Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuznik, Anthony

    1975-01-01

    In 1973, the state of Minnesota passed legislation lowering the legal age of adulthood from 21 to 18; this gave 18-year olds the opportunity to legally consume alcoholic beverages. At the same time, the University of Minnesota made policy changes which enabled dormitory residents to consume alcoholic beverages in their rooms. To ascertain the…

  15. Ambulatory Care in Medical Residency: Integration of Private Practitioner's Office with Traditional Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bane, Susan; Criscione, Teri

    1983-01-01

    An Albany Medical College program utilizes private internists' offices as sites for resident ambulatory education. The private practitioner is perceived as an excellent teacher and role model who provides a positive effect on the long-term career goals of residents. (MLW)

  16. Assigning Patients According to Curriculum: A Strategy for Improving Ambulatory Care Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brush, Alan D.; Moore, Gordon T.

    1994-01-01

    The strategy used by one health maintenance organization (HMO) for balancing residents' training needs and patient health problems, often limited and routine in an HMO, is to allocate patients to residents by matching them with curriculum content. A process for handling patient resistance to such an arrangement was also instituted. (MSE)

  17. Five Residents Speak: The Meaning of Living with Dying in a Long-Term Care Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djivre, Sandra E.; Levin, Elizabeth; Schinke, Robert J.; Porter, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Personal meanings given to the experience of living with nursing home death were shared by 5 nursing home residents. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. Using M. van Manen's (1990) hermeneutic phenomenology, the lived experience of residents emerged as a compilation of 5 dynamically occurring themes, including (a) mapping…

  18. Compliance with best practice: implementing the best available evidence in the use of physical restraint in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Janet

    2008-09-01

    The Aged Care Clinical Fellowship, funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing and conducted through the Joanna Briggs Institute is an initiative designed to improve the care of older Australians through clinical leadership and promotion of best practice. This paper outlines one of the projects undertaken at Carinya of Bicton, a residential aged high care facility, using an audit and feedback process to implement best practice standards in the use of physical restraint. Aims  Between 12% and 47% of residents in residential care facilities are restrained; however, initial observation of residents restrained in the project facility showed that restraint devices were utilised in up to 40% of residents. Within the aged care sector there has been a shift in attitude to reducing or eliminating restraint in aged care facilities. Restraint is seen as a negative experience for the resident, being associated with physical discomfort, embarrassment and restriction of freedom and of movement. The purpose of the project was to improve practice in the area of physical restraint through the process of auditing current practice against evidence-based, best practice criteria and ultimately to reduce the level of restraint in the facility. Methods  This practice improvement project utilised an audit and implementation cycle. The Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and best practice criteria developed from a systematic review were used to determine compliance with best practice. The Getting Research into Practice module was then employed to develop strategies to improve practice. Results  The follow-up audit indicated there has been a reduction in the number of residents restrained, increased use of alternatives to restraint and an awareness on the part of all care staff of the policies and procedures, which govern the use of restraint in the facility. Conclusions  It is recognised that the success of this project is in

  19. The Aging Brain Care Medical Home: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    LaMantia, Michael A; Alder, Catherine A; Callahan, Christopher M; Gao, Sujuan; French, Dustin D; Austrom, Mary G; Boustany, Karim; Livin, Lee; Bynagari, Bharath; Boustani, Malaz A

    2015-06-01

    The Aging Brain Care (ABC) Medical Home aims to improve the care, health outcomes, and medical costs of Medicare beneficiaries with dementia or depression across central Indiana. This population health management program, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovation Center, expanded an existing collaborative dementia and depression care program to serve 1,650 older adults in a local safety-net hospital system. During the first year, 20 full-time clinical staff were hired, trained, and deployed to deliver a collaborative care intervention. In the first 18 months, an average of 13 visits was provided per person. Thirty percent of the sample had a diagnosis of dementia, and 77% had a diagnosis of depression. Sixty-six percent of participants with high depression scores (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score ≥14) had at least a 50% reduction in their depressive symptoms. Fifty-one percent of caregivers of individuals with dementia had at least a 50% reduction in caregiver stress symptoms (measured by the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor-Caregiver Version). After 18 months, the ABC Medical Home has demonstrated progress toward improving the health of older adults with dementia and depression. Scalable and practical models like this show initial promise for answering the challenges posed by the nation's rapidly aging population. PMID:26096394

  20. What factors are important for deprescribing in Australian long-term care facilities? Perspectives of residents and health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Susan; Stanners, Melinda; Shakib, Sepehr; Bell, J Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Polypharmacy and multimorbidity are common in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Reducing polypharmacy may reduce adverse events and maintain quality of life. Deprescribing refers to reducing medications after consideration of therapeutic goals, benefits and risks, and medical ethics. The objective was to use nominal group technique (NGT) to generate then rank factors that general medical practitioners (GPs), nurses, pharmacists and residents or their representatives perceive are most important when deciding whether or not to deprescribe medications. Design Qualitative research using NGT. Setting Participants were invited if they worked with, or resided in LTCFs across metropolitan and regional South Australia. Participants 11 residents/representatives, 19 GPs, 12 nurses and 14 pharmacists participated across six separate groups. Methods Individual groups of GPs, nurses, pharmacists and residents/representatives were convened. Using NGT each group ranked factors perceived to be most important when deciding whether or not to deprescribe. Then, using NGT, the prioritised factors from individual groups were discussed and prioritised by a multidisciplinary metropolitan and regional group comprised of resident representatives, GPs, nurses and pharmacists. Results No two groups had the same priorities. GPs ranked ‘evidence for deprescribing’ and ‘communication with family/resident’ as most important factors. Nurses ranked ‘GP receptivity to deprescribing’ and ‘nurses ability to advocate for residents’ as most important. Pharmacists ranked ‘clinical appropriateness of therapy’ and ‘identifying residents’ goals of care’ as most important. Residents ranked ‘wellbeing of the resident’ and ‘continuity of nursing staff’ as most important. The multidisciplinary groups ranked ‘adequacy of medical and medication history’ and ‘identifying residents’ goals of care’ as most important. Conclusions While each group prioritised

  1. School-Age Child Care: Innovative Public School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERS Spectrum, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Innovative school-age day care programs include Tennessee's Extended School Program; Hawaii's After-School Plus program; San Antonio's Kid's Involvement Network (offering middle school supervision); Aurora, Colorado's state-licensed Year-Round School Recreation Plan; and Pomona, California's Child Development Program. These public school programs…

  2. Baby Boom Caregivers: Care in the Age of Individualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guberman, Nancy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Blein, Laure; Olazabal, Ignace

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many Baby Boomers are faced with the care of aging parents, as well as that of disabled or ill spouses or children. This study examines how Baby Boomers in Quebec, Canada, perceive and play their role as caregivers and how this might differ from their parents' generation. Design and methods: This was a qualitative and empirical study…

  3. Latchkey Children and School-Age Child Care. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Fink, Dale B.

    This ERIC Digest provides an overview of school-age child care (SACC) programs and suggests reasons for their growth. Discussion points out that escalating interest in SACC has paralleled the raising numbers of children left on their own, and that educators are only the latest in a parade of civic and professional groups which have gone on record…

  4. School Age Child Care in Virginia: 1993 Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Child Day Care and Early Childhood Programs, Richmond, VA.

    School-age child care (SACC) programs based on-site in Virginia elementary schools were surveyed to determine the scope of such programs across the commonwealth, and to look more comprehensively at existing programs in terms of operators, activities, affordability, and other issues. In January 1993, the survey was sent to school superintendents in…

  5. Online Dementia Care Training for Healthcare Teams in Continuing and Long-Term Care Homes: A Viable Solution for Improving Quality of Care and Quality of Life for Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Colla J.; Stodel, Emma J.; Casimiro, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to design, develop, deliver, and evaluate an online dementia care program aimed at enabling healthcare teams deliver better service to residents with dementia in continuing (CC) and long-term care (LTC) facilities. A Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) orientation (Minkler & Wallerstein, 2003) was adopted…

  6. Managing Malnutrition in Older Persons Residing in Care Homes: Nutritional and Clinical Outcomes Following a Screening and Intervention Program.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Christopher G; Okonkwo, Arthur C O; Hart, Kathryn; Thompson, Nick P

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to establish prevalence of malnutrition in older adult care home residents and investigate whether a nutritional screening and intervention program could improve nutritional and clinical outcomes. A community-based cohort study was conducted in five Newcastle care homes. 205 participants entered; 175 were followed up. Residents already taking oral nutritional supplements (ONS) were excluded from interventions. Those with Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) score of 1 received dietetic advice and ≥2 received dietetic advice and were prescribed ONS (220 ml, 1.5 kcal/ml) twice daily for 12 weeks. Body mass index (BMI), MUST, mini nutritional assessment score (MNA)®, mid upper arm muscle circumference (MAMC), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were recorded at baseline and 12 weeks. Malnutrition prevalence was 36.6% ± 6.6 (95% CI). A higher MUST was associated with greater mortality (p = 0.004). Type of intervention received was significantly associated with change in MUST score (p < 0.001); dietetic advice resulting in the greatest improvement. There were no significant changes in BMI (p = 0.445), MAMC (p = 0.256), or GDS (p = 0.385) following the interventions. Dietitian advice may slow the progression of nutritional decline. In this study oral nutritional supplements over a 3-month period did not significantly improve nutritional status in malnourished care home residents. PMID:26885946

  7. Valuable human capital: the aging health care worker.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2006-01-01

    With the workforce growing older and the supply of younger workers diminishing, it is critical for health care managers to understand the factors necessary to capitalize on their vintage employees. Retaining this segment of the workforce has a multitude of benefits including the preservation of valuable intellectual capital, which is necessary to ensure that health care organizations maintain their competitive advantage in the consumer-driven market. Retaining the aging employee is possible if health care managers learn the motivators and training differences associated with this category of the workforce. These employees should be considered a valuable resource of human capital because without their extensive expertise, intense loyalty and work ethic, and superior customer service skills, health care organizations could suffer severe economic repercussions in the near future. PMID:16905991

  8. Caring for Aging Chinese: Lessons Learned From the United States

    PubMed Central

    WAN, HONGWEI; YU, FANG; KOLANOWSKI, ANN

    2009-01-01

    After two birth peaks and the “one child per family” policy, China is facing unprecedented challenges with regard to its aging population. This article analyzes the problems associated with three traditional ways of caring for older Chinese, the current health care system, and social supports available to older Chinese. The “4-2-1” family structure and the “empty nest” undermine family support, the prevalence of chronic illnesses and lack of money reduce older adults’selfcare abilities, and insufficient care facilities threaten social support. Lessons learned from the United States show that community-based nursing models, nursing curriculum reforms with a gerontology focus, and reformed health care systems are pivotal for addressing China’s crisis. PMID:18239066

  9. Apartment residents' and day care workers' exposures to tetrachloroethylene and deficits in visual contrast sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Judith S; Hudnell, H Kenneth; Geller, Andrew M; House, Dennis E; Aldous, Kenneth M; Force, Michael S; Langguth, Karyn; Prohonic, Elizabeth J; Parker, Jean C

    2002-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene (also called perchloroethylene, or perc), a volatile organic compound, has been the predominant solvent used by the dry-cleaning industry for many years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classified perc as a hazardous air pollutant because of its potential adverse impact on human health. Several occupational studies have indicated that chronic, airborne perc exposure adversely affects neurobehavioral functions in workers, particularly visual color discrimination and tasks dependent on rapid visual-information processing. A 1995 study by Altmann and colleagues extended these findings, indicating that environmental perc exposure at a mean level of 4,980 microg/m(3) (median=1,360 microg/m(3)) alters neurobehavioral functions in residents living near dry-cleaning facilities. Although the U.S. EPA has not yet set a reference concentration guideline level for environmental exposure to airborne perc, the New York State Department of Health set an air quality guideline of 100 microg/m(3). In the current residential study, we investigated the potential for perc exposure and neurologic effects, using a battery of visual-system function tests, among healthy members of six families living in two apartment buildings in New York City that contained dry-cleaning facilities on the ground floors. In addition, a day care investigation assessed the potential for perc exposure and effects among workers at a day care center located in the same one-story building as a dry-cleaning facility. Results from the residential study showed a mean exposure level of 778 microg/m(3) perc in indoor air for a mean of 5.8 years, and that perc levels in breath, blood, and urine were 1-2 orders of magnitude in excess of background values. Group-mean visual contrast sensitivity (VCS), a measure of the ability to detect visual patterns, was significantly reduced in the 17 exposed study participants relative to unexposed matched-control participants. The groups did not

  10. Ageing with telecare: care or coercion in austerity?

    PubMed

    Mort, Maggie; Roberts, Celia; Callén, Blanca

    2013-07-01

    In recent years images of independence, active ageing and staying at home have come to characterise a successful old age in western societies. 'Telecare' technologies are heavily promoted to assist ageing-in-place and a nexus of demographic ageing, shrinking healthcare and social care budgets and technological ambition has come to promote the 'telehome' as the solution to the problem of the 'age dependency ratio'. Through the adoption of a range of monitoring and telecare devices, it seems that the normative vision of independence will also be achieved. But with falling incomes and pressure for economies of scale, what kind of independence is experienced in the telehome? In this article we engage with the concepts of 'technogenarians' and 'shared work' to illuminate our analysis of telecare in use. Drawing on European-funded research we argue that home-monitoring based telecare has the potential to coerce older people unless we are able to recognise and respect a range of responses including non-use and 'misuse' in daily practice. We propose that re-imagining the aims of telecare and redesigning systems to allow for creative engagement with technologies and the co-production of care relations would help to avoid the application of coercive forms of care technology in times of austerity. PMID:23094945

  11. Preventive dental health care experiences of preschool-age children with special health care needs

    PubMed Central

    Huebner, Colleen E.; Chi, Donald L.; Masterson, Erin; Milgrom, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the preventive dental health care experiences of young children with special needs and determined the feasibility of conducting clinical dental examinations at a community-based early intervention services center. Methods Study methods included 90 parent interviews and dental examinations of their preschool-age children. Results Thirteen percent of the children received optimal preventive care, defined as twice daily tooth brushing with fluoridated toothpaste and two preventive dental visits in the prior 12 months; 37 percent experienced care that fell short in both areas. Optimal care was more common among children of parents who reported tooth brushing was not a struggle and those with a personal dentist. Parents' opinion of the study experience was generally positive. Conclusions Few children with special needs receive effective preventive care early, when primary prevention could be achieved. Barriers to optimal care could be readily addressed by the dental community in coordination with early intervention providers. PMID:25082666

  12. Resident physicians using modern practices for excellent documentation and care in heart failure (PUMPED CHF).

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay; Cotorruelo-Martinez, Annia; Gill-Duncan, Nicole; Leveille, Philippe; Pearson, Julie M; Julliard, Kell; Saxena, Archana

    2014-01-01

    The most common indication for readmission among Medicare patients is congestive heart failure (CHF). Prior studies underscore the use of residents to bolster hospital-wide programs and reduce CHF readmissions. The authors assessed the effectiveness of a novel online training program designed to improve resident documentation and knowledge related to CHF. The findings suggest that despite a significant increase in knowledge scores following the online educational course, there was only a slight increase in documentation scores. Additional teaching modalities need to be identified to foster resident education and create sustained behavior change. PMID:25529788

  13. Masseter muscle tension, chewing ability, and selected parameters of physical fitness in elderly care home residents in Lodz, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Gaszynska, Ewelina; Godala, Malgorzata; Szatko, Franciszek; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Background Maintaining good physical fitness and oral function in old age is an important element of good quality of life. Disability-related impairment of oral function contributes to a deterioration of the diet of older people and to the reduction of their social activity. Objectives Investigate the association between masseter muscle tension, dental status, and physical fitness parameters. Materials and methods Two hundred fifty-nine elderly care home residents (97 men, 162 women; mean age, 75.3±8.9 years) were involved in this cross-sectional study. Their chewing ability was evaluated by masseter muscle tension palpation, differences of masseter muscle thickness, self-reported chewing ability, number of present and functional teeth, and number of posterior tooth pairs. Masseter muscle thickness was measured by ultrasonography. To assess physical fitness, hand grip strength and the timed up-and-go test were performed. Nutritional status was assessed using body mass index and body cell mass index (BCMI), calculated on the basis of electrical bioimpedance measurements. Medical records were used to collect information on systemic diseases and the number of prescribed medications. Subjects were also evaluated for their ability to perform ten activities of daily living. Results Ninety-seven percent of the subjects suffered from systemic diseases. The three most prevalent illnesses were cardiac/circulatory 64.5%, musculoskeletal 37.3%, and endocrine/metabolic/nutritional 29.3%. Of the participants, 1.5% were underweight and more than one third (34.4%) were overweight. Malnutrition (BCMI below normal) was found in almost half (45.2%) of the subjects. Only 5.8% had a sufficient number of functional natural teeth. Statistically significant correlations were found between palpation of masseter muscle tension and perceived chewing ability, number of present teeth, number of functional teeth, number of posterior tooth pairs, timed up-and-go, hand grip strength, body mass

  14. How to Create an Anti-Aging Skin Care Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Master Dermatologist Award Members Making a Difference Award Native American Health Service Resident Rotation PICMED Grant Professionalism Award ... Camp Discovery Diversity Mentorship Program Health Volunteers ... American Health Services Resident Rotation Resident International Grant Shade ...

  15. City Initiatives in School-Age Child Care. SACC Action Research Paper No. 1. School-Age Child Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannett, Ellen

    Features contributing to the success of six city-wide, comprehensive school-age program models are highlighted. Models are Seattle, Washington's Community Partnerships for School-Age Child Care; Madison, Wisconsin's School-Age Child Care Project; Irvine, California's Irvine Child Care Project; Houston, Texas' After-School Partnership; Los Angeles,…

  16. The Montana Model: Integrated Primary Care and Behavioral Health in a Family Practice Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakley, Claire; Moore, Douglas; Burford, Duncan; Fahrenwald, Roxanne; Woodward, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    To address the local health care needs of both patients and primary care providers in Montana, an integrated primary care and behavioral health family practice clinic was developed. In this paper we describe our experience with integrating mental health and substance abuse services into a primary care setting (a community health center) while…

  17. Quality of life of residents with dementia in long-term care settings in the Netherlands and Belgium: design of a longitudinal comparative study in traditional nursing homes and small-scale living facilities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The increase in the number of people with dementia will lead to greater demand for residential care. Currently, large nursing homes are trying to transform their traditional care for residents with dementia to a more home-like approach, by developing small-scale living facilities. It is often assumed that small-scale living will improve the quality of life of residents with dementia. However, little scientific evidence is currently available to test this. The following research question is addressed in this study: Which (combination of) changes in elements affects (different dimensions of) the quality of life of elderly residents with dementia in long-term care settings over the course of one year? Methods/design A longitudinal comparative study in traditional and small-scale long-term care settings, which follows a quasi-experimental design, will be carried out in Belgium and the Netherlands. To answer the research question, a model has been developed which incorporates relevant elements influencing quality of life in long-term care settings. Validated instruments will be used to evaluate the role of these elements, divided into environmental characteristics (country, type of ward, group size and nursing staff); basic personal characteristics (age, sex, cognitive decline, weight and activities of daily living); behavioural characteristics (behavioural problems and depression); behavioural interventions (use of restraints and use of psychotropic medication); and social interaction (social engagement and visiting frequency of relatives). The main outcome measure for residents in the model is quality of life. Data are collected at baseline, after six and twelve months, from residents living in either small-scale or traditional care settings. Discussion The results of this study will provide an insight into the determinants of quality of life for people with dementia living in traditional and small-scale long-term care settings in Belgium and the

  18. The continued success of registered nurse care coordination in a state evaluation of aging in place in senior housing.

    PubMed

    Rantz, Marilyn; Popejoy, Lori L; Galambos, Colleen; Phillips, Lorraine J; Lane, Kari R; Marek, Karen Dorman; Hicks, Lanis; Musterman, Katy; Back, Jessica; Miller, Steven J; Ge, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Older adults prefer to age in place, remaining in their home as their health care needs intensify. In a state evaluation of aging in place (AIP), the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing and Americare System Inc, Sikeston, MO, developed an elder housing facility to be an ideal housing environment for older adults to test the AIP care delivery model. An evaluation of the first 4 years (2005-2008) of the AIP program at TigerPlace (n = 66) revealed that the program was effective in restoring health and maintaining independence while being cost-effective. Similar results evaluating the subsequent 4 years (2009-2012) of the program (N = 128) revealed positive health outcomes (fall risk, gait velocity, Functional Ambulation Profile, handgrips, Short-Form 12 Physical Health, Short-Form 12 Mental Health, and Geriatric Depression Scale); slightly negative activities of daily living, independent activities of daily living, and Mini-Mental State Examination; and positive cost-effectiveness results. Combined care and housing costs for any resident who was receiving additional care services and qualified for nursing home care (n = 44) was about $20,000 less per year per person than nursing home care. Importantly, residents continued to live in private apartments and were encouraged to be as independent as possible through the end of life. PMID:24731918

  19. The impact of an aging population on palliative care.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Tony

    2013-12-01

    By 2050, it is predicted that 26% of the population will be aged 80 and over. Although older people have much to contribute, one challenging aspect of an aging population is the increasing rate of dementia. Palliative care is now included as part of the care pathway of a wide variety of nonmalignant diseases. The European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) have jointly called for every older citizen with chronic disease to be offered the best possible palliative care approach wherever they are cared for. This report is adapted from paineurope 2013; Issue 2, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International LTD. and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http://www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication. PMID:24303834

  20. “I Get Along With Most of Them”: Direct Care Workers' Relationships With Residents' Families in Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Candace L.; Ball, Mary M.; Perkins, Molly M.; Hollingsworth, Carole; Lepore, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to explore staff–family relationships in assisted living facilities (ALFs) as they are experienced by care staff and perceived by administrators. We identify factors that influence relationships and explore how interactions with residents’ families affect care staff’s caregiving experiences. Design and Methods: The data are drawn from a statewide study involving 45 ALFs in Georgia. Using grounded theory methods, we analyze qualitative data from in-depth interviews with 41 care staff and 43 administrators, and survey data from 370 care staff. Results: Care workers characterized their relationships with most family members as “good” or “pretty good” and aspired to develop relationships that offered personal and professional affirmation. The presence or absence of affirmation was central to understanding how these relationships influenced care staffs’ on-the-job experiences. Community, facility, and individual factors influenced the development of relationships and corresponding experiences. Insofar as interactions with family members were rewarding or frustrating, relationships exerted positive or negative influences on workers’ caregiving experiences. Implications: Findings suggest the need to create environments—through policy and practice—where both parties are empathetic of one another and view themselves as partners. Doing so would have positive outcomes for care workers, family members, and residents. PMID:19363017

  1. Using positive images to manage resistance-to-care and combative behaviors in nursing home residents with dementia: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Ying; Waszynski, Christine; Kessler, Jeanne; Chiang, Yu-Ching; Clarkson, P John

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study attempted to reduce resistance-to-care (RTC) and combative behaviors in nursing home residents with dementia by eliciting their positive affect. Four female residents with dementia were recruited from a nursing facility. Each resident was involved in one intervention trial and one control trial. The response of the residents was assessed by the Agitated Behavior Scale and the Observational Measurement of Engagement Tool. The distress level of the certified nursing assistants (CNAs) delivering the care was reported through the Distress Thermometer. Results showed that the residents displayed fewer behavioral symptoms in the intervention trial than in the control trial. The CNAs reported less distress in the intervention trial than in the control trial. These preliminary findings suggest that it might be feasible to use positive images to reduce residents' behavioral symptoms and decrease the distress of CNAs. PMID:27040950

  2. Protocol for a process-oriented qualitative evaluation of the Waltham Forest and East London Collaborative (WELC) integrated care pioneer programme using the Researcher-in-Residence model

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, Laura; George, Bethan; Marshall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The integration of health and social care in England is widely accepted as the answer to fragmentation, financial concerns and system inefficiencies, in the context of growing and ageing populations with increasingly complex needs. Despite an expanding body of literature, there is little evidence yet to suggest that integrated care can achieve the benefits that its advocates claim for it. Researchers have often adopted rationalist and technocratic approaches to evaluation, treating integration as an intervention rather than a process. Results have usually been of limited use to practitioners responsible for health and social care integration. There is, therefore, a need to broaden the evidence base, exploring not only what works but also how integrated care can most successfully be implemented and delivered. For this reason, we are carrying out a formative evaluation of the Waltham Forest and East London Collaborative (WELC) integrated care pioneer programme. Our expectation is that this will add value to the literature by focusing on the processes by which the vision and objectives of integrated care are translated through phases of development, implementation and delivery from a central to a local perspective, and from a strategic to an operational perspective. Methods and analysis The qualitative and process-oriented evaluation uses an innovative participative approach—the Researcher-in-Residence model. The evaluation is underpinned by a critical ontology, an interpretive epistemology and a critical discourse analysis methodology. Data will be generated using interviews, observations and documentary gathering. Ethics and dissemination Emerging findings will be interpreted and disseminated collaboratively with stakeholders, to enable the research to influence and optimise the effective implementation of integrated care across WELC. Presentations and publications will ensure that learning is shared as widely as possible. The study has received

