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Sample records for aged care residents

  1. Factors Influencing Residents' Satisfaction in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the important factors influencing residents' satisfaction in residential aged care and to provide a better understanding of their interrelationships. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect the required information, including resident satisfaction, resident dependency…

  2. Resident Satisfaction and Its Components in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the direction and magnitude of the effects among the components of resident satisfaction in residential aged care and to examine if the relationships among satisfaction components vary according to facility type (i.e., nursing home and hostel). Briefly, a hostel is a low-care facility in which…

  3. Resident transfers from aged care facilities to emergency departments: Can they be avoided?

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kelli; Griffiths, Debra L; Crawford, Kimberley; Williams, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective Residents from aged care facilities make up a considerable proportion of ED presentations. There is evidence that many residents transferred from aged care facilities to EDs could be managed by primary care services. The present study aimed to describe the characteristics of residents transferred from residential aged care facilities to EDs, and to evaluate the appropriateness and cost of these presentations. Methods A retrospective review of ED records was undertaken for residents transferred from residential aged care facilities to two EDs in Melbourne, Victoria, in 2012. Data examined included residents' mode and time of arrival to ED, presenting complaint, triage category, procedures within ED, diagnosis, length of stay, and disposition. Data were examined against a previously established tool to identify resident transfers that might be ‘potentially avoidable’. Results There were 2880 resident transfers included in the sample, of which 408 transfers were randomly selected for scrutiny of documentation. Seventy‐one residents (17.4%) were identified as being potentially avoidable transfers. Conclusion Many resident transfers might have been avoided with better primary care services in place. Future strategies to improve resident care might include aged care staff skill mix and the availability of outreach or primary care services. PMID:26095333

  4. A multi-organisation aged care emergency service for acute care management of older residents in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jane; Dilworth, Sophie; Hullick, Carolyn; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Turner, Catherine; Higgins, Isabel

    2015-11-01

    This case study describes a multi-organisation aged care emergency (ACE) service. The service was designed to enable point-of-care assessment and management for older people in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Design of the ACE service involved consultation and engagement of multiple key stakeholders. The ACE service was implemented in a large geographical region of a single Medicare Local (ML) in New South Wales, Australia. The service was developed over several phases. A case control pilot evaluation of one emergency department (ED) and four RACFs revealed a 16% reduction in presentations to the ED as well as reductions in admission to the hospital following ED presentation. Following initial pilot work, the ACE service transitioned across another five EDs and 85 RACFs in the local health district. The service has now been implemented in a further 10 sites (six metropolitan and four rural EDs) across New South Wales. Ongoing evaluation of the implementation continues to show positive outcomes. The ACE service offers a model shown to reduce ED presentations and admissions from RACFs, and provide quality care with a focus on the needs of the older person. PMID:25981903

  5. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities. PMID:24299253

  6. Factors associated with antidepressant use in residents with and without dementia in Australian aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Hiltunen, Henna; Tan, Edwin C. K.; Ilomäki, Jenni; Hilmer, Sarah N.; Visvanathan, Renuka; Emery, Tina; Robson, Leonie; Jones, Mary J.; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Bell, J. Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Depressive symptoms are highly prevalent in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). The prevalence of antidepressant use is increasing but the effectiveness of antidepressants in people with dementia is uncertain. The objective of the study was to investigate factors associated with antidepressant use in residents with and without dementia. Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 383 residents in six Australian RACFs. Data on health status, medications and demographics were collected by trained study nurses from April to August 2014. Logistic regression was used to compute adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with antidepressant use. Analyses were stratified by dementia and depression. Results: Overall, 183 (47.8%) residents used antidepressants. The prevalence of antidepressant use was similar among residents with and without dementia. Clinician-observed pain was inversely associated with antidepressant use in the main analysis (AOR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.32–0.99) and in subanalyses for residents with documented depression (AOR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.27–0.96). In residents with dementia, moderate quality of life was associated with a lower odds of antidepressant use compared with poor quality of life (AOR = 0.35, 95% C I= 0.13–0.95). In residents without dementia, analgesic use was associated with antidepressant use (AOR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.07–5.18). Conclusions: The prevalence of antidepressant use was similar in residents with and without dementia. Clinician-observed pain was inversely associated with antidepressant use but there was no association between self-reported pain and antidepressant use. PMID:27298718

  7. Effects of person-centered care on residents and staff in aged-care facilities: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Brownie, Sonya; Nancarrow, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Background Several residential aged-care facilities have replaced the institutional model of care to one that accepts person-centered care as the guiding standard of practice. This culture change is impacting the provision of aged-care services around the world. This systematic review evaluates the evidence for an impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and nursing staff. Methods We searched Medline, Cinahl, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Proquest, and Expanded Academic ASAP databases for studies published between January 1995 and October 2012, using subject headings and free-text search terms (in UK and US English spelling) including person-centered care, patient-centered care, resident-oriented care, Eden Alternative, Green House model, Wellspring model, long-term care, and nursing homes. Results The search identified 323 potentially relevant articles. Once duplicates were removed, 146 were screened for inclusion in this review; 21 were assessed for methodological quality, resulting in nine articles (seven studies) that met our inclusion criteria. There was only one randomized, controlled trial. The majority of studies were quasi-experimental pre-post test designs, with a control group (n = 4). The studies in this review incorporated a range of different outcome measures (ie, dependent variables) to evaluate the impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and staff. One person-centered intervention, ie, the Eden Alternative, was associated with significant improvements in residents’ levels of boredom and helplessness. In contrast, facility-specific person-centered interventions were found to impact nurses’ sense of job satisfaction and their capacity to meet the individual needs of residents in a positive way. Two studies found that person-centered care was actually associated with an increased risk of falls. The findings from this review need to be interpreted cautiously due to limitations in study designs and the

  8. Advance care planning for residents in aged care facilities: what is best practice and how can evidence-based guidelines be implemented?

    PubMed

    Lyon, Cheryl

    2007-12-01

    Background  Advance care planning in a residential care setting aims to assist residents to make decisions about future healthcare and to improve end-of-life care through medical and care staff knowing and respecting the wishes of the resident. The process enables individuals and others who are important to them, to reflect on what is important to the resident including their beliefs/values and preferences about care when they are dying. This paper describes a project conducted as part of the Joanna Briggs Institute Clinical Aged Care Fellowship Program implemented at the Manningham Centre in metropolitan Melbourne in a unit providing services for 46 low and high care residents. Objectives  The objectives of the study were to document implementation of best practice in advance care planning in a residential aged care facility using a cycle of audit, feedback and re-audit cycle audit with a clinical audit software program, the Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System. The evidence-based guidelines found in 'Guidelines for a Palliative Approach in Residential Aged Care' were used to inform the process of clinical practice review and to develop a program to implement advance care planning. Results  The pre-implementation audit results showed that advance care planning practice was not based on high level evidence as initial compliance with five audit criteria was 0%. The barriers to implementation that became apparent during the feedback stage included the challenge of creating a culture where advance care planning policy, protocols and guidelines could be implemented, and advance care planning discussions held, by adequately prepared health professionals and carers. Opportunities were made to equip the resident to discuss their wishes with family, friends and healthcare staff. Some residents made the decision to take steps to formally document those wishes and/or appoint a Medical Enduring Power of Attorney to act on behalf of the resident when they

  9. Supporting Staff to Identify Residents in Pain: A Controlled Pretest-Posttest Study in Residential Aged Care.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Clint; Haydon, Deborah; Wollin, Judy

    2016-02-01

    Practical strategies are needed to improve pain awareness among aged care staff and promote a systematic approach to pain identification using evidence-based tools. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a pain identification tool for use by nursing and nonprofessional staff in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). A controlled pretest-posttest intervention design was conducted in two RACFs in Brisbane, Australia. Completed surveys were returned by 216 staff and 74 residents at baseline and 218 staff and 94 residents at 3-month follow-up. Chart audits were conducted on 308 residents at baseline and 328 at follow-up. Groups were compared on: (1) staff knowledge and attitudes regarding pain, perceived confidence and skills for pain assessment, and perceived quality of pain management; (2) frequency of pain assessments and use of pain interventions; and (3) residents' perceptions of the quality of pain management. Both groups had high knowledge scores and reported high levels of confidence, skills, and perceived quality of pain management at baseline and follow-up. The intervention group showed significant improvement in routine pain assessment and use of nonpharmacological pain interventions. However, due to unexpected changes in control group conditions, both groups increased episodic pain assessment. Overall, staff believed the intervention was clinically useful and fostered a team approach to pain assessment. We found the introduction of pain identification resources with implementation strategies to support frontline staff was partially effective in improving staff and resident outcomes. Nonetheless, our findings confirm the need for change and importance of translational pain research in RACFs. PMID:26700721

  10. Planning and Decision Making about the Future Care of Older Group Home Residents and Transition to Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigby, C.; Bowers, B.; Webber, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Planning for future care after the death of parental caregivers and adapting disability support systems to achieve the best possible quality of life for people with intellectual disability as they age have been important issues for more than two decades. This study examined perceptions held by family members, group home staff and…

  11. Exploratory Investigation of Communication Management in Residential-Aged Care: A Comparison of Staff Knowledge, Documentation and Observed Resident-Staff Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michelle K.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a high prevalence of communication difficulty among older people living in residential-aged care. Such functional deficits can have a negative impact on resident quality of life, staff workplace satisfaction and the provision of quality care. Systematic research investigating the nature of communication management in…

  12. An Intervention to Improve the Oral Health of Residents in an Aged Care Facility Led by Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinkhorn, F. A.; Weingarten, L.; Boivin, L.; Plain, J.; Kay, M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The growing population of elderly people is impacting on overstretched dental services in many countries, as many individuals are retaining natural teeth and may have dentures or implants, all of which influence the way in which the oral cavity must be cared for. A major difficulty for older residents is their decreasing level of…

  13. Confused Resident Care. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This instructional module was designed for certified nurse assistants (CNA). This voluntary training program was developed as a "continuing education" option for the practicing graduate CNA with the intention of providing CNAs with the requisite knowledge and skills to provide care for the confused elderly resident in a long-term care facility.…

  14. The Association of Age With Rate of Cognitive Decline in Elderly Individuals Residing in Supporting Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Ravona-Springer, Ramit; Luo, Xiaodong; Schmeidler, James; Wysocki, Michael; Lesser, Gerson T.; Rapp, Michael A.; Dahlman, Karen; Grossman, Hillel T.; Haroutunian, Vahram; Beeri, Michal Schnaider

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study examines the effect of age on rate of cognitive decline in different stages of dementia, of nursing home and assisted-living residents. Methods In this longitudinal study, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to measure rate of cognitive decline in subjects who were nondemented [Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR)=0; n=353], questionably demented (CDR=0.5; n=121), or frankly demented (CDR≥1; n=213) at baseline. Results A generalized estimating equation was used to model the MMSE scores over time (mean follow-up 2.9±2.0 y). The generalized estimating equation model had the MMSE scores at successive follow-up time points as dependent variables and had linear and quadratic age, follow-up time from baseline, CDR at baseline, and all the interactions among them as independent variables, controlling for MMSE at baseline, sex, race, and education. The mean age of the entire sample was 85.2±7.4 years at baseline. There were no significant interactions of linear age effects with rate of cognitive decline. The analysis of interaction of quadratic age with rate of cognitive decline showed complex relationships: in the nondemented group, there was no substantial quadratic association of age with the rate of cognitive decline (P=0.13); in the questionable demented group, the oldest subjects declined relatively faster (P=0.02); and in the demented group, the youngest and oldest subjects tended to decline relatively less than subjects in the intermediate ages (P=0.07). Conclusions This study adds an additional aspect to the complexity of the association between age and rate of cognitive decline, showing that the direction and amplitude of this effect differs according to the stage along the course of cognitive decline. PMID:21572311

  15. Dying in a rural residential aged care facility: an action research and reflection project to improve end-of-life care to residents with a non-malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Joanne; Taylor, Beverley

    2011-12-01

    This article describes a qualitative research project that explored issues around end-of-life care provided to residents dying from non-malignant diseases in two, rural Australian, residential aged care facilities. Reflective processes and action research were combined to work in collaboration with 14 aged nurses, associated staff and relatives of dying residents. Reflection featured in the research and included group reflection on practice stories, critical reflection during thematic analysis and reflection on action research cycles. Themes and subthemes emerged, indicating that aspects of end-of-life care needed further improvement. Major thematic concerns were prioritized for action and included the need for better pain management practices which will be discussed. Identifying these clinical issues was an important step in creating, implementing and evaluating actions. Participants reported varying degrees of success in attempting to improve end-of-life care.

  16. Improving Health Care for Assisted Living Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Mach, John R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore how medical care is delivered to older people in assisted living (AL) settings and to suggest ways for improving it. Design and Methods: We present a review of the limited research available on health care for older AL residents and on building testable models of better ways to organize primary…

  17. Literacy in the World of the Aged Care Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Linda; Casarotto, Nadia

    Australia's Aged Care Act of 1997 mandates a number of key reforms aimed at ensuring consistency in the quality of care and well-being for all residents of aged care facilities. The law required residential aged care facilities to provide high-quality care within a framework of continuous improvement which requires aged care workers to perform the…

  18. Hispanic ethnicity, rural residence, and regular source of care.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, James E; Kruse, Gina; Zhang, Yun

    2004-02-01

    This study assessed whether Hispanic ethnicity and rural residence were related to usual source-of-care. We studied 3,689 persons over age 65 who lived in their own homes in a 108-county area in West Texas. A telephone interview in two waves was used to collect information. Usual source-of-care was measured in two ways: by asking if the subject had a usual place to go and by asking if the subject had a personal physician or nurse. In a logistic regression analysis, Hispanic ethnicity was independently associated with both having a usual place of care (OR = .511, CI = .32-.82) and a usual provider (OR = .629, CI = .45-.88). Rural residence was not associated with either measure. Efforts to promote usual source-of-care should be targeted at Hispanic seniors in this region of the southwestern United States.

  19. Resident-Care Practices in the County of Somerset, England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, H. H.; May, A. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of surveys of resident care practices for mentally retarded persons in Somerset indicated that hostel units were resident-oriented in their care practices, whereas hospital units for severely and profoundly mentally retarded people were institution-oriented. (Author)

  20. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs. PMID:26826073

  1. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs.

  2. Systematic review of the evidence for a liberalized diet in the management of diabetes mellitus in older adults residing in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Farrer, Olivia; Yaxley, Alison; Walton, Karen; Healy, Erin; Miller, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    A systematic review of the literature was conducted to review and evaluate the evidence supporting a liberalized diet for the management of diabetes mellitus in aged care homes and examine the effect of this on glycaemia, nutritional status and diabetes comorbidity risk factors. A 3 step search of eight databases followed by independent data extraction and quality assessment by two authors was undertaken. Studies which compared therapeutic diets to a liberalized diet or observation studies reviewing the effects of therapeutic diets on glycaemia and nutritional status were included. Of the 546 studies identified, six met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of the studies was rated poor and the majority concluded no statistically significant change in diabetes management outcomes with a liberalized diet, but modest increases in glycaemia were observed. Inadequate data was available to determine effects of diet change on nutritional status or diabetes risk factors. Overall studies were in support of a liberalized diet but due to the low quality of the evidence and a lack of significant findings it may not be appropriate to extrapolate these conclusions to inform dietetic practice.

  3. Does Rural Residence Affect Access to Prenatal Care in Oregon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Beth; Grant, Therese; Schiff, Melissa; Kasehagen, Laurin

    2009-01-01

    Context: Identifying how maternal residential location affects late initiation of prenatal care is important for policy planning and allocation of resources for intervention. Purpose: To determine how rural residence and other social and demographic characteristics affect late initiation of prenatal care, and how residence status is associated…

  4. A residential aged care end-of-life care pathway (RAC EoLCP) for Australian aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Liz; Israel, Fiona J; Charles, Margaret A

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop, implement and evaluate an end-of-life (terminal) care pathway and associated infrastructure suitable for Australian residential aged care facilities that improves resident and health system outcomes. The residential aged care end-of-life care pathway was developed by a multidisciplinary collaboration of government and non-government professionals and incorporated best clinical management for dying residents to guide care and increase palliative care capacity of generalist staff. Implementation included identifying and up-skilling Link Nurses to champion the pathway, networking facilities with specialist palliative care services, delivering education to generalists and commencing a Palliative Care Medication Imprest System in each facility. The primary outcome measure for evaluation was transfer to hospital; secondary measures included staff perceived changes in quality of palliative care provided and family satisfaction with care. Results indicated that the pathway, delivered within a care framework that guides provision of palliative care, resulted in improved resident outcomes and decreased inappropriate transfers to acute care settings. PMID:21871198

  5. Challenges to neurology residency education in today's health care environment.

    PubMed

    Bega, Danny; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-09-01

    Residency training has had to adapt to higher patient volumes, increased complexity of medical care, and the commercialized system of health care. These changes have led to a concerning culture shift in neurology. We review the relationship between the emerging health care delivery system and residency training, highlighting issues related to duty hours and work-life balance, the changing technological landscape, high patient volumes, and complex service obligations. We propose that the current challenges in health care delivery offer the opportunity to improve neurology residency through faculty development programs, bringing teaching back to the bedside, increasing resident autonomy, utilizing near-peer teaching, and rewarding educators who facilitate an environment of inquiry and scholarship, with the ultimate goal of better alignment between education and patient care. Ann Neurol 2016;80:315-320. PMID:27422739

  6. Relationships, Expertise, Incentives, and Governance: Supporting Care Home Residents' Access to Health Care. An Interview Study From England

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L.; Gordon, Adam L.; Meyer, Julienne; Dening, Tom; Gladman, John R.F.; Iliffe, Steve; Zubair, Maria; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Martin, Finbarr C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what commissioners of care, regulators, providers, and care home residents in England identify as the key mechanisms or components of different service delivery models that support the provision of National Health Service (NHS) provision to independent care homes. Methods Qualitative, semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of people with direct experience of commissioning, providing, and regulating health care provision in care homes and care home residents. Data from interviews were augmented by a secondary analysis of previous interviews with care home residents on their personal experience of and priorities for access to health care. Analysis was framed by the assumptions of realist evaluation and drew on the constant comparative method to identify key themes about what is required to achieve quality health care provision to care homes and resident health. Results Participants identified 3 overlapping approaches to the provision of NHS that they believed supported access to health care for older people in care homes: (1) Investment in relational working that fostered continuity and shared learning between visiting NHS staff and care home staff, (2) the provision of age-appropriate clinical services, and (3) governance arrangements that used contractual and financial incentives to specify a minimum service that care homes should receive. Conclusion The 3 approaches, and how they were typified as working, provide a rich picture of the stakeholder perspectives and the underlying assumptions about how service delivery models should work with care homes. The findings inform how evidence on effective working in care homes will be interrogated to identify how different approaches, or specifically key elements of those approaches, achieve different health-related outcomes in different situations for residents and associated health and social care organizations. PMID:25687930

  7. [Responsibilities of the resident in anesthesiology and postoperative care].

    PubMed

    Barrios Flores, L F

    2004-01-01

    Among medical specialties, anesthesiology/postoperative care has one of the highest rates of malpractice claims. This article treats the responsibilities of interns and residents in anesthesiology, their supervisors, and the institutions where they practice and receive training.

  8. Resident- and Facility-Level Predictors of Quality of Life in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Shippee, Tetyana P.; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Kane, Robert L.; Lewis, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Although there is substantial research on quality of care in nursing homes (NH), less is known about what contributes to quality of life (QOL) for NH residents. This study assesses multiple domains of QOL and examines facility- and resident-level correlates for different domains. Design and Methods: Data come from (a) self-reported resident interviews using a multidimensional measure of QOL; (b) resident clinical data from the Minimum Data Set; and (c) facility-level characteristics from Minnesota Department of Human Services. We used factor analysis to confirm domains of QOL, and then employed cross-sectional hierarchical linear modeling to identify significant resident- and facility-level predictors of each domain. Results: We examined six unique domains of QOL: environment, personal attention, food, engagement, negative mood, and positive mood. In multilevel models, resident-level characteristics were more reliable correlates of QOL than facility characteristics. Among resident characteristics, gender, age, marital status, activities of daily living, mood disorders, cognitive limitations, and length of stay consistently predicted QOL domains. Among facility characteristics, size, staff hours, quality of care, and percent of residents on Medicaid predicted multiple QOL domains. Implications: Examining separate domains rather than a single summary score makes associations with predictors more accurate. Resident characteristics account for the majority of variability in resident QOL. Helping residents maintain functional abilities, and providing an engaging social environment may be particularly important in improving QOL. PMID:24352532

  9. Attitudes of anesthesiology residents toward critical care medicine training.

    PubMed

    Durbin, C G; McLafferty, C L

    1993-09-01

    The number of anesthesiology residents pursuing critical care medicine (CCM) fellowship training has been decreasing in recent years. A significant number of training positions remain unfilled each year. Possible causes of this decline were evaluated by surveying residents regarding their attitudes toward practice and training in CCM. All 38 anesthesiology programs having accredited CCM fellowships were surveyed. Four of these and one program without CCM fellowships were used to develop the survey instrument. Four programs without CCM fellowships and 34 programs with CCM fellowships make up the survey group. Returned were 640 surveys from 37 (97%) programs accounting for over 30% of the possible residents. Resident interest in pursuing CCM training decreased as year of residency increased (P < 0.0001). Residents in programs with little patient care responsibility during intensive care unit (ICU) rotations expressed less interest in CCM training (P < 0.012). The administrative role of the anesthesiology department in the ICU also influenced resident interest (P < 0.014). Written responses to open-ended questions suggested resident concerns with the following: stress of chronic care, financial consequences of additional year of training, ICU call frequency and load, ICU role ambiguity, and shared decision-making in the ICU. A recurring question was, "Are there jobs (outside of academics) for anesthesiologist intensivists?" Most residents knew a CCM anesthesiologist they admired and knew that there were unfilled fellowship positions available. Defining the job market, improving curriculum and teaching, supporting deferment of student loans, and introducing residents and medical students to the ICU earlier may increase the interest in CCM practice among anesthesiology residents.

  10. Skin Care and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Age Spots and Skin Tags Click for more information Age spots, once called "liver spots," are flat, brown ... surface. They are a common occurrence as people age, especially for women. They are ... options, specific conditions, and related issues. ...

  11. Resident Characteristics Related to the Lack of Morning Care Provision in Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Durkin, Daniel W.; Rahman, Anna N.; Choi, Leena; Beuscher, Linda; Schnelle, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine usual long-term care (LTC) practices related to 3 aspects of morning care and determine if there were resident characteristics related to the lack of care. Design and Methods: Participants were 169 long-stay residents in 4 community LTC facilities who required staff assistance with either transfer…

  12. The Relations between the Mental Condition of the Care House Residents and Finger Plethysmograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohashi, Yoko; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Lee, Sangjae

    2011-06-01

    We measured the fingertip pulse waves of some of the elderly living in a care house (a welfare facility for the elderly) four times a day over two days to investigate their mental condition. We analyzed the chaotic information produced by the finger pulse waves using a nonlinear analysis method. The results of our research are as follows: 1) The Largest Lyapunov Exponent (LLE), which synchronizes to mental revitalization, rose when the care house residents felt happy. 2) After moderate movement (a stroll, etc.), the LLE was high. 3) The LLE did not rise when a regular action was carried out non-vigorously to kill time. 4) When residents made contact (a phone call or letter, etc.) with a family member, the LLE was high. 5) The LLE of long-term residents was high. 6) The majority of residents with high LLE moved into the care house in their early seventies. 7) The LLE of short-term residents was low and their sympathetic nerves were high. 8) There was no relativity between the LLE and present age of the care house residents. On this basis, the authors propose that fuller support of care house residents is crucial for the objective ascertainment of their mental condition.

  13. When Residents Need Health Care: Stigma of the Patient Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moutier, Christine; Cornette, Michelle; Lehrmann, Jon; Geppert, Cynthia; Tsao, Carol; DeBoard, Renee; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Whether and under what circumstances medical residents seek personal health care is a growing concern that has important implications for medical education and patient welfare, but has not been thoroughly investigated. Barriers to obtaining care have been previously documented, but very little empirical work has focused on trainees who…

  14. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  15. Living in institutional care: residents' experiences and coping strategies.

    PubMed

    Timonen, Virpi; O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2009-01-01

    Insights into daily living in residential care settings are rare. This article draws on a qualitative dataset (semi-structured interviews and recordings of residents' council meetings) that gives a glimpse of the experiences and coping strategies of (older) people living in residential care. The data highlight the range of unmet needs of the residents, similar to the categories of physiological, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization needs in Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory. Our analysis indicates that "higher" and "lower" needs are closely intertwined and mutually reinforcing and should therefore be accorded equal emphasis by professionals (including social workers) employed within residential care settings.

  16. Residents' choice of and control over food in care homes.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Susan

    2009-04-01

    This study aimed to map food pathways in care homes to identify how residents exercised choice and control over their food intake and any associated or influencing factors. Four homes were visited, interviews were conducted with chefs and nursing staff and the dining facilities were noted. It was found that residents were dependent on the care home for the provision of food. There was almost no direct contact between residents and external food retailers. A food map was constructed, which identified three routes for potential improvements in practice: supply and delivery of food; serving of food; and consumption of food. Residents' choice and control over food could be improved through the design of new products for serving and consumption of food and eating aids, access to local food retailers and nutritional training. PMID:19363950

  17. Oral health care in residential aged care services: barriers to engaging health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Lydia; Slack-Smith, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The oral health of older people living in residential aged care facilities has been widely recognised as inadequate. The aim of this paper is to identify barriers to effective engagement of health-care providers in oral care in residential aged care facilities. A literature review was conducted using MEDline, CINAHL, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete and PsychInfo between 2000 and 2013, with a grey literature search of government and non-government organisation policy papers, conference proceedings and theses. Keywords included: dental/oral care, residential aged care, health-care providers, barriers, constraints, and limitations. A thematic framework was used to synthesise the literature according to a series of oral health-care provision barriers, health-care provider barriers, and cross-sector collaborative barriers. A range of system, service and practitioner level barriers were identified that could impede effective communication/collaboration between different health-care providers, residents and carers regarding oral care, and these were further impeded by internal barriers at each level. Findings indicated several areas for investigation and consideration regarding policy and practice improvements. While further research is required, some key areas should be addressed if oral health care in residential aged care services is to be improved. PMID:25155109

  18. Training family medicine residents to care for children

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Pauline; Curran, Vernon; Hollett, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There is a lack of consensus around the optimal way to train family medicine residents to care for children. Objective of program Evaluation of an ambulatory versus an inpatient pediatrics rotation for family medicine residents. Program description A 4-week pediatrics rotation for second-year family medicine residents was introduced involving half-day ambulatory pediatric clinics. A nonequivalent control group evaluation study design was followed. Patient logbook entries, as well as residents’ satisfaction, knowledge, and self-reported confidence outcomes were compared between family medicine residents completing the new ambulatory rotation and those completing a traditional inpatient-ambulatory pediatrics rotation. Conclusion An ambulatory rotation in pediatrics is a feasible option for facilitating family medicine resident learning in child health care. Residents report exposure to more patient cases that reflect a family practice office setting and the same level of knowledge and confidence as residents completing an inpatient-ambulatory rotation. Intraprofessional collaboration, flexibility in scheduling, and the support of pediatric preceptors are key factors in the organization and implementation of an ambulatory rotation. PMID:21321160

  19. Pediatric palliative care instruction for residents: an introduction to IPPC.

    PubMed

    Carter, Brian S; Swan, Rebecca

    2012-08-01

    A 1-day training event for pediatric residents with interdisciplinary staff was held, which was modeled after the Initiative for Pediatric Palliative Care (IPPC). Training included relational communication, cultural humility, pain-symptom management, family-centered care, team problem solving, and strategic planning using didactic, small group, and plenary platforms. Two bereaved parents were co-learners and trainers. Twenty-six interdisciplinary staff participated. A positive impact was measured in new knowledge gained, value in collaborative learning with health care professionals and families, and ability to work with professionals outside participants' own unit. Confidence to advocate for improved pediatric palliative care was also noted. The IPPC curriculum is easily adapted for resident education. Incorporating family members as co-learners and teachers is valuable. Advocacy for pediatric palliative care may follow this type of experience.

  20. Personal Health Care of Residents: Preferences for Care outside of the Training Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Laura B.; Moutier, Christine; Hammond, Katherine A. Green; Lehrmann, Jon; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The personal health care issues of residents are important but have received minimal study. Available evidence suggests that residents experience difficulties obtaining care, partly related to both the demands of medical training and concerns about confidentiality and privacy. Methods: A self-report survey was distributed in 2000-2001…

  1. Curriculum on Resident Education in Care of Older Adults in Acute, Transitional and Extended Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Chandrika; Bensadon, Benjamin A.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Cooney, Leo M.

    2016-01-01

    Most geriatric care is provided in non-hospital settings. Internal Medicine and Family Medicine residents should therefore learn about these different clinical sites and acuity levels of care. To help facilitate this learning, a geriatrics training curriculum for internal medicine residents was developed that focused on cognition, function, goals…

  2. The use of acute hospital services by elderly residents of nursing and residential care homes.

    PubMed

    Godden, S; Pollock, A M

    2001-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare hospitalisation rates by cause of admission, hospital death rates and length of stay for residents from nursing and residential care homes with those in the community. This is a retrospective study of acute hospital emergency admissions in one health district, Merton, Sutton and Wandsworth between April 1996 and March 1997. Data linkage and manual look up were used to derive emergency hospital admissions for residents of care homes aged 65 and over. Admission rates were calculated for cause, length of stay and hospital death for residents of care homes and in the community with relative risks. The relative risk of emergency admission from a care home compared with the community was 1.39 for all diagnoses, 2.68 for all injuries, and 3.96 for fracture of neck of femur. The relative risk of dying in hospital for care home residents was 2.58 overall, and 3.64 in the first 48 hours of a hospital stay (all P-values <0.0001). Admission rates were higher from residential than from nursing homes. There was some increase in admissions from homes during holiday periods and over Christmas. In conclusion, there are major difficulties in monitoring admissions from nursing and residential care homes due to poor quality recording and inaccuracies in NHS coding. This was compounded by an absence of data on the age and sex profile and healthcare needs of the resident population in care homes. Prospective studies are required to ascertain when admission is avoidable and when it is appropriate. The information strategy needs to ensure that routine data sources are capable of monitoring the use of hospital services by residents of care homes.

  3. Attitude of resident doctors towards intensive care units' alarm settings.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rakesh; Bhalotra, Anju R; Goel, Nitesh; Pruthi, Amit; Bhadoria, Poonam; Anand, Raktima

    2010-11-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) monitors have alarm options to intimate the staff of critical incidents but these alarms needs to be adjusted in every patient. With this objective in mind, this study was done among resident doctors, with the aim of assessing the existing attitude among resident doctors towards ICU alarm settings. This study was conducted among residents working at ICU of a multispeciality centre, with the help of a printed questionnaire. The study involved 80 residents. All residents were in full agreement on routine use of ECG, pulse oximeter, capnograph and NIBP monitoring. 86% residents realised the necessity of monitoring oxygen concentration, apnoea monitoring and expired minute ventilation monitoring. 87% PGs and 70% SRs routinely checked alarm limits for various parameters. 50% PGs and 46.6% SRs set these alarm limits. The initial response to an alarm among all the residents was to disable the alarm temporarily and try to look for a cause. 92% of PGs and 98% of SRs were aware of alarms priority and colour coding. 55% residents believed that the alarm occurred due to patient disturbance, 15% believed that alarm was due to technical problem with monitor/sensor and 30% thought it was truly related to patient's clinical status. 82% residents set the alarms by themselves, 10% believed that alarms should be adjusted by nurse, 4% believed the technical staff should take responsibility of setting alarm limits and 4% believed that alarm levels should be pre-adjusted by the manufacturer. We conclude that although alarms are an important, indispensable, and lifesaving feature, they can be a nuisance and can compromise quality and safety of care by frequent false positive alarms. We should be familiar of the alarm modes, check and reset the alarm settings at regular interval or after a change in clinical status of the patient. PMID:21224968

  4. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms. PMID:25171938

  5. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms.

  6. Social Support and Successful Aging in Assisted Living Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Laura Odell; Troutman-Jordan, Meredith; Newman, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Successful aging has been associated with adequate social support. However, impaired functionality, increased dependence, multiple comorbidities, and reduced social interactions place older assisted living community (ALC) residents at risk for poorer social support and less successful aging. This cross-sectional descriptive study used the revised…

  7. Regulation and mindful resident care in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Plowman, Donde; Bailey, Donald; Corazzini, Kirsten; Utley-Smith, Queen; Ammarell, Natalie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth

    2010-09-01

    Regulatory oversight is intended to improve the health outcomes of nursing home residents, yet evidence suggests that regulations can inhibit mindful staff behaviors that are associated with effective care. We explored the influence of regulations on mindful staff behavior as it relates to resident health outcomes, and offer a theoretical explanation of why regulations sometimes enhance mindfulness and other times inhibit it. We analyzed data from an in-depth, multiple-case study including field notes, interviews, and documents collected in eight nursing homes. We completed a conceptual/thematic description using the concept of mindfulness to reframe the observations. Shared facility mission strongly impacted staff perceptions of the purpose and utility of regulations. In facilities with a resident-centered culture, regulations increased mindful behavior, whereas in facilities with a cost-focused culture, regulations reduced mindful care practices. When managers emphasized the punitive aspects of regulation we observed a decrease in mindful practices in all facilities. PMID:20479137

  8. Resident-Directed Long-Term Care: Staff Provision of Choice During Morning Care

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Rahman, Annie; Beuscher, Linda; Jani, Victoria; Durkin, Daniel W.; Schnelle, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an observational protocol to assess the quality of staff–resident communication relevant to choice and describe staff–resident interactions as preliminary evidence of the usefulness of the tool to assess current nursing home practices related to offering choice during morning care provision. Design and Methods: This study included 73 long-stay residents in 2 facilities. Research staff conducted observations for 4 consecutive morning hours during targeted care activities (transfer out of bed, incontinence, dressing, and dining location). Observations were conducted weekly for 12 consecutive weeks. Staff–resident interactions were measured related to staff offers of choice and residents’ responses. Results: Interrater agreement was achieved for measures of staff offers of choice (kappa = .83, p < .001), type of choice provided (kappa = .75, p < .001), and resident requests related to choice (kappa = .72, p < .001). Observations over 2,766 care episodes during 4 aspects of morning care showed that staff offered residents choice during 18% of the episodes. Most observations (70%) were coded as staff offering “no choice.” Implications: Nursing home staff can use a simplified version of this standardized observational tool to reliably measure staff–resident interactions related to choice during morning care provision as a first step toward improving resident-directed care practice. PMID:21719629

  9. Are family medicine residents adequately trained to deliver palliative care?

    PubMed Central

    Mahtani, Ramona; Kurahashi, Allison M.; Buchman, Sandy; Webster, Fiona; Husain, Amna; Goldman, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore educational factors that influence family medicine residents’ (FMRs’) intentions to offer palliative care and palliative care home visits to patients. Design Qualitative descriptive study. Setting A Canadian, urban, specialized palliative care centre. Participants First-year (n = 9) and second-year (n = 6) FMRs. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted with FMRs following a 4-week palliative care rotation. Questions focused on participant experiences during the rotation and perceptions about their roles as family physicians in the delivery of palliative care and home visits. Participant responses were analyzed to summarize and interpret patterns related to their educational experience during their rotation. Main findings Four interrelated themes were identified that described this experience: foundational skill development owing to training in a specialized setting; additional need for education and support; unaddressed gaps in pragmatic skills; and uncertainty about family physicians’ role in palliative care. Conclusion Residents described experiences that both supported and inadvertently discouraged them from considering future engagement in palliative care. Reassuringly, residents were also able to underscore opportunities for improvement in palliative care education. PMID:27035008

  10. Facility charter and quality of care for board and care residents.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation structure, process, and outcome measures of quality in for-profit and not-for-profit board and care homes are compared. We find one structural measure (providing nursing care), three process measures (food quality, staff treat residents with respect, and staff verbally abuse residents), and two outcomes measures (cleanliness of the facility and complaints to Ombudsman) to be significant. Moreover, the directions of these effects are all consistent, with for-profit facilities rated more poorly that not-for-profit facilities. These results are discussed emphasizing their implications for efficient and effective resident care.

  11. Facility charter and quality of care for board and care residents.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation structure, process, and outcome measures of quality in for-profit and not-for-profit board and care homes are compared. We find one structural measure (providing nursing care), three process measures (food quality, staff treat residents with respect, and staff verbally abuse residents), and two outcomes measures (cleanliness of the facility and complaints to Ombudsman) to be significant. Moreover, the directions of these effects are all consistent, with for-profit facilities rated more poorly that not-for-profit facilities. These results are discussed emphasizing their implications for efficient and effective resident care. PMID:15914377

  12. The characteristics of residents in extra care housing and care homes in England.

    PubMed

    Darton, Robin; Bäumker, Theresia; Callaghan, Lisa; Holder, Jacquetta; Netten, Ann; Towers, Ann-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Extra care housing aims to meet the housing, care and support needs of older people, while helping them to maintain their independence in their own private accommodation. It has been viewed as a possible alternative, or even a replacement for residential care. In 2003, the Department of Health announced capital funding to support the development of extra care housing and made the receipt of funding conditional on participating in an evaluative study. This paper presents findings on the characteristics of the residents at the time of moving in, drawing on information collected from the 19 schemes in the evaluation, and a recent comparable study of residents who moved into care homes providing personal care. Overall, the people who moved into extra care were younger and much less physically and cognitively impaired than those who moved into care homes. However, the prevalence of the medical conditions examined was more similar for the two groups, and several of the schemes had a significant minority of residents with high levels of dependence on the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. In contrast, levels of severe cognitive impairment were much lower in all schemes than the overall figure for residents of care homes, even among schemes designed specifically to provide for residents with dementia. The results suggest that, although extra care housing may be operating as an alternative to care homes for some individuals, it is providing for a wider population, who may be making a planned move rather than reacting to a crisis. While extra care supports residents with problems of cognitive functioning, most schemes appear to prefer residents to move in when they can become familiar with their new accommodation before the development of more severe cognitive impairment.

  13. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  14. Long-Term Care Resident Outcomes Following a Natural Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Cacchione, Pamela Z.; Willoughby, Lisa M.; Langan, Joanne C.; Culp, Kennith

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the outcomes of 17 long-term care residents who were participating in a nursing intervention study. The residents were evacuated for 5 days due to a severe summer storm that caused widespread power outages. These residents were seen the day of the storm and three times per week for 2 weeks following their return to the nursing home. More than half of the participants had significant changes in their NEECHAM Confusion Scale scores (n = 11) and modified Confusion Assessment Method scores (n = 9) scores, suggesting the onset of delirium. Two participants were hospitalized within the 2 weeks of the evacuation. One participant died unexpectedly. This report provides a rare look into the negative effects of a short-term evacuation due to a natural disaster. PMID:21634311

  15. Resident-Directed Long-Term Care: Staff Provision of Choice during Morning Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Rahman, Annie; Beuscher, Linda; Jani, Victoria; Durkin, Daniel W.; Schnelle, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an observational protocol to assess the quality of staff-resident communication relevant to choice and describe staff-resident interactions as preliminary evidence of the usefulness of the tool to assess current nursing home practices related to offering choice during morning care provision. Design and Methods: This study…

  16. Test ordering for preventive health care among family medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Daisy; Schabort, Inge; MacLean, Catherine A.; Asrar, Farhan M.; Khory, Ayesha; Vandermeer, Ben; Allan, G. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine which screening tests family medicine residents order as part of preventive health care. Design A cross-sectional survey. Setting Alberta and Ontario. Participants First- and second-year family medicine residents at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, the University of Calgary in Alberta, and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, during the 2011 to 2012 academic year. Main outcome measures Demographic information, Likert scale ratings assessing ordering attitudes, and selections from a list of 38 possible tests that could be ordered for preventive health care for sample 38-year-old and 55-year-old female and male patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics were calculated. Results A total of 318 of 482 residents (66%) completed the survey. Recommended or appropriate tests were ordered by 82% (for cervical cytology) to 95% (for fasting glucose measurement) of residents. Across the different sample patients, residents ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests per patient, with 58% to 92% ordering at least 1 inappropriate test per patient. The estimated average excess costs varied from $38.39 for the 38-year-old man to $106.46 for the 55-year-old woman. More regular use of a periodic health examination screening template did not improve ordering (P = .88). Conclusion In general, residents ordered appropriate preventive health tests reasonably well but also ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests for each patient. Training programs need to provide better education for trainees around inappropriate screening and work hard to establish good ordering behaviour in preparation for entering practice. PMID:25767171

  17. Residents Living in Residential Care Facilities: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Office of Disability, Aging, and Long-Term Care Policy. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute. 2005. Spillman BC, Black KJ. The size ...

  18. SCDA task force on a special care dentistry residency.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Jeffery; Vishwanat, Lakshmi; Perry, Maureen; Messura, Judith; Dee, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    The Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) has acted on a proposal regarding the status of training in the care of patients with special needs. Two phases of action were undertaken. Phase 1: (a) examination of the literature on existing training and curricula in the care of patients with special needs and (b) a survey of existing postdoctoral programs in special needs. Phase 2: establish a group of experts who: (a) submitted to the Commission on Dental Accreditation a request to approve a postdoctoral general dentistry residency program in Special Care Dentistry and (b) created suggested accreditation standards for such postdoctoral programs. This article describes efforts by the SCDA to evaluate: The status of existing training of dental students in the care of patients with special needs. The number and characteristics of postdoctoral general dentistry programs offering formal training in the care of patients with special needs. Whether additional training in the care of patients with special needs is needed for dental students and -dentists. Possible actions by SCDA to impact the numbers of dentists trained each year in the care of patients with -special needs.

  19. SCDA task force on a special care dentistry residency.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Jeffery; Vishwanat, Lakshmi; Perry, Maureen; Messura, Judith; Dee, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    The Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) has acted on a proposal regarding the status of training in the care of patients with special needs. Two phases of action were undertaken. Phase 1: (a) examination of the literature on existing training and curricula in the care of patients with special needs and (b) a survey of existing postdoctoral programs in special needs. Phase 2: establish a group of experts who: (a) submitted to the Commission on Dental Accreditation a request to approve a postdoctoral general dentistry residency program in Special Care Dentistry and (b) created suggested accreditation standards for such postdoctoral programs. This article describes efforts by the SCDA to evaluate: The status of existing training of dental students in the care of patients with special needs. The number and characteristics of postdoctoral general dentistry programs offering formal training in the care of patients with special needs. Whether additional training in the care of patients with special needs is needed for dental students and -dentists. Possible actions by SCDA to impact the numbers of dentists trained each year in the care of patients with -special needs. PMID:27113992

  20. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primary care setting and gives trainees the opportunity to integrate collaborative BH care into their regular practice routines. During 1998-2008, 48 pediatric residents and 8 psychology fellows trained in this integrated clinical environment. The program's accomplishments include longevity, faculty and fiscal stability, sustained support from pediatric leadership and community payers, the development in residents and faculty of greater comfort in addressing BH problems and collaborating with BH specialists, and replication of the model in two other primary care settings. In addition to quantitative program outcomes data, the authors present a case example that illustrates how the integrated program works and achieves its goals. They propose that educating residents and psychology trainees side by side in collaborative BH care is clinically and educationally valuable and potentially applicable to other settings. A companion report published in this issue provides results from a study comparing the perceptions of pediatric residents whose primary care continuity clinic took place in this integrated setting with those of residents from the same pediatric residency who had their continuity clinic training in a nonintegrated setting.

  1. Associations of Special Care Units and Outcomes of Residents with Dementia: 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Huabin; Fang, Xiangming; Liao, Youlian; Elliott, Amanda; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We compared the rates of specialized care for residents with Alzheimer's disease or dementia in special care units (SCUs) and other nursing home (NH) units and examined the associations of SCU residence with process of care and resident outcomes. Design and Methods: Data came from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. The indicators of…

  2. Palliative care teaching in medical residency: a review of two POGO-e teaching products.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lionel S; Kandavelou, Karthikeyan; Khan, Nabeela

    2012-06-01

    This is a comparison review of GeriaSims and Care of the Aging Medical Patient (CHAMP) modules addressing issues in palliative and hospice medicine found in the Portal of Geriatric Online Education, a free on-line repository of geriatric educational materials for medical educators. GeriaSims is a self-directed teaching module designed to systematically address many of the important questions involved in caring for individuals with chronic progressive and life-limiting illnesses. It is well suited for physicians, particularly medical residents and fellows in-training, who provide care for medically complicated elderly and terminally ill individuals. The CHAMP module is designed to familiarize physician educators with palliative and hospice medicine basics to teach residents and fellows through didactic slides, although it can probably be adapted for use by residents and fellows if audio commentary accompanies the slides. Both modules address practical approaches to addressing palliative care in patients and their families. They are useful teaching tools that address an important learning need and can be readily used to supplement current residency curriculum in hospice and palliative medicine.

  3. Population ageing and dental care.

    PubMed

    Harford, Jane

    2009-04-01

    Population ageing is a fact in both developed and developing countries. The concern about population ageing largely arises from the combination of a greater number of older people requiring greater amounts of healthcare services and pensions, and relatively fewer people working to pay for them. Oral health and dental care are important aspects of health and health care. Lower rates of edentulism and an ageing population mean that older people will feature more prominently in dental services. Traditionally, economic studies of ageing have focused on the fiscal implications of ageing, projecting the increased burden on health and welfare services that accompanies ageing. It assumed that ageing is the major driver of recent changes and those past trends will simply be amplified by faster population ageing in the future. Less work has been done to understand other past drivers of increased healthcare spending and their implications for the future. The conclusion of these reports is usually that population ageing is unaffordable with current policy settings. They have proposed policies to deal with population ageing which focused on increasing workforce participation and worker productivity to increase the tax base and reducing entitlements. However, the affordability question is as much political as a numerical. There are no clearly articulated criteria for affordability and little opportunity for public discourse about what citizens are willing to pay in taxes to support an ageing population. While the reports do not necessarily reflect public opinion, they will certainly shape it. Predicting the future for oral health is more fraught than for general health, as oral health is in the midst of an epidemiological transition from high rates of edentulism and tooth loss to low rates. Changes in the pattern of dental expenditure in the past do not mirror the experience of rapid increases in per capita expenditure on older age groups as regards general health. Dentistry

  4. AgedCare+GP: description and evaluation of an in-house model of general practice in a residential aged-care facility.

    PubMed

    Pain, Tilley; Stainkey, Lesley; Chapman, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a medical model to provide in-house GP services to residents of aged-care facilities. Access to GP services for aged-care residents is decreasing, partially due to the changing demographic of the Australian GP workforce. The model we have developed is an in-house GP (AgedCare+GP) trialled in a publicly funded residential aged-care facility (RACF). The service model was based on the GP cooperative used in our after-hours general practice (AfterHours+GP). Briefly, the service model involves rostering a core group of GPs to provide weekly sessional clinics at the RACF. Financial contributions from appropriate Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) items for aged-care planning (including chronic conditions) provided adequate funds to operate the clinic for RACF residents. Evaluation of the service model used the number of resident transfers to the local emergency department as the primary outcome measure. There were 37 transfers of residents in the 3 months before the commencement of the AgedCare+GP and 11 transfers over a 3-month period at the end of the first year of operation; a reduction of almost 70%. This project demonstrates that AgedCare+GP is a successful model for GP service provision to RACF residents, and it also reduces the number of emergency department transfers. PMID:24134857

  5. Out of sight, out of mind: including group quarters residents with household residents can change what we know about working-age people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, David; Honeycutt, Todd; Schechter, Bruce

    2012-02-01

    Information about residents of institutional and noninstitutional group quarters (GQ), particularly those with disabilities, has been limited by gaps in survey data, and statistics based on data that exclude some or all GQ residents are biased as estimates of total population statistics. We used the 2006 and 2007 American Community Survey (ACS) to identify the distribution of working-age populations with and without disabilities by major residence type and to assess the sensitivity of disability statistics to GQ residence. Our findings show that (1) of those with disabilities, about 1 in 13 males and 1 in 33 females live in GQ; (2) GQ rates are higher for individuals reporting mental, self-care, or go-outside-the-home disabilities than for those reporting sensory, physical, or employment disabilities; (3) younger males with disabilities are more likely to reside there, particularly at institutional GQ, reflecting their relatively high incarceration rate; (4) individuals with and without disabilities who are black, American Indian, were never married, or have less than a high school education have higher GQ residence rates; (5) 40% of male and 62% of female GQ residents have a disability; (6) adding GQ residents to household residents increases estimated disability prevalence for males by 6%, and the estimated difference between disability prevalence rates by gender nearly disappears; and (7) inclusion of the GQ population substantially lowers employment rate estimates for young males, blacks, and American Indians. PMID:22109082

  6. Resident attractiveness: an influential factor in the quality of care in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sara L

    2005-08-01

    Studying the characteristics considered attractive in residents in long-term care can provide an innovative picture of how nursing staff may perceive and inadvertently respond to residents based on those characteristics. It may be difficult to believe that attractiveness can affect the quality of residents' care. However, being open to the discovery of all factors that may influence the quality of care is important to promote positive changes in resident outcomes in nursing homes.

  7. Current Practices and Opportunities in a Resident Clinic Regarding the Care of Older Adults with Multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Schoenborn, Nancy L.; Boyd, Cynthia M.; McNabney, Matthew; Ray, Anushree; Cayea, Danelle

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Multimorbidity (≥2 chronic conditions) affects more than half of all older adults. The American Geriatrics Society developed and published guiding principles for the care of older adults with multimorbidity in 2012. Improved clinician training in caring for older adults with multimorbidity is needed, but it is not clear what opportunities arise within clinical encounters to apply the guiding principles or how clinicians at all stages of training currently practice in this area. This project aimed to characterize current practice and opportunities for improvement in an internal medicine residency clinic regarding the care of older adults with multimorbidity. DESIGN Qualitative content analysis of audio-recorded clinic visits. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Thirty clinic visits between 21 internal medicine residents and 30 of their primary care patients aged 65 and older with two or more chronic conditions were audio-recorded. Patients’ mean age was 73.6, and they had on average 3.7 chronic conditions and took 12.6 medications. MEASUREMENTS Transcripts of the audio-recorded visit discussions were analyzed using standard techniques of qualitative content analysis to describe the content and frequency of discussions in the clinic visits related to the five guiding principles: patient preferences, interpreting the evidence, prognosis, clinical feasibility, and optimizing therapies. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS All visits except one included discussions that were thematically related to at least one guiding principle, suggesting regular opportunities to apply the guiding principles in primary care encounters with internal medicine residents. Discussions related to some guiding principles occurred much more frequently than others. Patients presented a number of opportunities to incorporate the guiding principles that the residents missed, suggesting target areas for future educational interventions. PMID:26200347

  8. Medication safety in residential aged-care facilities: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicholas M; March, Lyn M; Sambrook, Philip N; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2010-10-01

    Medication safety must be tailored to the distinctive issues in residential aged-care facilities (RACFs). The health and functional characteristics of their residents are different to those of hospital inpatients and community-dwelling older adults, and there are unique staffing and management issues. Understanding the aetiology and epidemiology of drug-related problems is vital in developing methods to improve patient safety. In this perspective review, we discuss tools that are used to quantify exposure to 'high-risk' medications and their evaluation in residential aged-care settings. Drug withdrawal interventions are described as a potential way to reduce adverse drug events in RACFs. Multidisciplinary professional interventions, education programs and improved communication between health professionals have been shown to improve medication safety in RACFs. Technological advances and other administrative strategies may also improve resident safety. This perspective addresses issues in medication safety facing RACFs and methods to improve the safety of medicines for their residents.

  9. Inpatient Performance of Primary Care Residents: Impact of Reduction in Time on the Ward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Goroll, Allan H.

    1979-01-01

    The inpatient (ward/intensive care unit) performance of primary care medical residents was compared with that of their peers in the standard internal medicine residency program. Nearly identical performances of the two groups suggests that substantial time in the first two years of residency can be devoted successfully to ambulatory training.…

  10. Challenging residents to assume maximal responsibilities in homes for the aged.

    PubMed

    Rodstein, M

    1975-07-01

    A program for activating residents of homes for the aged to assume maximal responsibilities is described. Promoting maximal physical and mental health through various modalities including activity programs, appropriate exercise and participation in democratic self-government mechanisms, will result in a happier, healthier population of residents in institutions for the aged. The increased demands on staff time and patience will be compensated for by relief of the too-frequent feelings of hopelessness and boredom endemic among the staff of long-term care facilities. Such programs demand constant effort by all staff members, patients, volunteers and relatives because if they succumb to the usual human dislike of persistency, short-term gains can easily be lost. PMID:1141631

  11. Optimising nutrition in residential aged care: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ekta; Marshall, Skye; Miller, Michelle; Isenring, Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    In developed countries the prevalence of protein-energy malnutrition increases with age and multi-morbidities increase nutritional risk in aged care residents in particular. This paper presents a narrative review of the current literature on the identification, prevalence, associated risk factors, consequences, and management of malnutrition in the residential aged care (RAC) setting. We performed searches of English-language publications on Medline, PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane Library from January 1, 1990 to November 25, 2015. We found that, on average, half of all residents in aged care are malnourished as a result of factors affecting appetite, dietary intake and nutrient absorption. Malnutrition is associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes, including increased risk of infections, falls, pressure ulcers and hospital admissions, all of which can lead to increased health care costs and poorer quality of life. A number of food and nutrition strategies have demonstrated positive nutritional and clinical outcomes in the RAC setting. These strategies extend beyond simply enhancing the nutritional value of foods and hence necessitate the involvement of a range of committed stakeholders. Implementing a nutritional protocol in RAC facilities that comprises routine nutrition screening, assessment, appropriate nutrition intervention, including attention to food service systems, and monitoring by a multidisciplinary team can help prevent decline in residents' nutritional status. Food and nutritional issues should be identified early and managed on admission and regularly in the RAC setting. PMID:27621242

  12. [Do long-term care residents benefit from the dental bonus system?].

