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Sample records for aged mice fed

  1. Increased Aβ pathology in aged Tg2576 mice born to mothers fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Nizari, Shereen; Carare, Roxana O; Hawkes, Cheryl A

    2016-02-25

    Maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of developing diabetes, obesity and premature death in adult offspring. Mid-life diabetes, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia are risk factors for the development of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). A key pathogenic feature of AD is the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high fat diet feeding during early life on Aβ pathology in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. Female mice were fed a standard (C) or high fat (HF) diet before mating and during gestation and lactation. At weaning, male offspring were fed a C diet. Significantly higher levels of guanidine-soluble Aβ and plaque loads were observed in the hippocampi of 11-month old Tg2576 mice born to mothers fed a HF diet. Changes in the extracellular matrix led to increased retention of Aβ within the parenchyma. These data support a role for maternal and gestational health on the health of the aged brain and pathologies associated with AD and may provide a novel target for both the prevention and treatment of AD.

  2. Increased Aβ pathology in aged Tg2576 mice born to mothers fed a high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Nizari, Shereen; Carare, Roxana O.; Hawkes, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of developing diabetes, obesity and premature death in adult offspring. Mid-life diabetes, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia are risk factors for the development of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A key pathogenic feature of AD is the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high fat diet feeding during early life on Aβ pathology in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. Female mice were fed a standard (C) or high fat (HF) diet before mating and during gestation and lactation. At weaning, male offspring were fed a C diet. Significantly higher levels of guanidine-soluble Aβ and plaque loads were observed in the hippocampi of 11-month old Tg2576 mice born to mothers fed a HF diet. Changes in the extracellular matrix led to increased retention of Aβ within the parenchyma. These data support a role for maternal and gestational health on the health of the aged brain and pathologies associated with AD and may provide a novel target for both the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:26911528

  3. Natural History of Age-Related Retinal Lesions That Precede AMD in Mice Fed High or Low Glycemic Index Diets

    PubMed Central

    Weikel, Karen A.; FitzGerald, Paul; Shang, Fu; Caceres, M. Andrea; Bian, Qingning; Handa, James T.; Stitt, Alan W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Epidemiologic data indicate that people who consume low glycemic index (GI) diets are at reduced risk for the onset and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The authors sought corroboration of this observation in an animal model. Methods. Five- and 16-month-old C57BL/6 mice were fed high or low GI diets until they were 17 and 23.5 months of age, respectively. Retinal lesions were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results. Retinal lesions including basal laminar deposits, loss of basal infoldings, and vacuoles in the retinal pigment epithelium were more prevalent in the 23.5- than in the 17-month-old mice. Within each age group, consumption of a high GI diet increased the risk for lesions and the risk for photoreceptor abnormalities and accumulation of AGEs. Conclusions. Consuming high GI diets accelerates the appearance of age-related retinal lesions that precede AMD in mice, perhaps by increasing the deposition of toxic AGEs in the retina. The data support the hypothesis that consuming lower GI diets, or simulation of their effects with nutraceuticals or drugs, may protect against AMD. The high GI-fed C57BL/6 mouse is a new model of age-related retinal lesions that precede AMD and mimic the early stages of disease and may be useful for drug discovery. PMID:22205601

  4. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in middle-aged mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Carey, Amanda N; Gomes, Stacey M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2014-05-07

    Consuming a high-fat diet may result in behavioral deficits similar to those observed in aging animals. It has been demonstrated that blueberry supplementation can allay age-related behavioral deficits. To determine if supplementation of a high-fat diet with blueberries offers protection against putative high-fat diet-related declines, 9-month-old C57Bl/6 mice were maintained on low-fat (10% fat calories) or high-fat (60% fat calories) diets with and without 4% freeze-dried blueberry powder. Novel object recognition memory was impaired by the high-fat diet; after 4 months on the high-fat diet, mice spent 50% of their time on the novel object in the testing trial, performing no greater than chance performance. Blueberry supplementation prevented recognition memory deficits after 4 months on the diets, as mice on this diet spent 67% of their time on the novel object. After 5 months on the diets, mice consuming the high-fat diet passed through the platform location less often than mice on low-fat diets during probe trials on days 2 and 3 of Morris water maze testing, whereas mice consuming the high-fat blueberry diet passed through the platform location as often as mice on the low-fat diets. This study is a first step in determining if incorporating more nutrient-dense foods into a high-fat diet can allay cognitive dysfunction.

  5. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and markers of dynamics in hepatocytes from aged, calorie restricted mice fed with different dietary fats

    PubMed Central

    Khraiwesh, Husam; López-Domínguez, José A.; del Río, Lucía Fernández; Gutierrez-Casado, Elena; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; de Cabo, Rafael; Ramsey, Jon J.; Burón, María I.; Villalba, José M.; González-Reyes, José A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyzed changes in hepatocyte mitochondrial mass and ultrastructure as well as in mitochondrial markers of fission/fusion and biogenesis in mice subjected to 40% calorie restriction (CR) for 18 months versus ad libitum-fed controls. Animals subjected to CR were separated into three groups with different dietary fats: soybean oil (also in controls),fish oil and lard. Therefore, the effect of the dietary fat under CR was studied as well. Our results show that CR induced changes in hepatocyte and mitochondrial size, in the volume fraction occupied by mitochondria, and in the number of mitochondria per hepatocyte. Also, mean number of mitochondrial cristae and lengths were significantly higher in all CR groups compared with controls. Finally, CR had no remarkable effects on the expression levels of fission and fusion protein markers. However, considerable differences in many of these parameters were found when comparing the CR groups, supporting the idea that dietary fat plays a relevant role in the modulation of CR effects in aged mice. PMID:24704714

  6. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in middle-aged mice fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consuming a high-fat diet may result in behavioral deficits similar to those observed in aging animals; our lab has demonstrated that blueberry supplementation can allay age-related behavioral deficits. To determine if supplementation of a high-fat diet with blueberries offers protection against put...

  7. Food intake reduction and immunologic alterations in mice fed dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Weindruch, R; McFeeters, G; Walford, R L

    1984-01-01

    A diet containing 0.4% DHEA was fed to male mice of a long-lived strain from 3 weeks until 18 weeks of age. These mice were compared with others fed a control diet ad libitum and with mice pair-fed the control diet in amounts approximating the intake of the DHEA-fed group. Mice fed the DHEA diet failed to eat all of the food presented to them whereas the pair-fed mice ate all of their food. All mice were studied at 18 weeks of age for two age-sensitive immune parameters (spleen lymphocyte proliferation induced by T-cell mitogens [PHA or ConA] and natural killer cell lysis of an allogeneic tumor). DHEA feeding led to: 1) a decrease in food intake (approximately 30% less than for mice fed the control diet ad libitum), 2) a lower body weight at 18 weeks of age (approximately 40% lower than for ad libitum controls) due to a decrease in the body weight gained from 3 weeks through 18 weeks of age (approximately 55% lower than controls), 3) a lower spleen weight (approximately 30% lower than controls) but without lower numbers of nucleated cells per spleen, 4) an increase in PHA-induced proliferation by spleen lymphocytes (approximately 100% higher than for controls) and, 5) no influence on splenic natural killer cell activity. The inhibition of body weight gain for mice fed DHEA appeared due to both a reduction in food intake and a metabolic effect since mice eating DHEA gained less body weight per gram of food eaten than did mice in either group eating the control diet.

  8. Synchrotron infrared imaging of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in cardiac tissue from mice fed high glycemic diets

    PubMed Central

    Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Elizabeth A.; Fu, Shang; Weikel, Karen; Hu, Ping; Blankenberg, Francis G.; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Taylor, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Recent research findings correlate an increased risk for dieases such as diabetes, macular degeneration and cardiovascular disease (CVD) with diets that rapidly raise the blood sugar levels; these diets are known as high glycemic index (GI) diets which include white breads, sodas and sweet deserts. Lower glycemia diets are usually rich in fruits, non-starchy vegetables and whole grain products. The goal of our study was to compare and contrast the effects of a low vs. high glycemic diet using the biochemical composition and microstructure of the heart. The improved spatial resolution and signal-to-noise for SR-FTIR obtained through the coupling of the bright synchrotron infrared photon source to an infrared spectral microscope enabled the molecular-level observation of diet-related changes within unfixed fresh frozen histologic sections of mouse cardiac tissue. High and low glycemic index (GI) diets were started at the age of five-months and continued for one year, with the diets only differing in their starch distribution (high GI diet = 100% amylopectin versus low GI diet = 30% amylopectin/70% amylose). Serial cryosections of cardiac tissue for SR-FTIR imaging alternated with adjacent hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections allowed not only fine-scale chemical analyses of glycogen and glycolipid accumulation along a vein as well as protein glycation hotspots co-localizing with collagen cold spots but also the tracking of morphological differences occurring in tandem with these chemical changes. As a result of the bright synchrotron infrared photon source coupling, we were able to provide significant molecular evidence for a positive correlation between protein glycation and collagen degradation in our mouse model. Our results bring a new insight not only to the effects of long-term GI dietary practices of the public but also to the molecular and chemical foundation behind the cardiovascular disease pathogenesis commonly seen in diabetic patients. PMID

  9. Synchrotron infrared imaging of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in cardiac tissue from mice fed high glycemic diets.

    PubMed

    Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Elizabeth A; Fu, Shang; Weikel, Karen; Hu, Ping; Blankenberg, Francis G; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Taylor, Allen

    Recent research findings correlate an increased risk for dieases such as diabetes, macular degeneration and cardiovascular disease (CVD) with diets that rapidly raise the blood sugar levels; these diets are known as high glycemic index (GI) diets which include white breads, sodas and sweet deserts. Lower glycemia diets are usually rich in fruits, non-starchy vegetables and whole grain products. The goal of our study was to compare and contrast the effects of a low vs. high glycemic diet using the biochemical composition and microstructure of the heart. The improved spatial resolution and signal-to-noise for SR-FTIR obtained through the coupling of the bright synchrotron infrared photon source to an infrared spectral microscope enabled the molecular-level observation of diet-related changes within unfixed fresh frozen histologic sections of mouse cardiac tissue. High and low glycemic index (GI) diets were started at the age of five-months and continued for one year, with the diets only differing in their starch distribution (high GI diet = 100% amylopectin versus low GI diet = 30% amylopectin/70% amylose). Serial cryosections of cardiac tissue for SR-FTIR imaging alternated with adjacent hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections allowed not only fine-scale chemical analyses of glycogen and glycolipid accumulation along a vein as well as protein glycation hotspots co-localizing with collagen cold spots but also the tracking of morphological differences occurring in tandem with these chemical changes. As a result of the bright synchrotron infrared photon source coupling, we were able to provide significant molecular evidence for a positive correlation between protein glycation and collagen degradation in our mouse model. Our results bring a new insight not only to the effects of long-term GI dietary practices of the public but also to the molecular and chemical foundation behind the cardiovascular disease pathogenesis commonly seen in diabetic patients.

  10. Dietary CLA-induced lipolysis is delayed in soy oil-fed mice compared to coconut oil-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Ippagunta, S; Angius, Z; Sanda, M; Barnes, K M

    2013-11-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been shown to cause a reduction in obesity in several species. CLA-induced body fat loss is enhanced when mice are fed coconut oil (CO) and involves increased lipolysis. The objective of this paper was to determine if the CLA-induced lipolysis in mice fed with different oil sources was time-dependent. Mice were fed 7 % soybean oil (SO) or CO diets for 6 week and then supplemented with 0 or 0.5 % CLA for 3, 7, 10 or 14 days. Body fat and ex-vivo lipolysis was determined. Body fat was reduced by CO on day 7 (P < 0.01) and in both CO and SO-fed mice (P < 0.05) in response to CLA on d14. Lipolysis was increased by CLA in CO-fed mice (P < 0.01) but not in SO-fed mice on day 7 and 10, but on day 14 CLA increased lipolysis in both CO- and SO-fed mice (P < 0.001). Expression and activation level of proteins involved in lipolysis and lipogenesis was determined by western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. No significant differences were detected in protein expression. CO-fed mice had greater fatty acid synthase and stearyl CoA desaturase 1 mRNA expression and less acetyl CoA carboxylase mRNA expression (P < 0.01). Sterol regulatory binding protein 1c was decreased by CLA in CO-fed mice and increased in SO-fed mice (P < 0.05). Malic enzyme expression was increased by CLA (P < 0.001) and CO (P < 0.01). Therefore, CLA-induced lipolysis occurs more rapidly in CO vs SO-fed mice and lipogenesis is decreased in CO-fed mice with CLA supplementation.

  11. Resilience in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, James L; Stout, Michael B; Sierra, Felipe

    2016-11-01

    Recently discovered interventions that target fundamental aging mechanisms have been shown to increase life span in mice and other species, and in some cases, these same manipulations have been shown to enhance health span and alleviate multiple age-related diseases and conditions. Aging is generally associated with decreases in resilience, the capacity to respond to or recover from clinically relevant stresses such as surgery, infections, or vascular events. We hypothesize that the age-related increase in susceptibility to those diseases and conditions is driven by or associated with the decrease in resilience. Thus, a test for resilience at middle age or even earlier could represent a surrogate approach to test the hypothesis that an intervention delays the process of aging itself. For this, animal models to test resilience accurately and predictably are needed. In addition, interventions that increase resilience might lead to treatments aimed at enhancing recovery following acute illnesses, or preventing poor outcomes from medical interventions in older, prefrail subjects. At a meeting of basic researchers and clinicians engaged in research on mechanisms of aging and care of the elderly, the merits and drawbacks of investigating effects of interventions on resilience in mice were considered. Available and potential stressors for assessing physiological resilience as well as the notion of developing a limited battery of such stressors and how to rank them were discussed. Relevant ranking parameters included value in assessing general health (as opposed to focusing on a single physiological system), ease of use, cost, reproducibility, clinical relevance, and feasibility of being repeated in the same animal longitudinally. During the discussions it became clear that, while this is an important area, very little is known or established. Much more research is needed in the near future to develop appropriate tests of resilience in animal models within an aging context

  12. Mitochondrial alterations in livers of Sod1-/- mice fed alcohol.

    PubMed

    Kessova, Irina G; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2007-05-15

    Chronic alcohol consumption induced liver injury in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase-deficient mice (Sod1-/-), with extensive centrilobular necrosis and inflammation and a reduction in hepatic ATP content. Mechanisms by which ethanol decreased ATP in these mice remain unclear. We investigated alterations in mitochondria of Sod1-/- mice produced by chronic ethanol treatment. These mitochondria had an increase in State 4 oxygen consumption with succinate and especially with glutamate plus malate compared to mitochondria from pair-fed Sod1-/- mice or mitochondria from wild-type mice fed dextrose or ethanol. This uncoupling was associated with a decrease in ADP/O and respiratory control ratios, a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced mitochondrial permeability transition, and decreased aconitase activity. Total thiols and uncoupling protein 2 levels were elevated in the pair-fed Sod1-/- mitochondria, perhaps an adaptive response to oxidant stress. However, no such increases were found with the ethanol-fed Sod1-/- mitochondria, suggesting a failure to develop these adaptations. The mitochondria from the ethanol-fed Sod1-/- mice had elevated levels of cleaved Bax, Bak, Bcl-xl, and adenine nucleotide translocator. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed increased association of Bax and Bak with the adenine nucleotide translocator. ADP-ATP exchange was very low in the ethanol-fed Sod1-/- mitochondria. These results suggest that ethanol treatment of Sod1-/- mice produces uncoupling and a decline in Deltapsi, swelling, increased association of proapoptotic proteins involved in the permeability transition, and decreased adenine nucleotide translocator activity, which may be responsible for the decline in ATP levels and development of necrosis in this model of alcohol-induced liver injury.

  13. Mice fed rapamycin have an increase in lifespan associated with major changes in the liver transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Fok, Wilson C; Chen, Yidong; Bokov, Alex; Zhang, Yiqiang; Salmon, Adam B; Diaz, Vivian; Javors, Martin; Wood, William H; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Pérez, Viviana I; Richardson, Arlan

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin was found to increase (11% to 16%) the lifespan of male and female C57BL/6J mice most likely by reducing the increase in the hazard for mortality (i.e., the rate of aging) term in the Gompertz mortality analysis. To identify the pathways that could be responsible for rapamycin's longevity effect, we analyzed the transcriptome of liver from 25-month-old male and female mice fed rapamycin starting at 4 months of age. Few changes (<300 transcripts) were observed in transcriptome of rapamycin-fed males; however, a large number of transcripts (>4,500) changed significantly in females. Using multidimensional scaling and heatmap analyses, the male mice fed rapamycin were found to segregate into two groups: one group that is almost identical to control males (Rapa-1) and a second group (Rapa-2) that shows a change in gene expression (>4,000 transcripts) with more than 60% of the genes shared with female mice fed Rapa. Using ingenuity pathway analysis, 13 pathways were significantly altered in both Rapa-2 males and rapamycin-fed females with mitochondrial function as the most significantly changed pathway. Our findings show that rapamycin has a major effect on the transcriptome and point to several pathways that would likely impact the longevity.

  14. Effects of adrenalectomy on energy balance in obese (ob/ob) mice fed high carbohydrate or high fat diets.

    PubMed

    Grogan, C K; Kim, H K; Romsos, D R

    1987-06-01

    We reported previously that adrenalectomy reduced the energy density of body weight gain (an indicator of proportional gain in lean and fat tissue) and the efficiency of energy retention in obese (ob/ob) mice to values approximating those in lean mice, but that adrenalectomy had much less influence on these parameters in ob/ob mice fed a purified high fat diet. To determine if fat was the exclusive factor in the purified high fat diet that negated effects of adrenalectomy, ob/ob mice were fed a purified high carbohydrate (glucose) diet identical in composition to the high fat diet, except for the fat/carbohydrate ratio. Responses of adrenalectomized ob/ob mice fed the purified high glucose diet from 4 to 7 wk of age mimicked those of mice fed the purified high fat diet, not those of mice fed the high carbohydrate nonpurified diet. Plasma glucose responses to a glucose load in adrenalectomized ob/ob mice paralleled the diet-dependent changes in energy balance. These results demonstrate that diet composition interacts with adrenal secretions to influence energy and glucose metabolism in ob/ob mice; consumption of either a purified high glucose or high fat diet negates the beneficial effects of adrenalectomy on energy and glucose metabolism observed when adrenalectomized ob/ob mice consume a nonpurified diet.

  15. Comparison of growth and exploratory behavior in mice fed an exclusively milk formula diet and mice fed a food-pellet diet post weaning.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Toshiaki; Itou, Takuya; Nishimura, Masakazu

    2005-11-26

    An exclusively milk formula diet stunted the growth of mice immediately following weaning. Milk-fed mice displayed a low-frequency profile of exploratory behavior, while pellet-fed mice showed high-frequency exploration. In contrast to exploratory behavior, feeding behavior did not differ significantly between milk- and pellet-fed mice. Despite showing low-frequency exploratory behavior, mice on an exclusively milk formula diet showed no difference in behavioral activities analyzed by an automatic hole-board apparatus compared to pellet-fed mice. These results suggest that the growth stunt caused by an exclusively milk formula diet retards the acquisition of active exploratory behavior without affecting the emotional state of mice.

  16. Practical pathology of aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M.

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  17. Impaired Lipid and Glucose Homeostasis in Hexabromocyclododecane-Exposed Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Eiko; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Yamamoto, Megumi; Takano, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is an additive flame retardant used in the textile industry and in polystyrene foam manufacturing. Because of its lipophilicity and persistency, HBCD accumulates in adipose tissue and thus has the potential of causing metabolic disorders through disruption of lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the association between HBCD and obesity remains unclear. Objectives: We investigated whether exposure to HBCD contributes to initiation and progression of obesity and related metabolic dysfunction in mice fed a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD). Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD (62.2 kcal% fat) or a ND and treated orally with HBCD (0, 1.75, 35, or 700 μg/kg body weight) weekly from 6 to 20 weeks of age. We examined body weight, liver weight, blood biochemistry, histopathological changes, and gene expression profiles in the liver and adipose tissue. Results: In HFD-fed mice, body and liver weight were markedly increased in mice treated with the high (700 μg/kg) and medium (35 μg/kg) doses of HBCD compared with vehicle. This effect was more prominent in the high-dose group. These increases were paralleled by increases in random blood glucose and insulin levels and enhancement of microvesicular steatosis and macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue. HBCD-treated HFD-fed mice also had increased mRNA levels of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ) in the liver and decreased mRNA levels of Glut4 (glucose transporter 4) in adipose tissue compared with vehicle-treated HFD-fed mice. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HBCD may contribute to enhancement of diet-induced body weight gain and metabolic dysfunction through disruption of lipid and glucose homeostasis, resulting in accelerated progression of obesity. Citation: Yanagisawa R, Koike E, Win-Shwe TT, Yamamoto M, Takano H. 2014. Impaired lipid and glucose homeostasis in hexabromocyclododecane-exposed mice fed a high-fat diet. Environ Health

  18. Gene expression profiles and physiological data from mice fed resveratrol-enriched rice DJ526

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hea-Jong; Lee, Heui-Kwan; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Baek, So-Hyeon; Hong, Seong-Tshool

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying lifespan extension by resveratrol remains widely discussed. To help study this mechanism, we previously created resveratrol-enriched rice, DJ526, by transferring the resveratrol biosynthesis gene into Dongjin rice. DJ526 accumulates 1.4–1.9 μg g−1 of resveratrol in its grain and can ameliorates age-related deterioration in mice, as compared to control animals, based on assessments of motor coordination, physical strength and cutaneous tissue aging. Here, we present raw data sets, deposited in public repositories, from microarray analysis and physiological data of mice fed with DJ526 and Dongjin rice and treated with resveratrol. We also provide a method to analyze blood serum at micron levels. These data sets may help other researchers find new clues regarding the etiology of the anti-aging process and signaling pathways induced by resveratrol, rice, or DJ526. PMID:27996975

  19. Adrenalectomy fails to stimulate brown adipose tissue metabolism in ob/ob mice fed glucose.

    PubMed

    Kim, H K; Romsos, D R

    1988-11-01

    Adrenalectomy arrests the development of obesity in ob/ob mice fed nonpurified high-starch diets partly by stimulating the low thermogenic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT). However, adrenalectomy fails to suppress the development of obesity in ob/ob mice fed a purified high-glucose diet. Effects of adrenalectomy on BAT metabolism in ob/ob mice fed purified high-starch or high-glucose diets were therefore examined. Adrenalectomy markedly decreased the efficiency of energy retention and increased BAT metabolism (as assessed by GDP binding to BAT mitochondria, GDP-inhibitable acetate- or chloride-induced mitochondrial swelling, and by rates of norepinephrine turnover in BAT) in ob/ob mice fed a high-starch purified diet but had only minimal effects on energy efficiency or BAT metabolism in ob/ob mice fed a high-glucose purified diet. Plasma insulin concentrations decreased and thyroxine concentrations increased in adrenalectomized ob/ob mice fed the high-starch diet; changes in these hormones were less pronounced in adrenalectomized ob/ob mice fed the high-glucose diet. Consumption of glucose mimics effects of adrenal secretions on BAT metabolism in ob/ob mice.

  20. Cerebral lipid deposition in aged apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, L. C.; Parker, C. A.; Lipinski, W. J.; Callahan, M. J.; Carroll, R. T.; Gandy, S. E.; Smith, J. D.; Jucker, M.; Bisgaier, C. L.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the influence of age and diet on cerebral pathology in mice lacking apolipoprotein E (apoE), four male apoE knockout mice (epsilon -/-), and five male wild-type (epsilon +/+) littermate controls were placed on a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet for 7 weeks beginning at 17 months of age. All four aged knockout mice developed xanthomatous lesions in the brain consisting mostly of crystalline cholesterol clefts, lipid globules, and foam cells. Smaller xanthomas were confined mainly to the choroid plexus and ventral fornix in the roof of the third ventricle, occasionally extending subpially along the choroidal fissure and into the adjacent parenchyma. More advanced xanthomas disrupted adjoining neural tissue in the fornix, hippocampus, and dorsal diencephalon; in one case, over 60% of one telencephalic hemisphere, including nearly the entire neocortex, was obliterated by the lesion. No xanthomas were observed in aged wild-type controls fed the high-fat/high-cholesterol diet. Brains from 42 additional animals, fed only conventional chow, were examined; 3 of 15 aged (15- to 23-month-old) apoE knockout mice developed small choroidal xanthomas. In contrast, no lesions were observed in five young (2- to 4-month-old) apoE knockout mice or in any wild-type controls between the ages of 2 and 23 months. Our findings indicate that disorders of lipid metabolism can induce significant pathological changes in the central nervous system of aged apoE knockout mice, particularly those on a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet. It may be fruitful to seek potential interactions between genetic factors and diet in modulating the risk of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders in aged humans. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9358763

  1. Hypothalamic Leptin Gene Therapy Reduces Bone Marrow Adiposity in ob/ob Mice Fed Regular and High-Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Branscum, Adam J.; Kalra, Satya P.; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2016-01-01

    Low bone mass is often associated with elevated bone marrow adiposity. Since osteoblasts and adipocytes are derived from the same mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) progenitor, adipocyte formation may increase at the expense of osteoblast formation. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone known to regulate energy and bone metabolism. Leptin deficiency and high-fat diet-induced obesity are associated with increased marrow adipose tissue (MAT) and reduced bone formation. Short-duration studies suggest that leptin treatment reduces MAT and increases bone formation in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice fed a regular diet. Here, we determined the long-duration impact of increased hypothalamic leptin on marrow adipocytes and osteoblasts in ob/ob mice following recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene therapy. Eight- to 10-week-old male ob/ob mice were randomized into four groups: (1) untreated, (2) rAAV-Lep, (3) rAAV-green fluorescent protein (rAAV-GFP), or (4) pair-fed to rAAV-Lep. For vector administration, mice were injected intracerebroventricularly with either rAAV-leptin gene therapy (rAAV-Lep) or rAAV-GFP (9 × 107 particles) and maintained for 30 weeks. In a second study, the impact of increased hypothalamic leptin levels on MAT was determined in mice fed high-fat diets; ob/ob mice were randomized into two groups and treated with either rAAV-Lep or rAAV-GFP. At 7 weeks post-vector administration, half the mice in each group were switched to a high-fat diet for 8 weeks. Wild-type (WT) controls included age-matched mice fed regular or high-fat diet. High-fat diet resulted in a threefold increase in MAT in WT mice, whereas MAT was increased by leptin deficiency up to 50-fold. Hypothalamic leptin gene therapy increased osteoblast perimeter and osteoclast perimeter with minor change in cancellous bone architecture. The gene therapy decreased MAT levels in ob/ob mice fed regular or high-fat diet to values similar to WT mice fed regular diet. These findings suggest

  2. EPA prevents fat mass expansion and metabolic disturbances in mice fed with a Western diet.

    PubMed

    Pinel, Alexandre; Pitois, Elodie; Rigaudiere, Jean-Paul; Jouve, Chrystele; De Saint-Vincent, Sarah; Laillet, Brigitte; Montaurier, Christophe; Huertas, Alain; Morio, Beatrice; Capel, Frederic

    2016-08-01

    The impact of alpha linolenic acid (ALA), EPA, and DHA on obesity and metabolic complications was studied in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HF) diet. HF diets were supplemented with ALA, EPA, or DHA (1% w/w) and given to C57BL/6J mice for 16 weeks and to Ob/Ob mice for 6 weeks. In C57BL/6J mice, EPA reduced plasma cholesterol (-20%), limited fat mass accumulation (-23%) and adipose cell hypertrophy (-50%), and reduced plasma leptin concentration (-60%) compared with HF-fed mice. Furthermore, mice supplemented with EPA exhibited a higher insulin sensitivity (+24%) and glucose tolerance (+20%) compared with HF-fed mice. Similar effects were observed in EPA-supplemented Ob/Ob mice, although fat mass accumulation was not prevented. By contrast, in comparison with HF-fed mice, DHA did not prevent fat mass accumulation, increased plasma leptin concentration (+128%) in C57BL/6J mice, and did not improve glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J and Ob/Ob mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, DHA stimulated leptin expression whereas EPA induced adiponectin expression, suggesting that improved leptin/adiponectin balance may contribute to the protective effect of EPA. In conclusion, supplementation with EPA, but not ALA and DHA, could preserve glucose homeostasis in an obesogenic environment and limit fat mass accumulation in the early stage of weight gain.

  3. Castration influences intestinal microflora and induces abdominal obesity in high-fat diet-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Naoki; Hanaoka, Ryo; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Kitakaze, Tomoya; Mitani, Takakazu; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (i.e. androgen deficiency) raises the risk for abdominal obesity in men. The mechanism for this obesity is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that hypogonadism after castration caused abdominal obesity in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed, but not in standard diet (SD)-fed, C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, the phenotype was not induced in mice treated with antibiotics that disrupt the intestinal microflora. In HFD-fed mice, castration increased feed efficiency and decreased fecal weight per food intake. Castration also induced in an increase of visceral fat mass only in the absence of antibiotics in HFD-fed mice, whereas subcutaneous fat mass was increased by castration irrespective of antibiotics. Castration reduced the expression in the mesenteric fat of both adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase in HFD-fed mice, which was not observed in the presence of antibiotics. Castration decreased thigh muscle (i.e. quadriceps and hamstrings) mass, elevated fasting blood glucose levels, and increased liver triglyceride levels in a HFD-dependent manner, whereas these changes were not observed in castrated mice treated with antibiotics. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and Lactobacillus species increased in the feces of HFD-fed castrated mice. These results show that androgen (e.g. testosterone) deficiency can alter the intestinal microbiome and induce abdominal obesity in a diet-dependent manner. PMID:26961573

  4. Exercise Improves Glucose Disposal and Insulin Signaling in Pregnant Mice Fed a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lindsay G; Ngo Tenlep, Sara Y; Woollett, Laura A; Pearson, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Physical activity has been suggested as a non-pharmacological intervention that can be used to improve glucose homeostasis in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of voluntary exercise on glucose tolerance and body composition in pregnant high fat diet fed mice. Methods Female mice were put on a standard diet or high fat diet for two weeks. The mice were then split into 4 groups; control standard diet fed, exercise standard diet fed, control high fat diet fed, and exercise high fat diet fed. Exercise mice had voluntary access to a running wheel in their home cage one week prior to mating, during mating, and throughout pregnancy. Glucose tolerance and body composition were measured during pregnancy. Akt levels were quantified in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue isolated from saline or insulin injected pregnant dams as a marker for insulin signaling. Results Consumption of the high fat diet led to significantly increased body weight, fat mass, and impaired glucose tolerance in control mice. However, voluntary running in the high fat diet fed dams significantly reduced weight gain and fat mass and ultimately improved glucose tolerance compared to control high fat diet fed dams. Further, body weight, fat mass, and glucose disposal in exercise high fat diet dams were indistinguishable from control dams fed the standard diet. High fat diet fed exercise dams also had significantly increased insulin stimulated phosphorylated Akt expression in adipose tissue, but not skeletal muscle, compared to control dams on high fat diet. Conclusion The use of voluntary exercise improves glucose homeostasis and body composition in pregnant female mice. Thus, future studies could investigate potential long-term health benefits in offspring born to obese exercising dams. PMID:26966635

  5. Choline supplementation protects against liver damage by normalizing cholesterol metabolism in Pemt/Ldlr knockout mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Al Rajabi, Ala; Castro, Gabriela S F; da Silva, Robin P; Nelson, Randy C; Thiesen, Aducio; Vannucchi, Helio; Vine, Donna F; Proctor, Spencer D; Field, Catherine J; Curtis, Jonathan M; Jacobs, René L

    2014-03-01

    Dietary choline is required for proper structure and dynamics of cell membranes, lipoprotein synthesis, and methyl-group metabolism. In mammals, choline is synthesized via phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (Pemt), which converts phosphatidylethanolamine to phosphatidylcholine. Pemt(-/-) mice have impaired VLDL secretion and developed fatty liver when fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Because of the reduction in plasma lipids, Pemt(-/-)/low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Ldlr(-/-)) mice are protected from atherosclerosis. The goal of this study was to investigate the importance of dietary choline in the metabolic phenotype of Pemt(-/-)/Ldlr(-/-) male mice. At 10-12 wk of age, Pemt(+/+)/Ldlr(-/-) (HF(+/+)) and half of the Pemt(-/-)/Ldlr(-/-) (HF(-/-)) mice were fed an HF diet with normal (1.3 g/kg) choline. The remaining Pemt(-/-)/Ldlr(-/-) mice were fed an HF diet supplemented (5 g/kg) with choline (HFCS(-/-) mice). The HF diet contained 60% of calories from fat and 1% cholesterol, and the mice were fed for 16 d. HF(-/-) mice lost weight and developed hepatomegaly, steatohepatitis, and liver damage. Hepatic concentrations of free cholesterol, cholesterol-esters, and triglyceride (TG) were elevated by 30%, 1.1-fold and 3.1-fold, respectively, in HF(-/-) compared with HF(+/+) mice. Choline supplementation normalized hepatic cholesterol, but not TG, and dramatically improved liver function. The expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport and esterification increased by 50% to 5.6-fold in HF(-/-) mice when compared with HF(+/+) mice. Markers of macrophages, oxidative stress, and fibrosis were elevated in the HF(-/-) mice. Choline supplementation normalized the expression of these genes. In conclusion, HF(-/-) mice develop liver failure associated with altered cholesterol metabolism when fed an HF/normal choline diet. Choline supplementation normalized cholesterol metabolism, which was sufficient to prevent nonalcoholic steatohepatitis development

  6. Time-restricted feeding reduces adiposity in mice fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm contributes to obesity. The present study investigated the effects of time-restricted feeding (TRF) of a high-fat diet on adiposity in male C57BL/6 mice. Three-week-old mice were fed a low-fat or high-fat diet (16% or 45% of energy from corn oil) ad libitum (ad l...

  7. Long-term vitamin E supplementation reduces atherosclerosis and mortality in Ldlr-/- mice, but not when fed Western style diet

    PubMed Central

    Meydani, Mohsen; Kwan, Paul; Band, Michael; Knight, Ashley; Guo, Weimin; Goutis, Jason; Ordovas, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Epidemiological and experimental evidence have indicated potential health benefits of vitamin E supplementation on coronary heart disease (CHD), but several clinical trials have reported no benefit from vitamin E supplementation on CHD. We hypothesized that supplemental intake of vitamin E from an early age may prevent or retard the development and progression of atherosclerosis and CHD mortality. Methods To test this hypothesis, 300 Ldlr-/- mice were divided into groups receiving Western style high fat/cholesterol (HFHC), moderate fat/cholesterol (MFMC), or low fat/cholesterol (LFLC) diets all containing 50 IU of vitamin E. These dietary groups were further subdivided into four sub-groups (N=25) receiving their respective diets with no vitamin E supplementation or additionally supplemented with vitamin E (500 IU/kg diet) starting at the early age of 5 wks, or 6 mo, or 12 mo. All mice remained on their assigned diets until age 18 mo. Body weight, health status and survival rate of mice were monitored and recorded. After 18 mo of dietary treatments, mice were sacrificed. Results Body weight was the highest in HFHC groups and the lowest in LFLC groups. Plasma concentration of cholesterol and triglycerides was high in all dietary groups, and plasma vitamin E was high in vitamin E supplemented groups. Fifty percent of mice fed Western style HFHC diet and 53% of mice fed MFMC diet survived during the 18 mo, whereas 75% of mice fed LFLC diet survived during the 18 mo dietary treatments. At the age of 18 mo, all the Ldlr-/- mice, regardless of dietary treatments, had several advanced atherosclerotic lesions in both aortic root and aortic tree. Within the LFLC groups, those that received vitamin E supplements from age 5 wks up to 18 mo had a significantly higher survival rate of 88% (p=0.04) and lower mortality (12%) compared to mice that did not receive vitamin E supplements (64%). This lower mortality rate and higher survival rate coincided with significantly

  8. Electroencephalographic changes with age in male mice.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, B E; Zolovick, A J; Elias, M F

    1975-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) changes, as measured by the awake state, slow-wave sleep (SWS), rapid-eye movement (REM) patterns and ratio of REM/total sleep, were recorded in aging male mice of DBA/2J and C57BL/6J strains. Results indicate that there is a significant increase in the awake state accompanied by significant decrease in SWS with advancing age for both strains, although these changes appear more pronounced in DBA/2J mice than C57BL/6J mice. Of considerable significance is the finding that REM sleep is absent in mice of DBA/2J strain at 23.5 months of age. Based on these findings, the conclusion was reached that strain DBA/2J ages significantly faster than C57BL/6J. The difference in aging between the two strains emphasizes the need for additional studies dealing with genetic aspects of aging.