  3. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from residents and the environment in a long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Ludden, C; Brennan, G; Morris, D; Austin, B; O'Connell, B; Cormican, M

    2015-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major public health concern associated with residence in a long-term care facility (LTCF). The aim of this prospective study was to characterize MRSA isolated from residents over a 1-year period and their physical environment over a 2-year period. MRSA was recovered from 17/64 residents (R) of a LTCF and from 42 environmental (E) sites. All isolates carried the mecA gene and lacked the mecC and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes. Thirteen spa types were identified with t032 being the most frequent (41% of total; n = 8R, 16E), followed by t727 (22% of total; n = 13E), and t8783 (10% of total; n = 6E). Five spa types were each represented by single isolates. Thirty-nine isolates were of spa types associated with the multilocus sequence type ST22 (t032, 41%; spa-CC22, 68%) and reflect the predominance of ST22 in Irish hospitals. The uncommon spa types t727, t8783, t1372, t3130, t10038 were present in the environment but not detected in residents and are infrequently observed in Ireland. PMID:25640407

  4. Protecting care home residents from mistreatment and abuse: on the need for policy

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    With a rising older person population with increasing life expectancies, the demand for care homes will increase in the future. Older people in care homes are particularly vulnerable due to their dependencies related to cognitive and/or functional self-care challenges. Although many care homes provide good care, maltreatment and abuse of older people can and does occur. One major step in preventing and addressing maltreatment in care homes is having comprehensive and responsive policy, which delineates national expectations that are locally implemented. This paper examines the literature related to maltreatment in care homes and argues for policy based on a multisystems approach. Policy needs to firstly acknowledge and address general societal issues which tacitly impact on older person care delivery, underpin how care homes and related systems should be operationalized, and finally delineate expected standards and outcomes for individual experience of care. Such a policy demands attention at every level of the health care and societal system. Furthermore, contemporary issues central to policy evolution in care homes are discussed, such as safeguarding education and training and fostering organization whistle-blowing protection. PMID:26640391

  5. Evaluation of a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system at a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rohan A; Lee, Cik Yin; Hussainy, Safeera Y

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The aims of the study were to investigate discrepancies between general practitioners' paper medication orders and pharmacy-prepared electronic medication administration charts, back-up paper charts and dose-administration aids, as well as delays between prescribing, charting and administration, at a 90-bed residential aged care facility that used a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system. Methods A cross-sectional audit of medication orders, medication charts and dose-administration aids was performed to identify discrepancies. In addition, a retrospective audit was performed of delays between prescribing and availability of an updated electronic medication administration chart. Medication administration records were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether discrepancies and delays led to medication administration errors. Results Medication records for 88 residents (mean age 86 years) were audited. Residents were prescribed a median of eight regular medicines (interquartile range 5-12). One hundred and twenty-five discrepancies were identified. Forty-seven discrepancies, affecting 21 (24%) residents, led to a medication administration error. The most common discrepancies were medicine omission (44.0%) and extra medicine (19.2%). Delays from when medicines were prescribed to when they appeared on the electronic medication administration chart ranged from 18min to 98h. On nine occasions (for 10% of residents) the delay contributed to missed doses, usually antibiotics. Conclusion Medication discrepancies and delays were common. Improved systems for managing medication orders and charts are needed. What is known about the topic? Hybrid paper-electronic medication management systems, in which prescribers' orders are transcribed into an electronic system by pharmacy technicians and pharmacists to create medication administration charts, are increasingly replacing paper-based medication management systems in Australian residential aged care

  6. In-Hospital Cardiology Consultation and Evidence-Based Care for Nursing Home Residents with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Aronow, Wilbert S.; Rich, Michael W.; Goodlin, Sarah J.; Birkner, Thomas; Zhang, Yan; Feller, Margaret A.; Aban, Inmaculada B.; Jones, Linda G.; Bearden, Donna M.; Allman, Richard M.; Ahmed, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association between cardiology consultation and evidence-based care for nursing home (NH) residents with heart failure (HF). Participants Hospitalized NH residents (n= 646) discharged from 106 Alabama hospitals with a primary discharge diagnosis of HF during 1998–2001. Design Observational. Measurements of Evidence-Based Care Pre-admission estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) for patients with known HF (n=494), in-hospital LVEF estimation for HF patients without known LVEF (n=452), and discharge prescriptions of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEIs-or-ARBs) to systolic HF (LVEF <45%) patients discharged alive who were eligible to receive those drugs (n=83). Eligibility for ACEIs-or-ARBs was defined as lack of prior allergy or adverse effect, serum creatinine <2.5 mg/dL, serum potassium <5.5 mEq/L, and systolic blood pressure >100 mm Hg. Results Pre-admission LVEF was estimated in 38% and 12% of patients receiving and not receiving cardiology consultation, respectively (adjusted odds ratio {AOR}, 3.49; 95% CI, 2.16–5.66; p <0.001). In-hospital LVEF was estimated in 71% and 28% of patients receiving and not receiving cardiology consultation, respectively (AOR, 6.01; 95% CI, 3.69–9.79; p <0.001). ACEIs-or-ARBs were prescribed to 62% and 82% of patients receiving and not receiving cardiology consultation, respectively (AOR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.07–0.81; p=0.022). Conclusion In-hospital cardiology consultation was associated with significantly higher odds of LVEF estimation among NH residents with HF. However, it did not translate into higher odds of discharge prescriptions for ACEIs-or-ARBs to NH resident with systolic HF who were eligible for the receipt of these drugs. PMID:21982687

  7. Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Emily E; Polen, Kara N D; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Ellington, Sascha R; Oduyebo, Titilope; Cohn, Amanda; Oster, Alexandra M; Russell, Kate; Kawwass, Jennifer F; Karwowski, Mateusz P; Powers, Ann M; Bertolli, Jeanne; Brooks, John T; Kissin, Dmitry; Villanueva, Julie; Muñoz-Jordan, Jorge; Kuehnert, Matthew; Olson, Christine K; Honein, Margaret A; Rivera, Maria; Jamieson, Denise J; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2016-01-01

    CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available. PMID:27031943

  8. Factors affecting the age-C resident fish community along shorelines of the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadomski, D.M.; Wagner, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    The Hanford Reach is one of the few remaining unimpounded sections of the Columbia River. However, because of flow management at upstream dams, there are often large fluctuations in water level. To determine how environmental conditions might affect age-0 resident fishes in the Hanford Reach, we evaluated species composition, distribution, abundance, and standard lengths of larval and juvenile fishes along shoreline habitats during July and August 1998, 1999, and 2000. Catches in beach seine hauls during all three years were highly variable. The four most abundant taxa collected were three cyprinids, peamouth (Mylocheilus caurinus), northern pikeminnow (Plychocheilus oregonensis), and redside shiner (Richardson ius balteatus); and suckers (Catostoinus spp.). Highest overall catches were in sloughs of the Hanford Reach in 1999, a year with high flows, lower water level fluctuations, and more vegetation. Mean shoreline summer water temperatures were higher in 1998 than in 1999 and 2000, and mean lengths of the four most abundant taxa in late August were also greater in 1998, due presumably to enhanced growth or an earlier spawning season. In spite of flow fluctuations, overall catches of age-0 resident fishes were greater in the riverine Hanford Reach compared to past catches in a more lentic Columbia River reservoir. High abundances of age-0 resident fishes in the Hanford Reach could be due to more spawning and rearing habitat in this structurally complex area, and may mitigate for negative effects of variable flow regimes.

  9. Atmospheric residence times from transpiration and evaporation to precipitation: An age-weighted regional evaporation tagging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianhui; Knoche, Hans Richard; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-06-01

    The atmospheric water residence time is a fundamental descriptor that provides information on the timescales of evaporation and precipitation. In this study, a regional climate model-based evaporation tagging algorithm is extended with an age tracer approach to calculate moisture residence times, defined as time between the original evaporation and the returning of water masses to the land surface as precipitation. Our case study addresses how long this time is for the transpired and for the direct evaporated moisture. Our study region is the Poyang Lake region in Southeast China, the largest freshwater lake in the country. We perform simulations covering the period from October 2004 to December 2005. In 2005, 11% of direct evaporated water (10% of transpired water) precipitates locally. Direct evaporated water accounts for 64% and transpired water for 36% of the total tagged moisture with a mean age of around 36 h for both. Considering precipitation, a large proportion (69%) originates from direct evaporated water with a mean atmospheric residence time of 6.6 h and a smaller amount from transpired water with a longer residence time of 10.7 h. Modulated by the East Asian monsoon, the variation of the meteorological conditions, the magnitude of the partitioned moisture, and the corresponding residence time patterns change seasonally and spatially and reveal the different fate of transpired and direct evaporated water in the atmospheric hydrological cycle. We conclude that our methodological approach has the potential to be used for addressing how timescales of the hydrological cycle changes regionally under global warming.

  10. A novel influenza A (H1N1) outbreak experience among residents of a long term-care facility in Saudi Arabia during 2010 seasonal flu circulation

    PubMed Central

    Affifi, Raouf M.; Omar, Sherif R.; El Raggal, Ahmad A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to describe and analyze an outbreak of novel 2009 influenza A (H1N1) among residents of a long-term care facility (LTCF) in Prince Mansour Military Hospital (PMMH), Taif, Saudi Arabia. These patients had been admitted to the LTCF months or years before the outbreak for several reasons, e.g. cerebral palsy, neurological deficits due to road traffic accidents with resultant handicap, chronic diseases associated with old age. An observational study was carried out to demonstrate and analyze the epidemiological characteristics (demographic factors, risk factors, and outcomes) associated with the outbreak in order to clarify which prevention and control measures had been taken and which recommendations were followed. During the period October 28 to November 11 2010, 21 LTCF residents were suspected to be clinically involved: fever ≥38°C with influenza-like illness (ILI). Age ranged from 9-91 years (mean 46±24.13); 62% were males. Among them, 12 (57%) were influenza A (H1N1) positive by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Mortality involved 2 (17%) of the A (H1N1) laboratory confirmed individuals. Implementation of the recommended infection control measures mitigated the transmission of infection to new individuals. The fulfillment of strict infection control measures could limit H1N1 infection among LTCF-PMMH patients. Routine influenza, including specific H1N1 immunization of all LTCF residents together with their healthcare staff, should be mandatory in those settings serving immunocompromised patients. PMID:24470930

  11. A novel influenza A (H1N1) outbreak experience among residents of a long term-care facility in Saudi Arabia during 2010 seasonal flu circulation.

    PubMed

    Affifi, Raouf M; Omar, Sherif R; El Raggal, Ahmad A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to describe and analyze an outbreak of novel 2009 influenza A (H1N1) among residents of a long-term care facility (LTCF) in Prince Mansour Military Hospital (PMMH), Taif, Saudi Arabia. These patients had been admitted to the LTCF months or years before the outbreak for several reasons, e.g. cerebral palsy, neurological deficits due to road traffic accidents with resultant handicap, chronic diseases associated with old age. An observational study was carried out to demonstrate and analyze the epidemiological characteristics (demographic factors, risk factors, and outcomes) associated with the outbreak in order to clarify which prevention and control measures had been taken and which recommendations were followed. During the period October 28 to November 11 2010, 21 LTCF residents were suspected to be clinically involved: fever ≥38°C with influenza-like illness (ILI). Age ranged from 9-91 years (mean 46±24.13); 62% were males. Among them, 12 (57%) were influenza A (H1N1) positive by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Mortality involved 2 (17%) of the A (H1N1) laboratory confirmed individuals. Implementation of the recommended infection control measures mitigated the transmission of infection to new individuals. The fulfillment of strict infection control measures could limit H1N1 infection among LTCF-PMMH patients. Routine influenza, including specific H1N1 immunization of all LTCF residents together with their healthcare staff, should be mandatory in those settings serving immunocompromised patients. PMID:24470930

  12. Family members' perceptions of pain and distress related to analgesics and psychotropic drugs, and quality of care of elderly nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise; Johansson, Inger; Schmidt, Ingrid; Larsson, Bodil Wilde

    2003-05-01

    The aims of the present study were: (1) to describe family members' perceptions of nursing homes residents' pain and distress in relation to analgesics and psychotropic drugs; and (2) to compare whether background variables, dementia, help/support, prescribing of analgesics and psychotropic drugs, and quality of care vary between subgroups of residents. Two hundred and thirty-two family members of elderly people in 10 Swedish nursing homes participated in the study. The participants responded to a questionnaire including background variables, pain and distress variables, and the Quality from the Patient's Perspective (QPP) questionnaire. Data on drug prescribing was obtained from the medical records. The head nurse on each ward noted whether or not the resident had a documented or known diagnosis of dementia. The results showed that a high frequency of elderly nursing home residents were estimated as having physical pain and worry. A large number of the residents were prescribed psychotropic drugs. In addition, some of the residents with moderate or severe physical pain were not prescribed any analgesics. The residents were divided into three subgroups based on scores of physical discomfort, physical pain and worry. Subgroup comparisons differed with regard to sex, help/support, drugs and quality of care. Staff have a responsibility to assess the residents' pain and distress since this will form a basis for better pain and distress management. Other suggestions for improving quality of care are the provision of better information to the family members and the residents, meaningful occupation, less task-oriented care, and care that involves residents. PMID:12823431

  13. Referral Rates of Senior Family Practice Residents in an Ambulatory Care Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    A study of patterns in second- and third-year family practice residents' requests for referrals found higher rates for the senior students, suggesting possible differences in approach to case management, lack of experience in referral among younger students, and differences in case mix. (MSE)

  14. Pediatric Residents' Responses that Discourage Discussion of Psychosocial Problems in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wissow, Lawrence S.; Larson, Susan; Anderson, Jada; Hadjiisky, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Studies spanning nearly 4 decades demonstrate that doctors ignore or dismiss many patient bids for discussion of psychosocial topics. We sought to understand characteristics of doctors, patients, and visits in which this occurs. Methods: Reanalysis of 167 audiotapes from 2 studies of parent-doctor communication in a pediatric residents'…

  15. A Psychiatric Residency Curriculum on the Care of African American Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Herbert W.; Felder, Diane; Clark, Michelle O.

    2004-01-01

    Training psychiatric residents to address cross-cultural issues in their practice of psychiatry is a necessary objective of contemporary psychiatric education. Cultural issues play a critical role in the formation and expression of a patient's personality. In addition, they are a major determinant of the context in which mental illness develops.…

  16. Staff Reactions Toward Lesbian, Gay, or Bisexual (LGB) People Living in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) Who Actively Disclose Their Sexual Orientation.

    PubMed

    Villar, Feliciano; Serrat, Rodrigo; Fabà, Josep; Celdrán, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Fifty-three staff members currently working in residential aged care facilities located in Barcelona, Spain, were asked about the way they would react if a resident told them that he or she felt sexually attracted and had maintained sexual relationships with another resident of the same gender. Acceptance of non-heterosexual sexual orientation was a frequent answer, and around one in four professionals stated that they would try helping the resident in question, by offering a private space or giving some emotional support. However, some reactions were not consistent with a respectful approach toward sexual diversity, as, for instance, informing the resident's family or advising the resident to keep his or her sexual orientation hidden. We highlight the importance of developing formal policies and offering formal training to staff in order to address the specific needs of older LGB people living in RACFs. PMID:25710604

  17. Neighborhood Residence and the Problems of School-Age Children. Data Trends #125

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" uses data from a multilevel longitudinal study, the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN), to investigate possible effects of neighborhood residence on…

  18. Permanent resident

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff. PMID:27193992

  19. Fall-Related Hospitalization and Facility Costs among Residents of Institutions Providing Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Norman V.; Delafuente, Jeffrey C.; Cox, Fred M.; Narayanan, Siva

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to estimate hospital and long-term-care costs resulting from falls in long-term-care facilities (LTCFs). Design and Methods: The study used a retrospective, pre/post with comparison group design. We used matching, based on propensity scores, to control for baseline differences between fallers and non-fallers.…

  20. The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Risk Management of Information Systems in Australian Residential Aged Care Homes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David; Ma, Jun; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    To obtain indications of the influence of electronic health records (EHR) in managing risks and meeting information system accreditation standard in Australian residential aged care (RAC) homes. The hypothesis to be tested is that the RAC homes using EHR have better performance in meeting information system standards in aged care accreditation than their counterparts only using paper records for information management. Content analysis of aged care accreditation reports from the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency produced between April 2011 and December 2013. Items identified included types of information systems, compliance with accreditation standards, and indicators of failure to meet an expected outcome for information systems. The Chi-square test was used to identify difference between the RAC homes that used EHR systems and those that used paper records in not meeting aged care accreditation standards. 1,031 (37.4%) of 2,754 RAC homes had adopted EHR systems. Although the proportion of homes that met all accreditation standards was significantly higher for those with EHR than for homes with paper records, only 13 RAC homes did not meet one or more expected outcomes. 12 used paper records and nine of these failed the expected outcome for information systems. The overall contribution of EHR to meeting aged care accreditation standard in Australia was very small. Risk indicators for not meeting information system standard were no access to accurate and appropriate information, failure in monitoring mechanisms, not reporting clinical incidents, insufficient recording of residents' clinical changes, not providing accurate care plans, and communication processes failure. The study has provided indications that use of EHR provides small, yet significant advantages for RAC homes in Australia in managing risks for information management and in meeting accreditation requirements. The implication of the study for introducing technology innovation in RAC in

  1. Aging--Family Decision-Making for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: Rural-Urban Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessert, Charles E.; Elliott, Barbara A.; Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    Context: Research has demonstrated substantial differences between end-of-life care in rural and urban settings. As the end of life approaches, rural elders are less likely to be hospitalized, to be placed in an intensive care unit, or to have a feeding tube, compared to their urban counterparts. These differences cannot be fully explained by…

  2. Assessment of Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease Status among Elderly Residing in Old Age Homes of Madhya Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rohit; Gautam, Nalam Radhika; Kumar, P Mahesh; Kadhiresan, R; Saxena, Vrinda; Jain, Suyog

    2015-01-01

    Background: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the dental caries and periodontal disease status of elderly residing in old age homes of Madhya Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 599 elderly people residing in old age homes of Madhya Pradesh, India using cluster sampling methodology. The clinical findings were recorded using modified WHO Oral Health Assessment form (1997) to assess periodontal status as per community periodontal index, loss of attachment, WHO dentition status, and treatment needs. Results: In the present study, the caries prevalence among dentate subjects was found among 41.9% of the dentate subjects and the mean decayed, missed, and filled teeth was found to be 8.28 ± 4.779 with the mean number of decayed being 1.51. In the dentate population, 0% had healthy periodontal tissue, 0.26% had bleeding, and 24.5% had calculus, 52.1% had shallow pockets and 23.1% had deep pockets as their highest score and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). In the current study, 37.9% inmates were completely edentulous. This study also showed that as age advanced the prevalence increased from 23.1% to 55.4%. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The oral health status of elderly people was found to be poor. Hence, it is concluded from this study that tooth loss is higher among the geriatric group residing in old age homes and is associated with many demographic and behavioral risk indicators. PMID:26464541

  3. Multisensory installations in residential aged-care facilities: increasing novelty and encouraging social engagement through modest environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Theresa L; Masser, Barbara M; Pachana, Nancy A

    2014-09-01

    The current study examined the effect of an indoor simulated garden installation that included visual, auditory, and olfactory stimuli on resident well-being, compared to the effect elicited by a reminiscence installation and a control no-installation condition. A quasi-experimental ABA design was used (i.e., two intervention conditions plus a wait-list control condition). A survey instrument was administered to nursing home residents (N = 33) at three time points (pre-, during, and post intervention) over an 8-week period, which measured mood, behavior, health, and social interaction. Additionally, staff reports (N = 24) were collected. Both the nature-based and non-nature-based installations led to enhanced well-being and significantly more social benefits for residents because of their novel and aesthetic appeal, compared with the control condition. Residents in the nature-based installation condition reported more satisfaction with their living environment during the intervention phase than those in the comparison conditions. The results show that an indoor garden simulation is a relatively inexpensive way to transform a disused indoor area of an aged-care facility for the benefit of residents and staff. PMID:25199113

  4. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of...

  5. Planning Manual for School-Age Child Care in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainhart, Dolly

    This manual was designed to assist concerned individuals and organizations within communities in New Mexico to develop and plan effective school-age child care programs. Emphasized are the first steps in initiating and implementing school-age child care in a community. Chapter I discusses the need for school-age child care programs and the…

  6. European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS): background, aims and methods

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Prisca; Becker, Thomas; Losert, Carolin; Alptekin, Köksal; Berti, Loretta; Burti, Lorenzo; Burton, Alexandra; Dernovsek, Mojca; Dragomirecka, Eva; Freidl, Marion; Friedrich, Fabian; Genova, Aneta; Germanavicius, Arunas; Halis, Ulaş; Henderson, John; Hjorth, Peter; Lai, Taavi; Larsen, Jens Ivar; Lech, Katarzyna; Lucas, Ramona; Marginean, Roxana; McDaid, David; Mladenova, Maya; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Paziuc, Alexandru; Paziuc, Petronela; Priebe, Stefan; Prot-Klinger, Katarzyna; Wancata, Johannes; Kilian, Reinhold

    2009-01-01

    Background People with mental disorders have a higher prevalence of physical illnesses and reduced life expectancy as compared with the general population. However, there is a lack of knowledge across Europe concerning interventions that aim at reducing somatic morbidity and excess mortality by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. Methods and design HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i) gathering relevant knowledge on physical illness in people with mental illness, (ii) identifying health promotion initiatives in European countries that meet country-specific needs, and (iii) at identifying best practice across Europe. Criteria for best practice will include evidence on the efficacy of physical health interventions and of their effectiveness in routine care, cost implications and feasibility for adaptation and implementation of interventions across different settings in Europe. HELPS will develop and implement a "physical health promotion toolkit". The toolkit will provide information to empower residents and staff to identify the most relevant risk factors in their specific context and to select the most appropriate action out of a range of defined health promoting interventions. The key methods are (a) stakeholder analysis, (b) international literature reviews, (c) Delphi rounds with experts from participating centres, and (d) focus groups with staff and residents of mental health care facilities. Meanwhile a multi-disciplinary network consisting of 15 European countries has been established and took up the work. As one main result of the project they expect that a widespread use of the HELPS toolkit could have a significant positive effect on the physical health status of residents of mental health and social care facilities, as well as to hold resonance for community dwelling people with mental health problems. Discussion A general strategy on health promotion for people with mental disorders must take into

  7. Nurses’ and care workers’ experiences of spiritual needs in residents with dementia in nursing homes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate nurses’ and care workers’ experiences of spiritual needs among residents with dementia in nursing homes. Nurses claim to practice holistic nursing. Nevertheless, there is little knowledge about how to recognise spiritual needs in residents with dementia. Methods The study was conducted using a qualitative method with an exploratory design. Eight focus- group interviews in four Norwegian nursing homes were performed from June 2011 – Jan 2012. Using open-ended research questions, a total of 31 participants were asked to share their understanding and experiences regarding residents’ spiritual needs. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenological – hermeneutical method. Results The nurses’ and care workers’ experiences of residents’ spiritual needs were related to three main themes; i) The need for serenity and inner peace, described as “contemplative and restful moments” and “calmness due to familiarity”, ii) The need for confirmation, described as “love and proximity” and iii) The need to express faith and beliefs, described as “participate in worship and prayers” and “approaching death”. The comprehensive analyses revealed that the nurses believe the residents’ spiritual needs were linked to the residents’ previous sources of finding meaning, in relation to inter-personal, intra-personal and trans-personal dimensions in residents’ lives. Conclusions Nurses' and care workers’ experiences of spiritual needs in people with dementia are very similar to the findings for the general population regardless of the severity of the dementia. The study’s relevance to clinical practice indicates the importance of developing more knowledge about how people with dementia in nursing homes express spiritual needs and how to observe and interpret such needs. PMID:24731548

  8. Culture Change in Long Term Care Services: Eden-Greenhouse-Aging in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brune, Kendall

    2011-01-01

    To discuss the relationship between residents and the management team, we must first review the transition from a medical model to a social model of care that is sweeping across America. Long-term care (LTC) management models were developed for a very autocratic and hierarchical style of management based in the 1960s. Those facilities were built…

  9. TRACER: an ‘eye-opener’ to the patient experience across the transition of care in an internal medicine resident program

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Lauren B.; Hall, Susana L.; Kleppel, Reva W.; Hinchey, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    Background A safe patient transition requires a complex set of physician skills within the interprofessional practice. Objective To evaluate a rotation which applies self-reflection and workplace learning in a TRAnsition of CarE Rotation (TRACER) for internal medicine (IM) residents. TRACER is a 2-week required IM resident rotation where trainees join a ward team as a quality officer and follow patients into postacute care. Methods In 2010, residents participated in semistructured, one-on-one interviews as part of ongoing program evaluation. They were asked what they had learned on TRACER, the year prior, and how they used those skills in their practice. Using transcripts, the authors reviewed and coded each transcript to develop themes. Results Five themes emerged from a qualitative, grounded theory analysis: seeing things from the other side, the ‘ah ha’ moment of fragmented care, team collaboration including understanding nursing scope of practice in different settings, patient understanding, and passing the learning on. TRACER gives residents a moment to breathe and open their eyes to the interprofessional practice setting and the patient's experience of care in transition. Conclusions Residents learn about transitions of care through self-reflection. This learning is sustained over time and is valued enough to teach to their junior colleagues. PMID:25846349

  10. [Scarcity in health care, age as selection criterion and the value of old age. Current discussion].