    PubMed

    Nitschke, I; Bär, C; Hopfenmüller, W; Roggendorf, H; Stark, H; Sobotta, B; Reiber, Th

    2011-06-01

    Oral health of long-term care (LTC) residents is often poor. From 30 random German LTC facilities, 242 random residents (Berlin n=75, Northrhine-Westfalia (NRW) n=94, Saxony n=73) (median age: 82 years, female: 78.5%) were interviewed as to their use of dental services, possession of a bonus booklet (BB), and completeness of records. Only 18.6% possessed a BB. Significant regional differences were observed (Berlin=5.3%, NRW=18.1%, Saxony=32.9%) (χ(2) test p<0.01). The number of teeth was higher (Mann-Whitney test p=0.01) and the time since last dental visit shorter (p<0.01) for all residents with a BB. Only 18.6% of people possessing a BB declared not having had a dental appointment within the previous 12 months (LTC residents without BB 51.3%). As a means towards improved quality management in nursing, better oral infection control of residents and increased oral health and general quality of life, the introduction of a regular annual preventive dental screening program including the use of a dental bonus system are suggested.

  13. Iodine Status of New Zealand Elderly Residents in Long-Term Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jody C.; MacDonell, Sue O.; Gray, Andrew R.; Reid, Malcolm R.; Barr, David J.; Thomson, Christine D.; Houghton, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    In response to the re-emergence of iodine deficiency in New Zealand, in 2009 the government mandated that all commercially made breads be fortified with iodized salt. There has been no evaluation of the impact of the program on iodine status of the elderly, despite this population group being vulnerable to iodine deficiency or excess. The aim of this study was to describe the iodine status of elderly New Zealanders in residential aged-care homes following the implementation of the bread fortification program. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, involving 309 residents (median age 85 years) from 16 aged-care homes throughout NZ. Information on socio-demographic, anthropometric, dietary and health characteristics were collected. Casual spot urine samples were analysed for urinary iodine concentration (UIC). Blood samples were analysed for serum thyroglobulin, thyroglobulin antibodies, and other biochemical indices. The median UIC (MUIC) of the residents was 72 μg/L, indicating mild iodine deficiency, and 29% had a UIC < 50 μg/L. Median thyroglobulin concentration was 18 ng/mL and 26% had elevated thyroglobulin concentration (>40 ng/mL), suggesting iodine insufficiency. Diuretic use was associated with lower MUIC (p = 0.043). Synthetic thyroxine use was associated with lower odds of having a UIC < 50 μg/L (OR 0.32, p = 0.030)) and lower median thyroglobulin (−15.2 ng/mL, p = 0.001), compared with untreated participants. Frailty was associated with elevated thyroglobulin (p = 0.029), whereas anemia was associated with lower thyroglobulin (p = 0.016). Iodine insufficiency persists in New Zealanders residing in residential aged-care homes despite increasing iodine intake from fortified bread. Research is required to establish optimal iodine intake and status in the elderly. PMID:27455319

  14. Difficulties of residents in training in end-of-life care. A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Luthy, C; Cedraschi, C; Pautex, S; Rentsch, D; Piguet, V; Allaz, A F

    2009-01-01

    Residents in training are first-line physicians in hospital settings and they are in the process of developing knowledge and mastering clinical skills. They have to confront complex tasks calling upon their personal background, professional identity and relationships with the patients. We conducted a qualitative study investigating the difficulties they perceive in end-of-life care. In all, 24 consecutive residents were presented with a written query asking them to indicate the difficulties they identify in the management of patients hospitalised for end-of-life care. Their responses were submitted to content analysis. Physicians' mean age was 28 +/- 2.2 years, 37% were women, average postgraduate training duration was 2.5 +/- 1.3 years. Content analysis elicited eight categories of difficulties: ability to provide adequate explanations, understand the patients' needs, have sufficient theoretical knowledge, avoid flight, avoid false reassurance, manage provision of time, face one's limits as a physician and be able to help despite everything. Residents' responses showed that they identify the complexity of care in terminally-ill patients early in their training. Their responses pointed to the 'right distance' in-between getting involved and preserving oneself as a dimension of major importance. PMID:18996979

  15. Pneumonia in older residents of long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Furman, Christian Davis; Rayner, Abi V; Tobin, Elisabeth Pelcher

    2004-10-15

    Compared with community-dwelling persons, residents in long-term care facilities have more functional disabilities and underlying medical illnesses and are at increased risk of acquiring infectious diseases. Pneumonia is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this group. Risk factors include unwitnessed aspiration, sedative medication, and comorbidity. Recognition may be delayed because, in this population, pneumonia often presents without fever, cough, or dyspnea. Accurate identification of the etiologic agent is hampered because most patients cannot produce a suitable sputum specimen. It is difficult to distinguish colonization from infection. Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative organisms can result from aspiration of oral or gastric contents, which could lead to pneumonia. Aspiration of gastric contents also can produce aspiration pneumonitis. This condition is not infectious initially and may resolve without antibiotics. Antibiotics for the treatment of pneumonia should cover Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, gram-negative rods, and S. aureus. Acceptable choices include quinolones or an extended-spectrum beta-lactam plus a macrolide. Treatment should last 10 to 14 days. Pneumonia is associated with significant mortality for up to two years. Dementia is related independently to the death rate within the first week after pneumonia, regardless of treatment. Prevention strategies include vaccination against S. pneumoniae and influenza on admission to the care facility. This article focuses on recent recommendations for the recognition of respiratory symptoms and criteria for the designation of probable pneumonia, and provides a guide to hospitalization, antibiotic use, and prevention.

  16. Need or right: Sexual expression and intimacy in aged care.

    PubMed

    Rowntree, Margaret R; Zufferey, Carole

    2015-12-01

    This paper explores how the residential aged care sector could engage with residents' sexual expression and intimacy. It is informed by a study of 19 aged care staff members and 23 community members, and initially designed on the principles of Appreciative Inquiry methodology. The data were collected through focus groups and interviews and analyzed using discourse analysis. We found that staff members mainly conceptualize sexual expression as a need to be met, while community members (current and prospective residents) understand it as a right to be exercised. We conclude that the way in which sexual expression is conceptualized has critical implications for the sector's engagement with this topic. A 'needs' discourse informs policies, procedures and practices that enable staff to meet residents' needs, while a 'rights' discourse shapes policies, practices and physical designs that improve residents' privacy and autonomy, shifting the balance of power towards them. The former approach fits with a nursing home medical model of care, and the latter with a social model of service provision and consumption. PMID:26568211

  17. Is physical activity associated with appetite? A survey of long-term care residents.

    PubMed

    Dermott, Megann; McDaniel, Jennifer L; Weiss, Edward P; Tomazic, Terry J; Mattfeldt-Beman, Mildred

    2009-01-01

    The intent of this research was to explore the influence of physical activity on the appetite of older adults in long-term care. Given the impact of the anorexia of aging and the increasing numbers of older adults, this could have significant health implications. Residents (N = 93) of a long-term care, assisted living, and rehabilitation facility were surveyed using the "Appetite & Activity Questionnaire." There was no relationship found between physical activity and appetite regardless of the participants' sex or age. BMI appeared to correlate well with the amount of activity that was performed. The most salient finding was the near absence of physical activity, even in the presence of facilities, support personnel, and available time. PMID:19234996

  18. Older care-home residents as collaborators or advisors in research: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Backhouse, Tamara; Kenkmann, Andrea; Lane, Kathleen; Penhale, Bridget; Poland, Fiona; Killett, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background: patient and public involvement (PPI) in research can enhance its relevance. Older care-home residents are often not involved in research processes even when studies are care-home focused. Objective: to conduct a systematic review to find out to what extent and how older care-home residents have been involved in research as collaborators or advisors. Methods: a systematic literature search of 12 databases, covering the period from 1990 to September 2014 was conducted. A lateral search was also carried out. Standardised inclusion criteria were used and checked independently by two researchers. Results: nineteen reports and papers were identified relating to 11 different studies. Care-home residents had been involved in the research process in multiple ways. Two key themes were identified: (i) the differences in residents' involvement in small-scale and large-scale studies and (ii) the barriers to and facilitators of involvement. Conclusions: small-scale studies involved residents as collaborators in participatory action research, whereas larger studies involved residents as consultants in advisory roles. There are multiple facilitators of and barriers to involving residents as PPI members. The reporting of PPI varies. While it is difficult to evaluate the impact of involving care-home residents on the research outcomes, impact has been demonstrated from more inclusive research processes with care-home residents. The review shows that older care-home residents can be successfully involved in the research process. PMID:26790454

  19. Comprehensive care of pain: Developing systems and tools to improve patient care and resident education.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Julie; Devlin, Kwanza; Krohn, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Chronic non-cancer pain is a common condition associated with tremendous risk for morbidity and mortality. In many settings, the management of chronic non-cancer pain by primary care providers, although customary, can be difficult due to inadequate training and conflicts between patient expectations and best practices. Resident physicians, faculty, and staff of this family medicine residency program developed a comprehensive chronic pain management program to address these issues while improving patient outcomes. The program was aligned with evidence-based chronic non-cancer pain management strategies yet tailored to the needs of the providers and patients and the strengths of the clinic. In the end, the societal demand for improved chronic non-cancer pain management resulted in a massive curricular and clinical practice overhaul for this residency program. PMID:27497454

  20. Volunteering and depressive symptoms among residents in a continuing care retirement community.

    PubMed

    Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Resnick, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study examined the relationship between volunteer activities, depressive symptoms, and feelings of usefulness among older adults using path analysis. Survey data was collected via interview from residents of a continuing care retirement community. Neither feelings of usefulness nor volunteering were directly associated with depressive symptoms. Volunteering was directly associated with feelings of usefulness and indirectly associated with depressive symptoms through total physical activity. Age, fear of falling, pain, physical activity, and physical resilience explained 31% of the variance in depressive symptoms. Engaging in volunteer work may be beneficial for increasing feelings of usefulness and indirectly improving depressive symptoms among older adults.

  1. Elder Care Comes of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, Mary D.

    1995-01-01

    A discussion of elder care looks at the extent to which government and employers are addressing the issue, how elder care affects the work performance of and productivity of employed caregivers, and how human resource professionals can respond effectively to the needs of both employee and employer as these needs relate to the issue of elder care.…

  2. Gaps in quality of diabetes care in internal medicine residency clinics suggest the need for better ambulatory care training.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Lorna; Hess, Brian J; Weng, Weifeng; Lipner, Rebecca S; Holmboe, Eric S

    2012-01-01

    To ensure that medical residents will be prepared to deliver consistently high-quality care, they should be trained in settings that provide such care. Residents in internal medicine, particularly, need to learn good care habits in order to meet the needs of patients with diabetes and other common chronic and high-impact illnesses. To assess the strength of such training, we compared the quality of medical care provided in sixty-seven US internal medicine residency ambulatory clinics with the quality of care provided by 703 practicing general internists. We found significant quality gaps in process, intermediate outcome, and patient-experience measures. These inadequacies in ambulatory training for internal medicine residents must be addressed by policy makers and educators-for example, by accelerating the movement toward new residency curricula that emphasize competency-based training.

  3. Providing and financing aged care in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ergas, Henry; Paolucci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the provision and financing of aged care in Australia. Demand for aged care will increase substantially as a result of population aging, with the number of Australians aged 85 and over projected to increase from 400,000 in 2010 to over 1.8 million in 2051. Meeting this demand will greatly strain the current system, and makes it important to exploit opportunities for increased efficiency. A move to greater beneficiary co-payments is also likely, though its extent may depend on whether aged care insurance and other forms of pre-payment can develop. PMID:22312229

  4. Pneumonia care and the nursing home: a qualitative descriptive study of resident and family member perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chan Carusone, Soo; Loeb, Mark; Lohfeld, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    Background Nursing home residents are frequently sent to hospital for diagnostic tests or to receive acute health care services. These transfers are both costly and for some, associated with increased risks. Although improved technology allows long-term care facilities to deliver more complex health care on site, if this is to become a trend then residents and family members must see the value of such care. This qualitative study examined resident and family member perspectives on in situ care for pneumonia. Methods A qualitative descriptive study design was used. Participants were residents and family members of residents treated for pneumonia drawn from a larger randomized controlled trial of a clinical pathway to manage nursing home-acquired pneumonia on-site. A total of 14 in-depth interviews were conducted. Interview data were analyzed using the editing style, described by Miller and Crabtree, to identify key themes. Results Both residents and family members preferred that pneumonia be treated in the nursing home, where possible. They both felt that caring and attention are key aspects of care which are more easily accessible in the nursing home setting. However, residents felt that staff or doctors should make the decision whether to hospitalize them, whereas family members wanted to be consulted or involved in the decision-making process. Conclusion These findings suggest that interventions to reduce hospitalization of nursing home residents with pneumonia are consistent with resident and family member preferences. PMID:16430782

  5. Influence of Place of Residence in Access to Specialized Cancer Care for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Tracy; Duell, Eric J.; Shi, Xun; Demidenko, Eugene; Goodman, David

    2010-01-01

    Context: Disparities in cancer care for rural residents and for African Americans have been documented, but the interaction of these factors is not well understood. Purpose: The authors examined the simultaneous influence of race and place of residence on access to and utilization of specialized cancer care in the United States. Methods: Access to…

  6. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  7. Menu Planning in Residential Aged Care—The Level of Choice and Quality of Planning of Meals Available to Residents

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Karen L.; Wright, Olivia R. L.; Capra, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Choice of food is an imperative aspect of quality of life for residents in Residential Aged Care Homes (RACHs), where overall choice and control is diminished upon entering a home to receive care. The purpose of this study was to examine the current strategies of menu planning in a range of RACHs in Australia, and whether this facilitated appropriate levels of choice for residents receiving texture modified and general diets. Methods: The study comprised a National Menu Survey using a new survey instrument collecting general information about the RACH and foodservice system, menu information and staffing information (n = 247); a national menu analysis (n = 161) and an observational case study of 36 meal environments. Results: Choice was low for the entire sample, but particularly for those receiving pureed texture modified diets. Evidence of menu planning to facilitate the inclusion of choice and alternatives was limited. Discussion: Regulation and monitoring of the Australian Aged Care Accreditation Standards needs to be strengthened to mandate improvement of the choice and variety offered to residents, particularly those on pureed texture modified diets. Further research on how menu choice and a lack of variety in meals affects the quality of life residents is needed in this context, but current evidence suggests the effect would be detrimental and undermine resident autonomy and nutritional status. PMID:26371040

  8. Clinimetric Testing in Mexican Elders: Associations with Age, Gender, and Place of Residence

    PubMed Central

    Tavano-Colaizzi, Lorena; Arroyo, Pedro; Loria, Alvar; Pérez-Lizaur, Ana Bertha; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the ability of five clinimetric instruments to discriminate between subjects >60 years of age living at home versus those living in a residency. Methods: Trained nutritionists applied five instruments (cognition/depression/functionality/nutrition/appetite) to 285 subjects with majorities of women (64%), aged <80 years (61%), and home residents (54%). Results: Multivariable regression models were generated for each instrument using age, gender, and residency as independent variables. Age was associated with worsening scores in the five instruments whereas residency showed association in three instruments, and gender in two. Score-age regressions by place of residency showed differences suggesting that Mundet residents had increasingly worse scores with increasing age than home dwellers for cognition, depression, and nutrition. Also, living at home prevented the worsening of depression with increasing age. In contrast, functionality and appetite deteriorated at a similar rate for home and Mundet residents suggesting an inability of these two instruments to discriminate between settings. Score-age regressions by gender suggested that males have less cognitive problems at 60 and 80 years of age but not at 100 years, and better appetite than women at all ages. Conclusion: Increasing age proved to be associated to worsening scores in the five instruments but only three were able to detect differences according to setting. An interesting observation was that living at home appeared to prevent the depression increase with increasing age seen in Mundet residents. PMID:25593910

  9. Health Care Preferences Among Nursing Home Residents: Perceived Barriers and Situational Dependencies to Person-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Bangerter, Lauren R; Abbott, Katherine; Heid, Allison R; Klumpp, Rachel E; Van Haitsma, Kimberly

    2016-02-01

    Although much research has examined end-of-life care preferences of nursing home (NH) residents, little work has examined resident preferences for everyday health care. The current study conducted interviews with 255 residents recruited from 35 NHs. Content analysis identified barriers (i.e., hindrances to the fulfillment of resident preferences) and situational dependencies (i.e., what would make residents change their mind about the importance of these preferences) associated with preferences for using mental health services, choosing a medical care provider, and choosing individuals involved in care discussions. Barriers and situational dependencies were embedded within the individual, facility environment, and social environment. Approximately one half of residents identified barriers to their preferences of choosing others involved in care and choosing a medical care provider. In contrast, the importance of mental health services was situationally dependent on needs of residents. Results highlight opportunities for improvement in practice and facility policies that promote person-centered care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(2), 11-16.].

  10. Day-to-day care: the interplay of CNAs' views of residents & nursing home environments.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lucy Takesue; Wallhagen, Margaret I

    2008-11-01

    This qualitative study identified certified nursing assistants' (CNAs') perspectives of nursing home residents and how these perspectives translate into care practices. Data included observations of and interviews with 27 CNAs in three dissimilar nursing homes. All participants were people of color, and all but 3 were immigrants. CNAs constructed three views of residents: as fictive kin, as a commodity, and as an autonomous person. Although individual CNAs held one primary view of residents in general, select residents were viewed from an alternative perspective, resulting in variations in care practices. These findings suggest that such distinctions, in tandem with structural, organizational, and cultural differences in nursing homes, present opportunities for nursing leadership to affect the visible, everyday practice of nursing CNAs. To target interventions, further research is needed on how CNAs come to differentially view residents and how these differences influence CNAs' care relationships with residents. PMID:19024427

  11. Culture Change in Long-term Care: Participatory Action Research and the Role of the Resident

    PubMed Central

    Shura, Robin; Siders, Rebecca A.; Dannefer, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study's purpose was to advance the process of culture change within long-term care (LTC) and assisted living settings by using participatory action research (PAR) to promote residents’ competence and nourish the culture change process with the active engagement and leadership of residents. Design and Methods: Seven unit-specific PAR groups, each consisting of 4–7 residents, 1–2 family members, and 1–3 staff, met 1 hour per week for 4 months in their nursing home or assisted living units to identify areas in need of improvement and to generate ideas for community change. PAR groups included residents with varied levels of physical and cognitive challenges. Residents were defined as visionaries with expertise based on their 24/7 experience in the facility and prior life experiences. Results: All PAR groups generated novel ideas for creative improvements and reforms in their communities and showed initiative to implement their ideas. Challenges to the process included staff participation and sustainability. Implications: PAR is a viable method to stimulate creative resident-led reform ideas and initiatives in LTC. Residents’ expertise has been overlooked within prominent culture change efforts that have developed and facilitated changes from outside-in and top-down. PAR may be incorporated productively within myriad reform efforts to engage residents’ competence. PAR has indirect positive quality of life benefits as a forum of meaningful social engagement and age integration that may transform routinized and often ageist modes of relationships within LTC. PMID:21163911

  12. Residents' self-reported quality of life in long-term care facilities in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kehyayan, Vahe; Hirdes, John P; Tyas, Suzanne L; Stolee, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Quality of life (QoL) of long-term care (LTC) facility residents is an important outcome of care. This cross-sectional, descriptive study examined the self-reported QoL of LTC facility residents in Canada using the interRAI Self-Report Nursing Home Quality of Life Survey instrument. A secondary purpose was to test the instrument's psychometric properties. Psychometric testing of the instrument supported its reliability and its convergent and content validity for assessing the residents' QoL. Findings showed that residents rated positively several aspects of their life, such as having privacy during visits (76.9%) and staff's being honest with them (73.6%). Residents gave lower ratings to other aspects such as autonomy, staff-resident bonding, and personal relationships. The findings point to gaps between facility philosophies of care and their translation into a care environment where care is truly resident-directed. Moreover, the findings have potential implications for resident care planning, facility programming, social policy development, and future research.

  13. Primary Care Clinician Expectations Regarding Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Melinda M.; Bond, Lynne A.; Howard, Alan; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Expectations regarding aging (ERA) in community-dwelling older adults are associated with personal health behaviors and health resource usage. Clinicians' age expectations likely influence patients' expectations and care delivery patterns; yet, limited research has explored clinicians' age expectations. The Expectations Regarding Aging…

  14. Psychiatric training in primary care medicine residency programs. A national survey.

    PubMed

    Chin, H P; Guillermo, G; Prakken, S; Eisendrath, S

    2000-01-01

    The authors conducted a national survey to investigate the current status of psychiatric training in primary care/internal medicine residencies. Fifty-four residency training directors completed and returned the survey. The survey results show that an average of 99 hours (69.5 hours clinical plus 29.8 hours didactics) is devoted to psychiatric training during the 3 years of primary care/internal medicine residency training. Responding residency training directors indicated that psychiatric training is important (an average of 7 out of 10 on a 10-point rating scale), and 63% of respondents indicated that more training in psychiatry is needed.

  15. Effect of an Innovative Medicare Managed Care Program on the Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Flood, Shannon; Bershadsky, Boris; Keckhafer, Gail

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to assess the quality of care provided by an innovative Medicare+Choice HMO targeted specifically at nursing home residents and employing nurse practitioners to provide additional primary care over and above that provided by physicians. The underlying premise of the Evercare approach is that the additional primary care will…

  16. The needs, current knowledge, and attitudes of care staff toward the implementation of palliative care in old age homes.

    PubMed

    Lo, Raymond S K; Kwan, Bonnie H F; Lau, Kay P K; Kwan, Cecilia W M; Lam, L M; Woo, Jean

    2010-06-01

    This study aims to explore in depth the needs, current knowledge, and attitudes of all ranks of old age home staff. A large-scale qualitative study with 13 semistructured focus groups was conducted in Hong Kong. Key themes were extracted by framework analysis. Three major themes were extracted, including role as a service provider, current knowledge, and attitude toward palliative care. There was a marked difference in familiarity with the concept of ''palliative care'' between different groups of staff, yet both shared the motivation for enhancement. The biggest concerns for the staff were elderly residents' readiness to accept palliative care, manpower, and resources. Care staff, regardless of rank, seemed to welcome and be ready to adopt a palliative care approach in caring for old age home residents, though not without worries and concerns. PMID:19959840

  17. The Learners' Perceptions Survey—Primary Care: Assessing Resident Perceptions of Internal Medicine Continuity Clinics and Patient-Centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, John M.; Chang, Barbara K.; Gilman, Stuart C.; Keitz, Sheri A.; Kaminetzky, Catherine P.; Aron, David C.; Baz, Sam; Cannon, Grant W.; Zeiss, Robert A.; Holland, Gloria J.; Kashner, T. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2010, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) implemented a national patient-centered care initiative that organized primary care into interdisciplinary teams of health care professionals to provide patient-centered, continuous, and coordinated care. Objective We assessed the discriminate validity of the Learners' Perceptions Survey—Primary Care (LPS-PC), a tool designed to measure residents' perceptions about their primary and patient-centered care experiences. Methods Between October 2010 and June 2011, the LPS-PC was administered to Loma Linda University Medical Center internal medicine residents assigned to continuity clinics at the VA Loma Linda Healthcare System (VALLHCS), a university setting, or the county hospital. Adjusted differences in satisfaction ratings across settings and over domains (patient- and family-centered care, faculty and preceptors, learning, clinical, work and physical environments, and personal experience) were computed using a generalized linear model. Results Our response rate was 86% (77 of 90). Residents were more satisfied with patient- and family-centered care at the VALLHCS than at either the university or county (P < .001). However, faculty and preceptors (odds ratio [OR]  =  1.53), physical (OR  =  1.29), and learning (OR  =  1.28) environments had more impact on overall resident satisfaction than patient- and family-centered care (OR  =  1.08). Conclusions The LPS-PC demonstrated discriminate validity to assess residents' perceptions of their patient-centered clinical training experience across outpatient primary care settings at an internal medicine residency program. The largest difference in scores was the patient- and family-centered care domain, in which residents rated the VALLHCS much higher than the university or county sites. PMID:24455006

  18. Older Residents' Perspectives of Long-Term Care Facilities in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Junqiao; Cao, Yuling; Jia, Shoumei; Wu, Bei

    2016-08-01

    China's formal long-term care (LTC) system is in its developmental stage due to lack of standardized health assessments for resident admission, limited government funding, an acute shortage of qualified staff at all levels, and regional disparities in quality of care. Relocation to LTC facilities changes the lives of older adults because they have to leave behind their homes and previous social networks. The current study aimed to provide an in-depth exploration of 25 older adult residents' lives in four LTC facilities in China. A conventional content analysis approach was used to interpret participant interviews. Residents experienced losses and gains from residential life. Three themes emerged: (a) influences of cultural beliefs, (b) basic care needs fulfilled in LTC facilities, and (c) lack of quality care in LTC facilities. Findings show that residents' basic needs were met in Chinese LTC facilities, but there is room for improvement in delivering quality care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(8), 34-43.].

  19. Medical students' attitudes toward underserved populations: changing associations with choice of primary care versus non-primary care residency.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Sharon; Timm, Craig; Serna, Lisa; Solan, Brian; Kalishman, Summers

    2010-05-01

    The number of medical students entering primary care residencies continues to decrease. The association between student attitudes toward underserved populations and residency choice has received little attention even though primary care physicians see a larger proportion of underserved patients than most other specialists. We evaluated attitudes toward underserved populations in 826 medical students using a standardized survey, and used logistic regression to assess the effect of attitudes, along with other variables, on selection of a primary care residency. We compared results between two groups defined by year of entry to medical school (1993-99 and 2000-05) to determine whether associations differed by time period. Students' attitudes regarding professional responsibility toward underserved populations remained high over the study period; however, there was a statistically. significant association between positive attitudes and primary care residency in the early cohort only. This association was not found in the more recent group.

  20. Aging, health and place in residential care facilities in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yang; Rosenberg, Mark W; Wang, Wuyi; Yang, Linsheng; Li, Hairong

    2011-02-01

    In recent years, residential care has become an alternative option for elder care in Beijing, China. Little is known, however, about the well-being of elderly residents and the relationship between their health and living in residential care facilities (RCFs). Hence this research aims to understand the well-being of elderly residents in RCFs and how the environment of RCFs affects elderly people's everyday activities and health. The concepts of therapeutic landscapes, active aging, and well-being contribute to understanding the relationships among aging, health, and environment within RCF settings. Qualitative data from 46 in-depth semi-structured interviews with RCF managers, elderly residents, and family members in Beijing were transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method. The results show that most of the elderly residents are satisfied with their lives in RCFs, but a few of them feel isolated and depressed after their relocation. Each RCF, as a place with its unique physical and social environment, has a significant influence on the elderly residents' physical and psychological well-being. Individual factors such as characteristics of elderly residents, their attitudes on aging and residential care, and family support also play important roles in their adaptation and well-being after relocation from home to RCFs. Although this study focuses on residential care at the local level, it sheds light on future research on geographical and socio-cultural meanings of elder care at local, regional, and national levels in China. PMID:21109338

  1. Educational Implications of Nurse Practitioner Students and Medical Residents' Attitudes toward Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breer, M. Lynn; Pohl, Joanne M.; Stommel, Manfred; Barkauskas, Violet H.; Schillo, Barbara; Oakley, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Attitudes toward managed care of 431 medical residents and 153 advanced practice nursing students were compared. Medical students were more likely to agree that managed care emphasizes cost over quality and threatens autonomy. Nursing students were more likely to agree that it encourages preventive care. Medical students were less enthusiastic…

  2. What's the diagnosis? Organisational culture and palliative care delivery in residential aged care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rosemary; Boyd, Michal; Foster, Sue; Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn

    2016-07-01

    Organisational culture has been shown to impact on resident outcomes in residential aged care (RAC). This is particularly important given the growing number of residents with high palliative care needs. The study described herein (conducted from January 2013 to March 2014) examined survey results from a convenience sample of 46 managers, alongside interviews with a purposively selected sample of 23 bereaved family members in order to explore the perceptions of organisational culture within New Zealand RAC facilities in one large urban District Health Board. Results of the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) completed by managers indicated a preference for a 'Clan' and the structured 'Hierarchy' culture. Bereaved family interviews emphasised both positive and negative aspects of communication, leadership and teamwork, and relationship with residents. Study results from both managers' OCAI survey scores and next of kin interviews indicate that while the RAC facilities are culturally oriented towards providing quality care for residents, they may face barriers to adopting organisational processes supportive of this goal.

  3. What's the diagnosis? Organisational culture and palliative care delivery in residential aged care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rosemary; Boyd, Michal; Foster, Sue; Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn

    2016-07-01

    Organisational culture has been shown to impact on resident outcomes in residential aged care (RAC). This is particularly important given the growing number of residents with high palliative care needs. The study described herein (conducted from January 2013 to March 2014) examined survey results from a convenience sample of 46 managers, alongside interviews with a purposively selected sample of 23 bereaved family members in order to explore the perceptions of organisational culture within New Zealand RAC facilities in one large urban District Health Board. Results of the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) completed by managers indicated a preference for a 'Clan' and the structured 'Hierarchy' culture. Bereaved family interviews emphasised both positive and negative aspects of communication, leadership and teamwork, and relationship with residents. Study results from both managers' OCAI survey scores and next of kin interviews indicate that while the RAC facilities are culturally oriented towards providing quality care for residents, they may face barriers to adopting organisational processes supportive of this goal. PMID:25808936

  4. Perception of quality of care among residents of public nursing-homes in Spain: a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The quality of care in nursing homes is weakly defined, and has traditionally focused on quantify nursing homes outputs and on comparison of nursing homes’ resources. Rarely the point of view of clients has been taken into account. The aim of this study was to ascertain what means “quality of care” for residents of nursing homes. Methods Grounded theory was used to design and analyze a qualitative study based on in-depth interviews with a theoretical sampling including 20 persons aged over 65 years with no cognitive impairment and eight proxy informants of residents with cognitive impairment, institutionalized at a public nursing home in Spain. Results Our analysis revealed that participants perceived the quality of care in two ways, as aspects related to the persons providing care and as institutional aspects of the care’s process. All participants agreed that aspects related to the persons providing care was a pillar of quality, something that, in turn, embodied a series of emotional and technical professional competences. Regarding the institutional aspects of the care’s process, participants laid emphasis on round-the-clock access to health care services and on professional’s job stability. Conclusions This paper includes perspectives of the nursing homes residents, which are largely absent. Incorporating residents’ standpoints as a complement to traditional institutional criteria would furnish health providers and funding agencies with key information when it came to designing action plans and interventions aimed at achieving excellence in health care. PMID:23809066

  5. Effects of a psycho-educational intervention on direct care workers' communicative behaviors with residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana; Marques, Alda; Sousa, Liliana; Nolan, Mike; Figueiredo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a person-centered care-based psycho-educational intervention on direct care workers' communicative behaviors with people with dementia living in aged-care facilities. An experimental study with a pretest-posttest control-group design was conducted in four aged-care facilities. Two experimental facilities received an 8-week psycho-educational intervention aiming to develop workers' knowledge about dementia, person-centered care competences, and tools for stress management. Control facilities received education only, with no support to deal with stress. In total, 332 morning care sessions, involving 56 direct care workers (female, mean age 44.72 ± 9.02 years), were video-recorded before and 2 weeks after the intervention. The frequency and duration of a list of verbal and nonverbal communicative behaviors were analyzed. Within the experimental group there was a positive change from pre- to posttest on the frequency of all workers' communicative behaviors. Significant treatment effects in favor of the experimental group were obtained for the frequency of inform (p < .01, η(2)partial = 0.09) and laugh (p < .01, η(2)partial = 0.18). Differences between groups emerged mainly in nonverbal communicative behaviors. The findings suggest that a person-centered care-based psycho-educational intervention can positively affect direct care workers' communicative behaviors with residents with dementia. Further research is required to determine the extent of the benefits of this approach.

  6. The Care of Non-English Speaking Background Residents in Mainstream Nursing Homes and Hostels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkons, Rita

    A survey of 104 individuals of non-English-speaking backgrounds (NESBs) living in South Australia nursing homes and personal care homes and staff of 75 institution housing NESB residents is reported. The study's objectives was to determine the culturally-based needs of the residents and the provision of culturally appropriate services to them. The…

  7. Acting as Standardized Patients Enhances Family Medicine Residents' Self-Reported Skills in Palliative Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory…

  8. Attitudes of Medical Students and Residents toward Care of the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muangpaisan, Weerasak; Intalapapron, Somboon; Assantachai, Prasert

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this article examined attitudes toward the care of the elderly between and among medical students and residents in training. Data were collected with a 16-item attitude questionnaire. Participants were medical students in their introduction period (prior to clinical experience) and residents of the Department of Internal…

  9. Effectiveness of Advanced Illness Care Teams for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Dennis G.; Toseland, Ronald W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of advanced illness care teams (AICTs) for nursing home residents with advanced dementia. The AICTs used a holistic approach that focused on four domains: (1) medical, (2) meaningful activities, (3) psychological, and (4) behavioral. The authors recruited 118 residents in two nursing homes for this study and…

  10. Culture Change in Long-Term Care: Participatory Action Research and the Role of the Resident

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shura, Robin; Siders, Rebecca A.; Dannefer, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study's purpose was to advance the process of culture change within long-term care (LTC) and assisted living settings by using participatory action research (PAR) to promote residents' competence and nourish the culture change process with the active engagement and leadership of residents. Design and Methods: Seven unit-specific PAR…

  11. Exploring the Quality of Life of Younger Residents Living in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Hay, Kara; Chaudhury, Habib

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the characteristics of "quality of life" of younger residents in long-term care facilities. This multimethod study employed in-depth interviews with younger residents, focus groups with staff members and interviews with management team members at two care facilities in British Columbia, Canada. Data analysis revealed three themes: (a) a new chapter in life, (b) experiencing quality of life, and (c) nature of social life. These themes highlight the characteristics of younger residents' quality of life and provide insights into the salient contributing factors. Findings of this study are useful in better understanding aspects of younger residents' quality of life and their psychosocial needs and consequently can guide decision making to provide an appropriate care environment for this population segment in long-term care settings.

  12. Who's Who in School-Age Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2006-01-01

    In the field of school-age care, there are three organizations that have been instrumental in the development of the profession: (1) School-Age "NOTES"; (2) National Institute on Out-of-School Time; and (3) National AfterSchool Association. In recent years many new players have been effective in promoting the field. In this article, the author…

  13. Autonomy, Choice, Patient-Centered Care, and Hip Protectors: The Experience of Residents and Staff in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Sims-Gould, Joanie; McKay, Heather A.; Feldman, Fabio; Scott, Victoria; Robinovitch, Stephen N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine long-term care (LTC) resident and staff perceptions on the decision to use hip protectors and identify the factors that influence attitudes toward hip protector use. Staff (N = 39) and residents (N = 27) at two residential care facilities in British Columbia, Canada were invited to participate in focus groups on fall prevention and hip protector use. A total of 11 focus groups were conducted. Using framework analysis results show that residents and staff shared concerns on aesthetic and comfort issues with hip protectors. Residents also generally felt they did not need, or want to use, hip protectors. However, they also had desire to be cooperative within the LTC environment. Staff underscored their role in advocating for hip protector use and their desire to protect residents from harm. Practice considerations for facilities wishing to promote hip protectors within a patient centered framework are highlighted. PMID:24652886

  14. Advancing educational continuity in primary care residencies: an opportunity for patient-centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2015-05-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce. PMID:25470307

  15. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceived Ability to Direct Patient Care: Impact of Gender and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Christie; Goetz, Sarah; Ward, Earlise

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Physicians are expected to effect patient care by giving orders to members of a healthcare team. Because women are socialized to be less directive than men, the assertive behavior required of new physicians may be experienced differently by male and female residents. We sought to explore the effects of gender and year of training on residents' experiences and perceived ability to direct patient care. Methods This was a mixed-methods, cross-sectional, descriptive study employing a quantitative written survey and qualitative interviews among internal medicine residents at an academic health center. Measurements included questionnaires and interviews about stress, assertiveness, and personal factors that influence their effectiveness in directing patient care. Analyses examined differences by gender and year of training. Results One hundred residents were invited to participate; 65 returned questionnaires, and 16 of these residents were interviewed. Compared with male residents, female residents selected less assertive behaviors for clinical scenarios (p = 0.047) and were more likely to perceive gender as inhibiting their ability to influence patient care (p < 0.01). Stress associated with being assertive varied more with experience than gender. Interviews corroborated these findings and supported the complexity of gender norms for behavior for female residents in a directive leadership position. Conclusions When compared with male peers, female residents reported more gender issues in residency and chose less assertive behaviors in clinical scenarios. Experience mitigated some gender differences. Our findings suggest that discussion of the existing research on prescriptive gender norms for behavior and leadership may be warranted in resident orientation. PMID:19049356

  16. The Impact of a Resident Communication Skills Curriculum on Patients' Experiences of Care.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John D; Ku, Cindy; Wong, Vanessa; Fisher, Lauren J; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon L; Ott, Qi; Shahul, Sajid; Bose, Ruma; Tibbles, Carrie; Jones, Stephanie B

    2016-02-01

    Despite the high impact of lapses in communication skills on patient care, these skills are often not explicitly taught in residency training programs. We implemented a simulation and web-based curriculum in communication for anesthesia residents and used a patient survey adapted from the Four Habits Coding Scheme to detect changes in patient feedback on residents' communication skills after the curricular intervention. Postintervention mean ratings of residents for the overall survey were higher than preintervention mean ratings. Future research will focus on assessing the curriculum's effectiveness and exploring the generalizability of the survey and curriculum.

  17. Libraries of life: using life history books with depressed care home residents.

    PubMed

    Plastow, Nicola Ann

    2006-01-01

    Depression is a common, and often undetected, psychiatric disorder in geriatric care home residents. Reminiscence, an independent nursing therapy used by a variety of health and social care professionals, can prevent or reduce depression. This practice development project explored the use of reminiscence life history books as an interpersonal therapeutic tool with 3 depressed care-home residents living in residential care and skilled nursing facilities. The process of choosing to produce a book, assessment of capabilities, and methods of construction are described using 3 illustrative case studies. Three themes emerged: reviewing the past, accepting the present, and dreaming of an alternative future. This project demonstrated that life history books, tailored to individual needs and abilities, can facilitate reminiscence and reduce depression by increasing social interaction. The benefits to residents, their families, and care staff are discussed and the relevance to nursing practice highlighted.

  18. Effects of Namaste Care on residents who do not benefit from usual activities.

    PubMed

    Simard, Joyce; Volicer, Ladislav

    2010-02-01

    Namaste Care is a program designed to offer meaningful activities to nursing home residents with advanced dementia or those who cannot be engaged in traditional activities. This 7-day-a-week program is staffed by specially trained nursing assistants who provide activities of daily living in an unhurried manner, with a ''loving touch'' approach to care. The program takes place in a room with lowered lighting, soft music playing, and the scent of lavender. Analyses of Minimum Data Set data before the program were implemented and after residents were involved in the program for at least 30 days showed a decrease in residents' withdrawal, social interaction, delirium indicators, and trend for decreased agitation. Namaste Care helps families feel that in spite of the many losses experienced because of the disease process, something special can still help their loved one to feel comforted, cared for, and cared about in a unique loving environment.

  19. [The availability of particular types of medical social care to persons of elderly and senile age].

    PubMed

    Shigabutdinov, A F

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of sociological survey of respondents of elderly and senile age living with their families or in senior centers. The comparative analysis was applied to availability of particular types of medical social care of contingent of interest depending on place of its residence. The age and ability of self-support of respondents were taken into account.

  20. Health-promoting residential aged care: a pilot project in Austria.

    PubMed

    Krajic, Karl; Cichocki, Martin; Quehenberger, Viktoria

    2015-09-01

    Long-term care for the aged is an area that has not been in the focus of health promotion so far. The paper describes context, concept and project plan of a 2-year pilot project of comprehensive health-promoting setting development in residential aged care in Austria, and provides an overview over main experiences and results. Austria's most relevant health promotion agencies, a specialized scientific institute and Austria's largest provider of aged care acted as partners. The project aimed at developing elements of a comprehensive approach, but also providing evidence for the effectiveness of health promotion. Therefore, the project combined an organizational development approach with a scientific, randomized controlled study on mobility enhancement for residents. A comprehensive settings approach turned out acceptable for the main stakeholders of aged care (owners and management, staff, residents and residents' relatives). Strategy development, based on a systematic needs assessment, found staff health to be of special interest for the organization (ergonomics, workability over life course), and residents' relatives, got more attention. The mobility study was able to achieve positive results on occupational performance, concerning quality-of-life indicators and reached also formerly inactive groups. After the end of the project, health promotion is still on the agenda of the organization; further developments will be monitored. Good support from the policy level and well-established networking between the aged care provider, health promotion agencies and a network for health promotion in health care seems to have been an important resource for success.

  1. Improving kidney care for residents in nursing facilities: a national model.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    The RRC Staff Assisted Home Hemodialysis Program started in September 2013 with the target of improving care for the frail elderly residents in skilled facilities by offering hemodialysis in their home setting. Residents all receive short time, frequent dialysis. The residents no longer need to be transported to a local dialysis center three times per week in all types of weather and subject to long waits by the transport company. In addition, Medicare/Medicaid save significant dollars on transportation expenses. Residents needing rehabilitation services can receive their therapy while their dialysis schedule is adjusted around the resident's therapy. Residents no longer miss meals and medications or family visits. Collaboration between RRC and the skilled facility is patient centric whereby the care of each patient is consistent and individualized. The most meaningful measure of the success of this program is the residents themselves. They have self-reported how much better they feel with more energy. The residents can increase their socialization activities within the skilled facility. The dietitians report that the residents are eating better because there are fewer restrictions on foods and fluids. PMID:26983182

  2. Criminal offenders residing in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Bledsoe, Wes

    2006-01-01

    As a result of its investigative analysis, A Perfect Cause is attempting to heighten awareness of this significant issue confronting the disabled and elderly living in America's long-term facilities. This includes confronting the many related myths such as the belief that elderly offenders and disabled and incapacitated offenders do not pose a threat, that child molesters do not pose a threat to disabled adults or elderly residents, that only sex offenders pose a threat, and that nursing homes are not capable of housing criminal offenders with nonoffenders. Additional awareness and investigation is urgently needed to facilitate policy changes at all levels. Such action will help ensure the safety of facility residents who are currently at ongoing risk.

  3. Story sharing: enhancing nurse aide-resident relationships in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Heliker, Diane; Nguyen, Hoang Thanh

    2010-10-01

    National surveys often report nursing home deficiencies related to the preservation of residents' dignity and respectful care. Many nurse aides (NAs), who provide the majority of personal care, are unprepared to engage in empathic and meaningful relationships with residents. This article reports the findings of a pilot mixed method study comparing two interventions, Story Sharing (StS) and Communication Skills, on NA levels of mutuality, empathy, job attitude, and self-efficacy and resident levels of empathy and perceived caring behaviors. A quasi-experimental/interpretive phenomenological design was used. Total Mutuality and subscale (Shared Values, Affective Closeness, Shared Pleasurable Activities, Reciprocity) scores were significantly higher in the StS NA groups only, as were postintervention Empathy scores. Other trends are reported as well. StS is one approach toward helping NH staff and residents understand, respect, and connect with one another. PMID:20429492

  4. Medicaid claims history of Florida long-term care facility residents hospitalized for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Baker, J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify patterns of admission, discharge, and readmission between hospital and long-term care facility among a group of Florida long-term care facility residents with pressure ulcers whose care was paid for by Medicaid. A patient-specific, longitudinal claims history database was constructed from data provided by the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. This database was used to determine and analyze hospital admissions for pressure ulcer care among Medicaid recipients cared for in a long-term care facility. Analysis of the data determined that more than half of the Medicaid-covered long-term care facility residents who formed the target study group (54.57%) had multiple hospital admissions associated with pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcer hospital admissions amounted to a program cost of $9.9 million. PMID:8704846

  5. Primary Care of Women Aging with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Womack, Julie A.; Brandt, Cynthia A.; Justice, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    Women are living longer with HIV infection, but their life expectancy is shorter than for women in the general population. How best to manage the multiple comorbidities and polypharmacy that are common in HIV infected individuals has not been studied. This paper explores areas where the primary care of women with HIV may differ from that of aging women in the general population. We also discuss aspects of care that may not commonly be considered in those under the age of 65, specifically multimorbidity and polypharmacy. Incorporating a gerontologic approach in the care of these women may optimize outcomes until research provides more definitive answers as to how best to collaborate with women with HIV to provide them with optimal care. PMID:25782848

  6. Residence, Kinship and Social Isolation among the Aged Baganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahemow, Nina

    1979-01-01

    Investigated impact of interactions with kin on social integration in old age. A nonrandom sample of aged Baganda in Uganda was interviewed concerning perceptions of loneliness and social isolation. Results show that the majority of subjects did not view old age as a period of loneliness or isolation. (Author)

  7. Access to care among displaced Mississippi residents in FEMA travel trailer parks two years after Katrina.

    PubMed

    Shehab, Nadine; Anastario, Michael P; Lawry, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    The health care needs of Gulf Coast residents displaced by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 who remain in travel trailer parks nearly three years later have not been evaluated. We conducted a population-based assessment of the health care access of residents of these travel trailer parks in Mississippi. Our findings indicate a worsening of chronic disease, mental illness, and barriers to health care access since displacement. Meeting both the chronic disease and the mental health needs of people displaced by the hurricanes of 2005 is essential for ensuring their full recovery and that of the region.

  8. Meeting American Geriatrics Society Competencies: Are Residents Meeting Expectations for Quality Care of Older Adults?

    PubMed

    Bynum, Debra L; Wilson, Lindsay A; Ong, Thuan; Callahan, Kathryn E; Dalton, Thomas; Ohuabunwa, Ugochi

    2015-09-01

    In order to determine how often internal medicine and family medicine residents performed specific actions related to the geriatric competencies established by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) when caring for older hospitalized adults, a cross-sectional anonymous survey of residents at the University of North Carolina, University of Washington, Wake Forest University, Duke University, and Emory University was undertaken. Data on frequency of self-reported behaviors were analyzed, with comparisons made for different levels of training, institution, and program. A total of 375 residents responded for an overall response rate of 48%. Residents reported that they often do not demonstrate all of the AGS recommended core competencies when caring for older adults in the hospital setting. Residents report more frequently performing activities that are routinely integrated into hospital systems such as reviewing medication lists, working with an interdisciplinary team, evaluating for inappropriate bladder catheters, and evaluating for pressure ulcers. There were no consistent differences between institutions and only minor differences noted between Family Medicine and Internal Medicine residents. Operationalizing core competencies by integrating them into hospital systems' quality process indicators may prompt more consistent high-quality care and ensure systems support residents' competence.

  9. Meeting American Geriatrics Society Competencies: Are Residents Meeting Expectations for Quality Care of Older Adults?

    PubMed

    Bynum, Debra L; Wilson, Lindsay A; Ong, Thuan; Callahan, Kathryn E; Dalton, Thomas; Ohuabunwa, Ugochi

    2015-09-01

    In order to determine how often internal medicine and family medicine residents performed specific actions related to the geriatric competencies established by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) when caring for older hospitalized adults, a cross-sectional anonymous survey of residents at the University of North Carolina, University of Washington, Wake Forest University, Duke University, and Emory University was undertaken. Data on frequency of self-reported behaviors were analyzed, with comparisons made for different levels of training, institution, and program. A total of 375 residents responded for an overall response rate of 48%. Residents reported that they often do not demonstrate all of the AGS recommended core competencies when caring for older adults in the hospital setting. Residents report more frequently performing activities that are routinely integrated into hospital systems such as reviewing medication lists, working with an interdisciplinary team, evaluating for inappropriate bladder catheters, and evaluating for pressure ulcers. There were no consistent differences between institutions and only minor differences noted between Family Medicine and Internal Medicine residents. Operationalizing core competencies by integrating them into hospital systems' quality process indicators may prompt more consistent high-quality care and ensure systems support residents' competence. PMID:26313811

  10. Experiences in end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit: A survey of resident physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Zubair Umer; Muhammed, Fazil; Singh, Charu; Sudhakar, Abish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The practice of intensive care includes withholding and withdrawal of care, when appropriate, and the goals of care change around this time to comfort and palliation. We decided to survey the attitudes, training, and skills of intensive care residents in relation to end-of-life (EoL) care. All residents at our institute who has worked for at least a month in an adult Intensive Care Unit were invited to participate. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Ethics Committee approval, a Likert-scale questionnaire, divided into five composite measures of EoL skills including training and attitude, was handed over to individual residents and completed data were anonymized. Frequency and descriptive analysis was performed for the demographic variables. Central tendency, variability, and reliability were examined for the five composite measures. Scale internal consistency was checked by Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Multivariate forward conditional regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of demographic data or EoL experience to composite measures. Results: Of the 170 eligible residents, we received 120 (70.5%) responses. Conclusions: Internal medicine residents have more experience in caring for dying patients and conducting EoL discussions. Even though majority of participants reported that they are comfortable with the concept of EoL care, this does not always reflect the actual practice in the hospital. There is a need for further training in skills around EoL care. As this is a self-assessment survey, the specific measures of attitudes and skills in EoL are poorly reflected, indicating a need for further research. PMID:27630457

  11. Experiences in end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit: A survey of resident physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Zubair Umer; Muhammed, Fazil; Singh, Charu; Sudhakar, Abish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The practice of intensive care includes withholding and withdrawal of care, when appropriate, and the goals of care change around this time to comfort and palliation. We decided to survey the attitudes, training, and skills of intensive care residents in relation to end-of-life (EoL) care. All residents at our institute who has worked for at least a month in an adult Intensive Care Unit were invited to participate. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Ethics Committee approval, a Likert-scale questionnaire, divided into five composite measures of EoL skills including training and attitude, was handed over to individual residents and completed data were anonymized. Frequency and descriptive analysis was performed for the demographic variables. Central tendency, variability, and reliability were examined for the five composite measures. Scale internal consistency was checked by Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Multivariate forward conditional regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of demographic data or EoL experience to composite measures. Results: Of the 170 eligible residents, we received 120 (70.5%) responses. Conclusions: Internal medicine residents have more experience in caring for dying patients and conducting EoL discussions. Even though majority of participants reported that they are comfortable with the concept of EoL care, this does not always reflect the actual practice in the hospital. There is a need for further training in skills around EoL care. As this is a self-assessment survey, the specific measures of attitudes and skills in EoL are poorly reflected, indicating a need for further research.

  12. Health Insurance Status and the Care of Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeld, Keith S.; Grabowski, David C.; Caudry, Daryl J.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Nursing home residents with advanced dementia commonly experience burdensome and costly hospitalizations that may not extend survival or improve the quality of life. Fragmentation in health care has contributed to poor coordination of care for acutely ill nursing home residents. Objective To compare patterns of care and quality outcomes for nursing home residents with advanced dementia covered by managed care to those covered by traditional fee-for-service Medicare. Design The Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advanced Dementia at the End-of-Life (CASCADE) study was a prospective cohort study that followed 323 nursing home residents over eighteen months to better understand the course of advanced dementia at or near the end of life. CASCADE and Medicare data were linked to determine the health insurance status of study participants. Setting Twenty-two nursing homes in the Boston area. Participants Nursing home residents with advanced dementia and their health care proxies. Exposure The health insurance status of the resident, either managed care or traditional fee-for-service. Main Outcomes The outcomes included survival, symptoms related to comfort, treatment of pain and dyspnea, presence of pressure ulcers, presence of a DNH order, treatment for pneumonia, hospital transfer (hospitalization or emergency room visit) for an acute illness, hospice referral, primary care visits, and family satisfaction with care. Results Residents enrolled in managed care (n=133) were more likely to have do-not-hospitalize orders compared to those in traditional Medicare fee-for service (n=158) (64% vs. 51%, p-value < 0.05), were less likely to be transferred to the hospital for acute illness (4% vs. 16%, p-value < 0.05), had more primary care visits per 90 days (4.8±2.6 vs. 4.2±5.0, p-value < 0.05), and had more nurse practitioner visits (3.0±2.1 vs. 0.8±2.6, p-value < 0.05). Survival, comfort, and other treatment outcomes did not differ across groups

  13. Resident training in point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sheldon; Howanitz, Peter J

    2007-06-01

    Although central laboratory testing has been the norm for the last few decades and point-of-care testing (POCT) is considered an emerging area, physicians were performing POCT long before the existence of central laboratory testing. As medical directors of POCT programs, pathologists need the basic knowledge and skills associated with directing laboratory-based testing programs as well as additional knowledge and skills about testing at the point of care. Although the essential elements of quality testing are the same for laboratory-based and POCT, the enormous variety of settings, technologies, and workers involved present unique challenges. PMID:17556092

  14. Resident training in point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sheldon; Howanitz, Peter J

    2007-06-01

    Although central laboratory testing has been the norm for the last few decades and point-of-care testing (POCT) is considered an emerging area, physicians were performing POCT long before the existence of central laboratory testing. As medical directors of POCT programs, pathologists need the basic knowledge and skills associated with directing laboratory-based testing programs as well as additional knowledge and skills about testing at the point of care. Although the essential elements of quality testing are the same for laboratory-based and POCT, the enormous variety of settings, technologies, and workers involved present unique challenges.

  15. The relationship between building design and residents' quality of life in extra care housing schemes.

    PubMed

    Orrell, Alison; McKee, Kevin; Torrington, Judith; Barnes, Sarah; Darton, Robin; Netten, Ann; Lewis, Alan

    2013-05-01

    Well-designed housing is recognised as being an important factor in promoting a good quality of life. Specialised housing models incorporating care services, such as extra care housing (ECH) schemes are seen as enabling older people to maintain a good quality of life despite increasing health problems that can accompany ageing. Despite the variation in ECH building design little is known about the impact of ECH building design on the quality of life of building users. The evaluation of older people's living environments (EVOLVE) study collected cross-sectional data on building design and quality of life in 23 ECH schemes in England, UK. Residents' quality of life was assessed using the schedule for the evaluation of individual quality of life-direct weighting (SEIQoL-DW) and on the four domains of control, autonomy, self-realisation and pleasure on the CASP-19. Building design was measured on 12 user-related domains by means of a new tool; the EVOLVE tool. Using multilevel linear regression, significant associations were found between several aspects of building design and quality of life. Furthermore, there was evidence that the relationship between building design and quality of life was partly mediated by the dependency of participants and scheme size (number of living units). Our findings suggest that good quality building design in ECH can support the quality of life of residents, but that designing features that support the needs of both relatively independent and frail users is problematic, with the needs of highly dependent users not currently supported as well as could be hoped by ECH schemes.