  9. Testosterone and Dihydrotestosterone Differentially Improve Cognition in Aged Female Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benice, Ted S.; Raber, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Compared with age-matched male mice, female mice experience a more severe age-related cognitive decline (ACD). Since androgens are less abundant in aged female mice compared with aged male mice, androgen supplementation may enhance cognition in aged female mice. To test this, we assessed behavioral performance on a variety of tasks in 22- to…

  10. CCK(1) receptor is essential for normal meal patterning in mice fed high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Michael J; Paulino, Gabriel; Raybould, Helen E

    2007-12-05

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), released by lipid in the intestine, initiates satiety by acting at cholecystokinin type 1 receptors (CCK(1)Rs) located on vagal afferent nerve terminals located in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, we determined the role of the CCK(1)R in the short term effects of a high fat diet on daily food intake and meal patterns using mice in which the CCK(1)R gene is deleted. CCK(1)R(-/-) and CCK(1)R(+/+) mice were fed isocaloric high fat (HF) or low fat (LF) diets ad libitum for 18 h each day and meal size, meal frequency, intermeal interval, and meal duration were determined. Daily food intake was unaltered by diet in the CCK(1)R(-/-) compared to CCK(1)R(+/+) mice. However, meal size was larger in the CCK(1)R(-/-) mice compared to CCK(1)R(+/+) mice when fed a HF diet, with a concomitant decrease in meal frequency. Meal duration was increased in mice fed HF diet regardless of phenotype. In addition, CCK(1)R(-/-) mice fed a HF diet had a 75% decrease in the time to 1st meal compared to CCK(1)R(+/+) mice following a 6 h fast. These data suggest that lack of the CCK(1)R results in diminished satiation, causing altered meal patterns including larger, less frequent meals when fed a high fat diet. These results suggest that the CCK(1)R is involved in regulating caloric intake on a meal to meal basis, but that other factors are responsible for regulation of daily food intake.

  11. Dietary trimethylamine N-oxide exacerbates impaired glucose tolerance in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Liu, Xiaofang; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Xue, Yong; Wang, Yuming

    2014-10-01

    Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is an oxidation product of trimethylamine (TMA) and is present in many aquatic foods. Here, we investigated the effects of TMAO on glucose tolerance in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to the control, high fat (HF), and TMAO groups. The HF group was fed a diet containing 25% fat, and the TMAO group was fed the HFD plus 0.2% TMAO for 4 weeks. After 3 weeks of feeding, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Dietary TMAO increased fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and exacerbated the impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. These effects were associated with the expression of genes related to the insulin signal pathway, glycogen synthesis, gluconeogenesis and glucose transport in liver. mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine MCP-1 increased significantly and of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 greatly decreased in adipose tissue. Our results suggest that dietary TMAO exacerbates impaired glucose tolerance, obstructs the hepatic insulin signaling pathway, and causes adipose tissue inflammation in mice fed a high fat diet.

  12. The SIRT1 activator SRT1720 extends lifespan and improves health of mice fed a standard diet

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sarah J.; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Mercken, Evi M.; Palacios, Hector H.; Ward, Theresa M.; Abulwerdi, Gelareh; Minor, Robin K.; Vlasuk, George P.; Ellis, James L.; Sinclair, David A.; Dawson, John; Allison, David B.; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Bernier, Michel; de Cabo, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The prevention or delay of the onset of age-related diseases prolongs survival and improves quality of life while reducing the burden on the health care system. Activation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD+ deacetylase, improves metabolism and confers protection against physiological and cognitive disturbances in old age. SRT1720 is a specific SIRT1 activator that has health and lifespan benefits in adult mice fed a high-fat diet. We found extension in lifespan, delayed onset of age-related metabolic diseases, and improved general health in mice fed a standard diet after SRT1720 supplementation. Inhibition of pro-inflammatory gene expression both in the liver and muscle of SRT1720-treated animals was noted. SRT1720 lowered phosphorylation of NF-κB pathway regulators in vitro only when SIRT1 was functionally present. Combined with our previous work, the current study further supports the beneficial effects of SRT1720 on health across the lifespan in mice. PMID:24582957

  13. Subchronic toxicity study in mice fed Spirulina maxima.

    PubMed

    Salazar, M; Martínez, E; Madrigal, E; Ruiz, L E; Chamorro, G A

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of Spirulina maxima, a blue-green alga used as food supplement and food coloring, after 13 weeks of treatment. Groups of ten mice of each sex were given S. maxima in the diet at concentrations of 0 (control), 10, 20 or 30% (w/w) for 13 weeks. The alga ingestion had no effect on behavior, food and water intake, growth or survival. Terminal values in hematology and clinical chemistry did not reveal differences between treated and control groups. However, male and female mice showed significant changes in serum cholesterol levels at 20 and 30% algal concentrations, but a toxic effect of S. maxima was excluded. Post-mortem examination revealed no differences in gross or microscopic findings. Our results show that S. maxima up to high feeding levels did not produce adverse effects in mice after subchronic treatment.

  14. Intestinal Mucosal Triacylglycerol Accumulation Secondary to Decreased Lipid Secretion in Obese and High Fat Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, John D.; Malik, Nashmia; Chon, Su-Hyoun; Wells, Kevin; Zhou, Yin Xiu; Choi, Andrew S.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Storch, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The ectopic deposition of fat in liver and muscle during obesity is well established, however surprisingly little is known about the intestine. We used the ob/ob mouse and C57BL6/J mice fed a high fat (HF) diet to examine the effects of obesity and the effects of HF feeding, respectively, on intestinal mucosal triacylglycerol (TG) accumulation. Male C57BL6/J (wild-type, WT) mice were fed low fat (LF; 10% kcal as fat) or HF (45%) diets, and ob/ob mice were fed the LF diet, for 3 weeks. In this time frame, the WT–HF mice did not become obese, enabling independent examination of effects of the HF diet and effects of obesity. Analysis of intestinal lipid extracts from fed and fasted animals demonstrated that the mucosa, like other tissues, accumulates excess lipid. In the fed state, mucosal triacylglycerol (TG) levels were threefold and fivefold higher in the WT–HF and ob/ob mice, respectively, relative to the WT–LF mice. In the fasted state, mucosa from ob/ob mice had threefold higher TG levels relative to WT–LF mucosa. q-PCR analysis of mucosal mRNA from fed state mice showed alterations in the expression of several genes related to both anabolic and catabolic lipid metabolism pathways in WT–HF and ob/ob mice relative to WT–LF controls. Fewer changes were found in mucosal samples from the fasted state animals. Remarkably, oral fat tolerance tests showed a striking reduction in the plasma appearance of an oral fat load in the ob/ob and WT–HF mice compared to WT–LF. Overall, the results demonstrate that the intestinal mucosa accumulates excess TG during obesity. Changes in the expression of lipid metabolic and transport genes, as well as reduced secretion of dietary lipid from the mucosal cells into the circulation, may contribute to the TG accumulation in intestinal mucosa during obesity. Moreover, even in the absence of frank obesity, HF feeding leads to a large decrease in the rate of intestinal lipid secretion. PMID:22375121

  15. Adipokine production in mice fed high-fat diets containing different types of dietary fats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study compared high-fat diets containing different types of dietary fats with various levels of linoleic acid (18:2n6, LA) and a-linolenic acid (18:3n3, ALA) on adipokine production in male C57BL/6 mice. Three-week old mice were fed AIN93G diet (15% of energy from corn oil, control) or ...

  16. Fasting and sampling time affect liver gene expression of high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y

    2010-05-01

    Several physiological and biological variables are known to affect peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α-dependent signaling pathway and plasma biochemical profiles. However, less is known about the effect of these variables on high-fat diet-fed mice. In a 5-week study, C57BL/6 mice were divided into control (C) and high-fat diet-fed (H) groups, whereby before dissection, each group was subdivided into non-fasted (nC and nH) and a 15-h fasted mice (fC and fH) killed in the early light cycle, and a 15-h fasted mice (eC and eH) killed in the late phase of the light cycle. Liver and blood from the vena cava were collected. Non-fasted nC and nH mice have a marginal difference in their body weight gain, whereas significant differences were found for fasted mice. In nH mice, PPAR-α, acyl-CoA oxidase and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein expressions were significantly elevated, in contrast to fatty acid synthase (Fasn), stearoyl CoA-desaturase (SCD)-1, and elongase (ELOVL)-6 expressions. Fasn was profoundly induced in fH mice, while decreased sterol regulatory-binding protein-1 and SCD-1 were found only in eH mice. Different from the gene expression profiles, plasma total cholesterol level of the eH mice was higher than controls, whereas nH mice have increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids. Only glucose level of the fH mice was higher than that observed for controls. Results showed that fasting and sampling time have significantly affected liver gene expression and plasma biochemical indices of the high-fat diet-treated mice. An overlook in these aspects can cause serious discrepancies in the experimental data and their interpretations.

  17. Dietary anthocyanin-rich tart cherry extract inhibits intestinal tumorigenesis in APC(Min) mice fed suboptimal levels of sulindac.

    PubMed

    Bobe, Gerd; Wang, Bing; Seeram, Navindra P; Nair, Muraleedharan G; Bourquin, Leslie D

    2006-12-13

    A promising approach for cancer chemoprevention might be a combination therapy utilizing dietary phytochemicals and anticarcinogenic pharmaceuticals at a suboptimal dosage to minimize any potential adverse side effects. To test this hypothesis, various dosages of anthocyanin-rich tart cherry extract were fed in combination with suboptimal levels of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac to APCMin mice for 19 weeks. By the end of the feeding period, fewer mice that were fed the anthocyanin-rich extract in combination with sulindac lost more than 10% of body weight than mice fed sulindac alone. Mice that were fed anthocyanin-rich extract (at any dose) in combination with sulindac had fewer tumors and a smaller total tumor burden (total tumor area per mouse) in the small intestine when compared to mice fed sulindac alone. These results suggest that a dietary combination of tart cherry anthocyanins and sulindac is more protective against colon cancer than sulindac alone.

  18. Cow milk allergy symptoms are reduced in mice fed dietary synbiotics during oral sensitization with whey.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Bastiaan; van Esch, Betty C A M; Hofman, Gerard A; van Doorn, Suzan A C M; Knol, Jan; Nauta, Alma J; Garssen, Johan; Willemsen, Linette E M; Knippels, Léon M J

    2009-07-01

    Cow milk allergy is the most common food allergy in children. So far, no effective treatment is available to prevent or cure food allergy. The purpose of this study was to compare effects of dietary supplementation with a prebiotic mixture (Immunofortis), a probiotic strain [Bifidobacterium breve M-16V], or a synbiotic diet combining both on the outcome of the allergic response when provided during oral sensitization with whey in mice. Mice were fed diets containing 2% (wt:wt) Immunofortis and/or the B. breve M-16V (n = 6/group). The acute allergic skin response was determined by measuring ear swelling. Antigen-induced anaphylaxis was scored. Furthermore, whey-specific serum immunoglobulins and mouse mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1) were determined. In mice fed the synbiotic mixture, the allergic skin response and the anaphylactic reaction were strongly reduced compared with whey-sensitized mice fed the control diet (P < 0.01). Immunofortis or B. breve M-16V alone were significantly less effective in reducing the allergic skin response than the synbiotic diet and did not reduce the anaphylactic reaction. The whey-specific IgE and IgG(1) responses were not affected; however, IgG(2a) was greater in all treated groups than in the control group (P < 0.05). Serum mMCP-1 concentrations, reflecting mucosal mast cell degranulation, were lower in mice fed synbiotics compared with those fed the control diet (P < 0.01). Dietary supplementation with Immunofortis, B. breve M-16V, and particularly the synbiotic mixture, provided during sensitization, reduces the allergic effector response in a murine model of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity that mimics the human route of sensitization. This model shows the potential for dietary intervention with synbiotics in reducing the allergic response to food allergens.

  19. A novel mice model of metabolic syndrome: the high-fat-high-fructose diet-fed ICR mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhuhua, Zhang; Zhiquan, Wang; Zhen, Yang; Yixin, Niu; Weiwei, Zhang; Xiaoyong, Li; Yueming, Liu; Hongmei, Zhang; Li, Qin; Qing, Su

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the metabolic syndrome (MS) is occurring at growing rates worldwide, raising extensive concerns on the mechanisms and therapeutic interventions for this disorder. Herein, we described a novel method of establishing MS model in rodents. Male Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were fed with high-fat-high-fructose (HFHF) diet or normal chow (NC) respectively for 12 weeks. Metabolic phenotypes were assessed by glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Blood pressure was measured by a tail-cuff system. At the end of the experiment, mice were sacrificed, and blood and tissues were harvested for subsequent analysis. Serum insulin levels were measured by ELISA, and lipid profiles were determined biochemically. The HFHF diet-fed ICR mice exhibited obvious characteristics of the components of MS, including obvious obesity, severe insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, dislipidemia, significant hypertension and hyperuricemia. Our data suggest that HFHF diet-fed ICR mice may be a robust and efficient animal model that could well mimic the basic pathogenesis of human MS. PMID:26134356

  20. Systemic activation of NF-κB driven luciferase activity in transgenic mice fed advanced glycation end products modified albumin.

    PubMed

    Nass, Norbert; Bayreuther, Kristina; Simm, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are stable end products of the Maillard reaction and accumulate with progressing ageing and degenerative diseases. Significant amounts of AGE-modified peptides are also consumed with processed food. AGEs bind to specific receptors, especially the receptor of AGEs (RAGE). Activation of RAGE then evokes intracellular signalling, finally resulting in the activation of the NF-κB transcription factor and therefore a proinflammatory state. We here analysed, whether NF-κB is activated in short term upon feeding an AGE-modified protein in-vivo. Transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of an NF-κB responsive promoter were intraperitoneally injected or fed with AGE-modified- or control albumin and luciferase expression was analysed by in-vivo imaging and by in-vitro by determination of luciferase enzyme activity in heart, lung, gut, spleen, liver and kidney. In all organs, an activation of the luciferase reporter gene was observed in response to AGE-BSA feeding, however with different intensity and timing. The gut exhibited highest luciferase activity and this activity peaked 6-8 h post AGE-feeding. In heart and kidney, luciferase activity increased for up to 12 h post feeding. All other organs tested, exhibited highest activity at 10 h after AGE-consumption. Altogether, these data demonstrate that feeding AGE-modified protein resulted in a transient and systemic activation of the NF-κB reporter.

  1. Suggestive evidence for the induction of colonic aberrant crypts in mice fed sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Zahid, Muhammad; Anwar, Muhammad M; Pennington, Karen L; Cohen, Samuel M; Wisecarver, James L; Shostrom, Valerie; Mirvish, Sidney S

    2016-01-01

    A reported linkage between processed (nitrite-treated) meat products and the incidence of colon cancer could be due to sodium nitrite (NaNO2) itself or to N-nitroso compounds produced from the nitrite. Exposure to nitrite occurs due to residual nitrite in processed meat and to salivary nitrite arising by reduction of nitrate in vegetables and drinking water. Here we tested whether NaNO2 could induce colonic aberrant crypts (ABC) or ABC foci (ACF), which are putative precursors of colon cancer. We fed NaNO2 in drinking water for 20-25 wk to groups of 8-20 adult female mice. After sacrifice, ABC and ACF were counted in 2-cm distal colonic segments. In Experiment 1, no significant differences in ABC/ACF induction were seen between groups of 13-14 A/J mice fed 0, 0.5, or 1.0 g NaNO2/l drinking water. NaNO2 also did not affect fasting blood glucose levels. In Experiment 2, we fed 0, 1.0, 1.25, or 1.5 g NaNO2/l water to groups of 15 CF-1 mice. Five of the mice fed 1.5 g NaNO2/l showed ABC, whereas all other groups showed only 0-2 ABC/group, including 0 ABC for the group fed 1.25 g NaNO2/l. Overall statistical analysis indicated a dose-response p trends of 0.04. Pairwise comparison of ABC between groups fed 1.25 and 1.5 g NaNO2/l showed p 0.02 for both ABC and ACF, but a similar comparison between the untreated and 1.5 g/l groups showed no significant effects. In Experiment 3, hot dogs (18% of diet), which were fed to CF-1 mice previously treated with azoxymethane, inhibited ABC and ACF induction, but this effect was not significant (P = 0.10-0.12). In conclusion, these results support the view that NaNO2 may be a risk factor for colon carcinogenesis.

  2. Inhibitory effects of Leonurus sibiricus on weight gain after menopause in ovariectomized and high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangseon; Kim, Mi Hye; Choi, You Yeon; Hong, Jongki; Yang, Woong Mo

    2016-07-01

    Leonurus sibiricus, also called motherwort, is a well-known functional food and medicinal herb. It has been known to possess beneficial properties for women's health, especially for aged women. Estrogen deficiency in the menopause could induce lipid metabolic abnormalities in body fat, resulting in obesity. In this study, the inhibitory effects of L. sibiricus on obesity after the menopause were investigated. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and fed high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Following an induction period, aqueous extracts of L. sibiricus (LS) were orally administrated for 6 weeks. The body, uterine, and visceral fat weights were measured immediately after the animals were killed. Histological analysis was performed to monitor fat and liver. Serum levels of glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol were evaluated. In addition, the expression of lipases was analyzed. Total body weight was significantly decreased by LS treatment. Histological changes in adipocyte size were shown along with a decrease of visceral fat weight in the LS-treated group. In addition, the fat infiltration of liver was reduced by LS administration. LS-treated mice experienced decreases of serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol levels. The expression of HSL and ATGL was significantly increased by LS treatment. These results suggest that LS could regulate the lipid metabolism via an increase of lipases expression in ovariectomized and HFD-fed mice. LS might be a novel candidate for a functional food to inhibit weight gain after the menopause.

  3. GLP-2 as Beneficial Factor in the Glucose Homeostasis in Mice Fed a High Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Baldassano, Sara; Rappa, Francesca; Amato, Antonella; Cappello, Francesco; Mulè, Flavia

    2015-12-01

    Glucagon like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a gastrointestinal hormone released in response to dietary nutrients, which acts through a specific receptor, the GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R). The physiological effects of GLP-2 are multiple, involving also the intestinal adaptation to high fat diet (HFD). In consideration of the well-known relationship between chronic HFD and impaired glucose metabolism, in the present study we examined if the blocking of the GLP-2 signaling by chronic treatment with the GLP-2R antagonist, GLP-2 (3-33), leads to functional consequences in the regulation of glucose metabolism in HFD-fed mice. Compared with animals fed standard diet (STD), mice at the 10th week of HFD showed hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, high plasma insulin level after glucose load, increased pancreas weight and β cell expansion, but not insulin resistance. In HFD fed mice, GLP-2 (3-33) treatment for 4 weeks (from the 6th to the 10th week of diet) did not affect fasting glycaemia, but it significantly increased the glucose intolerance, both fasting and glucose-induced insulin levels, and reduced the sensitivity to insulin leading to insulin-resistance. In GLP-2 (3-33)-treated HFD mice pancreas was significantly heavier and displayed a significant increase in β-cell mass in comparison with vehicle-treated HFD mice. In STD mice, the GLP-2 (3-33) treatment did not affect fasted or glucose-stimulated glycemia, insulin, insulin sensitivity, pancreas weight and beta cell mass. The present study suggests that endogenous GLP-2 may act as a protective factor against the dysregulation of the glucose metabolism that occurs in HFD mice, because GLP-2 (3-33) worsens glucose metabolism disorders.

  4. Obesity-induced oxidative stress, accelerated functional decline with age and increased mortality in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Fischer, Kathleen E.; Soto, Vanessa; Liu, Yuhong; Sosnowska, Danuta; Richardson, Arlan; Salmon, Adam B.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a serious chronic disease that increases the risk of numerous co-morbidities including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and cancer as well as increases risk of mortality leading some to suggest this represents accelerated aging. Obesity is associated with significant increases in oxidative stress in vivo and, despite the well-explored relationship between oxidative stress and aging, the role this plays in the increased mortality of obese subjects remains an unanswered question. Here, we addressed this by undertaking a comprehensive, longitudinal study of a group of high fat-fed obese mice and assessed both their changes in oxidative stress and in their performance in physiological assays known to decline with aging. In female C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet starting in adulthood, mortality was significantly increased in high fat-fed mice as was oxidative damage in vivo. High fat-feeding significantly accelerated the decline in performance in several assays, including activity, gait, and rotarod. However, we also found that obesity had little effect on other markers and actually improved performance in grip strength, a marker of muscular function. Together, this first comprehensive assessment of longitudinal functional changes in high fat-fed mice suggests that obesity may induce segmental acceleration of some of the aging process. PMID:25558793

  5. Effects of Puerarin on Lipid Accumulation and Metabolism in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guodong; Lin, Lezhen; Zhong, Shusheng; Zhang, Qingfeng; Li, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms by which puerarin from kudzu root extract regulates lipid metabolism, fifty mice were randomly assigned to five groups: normal diet, high-fat diet (HFD), and HFD containing 0.2%, 0.4% or 0.8% puerarin for 12 weeks. Body weight, intraperitioneal adipose tissue (IPAT) weight, serum biochemical parameters, and hepatic and feces lipids were measured. Activity and mRNA and protein expressions of hepatic lipid metabolism-related enzymes were analyzed. Compared with HFD, 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin significantly decreased body and IPAT weight. There was a significant decrease in the serum and hepatic concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides and leptin in mice fed the 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets compared with HFD. Fatty acid synthase activity was suppressed in mice fed the 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets, while the activities of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), carnitine acyltransferase (CAT) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) were increased. mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ 2 (PPARγ 2) was down-regulated in liver of mice fed the 0.8% diet compared with HFD, while mRNA expression of CAT and HSL was considerably up-regulated by 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets. The protein expression of PPARγ2 in liver was decreased and those of p-AMPK, HSL and p-HSL were increased in mice fed 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets. These results suggest that > 0.4% puerarin influenced the activity, mRNA and protein levels of hepatic lipid metabolism-related enzymes, decreasing serum and liver lipids, body weight gain and fat accumulation. Puerarin might be beneficial to prevent lifestyle-related diseases. PMID:25822741

  6. Unexpected regeneration in middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Reines, Brandon; Cheng, Lily I; Matzinger, Polly

    2009-02-01

    Complete regeneration of damaged extremities, including both the epithelium and the underlying tissues, is thought to occur mainly in embryos, fetuses, and juvenile mammals, but only very rarely in adult mammals. Surprisingly, we found that common strains of mice are able to regenerate all of the tissues necessary to completely fill experimentally punched ear holes, but only if punched at middle age. Although young postweaning mice regrew the epithelium without typical pre-scar granulation tissue, they showed only minimal regeneration of connective tissues. In contrast, mice punched at 5-11 months of age showed true amphibian-like blastema formation and regrowth of cartilage, fat, and dermis, with blood vessels, sebaceous glands, hair follicles, and, in black mice, melanocytes. These data suggest that at least partial appendage regeneration may be more common in adult mammals than previously thought and call into question the common view that regenerative ability is lost with age. The data suggest that the age at which various inbred mouse strains become capable of epimorphic regeneration may be correlated with adult body weight.

  7. Unexpected Regeneration in Middle-Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lily I.; Matzinger, Polly

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Complete regeneration of damaged extremities, including both the epithelium and the underlying tissues, is thought to occur mainly in embryos, fetuses, and juvenile mammals, but only very rarely in adult mammals. Surprisingly, we found that common strains of mice are able to regenerate all of the tissues necessary to completely fill experimentally punched ear holes, but only if punched at middle age. Although young postweaning mice regrew the epithelium without typical pre-scar granulation tissue, they showed only minimal regeneration of connective tissues. In contrast, mice punched at 5–11 months of age showed true amphibian-like blastema formation and regrowth of cartilage, fat, and dermis, with blood vessels, sebaceous glands, hair follicles, and, in black mice, melanocytes. These data suggest that at least partial appendage regeneration may be more common in adult mammals than previously thought and call into question the common view that regenerative ability is lost with age. The data suggest that the age at which various inbred mouse strains become capable of epimorphic regeneration may be correlated with adult body weight. PMID:19226206

  8. Impact of PPAR-α induction on glucose homoeostasis in alcohol-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Valérie; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Lanthier, Nicolas; Sempoux, Christine; Cani, Patrice D; van Rooijen, Nico; Stärkel, Peter; Horsmans, Yves; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2013-12-01

    Alcohol consumption is a major cause of liver disease. It also associates with increased cardiovascular risk and Type 2 diabetes. ALD (alcoholic liver disease) and NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) share pathological features, pathogenic mechanisms and pattern of disease progression. In NAFLD, steatosis, lipotoxicity and liver inflammation participate to hepatic insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to verify the effect of alcohol on hepatic insulin sensitivity and to evaluate the role of alcohol-induced steatosis and inflammation on glucose homoeostasis. C57BL/6J mice were fed for 20 days a modified Lieber-DeCarli diet in which the alcohol concentration was gradually increased up to 35% of daily caloric intake. OH (alcohol liquid diet)-fed mice had liver steatosis and inflammatory infiltration. In addition, these mice developed insulin resistance in the liver, but not in muscles, as demonstrated by euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp and analysis of the insulin signalling cascade. Treatment with the PPAR-α (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-α) agonist Wy14,643 protected against OH-induced steatosis and KC (Kupffer cell) activation and almost abolished OH-induced insulin resistance. As KC activation may modulate insulin sensitivity, we repeated the clamp studies in mice depleted in KC to decipher the role of macrophages. Depletion of KC using liposomes-encapsuled clodronate in OH-fed mice failed both to improve hepatic steatosis and to restore insulin sensitivity as assessed by clamp. Our study shows that chronic alcohol consumption induces steatosis, KC activation and hepatic insulin resistance in mice. PPAR-α agonist treatment that prevents steatosis and dampens hepatic inflammation also prevents alcohol-induced hepatic insulin resistance. However, KC depletion has little impact on OH-induced metabolic disturbances.

  9. Increased calcium bioavailability in mice fed genetically engineered plants lacking calcium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jay; Nakata, Paul A; McConn, Michele; Brock, Amanda; Hirschi, Kendal D

    2007-07-01

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the model forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 M. truncatula mutant was identified which contains identical calcium concentrations to wild-type, but contains no oxalate crystals. In this study, equal number of male and female mice were randomly grouped and then fed one of four 45Ca-containing diets: M. truncatula extrinsically or intrinsically labeled, and cod5 extrinsically or intrinsically labeled. Absorption of the tracer was determined in the legs one day after consumption. The absorption was similar in the M. truncatula and cod5 extrinsically labeled diets; however, in the intrinsically labeled diets, calcium absorption was 22.87% (P < 0.001) higher in mice fed cod5. Our study presents the first genetic evidence demonstrating the nutritional impact of removing oxalate crystals from foods.

  10. Histopathology of neoplastic and nonneoplastic hepatic lesions in mice fed diets containing tetrachlorvinphos.

    PubMed

    Ward, J M; Bernal, E; Buratto, B; Goodman, D G; Strandberg, J D; Schueler, R

    1979-07-01

    Tetrachlorvinphos was fed at 8,000 or 16,000 ppm in diets to male and female (C57BL/6N X C3H/HeN)F1 mice for 80 weeks. Surviving mice were killed at 92 weeks, and all mice were completely necropsied. A high incidence of unusual nonneoplastic hepatic lesions in treated mice was present and characterized by pericellular fibrosis, hepatocyte nuclear pleomorphism, and intrasinusoidal foci of macrophages with intracytoplasmic crystalline structures. From 84 to 94% of the treated male mice and from 21 to 23% of the treated females had hepatocellular neoplasms. Only 17% of the control males and 7% of the control females had liver tumors. The induced tumors were frequently multiple in the liver, whereas the tumors in the controls were usually singular. The morphology of 241 liver tumors in 110 treated mice was different from that of tumors in controls. Liver tumors in control mice were generally composed of small basophillic hepatocytes. In treated mice, tumors were hepatocellular carcinomas composed of solid sheets of large basophilic or eosinophilic hepatocytes. Foci of prominent trabecular formation were seen in 51 tumors. Fifteen tumors were composed of small basophilic hepatocytes with oval cells interposed among them. Foci of capillary formation were noted in 3 of these tumors. In addition, 7 more typical hemangiosarcomas forming sinusoids and with thrombosis were observed.

  11. Time-restricted feeding reduces adiposity in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Sneha; Yan, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm contributes to obesity. This study tested the hypothesis that time-restricted feeding (TRF) reduces high-fat diet-induced increase in adiposity. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed the AIN93G or the high-fat diet ad libitum (ad lib); TRF of the high-fat diet for 12 or 8hours during the dark cycle was initiated when high-fat diet-fed mice exhibited significant increases in body weight. Energy intake of the TRF 12-hour group was not different from that of the high-fat ad lib group, although that of the TRF 8-hour group was slightly but significantly lower. Restricted feeding of the high-fat diet reduced body fat mass and body weight compared with mice fed the high-fat diet ad lib. There were no differences in respiratory exchange ratio (RER) among TRF and high-fat ad lib groups, but the RER of these groups was lower than that of the AIN93G group. Energy expenditure of the TRF groups was slightly but significantly lower than that of the high-fat ad lib group. Plasma concentrations of ghrelin were increased in TRF groups compared with both AIN93G and high-fat ad lib groups. Elevations of plasma concentrations of insulin, leptin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase-1 by high-fat ad lib feeding were reduced by TRF to the levels of mice fed the AIN93G diet. In conclusion, TRF during the dark cycle reduces high-fat diet-induced increases in adiposity and proinflammatory cytokines. These results indicate that circadian timing of food intake may prevent obesity and abate obesity-related metabolic disturbance.

  12. Modeling Energy Dynamics in Mice with Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy Fed High Calorie Diets

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Nichole D.; Guo, Juen; Hall, Kevin D.; McPherron, Alexandra C.

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective studies show that lean mass or strength is positively associated with metabolic health. Mice deficient in myostatin, a growth factor that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass, have increased muscle and body weights and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. Their leanness is often attributed to higher energy expenditure in the face of normal food intake. However, even obese animals have an increase in energy expenditure compared to normal weight animals suggesting this is an incomplete explanation. We have previously developed a computational model to estimate energy output, fat oxidation and respiratory quotient from food intake and body composition measurements to more accurately account for changes in body composition in rodents over time. Here we use this approach to understand the dynamic changes in energy output, intake, fat oxidation and respiratory quotient in muscular mice carrying a dominant negative activin receptor IIB expressed specifically in muscle. We found that muscular mice had higher food intake and higher energy output when fed either chow or a high-fat diet for 15 weeks compared to WT mice. Transgenic mice also matched their rate of fat oxidation to the rate of fat consumed better than WT mice. Surprisingly, when given a choice between high-fat diet and Ensure® drink, transgenic mice consumed relatively more calories from Ensure® than from the high-fat diet despite similar caloric intake to WT mice. When switching back and forth between diets, transgenic mice adjusted their intake more rapidly than WT to restore normal caloric intake. Our results show that mice with myostatin inhibition in muscle are better at adjusting energy intake and output on diets of different macronutrient composition than WT mice to maintain energy balance and resist weight gain. PMID:27076790

  13. Modeling Energy Dynamics in Mice with Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy Fed High Calorie Diets.

    PubMed

    Bond, Nichole D; Guo, Juen; Hall, Kevin D; McPherron, Alexandra C

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective studies show that lean mass or strength is positively associated with metabolic health. Mice deficient in myostatin, a growth factor that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass, have increased muscle and body weights and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. Their leanness is often attributed to higher energy expenditure in the face of normal food intake. However, even obese animals have an increase in energy expenditure compared to normal weight animals suggesting this is an incomplete explanation. We have previously developed a computational model to estimate energy output, fat oxidation and respiratory quotient from food intake and body composition measurements to more accurately account for changes in body composition in rodents over time. Here we use this approach to understand the dynamic changes in energy output, intake, fat oxidation and respiratory quotient in muscular mice carrying a dominant negative activin receptor IIB expressed specifically in muscle. We found that muscular mice had higher food intake and higher energy output when fed either chow or a high-fat diet for 15 weeks compared to WT mice. Transgenic mice also matched their rate of fat oxidation to the rate of fat consumed better than WT mice. Surprisingly, when given a choice between high-fat diet and Ensure® drink, transgenic mice consumed relatively more calories from Ensure® than from the high-fat diet despite similar caloric intake to WT mice. When switching back and forth between diets, transgenic mice adjusted their intake more rapidly than WT to restore normal caloric intake. Our results show that mice with myostatin inhibition in muscle are better at adjusting energy intake and output on diets of different macronutrient composition than WT mice to maintain energy balance and resist weight gain.

  14. Nrf2 deficiency improves glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Wu, Kai Connie; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-11-01

    Nrf2, a master regulator of intracellular redox homeostasis, is indicated to participate in fatty acid metabolism in liver. However, its role in diet-induced obesity remains controversial. In the current study, genetically engineered Nrf2-null, wild-type (WT), and Nrf2-activated, Keap1-knockdown (K1-KD) mice were fed either a control or a high-fat Western diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. The results indicate that the absence or enhancement of Nrf2 activity did not prevent diet-induced obesity, had limited effects on lipid metabolism, but affected blood glucose homeostasis. Whereas the Nrf2-null mice were resistant to HFD-induced glucose intolerance, the Nrf2-activated K1-KD mice exhibited prolonged elevation of circulating glucose during a glucose tolerance test even on the control diet. Feeding a HFD did not activate the Nrf2 signaling pathway in mouse livers. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21) is a liver-derived anti-diabetic hormone that exerts glucose- and lipid-lowering effects. Fgf21 mRNA and protein were both elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice, and Fgf21 protein was lower in K1-KD mice than WT mice. The inverse correlation between Nrf2 activity and hepatic expression of Fgf21 might explain the improved glucose tolerance in Nrf2-null mice. Furthermore, a more oxidative cellular environment in Nrf2-null mice could affect insulin signaling in liver. For example, mRNA of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1, a gene repressed by insulin in hepatocytes, was markedly elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, genetic alteration of Nrf2 does not prevent diet-induced obesity in mice, but deficiency of Nrf2 improves glucose homeostasis, possibly through its effects on Fgf21 and/or insulin signaling. -- Highlights: ► Nrf2 deficiency improves glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet. ► The anti-diabetic hormone, Fgf21, is highly expressed in livers of Nrf2-null mice. ► The absence of Nrf2 increases the insulin-regulated Igfbp-1 mRNA in liver.