    PubMed

    Naafs, J

    1993-06-01

    There is a growing attention for setting limits in health care. Contemporary medical scarcity makes choices necessary, but what are the arguments? Only medical criteria for selection are accepted in the Netherlands, but that does not mean at all that age is an unimportant criterion. In this article the discussion on age as criterion for selection is reviewed. It seems that arguments are based on different basic (moral) assumptions and that age and aging can be appreciated from different points of view. There is among other things the principle of justice and the idea of a natural life-span (Daniels), the norm of a worthwhile life-time (the fair-innings argument of Harris) and the idea of old age as a period of its own (Callahan). The different starting points can lead to the same way of thinking about age as a criterion for selection. Daniels, Harris, and Callahan justify this kind of selection. The Dunning-committee however does not accept it, from the point of a fundamental equality of people, the protection of life and the principle of solidarity in our society. It seems that not only the different arguments lead towards different conclusions but also the different views on the value of old age by different groups or by society as a whole. PMID:8328008

  11. The Association between Rural Residence and the Use, Type, and Quality of Depression Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, John C.; Harman, Jeffrey S.; Xu, Stanley; Dong, Fran

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the association between rurality and depression care. Methods: Data were extracted for 10,319 individuals with self-reported depression in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Pharmacotherapy was defined as an antidepressant prescription fill, and minimally adequate pharmacotherapy was defined as receipt of at least 4…

  12. Managing the wandering behaviour of people living in a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Brent; Koch, Susan; Nay, Rhonda; Lewis, Matthew

    2007-12-01

    Background  Wandering behaviour is frequently seen in older people with cognitive impairment. The prevalence of patients exhibiting wandering behaviour has been estimated to be 11.6% on traditional units and 52.7% on Alzheimer's units. Wandering is one of the core behavioural characteristics that impact on familial carers and is likely to influence the decision to place a family member in an aged care environment. Considering the possible risks associated with wandering behaviour, the successful identification and management of wandering is essential. Wandering is also a problem for caregivers in the institutionalised setting, in terms of containment, usually being addressed by securing the environment. There has been some research conducted to assist in the understanding and management of wandering behaviour; however, the findings have been diverse resulting in a level of confusion about the best approaches to take. Objectives  This review aims to present the best available evidence on the management of wandering in older adults who reside in an aged care facility (both high and low care). Search strategy  An extensive search of keywords contained in the title and abstract, and relevant MeSH headings and descriptor terms was performed on the following databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AGELINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, APAIS Health, Current Contents, Dare, Dissertation Abstracts, Personal Communication, Social Science Index. Selection criteria  Papers were selected if they focused on the treatment of wandering in an institutional setting. Some studies were not specifically examining wanderers over the age of 65 years as per the protocol requirements, but were included as it was felt that their findings could be applied to this age group. Data collection and analysis  Study design and quality were tabulated and relative risks, odds ratios, mean differences and associated 95% confidence intervals were calculated from individual comparative studies

  13. The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Johnson, Erica D.; Claridy, Mechelle D.; Earle, Rebecca L.; Kaplan, Lee M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. US primary care physicians are inadequately educated on how to provide obesity treatment. We sought to assess physician training in obesity and to characterize the perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and treatment patterns of primary care physicians. Methods. We administered a cross-sectional web-based survey from July to October 2014 to adult primary care physicians in practices affiliated with the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). We evaluated survey respondent demographics, personal health habits, obesity training, knowledge of bariatric surgery care, perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs regarding the etiology of obesity and treatment strategies. Results. Younger primary care physicians (age 20–39) were more likely to have received some obesity training than those aged 40–49 (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.008–0.822) or those 50+ (OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.004–0.321). Physicians who were young, had obesity, or received obesity education in medical school or postgraduate training were more likely to answer bariatric surgery knowledge questions correctly. Conclusions. There is a need for educational programs to improve physician knowledge and competency in treating patients with obesity. Obesity is a complex chronic disease, and it is important for clinicians to be equipped with the knowledge of the multiple treatment modalities that may be considered to help their patients achieve a healthy weight. PMID:26339506

  14. A critique of using age to ration health care.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R W

    1993-01-01

    Daniel Callahan has argued that economic and social benefits would result from a policy of withholding medical treatments which prolong life in persons over a certain age. He claims 'the real goal of medicine' is to conquer death and prolong life with the use of technology, regardless of the age and quality of life of the patient, and this has been responsible for the escalation of health care expenditure. Callahan's proposal is based on economic rationalism but there is little evidence to suggest that substantial economic savings could be achieved. Moreover, his argument raises serious moral objections. A policy of withholding treatments from members of a social group involves elements of compulsion and discrimination, both of which would intrude on the doctor-patient relationship, undermine the autonomy of elderly patients, and invoke the slippery slope towards involuntary forms of euthanasia. Life-death decisions should be based on more than the one criterion of age, and take account of more relevant factors such as the patient's usual state of well-being, her/his expressed wishes, informed consent and the type of illness. Any move to the implementation and enforcement of the policy Callahan recommends would be rejected by health professionals and the public. PMID:8459434

  15. [Dynamics of elements distribution in blood, depending on age, by example of Moscow Region residents].

    PubMed

    Yuvs, G G; Ignatova, T N; Anuchin, A M; Lebedeva, V L; Shilov, V V; Khapalyuk, A V

    2015-01-01

    Elemental status of a person determines the qualitative and quantitative content of chemical elements in the human body. This marker allows us to estimate the level of imbalance of chemical elements and therefore health risks. The method for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of 67 elements in biomaterials has been proposed. The detailed elemental analysis of whole blood samples of 1711 healthy people (age range 0-100 years) of Moscow Region has been performed. A number of patterns of age-related changes of the element status conditionally healthy people has been estimated. Na content in the samples increased with the age of the person. Presumably, this result reflects the studied populations nutrition disorders associated with immoderate consumption of table salt. The maximum content of Ca was observed in blood samples of people age range 0-20 years (66-69 mg/kg), the Ca content in the blood samples of people age range 26-85 years was significantly lower (59-62 mg/kg). The maximum decrease of Ca was detected in blood samples of people age range of 85-100 years (57-59 mg/kg). Thisreductionin the concentration of Ca, apparently due to age-related changes of Ca balance, correlates with decrease of bone mineral density and bone mass. Iron content decreased in the blood samples of people age range 10-100 years from 480 to 390 mg/kg. Selenium content in blood of people age range 0-25 years linearly increased, remained stable high in the blood of people age range 25-55 years (0,13-0,136 mg/kg) and then gradually decreased. A graph of As content dependence from a person's age is a mirror image of the graph of Se content dependence from a person's age, which is evidence of the antagonistic effects of these elements. Graphic changes in the content of rare earth elements Eu and Ho reflect the unidirectional trend of these elements accumulation. The maximum content of these elements was observed in blood samples of people age range of 25-65 years. Perhaps a

  16. Impact of Rural Residence on Survival of Male Veterans Affairs Patients after Age 65

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Todd A.; Wallace, Amy E.; Weeks, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: More than 1 in 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) users lives in a rural setting. Rural veterans face different barriers to health care than their urban counterparts, but their risk of death relative to their urban counterparts is unknown. The objective of our study was to compare survival between rural and urban VA users. Methods: We linked the…

  17. The Evaluation of Existing Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements: Day Care for the School-Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom, Joan M.; Dreher, Donna L.

    As part of an evaluation of the existing Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements (FIDCR), this paper reviews the current regulations and presents recommendations for modifications in the requirements as they relate to group or family day care services for school age children from 5 to 14 years of age. The paper is divided into five major…

  18. Implementation of the resident assessment instrument: a Canadian experience.

    PubMed

    Brunton, B; Rook, M

    1999-01-01

    As the population ages, the increasing number and complexity of needs of individuals requiring institutionalization will increase the demands for chronic care services. In this article, the authors describe the implementation process used to introduce interdisciplinary staff to the use of the Minimum Data Set (MDS) for assessment of both nursing home and chronic care residents. This screening tool assesses resident characteristics over a wide spectrum of dimensions. The assessment findings are then integrated into the clinical plan of care. PMID:10538542

  19. [Skin Care to Prevent Development of Pressure Ulcers in Bedridden Nursing Home Residents from Developing Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Residents].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Chie

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether skincare products are effective in preventing development of pressure ulcers in bedridden nursing home residents. The study sample consisted of 21 nursing home residents at a nursing home in Osaka, Japan who use diapers. Participants were assigned to 3 groups and compared to a control group. None of the subjects developed a pressure ulcer and had improved skin condition around the anus. PMID:26809416

  20. Immediate financial impact of computerized clinical decision support for long-term care residents with renal insufficiency: a case study.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sujha; Hoover, Sonja; Wagner, Joann L; Donovan, Jennifer L; Kanaan, Abir O; Rochon, Paula A; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Field, Terry S

    2012-01-01

    In a randomized trial of a clinical decision support system for drug prescribing for residents with renal insufficiency in a large long-term care facility, analyses were conducted to estimate the system's immediate, direct financial impact. We determined the costs that would have been incurred if drug orders that triggered the alert system had actually been completed compared to the costs of the final submitted orders and then compared intervention units to control units. The costs incurred by additional laboratory testing that resulted from alerts were also estimated. Drug orders were conservatively assigned a duration of 30 days of use for a chronic drug and 10 days for antibiotics. It was determined that there were modest reductions in drug costs, partially offset by an increase in laboratory-related costs. Overall, there was a reduction in direct costs (US$1391.43, net 7.6% reduction). However, sensitivity analyses based on alternative estimates of duration of drug use suggested a reduction as high as US$7998.33 if orders for non-antibiotic drugs were assumed to be continued for 180 days. The authors conclude that the immediate and direct financial impact of a clinical decision support system for medication ordering for residents with renal insufficiency is modest and that the primary motivation for such efforts must be to improve the quality and safety of medication ordering. PMID:22101906

  1. Facilitators and barriers to self-management of nursing home residents: perspectives of health-care professionals in Korean nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon-Hwan; Bang, Hwal Lan; Kim, Ga Hye; Ha, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore facilitators and barriers to self-management from the viewpoint of staff taking care of nursing home (NH) residents with chronic diseases in South Korea. Patients and methods A qualitative content analysis was done using the focus group interview method. A total of 23 health-care professionals (16 registered nurses and 7 social workers) were interviewed from three urban NHs, each with more than 100 beds. Results Five facilitators were identified: grouping the residents; the resident’s awareness of his/her current health status; the willingness of residents to engage in self-management; residence in the facility; and support from the staff. Additionally, seven barriers were identified: deterioration of the resident’s health; the dependency expectations of the resident; hesitation in asking for help; difference in expectations between the staff and the resident’s family; insufficient staffing and time; lack of standardized guidelines; and conservative tendencies of the staff due to rigid policies. Conclusion The findings of this study can help health-care professionals recognize the factors that influence self-management and provide direction for registered nurses and other health professionals involved in supporting self-management programs for NH residents. PMID:26491277

  2. Development and implementation of a geriatric care/case management program in a military community-based family medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Williams, C M; Petrelli, J; Murphy, M

    2000-11-01

    This article discusses how the development of a longitudinal geriatric assessment form facilitated a case management program in identifying high-risk frail elders within a military family practice clinic. A careful review of geriatric assessment tools was performed. From this review, a model geriatric assessment form was developed. A "SWOT" (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of the family medicine department was completed to determine if the environment was ready for case management. Analysis of the SWOT data revealed that the environment was favorable for a population-based approach to case management. Results of this initial study are encouraging. The new longitudinal geriatric assessment form has assisted family practice residents in organizing problems and data while seeing elderly patients. As a direct result, higher-risk frail elders have been identified for closer evaluation and follow-up. Future goals are to measure outcomes-based data and to refine the geriatric assessment process. PMID:11143424

  3. Complementary Self-Care Strategies for Healthy Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sondra

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on alternative self-care practices in terms of collaboration with the primary care physician and individual exploration of self-care practices such as acupuncture, meditation, and nutrition counseling. (JOW)

  4. Caring for people with dementia in residential aged care: successes with a composite person-centered care model featuring Montessori-based activities.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gail; Morley, Catherine; Walters, Wendy; Malta, Sue; Doyle, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes. PMID:25499658

  5. Engaging undergraduate nursing students in the care of elderly residents in Australian nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Rogan, Frances; Wyllie, Aileen

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a qualitative descriptive study exploring the effect of a structured educational program for beginning undergraduate nursing students undertaking clinical placements in Australian nursing homes. The study focuses on the students' perceptions of their knowledge, skills and attitudes towards the elderly. The analysis shows how the program with its supportive structure was able to engage the students in caring for the elderly person. Data gathered through questionnaires and focus groups demonstrate that negative attitudes toward the elderly had been modified or changed and that a surprising number of students were showing an interest in what traditionally has been an unpopular area of clinical practice. The results support some previous studies demonstrating that with the right educational support and structures beginning nursing students can engage in positive learning experiences with the elderly. PMID:19036324

  6. Physical activity among working age residents of Wroclaw in the light of their educational attainment

    PubMed Central

    Puciato, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This article attempts to define the relationship between physical activity and educational attainment of working-age adults from Wroclaw. [Subjects and Methods] The study surveyed 2,174 participants aged 18–64 years, 984 men and 1,190 women. To evaluate their physical activity, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used. [Results] Most of the participants performed low-intensity levels of physical activity. Men were characterized by generally higher physical activity than women, but the difference was not significant. The level of educational attainment differentiated physical activity only in women with secondary or higher education, who performed significantly more physical activities than those with primary and vocational education. [Conclusion] Further research in this subject area should be performed. It should be continuous and consider other methods and techniques. PMID:27065518

  7. Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over

    MedlinePlus

    ... April 18, 2012 Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over ... and Roberto Valverde, M.P.H., Division of Health Care Statistics Abstract Objective —This report presents national estimates ...

  8. Impact of the information age on residency training: communication, access to public information, and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Donald M; Belitsky, Richard; Cohen, Mitchell B; Cabaniss, Deborah L; Dickstein, Leah J; Bernstein, Carol A; Kaplan, Allan S; Scheiber, Stephen C; Crisp-Han, Holly D; Wrzosek, Marika I; Silberman, Edward K

    2015-02-01

    Access to technology in practice helps physicians manage information, communicate, and research topics; however, those in training receive almost no formal preparation for integrating web-based technologies into practice. One reason for this is that many faculty-aside from junior faculty or those in recent generations-did not grow up using Internet communication, may use it minimally, if at all, in their own practices, and may know little about its forms and varieties. This report presents a case to illustrate how these disparities may play out in the supervisory situation and makes suggestions about helping supervisors integrate technology-awareness into their teaching. PMID:25124878

  9. Women and stroke knowledge: influence of age, race, residence location, and marital status.

    PubMed

    Ennen, Kathleen A; Beamon, Emily R

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, stroke is the second leading cause of death and leading cause of disability. Women experience over half of all strokes, 60% of stroke-related deaths, and a death rate of 11% versus 8.4% for men. To understand the delay in stroke recognition and treatment, a convenience sample of 97 midlife women living in southeast North Carolina completed the Stroke Recognition Questionnaire. Rural women, younger women (<49 years old), and participants with incomes under $35,601 had higher stroke symptom and risk factor knowledge scores. Educational interventions should target women over the age of 50, and should distinguish between symptoms of stroke versus heart attack. PMID:22946594

  10. The End-of-Life Experience in Long-Term Care: Five Themes Identified from Focus Groups with Residents, Family Members, and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Jean C.; Dobbs, Debra; Meier, Andrea; Williams, Christianna S.; Biola, Holly; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We designed this study to examine the end-of-life (EOL) experience in long-term care (LTC) based on input from key stakeholders. Design and Methods: The study consisted of 10 homogeneous focus groups drawn from a purposive sample of LTC residents (2 groups; total n = 11), family caregivers (2 groups; total n = 19), paraprofessional staff…

  11. Use of a mobile device by nursing home residents for long-term care comprehensive geriatric self-assessment: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fanpin; Chang, Polun; Hou, I-Ching; Tu, Ming-Hsiang; Lan, Chung-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Long-term-care comprehensive geriatric assessments, such as the Minimum Data Set 3.0, are used to evaluate the clinical, psychological, and personal status of residents in long-term-care nursing facilities. Nursing staff conducts assessment interviews, thereby increasing the workload of nurses and the cost of patient care. This study explored the ability of nursing home residents to use two different mobile devices for a geriatric self-assessment. Study participants were residents of long-term-care nursing homes. A modified Minimum Data Set 3.0 was converted to a format for use with a 6-inch mobile pad and a 3.7-inch mobile smartphone. The survey completion rate and the response time were measured. A Technology Assessment Model questionnaire analyzed the participants' experience. All participants were able to use a 6-inch pad, with an average completion rate of 92.9% and an average time for completion of 21 minutes. Only 20% of the participants could complete the assessment with the 3.7-inch smartphone. The participants found the 6-inch pad easier to use than the 3.7-inch smartphone. This exploratory study suggests that nursing home residents are able to use a mobile device to perform a geriatric self-assessment and delineates the importance of the ergonomics of the device. PMID:25397723

  12. Excess body weight increases the burden of age-associated chronic diseases and their associated health care expenditures.

    PubMed

    Atella, Vincenzo; Kopinska, Joanna; Medea, Gerardo; Belotti, Federico; Tosti, Valeria; Mortari, Andrea Piano; Cricelli, Claudio; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Aging and excessive adiposity are both associated with an increased risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, which drive ever increasing health costs. The main aim of this study was to determine the net (non-estimated) health costs of excessive adiposity and associated age-related chronic diseases. We used a prevalence-based approach that combines accurate data from the Health Search CSD-LPD, an observational dataset with patient records collected by Italian general practitioners and up-to-date health care expenditures data from the SiSSI Project. In this very large study, 557,145 men and women older than 18 years were observed at different points in time between 2004 and 2010. The proportion of younger and older adults reporting no chronic disease decreased with increasing BMI. After adjustment for age, sex, geographic residence, and GPs heterogeneity, a strong J-shaped association was found between BMI and total health care costs, more pronounced in middle-aged and older adults. Relative to normal weight, in the 45-64 age group, the per-capita total cost was 10% higher in overweight individuals, and 27 to 68% greater in patients with obesity and very severe obesity, respectively. The association between BMI and diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease largely explained these elevated costs. PMID:26540605

  13. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  14. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  15. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  16. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  17. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  18. Most Sick, Aging Americans Live Far from In-Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160328.html Most Sick, Aging Americans Live Far From In-Home Care Study ... to swell. "The Baby Boomer generation, they're aging fast and they are living longer with multiple ...

  19. Succeeding Through Service Innovation: Consumer Directed Care in the Aged Care Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Linda; Laragy, Carmel; Zadeh, Hossein S.

    The growing challenge and diversity of ageing populations is a key global issue for struggling health systems. Consumer Directed Care (CDC), an innovative service delivery system, opens up possibilities for re-defining consumer expectations, prompting change in how health service providers operate. As a service delivery model, CDC offers improved responsiveness to individual requirements; and increased transparency in the use of allocated funding. Where implemented, CDC has established new relationships and interactions between key stakeholders, co-creating value for older citizens. This chapter reviews some drivers for the development of service innovation, surveys various in-country approaches, highlights current trends in CDC delivery and describes an EU policy impact assessment instrument to aid funding bodies. The chapter concludes by speculating on organizational outcomes from CDC and the likelihood that the introduction of this innovative service delivery model will require closer collaborative relationships between service providers and information technology specialists.

  20. "Post-residency disease" and the medical self: identity, work, and health care among doctors who become patients.

    PubMed

    Klitzman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Doctors who become patients due to serious illnesses face many challenges related to issues of identity, work, and professionalism. In-depth interviews with such doctors reveal the complex ways in which illness threatens identity in these professionals. In comparison with "medical student's disease," these doctors now exhibit "post-residency disease"-minimizing physical symptoms that are in fact present, leading to decreases in care sought. Doctors often feel they are somehow invulnerable to disease and have to remain strong, not burdening others. Many describe themselves as "workaholics," which can prove to be a double-edged sword, posing problems as well as providing benefits. This professional commitment could interfere with preventive health behaviors and with "practicing what they preach." Some view their illness with their "medical self" - as if they were a physician observing another patient rather than themselves. These doctors often support their approach by choosing a colleague as a doctor who will not challenge them, thereby establishing a "denial system" as opposed to a support system. These doctor-patients confront difficult issues of how much their physicianhood is an identity or an activity, illustrating the intricate relationships and tensions between work, identity, professionalism, and health in contemporary medicine. PMID:17146139

  1. Thyroid Cancer Detection by Ultrasound Among Residents Ages 18 Years and Younger in Fukushima, Japan: 2011 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Tokinobu, Akiko; Yamamoto, Eiji; Suzuki, Etsuji

    2016-01-01

    Background: After the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in March 2011, radioactive elements were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Based on prior knowledge, concern emerged about whether an increased incidence of thyroid cancer among exposed residents would occur as a result. Methods: After the release, Fukushima Prefecture performed ultrasound thyroid screening on all residents ages ≤18 years. The first round of screening included 298,577 examinees, and a second round began in April 2014. We analyzed the prefecture results from the first and second round up to December 31, 2014, in comparison with the Japanese annual incidence and the incidence within a reference area in Fukushima Prefecture. Results: The highest incidence rate ratio, using a latency period of 4 years, was observed in the central middle district of the prefecture compared with the Japanese annual incidence (incidence rate ratio = 50; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 25, 90). The prevalence of thyroid cancer was 605 per million examinees (95% CI = 302, 1,082) and the prevalence odds ratio compared with the reference district in Fukushima Prefecture was 2.6 (95% CI = 0.99, 7.0). In the second screening round, even under the assumption that the rest of examinees were disease free, an incidence rate ratio of 12 has already been observed (95% CI = 5.1, 23). Conclusions: An excess of thyroid cancer has been detected by ultrasound among children and adolescents in Fukushima Prefecture within 4 years of the release, and is unlikely to be explained by a screening surge. PMID:26441345

  2. Excess body weight increases the burden of age-associated chronic diseases and their associated health care expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Atella, Vincenzo; Kopinska, Joanna; Medea, Gerardo; Belotti, Federico; Tosti, Valeria; Mortari, Andrea Piano; Cricelli, Claudio; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Aging and excessive adiposity are both associated with an increased risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, which drive ever increasing health costs. The main aim of this study was to determine the net (non‐estimated) health costs of excessive adiposity and associated age‐related chronic diseases. We used a prevalence‐based approach that combines accurate data from the Health Search CSD‐LPD, an observational dataset with patient records collected by Italian general practitioners and up‐to‐date health care expenditures data from the SiSSI Project. In this very large study, 557,145 men and women older than 18 years were observed at different points in time between 2004 and 2010. The proportion of younger and older adults reporting no chronic disease decreased with increasing BMI. After adjustment for age, sex, geographic residence, and GPs heterogeneity, a strong J‐shaped association was found between BMI and total health care costs, more pronounced in middle‐aged and older adults. Relative to normal weight, in the 45‐64 age group, the per‐capita total cost was 10% higher in overweight individuals, and 27 to 68% greater in patients with obesity and very severe obesity, respectively. The association between BMI and diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease largely explained these elevated costs. PMID:26540605

  3. Developing a Quality School-Age Child Care Program: An Information and Training Manual for Directors of School-Age Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childcare Resources, Birmingham, AL.

    This manual for directors of school-age child care (SACC) programs contains six sections. Section I provides a rationale for SACC. Section II describes characteristics of school-age children. The extensive Section III discusses characteristics of high quality SACC. After an initial discussion of the importance of out-of-school time, the section…

  4. Barriers to care for sexual assault survivors of childbearing age: An integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that only a small fraction of sexual assault survivors seek comprehensive care afterward, including physical and mental health care, forensic evidence collection, victim services, and legal support. This integrative review was conducted to identify barriers that may be keeping sexual assault survivors of childbearing age from receiving such comprehensive care. PMID:25664329

  5. Standards for Day Care Centers for Infants and Children Under 3 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Academy of Pediatrics, Evanston, IL.