  16. Provision of care by medical residents and the impact on quality.

    PubMed

    Llopis Pastor, Estefanía; Pérez Guzmán, Estibaliz; Ávila Martínez, Regulo; Villena Garrido, Maria Victoria; Sobradillo Ecenarro, Patricia

    2015-10-01

    The quality of care received by patients is a basic element of modern medicine. Medical residents or interns are essential within the healthcare system, but their lack of experience can raise concerns about the quality of care given. A registrar or specialist has greater knowledge and skills, while a resident has greater motivation and enthusiasm. The aim of training programs is to prepare residents to provide high quality care. This requires close supervision that seems to be lacking, with the consequent impact on both healthcare quality and academic results. The so-called "July effect" refers to the diminished quality of care during the summer months when resident physicians switch over. The results of studies analysing this effect vary widely, but the loss of efficacy during these months does seem to be real. Pulmonology is one of medical specialties that generates the least demand for internships and residencies, but it is impossible to determine if this affects the quality of care. The high prevalence of respiratory diseases and the latest diagnostic and therapeutic advances may mean that this situation will change in coming years. PMID:25910550

  17. Provision of care by medical residents and the impact on quality.

    PubMed

    Llopis Pastor, Estefanía; Pérez Guzmán, Estibaliz; Ávila Martínez, Regulo; Villena Garrido, Maria Victoria; Sobradillo Ecenarro, Patricia

    2015-10-01

    The quality of care received by patients is a basic element of modern medicine. Medical residents or interns are essential within the healthcare system, but their lack of experience can raise concerns about the quality of care given. A registrar or specialist has greater knowledge and skills, while a resident has greater motivation and enthusiasm. The aim of training programs is to prepare residents to provide high quality care. This requires close supervision that seems to be lacking, with the consequent impact on both healthcare quality and academic results. The so-called "July effect" refers to the diminished quality of care during the summer months when resident physicians switch over. The results of studies analysing this effect vary widely, but the loss of efficacy during these months does seem to be real. Pulmonology is one of medical specialties that generates the least demand for internships and residencies, but it is impossible to determine if this affects the quality of care. The high prevalence of respiratory diseases and the latest diagnostic and therapeutic advances may mean that this situation will change in coming years.

  18. Supporting Children's Transition to School Age Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2016-01-01

    While a great deal of research has focused on children's experiences as they start school, less attention has been directed to their experiences--and those of their families and educators--as they start school age care. This paper draws from a recent research project investigating practices that promote positive transitions to school and school…

  19. An Agenda for Residency Training in Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Kurt; Buchsbaum, David

    1984-01-01

    Some of the differences between in-hospital and ambulatory medicine and their implications for the teaching and practice of ambulatory care are explored. The availability of time, the role of patient cooperation, and the decision-making process differ in the two settings. (MLW)

  20. Reciprocity of service learning among students and paired residents in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Huei-Lih; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Tu, Chin-Tang; Chen, Shiue; Chang, Su-Hsien

    2014-05-01

    Many intergenerational service learning projects have been designed for service providers and recipients, few studies have analyzed the providers and recipients of such projects in terms of caring behavior. In accordance with the Taiwan Ministry of Education initiative to develop curricular service learning, a service learning project was initiated during a nursing school course before the students performed their clinical practicum. The aim of this mixed method design was to report the development of an intergenerational service learning project and to test its effects both on nursing students paired with residents and residents of facilities. A pre-and post-test with non-randomized control group design was used to evaluate the effects of the project on caring perceived by the residents, and a one-group pre- and post-test design was used to test its effects among nursing students. The analysis included valid questionnaires received from 59 eligible residents and 210 nursing stu`dents. The 20-hour project included pre-service training, service, and an end-of-project presentation. At post-test, the residents showed that perceived caring significantly differed between the intervention group and the control group (F=8.99; p=.004). Paired t test analysis of nursing students also showed significant increases in both caring and attitude scores after the project (t=8.56; p=.000; t=6.35; p=.000). The project significantly affected the caring perceived by the residents and the achievements of the junior nursing students. This experimental study provides information of interest to nursing educators, long-term care administrators, and researchers in elderly care.

  1. Pediatric Residents' Perspective on Family-Clinician Discordance in Primary Care: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Connor, Katherine A; Fenick, Ada M

    2016-01-01

    The engagement of families in health maintenance is associated with better child health outcomes, but demographic discordance between families and clinicians may be a barrier to family engagement. Using a longitudinal qualitative study design, we conducted 15 semi-structured interviews with five pediatric residents who elected to facilitate group well child care (GWCC). Four themes describing residents' perceptions of the role of discordance in family-clinician engagement include: 1) discordance was not a barrier; 2) discordance leads to a lack of engagement and trust; 3) residents transcended discordance in GWCC because either GWCC led residents to change their communication techniques or because, with GWCC, parents have concordant adults in the room; and 4) the education residents obtained in GWCC allowed them to empathize with the families' health-related decisions. Finding ways in which pediatric providers can improve skills in family engagement may be an important step in decreasing health inequities.

  2. Pediatric Residents' Perspective on Family-Clinician Discordance in Primary Care: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Connor, Katherine A; Fenick, Ada M

    2016-01-01

    The engagement of families in health maintenance is associated with better child health outcomes, but demographic discordance between families and clinicians may be a barrier to family engagement. Using a longitudinal qualitative study design, we conducted 15 semi-structured interviews with five pediatric residents who elected to facilitate group well child care (GWCC). Four themes describing residents' perceptions of the role of discordance in family-clinician engagement include: 1) discordance was not a barrier; 2) discordance leads to a lack of engagement and trust; 3) residents transcended discordance in GWCC because either GWCC led residents to change their communication techniques or because, with GWCC, parents have concordant adults in the room; and 4) the education residents obtained in GWCC allowed them to empathize with the families' health-related decisions. Finding ways in which pediatric providers can improve skills in family engagement may be an important step in decreasing health inequities. PMID:27524749

  3. Quality of care in family practice: does residency training make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Borgiel, A E; Williams, J I; Bass, M J; Dunn, E V; Evensen, M K; Lamont, C T; MacDonald, P J; McCoy, J M; Spasoff, R A

    1989-01-01

    As the proportion of physicians who enter residency training in family practice steadily increases, so does the need to evaluate the impact of their training and postgraduate education on the quality of care in their practices. We audited the practices of 120 randomly selected family physicians in Ontario, who were separated into four groups: nonmembers of the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), members of the CFPC with no certification in family medicine, certificated members without residency training in family medicine and certificated members with residency training in family medicine. The practices were assessed according to predetermined criteria for charting, procedures in periodic health examination, quality of medical care and use of indicator drugs. Generally the scores were significantly higher for CFPC members with residency training in family medicine than for those in the other groups, nonmembers having the lowest scores. Patient questionnaires indicated no difference in satisfaction with specific aspects of care between the four groups. Self-selection into residency training and CFPC membership may account for some of the results; nevertheless, the findings support the contention that residency training in family medicine should be mandatory for family physicians. PMID:2706590

  4. Age and group residence but not maternal dominance affect dominance rank in young domestic horses.

    PubMed

    Komárková, M; Bartošová, J; Dubcová, J

    2014-11-01

    We present a study focused on those factors influencing dominance position in young horses, with emphasis on the role of the mother. Horses, as other group-living polygynous mammals, form stable linear dominance hierarchies based on agonistic interactions. Higher dominance positions are believed to be connected, in both sexes, to better condition and higher reproductive success. Many variables play a role in forming the dominant-submissive relationships between horses; however, the maternal effect on the dominance position of the offspring still remains unclear, as do the possible mechanisms of transference ("inheritance"). We hypothesized that the maternal dominance position, plus differences in suckling parameters or maternal style, may be responsible for later outcome of the offspring's dominance position, characterized by 2 variables: index of fighting success (CB); and rate of winning encounters (RW). Our study animals were 8 groups of Kladruby horses, loose-housed lactating mares with foals (n = 66 mare-foal pairs); and subsequently 4 groups of the same foals at 3 yr of age. Our results revealed the impact of age on the dominance position of the young horses (P < 0.001 for CB, and P < 0.01 for RW), and residence in the group (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, respectively); not the maternal dominance position. Older foals reached higher dominance positions, independent of the dominance position, age, or experience of the mother; therefore, we did not find support for direct inheritance of maternal rank. Nevertheless, the foals born to the same mare in 2 consecutive seasons (n = 16 mares) revealed fair repeatability in the dominance position they obtained at 3 yr of age (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.46). This suggests an important constant effect of the mother on the social success of her progeny; however, we did not find a significant effect of any of the tested variables describing maternal characteristics or maternal care. Dominance position depended

  5. Age and group residence but not maternal dominance affect dominance rank in young domestic horses.

    PubMed

    Komárková, M; Bartošová, J; Dubcová, J

    2014-11-01

    We present a study focused on those factors influencing dominance position in young horses, with emphasis on the role of the mother. Horses, as other group-living polygynous mammals, form stable linear dominance hierarchies based on agonistic interactions. Higher dominance positions are believed to be connected, in both sexes, to better condition and higher reproductive success. Many variables play a role in forming the dominant-submissive relationships between horses; however, the maternal effect on the dominance position of the offspring still remains unclear, as do the possible mechanisms of transference ("inheritance"). We hypothesized that the maternal dominance position, plus differences in suckling parameters or maternal style, may be responsible for later outcome of the offspring's dominance position, characterized by 2 variables: index of fighting success (CB); and rate of winning encounters (RW). Our study animals were 8 groups of Kladruby horses, loose-housed lactating mares with foals (n = 66 mare-foal pairs); and subsequently 4 groups of the same foals at 3 yr of age. Our results revealed the impact of age on the dominance position of the young horses (P < 0.001 for CB, and P < 0.01 for RW), and residence in the group (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, respectively); not the maternal dominance position. Older foals reached higher dominance positions, independent of the dominance position, age, or experience of the mother; therefore, we did not find support for direct inheritance of maternal rank. Nevertheless, the foals born to the same mare in 2 consecutive seasons (n = 16 mares) revealed fair repeatability in the dominance position they obtained at 3 yr of age (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.46). This suggests an important constant effect of the mother on the social success of her progeny; however, we did not find a significant effect of any of the tested variables describing maternal characteristics or maternal care. Dominance position depended

  6. Sexual incidents in an extended care unit for aged men.

    PubMed

    Szasz, G

    1983-07-01

    A survey was conducted among the nursing staff of a 400-bed extended-care unit for aged men by questionnaire to find out what patient behaviors were identified as sexual by the staff and how they reacted to these behaviors. Three types of behavior were identified as sexual and as "causing problems": sex talk (e.g., using foul language); sexual acts (e.g., touching or grabbing, exposing genitalia); and implied sexual behavior (e.g., openly reading pornographic magazines). As many as 25 per cent of the residents were thought to create such incidents. Acceptable sexual behavior identified by the staff were limited to hugging and kissing on the cheek, although their answers implied that residents could need more intimate touching and affection. The survey raised questions about the nature and causes of different types of sexual behavior in the institutionalized elderly and about the roles nursing staff, physicians, and administrators can play in recognizing individual needs while safeguarding both the residents and the staff from the consequences of unacceptable incidents. PMID:6863791

  7. Patient safety, resident well-being and continuity of care with different resident duty schedules in the intensive care unit: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Parshuram, Christopher S.; Amaral, Andre C.K.B.; Ferguson, Niall D.; Baker, G. Ross; Etchells, Edward E.; Flintoft, Virginia; Granton, John; Lingard, Lorelei; Kirpalani, Haresh; Mehta, Sangeeta; Moldofsky, Harvey; Scales, Damon C.; Stewart, Thomas E.; Willan, Andrew R.; Friedrich, Jan O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shorter resident duty periods are increasingly mandated to improve patient safety and physician well-being. However, increases in continuity-related errors may counteract the purported benefits of reducing fatigue. We evaluated the effects of 3 resident schedules in the intensive care unit (ICU) on patient safety, resident well-being and continuity of care. Methods: Residents in 2 university-affiliated ICUs were randomly assigned (in 2-month rotation-blocks from January to June 2009) to in-house overnight schedules of 24, 16 or 12 hours. The primary patient outcome was adverse events. The primary resident outcome was sleepiness, measured by the 7-point Stanford Sleepiness Scale. Secondary outcomes were patient deaths, preventable adverse events, and residents’ physical symptoms and burnout. Continuity of care and perceptions of ICU staff were also assessed. Results: We evaluated 47 (96%) of 49 residents, all 971 admissions, 5894 patient-days and 452 staff surveys. We found no effect of schedule (24-, 16- or 12-h shifts) on adverse events (81.3, 76.3 and 78.2 events per 1000 patient-days, respectively; p = 0.7) or on residents’ sleepiness in the daytime (mean rating 2.33, 2.61 and 2.30, respectively; p = 0.3) or at night (mean rating 3.06, 2.73 and 2.42, respectively; p = 0.2). Seven of 8 preventable adverse events occurred with the 12-hour schedule (p = 0.1). Mortality rates were similar for the 3 schedules. Residents’ somatic symptoms were more severe and more frequent with the 24-hour schedule (p = 0.04); however, burnout was similar across the groups. ICU staff rated residents’ knowledge and decision-making worst with the 16-hour schedule. Interpretation: Our findings do not support the purported advantages of shorter duty schedules. They also highlight the trade-offs between residents’ symptoms and multiple secondary measures of patient safety. Further delineation of this emerging signal is required before widespread system change. Trial

  8. Sustained increase in resident meal time hand hygiene through an interdisciplinary intervention engaging long-term care facility residents and staff.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Marguerite; Harris, Tony; Horn, Terancita; Midamba, Blondelle; Primes, Vickie; Sullivan, Nancy; Shuler, Rosalyn; Zabarsky, Trina F; Deshpande, Abhishek; Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2015-02-01

    Hand hygiene by patients may prevent acquisition and dissemination of health care-associated pathogens, but limited efforts have been made to engage patients in hand hygiene interventions. In a long-term care facility, we found that residents were aware of the importance of hand hygiene, but barriers, such as inaccessible products or difficult to use products, limited compliance. A dramatic and sustained improvement in meal time hand hygiene was achieved through engagement of staff and residents. PMID:25637117

  9. Family Day Care and the School-Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Michelle Seligson

    This paper provides portions of a workshop discussion at the Wheelock Conference on School-Age Child Care concerning the role of family day care for school-age children. The workshop participants included family day care providers affiliated with the day care system in the Greater Boston area, administrators of a family day care system which also…

  10. Status Report #1 on School-Age Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of issues and trends in school-age care. Topics discussed include (1) the population that needs care; (2) the providers of care; (3) challenges to providing care that relate to facility space, funding, affordability, staffing, and competition among providers; and (4) the future of school-age care. (HOD)

  11. What is Family-Centered Care for Nursing Home Residents With Advanced Dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ruth Palan; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Givens, Jane L.

    2014-01-01

    To understand family members’ perspectives on person- and family-centered end-of-life care provided to nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia, we conducted a qualitative follow-up interview with 16 respondents who had participated in an earlier prospective study, Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advance Dementia at End of Life (CASCADE). Family members of NH residents (N = 16) with advanced dementia participated in semistructured qualitative interviews that inquired about overall NH experience, communication, surrogate decision making, emotional reaction, and recommendations for improvement. Analysis identified 5 areas considered important by family members: (1) providing basic care; (2) ensuring safety and security; (3) creating a sense of belonging and attachment; (4) fostering self-esteem and self-efficacy; and (5) coming to terms with the experience. These themes can provide a framework for creating and testing strategies to meet the goal of person- and family-centered care. PMID:24085250

  12. Uninsurance, underinsurance, and health care utilization in Mexico by US border residents.

    PubMed

    Su, Dejun; Pratt, William; Stimpson, Jim P; Wong, Rebeca; Pagán, José A

    2014-08-01

    Using data from the 2008 Cross-Border Utilization of Health Care Survey, we examined the relationship between United States (US) health insurance coverage plans and the use of health care services in Mexico by US residents of the US-Mexico border region. We found immigrants were far more likely to be uninsured than their native-born counterparts (63 vs. 27.8 %). Adults without health insurance coverage were more likely to purchase medications or visit physicians in Mexico compared to insured adults. However, adults with Medicaid coverage were more likely to visit dentists in Mexico compared to uninsured adults. Improving health care access for US residents in the southwestern border region of the country will require initiatives that target not only providing coverage to the large uninsured population but also improving access to health care services for the large underinsured population.

  13. A good death for residents of long-term care: family members speak.

    PubMed

    Munn, Jean C; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2006-01-01

    Little research has been done on the topic of end-of-life care in long-term care settings to identify important themes regarding end-of-life care structures, processes, and outcomes. This study utilized data gathered in a stratified, random sample of 437 family members of residents who died in 31 nursing homes (NHs) and 199 residential care/ assisted living facilities. Structural components of care including staffing adequacy, training, and consistency as well as facility environment and size were important factors for family members interviewed. "Being there" and manner of care delivery (e.g., staff attitudes/empathy) were major elements in the process of care. These factors were mentioned more than direct care, Hospice, or resident preferences. Family members identified themes of [dying at] home and being comfortable and clean as important outcomes of care. These identified structural components, processes, and outcomes have implications for the role of social workers in these settings despite that social work support is notably absent in these findings.

  14. Creating Better School-Age Care Jobs: Model Work Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Peggy

    Built on the premise that good school-age care jobs are the cornerstone of high-quality services for school-age youth and their families, this guide presents model work standards for school-age care providers. The guide begins with a description of the strengths and challenges of the school-age care profession. The model work standards are…

  15. [Applying a creative art activity in care: report on an experience with a newly admitted resident].

    PubMed

    Wen, Hsin-Sing; Wu, Hung-Lan; Lee, Hsien-Ju

    2014-10-01

    Doing creative art has been shown to increase activity, reduce anxiety, promote confidence and self-esteem, increase sense of achievement, and facilitate participation in life activities in the elderly. This article describes a nursing experience that used creative art activities to help an elderly resident adjust to the environment and living conditions at a long-term care facility. During the care period from October 20th to December 16th, 2012, we evaluated the health problems of the resident, which included anxiety, loneliness, and low self-esteem. The creative art activity was a 30-minute intervention held 1~2 times per week for a total of 13 sessions. This article reports on the positive effects of this intervention on reducing the resident's negative emotions such as anxiety and loneliness and, in the long run, promoting self-esteem and sense of achievement.

  16. First-Year Residents' Caring, Medical Knowledge, and Clinical Judgment in Relation to Laboratory Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 36 first-year Northwestern University (Illinois) medical residents found that students' medical knowledge was a predictor of increased laboratory test use, that clinical judgment was a predictor of decreased laboratory use, and that level of caring was statistically unrelated to amount of laboratory use. (Author/MSE)

  17. Mixed Methods Research of Adult Family Care Home Residents and Informal Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanty, Guy C.; Hibel, James

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a mixed methods approach used to explore the experiences of adult family care home (AFCH) residents and informal caregivers (IC). A rationale is presented for using a mixed methods approach employing the sequential exploratory design with this poorly researched population. The unique challenges attendant to the sampling…

  18. Patient Safety Culture and the Association with Safe Resident Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kali S.; Hyer, Kathryn; Castle, Nicholas G.; Branch, Laurence G.; Andel, Ross; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Studies have shown that patient safety culture (PSC) is poorly developed in nursing homes (NHs), and, therefore, residents of NHs may be at risk of harm. Using Donabedian's Structure-Process-Outcome (SPO) model, we examined the relationships among top management's ratings of NH PSC, a process of care, and safety outcomes.…

  19. Attitudes about Cancer Medicine among Primary Care Residents and Their Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Richard R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A cancer attitude survey is analyzed that was administered to residents and faculty physicians in the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Human Oncology at the University of Wisconsin. Categories surveyed include opinions about the benefits of prevention, risk management, early detection and screening, treatment and care, and…

  20. Prevalence and impact of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities, 2011: A nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Joyce, Nina; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M; Zervou, Fainareti N; Besdine, Richard W; Mor, Vincent; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but the epidemiology of CDI in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is unknown.We performed a retrospective cohort study and used US 2011 LTCF resident data from the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims. We extracted CDI cases based on International Classification of Diseases-9 coding, and compared residents with the diagnosis of CDI to those who did not have a CDI diagnosis during their LTCF stay. We estimated CDI prevalence rates and calculated 3-month mortality rates.The study population consisted of 2,190,613 admissions (median age 82 years; interquartile range 76-88; female to male ratio 2:1; >80% whites), 45,500 of whom had a CDI diagnosis. The nationwide CDI prevalence rate was 1.85 per 100 LTCF admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83-1.87). The CDI rate was lower in the South (1.54%; 95% CI 1.51-1.57) and higher in the Northeast (2.29%; 95% CI 2.25-2.33). Older age, white race, presence of a feeding tube, unhealed pressure ulcers, end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, bowel incontinence, prior tracheostomy, chemotherapy, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently related to "high risk" for CDI. Residents with a CDI diagnosis were more likely to be admitted to an acute care hospital (40% vs 31%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be discharged to the community (46% vs 54%, P < 0.001) than those not reported with CDI during stay. Importantly, CDI was associated with higher mortality (24.7% vs 18.1%, P = 0.001).CDI is common among the elderly residents of LTCFs and is associated with significant increase in 3-month mortality. The prevalence is higher in the Northeast and risk stratification can be used in CDI prevention policies. PMID:27495022

  1. Does progressive resistance and balance exercise reduce falls in residential aged care? Randomized controlled trial protocol for the SUNBEAM program

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Jennifer; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Goodall, Stephen; Henwood, Timothy; Clemson, Lindy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Falls are common among older adults. It is reported that approximately 60% of residents of aged care facilities fall each year. This is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and a significant burden for health care providers and the health system. Among community dwelling older adults, exercise appears to be an effective countermeasure, but data are limited and inconsistent among studies in residents of aged care communities. This trial has been designed to evaluate whether the SUNBEAM program (Strength and Balance Exercise in Aged Care) reduces falls in residents of aged care facilities. Research question Is the program more effective and cost-effective than usual care for the prevention of falls? Design Single-blinded, two group, cluster randomized trial. Participants and setting 300 residents, living in 20 aged care facilities. Intervention Progressive resistance and balance training under the guidance of a physiotherapist for 6 months, then facility-guided maintenance training for 6 months. Control Usual care. Measurements Number of falls, number of fallers, quality of life, mobility, balance, fear of falling, cognitive well-being, resource use, and cost-effectiveness. Measurements will be taken at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Analysis The number of falls will be analyzed using a Poisson mixed model. A logistic mixed model will be used to analyze the number of residents who fall during the study period. Intention-to-treat analysis will be used. Discussion This study addresses a significant shortcoming in aged care research, and has potential to impact upon a substantial health care problem. Outcomes will be used to inform care providers, and guide health care policies. PMID:24591821

  2. Do gerontology nurse specialists make a difference in hospitalization of long-term care residents? Results of a randomized comparison trial.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Michal; Armstrong, Delwyn; Parker, Janet; Pilcher, Carole; Zhou, Lifeng; McKenzie-Green, Barbara; Connolly, Martin J

    2014-10-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities have highly complex care needs and quality of care is of international concern. Maintaining resident wellness through proactive assessment and early intervention is key to decreasing the need for acute hospitalization. The Residential Aged Care Integration Program (RACIP) is a quality improvement intervention to support residential aged care staff and includes on-site support, education, clinical coaching, and care coordination provided by gerontology nurse specialists (GNSs) employed by a large district health board. The effect of the outreach program was evaluated through a randomized comparison of hospitalization 1 year before and after program implementation. The sample included 29 intervention facilities (1,425 residents) and 25 comparison facilities (1,128 residents) receiving usual care. Acute hospitalization rate unexpectedly increased for both groups after program implementation, although the rate of increase was significantly less for the intervention facilities. The hospitalization rate after the intervention increased 59% for the comparison group and 16% for the intervention group (rate ratio (RR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.61-0.86, P < .001). Subgroup analysis showed a significantly lower rate change for those admitted for medical reasons for the intervention group (13% increase) than the comparison group (69% increase) (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.56-0.82, P < .001). Conversely, there was no significant difference in the RR for surgical admissions between the intervention and comparison groups (RR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.68-1.46, P = .99). The integration of GNS expertise through the RACIP intervention may be one approach to support staff to provide optimal care and potentially improve resident health. PMID:25283552

  3. Resident-to-Resident Aggression in Long-Term Care Facilities: Insights from Focus Groups of Nursing Home Residents and Staff

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Tony; Lachs, Mark S.; Bharucha, Ashok J.; Stevens, Scott M.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Nebres, Flor; Pillemer, Karl

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To more fully characterize the spectrum of RRA. DESIGN A focus group study of nursing home staff members and residents who could reliably self-report. SETTING A large urban, not-for-profit long-term care facility in New York City PARTICIPANTS 7 residents and 96 staff members from multiple clinical and non-clinical occupational groups. MEASUREMENTS 16 focus groups were conducted. Content was analyzed with nVivo 7 software for qualitative data. RESULTS 35 different types of physical, verbal and sexual RRA were described, with screaming and/or yelling being the most common. Calling out and making noise were the most frequent of 29 antecedents identified as instigating episodes of RRA. RRA was most frequent in dining and residents’ rooms, and in the afternoon, though it occurred regularly throughout the facility at all times. While no proven strategies exist to manage RRA, staff described 25 self-initiated techniques to address the issue. CONCLUSION RRA is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nursing home settings with important consequences for affected individuals and facilities. Further epidemiologic research is necessary to more fully describe the phenomenon and identify risk factors and preventative strategies. PMID:18637979

  4. Type of soap and the incidence of skin tears among residents of a long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Mason, S R

    1997-09-01

    Skin tears are common among residents of long-term care facilities. This study evaluated the effectiveness of emollient antibacterial soap compared to non-emollient antibacterial soap in improving skin quality and reducing skin tears among residents of a long-term care facility. Skin tears were monitored over 4 months: non-emollient soap in the first and third months, and emollient soap in the second and fourth months were used. Rate of skin tears per resident per month were calculated. Incident reports were monitored the first month to establish skin tear rates using non-emollient soap. Skin tears decreased with the use of emollient soap (37% and 33% decrease in months two and four, respectively) and increased with the reintroduction of non-emollient soap (43% increase in month three). Overall incidence of skin tears with the use of emollient soap was 34.8 percent lower than that of the non-emollient soap. Analysis of variance did not show statistical significance [F(1,84) = 3.108, p = .0821], but clinical significance was demonstrated by the reduced number of skin tears with the use of emollient soap. While the etiology of skin tears seems to be a problem of aging, the decrease in skin tears in this study supports the continued use of emollient soap.

  5. Service and its association with matching into a primary care residency

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, Ansab; Schaad, Douglas C; Arnold, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives There is a shortfall in the primary care workforce, and an effort is needed in learning more about what motivates students to work as generalists. There is enthusiasm about service as a potential motivator. The objective is to determine whether there is an association between high participation in service and selection of a primary care residency. Methods This is a retrospective cohort analysis. The service award was used to delineate two groups, recipients and non-recipients, with the recipients considered high service participators. This was associated with residency match data using test of proportions to examine relationships between service and selection of a primary care residency and other secondary factors. Results Of award recipients, 57.3% matched in primary care, compared to 52.8%, though this did not reach statistical significance. Service was linked with induction into Alpha Omega Alpha honor society (23.3% versus 14.6%) and induction into the Gold Humanism Honor Society (22.6%. versus 10.4%), with statistical significance. Conclusion This was an unsuccessful attempt to find a link between service and a primary care career choice, though there is a trend in the direction. The association with induction into the humanism honor society suggests that service is linked with development and/or retention of positively viewed qualities in medical students. PMID:25792861

  6. Urban–Rural Differences in Health-Care-Seeking Pattern of Residents of Abia State, Nigeria, and the Implication in the Control of NCDs

    PubMed Central

    Onyeonoro, Ugochukwu U.; Ogah, Okechukwu S.; Ukegbu, Andrew U.; Chukwuonye, Innocent I.; Madukwe, Okechukwu O.; Moses, Akhimiem O.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding the differences in care-seeking pattern is key in designing interventions aimed at improving health-care service delivery, including prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases. The aim of this study was to identify the differences and determinants of care-seeking patterns of urban and rural residents in Abia State in southeast Nigeria. METHODS This was a cross-sectional, community-based, study involving 2999 respondents aged 18 years and above. Data were collected using the modified World Health Organization’s STEPS questionnaire, including data on care seeking following the onset of illness. Descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were used to analyze care-seeking behavior and to identify differences among those seeking care in urban and rural areas. RESULTS In both urban and rural areas, patent medicine vendors (73.0%) were the most common sources of primary care following the onset of illness, while only 20.0% of the participants used formal care. Significant predictors of difference in care-seeking practices between residents in urban and rural communities were educational status, income, occupation, and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS Efforts should be made to reduce barriers to formal health-care service utilization in the state by increasing health insurance coverage, strengthening the health-care system, and increasing the role of patent medicine vendors in the formal health-care delivery system. PMID:27721654

  7. The social organization of a sedentary life for residents in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Kathleen; Rankin, Janet; Edwards, Nancy; Ploeg, Jenny; Legault, Frances

    2016-06-01

    Worldwide, the literature reports that many residents in long-term care (LTC) homes are sedentary. In Canada, personal support workers (PSWs) provide most of the direct care in LTC homes and could play a key role in promoting activity for residents. The purpose of this institutional ethnographic study was to uncover the social organization of LTC work and to discover how this organization influenced the physical activity of residents. Data were collected in two LTC homes in Ontario, Canada through participant observations with PSWs and interviews with people within and external to the homes. Findings explicate the links between meals, lifts and transfers, and the LTC standards to reveal that physical activity is considered an add-on program in the purview of physiotherapists. Some of the LTC standards which are intended to product good outcomes for residents actually disrupt the work of PSWs making it difficult for them to respond to the physical activity needs of residents. This descriptive ethnographic account is an important first step in trying to find a solution to optimize real activities of daily living into life in LTC.

  8. Outcome of community-acquired pneumonia: influence of age, residence status and antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Kothe, H; Bauer, T; Marre, R; Suttorp, N; Welte, T; Dalhoff, K

    2008-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of mortality in developed countries. There is much discrepancy in the literature regarding factors influencing the outcome in the elderly population. Data were derived from a multicentre prospective study initiated by the German Competence Network for Community-Acquired Pneumonia. Patients with community-acquired pneumonia (n = 2,647; 1,298 aged < 65 yrs and 1,349 aged > or = 65 yrs) were evaluated, of whom 72.3% were hospitalised and 27.7% treated in the community. Clinical history, residence status, course of disease and antimicrobial treatment were prospectively documented. Microbiological investigations included cultures and PCR of respiratory samples and blood cultures. Factors related to mortality were included in multivariate analyses. The overall 30-day mortality was 6.3%. Elderly patients exhibited a significantly higher mortality rate that was independently associated with the following: age; residence status; confusion, urea, respiratory frequency and blood pressure (CURB) score; comorbid conditions; and failure of initial therapy. Increasing age remained predictive of death in the elderly. Nursing home residents showed a four-fold increased mortality rate and an increased rate of gram-negative bacillary infections compared with patients dwelling in the community. The CURB score and cerebrovascular disease were confirmed as independent predictors of death in this subgroup. Age and residence status are independent risk factors for mortality after controlling for comorbid conditions and disease severity. Failure of initial therapy was the only modifiable prognostic factor.

  9. [Quality of care among older adults with diabetes mellitus: comparison between community-dwelling adults attended to by home care services and nursing home residents in Dresden].

    PubMed

    Coll-Planas, Laura; Bergmann, Antje; Schwarz, Peter; Guillén-Grima, Francisco; Schulze, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Due to changes in the age structure of the population the number of frail elderly diabetics is rising. This change is accompanied by an increase in nursing care efforts and requirements in both home care services and nursing homes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of care in the home care and nursing home setting concerning the structure, the process and the outcome quality at the institutional and patient level. This is an observational transversal study. At the institutional level a standardised questionnaire of the German Diabetes Research Institute was sent to all nursing homes (37) and home care services (88) in Dresden. At the patient level 37 homebound patients and 46 residents were recruited. A Geriatric assessment and a clinical examination were performed and a blood sample was analysed. Patients with moderate or severe cognitive impairment were excluded. The prevalence of diabetes in home care services was 27.2% and in nursing homes 36.1%. The participation rate among the institutions was 21.6% (n = 27). In 14% (n = 12) of the diabetic patients the HbA1c was above 8% (poor metabolic control) and in 24% (20) it was between 7% and 8% (regular metabolic control). 56.6% (n = 21) of the homebound elderly diabetics and 46.7% (n = 21) of the nursing home residents with diabetes were hospitalized at least once during the last 12 months. Our study showed a high prevalence of diabetes in both types of institutions in Dresden and a high hospitalisation rate of the elderly diabetics, although 62% of the patients had an optimum metabolic control. These facts indicate that the quality of care of frail elderly diabetics concerning the multimorbidity might be further improved. PMID:18269054

  10. Relationship of serum TCDD concentrations and age at exposure of female residents of Seveso, Italy.

    PubMed

    Eskenazi, Brenda; Mocarelli, Paolo; Warner, Marcella; Needham, Larry; Patterson, Donald G; Samuels, Steven; Turner, Wayman; Gerthoux, Pier Mario; Brambilla, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    In 1976, a chemical plant explosion near Seveso, Italy, resulted in the highest known exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in residential populations. In 1996, we initiated the Seveso Women's Health Study (SWHS), a historical cohort study of females who were 40 years old at the time of explosion and residents of the most heavily contaminated areas, zones A and B. Serum samples collected near the time of the explosion were analyzed for TCDD. We also analyzed pooled serum samples collected in 1976 from females who resided in zone non-ABR, the "unexposed" zone, to assess concurrent background exposures to other dioxins, furans, and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The median lipid-adjusted TCDD level for residents of zones A and B combined was 56 ppt (range = 2.5-56,000 ppt). Zone A residents had 5-fold higher TCDD levels (n = 67, median = 272 ppt) than did zone B residents (n = 814, median = 47 ppt). The youngest children had the highest TCDD levels, which decreased with age at explosion until approximately 13 years of age and were constant thereafter. Therefore, children living in zones A and B received a disproportionately higher exposure to TCDD as a result of the explosion. Zone of residence and age were the strongest predictors of TCDD level. Chloracne, nearby animal mortality, location (outdoors vs. indoors) at the time of explosion, and consumption of homegrown food were also related to serum TCDD levels. The serum pools from zone non-ABR residents had an average TCDD concentration of 20.2 ppt, and average total toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentration of 100.4 ppt. Therefore, background exposure to dioxins, furans, and PCBs unrelated to the explosion may have been substantial. As a consequence, previous SWHS studies that considered only TCDD exposure may have underestimated health effects due to total TEQ concentrations.

  11. The professional development needs of registered nurses in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Sharyn; McMillan, Margaret; Conway, Jane

    2007-04-01

    This paper reports on research which used a multiple-case study approach to investigate the responses of aged care nurses to changes in Australian health care policy following the introduction of the Aged Care Act 1997. Significant fiscal, social and environmental issues for Residential Aged Care (RAC) are the: need to respond to policy changes emphasizing efficiency in RAC facilities, nature of the needs of residents with increasing acuity, impact of decreasing numbers of Registered Nurses (RNs) working in the RAC environment, changing composition of the care team and RAC RN functions. The study explored the phenomenon of the contemporary practice of (RNs) within six RAC settings, focusing on changes in the practice of RNs. As a result of the research a number of issues pertinent to staff and role development of RNs were identified. PMID:17679262

  12. Children--The Effect of Rural Residence on Dental Unmet Need for Children with Special Health Care Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Asheley Cockrell; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Mayer, Michelle L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Unmet need for dental care is the most prevalent unmet health care need among children with special health care needs (CSHCN), even though these children are at a greater risk for dental problems. The combination of rural residence and special health care needs may leave rural CSHCN particularly vulnerable to high levels of unmet…

  13. Learning opportunities in a residential aged care facility: the role of supported placements for first-year nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lea, Emma; Marlow, Annette; Bramble, Marguerite; Andrews, Sharon; Crisp, Elaine; Eccleston, Claire; Mason, Ron; Robinson, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The residential aged care sector is reportedly a less attractive career choice for nursing students than other sectors. Research shows that students are often fearful of working with residents with dementia when they are inadequately supported on clinical placements by aged care staff. Thirty first-year nursing students attended a 2-week placement in one of two Tasmanian aged care facilities as part of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre Teaching Aged Care Facilities Program, which aims to provide students with a quality aged care placement focusing on dementia palliation. Placement experience and dementia knowledge were evaluated through preplacement and postplacement questionnaires and weekly feedback meetings with mentors and students. Students had more positive attitudes related to aged care and higher dementia knowledge at the end of placement. Students described their interactions with residents with dementia and thought that the placement had increased their capacity to provide quality care to these residents. The findings indicate that residential aged care placements can be productive learning environments for novice nursing students.

  14. Learning opportunities in a residential aged care facility: the role of supported placements for first-year nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lea, Emma; Marlow, Annette; Bramble, Marguerite; Andrews, Sharon; Crisp, Elaine; Eccleston, Claire; Mason, Ron; Robinson, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The residential aged care sector is reportedly a less attractive career choice for nursing students than other sectors. Research shows that students are often fearful of working with residents with dementia when they are inadequately supported on clinical placements by aged care staff. Thirty first-year nursing students attended a 2-week placement in one of two Tasmanian aged care facilities as part of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre Teaching Aged Care Facilities Program, which aims to provide students with a quality aged care placement focusing on dementia palliation. Placement experience and dementia knowledge were evaluated through preplacement and postplacement questionnaires and weekly feedback meetings with mentors and students. Students had more positive attitudes related to aged care and higher dementia knowledge at the end of placement. Students described their interactions with residents with dementia and thought that the placement had increased their capacity to provide quality care to these residents. The findings indicate that residential aged care placements can be productive learning environments for novice nursing students. PMID:24972402

  15. Resident and family perceptions of the nurse practitioner role in long term care settings: a qualitative descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Research evidence supports the positive impact on resident outcomes of nurse practitioners (NPs) working in long term care (LTC) homes. There are few studies that report the perceptions of residents and family members about the role of the NP in these settings. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of residents and family members regarding the role of the NP in LTC homes. Methods The study applied a qualitative descriptive approach. In-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 35 residents and family members from four LTC settings that employed a NP. Conventional content analysis was used to identify themes and sub-themes. Results Two major themes were identified: NPs were seen as providing resident and family-centred care and as providing enhanced quality of care. NPs established caring relationships with residents and families, providing both informational and emotional support, as well as facilitating their participation in decision making. Residents and families perceived the NP as improving availability and timeliness of care and helping to prevent unnecessary hospitalization. Conclusions The perceptions of residents and family members of the NP role in LTC are consistent with the concepts of person-centred and relationship-centred care. The relationships NPs develop with residents and families are a central means through which enhanced quality of care occurs. Given the limited use of NPs in LTC settings, there is an opportunity for health care policy and decision makers to address service inadequacies through strategic deployment of NPs in LTC settings. NPs can use their expert knowledge and skill to assist residents and families to make informed choices regarding their health care and maintain a positive care experience. PMID:24074157

  16. Ageing-Related Experiences of Adults with Learning Disability Resident in Rural Areas: One Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wark, Stuart; Canon-Vanry, Miranda; Ryan, Peta; Hussain, Rafat; Knox, Marie; Edwards, Meaghan; Parmenter, Marie; Parmenter, Trevor; Janicki, Matthew; Leggatt-Cook, Chez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Access to support services in rural areas is known to be problematic both in Australia, and in other countries around the world, but the majority of research on the population of people ageing with learning disability has so far focussed on metropolitan residents. The authors report about select aspects of the lived experience of older…

  17. Rural Residents with Disabilities Confront Substantial Barriers to Obtaining Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I; Killeen, Mary B; O'Day, Bonnie L

    2006-01-01

    Objective To learn about the health care experiences of rural residents with disabilities. Study Setting Rural areas in Massachusetts and Virginia. Study Design Local centers for independent living recruited 35 adults with sensory, physical, or psychiatric disabilities to participate in four focus group interviews. Data Collection Methods Verbatim transcripts of interviews were reviewed to identify major themes. Principal Findings Interviewees described the many well-recognized impediments to health care in rural America; disability appears to exacerbate these barriers. Interviewees reported substantial difficulties finding physicians who understand their disabilities and sometimes feel that they must teach their local doctors about their underlying conditions. Interviewees described needing to travel periodically to large medical centers to get necessary specialty care. Many are poor and are either uninsured or have Medicaid coverage, complicating their searches for willing primary care physicians. Because many cannot drive, they face great difficulties getting to their local doctor and especially making long trips to urban centers. Available public transportation often is inaccessible and unreliable. Physicians' offices are sometimes located in old buildings that do not have accessible entrances or equipment. Based on their personal experiences, interviewees perceive that rural areas are generally less sensitive to disability access issues than urban areas. Conclusions Meeting the health care needs of rural residents with disabilities will require interventions beyond health care, involving transportation and access issues more broadly. PMID:16899006

  18. A University Program to Improve Nursing Care to the Aged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marten, Marie Lucille

    1978-01-01

    Proposes a series of university nursing education programs developed to increase knowledge and skills relevant to nursing care of elderly and chronically ill persons who reside in nursing homes. Briefly describes five programs intended for persons engaged in long-term care or in preparation for such roles. (EM)

  19. Predictors of Mobility among Wheelchair Using Residents in Long Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Mortenson, W. Ben; Miller, William C.; Backman, Catherine L.; Oliffe, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of mobility among long term care residents who use wheelchairs as their main means of mobility. Based on the Matching Person to Technology Model, we hypothesized that wheelchair-related, personal and environmental factors would be independent predictors of mobility. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Eleven long term residential care facilities in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada Participants The study included 268 residents: 149 self-responding residents and 119 residents who required proxy respondents. Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measures Mobility was measured using the Nursing Home Life Space Diameter. Standardized measures of personal, wheelchair-related and environmental factors were administered and socio-demographic data were collected as independent variables. Results Independent mobility decreased as the distance from the resident’s room increased: 63% of participants were independently mobile on their units, 40% were independently mobile off their units within the facilities and 20% were independently mobile outdoors. For the total sample, the significant predictors of mobility, in descending order of importance, were wheelchair skills (including the capacity to engage brakes and manoeuvre), functional independence in activities of daily living, having four or more visits per week from friends or family and use of a power wheelchair. This regression model accounted for 48% of variance in mobility scores. Conclusions Limited independent mobility is a common problem among facility residents. Residents may benefit from interventions such as wheelchair skills training or provision of powered mobility but the effectiveness of these interventions needs to be evaluated. PMID:21840499

  20. Ethnicity and health care in cervical cancer survival: comparisons between a Filipino resident population, Filipino-Americans, and Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Redaniel, Maria Theresa; Laudico, Adriano; Mirasol-Lumague, Maria Rica; Gondos, Adam; Uy, Gemma Leonora; Toral, Jean Ann; Benavides, Doris; Brenner, Hermann

    2009-08-01

    Few studies have assessed and compared cervical cancer survival between developed and developing countries, or between ethnic groups within a country. Fewer still have addressed how much of the international or interracial survival differences can be attributed to ethnicity or health care. To determine the role of ethnicity and health care, 5-year survival of patients with cervical cancer was compared between patients in the Philippines and Filipino-Americans, who have the same ethnicity, and between Filipino-Americans and Caucasians, who have the same health care system. Cervical cancer databases from the Manila and Rizal Cancer Registries and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 13 were used. Age-adjusted 5-year survival estimates were computed and compared between the three patient groups. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, potential determinants of survival differences were examined. Overall 5-year relative survival was similar in Filipino-Americans (68.8%) and Caucasians (66.6%), but was lower for Philippine residents (42.9%). Although late stage at diagnosis explained a large proportion of the survival differences between Philippine residents and Filipino-Americans, excess mortality prevailed after adjustment for stage, age, and morphology in multivariate analysis [relative risk (RR), 2.07; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.68-2.55]. Excess mortality decreased, but persisted, when treatments were included in the multivariate models (RR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.41-2.23). A moderate, marginally significant excess mortality was found among Caucasians compared with Filipino-Americans (adjusted RR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.01-1.47). The differences in cervical cancer survival between patients in the Philippines and in the United States highlight the importance of enhanced health care and access to diagnostic and treatment facilities in the Philippines.

  1. Professional carers' knowledge and response to depression among their aged-care clients: the care recipients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Mellor, David; Davison, Tanya; McCabe, Marita; George, Kuruvilla

    2008-05-01

    Depression is an under-diagnosed disorder among the elderly, even in those who are in receipt of aged-care services. One factor associated with this under diagnosis has been identified as a reluctance amongst the elderly to discuss their mood and emotions with their medical practitioners. The current study focused on why depression is not recognised and acted on by those providing residential or home-based care to older people. We interviewed 15 elderly people residing in high-level or low-level aged-care facilities, and three elderly people who were receiving personal care in their homes. All participants had been identified by their care agencies as depressed. Participants reported their perceptions of their personal carers' knowledge and practices in managing the residents' depression. Although the participants described their carers in positive terms, they were critical of their knowledge and skills in recognising depression, and indicated that the communication between personal carers and care recipients about depressive symptomatology was seriously flawed. Training for personal carers in these areas, and efforts to change organisational culture are recommended. PMID:18728953

  2. Professional carers' knowledge and response to depression among their aged-care clients: the care recipients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Mellor, David; Davison, Tanya; McCabe, Marita; George, Kuruvilla

    2008-05-01

    Depression is an under-diagnosed disorder among the elderly, even in those who are in receipt of aged-care services. One factor associated with this under diagnosis has been identified as a reluctance amongst the elderly to discuss their mood and emotions with their medical practitioners. The current study focused on why depression is not recognised and acted on by those providing residential or home-based care to older people. We interviewed 15 elderly people residing in high-level or low-level aged-care facilities, and three elderly people who were receiving personal care in their homes. All participants had been identified by their care agencies as depressed. Participants reported their perceptions of their personal carers' knowledge and practices in managing the residents' depression. Although the participants described their carers in positive terms, they were critical of their knowledge and skills in recognising depression, and indicated that the communication between personal carers and care recipients about depressive symptomatology was seriously flawed. Training for personal carers in these areas, and efforts to change organisational culture are recommended.

  3. The paradox of the Aged Care Act 1997: the marginalisation of nursing discourse.

    PubMed

    Angus, Jocelyn; Nay, Rhonda

    2003-06-01

    This paper examines the marginalisation of nursing discourse, which followed the enactment of the Aged Care Act 1997. This neo-reform period in aged care, dominated by theories of economic rationalism, enshrined legislation based upon market principles and by implication, the provision of care at the cheapest possible price. This paper exposes some of the gaps in the neo-reform period and challenges the assertion that the amalgamation of nursing homes and hostels in such an environment can provide better quality of care and life for residents. It argues that this amalgamation entails a transformation towards a social model of care and fails to address the professional healthcare needs of the acutely sick and complex extreme old person and makes evident new gaps in the provision of aged care services. The paper proceeds to present strategies where the future for nursing practice in aged care necessarily involves a judicious balancing of individual cases alongside economic prescriptions of care and ever-changing public policy initiatives. It concludes that this can be achieved through a more interactive public, professional and advocacy discourse. The methodology involves extensive analysis of public documents including media, academic journals, government reports and interviews with recognised leaders in the field of aged care. The study utilises a critical interpretative framework consistent with the logic of Michel Foucault.

  4. Measuring the Caregiver Burden of Caring for Community-Residing People with Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongmei; Wang, Xiaocheng; He, Runlian; Liang, Ruifeng; Zhou, Liye

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the direct and indirect effects of patient or caregiver factors on caregiver burden of caring for community-residing people with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with AD from two hospitals and three communities in Taiyuan, China and their caregivers. For this survey, 200 patients with mild AD and their caregivers were selected. Caregivers were asked to provide sociodemographic information including age, gender, relationship with the patient, level of education, and number of contact hours per week with the patient. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Caregivers Burden Inventory. The caregivers also completed other measures including the Positive Aspects of Caregiving, the Family Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve, and the Social Support Rating Scale. The patients with AD completed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; their caregivers completed the Activities of Daily Living Scale and a questionnaire about the patients’ Behavioral and Psychological symptoms of Dementia. The main outcome in this study was caregiver burden. The care receivers’ level of cognitive function, physical function, and behavioral problems were treated as original stress; the primary appraisal variable was measured as the number of hours of caregiving in the previous week reported by the caregiver. Mediator variables included perceived social support, family function, and caregiving experience. Path analysis was used to build the interrelationship among caregiver burden and patient or caregiver factors. Results A lower level of cognitive function in patients (r = −0.28, p<0.001) and longer hours of caregiving (r = 0.17, p = 0.019) were related to increased caregiver burden. Greater social support (r = −0.23, p<0.001), family function (r = −0.17, p = 0.015) and caregiving experience (r = −0.16, p = 0.012) were related to decreased caregiver burden. Social support (r = 0

  5. Hearing and vision screening tools for long-term care residents with dementia: protocol for a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    McGilton, Katherine S; Höbler, Fiona; Campos, Jennifer; Dupuis, Kate; Labreche, Tammy; Guthrie, Dawn M; Jarry, Jonathan; Singh, Gurjit; Wittich, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hearing and vision loss among long-term care (LTC) residents with dementia frequently goes unnoticed and untreated. Despite negative consequences for these residents, there is little information available about their sensory abilities and care assessments and practices seldom take these abilities or accessibility needs into account. Without adequate knowledge regarding such sensory loss, it is difficult for LTC staff to determine the level of an individual's residual basic competence for communication and independent functioning. We will conduct a scoping review to identify the screening measures used in research and clinical contexts that test hearing and vision in adults aged over 65 years with dementia, aiming to: (1) provide an overview of hearing and vision screening in older adults with dementia; and (2) evaluate the sensibility of the screening tools. Methods and analysis This scoping review will be conducted using the framework by Arksey and O'Malley and furthered by methodological enhancements from cited researchers. We will conduct electronic database searches in CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We will also carry out a ‘grey literature’ search for studies or materials not formally published, both online and through interview discussions with healthcare professionals and research clinicians working in the field. Our aim is to find new and existing hearing and vision screening measures used in research and by clinical professionals of optometry and audiology. Abstracts will be independently reviewed twice for acceptance by a multidisciplinary team of researchers and research clinicians. Ethics and dissemination This review will inform health professionals working with this growing population. With the review findings, we aim to develop a toolkit and an algorithmic process to select the most appropriate hearing and vision screening assessments for LTC residents with dementia that will facilitate accurate testing and can

  6. Interprofessional education in practice: Evaluation of a work integrated aged care program.

    PubMed

    Lawlis, Tanya; Wicks, Alison; Jamieson, Maggie; Haughey, Amy; Grealish, Laurie

    2016-03-01

    Health professional clinical education is commonly conducted in single discipline modes, thus limiting student collaboration skills. Aged care residential facilities, due to the chronic and complex health care needs of residents, provide an ideal placement to provide a collaborative experience. Interprofessional education is widely acknowledged as the pedagogical framework through which to facilitate collaboration. The aim of the evaluation was to assess student attitudes towards collaboration after active involvement in an interprofessional education program. Students studying nursing, occupational therapy, and aged care were invited to complete a version of the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale before and after participating in a three-week pilot interprofessional program. A positive change in student attitudes towards other health professionals and the importance of working in interprofessional teams was reported with significant differences between two statements indicated: Learning with health-care students before qualifications would improve relationships after qualifications; and I learned a lot from the students from the other disciplines. The innovative pilot project was found to enhance student learning in interprofessional teams and the aged care environment. Further development of this and similar interprofessional programs is required to develop sustainable student projects that have health benefits for residents in aged care residential facilities. PMID:26733460

  7. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sangeeta; Hutchison, James; Group, Canadian Critical Care Trials

    2016-01-01

    Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians' professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees.