  15. Increased mucosal damage during parasite infection in mice fed an elemental diet.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, A; Logan, R F; MacDonald, T T

    1980-01-01

    We have examined the effects of parasite infection on the mucosal architecture of mice maintained on an elemental diet (Vivonex). Techniques used were conventional histology, micro-dissection and measurement of individual villi and crypts, and measurement of crypt cell proliferation rate by a metaphase accumulation technique. In normal, non-parasitised mice the elemental diet caused no change in villus height, crypt depth, or crypt cell proliferation. Likewise, the only effects of chronic protozoal infection or Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection on the intestine of mice fed a normal diet have been a slight crypt hypertrophy and an increase in crypt cell proliferation rate without villous atrophy. However, the combination of elemental diet and parasite infection resulted in increased mucosal damage when compared with infected mice on a normal diet. Elemental diet mice infected with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis had significantly reduced villus height and correspondingly raised crypt length and metaphase accumulation rate. Elemental diet mice infected with the protozoan Giardia muris did not have villous atrophy but there was a significant increase in crypt length and metaphase accumulation when compared with infected normal diet mice. These experiments show that in two animal models of enteric infection, elemental diet has altered the host parasite relationship to the detriment of the host. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7364318

  16. Diet-induced obesity, energy metabolism and gut microbiota in C57BL/6J mice fed Western diets based on lean seafood or lean meat mixtures.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jacob Bak; Rønnevik, Alexander; Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Fjære, Even; Fauske, Kristin Røen; Liisberg, Ulrike; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Liaset, Bjørn

    2016-05-01

    High protein diets may protect against diet-induced obesity, but little is known regarding the effects of different protein sources consumed at standard levels. We investigated how a mixture of lean seafood or lean meat in a Western background diet modulated diet-induced obesity, energy metabolism and gut microbiota. Male C57BL/6J mice fed a Western diet (WD) containing a mixture of lean seafood (seafood WD) for 12weeks accumulated less fat mass than mice fed a WD containing a mixture of lean meat (meat WD). Meat WD-fed mice exhibited increased fasting blood glucose, impaired glucose clearance, elevated fasting plasma insulin and increased plasma and liver lipid levels. We observed no first choice preference for either of the WDs, but over time, mice fed the seafood WD consumed less energy than mice fed the meat WD. Mice fed the seafood WD exhibited higher spontaneous locomotor activity and a lower respiratory exchange ratio (RER) than mice fed the meat WD. Thus, higher activity together with the decreased energy intake contributed to the different phenotypes observed in mice fed the seafood WD compared to mice fed the meat WD. Comparison of the gut microbiomes of mice fed the two WDs revealed significant differences in the relative abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to the orders Bacteroidales and Clostridiales, with genes involved in metabolism of aromatic amino acids exhibiting higher relative abundance in the microbiomes of mice fed the seafood WD.

  17. Nrf2 deficiency improves glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Wu, Kai Connie; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2012-11-01

    Nrf2, a master regulator of intracellular redox homeostasis, is indicated to participate in fatty acid metabolism in liver. However, its role in diet-induced obesity remains controversial. In the current study, genetically engineered Nrf2-null, wild-type (WT), and Nrf2-activated, Keap1-knockdown (K1-KD) mice were fed either a control or a high-fat Western diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. The results indicate that the absence or enhancement of Nrf2 activity did not prevent diet-induced obesity, had limited effects on lipid metabolism, but affected blood glucose homeostasis. Whereas the Nrf2-null mice were resistant to HFD-induced glucose intolerance, the Nrf2-activated K1-KD mice exhibited prolonged elevation of circulating glucose during a glucose tolerance test even on the control diet. Feeding a HFD did not activate the Nrf2 signaling pathway in mouse livers. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21) is a liver-derived anti-diabetic hormone that exerts glucose- and lipid-lowering effects. Fgf21 mRNA and protein were both elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice, and Fgf21 protein was lower in K1-KD mice than WT mice. The inverse correlation between Nrf2 activity and hepatic expression of Fgf21 might explain the improved glucose tolerance in Nrf2-null mice. Furthermore, a more oxidative cellular environment in Nrf2-null mice could affect insulin signaling in liver. For example, mRNA of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1, a gene repressed by insulin in hepatocytes, was markedly elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, genetic alteration of Nrf2 does not prevent diet-induced obesity in mice, but deficiency of Nrf2 improves glucose homeostasis, possibly through its effects on Fgf21 and/or insulin signaling.

  18. Dietary krill oil supplementation reduces hepatic steatosis, glycemia, and hypercholesterolemia in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Tandy, Sally; Chung, Rosanna W S; Wat, Elaine; Kamili, Alvin; Berge, Kjetil; Griinari, Mikko; Cohn, Jeffrey S

    2009-10-14

    Krill oil (KO) is rich in n-3 fatty acids that are present in phospholipids rather than in triglycerides. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary KO on cardiometabolic risk factors in male C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet. Mice (n = 6-10 per group) were fed for 8 weeks either: (1) a nonpurified chow diet (N); (2) a high-fat semipurified diet containing 21 wt % buttermilk + 0.15 wt % cholesterol (HF); (3) HF supplemented with 1.25 wt % KO (HFKO1.25); (4) HF with 2.5 wt % KO (HFKO2.5); or (5) HF with 5 wt % KO (HFKO5.0). Dietary KO supplementation caused a significant reduction in liver wt (i.e., hepatomegaly) and total liver fat (i.e., hepatic steatosis), due to a dose-dependent reduction in hepatic triglyceride (mean +/- SEM: 35 +/- 6, 47 +/- 4, and 51 +/- 5% for HFKO1.25, -2.5, and -5.0 vs HF, respectively, P < 0.001) and cholesterol (55 +/- 5, 66 +/- 3, and 71 +/- 3%, P < 0.001). Serum cholesterol levels were reduced by 20 +/- 3, 29 +/- 4, and 29 +/- 5%, and blood glucose was reduced by 36 +/- 5, 34 +/- 6, and 42 +/- 6%, respectively. Serum adiponectin was increased in KO-fed animals (HF vs HFKO5.0: 5.0 +/- 0.2 vs 7.5 +/- 0.6 microg/mL, P < 0.01). These results demonstrate that dietary KO is effective in improving metabolic parameters in mice fed a high-fat diet, suggesting that KO may be of therapeutic value in patients with the metabolic syndrome and/or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  19. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase knockout mice show resistance to obesity when fed high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Nobuteru; Ito, Takahito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Nanchi, Isamu; Notoya, Mitsuru; Oka, Shogo; Yukioka, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Ghrelin is an appetite-stimulating hormone secreted from stomach. Since the discovery that acylation of the serine-3 residue by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is essential for exerting its functions, GOAT has been regarded as an therapeutic target for attenuating appetite, and thus for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. However, contrary to the expectations, GOAT-knockout (KO) mice have not shown meaningful body weight reduction, under high-fat diet. Here, in this study, we sought to determine whether GOAT has a role in body weight regulation and glucose metabolism with a focus on dietary sucrose, because macronutrient composition of diet is important for appetite regulation. We found that peripherally administered acylated-ghrelin, but not unacylated one, stimulated sucrose consumption in a two-bottle-drinking test. The role of acylated-ghrelin in sucrose preference was further supported by the finding that GOAT KO mice consumed less sucrose solution compared with WT littermates. Then, we investigated the effect of dietary composition of sucrose on food intake and body weight in GOAT KO and WT mice. As a result, when fed on high-fat diet, food intake and body weight were similar between GOAT KO and WT mice. However, when fed on high-fat, high-sucrose diet, GOAT KO mice showed significantly reduced food intake and marked resistance to obesity, leading to amelioration of glucose metabolism. These results suggest that blockade of acylated-ghrelin production offers therapeutic potential for obesity and metabolic disorders caused by overeating of palatable food.

  20. Mice that are fed a high-fat diet display increased hepcidin expression in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Gotardo, Érica Martins Ferreira; dos Santos, Aline Noronha; Miyashiro, Renan Akira; Gambero, Sheley; Rocha, Thalita; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Gambero, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery that hepcidin is expressed in the adipose tissue of obese subjects, attention has been increasingly focused on alterations in iron homeostasis that are associated with adiposity. We examined the production of hepcidin, the expression of hepcidin-related genes and the iron content of the adipose tissue in obesity using Swiss mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The mice were maintained on a control diet or HFD for 12 or 24 wk, and body weight, adiposity and glucose homeostasis were evaluated. The expression of several genes (hepcidin, TfR1, TfR2, DMT1, FT-heavy, ferroportin, IRP-1, IRP-2 and HIF-1) and the protein expression of hepcidin and IL-6 were quantified. The iron level was assessed using a Prussian blue reaction in paraffin-embedded tissue. After 24 wk on the HFD, we observed increases in the levels of hepcidin in the serum and the visceral adipose tissue. The IL-6 levels also increased in the visceral adipose tissue. Adipocytes isolated from the visceral adipose tissues of lean and obese mice expressed hepcidin at comparable levels; however, isolated macrophages from the stromal vascular fraction expressed higher hepcidin levels. Adipose tissues from obese mice displayed increased tfR2 expression and the presence of iron. Our results indicate that IL-6 and iron may affect the signaling pathways governing hepcidin expression. Thus, the mice fed HFD for 24 wk represent a suitable model for the study of obesity-linked hepcidin alterations. In addition, hepcidin may play local roles in controlling iron availability and interfering with inflammation in adipose tissue.

  1. Role of 5-HT3 Receptor on Food Intake in Fed and Fasted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bingjin; Shao, Dongyuan; Luo, Yungang; Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Zhang, Xingyi; Cui, Ranji

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor subtypes are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior. However, the relative contribution of 5-HT3 receptor remains unclear. The present study was aimed to investigate the role of 5-HT3 receptor in control of feeding behavior in fed and fasted mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Food intake and expression of c-Fos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and 5-HT in the brain were examined after acute treatment with 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR-57227 alone or in combination with 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron. Food intake was significantly inhibited within 3 h after acute treatment with SR 57227 in fasted mice but not fed mice, and this inhibition was blocked by ondansetron. Immunohistochemical study revealed that fasting-induced c-Fos expression was further enhanced by SR 57227 in the brainstem and the hypothalamus, and this enhancement was also blocked by ondansetron. Furthermore, the fasting-induced downregulation of POMC expression in the hypothalamus and the TH expression in the brain stem was blocked by SR 57227 in the fasted mice, and this effect of SR 57227 was also antagonized by ondansetron. Conclusion/Significance Taken together, our findings suggest that the effect of SR 57227 on the control of feeding behavior in fasted mice may be, at least partially, related to the c-Fos expression in hypothalamus and brain stem, as well as POMC system in the hypothalamus and the TH system in the brain stem. PMID:25789930

  2. Anti-obesity effect of alkaline reduced water in high fat-fed obese mice.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica Coles; Kang, Tae-Young; Kim, Cheol-Su; Kim, Soo-Ki; Yang, Young-Chul; Sohn, Joon-Hyung; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not alkaline reduced water (ARW) has a positive effect on obesity is unclear. This study aims to prove the positive effect of ARW in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity (DIO) in C57BL/6 mice model. Toward this, obesity was induced by feeding the C57BL/6 male mice with high-fat diet (w/w 45% fat) for 12 weeks. Thereafter, the animals were administered with either ARW or tap water. Next, the degree of adiposity and DIO-associated parameters were assessed: clinico-pathological parameters, biochemical measurements, histopathological analysis of liver, the expression of cholesterol metabolism-related genes in the liver, and serum levels of adipokine and cytokine. We found that ARW-fed mice significantly ameliorated adiposity: controlled body weight gain, reduced the accumulation of epididymal fats and decreased liver fats as compared to control mice. Accordingly, ARW coordinated the level of adiponectin and leptin. Further, mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)7A1 was upregulated. In summary, our data shows that ARW intake inhibits the progression of HF-DIO in mice. This is the first note on anti-obesity effect of ARW, clinically implying the safer fluid remedy for obesity control.

  3. Dietary cocoa reduces metabolic endotoxemia and adipose tissue inflammation in high-fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yeyi; Yu, Shan; Park, Jong Yung; Harvatine, Kevin; Lambert, Joshua D

    2014-04-01

    In diet-induced obesity, adipose tissue (AT) is in a chronic state of inflammation predisposing the development of metabolic syndrome. Cocoa (Theobroma cacao) is a polyphenol-rich food with putative anti-inflammatory activities. Here, we examined the impact and underlying mechanisms of action of cocoa on AT inflammation in high fat-fed mice. In the present study, male C57BL/6 J mice were fed a high fat diet (HF), a HF diet with 8% (w/w) unsweetened cocoa powder (HFC), or a low-fat diet (LF) for 18 weeks. Cocoa supplementation decreased AT mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and EGF-like module-containing mucin-like hormone receptor-like 1 by 40-60% compared to HF group, and this was accompanied by decreased nuclear protein levels of nuclear factor-κB. Cocoa treatment reduced the levels of arachidonic acid in the AT by 33% compared to HF controls. Moreover, cocoa treatment also reduced protein levels of the eicosanoid-generating enzymes, adipose-specific phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase-2 by 53% and 55%, respectively, compared to HF-fed mice. Finally, cocoa treatment ameliorated metabolic endotoxemia (40% reduction in plasma endotoxin) and improved gut barrier function (as measured by increased plasma levels of glucagon-like peptide-2). In conclusion, the present study has shown for the first time that long-term cocoa supplementation can reduce AT inflammation in part by modulating eicosanoid metabolism and metabolic endotoxemia.

  4. Antihyperlipidemic effect of methanolic extract from Opuntia joconostle seeds in mice fed a hypercholesterolemic diet.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Esquivel, Obed; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Garduño-Siciliano, Leticia; Alvarez, Valente B; Hernández-Navarro, María Dolores

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hypolipidemic effect of a methanolic extract from Opuntia joconostle seeds fed to mice in a hypercholesterolemic diet. Acute toxicity of the methanolic extract was investigated by an established method. Phenolic composition and antioxidant activity were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and DPPH, respectively. The total phenolic content of Opuntia joconostle seeds was 47.85 ± 1.29 mg gallic acid equivalents/g dry weight. The main phenolic compounds were identified as quercetin, rutin, and cafeic acid. Percent inhibition of DPPH⁺ was 49.76 ± 0.49 %. The oral LD₅₀ for the methanolic extract from the Opuntia joconostle seeds was >5,000 mg/kg BW. Mice fed a hypercholesterolemic diet for six days exhibited significantly (P ≤ 0.001) higher plasma lipid levels than mice fed a normal diet. Remarkably, supplementation with methanolic extract from Opuntia joconostle at doses of 1, 2, and 5 g/kg body weight significantly (P ≤ 0.001) prevented the increase in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides level, and atherogenic index. Similar concentrations of the HDL cholesterol were observed in both treated and control groups. A significant dose-dependent reduction in lipid levels was noted for treated groups compared to the hypercholesterolemic group. We attribute this result to the seeds' phenolic composition. This methanolic extract has potential to be included in short-term hypercholesterolemia treatment regimens as it exhibits hypolipidemic activity with no apparent toxic manifestations.

  5. NADPH oxidase is implicated in the pathogenesis of oxidative phosphorylation dysfunction in mice fed a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    García-Ruiz, Inmaculada; Solís-Muñoz, Pablo; Fernández-Moreira, Daniel; Grau, Montserrat; Muñoz-Yagüe, Teresa; Solís-Herruzo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of NADPH oxidase (NADPHox) in the pathogenesis of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) dysfunction as found in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). C57BL/6J mice were distributed in four groups: WT/SCD: six wild-type (WT) mice fed a standard chow diet (SCD); WT/HFD, six WT mice fed a HFD; NOX2−/−/SCD, six NADPHox-deficient mice on a SCD; (4) NOX2−/−/HFD, six NADPHox-deficient mice on a HFD. After 32 weeks, we studied the liver for: histology; OXPHOS complex activity; fully assembled OXPHOS complexes and their subunits; gene expression of OXPHOS subunits; oxidative and nitrosative stress; and oxidative DNA damage. In the liver of WT/HFD mice, we found a significant decreased in the activity of all OXPHOS complexes, in fully assembled complexes, in the amount of OXPHOS subunits, and in gene expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits. 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine was only increased in mitochondrial DNA. The liver of NOX−/−/HFD mice showed mild steatosis but no non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) lesions were found. OXPHOS activity, OXPHOS subunits, and assembly of subunits into OXPHOS complexes were normal in these mice. We conclude that this study shows that NADPH deficiency protects mice from developing OXPHOS dysfunction and NASH caused by a HFD. PMID:27173483

  6. Protection against Influenza Virus Infection of Mice Fed Bifidobacterium breve YIT4064

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Hisako; Kiyoshima, Junko; Hori, Tetuji; Shida, Kan

    1999-01-01

    Mice fed Bifidobacterium breve YIT4064 and immunized orally with influenza virus were more strongly protected against influenza virus infection of the lower respiratory tract than ones immunized with influenza virus only. The number of mice with enhanced anti-influenza virus immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum upon oral administration of B. breve YIT4064 and oral immunization with influenza virus was significantly greater than that upon oral immunization with influenza virus only. These findings demonstrated that the oral administration of B. breve YIT4064 increased anti-influenza virus IgG antibodies in serum and protected against influenza virus infection. The oral administration of B. breve YIT4064 may enhance antigen-specific IgG against various pathogenic antigens taken orally and induce protection against various virus infections. PMID:10066652

  7. Allomyrina dichotoma (Arthropoda: Insecta) larvae confer resistance to obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-Il; Chung, Mi Yeon; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Han, Myung Sae; Goo, Tae-Won; Yun, Eun-Young

    2015-03-17

    To clarify the anti-obesity effect of Allomyrina dichotoma larvae (ADL), we previously reported that ADL block adipocyte differentiation on 3T3-L1 cell lines through downregulation of transcription factors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (CEBPA). In this study, we tested whether ADL prevent obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and further investigated the mechanism underlying the effects of ADL. All mice were maintained on a normal-fat diet (NFD) for 1 week and then assigned to one of five treatment groups: (1) NFD; (2) HFD; (3) HFD and 100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ADL; (4) HFD and 3000 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ADL; or (5) HFD and 3000 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis, positive control). ADL and yerba mate were administered orally daily. Mice were fed experimental diets and body weight was monitored weekly for 6 weeks. Our results indicated that ADL reduced body weight gain, organ weight and adipose tissue volume in a dose-dependent manner. Body weight gain was approximately 22.4% lower compared to mice fed only HFD, but the difference did not reach the level of statistical significance. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed that gene expression levels of PPARG, CEBPA and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the epididymal fat tissue of HFD-fed mice receiving 3000 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ADL were reduced by 12.4-, 25.7-, and 12.3-fold, respectively, compared to mice fed HFD only. Moreover, mice administered ADL had lower serum levels of triglycerides and leptin than HFD-fed mice that did not receive ADL. Taken together our results suggest that ADL and its constituent bioactive compounds hold potential for the treatment and prevention of obesity.

  8. Soy protein isolate inhibits hepatic tumor promotion in mice fed a high-fat liquid diet.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Kelly E; Pulliam, Casey F; Pedersen, Kim B; Hennings, Leah; Ronis, Martin Jj

    2017-03-01

    Alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases are risk factors for development of hepatocellular carcinoma, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. On the other hand, ingestion of soy-containing diets may oppose the development of certain cancers. We previously reported that replacing casein with a soy protein isolate reduced tumor promotion in the livers of mice with alcoholic liver disease after feeding a high fat ethanol liquid diet following initiation with diethylnitrosamine. Feeding soy protein isolate inhibited processes that may contribute to tumor promotion including inflammation, sphingolipid signaling, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We have extended these studies to characterize liver tumor promotion in a model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease produced by chronic feeding of high-fat liquid diets in the absence of ethanol. Mice treated with diethylnitrosamine on postnatal day 14 were fed a high-fat liquid diet made with casein or SPI as the sole protein source for 16 weeks in adulthood. Relative to mice fed normal chow, a high fat/casein diet led to increased tumor promotion, hepatocyte proliferation, steatosis, and inflammation. Replacing casein with soy protein isolate counteracted these effects. The high fat diets also resulted in a general increase in transcripts for Wnt/β-catenin pathway components, which may be an important mechanism, whereby hepatic tumorigenesis is promoted. However, soy protein isolate did not block Wnt signaling in this nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model. We conclude that replacing casein with soy protein isolate blocks development of steatosis, inflammation, and tumor promotion in diethylnitrosamine-treated mice fed high fat diets. Impact statement The impact of dietary components on cancer is a topic of great interest for both the general public and the scientific community. Liver cancer is currently the second leading form of cancer deaths worldwide. Our study has addressed the effect of the protein

  9. Androgenic and estrogenic metabolites in serum of mice fed dehydroepiandrosterone: relationship to antihyperglycemic effects.

    PubMed

    Leiter, E H; Beamer, W G; Coleman, D L; Longcope, C

    1987-09-01

    The steroid prehormone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has potent antihyperglycemic effects when fed in the diet of genetically diabetic C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze changes in sex steroid levels in serum of mice fed DHEA, and to compare the antihyperglycemic potencies of the various metabolites in order to clarify the mechanism of DHEA action. Steroid radioimmunoassays showed that dietary DHEA entered the blood in high concentrations and was actively metabolized to both androgens (testosterone, T; dihydrotestosterone, DHT) and estrogens (estrone, E1; 17 beta-estradiol, E2). This metabolism did not require intact adrenal glands or gonads. In C57BL/KsJ normal (+/+) males, conversion of DHEA to androgens was the prominent feature; in db/db males, DHEA feeding not only increased serum T and DHT, but also serum E1 and E2 levels. The db/db mice had increased amounts of adipose tissue that sequestered more intravenously injected 3H-E2; this additional body fat could account for increased aromatization of DHEA-derived estrogen precursors. Comparisons of the relative antihyperglycemic potencies of androgenic and estrogenic steroid metabolites of DHEA in db/db mice showed that the estrogens and metabolites with estrogenic properties (androstenediol) or those convertible to estrogens (DHEA sulfate) were the most potent. Although 17 beta-E2 was effective by injection or per os, DHEA was effective only when administered per os, implicating alimentary tract conversion of DHEA to more biologically active reactants. Based on the pivotal position of DHEA as a prehormone for androgens, estrogens, and etiocholanolones, an explanation of the seemingly paradoxical effects exerted by this compound in blocking autoimmune disease, hyperglycemia, obesity, and neoplasia was proposed.

  10. Exercise Increases and Browns Muscle Lipid in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Tiffany L.; Galior, Kornelia; McGrath, Cody; Wu, Xin; Uzer, Gunes; Uzer, Guniz Bas; Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Tyson, David; Rubin, Janet; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Muscle lipid increases with high-fat feeding and diabetes. In trained athletes, increased muscle lipid is not associated with insulin resistance, a phenomenon known as the athlete’s paradox. To understand if exercise altered the phenotype of muscle lipid, female C57BL/6 mice fed CTL or high-fat diet (HFD for 6 or 18 weeks) were further divided into sedentary or exercising groups (CTL-E or HFD-E) with voluntary access to running wheels for the last 6 weeks of experiments, running 6 h/night. Diet did not affect running time or distance. HFD mice weighed more than CTL after 18 weeks (p < 0.01). Quadriceps muscle TG was increased in running animals and in sedentary mice fed HFD for 18 weeks (p < 0.05). In exercised animals, markers of fat, Plin1, aP2, FSP27, and Fasn, were increased significantly in HFD groups. Ucp1 and Pgc1a, markers for brown fat, increased with exercise in the setting of high fat feeding. Fndc5, which encodes irisin, and CytC were sensitive to exercise regardless of diet. Plin5 was increased with HFD and unaffected by exercise; the respiratory exchange ratio was 15% lower in the 18-week HFD group compared with CTL (p < 0.001) and 10% lower in 18 weeks HFD-E compared with CTL-E (p < 0.001). Increased Ucp1 and Pgc1a in exercised muscle of running mice suggests that a beige/brown fat phenotype develops, which differs from the fat phenotype that induces insulin resistance in high fat feeding. This suggests that increased muscle lipid may develop a “brown” phenotype in the setting of endurance exercise training, a shift that is further promoted by HFD. PMID:27445983

  11. Ethanolic extract of Taheebo attenuates increase in body weight and fatty liver in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Hee; Um, Min Young; Ahn, Jiyun; Jung, Chang Hwa; Park, Myung Kyu; Ha, Tae Youl

    2014-10-08

    We evaluated whether intake of an ethanolic extract of Taheebo (TBE) from Tabebuia avellanedae protects against body weight increase and fat accumulation in mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Four-week old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a HFD (25% fat, w/w) for 11 weeks. The diet of control (HFD) mice was supplemented with vehicle (0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose by gavage); the diet of experimental (TBE) mice was supplemented with TBE (150 mg/kg body weight/day by gavage). Mice administered TBE had significantly reduced body weight gain, fat accumulation in the liver, and fat pad weight, compared to HFD mice. Reduced hypertrophy of fat cells was also observed in TBE mice. Mice administered TBE also showed significantly lower serum levels of triglycerides, insulin, and leptin. Lipid profiles and levels of mRNAs and proteins related to lipid metabolism were determined in liver and white adipose tissue of the mice. Expression of mRNA and proteins related to lipogenesis were decreased in TBE-administered mice compared to mice fed HFD alone. These results suggest that TBE inhibits obesity and fat accumulation by regulation of gene expression related to lipid metabolism in HFD-induced obesity in mice.

  12. Differential expression of cholesteryl ester transfer protein in the liver and plasma of fasted and fed transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    MacLean, P S; Vadlamudi, S; Hao, E; Barakat, H A

    2000-06-01

    Because cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is considered a potential target in the treatment of atherosclerosis, several reports have focused on the regulation of this enzyme, and there is evidence that insulin may be a regulatory factor. The present study examines the differential expression of the human CETP gene between physiologic conditions that are accompanied by low (fasted) and high (fed) insulin levels. CETP expression was examined in plasma and tissues of transgenic mice expressing the human CETP minigene after 12 hours of fasting (n = 20) or ad libitum feeding (n = 20) with normal mouse chow. Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) was 20% higher in fed than in fasted mice, reflecting higher levels of CETP (P < 0.05). This observation was accompanied by higher liver mRNA in fed mice (100%, P < 0.05), as determined by ribonuclease protection assays, as well as by higher CETA (23%, P < 0.05) and CETP mass (29%, P < 0.05) in the particulate fraction of liver homogenates. These parameters of liver CETP expression correlated well with each other, as well as with plasma CETA. CETP in the liver particulate fraction was found as a doublet (approximately 70 and 65 kDa), which resolved to a single band (approximately 60 kDa) upon deglycosylation. No differences in CETP expression were observed in pooled adipose tissue samples from fed and fasted mice. Insulin and glucose were not related to any plasma or tissue parameter of CETP expression. In summary, the concerted, differential expression of CETP in the liver of fed and fasted transgenic mice appears to contribute to higher plasma CETP levels in fed mice, but the precise role of insulin and glucose in regulating CETP expression under fasted and fed conditions needs to be defined.

  13. A Mitochondrial-Targeted Coenzyme Q Analog Prevents Weight Gain and Ameliorates Hepatic Dysfunction in High-Fat–Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Brian D.; Herlein, Judith A.; Guo, Deng Fu; Kulkarni, Chaitanya; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Yu, Liping; Grobe, Justin L.; Rahmouni, Kamal; Kerns, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, mitoquinone (mitoQ), known to have mitochondrial uncoupling properties, might prevent the development of obesity and mitigate liver dysfunction by increasing energy expenditure, as opposed to reducing energy intake. We administered mitoQ or vehicle (ethanol) to obesity-prone C57BL/6 mice fed high-fat (HF) or normal-fat (NF) diets. MitoQ (500 µM) or vehicle (ethanol) was added to the drinking water for 28 weeks. MitoQ significantly reduced total body mass and fat mass in the HF-fed mice but had no effect on these parameters in NF mice. Food intake was reduced by mitoQ in the HF-fed but not in the NF-fed mice. Average daily water intake was reduced by mitoQ in both the NF- and HF-fed mice. Hypothalamic expression of neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, and the long form of the leptin receptor were reduced in the HF but not in the NF mice. Hepatic total fat and triglyceride content did not differ between the mitoQ-treated and control HF-fed mice. However, mitoQ markedly reduced hepatic lipid hydroperoxides and reduced circulating alanine aminotransferase, a marker of liver function. MitoQ did not alter whole-body oxygen consumption or liver mitochondrial oxygen utilization, membrane potential, ATP production, or production of reactive oxygen species. In summary, mitoQ added to drinking water mitigated the development of obesity. Contrary to our hypothesis, the mechanism involved decreased energy intake likely mediated at the hypothalamic level. MitoQ also ameliorated HF-induced liver dysfunction by virtue of its antioxidant properties without altering liver fat or mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:25301169

  14. Moderate GLUT4 overexpression improves insulin sensitivity and fasting triglyceridemia in high-fat diet-fed transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Brittanie J; Griesel, Beth A; King, Caleb D; Josey, Miranda A; Olson, Ann Louise

    2013-07-01

    The GLUT4 facilitative glucose transporter mediates insulin-dependent glucose uptake. We tested the hypothesis that moderate overexpression of human GLUT4 in mice, under the regulation of the human GLUT4 promoter, can prevent the hyperinsulinemia that results from obesity. Transgenic mice engineered to express the human GLUT4 gene and promoter (hGLUT4 TG) and their nontransgenic counterparts (NT) were fed either a control diet (CD) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for up to 10 weeks. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance scores revealed that hGLUT4 TG mice fed an HFD remained highly insulin sensitive. The presence of the GLUT4 transgene did not completely prevent the metabolic adaptations to HFD. For example, HFD resulted in loss of dynamic regulation of the expression of several metabolic genes in the livers of fasted and refed NT and hGLUT4 TG mice. The hGLUT4 TG mice fed a CD showed no feeding-dependent regulation of SREBP-1c and fatty acid synthase (FAS) mRNA expression in the transition from the fasted to the fed state. Similarly, HFD altered the response of SREBP-1c and FAS mRNA expression to feeding in both strains. These changes in hepatic gene expression were accompanied by increased nuclear phospho-CREB in refed mice. Taken together, a moderate increase in expression of GLUT4 is a good target for treatment of insulin resistance.

  15. Absorption and distribution of cadmium in mice fed diets containing either inorganic or oyster-incorporated cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.F.; Hardy, J.T.; Miller, B.M.; Buschbom, R.L.; Siewicki, T.C.

    1984-02-01

    To determine the absorption, organ distribution, and retention of organically bound cadmium (Cd) and the effects of dietary zinc (Zn) on Cd metabolism, groups of mice were fed five different diets. The organic Cd used in the diets was in the form of lyophilized oyster (Crassostrea virginica) that had accumulated radiolabeled 109Cd through a plankton food chain. The mice were fed either a standard basal mouse diet (AIN-76) or diets containing five or eight times the Zn concentration of the basal diet. The source of Zn was either oyster tissue or ZnCO3. The concentration of organic and inorganic Cd provided a dose of approximately 0.4 mg/kg. Diets prepared from oyster tissue probably contained all of the Cd and 85% of the Zn in organic form. Diets prepared with inorganic metals contained about the same Cd and Zn concentrations as the diets prepared with oyster. There was very little difference between the retention of Cd by mice that ingested organic (oyster bound) Cd and those fed inorganic Cd (CdCl2). However, when the Cd retained in the intestine was excluded, retention of organic Cd was significantly greater than that of inorganic Cd. The organ distribution of Cd differed significantly according to the chemical form of Cd fed (organic or inorganic) and the Zn level in the diet. The kidneys of mice fed organically bound Cd retained a higher percentage of the metal than the kidneys of those fed inorganic Cd. On the other hand, the livers of animals fed a low-Zn diet retained a higher percentage of the Cd than the livers of those fed a high-Zn diet, regardless of the dietary source of Cd.

  16. Restricted diet delays accelerated ageing and genomic stress in DNA-repair-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, W P; Dollé, M E T; Reiling, E; Jaarsma, D; Payan-Gomez, C; Bombardieri, C R; Wu, H; Roks, A J M; Botter, S M; van der Eerden, B C; Youssef, S A; Kuiper, R V; Nagarajah, B; van Oostrom, C T; Brandt, R M C; Barnhoorn, S; Imholz, S; Pennings, J L A; de Bruin, A; Gyenis, Á; Pothof, J; Vijg, J; van Steeg, H; Hoeijmakers, J H J

    2016-09-15

    Mice deficient in the DNA excision-repair gene Ercc1 (Ercc1(∆/-)) show numerous accelerated ageing features that limit their lifespan to 4-6 months. They also exhibit a 'survival response', which suppresses growth and enhances cellular maintenance. Such a response resembles the anti-ageing response induced by dietary restriction (also known as caloric restriction). Here we report that a dietary restriction of 30% tripled the median and maximal remaining lifespans of these progeroid mice, strongly retarding numerous aspects of accelerated ageing. Mice undergoing dietary restriction retained 50% more neurons and maintained full motor function far beyond the lifespan of mice fed ad libitum. Other DNA-repair-deficient, progeroid Xpg(-/-) (also known as Ercc5(-/-)) mice, a model of Cockayne syndrome, responded similarly. The dietary restriction response in Ercc1(∆/-) mice closely resembled the effects of dietary restriction in wild-type animals. Notably, liver tissue from Ercc1(∆/-) mice fed ad libitum showed preferential extinction of the expression of long genes, a phenomenon we also observed in several tissues ageing normally. This is consistent with the accumulation of stochastic, transcription-blocking lesions that affect long genes more than short ones. Dietary restriction largely prevented this declining transcriptional output and reduced the number of γH2AX DNA damage foci, indicating that dietary restriction preserves genome function by alleviating DNA damage. Our findings establish the Ercc1(∆/-) mouse as a powerful model organism for health-sustaining interventions, reveal potential for reducing endogenous DNA damage, facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of dietary restriction and suggest a role for counterintuitive dietary-restriction-like therapy for human progeroid genome instability syndromes and possibly neurodegeneration in general.

  17. Decrease of Obesity by Allantoin via Imidazoline I1-Receptor Activation in High Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hsien-Hui; Lee, Kung Shing

    2013-01-01

    The activation of the imidazoline I1-receptor (I1R) is known to regulate appetite. Allantoin, an active ingredient in the yam, has been reported to improve lipid metabolism in high fat diet- (HFD-)fed mice. However, the effect of allantoin on obesity remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of allantoin on HFD-induced obesity. The chronic administration of allantoin to HFD-fed mice for 8 weeks significantly decreased their body weight, and this effect was reversed by efaroxan at a dose sufficient to block I1R. The epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) cell size and weight in HFD-fed mice were also decreased by allantoin via the activation of I1R. In addition, allantoin significantly decreased the energy intake of HFD-fed mice, and this reduction was associated with a decrease in the NPY levels in the brain. However, no inhibitory effect of allantoin on energy intake was observed in db/db mice. Moreover, allantoin lowered HFD-induced hyperleptinemia, and this activity was abolished by I1R blockade with efaroxan. Taken together, these data suggest that allantoin can ameliorate energy intake and eWAT accumulation by activating I1R to improve HFD-induced obesity. PMID:23606885

  18. Bardoxolone methyl prevents the development and progression of cardiac and renal pathophysiologies in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-05

    Obesity caused by the consumption of a high-fat (HF) diet is a major risk factor for the development of associated complications, such as heart and kidney failure. A semi-synthetic triterpenoid, bardoxolone methyl (BM) was administrated to mice fed a HF diet for 21 weeks to determine if it would prevent the development of obesity-associated cardiac and renal pathophysiologies. Twelve week old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a lab chow (LC), HF (40% fat), or a HF diet supplemented with 10 mg/kg/day BM in drinking water. After 21 weeks, the left ventricles of hearts and cortex of kidneys of mice were collected for analysis. Histological analysis revealed that BM prevented HF diet-induced development of structural changes in the heart and kidneys. BM prevented HF diet-induced decreases in myocyte number in cardiac tissue, although this treatment also elevated cardiac endothelin signalling molecules. In the kidneys, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced renal corpuscle hypertrophy and attenuated endothelin signalling. Furthermore, in both the hearts and kidneys of mice fed a HF diet, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced increases in fat accumulation, macrophage infiltration and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) gene expression. These findings suggest that BM prevents HF diet-induced developments of cardiac and renal pathophysiologies in mice fed a chronic HF diet by preventing inflammation. Moreover, these results suggest that BM has the potential as a therapeutic for preventing obesity-induced cardiac and renal pathophysiologies.