    The Committee on Infant and Preschool Child of the American Academy of Pediatrics has developed basic standards for quality day care for children under 3 years of age. The availability of day care provides a mother with the choice of group day care as one of the means of providing for her children. Options should include full-time or part-time day…

  6. Attachment Style, Home-Leaving Age and Behavioral Problems among Residential Care Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shechory, Mally; Sommerfeld, Eliane

    2007-01-01

    In a prospective study, the attachment style, home-leaving age, length of time in residential care, and behavioral problems among Israeli residential care children (N=68), were studied. Data analyses showed that children removed from their homes at a later age suffered from higher levels of anxiety, depression and social problems compared to…

  7. School-Age Child Care: An Action Manual for the 90s and Beyond. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Allenson, Michael

    Evidence suggests that self-care among school-age children has significant costs to the children, in the form of increased fearfulness and loneliness, heightened vulnerability to peer pressure, and greater likelihood of substance abuse. In response to the need for quality school-age care, this book serves as a guide for anyone wanting to implement…

  8. No Time to Waste: An Action Agenda for School-Age Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Fink, Dale Borman

    This book for persons interested in setting up high quality school-age child care (SACC) programs: (1) provides background information and a rationale; (2) describes a collaborative model of program development; (3) discusses program funding and resources; (4) considers approaches to recognizing high quality school-age child care; and (5) offers…

  9. Individual and contextual antecedents of workplace aggression in aged care nurses and certified nursing assistants.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne; Gulyas, Andre

    2015-08-01

    Employees in aged care are at high risk of workplace aggression. Research rarely examines the individual and contextual antecedents of aggression for specific types of workers within these settings, such as nurses and certified nursing assistants (CNAs). The study aimed to explore characteristics of the job demands-resources model (JD-R), negative affectivity (NA) and demographics related to workplace aggression for aged care workers. The survey study was based on 208 nurses and 83 CNAs working within aged care. Data from each group were analysed separately using ordinal regressions. Both aged care nurses and CNAs reported high rates of bullying, external emotional abuse, threat of assault and physical assault. Elements of the JD-R model and individual characteristics were related to aggression types for both groups. Characteristics of the JD-R model, NA and demographics are important in understanding the antecedents of aggression observed among aged care workers. PMID:26224217

  10. An Attitudinal Survey of Pennsylvania's Rural Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Rural Pennsylvania, Harrisburg.

    Telephone surveys of 844 residents in 42 rural Pennsylvania counties established baseline data on rural opinions about 14 public policy issues. Concerning government spending, respondents felt that too little was spent on job creation, aging issues, child care, education, health services, and farming and agriculture; funding was about right for…

  11. Expert perspectives on Western European prison health services: do ageing prisoners receive equivalent care?

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Wiebke; Elger, Bernice Simone

    2014-09-01

    Health care in prison and particularly the health care of older prisoners are increasingly important topics due to the growth of the ageing prisoner population. The aim of this paper is to gain insight into the approaches used in the provision of equivalent health care to ageing prisoners and to confront the intuitive definition of equivalent care and the practical and ethical challenges that have been experienced by individuals working in this field. Forty interviews took place with experts working in the prison setting from three Western European countries to discover their views on prison health care. Experts indicated that the provision of equivalent care in prison is difficult mostly due to four factors: variability of care in different prisons, gatekeeper systems, lack of personnel, and delays in providing access. This lack of equivalence can be fixed by allocating adequate budgets and developing standards for health care in prison. PMID:24965437

  12. A comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of the AD8 and BCAT-SF in identifying dementia and mild cognitive impairment in long-term care residents.

    PubMed

    Mansbach, William E; Mace, Ryan A

    2016-09-01

    We compared the accuracy of the Brief Cognitive Assessment Tool-Short Form (BCAT-SF) and AD8 in identifying mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia among long-term care residents. Psychometric analyses of 357 long-term care residents (n = 228, nursing home; n = 129, assisted living) in Maryland referred for neuropsychological evaluation evidenced robust internal consistency reliability and construct validity for the BCAT-SF. Furthermore, hierarchical logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses demonstrated superior predictive validity for the BCAT-SF in identifying MCI and dementia relative to the AD8. In contrast, previously reported psychometric properties or cut scores for the AD8 could not be cross-validated in this long-term care sample. Based on these findings, the BCAT-SF appears to be a more reliable and valid screening instrument than the AD8 for rapidly identifying MCI and dementia in long-term care residents. PMID:26873431

  13. A staff intervention targeting resident-to-resident elder mistreatment (R-REM) in long-term care increased staff knowledge, recognition and reporting: Results from a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Teresi, Jeanne A.; Ramirez, Mildred; Ellis, Julie; Silver, Stephanie; Boratgis, Gabriel; Kong, Jian; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Pillemer, Karl A.; Lachs, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elder abuse in long term care has received considerable attention; however, resident-to-resident elder mistreatment (R-REM) has not been well researched. Preliminary findings from studies of R-REM suggest that it is sufficiently widespread to merit concern, and is likely to have serious detrimental outcomes for residents. However, no evidence-based training, intervention and implementation strategies exist that address this issue. Objectives The objective was to evaluate the impact of a newly developed R-REM training intervention for nursing staff on knowledge, recognition and reporting of R-REM. Design The design was a prospective cluster randomized trial with randomization at the unit level. Methods A sample of 1405 residents (685 in the control and 720 in the intervention group) from 47 New York City nursing home units (23 experimental and 24 control) in 5 nursing homes was assessed. Data were collected at three waves: baseline, 6 and 12 months. Staff on the experimental units received the training and implementation protocols, while those on the comparison units did not. Evaluation of outcomes was conducted on an intent-to-treat basis using mixed (random and fixed effects) models for continuous knowledge variables and Poisson regressions for longitudinal count data measuring recognition and reporting. Results There was a significant increase in knowledge post-training, controlling for pre-training levels for the intervention group (p<0.001), significantly increased recognition of R-REM (p<0.001), and longitudinal reporting in the intervention as contrasted with the control group (p=0.0058). Conclusions A longitudinal evaluation demonstrated that the training intervention was effective in enhancing knowledge, recognition and reporting of R-REM. It is recommended that this training program be implemented in long term care facilities. PMID:23159018

  14. Quality Care through Multi-Age Grouping of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Leo

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that multi-age grouping in early childhood settings can and does work. Addresses four main hurdles to successful implementation: (1) laws and regulations that act as barriers; (2) health concerns; (3) overcoming educational values that conflict with those of the age-grouped classroom; and (4) staff misunderstanding of multi-age grouping…

  15. Do Effects of Early Child Care Extend to Age 15 Years? Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Belsky, Jay; Burchinal, Margaret; Steinberg, Laurence; Vandergrift, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Relations between nonrelative child care (birth to 4 1/2 years) and functioning at age 15 were examined (N = 1,364). Both quality and quantity of child care were linked to adolescent functioning. Effects were similar in size as those observed at younger ages. Higher quality care predicted higher cognitive-academic achievement at age 15, with…

  16. Undernutrition and Its Correlates among Children of 3–9 Years of Age Residing in Slum Areas of Bhubaneswar, India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sai Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Undernutrition among children is a major public health concern worldwide, more prevalent in Asia and Africa. It manifests itself in various forms such as wasting or stunting or underweight and retards physical and mental development, increases susceptibility to infection, and reduces educational attainment and productivity. The present study was undertaken to assess the level of wasting, stunting, and underweight and determine its associates among slum children of 3–9 years of age, residing in Bhubaneswar city, India. After obtaining informed consent, a total of 249 children from 249 households were studied and their parents/guardians were interviewed to collect all relevant information. 23.3%, 57.4%, and 45.4% of children were found to have wasting, stunting, and underweight, respectively. Variables like birth order of child, period of initiation of breastfeeding and mother's education were found to be strong predictors of wasting, whereas toilet facility in household and practice of drinking water storage were significantly associated with stunting among slum children as revealed in multiple regression analysis. Thus, a multipronged approach is needed such as giving priority to improve education for slum community especially for women, creating awareness regarding benefits of early initiation of breastfeeding, small family size, and proper storage of drinking water, and providing toilet facility in slum households which could improve the nutritional status of slum children. PMID:25580460

  17. SOS--Satisfied or Stuck, Why Older Rural Residents Stay Put: Aging in Place or Stuck in Place in Rural Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Lance D.; Call, Vaughn R. A.; Brown, Ralph B.

    2012-01-01

    As rural communities undergo substantial demographic and economic changes, understanding the migration intentions and their antecedents of rural elderly persons becomes increasingly important. Using data drawn from a survey of adults from 24 rural Utah communities conducted in 2008, we examine whether rural residents 60 years of age or older plan…

  18. Preliminary estimates of residence times and apparent ages of ground water in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and water-quality data from a survey of springs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Focazio, Michael J.; Plummer, L. Neil; Bohlke, John K.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Bachman, L. Joseph; Powars, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the residence times of the ground-water systems in Chesapeake Bay watershed helps resource managers anticipate potential delays between implementation of land-management practices and any improve-ments in river and estuary water quality. This report presents preliminary estimates of ground-water residence times and apparent ages of water in the shallow aquifers of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. A simple reservoir model, published data, and analyses of spring water were used to estimate residence times and apparent ages of ground-water discharge. Ranges of aquifer hydraulic characteristics throughout the Bay watershed were derived from published literature and were used to estimate ground-water residence times on the basis of a simple reservoir model. Simple combinations of rock type and physiographic province were used to delineate hydrogeomorphic regions (HGMR?s) for the study area. The HGMR?s are used to facilitate organization and display of the data and analyses. Illustrations depicting the relation of aquifer characteristics and associated residence times as a continuum for each HGMR were developed. In this way, the natural variation of aquifer characteristics can be seen graphically by use of data from selected representative studies. Water samples collected in September and November 1996, from 46 springs throughout the watershed were analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons (CFC?s) to estimate the apparent age of ground water. For comparison purposes, apparent ages of water from springs were calculated assuming piston flow. Additi-onal data are given to estimate apparent ages assuming an exponential distribution of ages in spring discharge. Additionally, results from previous studies of CFC-dating of ground water from other springs and wells in the watershed were compiled. The CFC data, and the data on major ions, nutrients, and nitrogen isotopes in the water collected from the 46 springs are included in this report. The apparent ages of water

  19. Violence against surgical residents.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, C B; Rizzo, A G

    1997-01-01

    Violence against hospital personnel is underreported (less than one in five assaults), and accurate statistics as to the rate of violence against hospital personnel are thus difficult to establish. In the psychiatric discipline, an abundance of information has been published regarding violence in the health care setting, but few studies have examined violence outside psychiatric hospitals or by patients not diagnosed with psychiatric ailments. Using a survey that elicits information about workplace violence, we sought to gauge the prevalence of violent acts affecting general hospital workers who treat victims of violence on a daily basis. The survey was completed by a cohort of surgical staff nationwide (475 responses from 57 residency programs). Two hundred and eighty residents reported having witnessed one or more physical attacks, and 179 reported having been attacked. Violent acts were more likely to be committed in a public hospital than a private institution (P = 0.05). As shown in previous research, most attacks occurred in the emergency room (P = 0.01); the wards and parking lot were next in frequency. Women residents were more likely than men to call hospital security to intervene in a potentially violent situation (P = 0.04), and junior residents (postgraduate years 1-4) were more likely to be attacked than senior residents (> or = 5 years) (P = 0.04). The attacker was most likely to be a young black male between ages 19 and 30 (P = 0.01). We found no statistical relationship between the attacker and the victim regarding sex or race. Of the 475 respondents, 470 reported that they carry a gun themselves or know someone in the hospital environment who carries a gun. Images Figure 1. PMID:9291743

  20. The Impact of Supervision on Internal Medicine Residents' Attitudes and Management of Depression in Primary Care: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milone, Jennifer M.; Gottumukkala, Aruna; Ward, Christopher P.; York, Kaki M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the effect of supervision on internal medicine residents' attitudes toward and management of depression. Method: Internal medicine residents completed a survey during preclinical conferences. The survey included a published, validated questionnaire, the Depression Attitude Questionnaire, and items developed by the…

  1. Making Our Health and Care Systems Fit for an Ageing Population: Considerations for Canada

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Melissa K.; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    A report from the United Kingdom on making health and care systems fit for an ageing population proposes a range of interventions to make care better for older adults, especially those who are frail. Here, we discuss the proposed shift for the acute care hospital to other models of care. The key for these models of care requires a fundamental shift to care that addresses the full range of an individual’s needs, rather than being based around single diseases. How this might apply in the Canadian context is considered. We emphasize strategies to keep people out of hospital but still receive needed care, make acute hospital care less hazardous, and improve the interface between acute and long-term care. PMID:25452826

  2. Trends in aging and skin care: Ayurvedic concepts.

    PubMed

    Datta, Hema Sharma; Paramesh, Rangesh

    2010-04-01

    The association between Ayurveda, anti-aging and cosmeceuticals is gaining importance in the beauty, health and wellness sector. Ayurvedic cosmeceuticals date back to the Indus Valley Civilization. Modern research trends mainly revolve around principles of anti-aging activity described in Ayurveda: Vayasthapana (age defying), Varnya (brighten skin-glow), Sandhaniya (cell regeneration), Vranaropana (healing), Tvachya (nurturing), Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Tvachagnivardhani (strengthening skin metabolism) and Tvagrasayana (retarding aging). Many rasayana plants such as Emblica officinalis (Amla) and Centella asiatica (Gotukola) are extensively used. PMID:21836797

  3. Trends in aging and skin care: Ayurvedic concepts

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Hema Sharma; Paramesh, Rangesh

    2010-01-01

    The association between Ayurveda, anti-aging and cosmeceuticals is gaining importance in the beauty, health and wellness sector. Ayurvedic cosmeceuticals date back to the Indus Valley Civilization. Modern research trends mainly revolve around principles of anti-aging activity described in Ayurveda: Vayasthapana (age defying), Varnya (brighten skin-glow), Sandhaniya (cell regeneration), Vranaropana (healing), Tvachya (nurturing), Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Tvachagnivardhani (strengthening skin metabolism) and Tvagrasayana (retarding aging). Many rasayana plants such as Emblica officinalis (Amla) and Centella asiatica (Gotukola) are extensively used. PMID:21836797

  4. Using existing information from medico-legal death investigations to improve care of older people in residential aged care services.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Joseph Elias; Bugeja, Lyndal; Ranson, David

    2013-12-01

    The care of older people in residential aged care services could be improved by optimising the use of existing information gathered for medico-legal death investigations. The authors address three myths contributing to underuse of this information: deaths are not preventable; public health gains are too small; and it is someone else's charter or responsibility A significant proportion of deaths are preventable, specifically those occurring prematurely from natural causes or due to injury and trauma. By addressing these preventable deaths, significant public health cost savings and better health outcomes for our growing ageing population can be achieved. Despite substantive monitoring of the provision of aged care, no single entity is explicitly responsible for systematically analysing medico-legal death information. The data and skills for using information from medico-legal death investigations currently exist. Dispelling the myths removes one impediment to investing in this area of public health. PMID:24597371

  5. Parental Immigration Status is Associated with Children’s Health Care Utilization: Findings from the 2003 New Immigrant Survey of US Legal Permanent Residents

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Curry, Leslie A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Desai, Mayur M.

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to examine the association between parental immigration status and child health and health care utilization. Using data from a national sample of immigrant adults who had recently become legal permanent residents (LPR), children (n = 2,170) were categorized according to their parents’ immigration status prior to LPR: legalized, mixed-status, refugee, temporary resident, or undocumented. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to compare child health and health care utilization by parental immigration status over the prior 12 months. Nearly all children in the sample were reported to be in good to excellent health. Children whose parents had been undocumented were least likely to have had an illness that was reported to have required medical attention (5.4 %). Children whose parents had been either undocumented or temporary residents were most likely to have a delayed preventive annual exam (18.2 and 18.7 %, respectively). Delayed dental care was most common among children whose parents had come to the US as refugees (29.1 %). Differences in the preventive annual exam remained significant after adjusting for socioeconomic characteristics. Parental immigration status before LPR was not associated with large differences in reported child health status. Parental immigration status before LPR was associated with the use of preventive annual exams and dental services. However, no group of children was consistently disadvantaged with respect to all measures. PMID:23329165

  6. An apocalyptic vision of ageing in China: Old age care for the largest elderly population in the world.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Sun, Li

    2015-06-01

    According to the National Bureau of Statistics of China, by 2010 the number of people aged 60 or over had reached 178 million in China or 13% of its population. With the largest elderly population in the world in absolute numbers, China faces a challenge of providing care for the elderly both in the present and the future. Unlike old age pensions and health protection for the elderly, in Chinese society elderly care had never been considered to be a social problem but rather the individual family's responsibility. After the turn of the millennium, as the repercussions of increasingly ageing demographics, the results of the One-Child Policy and drastic changes in traditional family structures gradually became more apparent, this issue of elderly care has increasingly become one of the most pressing concerns for the ageing society. As there is little existing research on this particular topic, this article aims to shed light on elderly care in China, focusing on the care of elderly needing assistance with activities of daily living, since this group of elderly are most in need of care, their numbers having risen to 33 million in 2010. This article argues it is urgent for China to switch from informal family-based elderly care to the state's formal long-term care, illustrates that a model of social insurance (e.g. as in Germany) is advocated by many Chinese scholars and points out the ways in which it is different from both the commercialized models (e.g. as in the USA) and state organized "Beveridge" models (e.g. as in Sweden). PMID:25323978

  7. Building Peer Relationships in School Age Care. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachy, Cindy L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This workshop section includes four essays: (1) "Building Lifelong Relationships: School Age Programs at Work" (Cindy L. Teachey); (2) "Building Friendships in School Age Programs" (Joan M. Bergstrom); (3) "On the Rocky Road to Friendship: Emerging Peer Relationships" (Kay Albrecht); (4) "Helping Teachers Understand Their Role in Supporting Peer…

  8. Care dependence in old age: preferences, practices and implications in two Indonesian communities

    PubMed Central

    SCHRÖDER-BUTTERFILL, ELISABETH; FITHRY, TENGKU SYAWILA

    2013-01-01

    The provision of physical care is a sensitive matter in all cultures and is circumscribed by moral injunctions and personal preferences. Research on Western cultures has shown care networks to be narrow subsets of people’s wider networks and revealed dependence to be deeply undermining of full personhood. In non-Western societies these issues have received little attention, although it is sometimes assumed that care provision and dependence are much less problematic. This paper uses longitudinal ethnographic data from two ethnic groups in rural Indonesia to compare care preferences and practices in old age and to examine the implications of care dependence. The groups manifest varying degrees of daughter preference in care and differ in the extent to which notions of shame and avoidance prohibit cross-gender intimate care and care by ‘non-blood’ relatives. Demographic and social constraints often necessitate compromises in actual care arrangements (e.g. dependence on in-laws, neighbours or paid carers), not all of which are compatible with quality care and a valued identity. We argue that by probing the norms and practices surrounding care provision in different socio-cultural settings, it becomes possible to arrive at a deeper understanding of kinship, personhood and sociality. These insights are not only of sociological interest but have implications for people’s vulnerability to poor quality care in old age. PMID:24518962

  9. Learning and Caring in the Age of the Five Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Paul

    2007-01-01

    At its heart "Every Child Matters: change for children" endeavours to engender an ethic of "care for" the client group. However, although its raison d'etre might well espouse such orientations, it has a certain level of internal ambiguity which if not considered might lead education to position subsequent operationalization in ways antithetical to…

  10. Home Care for the Aged: A Fragile Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Lenard W.

    1985-01-01

    Examined the efforts of relatives, friends, and professional caregivers in serving the homebound elderly. Results indicate that although the informal support network was perceived to be the preferable source of most home care aid, formal intervention was seen as best for housekeeping functions, specialized duties, and repetitive tasks for the…

  11. Caring for an Ageing Population: Are Physiotherapy Graduates Adequately Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramklass, Serela S.; Butau, Anne; Ntinga, Nomusa; Cele, Nozipho

    2010-01-01

    In view of South African policy developments related to the care of older persons, it was necessary to examine the nature of the geriatrics content within physiotherapy curricula. A survey was conducted amongst final-year student physiotherapists at South African universities, together with content analysis of physiotherapy curricula. Very little…

  12. Learning Potentials and Limitations under Globalisation in Aged Care Workplaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of research on the Australian elder care industry used the categories of gender equity, gender differences, and gender deconstruction. Findings revealed the gender segregation of the industry, devaluing of women's work, and persistence of body/mind, male/female dualism. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  13. The Perceived Needs and Availability of Eye Care Services for Older Adults in Long-term Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kergoat, Hélène; Boisjoly, Hélène; Freeman, Ellen E.; Monette, Johanne; Roy, Sylvie; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective was to evaluate the eye care services offered to older residents living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Methods A questionnaire targeting residents aged ≥65 years was sent to all LTCFs in Quebec. Questions related to the institution’s characteristics, demographic data related to residents, oculovisual health of residents and barriers to eye care, eye care services offered within and outside the institution, and degree of satisfaction regarding the eye care services offered to residents. Results 196/428 (45.8%) LTCFs completed the questionnaire. Participating LTCFs had an average of 97.0 ± 5.1 residents with a mean age of 82.8 ± 3.0 yrs and 69% women. Eye care services were mostly offered outside the institution, on a “per request” basis. The main barriers to eye care were the perception that residents could not cooperate and the lack of eye care professionals. Most LTCFs were satisfied with the eye care services offered to residents. Conclusions The fact that the LTCFs were satisfied with the eye care services offered to their residents, although it was neither provided on a regular basis nor to all residents, suggests that eye care professionals should take a proactive educational role for improving services to older institutionalized adults. PMID:25232370

  14. Interprofessional education in aged-care facilities: Tensions and opportunities among undergraduate health student cohorts.

    PubMed

    Annear, Michael; Walker, Kim; Lucas, Peter; Lo, Amanda; Robinson, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    This article examines the reflective discourses of medical, nursing, and paramedic students participating in interprofessional education (IPE) activities in the context of aged-care clinical placements. The intent of the research is to explore how students engage with their interprofessional colleagues in an IPE assessment and care planning activity and elucidate how students configure their role as learners within the context of a non-traditional aged-care training environment. Research participants included cohorts of volunteer medical (n = 61), nursing (n = 46), and paramedic (n = 20) students who were on clinical placements at two large teaching aged-care facilities in Tasmania, Australia, over a period of 18 months. A total of 39 facilitated focus group discussions were undertaken with cohorts of undergraduate student volunteers from three health professions between February 2013 and October 2014. Thematic analysis of focus group transcripts was assisted by NVIVO software and verified through secondary coding and member checking procedures. With an acceptable level of agreement across two independent coders, four themes were identified from student focus group transcripts that described the IPE relations and perceptions of the aged-care environment. Emergent themes included reinforcement of professional hierarchies, IPE in aged care perceived as mundane and extraneous, opportunities for reciprocal teaching and learning, and understanding interprofessional roles. While not all students can be engaged with IPE activities in aged care, our evidence suggests that within 1 week of clinical placements there is a possibility to develop reciprocal professional relations, affirm a positive identity within a collaborative healthcare team, and support the health of vulnerable older adults with complex care needs. These important clinical learnings support aged-care-based IPE as a potentially powerful context for undergraduate learning in the 21st Century. PMID

  15. Validating a Marking Rubric for Evaluating Staff Knowledge of Dementia for Competency in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aberdeen, Suzanne M.; Leggat, Sandra G.; Barraclough, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The shift to Vocational Education and Training (VET) for the training of the Australian residential aged care workforce has resulted in significant variance in the competencies at graduation of those caring for people with dementia. Competence may be also be enhanced, or conversely, decline over time as a result of implicit learning gained from…

  16. National School-Age Child Care Alliance (NSACCA): National Survey Results. Draft Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Fern

    Presenting preliminary results of a National School-Age Child Care Alliance study of child care providers, this report is an initial analysis of 250 out of 427 questionnaires received as of April, 1993, representing practitioners in 40 states and 180 cities. Tables present data from responses to 16 items on the questionnaire soliciting information…

  17. Association between age and use of intensive care among surgical Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Wunsch, Hannah; Gershengorn, Hayley B.; Guerra, Carmen; Rowe, John; Li, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role age plays in use of intensive care for patients who have major surgery. Materials and Methods Retrospective cohort study examining the association between age and admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) for all Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 or older who had a hospitalization for one of five surgical procedures: esophagectomy, cystectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (open AAA), and elective endovascular AAA repair (endo AAA) from 2004–08. The primary outcome was admission to an ICU. Secondary outcomes were complications and hospital mortality. We used multi-level mixed-effects logistic regression to adjust for other patient and hospital-level factors associated with each outcome. Results The percentage of hospitalized patients admitted to ICU ranged from 41.3% for endo AAA to 81.5% for open AAA. In-hospital mortality also varied, from 1.1% for endo AAA to 6.8% for esophagectomy. After adjusting for other factors, age was associated with admission to ICU for cystectomy (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 1.56 (95% CI 1.36–1.78) for age 80–84+; 2.25 (1.85–2.75) age 85+ compared with age 65–69), PD (AOR 1.26 (1.06–1.50) age 80–84; 1.49 (1.11–1.99) age 85+) and esophagectomy (AOR 1.26 (1.02–1.55) age 80–84; 1.28 (0.91–1.80) age 85+). Age was not associated with use of intensive care for open or endo AAA. Older age was associated with increases in complication rates and in-hospital mortality for all five surgical procedures. Conclusions The association between age and use of intensive care was procedure-specific. Complication rates and in-hospital mortality increased with age for all five surgical procedures. PMID:23787024

  18. Sustainable effects of a low-threshold physical activity intervention on health-related quality of life in residential aged care

    PubMed Central

    Quehenberger, Viktoria; Cichocki, Martin; Krajic, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Background Mobility is a main issue for health-related quality of life in old age. There is evidence for effects of physical activity (PA) interventions on several dimensions of health for the aged and also, some specific evidence for vulnerable populations, like residents of residential aged care. Research on low-threshold PA interventions for users of residential aged care and documentation of their sustainability are scarce. “Low threshold” implies moderate demands on the qualification of trainers and low frequency of conduct, implying low demands on the health status and discipline of users. Yet the investigation of low-threshold interventions in residential aged care seems important as they might foster participation of users and implementation in everyday routines of provider organizations. An initial study (October 2011 to June 2012) had found intervention effects on health-related quality of life. The objective of this study was to examine sustainability of the effects of a low-threshold PA intervention on health-related quality of life in residential aged care. Methods Data collection took place in three residential aged care homes in Vienna, Austria. At 1-year follow-up (June 2013), participants from the intervention group were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Using general mixed linear models and Friedman tests followed by paired t- and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, we compared outcome measures at follow-up with measures obtained at baseline and at the end of the intervention. Results At the 1-year follow-up assessment, participants’ (mean age 84.7 years; 89.7% female) subjective health status was still significantly increased, equaling a small sustainable intervention effect (Cohen’s d=0.38, P=0.02). In comparison with baseline, a significant decline of reported pain/discomfort (P=0.047) was found. Regarding the subdimensions of health-related quality of life, favorable trends could be observed. Conclusion The study indicates that

  19. Care through Authenticity: Teacher Preparation for an Ethic of Care in an Age of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabin, Colette

    2013-01-01

    This study elucidates the role that authenticity--knowing and being one's self--plays in preservice teachers' introduction to care ethics in a multicultural urban context. In one teacher education program, in observations, interviews, and surveys, preservice teachers described that caring required authenticity to avoid complying with…

  20. Successful models of comprehensive care for older adults with chronic conditions: evidence for the Institute of Medicine's "retooling for an aging America" report.

