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Sample records for aged material evaluations

  1. In-service irradiated and aged material evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this task is to provide a direct assessment of actual material properties in irradiated components of nuclear reactors, including the effects of irradiation and aging. Four activities are currently in progress: (1) establishing a machining capability for contaminated or activated materials by completing procurement and installation of a computer-based milling machine in a hot cell; (2) machining and testing specimens from cladding materials removed from the Gundremmingen reactor to establish their fracture properties; (3) preparing an interpretive report on the effects of neutron irradiation on cladding; and (4) continuing the evaluation of long-term aging of austenitic structural stainless steel weld metal by metallurgically examining and testing specimens aged at 288 and 343{degrees}C and reporting the results, as well as by continuing the aging of the stainless steel cladding toward a total time of 50,000 h.

  2. Evaluation of Ultrasonic and Thermal Nondestructive Evaluation for the Characterization of Aging Degradation in Braided Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of traditional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to measure the degradation of braided polymer composite materials subjected to thermal-humidity cycling to simulate aging. A series of braided composite coupons were examined using immersion ultrasonic and pulsed thermography techniques in the as received condition. These same specimens were then examined following extended thermal-humidity cycling. Results of this examination did not show a significant change in the resulting (NDE) signals.

  3. Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

  4. Experimental Techniques for Evaluating the Effects of Aging on Impact and High Strain Rate Properties of Triaxial Braided Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Gilat, Amos; Matrka, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program is underway to measure the impact and high strain rate properties of triaxial braided composite materials and to quantify any degradation in properties as a result of thermal and hygroscopic aging typically encountered during service. Impact tests are being conducted on flat panels using a projectile designed to induce high rate deformation similar to that experienced in a jet engine fan case during a fan blade-out event. The tests are being conducted on as-fabricated panels and panels subjected to various numbers of aging cycles. High strain rate properties are being measured using a unique Hopkinson bar apparatus that has a larger diameter than conventional Hopkinson bars. This larger diameter is needed to measure representative material properties because of the large unit cell size of the materials examined in this work. In this paper the experimental techniques used for impact and high strain rate testing are described and some preliminary results are presented for both as-fabricated and aged composites.

  5. Evaluation of sorbent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W.N.; Gomillion, S.L.; Luckenbach, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption efficiency of different types of liquid sorbent materials was determined under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. Results show that the sorption capacity is affected both by the type of material and by the form of the material. Attractive alternate sorbents to ''atomic wipes'' and Oil-Dry were identified. Small pillows of shredded synthetic sorbents are an attractive alternative to Oil-Dry as a sorbent and to ''atomic wipes'' as both a sorbent and in decontamination by wiping. Synthetic sorbents in cloth form offer an attractive alternative to ''atomic wipes'' in decontamination by wiping because these materials are compatible with nitric acid and they may be more fire resistant. A larger-scale evaluation is planned with the most promising sorbents. In addition, development is planned of a sorbent that will be efficient, compatible with nitric acid and fire resistant. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Evaluation of sorbent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W N; Gomillion, S L; Luckenbach, R L

    1989-01-01

    The sorption efficiency of different types of liquid sorbent materials was determined under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. Results show that the sorption capacity is affected both by the type of material and by the form of the material. Attractive alternate sorbents to atomic wipes'' and Oil-Dry were identified. Small pillows of shredded synthetic sorbents are an attractive alternative to Oil-Dry as a sorbent and to atomic wipes'' as both a sorbent and in decontamination by wiping. Synthetic sorbents in cloth form offer an attractive alternative to atomic wipes'' in decontamination by wiping because theses materials are compatible with nitric acid and they may be more fire resistant. A larger-scale evaluation is planned with the most promising sorbents. In addition, development is planned of a sorbent that will be efficient, compatible with nitric acid, fire resistant. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Skylab parasol material evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, S.

    1975-01-01

    Results of experimental work to evaluate the degradation rate of a parasol that was used as a means of alleviating thermal problems encountered soon after the launch of the Skylab 1 space vehicle are presented. Material selection criteria are discussed; the material chosen is described, and results of tests performed after environmental exposure at five facilities are given. The facilities used for exposure to ultraviolet radiation/thermal-vacuum environments and the equipment used for testing physical properties before and after exposure are described. Comparisons of ground test and flight test data are included.

  8. Accelerated Aging of Polymer Composite Bridge Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Nancy Margaret; Blackwood, Larry Gene; Torres, Lucinda Laine; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo; Yoder, Timothy Scott

    1999-03-01

    Accelerated aging research on samples of composite material and candidate ultraviolet (UV) protective coatings is determining the effects of six environmental factors on material durability. Candidate fastener materials are being evaluated to determine corrosion rates and crevice corrosion effects at load-bearing joints. This work supports field testing of a 30-ft long, 18-ft wide polymer matrix composite (PMC) bridge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Durability results and sensor data from tests with live loads provide information required for determining the cost/benefit measures to use in life-cycle planning, determining a maintenance strategy, establishing applicable inspection techniques, and establishing guidelines, standards, and acceptance criteria for PMC bridges for use in the transportation infrastructure.

  9. ALPHA SPECTROMETRIC EVALUATION OF SRM-995 AS A POTENTIAL URANIUM/THORIUM DOUBLE TRACER SYSTEM FOR AGE-DATING URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Beals, D.

    2011-12-06

    Uranium-233 (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 1.59E5 years) is an artificial, fissile isotope of uranium that has significant importance in nuclear forensics. The isotope provides a unique signature in determining the origin and provenance of uranium-bearing materials and is valuable as a mass spectrometric tracer. Alpha spectrometry was employed in the critical evaluation of a {sup 233}U standard reference material (SRM-995) as a dual tracer system based on the in-growth of {sup 229}Th (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7.34E3 years) for {approx}35 years following radiochemical purification. Preliminary investigations focused on the isotopic analysis of standards and unmodified fractions of SRM-995; all samples were separated and purified using a multi-column anion-exchange scheme. The {sup 229}Th/{sup 233}U atom ratio for SRM-995 was found to be 1.598E-4 ({+-} 4.50%) using recovery-corrected radiochemical methods. Using the Bateman equations and relevant half-lives, this ratio reflects a material that was purified {approx} 36.8 years prior to this analysis. The calculated age is discussed in contrast with both the date of certification and the recorded date of last purification.

  10. Kevlar 49/Epoxy COPV Aging Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Salem, Jonathan L.; Thesken, John C.; Russell, Richard W.; Littell, Justin; Ruggeri, Charles; Leifeste, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA initiated an effort to determine if the aging of Kevlar 49/Epoxy composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV) affected their performance. This study briefly reviews the history and certification of composite pressure vessels employed on NASA Orbiters. Tests to evaluate overwrap tensile strength changes compared 30 year old samples from Orbiter vessels to new Kevlar/Epoxy pressure vessel materials. Other tests include transverse compression and thermal analyses (glass transition and moduli). Results from these tests do not indicate a noticeable effect due to aging of the overwrap materials.

  11. The Evaluation of Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, William J.

    A review of four models of instructional materials evaluation is presented to synthesize the state of the art of such evaluation. A model for evaluation is then developed which includes the following elements: (1) context evaluation and needs assessment, (2) input evaluation, (3) determination of resources, (4) program planning, (5) program…

  12. The Material Convoy After Age 50

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Possessions constitute a dynamic “material convoy” that accumulates across adulthood to furnish role enactments and the development of the self. Following a familiar life course arc, older people should hypothetically release the possessions that equipped the daily lives that they no longer have. Method. We use new survey data on possession divestment from the 2010 Health and Retirement Study to assess activity on behalf of the material convoy after age 50. Results. After age 50, people are progressively less likely to divest themselves of belongings. After age 70, about 30% of persons say that they have done nothing in the past year to clean out, give away, or donate things, and over 80% have sold nothing. We tested whether divestments diminish with age because they do not seem necessary or because of health limitations, but the age pattern is robust, suggesting retention of the material convoy in later life. Discussion. Further research on this age pattern might consider housing, the construction of the self, and social networks as explanations for retention. Inertia toward the material convoy maintains the availability and comfort of things, but it may also lead to a predicament wherein the collection becomes a worry for self and others. PMID:24518148

  13. A research project to develop and evaluate a technical education component on materials technology for orientation to space-age technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A project was initiated to develop, implement, and evaluate a prototype component for self-pacing, individualized instruction on basic materials science. Results of this project indicate that systematically developed, self-paced instruction provides an effective means for orienting nontraditional college students and secondary students, especially minorities, to both engineering technology and basic materials science. In addition, students using such a system gain greater chances for mastering subject matter than with conventional modes of instruction.

  14. A preliminary mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of VIM-VAR work strengthened and direct aged Inconel 718 bar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of double melted (vacuum induction melted (VIM), and vacuum arc remelted (VAR)), solution treated, work strengthened and direct aged Inconel 718 alloy bar (5.50 in. (13.97 cm) diameter). Two sets of tensile specimens, one direct single aged and the other direct double aged, were tested at ambient temperature in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Longitudinal tensile and yield strengths in excess of 200 ksi (1378.96 MPa) and 168 ksi (1158.33 MPa), respectively, were realized at ambient temperature, for the direct double aged specimen. No failures occurred in the single or double edged longitudinal and transverse tensile specimens stressed to 75 and 100 percent of their respective yield strengths and exposed to a salt fog environment for 180 days. Tensile tests performed after the stress corrosion test showed no mechanical property degradation.

  15. Computational modeling of material aging effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.

    1996-07-01

    Progress is being made in our efforts to develop computational models for predicting material property changes in weapon components due to aging. The first version of a two-dimensional lattice code for modeling thermomechanical fatigue, such as has been observed in solder joints on electronic components removed from the stockpile, has been written and tested. The code does a good qualitative job of presenting intergranular and/or transgranular cracking in a polycrystalline material when under thermomechanical deformation. The current progress is an encouraging start for our long term effort to develop multi-level simulation capabilities, with the technology of high performance computing, for predicting age-related effects on the reliability of weapons.

  16. Material compatibility and thermal aging of thermoelectric materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Gardea, Andrew D.; Nishimoto, Ryan; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Whalen, Scott A.; Chames, Jeffrey M.; Clift, W. Miles

    2009-09-01

    In order to design a thermoelectric (TE) module suitable for long-term elevated temperature use, the Department 8651 has conducted parametric experiments to study material compatibility and thermal aging of TE materials. In addition, a comprehensive material characterization has been preformed to examine thermal stability of P- and N-based alloys and their interaction with interconnect diffusion barrier(s) and solder. At present, we have completed the 7-days aging experiments for 36 tiles, from ambient to 250 C. The thermal behavior of P- and N-based alloys and their thermal interaction with both Ni and Co diffusion barriers and Au-Sn solder were examined. The preliminary results show the microstructure, texture, alloy composition, and hardness of P-(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} and N-Bi{sub 2}(Te,Se){sub 3} alloys are thermally stable up to 7 days annealing at 250 C. However, metallurgical reactions between the Ni-phosphor barriers and P-type base alloy were evident at temperatures {ge} 175 C. At 250 C, the depth (or distance) of the metallurgical reaction and/or Ni diffusion into P-(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} is approximately 10-15 {micro}m. This thermal instability makes the Ni-phosphor barrier unsuitable for use at temperatures {ge} 175 C. The Co barrier appeared to be thermally stable and compatible with P(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} at all annealing temperatures, with the exception of a minor Co diffusion into Au-Sn solder at {ge} 175 C. The effects of Co diffusion on long-term system reliability and/or the thermal stability of the Co barrier are yet to be determined. Te evaporation and its subsequent reaction with Au-Sn solder and Ni and Co barriers on the ends of the tiles at temperatures {ge} 175 C were evident. The Te loss and its effect on the long-term required stoichiometry of P-(Bi, Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} are yet to be understood. The aging experiments of 90 days and 180 days are ongoing and scheduled to be completed in 30 days and 150 days, respectively. Material

  17. Method for evaluating material viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yusaku; Yamaguchi, Takao

    2004-01-01

    A method for evaluating the viscoelasticity of materials under oscillation load is proposed. In the method, a material under test is connected to a mass, which generates an oscillating inertial force after the mass is manually struck using a hammer. A pneumatic linear bearing is used to realize linear motion with sufficiently small friction acting on the mass that is the moving part of the bearing. The inertial force acting on the mass is determined highly accurately by means of measuring the velocity of the mass using an optical interferometer.

  18. DWPF MATERIALS EVALUATION SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, T.; Chandler, G.; Daugherty, W.; Imrich, K.; Jankins, C.

    1996-09-12

    To better ensure the reliability of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) remote canyon process equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed as part of the overall startup test program. Specific test programs included FA-04 ('Process Vessels Erosion/Corrosion Studies') and FA-05 (melter inspection). At the conclusion of field testing, Test Results Reports were issued to cover the various test phases. While these reports completed the startup test requirements, DWPF-Engineering agreed to compile a more detailed report which would include essentially all of the materials testing programs performed at DWPF. The scope of the materials evaouation programs included selected equipment from the Salt Process Cell (SPC), Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Melt Cell, Canister Decon Cell (CDC), and supporting facilities. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections (work completed in 1992) and follow-up inspections after completion of the DWPF cold chemical runs. Process equipment inspected included: process vessels, pumps, agitators, coils, jumpers, and melter top head components. Various NDE (non-destructive examination) techniques were used during the inspection program, including: ultrasonic testing (UT), visual (direct or video probe), radiography, penetrant testing (PT), and dimensional analyses. Finally, coupon racks were placed in selected tanks in 1992 for subsequent removal and corrosion evaluation after chemical runs.

  19. Aging and the Haptic Perception of Material Properties.

    PubMed

    Norman, J Farley; Adkins, Olivia C; Hoyng, Stevie C; Dowell, Catherine J; Pedersen, Lauren E; Gilliam, Ashley N

    2016-08-09

    The ability of 26 younger (mean age was 22.5 years) and older adults (mean age was 72.6 years) to haptically perceive material properties was evaluated. The participants manually explored (for 5 seconds) 42 surfaces twice and placed each of these 84 experimental stimuli into one of seven categories: paper, plastic, metal, wood, stone, fabric, and fur/leather. In general, the participants were best able to identify fur/leather and wood materials; in contrast, recognition performance was worst for stone and paper. Despite similar overall patterns of performance for younger and older participants, the younger adults' recognition accuracies were 26.5% higher. The participants' tactile acuities (assessed by tactile grating orientation discrimination) affected their ability to identify surface material. In particular, the Pearson r correlation coefficient relating the participants' grating orientation thresholds and their material identification performance was -0.8: The higher the participants' thresholds, the lower the material recognition ability. While older adults are able to effectively perceive the solid shape of environmental objects using the sense of touch, their ability to perceive surface materials is significantly compromised.

  20. Computational Age Dating of Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-06-30

    This slide-show presented an overview of the Constrained Progressive Reversal (CPR) method for computing decays, age dating, and spoof detecting. The CPR method is: Capable of temporal profiling a SNM sample; Precise (compared with known decay code, such a ORIGEN); Easy (for computer implementation and analysis). We have illustrated with real SNM data using CPR for age dating and spoof detection. If SNM is pure, may use CPR to derive its age. If SNM is mixed, CPR will indicate that it is mixed or spoofed.

  1. A mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of VIM-ESR-VAR work strengthened and direct double aged Inconel 718 bar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presented are the mechanical properties and the stress corrosion resistance of triple melted vacuum induction melted (VIM), electro-slag remelted (ESR), and vacuum arc remelted (VAR), solution treated, work strengthened and direct double aged Inconel 718 alloy bars 4.00 in. (10.16) and 5.75 in. (14.60 cm) diameter. Tensile, charpy v-notched impact, and compact tension specimens were tested at ambient temperature in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Longitudinal tensile and yield strengths in excess of 220 ksi (1516.85 MPa) and 200 ksi (1378.00 MPa) respectively, were realized at ambient temperature. Additional charpy impact and compact tension tests were performed at -100 F (-73 C). Longitudinal charpy impact strength equalled or exceeded 12.0 ft-lbs (16.3 Joules) at ambient and at -100 F(-73 C) while longitudinal compact (LC) tension fracture toughness strength remained above 79 ksi (86.80 MPa) at ambient and at -100 F(-73 C) temperatures. No failures occurred in the longitudinal or transverse tensile specimens stressed to 75 and 100 percent of their respective yield strengths and exposed to a salt fog environment for 180 days. Tensile tests performed after the stress corrosion test indicated no mechanical property degradation.

  2. Radiographic Evaluation of Mandible to Predict the Gender and Age

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jyothi Shiv; Mohan, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study is been conducted using digital panoramic radiographs for predicting age in various age groups and the accuracy of the parameters were accessed as age advances. Materials and Methods: The selected 300 panoramic images were divided into 3 age group of Group A (25-34 years), Group B (35-44 years), and Group C (45 -54 years). Each group comprised of 100 subjects in which 50 were males & 50 females. The age changes were evaluated using five parameters collectively, which were: Gonial angle, Antegonial angle, Mental foramen, Mandibular canal, Mandibular foramen. These parameters were evaluated on panoramic radiographs for age prediction and changes in their position as age advances. Results: Among all the parameters changes in Mandibular canal and mandibular foramen was found to be highly significant (p value ≤0.05) as age advances. Conclusion: These parameters can be used to predict the age of the individual as there were significant changes in Mandibular canal and Mandibular foramen as age advances. For Further studies large sample size, and recent modalities in radiography like CBCT or CT scan are required. PMID:25478451

  3. Nanomodification of Cementitious Materials: Fresh State and Early Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Shiho

    Concrete is heterogeneous at all length scales and its microstructure evolves continuously over decades. Through the use of nanoparticles, it is possible to alter the microstructure of cementitious materials from within the first microsecond to control its rheological and eventual mechanical properties. The continued development of this technology hinges on adopting a materials science approach to achieve proper processing and measurement techniques, both of which are investigated in this study. Novel rheological methods are implemented to evaluate the fresh-state properties of cement pastes modified with nano-sized attapulgite clays. Previous studies have demonstrated that clays can reduce the lateral pressure exerted on formwork by self-consolidating concrete (SCC). It is hypothesized that this is tied to the influence of clays on two rheological properties of SCC: material cohesion and structural rebuilding. Therefore the effect of clays on adhesive properties is measured by the tack test and rate of rebuilding is evaluated by measuring relaxation time during creep. In addition, due to the complexity of cement rheology, i.e. simultaneous thixotropic rebuilding and hydration, the results are supplemented with a measure of the viscoelastic properties obtained through oscillatory shear rheometry. It is found that clays significantly increase cohesion and accelerate structural recovery of cement pastes. The results also indicate that the tack test is a suitable method for measuring the adhesive properties and structural evolution of cementitious materials in the fresh state. The potential of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles in improving the early-age properties of fly ash-cement pastes is investigated. The focus is on dispersing the CaCO3 nanoparticles to enhance their effect and limit the addition level necessary. The selected approach involves sonication in an aqueous medium and use of surfactant. Degree of dispersion and stability are quantitatively

  4. Aging management of major LWR components with nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; MacDonald, P.E.; Akers, D.W.; Sellers, C.; Murty, K.L.; Miraglia, P.Q.; Mathew, M.D.; Haggag, F.M.

    1997-12-31

    Nondestructive evaluation of material damage can contribute to continued safe, reliable, and economical operation of nuclear power plants through their current and renewed license period. The aging mechanisms active in the major light water reactor components are radiation embrittlement, thermal aging, stress corrosion cracking, flow-accelerated corrosion, and fatigue, which reduce fracture toughness, structural strength, or fatigue resistance of the components and challenge structural integrity of the pressure boundary. This paper reviews four nondestructive evaluation methods with the potential for in situ assessment of damage caused by these mechanisms: stress-strain microprobe for determining mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel and cast stainless materials, magnetic methods for estimating thermal aging damage in cast stainless steel, positron annihilation measurements for estimating early fatigue damage in reactor coolant system piping, and ultrasonic guided wave technique for detecting cracks and wall thinning in tubes and pipes and corrosion damage to embedded portion of metal containments.

  5. Lithium hydride - A space age shielding material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    Men and materials performing in the environment of an operating nuclear reactor require shielding from the escaping neutron particles and gamma rays. For efficient shielding from gamma rays, dense, high atomic number elements such as iron, lead, or tungsten are required, whereas light, low atomic number elements such as hydrogen, lithium, or beryllium are required for efficient neutron shielding. The use of lithium hydride (LiH) as a highly efficient neutron-shielding material is considered. It contains, combined into a single, stable compound, two of the elements most effective in attenuating and absorbing neutrons.

  6. The Evaluation and Research of Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Elliot W.

    The production and sale of instructional materials are now big business in this country. Hence it is desirable, and probably necessary, to establish standards for such materials. Research in the area of curriculum materials is basically virgin territory. The evaluation of different types of curriculum materials will require the application of…

  7. Electrostatic Evaluation: SCAPE Suit Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The surface resistivity tests are performed per the requirements of the ESD Association Standard Test Method ESD STM11.11*. These measurements are taken using a PRS-801 resistance system with an Electro Tech System (ETS) PRF-911 concentric ring resistance probe. The tests require a five pound weight on top of cylindrical electrodes and were conducted at both ambient and low humidity conditions. In order for materials to "pass" resistivity tests the surface of the materials must either be conductive or statically dissipative otherwise the materials "fail" ESD. Volume resistivity tests are also conducted to measure conductivity through the material as opposed to conductivity along the surface. These tests are conducted using the same PRS-801 resistance system with the Electro Tech System PRF-911 concentric ring resistance probe but are performed in accordance with ESD Association Standard Test Method ESD STM11.l2**.

  8. Evaluation of thermal insulation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbers, O. J.; Conti, J. C.; Mcgee, J. V.; Mcpherson, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    Data was obtained on silicone-bonded fiberglass, isocyanurate foam, and two dozen other insulators. Materials were selected to withstand heat sterilization, outer space, and the Martian atmosphere. Significant environmental parameters were vibration, landing shock, and launch venting.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of material degradation by Barkhausen noise method

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Atsunori; Maeda, Noriyoshi; Sugibayashi, Takuya

    1995-12-01

    Evaluation the life of nuclear power plant becomes inevitable to extend the plant operating period. This paper applied the magnetic method using Barkhausen noise (BHN) to detect the degradation by fatigue and thermal aging. Low alloy steel (SA 508 cl.2) was fatigued at the strain amplitudes of {+-}1% and {+-}0.4%, and duplex stainless steel (SCS14A) was heated at 400 C for a long period (thermal aging). For the degraded material by thermal aging, BHN was measured and good correlation between magnetic properties and absorption energy of the material was obtained. For fatigued material, BHNM was measured at each predetermined cycle and the effect of stress or strain of the material when it measured was evaluated, and good correlation between BHN and fatigue damage ratio was obtained.

  10. Constitutive equations of ageing polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The constitutive equation for the relaxation behavior of time-dependent, chemically unstable materials developed by Valanis and Peng (1983), which used the irreversible thermodynamics of internal variables in Eyring's absolute reaction theory and yielded a theoretical expression for the effect of chemical crosslink density on the relaxation rate, is presently applied to the creep behavior of a network polymer which is undergoing a scission process. In particular, two equations are derived which may for the first time show the relations between mechanical models and internal variables in the creep expressions, using a three-element model with a Maxwell element.

  11. Space shuttle nonmetallic materials age life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, G. D.; Hassell, J. A.; Nathan, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The chemiluminescence from samples of polybutadiene, Viton, Teflon, Silicone, PL 731 Adhesive, and SP 296 Boron-Epoxy composite was measured at temperatures from 25 to 150 C. Excellent correlations were obtained between chemiluminescence and temperature. These correlations serve to validate accelerated aging tests (at elevated temperatures) designed to predict service life at lower temperatures. In most cases, smooth or linear correlations were obtained between chemiluminescence and physical properties of purified polymer gums, including the tensile strength, viscosity, and loss tangent. The latter is a complex function of certain polymer properties. Data were obtained with far greater ease by the chemiluminescence technique than by the conventional methods of study. The chemiluminescence from the Teflon (Halon) samples was discovered to arise from trace amounts of impurities, which were undetectable by conventional, destructive analysis of the sample.

  12. Evaluating CAI Material for the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, Timothy M.

    The relative worth of any evaluation instrument depends on user needs and the material being evaluated. Potential users of a good computer assisted instruction (CAI) instrument include purchasers, authors, reviewers, and publishers of CAI materials. Although each user has unique needs, a good instrument will serve both to educate and discriminate,…

  13. JT/LJT connector insert material evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, J.R.F.

    1991-10-01

    Different insert (insulator) materials are undergoing evaluation to replace the Fiberite E-3938 BE96 material currently used. Also being evaluated is the reconfiguration of the insert and metal shell-edge geometries for the purpose of reducing the alleged interference principally responsible for insert damage.

  14. Developing and Evaluating Patient Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsivais, Diane; Reynolds, Audree

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for nurse involvement in the development of patient education materials. Presents guidelines for evaluating existing material, including print and web resources, for credibility and readability. Makes recommendations for rewriting material at an easier-to-read level. (SK)

  15. An evaluation of dental operative simulation materials.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Hong; Foster Page, Lyndie; Purton, David

    2012-01-01

    The study was to evaluate the performance of different materials used in dental operative simulation and compare them with those of natural teeth. Three typical phantom teeth materials were compared with extracted permanent teeth by a nanoindentation system and evaluated by students and registered dentists on the drilling sensation of the materials. Moreover, the tool life (machinability) of new cylindrical diamond burs on cutting the sample materials was tested and the burs were observed. Although student and dentist evaluations were scattered and inconclusive, it was found that elastic modulus (E) and hardness (H) were not the main factors in determining the drilling sensation of the materials. The sensation of drilling is a reflection of cutting force and power consumption.An ideal material for dental simulation should be able to generate similar drilling resistance to that of natural tooth, which is the machinability of the material.

  16. Aging mechanisms in amorphous phase-change materials.

    PubMed

    Raty, Jean Yves; Zhang, Wei; Luckas, Jennifer; Chen, Chao; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Bichara, Christophe; Wuttig, Matthias

    2015-06-24

    Aging is a ubiquitous phenomenon in glasses. In the case of phase-change materials, it leads to a drift in the electrical resistance, which hinders the development of ultrahigh density storage devices. Here we elucidate the aging process in amorphous GeTe, a prototypical phase-change material, by advanced numerical simulations, photothermal deflection spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy experiments. We show that aging is accompanied by a progressive change of the local chemical order towards the crystalline one. Yet, the glass evolves towards a covalent amorphous network with increasing Peierls distortion, whose structural and electronic properties drift away from those of the resonantly bonded crystal. This behaviour sets phase-change materials apart from conventional glass-forming systems, which display the same local structure and bonding in both phases.

  17. Thermal Protection Materials: Development, Characterization and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Silvia M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal protection materials and systems (TPS) are used to protect space vehicles from the heat experienced during entry into an atmosphere. The application for these materials is very specialized as are the materials. They must have specific properties to withstand conditions during specific entries. There is no one-size-fits-all TPS as the conditions experienced by a material are very dependent upon the atmosphere, the entry speed, the size and shape of the vehicle, and the location on the vehicle. However, all TPS must be reliable and efficient to ensure mission safety, that is to protect the vehicle while ensuring that payload is maximized. Types of TPS will be reviewed in relation to types of missions and applications. Both reusable and ablative materials will be discussed. Approaches to characterizing and evaluating these materials will be presented. The role of heritage versus new materials will be described.

  18. LIGA microsystems aging : evaluation and mitigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2003-12-01

    The deployment of LIGA structures in DP applications requires a thorough understanding of potential long term physical and chemical changes that may occur during service. While these components are generally fabricated from simple metallic systems such as copper, nickel and nickel alloys, the electroplating process used to form them creates microstructural features which differ from those found in conventional (e.g. ingot metallurgy) processing of such materials. Physical changes in non-equilibrium microstructures may occur due to long term exposure to temperatures sufficient to permit atomic and vacancy mobility. Chemical changes, particularly at the surfaces of LIGA parts, may occur in the presence of gaseous chemical species (e.g. water vapor, HE off-gassing compounds) and contact with other metallic structures. In this study, we have characterized the baseline microstructure of several nickel-based materials that are used to fabricate LIGA structures. Solute content and distribution was found to have a major effect on the electroplated microstructures. Microstructural features were correlated to measurements of hardness and tensile strength. Dormancy testing was conducted on one of the baseline compositions, nickel-sulfamate. Groups of specimens were exposed to controlled thermal cycles; subsequent examinations compared properties of 'aged' specimens to the baseline conditions. Results of our testing indicate that exposure to ambient temperatures (-54 C to 71 C) do not result in microstructural changes that might be expected to significantly effect mechanical performance. Additionally, no localized changes in surface appearance were found as a result of contact between electroplated parts.

  19. Narayanaswamy’s 1971 aging theory and material time

    SciTech Connect

    Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2015-09-21

    The Bochkov-Kuzovlev nonlinear fluctuation-dissipation theorem is used to derive Narayanaswamy’s phenomenological theory of physical aging, in which this highly nonlinear phenomenon is described by a linear material-time convolution integral. A characteristic property of the Narayanaswamy aging description is material-time translational invariance, which is here taken as the basic assumption of the derivation. It is shown that only one possible definition of the material time obeys this invariance, namely, the square of the distance travelled from a configuration of the system far back in time. The paper concludes with suggestions for computer simulations that test for consequences of material-time translational invariance. One of these is the “unique-triangles property” according to which any three points on the system’s path form a triangle such that two side lengths determine the third; this is equivalent to the well-known triangular relation for time-autocorrelation functions of aging spin glasses [L. F. Cugliandolo and J. Kurchan, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 27, 5749 (1994)]. The unique-triangles property implies a simple geometric interpretation of out-of-equilibrium time-autocorrelation functions, which extends to aging a previously proposed framework for such functions in equilibrium [J. C. Dyre, e-print arXiv:cond-mat/9712222 (1997)].

  20. Predictive aging results for cable materials in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1990-11-01

    In this report, we provide a detailed discussion of methodology of predicting cable degradation versus dose rate, temperature, and exposure time and its application to data obtained on a number of additional nuclear power plant cable insulation (a hypalon, a silicon rubber and two ethylenetetrafluoroethylenes) and jacket (a hypalon) materials. We then show that the predicted, low-dose-rate results for our materials are in excellent agreement with long-term (7 to 9 years), low dose-rate results recently obtained for the same material types actually aged under nuclear power plant conditions. Based on a combination of the modelling and long-term results, we find indications of reasonably similar degradation responses among several different commercial formulations for each of the following generic'' materials: hypalon, ethylenetetrafluoroethylene, silicone rubber and PVC. If such generic'' behavior can be further substantiated through modelling and long-term results on additional formulations, predictions of cable life for other commercial materials of the same generic types would be greatly facilitated. Finally, to aid utilities in their cable life extension decisions, we utilize our modelling results to generate lifetime prediction curves for the materials modelled to data. These curves plot expected material lifetime versus dose rate and temperature down to the levels of interest to nuclear power plant aging. 18 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Transport suction apparatus and absorption materials evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives were as follows. The effectiveness and function was evaluated of the hand held, manually powered v-vac for suction during microgravity. The function was evaluated of the battery powered laerdal suction unit in microgravity. The two units in control of various types of simulated bodily fluids were compared. Various types of tubing and attachments were evaluated which are required to control the collection of bodily fluids during transport. Various materials were evaluated for absorption of simulated bodily fluids. And potential problems were identified for waste management and containment of secretions and fluids during transport. Test procedures, results, and conclusions are briefly discussed.

  2. Materialism and the future of aging in America.

    PubMed

    Almeder, R F

    1983-01-01

    In Growing Old in America, David Fischer argues that colonial America witnessed a sudden and revolutionary shift in social attitude from gerontophilia to gerontophobia. It is argued here that the shift can be explained as the necessary result of an emerging materialism which came to dominate mercantile America. It is shown how philosophical materialism requires an attitude of denigration toward aging and the elderly, and that the future of our collective attitude toward the elderly is wedded philosophically to the future success or failure of philosophical materialism. It is also suggested that the future of materialism in America looks dim and that there will emerge a strong philosophical base adequate for reforming ethical attitudes and engendering a much more favorable attitude toward the elderly in general. It is suggested that positive or negative attitudes toward aging and the elderly are rooted in unconscious commitments to non-materialistic (dualistic) or materialistic views on the nature of man. The two basically different views on the nature of man beget the two basically different views and attitudes toward aging and the elderly. Which attitude is right is a function of which philosophical view is correct and the paper closes with some evidence that materialism is on the wane.

  3. An evaluation of candidate oxidation resistant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon; Banks, Bruce; Mirtich, Michael; Difilippo, Frank; Hotes, Deborah; Labed, Richard; Dever, Terese; Kussmaul, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Ground based testing of materials considered for Kapton solar array blanket protection, graphite epoxy structural member protection, and high temperature radiators was performed in an RF plasma asher. Ashing rates for Kapton were correlated with rates measured on STS-8 to determine the exposure time equivalent to one year in low Earth orbit (LEO) at a constant density space station orbital flux. Protective coatings on Kapton from Tekmat, Andus Corporation, and LeRC were evaluated in the plasma asher and mass loss rates per unit area were measured for each sample. All samples evaluated provided some protection to the underlying surface but ion beam sputter deposited samples of SiO2 and SiO2 with 8% polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) showed no evidence of degradation after 47 hours of exposure. Mica paint was evaluated as a protective coating for graphite epoxy structural members. Mica appears to be resistant to attack by atomic oxygen but only offers some limited protection as a paint because the paint vehicles evaluated to date were not resistant to atomic oxygen. Four materials were selected for evaluation as candidate radiator materials: stainless steel, copper, niobium-1% zirconium, and titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium. These materials were surface textured by various means to improve their emittance. Emittances as high as 0.93 at 2.5 microns for stainless steel and 0.89 at 2.5 microns for Nb-1 Zr were obtained from surface texturing. There were no significant changes in emittance after asher exposure.

  4. Translucency changes of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the changes in translucency of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment. As a criterion for the evaluation of clinical translucency changes, visual perceptibility threshold in translucency parameter difference (ΔTP) of 2 was used. Translucency changes after curing were perceivable depending on experimental methods and products (largest ΔTP in resin composites = 15.9). Translucency changes after aging were reported as either relatively stable or showed perceivable changes by aging protocols (largest ΔTP in resin composites = -3.8). Translucency changes after curing, aging and treatment were perceivable in several products and experimental methods. Therefore, shade matching of direct esthetic materials should be performed considering these instabilities of translucency in direct esthetic materials. PMID:27847744

  5. Translucency changes of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the changes in translucency of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment. As a criterion for the evaluation of clinical translucency changes, visual perceptibility threshold in translucency parameter difference (ΔTP) of 2 was used. Translucency changes after curing were perceivable depending on experimental methods and products (largest ΔTP in resin composites = 15.9). Translucency changes after aging were reported as either relatively stable or showed perceivable changes by aging protocols (largest ΔTP in resin composites = -3.8). Translucency changes after curing, aging and treatment were perceivable in several products and experimental methods. Therefore, shade matching of direct esthetic materials should be performed considering these instabilities of translucency in direct esthetic materials.

  6. Evaluating Materials About Africa for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Nancy J.

    Choosing texts, media, and literature about Africa is a difficult task for school librarians who have not studied Africa in detail; however it is possible to evaluate the available materials on the basis of several important criteria. These include the authority of the author, the dates of preparation and publication, and the accuracy of…

  7. Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials: Aging on the component level

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.; Meir, M.; Rekstad, J.

    2010-03-15

    Within this study, the aging behavior of a PPE + PS absorber material was investigated on the absorber component level. To indicate aging, characteristic mechanical values were determined by indentation tests of specimens taken from components and exposed to laboratory aging (140 C in air, 80 C in water) and service near outdoor aging conditions (stagnation in northern climate). In addition to the mechanical tests, the unaged and aged specimens were also characterized thermo-analytically via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that reductions in both characteristic mechanical values of the indentation tests, i.e., load of the first transition and ultimate indentation, reflect at least some physical aging although chemical aging may also be of importance based on previous analytical investigations of laboratory aged polymer films. While laboratory aging in air at 140 C and service exposure at a test facility in Oslo (N) under stagnation conditions led to a significant reduction in the mechanical indentation resistance, no influence of laboratory aging in water at 80 C on the mechanical behavior of the absorber sheet was found. Depending on the ultimate failure criterion applied (reduction of characteristic mechanical values to 80% and 50%, respectively), the technical service life found for hot air laboratory and stagnation service conditions was found to be less than 51 and 159 h, respectively. As these durations are significantly below the estimated stagnation conditions accumulated in the desired operation lifetime for such a collector, the PPE + PS type investigated does not seem to be a proper material candidate for solar thermal absorbers. Finally, based on the results obtained, a relation between laboratory aging time in air at 140 C and cumulated irradiation energy during exposure on the test facility in Oslo was established. (author)

  8. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Materials Aging Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the issues concerning the aging of the materials in a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV). The basic composition of the COPV is a Boss, a composite overwrap, and a metallic liner. The lifetime of a COPV is affected by the age of the overwrap, the cyclic fatigue of the metallic liner, and stress rupture life, a sudden and catastrophic failure of the overwrap while holding at a stress level below the ultimate strength for an extended time. There is information about the coupon tests that were performed, and a test on a flight COPV.

  9. Reinterpreting Evaluation Classics in the Modern Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Joan Duncan

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes features of impact evaluation models by Kirkpatrick, Grotelueschen, Cervero, Robinson and Robinson, and Jackson. Incorporates features into the Behaviorally Based Impact Evaluation Model, designed for evaluating continuing professional education outcomes in corporate settings. Contains 23 references. (SK)

  10. Investigation of Hygro-Thermal Aging on Carbon/Epoxy Materials for Jet Engine Fan Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Miller, Sandi G.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster summarizes 2 years of aging on E862 epoxy and E862 epoxy with triaxial braided T700s carbon fiber composite. Several test methods were used to characterize chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of both the resin and composite materials. The aging cycle that was used included varying temperature and humidity exposure. The goal was to evaluate the environmental effects on a potential jet engine fan section material. Some changes were noted in the resin which resulted in increased brittleness, though this did not significantly affect the tensile and impact test results. A potential decrease in compression strength requires additional investigation.

  11. Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Nondestructive Evaluation of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn A.; Brooks, Thomas M. B.; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper will present an overview of efforts to investigate the application of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of Kevlar materials. Raman spectroscopy is a laser technique that is sensitive to molecular interactions in materials such as Kevlar, graphite and carbon used in composite materials. The overall goal of this research reported here is to evaluate Raman spectroscopy as a potential nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool for the detection of stress rupture in Kevlar composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Characterization of the Raman spectra of Kevlar yarn and strands will be presented and compared with analytical models provided in the literature. Results of testing to investigate the effects of creep and high-temperature aging on the Raman spectra will be presented.

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of advanced ceramic composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, L.A.; Kunerth, D.C.; Walter, J.B.

    1991-09-01

    Nondestructive evaluation techniques were developed to characterize performance degrading conditions in continuous fiber-reinforced silicon carbide/silicon carbide composites. Porosity, fiber-matrix interface bond strength, and physical damage were among the conditions studied. The material studied is formed by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of the matrix material into a preform of woven reinforcing fibers. Acoustic, ultrasonic, and vibration response techniques were studied. Porosity was investigated because of its inherent presence in the CVI process and of the resultant degradation of material strength. Correlations between porosity and ultrasonic attenuation and velocity were clearly demonstrated. The ability of ultrasonic transmission scanning techniques to map variations in porosity in a single sample was also demonstrated. The fiber-matrix interface bond was studied because of its importance in determining the fracture toughness of the material. Correlations between interface bonding and acoustic and ultrasonic properties were observed. These results are presented along with those obtained form acoustic and vibration response measurements on material samples subjected to mechanical impact damage. This is the final report on research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program. 10 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Radiocarbon dating of marine material: mollusc versus foraminifera ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callard, L.; Long, A. J.; Plets, R. M.; Cooper, A.; Belknap, D. F.; Edwards, R.; Jackson, D.; Kelley, J. T.; Long, D.; Milne, G. A.; Monteys, X.; Quinn, R.

    2013-12-01

    A key challenge in reconstructing Quaternary environmental change from marine archives is developing a robust chronology. During the last ~50k a-1, radiocarbon dating is the mainstay for many studies. Often investigators are restricted in the material that is available for dating, with studies relying on AMS dating of either mono-specific or mixed assemblages of foraminifera. In some instances, marine molluscs (broken or whole, articulated or disarticulated) may also be present and can provide an alternative or complementary dating target. Previous radiocarbon dating of paired foraminiferal and marine molluscan samples from the Kattegat (Denmark) revealed significant age offsets between these materials, inferred to reflect greater reworking of foraminifera compared to the marine molluscs (Heier-Nielsen et al., 1995). Here we present the results of a comparable study from the Irish Sea Basin, which forms part of a wider investigation into the evidence for the Late Glacial sea-level minima at offshore sites from around Britain and Ireland. We have collected and AMS 14C-dated twelve paired samples of foraminifera and marine shells. The results shows a systematic age offset with the monospecific foraminifera samples consistently giving older ages than their shell counterparts. This offset increases with sample age, reaching a maximum offset of 3000 years in the oldest sample (~ 13 ka cal a BP). These results are consistent with the observations of Heier-Nielsen et al. (1995), and we hypothesize that foraminifera may be more susceptible to reworking from older deposits because of their lower effective density than the shell samples. However, foraminifera size and shape may also be contributing factors. These findings are potentially significant for studies that develop chronologies based on radiocarbon dating of foraminifera alone, since the resulting dates may over-estimate sample age by several thousand years. We conclude by outlining an experimental design that seeks

  14. Evaluation of dental and bone age in iron-deficient anemic children of South India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Haridas, Harish; Hunsigi, Prahlad; Farooq, Umar; Erugula, Sridhar R.; Ealla, Kranti K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Dental and bone age is very essential for the dental practitioner in planning treatments and is an extra source of information for the pediatrician, orthopedician, and endocrinologist. There are few published data regarding collation between dental age, bone age, and chronological age in iron-deficiency anemic children. This study has been undertaken to evaluate and compare dental age, bone age, and chronological age in children with iron-deficiency anemia. Materials and Methods: One hundred iron-deficiency anemic children were selected in the age group of 8–14 years. Chronological age of the child was recorded by asking birth date from parents or checking school records. Dental age was calculated by Demirjians method and bone age was evaluated using Bjork, Grave, and Brown's method. Unpaired student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient were the two statistical tests applied to compare dental, bone, and chronological age. Results: Dental and bone age was significantly lower (P < 0.001) compared to chronological age. The correlation between the three ages was positive in both sexes. Conclusion: Dental and bone age retardation was a significant feature in our sample of 100 iron-deficient anemic children. Bone age and dental age are valuable parameters in assessing the overall growth of the child. Further studies are required to corroborate our findings. PMID:27891309

  15. ASC Supercomputers Predict Effects of Aging on Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, A; Reisman, D B; Wolfer, W G

    2005-08-25

    In an extensive molecular dynamics (MD) study of shock compression of aluminum containing such microscopic defects as found in aged plutonium, LLNL scientists have demonstrated that ASC supercomputers live up to their promise as powerful tools to predict aging phenomena in the nuclear stockpile. Although these MD investigations are carried out on material samples containing only about 10 to 40 million atoms, and being not much bigger than a virus particle, they have shown that reliable materials properties and relationships between them can be extracted for density, temperature, pressure, and dynamic strength. This was proven by comparing their predictions with experimental data of the Hugoniot, with dynamic strength inferred from gas-gun experiments, and with the temperatures behind the shock front as calculated with hydro-codes. The effects of microscopic helium bubbles and of radiation-induced dislocation loops and voids on the equation of state were also determined and found to be small and in agreement with earlier theoretical predictions and recent diamond-anvil-cell experiments. However, these microscopic defects play an essential role in correctly predicting the dynamic strength for these nano-crystalline samples. These simulations also prove that the physics involved in shock compression experiments remains the same for macroscopic specimens used in gas-gun experiments down to micrometer samples to be employed in future NIF experiments. Furthermore, a practical way was discovered to reduce plastic instabilities in NIF target materials by introducing finely dispersed defects.

  16. Age-Related Differences in Evaluating Developmental Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustafic, Maida; Freund, Alexandra M.

    2013-01-01

    Two studies examined the hypothesis that the evaluation of developmental stability changes across adulthood. Results of Study 1 ("N" = 119) supported the expectation that older adults ("M"[subscript age] = 65.29 years)--compared to younger ("M"[subscript age] = 23.38 years) and middle-aged adults…

  17. Sodium fast reactor evaluation: Core materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Chan Bock; Lee, Byoung Oon; Raison, J. P.; Mizuno, T.; Delage, F.; Carmack, J.

    2009-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) Program the Advanced Fuel Project has conducted an evaluation of the available fuel systems supporting future sodium cooled fast reactors. In this paper the status of available and developmental materials for SFR core cladding and duct applications is reviewed. To satisfy the Generation IV SFR fuel requirements, an advanced cladding needs to be developed. The candidate cladding materials are austenitic steels, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. A large amount of irradiation testing is required, and the compatibility of cladding with TRU-loaded fuel at high temperatures and high burnup must be investigated. The more promising F/M steels (compared to HT9) might be able to meet the dose requirements of over 200 dpa for ducts in the GEN-IV SFR systems.

  18. Electrochemical migration technique to accelerate ageing of cementitious materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaahmadi, A.; Tang, L.; Abbas, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Durability assessment of concrete structures for constructions in nuclear waste repositories requires long term service life predictions. As deposition of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) takes up to 100 000 years, it is necessary to analyze the service life of cementitious materials in this time perspective. Using acceleration methods producing aged specimens would decrease the need of extrapolating short term data sets. Laboratory methods are therefore, needed for accelerating the ageing process without making any influencing distortion in the properties of the materials. This paper presents an electro-chemical migration method to increase the rate of calcium leaching from cementitious specimens. This method is developed based on the fact that major long term deterioration process of hardened cement paste in concrete structures for deposition of LILW is due to slow diffusion of calcium ions. In this method the cementitious specimen is placed in an electrochemical cell as a porous path way through which ions can migrate at a rate far higher than diffusion process. The electrical field is applied to the cell in a way to accelerate the ion migration without making destructions in the specimen's micro and macroscopic properties. The anolyte and catholyte solutions are designed favoring dissolution of calcium hydroxide and compensating for the leached calcium ions with another ion like lithium.

  19. Commercial off-the-Shelf (COTS) Refractory Material Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Back, Teddy; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Perusich, Stephen; Bucherl, Cori

    2009-01-01

    Fondu Fyre (FF) is currently the only refractory material qualified for use in the flame trench at KSC's Shuttle Launch Pads 39A and 39B. However, the material is not used as it was qualified and has undergone increasingly frequent and severe degradation due to the launch blasts. This degradation is costly as well as dangerous for launch infrastructure, crew and vehicle. FF is applied at the pad via the gunnite process, where wetted refractory material is sprayed onto a steel grid mounted on a support structure. The water content in this process can be manually adjusted by operators, causing distinct visual and physical discrepancies among repair areas. Since the application process is unlikely to change for new refractory materials, it is important to understand the effects of water content on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) refractory materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the FF with respect to various water contents as well as heat treatments, to simulate aging and exposure to the blast. Initial results indicated that different water contents and heat treatments result in distinct differences in crushing strength, apparent porosity and bulk density. However, water content became an insignificant factor in both crush strength and porosity when FF was cured to at least 1500 deg. Additionally, inspection of the material's surface microstructure by scanning electron microscopy indicated distinguishable characteristics for different heat treatment levels. Results from this study will help guide future studies on the development and identification of new refractory materials.

  20. A multidimensional environmental evaluation of packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Chung; Ma, Hwong-Wen

    2004-05-25

    To reduce environmental damage, the properties of environmental issues must be understood. Most previous research has performed relevant assessment either qualitatively or quantitatively. This paper provides a new comprehensive evaluative framework to integrate these two types of approaches. Three methods are combined: (1) life cycle assessment (LCA), a quantitative method, to assess environmental loading, (2) analytic hierarchy process (AHP), a qualitative method, to obtain opinions from experts, and (3) cluster analysis to integrate the results of the former two methods. This new framework could provide integrated information and avoid a bias towards either qualitative or quantitative approach. To present the process of this new evaluative framework, packaging materials are selected as the case study in this paper.

  1. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  2. Colour measurements of surfaces to evaluate the restoration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Monaco, Angela; Marabelli, Maurizio; Pelosi, Claudia; Picchio, Rodolfo

    2011-06-01

    In this paper two case studies on the application of colour measurements for the evaluation of some restoration materials are discussed. The materials related to the research are: watercolours employed in restoration of wall paintings and preservative/consolidants for wood artifacts. Commercial watercolours, supplied by Maimeri, Windsor&Newton and Talens factories have been tested. Colour measurements have been performed by means of a reflectance spectrophotometer (RS) before and after accelerated ageing of watercolours at 92% relative humidity (RH) and in a Solar Box chamber. The experimental results show that watercolours based on natural earths and artificial ultramarine undergo the main colour changes, expressed as L*, a* and b* variations and total colour difference (▵E*). In the other cases colour differences depend on both watercolour typology and suppliers. The other example concerns the evaluation of colour change due to surface treatment of Poplar (Populus sp.) and chestnut (Castanea sativa L.) wood samples. The wooden samples have been treated with a novel organic preservative/consolidant product that has been tested also in a real case as comparison. The treated samples have been artificially aged in Solar Box chamber equipped with a 280 nm UV filter. Colour has been measured before and after the artificial ageing by means of a RS. Colour changes have been determined also for the main door of an historical mansion in Viterbo, made of chestnut wood, and exposed outdoors.

  3. Characterization of Finnish Building materials under salt frost artificial ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luodes, Nike M.; Torppa, Akseli; Pirinen, Heikki; Bellopede, Rossana; Marini, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Under a national project co financed by the Confederation of Finnish Construction Industries RT (CFCI), the Finnish Natural Stone Association and the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK), and thanks to the cooperation with the Polytechnic of Turin a comprehensive number of Finnish natural stones has been tested according to SFS EN standards for national CE marking and according to non standardized methods for research purposes. The aim was to evaluate the effects of combined salt and frost weathering caused by de-icing salts and to research a possible correlation between laboratory's accelerated decay and site weathering. The materials tested (60 stones in total) are mainly silicate rocks showing good resistance to the weathering. Results have been affected in some cases by uncertainties connected to the variation of material quality. Some materials have been from new quarries and variation of their properties has been higher than the effects of artificial weathering. Material sampled from crop presented higher weathering level and the additional artificial weathering has induced small variations. Results have shown that material weathering has been better represented by variation of flexural strength compared to uniaxial compressive strength. The most probable reason has been that small changes of planarity and perpendicularity had greater effects on the compressive strength than variations by weathering. Fifteen representative typologies of natural stones have been tested with non standardized methodologies to study the changes of the material and finding a possible correlation with methods used on site. Schmidt rebound test and Ultra Pulse Velocity (UPV) have been used on site to assess the durability of stone on construction. Materials tested in laboratory have shown less variation between rebounds compared to site tests, this can be because of a more controlled environment and saw cut surface instead of rocky or chiselled ones. Laboratory tests showed an average

  4. Materials compatibility and aging for flux and cleaner combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, Kim M.; Piatt, Rochelle

    2015-01-01

    A materials study of high reliability electronics cleaning is presented here. In Phase 1, mixed type substrates underwent a condensed contaminants application to view a worst- case scenario for unremoved flux with cleaning agent residue for parts in a silicone oil filled environment. In Phase 2, fluxes applied to copper coupons and to printed wiring boards underwent gentle cleaning then accelerated aging in air at 65% humidity and 30 O C. Both sets were aged for 4 weeks. Contaminants were no-clean (ORL0), water soluble (ORH1 liquid and ORH0 paste), and rosin (RMA; ROL0) fluxes. Defluxing agents were water, solvents, and engineered aqueous defluxers. In the first phase, coupons had flux applied and heated, then were placed in vials of oil with a small amount of cleaning agent and additional coupons. In the second phase, pairs of copper coupons and PWB were hand soldered by application of each flux, using tin-lead solder in a strip across the coupon or a set of test components on the PWB. One of each pair was cleaned in each cleaning agent, the first with a typical clean, and the second with a brief clean. Ionic contamination residue was measured before accelerated aging. After aging, substrates were removed and a visual record of coupon damage made, from which a subjective rank was applied for comparison between the various flux and defluxer combinations; more corrosion equated to higher rank. The ORH1 water soluble flux resulted in the highest ranking in both phases, the RMA flux the least. For the first phase, in which flux and defluxer remained on coupons, the aqueous defluxers led to worse corrosion. The vapor phase cleaning agents resulted in the highest ranking in the second phase, in which there was no physical cleaning. Further study of cleaning and rinsing parameters will be required.