  19. Morphometric and functional abnormalities of kidneys in the progeny of mice fed chocolate during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Patera, Janusz; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Słodkowska, Janina; Borowska, Adamina; Skopiński, Piotr; Sommer, Ewa; Wasiutyński, Aleksander; Skopińska-Rózewska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Even most commonly consumed beverages like tea, coffee, chocolate and cocoa contain methylxanthines, biogenic amines and polyphenols, among them catechins, that exhibit significant biological activity and might profoundly affect the organism homeostasis. We have previously shown that 400 mg of bitter chocolate or 6 mg of theobromine added to the daily diet of pregnant and afterwards lactating mice affected embryonic angiogenesis and caused bone mineralization disturbances as well as limb shortening in 4-weeks old offspring. The aim of the present study was the morphometric and functional evaluation of kidneys in the 4-weeks old progeny mice fed according to the protocol mentioned above. Progeny from the mice fed chocolate presented considerable morphometric abnormalities in the kidney structure, with the lower number of glomeruli per mm2 and their increased diameter. Moreover, higher serum creatinine concentration was observed in that group of offspring. No morphometric or functional irregularities were found in the progeny of mice fed theobromine. Abnormalities demonstrated in the offspring of mice fed chocolate are not related to its theobromine content. Consequently, identification of active compound(s) responsible for the observed effects is of vital importance.

  20. Artemisia annua Leaf Extract Attenuates Hepatic Steatosis and Inflammation in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Ko, Keon-Hee; Heo, Rok Won; Yi, Chin-ok; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jun Young; Park, Jae-Ho; Nam, Sanghae; Kim, Hwajin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Artemisia annua L. (AA) is a well-known source of the antimalarial drug artemisinin. AA also has an antibacterial and antioxidant activity. However, the effect of AA extract on hepatic steatosis induced by obesity is unclear. We investigated whether AA extract prevents obesity-induced insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Mice were randomly divided into groups that received a normal chow diet or HFD with or without AA for 12 weeks. We found that AA extract reduced insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in HFD-fed mice. Western blot analysis showed that HFD-induced expression of nuclear sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein in the livers was decreased by AA extract. In particular, dietary administration of AA extract decreased hepatic high-mobility group box 1 and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in HFD-fed mice. AA extract also attenuated HFD-induced collagen deposition and fibrosis-related transforming growth factor-β1 and connective tissue growth factor. These data indicate that dietary AA extract has beneficial effects on hepatic steatosis and inflammation in HFD-fed mice. PMID:26741655

  1. Table grape consumption reduces adiposity and markers of hepatic lipogenesis and alters gut microbiota in butter fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Jessie; Collins, Brian; Wolf, Patricia G; Martinez, Kristina; Shen, Wan; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Zhong, Wei; Cooney, Paula; Cockrell, Chase; Chang, Eugene; Gaskins, H Rex; McIntosh, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if consuming table grapes reduces adiposity and its metabolic consequences and alters gut microbiota in mice fed a high-fat (HF), butter-rich diet. C57BL/6J mice were fed a low-fat (LF) diet or HF diet with 3% or 5% grapes for 11weeks. Total body and inguinal fat were moderately but significantly reduced in mice fed both levels of grapes compared to their controls. Mice fed 5% grapes had lower liver weights and triglyceride levels and decreased expression of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (Gpat1) compared to the 5% controls. Mice fed 3% grapes had lower hepatic mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, sterol-CoA desaturase 1, fatty-acid binding protein 4 and Gpat1 compared to the 3% controls. Although grape feeding had only a minor impact on markers of inflammation or lipogenesis in adipose tissue or intestine, 3% of grapes decreased the intestinal abundance of sulfidogenic Desulfobacter spp. and the Bilophila wadsworthia-specific dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene and tended to increase the abundance of the beneficial bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila compared to controls. In addition, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Allobaculum and several other genera correlated negatively with adiposity. Allobaculum in particular was increased in the LF and 3% grapes groups compared to the HF-fed controls. Notably, grape feeding attenuated the HF-induced impairment in epithelial localization of the intestinal tight junction protein zonula occludens. Collectively, these data indicate that some of the adverse health consequences of consuming an HF diet rich in saturated fat can be attenuated by table grape consumption.

  2. Table grape consumption reduces adiposity and markers of hepatic lipogenesis and alters gut microbiota in butter fat-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Jessie; Collins, Brian; Wolf, Patricia G.; Martinez, Kristina; Shen, Wan; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Zhong, Wei; Cooney, Paula; Cockrell, Chase; Chang, Eugene; Gaskins, H. Rex; McIntosh, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if consuming table grapes reduces adiposity and its metabolic consequences and alters gut microbiota in mice fed a high fat (HF), butter-rich diet. C57BL/6J mice were fed a low fat (LF) diet or HF diet with 3% or 5% grapes for 11 weeks. Total body and inguinal fat were moderately, but significantly reduced in mice fed both levels of grapes compared to their controls. Mice fed 5% grapes had lower liver weights and triglyceride levels, and decreased expression of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (Gpat1) compared to the 5% controls. Mice fed 3% grapes had lower hepatic mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, sterol-CoA desaturase 1, fatty-acid binding protein 4, and Gpat1 compared to the 3% controls. Although grape feeding had only a minor impact on markers of inflammation or lipogenesis in adipose tissue or intestine, 3% grapes decreased the intestinal abundance of sulfidogenic Desulfobacter spp., and the Bilophila wadsworthia-specific dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA-Bw), and tended to increase the abundance of the beneficial bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila compared to controls. Additionally, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Allobaculum, and several other genera correlated negatively with adiposity. Allobaculum in particular was increased in the LF and 3% grapes groups compared to the HF-fed controls. Notably, grape feeding attenuated the HF-induced impairment in epithelial localization of the intestinal tight junction protein zonula occludens. Collectively, these data indicate that some of the adverse health consequences of consuming a HF diet rich in saturated fat can be attenuated by table grape consumption. PMID:26423887

  3. Liver Perilipin 5 Expression Worsens Hepatosteatosis But Not Insulin Resistance in High Fat-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Michelle B.; Mazur-Hart, David; Machida, Yui; King, Timothy; Nadler, Joseph; Galkina, Elena V.; Poddar, Arjun; Dutta, Sucharita

    2015-01-01

    Perilipin 5 (PLIN5) is a lipid droplet (LD) protein highly expressed in oxidative tissues, including the fasted liver. However, its expression also increases in nonalcoholic fatty liver. To determine whether PLIN5 regulates metabolic phenotypes of hepatosteatosis under nutritional excess, liver targeted overexpression of PLIN5 was achieved using adenoviral vector (Ad-PLIN5) in male C57BL/6J mice fed high-fat diet. Mice treated with adenovirus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) (Ad-GFP) served as control. Ad-PLIN5 livers increased LD in the liver section, and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry revealed increases in lipid classes associated with LD, including triacylglycerol, cholesterol ester, and phospholipid classes, compared with Ad-GFP liver. Lipids commonly associated with hepatic lipotoxicity, diacylglycerol, and ceramides, were also increased in Ad-PLIN5 liver. The expression of genes in lipid metabolism regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α was reduced suggestive of slower mobilization of stored lipids in Ad-PLIN5 mice. However, the increase of hepatosteatosis by PLIN5 overexpression did not worsen glucose homeostasis. Rather, serum insulin levels were decreased, indicating better insulin sensitivity in Ad-PLIN5 mice. Moreover, genes associated with liver injury were unaltered in Ad-PLIN5 steatotic liver compared with Ad-GFP control. Phosphorylation of protein kinase B was increased in Ad-PLIN5-transduced AML12 hepatocyte despite of the promotion of fatty acid incorporation to triacylglycerol as well. Collectively, our data indicates that the increase in liver PLIN5 during hepatosteatosis drives further lipid accumulation but does not adversely affect hepatic health or insulin sensitivity. PMID:26296152

  4. Serotonin Deficiency Rescues Lactation on Day 1 in Mice Fed a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Allan S.; Perez, Paola K.; Streckenbach, Liana J.; Olson, Jake M.; Cook, Mark E.; Hernandez, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an inflammatory state associated with delayed lactogenesis stage II and altered mammary gland morphology. Serotonin mediates inflammation and mammary gland involution. The objective of this study was to determine if a genetic deficiency of tryptophan hydroxylase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme in peripheral serotonin synthesis, would result in an improved ability to lactate in dams fed a high fat diet. Twenty-six female mice were fed a high (HFD) or low fat (LFD) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. Fourteen mice were genetically deficient for Tph1 (Tph1-/-), and twelve were wild type. Milk yield, pup mortality, and dam weights were recorded and milk samples were collected. On day 10 of lactation, dams were sacrificed and mammary glands were harvested for RT-PCR and histological evaluation. HFD dams weighed more than LFD dams at the onset of lactation. WT HFD dams were unable to lactate on day 1 of lactation and exhibited increased pup mortality relative to all other treatments, including Tph1-/- HFD dams. mRNA expression of immune markers C-X-C motif chemokine 5 and tumor necrosis factor alpha were elevated in WT HFD mammary glands. Mammary gland histology showed a reduced number of alveoli in WT compared to Tph1-/- dams, regardless of diet, and the alveoli of HFD dams were smaller than those of LFD dams. Finally, fatty acid profile in milk was dynamic in both early and peak lactation, with reduced de novo synthesis of fatty acids on day 10 of lactation in the HFD groups. Administration of a HFD to C57BL/6 dams produced an obese phenotype in the mammary gland, which was alleviated by a genetic deficiency of Tph1. Serotonin may modulate the effects of obesity on the mammary gland, potentially contributing to the delayed onset of lactogenesis seen in obese women. PMID:27603698

  5. Preoperative Fasting Protects against Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Aged and Overweight Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jongbloed, Franny; de Bruin, Ron W. F.; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Payán-Gómez, César; van den Engel, Sandra; van Oostrom, Conny T.; de Bruin, Alain; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van Steeg, Harry; IJzermans, Jan N. M.; Dollé, Martijn E. T.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is inevitable during kidney transplantation leading to oxidative stress and inflammation. We previously reported that preoperative fasting in young-lean male mice protects against IRI. Since patients are generally of older age with morbidities possibly leading to a different response to fasting, we investigated the effects of preoperative fasting on renal IRI in aged-overweight male and female mice. Male and female F1-FVB/C57BL6-hybrid mice, average age 73 weeks weighing 47.2 grams, were randomized to preoperative ad libitum feeding or 3 days fasting, followed by renal IRI. Body weight, kidney function and survival of the animals were monitored until day 28 postoperatively. Kidney histopathology was scored for all animals and gene expression profiles after fasting were analyzed in kidneys of young and aged male mice. Preoperative fasting significantly improved survival after renal IRI in both sexes compared with normal fed mice. Fasted groups had a better kidney function shown by lower serum urea levels after renal IRI. Histopathology showed less acute tubular necrosis and more regeneration in kidneys from fasted mice. A mRNA analysis indicated the involvement of metabolic processes including fatty acid oxidation and retinol metabolism, and the NRF2-mediated stress response. Similar to young-lean, healthy male mice, preoperative fasting protects against renal IRI in aged-overweight mice of both genders. These findings suggest a general protective response of fasting against renal IRI regardless of age, gender, body weight and genetic background. Therefore, fasting could be a non-invasive intervention inducing increased oxidative stress resistance in older and overweight patients as well. PMID:24959849

  6. Chronic prednisolone treatment reduces hepatic insulin sensitivity while perturbing the fed-to-fasting transition in mice.

    PubMed

    Laskewitz, Anke J; van Dijk, Theo H; Bloks, Vincent W; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; van Lierop, Marie-José; Dokter, Wim H; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K; Grefhorst, Aldo

    2010-05-01

    Chronic glucocorticoid use for treatment of inflammatory diseases is accompanied by severe side effects in humans (e.g. hyperglycemia and insulin resistance). The present studies were conducted to characterize consequences of chronic treatment with the synthetic glucocorticoid prednisolone on insulin sensitivity and blood glucose kinetics in mice. Prednisolone treatment increased fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations, but this apparently reduced insulin sensitivity could not be confirmed in hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies. Therefore, a novel method to study whole body glucose kinetics was used. This method revealed that prednisolone-treated mice show an increased hepatic glucose production (HGP). The increased HGP was accompanied by elevated plasma insulin concentrations, indicating reduced insulin sensitivity of hepatic glucose metabolism in prednisolone-treated mice. Compared with vehicle, prednisolone-treated mice had lower blood glucose concentrations, higher plasma free fatty acids, and higher plasma fibroblast growth factor-21 concentrations in the fed condition, i.e. mimicking a fasting situation. Next, the effects of 24-h fasting on energy metabolism were studied. Compared with controls, fasted prednisolone-treated mice had higher blood glucose concentrations and lower plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. In conclusion, these results indicate that chronic prednisolone treatment reduces insulin sensitivity of HGP, induces a fasting-like phenotype in fed mice, and perturbs the fed-to-fasting transition.

  7. Aging increases the susceptibility of hepatic inflammation, liver fibrosis and aging in response to high-fat diet in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Hee; Xu, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Koyama, Yukinori; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Diggle, Karin; You, Young-Hyun; Schilling, Jan M; Jeste, Dilip; Sharma, Kumar; Brenner, David A; Kisseleva, Tatiana

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to investigate whether aging increases the susceptibility of hepatic and renal inflammation or fibrosis in response to high-fat diet (HFD) and explore the underlying genetic alterations. Middle (10 months old) and old (20 months old) aged, male C57BL/6N mice were fed either a low-fat diet (4 % fat) or HFD (60 % fat) for 4 months. Young (3 months old) aged mice were included as control group. HFD-induced liver and kidney injuries were analyzed by serum and urine assay, histologic staining, immunohistochemistry, and reverse-transcription real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Total RNA sequencing with next-generation technology was done with RNA extracted from liver tissues. With HFD feeding, aged was associated with higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels, marked infiltration of hepatic macrophages, and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines (MCP1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17A). Importantly, aged mice showed more advanced hepatic fibrosis and increased expression of fibrogenic markers (Col-I-α1, αSMA, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGFβRII, PDGF, PDGFRβII, TIMP1) in response to HFD. Aged mice fed on HFD also showed increased oxidative stress and TLR4 expression. In the total RNA seq and gene ontology analysis of liver, old-aged HFD group showed significant up-regulation of genes linked to innate immune response, immune response, defense response, inflammatory response compared to middle-aged HFD group. Meanwhile, aging and HFD feeding showed significant increase in glomerular size and mesangial area, higher urine albumin/creatinine ratio, and advanced renal inflammation or fibrosis. However, the difference of HFD-induced renal injury between old-aged group and middle-aged group was not significant. The susceptibility of hepatic fibrosis as well as hepatic inflammation in response to HFD was significantly increased with aging. In addition, aging was associated with glomerular alterations and increased renal inflammation or

  8. Nutritional status of breast-fed and non-exclusively breast-fed infants from birth to age 5 months in 8 Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Ma, Defu; Ning, Yibing; Gao, Hongchong; Li, Wenjun; Wang, Junkuan; Zheng, Yingdong; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Peiyu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the nutritional status of infants aged 0 to 5 months by different feeding approaches. A cross-sectional study on infant nutrition was performed in eight cities in China. A total of 622 infants from birth to 2 months of age and 456 infants from 3 months to 5 months of age were included in this study. Mix-fed infants received breast milk and complementary foods from birth to 2 months of age. Approximately 38.2% of mix-fed infants received excessive vitamin A, and 15.6% of infants exceeded the tolerable upper intake levels (ULs) of zinc. For artificially fed infants who received only complementary foods, approximately 20% and 12.5% infants received inadequate dietary vitamin A and zinc intakes, respectively. The vitamin A and zinc intakes of half of the infants exceeded the ULs. Results showed that the usual intake distribution of the infants from 3 months to 5 months of age were similar to that of the infants from birth to 2 months of age. The common vitamin A and zinc intakes were also severely imbalanced. In addition, higher disease prevalence and lower Z scores of length-forage, weight-for-age, and weight-for-length were found in artificially fed infants and mix-fed infants compared with those in breast-fed infants. In conclusion, the usual nutrient intakes were adequate for the majority of Chinese infants, except for an important number of infants at risk for imbalance of vitamin A and zinc intakes.

  9. Beneficial effects of apple peel polyphenols on vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in high choline-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Mengfan; Ren, Daoyuan; Nie, Yan; Yang, Xingbin

    2017-03-22

    This study was designed to investigate the preventive effects of Red Fuji apple peel polyphenolic extract (APP) on vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in mice fed a high choline diet. The mice were fed 3% dietary choline in drinking water for 8 weeks and displayed vascular dysfunction and liver damage (p < 0.01). The administration of APP at 600 and 900 mg per kg bw significantly elevated serum NO, HDL and 6-Keto-PGF1a levels and lowered serum TC, TG, LDL, ET-1 and TXB2 levels in the HC-fed mice. Besides, APP also caused the reduction of AST, ALT activities and MDA, CRP, TNF-α levels, and increased the hepatic GSH-Px and SOD activities of the HC-fed mice. Furthermore, the histopathology of the liver by conventional H&E and oil red O staining confirmed the liver steatosis induced by a choline diet and the hepatoprotective effect of APP. The experiment results indicated that the polyphenolic extract from apple peel might be regarded as a preventive and therapeutic product for the amelioration of HC diet-induced vascular dysfunction and hepatic injury.

  10. Blueberry juice and anthocyanins modulate obesity, leptin and beta cell function in mice fed a high fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthocyanins (ACNs) are the components responsible for the red and blue colors found in many fruits and berries. Consumption of purified blueberry (BB) anthocyanins but not whole BB in the diet has been shown to prevent the development of obesity in mice fed high-fat diets (JAFC 56:647, 2008). The o...

  11. Triticale Bran Alkylresorcinols Enhance Resistance to Oxidative Stress in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Agil, Rania; Patterson, Zachary R.; Mackay, Harry; Abizaid, Alfonso; Hosseinian, Farah

    2016-01-01

    Triticale (× Triticosecale Whitm.) is a cereal grain with high levels of alkyresorcinols (AR) concentrated in the bran. These phenolic lipids have been shown to reduce or inhibit triglyceride accumulation and protect against oxidation; however, their biological effects have yet to be evaluated in vivo. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ARs extracted from triticale bran (TB) added to a high–fat diet on the development of obesity and oxidative stress. CF-1 mice were fed a standard low-fat (LF) diet, a 60% high-fat diet (HF) and HF diets containing either 0.5% AR extract (HF-AR), 10% TB (HF-TB), or 0.5% vitamin E (HF-VE). Energy intake, weight gain, glucose tolerance, fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels, and body composition were determined. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed on mice liver and heart tissues. The findings suggest that ARs may serve as a preventative measure against risks of oxidative damage associated with high-fat diets and obesity through their application as functional foods and neutraceuticals. Future studies aim to identify the in vivo mechanisms of action of ARs and the individual homologs involved in their favorable biological effects. PMID:28231100

  12. Regressive Effect of Myricetin on Hepatic Steatosis in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shu-Fang; Le, Guo-Wei; Wang, Peng; Qiu, Yu-Yu; Jiang, Yu-Yu; Tang, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Myricetin is an effective antioxidant in the treatment of obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders. The objective of this study was to explore the regressive effect of myricetin on pre-existing hepatic steatosis induced by high-fat diet (HFD). C57BL/6 mice were fed either a standard diet or a HFD for 12 weeks and then half of the mice were treated with myricetin (0.12% in the diet, w/w) while on their respective diets for further 12 weeks. Myricetin treatment significantly alleviated HFD-induced steatosis, decreased hepatic lipid accumulation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels, and increased antioxidative enzyme activities, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Microarray analysis of hepatic gene expression profiles showed that myricetin significantly altered the expression profiles of 177 genes which were involved in 12 biological pathways, including the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathway and peroxisome. Further research indicated that myricetin elevated hepatic nuclear Nrf2 translocation, increased the protein expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 (NQO1), reduced the protein expression of PPARγ, and normalized the expressions of genes that were involved in peroxisome and the PPAR signaling pathway. Our data indicated that myricetin might represent an effective therapeutic agent to treat HFD-induced hepatic steatosis via activating the Nrf2 pathway and the PPAR signaling pathway. PMID:27973423

  13. Coacervate whey protein improves inflammatory milieu in mice fed with high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional foods with bioactive properties may help in treat obesity, as they can lead to a decreased risks of inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chitosan coacervate whey protein on the proinflammatory processes in mice fed with high-fat diet. Methods Mice were divided into two groups receiving either a normolipidic or high-fat diet; the animals in each of the two diet groups were given a diet supplement of either coacervate (gavage, 36 mg protein/kg of body weight) or tap water for four weeks [groups: normolipidic diet plus water (C); normolipidic diet and coacervate (CC); high-fat diet and water (H); and high-fat diet and coacervate (HC)]. Results The high-fat diet promoted inflammation, possibly by decreased adiponectin/sum of adipose tissues ratio and increased phosphorylation of NF-κB p50. In HC we observed a positive correlation between IL-10 and TNF-α in mesenteric adipose tissue, retroperitoneal adipose tissue and liver tissue. We also observed a positive correlation between lipopolisaccharide with IL-10 in the liver tissue. Conclusions High-fat diet treatment promoted metabolic alterations and inflammation, and chitosan coacervate whey protein modulated inflammatory milieu. PMID:24673809

  14. Regressive Effect of Myricetin on Hepatic Steatosis in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shu-Fang; Le, Guo-Wei; Wang, Peng; Qiu, Yu-Yu; Jiang, Yu-Yu; Tang, Xue

    2016-12-11

    Myricetin is an effective antioxidant in the treatment of obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders. The objective of this study was to explore the regressive effect of myricetin on pre-existing hepatic steatosis induced by high-fat diet (HFD). C57BL/6 mice were fed either a standard diet or a HFD for 12 weeks and then half of the mice were treated with myricetin (0.12% in the diet, w/w) while on their respective diets for further 12 weeks. Myricetin treatment significantly alleviated HFD-induced steatosis, decreased hepatic lipid accumulation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels, and increased antioxidative enzyme activities, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Microarray analysis of hepatic gene expression profiles showed that myricetin significantly altered the expression profiles of 177 genes which were involved in 12 biological pathways, including the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathway and peroxisome. Further research indicated that myricetin elevated hepatic nuclear Nrf2 translocation, increased the protein expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 (NQO1), reduced the protein expression of PPARγ, and normalized the expressions of genes that were involved in peroxisome and the PPAR signaling pathway. Our data indicated that myricetin might represent an effective therapeutic agent to treat HFD-induced hepatic steatosis via activating the Nrf2 pathway and the PPAR signaling pathway.

  15. Luteolin Inhibits Microglia and Alters Hippocampal-Dependent Spatial Working Memory in Aged Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Saebyeol; Dilger, Ryan N.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2010-01-01

    A dysregulated overexpression of inflammatory mediators by microglia may facilitate cognitive aging and neurodegeneration. Considerable evidence suggests the flavonoid luteolin has antiinflammatory effects, but its ability to inhibit microglia, reduce inflammatory mediators, and improve hippocampal-dependent learning and memory in aged mice is unknown. In initial studies, pretreatment of BV-2 microglia with luteolin inhibited the induction of inflammatory genes and the release of inflammatory mediators after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Supernatants from LPS-stimulated microglia caused discernible death in Neuro.2a cells. However, treating microglia with luteolin prior to LPS reduced neuronal cell death caused by conditioned supernatants, indicating luteolin was neuroprotective. In subsequent studies, adult (3–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice were fed control or luteolin (20 mg/d)-supplemented diet for 4 wk and spatial working memory was assessed as were several inflammatory markers in the hippocampus. Aged mice fed control diet exhibited deficits in spatial working memory and expression of inflammatory markers in the hippocampus indicative of increased microglial cell activity. Luteolin consumption improved spatial working memory and restored expression of inflammatory markers in the hippocampus compared with that of young adults. Luteolin did not affect either spatial working memory or inflammatory markers in young adults. Taken together, the current findings suggest dietary luteolin enhanced spatial working memory by mitigating microglial-associated inflammation in the hippocampus. Therefore, luteolin consumption may be beneficial in preventing or treating conditions involving increased microglial cell activity and inflammation. PMID:20685893

  16. [Development of Rhodnius pictipes Stal, 1872 fed on mice and through a silicone membrane (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae)].

    PubMed

    Rocha, D da S; da Fonseca, A H; Costa, F A; Jurberg, J; Galvão, C

    1997-01-01

    Rhodnius pictipes (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) from Serra Norte, State of Pará, Brazil, acclimatized in an insectary at the Laboratório Nacional e Internacional de Referência em Taxonomia de Triatomíneos, Departamento de Entomologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, were fed through a silicone membrane. In order to know the viability and the efficiency of this membrane compared with insects fed on mice, the number of bloodmeals taken, period of development of the five nymphal instars, longevity of adults, average amount of blood intake in each meal and percent of mortality were observed. A total of 310 insects, were used, comprising 50 nymphs of each instar, as well as 30 male and 30 female adults. Insects fed artificially had reduced minimal and maximal periods of development than the group fed on mice. The largest relative increase of body weight was observed in the 2nd instar followed by the 1st, and the amount of blood ingested increased during the development, to the 5th instar for both groups. There were no significant differences between the groups fed artificially and in vivo according to Tukey's test for p > 0.05. The percent of mortality in the 1st instar was 18% for artificially fed and 16% for the group fed on mice; these percentages decreased as insects developed until the 4th instar, without mortality, returning to increase in the 5th instar. R. pictipes was shown to be easily adaptable to artificial feeding, and could be considered as an important and viable experimental model.

  17. Lack of mature lymphocytes results in obese but metabolically healthy mice when fed a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X; Huh, JY; Gong, H; Chamberland, JP; Brinkoetter, MT; Hamnvik, O-PR; Mantzoros, CS

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Obesity is characterized by chronic inflammation and immune dysregulation, as well as insulin resistance, but the link between obesity and adaptive immunity remains to be fully studied. METHODS To elucidate the role of adaptive immunity on body composition, glucose homeostasis and inflammation, recombination-activating gene 1 knockout (Rag1 − / −) mice, without mature T-lymphocytes or B-lymphocytes, were maintained on a low- or high-fat diet (LFD and HFD, respectively) for 11 weeks. RESULTS Rag1 − / − mice fed HFD gained significantly more weight and had increased body fat compared with wild type. Downregulation of energy expenditure as well as brown fat uncoupling protein UCP-1 and UCP-3 gene expression were noticed in HFD-fed Rag1 − / − mice compared with LFD. HFD mice had significantly decreased energy intake compared with LFD mice, consistent with decreased agouti-related protein and increased pro-opiomelanocortin gene expression levels in the hypothalamus. Moreover, compared with wild type, Rag1 − / − mice had lower interleukin (IL)-4 levels, a cytokine recently found to induce browning in white adipocytes, and higher IL-12 levels in HFD-fed Rag1 − / − mice. Despite that HFD Rag1 − / − mice were more obese, they had similar glucose, insulin and adiponectin levels, while leptin was marginally increased. CONCLUSIONS Mice with deficiency in adaptive immunity are obese, partly owing to decreased energy expenditure, but are metabolically normal, suggesting that mature lymphocytes have necessary roles in the development of obesity-related metabolic dysregulation. PMID:25994806

  18. Lipopolysaccharide-induced lethality and cytokine production in aged mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, K; Matsumoto, T; Miyazaki, S; Yamaguchi, K

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to define the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitivity of aged mice in terms of lethality and cytokine production and to determine down-regulating responses of corticosterone and interleukin 10 (IL-10). The 50% lethal doses of LPS in young (6- to 7-week-old) and aged (98- to 102-week-old) mice were 601 and 93 microg per mouse (25.6 and 1.6 mg per kg of body weight), respectively. Aged mice were approximately 6.5-fold more sensitive to the lethal toxicity of LPS in micrograms per mouse (16-fold more sensitive in milligrams per kilogram) than young mice. Levels in sera of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) IL-1alpha, and IL-6 after intraperitoneal injection of 100 microg of LPS peaked at 1.5, 3, and 3 h, respectively, and declined thereafter in both groups of mice. However, the peak values of these cytokines were significantly higher in aged than in young mice (P < 0.05). Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detectable at 3 h, and sustained high levels were still detected after 12 h in both age groups. Although there were no significant differences in levels of IFN-gamma in sera from both groups, aged mice showed higher IFN-gamma levels throughout the 3- to 12-h study period. Administration of increasing doses of LPS revealed that aged mice had a lower threshold to IL-1alpha production than young mice. In addition, aged mice were approximately 4-fold more sensitive to the lethal toxicity of exogenous TNF in units per mouse (10-fold more sensitive in units per kilogram) than young mice. With regard to down-regulating factors, corticosterone amounts were similar at basal levels and no differences in kinetics after the LPS challenge were observed, whereas IL-10 levels in sera were significantly higher in aged mice at 1.5 and 3 h than in young mice (P < 0.01). These results indicate that aged mice are more sensitive to the lethal toxicities of LPS and TNF than young mice. We conclude that a relatively activated, or primed, state for LPS

  19. Rhabdomyosarcomas in Aging A/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sher, Roger B.; Cox, Gregory A.; Mills, Kevin D.; Sundberg, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas (RSCs) are skeletal muscle neoplasms found in humans and domestic mammals. The A/J inbred strain developed a high frequency (between 70–80%) of adult pleomorphic type (APT) RSC at >20 months of age while BALB/cByJ also develop RSC but less frequently. These neoplasms invaded skeletal muscle surrounding either the axial or proximal appendicular skeleton and were characterized by pleomorphic cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, multiple nuclei, and cross striations. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of alpha-sarcomeric actin and myogenin in the neoplastic cells using immunocytochemistry. The A/J strain, but not the related BALB/c substrains, is also characterised by a progressive muscular dystrophy homologous to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B. The association between the development of RSC in similar muscle groups to those most severely affected by the progressive muscular dystrophy suggested that these neoplasms developed from abnormal regeneration of the skeletal muscle exacerbated by the dysferlin mutation. Transcriptome analyses of RSCs revealed marked downregulation of genes in muscular development and function signaling networks. Non-synonymous coding SNPs were found in Myl1, Abra, Sgca, Ttn, and Kcnj12 suggesting these may be important in the pathogenesis of RSC. These studies suggest that A strains of mice can be useful models for dissecting the molecular genetic basis for development, progression, and ultimately for testing novel anticancer therapeutic agents dealing with rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:21853140

  20. Bardoxolone methyl prevents insulin resistance and the development of hepatic steatosis in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Dinh, Chi H L; Wang, Hongqin; Cheng, Licai; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-09-05

    High-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity is a major risk factor for the development of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. We examined the hypothesis that bardoxolone methyl (BM) would prevent the development of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice fed a HF diet. C57BL/6J male mice were fed a lab chow (LC), HF (40% fat), or HF diet supplemented with 10 mg/kg/day BM orally for 21 weeks. Glucose metabolism was assessed using a glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin sensitivity test (IST). Signalling molecules involved in insulin resistance, inflammation, and lipid metabolism were examined in liver tissue via western blotting and RT-PCR. BM prevented HF diet-induced insulin resistance and alterations in the protein levels of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) and BDNF, and expression of the insulin receptor (IR), IRS-1 and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) genes. Furthermore, BM prevented fat accumulation in the liver and decreases in the β-oxidation gene, peroxisomal acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX) in mice fed a HF diet. In the livers of HF fed mice, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced macrophage infiltration, inflammation as indicated by reduced IL-6 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein levels and TNFα mRNA expression, and increased nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) mRNA expression and nuclear protein levels. These findings suggest that BM prevents HF diet induced insulin resistance and the development of hepatic steatosis in mice fed a chronic HF diet through modulation of molecules involved in insulin signalling, lipid metabolism and inflammation in the liver.

  1. Liver fatty acid binding protein gene-ablation exacerbates weight gain in high-fat fed female mice.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Avery L; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Martin, Gregory G; Storey, Stephen M; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-05-01

    Loss of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) decreases long chain fatty acid uptake and oxidation in primary hepatocytes and in vivo. On this basis, L-FABP gene ablation would potentiate high-fat diet-induced weight gain and weight gain/energy intake. While this was indeed the case when L-FABP null (-/-) mice on the C57BL/6NCr background were pair-fed a high-fat diet, whether this would also be observed under high-fat diet fed ad libitum was not known. Therefore, this possibility was examined in female L-FABP (-/-) mice on the same background. L-FABP (-/-) mice consumed equal amounts of defined high-fat or isocaloric control diets fed ad libitum. However, on the ad libitum-fed high-fat diet the L-FABP (-/-) mice exhibited: (1) decreased hepatic long chain fatty acid (LCFA) β-oxidation as indicated by lower serum β-hydroxybutyrate level; (2) decreased hepatic protein levels of key enzymes mitochondrial (rate limiting carnitine palmitoyl acyltransferase A1, CPT1A; HMG-CoA synthase) and peroxisomal (acyl CoA oxidase 1, ACOX1) LCFA β-oxidation; (3) increased fat tissue mass (FTM) and FTM/energy intake to the greatest extent; and (4) exacerbated body weight gain, weight gain/energy intake, liver weight, and liver weight/body weight to the greatest extent. Taken together, these findings showed that L-FABP gene-ablation exacerbated diet-induced weight gain and fat tissue mass gain in mice fed high-fat diet ad libitum--consistent with the known biochemistry and cell biology of L-FABP.

  2. Apple cider vinegar modulates serum lipid profile, erythrocyte, kidney, and liver membrane oxidative stress in ovariectomized mice fed high cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Güler, Mustafa; Özgül, Cemil; Saydam, Gündüzalp; Küçükayaz, Mustafa; Sözbir, Ercan

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potentially beneficial effects of apple cider vinegar (ACV) supplementation on serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, liver and kidney membrane lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant levels in ovariectomized (OVX) mice fed high cholesterol. Four groups of ten female mice were treated as follows: Group I received no treatment and was used as control. Group II was OVX mice. Group III received ACV intragastrically (0.6% of feed), and group IV was OVX and was treated with ACV as described for group III. The treatment was continued for 28 days, during which the mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet. The lipid peroxidation levels in erythrocyte, liver and kidney, triglycerides, total, and VLDL cholesterol levels in serum were higher in the OVX group than in groups III and IV. The levels of vitamin E in liver, the kidney and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH) were decreased in group II. The GSH-Px, vitamin C, E, and β-carotene, and the erythrocyte GSH and GSH-Px values were higher in kidney of groups III and IV, but in liver the vitamin E and β-carotene concentrations were decreased. In conclusion, ACV induced a protective effect against erythrocyte, kidney, and liver oxidative injury, and lowered the serum lipid levels in mice fed high cholesterol, suggesting that it possesses oxidative stress scavenging effects, inhibits lipid peroxidation, and increases the levels of antioxidant enzymes and vitamin.

  3. High folic acid intake reduces natural killer cell cytotoxicity in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Sawaengsri, Hathairat; Wang, Junpeng; Reginaldo, Christina; Steluti, Josiane; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Selhub, Jacob; Paul, Ligi

    2016-04-01

    Presence of unmetabolized folic acid in plasma, which is indicative of folic acid intake beyond the metabolic capacity of the body, is associated with reduced natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity in postmenopausal women ≥50years. NK cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that are part of the innate immune system critical for surveillance and defense against virus-infected and cancer cells. We determined if a high folic acid diet can result in reduced NK cell cytotoxicity in an aged mouse model. Female C57BL/6 mice (16-month-old) were fed an AIN-93M diet with the recommended daily allowance (1× RDA, control) or 20× RDA (high) folic acid for 3months. NK cytotoxicity was lower in splenocytes from mice fed a high folic acid diet when compared to mice on control diet (P<.04). The lower NK cell cytotoxicity in high folic acid fed mice could be due to their lower mature cytotoxic/naïve NK cell ratio (P=.03) when compared to the control mice. Splenocytes from mice on high folic acid diet produced less interleukin (IL)-10 when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (P<.05). The difference in NK cell cytotoxicity between dietary groups was abolished when the splenocytes were supplemented with exogenous IL-10 prior to assessment of the NK cytotoxicity, suggesting that the reduced NK cell cytotoxicity of the high folic acid group was at least partially due to reduced IL-10 production. This study demonstrates a causal relationship between high folic acid intake and reduced NK cell cytotoxicity and provides some insights into the potential mechanisms behind this relationship.

  4. Exercise Enhances Learning and Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Praag, Henriette van; Shubert, Tiffany; Zhao, Chunmei; Gage, Fred H.