    PubMed

    Boult, Chad; Green, Ariel Frank; Boult, Lisa B; Pacala, James T; Snyder, Claire; Leff, Bruce

    2009-12-01

    The quality of chronic care in America is low, and the cost is high. To help inform efforts to overhaul the ailing U.S. healthcare system, including those related to the "medical home," models of comprehensive health care that have shown the potential to improve the quality, efficiency, or health-related outcomes of care for chronically ill older persons were identified. Using multiple indexing terms, the MEDLINE database was searched for articles published in English between January 1, 1987, and May 30, 2008, that reported statistically significant positive outcomes from high-quality research on models of comprehensive health care for older persons with chronic conditions. Each selected study addressed a model of comprehensive health care; was a meta-analysis, systematic review, or trial with an equivalent concurrent control group; included an adequate number of representative, chronically ill participants aged 65 and older; used valid measures; used reliable methods of data collection; analyzed data rigorously; and reported significantly positive effects on the quality, efficiency, or health-related outcomes of care. Of 2,714 identified articles, 123 (4.5%) met these criteria. Fifteen models have improved at least one outcome: interdisciplinary primary care (1), models that supplement primary care (8), transitional care (1), models of acute care in patients' homes (2), nurse-physician teams for residents of nursing homes (1), and models of comprehensive care in hospitals (2). Policy makers and healthcare leaders should consider including these 15 models of health care in plans to reform the U.S. healthcare system. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services would need new statutory flexibility to pay for care by the nurses, social workers, pharmacists, and physicians who staff these promising models. PMID:20121991

  1. Self-care and deviance in elementary school-age children.

    PubMed

    Pettine, A; Rosén, L A

    1998-08-01

    Fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade students were surveyed to investigate whether self-care was related to self-reports of behavioral or attitudinal deviance, liking for school, or both. The Child Self-Care Measure (CSCM), a multiscale self-report instrument, measured self-care as a developmental task with four major dimensions: temporal, physical, structural, and psychological. Self-care in general was not linked to deviance. However, increases in psychological self-care were strongly correlated with reductions in children's liking for school. Additionally, children in self-care who cared for younger siblings for more than a year reported more deviant behaviors than those without responsibility for younger siblings; children in the care of older siblings less than 16 years old for more than 4 years reported more tolerance for deviance than peers in self-care without older sibling caregivers. Findings support earlier speculations that children in self-care may not be developmentally ready to take responsibility for elementary school-aged siblings. Results also indicated that although girls in self-care manifest problems earlier than boys, long term self-care may be more problematic for boys than girls. PMID:9696113

  2. Age-Associated Resident Memory CD8 T Cells in the Central Nervous System Are Primed To Potentiate Inflammation after Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ritzel, Rodney M; Crapser, Joshua; Patel, Anita R; Verma, Rajkumer; Grenier, Jeremy M; Chauhan, Anjali; Jellison, Evan R; McCullough, Louise D

    2016-04-15

    Aging is associated with an increase in basal inflammation in the CNS and an overall decline in cognitive function and poorer recovery following injury. Growing evidence suggests that leukocyte recruitment to the CNS is also increased with normal aging, but, to date, no systematic evaluation of these age-associated leukocytes has been performed. In this work, the effect of aging on CNS leukocyte recruitment was examined. Aging was associated with more CD45(high) leukocytes, primarily composed of conventional CD8(+) T cells. These results were strain independent and seen in both sexes. Intravascular labeling and immunohistology revealed the presence of parenchymal CD8(+) T cells in several regions of the brain, including the choroid plexus and meninges. These cells had effector memory (CD44(+)CD62L(-)) and tissue-resident phenotypes and expressed markers associated with TCR activation. Analysis of TCRvβ repertoire usage suggested that entry into the CNS is most likely stochastic rather than Ag driven. Correlational analyses revealed a positive association between CD8 T cell numbers and decreased proinflammatory function of microglia. However, the effects of cerebral ischemia and ex vivo stimulation of these cells dramatically increased production of TNF, IFN-γ, and MCP-1/CCL2. Taken together, we identified a novel population of resident memory, immunosurveillant CD8 T cells that represent a hallmark of CNS aging and appear to modify microglia homeostasis under normal conditions, but are primed to potentiate inflammation and leukocyte recruitment following ischemic injury. PMID:26962232

  3. Overnight Polysomnographic Characteristics and Oxygen Saturation of Healthy Infants, 1 to 18 Months of Age, Born and Residing At High Altitude (2,640 Meters)

    PubMed Central

    Bazurto-Zapata, María A.; Gozal, David; González-García, Mauricio; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Torres-Duque, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 8% of the world population resides above 1,600 m, with about 10 million people living above 2,500 m in Colombia. However, reference values for polysomnography (PSG) and oxygen saturation (Spo2) of children < 2 years old residing at high altitude are currently unavailable. METHODS: Healthy infants aged 1 to 18 months born and residing at high altitude (Bogotá: 2,640 m) underwent overnight PSG. Four age groups were defined: group 1, < 45 days; group 2, 3 to 4 months; group 3, 6 to 7 months; and group 4, 10 to 18 months. Of 122 children enrolled, 50 had three consecutive PSG tests and were analyzed as a longitudinal subcohort. RESULTS: A total of 281 PSG tests were performed in 122 infants (56% girls): group 1, 106 PSG tests; group 2, 89 PSG tests; group 3, 61 PSG tests; and group 4, 25 PSG tests. Active sleep diminished and quiet sleep increased with maturation. Apnea-hypopnea indexes (total, central, and obstructive) were highest in group 1 (21.4, 12.4, and 6.8/h total sleep time, respectively) and diminished with age (P < .001). Mean Spo2 during waking and sleep increased with age (P < .001). Nadir Spo2 values during respiratory events were lower in younger infants. Longitudinal assessments of 50 infants confirmed the temporal trends described for the cross-sectional dataset. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy infants (≤ 18 months old) born and residing at high altitude show preserved sleep architecture but higher apnea-hypopnea indexes and more prominent desaturation with respiratory events than do those living at low altitude. The current study findings can be used as reference values for infants at high altitude. PMID:25811138

  4. The influence of patients' immigration background and residence permit status on treatment decisions in health care. Results of a factorial survey among general practitioners in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Daniel; Krones, Tanja; Sauer, Carsten; Wild, Verina

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the influence of patients' immigration background and residence permit status on physicians' willingness to treat patients in due time. A factorial survey was conducted among 352 general practitioners with a background in internal medicine in a German-speaking region in Switzerland. Participants expressed their self-rating (SR) as well as the expected colleague-rating (CR) to provide immediate treatment to 12 fictive vignette patients. The effects of the vignette variables were analysed using random-effects models. The results show that SR as well as CR was not only influenced by the medical condition or the physicians' time pressure, but also by social factors such as the ethnicity and migration history, the residence permit status, and the economic condition of the patients. Our findings can be useful for the development of adequate, practically relevant teaching and training materials with the ultimate aim to reduce unjustified discrimination or social rationing in health care. PMID:27258017

  5. A Descriptive Analysis of Incidents Reported by Community Aged Care Workers.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amina; Douglas, Heather E; Smith, Cheryl; Georgiou, Andrew; Osmond, Tracey; Armour, Pauline; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about the types of incidents that occur to aged care clients in the community. This limits the development of effective strategies to improve client safety. The objective of the study was to present a profile of incidents reported in Australian community aged care settings. All incident reports made by community care workers employed by one of the largest community aged care provider organizations in Australia during the period November 1, 2012, to August 8, 2013, were analyzed. A total of 356 reports were analyzed, corresponding to a 7.5% incidence rate per client year. Falls and medication incidents were the most prevalent incident types. Clients receiving high-level care and those who attended day therapy centers had the highest rate of incidents with 14% to 20% of these clients having a reported incident. The incident profile indicates that clients on higher levels of care had higher incident rates. Incident data represent an opportunity to improve client safety in community aged care. PMID:25526960

  6. Increasing Public Awareness and Developing Community Based Strategies for Quality School-Age Child Care Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber, Susan Way

    A framework for gaining community involvement in planning for school-age child care initiatives is reported. The framework incorporates a plan than could be used as a model for the involvement of the public school system. Four primary components are described: (1) a "Kids' Council" Saturday meeting in which third graders in school-age child care…

  7. You're All Grown up Now: Termination of Foster Care Support at Age 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Rosemary J.; Freundlich, Madelyn

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the repercussions of discharging youth from foster care at age 18 based on recent research demonstrating that youth at this age are not developmentally prepared to live independently and have a continued need for strong social scaffolding during emerging adulthood. Drawing upon recent research findings, we make…

  8. The Agelink Project Replication Manual: An Intergenerational School-Age Child-Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crites, Marsha; And Others

    Chapter 1 of this document introduces AgeLink, a 5-year model intergenerational child care project for school-age children. The project implemented after-school services that linked children with volunteer older adults in 17 western North Carolina counties. Ten sites participated in the project between 1984 and 1989, and 11 sites currently have…

  9. A Direction towards Sustainability? Australian Rural Communities and Care for the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Geoffrey; Stehlik, Dani

    1996-01-01

    Rural elderly in Australia lack access to health and welfare services, compounded by an increasingly aging population and downsizing of services. Successful strategies can be found in U.S. retirement communities and the Australian Community Aged Care Package program. However, these strategies often compete with a drive toward cost-effectiveness.…

  10. Effects of age, sex and reproductive status on persistent organic pollutant concentrations in "Southern Resident" killer whales.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Margaret M; Hanson, M Bradley; Schorr, Gregory S; Emmons, Candice K; Burrows, Douglas G; Bolton, Jennie L; Baird, Robin W; Ylitalo, Gina M

    2009-10-01

    "Southern Resident" killer whales (Orcinus orca) that comprise three fish-eating "pods" (J, K and L) were listed as "endangered" in the US and Canada following a 20% population decline between 1996 and 2001. Blubber biopsy samples from Southern Resident juveniles had statistically higher concentrations of certain persistent organic pollutants than were found for adults. Most Southern Resident killer whales, including the four juveniles, exceeded the health-effects threshold for total PCBs in marine mammal blubber. Maternal transfer of contaminants to the juveniles during rapid development of their biological systems may put these young whales at greater risk than adults for adverse health effects (e.g., immune and endocrine system dysfunction). Pollutant ratios and field observations established that two of the pods (K- and L-pod) travel to California to forage. Nitrogen stable isotope values, supported by field observations, indicated possible changes in the diet of L-pod over the last decade. PMID:19541329

  11. Age equity in different models of primary care practice in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William; Tuna, Meltem; Russell, Grant; Devlin, Rose Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Kristjansson, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess whether the model of service delivery affects the equity of the care provided across age groups. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Ontario. Participants One hundred thirty-seven practices, including traditional fee-for-service practices, salaried community health centres (CHCs), and capitation-based family health networks and health service organizations. Main outcome measures To compare the quality of care across age groups using multilevel linear or logistic regressions. Health service delivery measures and health promotion were assessed through patient surveys (N = 5111), which were based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool, and prevention and chronic disease management were assessed, based on Canadian recommendations for care, through chart abstraction (N = 4 108). Results Older individuals reported better health service delivery in all models. This age effect ranged from 1.9% to 5.7%, and was larger in the 2 capitation-based models. Individuals aged younger than 30 years attending CHCs had more features of disadvantage (ie, living below the poverty line and without high school education) and were more likely than older individuals to report discussing at least 1 health promotion subject at the index visit. These differences were deemed an appropriate response to greater needs in these younger individuals. The prevention score showed an age-sex interaction in all models, with adherence to recommended care dropping with age for women. These results are largely attributable to the fact that maneuvers recommended for younger women are considerably more likely to be performed than other maneuvers. Chronic disease management scores showed an inverted U relationship with age in fee-for-service practices, family health networks, and health service organizations but not in CHCs. Conclusion The salaried model might have an organizational structure that is more conducive to providing appropriate care across age groups. The thrust toward

  12. {sup 226}Ra and {sup 231}Pa systematics of axial MORB, crustal residence ages, and magma chamber characteristics at 9--10{degree}N East Pacific Rise

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.J.; Murrell, M.T.; Perfit, M.R.; Batiza, R.; Fornari, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    Mass spectrometric measurements of {sup 30}Th-22{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}-U{sup 231}Pa disequilibria for axial basalts are used to determine crustal residence ages for MORB magma and investigate the temporal and spatial characteristics of axial magma chambers (AMC) at 9--10{degrees}N East Pacific Rise (EPR). Relative crustal residence ages can be calculated from variations in {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th and {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U activity ratios for axial lavas, if (1) mantle sources and melting are uniform, and mantle transfer times are constant or rapid for axial N-MORB, and (2) {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U and {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th in the melt are unaffected by shallow level fractional crystallization. Uniform Th, Sr, and Nd isotopic systematics and incompatible element ratios for N-MORB along the 9--10{degrees}N segment indicate that mantle sources and transfer times are similar. In addition, estimated bulk solid/melt partition coefficients for U, Th, and Pa are small, hence effects of fractional crystallization on {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U ratios for the melt are expected to be negligible. However, fractional crystallization of plagioclase in the AMC would lower {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th ratios in the melt and produce a positive bias in {sup 226}Ra crustal residence ages for fractionated lavas.

  13. Quality Care for School-Age Children: A Self-Instructional Guide To Help Staff Plan and Implement a Quality Program for School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childcare Resources, Birmingham, AL.

    The purpose of this manual is to provide school-age child care center staff in Alabama with information about school-age children that facilitates program planning and provides a basis for implementing and evaluating a high quality school-age child care (SACC) program. Sections of the manual discuss: (1) teacher competencies addressed by the…

  14. Early child care and obesity at 12 months of age in the Danish National Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Neelon, Sara E Benjamin; Andersen, Camilla Schou; Morgen, Camilla Schmidt; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Oken, Emily; Gillman, Matthew W; Sørensen, Thorkild IA

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Evidence suggests that the child care environment may be more obesogenic than the family home, and previous studies have found that child care use may be associated with obesity in children. Few studies, however, have focused on child care during infancy, which may be an especially vulnerable period. This study examined child care use in infancy and weight status at 12 months of age in a country where paid maternity leave is common and early child care is not as prevalent as in other developed countries. Subjects/Methods We studied 27821 children born to mothers participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), a longitudinal study of pregnant women enrolled between 1997 and 2002, who were also included in the Childcare Database, a national record of child care use in Denmark. The exposure was days in child care from birth to 12 months. The outcomes were sex-specific body mass index (BMI) z-score and overweight/obesity (BMI ≥85th percentile based on the World Health Organization classification) at 12 months. We conducted multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses examining child care use and weight outcomes. Results A total of 17721 (63.7%) children attended child care during their first year of life. After adjustment for potential confounders, a 30-day increment of child care was associated with a modestly higher BMI z-score at 12 months (0.03 units; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.05; p=0.003). Similarly, child care use was associated with increased odds of being overweight/obese at 12 months of age (OR 1.05; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.10; p=0.047). Conclusions Child care in the first year of life was associated with slightly higher weight at 12 months, suggesting that child care settings may be important targets for obesity prevention in infancy. PMID:25233894

  15. Differences in COPD Patient Care by Primary Family Caregivers: An Age-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Peng-Ching; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Pei-Yi; Perng, Wann-Cherng; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Background Because Taiwan has the fastest aging rate among developed countries, care for the elderly is becoming more prominent in the country. Primary family caregivers play an important role in patient health and health promotion behavior. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an age-related disease, is a major public health problem with high morbidity and mortality and can be a long-term burden for family members; however, little attention has been given to the differences in COPD care between elder caregivers and other caregivers. This study aimed to investigate the differences between elder family caregivers and non-elder family caregivers caring for COPD patients in Taiwan, including caring behavior, caregiver response, and caring knowledge. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2007 and January 2008; 406 primary family caregivers of COPD patients from the thoracic outpatient departments of 6 hospitals in north-central Taiwan were recruited to answer questionnaires measuring COPD characteristics, care behavior, caregiver response, and COPD knowledge. All questionnaires, which addressed caregiver knowledge, care behaviors, and care reactions, were shown to have acceptable validity and reliability, and the data were analyzed using univariate and generalized linear model techniques. Results The elder caregivers group had 79 participants, and the non-elder caregivers comprised 327 participants. The COPD-related knowledge scale results were positively correlated with the family caregiver caring behavior scale, suggesting that better COPD-related knowledge among family caregivers may result in improved caring behavior. After adjusting for all possible confounding factors, the elder caregivers had significantly lower COPD-related knowledge than the non-elder caregivers (P<0.001). However, there were no significant differences in the family caregiver caring behavior scale or the caregiver reaction assessment scale between the two

  16. Central obesity and health-related factors among middle-aged men: a comparison among native Japanese and Japanese-Brazilians residing in Brazil and Japan.

    PubMed

    Schwingel, Andiara; Nakata, Yoshio; Ito, Lucy S; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek J; Erb, Christopher T; Shigematsu, Ryosuke; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Shinjo, Samuel K; Uno, Miyuki; Marie, Suely K N; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of different cultural environments on the development of obesity by examining the association of central obesity, lifestyle, and selected coronary risk factors among people with identical Japanese genetic backgrounds living in Japan and Brazil. One hundred and four native Japanese and 286 Japanese-Brazilians residing in Brazil and Japan aged 35 years or over were studied. Obesity, metabolic risk factors for coronary disease, and history of regular sports activity, daily physical activity, and eating habits were assessed. The results showed Japanese-Brazilians residing in Brazil with significantly higher waist circumference values, and greater prevalence of central obesity compared to native Japanese and Japanese-Brazilians residing in Japan. The risk of developing central obesity was found to be 2.8 times higher among Japanese-Brazilians residing in Brazil. However, this association was no longer found to be significant after adjusting for lifestyle factors in the logistic model. Additionally, waist circumference was found to be significantly associated with metabolic risk factors for coronary disease. These findings suggest substantial variation in measures of central obesity among the three groups of Japanese ancestry, and underscore the heterogeneity of risk factors among communities of Japanese ancestry living in different cultural environments. The results also suggest that immigrant men exposed to the Brazilian cultural environment are more susceptible to the development of central obesity, and it seems to be associated with various lifestyle items and metabolic risk factors for coronary disease. PMID:17641453

  17. Bridging the gap in ageing: Translating policies into practice in Malaysian Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Ambigga, Krishnapillai S; Ramli, Anis Safura; Suthahar, Ariaratnam; Tauhid, Norlaili; Clearihan, Lyn; Browning, Colette

    2011-01-01

    Population ageing is poised to become a major challenge to the health system as Malaysia progresses to becoming a developed nation by 2020. This article aims to review the various ageing policy frameworks available globally; compare aged care policies and health services in Malaysia with Australia; and discuss various issues and challenges in translating these policies into practice in the Malaysian primary care system. Fundamental solutions identified to bridge the gap include restructuring of the health care system, development of comprehensive benefit packages for older people under the national health financing scheme, training of the primary care workforce, effective use of electronic medical records and clinical guidelines; and empowering older people and their caregivers with knowledge, skills and positive attitudes to ageing and self care. Ultimately, family medicine specialists must become the agents for change to lead multidisciplinary teams and work with various agencies to ensure that better coordination, continuity and quality of care are eventually delivered to older patients across time and settings. PMID:21385446

  18. Bridging the gap in ageing: Translating policies into practice in Malaysian Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Population ageing is poised to become a major challenge to the health system as Malaysia progresses to becoming a developed nation by 2020. This article aims to review the various ageing policy frameworks available globally; compare aged care policies and health services in Malaysia with Australia; and discuss various issues and challenges in translating these policies into practice in the Malaysian primary care system. Fundamental solutions identified to bridge the gap include restructuring of the health care system, development of comprehensive benefit packages for older people under the national health financing scheme, training of the primary care workforce, effective use of electronic medical records and clinical guidelines; and empowering older people and their caregivers with knowledge, skills and positive attitudes to ageing and self care. Ultimately, family medicine specialists must become the agents for change to lead multidisciplinary teams and work with various agencies to ensure that better coordination, continuity and quality of care are eventually delivered to older patients across time and settings. PMID:21385446

  19. Aging skin is functionally anaerobic: importance of coenzyme Q10 for anti aging skin care.

    PubMed

    Prahl, S; Kueper, T; Biernoth, T; Wöhrmann, Y; Münster, A; Fürstenau, M; Schmidt, M; Schulze, C; Wittern, K-P; Wenck, H; Muhr, G-M; Blatt, T

    2008-01-01

    The functional loss of mitochondria represents an inherent part in modern theories trying to explain the cutaneous aging process. The present study shows significant age-dependent differences in mitochondrial function of keratinocytes isolated from skin biopsies of young and old donors. Our data let us postulate that energy metabolism shifts to a predominantly non-mitochondrial pathway and is therefore functionally anaerobic with advancing age. CoQ10 positively influences the age-affected cellular metabolism and enables to combat signs of aging starting at the cellular level. As a consequence topical application of CoQ10 is beneficial for human skin as it rapidly improves mitochondrial function in skin in vivo. PMID:19096122

  20. Critical action research applied in clinical placement development in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily D; Kelton, Moira; Paterson, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop quality clinical placements in residential aged care facilities for undergraduate nursing students undertaking their nursing practicum topics. The proportion of people aged over 65 years is expected to increase steadily from 13% in 2006 to 26% of the total population in Australia in 2051. However, when demand is increasing for a nursing workforce competent in the care of older people, studies have shown that nursing students generally lack interest in working with older people. The lack of exposure of nursing students to quality clinical placements is one of the key factors contributing to this situation. Critical action research built on a partnership between an Australian university and five aged care organisations was utilised. A theoretical framework informed by Habermas' communicative action theory was utilised to guide the action research. Multiple research activities were used to support collaborative critical reflection and inform actions throughout the action research. Clinical placements in eight residential aged care facilities were developed to support 179 nursing students across three year-levels to complete their practicum topics. Findings were presented in three categories described as structures developed to govern clinical placement, learning and teaching in residential aged care facilities. PMID:23134277

  1. Timely Access to Quality Health Care Among Georgia Children Ages 4 to 17 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ogbuanu, Chinelo; Goodman, David A.; Kahn, Katherine; Long, Cherie; Noggle, Brendan; Bagchi, Suparna; Barradas, Danielle; Castrucci, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We examined factors associated with children's access to quality health care, a major concern in Georgia, identified through the 2010 Title V Needs Assessment. Data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health were merged with the 2008 Area Resource File and Health Resources and Services Administration medically under-served area variable, and restricted to Georgia children ages 4–17 years (N = 1,397). The study outcome, access to quality health care was derived from access to care (timely utilization of preventive medical care in the previous 12 months) and quality of care (compassionate/culturally effective/family-centered care). Andersen's behavioral model of health services utilization guided independent variable selection. Analyses included Chi-square tests and multinomial logit regressions. In our study population, 32.8 % reported access to higher quality care, 24.8 % reported access to moderate quality care, 22.8 % reported access to lower quality care, and 19.6 % reported having no access. Factors positively associated with having access to higher/moderate versus lower quality care include having a usual source of care (USC) (adjusted odds ratio, AOR:3.27; 95 % confidence interval, 95 % CI 1.15–9.26), and special health care needs (AOR:2.68; 95 % CI 1.42–5.05). Lower odds of access to higher/moderate versus lower quality care were observed for non-Hispanic Black (AOR:0.31; 95 % CI 0.18–0.53) and Hispanic (AOR:0.20; 95 % CI 0.08–0.50) children compared with non-Hispanic White children and for children with all other forms of insurance coverage compared with children with continuous-adequate-private insurance. Ensuring that children have continuous, adequate insurance coverage and a USC may positively affect their access to quality health care in Georgia. PMID:23054451

  2. Do Effects of Early Child Care Extend to Age 15 Years? Results From the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

    PubMed Central

    Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Belsky, Jay; Burchinal, Margaret; Vandergrift, Nathan; Steinberg, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Relations between nonrelative child care (birth to 4 ½ years) and functioning at age 15 were examined (N = 1364). Both quality and quantity of child care were linked to adolescent functioning. Effects were similar in size as those observed at younger ages. Higher quality care predicted higher cognitive-academic achievement at age 15, with escalating positive effects at higher levels of quality. The association between quality and achievement was mediated, in part, by earlier child care effects on achievement. Higher quality early child care also predicted youth reports of less externalizing behavior. More hours of nonrelative care predicted greater risk taking and impulsivity at age 15, relations that were partially mediated by earlier child care effects on externalizing behaviors. PMID:20573102

  3. Influence of socio-economic factors on street litter generation in the middle east: effects of education level, age, and type of residence.