  5. Evaluation of dental age in protein energy malnutrition children

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Patil, Kavitha; Munoli, Karishma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of dental age is very essential for a dental practitioner in planning treatment and it is a supplementary source of information for Pediatrician, Orthopedician and Endocrinologist. There are few studies in the literature about the comparison of dental with chronological age in protein energy malnutrition children (PEM). Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate and compare dental age and chronological age in PEM children. Aims and Objective: To determine and compare dental age and chronological age in PEM children. Methods: A total of 100 PEM children within the age range of 6–12 years were selected. Chronological age was recorded using date of birth. Dental age was assessed by Demirjian's method using orthopantomogram. Comparison of two ages was done using the unpaired Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: Dental age was retarded compared to chronological age, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The correlations between two ages were positive in both sexes. Conclusion: Dental age was delayed in our sample of 100 PEM children. Dental age can be considered as variable for diagnosing growth retardation in PEM children. Further studies are required to support our findings. PMID:26538919

  6. The difficult issue of age assessment on pedo-pornographic material.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Cristina; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Gabriel, Peter; Gibelli, Daniele; Giudici, Elena; Poppa, Pasquale; Nohrden, Doerte; Assmann, Sabine; Schmitt, Roland; Grandi, Marco

    2009-01-10

    The issue of juvenile pornography has seen an increase in the past few years of the number of expert opinions requested to forensic pathologists, paediatricians and other various experts within the forensic and medical fields concerning the age of represented individuals. Regardless of the entity of the problem, no actual method exists which can allow us to give an objective and scientific answer, particularly in the postpubertal stage. Using parameters related to sexual maturation can be very dangerous. Nonetheless some experts still insist with similar types of "expertises". This study aims at verifying the ability of different experts in assessing age of postpubertal individuals represented in pornographic material. Results underline the difficulties and major uncertainties of age evaluation by visual observation of photographic material particularly when the subjects have reached the sexual maturation stage - and therefore in verifying whether the individual is above or below 18 years of age (an important age limit for most European countries as far as this type of crime is concerned). Furthermore the study stresses the need both to search for an alternate approach and to apply extreme caution in judicial evaluation.

  7. The rules of implicit evaluation by race, religion, and age.

    PubMed

    Axt, Jordan R; Ebersole, Charles R; Nosek, Brian A

    2014-09-01

    The social world is stratified. Social hierarchies are known but often disavowed as anachronisms or unjust. Nonetheless, hierarchies may persist in social memory. In three studies (total N > 200,000), we found evidence of social hierarchies in implicit evaluation by race, religion, and age. Participants implicitly evaluated their own racial group most positively and the remaining racial groups in accordance with the following hierarchy: Whites > Asians > Blacks > Hispanics. Similarly, participants implicitly evaluated their own religion most positively and the remaining religions in accordance with the following hierarchy: Christianity > Judaism > Hinduism or Buddhism > Islam. In a final study, participants of all ages implicitly evaluated age groups following this rule: children > young adults > middle-age adults > older adults. These results suggest that the rules of social evaluation are pervasively embedded in culture and mind.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, G.

    Over the years new generations of propellants and explosives are being developed. High performance and pollution prevention issues have become the subject of interest in recent years. Desired properties of these materials are a halogen-free, nitrogen and oxygen rich molecular composition with high density and a positive heat of formation. The dinitramide anion is a new oxy anion of nitrogen and forms salts with variety of metal, organic and inorganic cations. Particular interest is in ammonium dinitramide (ADN, NH4N(NO 2)2) which is a potentially useful energetic oxidizer. ADN is considered as one of the most promising substitutes for ammonium perchlorate (AP, NH4ClO4) in currently used composite propellants. It is unique among energetic materials in that it has no carbon or chlorine; its combustion products are not detrimental to the atmosphere. Unquestionable advantage of ADN over AP is the significant improvement in the performance of solid rocket motors by 5-15%. The present thesis is centered on the experimental results along with discussion of some of the most pertinent aspects related to the synthesis and characterization of few dinitramide salts. The chemistry, mechanism and kinetics of the formation of dinitramide salts by nitration of deactivated amines are investigated. The evaluation of the thermal and spectral properties along with the adsorption and thermal decomposition characteristics of the dinitramide salts are also explored in this thesis.

  9. Materials evaluation for a transuranic processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, S.A., Schwenk, E.B. ); Divine, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company, with the assistance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is developing a transuranium extraction process for preheating double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site to reduce the volume of transuranic waste being sent to a repository. The bench- scale transuranium extraction process development is reaching a stage where a pilot plant design has begun for the construction of a facility in the existing B Plant. Because of the potential corrosivity of neutralized cladding removal waste process streams, existing embedded piping alloys in B Plant are being evaluated and new'' alloys are being selected for the full-scale plant screening corrosion tests. Once the waste is acidified with HNO{sub 3}, some of the process streams that are high in F{sup {minus}} and low in Al and zr can produce corrosion rates exceeding 30,000 mil/yr in austenitic alloys. Initial results results are reported concerning the applicability of existing plant materials to withstand expected process solutions and conditions to help determine the feasibility of locating the plant at the selected facility. In addition, process changes are presented that should make the process solutions less corrosive to the existing materials. Experimental work confirms that Hastelloy B is unsatisfactory for the expected process solutions; type 304L, 347 and 309S stainless steels are satisfactory for service at room temperature and 60{degrees}C, if process stream complexing is performed. Inconel 625 was satisfactory for all solutions. 17 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Preclinical evaluation of injectable bone substitute materials.

    PubMed

    Bongio, Matilde; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Jansen, John A

    2015-03-01

    Injectable bone substitutes (IBSs) represent an attractive class of ready-to-use biomaterials, both ceramic- and polymer-based, as they offer the potential benefit of minimally invasive surgery and optimal defect filling. Although in vitro assessments are the first step in the process of development, the safety and efficacy of an IBS strongly depend on validated preclinical research prior to clinical trials. However, the selection of a suitable preclinical model for performance evaluation of an IBS remains a challenge, as no gold standard exists to define the best animal model. In order to succeed in this attempt, we identified three stages of development, including (a) proof-of-principle, (b) predictive validity and (c) general scientific legitimacy, and the respective criteria that should be applied for such selection. The second part of this review provides an overview of commonly used animals for IBSs. Specifically, scientific papers published between January 1996 and March 2012 were retrieved that report the use of preclinical models for the evaluation of IBSs in situations requiring bone healing and bone augmentation. This review is meant not only to describe the currently available preclinical models for IBS application, but also to address critical considerations of such multi-factorial evaluation models (including animal species, strain, age, anatomical site, defect size and type of bone), which can be indicative but in most cases edge away from the human reality. Consequently, the ultimate goal is to guide researchers toward a more careful and meaningful interpretation of the results of experiments using animal models and their clinical applications.

  11. The use of information theory for the evaluation of biomarkers of aging and physiological age.

    PubMed

    Blokh, David; Stambler, Ilia

    2017-01-12

    The present work explores the application of information theoretical measures, such as entropy and normalized mutual information, for research of biomarkers of aging. The use of information theory affords unique methodological advantages for the study of aging processes, as it allows evaluating non-linear relations between biological parameters, providing the precise quantitative strength of those relations, both for individual and multiple parameters, showing cumulative or synergistic effect. Here we illustrate those capabilities utilizing a dataset on heart disease, including diagnostic parameters routinely available to physicians. The use of information-theoretical methods, utilizing normalized mutual information, revealed the exact amount of information that various diagnostic parameters or their combinations contained about the persons' age. Based on those exact informative values for the correlation of measured parameters with age, we constructed a diagnostic rule (a decision tree) to evaluate physiological age, as compared to chronological age. The present data illustrated that younger subjects suffering from heart disease showed characteristics of people of higher age (higher physiological age). Utilizing information-theoretical measures, with additional data, it may be possible to create further clinically applicable information-theory-based markers and models for the evaluation of physiological age, its relation to age-related diseases and its potential modifications by therapeutic interventions.

  12. Performance testing of aged hydrogen getters against criteria for interim safe storage of plutonium bearing materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Nissen, April; Buffleben, George M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen getters were tested for use in storage of plutonium-bearing materials in accordance with DOE's Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials. The hydrogen getter HITOP was aged for 3 months at 70 C and tested under both recombination and hydrogenation conditions at 20 and 70 C; partially saturated and irradiated aged getter samples were also tested. The recombination reaction was found to be very fast and well above the required rate of 45 std. cc H2h. The gettering reaction, which is planned as the backup reaction in this deployment, is slower and may not meet the requirements alone. Pressure drop measurements and {sup 1}H NMR analyses support these conclusions. Although the experimental conditions do not exactly replicate the deployment conditions, the results of our conservative experiments are clear: the aged getter shows sufficient reactivity to maintain hydrogen concentrations below the flammability limit, between the minimum and maximum deployment temperatures, for three months. The flammability risk is further reduced by the removal of oxygen through the recombination reaction. Neither radiation exposure nor thermal aging sufficiently degrades the getter to be a concern. Future testing to evaluate performance for longer aging periods is in progress.

  13. Evaluation of a Community-Based Aging Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Hui-Chuan; Wang, Chun-Hou; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chang, Ming-Chen; Wang, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the outcome and process of a community-based aging intervention program for the elderly in Taiwan. The program included education on nutrition and dietary behavior and on physical activities. Outcome and process evaluations were conducted. The program may have had some effects on decreasing some dietary behavioral problems and…

  14. Exploratory Strategic Evaluation of Policies for Aging Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles; And Others

    This report analyzes federal policies and program for aging Americans in view of emerging socio-economic issues to determine if the present federal strategy has future viability. A conceptual framework and methodology were developed to evaluate federal programs in terms of individual needs. Based on this strategic evaluation, alternative…

  15. Evaluation of age determination techniques for gray wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landon, D.B.; Waite, C.A.; Peterson, R.O.; Mech, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated tooth wear, cranial suture fusion, closure of the canine pulp cavity, and cementum annuli as methods of age determination for known- and unknown-age gray wolves (Canis lupus) from Alaska, Minnesota, Ontario, and Isle Royale, Michigan. We developed age classes for cranial suture closure and tooth wear. We used measurement data obtained from known-age captive and wild wolves to generate a regression equation to predict age based on the degree of closure of the canine pulp cavity. Cementum annuli were studied in known- and unknown-age animals, and calcified, unstained thin sections were found to provide clear annulus patterns under polarized transmitted light. Annuli counts varied among observers, partly because of variation in the pattern of annuli in different regions of the cementum. This variation emphasizes the need for standardized models of cementum analysis. Cranial suture fusion is of limited utility in age determination, while tooth wear can be used to estimate age of adult wolves within 4 years. Wolves lt 7 years old could be aged to within 13 years with the regression equation for closure of the canine pulp cavity. Although inaccuracy remains a problem, cementum-annulus counts were the most promising means of estimating age for gray wolves.

  16. 46 CFR 30.30-3 - Evaluation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation materials. 30.30-3 Section 30.30-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Interim Procedures for... materials. The materials to be submitted for evaluation must include the English text of the following:...

  17. 46 CFR 30.30-3 - Evaluation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Evaluation materials. 30.30-3 Section 30.30-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Interim Procedures for... materials. The materials to be submitted for evaluation must include the English text of the following:...

  18. METHODOLOGY FOR EXAMINING SYSTEM AGING DUE TO INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CHEMICALLY INCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    J. DENINGER; J. TANSKI

    1999-04-01

    We start with a stored and unused population of fielded engineered units that are composed of chemically incompatible materials. The units age primarily through heterogeneous chemical reactions between the materials resulting in possible degradation in performance. The engineered units are unused in storage, but may be called into actual service at any time. We sample several units from the population per year and perform a number of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as radiography, low-frequency vibration analysis, and ultrasonic imaging on the selected units. From those units, some are selected for destructive testing (D-test) involving disassembly and testing of internal parts and components. Chemical analyses, mechanical properties measurements and other tests are performed. All of the above steps provide information that is used in the system simulation mathematical model. The system simulation model incorporates chemical reactions and gas-solid transport processes, along with changes in both the surface and bulk properties of the solids. Model results are used to suggest improvements in NDE analyses of the units and improvements in component and material analyses. Model results give trending indications of individual component and overall system changes over time, plus some understanding of the mechanisms involved which allow science-based predictions of the aged state of the units in future times. The NDE, D-test, and model results can also be used to assess statistically the reliability and performance of the overall aging population of units.

  19. The evaluation of GOES black paint materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Philip T.; Kauder, Lonny R.; Triolo, Jack J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the contamination effect of black paint materials on the GOES instrument performance. The GOES spacecraft materials were originally selected for their low outgassing properties. Samples of the materials were tested according to the ASTM E-595 test method to fulfill the total mass loss and collected volatile condensable materials criteria for traditional spacecraft material selection. Due to the instrument design, the cavity will experience high temperatures during operation greater than the specified temperature in the ASTM test. As a result of this high cavity temperature, normally stable paint materials on the painted surface may severely outgas even though they have passed the ASTM test. Further enhancement of the contaminant remaining on the mirror by UV irradiation is also a great consideration. This concern prompted an investigation into the outgassing characteristics of the black paints at the predicted operating temperatures.

  20. Evaluation of Barrier Cable Impact Pad Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    ACTUAL BATCH DATA CU MATERIAL SOLID VOLUME SAT. SURF DRY SAT. . O,- DRY WATER ACT’.AL CU FT/BATCH BATCH WT. LB FACTOR EATCl ,9 CORRECTION. LB 1ATC. -T...POZZDOTHER CEMENT PROPORTIONS CALCULATED BATCH DATA (I CU YO) ACTUAL BATCH CATA CU =T SOLID VOLUME SAT. SURF DRY SAT. 3, DRY WATER MATERIAL CU FT

  1. Evaluation of Encapsulant Materials for PV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2010-01-01

    Encapsulant materials used in PV modules serve multiple purposes. They physically hold components in place, provide electrical insulation, optically couple superstrate materials (e.g., glass) to PV cells, protect components from mechanical stress by mechanically de-coupling components via strain relief, and protect materials from corrosion. To do this, encapsulants must adhere well to all surfaces, remain compliant, and transmit light after exposure to temperature, humidity, and UV radiation histories. Encapsulant materials by themselves do not completely prevent water vapour ingress [1-3], but if they are well adhered, they will prevent the accumulation of liquid water providing protection against corrosion as well as electrical shock. Here, a brief review of some of the polymeric materials under consideration for PV applications is provided, with an explanation of some of their advantages and disadvantages.

  2. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials via Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Betsy

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and imaging for the non-destructive evaluation of the degree of cure, aging, and other properties of resin-based composite materials. This method can be used in air, and is portable for field use. This method operates in reflectance, absorbance, and luminescence modes. The ultraviolet source is used to illuminate a composite surface of interest. In reflectance mode, the reflected response is acquired via the imaging system or via the spectrometer. The spectra are analyzed for organic compounds (conjugated organics) and inorganic compounds (semiconducting band-edge states; luminescing defect states such as silicates, used as adhesives for composite aerospace applications; and metal oxides commonly used as thermal coating paints on a wide range of spacecraft). The spectra are compared with a database for variation in conjugation, substitution, or length of molecule (in the case of organics) or band edge position (in the case of inorganics). This approach is useful in the understanding of material quality. It lacks the precision in defining the exact chemical structure that is found in other materials analysis techniques, but it is advantageous over methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, and chromatography in that it can be used in the field to assess significant changes in chemical structure that may be linked to concerns associated with weaknesses or variations in structural integrity, without disassembly of or destruction to the structure of interest.

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of composite materials - A design philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Efficient and reliable structural design utilizing fiber reinforced composite materials may only be accomplished if the materials used may be nondestructively evaluated. There are two major reasons for this requirement: (1) composite materials are formed at the time the structure is fabricated and (2) at practical strain levels damage, changes in the condition of the material, that influence the structure's mechanical performance is present. The fundamental basis of such a nondestructive evaluation capability is presented. A discussion of means of assessing nondestructively the material condition as well as a damage mechanics theory that interprets the material condition in terms of its influence on the mechanical response, stiffness, strength and life is provided.

  4. Evaluations of diapers containing absorbent gelling material with conventional disposable diapers in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Lane, A T; Rehder, P A; Helm, K

    1990-03-01

    We evaluated 149 infants diapered in either conventional cellulose core disposable diapers or diapers containing cellulose core with absorbent gelling material. The infants were evaluated from 1 day of age to 14 weeks of age for the prevalence and severity of diaper dermatitis. We identified a low prevalence of diaper dermatitis throughout the study period. At 14 weeks of age, we noted that infants in diapers containing absorbent gelling material had significantly less diaper dermatitis than those in conventional disposable diapers. Despite the overall low prevalence of diaper dermatitis in the newborn period, 7 of 204 infants evaluated had small skin erosions in the diaper area noted within the first 4 days of age. Both diaper types were associated with infants with erosions. This surprisingly high incidence of erosions in newborn infants suggests previously undocumented increased skin fragility of full-term infants.

  5. Age 60 Study, Part 4: Experimental Evaluation of Pilot Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    and aging. Computerized cognitive test batteries, COGSREEN and WOMBAT , were selected as the domain-independent measures. Flitescript and whole task...were assessed. COGSCREEN total composite scores were significantly correlated with evaluator ratings on emergency/abnormal maneuvers. Neither WOMBAT ...B-3 WOMBAT Questionnaire .......................................... B-4 Sim ulator Post-flight Questionnaire

  6. Effect of shelf aging on O-ring materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, T. E.; Stone, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    Commercial O-rings made from 13 different rubber compounds were tested for physical properties after 7 and 12 years of shelf aging. No gross changes were observed in tensile strength, elongation, or compression deflection characteristics.

  7. Trapped solar wind noble gases, kr81/kr exposure ages and k/ar ages in apollo 11 lunar material.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, P; Geiss, J; Graf, H; Grögler, N; Krähenbühl, U; Schwaller, H; Schwarzmüller, J; Stettler, A

    1970-01-30

    Grain size and etching experiments show that the fine lunar material contains large amounts of trapped solar wind particles. Elemental and isotopic compositions of the noble gases in solar material and in the terrestrial atmosphere are significantly different, except for the Ar(36)/ Ar(38) and the Kr isotope ratios. Exposure ages of two rocks and of the fine material are between 380 and 510 x 10(6) years. Feldspar concentrates give K/Ar ages of 3220 and 3300 x 10(6) years, significantly higher than the unseparated rock.

  8. Re-evaluating the age of the Haughton impact event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, Sarah C.; Kelley, Simon P.; Parnell, John; Green, Paul; Lee, Pascal; Osinski, Gordon R.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2005-12-01

    We have re-evaluated the published age information for the Haughton impact structure, which was believed to have formed ˜23 Ma ago during the Miocene age, and report new Ar/Ar laser probe data from shocked basement clasts. This reveals an Eocene age, which is at odds with the published Miocene stratigraphic, apatite fission track and Ar/Ar data; we discuss our new data within this context. We have found that the age of the Haughton impact structure is ˜39 Ma, which has implications for both crater recolonization models and post-impact hydrothermal activity. Future work on the relationship between flora and fauna within the crater, and others at high latitude, may resolve this paradox.

  9. Evaluation of NRC maintenance team inspection reports for managing aging

    SciTech Connect

    Fresco, A.; Gunther, W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear power plant's maintenance program is the principal vehicle through which age-related degradation is managed. Over the past two years, the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) has evaluated the maintenance program of every nuclear power plant in the U.S. The reports issued on these in-depth team inspections have been reviewed to ascertain the strengths and weaknesses of the programs as related to the need to understand and manage the effects of aging on nuclear power plant systems, structures, and components. Selected results of this review are presented in this paper, including examples of inspection and monitoring techniques successfully used by utilities to detect degradation due to aging. Attributes of plant maintenance programs where the NRC inspectors felt that improvement was needed to properly address the aging issue are also discussed. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  10. LEVERAGING AGING MATERIALS DATA TO SUPPORT EXTENSION OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPPING PACKAGES SERVICE LIFE

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Bellamy, S.; Daugherty, W.; Sindelar, R.; Skidmore, E.

    2013-08-18

    Nuclear material inventories are increasingly being transferred to interim storage locations where they may reside for extended periods of time. Use of a shipping package to store nuclear materials after the transfer has become more common for a variety of reasons. Shipping packages are robust and have a qualified pedigree for performance in normal operation and accident conditions but are only certified over an approved transportation window. The continued use of shipping packages to contain nuclear material during interim storage will result in reduced overall costs and reduced exposure to workers. However, the shipping package materials of construction must maintain integrity as specified by the safety basis of the storage facility throughout the storage period, which is typically well beyond the certified transportation window. In many ways, the certification processes required for interim storage of nuclear materials in shipping packages is similar to life extension programs required for dry cask storage systems for commercial nuclear fuels. The storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry cask storage systems is federally-regulated, and over 1500 individual dry casks have been in successful service up to 20 years in the US. The uncertainty in final disposition will likely require extended storage of this fuel well beyond initial license periods and perhaps multiple re-licenses may be needed. Thus, both the shipping packages and the dry cask storage systems require materials integrity assessments and assurance of continued satisfactory materials performance over times not considered in the original evaluation processes. Test programs for the shipping packages have been established to obtain aging data on materials of construction to demonstrate continued system integrity. The collective data may be coupled with similar data for the dry cask storage systems and used to support extending the service life of shipping packages in both transportation and storage.

  11. Evaluation of advanced materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Clauer, A.H.; Shetty, D.K.; Tucker, T.R.; Stropki, J.T.

    1982-11-18

    Cemented tungsten carbides with a binder level in the range of 5 to 6 percent exhibited the best resistance to erosion for this class of materials. Other practical cermet meterials were diamond - Si/SiC, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-B/sub 4/C-Cr, and B/sub 4/C-Co. SiAlON exhibited erosion resistance equivalent to the best WC-cermet. The only coating system to show promise of improved erosion resistance was CVD TiB/sub 2/ on cemented TiB/sub 2/-Ni. Cracking and/or spalling of a TiC coating and a proprietary TMT coating occurred in the standard slurry erosion test. Ranking of cemented tungsten carbide materials in the laboratory erosion test was the same as that found in service in the Wilsonville pilot plant. Specimens from the Fort Lewis pilot plant which performed well in service exhibited low erosion in the laboratory test. A substitute slurry, was found to be 2 to 4 times more erosive than the coal-derived slurry 8 wt% solids. Ranking of materials in the substitute slurry was nearly identical to that in the coal-derived slurry. Three modes of erosion were: ductile cutting; elastic-plastic indentation and fracture; and intergranular fracture. Erosion of a given material was closely related to its microstructure. In the substitute slurry, the angle-dependence of erosion of two forms of SiC, hot-pressed and sintered, were similar, but the sintered material eroded slower. Laser fusing of preplaced powder mixtures can produce cermet-like structures with potential for erosive and sliding wear resistance. TiC particles in Stellite 6 matrix proved less prone to cracking than WC particles in the same matrix. 74 figures, 14 tables.

  12. Evaluation of Polyurethane as a Cosmetic Glove Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Polyurethane latex was evaluated for possible use as a cosmetic glove material. A two component latex system was used with a number of films and a... cosmetic glove being fabricated and evaluated with varying amounts of the two components. The mechanical properties indicate that the material is

  13. Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) materials coating evaluation, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume consists of Appendices A and B to the report on the Weightless Environment Training Facility Materials Coating Evaluation project. The project selected 10 coating systems to be evaluated in six separate exposure environments, and subject to three tests for physical properties. Appendix A holds the coating system, surface preparation, and application data. Appendix B holds the coating material infrared spectra.

  14. Aging Management using Proactive Management of Materials Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Taylor, W Boyd; Carpenter, C. E.; Hull, Amy B.; Malik, Shah

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken a program to lay the technical foundations for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs). The current focus is existing plants; however, if applied to new construction, there is potential to better monitor and manage plants throughout their life cycle. This paper discusses the NRC’s Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems, and components (SSC).

  15. AGING MANAGEMENT USING PROACTIVE MANAGEMENT OF MATERIALS DEGRADATION

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S. R.; Bond, L. J.; Cumblidge, S. E.; Bruemmer, S. M.; Taylor, W. B.; Carpenter, C. E.; Hull, A. B.; Malik, S. N.

    2010-02-22

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken a program to lay the technical foundations for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors. The current focus is existing plants; however, if applied to new construction, there is potential to better monitor and manage plants throughout their life cycle. This paper discusses the NRC's Proactive Management of Materials Degradation program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems, and components.

  16. Aging Management Using Proactive Management of Materials Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, S. R.; Bond, L. J.; Cumblidge, S. E.; Bruemmer, S. M.; Taylor, W. B.; Carpenter, C. E.; Hull, A. B.; Malik, S. N.

    2010-02-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken a program to lay the technical foundations for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors. The current focus is existing plants; however, if applied to new construction, there is potential to better monitor and manage plants throughout their life cycle. This paper discusses the NRC's Proactive Management of Materials Degradation program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems, and components.

  17. Design and evaluation of lost circulation materials for severe environments

    SciTech Connect

    Loeppke, G.E.; Glowka, D.A.; Wright, E.K.

    1988-01-01

    An independent analysis of lost circulation materials for geothermal applications has been completed using unique laboratory tools developed for the purpose. Test results of commercial materials as well as mathematical models for evaluating their performance are presented. Physical attributes that govern the performance of lost circulation materials are identified and correlated with test results. 9 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Evaluating School Library Information Services in the Digital Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhart, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    Discusses criteria for evaluating school library information services. Highlights include types of services; physical facilities; library usage; circulation statistics; changes due to technology; fill rate, or the percentage of successful searches for library materials; OPAC (online public access catalog) reports; observation; and examining…

  19. Assessment of Cable Aging Equipment, Status of Acquired Materials, and Experimental Matrix at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zwoster, Andy; Schwenzer, Birgit

    2015-03-30

    The need for increased understanding of the aging and degradation behavior for polymer components of nuclear power plant electrical cables is described in this report. The highest priority materials for study and the resources available at PNNL for these studies are also described. The anticipated outcomes of the PNNL work described are : improved understanding of appropriate accelerated aging conditions, improved knowledge of correlation between observable aging indicators and cable condition in support of advanced non-destructive evaluation methods, and practical knowledge of condition-based cable lifetime prediction.

  20. Evaluation of aging of cast stainless steel components

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.

    1991-02-01

    Cast stainless steel is used extensively in nuclear reactors for primary-pressure-boundary components such as primary coolant pipes, elbows, valves, pumps, and safe ends. These components are, however, susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement in light water reactors because of the segregation of Cr atoms from Fe and Ni by spinodal decomposition in ferrite and the precipitation of Cr-rich carbides on ferrite/austenite boundaries. A recent advance in understanding the aging kinetics is presented. Aging kinetics are strongly influenced by the synergistic effects of other metallurgical reactions that occur in parallel with spinodal decomposition, i.e., clustering of Ni, Mo, and Si solute atoms and the nucleation and growth of G-phase precipitates in the ferrite phase. A number of methods are outlined for estimating aging embrittlement under end-of-life of life-extension conditions, depending on several factors such as degree of permissible conservatism, availability of component archive material, and methods of estimating and verifying the activation energy of aging. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Towards aging mechanisms of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable insulation materials in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuaishuai; Fifield, Leonard S.; Bowler, Nicola

    2016-12-19

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable insulation material undergoes simultaneous, accelerated thermal and gamma-radiation aging to simulate the long-term aging environment within nuclear power plants (NPPs). A variety of materials characterization tests, including scanning electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, oxidation induction time, gel-fraction and dielectric properties measurement, are conducted on pristine and differently aged XLPE samples. A preliminary model of one possible aging mechanism of XLPE cable insulation material under gamma radiation at elevated temperature of 115 °C is suggested.

  2. Materials Evaluated as Potential Soil Stabilizers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    21.0 168 270 +153 Lithium hydroxide 0.59 20.8 168 198 +85 Sodium sulfite 1.0 21.2 168 322 +200 Sodium carbonate 1.0 20.5 168 375 +250 Sodium bicarbonate...fluoride, sodium 1.0, and 2.0% rates fluoborate , and sodium tetraborate Mixing Material Form* Type of Soil Treated Capability Powder Silt Good Effective...used (sodiun fluosilicate, sodium fluoride, sodium fluoborate , ET-218, and sodium tetraborate) were either detrimental when added to the cement or no

  3. Reliability of Tethered Swimming Evaluation in Age Group Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, Nuno; Marinho, Daniel A; Batalha, Nuno; Marques, Mário C; Morouço, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reliability of tethered swimming in the evaluation of age group swimmers. The sample was composed of 8 male national level swimmers with at least 4 years of experience in competitive swimming. Each swimmer performed two 30 second maximal intensity tethered swimming tests, on separate days. Individual force-time curves were registered to assess maximum force, mean force and the mean impulse of force. Both consistency and reliability were very strong, with Cronbach’s Alpha values ranging from 0.970 to 0.995. All the applied metrics presented a very high agreement between tests, with the mean impulse of force presenting the highest. These results indicate that tethered swimming can be used to evaluate age group swimmers. Furthermore, better comprehension of the swimmers ability to effectively exert force in the water can be obtained using the impulse of force. PMID:25114742

  4. Materialism across the life span: An age-period-cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Esther D T; Pieters, Rik G M

    2016-09-01

    This research examined the development of materialism across the life span. Two initial studies revealed that (a) lay beliefs were that materialism declines with age and (b) previous research findings also implied a modest, negative relationship between age and materialism. Yet, previous research has considered age only as a linear control variable, thereby precluding the possibility of more intricate relationships between age and materialism. Moreover, prior studies have relied on cross-sectional data and thus confound age and cohort effects. To improve on this, the main study used longitudinal data from 8 waves spanning 9 years of over 4,200 individuals (16 to 90 years) to examine age effects on materialism while controlling for cohort and period effects. Using a multivariate multilevel latent growth model, it found that materialism followed a curvilinear trajectory across the life span, with the lowest levels at middle age and higher levels before and after that. Thus, in contrast to lay beliefs, materialism increased in older age. Moreover, age effects on materialism differed markedly between 3 core themes of materialism: acquisition centrality, possession-defined success, and acquisition as the pursuit of happiness. In particular, acquisition centrality and possession-defined success were higher at younger and older age. Independent of these age effects, older birth cohorts were oriented more toward possession-defined success, whereas younger birth cohorts were oriented more toward acquisition centrality. The economic downturn since 2008 led to a decrease in acquisition as the pursuit of happiness and in desires for personal growth, but to an increase in desires for achievement. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Evaluation of Obesity in School-Age Children.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    To prevent obesity in middle age, early precautions and interventions are required during childhood. Therefore, it is very important to accurately evaluate the degree of overweight in children. Body mass index (BMI) is widely used worldwide in adults, but not in children. Because standard BMI, which is calculated using the average height and weight for age, changes widely during growth, a constant cut-off point cannot be set for children. An international unified method defining childhood obesity has not been established. In many countries, BMI-for-age percentile (BMI%) value or Z (standard deviation) score is used, whereas in Japan, the percentage of overweight (POW), which is the modified weight-for-height method, is used. We compared BMI% values with POW values obtained using the anthropometric data of elementary and junior high school students based on the Japanese school survey conducted in 2000 and found that the values for the degree of overweight were significantly different between the two methods. It became clear that tall students were easily defined as being overweight, whereas short students tended to be evaluated as being underweight when using BMI%. POW method seemed to be more appropriate than BMI% for school-age children. Abdominal obesity, excess visceral adipose tissue (VAT), is highly associated with obesity-related complications. Waist circumference (WC) is now accepted as an appropriate guide to VAT accumulation. The cut-off value of WC defining excess VAT is 80 cm at the umbilical level in Japanese school-age children. It is not easy to decide the obesity criteria and optimum WC in school-age children. Childhood obesity should be discussed more internationally.

  6. Evaluation of materials and design modifications for aircraft brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, T. L.; Kennedy, F. E.; Peterson, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    A test program is described which was carried out to evaluate several proposed design modifications and several high-temperature friction materials for use in aircraft disk brakes. The evaluation program was carried out on a specially built test apparatus utilizing a disk brake and wheel half from a small het aircraft. The apparatus enabled control of brake pressure, velocity, and braking time. Tests were run under both constant and variable velocity conditions and covered a kinetic energy range similar to that encountered in aircraft brake service. The results of the design evaluation program showed that some improvement in brake performance can be realized by making design changes in the components of the brake containing friction material. The materials evaluation showed that two friction materials show potential for use in aircraft disk brakes. One of the materials is a nickel-based sintered composite, while the other is a molybdenum-based material. Both materials show much lower wear rates than conventional copper-based materials and are better able to withstand the high temperatures encountered during braking. Additional materials improvement is necessary since both materials show a significant negative slope of the friction-velocity curve at low velocities.

  7. Ballistic Evaluation of Aircraft Explosion Suppression Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    conclusions, and the fuel/air ratio me ~asurement system. DD I J’’N1 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 6SI 1OSS8OLEtE SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Ott THIS PACE (When Data...performance against various projectiles. 2 A"I~FI)L- Th ’- 76(-9 R S ECTI ON I I TEST I)ESCR I PT I ON 1, EXPLOSION SUPPRESSITON MATEIRIALS The materials tested...AFF.DL- TH - 76-98 11 P2 *T3 T4 0- Thermocouple Tl- T2Fra nONT VIEW .’Iguive 4. linstrumenitation Locations I tests that did 1iot require a stoichiometric

  8. Environmental Effects on ISS Materials Aging (1998 to 2008)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alred, John; Dasgupta, Rajib; Koontz, Steve; Soares, Carlos; Golden, John

    2009-01-01

    The performance of ISS spacecraft materials and systems on prolonged exposure to the low- Earth orbit (LEO) space flight are reported in this paper. In-flight data, flight crew observations, and the results of ground-based test and analysis directly supporting programmatic and operational decision-making are described. The space flight environments definitions (both natural and induced) used for ISS design, material selection, and verification testing are shown, in most cases, to be more severe than the actual flight environment accounting, in part, for the outstanding performance of ISS as a long mission duration spacecraft. No significant ISS material or system failures have been attributed to spacecraft-environments interactions. Nonetheless, ISS materials and systems performance data is contributing to our understanding of spacecraft material interactions with the spaceflight environment so as to reduce cost and risk for future spaceflight projects and programs. Orbital inclination (51.6 deg) and altitude (nominally near 360 km) determine the set of natural environment factors affecting the functional life of materials and systems on ISS. ISS operates in an electrically conducting environment (the F2 region of Earth s ionosphere) with well-defined fluxes of atomic oxygen, other charged and neutral ionospheric plasma species, solar UV, VUV, and x-ray radiation as well as galactic cosmic rays, trapped radiation, and solar cosmic rays. The LEO micrometeoroid and orbital debris environment is an especially important determinant of spacecraft design and operations. The magnitude of several environmental factors varies dramatically with latitude and longitude as ISS orbits the Earth. The high latitude orbital environment also exposes ISS to higher fluences of trapped energetic electrons, auroral electrons, solar cosmic rays, and galactic cosmic rays than would be the case in lower inclination orbits, largely as a result of the overall shape and magnitude of the

  9. Method and Apparatus for Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfine, Neil J. (Inventor); Washabaugh, Andrew P. (Inventor); Lyons, Robert (Inventor); Thomas, Zachary (Inventor); Jablonski, David A. (Inventor); Martin, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for characterizing composite materials for manufacturing quality assurance (QA), periodic inspection during the useful life, or for forensic analysis/material testing. System are provided that relate eddy-current sensor responses to the fiber layup of a composite structure, the presence of impact damage on a composite structure with or without a metal liner, volumetric stress within the composite, fiber tow density, and other NDE inspection requirements. Also provided are systems that determine electromagnetic material properties and material dimensions of composite materials from capacitive sensor inspection measurements. These properties are related to the presence of buried defects in non-conductive composite materials, moisture ingress, aging of the material due to service or environmental/thermal exposure, or changes in manufacturing quality.

  10. Evaluation criteria for commercially oriented materials processing in space proposals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. F.; Mcdowell, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    An approach and criteria for evaluating NASA funded experiments and demonstrations which have commercial potential were developed. Methods for insuring quick initial screening of commercial proposals are presented. Recommendations are given for modifying the current evaluation approach. New criteria for evaluating commercially orientated materials processing in space (MPS) proposals are introduced. The process for selection of qualified individuals to evaluate the phases of this approach and criteria is considered and guidelines are set for its implementation.

  11. Ultrasonic and radiographic evaluation of advanced aerospace materials: Ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    Two conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques were used to evaluate advanced ceramic composite materials. It was shown that neither ultrasonic C-scan nor radiographic imaging can individually provide sufficient data for an accurate nondestructive evaluation. Both ultrasonic C-scan and conventional radiographic imaging are required for preliminary evaluation of these complex systems. The material variations that were identified by these two techniques are porosity, delaminations, bond quality between laminae, fiber alignment, fiber registration, fiber parallelism, and processing density flaws. The degree of bonding between fiber and matrix cannot be determined by either of these methods. An alternative ultrasonic technique, angular power spectrum scanning (APSS) is recommended for quantification of this interfacial bond.

  12. Evaluation of Eco-Efficiency and Performance of Retrofit Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Smitha; Rama Chandra Murthy, A.; Iyer, Nagesh R.; Kokila, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work three materials namely Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP), ferrocement and Textile Reinforced Concrete (TRC) have been evaluated towards their performance efficiency and eco-effectiveness for sustainable retrofitting applications. Investigations have been carried out for flexural strengthening of RC beams with FRP, ferrocement and TRC. It is observed that in the case of FRP, it is not possible to tailor the material according to design requirements and most of the time strengthened structure becomes over stiff. Eco-effectiveness of these retrofitting materials has been evaluated by computing the embodied energy. It is observed that the amount of CO2 emitted by TRC is less compared to other retrofit materials. Further, the performance point of retrofitted RC frames has been evaluated and damage index has been calculated to find out the effective retrofit material. It is concluded that, if RC frame is retrofitted with FRP and TRC, it undergoes less damage compared to ferrocement.

  13. Dredged Material Testing and Evaluation for Ocean Disposal

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Evaluation and testing of dredged material proposed for ocean dumping is conducted to help protect human health and the marine environment. National guidance is provided by the Green Book. Regional Implementation Manuals are provided.

  14. Evaluating Course Design Principles for Multimedia Learning Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Bernard; Cong, Chunyu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on evaluation studies of principles of course design for interactive multimedia learning materials. Design/methodology/approach: At the Defence Academy of the UK, Cranfield University has worked with military colleagues to produce multimedia learning materials for courses on "Military Knowledge". The…

  15. Evaluation Echoes; A Teachers Guide for Selecting Bilingual Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rican Congress of New Jersey, Trenton.

    In this teacher's guide for selecting bilingual education materials, program materials are evaluated for the following subject areas: English language arts, Spanish language arts, fine arts, social studies, science and mathematics. A general profile matrix covering all programs and subjects appears at the beginning of the guide. It provides for…

  16. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J; Crary, John F; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M; Ironside, James W; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R; Munoz, David G; Murray, Melissa E; Nelson, Peter T; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bigio, Eileen H; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J; Mann, David M; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C; Vinters, Harry V; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B; White, Charles L; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M; Yamada, Masahito; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of

  17. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J.; Crary, John F.; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M.; Ironside, James W.; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Munoz, David G.; Murray, Melissa E.; Nelson, Peter T.; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G.; Bieniek, Kevin F.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N.; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M.; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R.; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A.; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J.; Mann, David M.; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C.; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J.; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B.; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D.; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A.; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B.; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C.; Vinters, Harry V.; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B.; White, Charles L.; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M.; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of

  18. Understanding and controlling low-temperature aging of nanocrystalline materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Boyce, Brad Lee; Brons, Justin G.; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Holm, Elizabeth A; Padilla, Henry A.,; Sharon, John Anthony; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2013-10-01

    Nanocrystalline copper lms were created by both repetitive high-energy pulsed power, to produce material without internal nanotwins; and pulsed laser deposition, to produce nan- otwins. Samples of these lms were indented at ambient (298K) and cryogenic temperatures by immersion in liquid nitrogen (77K) and helium (4K). The indented samples were sectioned through the indented regions and imaged in a scanning electron microscope. Extensive grain growth was observed in the lms that contained nanotwins and were indented cryogenically. The lms that either lacked twins, or were indented under ambient conditions, were found to exhibit no substantial grain growth by visual inspection. Precession transmission elec- tron microscopy was used to con rm these ndings quantitatively, and show that 3 and 7 boundaries proliferate during grain growth, implying that these interface types play a key role in governing the extensive grain growth observed here. Molecular dynamics sim- ulations of the motion of individual grain boundaries demonstrate that speci c classes of boundaries - notably 3 and 7 - exhibit anti- or a-thermal migration, meaning that their mobilities either increase or do not change signi cantly with decreasing temperature. An in-situ cryogenic indentation capability was developed and implemented in a transmission electron microscope. Preliminary results do not show extensive cryogenic grain growth in indented copper lms. This discrepancy could arise from the signi cant di erences in con g- uration and loading of the specimen between the two approaches, and further research and development of this capability is needed.

  19. An evaluation of sex-age-kill (SAK) model performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Boyce, Mark S.; Hansen, Lonnie P.; Kammermeyer, Kent

    2009-01-01

    The sex-age-kill (SAK) model is widely used to estimate abundance of harvested large mammals, including white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Despite a long history of use, few formal evaluations of SAK performance exist. We investigated how violations of the stable age distribution and stationary population assumption, changes to male or female harvest, stochastic effects (i.e., random fluctuations in recruitment and survival), and sampling efforts influenced SAK estimation. When the simulated population had a stable age distribution and λ > 1, the SAK model underestimated abundance. Conversely, when λ < 1, the SAK overestimated abundance. When changes to male harvest were introduced, SAK estimates were opposite the true population trend. In contrast, SAK estimates were robust to changes in female harvest rates. Stochastic effects caused SAK estimates to fluctuate about their equilibrium abundance, but the effect dampened as the size of the surveyed population increased. When we considered both stochastic effects and sampling error at a deer management unit scale the resultant abundance estimates were within ±121.9% of the true population level 95% of the time. These combined results demonstrate extreme sensitivity to model violations and scale of analysis. Without changes to model formulation, the SAK model will be biased when λ ≠ 1. Furthermore, any factor that alters the male harvest rate, such as changes to regulations or changes in hunter attitudes, will bias population estimates. Sex-age-kill estimates may be precise at large spatial scales, such as the state level, but less so at the individual management unit level. Alternative models, such as statistical age-at-harvest models, which require similar data types, might allow for more robust, broad-scale demographic assessments.

  20. Evaluation of Composite Materials for Use on Launch Complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, A.; Welch, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    Commercially available composite structural shapes were evaluated for use. These composites, fiberglass-reinforced polyester and vinylester resin materials are being used extensively in the fabrication and construction of low maintenance, corrosion resistant structures. The evaluation found that in many applications these composite materials can be successfully used at the space center. These composite materials should not be used where they will be exposed to the hot exhaust plume/cloud of the launch vehicle during the liftoff, and caution should be taken in their use in areas where electrostatic discharge and hypergolic propellant compatibility are primary concerns.

  1. Benefit evaluation of space processing of biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A rational analytical basis for the evaluation of potential benefits of space processing of biological materials is described. A preliminary evaluation of three candidate space processed biological materials was accomplished. Materials investigated were human lymphocytes, urokinase, and Beta cells. Separation of lymphocyte groups was considered in order to improve the matching of donors and recipients for kidney transplantation, while urokinase was examined in regard to treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Separation of Beta cells was studied since it could provide a highly effective means for the treatment of juvenile-onset diabetes.

  2. Active thermography in qualitative evaluation of protective materials.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Wiecek, Bogusław

    2009-01-01

    This is a study of the possibilities of a qualitative evaluation of protective materials with active thermography. It presents a simulation of a periodic excitation of a multilayer composite material. Tests were conducted with lock-in thermography on Kevlar composite consisting of 16 layers of Kevlar fabric reinforced with formaldehyde resin with implanted delamination defects. Lock-in thermography is a versatile tool for nondestructive evaluation. It is a fast, remote and nondestructive procedure. Hence, it was used to detect delaminations in the composite structure of materials used in the production of components designed for personal protection. This method directly contributes to an improvement in safety.

  3. Economic evaluation of closure cap barrier materials study

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    Volume II of the Economic Evaluation of the Closure Cap Barrier Materials, Revision I contains detailed cost estimates for closure cap barrier materials. The cost estimates incorporate the life cycle costs for a generic hazardous waste seepage basin closure cap under the RCRA Post Closure Period of thirty years. The economic evaluation assessed six barrier material categories. Each of these categories consists of several composite cover system configurations, which were used to develop individual cost estimates. The information contained in this report is not intended to be used as a cost estimating manual. This information provides the decision makers with the ability to screen barrier materials, cover system configurations, and identify cost-effective materials for further consideration.

  4. Evaluation of forensic examination of extremely aged seminal stains.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Hara, Masaaki; Takahashi, Shirushi; Takada, Aya; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2014-09-01

    The results of forensic tests, such as semen identification and short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of extremely aged seminal stains from unsolved sex crimes can provide important evidence. In this study we evaluated whether current forensic methods could be applied to seminal stains that were stored at room temperature for 33-56years (n=2, 33years old; n=1, 41years old; n=1, 44years old; n=1, 56years old). The prostatic acid phosphatase (SM-test reagent), microscopic (Baecchi stain method) and semenogelin (RSID™ Semen Laboratory Kit) tests were performed as discriminative tests for semen. In addition, the mRNA levels of the semen-specific proteins semenogelin 1 (SEMG1) and protamine 2 (PRM2) were investigated. STRs were analyzed using the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler™ PCR Amplification Kit. All samples were positive in the prostatic acid phosphatase and semenogelin tests, and sperm heads were identified in all samples. The staining degree of the aged sperm heads was similar to that of fresh sperm. Although SEMG1 mRNA was not detected in any sample, PRM2 mRNA was detected in three samples. In the STR analysis, all loci were detected in the 33-years-old sample and five loci were detected in the 56-years-old sample. We confirmed that current forensic examinations - including STR analysis - could be applied to extremely aged seminal stains. These results could be useful for forensic practice.

  5. Evaluation of oxidative behavior of polyolefin geosynthetics utilizing accelerated aging tests based on temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengjia

    Polyolefin geosynthetics are susceptible to oxidation, which eventually leads to the reduction in their engineering properties. In the application of polyolefin geosynthetics, a major issue is an estimate of the materials durability (i.e. service lifetime) under various aging conditions. Antioxidant packages are added to the polyolefin products to extend the induction time, during which antioxidants are gradually depleted and polymer oxidation reactions are prevented. In this PhD study, an improved laboratory accelerating aging method under elevated and high pressure environments was applied to evaluate the combined effect of temperature and pressure on the depletion of the antioxidants and the oxidation of polymers. Four types of commercial polyolefn geosynthetic materials selected for aging tests included HDPE geogrid, polypropylene woven and nonwoven geotextiles. A total of 33 different temperature/pressure aging conditions were used, with the incubation duration up to 24 months. The applied oven temperature ranged from 35°C to 105°C and the partial oxygen pressure ranged from 0.005 MPa to 6.3 MPa. Using the Oxidative Induction Time (OIT) test, the antioxidant depletion, which is correlated to the decrease of the OIT value, was found to follow apparent first-order decay. The OIT data also showed that, the antioxidant depletion rate increased with temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, while under constant temperatures, the rate increased exponentially with the partial pressure of oxygen. A modified Arrhenius model was developed to fit the antioxidant depletion rate as a function of temperature and pressure and to predict the antioxidant lifetime under various field conditions. This study has developed new temperature/pressure incubation aging test method with lifetime prediction models. Using this new technique, the antioxidant lifetime prediction results are close to regular temperature aging data while the aging duration can be reduced considerably

  6. IMPORTANCE OF MATERIAL BALANCES AND THEIR STATISTICAL EVALUATION IN RUSSIAN MATERIAL, PROTECTION, CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING

    SciTech Connect

    FISHBONE,L.G.

    1999-07-25

    While substantial work has been performed in the Russian MPC&A Program, much more needs to be done at Russian nuclear facilities to complete four necessary steps. These are (1) periodically measuring the physical inventory of nuclear material, (2) continuously measuring the flows of nuclear material, (3) using the results to close the material balance, particularly at bulk processing facilities, and (4) statistically evaluating any apparent loss of nuclear material. The periodic closing of material balances provides an objective test of the facility's system of nuclear material protection, control and accounting. The statistical evaluation using the uncertainties associated with individual measurement systems involved in the calculation of the material balance provides a fair standard for concluding whether the apparent loss of nuclear material means a diversion or whether the facility's accounting system needs improvement. In particular, if unattractive flow material at a facility is not measured well, the accounting system cannot readily detect the loss of attractive material if the latter substantially derives from the former.

  7. Application of Ultrasonic Guided Waves for Evaluating Aging Wire Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2005-01-01

    Aging wiring has become a critical issue to the aerospace and aircraft industries due to Shuttle and aircraft incidents. The problem is that over time the insulation on wire becomes brittle and cracks. This exposes the underlying conductive wire to the potential for short circuits and fire. Popular methods of monitoring aging wire problems focuses on applying electrical sensing techniques that are sensitive to the conductor's condition, but not very sensitive to the wire insulation's condition. Measurement of wire insulation stiffness and ultrasonic properties by ultrasonic guided waves is being examined. Experimental measurements showed that the lowest order extensional mode could be sensitive to stiffness changes in the wire insulation. To test this theory conventional wire samples were heat damaged in an oven, in a range of heating conditions. The samples were 12, 16, and 20 gauge and the heat damage introduced material changes in the wire insulation that made the originally flexible insulation brittle and darker in color. Results showed that extensional mode phase velocity increased for the samples that were exposed to heat for longer duration.

  8. Acceleration factors for oxidative aging of polymeric materials by oxygen detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Skutnik, Julie Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Three methods that were used to measure the chemical changes associated with oxidative degradation of polymeric materials are presented. The first method is based on the nuclear activation of {sup 18}O in an elastomer that was thermally aged in an {sup 18}O{sub 2} atmosphere. Second, the alcohol groups in a thermally aged elastomer were derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride and their concentration measured via {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy. Finally, a respirometer was used to directly measure the oxidative rates of a polyurethane foam as a function of aging temperature. The measurement of the oxidation rates enabled acceleration factors for oxidative degradation of these materials to be calculated.

  9. Low earth orbital atomic oxygen simulation for materials durability evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1989-01-01

    The erosion yields of numerous materials have been evaluated in low earth orbital space tests. There appears to be three classes of materials: materials of high erosion yield which include most of the hydrocarbon organic materials; materials which either do not react with atomic oxygen or form self-protecting oxides which allow the underlying material to appear durable to atomic oxygen, and materials with low but nonnegligeable erosion yields, such as fluoropolymers. A NASA atomic oxygen effects test program has been established to utilize collective data from a multitude of simulation facilities to promote an understanding of mechanism and erosion yield dependencies. Atomic oxygen protective coatings for Kapton polymide solar array blankets, fiberglass-epoxy composite mast structures, and solar dynamic power system concentrator surfaces have been identified and evaluated under atomic oxygen exposure in RF plasma asher laboratory tests. The control of defect density in protective coatings appears to be the key to the assurance of long-term protection of oxidizable materials in low earth orbit.

  10. Printed health information materials: evaluation of readability and suitability.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Carol; Hosei, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This study examined readability and suitability of printed health information materials colleted from multiple sources. In phase I, nursing students used Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG; McLaughlin, 1969) to assess the readability of 21 materials collected from the community. In phases II and III, nursing students and registered nurses used SMOG and the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM; Doak, Doak, & Root, 1996) to evaluate 15 prenatal materials from a Healthy Start program. SMOG assigns a reading grade level based on the number of words with 3 or more syllables. SAM has 22 items in 6 evaluation areas: content, literacy demand, graphics, layout and typography, learning stimulation and motivation, and cultural appropriateness. Major findings included that 53% to 86% of the printed materials had a reading level at or higher than 9th grade; materials lacked summary, interaction, and modeled behaviors, and registered nurses rated more materials as not suitable and fewer as superior for suitability qualities than students. Improving printed materials to have lower reading levels and better suitability qualities are indicated.

  11. Methodology for Evaluating Raw Material Changes to RSRM Elastomeric Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildenhall, Scott D.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) uses asbestos and silicon dioxide filled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (AS-NBR) as the primary internal insulation to protect the case from heat. During the course of the RSRM Program, several changes have been made to the raw materials and processing of the AS-NBR elastomeric insulation material. These changes have been primarily caused by raw materials becoming obsolete. In addition, some process changes have been implemented that were deemed necessary to improve the quality and consistency of the AS-NBR insulation material. Each change has been evaluated using unique test efforts customized to determine the potential impacts of the specific raw material or process change. Following the evaluations, the various raw material and process changes were successfully implemented with no detectable effect on the performance of the AS-NBR insulation. This paper will discuss some of the raw material and process changes evaluated, the methodology used in designing the unique test plans, and the general evaluation results. A summary of the change history of RSRM AS-NBR internal insulation is also presented.

  12. Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratoriers: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaschl, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users. The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in materials analysis planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the analysis process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define scope of analysis, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  13. Study on the Aging Behaviors of Rubber Materials in Tension and Compression Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Can; Wang, Hongyu; Ma, Xiaobing

    Rubber materials are widely used in aviation, aerospace, shipbuilding, automobile and other military field. However, rubber materials are easy to aging, which largely restricts its using life. In working environment, due to the combined effect of heat and oxygen, vulcanized rubber will undergo degradation and crosslinking reaction which will cause elasticity decease and permanent deformation, so mostly rubber products are used under stress state. Due to the asymmetric structure and asymmetric stress distribution, mechanical stress may cause serious damage to molecular structure; therefore, this paper is aimed to analyze the aging behavior of rubber materials under tensile and compressive loadings, through analyzing experiment data, and adopting Gauss function to describe stress relaxation coefficient, to build an aging equation containing compression ratio parameter and aging time.

  14. Pin bearing evaluation of LTM25 composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes pin bearing evaluations of LTM25 composite materials. Northrop Grumman Corporation conducted pin bearing testing and fabricate two panels from composite materials that cure at low temperatures. These materials are being incorporated into Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVS) to reduce manufacturing costs since they allow the use of low-cost tooling and facilities. Two composite prepreg product forms were evaluated; MR50/LTM25 unidirectional tape, batch 2881vd and CFS003/LTM25 woven cloth, batch 2216. Northrop Grumman fabricated, machined, and tested specimens to determine the bearing strength in accordance with MIL-HDBK-17D, Volume 1, Section 7.2.4. Quasi-isotropic laminates from the two product forms were fabricated for these tests. In addition, 2 quasi-isotropic panels of dimensions 12 in. x 28 in. were fabricated (one each from the two product forms), inspected, and shipped to NASA Langley for further evaluation.