    2005-01-01

    Aging causes changes in the hippocampus that may lead to cognitive decline in older adults. In young animals, exercise increases hippocampal neurogenesis and improves learning. We investigated whether voluntary wheel running would benefit mice that were sedentary until 19 months of age. Specifically, young and aged mice were housed with or without a running wheel and injected with bromodeoxyuridine or retrovirus to label newborn cells. After 1 month, learning was tested in the Morris water maze. Aged runners showed faster acquisition and better retention of the maze than age-matched controls. The decline in neurogenesis in aged mice was reversed to 50% of young control levels by running. Moreover, fine morphology of new neurons did not differ between young and aged runners, indicating that the initial maturation of newborn neurons was not affected by aging. Thus, voluntary exercise ameliorates some of the deleterious morphological and behavioral consequences of aging. PMID:16177036

  5. Neutrophil depletion delays wound repair in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Naomi; Okawa, Yayoi; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important clinical problems in caring for elderly patients is treatment of pressure ulcers. One component of normal wound healing is the generation of an inflammatory reaction, which is characterized by the sequential infiltration of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes. Neutrophils migrate early in the wound healing process. In aged C57BL/6 mice, wound healing is relatively inefficient. We examined the effects of neutrophil numbers on wound healing in both young and aged mice. We found that the depletion of neutrophils by anti-Gr-1 antibody dramatically delayed wound healing in aged mice. The depletion of neutrophils in young mice had less effect on the kinetics of wound healing. Intravenous G-CSF injection increased the migration of neutrophils to the wound site. While the rate of wound repair did not change significantly in young mice following G-CSF injection, it increased significantly in old mice. PMID:19424869

  6. Spontaneous development of autoimmune sialadenitis in aging BDF1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Y.; Kurashima, C.; Utsuyama, M.; Hirokawa, K.

    1988-01-01

    This study reports that spontaneous autoimmune sialadenitis developed in aging female, rather than male, BDF1 mice. The lesions first appeared in 6-month-old female BDF1 mice and were aggravated with advancing age, especially in 24-month-old and 30-month-old senescent mice. In contrast, significant inflammatory changes did not develop in aging male BDF1 mice. The presence of antisalivary duct antibody was found in sera from mice with sialadenitis. The infiltrating cells in the lesions of submandibular salivary glands were mainly composed of T cells, especially Lyt 1+ and L3T4+ cells. Moreover, mild inflammatory lesions were observed in parotid, sublingual salivary glands, pancreas, or kidneys in some mice that developed spontaneously occurring sialadenitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3260751

  7. A mixture of cod and scallop protein reduces adiposity and improves glucose tolerance in high-fat fed male C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Rønnevik, Alexander Krokedal; Borkowski, Kamil; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Liaset, Bjørn

    2014-01-01

    Low-protein and high-protein diets regulate energy metabolism in animals and humans. To evaluate whether different dietary protein sources modulate energy balance when ingested at average levels obesity-prone male C57BL/6J mice were pair-fed high-fat diets (67 energy percent fat, 18 energy percent sucrose and 15 energy percent protein) with either casein, chicken filet or a mixture of cod and scallop (1:1 on amino acid content) as protein sources. At equal energy intake, casein and cod/scallop fed mice had lower feed efficiency than chicken fed mice, which translated into reduced adipose tissue masses after seven weeks of feeding. Chicken fed mice had elevated hepatic triglyceride relative to casein and cod/scallop fed mice and elevated 4 h fasted plasma cholesterol concentrations compared to low-fat and casein fed mice. In casein fed mice the reduced adiposity was likely related to the observed three percent lower apparent fat digestibility compared to low-fat, chicken and cod/scallop fed mice. After six weeks of feeding an oral glucose tolerance test revealed that despite their lean phenotype, casein fed mice had reduced glucose tolerance compared to low-fat, chicken and cod/scallop fed mice. In a separate set of mice, effects on metabolism were evaluated by indirect calorimetry before onset of diet-induced obesity. Spontaneous locomotor activity decreased in casein and chicken fed mice when shifting from low-fat to high-fat diets, but cod/scallop feeding tended (P = 0.06) to attenuate this decrease. Moreover, at this shift, energy expenditure decreased in all groups, but was decreased to a greater extent in casein fed than in cod/scallop fed mice, indicating that protein sources regulated energy expenditure differently. In conclusion, protein from different sources modulates energy balance in C57BL/6J mice when given at normal levels. Ingestion of a cod/scallop-mixture prevented diet-induced obesity compared to intake of chicken filet and preserved glucose

  8. A Mixture of Cod and Scallop Protein Reduces Adiposity and Improves Glucose Tolerance in High-Fat Fed Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Rønnevik, Alexander Krokedal; Borkowski, Kamil; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Liaset, Bjørn

    2014-01-01

    Low-protein and high-protein diets regulate energy metabolism in animals and humans. To evaluate whether different dietary protein sources modulate energy balance when ingested at average levels obesity-prone male C57BL/6J mice were pair-fed high-fat diets (67 energy percent fat, 18 energy percent sucrose and 15 energy percent protein) with either casein, chicken filet or a mixture of cod and scallop (1∶1 on amino acid content) as protein sources. At equal energy intake, casein and cod/scallop fed mice had lower feed efficiency than chicken fed mice, which translated into reduced adipose tissue masses after seven weeks of feeding. Chicken fed mice had elevated hepatic triglyceride relative to casein and cod/scallop fed mice and elevated 4 h fasted plasma cholesterol concentrations compared to low-fat and casein fed mice. In casein fed mice the reduced adiposity was likely related to the observed three percent lower apparent fat digestibility compared to low-fat, chicken and cod/scallop fed mice. After six weeks of feeding an oral glucose tolerance test revealed that despite their lean phenotype, casein fed mice had reduced glucose tolerance compared to low-fat, chicken and cod/scallop fed mice. In a separate set of mice, effects on metabolism were evaluated by indirect calorimetry before onset of diet-induced obesity. Spontaneous locomotor activity decreased in casein and chicken fed mice when shifting from low-fat to high-fat diets, but cod/scallop feeding tended (P = 0.06) to attenuate this decrease. Moreover, at this shift, energy expenditure decreased in all groups, but was decreased to a greater extent in casein fed than in cod/scallop fed mice, indicating that protein sources regulated energy expenditure differently. In conclusion, protein from different sources modulates energy balance in C57BL/6J mice when given at normal levels. Ingestion of a cod/scallop-mixture prevented diet-induced obesity compared to intake of chicken filet and preserved glucose

  9. Hepatocyte X-box binding protein 1 deficiency increases liver injury in mice fed a high-fat/sugar diet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoying; Henkel, Anne S; LeCuyer, Brian E; Schipma, Matthew J; Anderson, Kristy A; Green, Richard M

    2015-12-15

    Fatty liver is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress and activation of the hepatic unfolded protein response (UPR). Reduced hepatic expression of the UPR regulator X-box binding protein 1 spliced (XBP1s) is associated with human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and feeding mice a high-fat diet with fructose/sucrose causes progressive, fibrosing steatohepatitis. This study examines the role of XBP1 in nonalcoholic fatty liver injury and fatty acid-induced cell injury. Hepatocyte-specific Xbp1-deficient (Xbp1(-/-)) mice were fed a high-fat/sugar (HFS) diet for up to 16 wk. HFS-fed Xbp1(-/-) mice exhibited higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels compared with Xbp1(fl/fl) controls. RNA sequencing and Gene Ontogeny pathway analysis of hepatic mRNA revealed that apoptotic process, inflammatory response, and extracellular matrix structural constituent pathways had enhanced activation in HFS-fed Xbp1(-/-) mice. Liver histology demonstrated enhanced injury and fibrosis but less steatosis in the HFS-fed Xbp1(-/-) mice. Hepatic Col1a1 and Tgfβ1 gene expression, as well as Chop and phosphorylated JNK (p-JNK), were increased in Xbp1(-/-) compared with Xbp1(fl/fl) mice after HFS feeding. In vitro, stable XBP1-knockdown Huh7 cells (Huh7-KD) and scramble control cells (Huh7-SCR) were generated and treated with palmitic acid (PA) for 24 h. PA-treated Huh7-KD cells had increased cytotoxicity measured by lactate dehydrogenase release, apoptotic nuclei, and caspase3/7 activity assays compared with Huh7-SCR cells. CHOP and p-JNK expression was also increased in Huh7-KD cells following PA treatment. In conclusion, loss of XBP1 enhances injury in both in vivo and in vitro models of fatty liver injury. We speculate that hepatic XBP1 plays an important protective role in pathogenesis of NASH.

  10. Atrial structure, function and arrhythmogenesis in aged and frail mice

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Hailey J.; Moghtadaei, Motahareh; Mackasey, Martin; Rafferty, Sara A.; Bogachev, Oleg; Sapp, John L.; Howlett, Susan E.; Rose, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent in aging populations; however not all individuals age at the same rate. Instead, individuals of the same chronological age can vary in health status from fit to frail. Our objective was to determine the impacts of age and frailty on atrial function and arrhythmogenesis in mice using a frailty index (FI). Aged mice were more frail and demonstrated longer lasting AF compared to young mice. Consistent with this, aged mice showed longer P wave duration and PR intervals; however, both parameters showed substantial variability suggesting differences in health status among mice of similar chronological age. In agreement with this, P wave duration and PR interval were highly correlated with FI score. High resolution optical mapping of the atria demonstrated reduced conduction velocity and action potential duration in aged hearts that were also graded by FI score. Furthermore, aged mice had increased interstitial fibrosis along with changes in regulators of extracellular matrix remodelling, which also correlated with frailty. These experiments demonstrate that aging results in changes in atrial structure and function that create a substrate for atrial arrhythmias. Importantly, these changes were heterogeneous due to differences in health status, which could be identified using an FI. PMID:28290548

  11. Resveratrol Attenuates Obesity-Associated Peripheral and Central Inflammation and Improves Memory Deficit in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Byeong Tak; Jeong, Eun Ae; Shin, Hyun Joo; Lee, Younghyurk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Roh, Gu Seob

    2012-01-01

    Obesity-induced diabetes is associated with chronic inflammation and is considered a risk factor for neurodegeneration. We tested the hypothesis that an AMP-activated protein kinase activator, resveratrol (RES), which is known to exert potent anti-inflammatory effects, would attenuate peripheral and central inflammation and improve memory deficit in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). C57BL/6J mice were fed an HFD or an HFD supplemented with RES for 20 weeks. Metabolic parameters in serum were evaluated, and Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry in peripheral organs and brain were completed. We used the Morris water maze test to study the role of RES on memory function in HFD-treated mice. RES treatment reduced hepatic steatosis, macrophage infiltration, and insulin resistance in HFD-fed mice. In the hippocampus of HFD-fed mice, the protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and Iba-1 expression were reduced by RES treatment. Choline acetyltransferase was increased, and the phosphorylation of tau was decreased in the hippocampus of HFD-fed mice upon RES treatment. In particular, we found that RES significantly improved memory deficit in HFD-fed mice. These findings indicate that RES reverses obesity-related peripheral and central inflammation and metabolic derangements and improves memory deficit in HFD-fed diabetic mice. PMID:22362175

  12. Neutral oligosaccharides in feces of breastfed and formula-fed infants at different ages.

    PubMed

    Dotz, Viktoria; Adam, Rüdiger; Lochnit, Günter; Schroten, Horst; Kunz, Clemens

    2016-12-01

    Beneficial effects have been proposed for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO), as deduced from in vitro and animal studies. To date, in vivo evidence of the link between certain oligosaccharide structures in milk and their consumption by infant gut microbiota is still missing, although likely. Whereas many studies have described HMO patterns in human milk from larger cohorts, data on the excretion of HMO and possible metabolites produced in the infant gut are still very limited. From smaller-scale studies, an age-dependency according to infant gut maturation and microbiota adaptation has previously been hypothesized. To further investigate this, we profiled neutral fecal oligosaccharides from term-born infants who were exclusively breastfed, formula-fed or mixed-fed at the age of 2 months, and from a follow-up of a subgroup at 7 months of age (INFABIO study). Data on maternal antibiotic exposure was also included. Automated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of HMO and metabolites in the feces of most, but not all breastfed infants at 2 months, with highly varying patterns that appeared not to differ with maternal antibiotics exposure. Formula-fed infants at 2 months and most of the breastfed infants at 7 months did not excrete HMO-like structures in their feces, the latter corresponding to the hypothesis of age-dependency. Together with our previous results that were partly contradictory to what has been proposed by others, here, we suggest alternative explanations for the described association of oligosaccharide excretion with age and feeding type in infants below 7 months of age.

  13. Fermented garlic protects diabetic, obese mice when fed a high-fat diet by antioxidant effects.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Mi; Lee, Seon-Ha; Lee, Dong-Sub; You, Myung-Jin; Chung, In Kwon; Cheon, Woo Hyun; Kwon, Young-Sam; Lee, Young-Joon; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2011-05-01

    This study examined the bioactivity of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)-fermented aged black garlic (FBG) on obese mice supplied a high-fat diet (HFD) and its in vitro antioxidant activity. Aged black garlic (BG) exhibits potent antioxidative effects and has been subjected to extensive research. In addition, the bioactivity of some natural products is increased by fermentation. In a preliminary test, this study found that the antioxidant activity of FBG is stronger than that of BG. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the bioactivity of BG would be increased by yeast fermentation and would be a good candidate as a nutraceutical product for improving the oxidative defense systems in older patients or patients affected by various oxidative stresses, for example, diabetes and diabetic complications. To test this hypothesis, the bioactivities of FBG in diabetic and obese mice as well as the antioxidant activity in vitro were examined. After 91 days of continuous HFD supply, the mice showed marked obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipemia, and liver and kidney damages. Black garlic and all 3 different doses of FBG showed favorable hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, hypolipidemic, and antiobesity effects compared with the HFD control, but no hypoglycemic effects. In particular, more favorable bioactivity against all 4 HFD-induced diabetic complications was detected in the FBG-treated groups compared with the group given equivalent doses of BG. These findings suggest that the bioactivities of BG can be improved by yeast fermentation.

  14. Changes in calcium status in aged rats fed Lactobacillus GG and Bifidobacterium lactis and oligofructose-enriched inulin.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Violetta; McSorley, Emeir; Naughton, Patrick J

    2011-02-01

    In this study we hypothesized that an increase in numbers of beneficial bacteria in the large intestine can affect calcium (Ca) status in the elderly. Adult and aged rats were fed a diet with or without synbiotics for 21 days. Synbiotics increased the numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in large intestine in both adult and aged rats. The plasma Ca concentration was significantly increased while osteocalcin concentration was significantly decreased only in aged rats fed synbiotics.

  15. Elevated GH/IGF-I promotes mammary tumors in high-fat, but not low-fat, fed mice.

    PubMed

    Gahete, Manuel D; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Lantvit, Daniel D; Ortega-Salas, Rosa; Sanchez-Sanchez, Rafael; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco; López-Miranda, José; Swanson, Steven M; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2014-11-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and/or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are thought to promote breast cancer based on reports showing circulating IGF-I levels correlate, in epidemiological studies, with breast cancer risk. Also, mouse models with developmental GH/IGF-I deficiency/resistance are less susceptible to genetic- or chemical-induced mammary tumorigenesis. However, given the metabolic properties of GH, medical strategies have been considered to raise GH to improve body composition and metabolic function in elderly and obese patients. Since hyperlipidemia, inflammation, insulin resistance and obesity increase breast cancer risk, elevating GH may serve to exacerbate cancer progression. To better understand the role GH/IGF-I plays in tumor formation, this study used unique mouse models to determine if reducing GH/IGF-I in adults protects against 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumor development, and if moderate elevations in endogenous GH/IGF-I alter DMBA-induced tumorigenesis in mice fed a standard-chow diet or in mice with altered metabolic function due to high-fat feeding. We observed that adult-onset isolated GH-deficient mice, which also have reduced IGF-I levels, were less susceptible to DMBA-treatment. Specifically, fewer adult-onset isolated GH-deficient mice developed mammary tumors compared with GH-replete controls. In contrast, chow-fed mice with elevated endogenous GH/IGF-I (HiGH mice) were not more susceptible to DMBA-treatment. However, high-fat-fed, HiGH mice showed reduced tumor latency and increased tumor incidence compared with diet-matched controls. These results further support a role of GH/IGF-I in regulating mammary tumorigenesis but suggest the ultimate consequences of GH/IGF-I on breast tumor development are dependent on the diet and/or metabolic status.

  16. Elevated GH/IGF-I promotes mammary tumors in high-fat, but not low-fat, fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Ortega-Salas, Rosa; Sanchez-Sanchez, Rafael; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco; López-Miranda, José; Swanson, Steven M.; Castaño, Justo P.; Luque, Raúl M.; Kineman, Rhonda D.

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and/or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are thought to promote breast cancer based on reports showing circulating IGF-I levels correlate, in epidemiological studies, with breast cancer risk. Also, mouse models with developmental GH/IGF-I deficiency/resistance are less susceptible to genetic- or chemical-induced mammary tumorigenesis. However, given the metabolic properties of GH, medical strategies have been considered to raise GH to improve body composition and metabolic function in elderly and obese patients. Since hyperlipidemia, inflammation, insulin resistance and obesity increase breast cancer risk, elevating GH may serve to exacerbate cancer progression. To better understand the role GH/IGF-I plays in tumor formation, this study used unique mouse models to determine if reducing GH/IGF-I in adults protects against 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumor development, and if moderate elevations in endogenous GH/IGF-I alter DMBA-induced tumorigenesis in mice fed a standard-chow diet or in mice with altered metabolic function due to high-fat feeding. We observed that adult-onset isolated GH-deficient mice, which also have reduced IGF-I levels, were less susceptible to DMBA-treatment. Specifically, fewer adult-onset isolated GH-deficient mice developed mammary tumors compared with GH-replete controls. In contrast, chow-fed mice with elevated endogenous GH/IGF-I (HiGH mice) were not more susceptible to DMBA-treatment. However, high-fat-fed, HiGH mice showed reduced tumor latency and increased tumor incidence compared with diet-matched controls. These results further support a role of GH/IGF-I in regulating mammary tumorigenesis but suggest the ultimate consequences of GH/IGF-I on breast tumor development are dependent on the diet and/or metabolic status. PMID:25085903

  17. Metabolic risk factors in mice divergently selected for BMR fed high fat and high carb diets

    PubMed Central

    Sadowska, Julita; Gębczyński, Andrzej K.; Konarzewski, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Factors affecting contribution of spontaneous physical activity (SPA; activity associated with everyday tasks) to energy balance of humans are not well understood, as it is not clear whether low activity is related to dietary habits, precedes obesity or is a result of thereof. In particular, human studies on SPA and basal metabolic rates (BMR, accounting for >50% of human energy budget) and their associations with diet composition, metabolic thrift and obesity are equivocal. To clarify these ambiguities we used a unique animal model—mice selected for divergent BMR rates (the H-BMR and L-BMR line type) presenting a 50% between-line type difference in the primary selected trait. Males of each line type were divided into three groups and fed either a high fat, high carb or a control diet. They then spent 4 months in individual cages under conditions emulating human “sedentary lifestyle”, with SPA followed every month and measurements of metabolic risk indicators (body fat mass %, blood lipid profile, fasting blood glucose levels and oxidative damage in the livers, kidneys and hearts) taken at the end of study. Mice with genetically determined high BMR assimilated more energy and had higher SPA irrespective of type of diet. H-BMR individuals were characterized by lower dry body fat mass %, better lipid profile and lower fasting blood glucose levels, but higher oxidative damage in the livers and hearts. Genetically determined high BMR may be a protective factor against diet-induced obesity and most of the metabolic syndrome indicators. Elevated spontaneous activity is correlated with high BMR, and constitutes an important factor affecting individual capability to sustain energy balance even under energy dense diets. PMID:28235091

  18. Metabolic risk factors in mice divergently selected for BMR fed high fat and high carb diets.

    PubMed

    Sadowska, Julita; Gębczyński, Andrzej K; Konarzewski, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Factors affecting contribution of spontaneous physical activity (SPA; activity associated with everyday tasks) to energy balance of humans are not well understood, as it is not clear whether low activity is related to dietary habits, precedes obesity or is a result of thereof. In particular, human studies on SPA and basal metabolic rates (BMR, accounting for >50% of human energy budget) and their associations with diet composition, metabolic thrift and obesity are equivocal. To clarify these ambiguities we used a unique animal model-mice selected for divergent BMR rates (the H-BMR and L-BMR line type) presenting a 50% between-line type difference in the primary selected trait. Males of each line type were divided into three groups and fed either a high fat, high carb or a control diet. They then spent 4 months in individual cages under conditions emulating human "sedentary lifestyle", with SPA followed every month and measurements of metabolic risk indicators (body fat mass %, blood lipid profile, fasting blood glucose levels and oxidative damage in the livers, kidneys and hearts) taken at the end of study. Mice with genetically determined high BMR assimilated more energy and had higher SPA irrespective of type of diet. H-BMR individuals were characterized by lower dry body fat mass %, better lipid profile and lower fasting blood glucose levels, but higher oxidative damage in the livers and hearts. Genetically determined high BMR may be a protective factor against diet-induced obesity and most of the metabolic syndrome indicators. Elevated spontaneous activity is correlated with high BMR, and constitutes an important factor affecting individual capability to sustain energy balance even under energy dense diets.

  19. Effects of Gliadin consumption on the Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolic Homeostasis in Mice Fed a High-fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Andersen, Daniel; Roager, Henrik Munch; Bahl, Martin Iain; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos; Kristiansen, Karsten; Radulescu, Ilinca Daria; Sina, Christian; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Brix, Susanne; Hellgren, Lars I.; Licht, Tine Rask

    2017-01-01

    Dietary gluten causes severe disorders like celiac disease in gluten-intolerant humans. However, currently understanding of its impact in tolerant individuals is limited. Our objective was to test whether gliadin, one of the detrimental parts of gluten, would impact the metabolic effects of an obesogenic diet. Mice were fed either a defined high-fat diet (HFD) containing 4% gliadin (n = 20), or a gliadin-free, isocaloric HFD (n = 20) for 23 weeks. Combined analysis of several parameters including insulin resistance, histology of liver and adipose tissue, intestinal microbiota in three gut compartments, gut barrier function, gene expression, urinary metabolites and immune profiles in intestinal, lymphoid, liver and adipose tissues was performed. Mice fed the gliadin-containing HFD displayed higher glycated hemoglobin and higher insulin resistance as evaluated by the homeostasis model assessment, more hepatic lipid accumulation and smaller adipocytes than mice fed the gliadin-free HFD. This was accompanied by alterations in the composition and activity of the gut microbiota, gut barrier function, urine metabolome, and immune phenotypes within liver and adipose tissue. Our results reveal that gliadin disturbs the intestinal environment and affects metabolic homeostasis in obese mice, suggesting a detrimental effect of gluten intake in gluten-tolerant subjects consuming a high-fat diet. PMID:28300220

  20. Oxyresveratrol Supplementation to C57bl/6 Mice Fed with a High-Fat Diet Ameliorates Obesity-Associated Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui Yuan; Tse, Iris Mei Ying; Li, Edmund Tsze Shing; Wang, Mingfu

    2017-01-01

    Oxyresveratrol has been proven effective in inhibiting adipogenesis in a 3T3-L1 cell model. We investigated the preventive effect of oxyresveratrol supplementation on obesity development in high-fat diet-fed mice. Male C57bl/6 mice were randomly subjected to control (5% fat by weight, LF), high-fat (30% fat by weight, HF), and high-fat supplemented with 0.25% and 0.5% oxyresveratrol (OXY1 and OXY2, respectively) diet groups for eight weeks. Oxyresveratrol supplementation effectively alleviated obesity-associated symptoms such as insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and hepatic steatosis in high-fat diet-fed mice. Compared to the high-fat diet group, oxyresveratrol supplementation suppressed expression of glucose-6-phosphatase, sterol regulatory element-binding proteins 1, fatty acid synthase and CCAAT/Enhancer-binding proteins α, and elevated AMP-activated protein kinase (α2-catalytic subunit) level in liver, upregulated insulin-dependent glucose transporter type 4 level in adipose tissue, and increased expression of insulin receptor substrate 1, insulin-dependent glucose transporter type 4, AMP-activated protein kinase α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α, and sirtuin 1 in muscle to regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis in these tissues. This study demonstrated that oxyresveratrol supplementation effectively ameliorated obesity-associated symptoms in high-fat diet-fed mice, presumably attributed to mediating critical regulators involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis in liver, visceral fat, and muscle. PMID:28212343

  1. Thylakoids suppress appetite by increasing cholecystokinin resulting in lower food intake and body weight in high-fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Köhnke, Rickard; Lindqvist, Andreas; Göransson, Nathanael; Emek, Sinan C; Albertsson, Per-Ake; Rehfeld, Jens F; Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    Thylakoids are membranes isolated from plant chloroplasts which have previously been shown to inhibit pancreatic lipase/colipase catalysed hydrolysis of fat in vitro and induce short-term satiety in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to examine if dietary supplementation of thylakoids could affect food intake and body weight during long-term feeding in mice. Female apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were fed a high-fat diet containing 41% of fat by energy with and without thylakoids for 100 days. Mice fed the thylakoid-enriched diet had suppressed food intake, body weight gain and body fat compared with the high-fat fed control mice. Reduced serum glucose, serum triglyceride and serum free fatty acid levels were found in the thylakoid-treated animals. The satiety hormone cholecystokinin was elevated, suggesting this hormone mediates satiety. Leptin levels were reduced, reflecting a decreased fat mass. There was no sign of desensitization in the animals treated with thylakoids. The results suggest that thylakoids are useful to suppress appetite and body weight gain when supplemented to a high-fat food during long-term feeding.

  2. Oxyresveratrol Supplementation to C57bl/6 Mice Fed with a High-Fat Diet Ameliorates Obesity-Associated Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Yuan; Tse, Iris Mei Ying; Li, Edmund Tsze Shing; Wang, Mingfu

    2017-02-16

    Oxyresveratrol has been proven effective in inhibiting adipogenesis in a 3T3-L1 cell model. We investigated the preventive effect of oxyresveratrol supplementation on obesity development in high-fat diet-fed mice. Male C57bl/6 mice were randomly subjected to control (5% fat by weight, LF), high-fat (30% fat by weight, HF), and high-fat supplemented with 0.25% and 0.5% oxyresveratrol (OXY1 and OXY2, respectively) diet groups for eight weeks. Oxyresveratrol supplementation effectively alleviated obesity-associated symptoms such as insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and hepatic steatosis in high-fat diet-fed mice. Compared to the high-fat diet group, oxyresveratrol supplementation suppressed expression of glucose-6-phosphatase, sterol regulatory element-binding proteins 1, fatty acid synthase and CCAAT/Enhancer-binding proteins α, and elevated AMP-activated protein kinase (α2-catalytic subunit) level in liver, upregulated insulin-dependent glucose transporter type 4 level in adipose tissue, and increased expression of insulin receptor substrate 1, insulin-dependent glucose transporter type 4, AMP-activated protein kinase α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α, and sirtuin 1 in muscle to regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis in these tissues. This study demonstrated that oxyresveratrol supplementation effectively ameliorated obesity-associated symptoms in high-fat diet-fed mice, presumably attributed to mediating critical regulators involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis in liver, visceral fat, and muscle.

  3. Accelerated tissue aging and increased oxidative stress in broiler chickens fed allopurinol.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Rathore, D S; Iqbal, M; Shi, X; Van Dyke, K

    2001-06-01

    Uric acid has been hypothesized as being one of the more important antioxidants in limiting the accumulation of glycosylated endproducts in birds. Study 1 was designed to quantitatively manipulate the plasma concentrations of uric acid using hemin and allopurinol while study 2 determined their effects on skin pentosidine, the shear force value of Pectoralis major muscle, plasma glucose, body weight and chemiluminescence monitored oxidative stress in broiler chickens. Hemin was hypothesized to raise uric acid concentrations thereby lowering oxidative stress whereas allopurinol was hypothesized to lower uric acid concentrations and raise measures of oxidative stress. In study 1 feeding allopurinol (10 mg/kg body weight) to 8-week-old broiler chicks (n=50) for 10 days decreased plasma uric acid by 57%. However, hemin (10 mg/kg body weight) increased uric acid concentrations 20%. In study 2, 12-week-old broiler chicks (n=90) were randomly assigned to either an ad libitum (AL) diet or a diet restricted (DR) group. Each group was further divided into three treatments (control, allopurinol or hemin fed). Unexpectedly, hemin did not significantly effect uric acid concentrations but increased (P<0.05) measures of chemiluminescence dependent oxidative stress in both the DR and AL birds probably due to the ability of iron to generate oxygen radicals. Allopurinol lowered concentrations of uric acid and increased (P<0.05) the oxidative stress in the AL birds at week 22, reduced (P<0.05) body weight in both the AL and DR fed birds at 16 and 22 weeks of age, and markedly increased (P<0.001) shear force values of the pectoralis major muscle. Skin pentosidine levels increased (P<0.05) in AL birds fed allopurinol or hemin fed birds, but not in the diet restricted birds at 22 weeks. The significance of these studies is that concentrations of plasma uric acid can be related to measures of oxidative stress, which can be linked to tissue aging.

  4. Oral Resveratrol Prevents Osteoarthritis Progression in C57BL/6J Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hailun; Li, Keyu; Li, Xingyao; Yu, Xiaolu; Wang, Wei; Ding, Lifeng; Liu, Li

    2016-04-20

    The effects of resveratrol on osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis have been demonstrated in vitro and in animal models employing intra-articular injections. However, the potential for oral resveratrol supplements to mediate protective effects on OA have not been examined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the potential anti-OA effects of oral resveratrol on mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). C57BL/6J male mice were fed either a standard diet or a HFD, and a subset of the latter also received varying doses of resveratrol. Twelve weeks later, all of the animals were sacrificed and knee joints were evaluated with histological, immunohistochemical, and TUNEL analyses. Mice that received a HFD had significantly greater body weights than the control mice and also exhibited features consistent with knee OA. The mice that received a HFD in combination with low, intermediate, or high doses of resveratrol were only slightly heavier than the control mice at the end of 12 weeks. Quantitative histological assessments indicated that resveratrol treatment partly recovered joint structure in the mice that received a HFD, while high doses of resveratrol prevented the degradation of type II collagen into C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and retained type II collagen expression in cartilage. Furthermore, TUNEL analyses revealed a reduction in chondrocyte apoptosis in the resveratrol-treated mice compared with the HFD mice. Thus, oral resveratrol appears to exert anti-OA effects in a mouse model of HFD-induced OA, thereby highlighting the potential preventive and therapeutic value of administering resveratrol for obesity-associated OA.

  5. Chronic stress impairs collateral blood flow recovery in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Lassance-Soares, Roberta M; Sood, Subeena; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Jhamnani, Sunny; Aghili, Nima; Nashin, Hajra; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti; Epstein, Stephen E; Burnett, Mary Susan

    2014-11-01

    Chronic stress is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Aging is also associated with vascular dysfunction. We hypothesize that chronic stress accelerates collateral dysfunction in old mice. Mice were subjected to either chronic social defeat (CSD) or chronic cold stress (CCS). The CSD mice were housed in a box inside an aggressor's cage and exposed to the aggressor. The CCS group was placed in iced water. After chronic stress, mice underwent femoral artery ligation (FAL) and flow recovery was measured. For the CSD group, appearance and use scores of the foot and a behavioral test were performed. CSD impaired collateral flow recovery after FAL. Further, stressed mice had greater ischemic damage, impaired foot function, and altered behavior. The CCS mice also showed impaired collateral flow recovery. Chronic stress causes hind limb collateral dysfunction in old mice, a conclusion reinforced by the fact that two types of stress produced similar changes.

  6. Inhibition of Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide Receptor Signaling in Adipose Tissue Reduces Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Joo, Erina; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Fukushima, Toru; Taura, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Kanako; Sankoda, Akiko; Shibue, Kimitaka; Harada, Takanari; Suzuki, Kazuyo; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2017-04-01

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor (GIPR) directly induces energy accumulation in adipose tissue in vitro. However, the importance of the direct effect of GIPR signaling on adipose tissue in vivo remains unclear. In the current study, we generated adipose tissue-specific GIPR knockout (GIPR(adipo-/-)) mice and investigated the direct actions of GIP in adipose tissue. Under high-fat diet (HFD)-fed conditions, GIPR(adipo-/-) mice had significantly lower body weight and lean body mass compared with those in floxed GIPR (GIPR(fl/fl)) mice, although the fat volume was not significantly different between the two groups. Interestingly, insulin resistance, liver weight, and hepatic steatosis were reduced in HFD-fed GIPR(adipo-/-) mice. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine that induces insulin resistance, were reduced in HFD-fed GIPR(adipo-/-) mice compared with those in HFD-fed GIPR(fl/fl) mice. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) signaling is located downstream of the IL-6 receptor and is associated with insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. Expression levels of SOCS3 mRNA were significantly lower in adipose and liver tissues of HFD-fed GIPR(adipo-/-) mice compared with those of HFD-fed GIPR(fl/fl) mice. Thus, GIPR signaling in adipose tissue plays a critical role in HFD-induced insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in vivo, which may involve IL-6 signaling.

  7. Hhip haploinsufficiency sensitizes mice to age-related emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lao, Taotao; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Yun, Jeong; Qiu, Weiliang; Guo, Feng; Huang, Chunfang; Mancini, John Dominic; Gupta, Kushagra; Laucho-Contreras, Maria E; Naing, Zun Zar Chi; Zhang, Li; Perrella, Mark A; Owen, Caroline A; Silverman, Edwin K; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-08-09

    Genetic variants in Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) have consistently been associated with the susceptibility to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary function levels, including the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), in general population samples by genome-wide association studies. However, in vivo evidence connecting Hhip to age-related FEV1 decline and emphysema development is lacking. Herein, using Hhip heterozygous mice (Hhip(+/-)), we observed increased lung compliance and spontaneous emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice starting at 10 mo of age. This increase was preceded by increases in oxidative stress levels in the lungs of Hhip(+/-) vs. Hhip(+/+) mice. To our knowledge, these results provide the first line of evidence that HHIP is involved in maintaining normal lung function and alveolar structures. Interestingly, antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine treatment in mice starting at age of 5 mo improved lung function and prevented emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice, suggesting that N-acetyl cysteine treatment limits the progression of age-related emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice. Therefore, reduced lung function and age-related spontaneous emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice may be caused by increased oxidative stress levels in murine lungs as a result of haploinsufficiency of Hhip.

  8. Comparative analysis of pancreatic changes in aged rats fed life long with sunflower, fish, or olive oils.

    PubMed

    Roche, Enrique; Ramírez-Tortosa, César L; Arribas, María I; Ochoa, Julio J; Sirvent-Belando, José E; Battino, Maurizio; Ramírez-Tortosa, M Carmen; González-Alonso, Adrián; Pérez-López, M Patricia; Quiles, José L

    2014-08-01

    An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. We aimed to study the effect of oil consumption on pancreas histology in order to find aging-related signs. To this end, three groups of rats were fed an isocaloric diet for 2 years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of sacrifice. As a result, the sunflower oil-fed rats presented higher β-cell numbers and twice the insulin content than virgin olive oil-fed animals. In addition, rats fed with fish oil developed acinar fibrosis and macrophage infiltrates in peri-insular regions, compared with counterparts fed with virgin olive oil. Inflammation signs were less prominent in the sunflower group. The obtained data emphasize the importance of dietary fatty acids in determining pancreatic structure.

  9. Polyphenol-Rich Fraction of Ecklonia cava Improves Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in High Fat Diet-Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Choi, Hojung; Yoon, Ji-Young; Lee, In-Young; Seo, Youngwan; Moon, Hong-Seop; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2015-11-12

    Ecklonia cava (E. cava; CA) is an edible brown alga with beneficial effects in diabetes via regulation of various metabolic processes such as lipogenesis, lipolysis, inflammation, and the antioxidant defense system in liver and adipose tissue. We investigated the effect of the polyphenol-rich fraction of E. cava produced from Gijang (G-CA) on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. C57BL6 mice were fed a HFD for six weeks and then the HFD group was administered 300 mg/kg of G-CA extracts by oral intubation for 10 weeks. Body weight, fat mass, and serum biochemical parameters were reduced by G-CA extract treatment. MRI/MRS analysis showed that liver fat and liver volume in HFD-induced obese mice were reduced by G-CA extract treatment. Further, we analyzed hepatic gene expression related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. The mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines and hepatic lipogenesis-related genes were decreased in G-CA-treated HFD mice. The mRNA expression levels of cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase 1 (CYP7A1), the key enzyme in bile acid synthesis, were dramatically increased by G-CA treatment in HFD mice. We suggest that G-CA treatment ameliorated hepatic steatosis by inhibiting inflammation and improving lipid metabolism.