    PubMed

    Arafat, Hassan A; Al-Khatib, Issam A; Daoud, Raeda; Shwahneh, Hadeel

    2007-08-01

    Street littering is considered an important environmental health issue in the Middle East. This problem is growing steadily and is attracting great concerns within the communities. The purpose of this paper, which focuses on Nablus district (Palestinian Territory), is to measure the perception and opinion of residents toward littering, in addition to studying prevailing attitudes and practices on littering. This was achieved using an interview survey approach. The influence of three socio-economic factors; level of education, age, and type of residence, on the littering behaviour of individuals was studied. As a result, possible remedial actions have been suggested. The data presented in this work can be considered as one piece of information, which can be compiled with other future data to design an effective litter control programrhe for Middle Eastern countries. PMID:17874663

  4. The Penna model for biological ageing on a lattice: spatial consequences of child-care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, A. O.; Moss de Oliveira, S.

    We introduce a square lattice into the Penna bit-string model for biological ageing and study the evolution of the spatial distribution of the population considering different strategies of child-care. Two of the strategies are related to the movements of a whole family on the lattice: in one case the mother cannot move if she has any child younger than a given age, and in the other case if she moves, she brings these young children with her. A stronger condition has also been added to the second case, considering that young children die with a higher probability if their mothers die, this probability decreasing with age. We show that a highly non uniform occupation can be obtained when child-care is considered, even for an uniform initial occupation per site. We also compare the standard survival rate of the model with that obtained when the spacial lattice is considered (without any kind of child-care).

  5. Snoezelen, structured reminiscence therapy and 10-minutes activation in long term care residents with dementia (WISDE): study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background People with dementia are often inapproachable due to symptoms of their illness. Therefore nurses should establish relationships with dementia patients via their remaining resources and facilitate communication. In order to achieve this, different targeted non-pharmacological interventions are recommended and practiced. However there is no sufficient evidence about the efficacy of most of these interventions. A number of publications highlight the urgent need for methodological sound studies so that more robust conclusions may be drawn. Methods/Design The trial is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial with 20 nursing homes in Saxony and Saxony-Anhalt (Germany) as the units of randomization. Nursing homes will be randomly allocated into 4 study groups consisting of 5 clusters and 90 residents: snoezelen, structured reminiscence therapy, 10-minutes activation or unstructured verbal communication (control group). The purpose is to determine whether the interventions are effective to reduce apathy in long-term care residents with dementia (N = 360) as the main outcome measure. Assessments will be done at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months after beginning of the interventions. Discussion This trial will particularly contribute to the evidence on efficacy of non-pharmacological interventions in dementia care. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00653731 PMID:20113526

  6. 'We're in the sandwich': Aged care staff members' negotiation of constraints and the role of the organisation in enacting and supporting an ethic of care.

    PubMed

    Petriwskyj, Andrea; Gibson, Alexandra; Webby, Glenys

    2015-12-01

    Aged care staff are often seen as holding power in care relationships, particularly in client engagement. Such a perception, however, may limit our understanding and analysis of the dynamics and politics within care spaces. This paper uses interview and focus group data from both staff and clients of an Australian aged care provider to identify the positions given to, and taken up by, staff in client engagement. Focusing on one of these positions, in which staff are seen as managing and negotiating constraints, the paper uses an ethic of care lens to examine the context in which engagement - and this position taking - occurs. Findings reflect the importance of the organisational and systemic context to the practice of care ethics and the potential vulnerability and disempowerment of care giving staff. Implications for the support of staff in client engagement and the role of care organisations beyond structures and processes to an active participant in an ethic of care are discussed. PMID:26568218

  7. 42 CFR 483.20 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.20 Resident assessment. The facility must conduct initially and periodically a... resident's immediate care. (b) Comprehensive assessments—(1) Resident assessment instrument. A...

  8. Risk Factors for the Development of Gastrointestinal Colonization With Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jennifer H.; Maslow, Joel; Han, Xiaoyan; Xie, Sharon X.; Tolomeo, Pam; Santana, Evelyn; Carson, Lesley; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2014-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to assess risk factors for the development of fluoroquinolone (FQ)–resistant Escherichia coli gastrointestinal tract colonization in long-term care facility (LTCF) residents. Methods. A prospective cohort study was conducted from 2006 to 2008 at 3 LTCFs. Residents initially colonized with FQ-susceptible E. coli were followed by means of serial fecal sampling for new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization for up to 12 months or until discharge or death. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was developed to identify risk factors for new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization, with antibiotic and device exposures modeled as time-varying covariates. Results. Fifty-seven (47.5%) of 120 residents became newly colonized with FQ-resistant E. coli, with a median time to colonization of 57 days. Fecal incontinence (hazard ratio [HR], 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–3.06; P = .04) was significantly associated with FQ-resistant E. coli acquisition. Receipt of amoxicillin-clavulanate (HR, 6.48; 95% CI, 1.43–29.4; P = .02) and the presence of a urinary catheter (HR, 3.81; 95% CI, 1.06–13.8; P = .04) during LTCF stay increased the risk of new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization. Conclusions. Acquisition of FQ-resistant E. coli was common, with nearly half of LTCF residents developing new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization. Further studies are needed on interventions to limit the emergence of FQ-resistant E. coli in LTCFs. PMID:23986544

  9. Design of Alarm Sound of Home Care Equipment Based on Age-related Auditory Sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibano, Jun-Ichi; Tadano, Shigeru; Kaneko, Hirotaka

    A wide variety of home care equipment has been developed to support the independent lifestyle and care taking of elderly persons. Almost all of the equipment has an alarm designed to alert a care person or to sound a warning in case of an emergency. Due to the fact that aging human beings' senses physiologically, weaken and deteriorate, each alarm's sound must be designed to account for the full range of elderly person's hearing loss. Since the alarms are usually heard indoors, it is also necessary to evaluate the relationship between the basic characteristics of the sounds and living area's layout. In this study, we investigated the sounds of various alarms of the home care equipment based on both the age-related hearing characteristics of elderly persons and the propagation property of the sounds indoors. As a result, it was determined that the hearing characteristics of elderly persons are attuned to sounds which have a frequency from 700Hz to 1kHz, and it was learned that the indoor absorption ratio of sound is smallest when the frequency is 1kHz. Therefore, a frequency of 1kHz is good for the alarm sound of home care equipment. A flow chart to design the alarm sound of home care equipment was proposed, taking into account the extent of age-related auditory sense deterioration.

  10. [Caring for healthy aging: building an educational process with rural women].

    PubMed

    Portella, M R

    1999-01-01

    This study analyses a proposal of nursing assistance. The project proposed has as its goal the construction of an educational process aiming a healthy aging among rural women. It is important to emphasize that these women's cultural health practices were taken into consideration in this research. The conceptual milestones adopted were drawn from Madeleine Leninger's concept of "cultural care" and Paulo Freire's pedagogical ideas. The educational process being proposed is based on the idea of caring/educating in which the nursing professional and the group share experiences through reflective dialog, and seek cultural health practices that can contribute on a healthy aging. PMID:12138632

  11. Older lesbians and work in the Australian health and aged care sector.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mark; Kentlyn, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    While research has identified challenges lesbians face in the workplace, there is limited understanding of the particular experiences of older lesbians, especially those working in the health and aged care sector. This article draws on the stories of four women who participated in a narrative research project on lesbian and gay people's experiences of health and aged care. It highlights the need for future research to examine the complexity of identity expression and community affiliation, how people negotiate "coming out" in the workplace, the impact of discrimination, and the resources (such as friends) available to lesbians in the workplace. PMID:25575323

  12. Improving adjustments for older age in pre-hospital assessment and care.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Marius

    2013-01-01

    Population estimates projects a significant increase in the geriatric population making elderly trauma patients more common. The geriatric trauma patients experience higher incidence of pre-existing medical conditions, impaired age-dependent physiologic reserve, use potent drugs and suffer from trauma system related shortcomings that influence outcomes. To improve adjustments for older age in pre-hospital assessment and care, several initiatives should be implemented. Decision-makers should make system revisions and introduce advanced point-of-care initiatives to improve outcome after trauma for the elderly. PMID:23343340

  13. Keys to Quality in School-Age Child Care. Trainer's Guide for Using the Video and Viewer's Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Roberta L.

    Based on observations of hundreds of school-age child care programs across the nation and conversations with parents, children, and professionals in school-age care, this training guide is intended to help parents, caregivers, and interested citizens to develop quality school-age programs in their communities. The guide begins by summarizing an…

  14. Ageism and age discrimination in health care: Fact or fiction? A narrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kydd, Angela; Fleming, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Ageism and age discrimination are terms used in best practice statements and in the literature to define negative attitudes towards older people and towards people because of their age (whether old or young). However, 'old age' is a nebulous concept with definitions ranging from the over 50s to the over 85s. In seeking to explore ageism and age discrimination within health care, this paper discusses the concept of 'old' and discusses the findings of a narrative review of the literature on these two concepts. Results show that negative attitudes have been perceived by users of health care services, but the reasons are not clear. Such attitudes are usually reported in acute health care settings, where targets and quick turnover are encouraged. Thus people, usually those with complex needs, who require longer periods of recuperation and rehabilitation following an episode of ill health, are troublesome to staff working in a system geared up for early discharges. This type of service user is usually over the age of 85. Recommendations from this paper include the need for acute frailty units, with well trained staff, where frail older people can be comprehensively assessed, receive timely and targeted care, followed by a supported discharge. PMID:26044073

  15. The HIV Care Cascade Measured Over Time and by Age, Sex, and Race in a Large National Integrated Care System.

    PubMed

    Horberg, Michael Alan; Hurley, Leo Bartemeier; Klein, Daniel Benjamin; Towner, William James; Kadlecik, Peter; Antoniskis, Diana; Mogyoros, Miguel; Brachman, Philip Sigmund; Remmers, Carol Louise; Gambatese, Rebecca Claire; Blank, Jackie; Ellis, Courtney Georgiana; Silverberg, Michael Jonah

    2015-11-01

    HIV care cascades can evaluate programmatic success over time. However, methodologies for estimating cascade stages vary, and few have evaluated differences by demographic subgroups. We examined cascade performance over time and by age, sex, and race/ethnicity in Kaiser Permanente, providing HIV care in eight US states and Washington, DC. We created cascades for HIV+ members' age ≥13 for 2010-2012. We measured "linkage" (a visit/CD4 within 90 days of being diagnosed for new patients; ≥1 medical visit/year if established); "retention" (≥2 medical visits ≥60 days apart); filled ART (filled ≥3 months of combination ART); and viral suppression (HIV RNA <200 copies/mL last measured in year). The cascades were stratified by calendar year, sex, age, and race/ethnicity. We found men had statistically (p < 0.05) higher percent linkage, filled ART, and viral suppression for 2010 and 2011 but not for 2012. Women had significantly greater retention for all years. Annually, older age was associated (p < 0.05) with retention, filled ART, and viral suppression but not linkage. Latinos had greater (p < 0.05) retention than whites or blacks in all years, with similar retention comparing blacks and whites. Filled ART and viral suppression was increased (p < 0.05) for whites compared with all racial/ethnic groups in all years. Cascade methodology requiring success at upstream stages before measuring success at later stages (i.e., "dependent" methodology) underreported performance by up to 20% compared with evaluating each stage separately ("independent"). Thus, care results improved over time, but significant differences exist by patient demographics. Specifically, retention efforts should be targeted toward younger patients and blacks; women, blacks, and Latinos require greater ART prescribing. PMID:26505968

  16. Residence times and age distributions of spring waters at the Semmering catchment area, Eastern Austria, as inferred from tritium, CFCs and stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Han, Liangfeng; Hacker, Peter; Gröning, Manfred

    2007-03-01

    The groundwater system in the mountainous area of Semmering, Austria, was studied by environmental tracers in several karst springs. The tracers used included stable isotopes ((18)O, (2)H), tritium ((3)H) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The tracers provided valuable information in regard to (1) the mean altitude of the spring catchment areas; (2) the residence time and age distribution of the spring waters; and (3) the interconnection of the springs to a sinkhole. The combination of the stable isotopic data and the topography/geology provided the estimates of the mean altitudes of the catchment areas. Based on the stable isotopic data the recharge temperature of the spring waters was estimated. The smoothing of precipitation's isotopic signal in spring discharge provided information on the minimum transit time of the spring waters. Due to short observation time, (3)H data alone cannot be used for describing the mean residence time of the karst waters. CFCs, though useful in recognizing the co-existence of young (post-1993) water with old (CFC-free) water, could not be used to resolve age distribution models. It is shown in this article, however, that the combined use of tritium and CFCs can provide a better assessment of models to account for different groundwater age distributions. In Appendix A, a simplified method for collecting groundwater samples for the analysis of CFCs is described. The method provides a real facilitation for fieldwork. Test data are given for this sampling method in regard to potential contamination by atmospheric CFCs. PMID:17454271

  17. Caring for Your School-Age Child: Ages 5 to 12. The Complete and Authorative Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schor, Edward L., Ed.

    The middle years of childhood are challenging for both children and their parents, as children master skills and develop behaviors that will strongly influence their later health and well-being. This parenting manual offers up-to-date information and guidelines on key emotional, physical, and behavioral issues that parents of school-age children…

  18. Advance care planning for older people in Australia presenting to the emergency department from the community or residential aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Street, Maryann; Ottmann, Goetz; Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Considine, Julie; Livingston, Patricia M

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of advance care planning (ACP) among older people presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) from the community or a residential aged care facility. The study sample comprised 300 older people (aged 65+ years) presenting to three Victorian EDs in 2011. A total of 150 patients transferred from residential aged care to ED were randomly selected and then matched to 150 people who lived in the community and attended the ED by age, gender, reason for ED attendance and triage category on arrival. Overall prevalence of ACP was 13.3% (n = 40/300); over one-quarter (26.6%, n = 40/150) of those presenting to the ED from residential aged care had a documented Advance Care Plan, compared to none (0%, n = 0/150) of the people from the community. There were no significant differences in the median ED length of stay, number of investigations and interventions undertaken in ED, time seen by a doctor or rate of hospital admission for those with an Advance Care Plan compared to those without. Those with a comorbidity of cerebrovascular disease or dementia and those assessed with impaired brain function were more likely to have a documented Advance Care Plan on arrival at ED. Length of hospital stay was shorter for those with an Advance Care Plan [median (IQR) = 3 days (2-6) vs. 6 days (2-10), P = 0.027] and readmission lower (0% vs. 13.7%). In conclusion, older people from the community transferred to ED were unlikely to have a documented Advance Care Plan. Those from residential aged care who were cognitively impaired more frequently had an Advance Care Plan. In the ED, decisions of care did not appear to be influenced by the presence or absence of Advance Care Plans, but length of hospital admission was shorter for those with an Advance Care Plan. PMID:25443161

  19. Health care utilization among rural women of child-bearing age: a Nigerian experience

    PubMed Central

    Odetola, Titilayo Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite the availability of primary health care services in virtually every community and village in Nigeria, clients travel long distances to reach secondary and tertiary health care institutions. Against this backdrop, the researcher sought to find the factors that influence choice of health institutions among pregnant women. Methods A descriptive study was carried out across three levels of health care institutions with a total sample size of 160 clients who were randomly selected. A thoroughly validated 45- item questionnaire was used to explore clients’ perceptions about what factors influence where they access health care services. Results Major findings revealed that level of education, proximity to place of residence, affordability and quality of services rendered, spousal and significant other's influences were active determinants of choice for health institutions among pregnant women in Nigeria. Conclusion This study elicited information on why some types of institutions were preferred. The study has implications for community health nurses and policy makers on what should be done to make health institutions appropriately utilized by community in Nigeria.

  20. Summary Statement: Appropriate Medical Care for the Secondary School-Aged Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Almquist, Jon; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C; Cavanna, Angela; Jenkinson, Dave; Lincoln, Andrew E; Loud, Keith; Peterson, Bart C; Portwood, Craig; Reynolds, John; Woods, Thomas S

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To present the recommendations made by the Appropriate Medical Care for Secondary School-Aged Athletes Task Force and to summarize the subsequent monograph developed around 11 consensus points. Data Sources: The MEDLINE, CINAHL, and SportDiscus databases were searched for relevant literature regarding secondary school-aged athletes; health care administration; preparticipation physical examination; facilities; athletic equipment; emergency action planning; environmental conditions; recognition, evaluation, and treatment of injuries; rehabilitation and reconditioning; psychosocial consultation; nutrition; and prevention strategies. Conclusions and Recommendations: Organizations that sponsor athletic programs for secondary school-aged athletes should establish an athletic health care team to ensure that appropriate medical care is provided to all participants. The 11 consensus points provide a framework—one that is supported by the medical literature and case law—for the development of an athletic health care team and for assigning responsibilities to the team, administrators, and staff members of institutions sponsoring secondary school and club-level athletic programs. PMID:18668175

  1. IAServ: an intelligent home care web services platform in a cloud for aging-in-place.

    PubMed

    Su, Chuan-Jun; Chiang, Chang-Yu

    2013-11-01

    As the elderly population has been rapidly expanding and the core tax-paying population has been shrinking, the need for adequate elderly health and housing services continues to grow while the resources to provide such services are becoming increasingly scarce. Thus, increasing the efficiency of the delivery of healthcare services through the use of modern technology is a pressing issue. The seamless integration of such enabling technologies as ontology, intelligent agents, web services, and cloud computing is transforming healthcare from hospital-based treatments to home-based self-care and preventive care. A ubiquitous healthcare platform based on this technological integration, which synergizes service providers with patients' needs to be developed to provide personalized healthcare services at the right time, in the right place, and the right manner. This paper presents the development and overall architecture of IAServ (the Intelligent Aging-in-place Home care Web Services Platform) to provide personalized healthcare service ubiquitously in a cloud computing setting to support the most desirable and cost-efficient method of care for the aged-aging in place. The IAServ is expected to offer intelligent, pervasive, accurate and contextually-aware personal care services. Architecturally the implemented IAServ leverages web services and cloud computing to provide economic, scalable, and robust healthcare services over the Internet. PMID:24225647

  2. IAServ: An Intelligent Home Care Web Services Platform in a Cloud for Aging-in-Place

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chuan-Jun; Chiang, Chang-Yu

    2013-01-01

    As the elderly population has been rapidly expanding and the core tax-paying population has been shrinking, the need for adequate elderly health and housing services continues to grow while the resources to provide such services are becoming increasingly scarce. Thus, increasing the efficiency of the delivery of healthcare services through the use of modern technology is a pressing issue. The seamless integration of such enabling technologies as ontology, intelligent agents, web services, and cloud computing is transforming healthcare from hospital-based treatments to home-based self-care and preventive care. A ubiquitous healthcare platform based on this technological integration, which synergizes service providers with patients’ needs to be developed to provide personalized healthcare services at the right time, in the right place, and the right manner. This paper presents the development and overall architecture of IAServ (the Intelligent Aging-in-place Home care Web Services Platform) to provide personalized healthcare service ubiquitously in a cloud computing setting to support the most desirable and cost-efficient method of care for the aged-aging in place. The IAServ is expected to offer intelligent, pervasive, accurate and contextually-aware personal care services. Architecturally the implemented IAServ leverages web services and cloud computing to provide economic, scalable, and robust healthcare services over the Internet. PMID:24225647

  3. Evaluation of age and gender dependences of the rate of strontium elimination 25-45 years after intake: analysis of data from residents living along the Techa river.

    PubMed

    Shagina, N B; Tolstykh, E I; Zalyapin, V I; Degteva, M O; Kozheurov, V P; Tokareva, E E; Anspaugh, L R; Napier, B A

    2003-02-01

    The Mayak Production Association released large amounts of 90Sr into the Techa River with peak amounts in 1950-1951. Residents near the Techa River ingested an average of approximately 3,000 kBq of 90Sr. The affected people have been followed by scientists at the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine. The whole-body content of 90Sr of approximately 15,000 individuals has been measured over a period of 24 years (1974-1997) using a special whole-body counter. This report evaluates the gender and age dependences of individual rates of strontium elimination. Data on persons who had been measured 12 or more times were selected for study. There were 108 men and 81 women older than 30 years who met this criterion. Individual measurement results were fitted to an exponential function and grouped mean averages of the rate of strontium elimination as a function of age for each sex were derived. For men, a significant increase (from 2.8% year(-1) to 3.2% year(-1)) in the rate of strontium elimination after age 55 years is seen. For women, the increase in the rate of elimination was significant at age 45 and reached 5.8% year(-1) after the age of 60. The results may be used to develop a gender- and age-dependent model of strontium metabolism. PMID:12537529

  4. Effects of adding a new PCMH block rotation and resident team to existing longitudinal training within a certified PCMH: primary care residents’ attitudes, knowledge, and experience

    PubMed Central

    Anandarajah, Gowri; Furey, Christopher; Chandran, Rabin; Goldberg, Arnold; El Rayess, Fadya; Ashley, David; Goldman, Roberta E

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model is considered important for the future of primary care in the USA, it remains unclear how best to prepare trainees for PCMH practice and leadership. Following a baseline study, the authors added a new required PCMH block rotation and resident team to an existing longitudinal PCMH immersion and didactic curriculum within a Level 3-certified PCMH, aiming for “enhanced situated learning”. All 39 residents enrolled in a USA family medicine residency program during the first year of curricular implementation completed this new 4-week rotation. This study examines the effects of this rotation after 1 year. Methods A total of 39 intervention and 13 comparison residents were eligible participants. This multimethod study included: 1) individual interviews of postgraduate year (PGY) 3 intervention vs PGY3 comparison residents, assessing residents’ PCMH attitudes, knowledge, and clinical experience, and 2) routine rotation evaluations. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analyzed using immersion/crystallization. Rotation evaluations were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis of free text responses. Results Authors analyzed 23 interviews (88%) and 26 rotation evaluations (67%). Intervention PGY3s’ interviews revealed more nuanced understanding of PCMH concepts and more experience with system-level PCMH tasks than those of comparison PGY3s. More intervention PGY3s rated themselves “extremely prepared” to implement PCMH than comparison PGY3s; however, most self-rated “somewhat prepared”. Their reflections demonstrated deeper understanding of PCMH implementation and challenges than comparison PGY3s but inadequate experience to directly see the results of successful solutions. Rotation evaluations from PGY1, PGY2, and PGY3s revealed strengths and several areas for improvement. Conclusion Adding one 4-week block rotation to existing longitudinal training appears

  5. Planning for End-of-Life Care: Findings from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Douglas D.; Tuokko, Holly; Stajduhar, Kelli I.; Lindsay, Joan; Buehler, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Steps involved in formalizing end-of-life care preferences and factors related to these steps are unclear in the literature. Using data from the third wave of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA-3), we examined the relations between demographic and health predictors, on the one hand, and three outcomes, on the other (whether participants…

  6. Declines with Age in Childhood Asthma Symptoms and Health Care Use: An Adjustment for Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Yi-An; Song, Peter X. K.; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Asthma is a variable condition with an apparent tendency for a natural decline in asthma symptoms and health care use occurring as children age. As a result, asthma interventions using a pre-post design may overestimate the intervention effect when no proper control group is available. Objectives: Investigate patterns of natural decline…

  7. Academic Achievement and Aging out of Care: Foster Parents' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Foster children experience multiple barriers and challenges that, amongst other issues, prevent them from achieving academically. At the age of 18, foster youth are forced out of the Department of Children and Families care, leading many of them to become homeless or to return to the homes from which they were displaced. Scholarly literature and…

  8. Plotting Careers in Aged Care: Perspectives of Medical, Nursing, Allied Health Students and New Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Natalie; McCall, Louise

    2007-01-01

    The research reported in this article explored the impact of the undergraduate placement experience on medical, nursing, and allied health students' perceptions of careers in aged care. Data were collected from undergraduate students (48) and graduates (26) via individual (46) and group (7) interviews; data were thematically analyzed.…

  9. School-Age Child Care: Texas School District Involvement: A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Kristen; Temple, Judy

    With increasing numbers of parents at work or in training and education programs when children get out of school, the existence and quality of school-age child care (SACC) affects not only families, but the community as a whole. Texas school district involvement with SACC was examined, and qualities of model programs and barriers to developing…

  10. Development of a Typology of Dual-Earner Couples Caring for Children and Aging Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Jennifer C.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Neal, Margaret B.; Sinclair, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    Using a national sample of 267 couples, the authors identify distinct profiles of dual-earner couples in the sandwiched generation (i.e., those caring for children and aging parents) using cluster analysis and then assess the relationship between these profiles and work-family conflict. The profiles are defined by characteristics of couples' child…

  11. Language, Literacy and Numeracy in National Training Packages: Case Studies in Aged Care and Hospitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Christine; Brand, Jennie Bickmore

    The implementation and effectiveness of the inclusion of literacy and numeracy in industry training packages was examined in case studies of three programs in Western Australia. Two were certificate programs in cooking and food and beverage as specified in the hospitality training package, and the third was an aged care program based on the…

  12. Two-Dimensional Work: Workplace Literacy in the Aged Care and Call Centre Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterhouse, Peter; Virgona, Crina

    2004-01-01

    A key challenge of Australia's vocational education and training (VET) system is to serve the broad needs of individuals, communities, and industries. This includes the provision of literacy and generic skills which meet the needs of all groups. This study investigates and documents workplace literacy in aged care facilities and call centres,…

  13. Status of School Age Child Care or Extended Day Programs in Minnesota Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    This report is based upon survey responses from 139 school districts and 59 nonpublic schools in Minnesota that offer School Age Child Care (SACC), or extended day programs. The report presents data on public and private SACC programs related to: (1) administration and growth; (2) number of children served; (3) types of services offered; (4)…

  14. Latchkey Children and School-Age Child Care: A Background Briefing. Policy Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Dale B.