  8. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sangeeta; Menon, Kusum; Piquette, Dominique; Gottesman, Ronald; Hutchison, James; Gilfoyle, Elaine; Group, Canadian Critical Care Trials

    2016-01-01

    Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians' professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees. PMID:27610029

  9. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sangeeta; Hutchison, James; Group, Canadian Critical Care Trials

    2016-01-01

    Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians' professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees. PMID:27610029

  10. Intentions to Quit Work among Care Staff Working in the Aged Care Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karantzas, Gery C.; Mellor, David; McCabe, Marita P.; Davison, Tanya E.; Beaton, Paul; Mrkic, Dejan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The aged care industry experiences high rates of staff turnover. Staff turnover has significant implications for the quality of care provided to care recipients and the financial costs to care agencies. In this study, we applied a model of intention to quit to identify the contextual and personal factors that shape aged care…

  11. State Developments in Child Care, Early Education, and School-Age Care, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewen, Danielle; Blank, Helen; Hart, Katherine; Schulman, Karen

    This report provides highlights and updates regarding state actions on child care, early education, and school-age care issues during 2001. It is intended to serve as a supplement to "State Developments in Child Care, Early Education, and School-Age Care 2000" and various reports published on this issue between 1997 and 1999. Information in the…

  12. Use of videophones for distant caregiving: an enriching experience for families and residents in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra R Parker; Hensel, Brian; Dickey, Geraldine; Rantz, Marilyn; Skubic, Marjorie

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the role of videophone technology in enhancing the distant caregiving experience of and communication between residents of a long-term care facility and their family members. Ten participants-4 residents of an independent retirement facility and 6 family members-were recruited. A videophone was installed in each resident's apartment, and another was mailed to the remote family member. Participants were asked to conduct a videocall at least once per week for 3 months. Exit interviews assessed general impressions of videophone communication, the relationship between residents and family members, stress, burden, and isolation. Participants were enthusiastic and emphasized a sense of closeness, the inclusion of the resident in family interactions, and reduced feelings of guilt and isolation as key benefits. New models of care are needed to challenge the existing paradigm, which often excludes distant caregivers from the care process. Technology can facilitate this process by bridging geographic distance. PMID:18649824

  13. School-Age Child Care Trend Report: Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2007-01-01

    According to the author, school-age care is the fastest growing segment of the early childhood arena and possibly the least visible. While programs have been serving school-age children in out-of-school hours since the turn of the century, it is only in recent years that professionals have started to view school-age care as a distinct discipline…

  14. Communicating for Quality in School Age Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartmel, Jennifer; Grieshaber, Susan

    2014-01-01

    School Age Care (SAC) services have existed in Australia for over 100 years but they have tended to take a back seat when compared with provision for school-aged children and those under school age using early childhood education and care (ECEC) services. Many SAC services are housed in shared premises and many children attending preparatory or…

  15. Comparing the information seeking strategies of residents, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants in critical care settings

    PubMed Central

    Kannampallil, Thomas G; Jones, Laura K; Patel, Vimla L; Buchman, Timothy G; Franklin, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Objective Critical care environments are information-intensive environments where effective decisions are predicated on successfully finding and using the ‘right information at the right time’. We characterize the differences in processes and strategies of information seeking between residents, nurse practitioners (NPs), and physician assistants (PAs). Method We conducted an exploratory study in the cardiothoracic intensive care units of two large academic hospitals within the same healthcare system. Clinicians (residents (n=5), NPs (n=5), and PAs (n=5)) were shadowed as they gathered information on patients in preparation for clinical rounds. Information seeking activities on 96 patients were collected over a period of 3 months (NRes=37, NNP=24, NPA=35 patients). The sources of information and time spent gathering the information at each source were recorded. Exploratory data analysis using probabilistic sequential approaches was used to analyze the data. Results Residents predominantly used a patient-based information seeking strategy in which all relevant information was aggregated for one patient at a time. In contrast, NPs and PAs primarily utilized a source-based information seeking strategy in which similar (or equivalent) information was aggregated for multiple patients at a time (eg, X-rays for all patients). Conclusions The differences in the information seeking strategies are potentially a result of the differences in clinical training, strategies of managing cognitive load, and the nature of the use of available health IT tools. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of these differences on clinical and process outcomes. PMID:24619926

  16. Can administrative data identify active diagnoses for long-term care resident assessment?

    PubMed

    Berlowitz, Dan R; Hickey, Elaine C; Saliba, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Many veterans receive rehabilitation services in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) nursing homes. Efficient methods for the identification of active diagnoses could facilitate care planning and outcomes assessment. We set out to determine whether diagnostic data from VA databases can be used to identify active diagnoses for Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments. We evaluated diagnoses being considered for inclusion in MDS version 3.0 and present in at least 15% of a sample of VA nursing home residents. A research nurse following a standardized protocol identified active diagnoses from the medical records of 120 residents. A clinical nurse also identified active diagnoses in 58 of these patients. Inpatient and outpatient diagnoses from the VA National Patient Care Database were identified for the past year. We calculated kappa, sensitivity, and specificity values, considering the nurses' assessments the gold standard. We found that kappa values comparing research nurses and databases were generally poor, with only 8 of the 19 diagnoses having a value >0.60. Levels of agreement between the clinical nurse and administrative data were generally similar. We conclude that VA administrative data cannot be used to accurately identify active diagnoses for nursing home residents. How best to efficiently collect these important data remains uncertain.

  17. Suicide Response Guidelines for Residency Trainees: A Novel Postvention Response for the Care and Teaching of Psychiatry Residents who Encounter Suicide in Their Patients.

    PubMed

    Cazares, Paulette T; Santiago, Patcho; Moulton, David; Moran, Scott; Tsai, Albert

    2015-08-01

    Suicide is an event that is almost universally encountered by psychiatrists and psychiatry residents. Because psychiatric patients are at a higher risk for completing suicide than patients of other specialties, psychiatry residents are at risk for experiencing the suicide of a patient during their training. A review of the literature shows that there is continually growing research into the negative emotional effects of patient suicides on psychiatry residents and the need for clear response protocols when a suicide occurs, also known as postvention protocols. However, there are no Graduate Medical Education requirements to specifically train psychiatry residents about this, even with a well-voiced desire by residents to receive this training. In the National Capitol Consortium Psychiatry Residency, encounters with patient suicides by residents in a time of war led us to a place in which interventions were designed and instituted to care for the caregiver, in this case focusing on psychiatry trainees. Our process and product, described here, offers an example of a systematic postvention response. It addresses aspects of what is known in the research base, combined with acknowledgement of the human response and the institutional need for a consistent and objective response.

  18. Suicide Response Guidelines for Residency Trainees: A Novel Postvention Response for the Care and Teaching of Psychiatry Residents who Encounter Suicide in Their Patients.

    PubMed

    Cazares, Paulette T; Santiago, Patcho; Moulton, David; Moran, Scott; Tsai, Albert

    2015-08-01

    Suicide is an event that is almost universally encountered by psychiatrists and psychiatry residents. Because psychiatric patients are at a higher risk for completing suicide than patients of other specialties, psychiatry residents are at risk for experiencing the suicide of a patient during their training. A review of the literature shows that there is continually growing research into the negative emotional effects of patient suicides on psychiatry residents and the need for clear response protocols when a suicide occurs, also known as postvention protocols. However, there are no Graduate Medical Education requirements to specifically train psychiatry residents about this, even with a well-voiced desire by residents to receive this training. In the National Capitol Consortium Psychiatry Residency, encounters with patient suicides by residents in a time of war led us to a place in which interventions were designed and instituted to care for the caregiver, in this case focusing on psychiatry trainees. Our process and product, described here, offers an example of a systematic postvention response. It addresses aspects of what is known in the research base, combined with acknowledgement of the human response and the institutional need for a consistent and objective response. PMID:26063679

  19. The Actively Caring for People Movement at Virginia Tech and Beyond: Cultivating Compassion and Relationships in Residence Halls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Shane M.; Mullins, Taris G.; Geller, E. Scott; Shushok, Frank, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    A professor and a group of student leaders initiated the Actively Caring for People (AC4P) Movement to establish a more civil, compassionate, and inclusive culture by inspiring intentional acts of kindness. This article explores the AC4P Movement in a first-year residence hall at Virginia Tech and a second-year residence hall at University of…

  20. Age and individual sleep characteristics affect cognitive performance in anesthesiology residents after a 24-hour shift.

    PubMed

    Tadinac, Meri; Sekulić, Ante; Hromatko, Ivana; Mazul-Sunko, Branka; Ivancić, Romina

    2014-03-01

    Previous research has shown that both shift work and sleep deprivation have an adverse influence on various aspects of human cognitive performance. The aim of this study was to explore changes in cognitive functioning and subjective sleepiness of anesthesiology residents after a 24-hour shift. Twenty-six anesthesiology residents completed a set of psychological instruments at the beginning and at the end of the shift, as well as a questionnaire regarding information about the shift, Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and Circadian Type Questionnaire. There was a significant decline in cognitive performance measured by the Auditory Verbal Learning Test after the shift. The effect was stronger in older participants and in those with high scores on rigidity of sleep scale and low scores on the ability to overcome sleepiness scale. There were no differences in the digits forward test (a measure of concentration), while digits backward test (a measure of working memory) even showed an improved performance after the shift. Although participants reported being significantly sleepier after the shift, the subjective sleepiness did not correlate with any of the objective measures of cognitive performance. In conclusion, the performance in short tasks involving concentration and working memory was not impaired, while performance in long-term and monotone tasks declined after sleep deprivation, and the magnitude of this decline depended on the specific individual characteristics of sleep and on age Surprisingly, age seemed to have an important impact on cognitive functions after shift work even in the relatively age-homogeneous population of young anesthesiology residents.

  1. Integrating Systematic Chronic Care for Diabetes into an Academic General Internal Medicine Resident-Faculty Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Kelso, Christine; Bowen, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    Background The quality of care for diabetes continues to fall short of recommended guidelines and results. Models for improving the care of chronic illnesses advocate a multidisciplinary team approach. Yet little is known about the effectiveness of such models in an academic setting with a diverse patient population and resident physicians participating in clinical care. Objective To implement a chronic illness management (CIM) practice within an academic setting with part-time providers, and evaluate its impact on the completion of diabetes-specific care processes and on the achievement of recommended outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus. Design Retrospective cohort study Subjects Patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who receive their primary care in an academic general internal medicine resident-faculty practice. Measurements Process and outcomes measures in patients exposed to the CIM practice were compared with non-exposed patients receiving usual care. Main Results Five hundred and sixty-five patients met inclusion criteria. Patients in the CIM practice experienced a significant increase in completion of care processes compared to control patients for measurement of annual low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7–5.7), urine microalbumin (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.1–5.5), blood pressure (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–2.8), retinal examination (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3–2.7), foot monofilament examination (OR 4.2, 95% CI 3.0–6.1) and administration of pneumococcal vaccination (OR 5.2, 95% CI 3.0–9.3). CIM-exposed patients were also more likely to achieve improvements in clinical outcomes of glycemic and blood pressure control reflected by hemoglobin A1c less than 7.0% (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.02–3) and blood pressure less than 130/80 (OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1–4.5) compared to controls. Conclusions A systematic chronic care model can be successfully integrated into an academic general internal medicine practice and may result in improved

  2. Orientation behaviors in residents relocated to a redesigned dementia care unit.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Margaret C; MacLean, Jill; Borrie, Michael; Geiger, Julia

    2004-01-01

    This descriptive study took advantage of a scheduled environmental renovation in a secured dementia care unit. A convenience sample of 19 residents who were relocated to the unit completed a performance-based orientation task involving locating their own room. The study included a brief structured interview and tests of psychological function (cognition, depression, and visual-spatial ability) two months after admission. Intrusions (uninvited entry into another resident's room) were tracked for one week. Eighty-four percent of participants were able to find their own rooms during the orientation task. The majority of participants reported use of color (n = 13) and structure (n = 12) as cues for locating their rooms. Thirty-eight percent of those who could find their own rooms also intruded into others' rooms; these intrusions were most commonly related to seeking social interaction. The results attest to the importance of understanding the multiple factors that determine environmental use in this population. PMID:15002345

  3. Association of resident and room characteristics with antipsychotic use in long-term care facilities (LTCF).

    PubMed

    Monette, Johanne; Alessa, Waleed; McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin; Voyer, Philippe; Champoux, Nathalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Sourial, Nadia; Monette, Michele; Belzile, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Inappropriate and widespread prescribing of antipsychotics in LTCF is of concern. This study aimed to explore the association of resident and room characteristics with antipsychotic use in this setting. This is cross-sectional secondary analysis of the baseline data of 280 residents ≥ 65 years old, from a prospective, observational, LTCF multi-site (n=7) cohort study on delirium. Demographic data included age, sex and length of stay. Resident characteristics assessed were presence of dementia, disruptive behavior, delirium and use of restraints. Room characteristics assessed were single room, clock/calendar, and telephone. Separate logistic regression models were used to explore the association of resident and room characteristics with antipsychotic use, adjusting for demographic variables. Mean age was 84.9 ± 7.0 years (± S.D.) with 56% female. The mean prevalence of antipsychotics use was 31.1% (range: 25.6-50.0%). The regression model of resident characteristics revealed a significant association between disruptive behavior (OR=1.18, 95% CI=1.12-1.25) and antipsychotic use. The model of room characteristics revealed a significant association between absence of a clock or calendar (OR=1.93, 95% CI=1.04-3.56) and absence of a telephone (OR=2.79, 95% CI=1.48-5.25). Our results suggest that behavior problems are associated with a higher likelihood of antipsychotic use. Absence of a clock/calendar and of a telephone was related to antipsychotic use. Further research is needed to confirm these findings.

  4. Prevalence and impact of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D.; Joyce, Nina; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M.; Zervou, Fainareti N.; Besdine, Richard W.; Mor, Vincent; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but the epidemiology of CDI in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is unknown. We performed a retrospective cohort study and used US 2011 LTCF resident data from the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims. We extracted CDI cases based on International Classification of Diseases-9 coding, and compared residents with the diagnosis of CDI to those who did not have a CDI diagnosis during their LTCF stay. We estimated CDI prevalence rates and calculated 3-month mortality rates. The study population consisted of 2,190,613 admissions (median age 82 years; interquartile range 76–88; female to male ratio 2:1; >80% whites), 45,500 of whom had a CDI diagnosis. The nationwide CDI prevalence rate was 1.85 per 100 LTCF admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83–1.87). The CDI rate was lower in the South (1.54%; 95% CI 1.51–1.57) and higher in the Northeast (2.29%; 95% CI 2.25–2.33). Older age, white race, presence of a feeding tube, unhealed pressure ulcers, end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, bowel incontinence, prior tracheostomy, chemotherapy, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently related to “high risk” for CDI. Residents with a CDI diagnosis were more likely to be admitted to an acute care hospital (40% vs 31%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be discharged to the community (46% vs 54%, P < 0.001) than those not reported with CDI during stay. Importantly, CDI was associated with higher mortality (24.7% vs 18.1%, P = 0.001). CDI is common among the elderly residents of LTCFs and is associated with significant increase in 3-month mortality. The prevalence is higher in the Northeast and risk stratification can be used in CDI prevention policies. PMID:27495022

  5. Improving the Quality of Care of Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents in France.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Yves; Mathieu, Celine; Piau, Christine; Cayla, Françoise; Bouget, Catherine; Vellas, Bruno; de Souto Barreto, Philipe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the Impact d'une démarche QUAlité sur l'évolution des pratiques et le déclin fonctionnel des Résidents en Établissement d'hébergement pour personnes âgées dépendantes (IQUARE) study was to examine the effects of a global intervention comprising professional support and education for nursing home (NH) staff on quality indicators (QIs) and functional decline and emergency department (ED) transfers of residents. One hundred seventy-five NHs in France (a total of 6,275 residents randomly selected from NHs) volunteered and were enrolled in a nonrandomized controlled multicenter individually customize trial with 18-month follow-up. NHs were allocated to a quality audit and feedback intervention (control group: 90 NHs, 3,258 residents) or to the quality audit and feedback intervention plus collaborative work meetings between a hospital geriatrician and NH staff (experimental group: 85 NHs, 3,017 residents). At the NH level, prevalence of assessment of kidney function, cognitive function, risk of pressure ulcers, behavioral disturbances, depression, pain, weight measurement, and transfer to the ED were recorded. Ability to perform basic activities of daily living was assessed at the resident level. At baseline, NH QIs were generally low (with large standard deviations), and annual rate of transfer to the ED was high (~20%) and similar in both groups. The intervention had a significant positive effect on the prevalence of assessment of pressure ulcer risk, depression, pain, and prevalence of ED transfers. It had no significant effect on functional decline. Large-scale efforts to improve QIs involving collaboration between hospital and NH providers and based on audit and collaborative discussion are feasible and improve some aspects of quality of care in NHs.

  6. Problem-based learning in a managed care seminar for all new residents at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Abouleish, Amr E; Golden, Alma; O'Donell, Alice Anne; Beach, Patricia S; Calhoun, Kirk A; Blackwell, Thomas A; Gallaway, Patricia J; Teske, Lenore; Wilson, Suzanne M; Koleng, Esther M; Leblanc, Alvin L

    2003-02-01

    One of the most important challenges in resident education is to train residents how to function in relation to managed care companies and systems so as to enhance the quality, accessibility, and efficiency of health care. Since 1996, The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston has presented an annual half-day seminar on managed care to new residents. The format involves training sessions and didactic presentations aimed at small groups (led by faculty physicians and nonphysicians from throughout the medical and managed care establishments). Problem-based learning sessions conducted in these groups focus on topics such as the organization of managed care systems, access, network, admit versus observation, inpatient status, denials, avoidable hospital days, concurrent reviews, gatekeepers, referrals, behavioral health, disease management programs, and financial considerations. Pretests and posttests are given to those participating to gauge the effectiveness of the program. In addition, participants complete evaluation forms that can be used by program coordinators to assess resident satisfaction with the learning format and to determine what improvements can be made in the process. For the 1999 and 2000 seminars, posttest results were significantly higher than pretest results for the new residents who participated in the seminar. Each year, seminar evaluations show that the small-group format is well received. We conclude that the small-group learning format is effective and enjoyable for the residents and their leaders. The format necessitates the training of 30 group leaders to increase their knowledge of managed care systems.

  7. A registry study of the association of patient's residence and age with colorectal cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Jayashri; Qiu, Fang; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu

    2014-04-01

    Because of limited literature from rural states of the United States like Nebraska, we evaluated the association of patient's age, Office of Management and Budget residence-county categories (rural-nonmetro, micropolitan-nonmetro, urban), and significant interactions between confounding-variables with colorectal cancer (CRC) survival. This retrospective 1998-2003 study of 6561 CRC patients from the Nebraska Cancer Registry showed median patient survival in colon and rectal cancer in urban, rural and micropolitan counties were 33, 36, and 46 months and 41, 47, 49 months, respectively. In Cox proportional-hazards analyses, after adjusting for significant demographics (age, race, marital status in colon cancer; age, insurance status in rectal cancer), cancer stage, surgery and radiation treatments; 1) no-chemotherapy urban colon cancer patients had significantly shorter survival (rural vs urban; adjusted hazard ratio, HR: 0.78 or urban vs rural HR: 1.28; micropolitan vs urban, HR: 0.78) and 2) no-surgery urban (vs rural, HR: 1.49); micropolitan (vs rural, HR: 2.01) rectal cancer patients had significantly shorter survival. Colon cancer (≥65 years) and rectal cancer (≥75 years) elderly each versus patients aged 19-64 years old had significantly shorter survival (all p < 0.01). The association of patients' age and treatment/residence-county interactions with CRC survival warrant decision-makers' attention.

  8. An Occupational Therapy intervention for residents with stroke-related disabilities in UK Care Homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial with economic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Sackley, Catherine M; Walker, Marion F; Burton, Christopher R; Watkins, Caroline L; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Barton, Garry R; Irvine, Lisa; Peryer, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Social Services. RESULTS Overall, 568 residents from 114 care homes were allocated to the intervention arm and 474 residents from another 114 care homes were allocated to the control arm, giving a total of 1042 participants. Randomisation occurred between May 2010 and March 2012. The mean age of participants was 82.9 years, and 665 (64%) were female. No adverse events attributable to the intervention were recorded. Of the 1042 participants, 870 (83%) were included in the analysis of the primary outcome (intervention, n = 479; control, n = 391). The primary outcome showed no significant differences between groups. The adjusted mean difference in the BI score between groups was 0.19 points higher in the intervention arm [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.33 to 0.70, p = 0.48; adjusted intracluster correlation coefficient 0.09]. Secondary outcome measures showed no significant differences at all time points. Mean incremental cost of the Occupational Therapy intervention for residents with stroke living in UK Care Homes intervention was £438.78 (95% CI -£3360.89 to £1238.46) and the incremental QALY gain was 0.009 (95% CI -0.030 to 0.048). LIMITATIONS A large proportion of participants with very severe activity-based limitations and cognitive impairment may have limited capacity to engage in therapy. CONCLUSION A 3-month individualised course of OT showed no benefit in maintaining functional activity in an older care home population with stroke-related disabilities. FUTURE WORK There is an urgent need to reduce health-related complications caused by inactivity and to provide an enabling built environment within care homes. TRIAL REGISTRATION Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN00757750. FUNDING This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 20, No. 15. See the Health Technology Assessment programme website for further project information

  9. Measuring Tijuana residents' choice of Mexican or U.S. health care services.

    PubMed Central

    Guendelman, S; Jasis, M

    1990-01-01

    There is growing concern that the indigent health care burden in the southwestern United States may be caused partly by Mexican residents who cross the border to use U.S. health services. This article describes the first attempt to measure the extent of this use by border residents. It also compares factors associated with their use of health care services in both the United States and Mexico. Data were obtained from a household survey conducted in Tijuana, Mexico, near the California border, using a random, stratified analytic sample of 660 households that included a total of 2,954 persons. The dependent variables--extent and volume of contacts with health professionals--were examined according to sociodemographic characteristics, insurance coverage, payment modality, type of visit, and health care setting. The results indicate that 40.3 percent of the Tijuana population used health services exclusively in Mexico during a 6-month period, compared with only 2.5 percent who used services in the United States. Of the Mexican users of U.S. services, the largest proportion appeared to be older people, lawful permanent residents or citizens of the United States who are living in Mexico, and persons from high- or middle-income sectors. In addition to the low level of use of U.S. health services, the findings show that more than 84 percent of the visits were to providers in the private sector and, for 59 percent of the visits, a fee for services was implied. Overall, this border population does not seem to be a drain on the U.S. public health system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2124358

  10. Effects of Dementia-Care Mapping on Residents and Staff of Care Homes: A Pragmatic Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Geertje; Draskovic, Irena; Adang, Eddy M. M.; Donders, Rogier; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of dementia-care mapping (DCM) for institutionalised people with dementia has been demonstrated in an explanatory cluster-randomised controlled trial (cRCT) with two DCM researchers carrying out the DCM intervention. In order to be able to inform daily practice, we studied DCM effectiveness in a pragmatic cRCT involving a wide range of care homes with trained nursing staff carrying out the intervention. Methods Dementia special care units were randomly assigned to DCM or usual care. Nurses from the intervention care homes received DCM training and conducted the 4-months DCM-intervention twice during the study. The primary outcome was agitation, measured with the Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory (CMAI). The secondary outcomes included residents’ neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs) and quality of life, and staff stress and job satisfaction. The nursing staff made all measurements at baseline and two follow-ups at 4-month intervals. We used linear mixed-effect models to test treatment and time effects. Results 34 units from 11 care homes, including 434 residents and 382 nursing staff members, were randomly assigned. Ten nurses from the intervention units completed the basic and advanced DCM training. Intention-to-treat analysis showed no statistically significant effect on the CMAI (mean difference between groups 2·4, 95% CI −2·7 to 7·6; p = 0·34). More NPSs were reported in the intervention group than in usual care (p = 0·02). Intervention staff reported fewer negative and more positive emotional reactions during work (p = 0·02). There were no other significant effects. Conclusions Our pragmatic findings did not confirm the effect on the primary outcome of agitation in the explanatory study. Perhaps the variability of the extent of implementation of DCM may explain the lack of effect. Trial Registration Dutch Trials Registry NTR2314. PMID:23844003

  11. Modelling medical care usage under medical insurance scheme for urban non-working residents.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Linping; Tian, Wenhua; Tang, Weidong

    2013-06-01

    This research investigates and evaluates China's urban medical care usage for non-working residents using microsimulation techniques. It focuses on modelling medical services usage and simulating medical expenses on hospitalization treatments as well as clinic services for serious illness in an urban area for the period of 2008-2010. A static microsimulation model was created to project the impact of the medical insurance scheme. Four kinds of achievements have been made. For three different scenarios, the model predicted the hospitalization services costs and payments, as well as the balance of the social pool fund and the medical burden on families. PMID:23433685

  12. Differences by age groups in health care spending.

    PubMed

    Fisher, C R

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents differences by age in health care spending by type of expenditure and by source of funds through 1978. Use of health care services generally increases with age. The average health bill reached $2,026 for the aged in 1978, $764 for the intermediate age group, and $286 for the young. Biological, demographic, and policy factors determine each age group's share of health spending. Public funds financed over three-fifths of the health expenses of the aged, with Medicare and Medicaid together accounting for 58 percent. Most of the health expenses of the young age groups were paid by private sources. PMID:10309224

  13. Sexuality and Aging: Implications for Long Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkley, Nancy E.

    With increasing emphasis on treating the whole person, on the maintenance of an individual's former life style, and on patients' rights, long-term care personnel need to become aware that many nursing home residents experience needs related to their sexuality. A model two-day workshop is presented wlth a focus on the following topics: (1) a broad…

  14. Self-perceived competence among medical residents in skills needed to care for patients with advanced dementia versus metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Manu, Erika; Marks, Adam; Berkman, Cathy S; Mullan, Patricia; Montagnini, Marcos; Vitale, Caroline A

    2012-06-01

    To examine medical residents' perceived competence in caring for patients with dementia we conducted an online survey of all 120 second, third and fourth-year residents in Internal Medicine, Medicine/Pediatrics, and Family Medicine at University of Michigan. A structured survey elicited residents' training, experience, confidence, and perceived career needs for skills in estimating prognosis, symptom management, and communication in caring for patients with dementia, compared to patients with metastatic cancer. Among the 61 (51 %) respondents, a majority report lower confidence in assessing prognosis and eliciting treatment wishes in patients with dementia (vs. metastatic cancer), and in performing skills integral to the care of patients with dementia, including the ability to assess caregiver needs, decisional capacity, advise on place of care, and manage agitation, despite viewing these skills as important to their future careers. These findings support the need for enhanced education on optimal care of patients with advanced dementia.

  15. Self-perceived competence among medical residents in skills needed to care for patients with advanced dementia versus metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Manu, Erika; Marks, Adam; Berkman, Cathy S; Mullan, Patricia; Montagnini, Marcos; Vitale, Caroline A

    2012-06-01

    To examine medical residents' perceived competence in caring for patients with dementia we conducted an online survey of all 120 second, third and fourth-year residents in Internal Medicine, Medicine/Pediatrics, and Family Medicine at University of Michigan. A structured survey elicited residents' training, experience, confidence, and perceived career needs for skills in estimating prognosis, symptom management, and communication in caring for patients with dementia, compared to patients with metastatic cancer. Among the 61 (51 %) respondents, a majority report lower confidence in assessing prognosis and eliciting treatment wishes in patients with dementia (vs. metastatic cancer), and in performing skills integral to the care of patients with dementia, including the ability to assess caregiver needs, decisional capacity, advise on place of care, and manage agitation, despite viewing these skills as important to their future careers. These findings support the need for enhanced education on optimal care of patients with advanced dementia. PMID:22477667

  16. Feasibility and clinical utility of the Japanese version of the Abbey pain scale in Japanese aged care.

    PubMed

    Takai, Yukari; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Chiba, Yumi; Kato, Ayako

    2014-06-01

    Active usage of observational pain scales in Japanese aged-care facilities has not been previously described. Therefore, to examine the feasibility and clinical utility of the Abbey Pain Scale-Japanese version (APS-J), this study examined the interrater reliability of the APS-J among a researcher, nurses, and care workers in aged-care facilities in Japan. This study also aimed to obtain nurses' and care workers' opinions on use of the scale. The following data were collected from 88 residents of two aged-care facilities: demographics, Barthel Index, Folstein Mini-Mental Examination (MMSE), 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), and APS-J for pain. The researchers, nurses, and care workers independently assessed the residents' pain by using the APS-J, and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for interrater reliability and Cronbach alpha for internal consistency were examined. The ICC between researchers and nurses, researchers and care workers, and nurses and care workers were 0.68, 0.74, and 0.76, respectively. Nurses and care workers were invited for focus group interviews to obtain their opinions regarding APS-J use. During these interviews, nurses and care workers stated that the observational points of APS-J subscales were the criteria they normally used to evaluate residents' pain. Several nurses and care workers reported a gap between the estimated pain intensity and APS-J score. Unclear APS-J criteria, difficulties in observing residents, and insufficient practice guidelines were also reported. Our findings indicate that the APS-J has moderate reliability and clinically utility. To facilitate APS-J usage, education and clinical guidelines for pain management may be required for nurses and care workers.

  17. Development of Electronic Medical Record-Based "Rounds Report" Results in Improved Resident Efficiency, More Time for Direct Patient Care and Education, and Less Resident Duty Hour Violations.

    PubMed

    Ham, Phillip B; Anderton, Toby; Gallaher, Ryan; Hyrman, Mike; Simmerman, Erika; Ramanathan, Annamalai; Fallaw, David; Holsten, Steven; Howell, Charles Gordon

    2016-09-01

    Surgeons frequently report frustration and loss of efficiency with electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Together, surgery residents and a programmer at Augusta University created a rounds report (RR) summarizing 24 hours of vitals, intake/output, labs, and other values for each inpatient that were previously transcribed by hand. The objective of this study was to evaluate the RR's effect on surgery residents. Surgery residents were queried to assess the RR's impact. Outcome measures were time spent preparing for rounds, direct patient care time, educational activity time, rates of incorrect/incomplete data on rounds, and rate of duty hour violations. Hospital wide, 17,200 RRs were generated in the 1-month study. Twenty-three surgery residents participated. Time spent preparing for rounds decreased per floor patient (15.6 ± 3.0 vs 6.0 ± 1.2, P < 0.0001) and per intensive care unit patient (19.9 ± 2.9 vs 7.5 ± 1.2 P < 0.0001). The work day spent in direct patient care increased from 45.1 ± 5.6 to 54.0 ± 5.7 per cent (P = 0.0044). Educational activity time increased from 35.2 ± 5.4 to 54.7 ± 7.1 minutes per resident per day (P = 0.0004). Reported duty hour violations decreased 58 per cent (P < 0.0001). American Board of Surgery in Training exam scores trended up, and estimates of departmental annual financial savings range from $66,598 to $273,141 per year. Significant improvements occur with surgeon designed EMR tools like the RR. Hospitals and EMR companies should pair interested surgeons with health information technology developers to facilitate EMR enhancements. Improvements like RRs can have broad ranging, multidisciplinary impact and should be standard in all EMRs used for inpatient care at academic medical centers. PMID:27670576

  18. [Elderly residents in homes for the aged: adjustment in the light of Callista Roy].

    PubMed

    Freitas, Maria Célia de; Guedes, Maria Vilani Cavalcante; de Galiza, Francisca Tereza; Nogueira, Jéssica de Menezes; Onofre, Marília Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the adaptation of elderly individuals voluntarily reside in Institution for the Aged (LTCF) in the city of Fortaleza-CE, based on the theoretical model of Roy. Descriptive study, in a IPLI involving thirteen elderly residents. Data collect was through interviews in the months of October and December 2011 and organized by thematic content analysis. The following themes has emerged: I Physical subdivided into body sensation and body image; Staff and I, subdivided into self-consistency and auto ideal be moral-ethical-spiritual. Thus, the option to live in ILPI not effectively changed the lives of elderly people. They managed to adapt to the local and coexist well with internal and external stimuli.

  19. Women's access to health care in Ghana: effects of education, residence, lineage and self-determination.

    PubMed

    Boateng, John; Flanagan, Constance

    2008-01-01

    Women's physical and psychological access to health care was analyzed using the 2003 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (GDHS), a nationally representative study for monitoring population and health in Ghana. Female respondents from the 2133 cases in the couple's data set were used in this study. Women's level of education was positively related to physical but not to psychological access to health care. Residing in an urban area was positively related to both types of access. Matriliny consistently showed positive effects on physical access. In addition to these demographic factors, both physical and psychological access were positively related to women's self-determination, i.e., women's right and ability to make real choices about their lives including their health, fertility, sexuality, childcare and all areas where women are denied autonomy and dignity in their identities as women. Self-determination factors both mediated the effects of background factors on access and added explanatory power to the models.

  20. Determinants of Medical and Health Care Expenditure Growth for Urban Residents in China: A Systematic Review Article

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, Xiaolong; CAI, Qiong; WANG, Jin; LIU, Yun

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, medical and health care consumption has risen, making health risk an important determinant of household spending and welfare. We aimed to examine the determinants of medical and health care expenditure to help policy-makers in the improvement of China’s health care system, benefiting the country, society and every household. This paper employs panel data from China’s provinces from 2001 to 2011 with all possible economic variations and studies the determinants of medical and healthcare expenditure for urban residents. CPI (consumer price index) of medical services and the resident consumption level of urban residents have positive influence on medical and health care expenditures for urban residents, while the local medical budget, the number of health institutions, the incidence of infectious diseases, the year-end population and the savings of urban residents will not have effect on medical and health care expenditure for urban residents. This paper proposed three relevant policy suggestions for Chinese governments based on the findings of the research. PMID:26171351

  1. Age and residency duration of loggerhead turtles at a North Pacific bycatch hotspot using skeletochronology

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewicz, Calandra N. Turner; Seminoff, Jeffrey A.; Avens, Larisa; Goshe, Lisa R.; Peckham, S. Hoyt; Rguez-Baron, Juan M.; Bickerman, Kalyn; Kurle, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    For migratory marine animals, like sea turtles, effective conservation can be challenging because key demographic information such as duration of life stages and exposure to spatially explicit threats in different habitats are often unknown. In the eastern Pacific near the Baja California Peninsula (BCP), Mexico, tens of thousands of endangered North Pacific loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) concentrate at a foraging area known to have high rates of fishery bycatch. Because stage survivorship of loggerheads in the BCP will vary significantly depending on the number of years spent in this region, we applied skeletochronology to empirically estimate residency duration in this loggerhead hotspot. The observed age distribution obtained from skeletochronology analysis of 146 dead-stranded loggerheads ranged from three to 24 years old, suggesting a BCP residency of >20 years. Given the maximum estimated age and a one-year migration to western Pacific nesting beaches, we infer age-at-maturation for BCP loggerheads at ~25 years old. We also examine survivorship at varying BCP residency durations by applying our findings to current annual mortality estimates. Predicted survivorship of loggerheads spending over 20 years in this BCP foraging habitat is less than 10%, and given that ~43,000 loggerhead turtles forage here, a significant number of turtles are at extreme risk in this region. This is the first empirical evidence supporting estimated age-at-maturation for BCP North Pacific loggerheads, and the first estimates of BCP stage survivorship. Our findings emphasize the urgent need for continued and effective international conservation efforts to minimize bycatch of this endangered species. PMID:25848136

  2. School's Out! Group Day Care for the School Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Elizabeth; Milich, Cynthia

    This report on group day care is designed to: (1) examine the kinds of group programs for school-age children which exist in Los Angeles County, (2) describe the conditions necessary for program operation, and (3) consider the issue of quality as it relates to community expansion of day care services for children of school age. The report is…

  3. Access technology and dementia care: influences on residents' everyday lives in a secure unit.

    PubMed

    Margot-Cattin, Isabel; Nygård, Louise

    2006-06-01

    There is a need to understand how technology can best be used to facilitate well-being in people with dementia. This study sought to describe how access control technology influenced the everyday lives of people with dementia living in a secure unit. The staff members and the unit's residents participated in the study. Data were collected through ethnographic observations and semi-structured interviews over 6 months, and were analyzed using the constant comparative method. The results show how access technology supported the residents' sense of security, territoriality, orientation, and adaptation to the environment. However, certain conditions were necessary for these influences to appear. Overall, the results indicate that access control technology may be used to support the well-being of people with dementia, and to increase their opportunities to feel in place in a secure unit. However, there is an urgent need in the future for further exploration of the conditions for use of technology in the field of dementia care, and the necessity of making careful evaluations of the use of technology in this field cannot be overemphasized. PMID:16856468

  4. Patient care in a technological age.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Natalie

    2006-07-01

    In this electronically wired world of the 21 st century, the health care system has tapped into technology available at the touch of a button. Scientific discoveries, high-tech equipment, electronic medical records, Smarticards, and long distance diagnosis using telehealth technology have all been embraced. But Natalie Dragon asks, what are the implications for nurses and the outcomes on patient care?

  5. Semelparous Penna Ageing Model with Parental Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehsenfeld, K. M.; Sá Martins, J. S.; de Oliveira, S. Moss; Bernardes, A. T.

    In this paper we study the importance of parental care for the survival of semelparous species, that reproduce only once in life. We perform our simulations for sexual and asexual reproductions and show that catastrophic senescence (death soon after reproduction) is delayed if parental care is considered.

  6. Incorporating Patient- and Family-Centered Care Into Resident Education: Approaches, Benefits, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Philibert, Ingrid; Patow, Carl; Cichon, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A design conference with participants from accredited programs and institutions was used to explore how the principles of patient- and family-centered care (PFCC) can be implemented in settings where residents learn and participate in care, as well as identify barriers to PFCC and simple strategies for overcoming them. Approach In September 2009, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) held a conference with 74 participants representing a diverse range of educational settings and a group of expert presenters and facilitators. Small group sessions explored the status of PFCC in teaching settings, barriers that need to be overcome in some settings, simple approaches, and the value of a national program and ACGME support. Findings Participants shared information on the state of their PFCC initiatives, as well as barriers to implementing PFCC in the learning environment. These emerged in 6 areas: culture, the physical environment, people, time and other constraints, skills and capabilities, and teaching and assessment, as well as simple strategies to help overcome these barriers. Two Ishikawa (Fishbone) diagrams (one for barriers and one for simple strategies) make it possible to select strategies for overcoming particular barriers. Conclusions A group of participants with a diversity of approaches to incorporating PFCC into the learning environment agreed that respectful communication with patients/families needs to be learned, supported, and continuously demanded of residents. In addition, for PFCC to be sustainable, it has to be a fundamental expectation for resident learning and attainment of competence. Participants concurred that improving the environment for patients concurrently improves the environment for learners. PMID:22655161

  7. Barriers to Care for Depressed Older People: Perceptions of Aged Care among Medical Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Marita P.; Davison, Tanya; Mellor, David; George, Kuruvilla

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated barriers to detection of depression among older people. Focus groups were conducted with 21 professional carers, 4 nurses, 10 general practitioners, and 7 aged care managers. The results demonstrated that care for older people is primarily focused on physical care. Further, staff resources, a lack of continuity of care,…

  8. Evaluation of care for the aged: a multipurpose guide.

    PubMed

    Bergman, R; Golander, H

    1982-05-01

    There is a growing recognition of the need to evaluate quality of care. As the aged are a particularly vulnerable group, often dependent on care-givers for their remaining years, it is important to control related services. An interdisciplinary workgroup prepared a tool which lists cues to be considered in determining the quality of care for the age in ambulatory services, home care programmes, short-and long-term institutions. The cues fall into six domains: physical environment, psychosocial environment, basic personal care, health care, family involvement and manpower. The tool can be used by clients and families for selecting placement for care; by caregivers in choosing or remaining in a place of work; by those administratively responsible for care, such as supervisors, or licensing bodies for controlling performance and policy; and by other involved persons, such as educators, researchers, volunteers or funding agencies for their specific purposes. PMID:6811642

  9. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. In addition to meeting... residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  10. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. In addition to meeting... residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  11. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. In addition to meeting... residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  12. Sense of Coherence among Older Adult Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities in Taiwan: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jueng, Ruo-Nan; Tsai, Der-Chong; Chen, I-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background Growing evidence shows that sense of coherence (SOC) is related to health promotion. Knowledge of SOC among older adults in Taiwan is limited. The present study aimed to investigate SOC status and its relationship to personal and environmental factors among older adult residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) in northeastern Taiwan. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed in Yilan, Taiwan. With face-to-face interviews, we obtained data from 104 LTCF residents (aged 65 years and older) using the Chinese version of Antonovsky's short 13-item SOC scale. We also collected the information on personal characteristics, physical and social environmental resources. Multiple linear regression was used to analyze factors potentially influencing SOC. Results Of the participants, the mean score (±standard deviation) of SOC was 58.3 (±8.8), while scores on SOC subscales (comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness) were 23.4 ±4.5, 17.9 ±3.8, and 17.0 ±3.2, respectively. Education level, activities of daily living and number of LTCF staff were found to be independently associated with SOC status after adjusting for demographic characteristics, health status, and environmental resources. In addition, interactions between personal and environmental factors had a crucial influence on SOC status. Conclusions Participants in this study had relatively low SOC scores compared to their counterparts in Western countries. In addition to personal factors, environmental factors can play a significant role in SOC status among older adult LTCF residents. Comprehensive evaluation of SOC status should consider person-environment interaction effects. PMID:26751949

  13. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  14. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  15. Perspective: beyond counting hours: the importance of supervision, professionalism, transitions of care, and workload in residency training.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Daniel J; Slovin, Sara R; Riebschleger, Meredith P; Englander, Robert; Hicks, Patricia J; Carraccio, Carol

    2012-07-01

    The medical education community's conversations about residents' duty hours have long focused solely on the number of those hours. In July 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) enacted its most recent iteration of standards regarding duty hours. Those standards, as well as a 2008 Institute of Medicine report, look beyond the quantity of duty hours to address their quality as well. Indeed, the majority of the 2011 ACGME standards specify requirements for the qualitative components of residents' working and learning environments, including supervision of residents; professionalism, personal responsibility, and patient safety; transitions of care; and clinical responsibilities (including workload). The authors believe that focusing on these qualitative (rather than quantitative) components of the resident's working and learning environment provides the greatest promise for balancing patient care with resident education, thus optimizing the safety and effectiveness of both. For each of the four qualitative components that the authors discuss (enhancing supervision, nurturing professionalism and personal responsibility, ensuring safe transitions of care, and optimizing workloads and cognitive loads), they offer agendas for faculty development, educational program planning, and research. Thus, the authors call on the medical education community to expand its discussion beyond counting duty hours to focus on these critical issues that ensure quality resident education and patient care and to implement necessary strategies to address them.

  16. Masterful care of the aging triathlete.

    PubMed

    Wright, Vonda J

    2012-12-01

    Current endurance champions are turning in winning performances in their late 30s and 40s. These masters-age athletes present a special challenge to Sport Medicine practitioners who in previous decades have simply advised masters-aged athletes to stop competing to prevent or treat injury. The fact is, many of the physical changes commonly attributed to aging alone are actually due to the rages of sedentary aging. Recently a body of literature emerged which begins to define what we are capable of with chronic high-level exercise and guides masters-age athletes to train and rehab smarter to stay competitive. The factors influencing the relative declines in overall performance in the various sports include both physiological and lifestyle changes. The following review summarizes age and sex-related changes in triathlon performance, the biology of aging as it relates to endurance sport and factors that affect performance in the masters athletes.

  17. Examining the role of information exchange in residential aged care work practices-a survey of residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The provision of residential aged care is underpinned by information, and is reliant upon systems that adequately capture and effectively utilise and communicate this information. The aim of this study was to explicate and quantify the volume and method by which information is collected, exchanged within facilities and with external providers, and retrieved from facility information systems and hospitals. Methods A survey of staff (n = 119), including managers, health informatics officers (HIOs), quality improvement staff, registered nurses (RNs), enrolled nurses (ENs)/endorsed enrolled nurses (EENs) and assistants in nursing (AINs) was carried out in four residential aged care facilities in New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. Sites varied in size and displayed a range of information technology (IT) capabilities. The survey investigated how and by whom information is collected, retrieved and exchanged, and the frequency and amount of time devoted to these tasks. Descriptive analysis was performed using SPSS, and open responses to questions were coded into key themes. Results Staff completed a median of six forms each, taking a median of 30 min per shift. 68.8% of staff reported transferring information from paper to a computer system, which took a median of 30 min per shift. Handover and face-to-face communication was the most frequently used form of information exchange within facilities. There was a large amount of faxing and telephone communication between facility staff and General Practitioners and community pharmacists, with staff reporting sending a median of 2 faxes to pharmacy and 1.5 faxes to General Practitioners, and initiating 2 telephone calls to pharmacies and 1.5 calls to General Practitioners per shift. Only 38.5% of respondents reported that they always had information available at the point-of-care and only 35.4% of respondents reported that they always had access to hospital stay information of residents after hospital

  18. Depletion of fat-resident Treg cells prevents age-associated insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Sagar P; Myoung Suh, Jae; Fang, Sungsoon; Liu, Sihao; Zhang, Yang; Cheng, Albert; Zhou, Carmen; Liang, Yuqiong; LeBlanc, Mathias; Liddle, Christopher; Atkins, Annette R; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M; Zheng, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Age-associated insulin resistance (IR) and obesity-associated IR are two physiologically distinct forms of adult-onset diabetes. While macrophage-driven inflammation is a core driver of obesity-associated IR, the underlying mechanisms of the obesity-independent yet highly prevalent age-associated IR are largely unexplored. Here we show, using comparative adipo-immune profiling in mice, that fat-resident regulatory T cells, termed fTreg cells, accumulate in adipose tissue as a function of age, but not obesity. Supporting the existence of two distinct mechanisms underlying IR, mice deficient in fTreg cells are protected against age-associated IR, yet remain susceptible to obesity-associated IR and metabolic disease. By contrast, selective depletion of fTreg cells via anti-ST2 antibody treatment increases adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. These findings establish that distinct immune cell populations within adipose tissue underlie ageing- and obesity-associated IR, and implicate fTreg cells as adipo-immune drivers and potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of age-associated IR.

  19. Dermatological disease in the older age group: a cross-sectional study in aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Maneka S; Vandal, Alain C; Jarrett, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of dermatological disease in aged care facilities, and the relationship between cognitive or physical disability and significant disease. Setting 2 large aged care facilities in Auckland, New Zealand, each providing low and high level care. Participants All 161 residents of the facilities were invited to participate. The only exclusion criterion was inability to obtain consent from the individual or designated guardian. 88 participants were recruited—66 females (75%), 22 males (25%) with average age 87.1 years (SD 5.5 years). Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary—presence of significant skin disease (defined as that which in the opinion of the investigators needed treatment or was identified as a patient concern) diagnosed clinically on full dermatological examination by a dermatologist or dermatology trainee. Secondary—functional and cognitive status (Rehabilitation Complexity Scale and Abbreviated Mental Test Score). Results 81.8% were found to have at least one significant condition. The most common disorders were onychomycosis 42 (47.7%), basal cell carcinoma 13 (14.8%), asteototic eczema 11 (12.5%) and squamous cell carcinoma in situ 9 (10.2%). Other findings were invasive squamous cell carcinoma 7 (8%), bullous pemphigoid 2 (2.3%), melanoma 2 (2.3%), lichen sclerosus 2 (2.3%) and carcinoma of the breast 1 (1.1%). Inflammatory disease was more common in those with little physical disability compared with those with serious physical disability (OR 3.69; 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6, p=0.04). No significant association was found between skin disease and cognitive impairment. Conclusions A high rate of dermatological disease was found. Findings ranged from frequent but not life-threatening conditions (eg, onychomycosis), to those associated with a significant morbidity (eg, eczema, lichen sclerosus and bullous pemphigoid), to potentially life-threatening (eg, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma and breast cancer

  20. Perceptions and employment intentions among aged care nurses and nursing assistants from diverse cultural backgrounds: A qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fengsong; Tilse, Cheryl; Wilson, Jill; Tuckett, Anthony; Newcombe, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The residential aged care industry faces shortages and high turnover rates of direct care workers. This situation is further complicated by the increasing cultural diversity of residents and staff. To retain direct care workers, it is crucial to explore their perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of care work, and their employment intentions in multicultural environments. A qualitative descriptive study was used to understand perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of residential aged care work for core direct care workers (i.e. nurses and nursing assistants), how these were related to their intentions to stay or leave, and how these varied between nurses and nursing assistants, and between locally and overseas born workers. Individual interviews were conducted between June and September 2013 with 16 direct care workers in an Australian residential aged care facility with a specific focus on people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. It was found that direct care workers' employment intentions were related to their perceptions and management of the rewards and difficulties of care work. Their experiences of care work, the employment characteristics, and the organizational resources that fitted their personality, ability, expectations, and essential needs were viewed as rewards. Evaluating their jobs as meaningful was a shared perception for direct care workers who intended to stay. Individual workers' perceptions of the rewarding aspects of care work served to counterbalance the challenges of care work, and promoted their intentions to stay. Perceptions and employment intentions varied by occupational groups and by cultural backgrounds. Overseas born direct care workers are valuable resources in residential aged care facility rather than a limitation, but they do require organizational support, such as cultural awareness of the management, English language support, a sense of family, and appropriate job responsibility. The findings

  1. Perceptions and employment intentions among aged care nurses and nursing assistants from diverse cultural backgrounds: A qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fengsong; Tilse, Cheryl; Wilson, Jill; Tuckett, Anthony; Newcombe, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The residential aged care industry faces shortages and high turnover rates of direct care workers. This situation is further complicated by the increasing cultural diversity of residents and staff. To retain direct care workers, it is crucial to explore their perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of care work, and their employment intentions in multicultural environments. A qualitative descriptive study was used to understand perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of residential aged care work for core direct care workers (i.e. nurses and nursing assistants), how these were related to their intentions to stay or leave, and how these varied between nurses and nursing assistants, and between locally and overseas born workers. Individual interviews were conducted between June and September 2013 with 16 direct care workers in an Australian residential aged care facility with a specific focus on people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. It was found that direct care workers' employment intentions were related to their perceptions and management of the rewards and difficulties of care work. Their experiences of care work, the employment characteristics, and the organizational resources that fitted their personality, ability, expectations, and essential needs were viewed as rewards. Evaluating their jobs as meaningful was a shared perception for direct care workers who intended to stay. Individual workers' perceptions of the rewarding aspects of care work served to counterbalance the challenges of care work, and promoted their intentions to stay. Perceptions and employment intentions varied by occupational groups and by cultural backgrounds. Overseas born direct care workers are valuable resources in residential aged care facility rather than a limitation, but they do require organizational support, such as cultural awareness of the management, English language support, a sense of family, and appropriate job responsibility. The findings

  2. [HOLDING OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED CLINICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR ANESTHESIOLOGY AND INTENSIVE CARE CLINICAL RESIDENCY IN STATE GRADUATES CERTIFICATION].

    PubMed

    Schegolev, A V; Andreenko, A A; Ershov, E N; Lahin, R E; Makarenko, E P

    2016-01-01

    The modern system of medical education requires objective methods to assess clinical competence of medical specialists. Application of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) during the final certification of graduates of clinical residency allows to evaluate the theoretical knowledge, manual skills. Enabling simulation scenarios in the program makes it possible to objectively evaluate the important non-technical skills of anesthesiologists, identify gaps in the system of training and modify it. The experience of the objective structured clinical examination as part of the state certification of graduates of clinical residency of the Department ofAnesthesiology and Intensive Care, Military MedicalAcademy after C M Kirov allows us to consider this technique in an objective way a comprehensive assessment of the competence of health professionals. Students confirmed its highly realistic, they have revealed the presence of emotional stress during the simulation sessions, the majority agreed that the simulation session increased the level of their readiness to address these situations in clinical practice. Staff of the department is planning to testing and introduction rating scales into a system of assessment, to improved exam program, increasing the number of clinical scenarios for simulation sessions. PMID:27192861

  3. Verbal and nonverbal indicators of quality of communication between care staff and residents in ethnoculturally and linguistically diverse long-term care settings.

    PubMed

    Small, Jeff; Chan, Sing Mei; Drance, Elisabeth; Globerman, Judith; Hulko, Wendy; O'Connor, Deborah; Perry, JoAnn; Stern, Louise; Ho, Lorraine

    2015-09-01

    Linguistic and ethnocultural diversity in long-term residential care is a growing trend in many urban settings. When long-term care staff and residents do not share the same language or ethnocultural background, the quality of their communication and care are jeopardized. There is very little research addressing how staff and residents communicate when they experience a mismatch in their language and ethnocultural backgrounds. Thus, the goals of the present study were to 1) document the verbal and nonverbal behaviours used by staff and residents in diverse interactions, and 2) identify and account for behaviours that either promoted or detracted from positive communication by drawing on principles from 'Communication Accommodation Theory'. Two long-term care facilities in British Columbia Canada were selected due to the diverse linguistic and ethnocultural backgrounds of their staff and residents. Twenty-seven staff and 27 residents consented to being video-recorded during routine activities (e.g., mealtimes, recreational activities). The recorded observations were transcribed, translated, and coded using qualitative descriptive and interpretive analyses. A number of verbal and nonverbal behaviours were identified and interpreted in relation to whether they promoted or detracted from positive communication. The findings point to considering a variety of proactive strategies that staff and administrators could employ to effectively accommodate to language and ethnocultural diversity in long-term care practice.

  4. Verbal and nonverbal indicators of quality of communication between care staff and residents in ethnoculturally and linguistically diverse long-term care settings.

    PubMed

    Small, Jeff; Chan, Sing Mei; Drance, Elisabeth; Globerman, Judith; Hulko, Wendy; O'Connor, Deborah; Perry, JoAnn; Stern, Louise; Ho, Lorraine

    2015-09-01

    Linguistic and ethnocultural diversity in long-term residential care is a growing trend in many urban settings. When long-term care staff and residents do not share the same language or ethnocultural background, the quality of their communication and care are jeopardized. There is very little research addressing how staff and residents communicate when they experience a mismatch in their language and ethnocultural backgrounds. Thus, the goals of the present study were to 1) document the verbal and nonverbal behaviours used by staff and residents in diverse interactions, and 2) identify and account for behaviours that either promoted or detracted from positive communication by drawing on principles from 'Communication Accommodation Theory'. Two long-term care facilities in British Columbia Canada were selected due to the diverse linguistic and ethnocultural backgrounds of their staff and residents. Twenty-seven staff and 27 residents consented to being video-recorded during routine activities (e.g., mealtimes, recreational activities). The recorded observations were transcribed, translated, and coded using qualitative descriptive and interpretive analyses. A number of verbal and nonverbal behaviours were identified and interpreted in relation to whether they promoted or detracted from positive communication. The findings point to considering a variety of proactive strategies that staff and administrators could employ to effectively accommodate to language and ethnocultural diversity in long-term care practice. PMID:26260486

  5. Ready for Discharge? A Survey of Discharge Transition-of-Care Education and Evaluation in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Gallahue, Fiona E.; Betz, Amy E.; Druck, Jeffrey; Jones, Jonathan S.; Burns, Boyd; Hern, Gene

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess current education and practices of emergency medicine (EM) residents as perceived by EM program directors to determine if there are deficits in resident discharge handoff training. This survey study was guided by the Kern model for medical curriculum development. A six-member Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD) Transitions of Care task force of EM physicians performed these steps and constructed a survey. The survey was distributed to program residency directors via the CORD listserve and/or direct contact. There were 119 responses to the survey, which were collected using an online survey tool. Over 71% of the 167 American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited EM residency programs were represented. Of those responding, 42.9% of programs reported formal training regarding discharges during initial orientation and 5.9% reported structured curriculum outside of orientation. A majority (73.9%) of programs reported that EM residents were not routinely evaluated on their discharge proficiency. Despite the ACGME requirements requiring formal handoff curriculum and evaluation, many programs do not provide formal curriculum on the discharge transition of care or evaluate EM residents on their discharge proficiency. PMID:26594283

  6. Ready for Discharge? A Survey of Discharge Transition-of-Care Education and Evaluation in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Gallahue, Fiona E; Betz, Amy E; Druck, Jeffrey; Jones, Jonathan S; Burns, Boyd; Hern, Gene

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to assess current education and practices of emergency medicine (EM) residents as perceived by EM program directors to determine if there are deficits in resident discharge handoff training. This survey study was guided by the Kern model for medical curriculum development. A six-member Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD) Transitions of Care task force of EM physicians performed these steps and constructed a survey. The survey was distributed to program residency directors via the CORD listserve and/or direct contact. There were 119 responses to the survey, which were collected using an online survey tool. Over 71% of the 167 American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited EM residency programs were represented. Of those responding, 42.9% of programs reported formal training regarding discharges during initial orientation and 5.9% reported structured curriculum outside of orientation. A majority (73.9%) of programs reported that EM residents were not routinely evaluated on their discharge proficiency. Despite the ACGME requirements requiring formal handoff curriculum and evaluation, many programs do not provide formal curriculum on the discharge transition of care or evaluate EM residents on their discharge proficiency.