  10. Polyphenol-Rich Fraction of Ecklonia cava Improves Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in High Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Young; Choi, Hojung; Yoon, Ji-Young; Lee, In-Young; Seo, Youngwan; Moon, Hong-Seop; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Ecklonia cava (E. cava; CA) is an edible brown alga with beneficial effects in diabetes via regulation of various metabolic processes such as lipogenesis, lipolysis, inflammation, and the antioxidant defense system in liver and adipose tissue. We investigated the effect of the polyphenol-rich fraction of E. cava produced from Gijang (G-CA) on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. C57BL6 mice were fed a HFD for six weeks and then the HFD group was administered 300 mg/kg of G-CA extracts by oral intubation for 10 weeks. Body weight, fat mass, and serum biochemical parameters were reduced by G-CA extract treatment. MRI/MRS analysis showed that liver fat and liver volume in HFD-induced obese mice were reduced by G-CA extract treatment. Further, we analyzed hepatic gene expression related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. The mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines and hepatic lipogenesis-related genes were decreased in G-CA-treated HFD mice. The mRNA expression levels of cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase 1 (CYP7A1), the key enzyme in bile acid synthesis, were dramatically increased by G-CA treatment in HFD mice. We suggest that G-CA treatment ameliorated hepatic steatosis by inhibiting inflammation and improving lipid metabolism. PMID:26569269

  11. Dietary wolfberry supplementation enhances the protective effect of flu vaccine against influenza challenge in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaogang; Wang, Junpeng; Niu, Xinli; Smith, Donald; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2014-02-01

    Current vaccines for influenza do not fully protect the aged against influenza infection. Although wolfberry (goji berry) has been shown to improve immune response, including enhanced antibody production, after vaccination in the aged, it is not known if this effect would translate to better protection after influenza infection, nor is its underlying mechanism well understood. To address these issues, we conducted a study using a 2 × 2 design in which aged male mice (20-22 mo) were fed a control or a 5% wolfberry diet for 30 d, then immunized with an influenza vaccine or saline (control) on days 31 and 52 of the dietary intervention, and finally challenged with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus. Mice fed wolfberry had higher influenza antibody titers and improved symptoms (less postinfection weight loss) compared with the mice treated by vaccine alone. Furthermore, an in vitro mechanistic study showed that wolfberry supplementation enhanced maturation and activity of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in aged mice, as indicated by phenotypic change in expression of DC activation markers major histocompatibility complex class II, cluster of differentiation (CD) 40, CD80, and CD86, and functional change in DC production of cytokines interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α as well as DC endocytosis. Also, adoptive transfer of wolfberry-treated bone marrow DCs (loaded with ovalbumin(323-339)-peptide) promoted antigen-specific T cell proliferation as well as interleukin-4 and interferon-γ production in CD4(+) T cells. In summary, our data indicate that dietary wolfberry enhances the efficacy of influenza vaccination, resulting in better host protection to prevent subsequent influenza infection; this effect may be partly attributed to improved DC function.

  12. Melatonin improves glucose homeostasis and endothelial vascular function in high-fat diet-fed insulin-resistant mice.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Claudio; Dessen, Pierre; Mathieu, Caroline; Monney, Anita; Bloch, Jonathan; Nicod, Pascal; Scherrer, Urs; Duplain, Hervé

    2009-12-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance represent a problem of utmost clinical significance worldwide. Insulin-resistant states are characterized by the inability of insulin to induce proper signal transduction leading to defective glucose uptake in skeletal muscle tissue and impaired insulin-induced vasodilation. In various pathophysiological models, melatonin interacts with crucial molecules of the insulin signaling pathway, but its effects on glucose homeostasis are not known. In a diet-induced mouse model of insulin resistance and normal chow-fed control mice, we sought to assess the effects of an 8-wk oral treatment with melatonin on insulin and glucose tolerance and to understand underlying mechanisms. In high-fat diet-fed mice, but not in normal chow-fed control mice, melatonin significantly improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, as evidenced by a higher rate of glucose infusion to maintain euglycemia during hyperinsulinemic clamp studies and an attenuated hyperglycemic response to an ip glucose challenge. Regarding underlying mechanisms, we found that melatonin restored insulin-induced vasodilation to skeletal muscle, a major site of glucose utilization. This was due, at least in part, to the improvement of insulin signal transduction in the vasculature, as evidenced by increased insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt and endoethelial nitric oxide synthase in aortas harvested from melatonin-treated high-fat diet-fed mice. In contrast, melatonin had no effect on the ability of insulin to promote glucose uptake in skeletal muscle tissue in vitro. These data demonstrate for the first time that in a diet-induced rodent model of insulin resistance, melatonin improves glucose homeostasis by restoring the vascular action of insulin.

  13. The intestinal microbiota in aged mice is modulated by dietary resistant starch and correlated with improvements in host responses.

    PubMed

    Tachon, Sybille; Zhou, June; Keenan, Michael; Martin, Roy; Marco, Maria L

    2013-02-01

    Dietary interventions might prevent or reverse age-related declines in health through modification of the activity and composition of the intestinal microbiota. As a first step toward more comprehensive evaluations of single dietary components on healthy aging, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was applied to determine the structure of the bacterial communities in the ceca of 20-month-old healthy mice fed energy-controlled diets containing 0, 18, or 36% type 2 resistant starch (RS) from high-amylose maize (HAM-RS2). The cecal microbiota of mice fed a diet depleted in RS and containing the readily digestible carbohydrate amylopectin were dominated by bacteria in the Firmicutes phylum and contained low levels of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. In contrast, mice fed diets containing HAM-RS2 were colonized by higher levels of Bacteroidetes and Bifidobacterium, Akkermansia, and Allobaculum species in proportions that were dependent on the concentration of the dietary fiber. The proportions of Bifidobacterium and Akkermansia were positively correlated with mouse feeding responses, gut weight, and expression levels of proglucagon, the precursor of the gut anti-obesity/diabetic hormone GLP-1. This study showed that aging mice harbor a distinct microbiota, which can be modulated by RS and enriched for bacteria that are associated with improved health.

  14. Chronic Angiotensin-(1-7) Improves Insulin Sensitivity in High-Fat Fed Mice Independent of Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ian M; Otero, Yolanda F; Bracy, Deanna P; Wasserman, David H; Biaggioni, Italo; Arnold, Amy C

    2016-05-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) improves glycemic control in animal models of cardiometabolic syndrome. The tissue-specific sites of action and blood pressure dependence of these metabolic effects, however, remain unclear. We hypothesized that Ang-(1-7) improves insulin sensitivity by enhancing peripheral glucose delivery. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were placed on standard chow or 60% high-fat diet for 11 weeks. Ang-(1-7) (400 ng/kg per minute) or saline was infused subcutaneously during the last 3 weeks of diet, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed at the end of treatment. High-fat fed mice exhibited modest hypertension (systolic blood pressure: 137 ± 3 high fat versus 123 ± 5 mm Hg chow;P=0.001), which was not altered by Ang-(1-7) (141 ± 4 mm Hg;P=0.574). Ang-(1-7) did not alter body weight or fasting glucose and insulin in chow or high-fat fed mice. Ang-(1-7) increased the steady-state glucose infusion rate needed to maintain euglycemia in high-fat fed mice (31 ± 5 Ang-(1-7) versus 16 ± 1 mg/kg per minute vehicle;P=0.017) reflecting increased whole-body insulin sensitivity, with no effect in chow-fed mice. The improved insulin sensitivity in high-fat fed mice was because of an enhanced rate of glucose disappearance (34 ± 5 Ang-(1-7) versus 20 ± 2 mg/kg per minute vehicle;P=0.049). Ang-(1-7) enhanced glucose uptake specifically into skeletal muscle by increasing translocation of glucose transporter 4 to the sarcolemma. Our data suggest that Ang-(1-7) has direct insulin-sensitizing effects on skeletal muscle, independent of changes in blood pressure. These findings provide new insight into mechanisms by which Ang-(1-7) improves insulin action, and provide further support for targeting this peptide in cardiometabolic disease.

  15. Respiratory and sniffing behaviors throughout adulthood and aging in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wesson, Daniel W.; Varga-Wesson, Adrienn G.; Borkowski, Anne H.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    Orienting responses are physiological and active behavioral reactions evoked by novel stimulus perception and are critical for survival. We explored whether odor orienting responses are impacted throughout both adulthood and normal and pathological aging in mice. Novel odor investigation (including duration and bout numbers) and its subsequent habituation as assayed in the odor habituation task were preserved in adult C57BL/6J mice up to 12mo of age with <6% variability between age groups in investigation time. Separately, using whole-body plethysmography we found that both spontaneous respiration and odor-evoked sniffing behaviors were strikingly preserved in wildtype (WT) mice up to 26mo of age. In contrast, mice accumulating amyloid-β protein in the brain by means of overexpressing mutations in the human amyloid precursor protein gene (APP) showed preserved spontaneous respiration up to 12mo, but starting at 14mo showed significant differences from WT. Similar to WTs, odor-evoked sniffing was not impacted in APP mice up to 26mo. These results show that odor-orienting responses are minimally impacted throughout aging in mice, and suggest that the olfactomotor network is mostly spared of insults due to aging. PMID:21524667

  16. Supplementation with the Extract of Schisandrae Fructus Pulp, Seed, or Their Combination Influences the Metabolism of Lipids and Glucose in Mice Fed with Normal and Hypercholesterolemic Diet

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Nan; Zhu, Pei-Li; Jia, Zhan-Hong; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Ko, Kam-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Schisandrae Fructus (SF), which possesses five tastes: sweet (fruit skin), sour (pulp), bitter/pungent (seed core), and saltiness (all parts), can produce a wide spectrum of biological activities in the body. Here, we investigated the effects of the ethanolic extract of SF pulp, seed, or their combination (namely, EtSF-P, EtSF-S, or EtSF-P/S, resp.; collectively called EtSF) on the metabolism of lipids and glucose in normal diet- (ND-) and hypercholesterolemic diet- (HCLD-) fed mice. Supplementation with EtSF significantly reduced hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels by 18–47% in both ND- and HCLD-fed mice. EtSF supplementation reduced serum triglyceride levels (approximately 29%), whereas EtSF-P and EtSF-S/P elevated serum cholesterol (up to 26 and 44%, resp.) in HCLD-fed mice. Treatment with EtSF decreased hepatic glucose levels (by 9–44%) in both ND- and HCLD-fed mice. Supplementation with EtSF-S or EtSF-S/P (at 1 and 3%) increased biliary or fecal TC contents in HCLD-fed mice. However, supplementation with EtSF-S/P at 9% reduced biliary TC levels in HCLD-fed mice. EtSF-P or EtSF-S/P supplementation reduced serum alanine aminotransferase activity in HCLD-fed mice. The findings suggested that supplementation with EtSF lowered lipid and glucose accumulation in the liver and increased fecal cholesterol contents in mice. Dietary supplementation with EtSF-P or EtSF-S/P attenuated liver damage in HCLD-fed mice. PMID:24876871

  17. Preservation of endothelium-dependent relaxation in cholesterol-fed and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by the chronic administration of cholestyramine.

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, K.; Sugiura, M.; Kojima, S.; Kasuya, Y.

    1996-01-01

    1. Experiments were designed to investigate the effects of the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-lowering drugs cholestyramine on serum LDL levels and endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) in cholesterol-fed or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. 2. In aortic rings from control mice, ACh or A23187 caused concentration-dependent relaxation. The relaxations caused by ACh or A23187 were significantly attenuated in aortic rings from cholesterol-fed and STZ-diabetic mice. The attenuated vasodilatation in both cholesterol-fed and diabetic mice was returned to normal by chronic administration of cholestyramine. The endothelium-independent relaxations of aortic rings induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not significantly different between control, cholesterol-fed and STZ-induced diabetic mice. 3. The increased LDL levels in cholesterol-fed and diabetic mice were returned to normal by the chronic administration of cholestyramine. Chronic administration of cholestyramine had no effects on serum glucose levels. 4. These results suggest that attenuated endothelium-dependent vasodilatations in both cholesterol-fed and STZ-diabetic mice are improved by the chronic administration of cholestyramine, and these effects are, at least in part, due to lowering serum LDL levels. PMID:8735642

  18. Dietary Fat and Aging Modulate Apoptotic Signaling in Liver of Calorie-Restricted Mice

    PubMed Central

    López-Domínguez, José Alberto; Khraiwesh, Husam; González-Reyes, José Antonio; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; Ramsey, Jon Jay; de Cabo, Rafael; Burón, María Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Imbalance between proliferation and cell death accounts for several age-linked diseases. Aging, calorie restriction (CR), and fat source are all factors that may influence apoptotic signaling in liver, an organ that plays a central metabolic role in the organism. Here, we have studied the combined effect of these factors on a number of apoptosis regulators and effectors. For this purpose, animals were fed diets containing different fat sources (lard, soybean oil, or fish oil) under CR for 6 or 18 months. An age-linked increase in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was detected with CR, including a decrease in Bcl-2/Bax ratio, an enhanced release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and higher caspase-9 activity. However, these changes were not fully transmitted to the effectors apoptosis-inducing factor and caspase-3. CR (which abated aging-related inflammatory responses) and dietary fat altered the activities of caspases-8, -9, and -3. Apoptotic index (DNA fragmentation) and mean nuclear area were increased in aged animals with the exception of calorie-restricted mice fed a lard-based fat source. These results suggest possible protective changes in hepatic homeostasis with aging in the calorie-restricted lard group. PMID:24691092

  19. Cell suspension culture of Eriobotrya japonica regulates the diabetic and hyperlipidemic signs of high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Ching; Ciou, Jiun-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Wu, Jin-Bin; Ho, Hui-Ya

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigates the anti-hyperlipidemic and antihyperglycemic effects and mechanism in high-fat (HF)-fed mice of cell suspension culture of Eriobotrya japonica (TA), which contains a great number of pentacyclic terpenoids. Firstly, C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two groups: the control (CON) group was fed with a low-fat diet (n = 9), whereas the experimental group was fed a 45% HF diet for 8 weeks. Afterwards, the CON group was treated with vehicle, whereas the HF group was subdivided into five groups and was orally given TA or rosiglitazone or not for 4 weeks. Blood and visceral adipose tissue, liver tissue and skeletal muscle were examined. Treatment with TA reduced body weight gain, weights of white adipose tissue (WAT) (including epididymal, perirenal, mesenteric WAT and visceral fat), and hepatic triacylglycerol content significantly without affecting food intake in diet-induced diabetic mice. TA effectively prevented HF diet-induced increases in the levels of blood glucose, insulin, leptin and HOMA-IR index (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively) and attenuated insulin resistance. Treatment with TA, adipocytes in the visceral depots showed a reduction in size. TA effectively significantly increased the protein contents of phosphorylation of AMPK-α (Thr172) both in liver and adipose tissue. It is shown that TA exhibits hypolipidemic effect in HF-fed mice by decreasing gene expressions of fatty acid synthesis, including acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) 2, which catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of triglycerides, and antidiabetic properties occurred as a result of decreased hepatic glucose production via phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) down- regulation, improved insulin sensitization and TA (at 1.0 g/kg dose) decreased expression of hepatic and adipose 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydroxygenase (11β-HSD1) gene, which contributed in attenuating diabetic state. Futhermore, TA at doses of 0

  20. Actions of incretin metabolites on locomotor activity, cognitive function and in vivo hippocampal synaptic plasticity in high fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Porter, David; Faivre, Emilie; Flatt, Peter R; Hölscher, Christian; Gault, Victor A

    2012-05-01

    The incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) improve markers of cognitive function in obesity-diabetes, however, both are rapidly degraded to their major metabolites, GLP-1(9-36)amide and GIP(3-42), respectively. Therefore, the present study investigated effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide and GIP(3-42) on locomotor activity, cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in mice with diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. High-fat fed Swiss TO mice treated with GLP-1(9-36)amide, GIP(3-42) or exendin(9-39)amide (twice-daily for 60 days) did not exhibit any changes in bodyweight, non-fasting plasma glucose and plasma insulin concentrations or glucose tolerance compared with high-fat saline controls. Similarly, locomotor and feeding activity, O(2) consumption, CO(2) production, respiratory exchange ratio and energy expenditure were not altered by chronic treatment with incretin metabolites. Administration of the truncated metabolites did not alter general behavior in an open field test or learning and memory ability as recorded during an object recognition test. High-fat mice exhibited a significant impairment in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) which was not affected by treatment with incretin metabolites. These data indicate that incretin metabolites do not influence locomotor activity, cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity when administered at pharmacological doses to mice fed a high-fat diet.

  1. Raspberry ketone fails to reduce adiposity beyond decreasing food intake in C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Cotten, Bradley M; Diamond, Stephanie A; Banh, Taylor; Hsiao, Yung-Hsuan; Cole, Rachel M; Li, Jinhui; Simons, Christopher T; Bruno, Richard S; Belury, Martha A; Vodovotz, Yael

    2017-04-05

    As the incidence of obesity continues to increase, identifying novel nutritional therapies to enhance weight loss are needed. Raspberry ketone (RK; 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl) butan-2-one) is a bioactive phytochemical that is marketed as a weight loss supplement in the United States, yet there is scant scientific evidence demonstrating that RK promotes weight loss. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of RK on accumulation of adipose mass, hepatic lipid storage, and levels of plasma adiponectin in mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Mice were individually housed and fed a HF control diet (45% kcal from fat) for two weeks to induce weight gain, then assigned to HF control, high-dose (1.74% wt/wt) raspberry ketone (HRK), low-dose (0.25% wt/wt) raspberry ketone (LRK), or a pair-fed group (PF) fed similar food intake to LRK mice. Following five weeks of feeding, mice fed LRK and HRK diets showed reduced food intake and body weight compared to mice maintained on control diet. When normalized to body weight, mice fed HRK diet exhibited decreased inguinal fat mass and increased liver mass compared to the control group. Hepatic steatosis was lowest in mice fed HRK diet, whereas LRK diet did not have an effect when compared to the PF group. Plasma adiponectin concentration was unaffected by RK and pair-feeding. Our findings demonstrate that RK supplementation has limited benefit to adipose loss beyond reducing energy intake in mice fed a high-fat diet. The present study supports the need for appropriate study design when validating weight-loss supplements.

  2. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products (AGEs) improves glycemic control and decreases adipocyte size in fructose-fed rats by suppressing AGE-RAGE axis.

    PubMed

    Ojima, A; Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Higashimoto, Y; Ueda, S; Fukami, K; Okuda, S; Yamagishi, S

    2015-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) decrease adiponectin expression and suppress insulin signaling in cultured adipocytes through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) via oxidative stress generation. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. This study examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on adipocyte remodeling, AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis, and adiponectin expression in fructose-fed rats. Although AGE-aptamer treatment by an osmotic mini pump for 8 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels, it significantly decreased average fasting blood glucose and had a tendency to inhibit body weight gain in fructose-fed rats. Furthermore, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the increase in adipocyte size and prevented the elevation in AGEs, RAGE, and an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), levels in adipose tissues of fructose-fed rats at 14-week-old, while it restored the decrease in adiponectin mRNA levels. Our present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could improve glycemic control and prevent adipocyte remodeling in fructose-fed rats partly by suppressing the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for fructose-induced metabolic derangements.

  3. Hepatocyte X-box binding protein 1 deficiency increases liver injury in mice fed a high-fat/sugar diet

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Anne S.; LeCuyer, Brian E.; Schipma, Matthew J.; Anderson, Kristy A.; Green, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty liver is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress and activation of the hepatic unfolded protein response (UPR). Reduced hepatic expression of the UPR regulator X-box binding protein 1 spliced (XBP1s) is associated with human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and feeding mice a high-fat diet with fructose/sucrose causes progressive, fibrosing steatohepatitis. This study examines the role of XBP1 in nonalcoholic fatty liver injury and fatty acid-induced cell injury. Hepatocyte-specific Xbp1-deficient (Xbp1−/−) mice were fed a high-fat/sugar (HFS) diet for up to 16 wk. HFS-fed Xbp1−/− mice exhibited higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels compared with Xbp1fl/fl controls. RNA sequencing and Gene Ontogeny pathway analysis of hepatic mRNA revealed that apoptotic process, inflammatory response, and extracellular matrix structural constituent pathways had enhanced activation in HFS-fed Xbp1−/− mice. Liver histology demonstrated enhanced injury and fibrosis but less steatosis in the HFS-fed Xbp1−/− mice. Hepatic Col1a1 and Tgfβ1 gene expression, as well as Chop and phosphorylated JNK (p-JNK), were increased in Xbp1−/− compared with Xbp1fl/fl mice after HFS feeding. In vitro, stable XBP1-knockdown Huh7 cells (Huh7-KD) and scramble control cells (Huh7-SCR) were generated and treated with palmitic acid (PA) for 24 h. PA-treated Huh7-KD cells had increased cytotoxicity measured by lactate dehydrogenase release, apoptotic nuclei, and caspase3/7 activity assays compared with Huh7-SCR cells. CHOP and p-JNK expression was also increased in Huh7-KD cells following PA treatment. In conclusion, loss of XBP1 enhances injury in both in vivo and in vitro models of fatty liver injury. We speculate that hepatic XBP1 plays an important protective role in pathogenesis of NASH. PMID:26472223

  4. Motor Performance is Impaired Following Vestibular Stimulation in Ageing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Victoria W. K.; Burton, Thomas J.; Quail, Stephanie L.; Mathews, Miranda A.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    Balance and maintaining postural equilibrium are important during stationary and dynamic movements to prevent falls, particularly in older adults. While our sense of balance is influenced by vestibular, proprioceptive, and visual information, this study focuses primarily on the vestibular component and its age-related effects on balance. C57Bl/6J mice of ages 1, 5–6, 8–9 and 27–28 months were tested using a combination of standard (such as grip strength and rotarod) and newly-developed behavioral tests (including balance beam and walking trajectory tests with a vestibular stimulus). In the current study, we confirm a decline in fore-limb grip strength and gross motor coordination as age increases. We also show that a vestibular stimulus of low frequency (2–3 Hz) and duration can lead to age-dependent changes in balance beam performance, which was evident by increases in latency to begin walking on the beam as well as the number of times hind-feet slip (FS) from the beam. Furthermore, aged mice (27–28 months) that received continuous access to a running wheel for 4 weeks did not improve when retested. Mice of ages 1, 10, 13 and 27–28 months were also tested for changes in walking trajectory as a result of the vestibular stimulus. While no linear relationship was observed between the changes in trajectory and age, 1-month-old mice were considerably less affected than mice of ages 10, 13 and 27–28 months. Conclusion: this study confirms there are age-related declines in grip strength and gross motor coordination. We also demonstrate age-dependent changes to finer motor abilities as a result of a low frequency and duration vestibular stimulus. These changes showed that while the ability to perform the balance beam task remained intact across all ages tested, behavioral changes in task performance were observed. PMID:26869921

  5. Astaxanthin affects oxidative stress and hyposalivation in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuraji, Manatsu; Matsuno, Tomonori; Satoh, Tazuko

    2016-01-01

    Oral dryness, a serious problem for the aging Japanese society, is induced by aging-related hyposalivation and causes dysphagia, dysgeusia, inadaptation of dentures, and growth of oral Candida albicans. Oxidative stress clearly plays a role in decreasing saliva secretion and treatment with antioxidants such astaxanthin supplements may be beneficial. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of astaxanthin on the oral saliva secretory function of aging mice. The saliva flow increased in astaxanthin-treated mice 72 weeks after administration while that of the control decreased by half. The plasma d-ROMs values of the control but not astaxanthin-treated group measured before and 72 weeks after treatment increased. The diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) value of astaxanthin-treated mice 72 weeks after treatment was significantly lower than that of the control group was. The plasma biological antioxidative potential (BAP) values of the control but not astaxanthin-treated mice before and 72 weeks after treatment decreased. Moreover, the BAP value of the astaxanthin-treated group 72 weeks after treatment was significantly higher than that of the control was. Furthermore, the submandibular glands of astaxanthin-treated mice had fewer inflammatory cells than the control did. Specifically, immunofluorescence revealed a significantly large aquaporin-5 positive cells in astaxanthin-treated mice. Our results suggest that astaxanthin treatment may prevent age-related decreased saliva secretion. PMID:27698533

  6. Absence of cytoglobin promotes multiple organ abnormalities in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Thuy, Le Thi Thanh; Van Thuy, Tuong Thi; Matsumoto, Yoshinari; Hai, Hoang; Ikura, Yoshihiro; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawada, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) was identified in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and pericytes of all organs; however, the effects of Cygb on cellular functions remain unclear. Here, we report spontaneous and age-dependent malformations in multiple organs of Cygb−/− mice. Twenty-six percent of young Cygb−/− mice (<1 year old) showed heart hypertrophy, cystic disease in the kidney or ovary, loss of balance, liver fibrosis and lymphoma. Furthermore, 71.3% (82/115) of aged Cygb−/− mice (1–2 years old) exhibited abnormalities, such as heart hypertrophy and cancer development in multiple organs; by contrast, 5.8% (4/68) of aged wild-type (WT) mice had abnormalities (p < 0.0001). Interestingly, serum and urine analysis demonstrated that the concentration of nitric oxide metabolites increased significantly in Cygb−/− mice, resulting in an imbalance in the oxidative stress and antioxidant defence system that was reversed by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine treatment. A senescent phenotype and evidence of DNA damage were found in primary HSCs and the liver of aged Cygb−/− mice. Moreover, compared with HSC+/+, HSC−/− showed high expression of Il-6 and chemokine mRNA when cocultured with mouse Hepa 1–6 cells. Thus, the absence of Cygb in pericytes provokes organ abnormalities, possibly via derangement of the nitric oxide and antioxidant defence system and through accelerated cellular senescence. PMID:27146058

  7. Hypocholesterolemic metabolism of dietary red pericarp glutinous rice rich in phenolic compounds in mice fed a high cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Mi; Kim, Eun-Hye; Chung, Ill-Min

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of red pericarp glutinous rice rich in polyphenols (Jakwangchalbyeo, red rice) on serum and hepatic levels of cholesterol and hepatic protein expression linked to synthesis and degradation of cholesterol in a hypercholesterolemic mice diet as compared with brown rice. MATERIALS/METHODS C57BL/6 male mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 5 each), which were fed different diets for a period of 12 weeks: American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-93G diet, AIN-93G diet with 2% cholesterol, brown rice with 2% cholesterol, or red rice with 2% cholesterol. RESULT Consumption of red rice resulted in a significant decrease in serum level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and hepatic levels of triglyceride and total-cholesterol. Expression of acyl-coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT-2), sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2), and 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase was decreased, while expression of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (p-AMPK)/AMPK ratio, cholesterol 7-α-hydroxylase (CYP7a1), and sterol 12-α-hydroxylase (CYP8b1) was increased in mice fed red rice. Brown rice had similar effects on cholesterol metabolism, but the effect of red rice was significantly greater than that of brown rice. CONCLUSIONS The current study suggested that red rice had a hypocholesterolemic effect by lowering hepatic cholesterol synthesis through ACAT-2, HMG-CoA reductase, and SREBP-2, and by enhancing hepatic cholesterol degradation through CYP7a1 and CYP8b1 in mice fed a hypercholesterolemic diet. PMID:25489402

  8. Melatonin improves age-induced fertility decline and attenuates ovarian mitochondrial oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chao; Peng, Wei; Yin, Songna; Zhao, Jiamin; Fu, Beibei; Zhang, Jingcheng; Mao, Tingchao; Wu, Haibo; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that melatonin protected against age-related mitochondrial oxidative damage. However, the protective effects of melatonin against ovarian aging has not been explored. Young Kunming females (aged 2–3 months) were fed with melatonin added to drinking water for 6 or 12 months (mo). We found that long-term (12 mo) melatonin treatment significantly reduced ovarian aging, as indicated by substantial increases in litter size, pool of follicles, and telomere length as well as oocyte quantity and quality. Melatonin treatment suppressed ovarian mitochondrial oxidative damage by decreasing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) generation, inhibiting apoptosis, repressing collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and preserving respiratory chain complex activities. Female mice fed with melatonin had enhanced mitochondrial antioxidant activities, thus reducing the risk of mitochondrial oxidative damage cause by free radicals. Notably, melatonin treatment enhanced SIRT3 activity but not the protein expression level, and increased the binding affinity of FoxO3a to the promoters of both superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase (CAT). In conclusion, melatonin exerted protection against aging-induced fertility decline and maintenance of mitochondrial redox balance. PMID:27731402

  9. Transcriptome analysis of the effects of chitosan on the hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress in high-fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Sicong; Wang, Xiaoya; Yang, Shuo; Jiang, Qixing; Xu, Yanshun; Xia, Wenshui

    2017-04-03

    Transcriptome analysis was performed to investigate the alterations in gene expression after chitosan (CS) treatment on the liver of mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD). The results showed that the body weight, the liver weight and the epididymal fat mass of HFD mice, which were 62.98%, 46.51% and 239.37%, respectively, higher than those of control mice, could be significantly decreased by chitosan supplementation. Also, high-fat diet increased both plasma lipid and liver lipid as compared with the control mice. Chitosan supplementation decreased the plasma lipid and liver lipid, increased the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL) activity, increased T-AOC and decreased MDA in the liver and the epididymis adipose as compared with the HFD mice. Transcriptome analysis indicated that increased Mups, Lcn2, Gstm3 and CYP2E1 expressions clearly indicated HFD induced lipid metabolism disorder and oxidative damage. Especially, chitosan treatment decreased the Mup17 and Lcn2 expressions by 64.32% and 82.43% respectively as compared with those of HFD mice. These results indicated that chitosan possess the ability to improve the impairment of lipid metabolism as strongly associated with increased Mups expressions and gene expressions related to oxidative stress.

  10. Changes in the small intestine of Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Alencar, Alba Cristina Miranda de Barros; Neves, Renata Heisler; de Oliveira, Albanita Viana; Machado-Silva, José Roberto

    2012-05-01

    The consumption of a high-fat diet modifies both the morphology of the small intestine and experimentally tested effects of schistosomiasis mansoni. However, whether a schistosomiasis infection associated with a high-fat diet causes injury to the small intestine has never been investigated. Mice were fed either a high-fat or a standard-fat diet for 6 months and were then infected with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. Physical characteristics of the intestinal tissue (mucosal thickness, small intestinal villi length and height, and abundance of goblet cells and enterocytes on the villous surface) and the distribution of granulomas along the intestinal segments and their developmental stage were measured at the time of sacrifice (9 or 17 weeks post-infection). The group fed a high-fat diet exhibited different granuloma stages, whereas the control group possessed only exudative granulomas. The chronically infected mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited higher granuloma and egg numbers than the acutely infected group. Exudative, exudative/exudative-productive and exudative-productive granulomas were present irrespective of diet. Computer-aided morphometric analysis confirmed that villus length, villus width, muscular height and submucosal height of the duodenal and jejunal segments were affected by diet and infection. In conclusion, a high-fat diet and infection had a significant impact on the small intestine morphology and morphometry among the animals tested.

  11. The major green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, inhibits obesity, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver disease in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Bose, Mousumi; Lambert, Joshua D; Ju, Jihyeung; Reuhl, Kenneth R; Shapses, Sue A; Yang, Chung S

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of the major green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), on high-fat-induced obesity, symptoms of the metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver in mice. In mice fed a high-fat diet (60% energy as fat), supplementation with dietary EGCG treatment (3.2 g/kg diet) for 16 wk reduced body weight (BW) gain, percent body fat, and visceral fat weight (P < 0.05) compared with mice without EGCG treatment. The BW decrease was associated with increased fecal lipids in the high-fat-fed groups (r(2) = 0.521; P < 0.05). EGCG treatment attenuated insulin resistance, plasma cholesterol, and monocyte chemoattractant protein concentrations in high-fat-fed mice (P < 0.05). EGCG treatment also decreased liver weight, liver triglycerides, and plasma alanine aminotransferase concentrations in high-fat-fed mice (P < 0.05). Histological analyses of liver samples revealed decreased lipid accumulation in hepatocytes in mice treated with EGCG compared with high-fat diet-fed mice without EGCG treatment. In another experiment, 3-mo-old high-fat-induced obese mice receiving short-term EGCG treatment (3.2 g/kg diet, 4 wk) had decreased mesenteric fat weight and blood glucose compared with high-fat-fed control mice (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that long-term EGCG treatment attenuated the development of obesity, symptoms associated with the metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver. Short-term EGCG treatment appeared to reverse preexisting high-fat-induced metabolic pathologies in obese mice. These effects may be mediated by decreased lipid absorption, decreased inflammation, and other mechanisms.

  12. Improved muscle function and quality after diet intervention with leucine-enriched whey and antioxidants in antioxidant deficient aged mice

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Miriam; Dijk, Francina J.; Bunschoten, Annelies; van Dartel, Dorien A.M.; van Norren, Klaske; Walrand, Stephane; Jourdan, Marion; Verlaan, Sjors; Luiking, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant (AOX) deficiencies are commonly observed in older adults and oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to sarcopenia. Here we investigate if 1) low levels of dietary antioxidants had a negative impact on parameters of muscle mass, function and quality, and 2) to study if nutritional interventions with AOX and/or leucine-enriched whey protein could improve these muscle parameters in aged mice. 18-months-old mice were fed a casein-based antioxidant-deficient (lowox) diet or a casein-based control-diet (CTRL) for 7 months. During the last 3 months, lowox-mice were subjected to either: a) continued lowox, b) supplementation with vitamin A/E, Selenium and Zinc (AOX), c) substitution of casein with leucine-enriched whey protein (PROT) or d) a combination of both AOX and PROT (TOTAL). After 7 months lowox-mice displayed lower muscle strength and more muscle fatigue compared to CTRL. Compared to lowox-mice, PROT-mice showed improved muscle power, grip strength and less muscle fatigue. AOX-mice showed improved oxidative status, less muscle fatigue, improved grip strength and mitochondrial dynamics compared to lowox-mice. The TOTAL-mice showed the combined effects of both interventions compared to lowox-mice. In conclusion, nutritional intervention with AOX and/or leucine-enriched whey protein can play a role in improving muscle health in a AOX-deficient mouse model. PMID:26943770

  13. Oleanolic acid, a natural triterpenoid improves blood glucose tolerance in normal mice and ameliorates visceral obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Célio L; Queiroz, Maria Goretti R; Fonseca, Said G C; Bizerra, Ayla M C; Lemos, Telma L G; Melo, Tiago S; Santos, Flavia A; Rao, Vietla S

    2010-04-15

    Excess visceral adiposity may predispose to chronic diseases like hypertension and type 2 diabetes with a high risk for coronary artery disease. Adipose tissue secreted cytokines and oxidative stress play an important role in chronic disease progression. To combat adiposity, plant-derived triterpenes are currently receiving much attention as they possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and the ability to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. In the search for potential antiobese compounds from natural sources, this study evaluated the effects of oleanolic acid (OA), a pentacyclic triterpene commonly present in fruits and vegetables, in glucose tolerance test and on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice. Adult male Swiss mice treated or not with OA (10 mg/kg) were fed a HFD during 15 weeks. Sibutramine (SIB) treated group (10 mg/kg) was included for comparison. Weekly body weights, food and water consumption were measured, and at the end of study period, the levels of blood glucose and lipids, plasma hormone levels of insulin, ghrelin and leptin, and the visceral abdominal fat content were analysed. Mice treated with OA and fed a HFD showed significantly (p<0.05) improved glucose tolerance, decreased body weights, visceral adiposity, blood glucose, plasma lipids relative to their respective controls fed no OA. Additionally, OA treatment, while significantly elevating the plasma hormone level of leptin, decreased the level of ghrelin. However, it caused a greater decrease in plasma amylase activity than lipase. Sibutramine-treated group also manifested similar effects like OA except for blood glucose level that was not different from HFD control. These findings suggest that OA ameliorates visceral adiposity and improves glucose tolerance in mice and thus has an antiobese potential through modulation of carbohydrate and fat metabolism.