    This background briefing paper synthesizes current thinking and practice on the issue of latchkey children and school-age child care (SACC). The paper defines the problem of latchkey children; reviews related literature and programmatic responses to the problem; reports responses of four southern states; and points out implications for policy…

  15. School-Age Child Care: An Examination of Philosophical Priorities. Research in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mick; Wallinga, Charlotte; Toledo, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    School-age child care (SACC) is a relatively new social institution, and effective SACC programs must balance academic, recreational, and enrichment needs of child development. Outcomes of a study in two states to review program operations, staffing, activities, community involvement, and evaluation indicate that programs focus on academics and…

  16. Understanding the information dynamics of medication administration in residential aged care facilities (RACFs): a prerequisite for design of effective ICT systems.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amina; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Medication information is a critical part of the information required to ensure residents' safety in the highly collaborative care context of RACFs. Studies report poor medication information as a barrier to improve medication management in RACFs. Research exploring medication work practices in aged care settings remains limited. This study aimed to identify contextual and work practice factors contributing to breakdowns in medication information exchange in RACFs in relation to the medication administration process. We employed non-participant observations and semi-structured interviews to explore information practices in three Australian RACFs. Findings identified inefficiencies due to lack of information timeliness, manual stock management, multiple data transcriptions, inadequate design of essential documents such as administration sheets and a reliance on manual auditing procedures. Technological solutions such as electronic medication administration records offer opportunities to overcome some of the identified problems. However these interventions need to be designed to align with the collaborative team based processes they intend to support. PMID:23941954

  17. A Videotape-Based Training Method for Improving the Detection of Depression in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Stacey; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Schnelle, Betha; Stephens, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the effectiveness of a new training program for improving nursing staffs' detection of depression within long-term care facilities. The course was designed to increase recognition of the Minimal Data Set (MDS) Mood Trigger items, to be brief, and to rely on images rather than didactics. Design and Methods: This study…

  18. Caring from Afar: Asian H1B Migrant Workers and Aging Parents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Shim; Chaudhuri, Anoshua; Yoo, Grace J

    2015-09-01

    With the growth in engineering/technology industries, the United States has seen an increase in the arrival of highly skilled temporary migrant workers on H1B visas from various Asian countries. Limited research exists on how these groups maintain family ties from afar including caring for aging parents. This study explores the experiences and challenges that Asian H1B workers face when providing care from a distance. A total of 21 Chinese/Taiwanese, Korean, and Indian H1B workers participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Key findings indicate that despite distance, caring relationships still continue through regular communications, financial remittances, and return visits, at the same time creating emotional, psychological, and financial challenges for the workers. Findings highlight the need for further research in understanding how the decline of aging parent's health impacts the migrants' adjustment and health in the United States. PMID:26267591

  19. Findings from a pilot investigation of the effectiveness of a snoezelen room in residential care: should we be engaging with our residents more?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Katrina; Bird, Michael; Macpherson, Sarah; McDonough, Vikki; Davis, Terri

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing literature on multisensory therapy or Snoezelen, with some evidence suggesting it promotes positive mood and reduces maladaptive behavior in people with dementia. We undertook a pilot evaluation of a Snoezelen room in residential care and compared effects with a condition in which staff took residents out to a garden. This study was therefore a comparison between a Snoezelen room containing prescriptive, expensive equipment and a more everyday existing location that, inevitably, also contained several sensory stimuli. The study was difficult to implement, with low numbers because some staff failed to attend sessions, and the frequent although rarely reported difficulty of introducing psychosocial interventions and doing research in residential care is one of the main stories of this study. No staff member used the room outside of the study, and we found no significant difference between Snoezelen and garden conditions. Results, although highly equivocal because of low numbers, raised the issue of the implementation of standard therapies in dementia care outpacing the evidence, possibly at the expense of less elaborate practices. PMID:21306798

  20. Age-Related Changes in the Cardiometabolic Profiles in Singapore Resident Adult Population: Findings from the National Health Survey 2010.

    PubMed

    Loh, Tze Ping; Ma, Stefan; Heng, Derrick; Khoo, Chin Meng

    2016-01-01

    We describe the centile trends of the blood pressure, glycemia and lipid profiles as well as renal function of a representative population who participated in the Singapore National Health Survey in 2010. Representative survey population was sampled in two phases, first using geographical/ residential dwelling type stratification, followed up ethnicity. 2,407 survey participants without any self-reported medical or medication history for diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia were included in this analysis. All biochemistry analyses were performed on Roche platforms. After excluding outliers using Tukey's criteria, the results of the remaining participants were subjected to lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) analysis. In men, systolic blood pressure increased linearly with age. By contrast, an upward inflection around late 40s was seen in women. The diastolic blood pressure was highest in men in the late 30s-50s age group, and in women in the late 50s-60s age group. All glycemia-related parameters, i.e. fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose and HbA1c concentrations increased with age, although the rate of increase differed between the tests. Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations increased with age, which became attenuated between the early 30s and late 50s in men, and declined thereafter. In women, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations gradually increased with age until late 30s, when there is an upward inflection, plateauing after late 50s. Our findings indicate that diagnostic performance of laboratory tests for diabetes may be age-sensitive. Unfavourable age-related cardiovascular risk profiles suggest that the burden of cardiovascular disease in this population will increase with aging population. PMID:27570971

  1. Age-Related Changes in the Cardiometabolic Profiles in Singapore Resident Adult Population: Findings from the National Health Survey 2010

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Tze Ping; Ma, Stefan; Heng, Derrick; Khoo, Chin Meng

    2016-01-01

    We describe the centile trends of the blood pressure, glycemia and lipid profiles as well as renal function of a representative population who participated in the Singapore National Health Survey in 2010. Representative survey population was sampled in two phases, first using geographical/ residential dwelling type stratification, followed up ethnicity. 2,407 survey participants without any self-reported medical or medication history for diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia were included in this analysis. All biochemistry analyses were performed on Roche platforms. After excluding outliers using Tukey's criteria, the results of the remaining participants were subjected to lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) analysis. In men, systolic blood pressure increased linearly with age. By contrast, an upward inflection around late 40s was seen in women. The diastolic blood pressure was highest in men in the late 30s-50s age group, and in women in the late 50s-60s age group. All glycemia-related parameters, i.e. fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose and HbA1c concentrations increased with age, although the rate of increase differed between the tests. Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations increased with age, which became attenuated between the early 30s and late 50s in men, and declined thereafter. In women, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations gradually increased with age until late 30s, when there is an upward inflection, plateauing after late 50s. Our findings indicate that diagnostic performance of laboratory tests for diabetes may be age-sensitive. Unfavourable age-related cardiovascular risk profiles suggest that the burden of cardiovascular disease in this population will increase with aging population. PMID:27570971

  2. A prospective study of long-term care institutionalization among the aged.

    PubMed

    Branch, L G; Jette, A M

    1982-12-01

    A statewide probability sample of 1,625 elders living in Massachusetts are studied prospectively to identify key determinants of long-term care (LTC) institutionalization. One-hundred forty-seven elders, 9 per cent of the original cohort, entered a LTC institution during the six-year investigation. Using logistic multiple regression, we examine the predictive power of 19 independent variables grouped into six categories: demographic characteristics, attitude, social context, long-term care needs, physical disability, and mental/emotional disability. Five variables are significantly related to institutionalization: advancing age, using ambulatory aids, mental disorientation, living alone, and using assistance to perform "instrumental" ADL (activities of daily living). These results may be helpful to those trying to target non-institutional services to elders for use as substitutes for institutional long-term care. They may also help explain why recent experimental tests of substituting non-institutional care for institutional services have been less than successful. PMID:6814269

  3. Health care strategy for ensuring work ability in an aging Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsun; Park, Jong-Tae; Kim, Soo Geun; Yoo, Cheol-In; Son, Junseok; Yim, Jun; Kim, Dae-Seong; Rhee, Kyung Young; Kim, Yangho

    2016-01-01

    The rapid aging trend in South Korea will cause a growing shortage of labor and decreasing quality of the labor force. The purpose of this commentary is to recommend a health care strategy to maintain and promote the work ability of employees in an aging Korea. Strategies to promote the work ability require the collaboration of governmental agencies at the central and local levels. First, the common goal should be the reinforcement of follow-up measure in general medical examinations and the promotion of healthy lifestyles for workers. Second, collaborating activities should be performed among the Worker's Health Center, the Health Promotion Center, and community health centers. In conclusion, health care strategies for ensuring the work ability in an aging Korea require the collaboration of governmental agencies at the central and local levels. PMID:27610236

  4. Emerging issues on comprehensive hemophilia care: preventing, identifying, and monitoring age-related comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Antonio; Santoro, Cristina; Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Caterina; Mogavero, Selene; Molinari, Angelo Claudio; Schinco, Piercarla; Tagliaferri, Annarita; Santoro, Rita Carlotta

    2013-10-01

    Life expectancy for persons with hemophilia (PWH) has considerably increased in the last decades as a direct result of the availability of modern therapies to control the clotting defect. Because their life expectancy now matches that of the general population, PWH are experiencing age-related comorbidities, such as, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, renal diseases, sexuality issues, malignancies, and neurologic problems, that until recently have been rarely seen in this group of patients. In this article, we present a summary of the current knowledge on the aging PWH along with the clinical approaches that may be integrated into the routine comprehensive care of these patients for preventing, diagnosing, and monitoring age-related comorbidities. In general, patients with and without hemophilia should receive similar care, with close collaboration between the physician treating PWH and the specialty expert treating the comorbid disease. PMID:24014070

  5. Resident recruitment.

    PubMed

    Longmaid, H Esterbrook

    2003-02-01

    This article has introduced the reader to the critical components of successful recruitment of radiology residents. With particular attention to the ACGME institutional and program requirements regarding resident recruitment, and an explanation of the support systems (ERAS and NRMP) currently available to those involved in applicant review and selection, the article has sought to delineate a sensible approach to recruitment. Successful recruiters have mastered the essentials of these programs and have learned to adapt the programs to their needs. As new program directors work with their departments' resident selection committees, they will identify the factors that faculty and current residents cite as most important in the successful selection of new residents. By structuring the application review process, exploiting the power of the ERAS, and crafting a purposeful and friendly interview process, radiology residency directors can find and recruit the residents who best match their programs. PMID:12585436

  6. Clinical ethics residency for nurses: an education model to decrease moral distress and strengthen nurse retention in acute care.

    PubMed

    Grace, Pamela J; Robinson, Ellen M; Jurchak, Martha; Zollfrank, Angelika A; Lee, Susan M

    2014-12-01

    The experience of unaddressed moral distress can lead to nurse attrition and/or distancing from patients, compromising patient care. Nurses who are confident in their ethical decision making abilities and moral agency have the antidote to moral distress for themselves and their colleagues and can act as local or institutional ethics resources. We describe a grant-funded model education program designed to increase ethics competence throughout the institution. PMID:25393140

  7. Association between underweight and taste sensitivity in middle- to old-aged nursing home residents in Sri Lanka: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Fuchida, S; Yamamoto, T; Takiguchi, T; Kandaudahewa, G; Yuyama, N; Hirata, Y

    2013-11-01

    Low taste sensitivity may be one factor related to undernutrition, which is a major problem in developing countries. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between underweight, one indicator of undernutrition, and taste sensitivity in middle- to old-aged Sri Lankan nursing home residents. Participants were 946 residents with BMI of <25·0 from 25 nursing homes. Data were obtained on height, weight, taste sensitivity, subjective taste ability, sex, age, ethnicity, number of years in nursing homes, activities of daily living (ADL), frequency of exercise, bowel movements, smoking status, drinking status, current number of chronic diseases, number and kinds of medications used, self-reporting questionnaire 20 (SRQ20), subjective smell ability, number of teeth present, Eichner index and flow rate of saliva. Low sensitivity to bitter taste, being male, old age, low ADL, smoking experience, drinking experience, fewer medications used and no use of medication for hypertension and diabetes were each associated with underweight (P < 0·05). In a multilevel Poisson regression model adjusted for sex, age, ADL, smoking status, drinking status, number of medications used, use of medication for hypertension and diabetes and flow rate of saliva, subjects with low sensitivity (>0·003% quinine hydrochloride dihydrate) to bitter taste had a significant 1·70 times higher prevalence ratio (95% confident interval 1·04-2·80) for underweight compared with those with high sensitivity (0·0001% quinine hydrochloride dihydrate). These results suggest that low taste sensitivity to bitter taste may be one factor related to underweight. PMID:24111976

  8. Elder abuse and neglect in institutional settings: the resident's perspective.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Michèle; Soulières, Maryse

    2013-01-01

    This article strives to share research findings concerning the rights and empowerment of the elderly living in various long-term care (LTC) or residential care facilities (public and private sectors) in Quebec, Canada. Inspired by the theories of constructivism, the research aims to understand the residents' perception of abuse, as well as the strategies they are developing to exercise their rights and liberties. Data from semistructured interviews with 20 residents, mostly very old women aged 80 to 98, are presented. Results show that residents' perception of abuse: (1) is conditioned by sensationalistic media coverage; (2) is limited to physical mistreatment; and (3) tends to legitimize day-to-day infringements of their rights, as these "minor" violations seem inoffensive when compared to the "real" acts of violence reported in the media. Tensions that can build up among residents, sometimes resulting in intimidation or even bullying, were addressed. PMID:23768416

  9. Evaluation of Remel Spectra CRE Agar for Detection of Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteria from Rectal Swabs Obtained from Residents of a Long-Term-Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Carl M.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Chen, Liang; Osorio, Giuliana; Kopacz, Joanna; Labaze, Georges; Segal-Maurer, Sorana

    2015-01-01

    We compared the Remel Spectra CRE agar plate to CDC standard methodology for the isolation of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) from 300 rectal swab specimens obtained from patients residing in a long-term-care facility (LTCF). Multiplex PCR experiments were performed on isolates to identify specific Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC) and additional β-lactamases. Of the 300 patients, 72 (24%) harbored CRE and were PCR positive for KPC enzymes. The Remel Spectra CRE plates detected KPC-type CRE in isolates from 70 of 72 patients (97.2%), while the CDC method detected CRE in 56 of 72 (77.8%). CRE identification results were available in 18 h compared to 36 h for the CDC method. Remel Spectra CRE agar plates can provide useful means for a fast and reliable method for detecting KPC-type CRE and for accelerated institution of appropriate infection control precautions. PMID:26085613

  10. Dental care for aging populations in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, United kingdom, and Germany.

    PubMed

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Vigild, Merete; Nitschke, Ina; Berkey, Douglas B

    2005-09-01

    This article reviews access to and financing of dental care for aging populations in selected nations in Europe. Old age per se does not seem to be a major factor in determining the use of dental services. Dentition status, on the other hand, is a major determinant of dental attendance. In addition to perceived need, a variety of social and behavioral factors as well as general health factors have been identified as determinants of dental service use. Frail and functionally dependent elderly have special difficulties in accessing dental care; private dental practitioners are hesitant to provide dental care to these patients. One reason may be that the fee for treating these patients is too low, considering high dental office expenses. Another reason may be problems related to management of medically compromised patients. This raises an important question: does inadequate training in geriatric dentistry discourage dentists from seeking opportunities to treat geriatric patients? Overall, the availability of dental services, the organization of the dental health care delivery system, and price subsidy for dental treatment are important factors influencing access to dental care among older people in Europe as well as in the United States. PMID:16141084

  11. Love stories: understanding the caring journeys of aged Greek-Australian carers.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, Debbie; Blignault, Ilse; Perry, Astrid; Antonopoulos, Penny

    2016-03-01

    This article documents the findings of a short-term longitudinal study that explored the caring journeys of aged Greek carers providing in-home care for their spouse. Through a deeper understanding of carers' decisions and decision-making and insights from service providers and community leaders, we aimed to inform policy makers, service managers and providers about how to develop and promote culturally appropriate support services, and negotiate them with carers and care recipients in a timely way. Initially, we conducted three focus groups and one follow-up forum with service providers and Greek community leaders. Then, over a 6-month period, we conducted two in-home interviews and two telephone interviews with 12 older Greek carers. We sought to understand factors influencing carers' decision-making regarding service uptake, and we provided information about services as required. Through our thematic analysis, we found that most carers wanted to remain as independent as possible and to avoid forced separation from the one they loved, through institutionalisation. They placed great value on their caring role which, while a struggle at times, gave them a sense of meaning, purpose and belonging. We also found that carers had great resourcefulness, strength and competence. They were all in long-term relationships, had negotiated coming to a foreign country and establishing themselves and were now in the process of negotiating old age and increasing frailty while at the same time providing care and support to family and friends. Our findings suggest that services need to be communicated in ways which support what carers value, not on outdated assumptions about cultural groups, otherwise providers will perpetuate exclusion. We propose an outreach in-home service model with an emphasis on ageing well and staying at home. This model of service provision is a model of care which emphasises relationships and community, and seeks to build social and cultural capital. PMID

  12. Age- and gender-related prevalence of multimorbidity in primary care: the swiss fire project

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background General practitioners often care for patients with several concurrent chronic medical conditions (multimorbidity). Recent data suggest that multimorbidity might be observed more often than isolated diseases in primary care. We explored the age- and gender-related prevalence of multimorbidity and compared these estimates to the prevalence estimates of other common specific diseases found in Swiss primary care. Methods We analyzed data from the Swiss FIRE (Family Medicine ICPC Research using Electronic Medical Record) project database, representing a total of 509,656 primary care encounters in 98,152 adult patients between January 1, 2009 and July 31, 2011. For each encounter, medical problems were encoded using the second version of the International Classification of primary Care (ICPC-2). We defined chronic health conditions using 147 pre-specified ICPC-2 codes and defined multimorbidity as 1) two or more chronic health conditions from different ICPC-2 rubrics, 2) two or more chronic health conditions from different ICPC-2 chapters, and 3) two or more medical specialties involved in patient care. We compared the prevalence estimates of multimorbidity defined by the three methodologies with the prevalence estimates of common diseases encountered in primary care. Results Overall, the prevalence estimates of multimorbidity were similar for the three different definitions (15% [95%CI 11-18%], 13% [95%CI 10-16%], and 14% [95%CI 11-17%], respectively), and were higher than the prevalence estimates of any specific chronic health condition (hypertension, uncomplicated 9% [95%CI 7-11%], back syndrome with and without radiating pain 6% [95%CI 5-7%], non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 3% [95%CI 3-4%]), and degenerative joint disease 3% [95%CI 2%-4%]). The prevalence estimates of multimorbidity rose more than 20-fold with age, from 2% (95%CI 1-2%) in those aged 20–29 years, to 38% (95%CI 31-44%) in those aged 80 or more years. The prevalence estimates of

  13. Age at adoption from institutional care as a window into the lasting effects of early experiences

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Megan M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major questions of human development is how early experience impacts the course of development years later. Children adopted from institutional care experience varying levels of deprivation in their early life followed by qualitatively better care in an adoptive home, providing a unique opportunity to study the lasting effects of early deprivation and its timing. The effects of age at adoption from institutional care are discussed for multiple domains of social and behavioral development within the context of several prominent developmental hypotheses about the effects of early deprivation (cumulative effects, experience-expectant developmental programming, and experience-adaptive developmental programming). Age at adoption effects are detected in a majority of studies, particularly when children experienced global deprivation and were assessed in adolescence. For most outcomes, institutionalization beyond a certain age is associated with a step-like increase in risk for lasting social and behavioral problems, with the step occurring at an earlier age for children who experienced more severe levels of deprivation. Findings are discussed in terms of their concordance and discordance with our current hypotheses, and speculative explanations for the findings are offered. PMID:23576122

  14. Practice Guidelines for Assessing Pain in Older Persons with Dementia Residing in Long-Term Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Theresa Dever; Marchildon, Gregory P.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Frail patients with dementia most frequently present with musculoskeletal pain and mobility concerns; therefore, physiotherapy interventions for this population are likely to be of great benefit. However, physiotherapists who work with older adults with dementia confront a considerable challenge: the communication impairments that characterize dementia make it difficult to assess pain and determine its source. For an effective physiotherapy programme to be implemented, valid pain assessment is necessary. This paper is intended to provide practice guidelines for pain assessment among older persons with dementia. Summary of Key Points: Over the last several years, there has been tremendous research progress in this area. While more research is needed, several promising assessment methodologies are available. These methodologies most often involve the use of observational checklists to record specific pain behaviours. Recommendations: We encourage the ongoing and regular evidence-based pain assessment of older persons with dementia, using standardized procedures. Without regular and systematic assessment, pain problems will often go undetected in this population. Given the need for systematic pain assessment and intervention for long-term care populations with mobility concerns and muculoskeletal pain problems, we call for increased involvement of physical therapists in long-term care facilities. PMID:21359040

  15. Age of Onset, Length of Residence, Language Aptitude, and Ultimate L2 Attainment in Three Linguistic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granena, Gisela; Long, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the scope and timing of maturational constraints in three linguistic domains within the same individuals, as well as the potential mediating roles of amount of second language (L2) exposure and language aptitude at different ages in different domains. Participants were 65 Chinese learners of Spanish and 12 native…

  16. Variability in ESL Outcomes: The Influence of Age on Arrival and Length of Residence on Achievement in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessingh, Hetty

    2008-01-01

    This article integrates findings from earlier research (Roessingh & Kover, 2003; Roessingh, Kover, & Watt, 2005) linking distinct patterns of achievement for diverse age-on-arrival (AOA) cohorts of ESL learners on the grade 12 Alberta English language arts (ELA) examination to their vocabulary and reading comprehension scores on a standardized…

  17. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights. The resident has a right to a dignified existence, self...) Exercise of rights. (1) The resident has the right to exercise his or her rights as a resident of...

  18. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights. The resident has a right to a dignified existence, self...) Exercise of rights. (1) The resident has the right to exercise his or her rights as a resident of...