  15. Aging predictions in nuclear power plants: Crosslinked polyolefin and EPR cable insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1991-06-01

    In two earlier reports, we derived a time-temperature-dose rate superposition methodology, which, when applicable, can be used to predict cable degradation versus dose rate, temperature and exposure time. This methodology results in long-term predictive capabilities at the low dose rates appropriate to ambient nuclear power plant aging environments. The methodology was successfully applied to numerous important cable materials used in nuclear applications and the extrapolated predictions were verified by comparisons with long-term (7 to 12 year) results for similar or identical materials aged in nuclear environments. In this report, we test the methodology on three crosslinked polyolefin (CLPO) and two ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cable insulation materials. The methodology applies to one of the CLPO materials and one of the EPR materials, allowing predictions to be made for these materials under low dose-rate, low temperature conditions. For the other materials, it is determined that, at low temperatures, a decrease in temperature at a constant radiation dose rate leads to an increase in the degradation rate for the mechanical properties. Since these results contradict the fundamental assumption underlying time-temperature-dose rate superposition, this methodology cannot be applied to such data. As indicated in the earlier reports, such anomalous results might be expected when attempting to model data taken across the crystalline melting region of semicrystalline materials. Nonetheless, the existing experimental evidence suggests that these CLPO and EPR materials have substantial aging endurance for typical reactor conditions. 28 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Children's Moral Evaluations of Reporting the Transgressions of Peers: Age Differences in Evaluations of Tattling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loke, Ivy Chiu; Heyman, Gail D.; Forgie, Julia; McCarthy, Anjanie; Lee, Kang

    2011-01-01

    The way children evaluate the reporting of peers' transgressions to authority figures was investigated. Participants, ages 6-11 years (N = 60), were presented with a series of vignettes, each of which depicted a child who committed either a minor transgression (such as not finishing the vegetables at lunch) or a more serious transgression (such as…

  17. Evaluation and Validation of Organic Materials for Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs): Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Euy-Sik Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Various organic materials are used as essential parts in Stirling Convertors for their unique properties and functionalities such as bonding, potting, sealing, thread locking, insulation, and lubrication. More efficient Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC) are being developed for future space applications especially with a long mission cycle, sometimes up to 17 years, such as deep space exploration or lunar surface power or Mars rovers, and others. Thus, performance, durability, and reliability of those organics should be critically evaluated in every possible material-process-fabrication-service environment relations based on their mission specifications. In general, thermal stability, radiation hardness, outgassing, and material compatibility of the selected organics have been systematically evaluated while their process and fabrication conditions and procedures were being optimized. Service environment-simulated long term aging tests up to 4 years were performed as a function of temperature for durability assessment of the most critical organic material systems.

  18. Absolute age of lunar regolith material from the Sea of Fertility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Artemov, Y. M.

    1974-01-01

    By averaging the absolute age of lunar regolith materials from the Sea of Fertility for the fine regolith fraction from the core zone V, an age of 4.65 10 to the 9th power + 0.4 10 to the 9th power years was obtained, employing as the primordial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio 0.69884 (ADOR). Also close to this age value is the age estimate based on the Pb-207/Pb-206 ratio. Using the value 0.69898 (BABI) as a primordial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio reduces the calculated age of the fine regolith fraction to 4.25 X 10 to the 9th power years. The fine fraction of lunar regolith from the Sea of Fertility is also characterized by a minimum addition of radiogenic Sr-87, a minimum Rb/Sr ratio, and a maximum K/Rb ratio compared with analogous lunar material from other points.

  19. Heterogeneity evaluation of research materials for microanalysis standards certification.

    PubMed

    Marinenko, Ryna; Leigh, Stefan

    2004-08-01

    Electron microprobe testing and evaluation procedures to determine the extent of within- and between-specimen heterogeneity of reference materials and the experimental uncertainty are described. These procedures have been developed and used at NIST in the certification of several NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). In this article, they have been simplified and updated for general use. Suggestions for experimental testing of specimens are described and a detailed description of the statistical evaluation process is included with an example of a data spreadsheet and instructions for its preparation.

  20. Identification and Assessment of Material Models for Age-Related Degradation of Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Kim, M. K.; Choi, I-K.

    2009-04-27

    When performing seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants (NPPs), the potential effects of age-related degradation on structures, systems, and components (SSCs) should be considered. To address the issue of aging degradation, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has embarked on a five-year research project to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which will include the consideration of aging of structures and components in NPPs. Three specific areas that are included in the KAERI research project, related to seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), are probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and a plant seismic risk analysis. To support the development of seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components, KAERI entered into a collaboration agreement with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 2007. The collaborative research effort is intended to continue over a five year period with the goal of developing seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of SSCs, and using these results as input to seismic PRAs. In the Year 1 scope of work BNL collected and reviewed degradation occurrences in US NPPs and identified important aging characteristics needed for the seismic capability evaluations that will be performed in the subsequent evaluations in the years that follow. This information is presented in the Annual Report for the Year 1 Task, identified as BNL Report-81741-2008 and also designated as KAERI/RR-2931/2008. The report presents results of the statistical and trending analysis of this data and compares the results to prior aging studies. In addition, the report provides a description of U.S. current regulatory requirements, regulatory guidance documents, generic communications, industry standards and guidance, and past research related to aging degradation of SSCs. This report

  1. Evaluation of materials for high performance solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Smith, C. F., Jr.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.; Little, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    A program has been underway to evaluate materials for advanced solar arrays which are required to provide power to weight ratios up to 100 W/kg. Severe mission environments together with the lack of knowledge of space environmental materials degradation rates require the generation of irradiation and outgassing engineering data for use in the initial design phase of the flight solar arrays. Therefore, approximately 25 candidate array materials were subjected to selected mission environments of vacuum, UV, and particle irradiation, and their mechanical and/or optical properties were determined where appropriate.

  2. Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) materials coating evaluation, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Weightless Environment Training Facility Material Coating Evaluation project has included preparing, coating, testing, and evaluating 800 test panels of three differing substrates. Ten selected coating systems were evaluated in six separate exposure environments and subject to three tests for physical properties. Substrate materials were identified, the manner of surface preparation described, and exposure environments defined. Exposure environments included immersion exposure, cyclic exposure, and field exposure. Cyclic exposures, specifically QUV-Weatherometer and the KTA Envirotest were found to be the most agressive of the environments included in the study when all three evaluation criteria are considered. This was found to result primarily from chalking of the coatings under ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. Volumes 2 and 3 hold the 5 appendices to this report.

  3. Evaluation of the bond strength between aged composite cores and luting agent

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of different surface treatment methods on the bond strength between aged composite-resin core and luting agent. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy-five resin composites and also seventy-five zirconia ceramic discs were prepared. 60 composite samples were exposed to thermal aging (10,000 cycles, 5 to 55℃) and different surface treatment. All specimens were separated into 5 groups (n=15): 1) Intact specimens 2) Thermal aging-air polishing 3) Thermal aging- Er:YAG laser irradiation 4) Thermal aging- acid etching 5) Thermal-aging. All specimens were bonded to the zirconia discs with resin cement and fixed to universal testing machine and bond strength testing loaded to failure with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fractured surface was classified as adhesive failure, cohesive failure and adhesive-cohesive failure. The bond strength data was statistically compared by the Kruskal-Wallis method complemented by the Bonferroni correction Mann-Whitney U test. The probability level for statistical significance was set at α=.05. RESULTS Thermal aging and different surface treatment methods have significant effect on the bond strength between composite-resin cores and luting-agent (P<.05). The mean baseline bond strength values ranged between 7.07 ± 2.11 and 26.05 ± 6.53 N. The highest bond strength of 26.05 ± 6.53 N was obtained with Group 3. Group 5 showed the lowest value of bond strength. CONCLUSION Appropriate surface treatment method should be applied to aged composite resin cores or aged-composites restorations should be replaced for the optimal bond strength and the clinical success. PMID:25932308

  4. Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) materials coating evaluation, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume consists of Appendices C, D, E, and F to the report on the Weightless Environment Training Facility Materials Coating Evaluation project. The project selected 10 coating systems to be evaluated in six separate exposure environments, and subject to three tests for physical properties. Appendix C is the photographic appendix of the test panels. Appendix D details methods and procedures. Appendix E lists application equipment costs. Appendix F is a compilation of the solicitation of the candidate coating systems.

  5. Comparative evaluation of liner materials for inactive uranium-mill-tailings piles

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.; Barnes, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    Under the funding of the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has completed the initial accelerated testing phase of eight candidate liner materials. The tests were designed to comparatively evaluate the long term effectiveness of liner materials as a radionuclide and hazardous chemical leachate barrier. The eight materials tested were selected from a technical review of published literature and industrial specialists. Conditions were then identified that would accelerate the aging processes expected in a uranium tailings environment for 1000 years. High calcium leachates were forced through thin layers of clay liners to accelerate the ion exchange rate of sodium and calcium. Asphalt and synthetic materials were accelerated by exposure to elevate temperatures, high concentrations of oxygen, and increased strengths of aqueous oxidizing agents. By comparing the changes of permeability with time of exposure, the most acceptable materials were then identified. These materials are a catalytically airblown asphalt membrane and natural soil amended with sodium bentonite. Both materials showed an increased resistance to leachate penetration throughout the exposure period with final permeabilities less than 10/sup -7/ cm/s. In addition, the asphalt membrane and sodium bentonite are among the least expensive materials to install at a disposal site. Therefore based on their economic and technical merits, these two materials are being evaluated further in field tests at Grand Junction, Colorado.

  6. 230Th-234U Model-Ages of Some Uranium Standard Reference Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R W; Gaffney, A M; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-05-28

    The 'age' of a sample of uranium is an important aspect of a nuclear forensic investigation and of the attribution of the material to its source. To the extent that the sample obeys the standard rules of radiochronometry, then the production ages of even very recent material can be determined using the {sup 230}Th-{sup 234}U chronometer. These standard rules may be summarized as (a) the daughter/parent ratio at time=zero must be known, and (b) there has been no daughter/parent fractionation since production. For most samples of uranium, the 'ages' determined using this chronometer are semantically 'model-ages' because (a) some assumption of the initial {sup 230}Th content in the sample is required and (b) closed-system behavior is assumed. The uranium standard reference materials originally prepared and distributed by the former US National Bureau of Standards and now distributed by New Brunswick Laboratory as certified reference materials (NBS SRM = NBL CRM) are good candidates for samples where both rules are met. The U isotopic standards have known purification and production dates, and closed-system behavior in the solid form (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) may be assumed with confidence. We present here {sup 230}Th-{sup 234}U model-ages for several of these standards, determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using a multicollector ICP-MS, and compare these ages with their known production history.

  7. Sensory evaluation of a novel vegetable in school age children.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, Helen; Palfreyman, Zoe; Morizet, David

    2016-05-01

    A behavioural sensory task was undertaken to further understanding into whether children's sensory evaluation of a new vegetable is associated with tasting and food neophobia scores. A sample of ninety-five children, aged 7-11 years, was recruited from a primary school in inner city Birmingham, UK. They were asked to rate the sight, smell and feel of a familiar vegetable (carrot) and an unfamiliar vegetable (celeriac) in a randomised order to control for order effects. They were then asked to try the each vegetable, and rate its taste. It was found that children rated the sensory characteristics of the familiar vegetable more positively than the novel vegetable across all sensory domains (p < 0.05). Refusing to try the novel vegetable was associated with food neophobia scores and olfactory ratings. The ratings of the taste of the novel vegetable were associated with olfactory and tactile ratings. In addition there was a clear developmental shift in the sample with younger children being more likely to rate the novel vegetable as 'looking strange' and older children rating the novel vegetable as 'smelling strange'. This research strengthens the idea that sensory information is important in children deciding to try, and their hedonic evaluation of the taste of a new vegetable.

  8. Material Aging and Degradation Detection and Remaining Life Assessment for Plant Life Management

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Henager, Charles H.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Pitman, Stan G.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-12-31

    One of the major factors that may impact long term operations is structural material degradation, Detecting materials degradation, estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of the component, and determining approaches to mitigating the degradation are important from the perspective of long term operations. In this study, multiple nondestructive measurement and monitoring methods were evaluated for their ability to assess the material degradation state. Metrics quantifying the level of damage from these measurements were defined, and evaluated for their ability to provide estimates of remaining life of the component. An example of estimating the RUL from nondestructive measurements of material degradation condition is provided.

  9. Evaluation of SRM flex bearing materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Tensile, peel, and shear testing was performed on combinations of primers, adhesives, tycements and rubber compounds cured at various times and temperatures. The materials used in the fabrication of the solid rocket motor flex bearing as well as in other systems were evaluated. A compatibility study between adhesives and tycements was initiated. The flex bearing mold design was reviewed by our tooling experts.

  10. Evaluation of the shedding potential of textile materials.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L; Lunstroot, K; Gason, F

    2010-12-01

    A practical method is proposed to assess the shedding potential of textile materials. The evaluation of the sheddability is based on the use of adhesive tapes and on comparison, using three different sheddability scales for cotton, wool and fine man-made fibres.

  11. [Evaluation of cervical vertebrae for determination of skeletal age].

    PubMed

    Caltabiano, M; Leonardi, R; Zaborra, G

    1990-01-01

    The relationship among cervical vertebral maturation and skeletal, dental and chronological ages were assessed by the Authors in lateral cephalometric, hand and orthopantomographic x-rays on 72 italian young subjects from 10 to 15 years of age. Statistically significant correlations were found between cervical vertebral maturation and skeletal age both in males and females, while vertebrae age was correlated with dental and chronological ages only in the females.

  12. Safety of Disposable Diaper Materials: Extensive Evaluations Validate Use.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swatee; Helmes, C Tucker; White, Jeffrey C; Zhou, Shaoying

    2014-08-01

    Disposable diapers are primarily composed of polymers, such as cellulose, polypropylene, polyester, and polyethylene, which are biologically inert and not bioavailable. They are used in clothes, fabrics, personal hygiene products, and other materials that are commonly in contact with the skin. Each component used throughout the production process must undergo rigorous safety evaluations and assessments and are proven to be well tolerated and safe for their intended uses. No materials are incorporated into a diaper until their safety is confirmed through robust assessments, and additional factors are integrated into the process to compensate for the uncertainty associated with extrapolating toxicity data. After a thorough assessment of the materials and final product, extensive skin compatibility evaluations are conducted as appropriate. This rigorous safety process provides reassurance that consumers can rely on the safety of these diapers.

  13. Materials Development and Evaluation of Selective Laser Sintering Manufacturing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Peter F.; Mitchell, Russell R.

    1997-01-15

    This report summarizes the FY96 accomplishments for CRADA No. LA95C10254, "Materials Development and Evaluation of Laser Sintering Manufacturing Applications". To research the potential for processing additional materials using DTM Corporations Selective Laser Sintering rapid prototyping technology and evaluate the capability for rapid manufacturing applications, the following materials were processed experimentally using the Sinterstation 2000 platform; Linear Low Density Polyethylene thermoplastic; Polypropylene thermoplastic; Polysulfone thermoplastic; Polymethylpentene (TPX) thermoplastic; Carbon microsphere filled nylon 11; "APO-BMI" Apocure bismaleimide thermoset polyimide glass m.icrosphere filled and carbon microsphere filled formulations; and 900-24 physical properties mock for plastic bonded TATB high explosive These materials have been successfully processed to a "proof of concept" level or better (with the exception of No. 7). While none of these materials have been introduced as a standard product as of this date, the potential to do so is viable. Present status of materials processing efforts is presented in Section A 2.0. Some recent efforts in manufacturing applications is discussed in Section A 4.0.

  14. Evaluation of Generalized Performance across Materials When Using Video Technology by Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Foster, Ashley L.; Bryant, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of four high school-aged students with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and moderate intellectual disability to generalize performance of skills when using materials different from those presented through video models. An adapted alternating treatments design was used to evaluate student…

  15. The aging of wire chambers filled with dimethyl ether: wire and construction materials and freon impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jibaly, Mohammed; Majewski, Stan; Chrusch, Peter; Wojcik, Randolph; Sauli, Fabio; Gaudaen, Jan

    1989-11-01

    This is a complete summary of our study of the aging of different types of wire chambers, with a variety of construction materials and wires, filled with dimethyl ether (DME) of varying degrees of purity. The resistive Nicotin and Stablohm wires were corroded by DME, producing fast aging. The moderately resistive stainless steel wires were able to withstand extended irradiation (up to 1 C/cm) in high-purity DME without any apparent damage; and gold-plated tungsten and molybdenum wires exhibited a comparable behavior. Many construction materials were tested and recommendations are thus reached as to what kinds of materials are safe in building DME-operated wire chambers. Among many different Freon and hydrocarbon impurities detected in DME by means of gas chromatography (GC), Freon-11 was found to be mostly responsible for the aging, even with noncorrosive stainless steel or gold-plated wires. The availability and feasibility of obtaining Freon-free DME is reported as well.

  16. Separator Materials Used in Secondary Alkaline Batteries Characterized and Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Nickel-cadmium (Ni/Cd) and nickel-hydrogen (Ni/H2) secondary alkaline batteries are vital to aerospace applications. Battery performance and cycle life are significantly affected by the type of separators used in those batteries. A team from NASA Lewis Research Center's Electrochemical Technology Branch developed standardized testing procedures to characterize and evaluate new and existing separator materials to improve performance and cycle life of secondary alkaline batteries. Battery separators must function as good electronic insulators and as efficient electrolyte reservoirs. At present, new types of organic and inorganic separator materials are being developed for Ni/Cd and Ni/H2 batteries. The separator material previously used in the NASA standard Ni/Cd was Pellon 2505, a 100-percent nylon-6 polymer that must be treated with zinc chloride (ZnCl2) to bond the fibers. Because of stricter Environmental Protection Agency regulation of ZnCl2 emissions, the battery community has been searching for new separators to replace Pellon 2505. As of today, two candidate separator materials have been identified; however, neither of the two materials have performed as well as Pellon 2505. The separator test procedures that were devised at Lewis are being implemented to expedite the search for new battery separators. The new test procedures, which are being carried out in the Separator Laboratory at Lewis, have been designed to guarantee accurate evaluations of the properties that are critical for sustaining proper battery operation. These properties include physical and chemical stability, chemical purity, gas permeability, electrolyte retention and distribution, uniformity, porosity, and area resistivity. A manual containing a detailed description of 12 separator test procedures has been drafted and will be used by the battery community to evaluate candidate separator materials for specific applications. These standardized procedures will allow for consistent, uniform

  17. Nanoglasses: A New Kind of Noncrystalline Material and the Way to an Age of New Technologies?

    PubMed

    Gleiter, Herbert

    2016-04-27

    Today's technologies are primarily based on crystalline materials (metals, semiconductors, etc.), as their properties can be controlled by varying their chemical and/or defect microstructures. This is not possible in today's glasses. The new features of nanoglasses--consisting of nanometer-sized glassy regions connected by interfaces--are that their properties may be controlled by varying their chemical and/or defect microstructures, and that their interfaces have a new kind of non-crystalline structure. By utilizing these new features, an age of new technologies based on non-crystalline materials (a "glass age") may be initiated.

  18. Purity Evaluation of Bulk Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Wang, J.; Liang, J.; Hornbostel, B.; Cech, J.; Roth, S.

    2005-09-01

    We report on our experience using a preliminary protocol for quality control of bulk single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) materials produced by the electric arc-discharge and laser ablation method. The first step in the characterization of the bulk material is mechanical homogenization. Quantitative evaluation of purity has been performed using a previously reported procedure based on solution phase near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results confirm that this method is reliable in determining the nanotube content in the arc-discharge sample containing carbonaceous impurities (amorphous carbon and graphitic particles). However, the application of this method to laser ablation samples gives a relative purity value over 100 %. The possible reason for that might be different extinction coefficient meaning different oscillator strength of the laser ablation tubes. At the present time, a 100 % pure reference sample of laser ablation SWNT is not available, so we chose to adopt the sample showing the highest purity as a new reference sample for a quantitative purity evaluation of laser ablation materials. The graphitic part of the carbonaceous impurities has been estimated using X-ray diffraction of 1:1 mixture of nanotube material and C60 as an internal reference. To evaluate the metallic impurities in the as prepared and homogenized carbon nanotube soot inductive coupled plasma (ICP) has been used.

  19. Evaluation of alternate construction materials for a lithium electrolysis cell

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Olsen, A.R.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1988-05-01

    Electrolytic cells currently used for the production of lithium metal are constructed of A285 Grade A steel (carbon content less than 0.15%). Failures of the cell wall have frequently occurred after 2 to 5 years of service, and these failures have been attributed to corrosion resulting from the reaction of iron carbide with lithium. An examination of a recent failure confirmed this conclusion. In an effort to identify alternate construction materials with better corrosion resistance for this application, five materials with very low carbon levels and/or carbides more stable than those in A285 were selected for evaluation. Materials were evaluated after exposure in an operating electrolytic cell, after exposure to pure lithium, and after exposure to a moist air-chlorine mixture. Results show that all five of the alternative materials selected are more corrosion resistant than A285, but two were eliminated from further consideration because of other potential shortcomings. Additional long-term corrosion tests are recommended for the remaining three candidate materials. Final selection should be based on considerations of cost, availability, and fabricability in addition to compatibility. 26 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Instrumental evaluation of anti-aging effects of cosmetic formulations containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Jung, Ho Jung; Schrammek-Drusios, Med Christine; Lee, Sung Nae; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kwon, Seung Bin; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-01-01

    Anti-aging cosmetics are widely used for improving signs of aged skin such as skin wrinkles, decreased elasticity, low dermal density and yellow skin tone. The present study evaluated the effects of cosmetic formulations, eye cream and facial cream, containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum (S. marianum) seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone after 4 weeks period of application on aged human skin. Healthy volunteers (n=20) with aged skin were recruited to apply the test materials facially twice per day for 4 weeks. Skin wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone were measured instrumentally for assessing the improvement of skin aging. All the measurements were conducted prior to the application of test materials and at 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Crow's feet wrinkles were decreased 5.97% after 2 weeks of test material application and 14.07% after 4 weeks of application in comparison of pre-application. Skin elasticity was increased 6.81% after 2 weeks and 8.79% after 4 weeks. Dermal density was increased 16.74% after 2 weeks and 27.63% after 4 weeks. With the L* value indicating skin brightness and the a* value indicating erythema (redness), the results showed that brightness was increased 1.70% after 2 weeks and 2.14% after 4 weeks, and erythema was decreased 10.45% after 2 weeks and 22.39% after 4 weeks. Hence, the test materials appear to exert some degree of anti-aging effects on aged human skin. There were no abnormal skin responses from the participants during the trial period. We conclude that the facial and eye cream containing palmitoyl peptides and S. marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other ingredients have effects on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone. PMID:27446338

  1. Instrumental evaluation of anti-aging effects of cosmetic formulations containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on aged human skin.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Jung, Ho Jung; Schrammek-Drusios, Med Christine; Lee, Sung Nae; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kwon, Seung Bin; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-08-01

    Anti-aging cosmetics are widely used for improving signs of aged skin such as skin wrinkles, decreased elasticity, low dermal density and yellow skin tone. The present study evaluated the effects of cosmetic formulations, eye cream and facial cream, containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum (S. marianum) seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone after 4 weeks period of application on aged human skin. Healthy volunteers (n=20) with aged skin were recruited to apply the test materials facially twice per day for 4 weeks. Skin wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone were measured instrumentally for assessing the improvement of skin aging. All the measurements were conducted prior to the application of test materials and at 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Crow's feet wrinkles were decreased 5.97% after 2 weeks of test material application and 14.07% after 4 weeks of application in comparison of pre-application. Skin elasticity was increased 6.81% after 2 weeks and 8.79% after 4 weeks. Dermal density was increased 16.74% after 2 weeks and 27.63% after 4 weeks. With the L* value indicating skin brightness and the a* value indicating erythema (redness), the results showed that brightness was increased 1.70% after 2 weeks and 2.14% after 4 weeks, and erythema was decreased 10.45% after 2 weeks and 22.39% after 4 weeks. Hence, the test materials appear to exert some degree of anti-aging effects on aged human skin. There were no abnormal skin responses from the participants during the trial period. We conclude that the facial and eye cream containing palmitoyl peptides and S. marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other ingredients have effects on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone.

  2. Metallurgical evaluation of factors influencing the ductility of aged T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The metallurgical factors influencing the ductility of T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) alloy following long-time exposures of GTA welds and tubing in the temperature range 982 C (1800 F) through 1316 C (2400 F) were evaluated by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron emission spectroscopy, and optical metallographic procedures. No classical aging response occurs in the alloy over the temperature range studied. The ductility impairment implied by previous investigations is not the result of microstructural response of the alloy to thermal exposures. Intergranular failure in the GTA sheet welds appears the result of random contamination by silicon, potassium, and/or fluorine at the grain boundaries of the fusion zones. Exposure to lithium at high temperatures had no adverse effects on the ductility of T-111 tubing. These materials were, however, sensitive to post-age handling and testing procedures.

  3. Degradation mechanisms of cable insulation materials during radiation-thermal ageing in radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguchi, Tadao; Tamura, Kiyotoshi; Ohshima, Takeshi; Shimada, Akihiko; Kudoh, Hisaaki

    2011-02-01

    Radiation and thermal degradation of ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) and crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) as cable insulation materials were investigated by evaluating tensile properties, gel-fraction, and swelling ratio, as well as by the infrared (FTIR) analysis. The activation energy of thermal oxidative degradation changed over the range 100-120 °C for both EPR and XLPE. This may be attributed to the fact that the content of an antioxidant used as the stabilizer for polymers decreases by evaporation during thermal ageing at high temperatures. The analysis of antioxidant content and oxidative products in XLPE as a model sample showed that a small amount of antioxidant significantly reduced the extent of thermal oxidation, but was not effective for radiation induced oxidation. The changes in mechanical properties were well reflected by the degree of oxidation. A new model of polymer degradation mechanisms was proposed where the degradation does not take place by chain reaction via peroxy radical and hydro-peroxide. The role of the antioxidant in the polymer is the reduction of free radical formation in the initiation step in thermal oxidation, and it could not stop radical reactions for either radiation or thermal oxidation.

  4. Aging commuter aeroplanes: Fatigue evaluation and control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmerson, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The loss of reliability in aircraft is caused by two broad classes of problems. There are those problems which are self evident and hazardous rather than catastrophic. These are the problem areas where characteristically there have been multiple overhauls, repairs, and replacements, and where aging really means the results of repair ineffectiveness that accumulates. The other class of the problem is the insidious and potentially catastrophic class. It includes the progressive deterioration of items that are not maintained, and often cannot be maintained because the deterioration cannot be seen. It includes the loss of physical properties in adhesives and other organic compounds, corrosion, and the response of repeated loads. Dealt with here is a currently unnecessarily troublesome aspect of that response. Although we must remain concerned about those types of aircraft which have been certified under a design standard or operational rule which embodies the elementary fail-safe concept and which have not been subjected to a subsequent structural audit, the focus here is on types of aircraft for which fatigue and damage tolerance evaluation was not required as a condition of certification.

  5. Post STS-134 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA design engineers submitted witness materials from the solid rocket booster (SRB) main flame deflector for evaluation after the launch of STS-134. The following items were submitted for analysis: 1018 steel witness rods 304 stainless steel caps, tungsten pistons, and A-286 piston sleeves. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-134. All of the items were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the 1018 witness rod metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch

  6. Post STS-135 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA design engineers submitted witness materials from the solid rocket booster (SRB) main flame deflector for evaluation after the launch of STS-135. The following items were submitted for analysis: HY-80 steel witnes rods, 304 sta inles steel caps, and tungsten pistons. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-135. The submitted samples were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the HY-80 witness rod metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch.

  7. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from MOTBY

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.

    1996-09-01

    The National Park Service, US Department of the Interior requested U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/New York District (USACE-NYD) to evaluate sediments around the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY) in Bayonne, New Jersey for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Sediment samples were collected from MOTBY. Tests and analyses were conducted on MOTBY sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from MOTBY included grain size and total organic carbon (TOC) analyses and one acute toxicity test with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita. In addition to this benthic toxicity test, a bioaccumulation test (28-day exposure) was conducted.

  8. Strategies and Materials for a College Course in Communication and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Robert

    The components of a college course on communication and aging are described and discussed in this paper. The first section of the paper focuses on appropriate assignments, their underlying strategies, and necessary materials for enhancing young people's communication with older adults and their appreciation of the situations that elderly people…

  9. Development and evaluation of die and container materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wills, R. R.; Niesz, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    X = 0.75 Beta prime Sialon (a silicon aluminum oxynitride) and Sibeon (silicon beryllium oxynitride) are promising die materials. In sessile drop tests in contact with molten silicon, beryllium contamination was less than ppm and aluminum contamination 50 ppm. A shaping die of the Sialon material was successfully fabricated. Dry milling studies for the preparation of Si3N4-Al2O3-ALN mixtures were performed with butanol, acetic anhydride, oleic acid, and triethanolamine milling aids. Optimum mixing was achieved with 0.15 percent triethanolamine using a milling time of 8 hours. Preliminary evaluation of Sibeon materials indicates that they are more resistent to molten silicon attack than Sialon. Silicon contamination from the beryllium was less than aluminum contamination even though the aluminum impurity level in the Sibeon was only 450 to 1300 ppm. Work designed to produce an aluminum-free Sibeon is described.

  10. A New Tribological Test for Candidate Brush Seal Materials Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700 C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  11. A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fellenstein, J.A.; DellaCorte, C.

    1994-10-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  12. Job Characteristics, Core Self-Evaluations, and Job Satisfaction: What's Age Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besen, Elyssa; Matz-Costa, Christina; Brown, Melissa; Smyer, Michael A.; Pitt-Catsouphes, Martha

    2013-01-01

    There is a well-established relationship between age and job satisfaction. To date, there is little research about how many well-known predictors of job satisfaction, specifically job characteristics and core self-evaluations, may vary with age. Using a multi-worksite sample of 1,873 employed adults aged 17 to 81, this study evaluated the extent…

  13. Non-destructive evaluation of composite materials using ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation of the nondestructive evaluation of advanced composite-laminates is summarized. Indices derived from the measurement of fundamental acoustic parameters are used in order to quantitatively estimate the local material properties of the laminate. The following sections describe ongoing studies of phase insensitive attenuation measurements, and discuss several phenomena which influences the previously reported technique of polar backscatter. A simple and effective programmable gate circuit designed for use in estimating attenuation from backscatter is described.

  14. Laboratory Evaluation of Nitrile Fuel Tank Materials (Phase 2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    control number . PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) September 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES...COVERED (From - To) October 2011–March 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laboratory Evaluation of Nitrile Fuel Tank Materials (Phase II) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ...5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) James M. Sloan, David Flanagan, Daniel DeSchepper, Paul Touchet,* and Henry Feuer† 5d

  15. Development and Evaluation of Nonmetallic Materials for Belt Links

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    75-008 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO 3 . RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF NONMETALLIC MATERIALS FOR...Conllnua on ravataa aida It nacaaaaxy and Idantlty by block number) 1. Belt Links 2. Reinforced Plastic 3 . Elastoplastic U. Plastic 20. ABSTRACT...automatic weapon systems were reviewed and are presented in Table 3 . The maximum tensile load for assembled links was dOO pounds for the M17A1 link used

  16. Order of aging of major human organs or systems and evaluation of health status based on aging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengfang; Liu, Chunqing; Gao, Hanboya; Liu, Hui

    2017-03-01

    To determine the functional age of an individual, a quantitative system for the assessment of aging status was developed in the present study. A total of 1579 subjects were selected randomly from patients undergoing physical examination. The index of organic mild impairment (IOMI) and IOMI corrected for age (COMI) were calculated. By receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of the IOMIs of younger and elderly subjects, a cutoff value for COMI of 30% was obtained. About 95% of <30-year-old subjects were healthy. These data suggest that organs and systems reflect the aging status of an individual and may be a useful tool for evaluating health status.

  17. Spectroscopic characterization of the oligomeric surface structures on polyamide materials formed during accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Chernev, Boril S; Eder, Gabriele C

    2011-10-01

    Crystalline surface species were observed at the surface of polyamide 12 materials upon accelerated aging. After detection of the depositions with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the crystalline surface precipitations were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman imaging microscopy. These surface species were supposed to be cyclic oligomers (dimer and trimer) of the PA12 monomer laurolactam, which are usually present in polyamide materials and tend to migrate to the surface when the material is subjected to accelerated aging. The evidence for the chemical identity of the crystalline surface structures to be mainly the cyclic dimer and trimer of laurolactam was given by melting-point identification and mass spectroscopic analysis of the methanol eluate of the surface. The Raman and FT-IR spectra of the mixture were extracted from the recorded images.

  18. Potential inert matrix materials: Materials synthesis and evaluation of in-service engineering parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng

    Containing no fertile materials, inert matrix fuel (IMF) has been introduced as a potential transmutation solution for the increasing inventory of both weapon grade and reactor grade plutonium (Pu). In the present work, the MgO-pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) composites and spinel magnesium stannate (Mg2SnO4) were selected as potential inert matrix (IM) materials. A comprehensive investigation was conducted on evaluation of the engineering parameters of the potential IM materials. The MgO-Nd2Zr2O7 composites and Mg 2SnO4 were fabricated through conventional solid state processing. The crystal structure and microstructure of the synthesized composites and Mg2SnO4 were studied. The irradiation tolerance of the potential IM materials was first assessed. The resistance of Mg2SnO 4 against irradiation induced amorphization was assessed experimentally using in situ TEM technique. The critical amorphization doses for Mg2SnO4 irradiated by 1 MeV Kr2+ ions were determined to be 5.5 dpa at 50 K and 11.0 dpa at 150 K, respectively. The obtained results were compared with other spinels especially MgAl 2O4, and the radiation tolerance of spinels were discussed. The next evaluation was water corrosion resistance of the potential IM materials. Homogeneous MgO-Nd2Zr2O7 composites exhibited an improved hydrothermal corrosion resistance than inhomogeneous composites and pure MgO. Even though spinel Mg2SnO4 was not stable in water at 300°C and saturation pressure, the corrosion was limited only to the surface, and the volume and mass changes were less than 1 % after 720 h corrosion. Feasibility of aqueous reprocessing was evaluated by studying the dissolution behavior of the potential IM materials in acidic solutions, with an emphasis on nitric acid. Dissolution of the MgO-Nd2Zr2O 7 composites in HNO3 resulted in a selective dissolution of MgO. Mechanical agitation such as magnetic bar stirring was necessary to achieve a completed dissolution of MgO and disintegration of porous Nd 2Zr2O7

  19. Aging effects on fire-retardant additives in organic materials for nuclear-plant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, R.L.

    1982-08-01

    Inhibiting fire is a major concern of nuclear safety. One of the most widely used commercial fire-retardant additives incorporated into cable insulation and other organic materials to reduce their flammability has been the halocarbon (usually a chlorinated hydrocarbon), typically in combination with antimony oxide. Such materials may be installed for the design lifetime of a nuclear plant; this report describes an investigation of the long-term aging behavior of these fire-retardant additives in polymeric materials. Extensive aging experiments on fire-retarded formulations of ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) and of chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSPE) have been carried out, with chemical analysis of halogen and antimony content performed as a function of aging time and conditions. Oxygen index flammability measurements were also performed on selected samples. Significant fire-retardant losses (both chlorine (Cl) and antimony (Sb)) were found to occur in certain of the fire-retardant materials but not in others, depending on the molecular structure of the particular halogen-containing component. The data indicate that the loss of halogen- and antimony-based fire retardants appears to be insignificant under ambient conditions expected for nuclear plants.

  20. Evaluation and utilization of Illinois FBC residues for construction materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafoori, N.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to investigate the extent to which fluidized bed combustion (FBC) by-products can be properly utilized as the viable construction materials. This investigation focuses primarily on the properties of residues derived from fluidized combustion burning of Illinois high-sulfur coal. The research plan calls for evaluation of physico-chemical and engineering characteristics of the FBC-based cement and non-cement mixes. The results of this study will be used to compare the physical and mechanical properties of the FBC-based mixtures with those of conventional mixes. The suitability of using FBC residues as a filler or binder aggregate for construction applications such as structural concrete members, precast building products, and as base or surface course for gravity dams and pavements in the form of conventional and roller compacted materials will then be evaluated. During this reporting period, the literature survey, preparation of raw materials, and chemical analyses were completed. Some of the physical properties and preconditioning studies were determined and efforts are in progress to complete these tasks.

  1. Criteria for clinical translucency evaluation of direct esthetic restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to suggest practical criteria for the clinical translucency evaluation of direct esthetic restorative materials, and to review the translucency with these criteria. For the evaluation of reported translucency values, measuring instrument and method, specimen thickness, background color, and illumination should be scrutinized. Translucency parameter (TP) of 15 to 19 could be regarded as the translucency of 1 mm thick human enamel. Visual perceptibility threshold for translucency difference in contrast ratio (ΔCR) of 0.07 could be transformed into ΔTP value of 2. Translucency differences between direct and indirect resin composites were perceivable (ΔTP > 2). Universal and corresponding flowable resin composites did not show perceivable translucency differences in most products. Translucency differed significantly by the product within each shade group, and by the shade group within each product. Translucency of human enamel and perceptibility threshold for translucency difference may be used as criteria for the clinical evaluation of translucency of esthetic restorative materials. PMID:27508156

  2. Criteria for clinical translucency evaluation of direct esthetic restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to suggest practical criteria for the clinical translucency evaluation of direct esthetic restorative materials, and to review the translucency with these criteria. For the evaluation of reported translucency values, measuring instrument and method, specimen thickness, background color, and illumination should be scrutinized. Translucency parameter (TP) of 15 to 19 could be regarded as the translucency of 1 mm thick human enamel. Visual perceptibility threshold for translucency difference in contrast ratio (ΔCR) of 0.07 could be transformed into ΔTP value of 2. Translucency differences between direct and indirect resin composites were perceivable (ΔTP > 2). Universal and corresponding flowable resin composites did not show perceivable translucency differences in most products. Translucency differed significantly by the product within each shade group, and by the shade group within each product. Translucency of human enamel and perceptibility threshold for translucency difference may be used as criteria for the clinical evaluation of translucency of esthetic restorative materials.

  3. Influence of artificial ageing on surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to dental composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Henrich, Anne; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Bürgers, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of artificial ageing on the surface properties and early Streptococcus mutans adhesion to current dental composites for the direct restoration of class II defects. Three hundred and thirty specimens each were prepared from five dental composites, and were randomly allotted to various artificial ageing protocols (storage in distilled water/ethanol/artificial saliva for 7/90/365 days; thermal cycling, 6,000 cycles 5/55 degrees C). Prior and after each treatment, surface roughness (R(a)) and hydrophobicity were determined, and S. mutans adhesion (ATCC 25175; 2.5 h, 37 degrees C) was simulated with and without prior exposition to human whole saliva (2 h, 37 degrees C). Adherence of S. mutans was determined fluorometrically. Means and standard deviations were calculated, and analyzed using three-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis (alpha = 0.05). For both R(a) and S. mutans adherence to uncoated and saliva-coated specimens, significant influences of the composite material, the ageing medium and the ageing duration have been observed; for surface hydrophobicity, significant influences of the composite material and the ageing duration were found. For uncoated specimens, significant increases in S. mutans adhesion were observed with prolonged artificial ageing, whereas significant decreases in S. mutans adhesion were found for the saliva-coated specimens. The data indicate influences of the artificial ageing method on surface parameters such as R(a) and hydrophobicity as well as microbial adhesion. The results underline the relevance of saliva coating on the outcome of studies simulating microbial adhesion, and highlight differences in the susceptibility of dental composites for the adhesion of oral bacteria.

  4. Post STS-133 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA Structures engineers submitted main flame deflector witness materials for evaluation after the launch of STS-133. The following items were submitted for analysis: HY-80 steel witness rods, 304 stainless steel caps, tungsten pistons, 17-4 precipitation hardened (PH) stainless steel and A-286 piston sleeves, Medtherm Corporation calorimeters, and Nanmac Corporation thermocouples. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-133, and before they were reinstalled at the launch pad for future launches. The HY -80 witness rods, 304 stainless steel caps, and the piston sleeves were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the HY-80 witness rod and 304 stainless steel cap metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch.

  5. Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Engineering Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the application of ultrasonic techniques to nondestructive measurement of mechanical strength of engineering materials is reviewed. A dormant concept in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is invoked. The availability of ultrasonic methods that can be applied to actual parts to assess their potential susceptibility to failure under design conditions is discussed. It was shown that ultrasonic methods yield measurements of elastic moduli, microstructure, hardness, fracture toughness, tensile strength, yield strength, and shear strength for a wide range of materials (including many types of metals, ceramics, and fiber composites). It was also indicated that although most of these methods were shown feasible in laboratory studies, more work is needed before they can be used on actual parts in processing, assembly, inspection, and maintenance lines.

  6. Using ABAQUS Scripting Interface for Materials Evaluation and Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Arnold, Steven M.; Baranski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    An ABAQUS script has been written to aid in the evaluation of the mechanical behavior of viscoplastic materials. The purposes of the script are to: handle complex load histories; control load/displacement with alternate stopping criteria; predict failure and life; and verify constitutive models. Material models from the ABAQUS library may be used or the UMAT routine may specify mechanical behavior. User subroutines implemented include: UMAT for the constitutive model; UEXTERNALDB for file manipulation; DISP for boundary conditions; and URDFIL for results processing. Examples presented include load, strain and displacement control tests on a single element model. The tests are creep with a life limiting strain criterion, strain control with a stress limiting cycle and a complex interrupted cyclic relaxation test. The techniques implemented in this paper enable complex load conditions to be solved efficiently with ABAQUS.

  7. Evaluation Of Shielding Efficacy Of A Ferrite Containing Ceramic Material

    SciTech Connect

    Verst, C.

    2015-10-12

    The shielding evaluation of the ferrite based Mitsuishi ceramic material has produced for several radiation sources and possible shielding sizes comparative dose attenuation measurements and simulated projections. High resolution gamma spectroscopy provided uncollided and scattered photon spectra at three energies, confirming theoretical estimates of the ceramic’s mass attenuation coefficient, μ/ρ. High level irradiation experiments were performed using Co-60, Cs-137, and Cf-252 sources to measure penetrating dose rates through steel, lead, concrete, and the provided ceramic slabs. The results were used to validate the radiation transport code MCNP6 which was then used to generate dose rate attenuation curves as a function of shielding material, thickness, and mass for photons and neutrons ranging in energy from 200 keV to 2 MeV.

  8. Study Materials for Economic Education in the Schools. Reports of Materials Evaluation Committees to the Joint Council on Economic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Council on Economic Education, New York, NY.

    The Materials Evaluation Committee of the Joint Council reviewed both print and non-print supplementary student materials for economics in order to make this selected list of those materials thought to be suitable according to: 1) whether the materials are genuinely concerned with economic matters; 2) whether they are analytical in nature; and, 3)…

  9. Job characteristics, core self-evaluations, and job satisfaction: what's age got to do with it?

    PubMed

    Besen, Elyssa; Matz-Costa, Christina; Brown, Melissa; Smyer, Michael A; Pitt-Catsouphes, Martha

    2013-01-01

    There is a well-established relationship between age and job satisfaction. To date, there is little research about how many well-known predictors of job satisfaction, specifically job characteristics and core self-evaluations, may vary with age. Using a multi-worksite sample of 1,873 employed adults aged 17 to 81, this study evaluated the extent to which several job characteristics and core self-evaluations varied in their relationships with job satisfaction for workers of different ages. Findings suggest that the positive relationships between job satisfaction and skill variety, autonomy, and friendship weaken as employee age increases, while the positive relationships between job satisfaction and dealing with others, task identity, task significance, feedback, and core self-evaluations did not vary with age. The findings extend previous research by examining how the factors important for job satisfaction vary for employees of different ages.

  10. Material Evaluation Test Series 07, 08A, and 09A

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D; Ingram, C; Simmons, L; Arganbright, R; Koester, C; Lyle, J

    2006-04-11

    This research effort examines the post-detonation environmental, safety, health and operational aspects of experimental explosive tests with mercury. Specific experimental information is necessary for the evaluation of post-detonation by-products in comparison with those potentially resulting from mercury-bearing material accumulation in biomass accumulation areas, such as landfills, from batteries, electrical switches, thermometers, and fluorescent lights (Lindberg et al 2001). This will assist in determining appropriate abatement techniques for cleaning the work environment and environmental mitigation to determine waste stream components and risk assessment protocol. Determination of the by-products for personal protection equipment and personal exposure monitoring parameters are also part of this experimental work.

  11. An electromagnetic microscope for eddy current evaluation of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Podney, W.N.; Czipott, P.V. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents the concept of a new instrument for nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Called an electromagnetic microscope, formed by superconductive microprobes arrayed in parallel rows. When moved over a test piece, the array generates a scanned image of flaws, stress variations, or changes in composition. Each microprobe comprises drive coils a few mm in radius that encircle pickup loops forming a concentric, coplanar gradiometer 1 mm or less in diameter coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Drive coils transmit an oscillating magnetic field that induces eddy or magnetization currents in conductive or ferromagnetic materials, respectively. The gradiometer senses distortions in paths of induced currents.

  12. Sixth Status Report: Testing of Aged Softwood Fiberboard Material for the 9975 Shipping Package

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2015-03-31

    Samples have been prepared from several 9975 lower fiberboard subassemblies fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in some environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the two most aggressive environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAC storage environment for up to 15 years. Samples from an additional 3 softwood fiberboard assemblies have begun aging during the past year to provide information on the variability of softwood fiberboard behavior. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected to support development of an aging model specific to softwood fiberboard.

  13. Decreases in bone blood flow and bone material properties in aging Fischer-344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Susan A.; Hogan, Harry A.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify precisely aging-induced changes in skeletal perfusion and bone mechanical properties in a small rodent model. Blood flow was measured in conscious juvenile (2 months old), adult (6 months old), and aged (24 months old) male Fischer-344 rats using radiolabeled microspheres. There were no significant differences in bone perfusion rate or vascular resistance between juvenile and adult rats. However, blood flow was lower in aged versus adult rats in the forelimb bones, scapulas, and femurs. To test for functional effects of this decline in blood flow, bone mineral density and mechanical properties were measured in rats from these two age groups. Bone mineral density and cross-sectional moment of inertia in femoral and tibial shafts and the femoral neck were significantly larger in the aged versus adult rats, resulting in increased (+14%-53%) breaking strength and stiffness. However, intrinsic material properties at midshaft of the long bones were 12% to 25% lower in the aged rats. Although these data are consistent with a potential link between decreased perfusion and focal alterations in bone remodeling activity related to clinically relevant bone loss, additional studies are required to establish the mechanisms for this putative relationship.

  14. Modifications of the Response of Materials to Shock Loading by Age Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, Jeremy C. F.

    2015-10-01

    The shock response of two age-hardened alloys, aluminum 6061 and copper-2 wt pct beryllium (CuBe), has been investigated in terms of their microstructual state; either solution treated or age hardened. While age hardening induces large increases in strength at quasi-static strain rates, age hardening does not produce the same magnitude of strength increase during shock loading. Examination of the shocked microstructures (of 6061) indicates that the presence of a fine distribution of precipitates throughout the microstructure hinders the motion and generation of dislocations and hence reduces the strain-rate sensitivity of the aged material, thus allowing the properties of the solution-treated state to approach those of the aged. It has also been observed that the shear strength of solution-treated CuBe is near identical to that of pure copper. It is suggested that this is the result of two competing processes; large lattice strains as beryllium substitutes onto the copper lattice inducing a high degree of solution strengthening acting against a reduction in shear strength caused by twinning in the alloy.

  15. Research strategies for safety evaluation of nanomaterials, part VII: evaluating consumer exposure to nanoscale materials.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Treye; Thomas, Karluss; Sadrieh, Nakissa; Savage, Nora; Adair, Patricia; Bronaugh, Robert

    2006-05-01

    Considerable media attention has recently been given to novel applications for products that contain nanoscale materials. These products could have utility in several industries that market consumer products, including textiles, sporting equipment, cosmetics, consumer electronics, and household cleaners. Some of the purported benefits of these products include improved performance, convenience, lower cost, as well as other desirable features, when compared to the conventional products that do not contain nanoscale materials. Although there are numerous likely consumer advantages from products containing nanoscale materials, there is very little information available regarding consumer exposure to the nanoscale materials in these products or any associated risks from these exposures. This paper seeks to review a limited subset of products that contain nanoscale materials, assess the available data for evaluating the consumer exposures and potential hazards associated with these products, and discuss the capacity of U.S. regulatory agencies to address the potential risks associated with these products.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of low cobalt wear materials for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shiels, S.A.; Wilson, W.L.; Rosengarth, K.W.; Wire, G.L.

    1994-09-01

    Laboratory wear and corrosion screening tests were conducted on several commercially available, low-cobalt and cobalt-free hardsurfacing alloys to evaluate their relative wear and corrosion performance under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary heat transport circuit conditions. Wear tests were performed under reciprocating, sliding contact. Corrosion performance was evaluated in both steady state and off-normal chemistry conditions. The wear behavior of the candidate hardsurfacing alloys was generally comparable to or better than that of Stellite 6, a material of proven wear performance under PWR operating conditions. With the exception of Tristelle 5183, the iron base alloys exhibited unacceptable corrosion behavior under wet layup conditions. The Tristelle 5183 experienced minor corrosion attack in primary coolant having elevated oxygen levels. The twelve percent cobalt alloy, Tristelle TS-2, performed well but exhibited some attack after a simulated decontamination treatment.

  17. An experimental and clinical evaluation of lens transparency and aging.

    PubMed

    Lerman, S

    1983-05-01

    The normal human lens is a precisely formed structure containing about 65% water and 35% organic matter, the latter being mainly (greater than 90%) structural proteins. The lens becomes encapsulated at the 13 mm embryonic stage and is consequently divorced from a direct blood supply for life. It provides the investigator with an organ that exists in an environment analogous to a single-cell type of tissue culture system and can be reproduced in vitro. Since the cornea and lens are transparent one can directly monitor morphologic and biochemical aging changes in vivo. Recent developments now permit us to monitor certain molecular changes as well. Thus this organ can serve as a unique model for studying in vivo aging parameters. In vivo UV slit lamp densitography to monitor lens fluorescence provides us with a useful diagnostic and prognostic screening method to identify lens photodamage due to excess UV exposure (occupational or accidental), photosensitizers (e.g. psoralens) as well as the normal age related increase in lenticular fluorescence. Cortical opacities are also a common finding in older individuals. In vitro NMR (human and animal lenses) and in vivo (animal experiments) currently in progress are rapidly elucidating the physicochemical basis for the development of light scattering areas in the aging lens cortex. This review demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing biophysical methods, in particular, optical spectroscopy and NMR analyses to delineate and monitor specific age related parameters in the ocular lens, in vivo as well as in vitro.

  18. Evaluation of microelectrode materials for direct-current electrocorticography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Narayan, Raj K.; Wu, Pei-Ming; Rajan, Neena; Wu, Zhizhen; Mehan, Neal; Golanov, Eugene V.; Ahn, Chong H.; Hartings, Jed A.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Direct-current electrocorticography (DC-ECoG) allows a more complete characterization of brain states and pathologies than traditional alternating-current recordings (AC-ECoG). However, reliable recording of DC signals is challenging because of electrode polarization-induced potential drift, particularly at low frequencies and for more conducting materials. Further challenges arise as electrode size decreases, since impedance is increased and the potential drift is augmented. While microelectrodes have been investigated for AC-ECoG recordings, little work has addressed microelectrode properties for DC-signal recording. In this paper, we investigated several common microelectrode materials used in biomedical application for DC-ECoG. Approach. Five of the most common materials including gold (Au), silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl), platinum (Pt), Iridium oxide (IrOx), and platinum-iridium oxide (Pt/IrOx) were investigated for electrode diameters of 300 μm. The critical characteristics such as polarization impedance, AC current-induced polarization, long-term stability and low-frequency noise were studied in vitro (0.9% saline). The two most promising materials, Pt and Pt/lrOx were further investigated in vivo by recording waves of spreading depolarization, one of the most important applications for DC-ECoG in clinical and basic science research. Main results. Our experimental results indicate that IrOx-based microelectrodes, particularly with composite layers of nanostructures, are excellent in all of the common evaluation characteristics both in vitro and in vivo and are most suitable for multimodal monitoring applications. Pt electrodes suffer high current-induced polarization, but have acceptable long-term stability suitable for DC-ECoG. Major significance. The results of this study provide quantitative data on the electrical properties of microelectrodes with commonly-used materials and will be valuable for development of neural recordings inclusive of

  19. On the Use of Accelerated Aging Methods for Screening High Temperature Polymeric Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Grayson, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A rational approach to the problem of accelerated testing of high temperature polymeric composites is discussed. The methods provided are considered tools useful in the screening of new materials systems for long-term application to extreme environments that include elevated temperature, moisture, oxygen, and mechanical load. The need for reproducible mechanisms, indicator properties, and real-time data are outlined as well as the methodologies for specific aging mechanisms.