  7. Preparing for an epidemic: cancer care in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population was charged with evaluating and proposing recommendations on how to improve the quality of cancer care, with a specific focus on the aging population. Based on their findings, the IOM committee recently released a report highlighting their 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care. Based on those recommendations, this article highlights ways to improve evidence-based care and addresses rising costs in health care for older adults with cancer. The IOM highlighted three recommendations to address the current research gaps in providing evidence-based care in older adults with cancer, which included (1) studying populations which match the age and health-risk profile of the population with the disease, (2) legislative incentives for companies to include patients that are older or with multiple morbidities in new cancer drug trials, and (3) expansion of research that contributes to the depth and breadth of data available for assessing interventions. The recommendations also highlighted the need to maintain affordable and accessible care for older adults with cancer, with an emphasis on finding creative solutions within both the care delivery system and payment models in order to balance costs while preserving quality of care. The implementation of the IOM's recommendations will be a key step in moving closer to the goal of providing accessible, affordable, evidence-based, high-quality care to all patients with cancer.

  8. Age differences in health care spending, fiscal year 1977.

    PubMed

    Gibson, R M; Fisher, C R

    1979-01-01

    This report of health care spending in fiscal year 1977 reveals that of the $142.6 billion spent by the Nation for personal health care in fiscal year 1977, 29 percent was spent for those aged 65 or older, 59 percent for those aged 19-64, and 13 percent for those below age 19. The average health bill reached $1,745 for the aged, $661 for the intermediate age group, and $253 for the young. Public funds financed 67 percent of the health expenses of the aged, with Medicare and Medicaid together accounting for 61 percent. More than two-thirds of the health expenses of the young and 71 percent of the expenses of those aged 19-64 were paid by private sources. Third-party payments met 68 percent of the health expenditures of all those under age 65. PMID:107600

  9. Understanding and improving communication processes in an increasingly multicultural aged care workforce.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Pam; Horner, Barbara; Fyfe, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how culture shapes relationships in aged care and the extent to which the residential aged care sector supports a cohesive multicultural workforce. An exploratory methodology utilising semi-structured questionnaires collected data from 58 participants comprising: staff who provide direct care to residents; managers; and family members from six residential care facilities in Perth, Western Australia. Communication issues emerged as an over-arching theme, and included interpersonal communication, the effect of cultural norms on communication and the impact of informal and formal workplace policies relating to spoken and written language. Sixty percent of participants from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) background had experienced negative reactions from residents with dementia, linked to visible cultural difference. They used a range of coping strategies including ignoring, resilience and avoidance in such situations. CaLD participants also reported prejudicial treatment from non-CaLD staff. The findings highlight the need for organisations to incorporate explicit processes which address the multiple layers of influence on cross cultural communication: internalised beliefs and values; moderating effects of education, experience and social circumstance; and factors external to the individuals, including workplace culture and the broader political economy, to develop a cohesive multicultural workplace.

  10. Understanding and improving communication processes in an increasingly multicultural aged care workforce.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Pam; Horner, Barbara; Fyfe, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how culture shapes relationships in aged care and the extent to which the residential aged care sector supports a cohesive multicultural workforce. An exploratory methodology utilising semi-structured questionnaires collected data from 58 participants comprising: staff who provide direct care to residents; managers; and family members from six residential care facilities in Perth, Western Australia. Communication issues emerged as an over-arching theme, and included interpersonal communication, the effect of cultural norms on communication and the impact of informal and formal workplace policies relating to spoken and written language. Sixty percent of participants from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) background had experienced negative reactions from residents with dementia, linked to visible cultural difference. They used a range of coping strategies including ignoring, resilience and avoidance in such situations. CaLD participants also reported prejudicial treatment from non-CaLD staff. The findings highlight the need for organisations to incorporate explicit processes which address the multiple layers of influence on cross cultural communication: internalised beliefs and values; moderating effects of education, experience and social circumstance; and factors external to the individuals, including workplace culture and the broader political economy, to develop a cohesive multicultural workplace. PMID:25661853

  11. Influences on Case-Managed Community Aged Care Practice.

    PubMed

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-10-01

    Case management has been widely implemented in the community aged care setting. In this study, we aimed to explore influences on case-managed community aged care practice from the perspectives of community aged care case managers. We conducted 33 semistructured interviews with 47 participants. We drew these participants from a list of all case managers working in aged care organizations that provided publicly funded case management program(s)/packages in Victoria, Australia. We used a multilevel framework that included such broad categories of factors as structural, organizational, case manager, client, and practice factors to guide the data analysis. Through thematic analysis, we found that policy change, organizational culture and policies, case managers' professional backgrounds, clients with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and case management models stood out as key influences on case managers' practice. In the future, researchers can use the multilevel framework to undertake implementation research in similar health contexts. PMID:26318797

  12. How to Select Anti-Aging Skin Care Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... zone Video library Find a dermatologist How to select anti-aging skin care products Dermatologists share their ... make a noticeable difference. When shopping for sunscreen, select one that offers all of the following: Broad ...

  13. Surviving the Silver Tsunami: Training a Health Care Workforce to Care for North Carolina's Aging Population.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Mitchell T

    2016-01-01

    North Carolina's aging population will require a health care workforce prepared to meet patients' complex care needs. The keys to training this workforce include continuing to mobilize the state's educational infrastructure to provide interprofessional, community-based experiences and maximizing exposure to new models of care. PMID:26961830

  14. Surviving the Silver Tsunami: Training a Health Care Workforce to Care for North Carolina's Aging Population.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Mitchell T

    2016-01-01

    North Carolina's aging population will require a health care workforce prepared to meet patients' complex care needs. The keys to training this workforce include continuing to mobilize the state's educational infrastructure to provide interprofessional, community-based experiences and maximizing exposure to new models of care.

  15. Becoming-Worker: Vocational Training for Workers in Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Women's care work sits on the boundary between unpaid work in the private domain and poorly paid, low-status work in the public sphere. It continues to be a site for the expression of complex, high-level knowledge and skills, and of ongoing gender oppression. The aged-care industry is a particularly salient example of such work. It is a…

  16. Comprehensive Care Plan Development Using Resident Assessment Instrument Framework: Past, Present, and Future Practices

    PubMed Central

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Corazzini, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Development of the comprehensive care plan (CCP) is a requirement for nursing homes participating in the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs, referred to as skilled nursing facilities. The plan must be developed within the context of the comprehensive interdisciplinary assessment framework—the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI). Consistent compliance with this requirement has been difficult to achieve. To improve the quality of CCP development within this framework, an increased understanding of complex factors contributing to inconsistent compliance is required. In this commentary, we examine the history of the comprehensive care plan; its development within the RAI framework; linkages between the RAI and registered nurse staffing; empirical evidence of the CCP’s efficacy; and the limitations of extant standards of practices in CCP development. Because of the registered nurse’s educational preparation, professional practice standards, and licensure obligations, the essential contributions of professional nurses in CCP development are emphasized. Recommendations for evidence-based micro and macro level practice changes with the potential to improve the quality of CCP development and regulatory compliance are presented. Suggestions for future research are given. PMID:27417811

  17. Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals' experiences of supporting resident's well-being processes within the frame of residential care homes (RCH).

    PubMed

    Lundin, Anette; Berg, Lars-Erik; Hellström Muhli, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being. The phenomenon is seen from the eldercarers' meaning-making through their lifeworld perspective at a residential care home. Based on primary empirical interview material with twelve professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being creates certain ambiguities in the professionals' meaning-making. In practice, it balances between the older persons' (from hereon called residents) needs and the conditions of the eldercare organization. The ambiguities (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older persons vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents' need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents' need for routine vs. the eldercarers' not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the eldercarers' choice of handling supportive care for older persons' well-being (the how). They have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and their own presence and time. In performing supportive care for older persons' well-being, the eldercarers have to consider aspects concerning the resident's lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organization. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the care of older residents are manifested in the importance of 'the little things', and the eldercarer's ability to give receptive attention, which requires presence. PMID:27131273

  18. The 2030 Problem: Caring for Aging Baby Boomers

    PubMed Central

    Knickman, James R; Snell, Emily K

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the coming challenges of caring for large numbers of frail elderly as the Baby Boom generation ages. Study Setting A review of economic and demographic data as well as simulations of projected socioeconomic and demographic patterns in the year 2030 form the basis of a review of the challenges related to caring for seniors that need to be faced by society. Study Design A series of analyses are used to consider the challenges related to caring for elders in the year 2030: (1) measures of macroeconomic burden are developed and analyzed, (2) the literatures on trends in disability, payment approaches for long-term care, healthy aging, and cultural views of aging are analyzed and synthesized, and(3)simulations of future income and assets patterns of the Baby Boom generation are developed. Principal Findings The economic burden of aging in 2030 should be no greater than the economic burden associated with raising large numbers of baby boom children in the 1960s. The real challenges of caring for the elderly in 2030 will involve: (1) making sure society develops payment and insurance systems for long-term care that work better than existing ones, (2) taking advantage of advances in medicine and behavioral health to keep the elderly as healthy and active as possible, (3) changing the way society organizes community services so that care is more accessible, and (4) altering the cultural view of aging to make sure all ages are integrated into the fabric of community life. Conclusions To meet the long-term care needs of Baby Boomers, social and public policy changes must begin soon. Meeting the financial and social service burdens of growing numbers of elders will not be a daunting task if necessary changes are made now rather than when Baby Boomers actually need long-term care. PMID:12236388

  19. Supporting residents’ expression of sexuality: the initial construction of a sexuality assessment tool for residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sexuality is a key component of quality of life and well-being and a need to express one’s sexuality continues into old age. Staff and families in residential aged care facilities often find expressions of sexuality by residents, particularly those living with dementia, challenging and facilities often struggle to address individuals’ needs in this area. This paper describes the development of an assessment tool which enables residential aged care facilities to identify how supportive their organisation is of all residents’ expression of their sexuality, and thereby improve where required. Methods Multi-phase design using qualitative methods and a Delphi technique. Tool items were derived from the literature and verified by qualitative interviews with aged care facility staff, residents and families. The final item pool was confirmed via a reactive Delphi process. Results A final item pool of sixty-nine items grouped into seven key areas allows facilities to score their compliance with the areas identified as being supportive of older people’s expression of their sexuality in a residential aged care environment. Conclusions The sexuality assessment tool (SexAT) guides practice to support the normalization of sexuality in aged care homes and assists facilities to identify where enhancements to the environment, policies, procedures and practices, information and education/training are required. The tool also enables facilities to monitor initiatives in these areas over time. PMID:24980463

  20. Factors contributing to nonadherence to follow-up appointments in a resident glaucoma clinic versus primary eye care clinic

    PubMed Central

    Fudemberg, Scott J; Lee, Brian; Waisbourd, Michael; Murphy, Rachel A; Dai, Yang; Leiby, Benjamin E; Hark, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the rate of adherence to follow-up appointment recommendations in a resident glaucoma clinic with no mechanism for reminders, compared to a resident cataract and primary eye care (CPEC) clinic in which telephone reminders were used, and to identify factors that contribute to adherence in each patient group. Methods This retrospective cohort study included subjects in the CPEC clinic who received telephone reminders and those in the glaucoma clinic who did not. Each sample was selected to have a similar proportion of follow-up recommendations for 1, 3, and 6 months. Subjects were considered adherent if they returned within a specified timeframe. Results A total of 144 subjects from the glaucoma clinic and 151 subjects from the CPEC clinic were included. There was no significant difference between follow-up adherence rates of patients who received telephone reminders and those who did not (odds ratio [OR] =1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79–2.32, P=0.28). Patients who were on more than two ocular medications were more likely to return for follow-up (OR=3.11, 95% CI 1.53–6.35, P=0.0018). Subjects between the ages 50 and 80 years were more likely to be adherent compared to their younger and older peers (P=0.02). Conclusion The follow-up adherence of patients in a CPEC clinic who received telephone reminders was similar to patients in a glaucoma clinic who did not receive any intervention to increase their adherence. Younger (⩽50 years old) and elderly (⩾80 years old) subjects, as well as patients using less than two glaucoma medications, were less likely to adhere to their follow-up appointments. PMID:26811672

  1. They know!—Do they? A qualitative study of residents and relatives views on advance care planning, end-of-life care, and decision-making in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Bollig, Georg; Gjengedal, Eva; Rosland, Jan Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residents living in long-term care facilities are a vulnerable population. For many residents, a nursing home is their place of death. Palliative care and end-of-life decisions are important components of their care provision. Aim: To study the views of cognitively able residents and relatives on advance care planning, end-of-life care, and decision-making in nursing homes. Design: A qualitative study with in-depth interviews with nursing home residents and focus group interviews with relatives of nursing home residents. Analysis is based on interpretive description. Setting/participants: In total, 43 informants from nine nursing homes participated in the study (25 nursing home residents and 18 relatives). All included residents had capacity to provide informed consent and lived in long-term care. Results: The main findings of this study were the differing views about decision-making and advance care planning of residents and relatives. Residents do trust relatives and staff to make important decisions for them. The relatives are in contrast insecure about the residents’ wishes and experience decision-making as a burden. The majority of the residents had not participated in advance care planning. None of the residents stated challenges connected to end-of-life care or mentioned the wish for euthanasia. Conclusion: Although most residents seem to be satisfied with decision-making and end-of life care, there is a need for systematic advance care planning. Advance care planning could help to explore future wishes for care and ease decision-making for the relatives, physicians, and staff and should be offered to all cognitively able nursing homes residents. PMID:26396227

  2. Old age, disability and care in public health.

    PubMed

    Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2015-12-01

    Aging of the population profoundly changes the scope of action of public health, altering the profile of morbidity-mortality and increasing the demand for chronic care. In the aging population, disability serves as an indicator of health and a guideline for actions and policies. This enquiry, with a qualitative approach, based on interpretative anthropology and the emic perspective, aims to understand the way of thinking and acting of old people in the face of 'old age with disability' and their relationships with public health. Individual interviews were held at the subject's homes, using a semi-structured script, with 57 old people living in the city, including participants from the cohort of Bambuí. Collection and analysis of the data was oriented by the methodology of Signs, Meanings and Actions, making possible anthropological investigation of the representations and concrete behaviors associated with disability in old age in the local culture. Two categories relating to the relationships between old age, disability and public healthcare emerged from the analysis: (i) experience of care in old age with disability; and (ii) the fear of lack of care. The results reveal that public health needs to review its concepts about disability in old age and incorporate disability into the agenda of the functional dimension of health and care for old age. PMID:26691789

  3. Old age, disability and care in public health.

    PubMed

    Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2015-12-01

    Aging of the population profoundly changes the scope of action of public health, altering the profile of morbidity-mortality and increasing the demand for chronic care. In the aging population, disability serves as an indicator of health and a guideline for actions and policies. This enquiry, with a qualitative approach, based on interpretative anthropology and the emic perspective, aims to understand the way of thinking and acting of old people in the face of 'old age with disability' and their relationships with public health. Individual interviews were held at the subject's homes, using a semi-structured script, with 57 old people living in the city, including participants from the cohort of Bambuí. Collection and analysis of the data was oriented by the methodology of Signs, Meanings and Actions, making possible anthropological investigation of the representations and concrete behaviors associated with disability in old age in the local culture. Two categories relating to the relationships between old age, disability and public healthcare emerged from the analysis: (i) experience of care in old age with disability; and (ii) the fear of lack of care. The results reveal that public health needs to review its concepts about disability in old age and incorporate disability into the agenda of the functional dimension of health and care for old age.

  4. Grip on challenging behaviour: a multidisciplinary care programme for managing behavioural problems in nursing home residents with dementia. Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Behavioural problems are common in nursing home residents with dementia and they often are burdensome for both residents and nursing staff. In this study, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new care programme for managing behavioural problems will be evaluated. Methods/Design The care programme is based on Dutch national guidelines. It will consist of four steps: detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation. A stepped wedge design will be used. A total of 14 dementia special care units will implement the care programme. The primary outcome is behavioural problems. Secondary outcomes will include quality of life, prescription rate of antipsychotics, use of physical restraints and workload and job satisfaction of nursing staff. The effect of the care programme will be estimated using multilevel linear regression analysis. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective will also be carried out. Discussion The care programme is expected to be cost-effective and effective in decreasing behavioural problems, workload of nursing staff and in increasing quality of life of residents. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR). Trial number: NTR 2141 PMID:21338502

  5. Primary Care Residents' Knowledge, Attitudes, Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Professional Norms Regarding Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Samantha; Seeholzer, Eileen L.; Gullett, Heidi; Jackson, Brigid; Antognoli, Elizabeth; Krejci, Susan A.; Flocke, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity and being overweight are both significant risk factors for multiple chronic conditions. Primary care physicians are in a position to provide health behavior counseling to the majority of US adults, yet most report insufficient training to deliver effective counseling for obesity. Objective To assess the degree to which residents training in adult primary care programs are prepared to provide obesity, nutrition, and physical activity (ONPA) counseling. Methods Senior residents (postgraduate year [PGY]-3 and PGY-4) from 25 Ohio family medicine, internal medicine, and obstetrics and gynecology programs were surveyed regarding their knowledge about obesity risks and effective counseling, as well as their attitudes, self-efficacy, and perceived professional norms toward ONPA counseling. We examined summary scores, and used regression analyses to assess associations with resident demographics and training program characteristics. Results A total of 219 residents participated (62% response rate). Mean ONPA counseling knowledge score was 50.8 (± 15.6) on a 0 to 100 scale. Specialty was associated with counseling self-efficacy (P < .001) and perceived norms (P = .002). Residents who reported having engaged in an elective rotation emphasizing ONPA counseling had significantly higher self-efficacy and more positive attitudes and professional norms scores. Conclusions Our findings suggest that primary care residents' knowledge of ONPA assessment and management strategies has room for improvement. Attitudes, self-efficacy, and perceived norms also are low and vary by training program characteristics. A deeper understanding of curricula associated with improved performance in these domains could inform interventions to enhance residents' ONPA counseling skills and prevent chronic disease. PMID:26457144

  6. Patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections in older residents of long-term care facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: To describe patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among elderly residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). DESIGN: Data from a prospective, randomized, controlled study conducted from April 1998 through August 2001 to investigate the effect of vitamin ...

  7. Risk factors for fecal colonization with multiple distinct strains of Escherichia coli among long-term care facility residents.

    PubMed

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Maslow, Joel N

    2009-05-01

    Of 49 long-term care facility residents, 21 (43%) were colonized with 2 or more distinct strains of Escherichia coli. There were no significant risk factors for colonization with multiple strains of E. coli. These results suggest that future efforts to efficiently identify the diversity of colonizing strains will be challenging. PMID:19292660

  8. Factors that Influence Physical Activity in Long-Term Care: Perspectives of Residents, Staff, and Significant Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Kathleen; Edwards, Nancy; Guitard, Paulette; Murray, Mary Ann; Caswell, Wenda; Perrier, Marie Josee

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity has been linked to positive health outcomes for frail seniors. However, our understanding of factors that influence the physical activity of residents in the long-term care (LTC) setting is limited. This article describes our work with focus groups, one component of a multi-component study that examined factors influencing the…

  9. The black aged: implications for mental health care.

    PubMed

    Carter, J H

    1982-01-01

    Some of the problems associated with providing quality mental health care for aged blacks are discussed. It is postulated that treatment should be used selectively, not in terms of simplistic formulas or part-truths about aged blacks, but on the bases of clinical indications in differential diagnosis. The essence of improved mental health for blacks, regardless of sex or age, entails an unrelenting struggle by mental health professionals toward the removal of all vestiges of racism.

  10. Phenomenological perspectives on self-care in aging

    PubMed Central

    Söderhamn, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Self-care is a central concept in health care and may be considered as a means to maintain, restore, and improve one’s health and well-being. When performed effectively, self-care contributes not only to human functioning but also to human structural integrity and human development (ie, to a dynamic and holistic state of health). Self-care as a clinical concept is relevant for health care professionals, and it should be meaningful to investigate it at a philosophical level and to further elaborate upon this concept. The aim of this article is to discuss and elaborate upon a phenomenological perspective on self-care in aging that is relevant for the health sciences. Self-care may be preliminarily regarded as a fundamental perspective for the conscious older individual, and as a way of being in the world with both the objective body and with the lived body. The lived body is the personal center of perception and the field of action, and it is also the center of self-care. The potentiality or ability for self-care activity and self-care activity itself are structures given to perception, with self-care ability as an integral part of the lived body. The actualization of self-care ability comes about through a certain meaning, which can be regarded as an important driving force. It is constituted by communication, a healthy lifestyle, and by building meaning and socializing. Successful self-care involves having contacts with the health care system, being conscious of a sound lifestyle, being physically and mentally active, being engaged, having social contacts with family and others, as well as being satisfied, positive, and being able to look forward. One fundamental cornerstone is serenity on behalf of the individual. Self-care can facilitate transitions, and it may also be an outcome of transitions. PMID:23807842

  11. Ambulatory care sensitive hospitalization rates in the aged Medicare population in Utah, 1990 to 1994: a rural-urban comparison.

    PubMed

    Silver, M P; Babitz, M E; Magill, M K

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the likelihood of hospitalization for conditions that are related to the adequacy and use of ambulatory health care services for Medicare beneficiaries residing in rural and urban regions in Utah. The Health Care Financing Administration's (HCFA) hospital discharge database (Utah hospitals: 1990 to 1994) was used to estimate hospitalization rates (with adjustment for out-of-state admissions) for ambulatory care sensitive conditions. Population estimates were obtained from HCFA beneficiary files. Regional hospitalization rates were obtained through ZIP code matching of the hospital discharge and beneficiary files. Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older residing in Utah during 1990 to 1994 are the subjects for the study. The main outcome measures include age and sex-adjusted hospitalization rates by region for the entire state and rate ratio estimates for nonurban regions. The results of the study show that Medicare beneficiaries residing in two rural-frontier regions were more likely than urban beneficiaries to be hospitalized for ambulatory care sensitive conditions. Rate ratio estimates were greater than 1.4 for both regions during the study period. These findings suggest a pattern of an increased burden of avoidable secondary complications and disease progression among Utah Medicare beneficiaries residing in some rural regions. This increased burden may be the result of limitations in the ambulatory care system, medical care provider supply, and/or beneficiary propensity to seek care. Variation in disease prevalence or hospital use patterns for these conditions also may be responsible for all or part of the observed variation in ambulatory care sensitive admission rates.

  12. Correlation between tea consumption and prevalence of hypertension among Singaporean Chinese residents aged ⩾40 years.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Yang, J; Zhu, X S; Li, S C; Ho, P C

    2016-01-01

    By a cross-sectional epidemiology study, we attempted to correlate the consumption of tea and/or health supplements, living habits and socio-demographic factors to the prevalence of hypertension among Singaporean Chinese residents. Singaporean Chinese residents aged ⩾40 years were randomly selected and interviewed face-to-face by clinical research assistants. Hypertension was defined as measured systolic blood pressure at least 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure at least 90  mmHg or self-reported history/treatment for hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension among the whole investigated population (N=1184, 58.27% females) was 49.73% and the prevalence increased to 66.47% in the sub-population aged ⩾60 years. High risk of hypertension was associated with age ⩾60 years (odds ratio (OR): 4.15-4.19, P<0.01), obesity (body mass index >25 kg m(-2), OR: 2.10-2.11, P<0.01), family history of hypertension (OR: 2.69-2.76, P<0.01), diabetes history (OR: 2.29-2.33, P<0.01), hyperlipidemia history (OR: 1.79-1.80, P<0.01), male (OR: 1.56-1.59, P<0.01) and coffee intake (OR: 1.44-1.46, P<0.05). In contrast, drinking green tea at least 150 ml per week was associated with lower hypertension risk (OR: 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.43-0.91, P<0.05). Drinking combination of green tea and British tea was associated with higher reduction in the risk of hypertension (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.39-0.85, P<0.05). This cross-sectional study suggests that consumption of tea, especially green tea and British tea, was associated with lowering the risk of hypertension. On the other hand, consumption of coffee could be a risk factor of hypertension. These findings may provide useful information for health promotion to reduce risk of hypertension and warrant further study to confirm and elucidate such association.

  13. Factors Related to Rejection of Care and Behaviors Directed towards Others: A Longitudinal Study in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Volicer, Ladislav; van der Steen, Jenny T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to analyze factors related to rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others in nursing home residents with dementia. Methods The relationship of lack of understanding, depression, psychosis and pain with rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others was explored using four assessments from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) within a period of 15 months on 1,101 residents with dementia in Dutch nursing homes. Presence of depressive symptoms was ascertained using a validated MDS scale, and presence of lack of understanding, rejection of care, psychosis and pain through the individual MDS items. A structural equation modeling approach and latent growth models were used to investigate the longitudinal relationship between changes in rejection of care and physical or verbal behaviors directed towards others, and changes in lack of understanding, pain, depression and psychotic symptoms. Results Changes in lack of understanding predicted changes in rejection of care, and there was also a relationship between changes in depression and rejection of care. Changes of behaviors directed towards others were related to changes in lack of understanding and depression. Pain and behaviors directed towards others were unrelated, and psychosis was rather stable throughout. A mediation model suggested that the relationship of lack of understanding with behaviors directed towards others was mediated by rejection of care. Conclusion These results indicate that lack of understanding and depression are important factors in development of rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others. The relationship between lack of understanding and behaviors directed towards others is mediated by rejection of care. Improvement in communication between residents and caregivers, and perhaps also effective treatment of depression may prevent or ameliorate these behaviors directed towards others. PMID:25999979

  14. Age differences in health care spending, fiscal year 1976.

    PubMed

    Gibson, R M; Mueller, M S; Fisher, C R

    1977-08-01

    Of the $120.4 billion spent by the Nation for personal health care in fiscal year 1976, 29% was spent for those aged 65 or older, 15% for those under age 19, and the remaining 56% for those aged 19-64. The average health bill reached $1,521 for the aged, $547 for the intermediate age group, and $249 for the young. Public funds financed 68% of the health expenses of the aged with Medicare and Medicaid together accounting for 59%. Private sources paid 74% of the health expenses of the young and 70% of the expenses of those aged 19-64. Third-party payments met 65% of the health expenditures of all those under age 65. PMID:408934

  15. Oxygen Saturation in Healthy Children Aged 5 to 16 Years Residing in Huayllay, Peru at 4340 m

    PubMed Central

    Schult, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Schult, Sandra, and Carlos Canelo-Aybar. Oxygen saturation in healthy chidren aged 5 to 6 years residing in Huayllay, Peru, at 4340 m. High Alt. Med. Biol. 12:89–92, 2011.—Hypoxemia is a major life-threatening complication of childhood pneumonia. The threshold points for hypoxemia vary with altitude. However, few published data describe that normal range of variation. The purpose of this study was to establish reference values of normal mean Sao2 levels and an approximate cutoff point to define hypoxemia for clinical purposes above 4300 meters above sea level (masl). Children aged 5 to 16 yr were examined during primary care visits at the Huayllay Health Center. Huayllay is a rural community located at 4340 m in the province of Pasco in the Peruvian Andes. We collected basic sociodemographic data and evaluated three outcomes: arterial oxygen saturation (Sao2) with a pulse oximeter, heart rate, and respiratory rate. Comparisons of main outcomes among age groups (5–6, 7–8, 9–10, 11–12, 13–14, and 15–16 yr) and sex were performed using linear regression models. The correlation of Sao2 with heart rate and respiration rate was established by Pearson's correlation test. We evaluated 583 children, of whom 386 were included in the study. The average age was 10.3 yr; 55.7% were female. The average Sao2, heart rate, and respiratory rate were 85.7% (95% CI: 85.2–86.2), 80.4/min (95% CI: 79.0–81.9), and 19.9/min (95% CI: 19.6–20.2), respectively. Sao2 increased with age (p < 0.001). No differences by sex were observed. The mean minus two standard deviations of Sao2 (threshold point for hypoxemia) ranged from 73.8% to 81.8% by age group. At 4300 m, the reference values for hypoxemia may be 14.2% lower than at sea level. This difference must be considered when diagnosing hypoxemia or deciding oxygen supplementation at high altitude. Other studies are needed to determine whether this reference value is appropriate for clinical use. PMID

  16. Length of residence, age and patterns of medicinal plant knowledge and use among women in the urban Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper explores patterns of women’s medicinal plant knowledge and use in an urban area of the Brazilian Amazon. Specifically, this paper examines the relationship between a woman’s age and her use and knowledge of medicinal plants. It also examines whether length of residence in three different areas of the Amazon is correlated with a woman’s use and knowledge of medicinal plants. Two of the areas where respondents may have resided, the jungle/seringal and farms/colonias, are classified as rural. The third area (which all of the respondents resided in) was urban. Methods This paper utilizes survey data collected in Rio Branco, Brazil. Researchers administered the survey to 153 households in the community of Bairro da Luz (a pseudonym). The survey collected data on phytotherapeutic knowledge, general phytotherapeutic practice, recent phytotherapeutic practice and demographic information on age and length of residence in the seringal, on a colonia, and in a city. Bivariate correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the inter-relationships among the key variables. Three dependent variables, two measuring general phytotherapeutic practice and one measuring phytotherapeutic knowledge were regressed on the demographic factors. Results The results demonstrate a relationship between a woman’s age and medicinal plant use, but not between age and plant knowledge. Additionally, length of residence in an urban area and on a colonia/farm are not related to medicinal plant knowledge or use. However, length of residence in the seringal/jungle is positively correlated with both medicinal plant knowledge and use. Conclusions The results reveal a vibrant tradition of medicinal plant use in Bairro da Luz. They also indicate that when it comes to place of residence and phytotherapy the meaningful distinction is not rural versus urban, it is seringal versus other locations. Finally, the results suggest that phytotherapeutic knowledge and use should be

  17. Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies

    PubMed Central

    Grall, Kristi H; Panchal, Ashish R; Chuffe, Eliud; Stoneking, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. Materials and methods We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; P<0.001). Conclusion Implementation of a longitudinal, integrated Spanish-immersion curriculum is feasible and improves language skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settings. PMID:26929679

  18. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR...: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. In addition to meeting the... of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  19. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR...: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. In addition to meeting the... of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  20. Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 2016.

    PubMed

    Oduyebo, Titilope; Petersen, Emily E; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Mead, Paul S; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Renquist, Christina M; Ellington, Sascha R; Fischer, Marc; Staples, J Erin; Powers, Ann M; Villanueva, Julie; Galang, Romeo R; Dieke, Ada; Muñoz, Jorge L; Honein, Margaret A; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-02-12

    CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak (1). Updated guidelines include a new recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women (women who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease) who have traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Testing can be offered 2-12 weeks after pregnant women return from travel. This update also expands guidance to women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, and includes recommendations for screening, testing, and management of pregnant women and recommendations for counseling women of reproductive age (15-44 years). Pregnant women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission have an ongoing risk for infection throughout their pregnancy. For pregnant women with clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease,* testing is recommended during the first week of illness. For asymptomatic pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, testing is recommended at the initiation of prenatal care with follow-up testing mid-second trimester. Local health officials should determine when to implement testing of asymptomatic pregnant women based on information about levels of Zika virus transmission and laboratory capacity. Health care providers should discuss reproductive life plans, including pregnancy intention and timing, with women of reproductive age in the context of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection.

  1. Influenza immunization coverage of residents and employees of long-term care facilities in New York State, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Person, Cara J; Nadeau, Jessica A; Schaffzin, Joshua K; Pollock, Lynn; Wallace, Barbara J; McNutt, Louise Ann; Blog, Debra

    2013-08-01

    We describe influenza immunization coverage trends from the New York State (NYS) Department of Health long-term care facility (LTCF) reports. Overall median immunization coverage levels for NYS LTCF residents and employees were 84.0% (range: 81.6%-86.0%) and 37.7% (range: 32.7%-50.0%), respectively. LTCF resident immunization coverage levels in NYS have neared the Healthy People 2020 target of 90% but have not achieved high LTCF employee coverage, suggesting a need for more regulatory interventions.

  2. Reducing and managing faecal incontinence in people with advanced dementia who are resident in care homes: protocol for a realist synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Rycroft Malone, Jo; Norton, Christine; Harari, Danielle; Harwood, Rowan; Roe, Brenda; Russell, Bridget; Fader, Mandy; Buswell, Marina; Drennan, Vari M; Bunn, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Faecal incontinence (FI) is the involuntary loss of liquid or solid stool that is a social or hygienic problem. The prevalence of FI in residents of care homes is high, but it is not an inevitable consequence of old age or dementia. There is good evidence on risk factors, but few studies provide evidence about effective interventions. There is a need to understand how, why, and in what circumstances particular programmes to reduce and manage FI are effective (or not) for people with dementia. The purpose of this review is to identify which (elements of the) interventions could potentially be effective, and examine the barriers and facilitators to the acceptability, uptake and implementation of interventions designed to address FI in people with dementia who are resident in care homes. Methods and analysis A realist synthesis approach to review the evidence will be used which will include studies on continence, person-centred care, implementation research in care homes, workforce and research on care home culture. An iterative four-stage approach is planned. Phase 1: development of an initial programme theory or theories that will be ‘tested’ through a first scoping of the literature and consultation with five stakeholder groups (care home providers, user representatives, academics and practice educators, clinicians with a special interest in FI and continence specialists). Phase 2: a systematic search and analysis of published and unpublished evidence to test and develop the programme theories identified in phase 1. Phase 3: validation of programme theory/ies with a purposive sample of participants from phase 1. Ethics and dissemination The overall protocol does not require ethical review. The University research ethics committee will review interviews conducted as part of phase 1 and 3. The final fourth phase will synthesise and develop recommendations for practice and develop testable hypotheses for further research. PMID:26163032

  3. Flexible teaching for inflexible schedules: an online resident curriculum in acute ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Cook, David A; Dupras, Denise M

    2003-05-01

    The authors report on a work in progress: a web-based curriculum for residents working shifts, addressing management of common acute outpatient problems. All components of the curriculum are available online, and residents may complete modules and submit tests at a time and from any location. There are few reports of web-based curricula in postgraduate training. Our interactive model avoids scheduling conflicts, is easily updated, encourages self-directed earning and facilitates resident assessment.

  4. Weathering the storm: challenges to nurses providing care to nursing home residents during hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Hyer, Kathryn; Brown, Lisa M; Christensen, Janelle J; Thomas, Kali S

    2009-11-01

    This article documents the experience of 291 Florida nursing homes during the 2004 hurricane season. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, the authors described and compared the challenges nurses encountered when evacuating residents with their experiences assisting residents of facilities that sheltered in place. The primary concerns for evacuating facilities were accessing appropriate evacuation sites for residents and having ambulance transportation contracts honored. The main issue for facilities that sheltered in place was the length of time it took for power to be restored. Barriers to maintaining resident health during disasters for those who evacuated or sheltered in place are identified.

  5. Companion animal knowledge, attachment and pet cat care and their associations with household demographics for residents of a rural Texas town.

    PubMed

    Ramón, Melanie E; Slater, Margaret R; Ward, Michael P

    2010-05-01

    This cross-sectional telephone survey explored companion animal attachment and knowledge as well as cat care of residents in a small Texas town. The survey included 441 residents of randomly selected households (55% response rate). Dogs were owned by 48% of households and cats by 29%. Companion animal ownership was associated with being 25-44 years old, being Anglo, having an income over $85,000/year, and feeding unowned cats. More knowledge about animals was associated with being any age except 45-54 years old and with completing college or an advanced degree. Higher attachment was associated with being a woman and having no children in the household. Attachment and knowledge were not related to ethnicity. Cats were likely to be sterilized if they had been owned more than 2 years and had been rabies vaccinated. Outside-only cats were used to control vermin ("mousers") and were less likely to have visited a veterinarian. Cats with identification were likely to be from a shelter, frequently have visited the veterinarian, and been vaccinated against rabies. There are many companion animal owners who still do not have basic knowledge to prevent accidental litters or provide basic health care. Attachment scores for companion animal owners were similar to those previously reported and similar for cat and dog owners. A pattern of better care emerges for owners who view their cats as companions.

  6. A Systematic Review of Interventions to Change Staff Care Practices in Order to Improve Resident Outcomes in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lee-Fay; Fletcher, Jennifer; Goodenough, Belinda; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; MacAndrew, Margaret; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed interventions that attempted to change staff practice to improve long-term care resident outcomes. Methods Studies met criteria if they used a control group, included 6 or more nursing home units and quantitatively assessed staff behavior or resident outcomes. Intervention components were coded as including education material, training, audit and feedback, monitoring, champions, team meetings, policy or procedures and organizational restructure. Results Sixty-three unique studies were broadly grouped according to clinical domain—oral health (3 studies), hygiene and infection control (3 studies), nutrition (2 studies), nursing home acquired pneumonia (2 studies), depression (2 studies) appropriate prescribing (7 studies), reduction of physical restraints (3 studies), management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (6 studies), falls reduction and prevention (11 studies), quality improvement (9 studies), philosophy of care (10 studies) and other (5 studies). No single intervention component, combination of, or increased number of components was associated with greater likelihood of positive outcomes. Studies with positive outcomes for residents also tended to change staff behavior, however changing staff behavior did not necessarily improve resident outcomes. Studies targeting specific care tasks (e.g. oral care, physical restraints) were more likely to produce positive outcomes than those requiring global practice changes (e.g. care philosophy). Studies using intervention theories were more likely to be successful. Program logic was rarely articulated, so it was often unclear whether there was a coherent connection between the intervention components and measured outcomes. Many studies reported barriers relating to staff (e.g. turnover, high workload, attitudes) or organizational factors (e.g. funding, resources, logistics). Conclusion Changing staff practice in nursing homes is possible but complex

  7. A comment on the use of flushing time, residence time, and age as transport time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsen, N.E.; Cloern, J.E.; Lucas, L.V.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    Applications of transport time scales are pervasive in biological, hydrologic, and geochemical studies yet these times scales are not consistently defined and applied with rigor in the literature. We compare three transport time scales (flushing time, age, and residence time) commonly used to measure the retention of water or scalar quantities transported with water. We identify the underlying assumptions associated with each time scale, describe procedures for computing these time scales in idealized cases, and identify pitfalls when real-world systems deviate from these idealizations. We then apply the time scale definitions to a shallow 378 ha tidal lake to illustrate how deviations between real water bodies and the idealized examples can result from: (1) non-steady flow; (2) spatial variability in bathymetry, circulation, and transport time scales; and (3) tides that introduce complexities not accounted for in the idealized cases. These examples illustrate that no single transport time scale is valid for all time periods, locations, and constituents, and no one time scale describes all transport processes. We encourage aquatic scientists to rigorously define the transport time scale when it is applied, identify the underlying assumptions in the application of that concept, and ask if those assumptions are valid in the application of that approach for computing transport time scales in real systems.

  8. The Effect of the Lowered Age of Majority and Relaxed Dormitory Policies on Drug Usage by Dormitory Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuznik, Anthony

    1975-01-01

    In 1973, the state of Minnesota passed legislation lowering the legal age of adulthood from 21 to 18; this gave 18-year olds the opportunity to legally consume alcoholic beverages. At the same time, the University of Minnesota made policy changes which enabled dormitory residents to consume alcoholic beverages in their rooms. To ascertain the…

  9. The Effect of Residence Area and Mother's Education on Motor Development of Preschool-Aged Children in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Kyparos, Antonios; Fotiadou, Eleni; Angelopoulou, Nickoletta

    2007-01-01

    Development occurs according to the rhythm that is established by the genetic potential and the influence of environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the child's residence area and maternal education on child's motor development. Eight hundred children (384 boys and 416 girls, aged 37-72 months), randomly…

  10. Self-Defined Community Satisfactions of Mexican American Families in Metropolitan South Texas: Age Status and Place of Residence Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Chester C.

    Trained, indigenous, bilingual people conducted interviews with 172 Mexican American families from the Southmost area of Brownsville and rural communities in Brooks County, Texas, to ascertain metro-nonmetro community satisfaction, as determined by place of residence and age status differentiations among family members. Complete family study units…

  11. Exploring Innovative Solutions for Quality of Life and Care of Bed-Ridden Nursing Home Residents through Codesign Sessions

    PubMed Central

    van Hoof, J.; Wetzels, M. H.; Dooremalen, A. M. C.; Overdiep, R. A.; Nieboer, M. E.; Eyck, A. M. E.; van Gorkom, P. J. L. M.; Zwerts-Verhelst, E. L. M.; Aarts, S.; Vissers-Luijcks, C.; van der Voort, C. S.; Moonen, M. J. G. A.; van de Vrande, H. A.; van Dijck-Heinen, C. J. M. L.; Wouters, E. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Bed-ridden nursing home residents are in need of environments which are homelike and facilitate the provision of care. Design guidance for this group of older people is limited. This study concerned the exploration and generation of innovative environmental enrichment scenarios for bed-ridden residents. This exploration was conducted through a combination of participatory action research with user-centred design involving 56 professional stakeholders in interactive work sessions. This study identified numerous design solutions, both concepts and products that are available on the marketplace and that on a higher level relate to improvements in resident autonomy and the supply of technological items and architectural features. The methodology chosen can be used to explore the creative potential of stakeholders from the domain of healthcare in product innovation. PMID:26543647

  12. Exploring Innovative Solutions for Quality of Life and Care of Bed-Ridden Nursing Home Residents through Codesign Sessions.

    PubMed

    van Hoof, J; Wetzels, M H; Dooremalen, A M C; Overdiep, R A; Nieboer, M E; Eyck, A M E; van Gorkom, P J L M; Zwerts-Verhelst, E L M; Aarts, S; Vissers-Luijcks, C; van der Voort, C S; Moonen, M J G A; van de Vrande, H A; van Dijck-Heinen, C J M L; Wouters, E J M

    2015-01-01

    Bed-ridden nursing home residents are in need of environments which are homelike and facilitate the provision of care. Design guidance for this group of older people is limited. This study concerned the exploration and generation of innovative environmental enrichment scenarios for bed-ridden residents. This exploration was conducted through a combination of participatory action research with user-centred design involving 56 professional stakeholders in interactive work sessions. This study identified numerous design solutions, both concepts and products that are available on the marketplace and that on a higher level relate to improvements in resident autonomy and the supply of technological items and architectural features. The methodology chosen can be used to explore the creative potential of stakeholders from the domain of healthcare in product innovation. PMID:26543647

  13. Effects of Prenatal Care on Child Health at Age 5

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Kelly; Corman, Hope; Schwartz-Soicher, Ofira; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The broad goal of contemporary prenatal care is to promote the health of the mother, child, and family through the pregnancy, delivery, and the child’s development. Although the vast majority of mothers giving birth in developed countries receive prenatal care, past research has not found compelling evidence that early or adequate prenatal care has favorable effects on birth outcomes. It is possible that prenatal care confers health benefits to the child that do not become apparent until after the perinatal period. Methods Using data from a national urban birth cohort study in the U.S., we estimate the effects of prenatal care on four markers of child health at age 5—maternal-reported health status, asthma diagnosis, overweight, and height. We implement a number of different strategies to address the issue of potential omitted variables bias as well as a large number of specification checks to validate the findings. Results and Conclusions Prenatal care, defined a number of different ways, does not appear to have any effect on the outcomes examined. The findings are robust and suggest that routine health care encounters during the prenatal period could potentially be used more effectively to enhance children’s health trajectories. However, future research is needed to explore the effects of prenatal care on additional child health and developmental outcomes as well as the effects of preconceptional and maternal lifetime helathcare on child health. PMID:22374319

  14. The Aging Brain Care Medical Home: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    LaMantia, Michael A; Alder, Catherine A; Callahan, Christopher M; Gao, Sujuan; French, Dustin D; Austrom, Mary G; Boustany, Karim; Livin, Lee; Bynagari, Bharath; Boustani, Malaz A

    2015-06-01

    The Aging Brain Care (ABC) Medical Home aims to improve the care, health outcomes, and medical costs of Medicare beneficiaries with dementia or depression across central Indiana. This population health management program, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovation Center, expanded an existing collaborative dementia and depression care program to serve 1,650 older adults in a local safety-net hospital system. During the first year, 20 full-time clinical staff were hired, trained, and deployed to deliver a collaborative care intervention. In the first 18 months, an average of 13 visits was provided per person. Thirty percent of the sample had a diagnosis of dementia, and 77% had a diagnosis of depression. Sixty-six percent of participants with high depression scores (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score ≥14) had at least a 50% reduction in their depressive symptoms. Fifty-one percent of caregivers of individuals with dementia had at least a 50% reduction in caregiver stress symptoms (measured by the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor-Caregiver Version). After 18 months, the ABC Medical Home has demonstrated progress toward improving the health of older adults with dementia and depression. Scalable and practical models like this show initial promise for answering the challenges posed by the nation's rapidly aging population. PMID:26096394

  15. Effect of resident handoffs on length of hospital and intensive care unit stay in a neurosurgical population: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Elizabeth N; Davis, Matthew C; Agee, Bonita S; Oster, Robert A; Markert, James M

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Handoffs and services changes are potentially modifiable sources of medical error and delays in transition of care. This cohort study assessed the relationship between resident service handoffs and length of stay for neurosurgical patients. METHODS All patients admitted to the University of Alabama at Birmingham neurosurgical service between July 1, 2012, and July 1, 2014, were retrospectively identified. A service handoff was defined as any point when a resident handed off coverage of a service for longer than 1 weekend. A conditional probability distribution was constructed to adjust length of stay for the increasing probability of a random handoff. The Student t-test and ANCOVA were used to assess relationships between resident service handoffs and length of hospital stay, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS A total of 3038 patients met eligibility criteria and were included in the statistical analyses. Adjusted length of hospital stay (5.32 vs 3.53 adjusted days) and length of ICU stay (4.38 vs 2.96 adjusted days) were both longer for patients who experienced a service handoff, with no difference in mortality. In the ANCOVA model, resident service handoff remained predictive of both length of hospital stay (p < 0.001) and length of ICU stay (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Occurrence of a resident service handoff is an independent predictor of length of hospital and ICU stay in neurosurgical patients. This finding is novel in the neurosurgical literature. Future research might identify mechanisms for improving continuity of care and mitigating the effect of resident handoffs on patient outcomes.

  16. Effect of resident handoffs on length of hospital and intensive care unit stay in a neurosurgical population: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Elizabeth N; Davis, Matthew C; Agee, Bonita S; Oster, Robert A; Markert, James M

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Handoffs and services changes are potentially modifiable sources of medical error and delays in transition of care. This cohort study assessed the relationship between resident service handoffs and length of stay for neurosurgical patients. METHODS All patients admitted to the University of Alabama at Birmingham neurosurgical service between July 1, 2012, and July 1, 2014, were retrospectively identified. A service handoff was defined as any point when a resident handed off coverage of a service for longer than 1 weekend. A conditional probability distribution was constructed to adjust length of stay for the increasing probability of a random handoff. The Student t-test and ANCOVA were used to assess relationships between resident service handoffs and length of hospital stay, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS A total of 3038 patients met eligibility criteria and were included in the statistical analyses. Adjusted length of hospital stay (5.32 vs 3.53 adjusted days) and length of ICU stay (4.38 vs 2.96 adjusted days) were both longer for patients who experienced a service handoff, with no difference in mortality. In the ANCOVA model, resident service handoff remained predictive of both length of hospital stay (p < 0.001) and length of ICU stay (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Occurrence of a resident service handoff is an independent predictor of length of hospital and ICU stay in neurosurgical patients. This finding is novel in the neurosurgical literature. Future research might identify mechanisms for improving continuity of care and mitigating the effect of resident handoffs on patient outcomes. PMID:26684784

  17. Ambulatory Care in Medical Residency: Integration of Private Practitioner's Office with Traditional Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bane, Susan; Criscione, Teri

    1983-01-01

    An Albany Medical College program utilizes private internists' offices as sites for resident ambulatory education. The private practitioner is perceived as an excellent teacher and role model who provides a positive effect on the long-term career goals of residents. (MLW)

  18. Assigning Patients According to Curriculum: A Strategy for Improving Ambulatory Care Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brush, Alan D.; Moore, Gordon T.

    1994-01-01

    The strategy used by one health maintenance organization (HMO) for balancing residents' training needs and patient health problems, often limited and routine in an HMO, is to allocate patients to residents by matching them with curriculum content. A process for handling patient resistance to such an arrangement was also instituted. (MSE)

  19. Five Residents Speak: The Meaning of Living with Dying in a Long-Term Care Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djivre, Sandra E.; Levin, Elizabeth; Schinke, Robert J.; Porter, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Personal meanings given to the experience of living with nursing home death were shared by 5 nursing home residents. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. Using M. van Manen's (1990) hermeneutic phenomenology, the lived experience of residents emerged as a compilation of 5 dynamically occurring themes, including (a) mapping…

  20. Baby Boom Caregivers: Care in the Age of Individualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guberman, Nancy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Blein, Laure; Olazabal, Ignace

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many Baby Boomers are faced with the care of aging parents, as well as that of disabled or ill spouses or children. This study examines how Baby Boomers in Quebec, Canada, perceive and play their role as caregivers and how this might differ from their parents' generation. Design and methods: This was a qualitative and empirical study…

  1. [Caring for the aging and institutionalized disabled person].

    PubMed

    Trungel-Legay, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    The French national group of public social and medical-social institutions (GEPSO) has for several years been studying the issue of the ageing of disabled people. These people need more complex care and can present a loss of autonomy requiring changes to their day-to-day life.

  2. School-Age Child Care: Innovative Public School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERS Spectrum, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Innovative school-age day care programs include Tennessee's Extended School Program; Hawaii's After-School Plus program; San Antonio's Kid's Involvement Network (offering middle school supervision); Aurora, Colorado's state-licensed Year-Round School Recreation Plan; and Pomona, California's Child Development Program. These public school programs…

  3. [The interface of nursing care with the aged attention policies].

    PubMed

    Darder, Juan José Tirado; Carvalho, Zuila Maria de Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to make an explanation on the interface of nursing care with the elder care policies. It is presented the aging phenomenon as a global reality and a victory of modern society; the situation of elderly people and the social consequences of aging in Spain; the dependence and assistance needs; the situation of elderly people in Brazil; comparison between Spain and Brazil; dependency levels; and the solutions that nurses provide and home care as a basis for a better future. The considerations given are: meeting the dependency must be addressed immediately, considering the failures in other countries, to avoid the same mistakes, and to urge the elder population to maintain their independence with health promotion. PMID:23338574

  4. Nursing staff's actions during older residents' transition into long-term care facility in a nursing home in rural Norway.

    PubMed

    Eika, Marianne; Espnes, Geir Arild; Hvalvik, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Working in long-term care units poses particular staff challenges as these facilities are expected to provide services for seriously ill residents and give help in a homelike atmosphere. Licensed and unlicensed personnel work together in these surroundings, and their contributions may ease or inhibit a smooth transition for recently admitted residents. The aim of the study was to describe and explore different nursing staff's actions during the initial transition period for older people into a long-term care facility. Participant observation periods were undertaken following staff during 10 new residents' admissions and their first week in the facility. In addition 16 interviews of different staff categories and reading of written documents were carried out. The findings show great variations of the staff's actions during the older residents' initial transition period. Characteristics of their actions were (1) in the preparation period: "actions of sharing, sorting out, and ignoring information"; (2) on admission day: "actions of involvement and ignorance"; and (3) in the initial period: "targeted and random actions," "actions influenced by embedded knowledge," and "actions influenced by local transparency."

  5. Can resident-centred inspection of nursing homes work with very sick residents?

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, J; Makkai, T

    1993-04-01

    This paper seeks to address the issue of whether a resident-centred inspection process can be effective in a nursing home environment dominated by residents who require high levels of care. Two fundamental criticisms of the current Australian monitoring process are its reliance on standards that are subjective resident-centred standards and its reliance on the views of residents concerning the quality of care provided in the home. These criticisms are becoming all the more important as survival rates for the aged increase and the average level of disability of nursing home residents continues to worsen. Our data suggest that the resident-centred process, despite some difficulties, is both reliable and practical, regardless of the care needs of residents in the home. Data collected from inspection teams show that inspectors use a variety of sources to validate information, with residents being one component. These sources vary little in importance between homes with different levels of care needs or behavioural problems. Perhaps of more importance is the finding that a home's overall performance across 31 resident-centred standards is not affected by either the home's average level of total care needs or the number of residents with severe behavioural problems. There are some significant effects (in both directions) of resident disability on compliance with particular standards. Most notable is the finding that the standard requiring appropriate use of restraint is less likely to be met when there are large numbers of residents with high levels of disability or behavioural problems.