  19. Participatory Evaluation of a Community Mobilization Effort to Enroll Wyandotte County, Kansas, Residents Through the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Sepers, Charles E.; McKain, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Successful implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) depends on the capacity of local communities to mobilize for action. Yet the literature offers few systematic investigations of what communities are doing to ensure support for enrollment. In this empirical case study, we report implementation and outcomes of Enroll Wyandotte, a community mobilization effort to facilitate enrollment through the ACA in Wyandotte County, Kansas. We describe mobilization activities during the first round of open enrollment in coverage under the ACA (October 1, 2013–March 31, 2014), including the unfolding of community and organizational changes (e.g., new enrollment sites) and services provided to assist enrollment over time. The findings show an association between implementation measures and newly created accounts under the ACA (the primary outcome). PMID:25905820

  20. Constipation and Laxative Use among Nursing Home Patients: Prevalence and Associations Derived from the Residents Assessment Instrument for Long-Term Care Facilities (interRAI LTCF)

    PubMed Central

    Blekken, Lene Elisabeth; Nakrem, Sigrid; Vinsnes, Anne Guttormsen; Mørkved, Siv; Gjeilo, Kari Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Constipation is a common, bothersome, and potentially dangerous condition among nursing home (NH) patients. Between 50 and 74% of NH patients use laxatives. Objective. To study prevalence and associations of laxative use and constipation using the comprehensive Norwegian version of the Resident Assessment Instrument for Long-Term Care Facilities. Methods. Cross-sectional study. Patients from 20 NH units were included. Logistic regression was used to analyze the results. Data collected in NHs might be clustered. Consequently, the multivariable models were tested against a mixed effects regression model to investigate variance both on the level of patients and on the level of NH units. Results. In all, 261 patients were included. The prevalence of constipation was 23.4%, and 67.1% used laxatives regularly. Balance problems, urinary incontinence, hypothyroidism, and Parkinson's disease were associated with constipation. Reduced ability to communicate and number of drugs were associated with laxative use. Antidementia-drugs and being involved in activities 1/3 to 2/3 of daytime were protective factors for laxative use. Mixed effects analyses identified variance on the level of NH units as nonsignificant. Conclusion. Constipation and laxative use are common. Variance is mainly explained by different patient characteristics/health deficiencies. Hence, patients might benefit from individualized care to compensate for deficiencies. PMID:26884751

  1. Thyroid hormones are associated with exposure to persistent organic pollutants in aging residents of upper Hudson River communities.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Michael S; Jansing, Robert L; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Rej, Robert; Fitzgerald, Edward F

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and thyroid hormones in an aging population. Forty-eight women and 66 men, aged 55-74 years and living in upper Hudson River communities completed a questionnaire and provided blood specimens. Serum was analyzed for thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone, TSH), free (fT4) and total thyroxine (T4), total triiodothyronine (T3), and for POPs. POPs included 39 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) determined by gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD), and nine polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) determined by high-resolution gas chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry detection (HRGC-HRMS). Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between thyroid hormones and sums of POPs, adjusted for covariates and stratified by sex. Effects were expressed as differences in thyroid hormone levels associated with a doubling in the level of exposure. Among women, DDT+DDE increased T4 by 0.34μg/dL (P=0.04) and T3 by 2.78ng/dL (P=0.05). Also in women, sums of PCBs in conjunction with PBDEs elicited increases of 24.39-80.85ng/dL T3 (P<0.05), and sums of PCBs in conjunction with DDT+DDE elicited increases of 0.18-0.31μg/dL T4 (P<0.05). For men estrogenic PCBs were associated with a 19.82ng/dL T3 decrease (P=0.003), and the sum of estrogenic PCBs in conjunction with DDT+DDE elicited an 18.02ng/dL T3 decrease (P=0.04). Given age-related declines in physiologic reserve, the influence of POPs on thyroid hormones in aging populations may have clinical implications and merits further investigation. PMID:24138783

  2. Older adults' evaluations of middle-aged children's attempts to initiate discussion of care needs.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Craig; Fisher, Carla L; Pitts, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    We explored how older adults evaluated the strategies used by an adult child to initiate discussion of future care needs, and subsequently, whether these judgments affected older adults' willingness to engage in discussions about eldercare if approached in a similar fashion by one of their own children. One hundred and thirty older adults were randomly assigned to read one of four scripts depicting efforts by a middle-aged daughter to raise the topic of future care needs with her mother by implementing a variety of facework behaviors. Scripts manipulated the degree to which the daughter conveyed respect for her mother's desires for autonomy (negative face) and connection (positive face). The daughter's facework significantly predicted older parents' evaluation of her as supportive, which in turn predicted their willingness to discuss future care needs with one of their own children if they were to approach the conversation in a similar way. PMID:24156501

  3. The elasticity of demand for health care in Burkina Faso: differences across age and income groups.

    PubMed

    Sauerborn, R; Nougtara, A; Latimer, E

    1994-06-01

    Like many other developing countries, Burkina Faso has been exploring how community resources can be tapped to co-finance health services. Although revenue generation is important for the viability of health services, effects on utilization and on equity of access to health care must also be considered. The authors present a logistic regression model to derive price elasticities of demand for health care based on cross-sectional survey data. While demand for health care appears inelastic overall (-0.79), subgroup analysis reveals differences in elasticity across age and income groups. Elasticities of demand for infants and children (-3.6 and -1.7) and for the lowest income quartile (-1.4) are substantially greater than overall elasticity. The method used is unusual in that it allows estimation of elasticities before the introduction of user fees. This increases the value of the information to policy makers. PMID:15726780

  4. Measuring the performance of electronic health records: a case study in residential aged care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; Qian, Siyu; Yu, Hui; Lei, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the performance of electronic health records (EHR) is an important, yet un-resolved challenge. Various measurements have addressed different aspects of EHR success, yet a holistic, comprehensive measurement tool needs to be developed to capture the potential EHR success variables completely. A self-administered questionnaire survey instrument was developed based on the theoretical framework of the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success Model. It measures nigh variables of EHR success: system quality, information quality, service quality, training, self efficacy, intention to use, use, user satisfaction and net benefits. The instrument was used to measure the performance of aged care EHR systems in three aged care organizations. The results suggest that the instrument was reliable. PMID:23920809

  5. Age and racial differences in the presentation and treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder in primary care.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Gretchen A; Knudson, Mark; McCall, W Vaughn; Williamson, Jeff D; Miller, Michael E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-10-01

    Despite the prevalence and impact of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in the primary care setting, little is known about its presentation in this setting. The purpose of this study is to examine age and racial differences in the presentation and treatment of GAD in medical patients. Participants were recruited from one family medicine clinic and one internal medicine clinic. The prevalence of GAD was lowest for older adults. Age differences were found in the presentation of GAD, with young adults reporting greater cognitive symptoms of anxiety, negative affect, and depressive symptoms. African-Americans with GAD reported more positive affect and lower rates of treatment. The lower levels of negative affect and depressive symptoms reported among older adults may affect the recognition of GAD by primary care physicians. Further research is needed to better understand the causes of racial differences in treatment. PMID:18182275

  6. Morphometric evaluation of the frontal sinus in relation to age and gender in subjects residing in Davangere, Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Bhakti A.; Sujatha, G. P.; Lingappa, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of the study was morphometric evaluation of the frontal sinus in relation to age and gender and to establish its forensic importance and application. Materials and Method: The study group consisted of 200 subjects (100 males and 100 females) in the age groups 14-20 years, 21-30 years, 31-45 years, 45 years and above. Posteroanterior (PA) cephalogram radiographs were taken using standardized technique. The processed films were traced and frontal sinus pattern was established as per Yoshino's classification system. Results: The mean values for length, width, and area of the frontal sinus were found to be higher in males as compared to females and area of frontal sinuses increase with age except in males who were 45 years and above. The left width, left area, and bilateral asymmetry in relation to gender was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: The morphologic evaluation of frontal sinus is a useful technique to determine gender and seems promising in personal identification. PMID:27051227

  7. Satisfaction and Difficulties of Korean Family Medicine Resident Training Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Kim, Ju Young; Kwon, Kil Young; Lee, Chul-Min; Hyun, Seung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background Practitioners of family medicine are essential to primary care practices in Korea. Resident training staffs in Korean family medicine departments have a crucial role in producing well-trained family physicians. This study assesses the aspects of satisfaction and difficulties of Korean family medicine resident training staffs. Methods We surveyed the resident training staffs of various Korean family medicine departments using an online survey tool. The survey used in this study was modified from previously used questionnaires. Respondents rated items using a five-point Likert scale and a 0-10 visual analogue scale. Results The response rate was 43.9% (122/278). The mean satisfaction score with regard to current family medicine residency programs was 7.59 out of 10. Resident training staffs found the administrative aspects of their role to be the most difficult. There were considerable differences in the reported difficulties of resident training according to the differing characteristics of each staff member, including age, sex, type of hospital, number of staff members, role as chief, and duration of staff. Most respondents (91.9%) cited a need for faculty development programs. Conclusion Korean family medicine resident training staffs need faculty development programs for the improvement of resident training. For the strengthening of core competencies among resident training staffs, faculty development programs or courses should be designed and implemented in Korea. PMID:24106588

  8. Silent and suffering: a pilot study exploring gaps between theory and practice in pain management for people with severe dementia in residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Peisah, Carmelle; Weaver, Judith; Wong, Lisa; Strukovski, Julie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is common in older people, particularly those in residential aged care facilities (RACF) and those with dementia. However, despite 20 years of discourse on pain and dementia, pain is still undetected or misinterpreted in people with dementia in residential aged care facilities, particularly those with communication difficulties. Methods A topical survey typology with semistructured interviews was used to gather attitudes and experiences of staff from 15 RACF across Northern Sydney Local Health District. Results While pain is proactively assessed and pain charts are used in RACF, this is more often regulatory-driven than patient-driven (eg, prior to accreditation). Identification of pain and need for pain relief was ill defined and poorly understood. Both pharmacological and non-pharmacological regimes were used, but in an ad hoc, variable and unsystematic manner, with patient, staff, and attitudinal obstacles between the experience of pain and its relief. Conclusion A laborious “pain communication chain” exists between the experience of pain and its relief for people with severe dementia within RACF. Given the salience of pain for older people with dementia, we recommend early, proactive consideration and management of pain in the approach to behaviors of concern. Individualized pain measures for such residents; empowerment of nursing staff as “needs interpreters”; collaborative partnerships with common care goals between patients where possible; RACF staff, doctors, and family carers; and more meaningful use of pain charts to map response to stepped pain protocols may be useful strategies to explore in clinical settings. PMID:25342895

  9. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area. PMID:26522630

  10. Medical care of children during the golden age of Islamic medicine.

    PubMed

    Modanlou, Houchang D

    2015-04-01

    During the Sassanid Empire in Persia (226-652 AD), there was a renaissance of humanistic sciences, including medicine, in the city of Gondi-Shapur. When the Islamic center of power moved to Baghdad in about 750 AD, physicians of Gondi-Shapur, including the dean of the medical school (a Nestorian Christian), gradually moved to Baghdad constructing hospitals and medical schools. Aided by the Persian and Nestorian Christians, the Islamic civilization ushered in what is considered to be the Golden Age of Islam from the 8th to 13th century AD. During this period, there were remarkable achievements in humanistic sciences including medicine by many physicians/authors whose medical textbooks were used for centuries in burgeoning medical schools in Europe. The medical texts written during the Golden Age of Islamic Medicine contain sections and chapters about the clinical conditions, diseases and medical care of children. It was during this era that the first treatise was written on the diseases of children and their care. This essay will describe, in brief, the writings about the conditions and diseases of children and their medical care, by three prominent Persian physicians of the Golden Age of Islamic Medicine: 1) Abubakr Muhammad Ibn Zakaria Razi, Rhazes (865-925 AD); 2) Ali ibn-al-Abbas al-Majusi or Haly Abbas (949-994 AD); and 3)  Abu Ali al-Husayn ibn Abd Allah ibn Sina or Avicenna (980-1037 AD). PMID:25841951

  11. Policy options to improve leadership of middle managers in the Australian residential aged care setting: a narrative synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of both chronic diseases and multi-morbidity increases with longer life spans. As Australia's population ages, the aged care sector is under increasing pressure to ensure that quality aged care is available. Key to responding to this pressure is leadership and management capability within the aged care workforce. A systematic literature review was conducted to inform the policy development necessary for the enhancement of clinical and managerial leadership skills of middle managers within residential aged care. Methods Using scientific journal databases, hand searching of specialist journals, Google, snowballing and suggestions from experts, 4,484 papers were found. After a seven-tiered culling process, we conducted a detailed review (narrative synthesis) of 153 papers relevant to leadership and management development in aged care, incorporating expert and key stakeholder consultations. Results • Positive staff experiences of a manager's leadership are critical to ensure job satisfaction and workforce retention, the provision of quality care and the well-being of care recipients, and potentially a reduction of associated costs. • The essential attributes of good leadership for aged care middle management are a hands-on accessibility and professional expertise in nurturing respect, recognition and team building, along with effective communication and flexibility. However, successful leadership and management outcomes depend on coherent and good organisational leadership (structural and psychological empowerment). • There is inadequate preparation for middle management leadership roles in the aged care sector and a lack of clear guidelines and key performance indicators to assess leadership and management skills. • Theory development in aged care leadership and management research is limited. A few effective generic clinical leadership programs targeting both clinical and managerial leaders exist. However, little is known regarding

  12. Declines with Age in Childhood Asthma Symptoms and Health Care Use. An Adjustment for Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yi-An; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Asthma is a variable condition with an apparent tendency for a natural decline in asthma symptoms and health care use occurring as children age. As a result, asthma interventions using a pre-post design may overestimate the intervention effect when no proper control group is available. Objectives: Investigate patterns of natural decline over time with increasing age in asthma symptoms and health care use of children. Develop a statistical procedure that enables adjustment that accounts for expected declines in these outcomes and is useable when intervention evaluations must rely solely on pre-post data. Methods: Mixed-effects models with mixture distributions were used to describe the pattern of symptoms and health care use in 3,021 children aged 2 to 15 years in a combined sample from three controlled trials. An adaptive least squares estimation was used to account for overestimation of intervention effects and make adjustments for pre-post only data. Termed “Adjustment for Natural Declines in Asthma Outcomes (ANDAO),” the adjustment method uses bootstrap sampling to create control cohorts comparable to subjects in the intervention study from existing control subjects. ANDAO accounts for expected declines in outcomes and is beneficial when intervention evaluations must rely solely on pre-post data. Measurements and Main Results: Children under 10 years of age experienced 18% (95% confidence interval, 15–21%) fewer symptom days and 28% (95% confidence interval, 24–32%) fewer symptom nights with each additional year of age. The decline was less than 10% after age 10 years, depending on baseline asthma severity. Emergency department visits declined regardless of baseline symptom frequency (P = 0.02). The adjustment method corrected estimates to within 2.4% of true effects through simulations using control cohorts. Conclusions: Because of the declines in symptoms and health care use expected with increasing age of children with asthma, pre

  13. Age differences in treatment response to a collaborative care intervention for anxiety disorders*†

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Petkus, Andrew J.; Thorp, Steven R.; Stein, Murray B.; Chavira, Denise A.; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Craske, Michelle G.; Sherbourne, Cathy; Bystritsky, Alexander; Sullivan, Greer; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Some data suggest that older adults with anxiety disorders do not respond as well to treatment as do younger adults. Aims We examined age differences in outcomes from the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) study, an effectiveness trial comparing usual care to a computer-assisted collaborative care intervention for primary care patients with panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and/or social anxiety disorder. This is the first study to examine the efficacy of a collaborative care intervention in a sample that included both younger and older adults with anxiety disorders. We hypothesised that older adults would show a poorer response to the intervention than younger adults. Method We examined findings for the overall sample, as well as within each diagnostic category (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00347269). Results The CALM intervention was more effective than usual care among younger adults overall and for those with generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder. Among older adults, the intervention was effective overall and for those with social anxiety disorder and PTSD but not for those with panic disorder or generalised anxiety disorder. The effects of the intervention also appeared to erode by the 18-month follow-up, and there were no significant effects on remission among the older adults. Conclusions These results are consistent with the findings of other investigators suggesting that medications and psychotherapy for anxiety disorders may not be as effective for older individuals as they are for younger people. PMID:23580378

  14. Incorporating Palliative Care Concepts Into Nutrition Practice: Across the Age Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Denise Baird; Olfson, Kristina; Goldman, Babak; Barrocas, Albert; Wesley, John R

    2016-06-01

    A practice gap exists between published guidelines and recommendations and actual clinical practice with life-sustaining treatments not always being based on the patient's wishes, including the provision of nutrition support therapies. Closing this gap requires an interdisciplinary approach that can be enhanced by incorporating basic palliative care concepts into nutrition support practice. In the fast-paced process of providing timely and effective medical treatments, communication often suffers and decision making is not always reflective of the patient's quality-of-life goals. The current healthcare clinical ethics model does not yet include optimum use of advance directives and early communication between patients and family members and their healthcare providers about treatment choices, including nutrition support. A collaborative, proactive, integrated process in all healthcare facilities and across levels of care and age groups, together with measurable sustained outcomes, shared best practices, and preventive ethics, will be needed to change the culture of care. Implementation of a better process, including basic palliative care concepts, requires improved communication skills by healthcare professionals. Formalized palliative care consults are warranted early in complex cases. An education technique, as presented in this article, of how clinicians can engage in critical and crucial conversations early with patients and family members, by incorporating the patient's values and cultural and religious diversity in easily understood language, is identified as an innovative tool. PMID:26888858

  15. Evaluation of Age and Gender Dependences of the Rate of Strontium elimination 25-45 Years after Intake: Analysis of Data from Residents Living along the Techa River

    SciTech Connect

    Shagina, N B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Zalyapin, V. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Kozheurov, V P.; Tokareva, E. E.; Anspaugh, L R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2003-02-14

    The Mayak Production Association released large amounts of Strontium 90 into the Techa River with peak amounts in 1950-1951. Residents near the Techa River ingested an average of {approx}3,000 kBq of Strontium 90. The affected people have been followed by Scientists at the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine. The whole-body content of Strontium 90 of {approx}15,000 individuals has been measured over a period of 24 years (1974-1997) using a special whole-body counter. This report evaluates the gender and age dependences of individual rates of strontium elimination. Data on persons who had been measured 12 or more times were selected for study. There were 108 men and 81 women older than 30 years who met this criterion. Individual measurement results were fitted to an exponential function and grouped mean averages of the rate of strontium elimination as a function of age for each sex were derived. The results may be used to develop a gender- and age-dependent model of strontium metabolism.

  16. Looking Beyond Nativity: The Relation of Age of Immigration, Length of Residence, and Birth Cohorts to the Risk of Onset of Psychiatric Disorders for Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Alegria, Margarita; Sribney, William; Woo, Meghan; Torres, Maria; Guarnaccia, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Past studies yield inconsistent results regarding risk of psychopathology for U.S. Latinos by nativity possibly due to differences across immigrants in their age of arrival to the U.S., their length of residence in the U.S., or birth-cohort differences. This paper seeks to document the relation of age of arrival, time in the U.S., and cohort effects on the risk of onset of psychiatric disorders using a nationally representative sample of 2554 Latinos in the coterminous United States. Risk of onset of psychiatric disorders was assessed using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI, Kessler & Ustun, 2004). Findings indicate that Latino immigrants have lower risks of onset for some psychiatric disorders in their country of origin, but once in the U.S., Latino immigrants appear to experience similar risks of onset as U.S.-born Latinos of the same age. The longer Latino immigrants remain in their country of origin, the less cumulative risk of onset they experience, resulting in lower lifetime rates of disorders. These findings could potentially be due to variation in cultural and social norms and expectations across geographical contexts, differences in family structure and gender roles, as well as artifactual-level explanations. PMID:19412354

  17. Levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in settled house dust from urban dwellings with resident preschool-aged children in Nanjing, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing-Ling; Pang, Shu-tao; Zhang, Xiao-ling; Li, Xi-ling; Sun, Yong-gang; Lu, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the levels and possible determinants of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the settled house-dust (SHD) of urban dwellings with resident preschool-aged children in Nanjing, China. The possible neurodevelopmental effects of house-dust PBDEs were also explored. SHD was collected from 216 urban houses. Levels of 8 PBDEs were measured by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The Child Behavior Checklist and the Gesell Development Inventory were used to evaluate the child's development. BDE47, BDE99, BDE153, BDE18, and BDE209 were detected in the SHD of >90 % of houses, of which BDE209 predominated. Most PBDEs were found at significantly greater levels in indoor than in outdoor dust (P < 0.05). Levels of BDE28 and BDE154 in houses with solid-wood floors were significantly greater than those in houses with plywood floors (P < 0.05). BDE154 levels in houses with wallpaper were significantly greater than those without wallpaper (P < 0.05). Greater BDE47 concentrations were found in houses with less natural ventilation time (linear trend P < 0.05). After dichotomization at the geometric mean concentration, BDE209 and total BDEs showed significant risks for depressed behavior problems and lower personal social developmental quotients (DQs); BDE99 and BDE153 indicated a risk for lower personal social DQs. In conclusion, PBDEs (especially BDE209) are ubiquitous in urban SHD in Nanjing residences. Natural ventilation and floor materials potentially influence PBDE levels in SHD. The potential adverse effect of postnatal exposure to PBDEs on the behavior and neurodevelopment of preschool-age children requires follow-up in larger studies. PMID:25034333

  18. Disparities in late stage diagnosis, treatment, and breast cancer-related death by race, age, and rural residence among women in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Markossian, Talar W; Hines, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the outcomes of late stage breast cancer diagnosis, receiving first course treatment, and breast cancer-related death by race, age, and rural/urban residence in Georgia. The authors used cross-sectional and follow-up data (1992-2007) for Atlanta and Rural Georgia cancer registries that are part of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (N = 23,500 incident breast cancer cases in non-Hispanic whites or non-Hispanic African Americans). Multilevel modeling and Cox proportional hazard models revealed that compared to whites, African American women had significantly increased odds of late stage diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] = 2.08, p = 0.0001) and unknown tumor stage (OR = 1.27, p = 0.0001), decreased odds of receiving radiation (OR = 0.93, p = 0.041) or surgery (OR = 0.50, p = 0.0001), and increased risk of death following breast cancer diagnosis (hazard rate ratio [HR] = 1.50, p = 0.0001). Increased age was significantly associated with the odds of late/unknown stage at diagnosis, worse treatment, and survival. Women residing in rural areas had significantly decreased odds of receiving radiation and surgery with radiation (OR = 0.59, p = 0.0001), and for receiving breast-conserving surgery compared to mastectomy (OR = 0.73, p = 0.005). Factors affecting each level of the breast cancer continuum are distinct and should be examined separately. Efforts are needed to alleviate disparities in breast cancer outcomes in hard-to-reach populations. PMID:22591230

  19. The prevention and management of constipation in older adults in a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Grieve, Jennifer

    2006-03-01

    The need to implement programs for developing leadership and practice improvement skills using an evidence-based practice approach to practice change is becoming more apparent in the health and aged care services. This is no more apparent than in high care residential health and aged care services, where health professionals are increasingly required to provide care for older people with multifocal and complex healthcare needs. This paper describes one of the projects undertaken as part of the Joanna Briggs Institute Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing Clinical Aged Care Fellowship program from February 2005 to June 2005. This purpose of this particular project was twofold. First it sought to improve the local practice in the prevention and management of constipation and that this practice was performed according to the best available evidence. Second to use the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Guidance (PACES) program to implement a process of audit and feedback as a strategy to improve practice. The project was designed to link in with the facility's existing quality improvement program and better practice continence management project. The project was conducted over 6 months and was divided into six stages involving the identification of evidence-based standards of care, an initial audit to determine appropriate sample size, a clinical audit across the facility, planning of the implementation process, implementation of the action plan and re-audit to assess practice change. Overall, the results were extremely positive and demonstrated a real improvement in practice relating to constipation in the project facility. This success, however, needs to be seen in the context of the benefits of having the support of senior management, an existing quality improvement and continence management better practice project, and a culture of clinical review. Although there will always be more work to be done, the success of this project can be

  20. Risk Factors for Diarrhea in Children under Five Years of Age Residing in Peri-urban Communities in Cochabamba, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    George, Christine Marie; Perin, Jamie; Neiswender de Calani, Karen J.; Norman, W. Ray; Perry, Henry; Davis, Thomas P.; Lindquist, Erik D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between childhood diarrhea prevalence and caregiver knowledge of the causes and prevention of diarrhea in a prospective cohort of 952 children < 5 years of age in Cochabamba, Bolivia. The survey of caregiver knowledge found that more than 80% of caregivers were unaware that hand washing with soap could prevent childhood diarrhea. Furthermore, when asked how to keep food safe for children to eat only 17% of caregivers reported hand washing before cooking and feeding a child. Lack of caregiver awareness of the importance of practices related to hygiene and sanitation for diarrhea prevention were significant risk factors for diarrheal disease in this cohort. The knowledge findings from this study suggest that health promotion in these communities should put further emphasis on increasing knowledge of how water treatment, hand washing with soap, proper disposal of child feces, and food preparation relate to childhood diarrhea prevention. PMID:25311693