  20. Age- and Race-Related Differences in Human Scleral Material Properties

    PubMed Central

    Grytz, Rafael; Fazio, Massimo A.; Libertiaux, Vincent; Bruno, Luigi; Gardiner, Stuart; Girkin, Christopher A.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We tested the hypothesis that there are age- and race-related differences in posterior scleral material properties, using eyes from human donors of European (20–90 years old, n = 40 eyes) and African (23–74 years old, n = 22 eyes) descent. Methods. Inflation tests on posterior scleral shells were performed while full-field, three-dimensional displacements were recorded using laser speckle interferometry. Scleral material properties were fit to each eye using a microstructure-based constitutive formulation that incorporates the collagen fibril crimp and the local anisotropic collagen architecture. The effects of age and race were estimated using Generalized Estimating Equations, while accounting for intradonor correlations. Results. The shear modulus significantly increased (P = 0.038) and collagen fibril crimp angle significantly decreased with age (P = 0.002). Donors of African descent exhibited a significantly higher shear modulus (P = 0.019) and showed evidence of a smaller collagen fibril crimp angle (P = 0.057) compared to donors of European descent. The in-plane strains in the peripapillary sclera were significantly lower with age (P < 0.015) and African ancestry (P < 0.015). Conclusions. The age- and race-related differences in scleral material properties result in a loss of scleral compliance due to a higher shear stiffness and a lower level of stretch at which the collagen fibrils uncrimp. The loss of compliance should lead to larger high frequency IOP fluctuations and changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) biomechanical response in the elderly and in persons of African ancestry, and may contribute to the higher susceptibility to glaucoma in these at-risk populations. PMID:25389203

  1. Evaluation of bone remodeling in regard to the age of scaphoid non-unions

    PubMed Central

    Rein, Susanne; Hanisch, Uwe; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Zwipp, Hans; Rammelt, Stefan; Weindel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyse bone remodeling in regard to the age of scaphoid non-unions (SNU) with immunohistochemistry. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with symptomatic SNU underwent surgery with resection of the pseudarthrosis. The resected material was evaluated histologically after staining with hematoxylin-eosin (HE), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), CD 68, osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OP). Histological examination was performed in a blinded fashion. RESULTS: The number of multinuclear osteoclasts in the TRAP-staining correlated with the age of the SNU and was significantly higher in younger SNU (P = 0.034; r = 0.75). A higher number of OP-immunoreactive osteoblasts significantly correlated with a higher number of OC-immunoreactive osteoblasts (P = 0.001; r = 0.55). Furthermore, a greater number of OP-immunoreactive osteoblasts correlated significantly with a higher number of OP-immunoreactive multinuclear osteoclasts (P = 0.008; r = 0.43). SNU older than 6 mo showed a significant decrease of the number of fibroblasts (P = 0.04). Smoking and the age of the patients had no influence on bone remodeling in SNU. CONCLUSION: Multinuclear osteoclasts showed a significant decrease in relation to the age of SNU. However, most of the immunhistochemical findings of bone remodeling do not correlate with the age of the SNU. This indicates a permanent imbalance of bone formation and resorption as indicated by a concurrent increase in both osteoblast and osteoclast numbers. A clear histological differentiation into phases of bone remodeling in SNU is not possible. PMID:27458552

  2. Subretinal Hyper-Reflective Material in the Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Alex S.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Toth, Cynthia A.; Maguire, Maureen G.; Burns, Russell E.; Grunwald, Juan E.; Daniel, Ebenezer; Jaffe, Glenn J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of subretinal hyper-reflective material (SHRM) with visual acuity (VA), geographic atrophy (GA) and scar in the Comparison of Age related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT) Design Prospective cohort study within a randomized clinical trial. Participants The 1185 participants in CATT. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to ranibizumab or bevacizumab treatment monthly or as-needed. Masked readers graded scar and GA on fundus photography and fluorescein angiography images, SHRM on time domain (TD) and spectral domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) throughout 104 weeks. Measurements of SHRM height and width in the fovea, within the center 1mm2, or outside the center 1mm2 were obtained on SD-OCT images at 56 (n=76) and 104 (n=66) weeks. VA was measured by certified examiners. Main Outcome Measures SHRM presence, location and size, and associations with VA, scar, and GA. Results Among all CATT participants, the percentage with SHRM at enrollment was 77%, decreasing to 68% at 4 weeks after treatment and 54% at 104 weeks. At 104 weeks, scar was present more often in eyes with persistent SHRM than eyes with SHRM that resolved (64% vs. 31%; p<0.0001). Among eyes with detailed evaluation of SHRM at weeks 56 (n=76) and 104 (n=66), mean [SE] VA letter score was 73.5 [2.8], 73.1 [3.4], 65.3 [3.5], and 63.9 [3.7] when SHRM was absent, present outside the central 1mm2, present within the central 1mm2 but not the foveal center, or present at the foveal center (p=0.02). SHRM was present at the foveal center in 43 (30%), within the central 1mm2 in 21 (15%) and outside the central 1mm2 in 19 (13%). When SHRM was present, the median maximum height in microns under the fovea, within the central 1 mm2 including the fovea and anywhere within the scan was 86; 120; and 122, respectively. VA was decreased with greater SHRM height and width (p<0.05). Conclusions SHRM is common in eyes with NVAMD and often persists after anti

  3. A simple-rapid method to separate uranium, thorium, and protactinium for U-series age-dating of materials.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew W; Eitrheim, Eric S; Nelson, Andrew W; Nelson, Steven; Schultz, Michael K

    2014-08-01

    Uranium-series dating techniques require the isolation of radionuclides in high yields and in fractions free of impurities. Within this context, we describe a novel-rapid method for the separation and purification of U, Th, and Pa. The method takes advantage of differences in the chemistry of U, Th, and Pa, utilizing a commercially-available extraction chromatographic resin (TEVA) and standard reagents. The elution behavior of U, Th, and Pa were optimized using liquid scintillation counting techniques and fractional purity was evaluated by alpha-spectrometry. The overall method was further assessed by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry for the preliminary age determination of an ancient carbonate sample obtained from the Lake Bonneville site in western Utah (United States). Preliminary evaluations of the method produced elemental purity of greater than 99.99% and radiochemical recoveries exceeding 90% for U and Th and 85% for Pa. Excellent purity and yields (76% for U, 96% for Th and 55% for Pa) were also obtained for the analysis of the carbonate samples and the preliminary Pa and Th ages of about 39,000 years before present are consistent with (14)C-derived age of the material.

  4. Quality framework proposal for Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Naomi G.; Arfman, John F.; Limary, Siviengxay

    2008-09-01

    This report proposes the first stage of a Quality Framework approach that can be used to evaluate and document Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects. The first stage of the Quality Framework defines two tools that will be used to evaluate a CME project. The first tool is used to decompose a CME project into its essential elements. These elements can then be evaluated for inherent quality by looking at the subelements that impact their level of quality maturity or rigor. Quality Readiness Levels (QRLs) are used to valuate project elements for inherent quality. The Framework provides guidance for the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders for CME project prerequisites that help to ensure the proper level of confidence in the deliverable given its intended use. The Framework also Provides a roadmap that defined when and how the Framework tools should be applied. Use of these tools allow the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders to understand what elements the project will use to execute the project, the inherent quality of the elements, which of those are critical to the project and why, and the risks associated to the project's elements.

  5. FOURTH STATUS REPORT: TESTING OF AGED SOFTWOOD FIBERBOARD MATERIAL FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-03-05

    Samples have been prepared from a 9975 lower fiberboard subassembly fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in elevated humidity environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the hotter dry environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAMS environment for up to 15 years. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected. Post-conditioning data have been measured on samples from a single softwood fiberboard assembly, and baseline data are also available from a limited number of vendor-provided samples. This provides minimal information on the possible sample-to-sample variation exhibited by softwood fiberboard. Data to date are generally consistent with the range seen in cane fiberboard, but some portions of the data trends are skewed toward the lower end of that range. Further understanding of the variability of softwood fiberboard properties will require testing of additional material.

  6. FIFTH STATUS REPORT: TESTING OF AGED SOFTWOOD FIBERBOARD MATERIAL FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.; Dunn, K.

    2014-04-15

    Samples have been prepared from a 9975 lower fiberboard subassembly fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in elevated humidity environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the hotter dry environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAC storage environment for up to 15 years. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected. Additional samples will be added to each aging environment, to support development of an aging model specific to softwood fiberboard. Post-conditioning data have been measured on samples from a single softwood fiberboard assembly, and baseline data are also available from a limited number of vendor-provided samples. This provides minimal information on the possible sample-to-sample variation exhibited by softwood fiberboard. Data to date are generally consistent with the range seen in cane fiberboard, but some portions of the data trends are skewed toward the lower end of that range. Two additional softwood fiberboard source packages have been obtained and will begin to provide data on the range of variability of this material.

  7. The Development and Evaluation of Physical Science Curriculum Materials Designed to Improve the Attitudes of the Secondary School Slow Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milson, James Lee

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate physical science curriculum materials suitable for secondary school age slow learners. A unit on measuring heat and temperature was developed, using guidelines based on a study of the characteristics of students of below-average intelligence (I.Q. between 75 to 90) and reading ability at or…

  8. Thermostructural Analysis of Carbon Cloth Phenolic Material Tested at the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie; Ehle, Curt; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    RSRM nozzle liner components have been analyzed and tested to explore the occurrence of anomalous material performance known as pocketing erosion. Primary physical factors that contribute to pocketing seem to include the geometric permeability, which governs pore pressure magnitudes and hence load, and carbon fiber high temperature tensile strength, which defines a material limiting capability. The study reports on the results of a coupled thermostructural finite element analysis of Carbon Cloth Phenolic (CCP) material tested at the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory (the LHMEL facility). Modeled test configurations will be limited to the special case of where temperature gradients are oriented perpendicular to the composite material ply angle. Analyses were conducted using a transient, one-dimensional flow/thermal finite element code that models pore pressure and temperature distributions and in an explicitly coupled formulation, passes this information to a 2-dimensional finite element structural model for determination of the stress/deformation behavior of the orthotropic fiber/matrix CCP. Pore pressures are generated by thermal decomposition of the phenolic resin which evolve as a multi-component gas phase which is partially trapped in the porous microstructure of the composite. The nature of resultant pressures are described by using the Darcy relationships which have been modified to permit a multi-specie mass and momentum balance including water vapor condensation. Solution to the conjugate flow/thermal equations were performed using the SINDA code. Of particular importance to this problem was the implementation of a char and deformation state dependent (geometric) permeability as describing a first order interaction between the flow/thermal and structural models. Material property models are used to characterize the solid phase mechanical stiffness and failure. Structural calculations were performed using the ABAQUS code. Iterations were made

  9. Testosterone deficiency causes penile fibrosis and organic erectile dysfunction in aging men. Evaluating association among Age, TDS and ED

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We studied the possible correlation between age, testosterone deficiency, cavernosal fibrosis and erectile dysfunction (ED). Methods 47 patients with ED were enrolled between September 2010 and October 2011. IIEF-EF score, NPTR test using the Rigiscan method, total and free testosterone levels, and cavernosum biopsy were carried out on all patients. Patients aged 65 or over were defined as Old Age (OA) while patients under 65 were defined Young age (YA). The strength of the relationships found was estimated by Odds Ratio. Results 74% of patients with values of over 52% collagen fibers in the corpora cavernosa were found to have organic ED. A significant difference was found in age, percentage of collagen fibers, testosterone levels between patients with Positive Rigiscan (PR) and Negative Rigiscan (NR). Hypotestosteronaemia increased the risk of ED with PR (OR: 21.4, 95% CI: 20.2-22.6) and in both young age patients (OR: 4.3, 95% CI: 2.4-6.2) and old age patients (OR: 15.5, 95% CI: 13.4-17.6). Moreover cavernosal fibrosis increased the risk of ED with PR in both young age patients (OR: 8.2, 95% CI: 6.4-10.0 and old age patients (OR: 24.6, 95% CI: 20.8-28.4). Conclusions This study demonstrates a strong association among age, testosterone deficiency, cavernosal fibrosis and ED with PR. Age, testosterone deficiency and cavernosal fibrosis are potentially correctable factors of cavernosal fibrosis and organic ED. Further, prospective studies are needed to evaluate if testosterone treatment, alone or in association with PDE5 inhibitors, may lower the risk of cavernosal fibrosis or decrease the severity the fibrosis in ED patients. PMID:23173727

  10. Validation of an instrument to evaluate quality of life in the aging population: WHOQOL-AGE

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a need for short, specific instruments that assess quality of life (QOL) adequately in the older adult population. The aims of the present study were to obtain evidence on the validity of the inferences that could be drawn from an instrument to measure QOL in the aging population (people 50+ years old), and to test its psychometric properties. Methods The instrument, WHOQOL-AGE, comprised 13 positive items, assessed on a five-point rating scale, and was administered to nationally representative samples (n = 9987) from Finland, Poland, and Spain. Cronbach’s alpha was employed to assess internal consistency reliability, whereas the validity of the questionnaire was assessed by means of factor analysis, graded response model, Pearson’s correlation coefficient and unpaired t-test. Normative values were calculated across countries and for different age groups. Results The satisfactory goodness-of-fit indices confirmed that the factorial structure of WHOQOL-AGE comprises two first-order factors. Cronbach’s alpha was 0.88 for factor 1, and 0.84 for factor 2. Evidence supporting a global score was found with a second-order factor model, according to the goodness-of-fit indices: CFI = 0.93, TLI = 0.91, RMSEA = 0.073. Convergent validity was estimated at r = 0.75 and adequate discriminant validity was also found. Significant differences were found between healthy individuals (74.19 ± 13.21) and individuals with at least one chronic condition (64.29 ± 16.29), supporting adequate known-groups validity. Conclusions WHOQOL-AGE has shown good psychometric properties in Finland, Poland, and Spain. Therefore, considerable support is provided to using the WHOQOL-AGE to measure QOL in older adults in these countries, and to compare the QOL of older and younger adults. PMID:24152691

  11. Follow-Up Evaluation of a Faculty Training Program in Aging Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Chandra M.

    2006-01-01

    In collaboration with distinguished scholars and National Institute on Aging (NIA) staff, we designed, implemented, and evaluated a research training program in aging for psychology faculty from 4-year colleges. The goal of the program was to build and sustain a community of college faculty committed to conducting aging research, incorporating…

  12. Production of Working Reference Materials for the Capability Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip D. Noll, Jr.; Robert S. Marshall

    1999-03-01

    Nondestructive waste assay (NDA) methods are employed to determine the mass and activity of waste-entrained radionuclides as part of the National TRU (Trans-Uranic) Waste Characterization Program. In support of this program the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Mixed Waste Focus Area developed a plan to acquire capability/performance data on systems proposed for NDA purposes. The Capability Evaluation Project (CEP) was designed to evaluate the NDA systems of commercial contractors by subjecting all participants to identical tests involving 55 gallon drum surrogates containing known quantities and distributions of radioactive materials in the form of sealed-source standards, referred to as working reference materials (WRMs). Although numerous Pu WRMs already exist, the CEP WRM set allows for the evaluation of the capability and performance of systems with respect to waste types/configurations which contain increased amounts of {sup 241}Am relative to weapons grade Pu, waste that is dominantly {sup 241}Am, as well as wastes containing various proportions of depleted uranium. The CEP WRMs consist of a special mixture of PuO{sub 2}/AmO{sub 2} (IAP) and diatomaceous earth (DE) or depleted uranium (DU) oxide and DE and were fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The IAP WRMS are contained inside a pair of welded inner and outer stainless steel containers. The DU WRMs are singly contained within a stainless steel container equivalent to the outer container of the IAP standards. This report gives a general overview and discussion relating to the production and certification of the CEP WRMs.

  13. 20 CFR 408.413 - How do we evaluate the evidence of age you give us?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How do we evaluate the evidence of age you give us? 408.413 Section 408.413 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Age § 408.413 How do we evaluate the...

  14. 20 CFR 408.413 - How do we evaluate the evidence of age you give us?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How do we evaluate the evidence of age you give us? 408.413 Section 408.413 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Age § 408.413 How do we evaluate the...

  15. 20 CFR 408.413 - How do we evaluate the evidence of age you give us?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How do we evaluate the evidence of age you give us? 408.413 Section 408.413 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Age § 408.413 How do we evaluate the...

  16. 20 CFR 408.413 - How do we evaluate the evidence of age you give us?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do we evaluate the evidence of age you give us? 408.413 Section 408.413 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Age § 408.413 How do we evaluate the...

  17. 20 CFR 408.413 - How do we evaluate the evidence of age you give us?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How do we evaluate the evidence of age you give us? 408.413 Section 408.413 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Age § 408.413 How do we evaluate the...

  18. Evaluation and recognition of skin images with aging by support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liangjun; Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Aging is a very important issue not only in dermatology, but also cosmetic science. Cutaneous aging involves both chronological and photoaging aging process. The evaluation and classification of aging is an important issue with the medical cosmetology workers nowadays. The purpose of this study is to assess chronological-age-related and photo-age-related of human skin. The texture features of skin surface skin, such as coarseness, contrast were analyzed by Fourier transform and Tamura. And the aim of it is to detect the object hidden in the skin texture in difference aging skin. Then, Support vector machine was applied to train the texture feature. The different age's states were distinguished by the support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The results help us to further understand the mechanism of different aging skin from texture feature and help us to distinguish the different aging states.

  19. Mathematical phantoms for evaluation of age-specific internal dose

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1980-01-01

    A series of mathematical phantoms representing children has been developed for use with photon transport codes. These phantoms, patterned after the Fisher-Snyder adult phantom, consist of simple mathematical expressions for the boundaries of the major organs and body sections. The location and shape of the organs are consistent with drawings depicting developmental anatomy, with the organ volumes assigned such that the masses at the various ages conform closely with the data presented in Reference Man. The explicit mathematical expressions for the various ages overcome the potential misrepresentation of organ sizes that occurred in phantoms derived from simple mathematical transformations of the adult phantom. Female breast tissue has been added to the phantoms, including the adult, now allowing assessment of doses to this organ.

  20. Materials Evaluation Test Series (METS) 04, 05, and 06

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D; Ingram, C; Simmons, L; Arganbright, R; Lyle, J; Wong, K

    2006-03-23

    The purpose of this work is to examine the environmental, safety, health and operational aspects of detonating a confined explosive test apparatus that has been designed to maximize the dynamics of impact on beryllium metal components for Contained Firing Facility (CFF) applications. A combination of experimental collection and evaluation methods were designed and implemented to provide an evaluation of immediately postdetonation by-products reflecting a potential worst-case scenario beryllium aerosolization explosive event. The collective Material Evaluation Test Series (METS) 04 - 06 provided explosive devices designed to scale for the dedicated METS firing tank that would provide a post-detonation internal environment comparable to the CFF. The experimental results provided appropriate information to develop operational parameters to be considered for conducting full-scale beryllium-containing experimental tests with similar designs within CFF and B801A. These operational procedures include the inclusion of chelating agents in pre-shot CFF cardboard containers with a minimum of 600 gallons content, an extended time period post-test before purging the CFF chamber, and an adaptation of approaches toward applications of the scrubber and HEPA systems during the post-shot sequence for an integrated environmental, safety, and health approach. In addition, re-entry and film retrieval procedures will be adapted, in line with abatement techniques for cleaning the chamber, that will be required for work inside a CFF that will contain an elevated concentration of spherical and highly aerosolizable beryllium particulate.

  1. Proficiency Testing for Evaluating Aerospace Materials Test Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, D.; Motto, S.; Peyton, S.; Beeson, H.

    2006-01-01

    ASTM G 86 and ASTM G 74 are commonly used to evaluate materials susceptibility to ignition in liquid and gaseous oxygen systems. However, the methods have been known for their lack of repeatability. The inherent problems identified with the test logic would either not allow precise identification or the magnitude of problems related to running the tests, such as lack of consistency of systems performance, lack of adherence to procedures, etc. Excessive variability leads to increasing instances of accepting the null hypothesis erroneously, and so to the false logical deduction that problems are nonexistent when they really do exist. This paper attempts to develop and recommend an approach that could lead to increased accuracy in problem diagnostics by using the 50% reactivity point, which has been shown to be more repeatable. The initial tests conducted indicate that PTFE and Viton A (for pneumatic impact) and Buna S (for mechanical impact) would be good choices for additional testing and consideration for inter-laboratory evaluations. The approach presented could also be used to evaluate variable effects with increased confidence and tolerance optimization.

  2. STATUS REPORT FOR AGING STUDIES OF EPDM O-RING MATERIAL FOR THE H1616 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.

    2012-08-31

    This is an interim status report for tasks carried out per Task Technical Plan SRNL-STI-2011-00506. A series of tasks/experiments are being performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory to monitor the aging performance of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) Orings used in the H1616 shipping package. The data will support the technical basis to extend the annual maintenance of the EPDM O-rings in the H1616 shipping package and to predict the life of the seals at bounding service conditions. Current expectations are that the O-rings will maintain a seal at bounding normal temperatures in service (152 F) for at least 12 months. The baseline aging data review suggests that the EPDM O-rings are likely to retain significant mechanical properties and sealing force at bounding service temperatures to provide a service life of at least 2 years. At lower, more realistic temperatures, longer service life is likely. Parallel compression stress relaxation and vessel leak test efforts are in progress to further validate this assessment and quantify a more realistic service life prediction. The H1616 shipping package O-rings were evaluated for baseline property data as part of this test program. This was done to provide a basis for comparison of changes in material properties and performance parameters as a function of aging. This initial characterization was limited to physical and mechanical properties, namely hardness, thickness and tensile strength. These properties appear to be consistent with O-ring specifications. Three H1616-1 Containment Vessels were placed in test conditions and are aging at temperatures ranging from 160 to 300 F. The vessels were Helium leak-tested initially and have been tested at periodic intervals after cooling to room temperature to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97 (< 1E-07 std cc air/sec at room temperature). To date, no leak test failures have occurred. The cumulative time at

  3. Age related differences in mechanical demands imposed on the lower back by manual material handling tasks.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, Iman; Vazirian, Milad; Croft, Emily; Nussbaum, Maury A; Bazrgari, Babak

    2016-04-11

    The prevalence of low back pain (LBP) increases with age, yet the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for this remains unclear. To explore the role of biomechanical factors, we investigated age-related differences in lower-back biomechanics during sagittally-symmetric simulated manual material handling tasks. For each task, trunk kinematics and mechanical demand on the lower back were examined, from among 60 participants within five equal-sized and gender-balanced age groups spanning from 20 to 70 years old. The tasks involved lowering a 4.5 kg load from an upright standing posture to both knee height and a fixed height and then lifting the load back to the initial upright posture. During these tasks, segmental body kinematics and ground reaction forces were collected using wireless inertial measurement units and a force platform. Overall, older participants completed the tasks with larger pelvic rotation and smaller lumbar flexion. Such adopted trunk kinematics resulted in larger peak shearing demand at the lower back in older vs. younger participants. These results suggest that older individuals may be at a higher risk for developing lower back pain when completing similar manual material handling tasks, consistent with epidemiological evidence for higher risks of occupational low back pain among this cohort.

  4. Photo-crosslinkable hybrid material with improved aging stability for integrated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusevic, Maja; Maaninen, Arto; Hiltunen, Jussi; Hiltunen, Marianne; Tuominen, Jarkko; Karioja, Pentti

    2004-08-01

    In the last decade, the processing of the waveguide structures on various substrates under mild conditions has been an appealing aim. The lithographic patterning of organic-inorganic hybrid materials processed by means of sol-gel technology allows the production of waveguides and other optical components. We describe the synthesis of a new, photo-patternable, organically modified material with an improved ageing stability. Synthesis step does not involve widely used zirconia precursors, but it retains the same possibility of altering the refractive index by tailoring of the material composition. Refractive index values varied from 1.4700 to 1.5100. Measured birefringence values meet the requirements of most integrated planar optic applications. The synthesized material is compatible with silicon, glass and plastic substrates. Material was analyzed using 29Si NMR techniques. The processed slab waveguides were characterized by using the prism coupling technique at various wavelengths. The attenuation in the waveguide was determined by the cut-back method, and it was found to be less than 0.5dB/cm at the wavelength of 830 nm. The morphology of the microstructures was measured by using the interferometer equipment. Slab waveguides rms values were in order of only 2 nm.

  5. All the things I have - handling one's material room in old age.

    PubMed

    Larsson Ranada, Asa; Hagberg, Jan-Erik

    2014-12-01

    The article explores how old people who live in their ordinary home, reason and act regarding their 'material room' (technical objects, such as household appliances, communication tools and things, such as furniture, personal belongings, gadgets, books, paintings, and memorabilia). The interest is in how they, as a consequence of their aging, look at acquiring new objects and phasing out older objects from the home. This is a broader approach than in most other studies of how old people relate to materiality in which attention is mostly paid either to adjustments to the physical environment or to the importance of personal possessions. In the latter cases, the focus is on downsizing processes (e.g. household disbandment or casser maison) in connection with a move to smaller accommodation or to a nursing home. The article is based on a study in which thirteen older people (median age 87), living in a Swedish town of medium size were interviewed (2012) for a third time. The questions concerned the need and desire for new objects, replacement of broken objects, sorting out the home or elsewhere, most cherished possessions, and the role of family members such as children and grandchildren. The results reveal the complexity of how one handles the material room. Most evident is the participants' reluctance to acquire new objects or even to replace broken things. Nearly all of them had considered, but few had started, a process of sorting out objects. These standpoints in combination resulted in a relatively intact material room, which was motivated by an ambition to simplify daily life or to facilitate the approaching dissolution of the home. Some objects of special value and other cherished objects materialized the connections between generations within a family. Some participants wanted to spare their children the burden of having to decide on what to do with their possessions. Others (mostly men), on the contrary, relied on their children to do the sorting out after

  6. Evaluation of materials proposed for use in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    The primary irritancy and allergenicity of flame resistant treated cotton knit shirts proposed for use in space flight were evaluated. The knitted shirts were supplied by NASA as follows: knitted shirts with collars were made of two-ply mercerized single-knit cotton jersey. The fabric was treated with tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium hydroxide and subsequently cured with gaseous ammonia (THPOH/NH3). The final treatment comprised adding on diammonium phosphate (DAP)/urea. The treated fabric was process scoured to remove extraneous materials, top softened and mechanically or chemically finished as required for specific needs. Diammonium phosphate is a more efficient flame inhabitant than the phosphonium; thus, the combination treatment served to impart higher resistance to ignition and sustained combustion as required by NASA test standard.

  7. Evaluation of an electric field sensor for nondestructive material inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyanasundaram, Kayatri; Arunachalam, Kavitha

    2013-01-01

    An electric field sensor is fabricated on a 125 micron thick flexible dielectric substrate for electromagnetic (EM) nondestructive material inspection at 915 MHz. The sensor consists of an electrically short dipole antenna and a radio frequency (RF) diode detector connected to a pair of high impedance screen printed carbon lines. The DC component of the rectified diode voltage conveyed across the high impedance lines is measured using a data acquisition circuit. Sensor measurements are validated with simulated data for a conformal patch antenna operating at 915 MHz. Sensor performance for EM nondestructive testing (NDT) is evaluated using phantom defects in low loss dielectric slabs. Preliminary results indicate sensor utility for EM NDT and support further testing on realistic defects.

  8. Generation and Evaluation of Lunar Dust Adhesion Mitigating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.; Lin, Yi; Belcher, Marcus A.; Palmieri, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Particulate contamination is of concern in a variety of environments. This issue is especially important in confined spaces with highly controlled atmospheres such as space exploration vehicles involved in extraterrestrial surface missions. Lunar dust was a significant challenge for the Apollo astronauts and will be of greater concern for longer duration, future missions. Passive mitigation strategies, those not requiring external energy, may decrease some of these concerns, and have been investigated in this work. A myriad of approaches to modify the surface chemistry and topography of a variety of substrates was investigated. These involved generation of novel materials, photolithographic techniques, and other template approaches. Additionally, single particle and multiple particle methods to quantitatively evaluate the particle-substrate adhesion interactions were developed.

  9. Microwave Nondestructive Evaluation of Dielectric Materials with a Metamaterial Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shreiber, Daniel; Gupta, Mool; Cravey, Robin L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel microwave Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) sensor was developed in an attempt to increase the sensitivity of the microwave NDE method for detection of defects small relative to a wavelength. The sensor was designed on the basis of a negative index material (NIM) lens. Characterization of the lens was performed to determine its resonant frequency, index of refraction, focus spot size, and optimal focusing length (for proper sample location). A sub-wavelength spot size (3 dB) of 0.48 lambda was obtained. The proof of concept for the sensor was achieved when a fiberglass sample with a 3 mm diameter through hole (perpendicular to the propagation direction of the wave) was tested. The hole was successfully detected with an 8.2 cm wavelength electromagnetic wave. This method is able to detect a defect that is 0.037 lambda. This method has certain advantages over other far field and near field microwave NDE methods currently in use.

  10. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE CHARACTERISTICS OF FOUR PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to evaluate several low-temperature characteristics of Challenge 5100, a new protective clothing material developed by Chemical Fabrics Corporation. The low temperature characteristics of three other protective clothing materials were also evaluated...

  11. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  12. Hot piston ring/cylinder liner materials: Selection and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    In current designs of the automotive (kinematic) Stirling engine, the piston rings are made of a reinforced polymer and are located below the pistons because they cannot withstand the high temperatures in the upper cylinder area. Theoretically, efficiency could be improved if hot piston rings were located near the top of the pistons. Described is a program to select piston ring and cylinder coating materials to test this theory. Candidate materials were screened, then subjected to a pin or disk friction and wear test machine. Tests were performed in hydrogen at specimen temperatures up to 760 C to simulate environmental conditions in the region of the hot piston ring reversal. Based on the results of these tests, a cobalt based alloy, Stellite 6B, was chosen for the piston rings and PS200, which consists of a metal-bonded chromium carbide matrix with dispersed solid lubricants, was chosen as the cylinder coating. Tests of a modified engine and a baseline engine showed that the hot ring reduced specific fuel consumption by up to 7 percent for some operating conditions and averaged about 3 percent for all conditions evaluated. Related applications of high-temperature coatings for shaft seals and as back-up lubricants are also described.

  13. Research Approach for Aging and Evaluating Diesel Exhaust catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne, Scott

    2000-08-20

    To determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emissions control devices that could lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks and buses in the 2002-2004 model years. West Virginia University is evaluating: - Diesel Oxidation Catalysts - Lean NOX Catalysts

  14. Evaluation of translucency of monolithic zirconia and framework zirconia materials

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, İlkin; Üşümez, Aslıhan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The opacity of zirconia is an esthetic disadvantage that hinders achieving natural and shade-matched restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the translucency of non-colored and colored framework zirconia and monolithic zirconia. MATERIALS AND METHODS The three groups tested were: non-colored framework zirconia, colored framework zirconia with the A3 shade according to Vita Classic Scale, and monolithic zirconia (n=5). The specimens were fabricated in the dimensions of 15×12×0.5 mm. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the contrast ratio, which is indicative of translucency. Three measurements were made to obtain the contrast ratios of the materials over a white background (L*w) and a black background (L*b). The data were analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. One specimen from each group was chosen for scanning electron microscope analysis. The determined areas of the SEM images were divided by the number of grains in order to calculate the mean grain size. RESULTS Statistically significant differences were observed among all groups (P<.05). Non-colored zirconia had the highest translucency with a contrast ratio of 0.75, while monolithic zirconia had the lowest translucency with a contrast ratio of 0.8. The mean grain sizes of the non-colored, colored, and monolithic zirconia were 233, 256, and 361 nm, respectively. CONCLUSION The translucency of the zirconia was affected by the coloring procedure and the grain size. Although monolithic zirconia may not be the best esthetic material for the anterior region, it may serve as an alternative in the posterior region for the bilayered zirconia restorations. PMID:27350851

  15. Evaluation of materials for on-board laser diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, James R.; Thomas, David; Lewis, Jay; Phipps, Claude R.

    2008-05-01

    The AEgis Technologies Group and RTI International are developing microsensors for High Energy Laser (HEL) diagnostic applications. The conformal sensor array will measure the irradiance profile of an incident laser beam, and concomitant rise in surface temperature of the target. The open mesh architecture allows 90% of the beam to impact the surface. A critical part of this program is developing a protective coating that ensures sensor survivability at high irradiance levels for operational lifetimes on the order of 10 seconds. The protective coating must transmit a measurable amount of light to the irradiance sensor. We have conducted experiments to evaluate candidate heat shield materials. In the first round of experiments, a 10kW CO2 laser was used to irradiate pure materials, including metals and carbon foils. Although many of the metal foils were perforated by the laser, no significant amount of material was ablated away. In fact, most of the test samples gained mass, presumably due to oxidation. Analysis of high speed video shows that once the metal melted, surface tension caused the molten metal to coalesce into droplets around the rim of the hole. The second and third rounds of testing, conducted with a 3kW, 1.07μm fiber laser, included samples of highly reflective metals and ceramics, standard plasma-sprayed coatings, and multilayer stacks. We have also measured the performance of temperature sensors and irradiance sensors fabricated from nanoparticle solutions deposited by advanced printing technology and have completed a preliminary investigation of high temperature adhesives.

  16. The Old Imbrium Hypothesis. [revision for KREEP materials formation age and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, E.; Meyer, C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    It is proposed that the order of lunar events was such that the Imbrium event predates the formation of the lunar rock type called KREEP. This hypothesis is used to explain the distribution of KREEP in the regions of Imbrium ejecta and the location of KREEP within the Imbrium and Procellarum mare regions. Model ages of KREEP materials have been previously interpreted to mean that their 'formation' age (time of initial extrusion) is about 4.3 to 4.4 AE. Consequently it is suggested that the Imbrium impact was before 4.3 to 4.4 AE rather than at about 3.9 AE, as is currently believed. This Old Imbrium Hypothesis is not yet proven, but seems to be consistent with a large variety of basic lunar observations.

  17. The electrical performance of polymeric insulating materials under accelerated aging in a fog chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gorur, R.S.; Cherney, E.A.; Hackam, R. ); Orbeck, T. )

    1988-07-01

    A comparative study of the ac (60 Hz) surface aging in a fog chamber is reported on cylindrical rod samples of high temperature vulcanized (HTV) silicone rubber and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber containing various amounts of alumina trihydrate (ATH) and/or silica fillers. In low conductivity (250 ..mu..S/cm) fog, silicone rubber performed better than EPDM samples whereas in high conductivity (1000 ..mu..S/cm) fog, the order of performance was reversed. The mechanisms by which fillers impart tracking and erosion resistance to materials is discussed as influenced by the experimental conditions of the accelerated aging tests. Surface studies by ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) demonstrate that the hydrophobicity of silicone rubber, despite the accumulation of surface contamination, can be attributed to migration of low molecular weight polymer chains and/or mobile fluids, such as silicone oil.

  18. Evaluating the safety of aging nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.

    1996-05-01

    Regulatory requirements limit the permissible accumulation of irradiation damage in RPV material such that adequate fracture prevention margins are maintained throughout the licensed operating period of a nuclear plant. Experience with application of those requirements has identified a number of areas where they could be further refined to eliminate excess conservatism. Research is ongoin to provide the data required to support refinement of the regulatory requirements. Research programs are investigating theeffects of local brittle zones, shallow flaws, biaxial loading, and stainless steel cladding. Preliminary results from this research indicate a potential for beneficial changes in the P-T curve and PTS analysis rules.

  19. Evaluation of Coatings and Materials for Future Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Westheimer, David T.; Birur, Gajanana C.; Beach, Duane E.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Peters, Wanda C.; Triolo, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    Radiators are used to reject energy from space vehicles through radiant heat transfer. They are typically the largest component in a vehicle's thermal control system and can have a large impact on the vehicle design and operation. NASA s current vision for exploration dictates that radiators for a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM), and a lunar base will need to be developed. These applications present new challenges when compared to previous radiators on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). In addition, many technological advances have been made that could positively impact future radiator design. This paper outlines new requirements for future radiators and documents a trade study performed to select the some promising technologies for further evaluation. The technologies include K1100 based carbon composites for the radiator surface as well as Optical Solar Reflectors (OSRs), a lithium based white paint, and electrochromic thin films for optical coatings. Coupons were made using these materials and tests were performed to characterize their performance. Testing included evaluating structural and thermal properties of the carbon composites, thermal cycling, launch pad weather simulation, and exposure to solar wind, and Ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

  20. A novel facility for ageing materials with narrow-band ultraviolet radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kaerhae, Petri; Ruokolainen, Kimmo; Heikkilae, Anu

    2011-02-15

    A facility for exploring wavelength dependencies in ultraviolet (UV) radiation induced degradation in materials has been designed and constructed. The device is essentially a spectrograph separating light from a lamp to spectrally resolved UV radiation. It is based on a 1 kW xenon lamp and a flat-field concave holographic grating 10 cm in diameter. Radiation at the wavelength range 250-500 nm is dispersed onto the sample plane of 1.5 cm in height and 21 cm in width. The optical performance of the device has been characterized by radiometric measurements. Using the facility, test samples prepared of regular newspaper have been irradiated from 1 to 8 h. Color changes on the different locations of the aged samples have been quantified by color measurements. Yellowness indices computed from the color measurements demonstrate the capability of the facility in revealing wavelength dependencies of the material property changes in reasonable time frames.

  1. Gender bias in the evaluation of new age music.

    PubMed

    Colley, Ann; North, Adrian; Hargreaves, David J

    2003-04-01

    Eminent composers in Western European art music continue to be predominantly male and eminence in contemporary pop music is similarly male dominated. One contributing factor may be the continuing under-valuation of women's music. Possible anti-female bias in a contemporary genre was investigated using the Goldberg paradigm to elicit judgments of New Age compositions. Since stronger stereotyping effects occur when information provided about individuals is sparse, fictitious male and female composers were presented either by name only or by name with a brief biography. Evidence for anti-female bias was found in the name-only condition and was stronger when liking for the music was controlled. Other findings were the tendency for females to give higher ratings, and the association of gender differences in liking of the music with ratings of quality in the name-only condition. These results are relevant to the design of formal assessment procedures for musical composition.

  2. Development of aircraft brake materials. [evaluation of metal and ceramic materials in sliding tests simulation of aircraft braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, T. L.; Peterson, M. B.

    1974-01-01

    The requirements of brake materials were outlined and a survey made to select materials to meet the needs of high temperature brakes. A number of metals and ceramic materials were selected and evaluated in sliding tests which simulated aircraft braking. Nickel, molybdenum tungsten, Zr02, high temperature cements and carbons were tested. Additives were then incorporated into these materials to optimize their wear or strength behavior with particular emphasis on nickel and molybdenum base materials and a high temperature potassium silicate cement. Optimum materials were developed which improved wear behavior over conventional brake materials in the simulated test. The best materials are a nickel, aluminum oxide, lead tungstate composition containing graphite or molybdenum disulphite; a molybdenum base material containing LPA100 (an intermetallic compound of cobalt, molybdenum, and silicon); and a carbon material (P5).

  3. Ultrasound velocity test to decay evaluation on decorative stone after different artificial ageing treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioretti, Giovanna; Andriani, Gioacchino Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound propagation velocity depends on several physical properties, for instance density, porosity and textural discontinuities within stones. These properties are strongly influenced by state of conservation of materials and their modification can be considered decay markers; therefore, ultrasound velocity measurement represents a non-destructive technique to evaluate the decay underway on employed stone. In this study, samples of the Avorio variety, an Apulian limestones, were processed to artificial ageing treatments, in particular thermal shocks, extreme thermal exposure at high temperatures between 200 and 600°C, and cycles of immersion of rock samples into saline solution alternating with drying phases in muffle furnace. Effects of induced deterioration were examined by comparing p-wave ultrasound velocity values, visual appearance and mass loss with water absorption values and capillarity test results. This research suggests first that the ultrasound velocity test can be considered a valuable non-invasive technique to assess the state of decay of decorative and building stones. Furthermore, in order to simulate dangerous and extreme environmental conditions and study their influence on the stone decay patterns, new considerations and suggestions about ageing test and procedures were proposed.

  4. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Nuclear Materials Using Non-Destructive Ball Indentation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, M.D.; Linga Murty, K.

    2002-07-01

    Integrity of structural components depends on the deformation and fracture behavior of materials. For evaluating the material condition in-service, it is generally not feasible or practical or advisable to cut samples from operating structures. Non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques are required to evaluate the mechanical properties. Although several NDT techniques such as ultrasound, magnetic strength, Barkhausen noise, microhardness etc., are employed for estimating the mechanical property degradation, these methodologies are generally empirical and indirect. Automated Ball Indentation (ABI) is a non-destructive testing technique for direct measurement of mechanical and fracture properties of metallic engineering materials. Because of the small area over which the test is carried out, it is possible to determine point to point variations in the mechanical and fracture properties, such as those that exist in weldments. Although ABI technique is non-intrusive, it is a state-of-the-art mechanical test that measures directly the current/local deformation behavior of the material. In this paper, we present results from studies on the application of ABI technique to determine tensile and fracture properties of ferritic steels, an austenitic stainless steel, a nickel base superalloy and Zircaloy in different thermo-mechanical conditions. The effects of aging and cold work on these properties were determined from the ABI tests. Gradients in mechanical properties of ferritic steel welds, particularly in the narrow heat-affected zone, were clearly established. ABI technique was found to be useful in determining the anisotropy in the tensile properties of Zircaloy cladding tubes. The technique has potential as a non-destructive method for assessing structural integrity of aged components. (authors)

  5. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  6. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  7. Bonding values of two contemporary ceramic inlay materials to dentin following simulated aging

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Ashraf Abdelfattah

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the push-out bond strength of feldspar and zirconia-based ceramic inlays bonded to dentin with different resin cements following simulated aging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Occlusal cavities in 80 extracted molars were restored in 2 groups (n=40) with CAD/CAM feldspar (Vitablocs Trilux forte) (FP) and zirconia-based (Ceramill Zi) (ZR) ceramic inlays. The fabricated inlays were luted in 2 subgroups (n=20) with either etch-and-bond (RelyX Ultimate Clicker) (EB) or self-adhesive (RelyX Unicem Aplicap) (SA) resin cement. Ten inlays in each subgroup were subjected to 3,500 thermal cycles and 24,000 loading cycles, while the other 10 served as control. Horizontal 3 mm thick specimens were cut out of the restored teeth for push out bond strength testing. Bond strength data were statistically analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's comparisons at α=.05. The mode of ceramic-cement-dentin bond failure for each specimen was also assessed. RESULTS No statistically significant differences were noticed between FP and ZR bond strength to dentin in all subgroups (ANOVA, P=.05113). No differences were noticed between EB and SA (Tukey's, P>.05) bonded to either type of ceramics. Both adhesive and mixed modes of bond failure were dominant for non-aged inlays. Simulated aging had no significant effect on bond strength values (Tukey's, P>.05) of all ceramic-cement combinations although the adhesive mode of bond failure became more common (60-80%) in aged inlays. CONCLUSION The suggested cement-ceramic combinations offer comparable bonding performance to dentin substrate either before or after simulated aging that seems to have no adverse effect on the achieved bond. PMID:26816574

  8. The ac and dc performance of polymeric insulating materials under accelerated aging in a fog chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gorur, R.S. ); Cherney, E.A. ); Hackam, R. )

    1988-10-01

    The paper presents the results of the dc performance of polymeric insulating materials in a fog chamber. The materials evaluated in fog produced from low (250 ..mu..S/cm) and high (1000 ..mu..S/cm) conductivity water include cylindrical rod samples of high temperature vulcanized (HTV) silicone rubber and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber containing various amounts of either alumina trihydrate (ATH) or silica fillers, or both. Comparison is made of material performance obtained with ac which was reported in an earlier study. In both low and high conductivity fog, the time to failure with ac and +dc was very similar, but a reduction by a factor of about four was observed in the time to failure with -dc. For both ac and dc, silicone rubber performed better than EPDM samples in low conductivity fog, while the order of performance was reversed in high conductivity fog. A theoretical model to determine the effect of dry band discharges on material is presented. Good agreement of the predicted behavior of materials with the experimental findings is shown.

  9. Evaluation of new stratospheric age tracers and SF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, J. C.; Gallacher, E.; Oram, D.; Boenisch, H.; Engel, A.; Fraser, P. J.; Röckmann, T.; Sturges, W. T.

    2015-12-01

    Sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) is a very long-lived, potent greenhouse gas. Its abundances continue to increase in the atmosphere. Due to its inert behaviour it has also been extensively used as a tracer of transport in the ocean, the troposphere and the stratosphere. We here combine long-term tropospheric records obtained from the Cape Grim Baseline station, Tasmania, with stratospheric data from high-altitude aircraft and balloon campaigns. We then assess the novel use of several alternative transport tracers (e.g. C2F6, C3F8 and HFC-23) in the stratosphere. The results indicate good suitability for some of these gases in terms of their inertness, tropospheric growth rates and measurement precisions. In addition we and compare the derived mean ages to those obtained from SF6 and find indications for the possibility of the existence of a stratospheric SF6 sink. The latter finding would also imply that the total atmospheric lifetime of SF6 is substantially shorter than previously believed, with further implications for its use as a transport tracer in the stratosphere.

  10. Magnetic properties evaluation of ageing behaviour in water-quenched 5Cr-0.5Mo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, J. N.; Panda, A. K.; Mitra, A.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen emissions and magnetic hysteresis measurements were carried out on water-quenched 5Cr-0.5Mo steel subjected to ageing at 600 °C up to 5000 h. During initial ageing, this steel exhibited magnetic softening, which was attributed to relaxation of quenching stress in the material as well as decrease in dislocation density and migration of interstitial carbon atoms towards the grain boundary. Further ageing resulted in magnetic hardening owing to the restricted movement of the domain wall by the precipitation of carbides such as M3C2, M2C, M7C3 where M stands for Fe, Cr or a combination of them. At longer ageing periods, magnetic behaviour was affected by a change in the composition and morphology of the carbides. Massive M23C6 types of carbides were formed during longer periods of ageing. The coarsening of carbides decreased the pinning density for the domain wall motion and affected the magnetic properties of the steel. The effect of demagnetizing field from voids and non-magnetic massive carbides also affected the magnetic behaviour. Magnetic behaviour and Vickers hardness measurements during ageing have been effectively supported by microstructural evaluations suggesting the capability of the magnetic techniques for assessment of damage during ageing in high temperature 5Cr-0.5Mo steel components.

  11. Investigating the Use of Ultrasound for Evaluating Aging Wiring Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Anastasi, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews our initial efforts to investigate the use of ultrasound to evaluate wire insulation. Our initial model was a solid conductor with heat shrink tubing applied. In this model, various wave modes were identified. Subsequently, several aviation classes of wires (MIL-W- 81381, MIL-W-22759/34, and MIL-W-22759/87) were measured. The wires represented polyimide and ethylene-tetraflouroethylene insulations, and combinations of polyimide and flouropolymer plastics. Wire gages of 12, 16, and 20 AWG sizes were measured. Finally, samples of these wires were subjected to high temperatures for short periods of time to cause the insulation to degrade. Subsequent measurements indicated easily detectable changes.

  12. Health Physics Code System for Evaluating Accidents Involving Radioactive Materials.

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-01

    Version 03 The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculational tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes provide a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. The developer's website is: http://www.llnl.gov/nhi/hotspot/. Four general programs, PLUME, EXPLOSION, FIRE, and RESUSPENSION, calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Additional programs deal specifically with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. The FIDLER program can calibrate radiation survey instruments for ground survey measurements and initial screening of personnel for possible plutonium uptake in the lung. The HOTSPOT codes are fast, portable, easy to use, and fully documented in electronic help files. HOTSPOT supports color high resolution monitors and printers for concentration plots and contours. The codes have been extensively used by the DOS community since 1985. Tables and graphical output can be directed to the computer screen, printer, or a disk file. The graphical output consists of dose and ground contamination as a function of plume centerline downwind distance, and radiation dose and ground contamination contours. Users have the option of displaying scenario text on the plots. HOTSPOT 3.0.1 fixes three significant Windows 7 issues: � Executable installed properly under "Program Files/HotSpot 3.0". Installation package now smaller: removed dependency on older Windows DLL files which previously needed to \\ � Forms now properly scale based on DPI instead of font for users who change their screen resolution to something other than 100%. This is a more common feature in Windows 7.

  13. An evaluation of agreement between pectoral spines and otoliths for estimating ages of catfishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olive, J.A.; Schramm, Harold; Gerard, Patrick D.; Irwin, E.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths have been shown to provide more accurate ages than pectoral spine sections for several catfish populations; but sampling otoliths requires euthanizing the specimen, whereas spines can be sampled non-lethally. To evaluate whether, and under what conditions, spines provide the same or similar age estimates as otoliths, we examined data sets of individual fish aged from pectoral spines and otoliths for six blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus populations (n=420), 14 channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus populations (n=997), and 10 flathead catfish Pylodictus olivaris populations (n=947) from lotic and lentic waters throughout the central and eastern U.S. Logistic regression determined that agreement between ages estimated from otoliths and spines was consistently related to age, but inconsistently related to growth rate. When modeled at mean growth rate, we found at least 80% probability of no difference in spine- and otolith-assigned ages up to ages 4 and 5 for blue and channel catfish, respectively. For flathead catfish, an 80% probability of agreement between spine- and otolith-assigned ages did not occur at any age due to high incidence of differences in assigned ages even for age-1 fish. Logistic regression models predicted at least 80% probability that spine and otolith ages differed by ≤1 year up to ages 13, 16, and 9 for blue, channel, and flathead catfish, respectively. Age-bias assessment found mean spine-assigned age differed by less than 1 year from otolith-assigned age up to ages 19, 9, and 17 for blue catfish, channel catfish, and flathead catfish, respectively. These results can be used to help guide decisions about which structure is most appropriate for estimating catfish ages for particular populations and management objectives.

  14. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  15. 75 FR 70949 - Proposed Information Collection for the Evaluation of the Aging Worker Initiative; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... Employment and Training Administration Proposed Information Collection for the Evaluation of the Aging Worker Initiative; Comment Request AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... burden conducts a preclearance consultation program to provide the general public and federal...

  16. Non-destructive evaluation of mechanical properties of magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kankolenski, K.P.; Hua, S.Z.; Yang, D.X.; Hicho, G.E.; Swartzendruber, L.J.; Zang, Z.; Chopra, H.D.

    2000-07-01

    A magnetic-based non-destructive evaluation (NDE) method, which employs Barkhausen effect and measurement of the hysteresis loops, is used to correlate the magnetic and mechanical properties of ultra low carbon (ULC) steel. In particular, the NDE method was used to detect small deviations from linearity that occur in the stress-strain curve well below the 0.2% offset strain, and which generally defines the yield point in materials. Results show that three parameters: jumpsum and jumpsum rate (derived from the Barkhausen spectrum), and the relative permeability (derived from the B-H loops) varies sensitively with small permanent strains, and can be related to the plastic deformation in ULC steels. Investigation of micromagnetic structure revealed that plastic deformation leaves a residual stress state in the samples; the associated magneto-elastic energy makes the favorable easy axis of magnetization in a given grain to be the one that lies closest to the tensile axis. The consequence of this realignment of domains is that wall motion becomes intergranular in nature (as opposed to intragranular in unstrained samples). As a result, the more complex grain boundaries instead of dislocations, become the dominant pinning sites for domain walls. These observations provide a microscopic interpretation of the observed changes in the measured magnetic properties.

  17. Effect of Aging on Bond Strength of Two Soft Lining Materials to a Denture Base Polymer.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was evaluation the effect of immersion in distilled water and inorganic artificial saliva on the shear bond strength of a heat-polymerized and an auto-polymerized silicone-based denture lining materials. The denture liners investigated were Molloplast-B (heat-polymerized), and Mollosil plus (auto-polymerized). The soft liner specimens were 10 × 10 × 2.5 mm and were processed between two poly(methylmethacrylate) plates. Thirty shear specimens for each type of test lining material were prepared. Specimens were divided equally into three groups for each test lining material: first group, specimens were tested after 48 h of preparation without immersion; second group, specimens were tested following immersion in distilled water at 37 °C for 12 months; and third group, specimens were tested following immersion in inorganic artificial saliva at 37 °C for 12 months. Shear bond strength was measured using an universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 40 mm/min and failure mode (adhesive, cohesive and mixed) after debonding was assessed. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 0.05). ANOVA was followed by Bonferroni post hoc tests for pairwise comparisons. A significant difference in shear bond strength was detected between Molloplast-B and Mollosil plus following immersion in distilled water and artificial saliva. Molloplast-B demonstrated considerably higher shear strength than Mollosil plus after immersion. Shear strengths of the lining materials investigated reduced significantly after immersion in both solutions. Visual examination after separation revealed that the soft materials tested exhibited mostly adhesive failure. The effect of immersion in distilled water and inorganic artificial saliva on bond strength of test lining materials was perceivable; however, both of them had acceptable bond strength and might be proper for long-term use.

  18. No aging bias favoring memory for positive material: evidence from a heterogeneity-homogeneity list paradigm using emotionally toned words.

    PubMed

    Grühn, Daniel; Smith, Jacqui; Baltes, Paul B

    2005-12-01

    Some authors argue for a memory advantage of older adults for positively toned material. To investigate the contribution of selective processing to a positivity effect, the authors investigated young (n = 72, aged 18 to 31) and older (n = 72, aged 64 to 75) adults' memory for emotionally toned words using a multitrial paradigm that compares performance for heterogeneous (mixed valence) and homogeneous (single valence) lists. Regarding the age comparison, there was no evidence for an aging bias favoring positive material. Moreover, older adults' memory was less affected by emotion-based processing prioritization. Although there was no support for age-specific processing biases in memory for emotionally toned words, the findings are consistent with proposals that negative information receives processing priority in some contexts. Possible limits to the generalizability of the present findings (e.g., to nonverbal material) are discussed.

  19. Guidelines for the Evaluation of Dementia and Age-Related Cognitive Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Dementia in its many forms is a leading cause of functional limitation among older adults worldwide and will continue to ascend in global health importance as populations continue to age and effective cures remain elusive. The following guidelines were developed for psychologists who perform evaluations of dementia and age-related cognitive…

  20. Growing Old in a New Age: National and International Evaluation of a Gerontology Telecourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubanoski, Joan Pabst; Goodman, Rebecca J.; Braun, Kathryn L.; Roberts, Ellen; Lenzer, Anthony M.