  6. What factors are important for deprescribing in Australian long-term care facilities? Perspectives of residents and health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Susan; Stanners, Melinda; Shakib, Sepehr; Bell, J Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Polypharmacy and multimorbidity are common in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Reducing polypharmacy may reduce adverse events and maintain quality of life. Deprescribing refers to reducing medications after consideration of therapeutic goals, benefits and risks, and medical ethics. The objective was to use nominal group technique (NGT) to generate then rank factors that general medical practitioners (GPs), nurses, pharmacists and residents or their representatives perceive are most important when deciding whether or not to deprescribe medications. Design Qualitative research using NGT. Setting Participants were invited if they worked with, or resided in LTCFs across metropolitan and regional South Australia. Participants 11 residents/representatives, 19 GPs, 12 nurses and 14 pharmacists participated across six separate groups. Methods Individual groups of GPs, nurses, pharmacists and residents/representatives were convened. Using NGT each group ranked factors perceived to be most important when deciding whether or not to deprescribe. Then, using NGT, the prioritised factors from individual groups were discussed and prioritised by a multidisciplinary metropolitan and regional group comprised of resident representatives, GPs, nurses and pharmacists. Results No two groups had the same priorities. GPs ranked ‘evidence for deprescribing’ and ‘communication with family/resident’ as most important factors. Nurses ranked ‘GP receptivity to deprescribing’ and ‘nurses ability to advocate for residents’ as most important. Pharmacists ranked ‘clinical appropriateness of therapy’ and ‘identifying residents’ goals of care’ as most important. Residents ranked ‘wellbeing of the resident’ and ‘continuity of nursing staff’ as most important. The multidisciplinary groups ranked ‘adequacy of medical and medication history’ and ‘identifying residents’ goals of care’ as most important. Conclusions While each group prioritised

  7. Valuable human capital: the aging health care worker.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2006-01-01

    With the workforce growing older and the supply of younger workers diminishing, it is critical for health care managers to understand the factors necessary to capitalize on their vintage employees. Retaining this segment of the workforce has a multitude of benefits including the preservation of valuable intellectual capital, which is necessary to ensure that health care organizations maintain their competitive advantage in the consumer-driven market. Retaining the aging employee is possible if health care managers learn the motivators and training differences associated with this category of the workforce. These employees should be considered a valuable resource of human capital because without their extensive expertise, intense loyalty and work ethic, and superior customer service skills, health care organizations could suffer severe economic repercussions in the near future. PMID:16905991

  8. Caring for aging Chinese: lessons learned from the United States.

    PubMed

    Hongwei Wan; Fang Yu; Kolanowski, Ann

    2008-04-01

    After two birth peaks and the "one child per family" policy, China is facing unprecedented challenges with regard to its aging population. This article analyzes the problems associated with three traditional ways of caring for older Chinese, the current health care system, and social supports available to older Chinese. The "4-2-1" family structure and the "empty nest" undermine family support, the prevalence of chronic illnesses and lack of money reduce older adults' selfcare abilities, and insufficient care facilities threaten social support. Lessons learned from the United States show that community-based nursing models, nursing curriculum reforms with a gerontology focus, and reformed health care systems are pivotal for addressing China's crisis.

  9. Online Dementia Care Training for Healthcare Teams in Continuing and Long-Term Care Homes: A Viable Solution for Improving Quality of Care and Quality of Life for Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Colla J.; Stodel, Emma J.; Casimiro, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to design, develop, deliver, and evaluate an online dementia care program aimed at enabling healthcare teams deliver better service to residents with dementia in continuing (CC) and long-term care (LTC) facilities. A Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) orientation (Minkler & Wallerstein, 2003) was adopted…

  10. How to Create an Anti-Aging Skin Care Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Master Dermatologist Award Members Making a Difference Award Native American Health Service Resident Rotation PICMED Grant Professionalism Award ... Camp Discovery Diversity Mentorship Program Health Volunteers ... American Health Services Resident Rotation Resident International Grant Shade ...

  11. Managing Malnutrition in Older Persons Residing in Care Homes: Nutritional and Clinical Outcomes Following a Screening and Intervention Program.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Christopher G; Okonkwo, Arthur C O; Hart, Kathryn; Thompson, Nick P

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to establish prevalence of malnutrition in older adult care home residents and investigate whether a nutritional screening and intervention program could improve nutritional and clinical outcomes. A community-based cohort study was conducted in five Newcastle care homes. 205 participants entered; 175 were followed up. Residents already taking oral nutritional supplements (ONS) were excluded from interventions. Those with Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) score of 1 received dietetic advice and ≥2 received dietetic advice and were prescribed ONS (220 ml, 1.5 kcal/ml) twice daily for 12 weeks. Body mass index (BMI), MUST, mini nutritional assessment score (MNA)®, mid upper arm muscle circumference (MAMC), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were recorded at baseline and 12 weeks. Malnutrition prevalence was 36.6% ± 6.6 (95% CI). A higher MUST was associated with greater mortality (p = 0.004). Type of intervention received was significantly associated with change in MUST score (p < 0.001); dietetic advice resulting in the greatest improvement. There were no significant changes in BMI (p = 0.445), MAMC (p = 0.256), or GDS (p = 0.385) following the interventions. Dietitian advice may slow the progression of nutritional decline. In this study oral nutritional supplements over a 3-month period did not significantly improve nutritional status in malnourished care home residents.

  12. Education in Quality Improvement for Practice in Primary Care During Residency Training and Subsequent Activities in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Carek, Peter J.; Dickerson, Lori M.; Stanek, Michele; Carter, Charles; Godenick, Mark T.; Jebaily, Gerard C.; Sprague, Stuart; Baxley, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Quality improvement (QI) is an integral aspect of graduate medical education and an important competence for physicians. Objective We examined the QI activities of recent family medicine residency graduates and whether a standardized curriculum in QI during residency resulted in greater self-reported participation in QI activities in practice after graduation. Methods The family medicine residency programs affiliated with the South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium (N  =  7) were invited to participate in this study. Following completion of introductory educational activities, each site implemented regularly occurring (at least monthly) educational and patient care activities using QI principles and tools. Semiannually, representatives from each participating site met to review project aims and to provide updates regarding the QI activities in their program. To examine the impact of this project on QI activities, we surveyed graduates from participating programs from the year prior to and 2 years after the implementation of the curriculum. Results Graduates in the preimplementation and postimplementation cohorts reported participating in periodic patient care data review, patient care registries, QI projects, and disease-specific activities (57%–71% and 54%–63%, respectively). There were no significant differences in QI activities between the 2 groups except in activities associated with status of their practice as a patient-centered medical home. Conclusions Most but not all family medicine graduates reported they were actively involved in QI activities within their practices, independent of their exposure to a QI curriculum during training. PMID:24701310

  13. Apartment residents' and day care workers' exposures to tetrachloroethylene and deficits in visual contrast sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Judith S; Hudnell, H Kenneth; Geller, Andrew M; House, Dennis E; Aldous, Kenneth M; Force, Michael S; Langguth, Karyn; Prohonic, Elizabeth J; Parker, Jean C

    2002-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene (also called perchloroethylene, or perc), a volatile organic compound, has been the predominant solvent used by the dry-cleaning industry for many years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classified perc as a hazardous air pollutant because of its potential adverse impact on human health. Several occupational studies have indicated that chronic, airborne perc exposure adversely affects neurobehavioral functions in workers, particularly visual color discrimination and tasks dependent on rapid visual-information processing. A 1995 study by Altmann and colleagues extended these findings, indicating that environmental perc exposure at a mean level of 4,980 microg/m(3) (median=1,360 microg/m(3)) alters neurobehavioral functions in residents living near dry-cleaning facilities. Although the U.S. EPA has not yet set a reference concentration guideline level for environmental exposure to airborne perc, the New York State Department of Health set an air quality guideline of 100 microg/m(3). In the current residential study, we investigated the potential for perc exposure and neurologic effects, using a battery of visual-system function tests, among healthy members of six families living in two apartment buildings in New York City that contained dry-cleaning facilities on the ground floors. In addition, a day care investigation assessed the potential for perc exposure and effects among workers at a day care center located in the same one-story building as a dry-cleaning facility. Results from the residential study showed a mean exposure level of 778 microg/m(3) perc in indoor air for a mean of 5.8 years, and that perc levels in breath, blood, and urine were 1-2 orders of magnitude in excess of background values. Group-mean visual contrast sensitivity (VCS), a measure of the ability to detect visual patterns, was significantly reduced in the 17 exposed study participants relative to unexposed matched-control participants. The groups did not

  14. Resident physicians using modern practices for excellent documentation and care in heart failure (PUMPED CHF).

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay; Cotorruelo-Martinez, Annia; Gill-Duncan, Nicole; Leveille, Philippe; Pearson, Julie M; Julliard, Kell; Saxena, Archana

    2014-01-01

    The most common indication for readmission among Medicare patients is congestive heart failure (CHF). Prior studies underscore the use of residents to bolster hospital-wide programs and reduce CHF readmissions. The authors assessed the effectiveness of a novel online training program designed to improve resident documentation and knowledge related to CHF. The findings suggest that despite a significant increase in knowledge scores following the online educational course, there was only a slight increase in documentation scores. Additional teaching modalities need to be identified to foster resident education and create sustained behavior change. PMID:25529788

  15. Resident physicians using modern practices for excellent documentation and care in heart failure (PUMPED CHF).

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay; Cotorruelo-Martinez, Annia; Gill-Duncan, Nicole; Leveille, Philippe; Pearson, Julie M; Julliard, Kell; Saxena, Archana

    2014-01-01

    The most common indication for readmission among Medicare patients is congestive heart failure (CHF). Prior studies underscore the use of residents to bolster hospital-wide programs and reduce CHF readmissions. The authors assessed the effectiveness of a novel online training program designed to improve resident documentation and knowledge related to CHF. The findings suggest that despite a significant increase in knowledge scores following the online educational course, there was only a slight increase in documentation scores. Additional teaching modalities need to be identified to foster resident education and create sustained behavior change.

  16. Masseter muscle tension, chewing ability, and selected parameters of physical fitness in elderly care home residents in Lodz, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Gaszynska, Ewelina; Godala, Malgorzata; Szatko, Franciszek; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Background Maintaining good physical fitness and oral function in old age is an important element of good quality of life. Disability-related impairment of oral function contributes to a deterioration of the diet of older people and to the reduction of their social activity. Objectives Investigate the association between masseter muscle tension, dental status, and physical fitness parameters. Materials and methods Two hundred fifty-nine elderly care home residents (97 men, 162 women; mean age, 75.3±8.9 years) were involved in this cross-sectional study. Their chewing ability was evaluated by masseter muscle tension palpation, differences of masseter muscle thickness, self-reported chewing ability, number of present and functional teeth, and number of posterior tooth pairs. Masseter muscle thickness was measured by ultrasonography. To assess physical fitness, hand grip strength and the timed up-and-go test were performed. Nutritional status was assessed using body mass index and body cell mass index (BCMI), calculated on the basis of electrical bioimpedance measurements. Medical records were used to collect information on systemic diseases and the number of prescribed medications. Subjects were also evaluated for their ability to perform ten activities of daily living. Results Ninety-seven percent of the subjects suffered from systemic diseases. The three most prevalent illnesses were cardiac/circulatory 64.5%, musculoskeletal 37.3%, and endocrine/metabolic/nutritional 29.3%. Of the participants, 1.5% were underweight and more than one third (34.4%) were overweight. Malnutrition (BCMI below normal) was found in almost half (45.2%) of the subjects. Only 5.8% had a sufficient number of functional natural teeth. Statistically significant correlations were found between palpation of masseter muscle tension and perceived chewing ability, number of present teeth, number of functional teeth, number of posterior tooth pairs, timed up-and-go, hand grip strength, body mass

  17. Considerations on Caring for Caregivers in an Aging Society.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dr Samir K

    2015-01-01

    While it is anticipated that healthcare systems around the world will continue to rely heavily on family members and friends to provide unpaid care especially to meet the needs of our aging population, current assumptions and issues around caregivers need to be challenged and addressed if we are to expect their future support. This paper builds on Williams et al's assertion that many current assumptions and issues around caregivers need to be challenged and addressed if we are to expect their future support. Indeed, with the pool of available caregivers expected to actually shrink in the future, this paper therefore examines four key policy issues in greater depth that we can address to enable individuals to age in place and others to maintain and take on caregiving roles. Through the establishment of policies that support robust and longterm capacity planning; make clear what care recipients and caregivers can expect to receive in the form of government supports; appreciate the increasing diversity that is occurring among those taking on caregiving roles and those requiring care; and recognize the need to invest in strategies that combat social isolation, we may not only improve our future health and well-being but ensure we are also enabled to care for ourselves as we age.

  18. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (g) Individuals under age... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4)...

  19. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (g) Individuals under age... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4)...

  20. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (g) Individuals under age... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4)...

  1. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (h) Individuals under Age 21. (1) For... accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4) For...

  2. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (h) Individuals under Age 21. (1) For... accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4) For...

  3. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (g) Individuals under age... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4)...

  4. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (h) Individuals under Age 21. (1) For... accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4) For...

  5. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... Social Security Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (g) Individuals under age... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4)...

  6. Residency training in advance care planning: can it be done in the outpatient clinic?

    PubMed

    Alderman, Jeffrey S; Nair, Baishali; Fox, Mark D

    2008-01-01

    Resident physicians are expected to assist their outpatients to understand and complete advance directives, but their efficacy in doing so remains uncertain. After receiving educational training, internal medicine residents identified at-risk patients and solicited them about advance directives. Residents completed pretest and posttest questionnaires that assessed their knowledge, skills, attitude, and comfort with advance directives. Patients were also surveyed about their attitudes regarding advance directives. Ten internal medicine residents and 88 patients participated. Residents' self-assessed knowledge rose from 6.0 to 9.2 on a 10-point Likert scale. Skills using advance directives increased from 4.0 to 7.9, attitudes improved from 6.0 to 8.4, and comfort rose from 5.4 to 8.9. Eighty-four percent of patients expressed interest in completing advance directives, and 16% actually completed documents. An educational intervention improved knowledge, skills, attitudes, and comfort with advance directives among internal medicine residents practicing in the outpatient setting. Meanwhile, patients demonstrated a strong interest in completing advance directives.

  7. Complexity in caring for an ageing heart failure population: concomitant chronic conditions and age related impairments.

    PubMed

    De Geest, Sabina; Steeman, Els; Leventhal, Marcia E; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Hengartner-Kopp, Beatrice; Conca, Antoinette; Bernasconi, Arlette T; Petry, Heidi; Brunner-La Rocca, Hanspeter

    2004-12-01

    The complexity of caring for the ageing heart failure (HF) population is further complicated by concomitant chronic conditions (i.e., polypharmacy, depression), age related impairments (i.e., hearing, visual and cognitive impairments, impairments in activities of daily living (ADL/IADL), and other issues (e.g., health illiteracy, lack of social support). This paper provides an overview of these risk factors, outlines how they individually and in interplay endanger favourable outcome by putting patients at risk for poor self-management. Moreover, suggestions are made on how these issues could be addressed and integrated in heart failure management by applying gerontological care principles in caring for the ageing heart failure population.

  8. Using positive images to manage resistance-to-care and combative behaviors in nursing home residents with dementia: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Ying; Waszynski, Christine; Kessler, Jeanne; Chiang, Yu-Ching; Clarkson, P John

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study attempted to reduce resistance-to-care (RTC) and combative behaviors in nursing home residents with dementia by eliciting their positive affect. Four female residents with dementia were recruited from a nursing facility. Each resident was involved in one intervention trial and one control trial. The response of the residents was assessed by the Agitated Behavior Scale and the Observational Measurement of Engagement Tool. The distress level of the certified nursing assistants (CNAs) delivering the care was reported through the Distress Thermometer. Results showed that the residents displayed fewer behavioral symptoms in the intervention trial than in the control trial. The CNAs reported less distress in the intervention trial than in the control trial. These preliminary findings suggest that it might be feasible to use positive images to reduce residents' behavioral symptoms and decrease the distress of CNAs. PMID:27040950

  9. Protocol for a process-oriented qualitative evaluation of the Waltham Forest and East London Collaborative (WELC) integrated care pioneer programme using the Researcher-in-Residence model

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, Laura; George, Bethan; Marshall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The integration of health and social care in England is widely accepted as the answer to fragmentation, financial concerns and system inefficiencies, in the context of growing and ageing populations with increasingly complex needs. Despite an expanding body of literature, there is little evidence yet to suggest that integrated care can achieve the benefits that its advocates claim for it. Researchers have often adopted rationalist and technocratic approaches to evaluation, treating integration as an intervention rather than a process. Results have usually been of limited use to practitioners responsible for health and social care integration. There is, therefore, a need to broaden the evidence base, exploring not only what works but also how integrated care can most successfully be implemented and delivered. For this reason, we are carrying out a formative evaluation of the Waltham Forest and East London Collaborative (WELC) integrated care pioneer programme. Our expectation is that this will add value to the literature by focusing on the processes by which the vision and objectives of integrated care are translated through phases of development, implementation and delivery from a central to a local perspective, and from a strategic to an operational perspective. Methods and analysis The qualitative and process-oriented evaluation uses an innovative participative approach—the Researcher-in-Residence model. The evaluation is underpinned by a critical ontology, an interpretive epistemology and a critical discourse analysis methodology. Data will be generated using interviews, observations and documentary gathering. Ethics and dissemination Emerging findings will be interpreted and disseminated collaboratively with stakeholders, to enable the research to influence and optimise the effective implementation of integrated care across WELC. Presentations and publications will ensure that learning is shared as widely as possible. The study has received

  10. Ethical constraints on rationing medical care by age.

    PubMed

    Jecker, N S; Pearlman, R A

    1989-11-01

    In a statement published in this issue, the Public Policy Committee of the American Geriatrics Society endorses the view that chronological age should not be a criterion for exclusion of individuals from medical care. This article aims to amplify the Committee's position by placing it within a broader context and identifying its justification in ethical argument. The paper is divided into three parts. The first part clarifies the difference between allocation (the distribution of funds between categories) and rationing (the distribution of funds within a single category). It is argued that given the current allocation of funds to medical care, some form of rationing is unavoidable. As others have noted, rationing is already occurring in an informal and piecemeal fashion. However, ethically sound rationing requires publicly debated and defensible policies. The second section of the paper reviews a number of arguments advanced in favor of rationing medical care on the basis of age. Objections to these arguments are carefully set out. The final part of the paper details and defends a series of positive arguments establishing special duties to the elderly. The paper concludes that to the extent that scarcity forces rationing, older persons should not be excluded because they are old.

  11. Protecting care home residents from mistreatment and abuse: on the need for policy.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    With a rising older person population with increasing life expectancies, the demand for care homes will increase in the future. Older people in care homes are particularly vulnerable due to their dependencies related to cognitive and/or functional self-care challenges. Although many care homes provide good care, maltreatment and abuse of older people can and does occur. One major step in preventing and addressing maltreatment in care homes is having comprehensive and responsive policy, which delineates national expectations that are locally implemented. This paper examines the literature related to maltreatment in care homes and argues for policy based on a multisystems approach. Policy needs to firstly acknowledge and address general societal issues which tacitly impact on older person care delivery, underpin how care homes and related systems should be operationalized, and finally delineate expected standards and outcomes for individual experience of care. Such a policy demands attention at every level of the health care and societal system. Furthermore, contemporary issues central to policy evolution in care homes are discussed, such as safeguarding education and training and fostering organization whistle-blowing protection. PMID:26640391

  12. Managed care implications of age-related ocular conditions.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, William J; Smith, Roderick A

    2013-05-01

    The economic costs of age-related ocular diseases and vision loss are increasing rapidly as our society ages. In addition to the direct costs of treating age-related eye diseases, elderly persons with vision loss are at significantly increased risk for falls and fractures, experiencing social isolation, and suffering from an array of comorbid medical conditions compared with individuals with normal vision. Recent studies estimate the total economic burden (direct and indirect costs) of adult vision impairment in the United States at $51.4 billion. This figure is expected to increase as the baby boomer generation continues to age. While a number of highly effective new therapies have caused a paradigm shift in the management of several major age-related ocular diseases in recent years, these treatments come at a substantial cost. This article reviews the economic burdens and treatment-related costs of 4 major ocular diseases of aging-glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and dry eye disease-and the implications for managed care.

  13. Family, caring and ageing in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Tony; Powell, Jason L

    2005-03-01

    This paper provides a critical exploration of the assumptions and narratives underpinning the development of social policy initiatives targeting caring relationships based upon family ties. Using a narrative approach attention is drawn to the ways in which family identities are open to a far greater range of negotiation than is assumed by policy. Drawing on the United Kingdom as a case example, questions are posed about intergenerational relations and the nature of late life citizenship. The comparatively recent invention of narratives supporting 'informal care' and the link with neo-liberal and 'third way' notions of active citizenship are explored. As is the failure of policy developments to take into account the diversity of care giving styles and the complexity of caring relationships. It is argued that the uneven and locally specific ways in which policy develops enables the co-existence of a complex range of narratives about family, caring and ageing which address diverse aspects of the family life of older people in often contradictory ways.

  14. Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Emily E; Polen, Kara N D; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Ellington, Sascha R; Oduyebo, Titilope; Cohn, Amanda; Oster, Alexandra M; Russell, Kate; Kawwass, Jennifer F; Karwowski, Mateusz P; Powers, Ann M; Bertolli, Jeanne; Brooks, John T; Kissin, Dmitry; Villanueva, Julie; Muñoz-Jordan, Jorge; Kuehnert, Matthew; Olson, Christine K; Honein, Margaret A; Rivera, Maria; Jamieson, Denise J; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2016-04-01

    CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available.

  15. Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Emily E; Polen, Kara N D; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Ellington, Sascha R; Oduyebo, Titilope; Cohn, Amanda; Oster, Alexandra M; Russell, Kate; Kawwass, Jennifer F; Karwowski, Mateusz P; Powers, Ann M; Bertolli, Jeanne; Brooks, John T; Kissin, Dmitry; Villanueva, Julie; Muñoz-Jordan, Jorge; Kuehnert, Matthew; Olson, Christine K; Honein, Margaret A; Rivera, Maria; Jamieson, Denise J; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2016-01-01

    CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available. PMID:27031943

  16. Atmospheric residence times from transpiration and evaporation to precipitation: An age-weighted regional evaporation tagging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianhui; Knoche, Hans Richard; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-06-01

    The atmospheric water residence time is a fundamental descriptor that provides information on the timescales of evaporation and precipitation. In this study, a regional climate model-based evaporation tagging algorithm is extended with an age tracer approach to calculate moisture residence times, defined as time between the original evaporation and the returning of water masses to the land surface as precipitation. Our case study addresses how long this time is for the transpired and for the direct evaporated moisture. Our study region is the Poyang Lake region in Southeast China, the largest freshwater lake in the country. We perform simulations covering the period from October 2004 to December 2005. In 2005, 11% of direct evaporated water (10% of transpired water) precipitates locally. Direct evaporated water accounts for 64% and transpired water for 36% of the total tagged moisture with a mean age of around 36 h for both. Considering precipitation, a large proportion (69%) originates from direct evaporated water with a mean atmospheric residence time of 6.6 h and a smaller amount from transpired water with a longer residence time of 10.7 h. Modulated by the East Asian monsoon, the variation of the meteorological conditions, the magnitude of the partitioned moisture, and the corresponding residence time patterns change seasonally and spatially and reveal the different fate of transpired and direct evaporated water in the atmospheric hydrological cycle. We conclude that our methodological approach has the potential to be used for addressing how timescales of the hydrological cycle changes regionally under global warming.

  17. Gaps in need, demand, and effective demand for dental care utilization among residents of Krishna district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Y.; Chakravarty, Kalyan K.; Simhadri, Kavya; Ghenam, Alexis; Naidu, Guntipalli M.; Vundavalli, Sudhakar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To identify the relation between need, demand, and effective demand for dental services in Andhra Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study performed among populations residing in the rural and urban areas of Krishna district, Andhra Pradesh, India. Data were collected from 3102 individuals who were selected through multiphase random sampling. Data regarding self-perceived dental need, dental service utilization, and barriers for utilization were collected through s pretested questionnaire followed by type-III clinical examination to assess the normative need of the individuals. Chi-square test was used to compare independent and dependent variables, and further comparison was done with multivariate logistic regression analysis for significant variables. Results: Less than half (40%) of the participants perceived a need for dental care. Among the people who perceived need for care, only 21.4% utilized dental care and 78.6% of them had unmet dental needs. The two main reasons for not seeking dental care was lack of money, i.e., unaffordable dental treatment (48%) and having the perception that they do not have any dental problem (19.4%). Conclusions: There is an enormous difference between normative need, demand, and actual utilization rates in dental care, and hindrances for effective demand need to be addressed to improve dental care delivery system. PMID:27652242

  18. Gaps in need, demand, and effective demand for dental care utilization among residents of Krishna district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Y.; Chakravarty, Kalyan K.; Simhadri, Kavya; Ghenam, Alexis; Naidu, Guntipalli M.; Vundavalli, Sudhakar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To identify the relation between need, demand, and effective demand for dental services in Andhra Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study performed among populations residing in the rural and urban areas of Krishna district, Andhra Pradesh, India. Data were collected from 3102 individuals who were selected through multiphase random sampling. Data regarding self-perceived dental need, dental service utilization, and barriers for utilization were collected through s pretested questionnaire followed by type-III clinical examination to assess the normative need of the individuals. Chi-square test was used to compare independent and dependent variables, and further comparison was done with multivariate logistic regression analysis for significant variables. Results: Less than half (40%) of the participants perceived a need for dental care. Among the people who perceived need for care, only 21.4% utilized dental care and 78.6% of them had unmet dental needs. The two main reasons for not seeking dental care was lack of money, i.e., unaffordable dental treatment (48%) and having the perception that they do not have any dental problem (19.4%). Conclusions: There is an enormous difference between normative need, demand, and actual utilization rates in dental care, and hindrances for effective demand need to be addressed to improve dental care delivery system.

  19. Neighborhood Residence and the Problems of School-Age Children. Data Trends #125

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" uses data from a multilevel longitudinal study, the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN), to investigate possible effects of neighborhood residence on…

  20. Referral Rates of Senior Family Practice Residents in an Ambulatory Care Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    A study of patterns in second- and third-year family practice residents' requests for referrals found higher rates for the senior students, suggesting possible differences in approach to case management, lack of experience in referral among younger students, and differences in case mix. (MSE)

  1. Measuring child work and residence adjustments to parents' long-term care needs.

    PubMed

    Stern, S

    1996-02-01

    This article estimates the effects of various parent and child characteristics on the choice of care arrangement of the parent, taking into account the potential endogeneity of some of the child characteristics. Three equations are estimated: a care choice equation, a child location equation, and a child work equation. Results suggest a hierarchy of family decision making; child locations affect the care decision, which affects child work decisions. The results also question previous research attempting to explain causes of secular trends in long-term care.

  2. Measuring child work and residence adjustments to parents' long-term care needs.

    PubMed

    Stern, S

    1996-02-01

    This article estimates the effects of various parent and child characteristics on the choice of care arrangement of the parent, taking into account the potential endogeneity of some of the child characteristics. Three equations are estimated: a care choice equation, a child location equation, and a child work equation. Results suggest a hierarchy of family decision making; child locations affect the care decision, which affects child work decisions. The results also question previous research attempting to explain causes of secular trends in long-term care. PMID:8932413

  3. [Aging of residents of St. Petersburg: current status and near-future prospects].

    PubMed

    Safarova, G L

    2002-01-01

    Population ageing, an increase in the proportion of elderly, is a worldwide process. Having numerous economic, social and political consequences, population ageing has now risen to the top of developed nations' agendas. The evolution of ageing characteristics during 1970-2000 for Saint-Petersburg and their future trends have been considered. Comparisons with characteristics of ageing for Russia have been done. Special attention has been paid to gender disparities of ageing characteristics.

  4. Permanent resident

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff. PMID:27193992

  5. Permanent resident.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  6. 42 CFR 483.356 - Protection of residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Condition of... Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.356 Protection of residents. (a) Restraint... behavior, and the resident's chronological and developmental age; size; gender; physical, medical,...

  7. The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Risk Management of Information Systems in Australian Residential Aged Care Homes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David; Ma, Jun; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    To obtain indications of the influence of electronic health records (EHR) in managing risks and meeting information system accreditation standard in Australian residential aged care (RAC) homes. The hypothesis to be tested is that the RAC homes using EHR have better performance in meeting information system standards in aged care accreditation than their counterparts only using paper records for information management. Content analysis of aged care accreditation reports from the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency produced between April 2011 and December 2013. Items identified included types of information systems, compliance with accreditation standards, and indicators of failure to meet an expected outcome for information systems. The Chi-square test was used to identify difference between the RAC homes that used EHR systems and those that used paper records in not meeting aged care accreditation standards. 1,031 (37.4%) of 2,754 RAC homes had adopted EHR systems. Although the proportion of homes that met all accreditation standards was significantly higher for those with EHR than for homes with paper records, only 13 RAC homes did not meet one or more expected outcomes. 12 used paper records and nine of these failed the expected outcome for information systems. The overall contribution of EHR to meeting aged care accreditation standard in Australia was very small. Risk indicators for not meeting information system standard were no access to accurate and appropriate information, failure in monitoring mechanisms, not reporting clinical incidents, insufficient recording of residents' clinical changes, not providing accurate care plans, and communication processes failure. The study has provided indications that use of EHR provides small, yet significant advantages for RAC homes in Australia in managing risks for information management and in meeting accreditation requirements. The implication of the study for introducing technology innovation in RAC in

  8. The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Risk Management of Information Systems in Australian Residential Aged Care Homes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David; Ma, Jun; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    To obtain indications of the influence of electronic health records (EHR) in managing risks and meeting information system accreditation standard in Australian residential aged care (RAC) homes. The hypothesis to be tested is that the RAC homes using EHR have better performance in meeting information system standards in aged care accreditation than their counterparts only using paper records for information management. Content analysis of aged care accreditation reports from the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency produced between April 2011 and December 2013. Items identified included types of information systems, compliance with accreditation standards, and indicators of failure to meet an expected outcome for information systems. The Chi-square test was used to identify difference between the RAC homes that used EHR systems and those that used paper records in not meeting aged care accreditation standards. 1,031 (37.4%) of 2,754 RAC homes had adopted EHR systems. Although the proportion of homes that met all accreditation standards was significantly higher for those with EHR than for homes with paper records, only 13 RAC homes did not meet one or more expected outcomes. 12 used paper records and nine of these failed the expected outcome for information systems. The overall contribution of EHR to meeting aged care accreditation standard in Australia was very small. Risk indicators for not meeting information system standard were no access to accurate and appropriate information, failure in monitoring mechanisms, not reporting clinical incidents, insufficient recording of residents' clinical changes, not providing accurate care plans, and communication processes failure. The study has provided indications that use of EHR provides small, yet significant advantages for RAC homes in Australia in managing risks for information management and in meeting accreditation requirements. The implication of the study for introducing technology innovation in RAC in

  9. Fall-Related Hospitalization and Facility Costs among Residents of Institutions Providing Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Norman V.; Delafuente, Jeffrey C.; Cox, Fred M.; Narayanan, Siva

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to estimate hospital and long-term-care costs resulting from falls in long-term-care facilities (LTCFs). Design and Methods: The study used a retrospective, pre/post with comparison group design. We used matching, based on propensity scores, to control for baseline differences between fallers and non-fallers.…

  10. Assessment of Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease Status among Elderly Residing in Old Age Homes of Madhya Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rohit; Gautam, Nalam Radhika; Kumar, P Mahesh; Kadhiresan, R; Saxena, Vrinda; Jain, Suyog

    2015-01-01

    Background: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the dental caries and periodontal disease status of elderly residing in old age homes of Madhya Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 599 elderly people residing in old age homes of Madhya Pradesh, India using cluster sampling methodology. The clinical findings were recorded using modified WHO Oral Health Assessment form (1997) to assess periodontal status as per community periodontal index, loss of attachment, WHO dentition status, and treatment needs. Results: In the present study, the caries prevalence among dentate subjects was found among 41.9% of the dentate subjects and the mean decayed, missed, and filled teeth was found to be 8.28 ± 4.779 with the mean number of decayed being 1.51. In the dentate population, 0% had healthy periodontal tissue, 0.26% had bleeding, and 24.5% had calculus, 52.1% had shallow pockets and 23.1% had deep pockets as their highest score and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). In the current study, 37.9% inmates were completely edentulous. This study also showed that as age advanced the prevalence increased from 23.1% to 55.4%. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The oral health status of elderly people was found to be poor. Hence, it is concluded from this study that tooth loss is higher among the geriatric group residing in old age homes and is associated with many demographic and behavioral risk indicators. PMID:26464541

  11. Multisensory installations in residential aged-care facilities: increasing novelty and encouraging social engagement through modest environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Theresa L; Masser, Barbara M; Pachana, Nancy A

    2014-09-01

    The current study examined the effect of an indoor simulated garden installation that included visual, auditory, and olfactory stimuli on resident well-being, compared to the effect elicited by a reminiscence installation and a control no-installation condition. A quasi-experimental ABA design was used (i.e., two intervention conditions plus a wait-list control condition). A survey instrument was administered to nursing home residents (N = 33) at three time points (pre-, during, and post intervention) over an 8-week period, which measured mood, behavior, health, and social interaction. Additionally, staff reports (N = 24) were collected. Both the nature-based and non-nature-based installations led to enhanced well-being and significantly more social benefits for residents because of their novel and aesthetic appeal, compared with the control condition. Residents in the nature-based installation condition reported more satisfaction with their living environment during the intervention phase than those in the comparison conditions. The results show that an indoor garden simulation is a relatively inexpensive way to transform a disused indoor area of an aged-care facility for the benefit of residents and staff. PMID:25199113

  12. 4-H and School-Age Care: A Great Combination! Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenbergh, Barbara D.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the positive relationship between 4-H programs and school-age care programs, advocating the use of 4-H programs as a model for care, or as a source of care, caregiver training, or curriculum. Notes the role of the Cooperative Extension System in training and supporting school-age care providers. (JPB)

  13. School-Age Child Care Arrangements. Research-to-Policy Connections No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Sharmila; Kreader, J. Lee

    2006-01-01

    School-age children ages 5 through 12 years spend their out-of-school time in many different types of arrangements. In addition to parental care, these include relative care, non-relative care (either in their own or another family's home), center- or school-based programs, sports and extracurricular activities, summer activities, and self-care.…

  14. Planning Manual for School-Age Child Care in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainhart, Dolly

    This manual was designed to assist concerned individuals and organizations within communities in New Mexico to develop and plan effective school-age child care programs. Emphasized are the first steps in initiating and implementing school-age child care in a community. Chapter I discusses the need for school-age child care programs and the…

  15. 20 CFR 416.211 - You are a resident of a public institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 50 percent) of the cost of your care; you are a child under the age of 18 residing throughout a month... such insurance; or, you are a child under the age of 18 residing throughout a month in a public... Medicaid pays a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care; you are a child under...

  16. European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS): background, aims and methods

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Prisca; Becker, Thomas; Losert, Carolin; Alptekin, Köksal; Berti, Loretta; Burti, Lorenzo; Burton, Alexandra; Dernovsek, Mojca; Dragomirecka, Eva; Freidl, Marion; Friedrich, Fabian; Genova, Aneta; Germanavicius, Arunas; Halis, Ulaş; Henderson, John; Hjorth, Peter; Lai, Taavi; Larsen, Jens Ivar; Lech, Katarzyna; Lucas, Ramona; Marginean, Roxana; McDaid, David; Mladenova, Maya; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Paziuc, Alexandru; Paziuc, Petronela; Priebe, Stefan; Prot-Klinger, Katarzyna; Wancata, Johannes; Kilian, Reinhold

    2009-01-01

    Background People with mental disorders have a higher prevalence of physical illnesses and reduced life expectancy as compared with the general population. However, there is a lack of knowledge across Europe concerning interventions that aim at reducing somatic morbidity and excess mortality by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. Methods and design HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i) gathering relevant knowledge on physical illness in people with mental illness, (ii) identifying health promotion initiatives in European countries that meet country-specific needs, and (iii) at identifying best practice across Europe. Criteria for best practice will include evidence on the efficacy of physical health interventions and of their effectiveness in routine care, cost implications and feasibility for adaptation and implementation of interventions across different settings in Europe. HELPS will develop and implement a "physical health promotion toolkit". The toolkit will provide information to empower residents and staff to identify the most relevant risk factors in their specific context and to select the most appropriate action out of a range of defined health promoting interventions. The key methods are (a) stakeholder analysis, (b) international literature reviews, (c) Delphi rounds with experts from participating centres, and (d) focus groups with staff and residents of mental health care facilities. Meanwhile a multi-disciplinary network consisting of 15 European countries has been established and took up the work. As one main result of the project they expect that a widespread use of the HELPS toolkit could have a significant positive effect on the physical health status of residents of mental health and social care facilities, as well as to hold resonance for community dwelling people with mental health problems. Discussion A general strategy on health promotion for people with mental disorders must take into

  17. Culture Change in Long Term Care Services: Eden-Greenhouse-Aging in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brune, Kendall

    2011-01-01

    To discuss the relationship between residents and the management team, we must first review the transition from a medical model to a social model of care that is sweeping across America. Long-term care (LTC) management models were developed for a very autocratic and hierarchical style of management based in the 1960s. Those facilities were built…

  18. Nurses’ and care workers’ experiences of spiritual needs in residents with dementia in nursing homes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate nurses’ and care workers’ experiences of spiritual needs among residents with dementia in nursing homes. Nurses claim to practice holistic nursing. Nevertheless, there is little knowledge about how to recognise spiritual needs in residents with dementia. Methods The study was conducted using a qualitative method with an exploratory design. Eight focus- group interviews in four Norwegian nursing homes were performed from June 2011 – Jan 2012. Using open-ended research questions, a total of 31 participants were asked to share their understanding and experiences regarding residents’ spiritual needs. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenological – hermeneutical method. Results The nurses’ and care workers’ experiences of residents’ spiritual needs were related to three main themes; i) The need for serenity and inner peace, described as “contemplative and restful moments” and “calmness due to familiarity”, ii) The need for confirmation, described as “love and proximity” and iii) The need to express faith and beliefs, described as “participate in worship and prayers” and “approaching death”. The comprehensive analyses revealed that the nurses believe the residents’ spiritual needs were linked to the residents’ previous sources of finding meaning, in relation to inter-personal, intra-personal and trans-personal dimensions in residents’ lives. Conclusions Nurses' and care workers’ experiences of spiritual needs in people with dementia are very similar to the findings for the general population regardless of the severity of the dementia. The study’s relevance to clinical practice indicates the importance of developing more knowledge about how people with dementia in nursing homes express spiritual needs and how to observe and interpret such needs. PMID:24731548

  19. TRACER: an ‘eye-opener’ to the patient experience across the transition of care in an internal medicine resident program

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Lauren B.; Hall, Susana L.; Kleppel, Reva W.; Hinchey, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    Background A safe patient transition requires a complex set of physician skills within the interprofessional practice. Objective To evaluate a rotation which applies self-reflection and workplace learning in a TRAnsition of CarE Rotation (TRACER) for internal medicine (IM) residents. TRACER is a 2-week required IM resident rotation where trainees join a ward team as a quality officer and follow patients into postacute care. Methods In 2010, residents participated in semistructured, one-on-one interviews as part of ongoing program evaluation. They were asked what they had learned on TRACER, the year prior, and how they used those skills in their practice. Using transcripts, the authors reviewed and coded each transcript to develop themes. Results Five themes emerged from a qualitative, grounded theory analysis: seeing things from the other side, the ‘ah ha’ moment of fragmented care, team collaboration including understanding nursing scope of practice in different settings, patient understanding, and passing the learning on. TRACER gives residents a moment to breathe and open their eyes to the interprofessional practice setting and the patient's experience of care in transition. Conclusions Residents learn about transitions of care through self-reflection. This learning is sustained over time and is valued enough to teach to their junior colleagues. PMID:25846349

  20. A critique of using age to ration health care.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R W

    1993-01-01

    Daniel Callahan has argued that economic and social benefits would result from a policy of withholding medical treatments which prolong life in persons over a certain age. He claims 'the real goal of medicine' is to conquer death and prolong life with the use of technology, regardless of the age and quality of life of the patient, and this has been responsible for the escalation of health care expenditure. Callahan's proposal is based on economic rationalism but there is little evidence to suggest that substantial economic savings could be achieved. Moreover, his argument raises serious moral objections. A policy of withholding treatments from members of a social group involves elements of compulsion and discrimination, both of which would intrude on the doctor-patient relationship, undermine the autonomy of elderly patients, and invoke the slippery slope towards involuntary forms of euthanasia. Life-death decisions should be based on more than the one criterion of age, and take account of more relevant factors such as the patient's usual state of well-being, her/his expressed wishes, informed consent and the type of illness. Any move to the implementation and enforcement of the policy Callahan recommends would be rejected by health professionals and the public. PMID:8459434

  1. [Dynamics of elements distribution in blood, depending on age, by example of Moscow Region residents].

    PubMed

    Yuvs, G G; Ignatova, T N; Anuchin, A M; Lebedeva, V L; Shilov, V V; Khapalyuk, A V

    2015-01-01

    Elemental status of a person determines the qualitative and quantitative content of chemical elements in the human body. This marker allows us to estimate the level of imbalance of chemical elements and therefore health risks. The method for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of 67 elements in biomaterials has been proposed. The detailed elemental analysis of whole blood samples of 1711 healthy people (age range 0-100 years) of Moscow Region has been performed. A number of patterns of age-related changes of the element status conditionally healthy people has been estimated. Na content in the samples increased with the age of the person. Presumably, this result reflects the studied populations nutrition disorders associated with immoderate consumption of table salt. The maximum content of Ca was observed in blood samples of people age range 0-20 years (66-69 mg/kg), the Ca content in the blood samples of people age range 26-85 years was significantly lower (59-62 mg/kg). The maximum decrease of Ca was detected in blood samples of people age range of 85-100 years (57-59 mg/kg). Thisreductionin the concentration of Ca, apparently due to age-related changes of Ca balance, correlates with decrease of bone mineral density and bone mass. Iron content decreased in the blood samples of people age range 10-100 years from 480 to 390 mg/kg. Selenium content in blood of people age range 0-25 years linearly increased, remained stable high in the blood of people age range 25-55 years (0,13-0,136 mg/kg) and then gradually decreased. A graph of As content dependence from a person's age is a mirror image of the graph of Se content dependence from a person's age, which is evidence of the antagonistic effects of these elements. Graphic changes in the content of rare earth elements Eu and Ho reflect the unidirectional trend of these elements accumulation. The maximum content of these elements was observed in blood samples of people age range of 25-65 years. Perhaps a

  2. [Dynamics of elements distribution in blood, depending on age, by example of Moscow Region residents].

    PubMed

    Yuvs, G G; Ignatova, T N; Anuchin, A M; Lebedeva, V L; Shilov, V V; Khapalyuk, A V

    2015-01-01

    Elemental status of a person determines the qualitative and quantitative content of chemical elements in the human body. This marker allows us to estimate the level of imbalance of chemical elements and therefore health risks. The method for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of 67 elements in biomaterials has been proposed. The detailed elemental analysis of whole blood samples of 1711 healthy people (age range 0-100 years) of Moscow Region has been performed. A number of patterns of age-related changes of the element status conditionally healthy people has been estimated. Na content in the samples increased with the age of the person. Presumably, this result reflects the studied populations nutrition disorders associated with immoderate consumption of table salt. The maximum content of Ca was observed in blood samples of people age range 0-20 years (66-69 mg/kg), the Ca content in the blood samples of people age range 26-85 years was significantly lower (59-62 mg/kg). The maximum decrease of Ca was detected in blood samples of people age range of 85-100 years (57-59 mg/kg). Thisreductionin the concentration of Ca, apparently due to age-related changes of Ca balance, correlates with decrease of bone mineral density and bone mass. Iron content decreased in the blood samples of people age range 10-100 years from 480 to 390 mg/kg. Selenium content in blood of people age range 0-25 years linearly increased, remained stable high in the blood of people age range 25-55 years (0,13-0,136 mg/kg) and then gradually decreased. A graph of As content dependence from a person's age is a mirror image of the graph of Se content dependence from a person's age, which is evidence of the antagonistic effects of these elements. Graphic changes in the content of rare earth elements Eu and Ho reflect the unidirectional trend of these elements accumulation. The maximum content of these elements was observed in blood samples of people age range of 25-65 years. Perhaps a

  3. Impact of Rural Residence on Survival of Male Veterans Affairs Patients after Age 65

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Todd A.; Wallace, Amy E.; Weeks, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: More than 1 in 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) users lives in a rural setting. Rural veterans face different barriers to health care than their urban counterparts, but their risk of death relative to their urban counterparts is unknown. The objective of our study was to compare survival between rural and urban VA users. Methods: We linked the…

  4. Self-Regulation and Experience of Loneliness of Elderly People Who Live in Social Care Residences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abitov, Ildar R.; Gorodetskaya, Inna M.

    2016-01-01

    The research addresses the peculiarities of self-regulation of loneliness experience of elderly people living in care homes. The population of the study consisted of 60 elderly people (65-80 years old). 30 of them live in families with spouses and children and 30 persons live in the State residential social service institution. It was found that…

  5. The Association between Rural Residence and the Use, Type, and Quality of Depression Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, John C.; Harman, Jeffrey S.; Xu, Stanley; Dong, Fran

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the association between rurality and depression care. Methods: Data were extracted for 10,319 individuals with self-reported depression in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Pharmacotherapy was defined as an antidepressant prescription fill, and minimally adequate pharmacotherapy was defined as receipt of at least 4…

  6. Demoralization and attitudes toward residents among certified nurse assistants in relation to job stressors and work resources: cultural diversity in long term care.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Mildred; Teresi, Jeanne; Holmes, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Certified Nurse Assistants (CNAs) (n=104) caring for a probability sample of residents in 22 New York State nursing homes were interviewed, longitudinally, regarding work demands and stressors, support and training, and job-stress outcomes. Twenty-seven percent of CNAs reported pejorative name-calling by their residents. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that (a) increase in perceived pressure to complete tasks, (b) assignment size, and (c) attendance at support groups were associated with CNAs' demoralization at follow-up. A decrease in perceived racism and increased in-services about confused residents contributed to more positive attitudes toward residents. Examination of the quality of long-term care should include consideration of cultural diversity. PMID:16856700

  7. Demoralization and attitudes toward residents among certified nurse assistants in relation to job stressors and work resources: cultural diversity in long term care.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Mildred; Teresi, Jeanne; Holmes, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Certified Nurse Assistants (CNAs) (n=104) caring for a probability sample of residents in 22 New York State nursing homes were interviewed, longitudinally, regarding work demands and stressors, support and training, and job-stress outcomes. Twenty-seven percent of CNAs reported pejorative name-calling by their residents. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that (a) increase in perceived pressure to complete tasks, (b) assignment size, and (c) attendance at support groups were associated with CNAs' demoralization at follow-up. A decrease in perceived racism and increased in-services about confused residents contributed to more positive attitudes toward residents. Examination of the quality of long-term care should include consideration of cultural diversity.

  8. The Burden of Aging: A Theoretical Framework for Understanding the Shifting Balance of Caregiving and Care Receiving as Cohorts Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhlenberg, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Develops a theoretical framework that explicates factors determining the level of care given and care received by cohorts moving through different stages of later life. Specifies four proximate determinants of caregiving and three proximate determinants of care receiving. Focuses on social changes that could reduce the burden of aging. (RJM)

  9. The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Johnson, Erica D; Claridy, Mechelle D; Earle, Rebecca L; Kaplan, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Objective. US primary care physicians are inadequately educated on how to provide obesity treatment. We sought to assess physician training in obesity and to characterize the perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and treatment patterns of primary care physicians. Methods. We administered a cross-sectional web-based survey from July to October 2014 to adult primary care physicians in practices affiliated with the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). We evaluated survey respondent demographics, personal health habits, obesity training, knowledge of bariatric surgery care, perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs regarding the etiology of obesity and treatment strategies. Results. Younger primary care physicians (age 20-39) were more likely to have received some obesity training than those aged 40-49 (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.008-0.822) or those 50+ (OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.004-0.321). Physicians who were young, had obesity, or received obesity education in medical school or postgraduate training were more likely to answer bariatric surgery knowledge questions correctly. Conclusions. There is a need for educational programs to improve physician knowledge and competency in treating patients with obesity. Obesity is a complex chronic disease, and it is important for clinicians to be equipped with the knowledge of the multiple treatment modalities that may be considered to help their patients achieve a healthy weight. PMID:26339506

  10. [Skin Care to Prevent Development of Pressure Ulcers in Bedridden Nursing Home Residents from Developing Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Residents].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Chie

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether skincare products are effective in preventing development of pressure ulcers in bedridden nursing home residents. The study sample consisted of 21 nursing home residents at a nursing home in Osaka, Japan who use diapers. Participants were assigned to 3 groups and compared to a control group. None of the subjects developed a pressure ulcer and had improved skin condition around the anus. PMID:26809416

  11. The principle of respect for autonomy in the care of nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    van Thiel, G J; van Delden, J J

    2001-09-01

    Respect for autonomy is well known as a core element of normative views on good care. Most often it is interpreted in a liberal way, with a focus on independence and self-determination. In this article we argue that this interpretation is too narrow in the context of care in nursing homes. With the aim of developing an alternative view on respect for autonomy in this setting we described four interpretations and investigated the moral intuitions (i.e. moral judgements) of caregivers regarding these approaches. We found that these caregivers seemed to value different notions relating to respect for autonomy under different circumstances. There was no significant difference in moral judgements between men and women or between doctors and nurses. We conclude that a multidimensional understanding of this principle would best fit this context. We end this article with a description of a modest theory of respect for autonomy in nursing homes. PMID:16004096

  12. Facilitators and barriers to self-management of nursing home residents: perspectives of health-care professionals in Korean nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon-Hwan; Bang, Hwal Lan; Kim, Ga Hye; Ha, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore facilitators and barriers to self-management from the viewpoint of staff taking care of nursing home (NH) residents with chronic diseases in South Korea. Patients and methods A qualitative content analysis was done using the focus group interview method. A total of 23 health-care professionals (16 registered nurses and 7 social workers) were interviewed from three urban NHs, each with more than 100 beds. Results Five facilitators were identified: grouping the residents; the resident’s awareness of his/her current health status; the willingness of residents to engage in self-management; residence in the facility; and support from the staff. Additionally, seven barriers were identified: deterioration of the resident’s health; the dependency expectations of the resident; hesitation in asking for help; difference in expectations between the staff and the resident’s family; insufficient staffing and time; lack of standardized guidelines; and conservative tendencies of the staff due to rigid policies. Conclusion The findings of this study can help health-care professionals recognize the factors that influence self-management and provide direction for registered nurses and other health professionals involved in supporting self-management programs for NH residents. PMID:26491277

  13. Complementary Self-Care Strategies for Healthy Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sondra

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on alternative self-care practices in terms of collaboration with the primary care physician and individual exploration of self-care practices such as acupuncture, meditation, and nutrition counseling. (JOW)

  14. Comparative effectiveness of exercise with patterned sensory enhanced music and background music for long-term care residents.

    PubMed

    O'Konski, Marjorie; Bane, Cynthia; Hettinga, Johanna; Krull, Katelyn

    2010-01-01

    The current study compared exercise performance and participant satisfaction for 2 conditions: Patterned Sensory Enhanced music (PSE) and big band background music. Residents of long-term care facilities in the Midwest (N = 45) attended a minimum of 3 sessions per condition and reported levels of satisfaction after each session. Observers blind to condition coded videotapes for number of repetitions, adherence to modeled movements, range of motion, and form. Significant differences were found for only 3/19 exercises and satisfaction levels did not differ between the 2 conditions. The results indicate that PSE may not be more effective than big band background music but that both types of music enhance exercise performance and participant enjoyment. PSE also provides consistency in number of repetitions led.

  15. Discipline in School-Age Care: Control the Climate, Not the Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Dale Borman

    This book is addressed to school-age care staff and suggests they rethink their attitudes about the behavior of the children under their care. Ideas were generated by workshop participants about ways to promote misbehavior, as a way of gaining insights into encouraging positive behaviors. The following six key elements of a school-age care program…

  16. Immune function in aging atomic bomb survivors residing in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bloom, E T; Korn, E L; Takasugi, M; Toji, D S; Onari, K; Makinodan, T

    1983-11-01

    Immunologic parameters were studied among survivors of the 1945 atomic bombs who now reside in the United States. Of all known survivors living in the U.S., about 40% (n = 189) participated in this study. Of those survivors on whom radiation exposure information was available (n = 168), 96% were exposed to less than 50 rad at the time of the bomb (ATB). Survivors were divided into two groups; those exposed to varying low doses of radiation (S+ group, exposed at less than or equal to 2500 m from the hypocenter) were compared with those exposed to "O rad" (S0 group, exposed at greater than 2500 m from the hypocenter). Of the former group, 92% were exposed to less than 100 rad and 89% to less than 50 rad ATB. Cellular immune responses, including natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC), interferon production, and the mitogenic response to PHA, tended to be higher among S+ individuals, although only the difference for NCMC was statistically significant. This was suggestive of a trend which was consistent with the higher serum interferon levels and lower frequencies of detectable immune complexes and antimitochondrial antibodies among the S+ group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Other immunologic parameters which showed no trend included frequency of antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, levels of serum immunoglobulins, levels of isoantibodies and heteroantibodies, and the magnitude of the mixed lymphocyte reaction.

  17. Web 2.0 support for residents' and fellows' patient care and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Sherry; Gleason, Ann Whitney

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses librarian support of medical education programs and patient care with blogs and wikis. Pedagogical background for using Web 2.0 tools in educational settings is explored and example applications given. A survey of health sciences libraries usage of blogs and wikis was conducted in 2009-2010. Using the results from the survey plus five years of experience using blogs and wikis at the University of Washington Health Sciences Library, best practices were compiled and are presented for guidance in establishing new blogs and wikis. PMID:21534109

  18. Web 2.0 support for residents' and fellows' patient care and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Sherry; Gleason, Ann Whitney

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses librarian support of medical education programs and patient care with blogs and wikis. Pedagogical background for using Web 2.0 tools in educational settings is explored and example applications given. A survey of health sciences libraries usage of blogs and wikis was conducted in 2009-2010. Using the results from the survey plus five years of experience using blogs and wikis at the University of Washington Health Sciences Library, best practices were compiled and are presented for guidance in establishing new blogs and wikis.