  14. Effect of Erabu sea snake (Laticauda semifasciata) lipids on the swimming endurance of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guihua; Shirai, Nobuya; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Hiramitsu; Shimizu, Eiji

    2007-12-01

    The effect of Erabu sea snake (Laticauda semifasciata) lipids on the swimming endurance was investigated in aged mice. Fifty three-week-old male Crlj:CD-1 (ICR) mice were fed one of three experimental diets containing either 6% lard, 6% fish oil, or 6% sea snake lipids for 16 wk. The swimming exercise was carried out in an acrylic plastic tank filled with 25 cm of water maintained at 23(o)C. Swimming times to exhaustion were measured with a load of 2% of their body weights attached to the tails of the mice. The swimming times to exhaustion of the group that were fed the sea snake lipid diet tended to be longer than those of the lard diet group, and were significantly improved compared with the fish oil diet group (p<0.05). The plasma and muscle lactate levels were significantly lower in the sea snake lipid diet group than in the lard and fish oil diet groups (p<0.05). The liver glycogen and plasma glucose levels of the sea snake lipid diet group did not differ markedly from those of the lard diet group (p>0.05), and were significantly higher than those of the fish oil diet group (p<0.05). These results suggest that an intake of sea snake lipids but not the fish oil, which is also rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), is useful for improving the swimming endurance of aged mice by attenuating lactate production and/or enhancing lactate clearance during swimming exercise, and the n-3 PUFAs contained in the sea snake lipids did little or nothing for this improved endurance.

  15. Disruption of Protein Kinase A in Mice Enhances Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Enns, Linda C.; Morton, John F.; Treuting, Piper R.; Emond, Mary J.; Wolf, Norman S.; McKnight, G. S.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Ladiges, Warren C.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations that cause a reduction in protein kinase A (PKA) activity have been shown to extend lifespan in yeast. Loss of function of mammalian RIIβ, a regulatory subunit of PKA expressed in brain and adipose tissue, results in mice that are lean and insulin sensitive. It was therefore hypothesized that RIIB null (RIIβ−/−) mice would express anti-aging phenotypes. We conducted lifespan studies using 40 mutant and 40 wild type (WT) littermates of equal gender numbers and found that both the median and maximum lifespans were significantly increased in mutant males compared to WT littermates. The median lifespan was increased from 884 days to 1005 days (p = 0.006 as determined by the log rank test) and the 80% lifespan (defined here as 80% deaths) was increased from 941 days to 1073 days (p = 0.004 as determined by the Wang-Allison test). There was no difference in either median or 80% lifespan in female genotypes. WT mice of both genders became increasingly obese with age, while mutant mice maintained their lean phenotype into old age. Adiposity was found to correlate with lifespan for males only. 50% of male mice between 30 and 35 g, corresponding to about 5% body fat, for either genotype lived over 1000 days. No male mouse outside of this weight range achieved this lifespan. During their last month of life, WT mice began losing weight (a total of 8% and 15% of body weight was lost for males and females, respectively), but RIIβ−/− male mice maintained their lean body mass to end of life. This attenuation of decline was not seen in female mutant mice. Old male mutant mice were insulin sensitive throughout their life. Both genders showed modestly lower blood glucose levels in old mutants compared to WT. Male mutants were also resistant to age-induced fatty liver. Pathological assessment of tissues from end of life male mutant mice showed a decrease in tumor incidence, decreased severity of renal lesions, and a trend towards a decrease in age

  16. Running reduces stress and enhances cell genesis in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Kannangara, Timal S; Lucero, Melanie J; Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Drapala, Robert J; Simpson, Jessica M; Christie, Brian R; van Praag, Henriette

    2011-12-01

    Cell proliferation and neurogenesis are diminished in the aging mouse dentate gyrus. However, it is not known whether isolated or social living affects cell genesis and stress levels in old animals. To address this question, aged (17-18 months old) female C57Bl/6 mice were single or group housed, under sedentary or running conditions. We demonstrate that both individual and socially housed aged C57Bl/6 mice have comparable basal cell proliferation levels and demonstrate increased running-induced cell genesis. To assess stress levels in young and aged mice, corticosterone (CORT) was measured at the onset of the active/dark cycle and 4h later. In young mice, no differences in CORT levels were observed as a result of physical activity or housing conditions. However, a significant increase in stress in socially housed, aged sedentary animals was observed at the onset of the dark cycle; CORT returned to basal levels 4h later. Together, these results indicate that voluntary exercise reduces stress in group housed aged animals and enhances hippocampal cell proliferation.

  17. Exposure to excess insulin (glargine) induces type 2 diabetes mellitus in mice fed on a chow diet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Gu, Haihua; Guo, Huailan; Zha, Longying; Cai, Junwei; Li, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi; Cao, Wenhong

    2014-06-01

    We have previously shown that insulin plays an important role in the nutrient-induced insulin resistance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic exposure to excess long-acting insulin (glargine) can cause typical type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in normal mice fed on a chow diet. C57BL/6 mice were treated with glargine once a day for 8 weeks, followed by evaluations of food intake, body weight, blood levels of glucose, insulin, lipids, and cytokines, insulin signaling, histology of pancreas, ectopic fat accumulation, oxidative stress level, and cholesterol content in mitochondria in tissues. Cholesterol content in mitochondria and its association with oxidative stress in cultured hepatocytes and β-cells were also examined. Results show that chronic exposure to glargine caused insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and relative insulin deficiency (T2DM). Treatment with excess glargine led to loss of pancreatic islets, ectopic fat accumulation in liver, oxidative stress in liver and pancreas, and increased cholesterol content in mitochondria of liver and pancreas. Prolonged exposure of cultured primary hepatocytes and HIT-TI5 β-cells to insulin induced oxidative stress in a cholesterol synthesis-dependent manner. Together, our results show that chronic exposure to excess insulin can induce typical T2DM in normal mice fed on a chow diet.

  18. Transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ and mtDNA mutator mice, but not aged mice, share the same spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mito, Takayuki; Ishizaki, Hikari; Suzuki, Michiko; Morishima, Hitomi; Ota, Azusa; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Maeno, Akiteru; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-24

    The spectra of phenotypes associated with aging and mitochondrial diseases sometimes appear to overlap with each other. We used aged mice and a mouse model of mitochondrial diseases (transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ with deleted mtDNA) to study whether premature aging phenotypes observed in mtDNA mutator mice are associated with aging or mitochondrial diseases. Here, we provide convincing evidence that all the mice examined had musculoskeletal disorders of osteoporosis and muscle atrophy, which correspond to phenotypes prevalently observed in the elderly. However, precise investigation of musculoskeletal disorders revealed that the spectra of osteoporosis and muscle atrophy phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice were very close to those in mito-miceΔ, but different from those of aged mice. Therefore, mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, but not aged mice, share the spectra of musculoskeletal disorders.

  19. Intermittent access to liquid sucrose differentially modulates energy intake and related central pathways in control or high-fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Soto, Marion; Chaumontet, Catherine; Even, Patrick C; Nadkarni, Nachiket; Piedcoq, Julien; Darcel, Nicolas; Tomé, Daniel; Fromentin, Gilles

    2015-03-01

    Intake of sodas has been shown to increase energy intake and to contribute to obesity in humans and in animal models, although the magnitude and importance of these effects are still debated. Moreover, intake of sugar sweetened beverages is often associated with high-fat food consumption in humans. We studied two different accesses to a sucrose-sweetened water (SSW, 12.3%, a concentration similar to that usually found in sugar sweetened beverages) in C57BL/6 mice fed a normal-fat (NF) or a high-fat (HF) diet in a scheduled access (7.5h). NF-fed and HF-fed mice received during 5weeks access to water, to SSW continuously for 7.5h (SSW), or to water plus SSW for 2h (randomly-chosen time slot for only 5 random days/week) (SSW-2h). Mouse preference for SSW was greater in HF-fed mice than NF-fed mice. Continuous SSW access induced weight gain whatever the diet and led to greater caloric intake than mice drinking water in NF-fed mice and in the first three weeks in HF-fed mice. In HF-fed mice, 2h-intermittent access to SSW induced a greater body weight gain than mice drinking water, and led to hyperphagia on the HF diet when SSW was accessible compared to days without SSW 2h-access (leading to greater overall caloric intake), possibly through inactivation of the anorexigenic neuropeptide POMC in the hypothalamus. This was not observed in NF-fed mice, but 2h-intermittent access to SSW stimulated the expression of dopamine, opioid and endocannabinoid receptors in the nucleus accumbens compared to water-access. In conclusion, in mice, a sucrose solution provided 2h-intermittently and a high-fat diet have combined effects on peripheral and central homeostatic systems involved in food intake regulation, a finding which has significant implications for human obesity.

  20. Metabolomic and genomic profiling of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid effects on muscle metabolism in mice fed a high fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported that feeding mice high-fat (HF) diets enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreased inflammation, adiposity and insulin resistance. In the current study, we used skeletal muscle from mice fed HF or HF-EPA for 11 weeks to further dissect mechanisms mediating EPA effects o...

  1. Propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist, attenuates the decrease in trabecular bone mass in high calorie diet fed growing mice.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyunghwa; Hwang, Hyo Rin; Park, Hyun-Jung; Kwon, Arang; Qadir, Abdul S; Baek, Jeong-Hwa

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the effects of high calorie and low calorie diets on skeletal integrity, and whether β-adrenergic blockade (BB) attenuates bone loss induced by dietary calorie alteration. Male 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were assigned to either an ad-lib fed control diet (CON), a high calorie diet (HIGH), or a low calorie diet (LOW) group. In each diet group, mice were treated with either vehicle (VEH) or propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist. Over 12-weeks, β-blockade mitigated body weight and fat mass increases induced by the high calorie diet. Femoral trabecular bone mineral density and the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes in bone marrow cells were reduced in HIGHVEH and LOWVEH mice, and BB significantly attenuated this decline only in HIGH mice. In summary, the magnitude of bone loss induced by low calorie diet was greater than that caused by high calorie diet in growing mice, and β-blockade mitigated high calorie diet-induced bone loss.

  2. Coumarin attenuates hepatic steatosis by down-regulating lipogenic gene expression in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Um, Min Young; Moon, Mi Kyeong; Ahn, Jiyun; Youl Ha, Tae

    2013-05-01

    Coumarin is a natural compound abundant in plant-based foods such as citrus fruits, tomatoes, vegetables and green tea. Although coumarin has been reported to exhibit anti-coagulant, anti-inflammation and cholesterol-lowering properties, the effect of coumarin on hepatic lipid metabolism remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of coumarin to protect against hepatic steatosis associated with a high-fat diet (HFD) and investigated potential mechanisms underlying this effect. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet, HFD and HFD containing 0·05 % courmarin for 8 weeks. The present results showed that coumarin reduced weight gain and abdominal fat mass in mice fed the HFD for 8 weeks (P< 0·05). Coumarin also significantly reduced the HFD-induced elevation in total cholesterol, apoB, leptin and insulin (P< 0·05). In the liver of HFD-fed mice, coumarin significantly reduced total lipids, TAG and cholesterol (38, 22 and 9 % reductions, respectively; P< 0·05), as well as lipid droplet number and size. Additionally, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels, as an indicator of hepatic steatosis, were attenuated by coumarin (P< 0·05). Finally, coumarin suppressed the HFD-induced up-regulation in fatty acid synthase (FAS) activity, and the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1, FAS, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1, PPARγ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α in the liver. Taken together, these results demonstrate that coumarin could prevent HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by regulating lipogenic gene expression, suggesting potential targets for preventing hepatic steatosis.

  3. Morphoquantitative analysis of the Ileum of C57BL/6 mice (Mus musculus) fed with a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Javiera; Vásquez, Bélgica; del Sol, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increase in overweight and obesity in humans, various studies have been conducted in recent years that demonstrate the detrimental effects on tissues and organs. The aim of this study was to assess the morphoquantitative changes produced in the ileum of mice, associated with high-fat diets. Fourteen male C57BL/6 mice, 5 months old, were fed two types of diets for 14 weeks. The control group (C) was fed a standard diet (10% fat, AIN-93M) and the experimental group (E) was fed a high-fat diet (42% fat, AIN-93M-AG). The assessments included: body weight, calorie consumption, food efficiency, biochemical analysis of plasma lipids, diameter, total wall thickness, thickness of the tunica mucosa and tunica muscularis, length and width of the intestinal villi, depth of the intestinal crypts and number of goblet cells per mm-2 (NA). For the statistical analysis the Student’s t-test was used, considering a P value less than 0.05. The mice in the E group presented greater weight gain (P = 0.028), higher levels of total and LDL cholesterol (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01, respectively), and length of the intestinal villi (P = 0.000). The width of the intestinal villi and the NA of PAS-positive goblet cells presented significantly lower values (P = 0.037 and P = 0.039, respectively) than the C group. The observed changes could be related to the higher demand for fat absorption and to possible alterations in the intestinal microflora and inflammation by action of high-fat diets. PMID:26823788

  4. Improved Endothelial Dysfunction by Cynanchum wilfordii in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice Fed a High Fat/Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Deok Ho; Lee, Yun Jung; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Cui, Ying Lan; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cynanchum wilfordii is used in traditional Chinese medicine with almost all parts of this plant considered beneficial for various vascular diseases. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of an ethanol extract of C. wilfordii (ECW) on vascular dysfunction in apolipoprotein E (apoE)−/− mice fed with high fat/cholesterol diets (HFCDs). The apoE−/− mice were fed HFCD consisting of 7.5% cocoa butter and 1.25% cholesterol, with or without 100 or 200 mg/day/kg ECW. Chronic ECW treatment significantly lessened the level of low-density lipoprotein (P<.05) and elevated that of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P<.01). Chronic ECW treatment normalized the HFCD-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, maintained smooth and soft intimal endothelial layers, and decreased intima-media thickness in aortic sections of HFCD-fed apoE−/− mice. ECW significantly restored the diet-induced decrease in vasorelaxation response to acetylcholine; however, the response to sodium nitroprusside did not change. ECW clearly restored the HFCD-induced reduction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression levels in aortic tissue, leading to decreased vascular inflammation through an inhibition of cellular adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 as well as endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression. In conclusion, ECW ameliorates endothelial dysfunction via improvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling pathway in a diet/genetic model of hyperlipidemia. ECW also substantially inhibited the development of atherosclerosis, possibly by inhibiting ET-1, cell adhesion molecules, and lesion formation, suggesting a vascular protective role for this herb in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22082065

  5. Inhibition of ileal bile acid uptake protects against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Rao, Anuradha; Kosters, Astrid; Mells, Jamie E; Zhang, Wujuan; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Amanso, Angelica M; Wynn, Grace M; Xu, Tianlei; Keller, Brad T; Yin, Hong; Banton, Sophia; Jones, Dean P; Wu, Hao; Dawson, Paul A; Karpen, Saul J

    2016-09-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the Western world, and safe and effective therapies are needed. Bile acids (BAs) and their receptors [including the nuclear receptor for BAs, farnesoid X receptor (FXR)] play integral roles in regulating whole-body metabolism and hepatic lipid homeostasis. We hypothesized that interruption of the enterohepatic BA circulation using a luminally restricted apical sodium-dependent BA transporter (ASBT) inhibitor (ASBTi; SC-435) would modify signaling in the gut-liver axis and reduce steatohepatitis in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Administration of this ASBTi increased fecal BA excretion and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of BA synthesis genes in liver and reduced mRNA expression of ileal BA-responsive genes, including the negative feedback regulator of BA synthesis, fibroblast growth factor 15. ASBT inhibition resulted in a marked shift in hepatic BA composition, with a reduction in hydrophilic, FXR antagonistic species and an increase in FXR agonistic BAs. ASBT inhibition restored glucose tolerance, reduced hepatic triglyceride and total cholesterol concentrations, and improved NAFLD activity score in HFD-fed mice. These changes were associated with reduced hepatic expression of lipid synthesis genes (including liver X receptor target genes) and normalized expression of the central lipogenic transcription factor, Srebp1c Accumulation of hepatic lipids and SREBP1 protein were markedly reduced in HFD-fed Asbt(-/-) mice, providing genetic evidence for a protective role mediated by interruption of the enterohepatic BA circulation. Together, these studies suggest that blocking ASBT function with a luminally restricted inhibitor can improve both hepatic and whole body aspects of NAFLD.

  6. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shireesh; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, M. Todd; Baxa, Ulrich; Tam, Joseph; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Clarke, Kieran; Veech, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    We measured the effects of a diet in which d-β-hydroxybutyrate-(R)-1,3 butanediol monoester [ketone ester (KE)] replaced equicaloric amounts of carbohydrate on 8-wk-old male C57BL/6J mice. Diets contained equal amounts of fat, protein, and micronutrients. The KE group was fed ad libitum, whereas the control (Ctrl) mice were pair-fed to the KE group. Blood d-β-hydroxybutyrate levels in the KE group were 3-5 times those reported with high-fat ketogenic diets. Voluntary food intake was reduced dose dependently with the KE diet. Feeding the KE diet for up to 1 mo increased the number of mitochondria and doubled the electron transport chain proteins, uncoupling protein 1, and mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in IBAT of the KE group was twice that in IBAT of the Ctrl group. Plasma leptin levels of the KE group were more than 2-fold those of the Ctrl group and were associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activity to IBAT. The KE group exhibited 14% greater resting energy expenditure, but the total energy expenditure measured over a 24-h period or body weights was not different. The quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index was 73% higher in the KE group. These results identify KE as a potential antiobesity supplement.—Srivastava, S., Kashiwaya, Y., King, M. T. Baxa, U., Tam, J., Niu, G., Chen, X., Clarke, K., Veech, R. L. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet. PMID:22362892

  7. Accelerated retinal aging in PACAP knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Kovács-Valasek, Andrea; Szabadfi, Krisztina; Dénes, Viktória; Szalontai, Bálint; Tamás, Andrea; Kiss, Péter; Szabó, Aliz; Setalo, Gyorgy; Reglődi, Dóra; Gábriel, Robert

    2017-02-13

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurotrophic and neuroprotective peptide. PACAP and its receptors are widely distributed in the retina. A number of reports provided evidence that PACAP is neuroprotective in retinal degenerations. The current study compared retina cell type-specific differences in young (3-4months) and aged adults (14-16months), of wild-type (WT) mice and knock-out (KO) mice lacking endogenous PACAP production during the course of aging. Histological, immunocytochemical and Western blot examinations were performed. The staining for standard neurochemical markers (tyrosine hydroxylase for dopaminergic cells, calbindin 28 kDa for horizontal cells, protein kinase Cα for rod bipolar cells) of young adult PACAP KO retinas showed no substantial alterations compared to young adult WT retinas, except for the specific PACAP receptor (PAC1-R) staining. We could not detect PAC1-R immunoreactivity in bipolar and horizontal cells in young adult PACAP KO animals. Some other age-related changes were observed only in the PACAP KO mice only. These alterations included horizontal and rod bipolar cell dendritic sprouting into the photoreceptor layer and decreased ganglion cell number. Also, Müller glial cells showed elevated GFAP expression compared to the aging WT retinas. Furthermore, Western blot analyses revealed significant differences between the phosphorylation state of ERK1/2 and JNK in KO mice, indicating alterations in the MAPK signaling pathway. These results support the conclusion that endogenous PACAP contributes to protection against aging of the nervous system.

  8. Actions of exendin-4 therapy on cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Gault, V A; Porter, W D; Flatt, P R; Hölscher, C

    2010-08-01

    High-calorie diet has been shown to impair learning ability and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rodents. This study examined effects of daily treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 mimetic, exendin-4, on cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in a model of diet-induced obesity, which exhibits compromised cognitive performance. Mice fed a high-fat diet were treated with exendin-4 (25 nmol kg(-1) bodyweight; twice daily) or saline vehicle (0.9% (w/v) NaCl) over 21 days. In addition to improving metabolic control, exendin-4-treated mice exhibited a marked increase in recognition index highlighting improved learning and memory. High-fat diet resulted in the elimination of in vivo electrophysiological long-term potentiation, which was rescued following exendin-4 treatment. This study shows that exendin-4 therapy improves cognitive function and ameliorates impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity in dietary-induced obesity.

  9. Reduction of intestinal polyp formation in min mice fed a high-fat diet with aloe vera gel extract.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Takeshi; Shimpo, Kan; Beppu, Hidehiko; Tomatsu, Akiko; Kaneko, Takaaki; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yamada, Muneo; Abe, Fumiaki; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera gel supercritical CO2 extract (AVGE) has been shown to contain five phytosterols, reduce visceral fat accumulation, and influence the metabolism of glucose and lipids in animal model experiments. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that obesity is an established risk factor for several cancers including colorectal cancer. Therefore, we examined the effects of AVGE on intestinal polyp formation in Apc-deficient Min mice fed a high-fat diet. Male Min mice were divided into normal diet (ND), high fat diet (HFD), low dose AVGE (HFD+LAVGE) and high dose AVGE (HFD+HAVGE) groups. The ND group received AIN-93G diet and the latter 3 groups were given modified high-fat AIN-93G diet (HFD) for 7 weeks. AVGE was suspended in 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and administered orally to mice in HFD+LAVGE and HFD+HAVGE groups every day (except on Sunday) for 7 weeks at a dose of 3.75 and 12.5 mg/kg body weight, respectively. ND and HFD groups received 0.5% CMC alone. Between weeks 4 and 7, body weights in the HFD and HFD+LAVGE groups were reduced more than those in the ND group. However, body weights were not reduced in the HFD+HAVGE group. Mice were sacrificed at the end of the experiment and their intestines were scored for polyps. No significant differences were observed in either the incidence and multiplicity of intestinal polyps (≥0.5 mm in a diameter) among the three groups fed HFD. However, when intestinal polyps were categorized by their size into 0.5-1.4, 1.5-2.4, or ≥2.5 mm, the incidence and multiplicity of large polyps (≥2.5 mm) in the intestine in the HFD+HAVGE group were significantly lower than those in the HFD group. We measured plasma lipid (triglycerides and total cholesterol) and adipocytokine [interleukin-6 and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin] levels as possible indicators of mechanisms of inhibition. The results showed that HMW adiponectin levels in the HFD group were significantly lower than those in the ND group. However, the

  10. Age-related deterioration of rod vision in mice.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Fan, Jie; Crouch, Rosalie K; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2010-08-18

    Even in healthy individuals, aging leads to deterioration in visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual field, and dark adaptation. Little is known about the neural mechanisms that drive the age-related changes of the retina and, more specifically, photoreceptors. According to one hypothesis, the age-related deterioration in rod function is due to the limited availability of 11-cis-retinal for rod pigment formation. To determine how aging affects rod photoreceptors and to test the retinoid-deficiency hypothesis, we compared the morphological and functional properties of rods of adult and aged B6D2F1/J mice. We found that the number of rods and the length of their outer segments were significantly reduced in 2.5-year-old mice compared with 4-month-old animals. Aging also resulted in a twofold reduction in the total level of opsin in the retina. Behavioral tests revealed that scotopic visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were decreased by twofold in aged mice, and rod ERG recordings demonstrated reduced amplitudes of both a- and b-waves. Sensitivity of aged rods determined from single-cell recordings was also decreased by 1.5-fold, corresponding to not more than 1% free opsin in these photoreceptors, and kinetic parameters of dim flash response were not altered. Notably, the rate of rod dark adaptation was unaffected by age. Thus, our results argue against age-related deficiency of 11-cis-retinal in the B6D2F1/J mouse rod visual cycle. Surprisingly, the level of cellular dark noise was increased in aged rods, providing an alternative mechanism for their desensitization.

  11. Eicosapentaenoic acid regulates brown adipose tissue metabolism in high-fat-fed mice and in clonal brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Pahlavani, Mandana; Razafimanjato, Fitia; Ramalingam, Latha; Kalupahana, Nishan S; Moussa, Hanna; Scoggin, Shane; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima

    2017-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a key role in energy expenditure through its specialized thermogenic function. Therefore, BAT activation may help prevent and/or treat obesity. Interestingly, subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT) also has the ability to differentiate into brown-like adipocytes and may potentially contribute to increased thermogenesis. We have previously reported that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) reduces high-fat (HF)-diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice. Whether BAT mediates some of these beneficial effects of EPA has not been determined. We hypothesized that EPA activates BAT thermogenic program, contributing to its antiobesity effects. BAT and WAT were harvested from B6 male mice fed HF diets supplemented with or without EPA. HIB 1B clonal brown adipocytes treated with or without EPA were also used. Gene and protein expressions were measured in adipose tissues and H1B 1B cells by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting, respectively. Our results show that BAT from EPA-supplemented mice expressed significantly higher levels of thermogenic genes such as PRDM16 and PGC1α and higher levels of uncoupling protein 1 compared to HF-fed mice. By contrast, both WATs (subcutaneous and visceral) had undetectable levels of these markers with no up regulation by EPA. HIB 1B cells treated with EPA showed significantly higher mRNA expression of PGC1α and SIRT2. EPA treatment significantly increased maximum oxidative and peak glycolytic metabolism in H1B 1B cells. Our results demonstrate a novel and promising role for EPA in preventing obesity via activation of BAT, adding to its known beneficial anti-inflammatory effects.

  12. Impact of dietary dairy polar lipids on lipid metabolism of mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Reis, Mariza G; Roy, Nicole C; Bermingham, Emma N; Ryan, Leigh; Bibiloni, Rodrigo; Young, Wayne; Krause, Lutz; Berger, Bernard; North, Mike; Stelwagen, Kerst; Reis, Marlon M

    2013-03-20

    The effect of milk polar lipids on lipid metabolism of liver, adipose tissue, and brain and on composition of intestinal microbiota was investigated. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 5 weeks, followed by 5 weeks with HFD without (control) or supplemented with total polar lipids (TPL), phospholipids (PL), or sphingolipids (SPL). Animals fed SPL showed a tendency for lower triglyceride synthesis (P = 0.058) in the liver, but not in adipose tissue. PL and TPL reduced de novo hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis. The ratio of palmitoleic to palmitic acid in the liver was lower for animals fed SPL or TPL compared to control. There was little effect of the supplementation on the cecal microbiota composition. In the brain, DHA (C22:6) content correlated negatively with tetracosanoic acid (C24:0) after TPL supplementation (-0.71, P = 0.02) but not in control (0.26, P = 0.44). Arachidonic acid (C20:4) was negatively correlated with C24:0 in both groups (TPL, -0.77, P = 0.008; control, -0.81, P = 0.003).

  13. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channel activity in brain cells of adult offspring mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A; Busso, Dolores; Ramírez, Gigliola; Campos, Marlys; Rigotti, Attilio; Eugenín, Jaime; von Bernhardi, Rommy

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine, the most important neuroteratogen of tobacco smoke, can reproduce brain and cognitive disturbances per se when administered prenatally. However, it is still unknown if paracrine signaling among brain cells participates in prenatal nicotine-induced brain impairment of adult offspring. Paracrine signaling is partly mediated by unopposed channels formed by connexins hemichannels (HCs) and pannexins serving as aqueous pores permeable to ions and small signaling molecules, allowing exchange between the intra- and extracellular milieus. Our aim was to address whether prenatal nicotine exposure changes the activity of those channels in adult mice offspring under control conditions or subjected to a second challenge during young ages: high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet. To induce prenatal exposure to nicotine, osmotic minipumps were implanted in CF1 pregnant mice at gestational day 5 to deliver nicotine bitartrate or saline (control) solutions. After weaning, offspring of nicotine-treated or untreated pregnant mice were fed ad libitum with chow or HFC diets for 8 weeks. The functional state of connexin 43 (Cx43) and pannexin 1 (Panx1) unopposed channels was evaluated by dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices from 11-week-old mice. We found that prenatal nicotine increased the opening of Cx43 HCs in astrocytes, and Panx1 channels in microglia and neurons only if offspring mice were fed with HFC diet. Blockade of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and prostaglandin E receptor 1 (EP1), ionotropic ATP receptor type 7 (P2X7) and NMDA receptors, showed differential inhibition of prenatal nicotine-induced channel opening in glial cells and neurons. Importantly, inhibition of the above mentioned enzymes and receptors, or blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channels greatly reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and glutamate release from hippocampal slices of prenatally nicotine-exposed offspring. We propose that unregulated gliotransmitter

  14. Hypolipidemic effect of n-butanol Extract from Asparagus officinalis L. in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinglei; Zhang, Wen; Pang, Xiufeng; Wang, Jiesi; Zhao, Jingjing; Qu, Weijing

    2011-08-01

    During industrial processing of Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.), around half of each spear is discarded. However, these discarded asparagus (by-products) might be used as food supplements for their potential therapeutic effects. This study evaluated the hypolipidemic effect of n-butanol extract (BEA) from asparagus by-products in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Continuous HFD feeding caused hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress and liver damage in mice. Interestingly, while BEA significantly decreased the levels of body weight gain, serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, it dramatically increased the high density lipoprotein level when administered at three different doses (40, 80 or 160 mg/kg body weight) for 8 weeks in hyperlipidemic mice. In addition, BEA decreased the levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase in serum. Finally, superoxide dismutase activity and the total antioxidation capacity were evidently increased, while the malondialdehyde level and the distribution of lipid droplets were reduced in liver cells of BEA-treated mice. Taken together, the findings of this study suggested that BEA had a strong hypolipidemic function and could be used as a supplement in healthcare foods and drugs or in combination with other hypolipidemic drugs.

  15. Dietary cholesterol induces hepatic inflammation and blunts mitochondrial function in the liver of high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Songpei; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Zhou, Xiu; Wang, Hao; Jo, Eunjung; Robinson, Stephen R; Xu, Aimin; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of dietary cholesterol and fat in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a common liver disease in metabolic disorders. Mice were fed a diet of regular chow (CH), chow supplemented with 0.2% w/w cholesterol (CHC), high fat (HF, 45kcal%) or HF with cholesterol (HFC) for 17weeks. While both HF and HFC groups displayed hepatic steatosis and metabolic syndrome, only HFC group developed the phenotype of liver injury, as indicated by an increase in plasma level of alanine transaminase (ALT, by 50-80%). There were ~2-fold increases in mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in the liver of HFC-fed mice (vs. HF) but no endoplasmic reticulum stress or oxidative stress was observed. Furthermore, cholesterol suppressed HF-induced increase of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and mitochondrial transcription factor A expression and blunted fatty acid oxidation. Interestingly, after switching HFC to HF diet for 5weeks, the increases in plasma ALT and liver inflammatory markers were abolished but the blunted of mitochondrial function remained. These findings suggest that cholesterol plays a critical role in the conversion of a simple fatty liver toward nonalcoholic steatohepatitis possibly by activation of inflammatory pathways together with retarded mitochondrial function.

  16. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shireesh; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, M Todd; Baxa, Ulrich; Tam, Joseph; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Clarke, Kieran; Veech, Richard L

    2012-06-01

    We measured the effects of a diet in which D-β-hydroxybutyrate-(R)-1,3 butanediol monoester [ketone ester (KE)] replaced equicaloric amounts of carbohydrate on 8-wk-old male C57BL/6J mice. Diets contained equal amounts of fat, protein, and micronutrients. The KE group was fed ad libitum, whereas the control (Ctrl) mice were pair-fed to the KE group. Blood d-β-hydroxybutyrate levels in the KE group were 3-5 times those reported with high-fat ketogenic diets. Voluntary food intake was reduced dose dependently with the KE diet. Feeding the KE diet for up to 1 mo increased the number of mitochondria and doubled the electron transport chain proteins, uncoupling protein 1, and mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). [(18)F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in IBAT of the KE group was twice that in IBAT of the Ctrl group. Plasma leptin levels of the KE group were more than 2-fold those of the Ctrl group and were associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activity to IBAT. The KE group exhibited 14% greater resting energy expenditure, but the total energy expenditure measured over a 24-h period or body weights was not different. The quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index was 73% higher in the KE group. These results identify KE as a potential antiobesity supplement.

  17. Anti-obesity Effect of Capsaicin in Mice Fed with High-Fat Diet Is Associated with an Increase in Population of the Gut Bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei; Shen, Mengyu; Zhao, Xia; Zhu, Hongbin; Yang, Yuhui; Lu, Shuguang; Tan, Yinling; Li, Gang; Li, Ming; Wang, Jing; Hu, Fuquan; Le, Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Capsaicin (CAP) reduces body weight mainly through activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel. However, recent evidence indicates that the gut microbiota influences many physiological processes in host and might provoke obesity. This study determined whether the anti-obesity effect of CAP is related to the changes in gut microbiota. C57BL/6 mice were fed either with high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD with CAP (HFD-CAP) for 9 weeks. We observed a significantly reduced weight gain and improved glucose tolerance in HFD-CAP-fed mice compared with HFD-fed mice. 16S rRNA gene sequencing results showed a decrease of phylum Proteobacteria in HFD-CAP-fed mice. In addition, HFD-CAP-fed mice showed a higher abundance of Akkermansia muciniphila, a mucin-degrading bacterium with beneficial effects on host metabolism. Further studies found that CAP directly up-regulates the expression of Mucin 2 gene Muc2 and antimicrobial protein gene Reg3g in the intestine. These data suggest that the anti-obesity effect of CAP is associated with a modest modulation of the gut microbiota. PMID:28280490

  18. Anti-obesity Effect of Capsaicin in Mice Fed with High-Fat Diet Is Associated with an Increase in Population of the Gut Bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Shen, Mengyu; Zhao, Xia; Zhu, Hongbin; Yang, Yuhui; Lu, Shuguang; Tan, Yinling; Li, Gang; Li, Ming; Wang, Jing; Hu, Fuquan; Le, Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Capsaicin (CAP) reduces body weight mainly through activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel. However, recent evidence indicates that the gut microbiota influences many physiological processes in host and might provoke obesity. This study determined whether the anti-obesity effect of CAP is related to the changes in gut microbiota. C57BL/6 mice were fed either with high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD with CAP (HFD-CAP) for 9 weeks. We observed a significantly reduced weight gain and improved glucose tolerance in HFD-CAP-fed mice compared with HFD-fed mice. 16S rRNA gene sequencing results showed a decrease of phylum Proteobacteria in HFD-CAP-fed mice. In addition, HFD-CAP-fed mice showed a higher abundance of Akkermansia muciniphila, a mucin-degrading bacterium with beneficial effects on host metabolism. Further studies found that CAP directly up-regulates the expression of Mucin 2 gene Muc2 and antimicrobial protein gene Reg3g in the intestine. These data suggest that the anti-obesity effect of CAP is associated with a modest modulation of the gut microbiota.

  19. Dietary broccoli mildly improves neuroinflammation in aged mice but does not reduce lipopolysaccharide-induced sickness behavior.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Brigitte E; Chen, Yung-Ju; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Johnson, Rodney W

    2014-11-01

    Aging is associated with oxidative stress and heightened inflammatory response to infection. Dietary interventions to reduce these changes are therefore desirable. Broccoli contains glucoraphanin, which is converted to sulforaphane (SFN) by plant myrosinase during cooking preparation or digestion. Sulforaphane increases antioxidant enzymes including NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase and heme oxygenase I and inhibits inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that dietary broccoli would support an antioxidant response in brain and periphery of aged mice and inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation and sickness. Young adult and aged mice were fed control or 10% broccoli diet for 28 days before an intraperitoneal LPS injection. Social interactions were assessed 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours after LPS, and mRNA was quantified in liver and brain at 24 hours. Dietary broccoli did not ameliorate LPS-induced decrease in social interactions in young or aged mice. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression was unaffected by broccoli consumption but was induced by LPS in brain and liver of adult and aged mice. In addition, IL-1β was elevated in brain of aged mice without LPS. Broccoli consumption decreased age-elevated cytochrome b-245 β, an oxidative stress marker, and reduced glial activation markers in aged mice. Collectively, these data suggest that 10% broccoli diet provides a modest reduction in age-related oxidative stress and glial reactivity, but is insufficient to inhibit LPS-induced inflammation. Thus, it is likely that SFN would need to be provided in supplement form to control the inflammatory response to LPS.