    1999-01-01

    "Growing Old in a New Age," a Public Broadcasting Service telecourse, was evaluated by 40 faculty, 29 state aging administrators, 2 international public broadcasting users, and a training specialist. The course was generally considered effective, but improvements were recommended in content, integration of video and text, and updated…

  1. An Evaluation of Graduates of a Toddlerhood Home Visiting Program at Kindergarten Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, LaRue; Sethi, Anita; Astuto, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Overview: A recent evaluation of children who had participated in the Parent-Child Home Program (PCHP) as toddlers found that at kindergarten age, these children were performing at levels expected for their age, despite the fact that they had multiple factors putting them at risk for school failure. The Study: In the winter and spring of 2002, 135…

  2. Evaluation of steam resistance of gravel-packing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.D.; Knox, J.A. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper compares the steam stability of common gravel-packing materials. The scope was limited to one set of downhole conditions. Results indicated that none of the commonly used materials were entirely satisfactory, but another material not normally used in the petroleum industry was found to give excellent results.

  3. Development and Evaluation of Patient Education Materials for Elderly Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Jewitt, Natalie; Hope, Andrew J; Milne, Robin; Le, Lisa W; Papadakos, Janet; Abdelmutti, Nazek; Catton, Pamela; Giuliani, Meredith E

    2016-03-01

    Patients treated for lung cancer are often elderly presenting a unique challenge for developing patient education materials. This study developed and evaluated a patient education pamphlet on lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) designed specifically for an elderly population. The SBRT pamphlet was developed using a participatory design involving a convenience sample of patients. This prospective study assessed patient's opinions of pamphlet effectiveness through self-report questionnaires. The pamphlet was deemed "effective" if patients rated 16/18 evaluation statements as "strongly agree" or "agree." Demographic data and health literacy (Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine short-form (REALM-SF)) were also assessed. Patient opinion of pamphlet "effectiveness" was compared between patients with REALM-SF scores of 7 versus <7 using Fisher's exact test. The overall EQ-5D-5L score was compared for patients who did and did not find the pamphlet effective using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Thirty-seven patients participated. The median age was 76 years (range 56-93) and 22 patients (59 %) had ≤high school education. Most patients preferred to have verbal (65 %) or written (78 %) educational materials as opposed to online information or educational classes. Thirty-two patients (86 %) rated the pamphlet as effective. The proportion of patients who found the pamphlet effective was 85.7 versus 86.7 % (p = 1.00) in those with REALM 7 versus <7. The mean EQ-5D score was 67.5 (SD 19.1) versus 71.8 (SD 8.7) (p = 0.84) in those who found the pamphlet effective versus not. Participatory design is an effective method for developing education materials for challenging patient groups such as elderly patients. Despite advanced age and comorbidity, this patient group had adequate health literacy.

  4. Pb-207/Pb-206 ages of individual mineral phases in Luna 20 material by ion microprobe mass analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. A.; Hinthorne, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Ion microprobe analyses of returned lunar material have helped to demonstrate that U, Th, and radiogenic Pb are concentrated in small accessory mineral phases. It is possible to measure the isotopic composition of this Pb and obtain a radiometric Pb-207/Pb-206 age for the mineral. The ages so derived compare favorably with crystallization ages determined by conventional methods. A grain mount (22003,2/6) of Luna 20 material was searched for such accessory mineral phases, and two were found. One of these phases give an age of 4.12 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. and the other an age of 4.42 plus or minus 0.11 b.y. Ages of minerals dated by the ion probe in Apollo samples 14310 and 15555 are given for comparison. Data on the upper limit for Pb concentration in the outermost surface layers of free lunar soil particles are also given.

  5. Evaluation of Solute Clusters Associated with Bake-Hardening Response in Isothermal Aged Al-Mg-Si Alloys Using a Three-Dimensional Atom Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruga, Yasuhiro; Kozuka, Masaya; Takaki, Yasuo; Sato, Tatsuo

    2014-12-01

    Temporal changes in the number density, size distribution, and chemical composition of clusters formed during natural aging at room temperature and pre-aging at 363 K (90 °C) in an Al-0.62Mg-0.93Si (mass pct) alloy were evaluated using atom probe tomography. More than 10 million atoms were examined in the cluster analysis, in which about 1000 clusters were obtained for each material after various aging treatments. The statistically proven records show that both number density and the average radius of clusters in pre-aged materials are larger than in naturally aged materials. It was revealed that the fraction of clusters with a low Mg/Si ratio after natural aging for a short time is higher than with other aging treatments, regardless of cluster size. This indicates that Si-rich clusters form more easily after short-period natural aging, and that Mg atoms can diffuse into the clusters or possibly form another type of Mg-Si cluster after prolonged natural aging. The formation of large clusters with a uniform Mg/Si ratio is encouraged by pre-aging. It can be concluded that an increase of small clusters with various Mg/Si ratios does not promote the bake-hardening (BH) response, whereas large clusters with a uniform Mg/Si ratio play an important role in hardening during the BH treatment at 443 K (170 °C).

  6. A structured approach to evaluating aging of the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Dwight, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    An aging evaluation program has been developed for the United States Department of Energy's Advanced Test Reactor to support the current goal of operation through the year 2014 and beyond. The Aging Evaluation and Life Extension Program (AELEX) employs a three-phased approach. In Phases 1 and 2, now complete, components were identified, categorized and prioritized. Critical components were selected and aging mechanisms for the critical components identified. An initial evaluation of the critical components was performed and extended life operation for the plant appears to be both technically and economically feasible. Detailed evaluations of the critical components are now in progress in the early stages of Phase 3. Some results are available. Evaluations of many non-critical components and refinements to the program based on probabilistic risk assessment results will follow in later stages of Phase 3. 6 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. The Evaluation of Vehicle Mass Reduction and Material ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Developments in the realm of lightweight materials for automotive use continue to be announced by the industry and by academia. This session will provide new and updated information on new generation of materials. Additionally, this session will focus on the key topics involved in Life-Cycle-Analysis of light-weight materials including practices and developments in material recyclability. This presentation will review key findings from recent LCAs for vehicle mass reduction. Presentation for panel session on advanced materials/lightweighting for light duty vehicles at the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Government/Industry Meeting, Washington, DC (January 25, 2017)

  8. Evaluation of advanced materials through experimental mechanics and modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yii-Ching

    1993-01-01

    Composite materials have been frequently used in aerospace vehicles. Very often defects are inherited during the manufacture and damages are inherited during the construction and services. It becomes critical to understand the mechanical behavior of such composite structure before it can be further used. One good example of these composite structures is the cylindrical bottle of solid rocket motor case with accidental impact damages. Since the replacement of this cylindrical bottle is expensive, it is valuable to know how the damages affects the material, and how it can be repaired. To reach this goal, the damage must be characterized and the stress/strain field must be carefully analyzed. First the damage area, due to impact, is surveyed and identified with a shearography technique which uses the principle of speckle shearing interferometry to measure displacement gradient. Within the damage area of a composite laminate, such as the bottle of solid rocket motor case, all layers are considered to be degraded. Once a lamina being degraded the stiffness as well as strength will be drastically decreased. It becomes a critical area of failure to the whole bottle. And hence the stress/strain field within and around a damage should be accurately evaluated for failure prediction. To investigate the stress/strain field around damages a Hybrid-Numerical method which combines experimental measurement and finite element analysis is used. It is known the stress or strain at the singular point can not be accurately measured by an experimental technique. Nevertheless, if the location is far away from the singular spot, the displacement can be found accurately. Since it reflects the true displacement field locally regardless of the boundary conditions, it is an excellent input data for a finite element analysis to replace the usually assumed boundary conditions. Therefore, the Hybrid-Numerical method is chosen to avoid the difficulty and to take advantage of both experimental

  9. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  10. Sorption/Desorption and Transport of Trichloroethene in Freshly-amended, Synthetically- aged, and Field-contaminated Aquifer Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. R.; Norris, D. K.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of long-term contaminant aging on the sorption/desorption and transport of trichloroethene in a low organic-carbon content aquifer material collected from the source zone of a chlorinated-solvent contaminated federal Superfund site in Arizona. This was accomplished by comparing elution behavior for field-contaminated, synthetically-aged (contact times of approximately four years), and freshly-amended aquifer material. Elution of trichloroethene exhibited extensive low-concentration tailing, despite minimal retention of trichloroethene by the aquifer material. The observed nonideal behavior indicates significant mass-transfer constraints influenced trichloroethene transport in this aquifer material. The elution behavior of trichloroethene for the field-contaminated and aged treatments was essentially identical to that observed for the fresh treatments. In addition, the results of three independent mass- balance analyses, total mass eluted, solvent-extraction analysis of residual sorbed mass, and flow- interruption rebound, showed equivalent recoveries for the aged and fresh treatments. These results indicate that long-term contaminant aging did not significantly influence the transport and fate behavior of trichloroethene in this low organic-carbon aquifer material. The observed nonideal behavior of trichloroethene (i.e., nonlinear sorption and significantly rate-limited sorption/desorption) suggests physically condensed carbonaceous material, comprising 61% of this media's organic-carbon content, mediates the transport and fate behavior of trichloroethene in this low organic-carbon content aquifer material.

  11. Evaluation and prediction of long-term environmental effects on nonmetallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Changes in functional properties of a broad spectrum of nonmetallic materials as a function of environment and exposure time were evaluated. Models for predicting long-term material performance are discussed. A literature search on specific materials in the space and simulated space environment was carried out and evaluated.

  12. Fundamental investigations related to the mitigation of volume changes in cement-based materials at early ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant, Gaurav Niteen

    The increased use of high-performance, low water-to-cement (w/c) ratio concretes has led to increased occurrences of early-age shrinkage cracking in civil engineering structures. To reduce the magnitude of early-age shrinkage and the potential for cracking, mitigation strategies using shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs), saturated lightweight aggregates, expansive cements and extended moist curing durations in construction have been recommended. However, to appropriately utilize these strategies, it is important to have a complete understanding of the driving forces of early-age volume change and how these methods work from a materials perspective to reduce shrinkage. This dissertation uses a first-principles approach to understand the mechanism of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) to generate an expansion and mitigate shrinkage at early-ages, quantify the influence of a CaO-based expansive additive in reducing unrestrained shrinkage, residual stress development and the cracking potential at early-ages and quantify the influence of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) and cement hydration (pore structure refinement) on the reduction induced in the fluid transport properties of the material. The effects of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) are described in terms of inducing autogenous expansions in cement pastes at early ages. An evaluation comprising measurements of autogenous deformation, x-ray diffraction (Rietveld analysis), pore solution and thermogravimetric analysis and electron microscopy is performed to understand the chemical nature and physical effects of the expansion. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the measured liquid-phase compositions indicate the SRA produces elevated Portlandite super-saturations in the pore solution which results in crystallization stress driven expansions. The thermodynamic calculations are supported by deformation measurements performed on cement pastes mixed in solutions saturated with Portlandite or containing

  13. Clinical studies with disposable diapers containing absorbent gelling materials: evaluation of effects on infant skin condition.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R L; Seymour, J L; Stone, L C; Milligan, M C

    1987-12-01

    Disposable infant diapers with absorbent gelling material (cross-linked sodium polyacrylates) incorporated into the core were clinically evaluated for their effect on infant skin condition. Absorbent gelling materials tightly hold water and provide pH control by a buffering capacity as well as by helping to segregate urine apart from feces. Four clinical studies were conducted with each following a rigid protocol that controlled for variables of diet and age in addition to the diaper material that may influence the development of diaper dermatitis and helped to control for any inherent bias in the study. This allowed for the controlled assessment of skin condition with respect to diaper type. Absorbent gelling material-containing disposable, conventional (100% cellulose core) disposable, and home-laundered cloth diapers were test products. In these studies 1614 infants were initially enrolled with 522 of them assigned to absorbent gelling material disposable, 738 to conventional disposable, and 354 to home-laundered cloth diapers. Objective measurements of skin wetness (transepidermal water loss) and skin pH, as well as double-blind grading of diaper dermatitis, were the measures of skin condition. Absorbent gelling material disposable diapers were associated with significantly reduced skin wetness, closer to normal skin pH, and lower degrees of diaper dermatitis when compared to conventional disposable or home-laundered cloth diapers. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that better control in the diaper area of skin wetness, skin pH, and the prevention of the mixing of urine and feces produces a better diaper environment.

  14. In vitro evaluation of surface roughness and microhardness of restorative materials submitted to erosive challenges.

    PubMed

    Briso, A L F; Caruzo, L P; Guedes, A P A; Catelan, A; dos Santos, P H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different acidic solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of restorative materials. The 120 specimens of restorative materials (Fuji II LC, Vitremer, Supreme XT, and Supreme XT + Biscover LV) were randomly divided into three groups according to the immersion media: hydrochloric acid, soft drink, or distilled water. Over a period of five weeks, the groups were immersed in the solutions, which were changed weekly. Data were tested using analysis of variance and the Fisher protected least significant difference test (p<0.05). The results showed that the glass ionomer materials showed the highest surface roughness values (Fuji II LC: 0.111 ± 0.014 μm before and 0.139 ± 0.016 μm after immersion; Vitremer: 0.177 ± 0.012 μm before and 0.084 ± 0.012 μm after immersion), whereas the lowest values were found for the resin sealed with Biscover LV before (0.047 ± 0.011 μm) and after exposure in distilled water (0.043 ± 0.007 μm), soft drink (0.040 ± 0.005 μm), and hydrochloric acid (0.045 ± 0.005 μm). The Supreme XT showed the highest microhardness values before (44.96 ± 2.51 KHN) and after the aging process (41.26 ± 1.22 KHN in water, 35.96 ± 0.81 KHN in soft drink, and 34.74 ± 0.97 KHN in HCl), with significant differences from the other materials (p<0.0001). The lowest microhardness values were found for glass ionomer materials. The solutions used in this study decreased the microhardness of all studied materials, whereas the sealed surface suffered minor changes in microhardness and surface roughness after exposure to acidic solutions.

  15. [Evaluating programs for preparation to old age: some theoretical thoughts and a practical example (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schneider, H D

    1977-07-01

    In the first part methodically satisfactory experimental designs for evaluating programs for preparation to old age on the basis of Cambell & Stanely (1963) are sketched including conditions which hinder the realization of the ideal notions. In the second part an experiment for comparing two preparatory courses to old age using different methods of instruction is described. It was observed that the more demanding teaching method resulted in more anxiety for old age. This led to the conclusion, that programs for preparation to old age should be planned as a sequence of several units in which the mastering of the new ideas may be learned and in which this learning process may be supervised.

  16. Aging response and characterization of precipitates in Zr alloy Excel pressure tube material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattari, M.; Holt, R. A.; Daymond, M. R.

    2014-09-01

    Precipitation hardening in the Zr-based alloy Excel (Zr-3.5 wt.% Sn-0.8 wt.% Mo-0.8 wt.% Nb) was studied using hardness testing and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Solution treatment at 890 °C, in the αZr + βZr region, and 980 °C, in the βZr region, followed by water-quenching and aging resulted in an increase of hardness, of up to 47% compared to the annealed material. The optimum condition for aging heat treatment was found to be 450 °C for 1-2 h. The precipitates were observed only in the transformed βZr martensitic phase. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in TEM showed the precipitate composition to be Zr-30 wt.% Mo-25 wt.% Nb-2 wt.% Fe. The crystal structure of the precipitates was determined to be hexagonal with a = 0.294 nm and c = 0.448 nm, i.e. c/a = 1.526.

  17. Stability of ethyl glucuronide in hair reference materials after accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Ammann, D; Becker, R; Nehls, I

    2015-12-01

    Two different hair reference materials, one produced from authentic hair displaying an ethyl glucuronide (EtG) content of about 25 pg/mg and one obtained by fortification of blank hair to an EtG level of 85 pg/mg were submitted to accelerated aging between 4 °C and 60 °C for periods between one and 24 months. Subsequently, the EtG content was determined in the aged samples and untreated reference samples stored at -22 °C under repeatability conditions following the so-called isochronous approach. The EtG content remained stable even at 40 °C for 24 months and at 60 °C over six months. This is in contrast to many organic analytes contained in trace concentrations in diverse matrices. A slight but significant increase of the recovered EtG in case of authentic hair samples having been exposed for 24 months between 4 °C and 60 °C may be due to a temperature-driven process that allows increased recoveries of the physiologically embedded EtG.

  18. Evaluating Learning in the 21st Century: A Digital Age Learning Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkey, Louise

    2011-01-01

    If the purpose of secondary schooling is to educate the upcoming generation to become active participants in society, evaluation of teaching and learning in the information-rich digital age should be underpinned by relevant theories and models. This article describes an evaluation tool developed using emerging ideas about knowledge creation and…

  19. Evaluation of Nontraditional Age Learners' Experiences in Internet-Based Clinical Social Work Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanke, Jayme; Zeman, Laura Dreuth

    2015-01-01

    This study involves an evaluation of online learners' experiences with two Internet-based clinical social work courses. The evaluation sought to discover whether there were differences in learning between traditional (under 25 years old) and nontraditional age learners (25 years and over) who completed the asynchronous online course. The study…

  20. Prevalence, Formation, Maintenance, and Evaluation of Interdisciplinary Student Aging Interest Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine J.; Vandenberg, Edward V.; Bottsford, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe the prevalence, formation, maintenance, and evaluation of student aging interest groups. They conducted a cross-sectional electronic survey of the 46 academic medical centers funded by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. To evaluate their group of approximately 50 students, the authors conducted an electronic pretest and…

  1. Computed tomography evaluation of the iliac crest apophysis: age estimation in living individuals.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Inci, Ercan; Erdil, Irem; Hocaoglu, Elif; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Kazimoglu, Cemal; Reisoglu, Ali; Can, Ismail Ozgur

    2016-07-01

    Determination of the ossification properties of the iliac apophysis is important not only in the clinical evaluation of patients undergoing orthopedic surgery but also in age estimation studies for forensic purposes. The literature includes both anthropological and radiological (conventional radiography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging modalities) investigations of the different staging systems used for these purposes. In this study, we assessed the utility of computed tomography (CT) of the iliac crest apophysis in estimating forensic age. CT scans of the iliac crest apophysis of 380 patients (187 females, 193 males, and 10-29 years of age) were evaluated according to the four-stage system. Further subclassification did not give data properly due to the reference length measurement of the iliac wing with CT. Thus, in our series, stage 2 was first seen in 12 years of age and stage 3 in those 14 years of age in both sexes and on both sides of the pelvis. Stage 4 was first seen in 17 years of both sexes but only on the right side; on the left side, it appeared in females 18 years of age and in males 17 years of age. Present data was found consistent with previous pelvic radiographic findings. First seen ages for stage 2 and 3 are 12 and 14 years respectively which presented valuable information for legally important age thresholds. However, disadvantages of CT, including high-dose radiation exposure to gonads, the difficulty of evaluating the iliac crest, and the age boundary of 17 years, could make this method infeasible, as compared with hand wrist and pelvic radiographic methods. CT of the iliac crest has probably a greater utility where preexisting CT scans of the pelvic region are available, and it may be considered as a supportive method for age-estimation purposes.

  2. Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yoshiki; Minami, Masayo; Onbe, Shin; Sakamoto, Minoru; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Toshio; Imamura, Mineo

    2011-01-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) radiocarbon dates for eight potsherds from a single piece of pottery from a wetland archaeological site indicated that charred material from the inner pottery surfaces (5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) is about 90 (14)C years older than that from the outer surfaces (4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis. We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis. Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis.

  3. Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Yoshiki; MINAMI, Masayo; ONBE, Shin; SAKAMOTO, Minoru; MATSUZAKI, Hiroyuki; NAKAMURA, Toshio; IMAMURA, Mineo

    2011-01-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) radiocarbon dates for eight potsherds from a single piece of pottery from a wetland archaeological site indicated that charred material from the inner pottery surfaces (5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) is about 90 14C years older than that from the outer surfaces (4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis. We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis. Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis. PMID:21986315

  4. Evaluation of Student Outcomes in Materials Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piippo, Steven

    1996-01-01

    This paper specifies 14 benchmarks and exit standards for the introduction of Materials Science and Technology in a secondary school education. Included is the standard that students should be able to name an example of each category of technological materials including metals, glass/ceramics, polymers (plastics) and composites. Students should know that each type of solid material has specific properties that can be measured. Students will learn that all solid materials have either a long range crystalline structure or a short range amorphous structure (i.e., glassy). They should learn the choice of materials for a particular application depends on the properties of the material, and the properties of the material depends on its crystal structure and microstructure. The microstructure may be modified by the methods by which the material is processed; students should explain this by the example of sintering a ceramic body to reduce its porosity and increase its densification and strength. Students will receive exposure to the world of work, post secondary educational opportunities, and in general a learning that will lead to a technologically literate intelligent citizen.

  5. Teaching and Evaluation Materials Utilizing Multiple Representations in Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savinainen, A.; Nieminen, P.; Makynen, A.; Viiri, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present materials and teaching ideas utilizing multiple representations in the contexts of kinematics and the force concept. These ideas and materials are substantiated by evidence and can be readily used in teaching with no special training. In addition, we briefly discuss two multiple-choice tests based on physics education…

  6. Development and evaluation of thermoplastic street maintenance material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemens, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    An all-weather permanent street patching material was investigated for flexible and rigid pavements. The economic, operational, and material requirements are discussed along with the results of field tests with various mixtures of EVA resins and asphalt. Cost analyses for thermoplastic patching methods are included.

  7. Evaluation of Dielectric-Barrier-Discharge Actuator Substrate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Sauti, Godfrey; Xu, Tian-Bing; Meador, Mary Ann; Guo, Haiquan

    2014-01-01

    A key, enabling element of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuator is the dielectric substrate material. While various investigators have studied the performance of different homogeneous materials, most often in the context of related DBD experiments, fundamental studies focused solely on the dielectric materials have received less attention. The purpose of this study was to conduct an experimental assessment of the body-force-generating performance of a wide range of dielectric materials in search of opportunities to improve DBD actuator performance. Materials studied included commonly available plastics and glasses as well as a custom-fabricated polyimide aerogel. Diagnostics included static induced thrust, electrical circuit parameters for 2D surface discharges and 1D volume discharges, and dielectric material properties. Lumped-parameter circuit simulations for the 1D case were conducted showing good correspondence to experimental data provided that stray capacitances are included. The effect of atmospheric humidity on DBD performance was studied showing a large influence on thrust. The main conclusion is that for homogeneous, dielectric materials at forcing voltages less than that required for streamer formation, the material chemical composition appears to have no effect on body force generation when actuator impedance is properly accounted for.

  8. Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for the evaluation of anti-aging compounds.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mahtab

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the causes of aging is a complex problem due to the multiple factors that influence aging, which include genetics, environment, metabolism and reproduction, among others. These multiple factors create logistical difficulties in the evaluation of anti-aging agents. There is a need for good model systems to evaluate potential anti-aging compounds. The model systems used should represent the complexities of aging in humans, so that the findings may be extrapolated to human studies, but they should also present an opportunity to minimize the variables so that the experimental results can be accurately interpreted. In addition to positively affecting lifespan, the impact of the compound on the physiologic confounders of aging, including fecundity and the health span--the period of life where an organism is generally healthy and free from serious or chronic illness--of the model organism needs to be evaluated. Fecundity is considered a major confounder of aging in fruit flies. It is well established that female flies that are exposed to toxic substances typically reduce their dietary intake and their reproductive output and display an artifactual lifespan extension. As a result, drugs that achieve longevity benefits by reducing fecundity as a result of diminished food intake are probably not useful candidates for eventual treatment of aging in humans and should be eliminated during the screening process. Drosophila melanogaster provides a suitable model system for the screening of anti-aging compounds as D. melanogaster and humans have many conserved physiological and biological pathways. In this paper, I propose an algorithm to screen anti-aging compounds using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system.

  9. Evaluation of oral health status of retirement-age population in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Vidzis, Aldis; Cema, Ingrida; Krasta, Ingrida; Brinkmane, Anda; Kalnins, Imants

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Latvian government Health care financing regulations do not envisage free dental care in nursing homes. Consequently, in this situation arises need to carry out comparative evaluation of oral health status and quantity indicators of dental prosthodontics among retirement-age population in Latvia. The aim of the study was to estimate oral health and dental prosthodontics indicators among retirement-age population in Latvia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. We examinated 465 retirement-age inhabitants in Latvia. We assessed dental status, quantity and quality of the existing complete dental prostheses. We also evaluated the DMF-T index. RESULTS. Oral health indicators among Latvian retirement-age population are better than those for nursing homes residents in the same age group. Complete dental prostheses used by nursing homes residents do not meet denture's quality criteria. Retirement-age patients have oral hygiene problems. CONCLUSIONS. DMF-T index among Latvian retirement-age population is lower than among residents of nursing homes. The major component of DMF-T index is the number of lost teeth. The assessment of dental prostheses among residents of nursing homes showed unsatisfactory results. Retirement-age population in Latvia needs treatment of oral mucosal diseases, improvement of oral hygienic measures and increase of amount of dental prosthodontics.

  10. Evaluation of the Mental Healthiness Aging Initiative: community program to promote awareness about mental health and aging issues.

    PubMed

    Zanjani, Faika; Kruger, Tina; Murray, Deborah

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the Mental Healthiness Aging Initiative, designed to promote community awareness and knowledge about mental health and aging issues. This study occurred during 2007-2009 in 67 of 120 counties in Kentucky. A rural region (11 counties) received the intervention, consisting of focus groups, Extension Agent training, and television-based social marketing campaign. Partial-intervention counties (29 counties) received only the television-based social marketing campaign. The control counties (27 counties) received no intervention activities. Results indicated that the intervention counties agreed more with being able to assist elder adults with a potential mental illness. Also, the intervention counties understood the risk of consuming alcohol and medications better, but had a poorer recognition of drinking problems in elder adults. These findings need to be considered within study limitations, such as measurement error, degree of intervention exposure, and regional differences across intervention groups. The study demonstrates that community interventions on mental health awareness and knowledge are feasible within majority rural regions, with Extension Agents being gatekeepers, for promoting positive messages about mental health and aging issues.

  11. Femtosecond laser processing of fuel injectors - a materials processing evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B C; Wynne, A

    2000-12-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a new laser-based machining technology that utilizes ultrashort-pulse (0.1-1.0 picosecond) lasers to cut materials with negligible generation of heat or shock. The ultrashort pulse laser, developed for the Department of Energy (Defense Programs) has numerous applications in operations requiring high precision machining. Due to the extremely short duration of the laser pulse, material removal occurs by a different physical mechanism than in conventional machining. As a result, any material (e.g., hardened steel, ceramics, diamond, silicon, etc.) can be machined with minimal heat-affected zone or damage to the remaining material. As a result of the threshold nature of the process, shaped holes, cuts, and textures can be achieved with simple beam shaping. Conventional laser tools used for cutting or high-precision machining (e.g., sculpting, drilling) use long laser pulses (10{sup -8} to over 1 sec) to remove material by heating it to the melting or boiling point (Figure 1.1a). This often results in significant damage to the remaining material and produces considerable slag (Figure 1.2a). With ultrashort laser pulses, material is removed by ionizing the material (Figure 1.1b). The ionized plasma expands away from the surface too quickly for significant energy transfer to the remaining material. This distinct mechanism produces extremely precise and clean-edged holes without melting or degrading the remaining material (Figures 1.2 and 1.3). Since only a very small amount of material ({approx} <0.5 microns) is removed per laser pulse, extremely precise machining can be achieved. High machining speed is achieved by operating the lasers at repetition rates up to 10,000 pulses per second. As a diagnostic, the character of the short-pulse laser produced plasma enables determination of the material being machined between pulses. This feature allows the machining of multilayer materials, metal on metal or metal on

  12. Development and evaluation of elastomeric materials for geothermal applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Kalfayan, S. H.; Reilly, W. W.; Ingham, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A material for a casing packer for service for 24 hours in a geothermal environment was developed by synthesis of new elastomers and formulation of available materials. Formulation included use of commercial elastomer gumstocks and also crosslinking of plastic (high Tg) materials. Fibrous reinforcement of fluorocarbon rubbers was emphasized. Organic fiber reinforcement did not increase hot properties significantly. Glass fiber reinforcement gave significant increase in tensile properties. Elongation was reduced, and the glass-reinforced composition examined so far did not hold up well in the geothermal environment. Colloidal asbestos fibers were also investigated. A few experiments with polyphenyl ether gave material with low tensile and high compression set. Available high styrene SBR compositions were studied. Work to date suggests that new synthetic polymers will be required for service in geothermal environments.

  13. Post Test Evaluation of NSWCCD Materials at EERC

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Eric Wuchina

    2001-12-31

    The higher combustion temperatures, particulate erosion, multivalent metal impurities, and local gas composition variations will all have dramatic effects on the performance of materials used for the cyclone combustor deflector cone.

  14. Nondestructive evaluation of a ceramic matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosskopf, Paul P.; Duke, John C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Monolithic ceramic materials have proven their usefulness in many applications, yet, their potential for critical structural applications is limited because of their sensitivity to small imperfections. To overcome this extreme sensitivity to small imperfections, ceramic matrix composite materials have been developed that have the ability to withstand some distributed damage. A borosilicate glass reinforced with several layers of silicon-carbide fiber mat has been studied. Four-point flexure and tension tests were performed not only to determine some of the material properties, but also to initiate a controlled amount of damage within each specimen. Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements were performed periodically during mechanical testing. This paper will compare the AU results to the mechanical test results and data from other nondestructive methods including acoustic emission monitoring and X-ray radiography. It was found that the AU measurements were sensitive to the damage that had developed within the material.

  15. Effect of disinfectant, water age, and pipe material on occurrence and persistence of Legionella, mycobacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and two amoebas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Masters, Sheldon; Hong, Yanjuan; Stallings, Jonathan; Falkinham, Joseph O; Edwards, Marc A; Pruden, Amy

    2012-11-06

    Opportunistic pathogens represent a unique challenge because they establish and grow within drinking water systems, yet the factors stimulating their proliferation are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of pipe materials, disinfectant type, and water age on occurrence and persistence of three opportunistic pathogens (Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), broader genera (Legionella and mycobacteria), and two amoeba hosts (Acanthamoeba spp. and Hartmanella vermiformis). Triplicate simulated distribution systems (SDSs) compared iron, cement, and PVC pipe materials fed either chlorinated or chloraminated tap water and were sampled at water ages ranging from 1 day to 5.7 days. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction quantified gene copies of target microorganisms in both biofilm and bulk water. Legionella, mycobacteria, P. aeruginosa, and both amoebas naturally colonized the six SDSs, but L. pneumophila and M. avium were not detected. Disinfectant type and dose was observed to have the strongest influence on the microbiota. Disinfectant decay was noted with water age, particularly in chloraminated SDSs (due to nitrification), generally resulting in increased microbial detection frequencies and densities with water age. The influence of pipe material became apparent at water ages corresponding to low disinfectant residual. Each target microbe appeared to display a distinct response to disinfectant type, pipe materials, water age, and their interactions. Differences between the first and the second samplings (e.g., appearance of Legionella, reduction in P. aeruginosa and Acanthamoeba) suggest a temporally dynamic drinking water microbial community.

  16. Numerical Evaluation of Mode 1 Stress Intensity Factor as a Function of Material Orientation For BX-265 Foam Insulation Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, Erik; Arakere, Nagaraj K.

    2006-01-01

    Foam; a cellular material, is found all around us. Bone and cork are examples of biological cell materials. Many forms of man-made foam have found practical applications as insulating materials. NASA uses the BX-265 foam insulation material on the external tank (ET) for the Space Shuttle. This is a type of Spray-on Foam Insulation (SOFI), similar to the material used to insulate attics in residential construction. This foam material is a good insulator and is very lightweight, making it suitable for space applications. Breakup of segments of this foam insulation on the shuttle ET impacting the shuttle thermal protection tiles during liftoff is believed to have caused the space shuttle Columbia failure during re-entry. NASA engineers are very interested in understanding the processes that govern the breakup/fracture of this complex material from the shuttle ET. The foam is anisotropic in nature and the required stress and fracture mechanics analysis must include the effects of the direction dependence on material properties. Material testing at NASA MSFC has indicated that the foam can be modeled as a transversely isotropic material. As a first step toward understanding the fracture mechanics of this material, we present a general theoretical and numerical framework for computing stress intensity factors (SIFs), under mixed-mode loading conditions, taking into account the material anisotropy. We present mode I SIFs for middle tension - M(T) - test specimens, using 3D finite element stress analysis (ANSYS) and FRANC3D fracture analysis software, developed by the Cornel1 Fracture Group. Mode I SIF values are presented for a range of foam material orientations. Also, NASA has recorded the failure load for various M(T) specimens. For a linear analysis, the mode I SIF will scale with the far-field load. This allows us to numerically estimate the mode I fracture toughness for this material. The results represent a quantitative basis for evaluating the strength and

  17. Evaluation of Neutron Poison Materials for DOE SNF Disposal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, D.W.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1998-09-01

    Aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) from foreign and domestic research reactors is being consolidated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for ultimate disposal in the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). Most of the aluminum-based fuel material contains highly enriched uranium (HEU) (more than 20 percent 235U), which challenges the preclusion of criticality events for disposal periods exceeding 10,000 years. Recent criticality analyses have shown that the addition of neutron absorbing materials (poisons) is needed in waste packages containing DOE SNF canisters fully loaded with Al-SNF under flooded and degraded configurations to demonstrate compliance with the requirement that Keff less than 0.95. Compatibility of poison matrix materials and the Al-SNF, including their relative degradation rate and solubility, are important to maintain criticality control. An assessment of the viability of poison and matrix materials has been conducted, and an experimental corrosion program has been initiated to provide data on degradation rates of poison and matrix materials and Al-SNF materials under repository relevant vapor and aqueous environments. Initial testing includes Al6061, Type 316L stainless steel, and A516Gr55 in synthesized J-13 water vapor at 50 degrees C, 100 degrees C, and 200 degrees C and in condensate water vapor at 100 degrees C. Preliminary results are presented herein.

  18. Bioreceptivity evaluation of cementitious materials designed to stimulate biological growth.

    PubMed

    Manso, Sandra; De Muynck, Willem; Segura, Ignacio; Aguado, Antonio; Steppe, Kathy; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2014-05-15

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC), the most used binder in construction, presents some disadvantages in terms of pollution (CO2 emissions) and visual impact. For this reason, green roofs and façades have gain considerable attention in the last decade as a way to integrate nature in cities. These systems, however, suffer from high initial and maintenance costs. An alternative strategy to obtain green facades is the direct natural colonisation of the cementitious construction materials constituting the wall, a phenomenon governed by the bioreceptivity of such material. This work aims at assessing the suitability of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) materials to allow a rapid natural colonisation taking carbonated OPC samples as a reference material. For that, the aggregate size, the w/c ratio and the amount of cement paste of mortars made of both binders were modified. The assessment of the different bioreceptivities was conducted by means of an accelerated algal fouling test. MPC samples exhibited a faster fouling compared to OPC samples, which could be mainly attributed to the lower pH of the MPC binder. In addition to the binder, the fouling rate was governed by the roughness and the porosity of the material. MPC mortar with moderate porosity and roughness appears to be the most feasible material to be used for the development of green concrete walls.

  19. Evaluation and ranking of candidate ceramic wafer engine seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    Modern engineered ceramics offer high temperature capabilities not found in even the best superalloy metals. The high temperature properties of several selected ceramics including aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride are reviewed as they apply to hypersonic engine seal design. A ranking procedure is employed to objectively differentiate among four different monolithic ceramic materials considered, including: a cold-pressed and sintered aluminum oxide; a sintered alpha-phase silicon carbide; a hot-isostatically pressed silicon nitride; and a cold-pressed and sintered silicon nitride. This procedure is used to narrow the wide range of potential ceramics considered to an acceptable number for future detailed and costly analyses and tests. The materials are numerically scored according to their high temperature flexural strength; high temperature thermal conductivity; resistance to crack growth; resistance to high heating rates; fracture toughness; Weibull modulus; and finally according to their resistance to leakage flow, where materials having coefficients of thermal expansion closely matching the engine panel material resist leakage flow best. The cold-pressed and sintered material (Kyocera SN-251) ranked the highest in the overall ranking especially when implemented in engine panels made of low expansion rate materials being considered for the engine, including Incoloy and titanium alloys.

  20. A comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of nanofibrous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubun, German P.; Bessudnova, Nadezda O.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration or replacement of lost or damaged hard tooth tissues remain a reconstructive clinical dentistry challenge. One of the most promising solutions to this problem is the development of novel concepts and methodologies of tissue engineering for the synthesis of three-dimensional graft constructs that are equivalent to original organs and tissues. This structural and functional compatibility can be reached by producing ultra-thin polymer filament scaffolds. This research aims through a series of studies to examine different methods of polymer filament material special preparation and test mechanical properties of the produced materials subjected to a tensile strain. Nanofibrous material preparation using chemically pure acetone and mixtures of ethanol/water has shown no significant changes in sample surface morphology. The high temperature impact on material morphology has resulted in the modification of fiber structure. In the course of mechanical tests it has been revealed the dependence of the material strength on the spinning solution compositions. The results achieved point to the possibility to develop nanofibrous materials with required parameters changing the methodology of spinning solution production.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC AND ENERGY IMPACTS OF MATERIAL RECOVERY FACILITIES - A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFS) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. he MITE Program is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protecti...

  2. Quantitative non-destructive evaluation of composite materials based on ultrasonic parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Research into the nondestructive evaluation of advanced reinforced composite laminates is summarized. The applicability of the Framers-Kronig equations to the nondestructive evaluation of composite materials is described.

  3. Effect of pad location relative to glass weave on cratering and underfill process improvement and material evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quran, Mohammad M.

    This research contains two studies. First study investigated one of the factors that affect the performance of pads; the locations of pads relative to glass weave. Dage 4000plus bond tester was used in conducting a joint-level testing of pads on 370HR printed circuit board that has 1080 glass fabric. Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) was utilized to image pads with respect to upper layer of glass weave. It was found that locations of pads do not affect their strength, but it has a weak effect on fatigue performance. The second part of this research is underfill process improvement and material selection. This study evaluated four underfill materials against a flow model. Assemblies were made of transparent glass slides and then underfilled. Different factors that affect this flow were investigated: substrate temperature, standoff, and material age. In addition, the materials' tendency to form voids during flow or curing was observed.

  4. A Step Forward: Investigating Expertise in Materials Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Keith; Kim, Mija; Ya-Fang, Liu; Nava, Andrea; Perkins, Dawn; Smith, Anne Margaret; Soler-Canela, Oscar; Lu, Wang

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating the textbook evaluation techniques of novice and experienced teachers, which was conducted by the Language Teaching Expertise Research Group (or LATEX) within Lancaster University's Department of Linguistics and English Language. Three ELT teachers were chosen to evaluate the student and teacher…

  5. Formative Evaluation of Instructional Materials: An Overview of Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Cynthia B.

    1986-01-01

    Describes and compares formative evaluation approaches: expert review, developmental testing, three-stage model, learner verification and revision, and general approach to formative evaluation. Discussion of differences among approaches related to duration of try-out/revision cycle and recommendations for effective acquisition of data are…

  6. Evaluation of human antibody responses to diphtheria toxin subunits A and B in various age groups.

    PubMed

    Karakus, R; Caglar, K; Aybay, C

    2007-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate human antibody responses to diphtheria toxin subunits in various age groups. Antibodies against the intact diphtheria toxin and the diphtheria toxin subunits A and B were evaluated in 1319 individuals using a double-antigen ELISA. Although high levels of protection (83.6%, 95% CI 79.2-87.4) were found in children and adolescents, the middle-aged adult population was less protected (28.8%, 95% CI 24.3-33.6). An increase in age was associated with a decrease in the frequency of protected individuals in the 0-39-year age group (p <0.001). Anti-subunit B levels correlated well (p <0.01) with levels of antibodies against the intact toxin. In children aged < or =16 years, the intervals at which the peaks in geometric mean titres of anti-subunit B antibodies were observed were found to correlate with the ages at which booster doses are administered. Overall, males appeared to be more protected than females (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.34-2.08, p <0.001). A small group of individuals had antibody levels of > or =0.1 IU/mL against the intact toxin, but did not have protective antibody against subunit B. Determination of anti-subunit B antibody levels should help in evaluating the effectiveness of diphtheria boosters and other aspects of diphtheria immunity.

  7. The Development of Experimentation and Evidence Evaluation Skills at Preschool Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekny, Jeanette; Grube, Dietmar; Maehler, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Researchers taking a domain-general approach to the development of scientific reasoning long thought that the ability to engage in scientific reasoning did not develop until adolescence. However, more recent studies have shown that preschool children already have a basic ability to evaluate evidence and a basic understanding of experimentation. Data providing insights into when exactly in the preschool years significant gains in these abilities occur are scarce. Drawing on a sample of 138 preschool children, this longitudinal study therefore examined how children's ability to evaluate evidence and their understanding of experimentation develop between the ages of four and six. Findings showed that the ability to evaluate evidence was already well developed at age four and increased steadily and significantly over time as long as the pattern of covariation was perfect. In the case of imperfect covariation, the proportion of correct answers was low over the period of observation, but showed a significant increase between the ages of four and five. If the data did not allow relationship between variables to be inferred, the proportion of correct answers was low, with a significant increase between the ages of five and six. The children's understanding of experimentation increased significantly between the ages of five and six. The implications of these findings for age-appropriate science programs in preschool are discussed.

  8. In vivo evaluation of optic nerve aging in adult rhesus monkey by diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yumei; Li, Longchuan; Preuss, Todd M.; Hu, Xiaoping; Herndon, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Aging of the optic nerve can result in reduced visual sensitivity or vision loss. Normal optic nerve aging has been investigated previously in tissue specimens but poorly explored in vivo. In the present study, the normal aging of optic nerve was evaluated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in non-human primates. Adult female rhesus monkeys at the ages of 9 to 13 years old (young group, n=8) and 21 to 27 years old (old group, n=7) were studied using parallel-imaging-based DTI on a clinical 3T scanner. Compared to young adults, the old monkeys showed 26% lower fractional anisotropy (P<0.01), and 44% greater radial diffusivity, although the latter difference was of marginal statistical significance (P=0.058). These MRI findings are largely consistent with published results of light and electron microscopic studies of optic nerve aging in macaque monkeys, which indicate a loss of fibers and degenerative changes in myelin sheaths. PMID:24649434

  9. Evaluation of material dispersion using a nanosecond optical pulse radiator.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, M; Ohmori, Y; Miya, T

    1979-07-01

    To study the material dispersion effects on graded-index fibers, a method for measuring the material dispersion in optical glass fibers has been developed. Nanosecond pulses in the 0.5-1.7-microm region are generated by a nanosecond optical pulse radiator and grating monochromator. These pulses are injected into a GeO(2)-P(2)0(5)-doped silica graded-index fiber. Relative time delay changes between different wavelengths are used to determine material dispersion, core glass refractive index, material group index, and optimum profile parameter of the graded-index fiber. From the measured data, the optimum profile parameter on the GeO(2)-P(2)O(5)-doped silica graded-index fiber could be estimated to be 1.88 at 1.27 microm of the material dispersion free wavelength region and 1.82 at 1.55 microm of the lowest-loss wavelength region in silica-based optical fiber waveguides.

  10. Fire-resistant aircraft materials development and evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bricker, R. W.; Stuckey, R. N.

    1974-01-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to provide a more fire-resistant commercial aircraft interior and to improve the fuselage insulation barrier between the cabin interior and an exterior fuel fire. Significant secondary objectives are to reduce the smoke and toxic gas production of the materials and to meet the end item use requirements pertaining to wearability, color fastness, and aesthetic appeal. It is shown that the fuselage insulation materials must meet stringent requirements pertaining to acoustic attenuation, low density, and water repellency.

  11. Concepts and techniques for ultrasonic evaluation of material mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1980-01-01

    Ultrasonic methods that can be used for material strength are reviewed. Emergency technology involving advanced ultrasonic techniques and associated measurements is described. It is shown that ultrasonic NDE is particularly useful in this area because it involves mechanical elastic waves that are strongly modulated by morphological factors that govern mechanical strength and also dynamic failure modes. These aspects of ultrasonic NDE are described in conjunction with advanced approaches and theoretical concepts for signal acquisition and analysis for materials characterization. It is emphasized that the technology is in its infancy and that much effort is still required before the techniques and concepts can be transferred from laboratory to field conditions.

  12. Shade material evaluation based on physiological response of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle produced in open feedlots are vulnerable to a variety of weather events; under certain conditions heat events can be especially detrimental. Shade structures are often considered as one method of reducing cattle stress. A variety of shading materials are available; selection of a suitable m...

  13. PHYSICAL EVALUATION OF THIN FILMS OF SOLID STATE MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    microscopy and X-ray and electron diffraction methods. These materials include vapor deposited thin films of boron and boron phosphide on single...crystal silicon substrates via halide reduction, electrodeposits of copper onto single crystal copper substrates, thin films of carbon deposited onto

  14. Development and Evaluation of Elastomeric Materials for Geothermal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Kalfayan, S. H.; Reilly, W. W.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Mosesman, I. D.; Ingham, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    A material was formulated having about 250-350 psi tensile strength and 30-80 percent elongation at 260 C for at least 24 hours in simulated brine. The relationship between these laboratory test results and sealing performance in actual or simulated test conditions is not entirely clear; however, it is believed that no conventional formation or casing packer design is likely to perform well using these materials. The synthetic effort focused on high temperature block copolymers and development of curable polystyrene. Procedures were worked out for synthesizing these new materials. Initial results with heat-cured unfilled polystyrene 'gum' at 260 C indicate a tensile strength of about 50 psi. Cast films of the first sample of polyphenyl quinoxaline-polystyrene block copolymer, which has 'graft-block' structure consisting of a polystyrene chain with pendant polyphenyl quinoxaline groups, show elastomeric behavior in the required temperature range. Its tensile strength and elongation at 260 C were 220-350 psi and 18-36 percent, respectively. All of these materials also showed satisfactory hydrolytic stability.

  15. Developing, Implementing and Evaluating Case Studies in Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Claire; Wilcock, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The use of case studies to teach materials science undergraduates is an exciting and interesting educational approach. As well as helping learners to connect theory and practice, the case method is also useful for creating an active learning environment, developing key skills and catering for a range of different learning styles. This paper…

  16. Formulation development of a cream containing fennel extract: in vivo evaluation for anti-aging effects.

    PubMed

    Rasul, A; Akhtar, N; Khan, B A; Mahmood, T; Uz Zaman, S; Khan, H M Shoaib

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to formulate and evaluate anti-aging effects of a topical cream (w/o emulsion) containig extract of Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) versus its base. Formulation containing 4% concentrated extract of Foeniculum vulgare was developed by entrapping in the inner aqueous phase of w/o emulsion and base contained no extract. Both the base and formulation were stored under different storage conditions to predict their stability. The formulation and base were evaluated for effect on skin moisture and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). The base showed insignificant while the formulation showed significant effects on skin moisture and TEWL. The parameter volume and surface evaluation of living skin (SELS) parameters SEr, SEsc, SEsm, SEw were also evaluated and showed a significant (p < or = 0.05) decline. The texture parameter energy showed a significant increase proving that the formulation possesses potential anti-aging effects.

  17. An evaluation of the use of pentosidine as a biomarker for ageing turtles

    PubMed Central

    Iverson, John B.; Stahl, Randal S.; Furcolow, Carol; Kraus, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Concentrations of the biomarker pentosidine have been shown to be useful measures of age for a number of avian and mammalian species. However, no study has examined its usefulness as an age marker in a long-lived ectotherm despite the fact that such a marker could prove useful in understanding age distributions of populations subject to conservation programmes. Therefore, we evaluated pentosidine concentrations in the interdigital webbing of 117 female yellow mud turtles (Kinosternon flavescens) at a 35 year study site in western Nebraska where nearly all turtles are of known age. Pentosidine concentrations were extraordinarily low and positively correlated with age in this turtle, but concentrations were too variable to permit precise estimates of age for turtles of unknown age. These results may reflect the remarkable physiological adaptations of this turtle to low temperatures and oxygen deprivation in a highly seasonal environment requiring prolonged hibernation. Whether pentosidine concentrations in other ectotherms occupying less seasonal environments would be more highly correlated with age remains to be determined. However, our results suggest that patterns of accumulation of pentosidine in ectotherms may be fundamentally different from those in endotherms. PMID:28149519

  18. Evaluation of Aged Garlic Extract Neuroprotective Effect in a Focal Model of Cerebral Ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Penélope; Maldonado, Perla D.; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Barrera, Diana; Chánez-Cárdenas, María Elena

    2008-02-01

    The oxidant species generated in cerebral ischemia have been implicated as important mediators of neuronal injury through damage to lipids, DNA, and proteins. Since ischemia as well as reperfusion insults generate oxidative stress, the administration of antioxidants may limit oxidative damage and ameliorate disease progression. The present work shows the transitory neuroprotective effect of the aged garlic extract (AGE) administration (a proposed antioxidant compound) in a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in rats and established its therapeutic window. To determine the optimal time of administration, animal received AGE (1.2 mL/kg) intraperitoneally 30 min before onset of reperfusion (-0.5 R), at the beginning of reperfusion (0R), or 1 h after onset of reperfusion (1R). Additional doses were administrated after 1, 2, or 3 h after onset of reperfusion. To establish the therapeutic window of AGE, the infarct area was determined for each treatment after different times of reperfusion. Results show that the administration of AGE at the onset of reperfusion reduced the infarct area by 70% (evaluated after 2 h reperfusion). The therapeutic window of AGE was determined. Repeated doses did not extend the temporal window of protection. A significant reduction in the nitrotyrosine level was observed in the brain tissue subjected to MCAO after AGE treatment at the onset of reperfusion. Data in the present work show that AGE exerts a transitory neuroprotective effect in response to ischemia/reperfusion-induced neuronal injury.

  19. Evaluation of combined effects of ageing period and freezing rate on quality attributes of beef loins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuan H Brad; Liesse, Charlotte; Kemp, Robert; Balan, Prabhu

    2015-12-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the combined effects of ageing period and different freezing rates on meat quality attributes of beef loins. Pairs of loins (M. longissimus at 1 day post mortem) from 12 carcasses were divided into four equal portions and randomly assigned to four ageing/freezing treatments (aged only, frozen only, and 3 or 4 weeks ageing at -1.5°C then frozen). Two freezing methods (fast freezing by calcium chloride immersion or slow freezing by air freezer at -18°C) were applied to the loin sections. Fast freezing had no effect on shear force (P>0.05), but significantly improved the water-holding capacity of the aged/frozen loins by reducing purge and drip losses. Ageing-then-freezing significantly improved shear force values of loins compared to both the aged only and frozen only loins. These observations suggest that fast freezing will add more value to the aged/frozen/thawed meat by minimising the amount of water-loss due to the freezing/thawing process.

  20. Effect of aging on the transverse toughness of human cortical bone: evaluation by R-curves.

    PubMed

    Koester, K J; Barth, H D; Ritchie, R O

    2011-10-01

    The age-related deterioration in the quality (e.g., strength and fracture resistance) and quantity (e.g., bone-mineral density) of human bone, together with increased life expectancy, is responsible for increasing incidence of bone fracture in the elderly. The present study describes ex vivo fracture experiments to quantitatively assess the effect of aging on the fracture toughness properties of human cortical bone specifically in the transverse (breaking) orientation. Because bone exhibits rising crack-growth resistance with crack extension, the aging-related transverse toughness is evaluated in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, measured for bone taken from a wide range of age groups (25-74 years). Using this approach, both the ex vivo crack-initiation and crack-growth toughness are determined and are found to deteriorate with age; however, the effect is far smaller than that reported for the longitudinal toughness of cortical bone. Whereas the longitudinal crack-growth toughness has been reported to be reduced by almost an order of magnitude for human cortical bone over this age range, the corresponding age-related decrease in transverse toughness is merely ~14%. Similar to that reported for X-ray irradiated bone, with aging cracks in the transverse direction are subjected to an increasing incidence of crack deflection, principally along the cement lines, but the deflections are smaller and result in a generally less tortuous crack path.

  1. Final Report on the Evaluation of the National Science Foundation's Instructional Materials Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tushnet, Naida C.; Millsap, Mary Ann; Abdullah-Welsh, Noraini; Brigham, Nancy; Cooley, Elizabeth; Elliott, Jeanne; Johnston, Karen; Martinez, Alina; Nierenberg, Marla; Rosenblum, Sheila

    This document presents the final report on the evaluation of the Instructional Materials Development (IMD) program of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and focuses on issues related to the development, dissemination, adoption, implementation, and impact of new instructional materials. The IMD program evaluates products at each step, from…

  2. Evaluation and prediction of long-term environmental effects of nonmetallic materials, second phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the functional properties of a number of nonmetallic materials were evaluated experimentally as a function of simulated space environments and to use such data to develop models for accelerated test methods useful for predicting such behavioral changes. The effects of changed particle irradiations on candidate space materials are evaluated.

  3. Performance prediction evaluation of ceramic materials in point-focusing solar receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, J.; Zwissler, J.

    1979-01-01

    A performance prediction was adapted to evaluate the use of ceramic materials in solar receivers for point focusing distributed applications. System requirements were determined including the receiver operating environment and system operating parameters for various engine types. Preliminary receiver designs were evolved from these system requirements. Specific receiver designs were then evaluated to determine material functional requirements.