  19. Newborn care and safety: the black box of obstetric practices and residency training.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Erin E; Haas, Susan; Lauria, Michele R

    2012-09-01

    Certain causes of newborn mortality such as sudden unexpected infant death, which includes sleep-related infant death and sudden unexplained infant death syndrome, are potentially preventable. Obstetricians are uniquely positioned to counsel new parents about safe practices regarding newborn sleep, feeding, and transportation. Patients often do not develop a relationship with their pediatricians until the neonate has been discharged, and the newborn period is a time of particular vulnerability. Newborn safety should be routinely taught in obstetric curricula, and the American College/Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) should partner to disseminate updated literature and guidelines to health care providers regarding newborn safety. Current guidelines from the Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Sudden Infant Syndrome are summarized in this article. PMID:22914475

  20. Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over

    MedlinePlus

    ... April 18, 2012 Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over ... and Roberto Valverde, M.P.H., Division of Health Care Statistics Abstract Objective —This report presents national estimates ...

  1. Women and stroke knowledge: influence of age, race, residence location, and marital status.

    PubMed

    Ennen, Kathleen A; Beamon, Emily R

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, stroke is the second leading cause of death and leading cause of disability. Women experience over half of all strokes, 60% of stroke-related deaths, and a death rate of 11% versus 8.4% for men. To understand the delay in stroke recognition and treatment, a convenience sample of 97 midlife women living in southeast North Carolina completed the Stroke Recognition Questionnaire. Rural women, younger women (<49 years old), and participants with incomes under $35,601 had higher stroke symptom and risk factor knowledge scores. Educational interventions should target women over the age of 50, and should distinguish between symptoms of stroke versus heart attack. PMID:22946594

  2. Women and stroke knowledge: influence of age, race, residence location, and marital status.

    PubMed

    Ennen, Kathleen A; Beamon, Emily R

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, stroke is the second leading cause of death and leading cause of disability. Women experience over half of all strokes, 60% of stroke-related deaths, and a death rate of 11% versus 8.4% for men. To understand the delay in stroke recognition and treatment, a convenience sample of 97 midlife women living in southeast North Carolina completed the Stroke Recognition Questionnaire. Rural women, younger women (<49 years old), and participants with incomes under $35,601 had higher stroke symptom and risk factor knowledge scores. Educational interventions should target women over the age of 50, and should distinguish between symptoms of stroke versus heart attack.

  3. Impact of the information age on residency training: communication, access to public information, and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Donald M; Belitsky, Richard; Cohen, Mitchell B; Cabaniss, Deborah L; Dickstein, Leah J; Bernstein, Carol A; Kaplan, Allan S; Scheiber, Stephen C; Crisp-Han, Holly D; Wrzosek, Marika I; Silberman, Edward K

    2015-02-01

    Access to technology in practice helps physicians manage information, communicate, and research topics; however, those in training receive almost no formal preparation for integrating web-based technologies into practice. One reason for this is that many faculty-aside from junior faculty or those in recent generations-did not grow up using Internet communication, may use it minimally, if at all, in their own practices, and may know little about its forms and varieties. This report presents a case to illustrate how these disparities may play out in the supervisory situation and makes suggestions about helping supervisors integrate technology-awareness into their teaching. PMID:25124878

  4. Impact of the information age on residency training: communication, access to public information, and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Donald M; Belitsky, Richard; Cohen, Mitchell B; Cabaniss, Deborah L; Dickstein, Leah J; Bernstein, Carol A; Kaplan, Allan S; Scheiber, Stephen C; Crisp-Han, Holly D; Wrzosek, Marika I; Silberman, Edward K

    2015-02-01

    Access to technology in practice helps physicians manage information, communicate, and research topics; however, those in training receive almost no formal preparation for integrating web-based technologies into practice. One reason for this is that many faculty-aside from junior faculty or those in recent generations-did not grow up using Internet communication, may use it minimally, if at all, in their own practices, and may know little about its forms and varieties. This report presents a case to illustrate how these disparities may play out in the supervisory situation and makes suggestions about helping supervisors integrate technology-awareness into their teaching.

  5. Continuing in Foster Care Beyond Age 18: How Courts Can Help. Issue Brief 116

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Clark; Bell, Katie S. Claussen; Zinn, Andrew; Goerge, Robert M.; Courtney, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Research has found that foster youth who remain in care beyond age 18 are more likely to participate in services and tend to have better outcomes than those who do not. However, not all youth eligible to remain in care beyond age 18 do so. This study examines Illinois, one of the few states that extends care up to age 21, to identify the major…

  6. Association between prenatal care and small for gestational age birth: an ecological study in Quebec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Savard, N.; Levallois, P.; Rivest, LP.; Gingras, S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: In Quebec, women living on low income receive a number of additional prenatal care visits, determined by their area of residence, of both multi-component and food supplementation programs. We investigated whether increasing the number of visits reduces the odds of the main outcome of small for gestational age (SGA) birth (weight < 10th percentile on the Canadian scale). Methods: In this ecological study, births were identified from Quebec’s registry of demographic events between 2006 and 2008 (n  =  156 404; 134 areas). Individual characteristics were extracted from the registry, and portraits of the general population were deduced from data on multi-component and food supplement interventions, the Canadian census and the Canadian Community Health Survey. Mothers without a high school diploma were eligible for the programs. Multilevel logistic regression models were fitted using generalized estimating equations to account for the correlation between individuals on the same territory. Potential confounders included sedentary behaviour and cigarette smoking. The odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for mother’s age, marital status, parity, program coverage and mean income in the area. Results: Mothers eligible for the programs remain at a higher odds of SGA than non-eligible mothers (OR =  1.40; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30–1.51). Further, areas that provide more visits to eligible mothers (4–6 food supplementation visits) seem more successful at reducing the frequency of SGA birth than those that provide 1–2 or 3 visits (OR  =  0.86; 95% CI: 0.75–0.99). Conclusions: Further studies that validate whether an increase in the number of prenatal care interventions reduces the odds of SGA birth in different populations and evaluate other potential benefits for the children should be done. PMID:27409987

  7. A systematic review of telemedicine services for residents in long term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Edirippulige, Sisira; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Beattie, Elizabeth; Smith, Anthony C; Gray, Leonard C

    2013-04-23

    We conducted a systematic review of the literature on telemedicine use in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) and assessed the quality of the published evidence. A database search identified 22 papers which met the inclusion criteria. The quality of the studies was assessed and if they contained economic data, they were rated according to standard criteria. The clinical services provided by telemedicine included allied health (n = 5), dermatology (3), general practice (4), neurology (2), geriatrics (1), psychiatry (4) and multiple specialities (3). Most studies (17) employed real-time telemedicine using videoconferencing. The remaining five used store and forward telemedicine. The papers focused on economics (3), feasibility (9), stakeholder satisfaction (12), reliability (5) and service implementation (2). Overall, the quality of evidence for telemedicine in LTCFs was low. There was only one small randomised controlled trial (RCT). Most studies were observational and qualitative, and focused on utilisation. They were mainly based on surveys and interviews of stakeholders. A few studies evaluated the cost associated with implementing telemedicine services in LTCFs. The present review shows that there is evidence for feasibility and stakeholder satisfaction in using telemedicine in LTCFs in a number of clinical specialities.

  8. Age-Related Incidence of Cervical Spondylosis in Residents of Jeju Island

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min-Geun; Park, Bong-Keun; Park, Min-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cervical spine radiograms of 460 Jeju islanders. Purpose To investigate the age-matched incidences and severity of the cervical disc degeneration and associated pathologic findings. Overview of Literature Several related studies on the incidences of disc and Luschka's and facet joint degeneration have provided some basic data for clinicians. Methods Cervical radiographs of 460 (220 males and 240 females) patients in their fourth to ninth decade were analyzed. Ninety patients in their third decade were excluded because of absence of spondylotic findings. Results Overall incidence of cervical spondylosis was 47.8% (220 of 460 patients). The percentile incidences of spondylosis in the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth decade was 13.2% (10 of 76 patients), 34.6% (37 of 107 patients), 58.9% (66 of 112 patients), 58.8% (50 of 85 patients), 70.3% (45 of 64 patients) and 75.0% (12 of 16 patients), respectively. The percentile incidences of one, two, three, four and five level spondylosis among 220 spondylosis patients was 45.5% (n=100), 34.1% (n=75), 15.0% (n=33), 4.5% (n=10), and 0.9% (n=2). Severity of disc degeneration ranged from ± to ++++, and was ± in 6.0% (24 segments), + in 49.6% (198 segments), ++ in 35.3% (141 segments), +++ in 9.0% (36 segments) and ++++ in 0.25% (one segment). Spurs and anterior ligament ossicle formed at the spondylotic segments, mostly at C4~6. The rate of posterior corporal spurs formation was very low. Olisthesis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament were rarely combined with spondylosis. Cervical lordotic curve decreased gradually according to the progress of severity of spondylosis. Conclusions The incidence of cervical spondylosis and number of spondylotic segments increase, and degeneration gradually becomes more severe with age. PMID:27790313

  9. How to Further Decrease the Efficiency of Care at a Level I Trauma Center: Implement the Amended Resident Work Hours.

    PubMed

    Schroeppel, Thomas J; Sharpe, John P; Magnotti, Louis J; Weinberg, Jordan A; Croce, Martin A; Fabian, Timothy C

    2015-07-01

    Work-hour restrictions were amended in 2011 to limit interns to 16 continuous duty hours, essentially requiring a night float system of 12-hour shifts. We hypothesize that there has been no improvement in outcomes after implementation of the amended work-hour restrictions. Outcomes from trauma admissions were queried from the trauma registry from 2009 to 2011 (PRE) and 2011 to 2013 (POST). The primary outcome was mortality with secondary outcomes intensive care unit length of stay (LOS)and LOS. Patients were stratified based on age, mechanism, gender, blood pressure, heart rate, and injury severity (Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, Base Deficit). Outcomes were then compared from admissions PRE to POST. A total of 9178 patients were included in the study population. The mean age was 42 with most being male (72%) and blunt mechanism (81%). Patient populations were well matched except patients in the POST period were slightly older (43 vs 42 years; P = 0.01). Intensive care unit LOS and LOS were higher in the POST period. After adjusted analysis, admission in the POST period was not a predictor of mortality (odds ratio 0.857; confidence interval 0.655-1.12). The POST period was an independent predictor for LOS (β = 0.74; P = 0.002). This study adds to the mounting evidence that the implementation of the amended limits on work hours leads to furthermore decreased efficiency of care.

  10. The agreement between proxy and self-completed EQ-5D for care home residents was better for index scores than individual domains☆

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Angela; Taylor, Stephanie J.C.; Spencer, Anne; Diaz-Ordaz, Karla; Eldridge, Sandra; Underwood, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Proxy measures are an alternative source of data for care home residents who are unable to complete the health utility measure, but the agreement levels between residents and care home staff for the EQ-5D have not been investigated previously. The objective of the present study was to examine the inter-rater agreement levels for the reporting of EQ-5D by care home residents and staff, adjusting for the impact of clustering. Study Design and Setting The data consist of EQ-5D scores for 565 pairs of care home residents and proxies and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for 248 pairs. Cluster-adjusted agreement was compared for the domains, index scores, and QALYs from the EQ-5D. Factors influencing index score agreement are also described. Results The results show poor to fair agreement at the domain level (cluster-adjusted Kappa −0.03 to 0.26) and moderate agreement at the score level (cluster-adjusted intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] 0.44–0.50) and for QALYs (cluster-adjusted ICC 0.59). A higher likelihood of depression and lower cognitive impairment were both associated with smaller discrepancy between proxy and self-completed scores. Conclusion Proxies appear to be an acceptable source of data for index scores and QALYs but may be less reliable if individual domains are considered. PMID:24837298

  11. Most Sick, Aging Americans Live Far from In-Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160328.html Most Sick, Aging Americans Live Far From In-Home Care Study ... to swell. "The Baby Boomer generation, they're aging fast and they are living longer with multiple ...

  12. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  13. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  14. The introduction of a targeted user-pays approach to funding high-level residential aged care in Australia: an empirical investigation of the impact on price.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Susan

    2010-10-01

    In response to predictions that population ageing will increase government spending over the coming decades, in 1997-98, the Australian Government introduced means-tested income fees and accommodation charges for those admitted to nursing homes with income and assets above set threshold levels. Immediately prior, all residents paid the same price for their care and were not required to contribute towards the cost of their accommodation. In addition, in relation to those eligible to pay a higher price, the Government reduced its subsidisation of the cost of their care. The Government anticipated that the initiative would more equitably share the cost of age-related services across the public and private sectors, and result in some cost savings for itself. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of the policy on the average price paid by residents. The findings suggest that the policy may have contributed to an increase in the average price paid, but statistical evidence is limited due to a number of data issues. Results also indicate that the rate of increase in the price was greater after the Residential Aged Care Structural Reform package was introduced. The study contributes to the economic analysis of the sector by evaluating time series estimates of prices paid by residents since the early 1970s. PMID:20122304

  15. The introduction of a targeted user-pays approach to funding high-level residential aged care in Australia: an empirical investigation of the impact on price.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Susan

    2010-10-01

    In response to predictions that population ageing will increase government spending over the coming decades, in 1997-98, the Australian Government introduced means-tested income fees and accommodation charges for those admitted to nursing homes with income and assets above set threshold levels. Immediately prior, all residents paid the same price for their care and were not required to contribute towards the cost of their accommodation. In addition, in relation to those eligible to pay a higher price, the Government reduced its subsidisation of the cost of their care. The Government anticipated that the initiative would more equitably share the cost of age-related services across the public and private sectors, and result in some cost savings for itself. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of the policy on the average price paid by residents. The findings suggest that the policy may have contributed to an increase in the average price paid, but statistical evidence is limited due to a number of data issues. Results also indicate that the rate of increase in the price was greater after the Residential Aged Care Structural Reform package was introduced. The study contributes to the economic analysis of the sector by evaluating time series estimates of prices paid by residents since the early 1970s.

  16. Population aging and its impacts: strategies of the health-care system in Taipei.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Peng, Li-Ning; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2010-11-01

    Taiwan is one of the fastest aging countries in the world. As such, the government has developed various strategies to promote an age-friendly health-care system. Health services are supported by National Health Insurance (NHI), which insures over 97% of citizens and over 99% of health-care institutes. The current health-care system has difficulties in caring for older patients with multiple comorbidities, complex care needs, functional impairments, and post-acute care needs. Taipei, an international metropolis with a well-preserved tradition of filial piety in Chinese societies, has developed various strategies to overcome the aforementioned barriers to an age-friendly health-care system. These include an emphasis on general medical care and a holistic approach in all specialties, development of a geriatrics specialty training program, development of post-acute services, and strengthening of linkages between health and social care services. Despite achievements thus far, challenges still include creating a more extensive integration between medical specialties, promotion of an interdisciplinary care model across specialties and health-care settings, and integration of health and social care services. The experiences of Taipei in developing an age-friendly health-care service system may be a culturally appropriate model for other Chinese and Asian communities.

  17. Succeeding Through Service Innovation: Consumer Directed Care in the Aged Care Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Linda; Laragy, Carmel; Zadeh, Hossein S.

    The growing challenge and diversity of ageing populations is a key global issue for struggling health systems. Consumer Directed Care (CDC), an innovative service delivery system, opens up possibilities for re-defining consumer expectations, prompting change in how health service providers operate. As a service delivery model, CDC offers improved responsiveness to individual requirements; and increased transparency in the use of allocated funding. Where implemented, CDC has established new relationships and interactions between key stakeholders, co-creating value for older citizens. This chapter reviews some drivers for the development of service innovation, surveys various in-country approaches, highlights current trends in CDC delivery and describes an EU policy impact assessment instrument to aid funding bodies. The chapter concludes by speculating on organizational outcomes from CDC and the likelihood that the introduction of this innovative service delivery model will require closer collaborative relationships between service providers and information technology specialists.

  18. Thyroid Cancer Detection by Ultrasound Among Residents Ages 18 Years and Younger in Fukushima, Japan: 2011 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Tokinobu, Akiko; Yamamoto, Eiji; Suzuki, Etsuji

    2016-01-01

    Background: After the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in March 2011, radioactive elements were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Based on prior knowledge, concern emerged about whether an increased incidence of thyroid cancer among exposed residents would occur as a result. Methods: After the release, Fukushima Prefecture performed ultrasound thyroid screening on all residents ages ≤18 years. The first round of screening included 298,577 examinees, and a second round began in April 2014. We analyzed the prefecture results from the first and second round up to December 31, 2014, in comparison with the Japanese annual incidence and the incidence within a reference area in Fukushima Prefecture. Results: The highest incidence rate ratio, using a latency period of 4 years, was observed in the central middle district of the prefecture compared with the Japanese annual incidence (incidence rate ratio = 50; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 25, 90). The prevalence of thyroid cancer was 605 per million examinees (95% CI = 302, 1,082) and the prevalence odds ratio compared with the reference district in Fukushima Prefecture was 2.6 (95% CI = 0.99, 7.0). In the second screening round, even under the assumption that the rest of examinees were disease free, an incidence rate ratio of 12 has already been observed (95% CI = 5.1, 23). Conclusions: An excess of thyroid cancer has been detected by ultrasound among children and adolescents in Fukushima Prefecture within 4 years of the release, and is unlikely to be explained by a screening surge. PMID:26441345

  19. Aging, social capital, and health care utilization in Canada.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Audrey; Nauenberg, Eric; Shen, Leilei

    2008-10-01

    This paper examines relationships between aging, social capital, and healthcare utilization. Cross-sectional data from the 2001 Canadian Community Health Survey and the Canadian Census are used to estimate a two-part model for both GP physicians (visits) and hospitalization (annual nights) focusing on the impact of community- (CSC) and individual-level social capital (ISC). Quantile regressions were also performed for GP visits. CSC is measured using the Petris Social Capital Index (PSCI) based on employment levels in religious and community-based organizations [NAICS 813XX] and ISC is based on self-reported connectedness to community. A higher CSC/lower ISC is associated with a lower propensity for GP visits/higher propensity for hospital utilization among seniors. The part-two (intensity model) results indicated that a one standard deviation increase (0.13%) in the PSCI index leads to an overall 5% decrease in GP visits and an annual offset in Canada of approximately $225 M. The ISC impact was smaller; however, neither measure was significant in the hospital intensity models. ISC mainly impacted the lower quantiles in which there was a positive association with GP utilization, while the impact of CSC was strongest in the middle quantiles. Each form of social capital likely operates through a different mechanism: ISC perhaps serves an enabling role by improving access (e.g. transportation services), while CSC serves to obviate some physician visits that may involve counseling/caring services most important to seniors. Policy implications of these results are discussed herein.

  20. Excess body weight increases the burden of age-associated chronic diseases and their associated health care expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Atella, Vincenzo; Kopinska, Joanna; Medea, Gerardo; Belotti, Federico; Tosti, Valeria; Mortari, Andrea Piano; Cricelli, Claudio; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Aging and excessive adiposity are both associated with an increased risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, which drive ever increasing health costs. The main aim of this study was to determine the net (non‐estimated) health costs of excessive adiposity and associated age‐related chronic diseases. We used a prevalence‐based approach that combines accurate data from the Health Search CSD‐LPD, an observational dataset with patient records collected by Italian general practitioners and up‐to‐date health care expenditures data from the SiSSI Project. In this very large study, 557,145 men and women older than 18 years were observed at different points in time between 2004 and 2010. The proportion of younger and older adults reporting no chronic disease decreased with increasing BMI. After adjustment for age, sex, geographic residence, and GPs heterogeneity, a strong J‐shaped association was found between BMI and total health care costs, more pronounced in middle‐aged and older adults. Relative to normal weight, in the 45‐64 age group, the per‐capita total cost was 10% higher in overweight individuals, and 27 to 68% greater in patients with obesity and very severe obesity, respectively. The association between BMI and diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease largely explained these elevated costs. PMID:26540605

  1. No Time to Waste: An Action Agenda for School-Age Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Fink, Dale Borman

    This book for persons interested in setting up high quality school-age child care (SACC) programs: (1) provides background information and a rationale; (2) describes a collaborative model of program development; (3) discusses program funding and resources; (4) considers approaches to recognizing high quality school-age child care; and (5) offers…

  2. Addressing the Need for School Age Child Care: A Guide for Philadelphia Elementary School Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintzer, Janet L.

    The Delaware Valley Child Care Council (DVCCC) developed this booklet to help Philadelphia school principals plan and develop privately run after-school centers in their schools. First, an executive summary documents the need for school-age day care nationwide and in the Philadelphia area. Section I offers guidance on planning a school-age child…

  3. What Is the Need for School-Age Care? Lessons from Two Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, Ami

    In 2001, Arizona's Children's Action Alliance (CCA) developed a resource for community groups interested in exploring the need for care for school-age children. Titled "School-Age Care Tool Kit: A Guide for Measuring Needs in Your Community," the resource provided step-by-step advice to community organizations on how to identify the need for…

  4. Attachment Style, Home-Leaving Age and Behavioral Problems among Residential Care Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shechory, Mally; Sommerfeld, Eliane

    2007-01-01

    In a prospective study, the attachment style, home-leaving age, length of time in residential care, and behavioral problems among Israeli residential care children (N=68), were studied. Data analyses showed that children removed from their homes at a later age suffered from higher levels of anxiety, depression and social problems compared to…

  5. Joining the Quality Circle: Developmentally Appropriate Practice in School-Age Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Kay

    1993-01-01

    Describes characteristics of a high-quality school-age care program: resourceful, caring staff; recognition of the importance of peers; opportunities for mixed- and same-age grouping; children's selection of activities and experiences; guidance for children's social and emotional development; and environments that encourage a wide variety of…

  6. Long-term care of the aging population with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nae-Hwa; Hoyek, Georges El; Chau, Diane

    2011-05-01

    The aging population with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) deserves appropriate health care and social support. This population poses unique medical and social challenges to the multidisciplinary team that provides care. In the past, long-term care (LTC) facilities played an essential role in the livelihood of this population. The likelihood that the geriatric LTC system must prepare for adequately caring for this population is high. This article conveys the need to prepare for the inclusion of the growing aging population with I/DD into long-term care with the general elderly population in the near future.

  7. Individual and contextual antecedents of workplace aggression in aged care nurses and certified nursing assistants.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne; Gulyas, Andre

    2015-08-01

    Employees in aged care are at high risk of workplace aggression. Research rarely examines the individual and contextual antecedents of aggression for specific types of workers within these settings, such as nurses and certified nursing assistants (CNAs). The study aimed to explore characteristics of the job demands-resources model (JD-R), negative affectivity (NA) and demographics related to workplace aggression for aged care workers. The survey study was based on 208 nurses and 83 CNAs working within aged care. Data from each group were analysed separately using ordinal regressions. Both aged care nurses and CNAs reported high rates of bullying, external emotional abuse, threat of assault and physical assault. Elements of the JD-R model and individual characteristics were related to aggression types for both groups. Characteristics of the JD-R model, NA and demographics are important in understanding the antecedents of aggression observed among aged care workers.

  8. Medical innovation and age-specific trends in health care utilization: findings and implications.

    PubMed

    Wong, Albert; Wouterse, Bram; Slobbe, Laurentius C J; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Polder, Johan J

    2012-01-01

    Health care utilization is expected to rise in the coming decades. Not only will the aggregate need for health care grow by changing demographics, so too will per capita utilization. It has been suggested that trends in health care utilization may be age-specific. In this paper, age-specific trends in health care utilization are presented for different health care sectors in the Netherlands, for the period 1981-2009. For the hospital sector we also explore the link between these trends and the state of medical technology. Using aggregated data from a Dutch health survey and a nationwide hospital register, regression analysis was used to examine age-specific trends in the probability of utilizing health care. To determine the influence of medical technology, the growth in age-specific probabilities of hospital care was regressed on the number of medical patents while adjusting for confounders related to demographics, health status, supply and institutional factors. The findings suggest that for most health care sectors, the trend in the probability of health care utilization is highest for ages 65 and up. Larger advances in medical technology are found to be significantly associated with a higher growth of hospitalization probability, particularly for the higher ages. Age-specific trends will raise questions on the sustainability of intergenerational solidarity in health care, as solidarity will not only be strained by the ageing population, but also might find itself under additional pressure as the gap in health care utilization between elderly and non-elderly grows over time. For hospital care utilization, this process might well be accelerated by advances in medical technology.

  9. Expert perspectives on Western European prison health services: do ageing prisoners receive equivalent care?

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Wiebke; Elger, Bernice Simone

    2014-09-01

    Health care in prison and particularly the health care of older prisoners are increasingly important topics due to the growth of the ageing prisoner population. The aim of this paper is to gain insight into the approaches used in the provision of equivalent health care to ageing prisoners and to confront the intuitive definition of equivalent care and the practical and ethical challenges that have been experienced by individuals working in this field. Forty interviews took place with experts working in the prison setting from three Western European countries to discover their views on prison health care. Experts indicated that the provision of equivalent care in prison is difficult mostly due to four factors: variability of care in different prisons, gatekeeper systems, lack of personnel, and delays in providing access. This lack of equivalence can be fixed by allocating adequate budgets and developing standards for health care in prison.

  10. Expert perspectives on Western European prison health services: do ageing prisoners receive equivalent care?

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Wiebke; Elger, Bernice Simone

    2014-09-01

    Health care in prison and particularly the health care of older prisoners are increasingly important topics due to the growth of the ageing prisoner population. The aim of this paper is to gain insight into the approaches used in the provision of equivalent health care to ageing prisoners and to confront the intuitive definition of equivalent care and the practical and ethical challenges that have been experienced by individuals working in this field. Forty interviews took place with experts working in the prison setting from three Western European countries to discover their views on prison health care. Experts indicated that the provision of equivalent care in prison is difficult mostly due to four factors: variability of care in different prisons, gatekeeper systems, lack of personnel, and delays in providing access. This lack of equivalence can be fixed by allocating adequate budgets and developing standards for health care in prison. PMID:24965437

  11. The Mini Mental State Examination at the Time of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Diagnosis, According to Age, Education, Gender and Place of Residence: A Cross-Sectional Study among the French National Alzheimer Database

    PubMed Central

    Pradier, Christian; Sakarovitch, Charlotte; Le Duff, Franck; Layese, Richard; Metelkina, Asya; Anthony, Sabine; Tifratene, Karim; Robert, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was firstly to describe the MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination) score upon initial diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders among the French population, according to age. Secondly, education, gender and place of residence were studied as factors potentially associated with delayed Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. Design we conducted a cross sectional analysis of the French National Alzheimer database (BNA). Data from 2008 to 2012 were extracted. Patients were selected at the moment of their first diagnosis of AD (n = 39,451). Results The MMSE score at initial diagnosis dropped significantly with increasing age. The test score increased with the degree of educational background regardless of age. Gender and place of residence were significantly related to the MMSE score, women and persons living in medical institutions having lower MMSE scores under the age of 90 years and at all educational levels. Conclusions Health care professionals should be aware of these risk factors in order to maximize chances of earliest possible diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. PMID:25093735

  12. Teaching high-value, cost-conscious care to residents: the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine–American College of Physicians Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cynthia D

    2012-08-21

    Health care expenditures are projected to reach nearly 20% of the U.S. gross domestic product by 2020. Up to $765 billion of this spending has been identified as potentially avoidable; many of the avoidable costs have been attributed to unnecessary services. Postgraduate trainees have historically received little specific training in the stewardship of health care resources and minimal feedback on resource utilization and its effect on the cost of care. This article describes a new curriculum that was developed collaboratively by the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine and the American College of Physicians to address this training gap. The curriculum introduces a simple, stepwise framework for delivering high-value care and focuses on teaching trainees to incorporate high-value, cost-conscious care principles into their clinical practice. It consists of ten 1-hour, case-based, interactive sessions designed to be flexibly incorporated into the existing conference structure of a residency training program.

  13. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (h) Individuals age 21 and over... is used if the individual has been abandoned by his or her parent(s), does not have a legal...

  14. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... Act, the State of residence is the State where the child lives. (h) Individuals age 21 and over... is used if the individual has been abandoned by his or her parent(s), does not have a legal...

  15. An Attitudinal Survey of Pennsylvania's Rural Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Rural Pennsylvania, Harrisburg.

    Telephone surveys of 844 residents in 42 rural Pennsylvania counties established baseline data on rural opinions about 14 public policy issues. Concerning government spending, respondents felt that too little was spent on job creation, aging issues, child care, education, health services, and farming and agriculture; funding was about right for…

  16. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Among the Mexican American Population in the Texas-Mexico Border Region, by Age and Length of Residence in United States

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbary, Bassent; Rentfro, Anne; Fisher-Hoch, Susan; McCormick, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the relationship between health behaviors and outcomes such as smoking and obesity with longer residence in the United States among Mexican American immigrants is established, the relationship between length of residency in the United States and risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between immigrant status, length of residence in the United States, age, and CVD markers in a sample of Mexican American adults living in Brownsville, Texas. Methods We categorized participants in the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort study as immigrants in the United States for 10 years or less, immigrants in the United States for more than 10 years, or born in the United States. We conducted logistic and ordinary least squares regression for self-reported chronic conditions and CVD biomarkers. Results We found bivariate differences in the prevalence of self-reported conditions and 1 CVD biomarker (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) by length of residence in the middle (41–64 y) and younger (18–40 y) age groups. After adjusting for covariates, the following varied significantly by immigrant status: stroke and high cholesterol (self-reported conditions) and diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (CVD biomarkers). Conclusion The association between immigrant status, length of residence in the United States, and CVD markers varied. The effect of length of residence in the United States or immigrant status may depend on age and may be most influential in middle or older age. PMID:24721218

  17. Undernutrition and Its Correlates among Children of 3–9 Years of Age Residing in Slum Areas of Bhubaneswar, India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sai Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Undernutrition among children is a major public health concern worldwide, more prevalent in Asia and Africa. It manifests itself in various forms such as wasting or stunting or underweight and retards physical and mental development, increases susceptibility to infection, and reduces educational attainment and productivity. The present study was undertaken to assess the level of wasting, stunting, and underweight and determine its associates among slum children of 3–9 years of age, residing in Bhubaneswar city, India. After obtaining informed consent, a total of 249 children from 249 households were studied and their parents/guardians were interviewed to collect all relevant information. 23.3%, 57.4%, and 45.4% of children were found to have wasting, stunting, and underweight, respectively. Variables like birth order of child, period of initiation of breastfeeding and mother's education were found to be strong predictors of wasting, whereas toilet facility in household and practice of drinking water storage were significantly associated with stunting among slum children as revealed in multiple regression analysis. Thus, a multipronged approach is needed such as giving priority to improve education for slum community especially for women, creating awareness regarding benefits of early initiation of breastfeeding, small family size, and proper storage of drinking water, and providing toilet facility in slum households which could improve the nutritional status of slum children. PMID:25580460

  18. Correlates of Three Year Transfer Student Retention Rates with Race, Gender, Age, Credit Hours, and Place of Residence at a Regional Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Michael Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation examined the relationship between the three year academic success of transfer students and the variables of race, gender, age, number of transfer credit hours, and place of residence. The study was conducted at Midwestern State University, a public, regional four-year institution and followed the incoming transfer classes of the…

  19. Do Effects of Early Child Care Extend to Age 15 Years? Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Belsky, Jay; Burchinal, Margaret; Steinberg, Laurence; Vandergrift, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Relations between nonrelative child care (birth to 4 1/2 years) and functioning at age 15 were examined (N = 1,364). Both quality and quantity of child care were linked to adolescent functioning. Effects were similar in size as those observed at younger ages. Higher quality care predicted higher cognitive-academic achievement at age 15, with…

  20. Preliminary estimates of residence times and apparent ages of ground water in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and water-quality data from a survey of springs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Focazio, Michael J.; Plummer, L. Neil; Bohlke, John K.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Bachman, L. Joseph; Powars, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the residence times of the ground-water systems in Chesapeake Bay watershed helps resource managers anticipate potential delays between implementation of land-management practices and any improve-ments in river and estuary water quality. This report presents preliminary estimates of ground-water residence times and apparent ages of water in the shallow aquifers of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. A simple reservoir model, published data, and analyses of spring water were used to estimate residence times and apparent ages of ground-water discharge. Ranges of aquifer hydraulic characteristics throughout the Bay watershed were derived from published literature and were used to estimate ground-water residence times on the basis of a simple reservoir model. Simple combinations of rock type and physiographic province were used to delineate hydrogeomorphic regions (HGMR?s) for the study area. The HGMR?s are used to facilitate organization and display of the data and analyses. Illustrations depicting the relation of aquifer characteristics and associated residence times as a continuum for each HGMR were developed. In this way, the natural variation of aquifer characteristics can be seen graphically by use of data from selected representative studies. Water samples collected in September and November 1996, from 46 springs throughout the watershed were analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons (CFC?s) to estimate the apparent age of ground water. For comparison purposes, apparent ages of water from springs were calculated assuming piston flow. Additi-onal data are given to estimate apparent ages assuming an exponential distribution of ages in spring discharge. Additionally, results from previous studies of CFC-dating of ground water from other springs and wells in the watershed were compiled. The CFC data, and the data on major ions, nutrients, and nitrogen isotopes in the water collected from the 46 springs are included in this report. The apparent ages of water

  1. Strategies for School-Age Child Care in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nancy A.

    This manual was designed to assist Texas school districts in their efforts to implement Senate Bill (SB) 913 and to serve as a guide for organizing child care programs in the schools. Chapter 1 provides a summary of SB 913, a bill that requires school districts with more than 5,000 students to hold annual public hearings on out-of-school care for…

  2. Tracer ages along a section between Ellesmere Island and the North Pole: Implications for circulation and mean residence times of the upper water colum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, P.; Smethie, W. M., Jr.; Newton, R.; Friedrich, R.

    2014-12-01

    We present age tracer distributions (Tritium/He-3 and SF6) from a section between Ellesmere Island and the North Pole as part of the Switchyard project. The sections cover the period between 2008 and 2013. The tracers are interpreted in the context of circulation patterns and mean residence times of the main water masses. Mixed layer tracer ages range from close to zero to ca. 5 years with most of the ages grouping around 2.5 years. The tracer ages increase rapidly through the halocline waters (roughly 10 years at about 100 and 20 years close to 200 meters depth, respectively) and typically reach their maximum values close to the depth of the core of the Atlantic Water (up to 35 years). Within the AW there are large lateral gradients with higher ages found in the boundary current along the slope of the Canadian Archipelago, and lower ages prevalent close to the North Pole. We also observe temporal variability in the age tracer distributions, mainly in the lateral gradient of the ages in the AW layer. We discuss the age tracer results in the context of the circulation and mean residence times of waters in the Switchyard region of the Arctic Ocean and their variability. We also discuss possible systematic differences between the Tritium/He-3 and SF6 ages and their relevance for our main conclusions.

  3. A prospective observational study of quality of diabetes care in a shared care setting: trends and age differences (ZODIAC-19)

    PubMed Central

    van Hateren, Kornelis J J; Drion, Iefke; Kleefstra, Nanne; Groenier, Klaas H; Houweling, Sebastiaan T; van der Meer, Klaas; Bilo, Henk J G

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Zwolle Outpatient Diabetes project Integrating Available Care (ZODIAC) study was initiated in 1998 to investigate the effects of shared care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the Netherlands, and to reduce the number of diabetes-related complications. Benchmarking the performance of diabetes care was and is an important aspect of this study. We aimed to investigate trends in diabetes care, within the ZODIAC study for a wide variety of quality indicators during a long follow-up period (1998–2008), with special interest for different age groups. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting Primary care, Zwolle, The Netherlands. Participants Patients with T2DM. Methods A dataset of quality measures was collected annually during the patient's visit to the practice nurse or general practitioner. Linear time trends from 1998 to 2008 were estimated using linear mixed models in which we adjusted for age and gender. Age was included in the model as a categorical variable: for each follow-up year all participants were categorised into the categories <60, 60–75 and >75 years. Differences in trends between the age categories were investigated by adding an interaction term to the model. Results The number of patients who were reported to participate increased in the period 1998–2008 from 1622 to 27 438. All quality indicators improved in this study, except for body mass index. The prevalence albuminuria decreased in an 11-year-period from 42% to 21%. No relevant differences between the trends for the three age categories were observed. During all years of follow-up, mean blood pressure and body mass index were the lowest and highest, respectively, in the group of patients <60 years (data not shown). Conclusions Quality of diabetes care within the Dutch ZODIAC study, a shared care project, has considerably improved in the period 1998–2008. There were no relevant differences between trends across various age categories

  4. Comparing Aging in Place to Home Health Care: Impact of Nurse Care Coordination On Utilization and Costs.

    PubMed

    Popejoy, Lori L; Galambos, Colleen; Stetzer, Frank; Popescu, Mihail; Hicks, Lanis; Khalilia, Mohammed A; Rantz, Marilyn J; Marek, Karen D

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare utilization and cost outcomes of patients who received long-term care coordination in an Aging in Place program to patients who received care coordination as a routine service in home health care. This research offered the unique opportunity to compare two groups of patients who received services from a single home health care agency, using the same electronic health record, to identify the impact of long-term and routine care coordination on utilization and costs to Medicare and Medicaid programs. This study supports that long-term care coordination supplied by nurses outside of a primary medical home can positively influence functional, cognitive, and health care utilization for frail older people. The care coordinators in this study practiced nursing by routinely assessing and educating patients and families, assuring adequate service delivery, and communicating with the multidisciplinary health care team. Care coordination managed by registered nurses can influence utilization and cost outcomes, and impact health and functional abilities.

  5. Leadership and management in the aged care sector: a narrative synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Merlyn, Teri; Chenoweth, Lynn

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the issues and the progress being made in leadership and management with relevance for the residential aged care workforce. A systematic review was conducted using scientific journal databases, hand searching of specialist journals, Google, snowballing and suggestions from experts. After a seven-tiered culling process, we conducted a detailed review of 153 papers relevant to leadership and management development in aged care. Strong, effective leadership and management promotes staff job satisfaction and retention, high care quality and the well-being of care recipients, and reduces associated costs. Good leadership and effective management also play a key role in bringing about a successful change to a positive workplace culture through innovative programs and research projects. Organisational investment in improving leadership and management skills and capabilities can only improve outcomes for staff stability and productivity, care quality and budgets, and better prepare the aged care sector. PMID:20553534

  6. The Epidemiology of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Colonization and Infection among Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Residents.

    PubMed

    Mills, John P; Talati, Naasha J; Alby, Kevin; Han, Jennifer H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE An improved understanding of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) in long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) is needed. The objective of this study was to assess risk factors for colonization or infection with CRKP in LTACH residents. METHODS A case-control study was performed at a university-affiliated LTACH from 2008 to 2013. Cases were defined as all patients with clinical cultures positive for CRKP and controls were those with clinical cultures positive for carbapenem-susceptible K. pneumoniae (CSKP). A multivariate model was developed to identify risk factors for CRKP infection or colonization. RESULTS A total of 222 patients were identified with K. pneumoniae clinical cultures during the study period; 99 (45%) were case patients and 123 (55%) were control patients. Our multivariate analysis identified factors associated with a significant risk for CRKP colonization or infection: solid organ or stem cell transplantation (OR, 5.05; 95% CI, 1.23-20.8; P=.03), mechanical ventilation (OR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.24-5.28; P=.01), fecal incontinence (OR, 5.78; 95% CI, 1.52-22.0; P=.01), and exposure in the prior 30 days to meropenem (OR, 3.55; 95% CI, 1.04-12.1; P=.04), vancomycin (OR, 2.94; 95% CI, 1.18-7.32; P=.02), and metronidazole (OR, 4.22; 95% CI, 1.28-14.0; P=.02). CONCLUSIONS Rates of colonization and infection with CRKP were high in the LTACH setting, with nearly half of K. pneumoniae cultures demonstrating carbapenem resistance. Further studies are needed on interventions to limit the emergence of CRKP in LTACHs, including targeted surveillance screening of high-risk patients and effective antibiotic stewardship measures. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):55-60. PMID:26455382

  7. Informing policy and service development at the interfaces between acute and aged care.

    PubMed

    Howe, Anna L

    2002-01-01

    This paper argues that policies to address the interfaces between acute care and aged care should view older people as members of the wider Australian population entitled to a range of health services under Medicare rather than focusing only on supposed "bed blockers". In seeking to explain the current level of policy interest in this area, three areas are canvassed: pressures on acute hospital care, particularly those attributed to population ageing; shrinking provision of residential aged care; and the proliferation of post acute services. If policy development is to maintain a wider rather than narrower perspective, attention needs to be given to improving collection and analysis of critical data that are currently unavailable, to developing system-wide funding arrangements for post acute care, and to reassessing what constitutes appropriate hospital activity for younger and older age groups alike. PMID:12536863

  8. Epidemiology of Necator americanus hookworm infections in Xiulongkan Village, Hainan Province, China: high prevalence and intensity among middle-aged and elderly residents.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, N S; Jizhang, C; Khoshnood, K; Fuying, X; Shanwen, L; Yaoruo, L; Bin, Z; Haechou, X; Chongjin, T; Yan, W; Wensen, W; Dungxing, H; Chong, C; Shuhua, X; Hawdon, J M; Hotez, P J

    2001-08-01

    Hookworm is highly endemic to Hainan Province, an island located in the South China Sea. To investigate the prevalence and intensity of infection in the area, the village of Xiulongkan was surveyed between April and July 1998. A cross-sectional study was conducted in which fecal samples of 80% of the village residents (631 individuals) were tested for the presence of helminth eggs. Hookworm was the predominant intestinal helminth in Xiulongkan, where it was determined that 60% of those tested were infected. Necator americanus was the predominant species of hookworm in this population. The prevalence of hookworm increased with age, and then leveled to a plateau for ages 41 yr and up. This observation was in contrast to infections with Ascaris lumbricoides, where the highest prevalences occurred among school-aged children. Women had a significantly higher prevalence of hookworm than men and this difference emerged in early adulthood. The intensity of hookworm infection also significantly increased with age, with the highest intensity infections occurring among middle-aged and elderly residents. Females were more likely to have moderate or heavy infections, whereas males were more likely to have light infections. The rates of hookworm transmission are particularly high among the middle-aged and elderly residents of Xiulongkan.

  9. Caring for an aging society: cohort values and eldercare services.

    PubMed

    Karner, T X

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the impact of cohort values is important in trying to project future aging service needs. The cultural characteristics of cohorts yet to reach the age of 65 are compared with those already "old," with specific focus on the Baby Boomers. Aging policies (and available services) reflect the cultural notions of age and aging held as normative during the historical era in which they are enacted. Previous research into lifestyle preferences, consumer practices, and key characteristics is drawn upon to investigate the values of Baby Boomers in light of their projected needs for eldercare services. Cohort research and generational marketing practices offer a promising foundation for exploring how best to develop, target, and deliver aging services that most effectively utilize our social resources.

  10. Trends in aging and skin care: Ayurvedic concepts

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Hema Sharma; Paramesh, Rangesh

    2010-01-01

    The association between Ayurveda, anti-aging and cosmeceuticals is gaining importance in the beauty, health and wellness sector. Ayurvedic cosmeceuticals date back to the Indus Valley Civilization. Modern research trends mainly revolve around principles of anti-aging activity described in Ayurveda: Vayasthapana (age defying), Varnya (brighten skin-glow), Sandhaniya (cell regeneration), Vranaropana (healing), Tvachya (nurturing), Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Tvachagnivardhani (strengthening skin metabolism) and Tvagrasayana (retarding aging). Many rasayana plants such as Emblica officinalis (Amla) and Centella asiatica (Gotukola) are extensively used. PMID:21836797

  11. Associations between chewing and swallowing problems and physical and psychosocial health status of long-term care residents in taiwan: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tze-Fang; Chen, I-Ju; Li, I-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Oral health is often overlooked in institutional elder care but may have an impact on general health and ability to communicate. We aimed to determine the factor associated with chewing and swallowing problems among long-term care residents in Taiwan. Staff nurses trained to evaluate oral health assessed 781 residents using relevant sections of the Minimum Data Set 2.1 for nursing homes (Chinese version), including the Cognitive Performance Scale, Index of Social Engagement, and Activities of Daily Living Scale. Individuals with chewing and swallowing problems (n = 345) tended to be women (odds ratio [OR] = 1.51, P = .019) in smaller facilities (OR = 4.18, P < .001) with fewer natural teeth (OR = 0.54, P = .011); more broken, loose, or carious teeth (OR = 1.74, P = .042); and with more frequently inflamed gums (OR = 2.72, P = .025) than residents without chewing and swallowing problems (n = 436). Residents' chewing and swallowing problems were significantly associated with parenteral/enteral intake, oral health status, nutritional status, concomitant disease and infection, cognitive function, and social engagement.

  12. Work satisfaction and intention to leave among direct care workers in community and residential aged care in Australia.

    PubMed

    King, Debra; Wei, Zhang; Howe, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Turnover in the Australian aged-care workforce is lower than in the United States but is still of concern. This research examined the effects of worker satisfaction, worker characteristics, work conditions, and workplace environment on intention to leave, using data from a 2007 national census of the aged-care workforce. A probit model was used to estimate the probability of care workers leaving their jobs in the next 12 months. While workers were satisfied, overall, with their work, improving some components of satisfaction and converting casual contracts to permanent work would reduce intention to leave. To these ends, a shift in focus is required away from worker characteristics and the nature of care work to job conditions and organizational matters amenable to management and policy action.

  13. The Care Of The Aged: A Responsibility & Challenge For The Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    de Buda, Yvonne

    1979-01-01

    The population increase in the over 65 age group creates a challenge and responsibility for family physicians in the continuing and comprehensive care of the aged. Family physicians have to assess the medical, psychological and social needs of the elderly and provide them with the best care available by utilizing local facilities, community resources, health care personnel, and whenever possible, the cooperation of the patient's family. Medical students, family practice trainees and other health professionals require the appropriate training. New trends in the care of the elderly and medical education geared towards this task are discussed. PMID:20469307

  14. An apocalyptic vision of ageing in China: Old age care for the largest elderly population in the world.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Sun, Li

    2015-06-01

    According to the National Bureau of Statistics of China, by 2010 the number of people aged 60 or over had reached 178 million in China or 13% of its population. With the largest elderly population in the world in absolute numbers, China faces a challenge of providing care for the elderly both in the present and the future. Unlike old age pensions and health protection for the elderly, in Chinese society elderly care had never been considered to be a social problem but rather the individual family's responsibility. After the turn of the millennium, as the repercussions of increasingly ageing demographics, the results of the One-Child Policy and drastic changes in traditional family structures gradually became more apparent, this issue of elderly care has increasingly become one of the most pressing concerns for the ageing society. As there is little existing research on this particular topic, this article aims to shed light on elderly care in China, focusing on the care of elderly needing assistance with activities of daily living, since this group of elderly are most in need of care, their numbers having risen to 33 million in 2010. This article argues it is urgent for China to switch from informal family-based elderly care to the state's formal long-term care, illustrates that a model of social insurance (e.g. as in Germany) is advocated by many Chinese scholars and points out the ways in which it is different from both the commercialized models (e.g. as in the USA) and state organized "Beveridge" models (e.g. as in Sweden).

  15. Gender, age, and place of residence as moderators of the internalized homophobia-depressive symptoms relation among Australian gay men and lesbians.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Internalized homophobia is a risk factor for depression among gay men and lesbians. The aim of the study was to test whether the internalized homophobia-depression relation was moderated by gender (stronger among gay men compared with lesbians), age (stronger among younger compared with older gay men and lesbians), and place of residence (stronger among gay men and lesbians who live in rural areas compared with those who live in urban areas). An Australian sample of 311 self-identified gay men and 570 self-identified lesbians, aged 18 to 70 years, completed the Internalized Homophobia Scale and the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Results indicated that age and gender did not moderate the internalized homophobia-depressive symptoms relation. Place of residence was a significant moderator for gay men but not lesbians. In contrast to the hypothesis, the internalized homophobia-depression relation was significant only among gay men who resided in urban areas. Those who work with gay men should be particularly aware of the significant relationship between internalized homophobia and depressive symptoms among gay men who reside in urban areas.

  16. Parental immigration status is associated with children's health care utilization: findings from the 2003 new immigrant survey of US legal permanent residents.

    PubMed

    Yun, Katherine; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Curry, Leslie A; Krumholz, Harlan M; Desai, Mayur M

    2013-12-01

    Our objective was to examine the association between parental immigration status and child health and health care utilization. Using data from a national sample of immigrant adults who had recently become legal permanent residents (LPR), children (n = 2,170) were categorized according to their parents' immigration status prior to LPR: legalized, mixed-status, refugee, temporary resident, or undocumented. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to compare child health and health care utilization by parental immigration status over the prior 12 months. Nearly all children in the sample were reported to be in good to excellent health. Children whose parents had been undocumented were least likely to have had an illness that was reported to have required medical attention (5.4 %). Children whose parents had been either undocumented or temporary residents were most likely to have a delayed preventive annual exam (18.2 and 18.7 %, respectively). Delayed dental care was most common among children whose parents had come to the US as refugees (29.1 %). Differences in the preventive annual exam remained significant after adjusting for socioeconomic characteristics. Parental immigration status before LPR was not associated with large differences in reported child health status. Parental immigration status before LPR was associated with the use of preventive annual exams and dental services. However, no group of children was consistently disadvantaged with respect to all measures.

  17. Care dependence in old age: preferences, practices and implications in two Indonesian communities

    PubMed Central

    SCHRÖDER-BUTTERFILL, ELISABETH; FITHRY, TENGKU SYAWILA

    2013-01-01

    The provision of physical care is a sensitive matter in all cultures and is circumscribed by moral injunctions and personal preferences. Research on Western cultures has shown care networks to be narrow subsets of people’s wider networks and revealed dependence to be deeply undermining of full personhood. In non-Western societies these issues have received little attention, although it is sometimes assumed that care provision and dependence are much less problematic. This paper uses longitudinal ethnographic data from two ethnic groups in rural Indonesia to compare care preferences and practices in old age and to examine the implications of care dependence. The groups manifest varying degrees of daughter preference in care and differ in the extent to which notions of shame and avoidance prohibit cross-gender intimate care and care by ‘non-blood’ relatives. Demographic and social constraints often necessitate compromises in actual care arrangements (e.g. dependence on in-laws, neighbours or paid carers), not all of which are compatible with quality care and a valued identity. We argue that by probing the norms and practices surrounding care provision in different socio-cultural settings, it becomes possible to arrive at a deeper understanding of kinship, personhood and sociality. These insights are not only of sociological interest but have implications for people’s vulnerability to poor quality care in old age. PMID:24518962

  18. The emotional overlay: older person and carer perspectives on negotiating aging and care in rural Ontario.

    PubMed

    Herron, Rachel V; Skinner, Mark W

    2013-08-01

    This paper extends the burgeoning interest in emotion, health and place by investigating the emotionally complex experiences of aging and care in rural settings. Featuring a thematic analysis of 44 semi-structured interviews and two focus groups with older people and their carers in rural Ontario (Canada) we examine the importance and implications of emotions within and across multiple scales at which care relationships, expectations and responsibilities are negotiated. With the aim of broadening the discussion surrounding geographical dimensions of ethical care, our approach draws on feminist care ethics to understand the multifaceted ways in which emotions shape and are shaped by experiences of aging and caring at the interpersonal, household and community scales. The findings reveal how emotions are central, yet often-overlooked and even hidden within care relationships among older rural people and their carers. We argue that ethical care is contingent on recognizing and valuing the situated emotions involved in doing care work, sustaining care relationships and asking for care. In doing so, we demonstrate how qualitative research on the emotional geographies of care can contribute to the development of informed policies that are contextually sensitive and, ultimately, have the potential to build more ethical rural conditions of care.

  19. Population ageing and its implications on aggregate health care demand: empirical evidence from 22 OECD countries.

    PubMed

    Palangkaraya, Alfons; Yong, Jongsay

    2009-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the relationship between age and health care expenditure is not as straightforward as it appears. In fact, micro-level studies find that time to death, rather than ageing, is possibly the main driver of the escalating health care costs in developed countries. Unfortunately, the evidence at the macro level is less clear and often depends on the specification of the empirical model used. We use an aggregate demand framework to assess whether health expenditure is more likely to be driven by ageing per se or proximity to death. Using panel data from 22 OECD countries from the first half of the 1990s, we find population ageing to be negatively correlated with health expenditure once proximity to death is accounted for. This suggests that the effects of ageing on health expenditure growth might be overstated while the effects of the high costs of medical care at the end of life are potentially underestimated. With respect to the latter, our finding highlights the importance of long-term and hospice care management. An expanded long-term care program may not only improve patient welfare, but also reduce costs of care by reducing the duration of hospital care for terminally ill patients. If expensive medical treatment for patients near the end of life can be controlled for, health expenditure growth resulting from population ageing is unlikely to present a most serious problem.

  20. Targeting Expanded Care to the Aged: Early SHMO Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leutz, Walter; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes targeting policies of four Social Health Maintenance Organization sites which deliver integrated, prepaid, acute, and chronic care to Medicare beneficiaries. Analyzes complexities of operationalizing targeting systems in four different settings. Notes that selection criteria for targeting expanded benefits and their implementation affect…

  1. Learning Potentials and Limitations under Globalisation in Aged Care Workplaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of research on the Australian elder care industry used the categories of gender equity, gender differences, and gender deconstruction. Findings revealed the gender segregation of the industry, devaluing of women's work, and persistence of body/mind, male/female dualism. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  2. Caring for an Ageing Population: Are Physiotherapy Graduates Adequately Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramklass, Serela S.; Butau, Anne; Ntinga, Nomusa; Cele, Nozipho

    2010-01-01

    In view of South African policy developments related to the care of older persons, it was necessary to examine the nature of the geriatrics content within physiotherapy curricula. A survey was conducted amongst final-year student physiotherapists at South African universities, together with content analysis of physiotherapy curricula. Very little…

  3. Are medical residents a "core group" for future improvement of influenza vaccination coverage in health-care workers? A study among medical residents at the University Hospital of Palermo (Sicily).