  4. EFL Learners' Perspectives on ELT Materials Evaluation Relative to Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bokyung

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the relationship between Korean EFL learners' self-reporting learning style preferences and their perspectives on ELT materials evaluation. Quantitative data was acquired from 521 subjects' responses to a learning style survey and a questionnaire of materials evaluation checklist. The findings show that Korean EFL learners'…

  5. Thermal Performance of Aged and Weathered Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI) Materials Under Cryogenic Vacuum Conditions (Cryostat-4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center conducted long-term testing of SOFI materials under actual-use cryogenic conditions with Cryostat-4. The materials included in the testing were NCFI 24-124 (acreage foam), BX-265 (close-out foam, including intertank flange and bipod areas), and a potential alternate material, NCFI 27-68, (acreage foam with the flame retardant removed). Specimens of these materials were placed at two locations: a site that simulated aging (the Vehicle Assembly Building [VAB]) and a site that simulated weathering (the Atmospheric Exposure Test Site [beach site]). After aging/weathering intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months, the samples were retrieved and tested for their thermal performance under cryogenic vacuum conditions with test apparatus Cryostat-4.

  6. Re-evaluating neonatal-age models for ungulates: does model choice affect survival estimates?

    PubMed

    Grovenburg, Troy W; Monteith, Kevin L; Jacques, Christopher N; Klaver, Robert W; DePerno, Christopher S; Brinkman, Todd J; Monteith, Kyle B; Gilbert, Sophie L; Smith, Joshua B; Bleich, Vernon C; Swanson, Christopher C; Jenks, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    New-hoof growth is regarded as the most reliable metric for predicting age of newborn ungulates, but variation in estimated age among hoof-growth equations that have been developed may affect estimates of survival in staggered-entry models. We used known-age newborns to evaluate variation in age estimates among existing hoof-growth equations and to determine the consequences of that variation on survival estimates. During 2001-2009, we captured and radiocollared 174 newborn (≤24-hrs old) ungulates: 76 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Minnesota and South Dakota, 61 mule deer (O. hemionus) in California, and 37 pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) in South Dakota. Estimated age of known-age newborns differed among hoof-growth models and varied by >15 days for white-tailed deer, >20 days for mule deer, and >10 days for pronghorn. Accuracy (i.e., the proportion of neonates assigned to the correct age) in aging newborns using published equations ranged from 0.0% to 39.4% in white-tailed deer, 0.0% to 3.3% in mule deer, and was 0.0% for pronghorns. Results of survival modeling indicated that variability in estimates of age-at-capture affected short-term estimates of survival (i.e., 30 days) for white-tailed deer and mule deer, and survival estimates over a longer time frame (i.e., 120 days) for mule deer. Conversely, survival estimates for pronghorn were not affected by estimates of age. Our analyses indicate that modeling survival in daily intervals is too fine a temporal scale when age-at-capture is unknown given the potential inaccuracies among equations used to estimate age of neonates. Instead, weekly survival intervals are more appropriate because most models accurately predicted ages within 1 week of the known age. Variation among results of neonatal-age models on short- and long-term estimates of survival for known-age young emphasizes the importance of selecting an appropriate hoof-growth equation and appropriately defining intervals (i.e., weekly

  7. Re-Evaluating Neonatal-Age Models for Ungulates: Does Model Choice Affect Survival Estimates?

    PubMed Central

    Grovenburg, Troy W.; Monteith, Kevin L.; Jacques, Christopher N.; Klaver, Robert W.; DePerno, Christopher S.; Brinkman, Todd J.; Monteith, Kyle B.; Gilbert, Sophie L.; Smith, Joshua B.; Bleich, Vernon C.; Swanson, Christopher C.; Jenks, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    New-hoof growth is regarded as the most reliable metric for predicting age of newborn ungulates, but variation in estimated age among hoof-growth equations that have been developed may affect estimates of survival in staggered-entry models. We used known-age newborns to evaluate variation in age estimates among existing hoof-growth equations and to determine the consequences of that variation on survival estimates. During 2001–2009, we captured and radiocollared 174 newborn (≤24-hrs old) ungulates: 76 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Minnesota and South Dakota, 61 mule deer (O. hemionus) in California, and 37 pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) in South Dakota. Estimated age of known-age newborns differed among hoof-growth models and varied by >15 days for white-tailed deer, >20 days for mule deer, and >10 days for pronghorn. Accuracy (i.e., the proportion of neonates assigned to the correct age) in aging newborns using published equations ranged from 0.0% to 39.4% in white-tailed deer, 0.0% to 3.3% in mule deer, and was 0.0% for pronghorns. Results of survival modeling indicated that variability in estimates of age-at-capture affected short-term estimates of survival (i.e., 30 days) for white-tailed deer and mule deer, and survival estimates over a longer time frame (i.e., 120 days) for mule deer. Conversely, survival estimates for pronghorn were not affected by estimates of age. Our analyses indicate that modeling survival in daily intervals is too fine a temporal scale when age-at-capture is unknown given the potential inaccuracies among equations used to estimate age of neonates. Instead, weekly survival intervals are more appropriate because most models accurately predicted ages within 1 week of the known age. Variation among results of neonatal-age models on short- and long-term estimates of survival for known-age young emphasizes the importance of selecting an appropriate hoof-growth equation and appropriately defining intervals (i.e., weekly

  8. Re-evaluating neonatal-age models for ungulates: Does model choice affect survival estimates?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grovenburg, Troy W.; Monteith, Kevin L.; Jacques, Christopher N.; Klaver, Robert W.; DePerno, Christopher S.; Brinkman, Todd J.; Monteith, Kyle B.; Gilbert, Sophie L.; Smith, Joshua B.; Bleich, Vernon C.; Swanson, Christopher C.; Jenks, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    New-hoof growth is regarded as the most reliable metric for predicting age of newborn ungulates, but variation in estimated age among hoof-growth equations that have been developed may affect estimates of survival in staggered-entry models. We used known-age newborns to evaluate variation in age estimates among existing hoof-growth equations and to determine the consequences of that variation on survival estimates. During 2001–2009, we captured and radiocollared 174 newborn (≤24-hrs old) ungulates: 76 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Minnesota and South Dakota, 61 mule deer (O. hemionus) in California, and 37 pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) in South Dakota. Estimated age of known-age newborns differed among hoof-growth models and varied by >15 days for white-tailed deer, >20 days for mule deer, and >10 days for pronghorn. Accuracy (i.e., the proportion of neonates assigned to the correct age) in aging newborns using published equations ranged from 0.0% to 39.4% in white-tailed deer, 0.0% to 3.3% in mule deer, and was 0.0% for pronghorns. Results of survival modeling indicated that variability in estimates of age-at-capture affected short-term estimates of survival (i.e., 30 days) for white-tailed deer and mule deer, and survival estimates over a longer time frame (i.e., 120 days) for mule deer. Conversely, survival estimates for pronghorn were not affected by estimates of age. Our analyses indicate that modeling survival in daily intervals is too fine a temporal scale when age-at-capture is unknown given the potential inaccuracies among equations used to estimate age of neonates. Instead, weekly survival intervals are more appropriate because most models accurately predicted ages within 1 week of the known age. Variation among results of neonatal-age models on short- and long-term estimates of survival for known-age young emphasizes the importance of selecting an appropriate hoof-growth equation and appropriately defining intervals (i.e., weekly

  9. Evaluating the physiological reserves of older patients with cancer: the value of potential biomarkers of aging?

    PubMed

    Pallis, Athanasios G; Hatse, Sigrid; Brouwers, Barbara; Pawelec, Graham; Falandry, Claire; Wedding, Ulrich; Lago, Lissandra Dal; Repetto, Lazzaro; Ring, Alistair; Wildiers, Hans

    2014-04-01

    Aging of an individual entails a progressive decline of functional reserves and loss of homeostasis that eventually lead to mortality. This process is highly individualized and is influenced by multiple genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. This individualization and the diversity of factors influencing aging result in a significant heterogeneity among people with the same chronological age, representing a major challenge in daily oncology practice. Thus, many factors other than mere chronological age will contribute to treatment tolerance and outcome in the older patients with cancer. Clinical/comprehensive geriatric assessment can provide information on the general health status of individuals, but is far from perfect as a prognostic/predictive tool for individual patients. On the other hand, aging can also be assessed in terms of biological changes in certain tissues like the blood compartment which result from adaptive alterations due to past history of exposures, as well as intrinsic aging processes. There are major signs of 'aging' in lymphocytes (e.g. lymphocyte subset distribution, telomere length, p16INK4A expression), and also in (inflammatory) cytokine expression and gene expression patterns. These result from a combination of the above two processes, overlaying genetic predispositions which contribute significantly to the aging phenotype. These potential "aging biomarkers" might provide additional prognostic/predictive information supplementing clinical evaluation. The purpose of the current paper is to describe the most relevant potential "aging biomarkers" (markers that indicate the biological functional age of patients) which focus on the biological background, the (limited) available clinical data, and technical challenges. Despite their great potential interest, there is a need for much more (validated) clinical data before these biomarkers could be used in a routine clinical setting. This manuscript tries to provide a guideline on how

  10. Evaluation of a Web Based Mathematics Teaching Material on the Subject of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baki, A.; Guveli, E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study is to develop a web-based mathematics teaching (WBMT) material and to evaluate the effectiveness of the WBMT material for 9th grade students learning the concept of mathematical function. Firstly, a WBMT material was designed and piloted. As a result of this pilot study the site was revised as a final form. The study was…

  11. Survey and evaluation of available thermal insulation materials for use on solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    This is the final report of a survey and evaluation of insulation materials for use with components of solar heating and cooling systems. The survey was performed by mailing questionnaires to manufacturers of insulation materials and by conducting an extensive literature search to obtain data on relevant properties of various types of insulation materials. The study evaluated insulation materials for active and passive solar heating and cooling systems and for multifunction applications. Primary and secondary considerations for selecting insulation materials for various components of solar heating and cooling systems are presented.

  12. Developing indicators for evaluation of age-friendly communities in Canada: process and results

    PubMed Central

    Orpana, H.; Chawla, M.; Gallagher, E.; Escaravage, E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: In 2006, the World Health Organization launched the Global Age-Friendly Cities Project to support active aging. Canada has a large number of age-friendly initiatives; however, little is known about the effectiveness and outcomes of age-friendly community (AFC) initiatives. In addition, stakeholders report that they lack the capacity and tools to develop and conduct evaluations of their AFC initiatives. In order to address these gaps, the Public Health Agency of Canada developed indicators to support the evaluation of AFC initiatives relevant to a wide range of Canadian communities. These indicators meet the varied needs of communities, but are not designed to evaluate collective impact or enable cross-community comparisons. Methods: An evidence-based, iterative consultation approach was used to develop indicators for AFCs. This involved a literature review and an environmental scan. Two rounds of key expert and stakeholder consultations were conducted to rate potential indicators according to their importance, actionability and feasibility. A final list of indicators and potential measures were developed based on results from these consultations, as well as key policy considerations. Results: Thirty-nine indicators emerged across eight AFC domains plus four indicators related to long-term health and social outcomes. All meet the intended purpose of evaluating AFC initiatives at the community level. A user-friendly guide is available to support and share this work. Conclusion: The AFC indicators can help communities evaluate age-friendly initiatives, which is the final step in completing a cycle of the Pan-Canadian AFC milestones. Communities are encouraged to use the evaluation results to improve their AFC initiatives, there by benefiting a broad range of Canadians. PMID:27768558

  13. Recognition of Pictorial Material As A Function of Experiential Deprivation and Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misra, Girishwar; Shukla, Aradhana

    1984-01-01

    Investigated relative effects of chronological age and experiential deprivation upon pictorial recognition. Four age levels (ages four to five, five to six, six to seven, and seven to eight years) and two levels of deprivation were manipulated. The 50 subjects in each factorial cell performed tasks individually. (Author/RH)

  14. Evaluation of hybrid composite materials in cylindrical specimen geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liber, T.; Daniel, I. M.

    1976-01-01

    Static and fatigue properties of three composite materials and hybrids were examined. The materials investigated were graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy, PRD-49 (Kevlar 49)/epoxy, and hybrids in angle-ply configurations. A new type of edgeless cylindrical specimen was developed. It is a flattened tube with two flat sides connected by curved sections and it is handled much like the standard flat coupon. Special specimen fabrication, tabbing, and tab region reinforcing techniques were developed. Axial modulus, Poisson's ratio, strength, and ultimate strain were obtained under static loading from flattened tube specimens of nine laminate configurations. In the case of graphite/epoxy the tubular specimens appeared to yield somewhat higher strength and ultimate strain values than flat specimens. Tensile fatigue tests were conducted with all nine types of specimens and S-N curves obtained. Specimens surviving 10 million cycles of tensile loading were subsequently tested statically to failure to determine residual properties.

  15. Quantitative ultrasonic evaluation of mechanical properties of engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1978-01-01

    Current progress in the application of ultrasonic techniques to nondestructive measurement of mechanical strength properties of engineering materials is reviewed. Even where conventional NDE techniques have shown that a part is free of overt defects, advanced NDE techniques should be available to confirm the material properties assumed in the part's design. There are many instances where metallic, composite, or ceramic parts may be free of critical defects while still being susceptible to failure under design loads due to inadequate or degraded mechanical strength. This must be considered in any failure prevention scheme that relies on fracture analysis. This review will discuss the availability of ultrasonic methods that can be applied to actual parts to assess their potential susceptibility to failure under design conditions.

  16. Technical evaluation of Russian aircraft stealth coating and structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gac, F.D.; Young, A.T. Jr.; Migliori, A.

    1996-10-01

    Treating aircraft, missiles, and ships with materials that absorb electromagnetic energy continues to be an important technique for reducing a vehicle`s radar cross section (RCS) and improving tis combat effectiveness and survivability. Work at the Russian Scientific Center for Applied Problems in Electrodynamics (SCAPE) has produced and experimentally validated an accurate predictor of the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with discontinuous composite materials consisting of magnetic and/or dielectric particles dispersed in a non-conductive matrix (i.e. percolation systems). The primary purpose of this project was to analyze rf-absorbing coatings and validate manufacturing processes associated with the Russian percolation system designs. An additional objective was to apply the percolation methodology toward a variety of civilian applications by transferring the technology to US industry.

  17. Property Screening and Evaluation of Ceramic Turbine Engine Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    doped with 1% MgO, 8% Y2 03, and 15% Y20 3 ) were of lower strength than the Norton NC-132 and NCX- 34 materials, Slow crick growth was in evidence...T.L. Francis and R.L. Coble, "Creep of Polycrystalline Silicon Carbide," Jour. Amer. Ceram. Soc., 51(2) pp. 115-6 (1968). 44. P.L. Farnsworth and R.L

  18. Development and Evaluation of Deep-Sea Swimsuit Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-06-01

    great sea depths for long periods of time . Two chemically distinct, flexible, syntactic foams--a Unit-developed, polyurethane, hollow-glass-microsphere...applications in deep-sea environments down to 1000 FSW. Tests showed that both materials were essentially incompressible to depths of 1000 FSW (less than 3...verification of sample thermal-conductivity data. Suit conductivity tests performed on an instrumented copper manikin substantially confirmed the

  19. A New Class of Risk-Importance Measures to Support Reactor Aging Management and the Prioritization of Materials Degradation Research

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Toyooka, Michael Y.

    2010-06-07

    As the US fleet of light water reactors ages, the risks of operation might be expected to increase. Although probabilistic risk assessment has proven a critical resource in risk-informed regulatory decision-making, limitations in current methods and models have constrained their prospective value in reactor aging management. These limitations stem principally from the use of static component failure rate models (which do not allow the impact of component aging on failure rates to be represented) and a very limited treatment of passive components (which would be expected to have an increasingly significant risk contribution in an aging system). Yet, a PRA captures a substantial knowledge base that could be of significant value in addressing plant aging. In this paper we will describe a methodology and a new class of risk importance measures that allow the use of an existing PRA model to support the management of plant aging, the prioritization of improvements to non-destructive examination and monitoring techniques, and the establishment of research emphases in materials science. This methodology makes use of data resources generated under the USNRC Proactive Management of Materials Degradation program which addresses the anticipated effects of numerous aging degradation mechanisms on a wide variety of component types.

  20. Evaluation of dimensional stability of autoclavable elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Surendra, G P; Anjum, Ayesha; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2011-03-01

    Impressions are important sources of cross contamination between patients and dental laboratories. As a part of infection control impressions contaminated with variety of micro-organisms via blood and oral secretions should be cleaned and disinfected or sterilized before being handled in dental laboratory. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on dimensional stability of elastomeric impression material (polyvinyl siloxane-Affinis). In this in vitro study standardized stainless steel die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. Polyvinyl siloxane (Affinis) light body and putty viscosity elastomeric impression materials were used. A total of 40 impressions of the stainless steel die were made and numeric coding system was used to identify the samples. Measurements were made using a measuring microscope. Distance between the cross lines CD and C'D' reproduced in the impression were measured before autoclaving, immediately after autoclaving and 24 hours after autoclaving and dimensional change was calculated. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. The mean difference in dimensional change between the three groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). However the results revealed that there was higher mean dimensional change immediately after autoclaving when compared to the other 2 time intervals. It is desirable to delay the casting of an autoclavable elastomeric impression material by about 24 hours. Though disinfection of impression is routinely followed autoclaving of impression is an effective method of sterilization.

  1. Evaluative Language Used by Mandarin-Chinese-Speaking Dyads in Personal Narratives: Age and Socioeconomic Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Wen-Feng; Chen, Yen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of age and family socioeconomic status (SES) on the evaluative language performance of Mandarin-Chinese-speaking young children and their mothers. The participants were 65 mother-child dyads recruited in Taiwan. Thirty-four of these dyads were from middle-class families and 31 were from…

  2. Mentoring Australian Emerging Researchers in Aging: Evaluation of a Pilot Mentoring Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henwood, Tim; Bartlett, Helen; Carroll, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    A survey of Australian emerging researchers in aging identified the need for greater professional development and networking opportunities. To address this, a formal mentorship scheme was developed and evaluated. Fourteen postgraduate researchers (proteges) were matched by discipline and research interest to experienced academics (mentors).…

  3. The National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study (NTIES): Profile of Clients Age 45 and Over.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliber Associates, Fairfax, VA.

    This paper summarizes similarities and differences between two cohorts of the National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study (NTIES) clients, those age 45 or older and those younger than 45. Results reveal the following: Clients in the 45+ cohort were considerably more likely to be treated for problems with alcohol or with heroin, and they were…

  4. Attachment and Self-Evaluation in Chinese Adolescents: Age and Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Hairong; Thompson, Ross A.; Ferrer, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated age and gender differences in the quality of attachment to mothers, fathers, and peers, and the association of attachment with measures of self-evaluation in 584 Chinese adolescents in junior high, high school, and university. Their responses to the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment indexed attachment quality, and…

  5. Evaluation of Ion Exchange Materials in K Basin Floor Sludge and Potential Solvents for PCB Extraction from Ion Exchange Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.J.; Klinger, G.S.; Bredt, P.R.

    1999-04-10

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. These small amounts are significant from a regulatory standpoint. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). Chemical pretreatment is required to address criticality issues and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Eleven technologies have been evaluated (Papp 1997) as potential pretreatment methods. Based on the evaluations and engineering studies and limited testing, Fluor Daniel Hanford recommended solvent washing of the K Basin sludge, followed by nitric acid dissolution and, potentially, peroxide addition (FDH 1997). The solvent washing (extraction) and peroxide addition would be used to facilitate PCB removal and destruction. Following solvent extraction, the PCBs could be distilled and concentrated for disposal as a low-level waste. The purpose of the work reported here was to continue investigating solvent extraction, first by better identifying the ion exchange materials in the actual sludge samples and then evaluating various solvents for removing the PCBs or possibly dissolving the resins. This report documents some of the process knowledge on ion exchange materials used and spilled in the K Basins and describes the materials identified from wet sieving KE Basin floor and canister sludge and the results of other analyses. Several photographs are included to compare materials and illustrate material behavior. A summary of previous tests on

  6. Evaluation of Insulation Materials and Combinations for Bulkhead Fire Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-20

    fire. (This evaluation condition was suggested by Mr. J. Morris to Mr. R. C. Manahan of Johns - Manville during a visit by Mr. Manahan to the Naval Ship...and Concord Pike Wilmington, Delaware 19897 Telephone: (302) 575-3000 5. Johns - Manville Corporation CERAFELT, CERABLANKET P. 0. Box 5108 Flexible MIN

  7. Loneliness accentuates age differences in cardiovascular responses to social evaluative threat.

    PubMed

    Ong, Anthony D; Rothstein, Jeremy D; Uchino, Bert N

    2012-03-01

    The effects of aging and loneliness on cardiovascular stress responses were examined in 91 young (18-30 years) and 91 older (65-80 years) normotensive adults. Participants completed the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test. Piece-wise linear growth-curve analysis was used to model group differences in resting, reactivity, and recovery levels of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Replicating and extending prior research, analyses revealed age-related increases in resting SBP and DBP. Adjusting for demographics and health covariates, interactions were found for SBP in which age differences in stress reactivity and recovery were greater among lonely than nonlonely participants. Findings provide further evidence that loneliness interacts with age to augment cardiovascular risk to social evaluative threat.

  8. An evaluation of the precision of fin ray, otolith, and scale age determinations for brook trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolarski, J.T.; Hartman, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    The ages of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis are typically estimated using scales despite a lack of research documenting the effectiveness of this technique. The use of scales is often preferred because it is nonlethal and is believed to require less effort than alternative methods. To evaluate the relative effectiveness of different age estimation methodologies for brook trout, we measured the precision and processing times of scale, sagittal otolith, and pectoral fin ray age estimation techniques. Three independent readers, age bias plots, coefficients of variation (CV = 100 x SD/mean), and percent agreement (PA) were used to measure within-reader, among-structure bias and within-structure, among-reader precision. Bias was generally minimal; however, the age estimates derived from scales tended to be lower than those derived from otoliths within older (age > 2) cohorts. Otolith, fin ray, and scale age estimates were within 1 year of each other for 95% of the comparisons. The measures of precision for scales (CV = 6.59; PA = 82.30) and otoliths (CV = 7.45; PA = 81.48) suggest higher agreement between these structures than with fin rays (CV = 11.30; PA = 65.84). The mean per-sample processing times were lower for scale (13.88 min) and otolith techniques (12.23 min) than for fin ray techniques (22.68 min). The comparable processing times of scales and otoliths contradict popular belief and are probably a result of the high proportion of regenerated scales within samples and the ability to infer age from whole (as opposed to sectioned) otoliths. This research suggests that while scales produce age estimates rivaling those of otoliths for younger (age > 3) cohorts, they may be biased within older cohorts and therefore should be used with caution. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  9. Evaluation of air permeability in layered unsaturated materials.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Christine; Kosson, David S

    2007-03-20

    Field estimation of air permeability is important in the design and operation of soil-vapor extraction systems. Previous models have examined airflow in homogenous soils, incorporating leakage through a low-permeability cap either as a correction to the airflow equation or as a boundary condition. The dual leakage model solution developed here improves upon the previous efforts by adding a leaky lower boundary condition, allowing for the examination of airflow in heterogeneous layered soils. The dual leakage model is applied to the evaluation of pump tests at a pilot soil-vapor extraction system at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. A thick, low-permeability, stiff clay layer divides the stratigraphy at the site into two units for evaluation. A modified version of the previous model, using the water table as the impermeable lower boundary, is used to evaluate the permeability of the low-permeability stiff clay layer (3.2 x 10(-10) cm(2)) and permeable sand (7.2 x 10(-7) cm(2)) beneath it. The stiff clay permeability estimate is used in the evaluation of the shallow unit. Permeability estimates of the shallow sand (3.8 x 10(-7) cm(2)) and kaolin cap (1.5 x 10(-9)cm(2)) were obtained with the dual leakage model. The shallow unit was evaluated using the previous model for comparison. The effects of anisotropy were investigated with a series of model simulations based on the shallow unit solution. The anisotropy sensitivity analysis suggests that increased anisotropy ratio or decreased axial permeability has a significant impact on the velocity profile at the lower boundary, especially at high values of the anisotropy ratio. This result may increase estimates of SVE removal rates for contaminants located at the interface of the lower boundary, typical of chlorinated solvent contamination.

  10. Development of Evaluation Methods for Lower Limb Function between Aged and Young Using Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Yohei; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Ohya, Tetsuya; Koyama, Hironori; Kawasumi, Masashi

    There is the increasing concern of the society to prevent the fall of the aged. The improvement in aged people's the muscular strength of the lower-limb, postural control and walking ability are important for quality of life and fall prevention. The aim of this study was to develop multiple evaluation methods in order to advise for improvement and maintenance of lower limb function between aged and young. The subjects were 16 healthy young volunteers (mean ± S.D: 19.9 ± 0.6 years) and 10 healthy aged volunteers (mean ± S.D: 80.6 ± 6.1 years). Measurement items related to lower limb function were selected from the items which we have ever used. Selected measurement items of function of lower are distance of extroversion of the toe, angle of flexion of the toe, maximum width of step, knee elevation, moving distance of greater trochanter, walking balance, toe-gap force and rotation range of ankle joint. Measurement items summarized by the principal component analysis into lower ability evaluation methods including walking ability and muscle strength of lower limb and flexibility of ankle. The young group demonstrated the factor of 1.6 greater the assessment score of walking ability compared with the aged group. The young group demonstrated the factor of 1.4 greater the assessment score of muscle strength of lower limb compared with the aged group. The young group demonstrated the factor of 1.2 greater the assessment score of flexibility of ankle compared with the aged group. The results suggested that it was possible to assess the lower limb function of aged and young numerically and to advise on their foot function.

  11. The Evaluation of Reading Performance with Minnesota Low Vision Reading Charts in Patients with Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Altinbay, Deniz; Adibelli, Fatih Mehmet; Taskin, Ibrahim; Tekin, Adil

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the reading performance using the Minnesota low vision reading (MNREAD) charts, of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) who use low vision aid (LVA) devices. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study enrolled 27 patients with AMD. Distance visual acuity (VA) was evaluated with a distance chart designed for patients with low vision. Near vision and reading performance were evaluated with the Turkish version of the MNREAD charts. Unaided vision and vision with LVA devices and high spherical add near glasses was measured. P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The mean unaided near VA was 1.05 ± 0.27 log of the minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR). The mean VA with the LVA devices was 0.71 ± 0.41 LogMAR. Reading acuity ranged between 1.15 and 0.21 LogMAR, critical print size was between − 1.2 and 0.2 LogMAR. Maximum reading speeds were between 0 and 103 words/min. The cases are divided into groups in terms of reading speed according to age, gender, diagnosis, and education. Reading speed was negatively correlated to increasing age. CONCLUSION: MNREAD reading charts can be used to evaluate reading performance in patients with AMD with low vision. The outcomes of the present study indicate that optical correction is adequate for near VA requirements in this patient population. However, optical correction was inadequate for improving reading performance. Appropriate rehabilitation programs can be used to increase reading speed. PMID:27994393

  12. Scanning Probe Evaluation of Electronic, Mechanical and Structural Material Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virwani, Kumar

    2011-03-01

    We present atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of a range of properties from three different classes of materials: mixed ionic electronic conductors, low-k dielectrics, and polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles. (1) Mixed ionic electronic conductors are being investigated as novel diodes to drive phase-change memory elements. Their current-voltage characteristics are measured with direct-current and pulsed-mode conductive AFM (C-AFM). The challenges to reliability of the C-AFM method include the electrical integrity of the probe, the sample and the contacts, and the minimization of path capacitance. The role of C-AFM in the optimization of these electro-active materials will be presented. (2) Low dielectric constant (low-k) materials are used in microprocessors as interlayer insulators, a role directly affected by their mechanical performance. The mechanical properties of nanoporous silicate low-k thin films are investigated in a comparative study of nanomechanics measured by AFM and by traditional nanoindentation. Both methods are still undergoing refinement as reliable analytical tools for determining nanomechanical properties. We will focus on AFM, the faster of the two methods, and its developmental challenges of probe shape, cantilever force constant, machine compliance and calibration standards. (3) Magnetic nanoparticles are being explored for their use in patterned media for magnetic storage. Current methods for visualizing the core-shell structure of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles include dye-staining the polymer shell to provide contrast in transmission electron microscopy. AFM-based fast force-volume measurements provide direct visualization of the hard metal oxide core within the soft polymer shell based on structural property differences. In particular, the monitoring of adhesion and deformation between the AFM tip and the nanoparticle, particle-by-particle, provides a reliable qualitative tool to visualize core-shell contrast without the use

  13. Evaluation of Pyro-optic Materials for Infrared Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. K.; Kotru, Sushma; Song, Xiuyu; Donnelly, David

    2004-03-01

    Infrared detectors are needed for a wide range of applications. IR detectors operate either on the principles of photon detection or pyroelectric detection. Both these systems have their respective advantages and disadvantages. However, both of them inherently have difficulties in management of noise to signal ratio and in read-out circuitory. One of the most serious handicaps of photon detectors is requirement of cryogenic cooling for satisfactory operation. In this respect uncooled pyroelectric detectors operating at above room temperature have an advantage. An alternative to these approaches can be pyro-optic based detectors. Only a handful of materials have been found with some satisfactory level of pyro-optic coefficients appropriate for imaginig devices. Some of them are: antimony-sulfo-iodide (SbSI), molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) and Pb-based titanates. Pyrooptic coefficients of these materials have been reported using presumably bulk single crystals. However, no such data are available for their thin films which would be very important for light weight integrated structured devices.In this paper we will describe the parameters and optimization protocol for the growh of thin films of these materials on thermally insulating substrates. We will also discuss their structural, electrical and optical properties. Our investigations suggest that SbSI, BiVO4 and PNZT films are attractive options for advancing the IR detecting technology by utilizing the pyro-optic effect. Integrated thin film structures might lead to the fabrication of light weight, low cost, noise immune and efficient imaging devices based on pyro-optic properties. This research is sponsored by the DEPSCoR program of the U.S. Army Research Office.

  14. Promising quantitative nondestructive evaluation techniques for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    Some recent results in the area of the ultrasonic, acoustic emission, thermographic, and acousto-ultrasonic NDE of composites are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to the progress in the use of ultrasonic attenuation, acoustic emission (parameter) delay, liquid-crystal thermography, and the stress wave factor in structural integrity monitoring of composite materials. The importance of NDE flaw significance characterizations is emphasized since such characterizations can directly indicate the appropriate NDE technique sensitivity requirements. The role of the NDE of flawed composites with and without overt defects in establishing quantitative accept/reject criteria for structural integrity assessment is discussed.

  15. Acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of ceramic matrix composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dosreis, Henrique L. M.

    1991-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of ceramic composite specimens with a lithium-alumino-silicate glass matrix reinforced with unidirectional silicon carbide (NICALON) fibers was conducted to evaluate their reserve of strength. Ceramic composite specimens with different amount of damage were prepared by four-point cyclic fatigue loading of the specimens at 500 C for a different number of cycles. The reserve of strength of the specimens was measured as the maximum bending stress recorded during four-pointed bending test with the load monotonically increased until failure occurs. It was observed that the reserve of strength did not correlate with the number of fatigue cycles. However, it was also observed that higher values of the stress wave factor measurements correspond to higher values of the reserve of strength test data. Therefore, these results show that the acousto-ultrasonic approach has the potential of being used to monitor damage and to estimate the reserve of strength of ceramic composites.

  16. Evaluation of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Macdonald, D.; Nanyaro, A. P.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental and analytical evaluation of the tensor polynomial failure criterion was undertaken to determine its capability for predicting the ultimate strength of laminated composite structures subject to a plane stress state. Results are presented demonstrating that a quadratic formulation is too conservative and a cubic representation is required. Strength comparisons with test data derived from glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy tubular specimens are also provided to validate the cubic strength criterion.

  17. Evaluation of Corrosion Preventive Compounds for Aviation Materials Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Orange Peel Solvent for Removal of Carwell AR500 85 Appendix B. U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command’s Carwell AR500 Debris Test Report 87 Appendix...an alternative wash method employing environmentally friendly citrus oil limonene based cleaners. The manufacturer’s proposal detailing the...procedure is supplied in appendix A. One commercial brand of citrus cleaner from Inland Technology Incorporated known as “Citrex” was evaluated and found

  18. Evaluation of Anti-fouling Materials for Optical Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-30

    Hani R., Waldron C. and Farmer D. A. (1994) Gel-Free Paint Containing Zinc Pyrithione , Cuprous Oxide, and Carboxylic Acid. U.S. Patent 5342437, Olin Corp...2. Hani R., Waldron C. and Farmer D. A. Jr. (1992) Stabilization of Paints Containing Zinc Pyrithione and Cuprous Oxide Antifouling Agents. U.S...using ESEM. The following commercially prepared formulations provided by Magellan Co., Inc. were evaluated: 1) 10,000 ppm zinc pyrithione1,2,3 + 300 ppm

  19. Evaluation of CBS 600 carburized steel as a gear material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1979-01-01

    Gear endurance tests were conducted with one lot of consumable-electrode vacuum-melted (CVM) AISI 9310 gears and one lot of air-melt CBS 600 gears. The gears were 8 pitch with a pitch diameter of 8.89 centimeters (3.5 in.). Bench-type rolling-element fatigue tests were also conducted with one lot of CVM AISI 9310, three lots of CVM CBS 600, and one of air-melt CBS 600 material. The rolling-element bars were 0.952 centimeter (0.375 in.) in diameter. The CBS 600 material exhibited pitting fatigue lives in both rolling-element specimens and gears at least equivalent to that of CVM AISI 9310. Tooth fracture failure occurred with the CBS 600 gears after overrunning a fatigue spall, but it did not occur with the CVM AISI 9310 gears. Tooth fracture in the CBS 600 was attributed to excessive carbon content in the case, excessive case depth, and a higher than normal core hardness.

  20. Micromagnetic surface studies of materials for nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sipahi, L.B.

    1992-11-25

    A system which employs the magnetic Barkhausen effect to measure micromagnetic Barkhausen emissions (E) in ferromagnetic materials using a time varying magnetic field was developed. A patent application was made (US patent application temporary no. 754,904 pending). It was observed that E is dependent on microstructure in different Fe, Ni, Co alloys, steel, and rare earth-Fe alloys. The ac excitation field used in the present developed system is essential, since superposition of ac excitation field on quasi dc field gives cleaner, more reproducible magnetic Barkhausen pulse waveforms. 30 Hz was found optimal for the excitation frequency, for very fast in situ measurements. E can be generated at different depths in the material by altering the excitation frequency; using a band pass filter, E can be detected over different frequency ranges. Instead of conventional count rate, techniques for analyzing the E were developed: pulse height spectrum analysis, frequency spectrum analysis, RMS voltage analysis, and pulse waveform analysis. A model was developed for the magnetic Barkhausen effect.

  1. Low velocity impact testing and nondestructive evaluation of transparent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R. E.; Green, W. H.

    2011-06-23

    Advanced transparent materials are used in protective systems for enhancing the survivability of ground vehicles, air vehicles, and personnel in applications such as face shields, riot gear, and vehicle windows. Low velocity impact damage can limit visibility and compromise the structural integrity of a transparent system, increasing the likelihood of further damage or penetration from a high velocity impact strike. For this reason, it is critical to determine damage tolerance levels of transparent systems to indicate whether or not a component should be replaced. In this study, transparent laminate systems will be tested by comparing baseline conditions to experimentally controlled damage states. Destructive testing including air gun and sphere impact testing will be used to replicate low velocity impacts in the field. Characterization of the damaged state will include basic visual inspection as well as nondestructive techniques including cross-polarization, x-ray, and ultrasound. The combination of destructive testing and characterization of the resulting damage can help to establish a damage acceptance criterion for materials used in protective systems.

  2. Electrostatic Evaluation of the ARES I FTS Antenna Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2010-01-01

    Surface resistivity and volume resistivity data show all the tested non-metallic materials of the Ares I FTS antenna assembly to be insulative. The external materials (White foam, phenolic) should be able to develop a large surface charge density upon tribocharging with ice crystal impingement. Dielectric breakdown tests on the FTS antenna housing materials show that each of the insulative materials are very resistive to electrical breakdown. The thicknesses of these materials in a nominal housing should protect the antenna from direct breakdown from external triboelectric charging potentials. Per data from the Air Force study, a maximum external electric potential in the range of 100kV can be developed on surfaces tribocharged by ice crystal impingement. Testing showed that under operational pressure ranges, this level of exterior voltage can result in a potential of about 6 kV induced on the electrically floating interior antenna vanes. Testing the vanes up to this voltage level showed that electrostatic discharges can occur between the electrically floating vanes and the center, grounded screw heads. Repeated tests with multiple invisible and visible discharges caused only superficial physical damage to the vanes. Fourier analysis of the discharge signals showed that the frequency range of credible discharges would not interfere with the nominal operation of the FTS antenna. However, due to the limited scope, short timetable, and limited funding of this study, a direct measurement of the triboelectric charge that could be generated on the Ares I antenna housing when the rocket traverses an ice cloud at supersonic speeds was not performed. Instead, data for the limited Air Force study [3] was used as input for our experiments. The Air Force data used was not collected with a sensor located to provide us with the best approximation at the geometry of the Ares I rocket, namely that of the windshield electrometer, because brush discharges to the metal frame of the

  3. Toward sustainable material usage: evaluating the importance of market motivated agency in modeling material flows.

    PubMed

    Gaustad, Gabrielle; Olivetti, Elsa; Kirchain, Randolph

    2011-05-01

    Increasing recycling will be a key strategy for moving toward sustainable materials usage. There are many barriers to increasing recycling, including quality issues in the scrap stream. Repeated recycling can compound this problem through the accumulation of tramp elements over time. This paper explores the importance of capturing recycler decision-making in accurately modeling accumulation and the value of technologies intended to mitigate it. A method was developed combining dynamic material flow analysis with allocation of those materials into production portfolios using blending models. Using this methodology, three scrap allocation methods were explored in the context of a case study of aluminum use: scrap pooling, pseudoclosed loop, and market-based. Results from this case analysis suggest that market-driven decisions and upgrading technologies can partially mitigate the negative impact of accumulation on scrap utilization, thereby increasing scrap use and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A market-based allocation method for modeling material flows suggests a higher value for upgrading strategies compared to a pseudoclosed loop or pooling allocation method for the scenarios explored.

  4. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance – Part II: Development of an accelerated aging method for roofing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley E.; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea V.; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amandine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-01-09

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products₋single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles₋and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. In conclusion, this accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  5. Standards for Evaluation of Instructional Materials with Respect to Social Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Curriculum Framework and Instructional Materials Unit.

    The purpose of this document is to provide reasonable, systematic standards for evaluation of instructional materials upon which evaluators may base their judgments, so that the results of the evaluation process will be as nearly consistent and therefore, as equitable, as possible. The guidelines are based on the social content requirements of the…

  6. Age differences in response to conformity pressure for emotional and nonemotional material.

    PubMed

    Pasupathi, M

    1999-03-01

    Most theories of social influence do not consider adult development. Theoretical and empirical work in life span developmental psychology, however, suggests that age may reduce susceptibility to social influence. The present study examined age differences in social conformity for 2 classes of stimuli: judgments of geometric shapes and emotional facial expressions. As predicted, older people, compared with their younger counterparts, displayed lower rates of social conformity, and this age difference was most evident when judging emotional facial expressions.

  7. RELIABILITY MODELS OF AGING PASSIVE COMPONENTS INFORMED BY MATERIALS DEGRADATION METRICS TO SUPPORT LONG-TERM REACTOR OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Toyooka, Michael Y.

    2012-05-01

    Paper describes a methodology for the synthesis of nuclear power plant service data with expert-elicited materials degradation information to estimate the future failure rates of passive components. This method should be an important resource to long-term plant operations and reactor life extension. Conventional probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) are not well suited to addressing long-term reactor operations. Since passive structures and components are among those for which replacement can be least practical, they might be expected to contribute increasingly to risk in an aging plant; yet, passives receive limited treatment in PRAs. Furthermore, PRAs produce only snapshots of risk based on the assumption of time-independent component failure rates. This assumption is unlikely to be valid in aging systems. The treatment of aging passive components in PRA presents challenges. Service data to quantify component reliability models are sparse, and this is exacerbated by the greater data demands of age-dependent reliability models. Another factor is that there can be numerous potential degradation mechanisms associated with the materials and operating environment of a given component. This deepens the data problem since risk-informed management of component aging will demand an understanding of the long-term risk significance of individual degradation mechanisms. In this paper we describe a Bayesian methodology that integrates metrics of materials degradation susceptibility with available plant service data to estimate age-dependent passive component reliabilities. Integration of these models into conventional PRA will provide a basis for materials degradation management informed by predicted long-term operational risk.

  8. Radiographic evaluation of destructive periodontal disease in blue mink in relation to age and blood morphology

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract In this study, blood samples and jaws were collected from 2 genotypes of blue mink (n = 289) in order to examine phenotypic expression of specific characteristics of Chediak-Higashi Syndrome (C-HS). Blood samples were subjected to differential counts to assess the proportion of abnormal polymorphonuclear leukocytes characteristic for CH-S (C-HS-leukocytes). Abnormal leukocytes with characteristic signs of C-HS were found in blood smears from all mink included in this study. Four teeth in one half of the mandible (P3, P4, M1, M2) were subjected to quantitative radiographic evaluation of alveolar bone loss and tooth loss. There was a high prevalence of destructive periodontal disease among blue mink included in this study. Mild to moderate periodontal disease (defined by less than 50% alveolar bone loss related to 1 or more teeth) affected 73.7% of young mink (age = 7 mo) and 67.9% of older animals (age ≥ 19 mo). Severe periodontal disease (defined by more than 50% bone loss related to one or more teeth) was not detected in mink aged 7 mo, but affected 15.3% of mink aged 19 mo and 39.6% of mink aged 31 mo. The positive relationship between age and periodontal disease was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The prevalence of tooth loss was found to be high among blue mink aged >19 mo (21.6%) and was also significantly related to age (P < 0.01). A significant positive interaction between alveolar bone loss and tooth loss (P < 0.01), implies that the highly prevalent tooth loss in the mink was related to and possibly caused by destructive periodontal disease. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of periodontal disease between the 2 genotypes and age was found to be the only statistical predictor of poor production results (P < 0.01) in blue mink. PMID:15971677

  9. Evaluation of patch test results with denture material series.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, M; Geier, J

    1996-03-01

    791 patients, among them 59 dental technicians and 732 other patients, were tested with the denture material series (DMS) recommended by the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group (DKG) in the hospitals of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) between January 1990 and July 1993. Most frequently, positive reactions occurred to cadmium chloride in both groups. However, there was no evidence at all for relevance of these reactions. Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) ranked 2nd in patch test positivity. Although not statistically significant, reactions were more frequent in dental technicians, who might be exposed to BPO the in working environment. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) were common sensitizers in dental technicians but not in other patients. This finding, too, has its explanation in the working process of manufacturing dental prostheses.

  10. Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

  11. Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1992-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

  12. Characterization and evaluation of golpata fronds as pulping raw materials.

    PubMed

    Jahan, M Sarwar; Chowdhury, D A Nasima; Islam, M Khalidul

    2006-02-01

    The chemical, morphological and anatomical studies of golpata fronds have been discussed. The lignin, pentosan and alpha-cellulose in golpata fronds were comparable to some common nonwood and hardwood raw materials. The alkali, water and dichloromethane solubility were higher than wood and common nonwood. The fiber length 1.73 mm was observed, which is little bit shorter than softwood and longer than hardwood but fiber diameter was very short. The pulpability of golpata fronds has also been studied. The pulp yield was very low and Kappa number was high. The strength properties were better than that of some common nonwood pulps. FT-IR spectrum and alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation products showed that golpata fronds lignin mainly consist of syringyl (S) and guaiacyl units (V).

  13. A space debris simulation facility for spacecraft materials evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Roy A.

    1987-01-01

    A facility to simulate the effects of space debris striking an orbiting spacecraft is described. This facility was purchased in 1965 to be used as a micrometeoroid simulation facility. Conversion to a Space Debris Simulation Facility began in July 1984 and it was placed in operation in February 1985. The facility consists of a light gas gun with a 12.7-mm launch tube capable of launching 2.5-12.7 mm projectiles with a mass of 4-300 mg and velocities of 2-8 km/sec, and three target tanks of 0.067 m, 0.53 a m and 28.5 a m. Projectile velocity measurements are accomplished via pulsed X-ray, laser diode detectors, and a Hall photographic station. This facility is being used to test development structural configurations and candidate materials for long duration orbital spacecraft. A summary of test results are also described.

  14. Evaluation of Skull Cortical Thickness Changes With Age and Sex From Computed Tomography Scans.

    PubMed

    Lillie, Elizabeth M; Urban, Jillian E; Lynch, Sarah K; Weaver, Ashley A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2016-02-01

    Head injuries resulting from motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are extremely common, yet the details of the mechanism of injury remain to be well characterized. Skull deformation is believed to be a contributing factor to some types of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Understanding biomechanical contributors to skull deformation would provide further insight into the mechanism of head injury resulting from blunt trauma. In particular, skull thickness is thought be a very important factor governing deformation of the skull and its propensity for fracture. Previously, age- and sex-based skull cortical thickness changes were difficult to evaluate based on the need for cadaveric skulls. In this cross-sectional study, skull thickness changes with age and sex have been evaluated at homologous locations using a validated cortical density-based algorithm to accurately quantify cortical thickness from 123 high-resolution clinical computed tomography (CT) scans. The flat bones of the skull have a sandwich structure; therefore, skull thickness was evaluated for the inner and outer tables as well the full thickness. General trends indicated an increase in the full skull thickness, mostly attributed to an increase in the thickness of the diploic layer; however, these trends were not found to be statistically significant. There was a significant relationship between cortical thinning and age for both tables of the frontal, occipital, and parietal bones ranging between a 36% and 60% decrease from ages 20 to 100 years in females, whereas males exhibited no significant changes. Understanding how cortical and full skull thickness changes with age from a wide range of subjects can have implications in improving the biofidelity of age- and sex-specific finite element models and therefore aid in the prediction and understanding of TBI from impact and blast injuries.

  15. Material selection and evaluation aimed at resolving deficiencies of a space technology material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Asit K.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Kennedy Space Center propellant handlers' visors are undergoing conversion from Plexiglass G to a Surlyn 8920-based material; various Surlyn compositions are here subjected to a battery of environmental and mechanical-properties tests under the relevant conditions. Specially-molded Surlyn samples have exhibited much higher impact strengths than either Plexiglass G or Lexan, and passed the ANSI weight-drop test. DSC results show that Surlyn and Plexiglass G exhibit strikingly different thermal transitions.

  16. Material selection and evaluation aimed at resolving deficiencies of a space technology material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Asit K.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    NASA-Kennedy Space Center propellant handlers' visors are undergoing conversion from Plexiglass G to a Surlyn 8920-based material; various Surlyn compositions are here subjected to a battery of environmental and mechanical-properties tests under the relevant conditions. Specially-molded Surlyn samples have exhibited much higher impact strengths than either Plexiglass G or Lexan, and passed the ANSI weight-drop test. DSC results show that Surlyn and Plexiglass G exhibit strikingly different thermal transitions.

  17. Effect of Aging on the Toughness of Human Cortical Bone: Evaluation by R-Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J

    2004-10-08

    Age-related deterioration of the fracture properties of bone, coupled with increased life expectancy, are responsible for increasing incidence of bone fracture in the elderly, and hence, an understanding of how its fracture properties degrade with age is essential. The present study describes ex vivo fracture experiments to quantitatively assess the effect of aging on the fracture toughness properties of human cortical bone in the longitudinal direction. Because cortical bone exhibits rising crack-growth resistance with crack extension, unlike most previous studies the toughness is evaluated in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, measured for bone taken from wide range of age groups (34-99 years). Using this approach, both the ex vivo crack-initiation and crack-growth toughness are determined and are found to deteriorate with age; the initiation toughness decreases some 40% over six decades from 40 to 100 years, while the growth toughness is effectively eliminated over the same age range. The reduction in crack-growth toughness is considered to be associated primarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, in particular involving crack bridging in the wake of the crack.

  18. Effect of aging on the toughness of human cortical bone:Evaluation by R-curves

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kruzic, Jamie J.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie,Robert O.

    2005-04-05

    Age-related deterioration of the fracture properties of bone, coupled with increased life expectancy, is responsible for increasing incidence of bone fracture in the elderly, and hence, an understanding of how its fracture properties degrade with age is essential. The present study describes ex vivo fracture experiments to quantitatively assess the effect of aging on the fracture toughness properties of human cortical bone in the longitudinal direction. Because cortical bone exhibits rising crack-growth resistance with crack extension, unlike most previous studies, the toughness is evaluated in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, measured for bone taken from wide range of age groups (34-99 years). Using this approach, both the ex vivo crack-initiation and crack-growth toughness are determined and are found to deteriorate with age; the initiation toughness decreases some 40 percent over 6 decades from 40 to 100 years, while the growth toughness is effectively eliminated over the same age range. The reduction in crack-growth toughness is considered to be associated primarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, in particular, involving crack bridging in the wake of the crack.

  19. Effect of aging on the toughness of human cortical bone:Evaluation by R-curves

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kruzic, Jamie J.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie,Robert O.

    2005-04-05

    Age-related deterioration of the fracture properties ofbone, coupled with increased life expectancy, is responsible forincreasing incidence of bone fracture in the elderly, and hence, anunderstanding of how its fracture properties degrade with age isessential. The present study describes ex vivo fracture experiments toquantitatively assess the effect of aging on the fracture toughnessproperties of human cortical bone in the longitudinal direction. Becausecortical bone exhibits rising crack-growth resistance with crackextension, unlike most previous studies, the toughness is evaluated interms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, measured for bone takenfrom wide range of age groups (34-99 years). Using this approach, boththe ex vivo crack-initiation and crack-growth toughness are determinedand are found to deteriorate with age; the initiation toughness decreasessome 40 percent over 6 decades from 40 to 100 years, while the growthtoughness is effectively eliminated over the same age range. Thereduction in crack-growth toughness is considered to be associatedprimarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, inparticular, involving crack bridging in the wake of thecrack.

  20. Effect of aging on the toughness of human cortical bone: evaluation by R-curves.

    PubMed

    Nalla, R K; Kruzic, J J; Kinney, J H; Ritchie, R O

    2004-12-01

    Age-related deterioration of the fracture properties of bone, coupled with increased life expectancy, is responsible for increasing incidence of bone fracture in the elderly, and hence, an understanding of how its fracture properties degrade with age is essential. The present study describes ex vivo fracture experiments to quantitatively assess the effect of aging on the fracture toughness properties of human cortical bone in the longitudinal direction. Because cortical bone exhibits rising crack-growth resistance with crack extension, unlike most previous studies, the toughness is evaluated in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, measured for bone taken from wide range of age groups (34-99 years). Using this approach, both the ex vivo crack-initiation and crack-growth toughness are determined and are found to deteriorate with age; the initiation toughness decreases some 40% over 6 decades from 40 to 100 years, while the growth toughness is effectively eliminated over the same age range. The reduction in crack-growth toughness is considered to be associated primarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, in particular, involving crack bridging in the wake of the crack.

  1. Methods and Materials for Infusing Aging Issues into the Rehabilitation Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampfe, Charlene M.; Harley, Debra A.; Wadsworth, John S.; Smith, S. Mae

    2007-01-01

    In order to better prepare rehabilitation counselors to meet the needs of older workers, Kampfe, Wadsworth, Smith, and Harley (2005) suggested that aging issues can be infused into the curriculum of rehabilitation education programs. This article is a follow-up to the earlier publication that called for infusion of aging issues into the…

  2. Evaluation of materials proposed for use in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    The cutaneous primary irritancy and allergenicity potential of cotton shirts/fabrics treated with flame retardants were evaluated in order to establish their suitability for spacecraft crew use. Twenty-five volunteer human subjects were patch tested on the back utilizing standard methodology, with both treated and untreated cotton fabric. The fabric was treated with tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium hydroxide and subsequently cured with gaseous ammonia. The final treatment comprised adding on dicyandiamine phosphoric acid. None of the individuals experienced primary irritant or allergic reactions attributable to the fabric during induction or challenge patch testing. Likewise, there were no reactions to treated or untreated fabric patches placed on ten subjects of the usage panel at the conclusion of the study.

  3. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  4. Evaluation, development, and characterization of superconducting materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Arthur N.

    1990-01-01

    The anisotropic electromagnetic features of a grain-aligned YBa2Cu3O(x) bulk sample derived from a process of long-time partial melt growth were investigated by the measurements of direct current magnetization (at 77 K) and alternating current susceptibility as a function of temperature, with the fields applied parallel and perpendicular to the c axis, respectively. The extended Bean model was further studied and applied to explain the experimental results. Upon comparison of the grain-aligned sample with pure single crystal materials, it is concluded that because of the existence of more effective pinning sites in the grain-aligned sample, not only its critical current density perpendicular to the c axis is improved, but the one parallel to the c axis is improved even more significantly. The anisotropy in the critical current densities in the grain-aligned sample at 77 K is at least one to two orders of magnitude smaller than in the pure single crystal. The measurement of anisotropy of alternating current susceptibility as a function of temperature, especially its imaginary part, shows that there are still some residues of interlayer weak links in the grain-aligned samples, but they are quite different from and far less serious than the weak links in the sintered sample.

  5. Evaluation of temper embrittlement in turbine rotor material

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A.; Pepe, J. )

    1991-02-01

    A major requirement for the reliable operation of modern NiCrMoV steel low pressure (LO) rotor forgings is a toughness level high enough to tolerate small flaws. Since LP rotor forgings operate at elevated temperatures for prolonged periods of time, it is important to insure that the rotor's toughness does not degrade due to thermal exposure during its service life. One phenomena which is known to degrade the toughness of NiCrMoV rotor forging material with time is temper embrittlement. Temper embrittlement is of most concern in the temperature range 316--510{degree}C (600--950{degree}F). The major chemical elements responsible for temper embrittlement are known to be P, Si, Sn, Sb and As. This report describes the development of a mathematical model obtained by regression techniques for prediction of the degree of temper embrittlement based on the chemistry, strength, mechanical properties and other characteristics of the rotor. In addition, the effects of temper embrittlement on the fracture toughness as determined by J{sub Ic} samples and on the fatique life were examined. Finally, a model was developed for the prediction of temper embrittlement in CrMoV rotor steels based on some limited available data. 45 refs., 46 figs., 22 tabs.

  6. A reverse genetics cell-based evaluation of genes linked to healthy human tissue age

    PubMed Central

    Crossland, Hannah; Atherton, Philip J.; Strömberg, Anna; Gustafsson, Thomas; Timmons, James A.

    2017-01-01

    We recently developed a binary (i.e., young vs. old) classifier using human muscle RNA profiles that accurately distinguished the age of multiple tissue types. Pathway analysis did not reveal regulators of these 150 genes, so we used reverse genetics and pharmacologic methods to explore regulation of gene expression. Using small interfering RNA, well-studied age-related factors (i.e., rapamycin, resveratrol, TNF-α, and staurosporine), quantitative real-time PCR and clustering analysis, we studied gene–gene interactions in human skeletal muscle and renal epithelial cells. Individual knockdown of 10 different age genes yielded a consistent pattern of gene expression in muscle and renal cells, similar to in vivo. Potential epigenetic interactions included HIST1H3E knockdown, leading to decreased PHF19 and PCDH9, and increased ICAM5 in muscle and renal cells, while ICAM5 knockdown reduced HIST1H3E expression. Resveratrol, staurosporine, and TNF-α significantly regulated the in vivo aging genes, while only rapamycin perturbed the healthy-age gene expression signature in a manner consistent with in vivo. In vitro coordination of gene expression for this in vivo tissue age signature indicates a degree of direct coordination, and the observed link with mTOR activity suggests a direct link between a robust biomarker of healthy neuromuscular age and a major axis of life span in model systems.—Crossland, H., Atherton, P. J., Strömberg, A., Gustafsson, T., Timmons, J. A. A reverse genetics cell-based evaluation of genes linked to healthy human tissue age. PMID:27698205

  7. Evaluation of Skin Anti-aging Potential of Citrus reticulata Blanco Peel

    PubMed Central

    Apraj, Vinita D.; Pandita, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The peel of Citrus reticulata Blanco is traditionally used as tonic, stomachic, astringent, and carminative. It is also useful in skin care. Objective: To study the anti-aging potential of alcoholic extracts of C. reticulata Blanco peel using in vitro antioxidant and anti-enzyme assays. Materials and Methods: Plant extracts were obtained by Soxhlation (CR HAE- Hot Alcoholic Extract of Citrus reticulata) and maceration method (CR CAE- Cold Alcoholic Extract of Citrus reticulata). Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis was performed. Further, in vitro antioxidant, anti-enzyme, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses were performed. Results: Total phenolic and flavonoid contents of CR HAE were found to be higher than CR CAE. EC50 value of CR HAE and CR CAE for 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, Superoxide anion, and 2, 2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) assays were 250.33 ± 40.16 μg/ml and 254.73 ± 15.78 μg/ml, 221.27 ± 11.25 μg/ml and 354.20 ± 23.79 μg/ml, and 59.16 ± 2.17 μg/ml and 59.12 ± 6.21 μg/ml, respectively. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity values for CR HAE and CR CAE were found to be 1243 and 1063 μmoles 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetra methylchromane-2-carboxylic acid equivalent/g of substance, respectively. Anti-collagenase and anti-elastase activities were evaluated for both CR HAE and CR CAE. EC50 values of CR HAE and CR CAE for anti-collagenase and anti-elastase were 329.33 ± 6.38 μg/ml, 466.93 ± 8.04 μg/ml and 3.22 ± 0.24 mg/ml, 5.09 ± 0.30 mg/ml, respectively. CR HAE exhibited stronger anti-collagenase and anti-elastase activity than CR CAE. GC-MS analysis of CR HAE was carried out because CR HAE exhibited higher antioxidant and anti-enzyme potential than CR CAE. Conclusion: C. reticulata peel can be utilized in anti-wrinkle skin care formulations. SUMMARY Skin anti-aging potential of Citrus reticulata Blanco peel was evaluated throughIn vitro antioxidant and anti-enzyme assays

  8. 235U–231Pa age dating of uranium materials for nuclear forensic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Eppich, Gary R.; Williams, Ross W.; Gaffney, Amy M.; Schorzman, Kerri C.

    2013-04-03

    Here, age dating of nuclear material can provide insight into source and suspected use in nuclear forensic investigations. We report here a method for the determination of the date of most recent chemical purification for uranium materials using the 235U-231Pa chronometer. Protactinium is separated from uranium and neptunium matrices using anion exchange resin, followed by sorption of Pa to an SiO2 medium. The concentration of 231Pa is measured by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using 233Pa spikes prepared from an aliquot of 237Np and calibrated in-house using the rock standard Table Mountain Latite and the uranium isotopic standard U100. Combined uncertainties of age dates using this method are 1.5 to 3.5 %, an improvement over alpha spectrometry measurement methods. Model ages of five uranium standard reference materials are presented; all standards have concordant 235U-231Pa and 234U-230Th model ages.

  9. Analysis and evaluation of facial expression and perceived age for designing automotive frontal views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takayuki; Kawasumi, Mikiko; Koshimizu, Hiroyasu

    2007-01-01

    We propose a method for quantifying the design of automotive frontal view based on the research on the human visual impression to the facial expression. We have researched to evaluate the automotive frontal face by using the facial words and the perceived age. Then we verified experimentally how effectively the line drawing image could work and coche-PICASSO image could be used for the image stimulation. As a result of this paper, a part of the facial words could be strongly correlated to both the facial expressions and the perceived age in the line drawing image. Besides, it was also known that the perceived age in the coche-PICASSO image was always younger than those of the line drawing image.

  10. An Evaluation Of Photochromic And Photodichroic Materials For Write, Read, Erase Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, L. M.

    1983-11-01

    Two erasable optical recording materials were evaluated for use in direct digital spot recording systems: a photodichroic from Corning and a photochromic from Plessey. The materials were tested in a static system to isolate the material parameters from the system characteristics. Both materials have potential for data storage applications. The photodichroic has the sensitivity, frequency response and noise characteristics for direct spot recording and has an amplitude readout mode. The photochromic has the necessary recording properties but requires a phase readout system. For both materials, the coating parameters must be optimized to meet the specific system requirements.

  11. Evaluation of the Durability of Flexible Barrier Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, Michael D.; Nobles, Dylan L.; Weigel, Mark D.; Nachtigal, Alan K.; Roehrig, Mark A.; Berniard, Tracie J.; Spagnola, Joseph C.; Schubert, Charlene M.

    2015-06-14

    To enable the production of lightweight photovoltaic modules, it is desired to use thin film absorbers on metal substrates in a flexible package. To do this with a polymer based frontsheet, it is estimated that a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) less than 10-4 g/m2/day must be achieved and maintained through the expected life of the module. Barrier-frontsheet films have been developed at 3M with very low permeation rates and evaluated for their long term durability with respect to WVTR and optical transmittance. After exposure to 2500 h of 10 UV suns at 105 degrees C, one design was found which experienced negligible loss in optical transmission while maintaining a WVTR well below the required 10-4 g/m2/day. Further accelerated tests were conducted at different stress levels. For some less durable designs we were able to obtain degradation acceleration factors suggesting the highest exposure was equal to between 4.4 and 10 y on a roof.

  12. Evaluation and Modeling of Edge-Seal Materials for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M. D.; Dameron, A. A.; Moricone, T. J.; Reese, M. O.

    2011-02-01

    Because of the sensitivity of some photovoltaic devices to moisture-induced corrosion, they are packaged using impermeable front- and back-sheets along with an edge seal to prevent moisture ingress. Evaluation of edge seal materials can be difficult because of the low permeation rates involved and/or non-Fickian behavior. Here, using a Ca film deposited on a glass substrate, we demonstrate the evaluation of edge seal materials in a manner that effectively duplicates their use in a photovoltaic application and compare the results with standard methods for measuring water vapor transport. We demonstrate how moisture permeation data from polymer films can be used to estimate moisture ingress rates and compare the results of these two methods. Encapsulant materials were also evaluated for comparison and to highlight the need for edge seals. Of the materials studied, desiccant filled polyisobutylene materials demonstrate by far the best potential to keep moisture out for a 20 to 30 year lifetime.

  13. Calcium Based Test Method for Evaluation of Photovoltaic Edge-Seal Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.; Dameron, A.; Reese, M.

    2011-02-01

    Because of the sensitivity of some photovoltaic devices to moisture-induced corrosion, they are packaged using impermeable front- and back-sheets with an edge seal to prevent moisture ingress. Evaluation of edge seal materials can be difficult because of the low permeation rates involved and/or non-Fickian behavior. Here, using a Ca film deposited on a glass substrate, we demonstrate the evaluation of edge seal materials in a manner that effectively duplicates their use in a photovoltaic application and compare the results with standard methods for measuring water vapor transport. We demonstrate how moisture permeation data from polymer films can be used to estimate moisture ingress rates and compare the results of these two methods. Encapsulant materials were also evaluated for comparison and to highlight the need for edge seals. Of the materials studied, dessicant-filled polyisobutene materials demonstrate by far the best potential to keep moisture out for a 20 to 30 year lifetime.

  14. Evaluating the information content of multiple groundwater age tracers in projecting nitrate vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhani, J.; Massoudieh, A.; Deinhart, A.; Visser, A.; Esser, B.; Moran, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate is one of the major sources of contamination of groundwater in the United States and around the world. In this study the applicability of multiple groundwater age tracers including 3H, 3He, 4He, 14C, 13C, and 85Kr in projecting future trends of nitrate concentration in several long-screened, public drinking water wells in Turlock, California, where nitrate concentrations are increasing toward the regulatory limit, is studied. Several lumped parameter models (LPM)s were considered to represent the groundwater age distribution at each well, including binary mixtures between Inverse Gaussian(young) and Dirac(old), generalized inverse Gaussian, and Levy distributions . LPM model parameters and unknown physical parameters (crustal production rate of 4He, dissolved inorganic carbon contribution from rock dissolution) were estimated using a Bayesian inference, resulting in the posterior probability distribution of the parameters and therefore the uncertainty associated with each. The performance of each LPM in reproducing the data while accounting for the level of model complexity is evaluated using deviance information criteria (DIC) and Bayes Factors (BF). Historical nitrate concentration data are also evaluated as an additional tracer to refine the age distribution. We found that historical nitrate levels can reduce the uncertainty about the age distribution. LPMs with a distinct feature to represent the old fraction of groundwater (for example Inverse Gaussian-Dirac) are better at reproducing the tracer data but with the price of a larger number of parameters, which results in a larger uncertainty about the age distribution itself. Although the uncertainty regarding the shape of the age distribution remains relatively high, whether nitrate is included as a tracer or not, different models predict similar future trends in nitrate concentration.

  15. Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) final report on aging and condition monitoring of low-voltage cable materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Bernstein, Robert

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes results generated on a 5-year cable-aging program that constituted part of the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) program, an effort cosponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The NEPO cable-aging effort concentrated on two important issues involving the development of better lifetime prediction methods as well as the development and testing of novel cable condition-monitoring (CM) techniques. To address improved life prediction methods, we first describe the use of time-temperature superposition principles, indicating how this approach improves the testing of the Arrhenius model by utilizing all of the experimentally generated data instead of a few selected and processed data points. Although reasonable superposition is often found, we show several cases where non-superposition is evident, a situation that violates the constant acceleration assumption normally used in accelerated aging studies. Long-term aging results over extended temperature ranges allow us to show that curvature in Arrhenius plots for elongation is a common occurrence. In all cases the curvature results in a lowering of the Arrhenius activation energy at lower temperatures implying that typical extrapolation of high temperature results over-estimates material lifetimes. The long-term results also allow us to test the significance of extrapolating through the crystalline melting point of semi-crystalline materials. By utilizing ultrasensitive oxygen consumption (UOC) measurements, we show that it is possible to probe the low temperature extrapolation region normally inaccessible to conventional accelerated aging studies. This allows the quantitative testing of the often-used Arrhenius extrapolation assumption. Such testing indicates that many materials again show evidence of ''downward'' curvature (E{sub a} values drop as the aging temperature is lowered) consistent with the limited elongation results and

  16. Creating an aging-prepared community in the inner city: an early descriptive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara B

    2008-01-01

    As the population ages, and healthcare costs continue to rise, innovative models to address these twin issues of cost-effective elder care continue to evolve. Looking to the community as the context for care requires new ways of thinking about how to develop and evaluate services. This paper describes the Neighborhood Health Advocate Program (NHAP), an innovative approach to supporting inner-city minority older adults to live in their homes, as well as testing a model for program evaluation based on an action research approach.

  17. Evaluation of Dairy Whey as a Subsurface Reactive Barrier Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkiw, E.; Barcelona, M.; Kim, M.

    2006-05-01

    Subsurface permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) in remediation of contaminated ground water are currently being utilized and refined as an alternative/supplement to costly pump-and-treat remediation. Identification of efficient reactive materials that are effective in the long-term is essential for the ultimate success of PRBs in ground water remediation. A variety of enhancements have been used: oxidants, reductants or sorbents. Electron donors create/strengthen reducing conditions that are favorable for microbial degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Inexpensive, food-grade electron donors effectively enhance dechlorination activity, and those that are solids that can be slurried and then pressure grouted are the best candidates for maintaining an active biobarrier at low cost. Dried dairy whey (~70% alpha-lactose), a slowly dissolving solid, is a prime candidate. To determine the efficiency of whey in promoting dechlorination, it is essential to identify the aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways and perform quantitative analysis of breakdown products. We hypothesize that dissolved whey will undergo microbial degradation (aerobic and anaerobic) to form carboxylic acids, and that in a suboxic/reducing environment the anaerobic products will stimulate the microbial dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons PCE, TCE, and DCE. Analysis of the breakdown products in the absence as well as the presence of chlorinated hydrocarbons will result in the calculation of rate constants. Kinetics will, in turn, provide us with residence time, loading (whey mass), and projected lifetime of the whey PRB under estimated loads of total chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination. Early results from our field-scale effort to treat a TCE-contaminated site show increased concentrations of cis- DCE and VC downgradient from the whey PRBs, indicative of enhanced TCE dechlorination. Results from an initial microcosm experiment show complete disappearance of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the

  18. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Brenchley, David L.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hashemian, Hash; Konnik, Robert; Ray, Sheila

    2012-09-14

    The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), NDE instrumentation development, universities, commercial NDE services and cable manufacturers, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The motivation for the R&D roadmap comes from the need to address the aging management of in-containment cables at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

  19. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Tension-Tension Fatigue of Polymer Matrix Composite Materials, in D3479/D3479M – 96, A. International, Editor. 2007. [12] ASTM, Standard Test Method...for Tensile Properties of Polymer Matrix Composite Materials, in D3039/D3039M - 08. 2008, ASTM International: Pennsylvania. [13] Larossa, C., et al

  20. Evaluation of blue and green absorbing proteorhodopsins as holographic materials.

    PubMed

    Xi, Bangwei; Tetley, William C; Marcy, Duane L; Zhong, Cheng; Whited, Gregg; Birge, Robert R; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2008-02-28

    Transient holographic diffraction is observed for the green (GPR) and blue (BPR) absorbing proteorhodopsins (BAC31A8 and HOT75M1, respectively), as well as the GPR E108Q and BPR E110Q variants. In contrast to bacteriorhodopsin, where the metastable bR-M pair is responsible for generating diffraction, the pR and red-shifted N-like states fulfill that role in both the green and blue wild-type proteorhodopsins. The GPR E108Q and BPR E110Q variants, however, behave more similarly to their bacteriorhodopsin analogue, D96N, with diffraction arising from the PR M-state (strongly enhanced in both GPR E108Q and BPR E110Q). Of the four proteins evaluated, wild type (WT) GPR and GPR E108Q produce the highest diffraction efficiencies, etamax, at approximately 1% for a 1.7 OD sample. GPR E108Q, however, requires 1-2 orders of magnitude less laser intensity to generate eta equivalent to WT GPR and BR D96N under similar conditions (as compared to literature values). WT BPR requires lower actinic powers than GPR but diffracts only about 30% as well. BPR E110Q performs the most poorly of the four, with etamax < 0.05% for a 1.4 OD film. The Kramers-Kronig transformation and Koglenik's coupled wave theory were used to predict the dispersion spectra and diffraction efficiency for the long M-state variants. To a first approximation, the gratings formed by all samples decay upon discontinuing the 520 nm actinic beams with a time constant characteristic of the appropriate intermediate: the N-like state for WT GPR and BPR and the M-state for GPR 108Q and BPR E110Q.

  1. Evaluation available encapsulation materials for low-cost long-life silicon photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, D. C.; Gaines, G. B.; Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Nance, G. P.; Bunk, A. R.; Brockway, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of selected encapsulation designs and materials based on an earlier study which have potential for use in low cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays are reported. The performance of candidate materials and encapsulated cells were evaluated principally for three types of encapsulation designs based on their potentially low materials and processing costs: (1) polymeric coatings, transparent conformal coatings over the cell with a structural-support substrate; (2) polymeric film lamination, cells laminated between two films or sheets of polymeric materials; and (3) glass-covered systems, cells adhesively bonded to a glass cover (superstrate) with a polymeric pottant and a glass or other substrate material. Several other design types, including those utilizing polymer sheet and pottant materials, were also included in the investigation.

  2. An Economic Evaluation on Replacement Plan for Aged Thermal Power Plants through a Real Option Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Moritoshi; Zhou, Yicheng

    This paper presents a novel method to evaluate replacement plan for aged thermal power plants under uncertain circumstances through a real option approach. The most economical plan is selected among the three options: an option to operate an existing oil-fired thermal plant, an option to mothball it, and an option to abandon it and to construct an advanced gas combined cycle power plant (ACC) at the same time. Basic ideas of our model are: we use quadranomial approach in order to evaluate an option value consisted by two different uncertain assets; we consider cash flow with a dividend in order to reflect conditions of an aged oil-fired thermal plant and use the sequential compound option approach; we evaluate replacement time using quadranomial decision tree taking into account the options. We also analyze value and time of replacement using numerical examples. Our proposed method will be practically used for generation planning. For example it is possible to make priority quantitatively in replacements of aged thermal power plants by real option values. The target year of replacement may be set as a year when cumulative probability of replacement becomes over certain level.

  3. Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-15003 Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials Mark E. Todaro...SUBTITLE Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...thermomechanical effects that occur at the bore of large and medium caliber guns during firing. Hence, PLH has been used not only to gain insight into the erosion

  4. [Delphi method to identify education material on healthy food for teachers, school-age children and their parents].

    PubMed

    Vio, Fernando; Lera, Lydia; Fuentes-García, Alejandra; Salinas, Judith

    2012-09-01

    Delphi method to identify education material on healthy food for teachers, school-age children and their parents. Delphi method applied to get expert consensus about healthy food topics to include in educational materials for preschool and school-age children, their parents and teachers is described. The questionnaire was developed with the results of surveys and focus groups in children, parents and teachers made previously. The questionnaire was mailed to 54 experts in nutrition, education and communication in a first round. The results were analyzed and forwarded in a second round with the subjects without consensus. The cycle was completed by a validation conducted with teachers and parents and were prioritized by audiovisual educational materials on the writings, favoring participatory activities such as cooking workshops, games, activities over the passive (information at parent meetings, delivery of educational materials and conferences of experts). There was consensus on education in health behaviors such as not giving them money to carry to school, make healthy food choices on family outings and recreational activities associated with healthy eating during weekends; prefer healthy food prepared at home instead of the processed food; restrict eating out candy and prefer family meals without watching TV and food instead of taking a snack in the evening. These results are critical to design educational materials on healthy eating plans to change current eating habits that are contributing significantly to increase the childhood obesity.

  5. Nondestructive evaluation of composite materials by electrical resistance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhen

    This dissertation investigates electrical resistance measurement for nondestructive evaluation of carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polymer matrix composites. The method involves measuring the DC electrical resistance in either the longitudinal or through thickness direction. The thermal history and thermal properties of thermoplastic/CF composites were studied by longitudinal and through-thickness resistance measurements. The resistance results were consistent with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermomechanical analysis (TMA) results. The resistance measurements gave more information on the melting of the polymer matrix than TMA. They were more sensitive to the glass transition of the polymer matrix than DSC. The through-thickness resistance decreased as autohesion progressed. The activation energy of autohesion was 21.2 kJ/mol for both nylon-6 and polyphenylene sulfide (PPS)/CF composites. Adhesive bonding and debonding were monitored in real-time by measurement of the through-thickness resistance between the adherends in an adhesive joint during heating and subsequent cooling. Debonding occurred during cooling when the pressure or temperature during prior bonding was not sufficiently high. A long heating time below the melting temperature (T m) was found to be detrimental to subsequent PPS adhesive joint development above Tm, due to curing reactions below Tm and consequent reduced mass flow response above Tm. A high heating rate (small heating time) enhanced the bonding more than a high pressure. The longitudinal resistance measurement was used to investigate the effects of temperature and stress on the interface between a concrete substrate and its epoxy/CF composite retrofit. The resistance of the retrofit was increased by bond degradation, whether the degradation was due to heat or stress. The degradation was reversible. Irreversible disturbance in the fiber arrangement occurred slightly as thermal or load cycling occurred, as indicated by the

  6. Critical Evaluation of Radiometric Ages Used for Tracking Hotspots in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, A. K.

    2004-12-01

    One of the pillars supporting the plume hypothesis, is the progression of ages for numerous hotspot tracks in oceans. These ages should be based on radiometric measurements. The argon dating methods have been the tool most commonly used. Since most of the rocks selected for dating have suffered (considerable) alteration, K-Ar dates should not be used as accurate measures of the age of crystallization. 40Ar/39Ar total fusion ages, though better than K-Ar dates in general, do not pinpoint samples that (a) contain excess argon or (b) have suffered partial loss of 40Ar* due to alteration. Hence 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating studies remain as the (only) tool of choice. From such experiments, at a minimum, ages must be based on plateau and/or isochron sections that meet the necessary statistical requirements to be considered crystallization ages. Earlier (Baksi, 1999, Jour. Geol.) it has been shown that almost all the purported crystallization ages for hotspot tracks in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, are invalid (see also www.mantleplumes.org/ArAr.html). Herein, I apply the tests outlined therein, to evaluate ages available in the literature for hotspot tracks in the Pacific Ocean. These can be divided into five main groups. (1) Those with reliable age data (e.g. Dalrymple and Garcia,1980; Dalrymple et al., 1980, DSDP 55, Hawaiian-Emperor Chain); the authors use care in selecting valid ages from their data sets. (2) Others (e.g. Pringle, 1993, AGU Monograph 77, Musicians Seamounts), most ages are statistically valid, though some fail the requisite test. In addition, many samples show high levels of atmospheric argon, suggesting the samples are (quite) altered; this could lead to incorrect plateau ages. (3) The next set (e.g. Winterer et al., 1993, AGU Monograph 77, Cretaceous guyots in the Northwest Pacific; Ozima et al., 1977, JGRAS, Western Pacific guyots; Saito and Ozima, 1977, EPSL, Western Pacific area) have few, if any, valid ages. Most plateaux/isochrons clearly

  7. A Systematic Approach to Evaluating Career Education Materials at the Local Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co., Washington, DC.

    The document contains an assessment instrument, developed by three teams of educators, designed to assist career education practitioners in identifying, classifying, and evaluating career education instructional materials to determine the usefulness of a particular unit of material in a specific local situation. It also contains suggestions of…

  8. Evaluation of heat sink materials for thermal management of lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimpault-Darcy, E. C.; Miller, K.

    1988-01-01

    Aluminum, neopentyl glycol (NPG), and resins FT and KT are evaluated theoretically and experimentally as heat sink materials for lithium battery packs. The thermal performances of the two resins are compared in a thermal vacuum experiment. As solutions to the sublimation property were not immediately apparent, a theoretical comparison of the thermal performance of NPG versus KT, Al, and no material, is presented.

  9. Development and Evaluation of a Calibrator Material for Nucleic Acid-Based Assays for Diagnosing Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Ali, Deborah; Loeffler, Juergen; White, P. Lewis; Wickes, Brian; Herrera, Monica L.; Alexander, Barbara D.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Clancy, Cornelius; Denning, David; Nguyen, M. Hong; Sugrue, Michele; Wheat, L. Joseph; Wingard, John R.; Donnelly, J. Peter; Barnes, Rosemary; Patterson, Thomas F.; Caliendo, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Twelve laboratories evaluated candidate material for an Aspergillus DNA calibrator. The DNA material was quantified using limiting-dilution analysis; the mean concentration was determined to be 1.73 × 1010 units/ml. The calibrator can be used to standardize aspergillosis diagnostic assays which detect and/or quantify nucleic acid. PMID:23616459

  10. To Kit or Not to Kit? Evaluating and Implementing Science Materials and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Ellen; Melin, Jacque; Bair, Mary

    2016-01-01

    With the release of the "Next Generation Science Standards," many schools are reexamining the science materials they are using. Textbook companies and kit developers are eager to meet the demand for "NGSS"-aligned teaching materials. Teacher may have been asked to serve on a science curriculum committee, or to evaluate current…

  11. Quick Reaction Evaluation of Materials and Processes. Delivery Order 0010: Bonded Boron Patch Repair Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    for an overview of the inside lower wing skin structure. 1 " Metallic Materials Properties ...Development and Standardization ( MMPDS )", MMPDS - 02 , Federal Aviation Administration, April 2005. 3 Figure 1. Wing Skin Plank, Denoting Riser... metallic materials , does not provide specific guidance for maximum allowable bending; it simply states that excessive bending adversely affects the results

  12. Deep Pacific ventilation ages during the last deglaciation: Evaluating the influence of diffusive mixing and source region reservoir age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, David C.

    2013-11-01

    Enhanced ventilation of the deep ocean during the last deglaciation may have caused the rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide that drove Earth's climate from a glacial to interglacial state. Recent results based on the projection age method, however, suggest the ventilation rate of the deep Pacific slowed during the deglaciation, opposite the expected pattern (Lund et al., 2011). Because the projection age method does not account for tracer diffusion (Adkins and Boyle, 1997) it can yield spurious results and therefore requires validation with alternative techniques. Here ventilation ages are determined using the transit-time equilibration-time distribution (TTD-ETD) method which explicitly accounts for diffusive mixing in the ocean interior (DeVries and Primeau, 2010). The overall time history of deep Pacific TTD-ETD and projection ages is very similar; both show a 1000-yr increase in ventilation age during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1; 14.5-17.5 kyr BP) and a 500-yr increase during the Younger Dryas (YD). The similarity is due in part to the use of projection age error estimates that take into account uncertainty in both calendar age and benthic 14C age. Centennial-scale offsets between the TTD-ETD and projection ages are due primarily to the different approaches used to estimate surface ocean radiocarbon content. Both the TTD-ETD and projection age results imply that the ventilation rate of the deep Pacific decreased during the deglaciation, opposite the pattern expected if Southern Ocean upwelling and enhanced meridional overturning drove outgassing of CO2 from the abyss. Variations in surface water reservoir age could cause an apparent shift in deep Pacific ventilation age but existing proxy records from the Southern Ocean appear to be inconsistent with such a driver.

  13. Evaluation of American Wagyu sires for scrotal circumference by age and body weight.

    PubMed

    Sosa, J M; Senger, P L; Reeves, J J

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-six percent of American Wagyu bulls do not meet the current minimum standards set by the Society of Theriogenology for the breeding soundness exam. In contrast, only 15% of bulls of domestic breeds do not meet the minimum standards. Scrotal circumference measurements of Wagyu are smaller than those of other breeds. The objective of this research was to describe scrotal circumference of Wagyu bulls as it relates to age and BW. The data set consisted of 190 Wagyu bulls housed at two locations. One hundred forty-one bulls constituted the first set of data (location 1); scrotal circumference was measured one to six times per bull aged between 13 and 70 mo. Ninety-four of the bulls underwent semen evaluation for motility and morphology. Forty-nine bulls constituted the data set for which scrotal circumference and BW was measured one to nine times per bull between 5 and 21 mo of age (location 2). Mean scrotal circumference of bulls within each age group was as follows: 12 to 14 mo, 29.8 0.2 cm (mean +/- SE); 15 to 17 mo, 31.8 +/- 0.2 cm; 18 to 20 mo, 32.9 +/- 0.3 cm; 21 to 24 mo, 31.8 +/- 0.5 cm; and > 24 mo, 35.5 +/- 0.2 cm. Both age and BW were highly correlated to scrotal circumference (r = 0.81 and 0.82, respectively). Within each age group, there were a percentage of bulls that did not meet the minimum standard for scrotal circumference set by the Society of Theriogenology. The percentages were as follows: 12 to 14 mo, 46%; 15 to 17 mo, 25%; 18 to 20 mo, 33%; 21 to 24 mo, 42%; and > 24 mo, 32%. Morphology and motility were > 50% each in 91% of the bulls between ages 12 and 20 mo at location 1. Based on these data, it is recommended that Wagyu bulls be evaluated with the breed-specific minimum standards for scrotal circumference of 26 cm from 12 to 14 mo, 29 cm from 15 to 17 mo, and 30 cm from 18 to 20 mo of age.

  14. Evaluation of the Applicability of Different Age Determination Methods for Estimating Age of the Endangered African Wild Dog (Lycaon Pictus)

    PubMed Central

    Steenkamp, Gerhard; Groom, Rosemary J.

    2016-01-01

    African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are endangered and their population continues to decline throughout their range. Given their conservation status, more research focused on their population dynamics, population growth and age specific mortality is needed and this requires reliable estimates of age and age of mortality. Various age determination methods from teeth and skull measurements have been applied in numerous studies and it is fundamental to test the validity of these methods and their applicability to different species. In this study we assessed the accuracy of estimating chronological age and age class of African wild dogs, from dental age measured by (i) counting cementum annuli (ii) pulp cavity/tooth width ratio, (iii) tooth wear (measured by tooth crown height) (iv) tooth wear (measured by tooth crown width/crown height ratio) (v) tooth weight and (vi) skull measurements (length, width and height). A sample of 29 African wild dog skulls, from opportunistically located carcasses was analysed. Linear and ordinal regression analysis was done to investigate the performance of each of the six age determination methods in predicting wild dog chronological age and age class. Counting cementum annuli was the most accurate method for estimating chronological age of wild dogs with a 79% predictive capacity, while pulp cavity/tooth width ratio was also a reliable method with a 68% predictive capacity. Counting cementum annuli and pulp cavity/tooth width ratio were again the most accurate methods for separating wild dogs into three age classes (6–24 months; 25–60 months and > 60 months), with a McFadden’s Pseudo-R2 of 0.705 and 0.412 respectively. The use of the cementum annuli method is recommended when estimating age of wild dogs since it is the most reliable method. However, its use is limited as it requires tooth extraction and shipping, is time consuming and expensive, and is not applicable to living individuals. Pulp cavity/tooth width ratio is a

  15. Evaluating medication-related quality of care in residential aged care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Jodie B; Vitry, Agnes; Caughey, Gillian E

    2015-01-01

    Given the growing aged care population, the complexity of their medication-related needs and increased risk of adverse drug events, there is a necessity to systematically monitor and manage medication-related quality of care. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and synthesise medication-related quality of care indicators with respect to application to residential aged care. MEDLINE (Ovid), Psychinfo, CINAHL, Embase and Google® were searched from 2001 to 2013 for studies that were in English, focused on older people aged 65+ years and discussed the development, application or validation of original medication-related quality of care indicators. The quality of selected articles was appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program and psychometric qualities extracted and synthesised using content analysis. Indicators were mapped to six medication-related quality of care attributes and a minimum indicator set derived. Thirty three articles describing 25 indicator sets met the inclusion criteria. Thirteen (52%) contained prescribing quality indicators only. Eight (32%) were developed specifically for aged care. Twenty three (92%) were validated and seven (28%) assessed for reliability. The most common attribute addressed was medication appropriateness (n = 24). There were no indicators for evaluating medication use in those with limited life expectancy, which resulted in only five of the six attributes being addressed. The developed minimum indicator set contains 28 indicators representing 22 of 25 identified indicator sets. Whilst a wide variety of validated indicator sets exist, none addressed all aspects of medication-related quality of care pertinent to residential aged care. The minimum indicator set is intended as a foundation for comprehensively evaluating medication-related quality of care in this setting. Future work should focus on bridging identified gaps.

  16. Evaluation of contrast injection site effectiveness: thoracic CT angiography in children with hand injection of IV contrast material.

    PubMed

    Schooler, Gary R; Zurakowski, David; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of various contrast injection sites when performing thoracic CT angiography (CTA) using hand injection of IV contrast material in infants and young children with a small IV catheter. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We used our hospital information system to retrospectively identify consecutive pediatric patients who underwent thoracic CTA with hand injection of contrast material from August 2012 to July 2013. The study indication for thoracic CTA was to evaluate the thoracic systemic arterial vasculature and pulmonary venous vasculature. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluation of thoracic CTA image quality was performed by two reviewers independently. Qualitative evaluation of thoracic CTA image quality was performed by visual assessment of the degree of contrast enhancement in the ROI on a 4-point scale. Quantitative evaluation was performed by measuring attenuation obtained with the ROI placed within the aorta at two locations (the level of the aortic arch and at the level of the carina) to evaluate the thoracic systemic arterial vasculature. For evaluation of the pulmonary venous system, attenuation measurements were obtained at the center of the left atrium. Six individual injection sites were identified: head, jugular vein, arm vein, hand vein, leg vein, and foot vein. Injection sites were categorized into three regional groups: head-neck region (head vein and jugular veins), upper extremity region (arm and hand veins), and lower extremity region (leg and foot veins). Comparisons of attenuation values between individual and regionally grouped contrast injection sites were determined using the F-test in ANOVA. RESULTS. The study cohort included 50 pediatric patients (29 boys and 21 girls; mean age, 8 months ± 1 year; range, 1 week to 5 years) who underwent a total of 50 thoracic CTA studies for evaluating the thoracic systemic arterial vasculature (n = 38; 76%) or pulmonary venous vasculature

  17. Evaluation of aged concrete structures for continued service in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Arndt, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    Results are summarized of a study on concrete component aging and its significance relative to continued service of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond the initial period for which they were granted operating licenses. Progress is presented of a second study being conducted to identify and provide acceptance criteria for structural safety issues which the USNRC staff will need to address when applications are submitted for continued service of NPPs. Major activities under this program include: development of a materials property data base, establishment of structural component assessment and repair procedures, and development of a methodology for determination of structural reliability.

  18. Evaluation of aged concrete structures for continued service in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Arndt, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    Results are summarized of a study on concrete component aging and its significance relative to continued service of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond the initial period for which they were granted operating licenses. Progress is presented of a second study being conducted to identify and provide acceptance criteria for structural safety issues which the USNRC staff will need to address when applications are submitted for continued service of NPPs. Major activities under this program include: development of a materials property data base, establishment of structural component assessment and repair procedures, and development of a methodology for determination of structural reliability. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Self-healing of early age cracks in cement-based materials by mineralization of carbonic anhydrase microorganism

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chunxiang; Chen, Huaicheng; Ren, Lifu; Luo, Mian

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the self-healing potential of early age cracks in cement-based materials incorporating the bacteria which can produce carbonic anhydrase. Cement-based materials specimens were pre-cracked at the age of 7, 14, 28, 60 days to study the repair ability influenced by cracking time, the width of cracks were between 0.1 and 1.0 mm to study the healing rate influenced by width of cracks. The experimental results indicated that the bacteria showed excellent repairing ability to small cracks formed at early age of 7 days, cracks below 0.4 mm was almost completely closed. The repair effect reduced with the increasing of cracking age. Cracks width influenced self-healing effectiveness significantly. The transportation of CO2and Ca2+ controlled the self-healing process. The computer simulation analyses revealed the self-healing process and mechanism of microbiologically precipitation induced by bacteria and the depth of precipitated CaCO3 could be predicted base on valid Ca2+. PMID:26583014

  20. Application of Mercuric Iodide Detectors to the Monitoring and Evaluation of Stored Special Nuclear Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Application of Mercuric Iodide Detectors to the Monitoring and Evaluation of Stored Special Nuclear Materials L. van den Berg, A.E. Proctor and K.R...2001 to 00-00-2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Application of Mercuric Iodide Detectors to the Monitoring and Evaluation of Stored Special Nuclear

  1. Toolkit for Evaluating Alignment of Instructional and Assessment Materials to the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieve, Inc., 2014

    2014-01-01

    In joint partnership, Achieve, The Council of Chief State School Officers, and Student Achievement Partners have developed a Toolkit for Evaluating the Alignment of Instructional and Assessment Materials to the Common Core State Standards. The Toolkit is a set of interrelated, freely available instruments for evaluating alignment to the CCSS; each…

  2. Toolkit for Evaluating Alignment of Instructional and Assessment Materials to the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieve, Inc., 2014

    2014-01-01

    In joint partnership, Achieve, The Council of Chief State School Officers, and Student Achievement Partners have developed a Toolkit for Evaluating the Alignment of Instructional and Assessment Materials to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The Toolkit is a set of interrelated, freely available instruments for evaluating alignment to the…

  3. Further study for fabrication, evaluation, and testing of monolayer woven materials for space suit insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, R.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements to the monolayer woven pile concept were evaluated in terms of increased durability and thermal performance. Three varieties of the monolayer material were tested for thermal conductance under various conditions simulating those which occur in space. In addition, the tendency of the pile to unravel was subjectively evaluated.

  4. An Evaluation of the Grade Improvement Materials, "Where There's a Will There's an A."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Larry; Sherman, Thomas M.

    1993-01-01

    The grade improvement program "Where There's a Will There's an A" was evaluated with 36 experimental and 37 control group undergraduates. The approach and content of the evaluated materials appear inconsistent with the body of research on academic improvement, and study results do not indicate any improved achievement. (SLD)

  5. EVALUATION OF AEROSOLIZATION OF ASBESTOS AND RELATED FIBERS FROM BULK MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Status Report on the Evaluation of the Alternative Asbestos Control Method – A Comparison to the NESHAP Method of Demolition of Asbestos Containing Buildings; and, 2. Update on the Evaluation of Aerosolization of Asbestos and Related Fibers from Bulk Materials. This abstract a...

  6. Instructional Materials Development Program: Winter and Spring Quarters, 1976. OASIS Evaluation Report No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.; Majer, Kenneth

    The Office of Academic Support and Instructional Services (OASIS) at the University of California, San Diego administers an Instructional Materials Development Program. An overview of the program is presented along with a description of the product development/evaluation cycle. Program evaluation is generic to this process, since several formative…

  7. Interim Guidelines for Evaluation of Instructional Materials with Respect to Social Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Curriculum Framework and Instructional Materials Unit.

    The purpose of these guidelines is to provide consistent, systematic standards for evaluating instructional materials proposed for use in California's public schools to ensure compliance with the Education Code. Though they are not intended to supplant the evaluator's judgment, the guidelines do comprise the minimum standards for acceptability in…

  8. White LED compared with other light sources: age-dependent photobiological effects and parameters for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rebec, Katja Malovrh; Klanjšek-Gunde, Marta; Bizjak, Grega; Kobav, Matej B

    2015-01-01

    Ergonomic science at work and living places should appraise human factors concerning the photobiological effects of lighting. Thorough knowledge on this subject has been gained in the past; however, few attempts have been made to propose suitable evaluation parameters. The blue light hazard and its influence on melatonin secretion in age-dependent observers is considered in this paper and parameters for its evaluation are proposed. New parameters were applied to analyse the effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources and to compare them with the currently applied light sources. The photobiological effects of light sources with the same illuminance but different spectral power distribution were determined for healthy 4-76-year-old observers. The suitability of new parameters is discussed. Correlated colour temperature, the only parameter currently used to assess photobiological effects, is evaluated and compared to new parameters.

  9. Laws of Influence of Structural Characteristics on the Strength and Crack Resistance of Aging Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizhnik, S. B.; Usikova, G. I.

    2005-01-01

    The structural characteristics (the volume fraction, size, and shape of and the distance among hardening-phase particles) of aging alloys and steels, which define the behavior of the critical stress intensity factor during thermal hardening, are determined using the structural-mechanical approach we have developed. It is experimentally demonstrated for maraging steels that our approach is capable of proving the correlations of strength, plasticity, and crack- resistance with the structural characteristics, which were varied by changing the chemical composition of steel and thermokinetic aging conditions

  10. Study of the stress wave factor technique for evaluation of composite materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, J.C. Jr.; Henneke, E.G. II; Kiernan, M.T.; Grosskopf, P.P.

    1989-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic approach for nondestructive evaluation provides a measurement procedure for quantifying the integrated effect of globally distributed damage characteristic of fiber reinforced composite materials. The evaluation procedure provides a stress wave factor that correlates closely with several material performance parameters. The procedure was investigated for a variety of materials including advanced composites, hybrid structure bonds, adhesive bonds, wood products, and wire rope. The research program focused primarily on development of fundamental understanding and applications advancements of acousto-ultrasonics for materials characterization. This involves characterization of materials for which detection, location, and identification of imperfections cannot at present be analyzed satisfactorily with mechanical performance prediction models. In addition to presenting definitive studies on application potentials, the understanding of the acousto-ultrasonic method as applied to advanced composites is reviewed.

  11. A study of the stress wave factor technique for evaluation of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Kiernan, M. T.; Grosskopf, P. P.

    1989-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic approach for nondestructive evaluation provides a measurement procedure for quantifying the integrated effect of globally distributed damage characteristic of fiber reinforced composite materials. The evaluation procedure provides a stress wave factor that correlates closely with several material performance parameters. The procedure was investigated for a variety of materials including advanced composites, hybrid structure bonds, adhesive bonds, wood products, and wire rope. The research program focused primarily on development of fundamental understanding and applications advancements of acousto-ultrasonics for materials characterization. This involves characterization of materials for which detection, location, and identification of imperfections cannot at present be analyzed satisfactorily with mechanical performance prediction models. In addition to presenting definitive studies on application potentials, the understanding of the acousto-ultrasonic method as applied to advanced composites is reviewed.

  12. Empirical evaluation of diving wet suit material heat transfer and thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    West, P.B.

    1993-10-01

    This wet suit material testing program provides a quantitative thermal conductivity and heat transfer analysis, and comparison of various materials used in skin diving and SCUBA diving. Thermal resistance represents the primary subject examined, but due to compressibility of the baseline materials and its effect on heat transfer, this program also examines compression at simulated depth. This article reports the empirical heat transfer coefficients for both thermal conductivity and convection. Due to the limitations of the test apparatus, this analysis must restrict the convection evaluation to an approximately 20-cm-height, free-convection model. As a consequence, this model best simulates the overall heat transfer coefficient of a diver hovering in a horizontal position. This program also includes evaluations of some nonstandard materials in an effort to identify alternative wet suit materials.

  13. Using Spiral Notch Torsion Test to Evaluate Fracture Toughness of Structural Materials and Polymeric Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Tan, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT) was developed recently to measure the intrinsic fracture toughness (KIC) of structural materials. The SNTT system operates by applying pure torsion to uniform cylindrical specimens with a notch line that spirals around the specimen at a 45 pitch. The KIC values and the associated energy release rate are obtained with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element evaluation. The SNTT method is uniquely suitable for testing a wide variety of structural materials, including others such as ceramics, graphite, concrete, polymeric composites, and for bi-material interface fracture toughness evaluation. The SNTT test results for these structural materials and polymeric composite are demonstrated in this paper. These results demonstrated that SNTT has great potential in structural materials and polymeric composites testing, which can provide useful information for design and fabrication of structural components.

  14. Declines with Age in Childhood Asthma Symptoms and Health Care Use. An Adjustment for Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yi-An; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Asthma is a variable condition with an apparent tendency for a natural decline in asthma symptoms and health care use occurring as children age. As a result, asthma interventions using a pre-post design may overestimate the intervention effect when no proper control group is available. Objectives: Investigate patterns of natural decline over time with increasing age in asthma symptoms and health care use of children. Develop a statistical procedure that enables adjustment that accounts for expected declines in these outcomes and is useable when intervention evaluations must rely solely on pre-post data. Methods: Mixed-effects models with mixture distributions were used to describe the pattern of symptoms and health care use in 3,021 children aged 2 to 15 years in a combined sample from three controlled trials. An adaptive least squares estimation was used to account for overestimation of intervention effects and make adjustments for pre-post only data. Termed “Adjustment for Natural Declines in Asthma Outcomes (ANDAO),” the adjustment method uses bootstrap sampling to create control cohorts comparable to subjects in the intervention study from existing control subjects. ANDAO accounts for expected declines in outcomes and is beneficial when intervention evaluations must rely solely on pre-post data. Measurements and Main Results: Children under 10 years of age experienced 18% (95% confidence interval, 15–21%) fewer symptom days and 28% (95% confidence interval, 24–32%) fewer symptom nights with each additional year of age. The decline was less than 10% after age 10 years, depending on baseline asthma severity. Emergency department visits declined regardless of baseline symptom frequency (P = 0.02). The adjustment method corrected estimates to within 2.4% of true effects through simulations using control cohorts. Conclusions: Because of the declines in symptoms and health care use expected with increasing age of children with asthma, pre

  15. Gen IV Materials Handbook Beta Release for Structural and Functional Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Luttrell, Claire

    2006-09-12

    Development of the Gen IV Materials Handbook is briefly summarized up to date. Current status of the Handbook website construction is described. The developed Handbook components and access control of the beta version are discussed for the present evaluation release. Detailed instructions and examples are given to provide guidance for evaluators to browse the constructed parts and use all the currently developed functionalities of the Handbook in evaluation.

  16. Electromagnetic Nondestructive Evaluation of Wire Insulation and Models of Insulation Material Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowler, Nicola; Kessler, Michael R.; Li, Li; Hondred, Peter R.; Chen, Tianming

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have been widely used as wiring electrical insulation materials in space/air-craft. The dielectric properties of insulation polymers can change over time, however, due to various aging processes such as exposure to heat, humidity and mechanical stress. Therefore, the study of polymers used in electrical insulation of wiring is important to the aerospace industry due to potential loss of life and aircraft in the event of an electrical fire caused by breakdown of wiring insulation. Part of this research is focused on studying the mechanisms of various environmental aging process of the polymers used in electrical wiring insulation and the ways in which their dielectric properties change as the material is subject to the aging processes. The other part of the project is to determine the feasibility of a new capacitive nondestructive testing method to indicate degradation in the wiring insulation, by measuring its permittivity.

  17. The importance of age and smoking in evaluating adverse cytogenetic effects of exposure to environmental agents

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Moore, D.H. II

    1995-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific composite DNA probes (``chromosome painting``) is a reliable and efficient method for detecting structural chromosome aberrations. Painting is now being used to quantify chromosome damage in many human populations. In one such study we evaluated 91 unexposed people ranging in age from birth (cord bloods) to 79. We established a baseline frequency of stable aberrations that showed a highly significant curvi-linear increase with age (p < 0.00001) that accounted for 70% of the variance between donors. The magnitude of this effect illustrates the importance of understanding the cytogenetic changes that occur with age, which is particularly important for quantifying the effects of prior adverse environmental, occupational, or accidental exposure. In this paper we use the data obtained in our previous study to characterize the distribution of stable aberrations by age and pack-years of cigarette smoking. We also provide estimates of the number of cell equivalents that need to be scored to detect a given increase in aberrations above the background level surveyed in this population.

  18. Interprofessional education in practice: Evaluation of a work integrated aged care program.

    PubMed

    Lawlis, Tanya; Wicks, Alison; Jamieson, Maggie; Haughey, Amy; Grealish, Laurie

    2016-03-01

    Health professional clinical education is commonly conducted in single discipline modes, thus limiting student collaboration skills. Aged care residential facilities, due to the chronic and complex health care needs of residents, provide an ideal placement to provide a collaborative experience. Interprofessional education is widely acknowledged as the pedagogical framework through which to facilitate collaboration. The aim of the evaluation was to assess student attitudes towards collaboration after active involvement in an interprofessional education program. Students studying nursing, occupational therapy, and aged care were invited to complete a version of the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale before and after participating in a three-week pilot interprofessional program. A positive change in student attitudes towards other health professionals and the importance of working in interprofessional teams was reported with significant differences between two statements indicated: Learning with health-care students before qualifications would improve relationships after qualifications; and I learned a lot from the students from the other disciplines. The innovative pilot project was found to enhance student learning in interprofessional teams and the aged care environment. Further development of this and similar interprofessional programs is required to develop sustainable student projects that have health benefits for residents in aged care residential facilities.

  19. LWR Aging Management Using a Proactive Approach to Control Materials Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Taylor, W Boyd; Hull, Amy; Malik, Shah

    2009-05-12

    Material issues can be the limiting factor for the operation of nuclear power plants. There is growing interest in new and improved philosophies and methodolgies for plant life management, which include the migration from reliance on periodic inservice inspection to include condition-based maintenance. A further step in the development of plant management is the move from proactive responses based on ISI to become proactive, through the investigation of the potential for implementation of a proactive management of materials degradation program and its potential impact on the managements of LWRs

  20. Ultrasound Elastography for Determination of the Age of Venous Thrombi. Evaluation of Thrombus Evolution in Patients After Sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paluch, Łukasz; Nawrocka-Laskus, Ewa; Dąbrowska, Agnieszka; Popiela, Tadeusz; Walecki, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Venous thrombosis is a multicausal disease involving intravenous clot formation. It may occur spontaneously or after provoking events, such as traumatic injuries to the pelvis, upper and lower extermities, immobilization, intravascular procedures, including venous catheterization or injection. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a rapid and non-invasive technique for evaluation of venous disease. It is a very sensitive method for detection of thrombi, but has some limitations, e.g. inability to distinguish between an old and fresh thrombus. Elastography as a method for evaluation of tissue elasticity and allows more accurate assessment of venous thombosis. The thrombus solidifies significantly during the process of remodeling, thereby changing elasticity, while the tissues located around the vessel remain unchanged. Moreover, the homogeneity of the thrombus is also changed. These factors allow for exact determination of the age of the thrombus depending on changes of its elasticity. Material/Methods The object of this study was to assess thrombus age in patients with saphenous vein insufficiency treated with sclerotherapy. We examined 34 patients, 30 women and 4 men, aged 18–62 years. All short-listed patients with initial 7–8 mm vessel diameter underwent treatment with 3% Aetoxysklerol mixed with CO2 and other respiratory gases. Data acquisition was performed using an Esaote MyLab Twice device with LA523 linear probe. Results On the sixth day after the treatment 31 patients presented uniform, hypoechogenic thrombus in B-mode image. Ultrasound-based elasticity images (elastography) showed significant predominant red and green areas. Blue area was either invisible or appeared in insignificant grade on examined area. The mosaic image of colors appeared on 2 patients. On the fourteenth day of study 21 patients still presented hypoechogenic thrombus, whereas mixed echogenicity of thrombus appeared on 11 patients. On 28 examined patients mosaics of

  1. Fusion materials: Technical evaluation of the technology of vandium alloys for use as blanket structural materials in fusion power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-04

    The Committee`s evaluation of vanadium alloys as a structural material for fusion reactors was constrained by limited data and time. The design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is still in the concept stage, so meaningful design requirements were not available. The data on the effect of environment and irradiation on vanadium alloys were sparse, and interpolation of these data were made to select the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. With an aggressive, fully funded program it is possible to qualify a vanadium alloy as the principal structural material for the ITER blanket in the available 5 to 8-year window. However, the data base for V-5Cr-5Ti is United and will require an extensive development and test program. Because of the chemical reactivity of vanadium the alloy will be less tolerant of system failures, accidents, and off-normal events than most other candidate blanket structural materials and will require more careful handling during fabrication of hardware. Because of the cost of the material more stringent requirements on processes, and minimal historical worlding experience, it will cost an order of magnitude to qualify a vanadium alloy for ITER blanket structures than other candidate materials. The use of vanadium is difficult and uncertain; therefore, other options should be explored more thoroughly before a final selection of vanadium is confirmed. The Committee views the risk as being too high to rely solely on vanadium alloys. In viewing the state and nature of the design of the ITER blanket as presented to the Committee, h is obvious that there is a need to move toward integrating fabrication, welding, and materials engineers into the ITER design team. If the vanadium allay option is to be pursued, a large program needs to be started immediately. The commitment of funding and other resources needs to be firm and consistent with a realistic program plan.

  2. Development of age-specific Japanese head phantoms for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Fujii, K; Akahane, K; Yamauchi, M; Narai, K; Aoyama, T; Katsu, T; Obara, S; Imai, K; Ikeda, M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the authors developed age-specific physical head phantoms simulating the physique of Japanese children for dose evaluation in paediatric head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Anatomical structures at 99 places in 0-, 0.5-, 1- and 3-y-old Japanese patients were measured using DICOM viewer software from CT images, and the head phantom of each age was designed. For trial manufacture, a 3-y-old head phantom consisting of acrylic resin and gypsum was produced by machine processing. Radiation doses for the head phantom were measured with radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters and Si-pin photodiode dosemeters. To investigate whether the phantom shape was suitable for dose evaluation, organ doses in the same scan protocol were compared between the 3-y-old head and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms having approximately the same head size. The doses of organs in both phantoms were equivalent. The authors' designed paediatric head phantom will be useful for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations.