    PubMed

    Amodio, Emanuele; Tramuto, Fabio; Maringhini, Guido; Asciutto, Rosario; Firenze, Alberto; Vitale, Francesco; Costantino, Claudio; Calamusa, Giuseppe

    2011-10-19

    Despite international recommendations, vaccination coverage among European healthcare workers, including physicians, is widely recognized as unsatisfactory. In order to plan tailored vaccination campaigns and increase future coverage, we investigated reasons for refusing vaccination and determinants associated with influenza vaccine uptake among young health care workers. A survey was carried out during September and October 2010 on medical residents attending post-graduate Schools of the Medical Faculty at the University of Palermo (Italy). Each participant completed an anonymous web-based questionnaire including items on demographic and occupational characteristics, knowledge, attitudes and behaviours with regard to influenza and influenza vaccination, and main sources of information. A total of 202 (66.9%) out of 302 medical residents participated in the survey. During the 2009-2010 influenza vaccine campaign, 44 residents (21.8%) were vaccinated against seasonal influenza and 84 (41.6%) against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009. For the impending 2010-2011 influenza season, 45 (22.3%) stated their intention to get vaccinated against seasonal influenza, 40 (19.8%) were uncertain and 117 (57.9%) were opposed. Considering themselves to be a high risk group for developing influenza was significantly associated with vaccination against both 2009-2010 seasonal (adj-OR=1.46; 95% CI=1.05-2.04) and pandemic A (H1N1) influenza (adj-OR 1.38; 95% CI=1.08-1.75). Intention to get vaccinated against 2010-2011 seasonal influenza was significantly more frequent in participants who had a high perception of efficacy/safety (adj-OR=1.49; 95% CI=1.05-2.12). After adjusting for confounding, vaccinations against seasonal 2009-2010 influenza, pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal 2010-2011 influenza were significantly more frequent in residents who were vaccinated against influenza at least once in the previous five influenza seasons. Influenza vaccination among medical

  4. Ethnic aged discrimination and disparities in health and social care: a question of social justice.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2008-09-01

    Older overseas-born Australians of diverse cultural and language backgrounds experience significant disparities in their health and social care needs and support systems. Despite being identified as a 'special needs' group, the ethnic aged in Australia are generally underserved by local health and social care services, experience unequal burdens of disease and encounter cultural and language barriers to accessing appropriate health and social care compared to the average Australian-born population. While a range of causes have been suggested to explain these disparities, rarely has the possibility of cultural racism been considered. In this article, it is suggested that cultural racism be named as a possible cause of ethnic aged disparities and disadvantage in health and social care. It is further suggested that unless cultural racism is named as a structural mechanism by which ethnic aged disparities in health and social care have been created and maintained, redressing them will remain difficult.

  5. Interprofessional education in aged-care facilities: Tensions and opportunities among undergraduate health student cohorts.

    PubMed

    Annear, Michael; Walker, Kim; Lucas, Peter; Lo, Amanda; Robinson, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    This article examines the reflective discourses of medical, nursing, and paramedic students participating in interprofessional education (IPE) activities in the context of aged-care clinical placements. The intent of the research is to explore how students engage with their interprofessional colleagues in an IPE assessment and care planning activity and elucidate how students configure their role as learners within the context of a non-traditional aged-care training environment. Research participants included cohorts of volunteer medical (n = 61), nursing (n = 46), and paramedic (n = 20) students who were on clinical placements at two large teaching aged-care facilities in Tasmania, Australia, over a period of 18 months. A total of 39 facilitated focus group discussions were undertaken with cohorts of undergraduate student volunteers from three health professions between February 2013 and October 2014. Thematic analysis of focus group transcripts was assisted by NVIVO software and verified through secondary coding and member checking procedures. With an acceptable level of agreement across two independent coders, four themes were identified from student focus group transcripts that described the IPE relations and perceptions of the aged-care environment. Emergent themes included reinforcement of professional hierarchies, IPE in aged care perceived as mundane and extraneous, opportunities for reciprocal teaching and learning, and understanding interprofessional roles. While not all students can be engaged with IPE activities in aged care, our evidence suggests that within 1 week of clinical placements there is a possibility to develop reciprocal professional relations, affirm a positive identity within a collaborative healthcare team, and support the health of vulnerable older adults with complex care needs. These important clinical learnings support aged-care-based IPE as a potentially powerful context for undergraduate learning in the 21st Century. PMID

  6. Interprofessional education in aged-care facilities: Tensions and opportunities among undergraduate health student cohorts.

    PubMed

    Annear, Michael; Walker, Kim; Lucas, Peter; Lo, Amanda; Robinson, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    This article examines the reflective discourses of medical, nursing, and paramedic students participating in interprofessional education (IPE) activities in the context of aged-care clinical placements. The intent of the research is to explore how students engage with their interprofessional colleagues in an IPE assessment and care planning activity and elucidate how students configure their role as learners within the context of a non-traditional aged-care training environment. Research participants included cohorts of volunteer medical (n = 61), nursing (n = 46), and paramedic (n = 20) students who were on clinical placements at two large teaching aged-care facilities in Tasmania, Australia, over a period of 18 months. A total of 39 facilitated focus group discussions were undertaken with cohorts of undergraduate student volunteers from three health professions between February 2013 and October 2014. Thematic analysis of focus group transcripts was assisted by NVIVO software and verified through secondary coding and member checking procedures. With an acceptable level of agreement across two independent coders, four themes were identified from student focus group transcripts that described the IPE relations and perceptions of the aged-care environment. Emergent themes included reinforcement of professional hierarchies, IPE in aged care perceived as mundane and extraneous, opportunities for reciprocal teaching and learning, and understanding interprofessional roles. While not all students can be engaged with IPE activities in aged care, our evidence suggests that within 1 week of clinical placements there is a possibility to develop reciprocal professional relations, affirm a positive identity within a collaborative healthcare team, and support the health of vulnerable older adults with complex care needs. These important clinical learnings support aged-care-based IPE as a potentially powerful context for undergraduate learning in the 21st Century.

  7. Validating a Marking Rubric for Evaluating Staff Knowledge of Dementia for Competency in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aberdeen, Suzanne M.; Leggat, Sandra G.; Barraclough, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The shift to Vocational Education and Training (VET) for the training of the Australian residential aged care workforce has resulted in significant variance in the competencies at graduation of those caring for people with dementia. Competence may be also be enhanced, or conversely, decline over time as a result of implicit learning gained from…

  8. Association between age and use of intensive care among surgical Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Wunsch, Hannah; Gershengorn, Hayley B.; Guerra, Carmen; Rowe, John; Li, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role age plays in use of intensive care for patients who have major surgery. Materials and Methods Retrospective cohort study examining the association between age and admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) for all Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 or older who had a hospitalization for one of five surgical procedures: esophagectomy, cystectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (open AAA), and elective endovascular AAA repair (endo AAA) from 2004–08. The primary outcome was admission to an ICU. Secondary outcomes were complications and hospital mortality. We used multi-level mixed-effects logistic regression to adjust for other patient and hospital-level factors associated with each outcome. Results The percentage of hospitalized patients admitted to ICU ranged from 41.3% for endo AAA to 81.5% for open AAA. In-hospital mortality also varied, from 1.1% for endo AAA to 6.8% for esophagectomy. After adjusting for other factors, age was associated with admission to ICU for cystectomy (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 1.56 (95% CI 1.36–1.78) for age 80–84+; 2.25 (1.85–2.75) age 85+ compared with age 65–69), PD (AOR 1.26 (1.06–1.50) age 80–84; 1.49 (1.11–1.99) age 85+) and esophagectomy (AOR 1.26 (1.02–1.55) age 80–84; 1.28 (0.91–1.80) age 85+). Age was not associated with use of intensive care for open or endo AAA. Older age was associated with increases in complication rates and in-hospital mortality for all five surgical procedures. Conclusions The association between age and use of intensive care was procedure-specific. Complication rates and in-hospital mortality increased with age for all five surgical procedures. PMID:23787024

  9. Care through Authenticity: Teacher Preparation for an Ethic of Care in an Age of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabin, Colette

    2013-01-01

    This study elucidates the role that authenticity--knowing and being one's self--plays in preservice teachers' introduction to care ethics in a multicultural urban context. In one teacher education program, in observations, interviews, and surveys, preservice teachers described that caring required authenticity to avoid complying with…

  10. The feasibility of developing a standards rating system for all Australian government aged care homes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Susan; Nay, Rhonda; McAuliffe, Linda; Koch, Bill

    2008-06-01

    Aims and objectives.  The main objective of this project was to investigate the likelihood of creating an easily understood rating system for all aged care homes. A secondary objective was to canvas the feasibility of alternative systems that could better inform aged care consumers. Background.  Standards rating systems are used internationally to enable comparisons in healthcare. In Australia, the performance of numerous services and products are measured according to the star system of ratings, yet despite their widespread use, star ratings remain absent from the healthcare industry. Methods.  A National Consultative Group (NCG) consisting of key stakeholder representatives was consulted, and a literature review performed on existing standards (or 'star') rating systems. Telephone interviews were conducted with representatives from aged care homes, as well as consumers. Results.  A standards rating system for aged care homes was not found to be feasible in the current climate. However, an alternative system that emphasises empowering aged care consumers, such as one that allows consumers to search for an aged care home using their own criteria of preference, was considered more feasible. Conclusion.  The need for information to assist consumer choice - limited as it may be - is real. Ways of providing more consumer friendly, useful information need to be further explored and developed. Recommendations are made for future work in this area.

  11. Income Inequities in Health Care Utilization among Adults Aged 50 and Older.

    PubMed

    Penning, Margaret J; Zheng, Chi

    2016-03-01

    Equitable access to and utilization of health services is a primary goal for many health care systems, particularly in countries with universal publicly funded systems. Despite concerns regarding potentially adverse implications of the 1990s' health care policy and other reforms, whether and how income inequalities in service utilization changed remains unclear. This study addressed the impact of income on physician and hospital utilization from 1992-2002 among adults aged 50 and older in British Columbia. Those with lower incomes were found less likely to access general practitioner and specialist services but more likely to access hospital services. Income-related disparities in physician care increased over time; hospital care declined. Volume of GP and hospital care was inversely associated with income; these differences increased regarding GP services only. Findings of declines in hospital-care access, accompanied by increasing income-related disparities in physician-services access, show that inequities are increasing within Canada's health care system.

  12. Income Inequities in Health Care Utilization among Adults Aged 50 and Older.

    PubMed

    Penning, Margaret J; Zheng, Chi

    2016-03-01

    Equitable access to and utilization of health services is a primary goal for many health care systems, particularly in countries with universal publicly funded systems. Despite concerns regarding potentially adverse implications of the 1990s' health care policy and other reforms, whether and how income inequalities in service utilization changed remains unclear. This study addressed the impact of income on physician and hospital utilization from 1992-2002 among adults aged 50 and older in British Columbia. Those with lower incomes were found less likely to access general practitioner and specialist services but more likely to access hospital services. Income-related disparities in physician care increased over time; hospital care declined. Volume of GP and hospital care was inversely associated with income; these differences increased regarding GP services only. Findings of declines in hospital-care access, accompanied by increasing income-related disparities in physician-services access, show that inequities are increasing within Canada's health care system. PMID:26757886

  13. Maternal care, mother-offspring aggregation and age-dependent coadaptation in the European earwig.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Y; Kölliker, M

    2013-09-01

    Benefits and costs of parental care are expected to change with offspring development and lead to age-dependent coadaptation expressed as phenotypic (behavioural) matches between offspring age and parental reproductive stage. Parents and offspring interact repeatedly over time for the provision of parental care. Their behaviours should be accordingly adjusted to each other dynamically and adaptively, and the phenotypic match between offspring age and parental stage should stabilize the repeated behavioural interactions. In the European earwig (Forficula auricularia), maternal care is beneficial for offspring survival, but not vital, allowing us to investigate the extent to which the stability of mother-offspring aggregation is shaped by age-dependent coadaptation. In this study, we experimentally cross-fostered nymphs of different age classes (younger or older) between females in early or late reproductive stage to disrupt age-dependent coadaptation, thereby generating female-nymph dyads that were phenotypically matched or mismatched. The results revealed a higher stability in aggregation during the first larval instar when care is most intense, a steeper decline in aggregation tendency over developmental time and a reduced developmental rate in matched compared with mismatched families. Furthermore, nymph survival was positively correlated with female-nymph aggregation stability during the early stages when maternal care is most prevalent. These results support the hypothesis that age-related phenotypically plastic coadaptation affects family dynamics and offspring developmental rate.

  14. [Cost-effectiveness research in elderly residents in long-term care: prevention is better than cure, but not always cheaper].

    PubMed

    Achterberg, Wilco P; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; van den Hout, Wilbert B

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness research in elderly residents in long-term care facilities is based on general principals of cost-effectiveness research; these have been developed primarily from the perspective of relatively healthy adults in curative medicine. These principals are, however, inadequate when evaluating interventions for the fragile elderly in long-term care, both in terms of the value attached to the health of patients and to the specific decision-making context of the institution. Here we discuss the pitfalls of cost-effectiveness research in long-term care facilities, illustrated by two prevention interventions for prevalent conditions in nursing homes: pressure ulcers and urinary tract infections. These turned out to be effective, but not cost-effective.

  15. An assessment of risk posed by a Campylobacter-positive puppy living in an Australian residential aged-care facility

    PubMed Central

    Appuhamy, Ranil; Andrew, Will; Wynn, Sandy; Roberts, Jan; Kennedy, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In April and June 2012, two outbreaks of Campylobacter gastroenteritis were investigated in an Australian aged-care facility (ACF); a Campylobacter-positive puppy was identified as a potential source of infection. Methods An expert panel was convened to assess transmission risk from the puppy to elderly residents and to guide further public health action. Criteria considered as part of the panel’s assessment included the puppy’s infectivity, the bacterium’s transmissibility, puppy–resident contact, infection control and cleaning practices and animal management at the facility. A literature review was used to assist the panel, with a final risk being determined using a likelihood and consequence matrix. Results The panel determined that the setting and low infective dose made transmission likely despite varying degrees of contact between the puppy and cases. While infection control practices were generally appropriate, the facility’s animal policy did not adequately address potential zoonotic risk. Conclusion In summary, puppies should not be considered as companion animals in ACFs due to high rates of Campylobacter carriage and the underlying susceptibility of the elderly. Infection control and animal policies in ACFs should reflect an awareness of zoonotic disease potential. PMID:25320673

  16. Health care leadership in an age of change.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the leadership practices of a sample of network and hospital administrators in metropolitan Victoria, Australia. It was undertaken in the mid-1990s when the State Liberal-National (Coalition) Government in Victoria established Melbourne's metropolitan health care networks. I argue that leadership, and the process of leading, contributes significantly to the success of the hospital in a time of turmoil and change. The sample was taken from the seven health care networks and consisted of 15 network and hospital administrators. Bolman and Deal's frames of leadership--structural, human resource, political and symbolic--were used as a framework to categorize the leadership practices of the administrators. The findings suggest a preference for the structural frame--an anticipated result, since the hospital environment is more conducive to a style of leadership that emphasizes rationality and objectivity. The human resource frame was the second preferred frame, followed by the political and symbolic. These findings suggest that network and hospital administrators focus more on intellectual than spiritual development, and perhaps this tendency needs to be addressed when educating present and future hospital leaders.

  17. Overnight Polysomnographic Characteristics and Oxygen Saturation of Healthy Infants, 1 to 18 Months of Age, Born and Residing At High Altitude (2,640 Meters)

    PubMed Central

    Bazurto-Zapata, María A.; Gozal, David; González-García, Mauricio; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Torres-Duque, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 8% of the world population resides above 1,600 m, with about 10 million people living above 2,500 m in Colombia. However, reference values for polysomnography (PSG) and oxygen saturation (Spo2) of children < 2 years old residing at high altitude are currently unavailable. METHODS: Healthy infants aged 1 to 18 months born and residing at high altitude (Bogotá: 2,640 m) underwent overnight PSG. Four age groups were defined: group 1, < 45 days; group 2, 3 to 4 months; group 3, 6 to 7 months; and group 4, 10 to 18 months. Of 122 children enrolled, 50 had three consecutive PSG tests and were analyzed as a longitudinal subcohort. RESULTS: A total of 281 PSG tests were performed in 122 infants (56% girls): group 1, 106 PSG tests; group 2, 89 PSG tests; group 3, 61 PSG tests; and group 4, 25 PSG tests. Active sleep diminished and quiet sleep increased with maturation. Apnea-hypopnea indexes (total, central, and obstructive) were highest in group 1 (21.4, 12.4, and 6.8/h total sleep time, respectively) and diminished with age (P < .001). Mean Spo2 during waking and sleep increased with age (P < .001). Nadir Spo2 values during respiratory events were lower in younger infants. Longitudinal assessments of 50 infants confirmed the temporal trends described for the cross-sectional dataset. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy infants (≤ 18 months old) born and residing at high altitude show preserved sleep architecture but higher apnea-hypopnea indexes and more prominent desaturation with respiratory events than do those living at low altitude. The current study findings can be used as reference values for infants at high altitude. PMID:25811138

  18. A Descriptive Analysis of Incidents Reported by Community Aged Care Workers.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amina; Douglas, Heather E; Smith, Cheryl; Georgiou, Andrew; Osmond, Tracey; Armour, Pauline; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about the types of incidents that occur to aged care clients in the community. This limits the development of effective strategies to improve client safety. The objective of the study was to present a profile of incidents reported in Australian community aged care settings. All incident reports made by community care workers employed by one of the largest community aged care provider organizations in Australia during the period November 1, 2012, to August 8, 2013, were analyzed. A total of 356 reports were analyzed, corresponding to a 7.5% incidence rate per client year. Falls and medication incidents were the most prevalent incident types. Clients receiving high-level care and those who attended day therapy centers had the highest rate of incidents with 14% to 20% of these clients having a reported incident. The incident profile indicates that clients on higher levels of care had higher incident rates. Incident data represent an opportunity to improve client safety in community aged care. PMID:25526960

  19. The lifestyle questionnaire for school-aged children: a tool for primary care.

    PubMed

    VanAntwerp, C A

    1995-01-01

    The Lifestyle Questionnaire for School-Aged Children can be used by nurse practitioners in the primary care setting to enhance assessment and focus health teaching. A survey of 75 school-aged children seen for well child examinations is highlighted, illustrating how nurse practitioners can use the Lifestyle Questionnaire to assess lifestyle patterns and promote healthy behaviors and habits.

  20. You're All Grown up Now: Termination of Foster Care Support at Age 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Rosemary J.; Freundlich, Madelyn

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the repercussions of discharging youth from foster care at age 18 based on recent research demonstrating that youth at this age are not developmentally prepared to live independently and have a continued need for strong social scaffolding during emerging adulthood. Drawing upon recent research findings, we make…

  1. The impact of electronic health records on client safety in aged care homes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    This study collects and critically reviews the published literature to synthesize the risk factors for client safety in residential aged care and the potential contributions of electronic health records to reducing these risks. Three major types of risk factors for client safety were identified: risk factors related to the person's health; those related to the health and aged care system serving the person and those related to human error. Multiple strategies at all levels of an aged care organization are needed to reduce risks and improve client safety. Electronic health records can be one of the effective organizational mechanisms because it improves access to better information and integrates intelligent functions to support point-of-care decision making.

  2. Nurse practitioners in aged care: documentary analysis of successful project proposals.

    PubMed

    Clark, Shannon J; Parker, Rhian M; Davey, Rachel

    2014-11-01

    Meeting the primary health care needs of an aging population is an increasing challenge for many Western nations. In Australia, the federal government introduced a program to develop, test, and evaluate nurse practitioner models in aged care settings. In this article, we present a documentary analysis of 32 project proposals awarded funding under the Nurse Practitioner-Aged Care Models of Practice Program. Successfully funded models were diverse and were operated by a range of organizations across Australia. We identified three key priorities as underlying the proposed models: "The right care," "in the right place," and "at the right time." In this article, we explore how these priorities were presented by different applicants in different ways. Through the presentation of their models, the program's applicants identified and proposed to address current gaps in health services. Applicants contrasted their proposed models with available services to create persuasive and competitive applications for funding.

  3. {sup 226}Ra and {sup 231}Pa systematics of axial MORB, crustal residence ages, and magma chamber characteristics at 9--10{degree}N East Pacific Rise

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.J.; Murrell, M.T.; Perfit, M.R.; Batiza, R.; Fornari, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    Mass spectrometric measurements of {sup 30}Th-22{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}-U{sup 231}Pa disequilibria for axial basalts are used to determine crustal residence ages for MORB magma and investigate the temporal and spatial characteristics of axial magma chambers (AMC) at 9--10{degrees}N East Pacific Rise (EPR). Relative crustal residence ages can be calculated from variations in {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th and {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U activity ratios for axial lavas, if (1) mantle sources and melting are uniform, and mantle transfer times are constant or rapid for axial N-MORB, and (2) {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U and {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th in the melt are unaffected by shallow level fractional crystallization. Uniform Th, Sr, and Nd isotopic systematics and incompatible element ratios for N-MORB along the 9--10{degrees}N segment indicate that mantle sources and transfer times are similar. In addition, estimated bulk solid/melt partition coefficients for U, Th, and Pa are small, hence effects of fractional crystallization on {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U ratios for the melt are expected to be negligible. However, fractional crystallization of plagioclase in the AMC would lower {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th ratios in the melt and produce a positive bias in {sup 226}Ra crustal residence ages for fractionated lavas.

  4. Age equity in different models of primary care practice in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William; Tuna, Meltem; Russell, Grant; Devlin, Rose Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Kristjansson, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess whether the model of service delivery affects the equity of the care provided across age groups. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Ontario. Participants One hundred thirty-seven practices, including traditional fee-for-service practices, salaried community health centres (CHCs), and capitation-based family health networks and health service organizations. Main outcome measures To compare the quality of care across age groups using multilevel linear or logistic regressions. Health service delivery measures and health promotion were assessed through patient surveys (N = 5111), which were based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool, and prevention and chronic disease management were assessed, based on Canadian recommendations for care, through chart abstraction (N = 4 108). Results Older individuals reported better health service delivery in all models. This age effect ranged from 1.9% to 5.7%, and was larger in the 2 capitation-based models. Individuals aged younger than 30 years attending CHCs had more features of disadvantage (ie, living below the poverty line and without high school education) and were more likely than older individuals to report discussing at least 1 health promotion subject at the index visit. These differences were deemed an appropriate response to greater needs in these younger individuals. The prevention score showed an age-sex interaction in all models, with adherence to recommended care dropping with age for women. These results are largely attributable to the fact that maneuvers recommended for younger women are considerably more likely to be performed than other maneuvers. Chronic disease management scores showed an inverted U relationship with age in fee-for-service practices, family health networks, and health service organizations but not in CHCs. Conclusion The salaried model might have an organizational structure that is more conducive to providing appropriate care across age groups. The thrust toward

  5. Long-term care insurance and integrated care for the aged in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Shinya; Yamamoto, Mieko

    2001-01-01

    Abstract By the introduction of a public, mandatory program of Long-Term Care Insurance (LTCI) on April 1, 2000, Japan has moved towards a system of social care for the frail and elderly. The program covers care that is both home-based and institutional. Fifty percent of the insurance is financed from the general tax and the other fifty percent from the premiums of the insured. The eligibility process begins with the individual or his/her family applying to the insurer (usually municipal government). A two-step assessment process to determine the limit of benefit follows this. The first step is an on-site assessment using a standardised questionnaire comprising 85 items. These items are analysed by an official computer program in order to determine either the applicant's eligibility or not. If the applicant is eligible it determines which of 6 levels of dependency is applicable. The Japanese LTCI scheme has thus formalised the care management process. A care manager is entrusted with the entire responsibility of planning all care and services for individual clients. The introduction of LTCI is introducing two fundamental structural changes in the Japanese health system; the development of an Integrated Delivery System (IDS) and greater informatisation of the health system. PMID:16896410

  6. The influence of patients' immigration background and residence permit status on treatment decisions in health care. Results of a factorial survey among general practitioners in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Daniel; Krones, Tanja; Sauer, Carsten; Wild, Verina

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the influence of patients' immigration background and residence permit status on physicians' willingness to treat patients in due time. A factorial survey was conducted among 352 general practitioners with a background in internal medicine in a German-speaking region in Switzerland. Participants expressed their self-rating (SR) as well as the expected colleague-rating (CR) to provide immediate treatment to 12 fictive vignette patients. The effects of the vignette variables were analysed using random-effects models. The results show that SR as well as CR was not only influenced by the medical condition or the physicians' time pressure, but also by social factors such as the ethnicity and migration history, the residence permit status, and the economic condition of the patients. Our findings can be useful for the development of adequate, practically relevant teaching and training materials with the ultimate aim to reduce unjustified discrimination or social rationing in health care. PMID:27258017

  7. Primary care presentations at emergency departments: rates and reasons by age and sex.

    PubMed

    Siminski, Peter; Bezzina, Andrew J; Lago, Luise P; Eagar, Kathy

    2008-11-01

    Primary care presentations at emergency departments (EDs) have been the subject of much attention in recent years. This paper is a demographic analysis using administrative data from the Emergency Department Information System (EDIS) for 2005 of such presentations in New South Wales EDs and of self-reported reasons for presentation. Age and sex differences in the reasons given by patients for such presentations are analysed using data from a survey of patients conducted in a subset of EDs in 2004. The rate of "potential primary care" presentations varies greatly with age and to a lesser extent with sex. Almost half (47%) of these presentations are made by people under 25 years of age. Children aged 0-4 years account for 14% of the total. The pattern is distinctly different to the corresponding rate of ED presentations that do not fit the "potential primary care" definition. Reasons given for "potential primary care" presentations are consistent across all age groups, reflecting self-assessed urgency, access to diagnostics and self-assessed complexity. Older "primary care" patients are particularly unlikely to give reasons associated with GP affordability or availability for their presentations. Young adults' responses are consistent with the overall population, and children under the age of five seem most susceptible to availability issues.

  8. Early child care and obesity at 12 months of age in the Danish National Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Neelon, Sara E Benjamin; Andersen, Camilla Schou; Morgen, Camilla Schmidt; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Oken, Emily; Gillman, Matthew W; Sørensen, Thorkild IA

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Evidence suggests that the child care environment may be more obesogenic than the family home, and previous studies have found that child care use may be associated with obesity in children. Few studies, however, have focused on child care during infancy, which may be an especially vulnerable period. This study examined child care use in infancy and weight status at 12 months of age in a country where paid maternity leave is common and early child care is not as prevalent as in other developed countries. Subjects/Methods We studied 27821 children born to mothers participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), a longitudinal study of pregnant women enrolled between 1997 and 2002, who were also included in the Childcare Database, a national record of child care use in Denmark. The exposure was days in child care from birth to 12 months. The outcomes were sex-specific body mass index (BMI) z-score and overweight/obesity (BMI ≥85th percentile based on the World Health Organization classification) at 12 months. We conducted multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses examining child care use and weight outcomes. Results A total of 17721 (63.7%) children attended child care during their first year of life. After adjustment for potential confounders, a 30-day increment of child care was associated with a modestly higher BMI z-score at 12 months (0.03 units; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.05; p=0.003). Similarly, child care use was associated with increased odds of being overweight/obese at 12 months of age (OR 1.05; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.10; p=0.047). Conclusions Child care in the first year of life was associated with slightly higher weight at 12 months, suggesting that child care settings may be important targets for obesity prevention in infancy. PMID:25233894

  9. Sex as a Bona Fide Occupational Qualification for Direct Care Staff in Residences for Mentally Retarded People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotegard, Lisa L.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Court rulings and legislation are cited in a discussion of institutionalized mentally retarded persons' rights to privacy. The authors emphasize the need to restructure job responsibilities and/or descriptions to ensure appropriate resident-staff relations for dressing, bathing, toileting, and other private activities. (CL)

  10. Improving the oral health of older adults with dementia/cognitive impairment living in a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Georg, Diana

    2006-03-01

    Background  Studies conducted in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) indicate that high levels of oral diseases and conditions are prevalent in older adults who have dementia. Poor oral health impacts on eating ability, weight, speech, hydration, severity of behavioural problems, appearance and social interactions. This study looked at a group of older adults with dementia in a RACF site in the northern suburbs of Adelaide, South Australia. It is known that in nursing home residents with dementia dental pain and problems are under-detected and under-treated. Strategy  An audit was conducted to assess the level of compliance of the RACFs oral hygiene care practices with established best practice. The audit questions were based on current best practice as identified from a rigorous international systematic review of the subject. A clinical audit software program (The Joanna Briggs Institute, Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (JBI PACES)) was used to manage the audit. An audit, feedback, re-audit cycle was followed. Stakeholders of the project were identified from which a Project team was formed. The Project team analysed the results of the first audit, conducted a situational analysis and formulated and implemented a strategic plan to target specific criteria for a change management process. Short-term and longer-term strategies were identified. Those criteria targeted as achievable in the short term were then re-audited after 6 weeks to determine the effectiveness of the change management process. Findings  The criterion Daily cleaning and night-time removal of dentures are documented was re-audited and although there was a slight increase in compliance across the site this increase was not statistically significant. The criterion Resident's dentures are individually marked was re-audited and showed a large increase in compliance across the site, this increase was statistically significant.

  11. Improving the oral health of older adults with dementia/cognitive impairment living in a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Georg, Diana

    2006-03-01

    Background  Studies conducted in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) indicate that high levels of oral diseases and conditions are prevalent in older adults who have dementia. Poor oral health impacts on eating ability, weight, speech, hydration, severity of behavioural problems, appearance and social interactions. This study looked at a group of older adults with dementia in a RACF site in the northern suburbs of Adelaide, South Australia. It is known that in nursing home residents with dementia dental pain and problems are under-detected and under-treated. Strategy  An audit was conducted to assess the level of compliance of the RACFs oral hygiene care practices with established best practice. The audit questions were based on current best practice as identified from a rigorous international systematic review of the subject. A clinical audit software program (The Joanna Briggs Institute, Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (JBI PACES)) was used to manage the audit. An audit, feedback, re-audit cycle was followed. Stakeholders of the project were identified from which a Project team was formed. The Project team analysed the results of the first audit, conducted a situational analysis and formulated and implemented a strategic plan to target specific criteria for a change management process. Short-term and longer-term strategies were identified. Those criteria targeted as achievable in the short term were then re-audited after 6 weeks to determine the effectiveness of the change management process. Findings  The criterion Daily cleaning and night-time removal of dentures are documented was re-audited and although there was a slight increase in compliance across the site this increase was not statistically significant. The criterion Resident's dentures are individually marked was re-audited and showed a large increase in compliance across the site, this increase was statistically significant. PMID:21631755

  12. [Health Care Insurance in France: its impact on income distribution between age and social groups].

    PubMed

    Fourcade, N; Duval, J; Lardellier, R

    2013-08-01

    Our study, based on microsimulation models, evaluates the redistributive impact of health care insurance in France on income distribution between age and social groups. This work sheds light on the debate concerning the respective role of the public health care insurance (PHI) and the private supplemental health care insurance (SHI) in France. The analysis points out that the PHI enables the lowest-income households and the pensioners a better access to health care than they would have had under a complete private SHI. Due to the progressivity of taxes, low-income households contribute less to the PHI and get higher benefits because of a weaker health. Pensioners have low contributions to public health care finance but the highest health care expenditures.

  13. Incorporating Age-Specific Plans of Care to Achieve Optimal Perioperative Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mower, Juliana

    2015-10-01

    When developing a nursing plan of care, a perioperative nurse identifies nursing diagnoses during the preoperative patient assessment. The ability to identify age-specific outcomes (ie, infant/child, adolescent, adult, elderly adult) in addition to those that are universally applicable is a major responsibility of the perioperative RN. Having an individualized plan of care is one of the best ways to determine whether desired patient outcomes have been successfully attained. Nursing care plans address intraoperative and postoperative risks and allow for a smooth transfer of care throughout the perioperative experience. A good nursing care plan also includes education for the patient and his or her caregiver. Within an overall plan of care, the use of methods such as a concept or mind map can visually demonstrate the relationships between systems, nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, and desirable outcomes.

  14. Aging skin is functionally anaerobic: importance of coenzyme Q10 for anti aging skin care.

    PubMed

    Prahl, S; Kueper, T; Biernoth, T; Wöhrmann, Y; Münster, A; Fürstenau, M; Schmidt, M; Schulze, C; Wittern, K-P; Wenck, H; Muhr, G-M; Blatt, T

    2008-01-01

    The functional loss of mitochondria represents an inherent part in modern theories trying to explain the cutaneous aging process. The present study shows significant age-dependent differences in mitochondrial function of keratinocytes isolated from skin biopsies of young and old donors. Our data let us postulate that energy metabolism shifts to a predominantly non-mitochondrial pathway and is therefore functionally anaerobic with advancing age. CoQ10 positively influences the age-affected cellular metabolism and enables to combat signs of aging starting at the cellular level. As a consequence topical application of CoQ10 is beneficial for human skin as it rapidly improves mitochondrial function in skin in vivo. PMID:19096122

  15. Bridging the gap in ageing: Translating policies into practice in Malaysian Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Population ageing is poised to become a major challenge to the health system as Malaysia progresses to becoming a developed nation by 2020. This article aims to review the various ageing policy frameworks available globally; compare aged care policies and health services in Malaysia with Australia; and discuss various issues and challenges in translating these policies into practice in the Malaysian primary care system. Fundamental solutions identified to bridge the gap include restructuring of the health care system, development of comprehensive benefit packages for older people under the national health financing scheme, training of the primary care workforce, effective use of electronic medical records and clinical guidelines; and empowering older people and their caregivers with knowledge, skills and positive attitudes to ageing and self care. Ultimately, family medicine specialists must become the agents for change to lead multidisciplinary teams and work with various agencies to ensure that better coordination, continuity and quality of care are eventually delivered to older patients across time and settings. PMID:21385446

  16. [The nurse as an action tool in care for the aged].

    PubMed

    Brum, Ana Karine Ramos; Tocantins, Florence Romijn; Silva, Teresinha de Jesus do Espírito Santo da

    2005-01-01

    This study approaches nursing care as related to the aged. The studied situation involved health care needs of hospitalized persons, using the following central question: which is the meaning of nurses' actions when attending hospitalized aged patients without expectation of recovery and when technology is no longer that important? We aimed to reflect about hospitalized elders' needs in nursing reality. Comprehensive Sociology was used as a theoretical-methodological framework. The study was carried out at an Intensive Care Service of a Municipal Hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro-Brazil. The subjects were nurses who attend hospitalized aged persons without any expectation of recovery, who were approached through a phenomenological interview. Through a comprehensive analysis, we identified care by being together, providing at the same time physical comfort and well-being to cope with the situation as typical of nursing actions. This study indicates some contributions for nursing care, assistance, teaching and research, aimed at strengthening nurses' attitude as an action tool in care for aged patients.

  17. Financing care for aging women in the U.S.: international perspectives.

    PubMed

    Neuman, P H; Rice, D P; Hussey, P S

    2000-04-01

    The aging of the U.S. population presents challenges in financing care and meeting the health and long-term care needs of older Americans. Women, who constitute a majority of the older adult population and a disproportionate share of those with low incomes, chronic conditions and long-term care needs, have much at stake in the future direction of health programs for aging Americans. This paper examines the status of older women in 12 industrialized nations to assess how the U.S. compares to other countries in terms of its aging female population. We find that women across the 12 industrialized countries have a longer life expectancy than men at ages 65 and 80, underscoring the universality of aging as a "women's issue". With respect to age composition, the U.S. lags behind many industrialized nations in the share of its elderly female population; by 2030, the proportion of women aged 65 and older, and 80 and older, will be lower in the U.S. than in any of the industrialized nations compared in this paper. Against this backdrop, the paper examines the characteristics of older adult women in the U.S., considers the role of Medicare in meeting the needs of aging women, and identifies gaps in coverage, primarily prescription drug and long-term care, that disproportionately affect older women. The paper concludes by considering how other nations provide and finance prescription drug and long-term care services for older adults, suggesting useful models for the U.S. to consider as it struggles to meet the demands of its aging population. PMID:10902056

  18. The effects of age, gender, and crash types on drivers' injury-related health care costs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Sijun; Neyens, David M

    2015-04-01

    There are many studies that evaluate the effects of age, gender, and crash types on crash related injury severity. However, few studies investigate the effects of those crash factors on the crash related health care costs for drivers that are transported to hospital. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between drivers' age, gender, and the crash types, as well as other crash characteristics (e.g., not wearing a seatbelt, weather condition, and fatigued driving), on the crash related health care costs. The South Carolina Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System (SC CODES) from 2005 to 2007 was used to construct six separate hierarchical linear regression models based on drivers' age and gender. The results suggest that older drivers have higher health care costs than younger drivers and male drivers tend to have higher health care costs than female drivers in the same age group. Overall, single vehicle crashes had the highest health care costs for all drivers. For males older than 64-years old sideswipe crashes are as costly as single vehicle crashes. In general, not wearing a seatbelt, airbag deployment, and speeding were found to be associated with higher health care costs. Distraction-related crashes are more likely to be associated with lower health care costs in most cases. Furthermore this study highlights the value of considering drivers in subgroups, as some factors have different effects on health care costs in different driver groups. Developing an understanding of longer term outcomes of crashes and their characteristics can lead to improvements in vehicle technology, educational materials, and interventions to reduce crash-related health care costs.

  19. Critical action research applied in clinical placement development in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily D; Kelton, Moira; Paterson, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop quality clinical placements in residential aged care facilities for undergraduate nursing students undertaking their nursing practicum topics. The proportion of people aged over 65 years is expected to increase steadily from 13% in 2006 to 26% of the total population in Australia in 2051. However, when demand is increasing for a nursing workforce competent in the care of older people, studies have shown that nursing students generally lack interest in working with older people. The lack of exposure of nursing students to quality clinical placements is one of the key factors contributing to this situation. Critical action research built on a partnership between an Australian university and five aged care organisations was utilised. A theoretical framework informed by Habermas' communicative action theory was utilised to guide the action research. Multiple research activities were used to support collaborative critical reflection and inform actions throughout the action research. Clinical placements in eight residential aged care facilities were developed to support 179 nursing students across three year-levels to complete their practicum topics. Findings were presented in three categories described as structures developed to govern clinical placement, learning and teaching in residential aged care facilities. PMID:23134277

  20. Perceived Needs of Developmentally Disabled Skilled Care Facility and Intermediate Care Facility Residents as Compared to Their Non-institutionalized Peers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughman, Sharon

    The Center for Independent Living of Greater Bridgeport and its operating agencies conducted a survey of 32 people, the majority of whom were developmentally disabled and residents of institutional or community settings, in both rural and urban areas. The aim of the survey was to determine the perceived needs and levels of independence experienced…

  1. Influence of socio-economic factors on street litter generation in the middle east: effects of education level, age, and type of residence.

    PubMed

    Arafat, Hassan A; Al-Khatib, Issam A; Daoud, Raeda; Shwahneh, Hadeel

    2007-08-01

    Street littering is considered an important environmental health issue in the Middle East. This problem is growing steadily and is attracting great concerns within the communities. The purpose of this paper, which focuses on Nablus district (Palestinian Territory), is to measure the perception and opinion of residents toward littering, in addition to studying prevailing attitudes and practices on littering. This was achieved using an interview survey approach. The influence of three socio-economic factors; level of education, age, and type of residence, on the littering behaviour of individuals was studied. As a result, possible remedial actions have been suggested. The data presented in this work can be considered as one piece of information, which can be compiled with other future data to design an effective litter control programrhe for Middle Eastern countries.

  2. The Relationship of Age to Life Satisfaction, Locus of Control, and Self Concept in Elderly Domiciliary Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehrke, MiltonF.; And Others

    This research project investigates the relationships between age and life satisfaction, self-concept, and locus of control among the aged. The predictions were based in large part on Erickson's adult development theory, and attempts were made to isolate the effects of age from other possible factors such as cohort and environment. The findings…

  3. 'We're in the sandwich': Aged care staff members' negotiation of constraints and the role of the organisation in enacting and supporting an ethic of care.

    PubMed

    Petriwskyj, Andrea; Gibson, Alexandra; Webby, Glenys

    2015-12-01

    Aged care staff are often seen as holding power in care relationships, particularly in client engagement. Such a perception, however, may limit our understanding and analysis of the dynamics and politics within care spaces. This paper uses interview and focus group data from both staff and clients of an Australian aged care provider to identify the positions given to, and taken up by, staff in client engagement. Focusing on one of these positions, in which staff are seen as managing and negotiating constraints, the paper uses an ethic of care lens to examine the context in which engagement - and this position taking - occurs. Findings reflect the importance of the organisational and systemic context to the practice of care ethics and the potential vulnerability and disempowerment of care giving staff. Implications for the support of staff in client engagement and the role of care organisations beyond structures and processes to an active participant in an ethic of care are discussed. PMID:26568218

  4. Older lesbians and work in the Australian health and aged care sector.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mark; Kentlyn, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    While research has identified challenges lesbians face in the workplace, there is limited understanding of the particular experiences of older lesbians, especially those working in the health and aged care sector. This article draws on the stories of four women who participated in a narrative research project on lesbian and gay people's experiences of health and aged care. It highlights the need for future research to examine the complexity of identity expression and community affiliation, how people negotiate "coming out" in the workplace, the impact of discrimination, and the resources (such as friends) available to lesbians in the workplace. PMID:25575323

  5. Comparison of Informal Care Time and Costs in Different Age-Related Dementias: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Nadège; Ferlicoq, Laura; Derumeaux-Burel, Hélène; Rapp, Thomas; Garnault, Valérie; Gillette-Guyonnet, Sophie; Andrieu, Sandrine; Vellas, Bruno; Lamure, Michel; Grand, Alain; Molinier, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Age-related dementia is a progressive degenerative brain syndrome whose prevalence increases with age. Dementias cause a substantial burden on society and on families who provide informal care. This study aims to review the relevant papers to compare informal care time and costs in different dementias. Methods. A bibliographic search was performed on an international medical literature database (MEDLINE). All studies which assessed the social economic burden of different dementias were selected. Informal care time and costs were analyzed in three care settings by disease stages. Results. 21 studies met our criteria. Mean informal care time was 55.73 h per week for Alzheimer disease and 15.8 h per week for Parkinson disease (P = 0.0076), and the associated mean annual informal costs were $17,492 versus $3,284, respectively (P = 0.0393). Conclusion. There is a lack of data about informal care time and costs among other dementias than AD or PD. Globally, AD is the most costly in terms of informal care costs than PD, $17,492 versus $3,284, respectively. PMID:23509789

  6. Ageism and age discrimination in health care: Fact or fiction? A narrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kydd, Angela; Fleming, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Ageism and age discrimination are terms used in best practice statements and in the literature to define negative attitudes towards older people and towards people because of their age (whether old or young). However, 'old age' is a nebulous concept with definitions ranging from the over 50s to the over 85s. In seeking to explore ageism and age discrimination within health care, this paper discusses the concept of 'old' and discusses the findings of a narrative review of the literature on these two concepts. Results show that negative attitudes have been perceived by users of health care services, but the reasons are not clear. Such attitudes are usually reported in acute health care settings, where targets and quick turnover are encouraged. Thus people, usually those with complex needs, who require longer periods of recuperation and rehabilitation following an episode of ill health, are troublesome to staff working in a system geared up for early discharges. This type of service user is usually over the age of 85. Recommendations from this paper include the need for acute frailty units, with well trained staff, where frail older people can be comprehensively assessed, receive timely and targeted care, followed by a supported discharge.

  7. Exploring the limitations of age-based models for health care planning.

    PubMed

    Mason, Thomas; Sutton, Matt; Whittaker, William; Birch, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    Health care decision makers are required to make planning decisions over a medium to long term planning horizon. Whilst population ageing is an important consideration for planners, age-stratified demographic models may produce misleading estimates of future resource requirements if the actual relationship between age and health is not fixed. We present a methodology which tests whether the assumption of a fixed age-health relationship is valid and estimate the magnitude of planning errors using a long time-series of measures of chronic health and service utilisation (N = 2419) taken from the Great British General Household Survey (1980-2008). We find that age-only models contain significant omitted variable bias, and that the relationship between age and health varies significantly across birth cohorts. Chronic sickness has fallen across birth cohorts born between 1890 and 2008, particularly before birth year 1930. Generational health improvements have mitigated the effects of population ageing, meaning that the population rate of sickness fell between 1980 and 2008. Planning based only on age leads to overestimation of the population level of health care need if successive cohorts are becoming healthier. Many alternative approaches exist which allow planners to relax the assumption of a fixed relationship between age and health. PMID:25780858

  8. Age-friendly primary health care: an assessment of current service provision for older adults in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jean; Mak, Benise; Yeung, Fannie

    2013-01-01

    There has been no study evaluating whether primary care services are sufficiently oriented towards the older population in Hong Kong, particularly those with increasing frailty. Since primary care is a key first interface in promotion and maintenance of health in older people, an assessment of the age-friendliness of service provisions is of critical importance in optimizing the health of aging populations. The age-friendliness of primary care services for older people was assessed using focus groups of elderly people and also of service providers who care for them. Discussion content was based on the WHO guidelines for age-friendly primary care in the following areas: Information, education and training, community-based health care management systems, and the physical environment. Desirable improvements were identified in all domains. The findings underscore the need for wider dissemination of health care needs of older people in the primary care setting.

  9. Development and pilot test of pictograph-enhanced breast health-care instructions for community-residing immigrant women.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeungok

    2012-08-01

    Current written text-based health-care instructions are not suitable for presenting lengthy, complex breast health-care instructions and are difficult for immigrant women with limited literacy skills. The aims of this study were to develop breast health-care instructions enhanced by pictographs (simple line drawings representing health-care actions) and pilot test the instructions in a sample of six immigrant women with limited literacy skills. Based on the Mayer's Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning, pictographs were developed in addition to low-literacy text. The text and the pictographs were then pilot tested with six immigrant women in community health centres for clarity, comprehension and acceptability through face-to-face interviews. Participants perceived that the drawings were engaging and enhanced clarity of the intended health-care messages. The black and white simple line drawings were well received by participants of varying race and ethnicity. The pictograph-based approach might be an effective tool in developing health-care instructions for immigrant women with limited literacy skills. Future research is needed to compare the effect of pictograph-enhanced instructions with written text-based instructions on adherence to instructions and health outcomes.

  10. Caring for Your School-Age Child: Ages 5 to 12. The Complete and Authorative Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schor, Edward L., Ed.

    The middle years of childhood are challenging for both children and their parents, as children master skills and develop behaviors that will strongly influence their later health and well-being. This parenting manual offers up-to-date information and guidelines on key emotional, physical, and behavioral issues that parents of school-age children…

  11. Family Day Care Check-In Program: After-School Care for Children Aged 10-14. [Introduction and Guide to Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Linda B., Ed.

    The Family Day Care Check-In Program is designed to offer working parents convenient, affordable after school care for their children aged 10 to 14. It provides children with flexible supervision by caring, trained adults and gives them opportunities to grow into responsible, independent teens by planning and participating in activities on their…

  12. Residence times and age distributions of spring waters at the Semmering catchment area, Eastern Austria, as inferred from tritium, CFCs and stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Han, Liangfeng; Hacker, Peter; Gröning, Manfred

    2007-03-01

    The groundwater system in the mountainous area of Semmering, Austria, was studied by environmental tracers in several karst springs. The tracers used included stable isotopes ((18)O, (2)H), tritium ((3)H) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The tracers provided valuable information in regard to (1) the mean altitude of the spring catchment areas; (2) the residence time and age distribution of the spring waters; and (3) the interconnection of the springs to a sinkhole. The combination of the stable isotopic data and the topography/geology provided the estimates of the mean altitudes of the catchment areas. Based on the stable isotopic data the recharge temperature of the spring waters was estimated. The smoothing of precipitation's isotopic signal in spring discharge provided information on the minimum transit time of the spring waters. Due to short observation time, (3)H data alone cannot be used for describing the mean residence time of the karst waters. CFCs, though useful in recognizing the co-existence of young (post-1993) water with old (CFC-free) water, could not be used to resolve age distribution models. It is shown in this article, however, that the combined use of tritium and CFCs can provide a better assessment of models to account for different groundwater age distributions. In Appendix A, a simplified method for collecting groundwater samples for the analysis of CFCs is described. The method provides a real facilitation for fieldwork. Test data are given for this sampling method in regard to potential contamination by atmospheric CFCs.

  13. The HIV Care Cascade Measured Over Time and by Age, Sex, and Race in a Large National Integrated Care System.

    PubMed

    Horberg, Michael Alan; Hurley, Leo Bartemeier; Klein, Daniel Benjamin; Towner, William James; Kadlecik, Peter; Antoniskis, Diana; Mogyoros, Miguel; Brachman, Philip Sigmund; Remmers, Carol Louise; Gambatese, Rebecca Claire; Blank, Jackie; Ellis, Courtney Georgiana; Silverberg, Michael Jonah

    2015-11-01

    HIV care cascades can evaluate programmatic success over time. However, methodologies for estimating cascade stages vary, and few have evaluated differences by demographic subgroups. We examined cascade performance over time and by age, sex, and race/ethnicity in Kaiser Permanente, providing HIV care in eight US states and Washington, DC. We created cascades for HIV+ members' age ≥13 for 2010-2012. We measured "linkage" (a visit/CD4 within 90 days of being diagnosed for new patients; ≥1 medical visit/year if established); "retention" (≥2 medical visits ≥60 days apart); filled ART (filled ≥3 months of combination ART); and viral suppression (HIV RNA <200 copies/mL last measured in year). The cascades were stratified by calendar year, sex, age, and race/ethnicity. We found men had statistically (p < 0.05) higher percent linkage, filled ART, and viral suppression for 2010 and 2011 but not for 2012. Women had significantly greater retention for all years. Annually, older age was associated (p < 0.05) with retention, filled ART, and viral suppression but not linkage. Latinos had greater (p < 0.05) retention than whites or blacks in all years, with similar retention comparing blacks and whites. Filled ART and viral suppression was increased (p < 0.05) for whites compared with all racial/ethnic groups in all years. Cascade methodology requiring success at upstream stages before measuring success at later stages (i.e., "dependent" methodology) underreported performance by up to 20% compared with evaluating each stage separately ("independent"). Thus, care results improved over time, but significant differences exist by patient demographics. Specifically, retention efforts should be targeted toward younger patients and blacks; women, blacks, and Latinos require greater ART prescribing.

  14. Summary Statement: Appropriate Medical Care for the Secondary School-Aged Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Almquist, Jon; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C; Cavanna, Angela; Jenkinson, Dave; Lincoln, Andrew E; Loud, Keith; Peterson, Bart C; Portwood, Craig; Reynolds, John; Woods, Thomas S

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To present the recommendations made by the Appropriate Medical Care for Secondary School-Aged Athletes Task Force and to summarize the subsequent monograph developed around 11 consensus points. Data Sources: The MEDLINE, CINAHL, and SportDiscus databases were searched for relevant literature regarding secondary school-aged athletes; health care administration; preparticipation physical examination; facilities; athletic equipment; emergency action planning; environmental conditions; recognition, evaluation, and treatment of injuries; rehabilitation and reconditioning; psychosocial consultation; nutrition; and prevention strategies. Conclusions and Recommendations: Organizations that sponsor athletic programs for secondary school-aged athletes should establish an athletic health care team to ensure that appropriate medical care is provided to all participants. The 11 consensus points provide a framework—one that is supported by the medical literature and case law—for the development of an athletic health care team and for assigning responsibilities to the team, administrators, and staff members of institutions sponsoring secondary school and club-level athletic programs. PMID:18668175

  15. IAServ: an intelligent home care web services platform in a cloud for aging-in-place.

    PubMed

    Su, Chuan-Jun; Chiang, Chang-Yu

    2013-11-01

    As the elderly population has been rapidly expanding and the core tax-paying population has been shrinking, the need for adequate elderly health and housing services continues to grow while the resources to provide such services are becoming increasingly scarce. Thus, increasing the efficiency of the delivery of healthcare services through the use of modern technology is a pressing issue. The seamless integration of such enabling technologies as ontology, intelligent agents, web services, and cloud computing is transforming healthcare from hospital-based treatments to home-based self-care and preventive care. A ubiquitous healthcare platform based on this technological integration, which synergizes service providers with patients' needs to be developed to provide personalized healthcare services at the right time, in the right place, and the right manner. This paper presents the development and overall architecture of IAServ (the Intelligent Aging-in-place Home care Web Services Platform) to provide personalized healthcare service ubiquitously in a cloud computing setting to support the most desirable and cost-efficient method of care for the aged-aging in place. The IAServ is expected to offer intelligent, pervasive, accurate and contextually-aware personal care services. Architecturally the implemented IAServ leverages web services and cloud computing to provide economic, scalable, and robust healthcare services over the Internet. PMID:24225647

  16. Planning for End-of-Life Care: Findings from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Douglas D.; Tuokko, Holly; Stajduhar, Kelli I.; Lindsay, Joan; Buehler, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Steps involved in formalizing end-of-life care preferences and factors related to these steps are unclear in the literature. Using data from the third wave of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA-3), we examined the relations between demographic and health predictors, on the one hand, and three outcomes, on the other (whether participants…

  17. Aged Patients in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Staff Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Alvin I.

    This document represents transcripts of a series of workshops presented for the staff of a long-term care facility for aged patients. A specialist in geriatric psychiatry leads the discussions, which cover topics such as the definition of brain syndrome; testing procedures; emotional and behavioral problems; and the optimal environment for the…

  18. Academic Achievement and Aging out of Care: Foster Parents' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Foster children experience multiple barriers and challenges that, amongst other issues, prevent them from achieving academically. At the age of 18, foster youth are forced out of the Department of Children and Families care, leading many of them to become homeless or to return to the homes from which they were displaced. Scholarly literature and…

  19. What Are the School-Age Child Care Needs of Families in Rural Communities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Beverly B.; Chang, Joyce I.

    During 1994 and 1995, the Commissions on Children and Families in six rural Oregon counties joined with local elementary schools and the Oregon State University Extension Service to conduct surveys to determine the school-age child care needs of local families. Data were collected and analyzed, and individual reports were prepared by county. The…

  20. Plotting Careers in Aged Care: Perspectives of Medical, Nursing, Allied Health Students and New Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Natalie; McCall, Louise

    2007-01-01

    The research reported in this article explored the impact of the undergraduate placement experience on medical, nursing, and allied health students' perceptions of careers in aged care. Data were collected from undergraduate students (48) and graduates (26) via individual (46) and group (7) interviews; data were thematically analyzed.…