  3. Implementation and statistical evaluation of a web-based software for bone age assessment.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Metin; Guvenis, Albert; Guven, Esra; Talat, Didar; Haktan, Mahmut

    2011-12-01

    Bone age assessment is a tedious procedure carried out for assessing growth disorders of children using the left hand radiograph. The purpose of this work was to implement and evaluate a web-based software based on the Tanner and Whitehouse method in a pediatric endocrine department of a social security hospital processing 600-1,000 radiographs per year. The system was evaluated by using a statistical technique for comparing measurement methods in order to test the performance of the procedure and a time study to assess its feasibility under local conditions. It was found that the intra-observer variation for the web-based Tanner and Whitehouse method was smaller (95% confidence limits, -0.77 to 0.97 vs. -0.45 to 0.37) then the conventional Greulich and Pyle manual method and the average net time required for an age assessment was 2.4 min. We therefore concluded that the web-based system should be adopted for its higher precision and relatively low turnaround time for cases requiring serial readings on the same patient. The statistical method demonstrated in this study can also serve as an example for evaluating similar biomedical parameter assessing software.

  4. Listening Diary in the Digital Age: Students' Material Selection, Listening Problems, and Perceived Usefulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Cheryl Wei-yu

    2016-01-01

    The current study reports on a group of Taiwanese college students' first-person diary accounts of their private, transactional listening activities outside the classroom. Issues related to students' material selection, listening problems, and perceived usefulness of keeping a listening diary were explored. It was found that most students chose…

  5. High Temperature Properties and Aging-Stress Related Changes of FeCo Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    NOTES PAO case number: AFRL/WS 06-1683; Date cleared: 07 Jul 2006. 14. ABSTRACT This publication focuses on high temperature magnetic, mechanical...Testing and Materials, Philadelphia (1991) [3.12] M. R. Pinnel and J. E. Bennett, Metallurgical Trans., 5, 1273 (1974) [3.13] S. Mahajan, M. R. Pinnel and

  6. The origin of early age expansions induced in cementitious materials containing shrinkage reducing admixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sant, Gaurav; Lothenbach, Barbara; Juilland, Patrick; Le Saout, Gwenn; Weiss, Jason; Scrivener, Karen

    2011-03-15

    Studies on the early-age shrinkage behavior of cement pastes, mortars, and concretes containing shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) have indicated these mixtures frequently exhibit an expansion shortly after setting. While the magnitude of the expansion has been noted to be a function of the chemistry of the cement and the admixture dosage; the cause of the expansion is not clearly understood. This investigation uses measurements of autogenous deformation, X-ray diffraction, pore solution analysis, thermogravimetry, and scanning electron microscopy to study the early-age properties and describe the mechanism of the expansion in OPC pastes made with and without SRA. The composition of the pore solution indicates that the presence of the SRA increases the portlandite oversaturation level in solution which can result in higher crystallization stresses which could lead to an expansion. This observation is supported by deformation calculations for the systems examined.

  7. Groundwater flow evaluation through backfilling materials of a surface coal mining site of Northeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Ojeda, C.; Martínez-Morales, M.; Ortíz-Flores, G.

    2013-05-01

    Surface coal mining at the Allende-Piedras Negras aquifer system requires the complete dewatering and removal of the aquifer. The aquifer contains several geologic layers of variable hydraulic conductivity. Backfilling material is composed of a mixture of permeable and impermeable layers and it was initially considered as impermeable. Exploratory drillings, pumping tests and a geophysical survey were performed in the backfilling materials and the surrounding unaltered materials in order to evaluate the natural groundwater flow modification due to the mining activities. Results of geophysical survey evidenced a saturated water table within the back filling material which was verified by exploratory drilling. Pumping tests showed that unaltered materials have a mean hydraulic conductivity of 34.5 m/day while the backfilling of 5.3 m/day. Although the mining activities reduce the hydraulic conductivity by almost an order of magnitude, it was corroborated the existence of a groundwater flow through the backfilling materials.

  8. Method for on-line evaluation of materials using prompt gamma ray analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2009-12-08

    A method for evaluating a material specimen comprises: Mounting a neutron source and a detector adjacent the material specimen; bombarding the material specimen with neutrons from the neutron source to create prompt gamma rays within the material specimen, some of the prompt gamma rays being emitted from the material specimen, some of the prompt gamma rays resulting in the formation of positrons within the material specimen by pair production; collecting positron annihilation data by detecting with the detector at least one emitted annihilation gamma ray resulting from the annihilation of a positron; storing the positron annihilation data on a data storage system for later retrieval and processing; and continuing to collect and store positron annihilation data, the continued collected and stored positron annihilation data being indicative of an accumulation of lattice damage over time.

  9. Cscibox: A Software System for Age-Model Construction and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, E.; Anderson, K. A.; Marchitto, T. M., Jr.; de Vesine, L. R.; White, J. W. C.; Anderson, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    CSciBox is an integrated software system for the construction and evaluation of age models of paleo-environmetal archives, both directly dated and cross dated. The time has come to encourage cross-pollinization between earth science and computer science in dating paleorecords. This project addresses that need. The CSciBox code, which is being developed by a team of computer scientists and geoscientists, is open source and freely available on github. The system employs modern database technology to store paleoclimate proxy data and analysis results in an easily accessible and searchable form. This makes it possible to do analysis on the whole core at once, in an interactive fashion, or to tailor the analysis to a subset of the core without loading the entire data file. CSciBox provides a number of 'components' that perform the common steps in age-model construction and evaluation: calibrations, reservoir-age correction, interpolations, statistics, and so on. The user employs these components via a graphical user interface (GUI) to go from raw data to finished age model in a single tool: e.g., an IntCal09 calibration of 14C data from a marine sediment core, followed by a piecewise-linear interpolation. CSciBox's GUI supports plotting of any measurement in the core against any other measurement, or against any of the variables in the calculation of the age model-with or without explicit error representations. Using the GUI, CSciBox's user can import a new calibration curve or other background data set and define a new module that employs that information. Users can also incorporate other software (e.g., Calib, BACON) as 'plug ins.' In the case of truly large data or significant computational effort, CSciBox is parallelizable across modern multicore processors, or clusters, or even the cloud. The next generation of the CSciBox code, currently in the testing stages, includes an automated reasoning engine that supports a more-thorough exploration of plausible age models

  10. EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATION OF SALTSTONE MIXER AUGER/PADDLES MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION FOR IMPROVED WEAR RESISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Torres, R.

    2012-08-15

    Wear and corrosion testing were conducted to evaluate alternate materials of construction for the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles. These components have been degraded by wear from the slurry processed in the mixer. Material test options included PVD coatings (TiN, TiCN, and ZrN), weld overlays (Stellite 12 and Ultimet) and higher hardness steels and carbides (D2 and tungsten carbide). The corrosion testing demonstrated that the slurry is not detrimental to the current materials of construction or the new candidates. The ASTM G75 Miller wear test showed that the high hardness materials and the Stellite 12 weld overlay provide superior wear relative to the Astralloy and CF8M stainless steel, which are the current materials of construction, as well as the PVD coatings and Ultimet. The following recommendations are made for selecting new material options and improving the overall wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer components: A Stellite 12 weld overlay or higher hardness steel (with toughness equivalent to Astralloy) be used to improve the wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer paddles; other manufacturing specifications for the mixer need to be considered in this selection. The current use of the Stellite 12 weld overlay be evaluated so that coverage of the 316 auger can be optimized for improved wear resistance of the auger. The wear surfaces of the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles be evaluated so that laboratory data can be better correlated to actual service. The 2-inch Saltstone mixer prototype be used to verify material performance.

  11. Methods and evaluation of frequency aging in distributed-feedback laser diodes for rubidium atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthey, Renaud; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2011-09-01

    Distributed-feedback laser diodes emitting at 780nm have been evaluated, with respect to the aging of the injection current required for reaching the rubidium D2 resonance line. Results obtained for lasers operating in air and in vacuum for 9 months are reported. When operated at constant temperature, the laser current required for emission at the wavelength of the desired atomic resonance is found to decrease by 50 to 80μA per month. The impact of this result on the lifetime and long-term performances of laser-pumped rubidium atomic clocks is discussed.

  12. Methods and evaluation of frequency aging in distributed-feedback laser diodes for rubidium atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Matthey, Renaud; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2011-09-01

    Distributed-feedback laser diodes emitting at 780 nm have been evaluated, with respect to the aging of the injection current required for reaching the rubidium D2 resonance line. Results obtained for lasers operating in air and in vacuum for 9 months are reported. When operated at constant temperature, the laser current required for emission at the wavelength of the desired atomic resonance is found to decrease by 50 to 80 μA per month. The impact of this result on the lifetime and long-term performances of laser-pumped rubidium atomic clocks is discussed.

  13. Instrumental analysis for differentiation of beers and evaluation of beer ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreve, Simina; Voica, Cezara; Dragan, Felicia; Georgiu, Monica

    2013-11-01

    A representative selection of 5 different beers commercially available were measured spectrophotometrically in UV-Vis spectral region and by fluorescence spectroscopy, in order to determine qualitative differentiation due to the mainly iso-R-acids (with a five member ring) originating from R-acids present in hops. Minerals and trace elements analysis were also performed by ICP-MS method. The determination of the bitter organic acids in beers and of the content in metallic ions can be used as indicators for differentiation of beers and evaluation of beer ageing.

  14. Evaluation of properties of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials mixed with disinfectant liquids

    PubMed Central

    Amalan, Arul; Ginjupalli, Kishore; Upadhya, Nagaraja

    2013-01-01

    Background: Addition of disinfectant to irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials can eliminate the disinfection step to avoid dimensional changes associated with it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of various disinfectant mixing liquids on the properties of commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials. Materials and Methods: Four commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials (Zelgan, Vignette, Tropicalgin, and Algitex) were mixed with disinfectant liquid containing chlorhexidine (0.1 and 0.2%) and sodium hypochlorite (0.1 and 0.5%). After mixing with disinfectant liquids, materials were evaluated for pH changes during gelation, gelation time, flow, gel strength, permanent deformation and detail reproduction. Results: Significant changes in gelation time were observed in irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials upon mixing with disinfectant liquids. In general, chlorhexidine increased the gelation time, whereas sodium hypochlorite reduced it. However, no significant changes in the flow were observed both with chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite. Gel strength was found to decrease when mixed with chlorhexidine, whereas an increase in gel strength was observed upon mixing with sodium hypochlorite. Permanent deformation of the most irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials was below the specification limit even after mixing with disinfectant liquids. Sodium hypochlorite significantly reduced the surface detail reproduction, whereas no change in detail reproduction was observed with chlorhexidine. Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution can be used to mix irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials in regular dental practice as it did not significantly alter the properties. This may ensure effective disinfection of impressions. PMID:23878566

  15. Toxicity Determinations for Five Energetic Materials, Weathered and Aged in Soil, to the Collembolan Folsomia Candida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    and NG that meet the USEPA criteria for inclusion in the development of scientifically based ecological soil-screening levels, which can be used...in ecological risk assessment at sites that are contaminated with energetic materials. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 2,4-Dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT...Toxicity Ecological soil-screening level (Eco-SSL) Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  16. Simulated Aging and Characterization of Phase Change Materials for Thermal Management of Building Envelopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Efficient Shelter Systems for Contingency Basing and Other Applications.” The project title was “Advanced Materials for Energy Efficient Shelters.” The...Over the past decades, for example, PCMs have come to be seen as useful media for used in improving the efficiency of thermal storage systems for...mance (Kosny et al. 2009, Farid et al. 2003). Latent heat storage systems that use PCMs are preferred due to their large energy storage density and

  17. A Primer on Wound Healing in Colorectal Surgery in the Age of Bioprosthetic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex, dynamic process that is vital for closure of cutaneous injuries, restoration of abdominal wall integrity after laparotomy closure, and to prevent anastomotic dehiscence after bowel surgery. Derangements in healing have been described in multiple processes including diabetes mellitus, corticosteroid use, irradiation for malignancy, and inflammatory bowel disease. A thorough understanding of the process of healing is necessary for clinical decision making and knowledge of the current state of the science may lead future researchers in developing methods to enable our ability to modulate healing, ultimately improving outcomes. An exciting example of this ability is the use of bioprosthetic materials used for abdominal wall surgery (hernia repair/reconstruction). These bioprosthetic meshes are able to regenerate and remodel from an allograft or xenograft collagen matrix into site-specific tissue; ultimately being degraded and minimizing the risk of long-term complications seen with synthetic materials. The purpose of this article is to review healing as it relates to cutaneous and intestinal trauma and surgery, factors that impact wound healing, and wound healing as it pertains to bioprosthetic materials. PMID:25435821

  18. PBX 9404 detonation copper cylinder tests: a comparison of new and aged material

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Larry G; Mier, Robert; Briggs, Matthew E

    2009-01-01

    We present detonation copper cylinder test results on aged PBX 9404 (94 wt% HMX, 3 wt% CEF, 2.9 wt% NC, 0.1 wt% DPA) explosive. The charges were newly pressed from 37.5 year-old molding powder. We compare these results to equivalent data performed on the same lot when it was 3.5 years old. Comparison of the detonation energy inferred from detonation speed to that inferred from wall motion suggests that the HMX energy is unchanged but the NC energy has decreased to {approx}25% of its original value. The degradation of explosives and their binders is a subject of continual interest. Secondary explosives such as HMX are sufficiently stable near room temperature that they do not measurably degrade over a period of at least several decades. For formulated systems the bigger concern is binder degradation, for which the three main issues are strength, initiation safety, and (if the binder is energetic) energy content. In this paper we examine the detonation energy of new and aged PBX 9404 (94 wt% HMX, 3 wt% tris-{beta} chloroethylphosphate (CEF), 2.9 wt% nitrocellulose (NC), 0.1 wt% diphenylamine (DPA) [1, 2]), measured via the detonation copper cylinder test. In 1959, two independent PBX 9404 accidents [3] raised serious concerns about the safety of the formulation. Over about a decade's time, Los Alamos pursued a safer, energetically equivalent replacement, which ultimately became PBX 9501. In order to accurately compare the performance of the PBX 9404 and PBX 9501 formulations, W. Campbell and R. Engelke (C & E) developed a stringent cylinder test protocol that they called the Los Alamos Precision Cylinder Test [4]. The present aging study is possible because excellent PBX 9404 data from those qualification tests endures.

  19. Test Procedures for Characterizing, Evaluating, and Managing Separator Materials used in Secondary Alkaline Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guasp, Edwin; Manzo, Michelle A.

    1997-01-01

    Secondary alkaline batteries, such as nickel-cadmium and silver-zinc, are commonly used for aerospace applications. The uniform evaluation and comparison of separator properties for these systems is dependent upon the measurement techniques. This manual presents a series of standard test procedures that can be used to evaluate, compare, and select separator materials for use in alkaline batteries. Detailed test procedures evaluating the following characteristics are included in this manual: physical measurements of thickness and area weight, dimensional stability measurements, electrolyte retention, resistivity, permeability as measured via bubble pressure, surface evaluation via SEM, chemical stability, and tensile strength.

  20. Test Methodology to Evaluate the Safety of Materials Using Spark Incendivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos; Clements, Sid; Ritz, Mindy; Starnes, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    For many years scientists and engineers have been searching for the proper test method to evaluate an electrostatic risk for materials used in hazardous environments. A new test standard created by the International Electrotechnical Commission is a promising addition to conventional test methods used throughout industry. The purpose of this paper is to incorporate this test into a proposed new methodology for the evaluation of materials exposed to flammable environments. However, initial testing using this new standard has uncovered some unconventional behavior in materials that conventional test methods were thought to have reconciled. For example some materials tested at higher humidities were more susceptible to incendive discharges than at lower humidity even though the surface resistivity was lower.

  1. Assembling of Fluid Filtration System for Quantitative Evaluation of Microleakage in Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Javidi, Maryam; Naghavi, Neda; Roohani, Ehsan

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There are several methods for evaluating microleakage in dentistry, for example dye or bacterial leakage, electro-chemical methods, radioisotope labeling and fluid filtration. The purpose of this study was to assemble the fluid filtration system for quantitative evaluation of microleakage in dental materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The roots were connected to a tube filled with an underwater pressure supply. A bubble was introduced into the water to measure endodontic leakage. A digital camera and professional software were utilized to record and measure the bubble displacement. RESULTS: Our system was constructed successfully and functioned correctly. CONCLUSION: In this pilot study we found this system efficient for the evaluation of microleakage of dental materials. PMID:24146673

  2. Method and apparatus for non-destructive evaluation of composite materials with cloth surface impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madras, Eric I. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and related apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of composite materials by determination of the quantity known as Integrated Polar Backscatter, which avoids errors caused by surface texture left by cloth impressions by identifying frequency ranges associated with peaks in a power spectrum for the backscattered signal, and removing such frequency ranges from the calculation of Integrated Polar Backscatter for all scan sites on the composite material is presented.

  3. [Correctly evaluate the role of visual acuity in age-related macular degeneration treatment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in aged population. As the aging of population, the prevalence of AMD increases gradually. Anti-VEGF medication intravitreal injection, which can obtain good therapeutic efficiency and is relatively safe, becomes the main therapy for neovascular AMD. However, high-frequency repeated treatment increases the intravitreal injections risk, as well as the costs. In clinical practice, to pursue the best-corrected visual acuity, high-frequency repeated injections are implemented and inflict psychological pressure and economic burden on patients. The author believes that to pursue the best corrected visual acuity is the ultimate aim but not the only one for every ophthalmologist and patient. The activity of lesions should be overall evaluated with fundus imaging technologies. Being people-oriented is the principle in clinical medicine. A treatment plan is made according to the patients' sickness and economy and to coordinate the relation between the best corrected visual acuity and the numbers of treatment. Based on the stabilized lesion, patient should be benefited at the lowest risk and cost with the best effect.

  4. Highway crash rates and age-related driver limitations: Literature review and evaluation of data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, P.S.; Young, J.R.; Lu, An

    1993-08-01

    American society is undergoing a major demographic transformation that is resulting in a larger proportion of older individuals in the population. Moreover, recent travel surveys show that an increasing number of older individuals are licensed to drive and that they drive more than their same age cohort a decade ago. However, they continue to take shorter trips than younger drivers and they avoid driving during congested hours. This recent demographic transformation in our society, the graying of America, coupled with the increasing mobility of the older population impose a serious highway safety issue that cannot be overlooked. Some of the major concerns are the identification of ``high-risk`` older drivers and the establishment of licensing guidelines and procedures that are based on conclusive scientific evidence. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) objectives in this project can be characterized by the following tasks: Review and evaluate the 1980 American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) licensing guidelines. Determine whether the license restriction recommended in the 1980 AAMVA and NHTSA guidelines was based on scientific evidence or on judgement of medical advisors. Identify in the scientific literature any medical conditions which are found to be highly associated with highway crashes, and which are not mentioned in the 1980 guidelines. Summarize States` current licensing practices for drivers with age-related physical and mental limitations. Identify potential data sources to establish conclusive evidence on age-related functional impairments and highway crashes.

  5. [BREV: a rapid clinical scale for cognitive function evaluation in preschool and school-age children].

    PubMed

    Billard, C; Vol, S; Livet, M O; Motte, J; Vallée, L; Gillet, P; Marquet, T

    2002-02-01

    BREV, standing for the French "Batterie Rapide d'Evaluation des Fonctions Cognitive", is a rapid test to screen children with disorders of higher functions and to define the patterns of these disorders. We describe here two phases of the validation procedure. The first phase consisted in measuring the internal validity of the scale by testing 500 normal school children free of disability. The validation process provided appropriate values for each of the 18 subtests assessing cognitive functions (oral language, non-verbal abilities, attention and memory, education and memory, educational achievment) in ten age groups from 4 to 8 years. All subtests with the same content for any revealed values which increased significantly with age. Inter-reliability was tested by retesting 70 children. The second phase of validation, comparing BREV results and those from a large classical neuropsychological battery, tested specificity and sensitivity. Each of the BREV subtests were correlated with the similar subtest of the classical battery. Correlations between verbal and non-verbal scores and verbal and performance intellectual quotient (Weschler scale) were very significant. Sensitivity and specificity of BREV were above 75p.100;. This confirms the reliability of this battery for children, with good sensitivity and specificity. BREV is a reliable test, with carefully established norms, appropriate for preschool and school-age children.

  6. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of four odontological methods for age evaluation in Italian children at the age threshold of 14 years using ROC curves.

    PubMed

    Pinchi, Vilma; Pradella, Francesco; Vitale, Giulia; Rugo, Dario; Nieri, Michele; Norelli, Gian-Aristide

    2016-01-01

    The age threshold of 14 years is relevant in Italy as the minimum age for criminal responsibility. It is of utmost importance to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of every odontological method for age evaluation considering the sensitivity, or the ability to estimate the true positive cases, and the specificity, or the ability to estimate the true negative cases. The research aims to compare the specificity and sensitivity of four commonly adopted methods of dental age estimation - Demirjian, Haavikko, Willems and Cameriere - in a sample of Italian children aged between 11 and 16 years, with an age threshold of 14 years, using receiver operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUC). In addition, new decision criteria are developed to increase the accuracy of the methods. Among the four odontological methods for age estimation adopted in the research, the Cameriere method showed the highest AUC in both female and male cohorts. The Cameriere method shows a high degree of accuracy at the age threshold of 14 years. To adopt the Cameriere method to estimate the 14-year age threshold more accurately, however, it is suggested - according to the Youden index - that the decision criterion be set at the lower value of 12.928 for females and 13.258 years for males, obtaining a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 88% in females, and a sensitivity of 77% and specificity of 92% in males. If a specificity level >90% is needed, the cut-off point should be set at 12.959 years (82% sensitivity) for females.

  7. Evaluation of methods to compare consequences from hazardous materials transportation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, R.E.; Franklin, A.L.; Lavender, J.C.

    1986-10-01

    This report presents the results of a project to develop a framework for making meaningful comparisons of the consequences from transportation accidents involving hazardous materials. The project was conducted in two phases. In Phase I, methods that could potentially be used to develop the consequence comparisons for hazardous material transportation accidents were identified and reviewed. Potential improvements were identified and an evaluation of the improved methods was performed. Based on this evaluation, several methods were selected for detailed evaluation in Phase II of the project. The methods selected were location-dependent scenarios, figure of merit and risk assessment. This evaluation included application of the methods to a sample problem which compares the consequences of four representative hazardous materials - chlorine, propane, spent nuclear fuel and class A explosives. These materials were selected because they represented a broad class of hazardous material properties and consequence mechanisms. The sample case aplication relied extensively on consequence calculations performed in previous transportation risk assessment studies. A consultant was employed to assist in developing consequence models for explosives. The results of the detailed evaluation of the three consequence comparison methods indicates that methods are available to perform technically defensible comparisons of the consequences from a wide variety of hazardous materials. Location-dependent scenario and risk assessment methods are available now and the figure of merit method could be developed with additional effort. All of the methods require substantial effort to implement. Methods that would require substantially less effort were identified in the preliminary evaluation, but questions of technical accuracy preclude their application on a scale. These methods may have application to specific cases, however.

  8. THE USE OF DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY IN THE EVALUATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGING PERFORMANCE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    May, C; Lawrence Gelder, L; Boyd Howard, B

    2007-03-22

    New designs of radioactive material shipping packages are required to be evaluated in accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, ''Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material''. This paper will discuss the use of digital radiography to evaluate the effects of the tests required by 10 CFR 71.71, Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT), and 10 CFR 71.73, Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). One acceptable means of evaluating packaging performance is to subject packagings to the series of NCT and HAC tests. The evaluation includes a determination of the effect on the packaging by the conditions and tests. That determination has required that packagings be cut and sectioned to learn the actual effects on internal components. Digital radiography permits the examination of internal packaging components without sectioning a package. This allows a single package to be subjected to a series of tests. After each test, the package is digitally radiographed and the effects of particular tests evaluated. Radiography reduces the number of packages required for testing and also reduces labor and materials required to section and evaluate numerous packages. This paper will include a description of the digital radiography equipment used in the testing and evaluation of the 9977 and 9978 packages at SRNL. The equipment is capable of making a single radiograph of a full-sized package in one exposure. Radiographs will be compared to sectioned packages that show actual conditions compared to radiographic images.

  9. Models for estimating the metabolic syndrome biological age as the new index for evaluation and management of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young Gon; Suh, Eunkyung; Chun, Hyejin; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Deog Ki; Bae, Chul-Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to propose a metabolic syndrome (MS) biological age model, through which overall evaluation and management of the health status and aging state in MS can be done easily. Through this model, we hope to provide a novel evaluation and management health index that can be utilized in various health care fields. Patient and methods MS parameters from American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines in 2005 were used as biomarkers for the estimation of MS biological age. MS biological age model development was done by analyzing data of 263,828 participants and clinical application of the developed MS biological age was assessed by analyzing the data of 188,886 subjects. Results The principal component accounted for 36.1% in male and 38.9% in female of the total variance in the battery of five variables. The correlation coefficient between corrected biological age and chronological age in males and females were 0.711 and 0.737, respectively. Significant difference for mean MS biological age and chronological age between the three groups, normal, at risk and MS, was seen (P<0.001). Conclusion For the comprehensive approach in MS management, MS biological age is expected to be additionally utilized as a novel evaluation and management index along with the traditional MS diagnosis. PMID:28203066

  10. Strain changes on the cortical shell of vertebral bodies due to spine ageing: a parametric study using a finite element model evaluated by strain measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongtao; Rosenau, Eike; Paetzold, Helge; Klein, Anke; Püschel, Klaus; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2013-12-01

    The probability of fractures of the cortical shell of vertebral bodies increases as ageing progresses. Ageing involves all the spinal component changes. However, the effect of the spinal component ageing on the fracture risk of the cortical shell remains poorly understood. In this study, the influence of the ageing of the spinal components on cortical shell strain was investigated. A lumbar spinal specimen (L3-L5) was mechanically tested under a quasi-static axial compressive load. Clinical computed tomography images of the same specimen were used to create a corresponding finite element model. The material properties were determined by calibrating the finite element model using the L4 cortical shell strains of the anterior centre measurement site. The remaining experiment data (axial displacement, the intra-discal pressures, L4 cortical shell strain on the lateral measurement site) were used to evaluate the model. The individual ageing process of the six spinal components (cortical shell, cancellous bone, bony endplate, posterior elements, nucleus pulposus and annulus matrix) was simulated by changing their Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios, and the effect on cortical shell strain was investigated. Results show that the cortical shell strain is more sensitive to the ageing of the cortical shell and the cancellous bone than to the ageing of the nucleus pulposus, the annulus matrix, and the bony endplates and of the posterior elements. The results can help the clinicians focus on the aspects that mainly influence the vertebral cortex fracture risk factor.

  11. Effect of disinfectant, water age, and pipe materials on bacterial and eukaryotic community structure in drinking water biofilm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Masters, Sheldon; Edwards, Marc A; Falkinham, Joseph O; Pruden, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Availability of safe, pathogen-free drinking water is vital to public health; however, it is impossible to deliver sterile drinking water to consumers. Recent microbiome research is bringing new understanding to the true extent and diversity of microbes that inhabit water distribution systems. The purpose of this study was to determine how water chemistry in main distribution lines shape the microbiome in drinking water biofilms and to explore potential associations between opportunistic pathogens and indigenous drinking water microbes. Effects of disinfectant (chloramines, chlorine), water age (2.3 days, 5.7 days), and pipe material (cement, iron, PVC) were compared in parallel triplicate simulated water distribution systems. Pyrosequencing was employed to characterize bacteria and terminal restriction fragment polymorphism was used to profile both bacteria and eukaryotes inhabiting pipe biofilms. Disinfectant and water age were both observed to be strong factors in shaping bacterial and eukaryotic community structures. Pipe material only influenced the bacterial community structure (ANOSIM test, P < 0.05). Interactive effects of disinfectant, pipe material, and water age on both bacteria and eukaryotes were noted. Disinfectant concentration had the strongest effect on bacteria, while dissolved oxygen appeared to be a major driver for eukaryotes (BEST test). Several correlations of similarity metrics among populations of bacteria, eukaryotes, and opportunistic pathogens, as well as one significant association between mycobacterial and proteobacterial operational taxonomic units, provides insight into means by which manipulating the microbiome may lead to new avenues for limiting the growth of opportunistic pathogens (e.g., Legionella) or other nuisance organisms (e.g., nitrifiers).

  12. A structure state evaluation method based on electric-thermo-acoustic effect for tension materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Aijun; Zhang, Panpan; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-10-01

    The material properties of a structure will change over the course of its service life. Monitoring for material properties can be used to evaluate equipment state. Characterising and tracking variations in properties have promising potential for the detection and evaluation of material state caused by fatigue or residual stress. Theoretical analysis for the formation of a thermo-acoustic effect is carried out and it reveals a kind of interaction between the resonance of gas heat and that of solid heat. This paper introduces an electric-thermo-acoustic model with a multi-layered structure and analyses the effects of the material properties on sound pressure. Based on this effect, a method for evaluating the performance of a multi-layered structure material is proposed that can be used to assess a greater number of physical properties than the existing approaches. The simulations and experiments with variations in material property are generated and processed with the proposed model, and the results verify the method’s efficiency.

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, K.L.; Ramuhali, P.; Brenchley, D.L.; Coble, J.B.; Hashemian, H.M.; Konnick, R.; Ray, S.

    2012-09-01

    Executive Summary [partial] The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. A workshop was held to gather subject matter experts to develop the NDE R&D Roadmap for Cables. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, and NDE instrumentation development from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), universities, commercial NDE service vendors and cable manufacturers, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

  14. Evaluation and recommendations for work group integration within the Materials and Processes Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrington, Phillip A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate and make recommendations for improving the level of integration of several work groups within the Materials and Processes Lab at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This evaluation has uncovered a variety of projects that could improve the efficiency and operation of the work groups as well as the overall integration of the system. In addition, this study provides the foundation for specification of a computer integrated manufacturing test bed environment in the Materials and Processes Lab.

  15. An evaluation of potentially useful separator materials for nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd] satellite batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, H. A.; Toner, S. D.; Cuthrell, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation intended to determine the potential suitability and probable efficacy of a group of separator materials for use in nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) satellite batteries was carried out. These results were obtained using test procedures established in an earlier evaluation of other separator materials, some of which were used in experimental battery cells subjected to simulated use conditions. The properties that appear to be most important are: high electrolyte absorptivity, good electrolyte retention, low specific resistivity, rapid wettability and low resistance to air permeation. Wicking characteristics and wet-out time seem to be more important with respect to the initial filling of the battery with the electrolyte.

  16. Economic evaluation of closure CAP barrier materials Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    This study prepared by the Site Geotechnical Services (SGS) and Environmental Restoration (ER) departments of the WSRC evaluates a generic closure cover system for a hazardous waste site, using 10 different surface areas, ranging from 0.1 acre to 80 acres, and 12 barrier materials. This study presents a revision to the previous study (Rev. 0) published in June 1993, under the same title. The objective of this study was to revise the previous study by incorporating four additional site sizes into the evaluation process and identifying the most cost-effective barrier material for a given closure cover system at the SRS.

  17. Invariant and partially invariant solutions of integro-differential equations for linear thermoviscoelastic aging materials with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Long-Qiao; Meleshko, Sergey V.

    2017-01-01

    A linear thermoviscoelastic model for homogeneous, aging materials with memory is established. A system of integro-differential equations is obtained by using two motions (a one-dimensional motion and a shearing motion) for this model. Applying the group analysis method to the system of integro-differential equations, the admitted Lie group is determined. Using this admitted Lie group, invariant and partially invariant solutions are found. The present paper gives a first example of application of partially invariant solutions to integro-differential equations.

  18. Development of apparatus and procedures for evaluating radon-resistant construction materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, T.D.; Greenfield, M.B.; MacKenzie, J.; Meijer, R.J. de

    1992-12-31

    Laboratory facilities and apparatus have been constructed to measure radon exhalation from, and radon permeability through, various construction materials. This phase of the project has focused on development of test apparatus and evaluation of instrumentation. Results indicate significant spatial variability in the radon permeability of polyethylene, even when all test samples were selected from the same roll of material, and when no visible differentiation could be made regarding sample quality. Implications for code enforcement are described, and recommendations are offered for refinement of equipment and the measurement process, prioritization of future materials testing, and specific building code provisions, based on our results.

  19. An Evaluation of Various Permanent Restorative Materials’ Effect on the Shade of Bleached Teeth.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-28

    O AD-Alt 9 628 ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC F/G 6/5 AN EVALUATION OF VARIOUS PERMANENT RESTORATIVE MATER! S’ EFFFC--ETC (U) DEC A1 W F... Materials ’ Effect on the Shade of Bleached Teeth William F. Freccia, BS, DDS, MS Donald D. Peters, BA, DDS, MS Lewis Lorton, BA, DDS, MSD Commercial materials ...or that the materials and equip- ment are necessarily the best available for the purpose. The opinions contained herein are the private views of the

  20. Development and evaluation of an ablative closeout material for solid rocket booster thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    A trowellable closeout/repair material designated as MTA-2 was developed and evaluated for use on the Solid Rocket Booster. This material is composed of an epoxy-polysulfide binder and is highly filled with phenolic microballoons for density control and ablative performance. Mechanical property testing and thermal testing were performed in a wind tunnel to simulate the combined Solid Rocket Booster trajectory aeroshear and heating environments. The material is characterized by excellent thermal performance and was used extensively on the Space Shuttle STS-1 and STS-2 flight hardware.

  1. Plexogenic arteriopathy in broiler lungs: Evaluation of line, age, and sex influences1

    PubMed Central

    Wideman, R. F.; Mason, J. G.; Anthony, N. B.; Cross, D.

    2015-01-01

    Plexiform lesions form in the terminal pulmonary arterioles of human patients suffering from prolonged pulmonary arterial hypertension. Plexiform lesions also develop in broiler lungs, but lesion incidences are not strongly correlated with sustained pulmonary hypertension as reflected by right to total ventricular weight (RVTV) ratios. The present study was conducted to assess plexiform lesion incidences in broiler lines that have been divergently selected for susceptibility or resistance to pulmonary hypertension. Broilers from susceptible (SUS) and resistant (RES) lines were reared together and only clinically healthy (nonascitic, noncyanotic) individuals were evaluated to minimize potential line differences in cardiopulmonary hemodynamics. The objective was to determine if an innate genetic predisposition for plexogenic arteriopathy would be exposed in SUS broilers when compared with RES broilers in the absence of extreme differences in cardiopulmonary hemodynamics. Broilers up to 12 wk age from the SUS and RES lines had essentially equivalent BW, indices of cardiopulmonary function (left ventricle + septum weight, total ventricle weight, and RVTV ratios), and lung volumes within a sex. Average RVTV ratios for broilers from both lines were indicative of normal pulmonary arterial pressures at all ages sampled. Nevertheless, plexiform lesions were detected in SUS and RES broiler lungs immediately posthatch and thereafter at all ages sampled. Lesion incidences were consistently low and did not differ between the lines within any of the sampling ages. This evidence demonstrates that plexiform lesions develop extremely rapidly in broiler chicks, apparently without the prerequisite for vascular stress caused by severe, prolonged pulmonary arterial hypertension. No innate genetic predisposition for complex vascular lesion development appeared to exist in the SUS line when compared with the RES line. PMID:25681478

  2. Evaluation of Anticorrosion Performance of New Materials for Alternative Superheater Tubes in Biomass Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuchun; Zhang, Hongliang; He, Yuwu

    2016-09-01

    One way of controlling alkali chloride-induced corrosion in biomass boilers is by designing new alloy materials used as superheater tubes. Four newly designed Cr-Ni alloy was designed and studied for applicability in biomass power plants. High-temperature oxidation experiments and high-temperature corrosion experiments were carried out for evaluation material characterization. Through analysis and discussion of the corrosion kinetics and oxidation kinetics, it can be concluded that materials with series number of "2xx" and "3xx" had better endurance ability in KCl environment under 650°C and 700°C than TP316 material. In the same conditions, 3xx material had better anticorrosion ability in 700°C with KCl environment.

  3. A sparse digital signal model for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of layered materials.

    PubMed

    Bochud, N; Gomez, A M; Rus, G; Peinado, A M

    2015-09-01

    Signal modeling has been proven to be an useful tool to characterize damaged materials under ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In this paper, we introduce a novel digital signal model for ultrasonic NDE of multilayered materials. This model borrows concepts from lattice filter theory, and bridges them to the physics involved in the wave-material interactions. In particular, the proposed theoretical framework shows that any multilayered material can be characterized by a transfer function with sparse coefficients. The filter coefficients are linked to the physical properties of the material and are analytically obtained from them, whereas a sparse distribution naturally arises and does not rely on heuristic approaches. The developed model is first validated with experimental measurements obtained from multilayered media consisting of homogeneous solids. Then, the sparse structure of the obtained digital filter is exploited through a model-based inverse problem for damage identification in a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) plate.

  4. U. S. -French Cooperative Research Program: U. S. test results for cable insulation and jacket materials at the completion of accelerated aging

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Eight different U.S. insulation and jacket products have been accelerated aged at Sandia. The experimental variables included: (1) sequential versus simultaneous accelerated aging exposures; (2) the order of the sequential exposures; and (3) ambient versus 70/sup 0/C irradiation temperatures during sequential aging exposures. We observed that the irradiation temperature (70/sup 0/C or ambient) was secondary in importance to the choice of sequence for thermal and radiation aging. For most materials studied (except TEFZEL) the irradiation then thermal aging sequence was as severe or more severe than the thermal then irradiation aging sequence.

  5. TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE MATERIAL AND PERSONNEL HANDLING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    T. A. Misiak

    1998-05-21

    This Title III Evaluation Report (TER) provides the results of an evaluation that was conducted on the Material and Personnel Handling System. This TER has been written in accordance with the ''Technical Document Preparation Plan for the Mined Geologic Disposal System Title III Evaluation Reports'' (BA0000000-01717-4600-00005 REV 03). The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Material and Personnel Handling System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, the technical baseline requirements, and the baseline design are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications.

  6. Application of GRA for Sustainable Material Selection and Evaluation Using LCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakrishna, Kandasamy; Vinodh, Sekar; Sakthi Sanghvi, Vijayaselvan; Deepika, Chinadurai

    2016-07-01

    Material selection is identified as a successful key parameter in establishing any product to be sustainable, considering its end of life (EoL) characteristics. An accurate understanding of expected service conditions and environmental considerations are crucial in the selection of material plays a vital role with overwhelming customer expectations and stringent laws. Therefore, this article presents an integrated approach for sustainable material selection using grey relational analysis (GRA) considering the EoL disposal strategies with respect to an automotive product. GRA, an impact evaluation model measures the degree of similarity between the comparability (choice of material) sequence and reference (EoL strategies) sequence based on the relational grade. The ranking result shows that the outranking relationships in the order, ABS-REC > PP-INC > AL-REM > PP-LND > ABS-LND > ABS-INC > PU-LND > AL-REC > AL-LND > PU-INC > AL-INC. The best sustainable material selected was ABS and recycling was selected as the best EoL strategy with the grey relational value of 2.43856. The best material selected by this approach, ABS was evaluated for its viability using life cycle assessment and the estimated impacts also proved the practicability of the selected material highlighting the focus on dehumidification step in the manufacturing of the case product using this developed multi-criteria approach.

  7. Field Evaluation of the Potential for Creep in Thermoplastic Encapsulant Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M. D.; Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Moseley, J. M.; Shah, Q.; Tamizhmani, G.; Sakurai, K.; Inoue, M.; Doi, T.; Masuda, A.; Samuels, S. L.; Vanderpan, C. E.

    2012-06-01

    There has been recent interest in the use of thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules to replace chemically crosslinked materials, e.g., ethylene-vinyl acetate. The related motivations include the desire to: reduce lamination time or temperature; use less moisture-permeable materials; use materials with better corrosion characteristics or with improved electrical resistance. However, the use of any thermoplastic material in a high-temperature environment raises safety and performance concerns, as the standardized tests currently do not expose the modules to temperatures in excess of 85 degrees C, though fielded modules may experience temperatures above 100 degrees C. Here we constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass thin-film mock modules using different encapsulant materials of which only two were designed to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with insulation on the back side in Arizona in the summer, and an identical set was exposed in environmental chambers. High precision creep measurements (+/- 20 um) and performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials being in the melt state during outdoor deployment, very little creep was seen because of their high viscosity, temperature heterogeneity across the modules, and the formation of chemical crosslinks in many of the encapsulants as they aged. In the case of the crystalline silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet reduced the creep further.

  8. An early I-Xe age for CB chondrite chondrule formation, and a re-evaluation of the closure age of Shallowater enstatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Crowther, S. A.; Busfield, A.; Holland, G.; Whitby, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    The iodine-xenon system has been analyzed in samples of 7 chondrules from the CB chondrites Gujba and Hammadah al Hamra (HaH) 237. One sample from Gujba defined a high temperature iodine-xenon isochron corresponding to closure 1.87 ± 0.4 Ma before closure of Shallowater enstatite. Motivated by this result, we employ outlier rejection to re-evaluate the Shallowater age, leading to a modified value of 4562.3 ± 0.4 Ma (1σ). In this process, the datum obtained by combining our I-Xe age for Gujba with the literature Pb-Pb age is rejected as an outlier, indicating that in this sample the I-Xe system closed earlier than the accepted Pb-Pb age of chondrules from CB chondrites. The need for a formation environment distinct from that of chondrules from other meteorites is thus reduced.

  9. Inorganic raw materials economy and provenance of chipped industry in some stone age sites of northern and central Italy.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Amilcare; Boschian, Giovanni; Crisci, Gino Mirocle; Danese, Ermanno; De Francesco, Anna Maria; Dini, Mario; Fontana, Federica; Giampietri, Alessandra; Grifoni, Renata; Guerreschi, Antonio; Liagre, Jérémie; Negrino, Fabio; Radi, Giovanna; Tozzi, Carlo; Tykot, Robert

    2004-06-01

    An opportunistic and local choice of raw materials is typically attested in the Lower and Middle Paleolithic industries throughout Italy. The quality of the raw material usually affected the flaking technology and quality of the products. In the Upper Paleolithic and the Mesolithic, raw material procurement strategies were more complex. Flint was exploited both locally, in areas where abundant outcrops of raw materials were available (such as the Lessini mountains), and in distant localities, after which it was transported or exchanged over medium/long distances. Different routes of exchange were thus followed in the various periods; good reconstruction of these routes have been provided by a study of the Garfagnana sites in Northern Tuscany, and the Mesolithic deposit of Mondeval de Sora (Dolomites). An interesting example of a Late Upper Paleolithic flint quarry and workshop were found in Abruzzo, in the San Bartolomeo shelter. The extended trade of obsidian from Lipari, Palmarola and Sardinia to the Italian Peninsula is attested in the Neolithic, with some differences concerning the age and different areas.

  10. Dredged Material Evaluations: Review of Zooplankton Toxicity Test Methods for Marine Water Quality Evaluations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Toxicity Test Methods for Marine Water Quality Evaluations by Alan J Kennedy, Guilherme Lotufo, Jennifer G. Laird, and J. Daniel Farrar PURPOSE: The...first objective of this Dredging Operations and Engineering (DOER) technical note is to summarize currently available estuarine and marine water ...suitable for unrestricted open water placement, beneficial use, or if management strategies are necessary. Open water placement of DM into inland

  11. Evaluation of Space Power Materials Flown on the Passive Optical Sample Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Skowronski, Timothy J.; McCollum, Tim; Pippin, Gary; Bungay, Corey

    1999-01-01

    Evaluating the performance of materials on the exterior of spacecraft is of continuing interest, particularly in anticipation of those applications that will require a long duration in low Earth orbit. The Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA) experiment flown on the exterior of Mir as a risk mitigation experiment for the International Space Station was designed to better understand the interaction of materials with the low Earth orbit environment and to better understand the potential contamination threats that may be present in the vicinity of spacecraft. Deterioration in the optical performance of candidate space power materials due to the low Earth orbit environment, the contamination environment, or both, must be evaluated in order to propose measures to mitigate such deterioration. The thirty two samples of space power materials studied here include solar array blanket materials such as polyimide Kapton H and SiO(x) coated polyimide Kapton H, front surface aluminized sapphire, solar dynamic concentrator materials such as silver on spin coated polyimide and aluminum on spin coated polyimide, CV 1144 silicone, and the thermal control paint Z-93-P. The physical and optical properties that were evaluated prior to and after the POSA flight include mass, total, diffuse, and specular reflectance, solar absorptance, and infrared emittance. Additional post flight evaluation included scanning electron microscopy to observe surface features caused by the low Earth orbit environment and the contamination environment, and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry to identify contaminant type and thickness. This paper summarizes the results of pre- and post-flight measurements, identifies the mechanisms responsible for optical properties deterioration, and suggests improvements for the durability of materials in future missions.

  12. Constraints on the formation age of cometary material from the NASA Stardust mission.

    PubMed

    Matzel, J E P; Ishii, H A; Joswiak, D; Hutcheon, I D; Bradley, J P; Brownlee, D; Weber, P K; Teslich, N; Matrajt, G; McKeegan, K D; MacPherson, G J

    2010-04-23

    We measured the 26Al-26Mg isotope systematics of a approximately 5-micrometer refractory particle, Coki, returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 in order to relate the time scales of formation of cometary inclusions to their meteoritic counterparts. The data show no evidence of radiogenic 26Mg and define an upper limit to the abundance of 26Al at the time of particle formation: 26Al/27Al < 1 x 10(-5). The absence of 26Al indicates that Coki formed >1.7 million years after the oldest solids in the solar system, calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs). The data suggest that high-temperature inner solar system material formed, was subsequently transferred to the Kuiper Belt, and was incorporated into comets several million years after CAI formation.

  13. Constraints on the Formation Age of Cometary Material from the NASA Stardust Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Matzel, J; Ishii, H; Joswiak, D; Hutcheon, I; Bradley, J; Brownlee, D; Weber, P K; Teslich, N; Matrajt, G; McKeegan, K; MacPherson, G

    2009-11-13

    We measured the {sup 26}Al-{sup 26}Mg isotope systematics of a {approx} 5-micrometer refractory particle, Coki, returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 in order to relate the time scales of formation of cometary inclusions to their meteoritic counterparts. The data show no evidence of radiogenic {sup 26}Mg and define an upper limit to the abundance of {sup 26}Al at the time of particle formation: {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al < 1 x 10-5. The absence of {sup 26}Al indicates that Coki formed >1.7 million years after the oldest solids in the solar system, calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs). The data suggest that high-temperature inner solar system material formed, was subsequently transferred to the Kuiper Belt, and was incorporated into comets several million years after CAI formation.

  14. AgedCare+GP: description and evaluation of an in-house model of general practice in a residential aged-care facility.

    PubMed

    Pain, Tilley; Stainkey, Lesley; Chapman, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a medical model to provide in-house GP services to residents of aged-care facilities. Access to GP services for aged-care residents is decreasing, partially due to the changing demographic of the Australian GP workforce. The model we have developed is an in-house GP (AgedCare+GP) trialled in a publicly funded residential aged-care facility (RACF). The service model was based on the GP cooperative used in our after-hours general practice (AfterHours+GP). Briefly, the service model involves rostering a core group of GPs to provide weekly sessional clinics at the RACF. Financial contributions from appropriate Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) items for aged-care planning (including chronic conditions) provided adequate funds to operate the clinic for RACF residents. Evaluation of the service model used the number of resident transfers to the local emergency department as the primary outcome measure. There were 37 transfers of residents in the 3 months before the commencement of the AgedCare+GP and 11 transfers over a 3-month period at the end of the first year of operation; a reduction of almost 70%. This project demonstrates that AgedCare+GP is a successful model for GP service provision to RACF residents, and it also reduces the number of emergency department transfers.

  15. The Evaluation of Existing Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements: Day Care for the School-Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom, Joan M.; Dreher, Donna L.

    As part of an evaluation of the existing Federal Interagency Day Care Requirements (FIDCR), this paper reviews the current regulations and presents recommendations for modifications in the requirements as they relate to group or family day care services for school age children from 5 to 14 years of age. The paper is divided into five major…

  16. Assessing Defense Structure in School-Age Children Using the Response Evaluation Measure-71-Youth Version (REM-Y-71)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Katy B.; Medic, Sanja; Yasnovsky, Jessica; Steiner, Hans

    2006-01-01

    This study used the Response Evaluation Measure-Youth (REM-Y-71), a self-report measure of 21 defense reactions, among school-age children. Participants were elementary and middle school students (n=290; grades 3-8; age range: 8-15; mean=11.73). Factor analysis revealed a 2-factor defense structure consistent with structure among high school and…

  17. Cytogenetic Evaluation of the Physiological Saline Extract of a Newly Developed Dental Material "ORMO-48".

    PubMed

    Mohanan, P V; Mol, Lizzy

    2011-07-01

    The ORMO-48 is a new indigenous material for dental applications, developed by the Dental Products Laboratory of our Institute. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic effect of an indigenously developed dental material in Swiss albino mice. The genotoxic effect was evaluated by micronucleus and chromosomal aberration tests. Two grams of dental material was extracted in 10.0 ml of physiological saline at 70°C for 24 h. The extract was cooled to room temperature and was used for the experiment. The experimental designed had three groups each (six mice in each group) for micronucleus and chromosomal aberration tests. The first, second, and third groups were given a single exposure of physiological saline alone (control), dental material's extract (test), and cyclophosphamide (positive control) respectively for micronucleus and chromosomal aberration tests. The result of the study indicated that, the percentage of micronucleated PCE (polychromatic erythrocytes) and NCE (normochromatic erythrocytes) induced by the dental material (extract) treated group was well comparable with control group, whereas the positive control induced significantly high (P < 0.001) micronucleated PCE when compared to control. The PCE and NCE ratio of the dental material extract treated group was similar to that of control group. The chromosomal anomalies such as chromatid/chromosomal breaks, centric rings, exchanges, dicentric, and acentric fragments were evaluated. The result showed that the anomalies of the dental material extract treated group were similar to control group, however, significant anomalies were observed in the cyclophosphamide treated group. Hence, the present study concluded that the indigenously developed biocompatible dental material, ORMO-48 is non genotoxic at our laboratory conditions.

  18. Psychometric Evaluation of the Persian Version of the ‘Aging Male Scales’ Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Ardebili, Hasan Eftekhar; Khosravi, Shahla; Larijani, Bagher; Nedjat, Saharnaze; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht

    2014-01-01

    Background: Men, much like women, are faced with age-related menopause-like symptoms as they age. In recent years, increasing attention has been drawn to clinical research into elderly men and their health-related quality of life. The Aging Male Scales (AMS) questionnaire is an international tool for assessing the health-related quality of life in elderly men. Hence far this questionnaire has not been subjected to psychometric assessment in Iran. This study aims to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Persian version of the AMS questionnaire specific to the health of elderly men in Iran. Methods: To validate this instrument, a cross-sectional study was conducted on 521 healthy Iranian men aged 40-65 years old, who attended the blood transfusion center clinic between February 2011 and June 2012. The English version of the AMS questionnaire was translated to Persian and then back-translated. To determine the reliability of the AMS questionnaire, internal consistency was evaluated and test-retest was done. The questionnaire was validated using convergent and structural validity methods. To assess the factor structure of the questionnaire, a correlation matrix of questions and domains was used. Results: Cronbach's alpha was higher than 0.7 (0.73-0.88) in all domains. A Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.87 between pretest and posttest indicated a high correlation and an acceptable reliability. The convergent validity of the questionnaire was found acceptable by calculating the correlation between the domains and items-total correlation ranging 0.40-0.85, except for question 14 that had a 0.28 correlation with the whole test. The criterion-related validity of the questionnaire in the psychological domain was confirmed with the “two-item Patient Health Questionnaire” (r = 0.63, P < 0.001). Conclusions: According to the results, the Persian version of the AMS questionnaire has high validity and reliability and may be used to assess the health

  19. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Janapati, Vishnuvardhan; Roy, Surajit; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Composite structures are gaining importance for use in the aerospace industry. Compared to metallic structures their behavior is less well understood. This lack of understanding may pose constraints on their use. One possible way to deal with some of the risks associated with potential failure is to perform in-situ monitoring to detect precursors of failures. Prognostic algorithms can be used to predict impending failures. They require large amounts of training data to build and tune damage model for making useful predictions. One of the key aspects is to get confirmatory feedback from data as damage progresses. These kinds of data are rarely available from actual systems. The next possible resource to collect such data is an accelerated aging platform. To that end this paper describes a fatigue cycling experiment with the goal to stress carbon-carbon composite coupons with various layups. Piezoelectric disc sensors were used to periodically interrogate the system. Analysis showed distinct differences in the signatures of growing failures between data collected at conditions. Periodic X-radiographs were taken to assess the damage ground truth. Results after signal processing showed clear trends of damage growth that were correlated to damage assessed from the X-ray images.

  20. Evaluation of impurity migration and microwave digestion methods for lithographic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Fu-Hsiang; Hsiao, Li-Tung; Chou, Cheng-Tung; Wang, Mei-Ya; Wang, Tien-Ko; Sun, Yuh-Chang; Cheng, Bor-Jen; Yeng, Steven; Dai, Bau-Tong

    1999-06-01

    In the section of incoming quality or quality reliability analysis of advanced semiconductor fabrication company, it is inevitable to regulate the strict standard for the incoming materials to ensure the reliability. In our radioactive tracer study, it is interestingly found the various amounts of metal and trace element impurities in the lithographic materials may migrate into the substrate. Based on the complex organic matrix in lithographic materials such as bottom anti-reflective coating, I-line resist and DUV resist, it is not easy to direct determine the multi- elements by the instrumentation. In this work, the lithographic materials are first composed by the close- vessel and open-focused microwave oven, and the digest is evaporated to incipient dryness. After adding water, the sample solutions are used either for evaluating the completeness of the digestion process by UV-VIS spectrometer, or for the determination of eleven elements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In addition, the digestion efficiency is also evaluated by the limits for analytes can be achieved at lower than ng/g level. For evaluation of data accuracy, the result obtained by the two 130 percent. According to the microcontamination control limit predicted by the SIA roadmap, the established method can meet the requirements for the quality control of lithographic materials in the future ten years.