  20. Kidney EPO expression during chronic hypoxia in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Benderro, Girriso F; LaManna, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    In order to maintain normal cellular function, mammalian tissue oxygen concentrations must be tightly regulated within a narrow physiological range. The hormone erythropoietin (EPO) is essential for maintenance of tissue oxygen supply by stimulating red blood cell production and promoting their survival. In this study we compared the effects of 290 Torr atmospheric pressure on the kidney EPO protein levels in young (4-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) C57BL/6 mice. The mice were sacrificed after being anesthetized, and kidney samples were collected and processed by Western blot analysis. Relatively low basal expression of EPO during normoxia in young mice showed significant upregulation in hypoxia and stayed upregulated throughout the hypoxic period (threefold compared to normoxic control), showing a slight decline toward the third week. Whereas, a relatively higher normoxic basal EPO protein level in aged mice did not show significant increase until seventh day of hypoxia, but showed significant upregulation in prolonged hypoxia. Hence, we confirmed that there is a progressively increased accumulation of EPO during chronic hypoxia in young and aged mouse kidney, and the EPO upregulation during hypoxia showed a similarity with the pattern of increase in hematocrit, which we have reported previously.

  1. Olive Leaf Extract Attenuates Obesity in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice by Modulating the Expression of Molecules Involved in Adipogenesis and Thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su Jin

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether olive leaf extract (OLE) prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Mice were randomly divided into groups that received a chow diet (CD), HFD, or 0.15% OLE-supplemented diet (OLD) for 8 weeks. OLD-fed mice showed significantly reduced body weight gain, visceral fat-pad weights, and plasma lipid levels as compared with HFD-fed mice. OLE significantly reversed the HFD-induced upregulation of WNT10b- and galanin-mediated signaling molecules and key adipogenic genes (PPARγ, C/EBPα, CD36, FAS, and leptin) in the epididymal adipose tissue of HFD-fed mice. Furthermore, the HFD-induced downregulation of thermogenic genes involved in uncoupled respiration (SIRT1, PGC1α, and UCP1) and mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF-1, and COX2) was also significantly reversed by OLE. These results suggest that OLE exerts beneficial effects against obesity by regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis and thermogenesis in the visceral adipose tissue of HFD-fed mice. PMID:24624222

  2. Lung remodeling in aging surfactant protein D deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Arkenau, Martina; Knudsen, Lars; Wedekind, Dirk; Ochs, Matthias

    2017-02-07

    Pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of lipids and proteins at the air-liquid interface of alveoli, prevents the lungs from collapsing due to surface tension. One constituent is surfactant-associated protein-D (SP-D), a protein involved in surfactant homeostasis and innate immunity. Mice deficient in SP-D (SP-D (-/-)) has been described as developing a characteristic phenotype which affects the surfactant system (including changes in the intra-cellular and intra-alveolar surfactant pool, alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages), lung architecture and its inflammatory state (development of an emphysema-like pathology, inflammatory cell infiltration). Furthermore, it has been described that these mice develop sub-pleural fibrosis and a thickening of alveolar septal walls. The aim of the present study was to systematically investigate the long term progression of this phenotype with special focus on parenchymal remodeling, whether there are progressive emphysematous changes and whether there is progressive septal wall thickening which might indicate the development of pulmonary fibrosis. By means of design-based stereology and light microscopy, lungs of wild type (wt) and SP-D (-/-) mice of four age groups (3, 6, 12 and ∼18 months) were investigated. The data do not suggest a relevant spontaneous pro-fibrotic remodeling or a destructive process in the aging SP-D (-/-) mice. We demonstrated neither a significant destructive emphysema nor significant thickening of alveolar septal walls, but the data suggest an increase in the number weighted mean alveolar volume in aging SP-D (-/-) mice without loss of alveoli or alveolar epithelial surface area per lung. This increase may reflect over-distension due to altered mechanical properties of alveoli. In the light of our findings and data from the literature, the question arises as to whether a lack of SP-D promotes structural changes in the lung which have been described as being associated with aging lungs

  3. Erythropoietin inhibits gluconeogenesis and inflammation in the liver and improves glucose intolerance in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ran; Zhu, Dalong; Bi, Yan; Yang, Donghui; Wang, Yaping

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has multiple biological functions, including the modulation of glucose metabolism. However, the mechanisms underlying the action of EPO are still obscure. This study is aimed at investigating the potential mechanisms by which EPO improves glucose tolerance in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks and then treated with EPO (HFD-EPO) or vehicle saline (HFD-Con) for two week. The levels of fasting blood glucose, serum insulin and glucose tolerance were measured and the relative levels of insulin-related phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, insulin receptor (IR) and IR substrate 1 (IRS1) phosphorylation were determined. The levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose-6- phosphatase (G6Pase), toll like receptor 4 (TLR4), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 expression and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 MAPK activation in the liver were examined. EPO treatment significantly reduced the body weights and the levels of fasting blood glucose and serum insulin and improved the HFD-induced glucose intolerance in mice. EPO treatment significantly enhanced the levels of Akt, but not IR and IRS1, phosphorylation, accompanied by inhibiting the PEPCK and G6Pase expression in the liver. Furthermore, EPO treatment mitigated the HFD-induced inflammatory TNF-α and IL-6 production, TLR4 expression, NF-κB and JNK, but not ERK and p38 MAPK, phosphorylation in the liver. Therefore, our data indicated that EPO treatment improved glucose intolerance by inhibiting gluconeogenesis and inflammation in the livers of HFD-fed mice.

  4. Pasture v. standard dairy cream in high-fat diet-fed mice: improved metabolic outcomes and stronger intestinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Bérengère; Plaisancié, Pascale; Géloën, Alain; Estienne, Monique; Debard, Cyrille; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Loizon, Emmanuelle; Daira, Patricia; Bodennec, Jacques; Cousin, Olivier; Vidal, Hubert; Laugerette, Fabienne; Michalski, Marie-Caroline

    2014-08-28

    Dairy products derived from the milk of cows fed in pastures are characterised by higher amounts of conjugated linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid (ALA), and several studies have shown their ability to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, their specific metabolic effects compared with standard dairy in a high-fat diet (HFD) context remain largely unknown; this is what we determined in the present study with a focus on the metabolic and intestinal parameters. The experimental animals were fed for 12 weeks a HFD containing 20 % fat in the form of a pasture dairy cream (PDC) or a standard dairy cream (SDC). Samples of plasma, liver, white adipose tissue, duodenum, jejunum and colon were analysed. The PDC mice, despite a higher food intake, exhibited lower fat mass, plasma and hepatic TAG concentrations, and inflammation in the adipose tissue than the SDC mice. Furthermore, they exhibited a higher expression of hepatic PPARα mRNA and adipose tissue uncoupling protein 2 mRNA, suggesting an enhanced oxidative activity of the tissues. These results might be explained, in part, by the higher amounts of ALA in the PDC diet and in the liver and adipose tissue of the PDC mice. Moreover, the PDC diet was found to increase the proportions of two strategic cell populations involved in the protective function of the intestinal epithelium, namely Paneth and goblet cells in the small intestine and colon, compared with the SDC diet. In conclusion, a PDC HFD leads to improved metabolic outcomes and to a stronger gut barrier compared with a SDC HFD. This may be due, at least in part, to the protective mechanisms induced by specific lipids.

  5. Taurine improves learning and retention in aged mice.

    PubMed

    El Idrissi, Abdeslem

    2008-05-02

    Aging of the brain is characterized by several neurochemical modifications involving structural proteins, neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and related receptors. Alterations of neurochemical indices of synaptic function have been considered as indicators of age-related impairment of central functions, such as locomotion, memory and sensory performances. Several studies demonstrated that GABA receptors, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65&67), and different subpopulations of GABAergic neurons are markedly decreased in experimental animal brains during aging. Thus, the age-related decline in cognitive functions could be attributable, at least in part, to decrements in GABA inhibitory neurotransmission. In this study, using a passive avoidance test, we show that chronic supplementation of taurine to aged mice significantly ameliorates the age-dependent decline in memory acquisition and retention. We have previously shown that taurine supplementation caused changes in the GABAergic system. These changes include increased levels of the neurotransmitters GABA and glutamate, increased expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase and the neuropeptide somatostatin and increase in the number of somatostatin-positive neurons. These specific alterations of the inhibitory system caused by taurine treatment oppose those naturally occurring in aging, and suggest a protective role of taurine against the normal aging process. Increased understanding of age-related neurochemical changes in the GABAergic system will be important in elucidating the underpinnings of the functional changes of aging. Taurine might help forestall the age-related decline in cognitive functions through alterations of the GABAergic system.

  6. Oxidative costs of reproduction: Oxidative stress in mice fed standard and low antioxidant diets.

    PubMed

    Vaanholt, L M; Milne, A; Zheng, Y; Hambly, C; Mitchell, S E; Valencak, T G; Allison, D B; Speakman, J R

    2016-02-01

    Lactation is one of the most energetically expensive behaviours, and trade-offs may exist between the energy devoted to it and somatic maintenance, including protection against oxidative damage. However, conflicting data exist for the effects of reproduction on oxidative stress. In the wild, a positive relationship is often observed, but in laboratory studies oxidative damage is often lower in lactating than in non-breeding animals. We hypothesised that this discrepancy may exist because during lactation food intake increases many-fold resulting in a large increase in the intake of dietary antioxidants which are typically high in laboratory rodent chow where they are added as a preservative. We supplied lactating and non-breeding control mice with either a standard or low antioxidant diet and studied how this affected the activity of endogenous antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase; SOD, and glutathione peroxidise; GPx) and oxidative damage to proteins (protein carbonyls, PC) in liver and brain tissue. The low antioxidant diet did not significantly affect activities of antioxidant enzymes in brain or liver, and generally did not result in increased protein damage, except in livers of control mice on low antioxidant diet. Catalase activity, but not GPx or SOD, was decreased in both control and lactating mice on the low antioxidant diet. Lactating mice had significantly reduced oxidative damage to both liver and brain compared to control mice, independent of the diet they were given. In conclusion, antioxidant content of the diet did not affect oxidative stress in control or reproductive mice, and cannot explain the previously observed reduction in oxidative stress in lactating mammals studied in the laboratory. The reduced oxidative stress in the livers of lactating mice even under low antioxidant diet treatment was consistent with the 'shielding' hypothesis.

  7. Metabolic effects of a mitochondrial-targeted coenzyme Q analog in high fat fed obese mice.

    PubMed

    Fink, Brian D; Guo, Deng Fu; Kulkarni, Chaitanya A; Rahmouni, Kamal; Kerns, Robert J; Sivitz, William I

    2017-04-01

    We recently reported that mitoquinone (mitoQ, 500 μmol/L) added to drinking water of C57BL/6J mice attenuated weight gain, decreased food intake, increased hypothalamic orexigenic gene expression, and mitigated oxidative stress when administered from the onset of high-fat (HF) feeding. Here, we examined the effects of mitoQ on pre-existing obesity in C57BL/6J mice first made obese by 107 days of HF feeding. In contrast to our preventative study, we found that already obese mice did not tolerate mitoQ at 500 μmol/L. Within 4 days of administration, obese mice markedly decreased food and water intake and lost substantial weight necessitating a dose reduction to 250 μmol/L. Food and water intake then improved. Over the next 4 weeks, body mass of the mitoQ-treated mice increased faster than vehicle-treated controls but did not catch up. Over the subsequent 10 weeks, weights of the mitoQ-treated group remained significantly less than vehicle control, but percent fat and food intake did not differ. Although the mitoQ-treated groups continued to drink less, there was no difference in percent body fluid and no laboratory evidence of dehydration at study end. At the time of killing, hypothalamic NPY gene expression was reduced in the mitoQ-treated mice . Liver fat was markedly increased by HF feeding but did not differ between mitoQ and vehicle groups and, in contrast to our previous preventative study, there was no improvement in plasma alanine amino transferase or liver hydroperoxides. In summary, administration of mitoQ to already obese mice attenuated weight gain, but showed limited overall benefit.

  8. Differences and similarities in hepatic lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis and oxidative imbalance in mice fed diets rich in fructose or sucrose.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Alini; Barbosa-da-Silva, Sandra; Aguila, Marcia B; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos A

    2015-05-01

    Changes in feeding habits are the primary environmental factors (though modifiable) commonly correlated with increase in diseases such as obesity and associated comorbidities. Diets rich in fructose and sucrose have been related to the epidemic of obesity. Three groups of mice were studied during 15 weeks of consuming standard chow (SC), a high-fructose diet (HFru) and a high-sucrose diet (HSu). The animals did not present significant differences in food intake, energy intake, or body mass evolution at the end of the experiment. Although the findings in the HFru and HSu animals were not equal in magnitude, in comparison with the SC mice, the HFru and HSu animals showed hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia as well as high levels of inflammatory adipokines, low adiponectin, and high levels of total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and liver enzymes. The liver of HFru (more) and HSu (less) groups showed fatty infiltration and areas of necroinflammation, which are characteristic of the transition from nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. In addition, the HFru and HSu groups showed increased lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, reduced beta-oxidation and antioxidant imbalance compared with the SC animals. In conclusion, current findings demonstrate comparable adverse effects on carbohydrate metabolism, inflammatory profile, antioxidant imbalance and NAFLD in the mice of the C57BL/6 strain fed a diet rich in sucrose or rich in fructose.

  9. Antihyperglycemic and antioxidative effects of Hydroxyethyl Methylcellulose (HEMC) and Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose (HPMC) in mice fed with a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Ban, Su Jeong; Rico, Catherine W; Um, In Chul; Kang, Mi Young

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dietary feeding of hydroxyethyl methylcellulose (HEMC) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) on the glucose metabolism and antioxidative status in mice under high fat diet conditions was investigated. The mice were randomly divided and given experimental diets for six weeks: normal control (NC group), high fat (HF group), and high fat supplemented with either HEMC (HF+HEMC group) or HPMC (HF+HPMC group). At the end of the experimental period, the HF group exhibited markedly higher blood glucose and insulin levels as well as a higher erythrocyte lipid peroxidation rate relative to the control group. However, diet supplementation of HEMC and HPMC was found to counteract the high fat-induced hyperglycemia and oxidative stress via regulation of antioxidant and hepatic glucose-regulating enzyme activities. These findings illustrate that HEMC and HPMC were similarly effective in improving the glucose metabolism and antioxidant defense system in high fat-fed mice and they may be beneficial as functional biomaterials in the development of therapeutic agents against high fat dietinduced hyperglycemia and oxidative stress.

  10. Antihyperglycemic and Antioxidative Effects of Hydroxyethyl Methylcellulose (HEMC) and Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose (HPMC) in Mice Fed with a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Su Jeong; Rico, Catherine W.; Um, In Chul; Kang, Mi Young

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dietary feeding of hydroxyethyl methylcellulose (HEMC) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) on the glucose metabolism and antioxidative status in mice under high fat diet conditions was investigated. The mice were randomly divided and given experimental diets for six weeks: normal control (NC group), high fat (HF group), and high fat supplemented with either HEMC (HF+HEMC group) or HPMC (HF+HPMC group). At the end of the experimental period, the HF group exhibited markedly higher blood glucose and insulin levels as well as a higher erythrocyte lipid peroxidation rate relative to the control group. However, diet supplementation of HEMC and HPMC was found to counteract the high fat-induced hyperglycemia and oxidative stress via regulation of antioxidant and hepatic glucose-regulating enzyme activities. These findings illustrate that HEMC and HPMC were similarly effective in improving the glucose metabolism and antioxidant defense system in high fat-fed mice and they may be beneficial as functional biomaterials in the development of therapeutic agents against high fat dietinduced hyperglycemia and oxidative stress. PMID:22489179

  11. Antilithiasic and Hypolipidaemic Effects of Raphanus sativus L. var. niger on Mice Fed with a Lithogenic Diet

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Torres, Ibrahim Guillermo; Naranjo-Rodríguez, Elia Brosla; Domínguez-Ortíz, Miguel Ángel; Gallegos-Estudillo, Janeth; Saavedra-Vélez, Margarita Virginia

    2012-01-01

    In Mexico, Raphanus sativus L. var. niger (black radish) has uses for the treatment of gallstones and for decreasing lipids serum levels. We evaluate the effect of juice squeezed from black radish root in cholesterol gallstones and serum lipids of mice. The toxicity of juice was analyzed according to the OECD guidelines. We used female C57BL/6 mice fed with a lithogenic diet. We performed histopathological studies of gallbladder and liver, and measured concentrations of cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. The juice can be considered bioactive and non-toxic; the lithogenic diet significantly induced cholesterol gallstones; increased cholesterol and triglycerides levels, and decreased HDL levels; gallbladder wall thickness increased markedly, showing epithelial hyperplasia and increased liver weight. After treatment with juice for 6 days, cholesterol gallstones were eradicated significantly in the gallbladder of mice; cholesterol and triglycerides levels decreased too, and there was also an increase in levels of HDL (P < 0.05). Gallbladder tissue continued to show epithelial hyperplasia and granulocyte infiltration; liver tissue showed vacuolar degeneration. The juice of black radish root has properties for treatment of cholesterol gallstones and for decreasing serum lipids levels; therefore, we confirm in a preclinical study the utility that people give it in traditional medicine. PMID:23093836

  12. Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) extract inhibits obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet over the long term.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-14

    Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are traditionally used to add bitterness and flavour to beer. Although the isomerised hop extracts produced by the brewing process have been thought to ameliorate lipid and glucose metabolism, the influence of untreated hop extracts on high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity is unclear. The present study examined the anti-obesity effects of a hop extract in male C57BL/6J mice fed a HF diet, or HF diet plus 2 or 5 % hop extract for 20 weeks. The oral glucose tolerance test was performed at week 19. Furthermore, water excretion was evaluated in water-loaded Balb/c male mice. The effects of the extract on lipid accumulation and PPARγ expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes were examined. The hop extract inhibited the increase in body and adipose tissue weight, adipose cell diameter and liver lipids induced by the HF diet. Furthermore, it improved glucose intolerance. The extract enhanced water excretion in water-loaded mice. Various fractions of the hop extract inhibited lipid accumulation and PPARγ expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Hop extracts might be useful for preventing obesity and glucose intolerance caused by a HF diet.

  13. Time-restricted feeding without reducing caloric intake prevents metabolic diseases in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Megumi; Vollmers, Christopher; Zarrinpar, Amir; DiTacchio, Luciano; Bushong, Eric A; Gill, Shubhroz; Leblanc, Mathias; Chaix, Amandine; Joens, Matthew; Fitzpatrick, James A J; Ellisman, Mark H; Panda, Satchidananda

    2012-06-06

    While diet-induced obesity has been exclusively attributed to increased caloric intake from fat, animals fed a high-fat diet (HFD) ad libitum (ad lib) eat frequently throughout day and night, disrupting the normal feeding cycle. To test whether obesity and metabolic diseases result from HFD or disruption of metabolic cycles, we subjected mice to either ad lib or time-restricted feeding (tRF) of a HFD for 8 hr per day. Mice under tRF consume equivalent calories from HFD as those with ad lib access yet are protected against obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis, and inflammation and have improved motor coordination. The tRF regimen improved CREB, mTOR, and AMPK pathway function and oscillations of the circadian clock and their target genes' expression. These changes in catabolic and anabolic pathways altered liver metabolome and improved nutrient utilization and energy expenditure. We demonstrate in mice that tRF regimen is a nonpharmacological strategy against obesity and associated diseases.

  14. Ca2+ dynamics in oocytes from naturally-aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Haverfield, Jenna; Nakagawa, Shoma; Love, Daniel; Tsichlaki, Elina; Nomikos, Michail; Lai, F. Anthony; Swann, Karl; FitzHarris, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The ability of human metaphase-II arrested eggs to activate following fertilisation declines with advancing maternal age. Egg activation is triggered by repetitive increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the ooplasm as a result of sperm-egg fusion. We therefore hypothesised that eggs from older females feature a reduced ability to mount appropriate Ca2+ responses at fertilisation. To test this hypothesis we performed the first examination of Ca2+ dynamics in eggs from young and naturally-aged mice. Strikingly, we find that Ca2+ stores and resting [Ca2+]i are unchanged with age. Although eggs from aged mice feature a reduced ability to replenish intracellular Ca2+ stores following depletion, this difference had no effect on the duration, number, or amplitude of Ca2+ oscillations following intracytoplasmic sperm injection or expression of phospholipase C zeta. In contrast, we describe a substantial reduction in the frequency and duration of oscillations in aged eggs upon parthenogenetic activation with SrCl2. We conclude that the ability to mount and respond to an appropriate Ca2+ signal at fertilisation is largely unchanged by advancing maternal age, but subtle changes in Ca2+ handling occur that may have more substantial impacts upon commonly used means of parthenogenetic activation. PMID:26785810

  15. Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Aging on Long-Term and Remote Memory in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a…

  16. Curcumin attenuates surgery-induced cognitive dysfunction in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang; Chen, Huixin; Huang, Chunhui; Gu, Xinmei; Wang, Jialing; Xu, Dilin; Yu, Xin; Shuai, Chu; Chen, Liping; Li, Shun; Xu, Yiguo; Gao, Tao; Ye, Mingrui; Su, Wei; Liu, Haixiong; Zhang, Jinrong; Wang, Chuang; Chen, Junping; Wang, Qinwen; Cui, Wei

    2017-02-21

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with elderly patients undergoing surgery. However, pharmacological treatments for POCD are limited. In this study, we found that curcumin, an active compound derived from Curcuma longa, ameliorated the cognitive dysfunction following abdominal surgery in aged mice. Further, curcumin prevented surgery-induced anti-oxidant enzyme activity. Curcumin also increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-positive area and expression of pAkt in the brain, suggesting that curcumin activated BDNF signaling in aged mice. Furthermore, curcumin neutralized cholinergic dysfunction involving choline acetyltransferase expression induced by surgery. These results strongly suggested that curcumin prevented cognitive impairments via multiple targets, possibly by increasing the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes, activation of BDNF signaling, and neutralization of cholinergic dysfunction, concurrently. Based on these novel findings, curcumin might be a potential agent in POCD prophylaxis and treatment.

  17. Progranulin Knockout Accelerates Intervertebral Disc Degeneration in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Ben; Cuellar, Jason; Richbourgh, Brendon; Jia, Tang-hong; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common degenerative disease, yet much is unknown about the mechanisms during its pathogenesis. Herein we investigated whether progranulin (PGRN), a chondroprotective growth factor, is associated with IVD degeneration. PGRN was detectable in both human and murine IVD. The levels of PGRN were upregulated in murine IVD tissue during aging process. Loss of PGRN resulted in an early onset of degenerative changes in the IVD tissue and altered expressions of the degeneration-associated molecules in the mouse IVD tissue. Moreover, PGRN knockout mice exhibited accelerated IVD matrix degeneration, abnormal bone formation and exaggerated bone resorption in vertebra with aging. The acceleration of IVD degeneration observed in PGRN null mice was probably due to the enhanced activation of NF-κB signaling and β-catenin signaling. Taken together, PGRN may play a critical role in homeostasis of IVD, and may serve as a potential molecular target for prevention and treatment of disc degenerative diseases. PMID:25777988

  18. Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain K21 on High-Fat Diet-Fed Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Chen; Weng, Wei-Lien; Lai, Wen-Lin; Tsai, Hui-Ping; Liu, Wei-Hsien; Lee, Meng-Hwan; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of specific probiotics on alleviating obesity-related disorders. Here we aimed to identify probiotics with potential antiobesity activity among 88 lactic acid bacterial strains via in vitro screening assays, and a Lactobacillus plantarum strain K21 was found to harbor abilities required for hydrolyzing bile salt, reducing cholesterol, and inhibiting the accumulation of lipid in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Furthermore, effects of K21 on diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were examined. Male C57Bl/6J mice received a normal diet, high-fat diet (HFD), or HFD with K21 administration (10(9) CFU in 0.2 mL PBS/day) for eight weeks. Supplementation of K21, but not placebo, appeared to alleviate body weight gain and epididymal fat mass accumulation, reduce plasma leptin levels, decrease cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and mitigate liver damage in DIO mice. Moreover, the hepatic expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) related to adipogenesis was significantly downregulated in DIO mice by K21 intervention. We also found that K21 supplementation strengthens intestinal permeability and modulates the amount of Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., and Clostridium perfringens in the cecal contents of DIO mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that dietary intake of K21 protects against the onset of HFD-induced obesity through multiple mechanisms of action.

  19. Chronic ingestion of advanced glycation end products induces degenerative spinal changes and hypertrophy in aging pre-diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Illien-Jünger, Svenja; Lu, Young; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Hecht, Andrew C; Cai, Weijing; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E; Iatridis, James C

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and pathological spinal changes are major causes of back pain, which is the top cause of global disability. Obese and diabetic individuals are at increased risk for back pain and musculoskeletal complications. Modern diets contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), cyto-toxic components which are known contributors to obesity, diabetes and accelerated aging pathologies. There is little information about potential effects of AGE rich diet on spinal pathology, which may be a contributing cause for back pain which is common in obese and diabetic individuals. This study investigated the role of specific AGE precursors (e.g. methylglyoxal-derivatives (MG)) on IVD and vertebral pathologies in aging C57BL6 mice that were fed isocaloric diets with standard (dMG+) or reduced amounts of MG derivatives (dMG-; containing 60-70% less dMG). dMG+ mice exhibited a pre-diabetic phenotype, as they were insulin resistant but not hyperglycemic. Vertebrae of dMG+ mice displayed increased cortical-thickness and cortical-area, greater MG-AGE accumulation and ectopic calcification in vertebral endplates. IVD morphology of dMG+ mice exhibited ectopic calcification, hypertrophic differentiation and glycosaminoglycan loss relative to dMG- mice. Overall, chronic exposure to dietary AGEs promoted age-accelerated IVD degeneration and vertebral alterations involving ectopic calcification which occurred in parallel with insulin resistance, and which were prevented with dMG- diet. This study described a new mouse model for diet-induced spinal degeneration, and results were in support of the hypothesis that chronic AGE ingestion could be a factor contributing to a pre-diabetic state, ectopic calcifications in spinal tissues, and musculoskeletal complications that are more generally known to occur with chronic diabetic conditions.

  20. Chronic Ingestion of Advanced Glycation End Products Induces Degenerative Spinal Changes and Hypertrophy in Aging Pre-Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Illien-Jünger, Svenja; Lu, Young; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Hecht, Andrew C.; Cai, Weijing; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E.; Iatridis, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and pathological spinal changes are major causes of back pain, which is the top cause of global disability. Obese and diabetic individuals are at increased risk for back pain and musculoskeletal complications. Modern diets contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), cyto-toxic components which are known contributors to obesity, diabetes and accelerated aging pathologies. There is little information about potential effects of AGE rich diet on spinal pathology, which may be a contributing cause for back pain which is common in obese and diabetic individuals. This study investigated the role of specific AGE precursors (e.g. methylglyoxal-derivatives (MG)) on IVD and vertebral pathologies in aging C57BL6 mice that were fed isocaloric diets with standard (dMG+) or reduced amounts of MG derivatives (dMG-; containing 60-70% less dMG). dMG+ mice exhibited a pre-diabetic phenotype, as they were insulin resistant but not hyperglycemic. Vertebrae of dMG+ mice displayed increased cortical-thickness and cortical-area, greater MG-AGE accumulation and ectopic calcification in vertebral endplates. IVD morphology of dMG+ mice exhibited ectopic calcification, hypertrophic differentiation and glycosaminoglycan loss relative to dMG- mice. Overall, chronic exposure to dietary AGEs promoted age-accelerated IVD degeneration and vertebral alterations involving ectopic calcification which occurred in parallel with insulin resistance, and which were prevented with dMG- diet. This study described a new mouse model for diet-induced spinal degeneration, and results were in support of the hypothesis that chronic AGE ingestion could be a factor contributing to a pre-diabetic state, ectopic calcifications in spinal tissues, and musculoskeletal complications that are more generally known to occur with chronic diabetic conditions. PMID:25668621

  1. Disturbances in cholesterol, bile acid and glucose metabolism in peroxisomal 3-ketoacylCoA thiolase B deficient mice fed diets containing high or low fat contents.

    PubMed

    Nicolas-Francès, Valérie; Arnauld, Ségolène; Kaminski, Jacques; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Clémencet, Marie-Claude; Chamouton, Julie; Athias, Anne; Grober, Jacques; Gresti, Joseph; Degrace, Pascal; Lagrost, Laurent; Latruffe, Norbert; Mandard, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    The peroxisomal 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase B (ThB) catalyzes the thiolytic cleavage of straight chain 3-ketoacyl-CoAs. Up to now, the ability of ThB to interfere with lipid metabolism was studied in mice fed a laboratory chow enriched or not with the synthetic agonist Wy14,643, a pharmacological activator of the nuclear hormone receptor PPARα. The aim of the present study was therefore to determine whether ThB could play a role in obesity and lipid metabolism when mice are chronically fed a synthetic High Fat Diet (HFD) or a Low Fat Diet (LFD) as a control diet. To investigate this possibility, wild-type (WT) mice and mice deficient for Thb (Thb(-/-)) were subjected to either a synthetic LFD or a HFD for 25 weeks, and their responses were compared. First, when fed a normal regulatory laboratory chow, Thb(-/-) mice displayed growth retardation as well as a severe reduction in the plasma level of Growth Hormone (GH) and Insulin Growth Factor-I (IGF-I), suggesting alterations in the GH/IGF-1 pathway. When fed the synthetic diets, the corrected energy intake to body mass was significantly higher in Thb(-/-) mice, yet those mice were protected from HFD-induced adiposity. Importantly, Thb(-/-) mice also suffered from hypoglycemia, exhibited reduction in liver glycogen stores and circulating insulin levels under the LFD and the HFD. Thb deficiency was also associated with higher levels of plasma HDL (High Density Lipoproteins) cholesterol and increased liver content of cholesterol under both the LFD and the HFD. As shown by the plasma lathosterol to cholesterol ratio, a surrogate marker for cholesterol biosynthesis, whole body cholesterol de novo synthesis was increased in Thb(-/-) mice. By comparing liver RNA from WT mice and Thb(-/-) mice using oligonucleotide microarray and RT-qPCR, a coordinated decrease in the expression of critical cholesterol synthesizing genes and an increased expression of genes involved in bile acid synthesis (Cyp7a1, Cyp17a1, Akr1d1) were

  2. Ingestion of cinnamaldehyde, a TRPA1 agonist, reduces visceral fats in mice fed a high-fat and high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yasuko; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Narukawa, Masataka; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CNA), a pungent compound in cinnamon or dried bark of cassia, is a TRPA1 agonist. The effect of 0.1-1.0% CNA on pair-fed mice with high fat and high sucrose (HFS) diet for 1 mo was investigated. The total food intake was similar in the mice fed control and CNA diets, but the body weight showed a tendency to be lower in CNA-fed mice than in control mice. By adding CNA at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0% concentrations, the weight of the mesenteric adipose tissue decreased significantly, and there was a tendency foward lower perirenal and epididymal adipose tissue weights compared to the control. No differences were found in any blood component measured. UCP1 protein levels in the interscapular brown adipose tissue were higher in the 0.5 and 1.0% CNA groups than in the HSF group, as shown by Western blotting. Collectively, these data show that the addition of CNA diminishes visceral fat deposition in HFS diet-fed mice, in part by stimulating interscapular brown adipose tissue.

  3. Hepatic lipid profiling of deer mice fed ethanol using {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy: A dose-dependent subchronic study

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.

    2012-11-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a 2nd major cause of liver disease resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by a wide spectrum of pathologies starting from fat accumulation (steatosis) in early reversible stage to inflammation with or without fibrosis and cirrhosis in later irreversible stages. Previously, we reported significant steatosis in the livers of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup −}) vs. hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol daily for 2 months [Bhopale et al., 2006, Alcohol 39, 179–188]. However, ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 4% ethanol also showed a significant mortality. Therefore, a dose-dependent study was conducted to understand the mechanism and identify lipid(s) involved in the development of ethanol-induced fatty liver. ADH{sup −} and ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 1, 2 or 3.5% ethanol daily for 2 months and fatty infiltration in the livers were evaluated by histology and by measuring dry weights of extracted lipids. Lipid metabolomic changes in extracted lipids were determined by proton ({sup 1}H) and {sup 31}phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR data was analyzed by hierarchical clustering (HC) and principle component analysis (PCA) for pattern recognition. Extensive vacuolization by histology and significantly increased dry weights of total lipids found only in the livers of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls suggest a dose-dependent formation of fatty liver in ADH{sup −} deer mouse model. Analysis of NMR data of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls shows increases for total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), triacylglycerides and unsaturation, and decreases for free cholesterol, phospholipids and allylic and diallylic protons. Certain classes of neutral lipids (cholesterol esters, fatty acyl chain (-COCH{sub 2}-) and FAMEs) were

  4. A human apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide reduces atherosclerosis in aged apolipoprotein E null mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanyong; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Mengting; Li, Feifei; Liu, Liangchen; Du, Fen; Fan, Daping; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is well known as an antiatherogenic protein via regulating lipid metabolism and inflammation. We previously reported that a human apoE mimetic peptide, EpK, reduced atherosclerosis in apoE null (apoE-/-) mice through reducing inflammation without affecting plasma lipid levels. Here, we construct another human apoE mimetic peptide, named hEp, and investigate whether expression of hEp can reduce atherosclerotic lesion development in aged female apoE-/- mice with pre-existing lesions. We found that chemically synthesized hEp significantly decreased cholesterol accumulation induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein and the expression of inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophages. In an in vivo study, Lv-hEp-GFP lentiviruses were intravenously injected into 9 month-old apoE-/- mice. Mice were then fed a chow diet for 18 weeks. Results showed that in comparison to the Lv-GFP lentivirus injection (Lv-GFP) group, Lv-hEp-GFP lentivirus injection achieved hepatic hEp expression and secretion in apoE-/- mice. It was observed that hEp expression significantly reduced plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol levels and decreased aortic atherosclerotic lesions. This was accompanied by an increase of LDL receptor expression and a reduction of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA levels in the liver. Moreover, expression of hEp increased plasma paraoxonase-1 activity and decreased plasma myeloperoxidase activity and serum amyloid A levels. Our study provides evidence that hEp may be developed as a promising therapeutic apoE mimetic peptide for atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases through its induction of plasma VLDL/LDL cholesterol clearance as well as its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:27648138

  5. Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Graham, Leah C; Harder, Jeffrey M; Soto, Ileana; de Vries, Wilhelmine N; John, Simon W M; Howell, Gareth R

    2016-02-18

    Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the effects of the diet in AD. Astrocytosis and microglia/monocyte activation were dramatically increased in response to diet and was further increased in APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet. This increase in glial responses was associated with increased plaque burden in the hippocampus. Interestingly, given recent studies highlighting the importance of TREM2 in microglia/monocytes in AD susceptibility and progression, B6 and APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet showed significant increases TREM2+ microglia/monocytes. Therefore, an increase in TREM2+ microglia/monocytes may underlie the increased risk from a western diet to age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This study lays the foundation to fully investigate the impact of a western diet on glial responses in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Leah C.; Harder, Jeffrey M.; Soto, Ileana; de Vries, Wilhelmine N.; John, Simon W. M.; Howell, Gareth R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the effects of the diet in AD. Astrocytosis and microglia/monocyte activation were dramatically increased in response to diet and was further increased in APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet. This increase in glial responses was associated with increased plaque burden in the hippocampus. Interestingly, given recent studies highlighting the importance of TREM2 in microglia/monocytes in AD susceptibility and progression, B6 and APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet showed significant increases TREM2+ microglia/monocytes. Therefore, an increase in TREM2+ microglia/monocytes may underlie the increased risk from a western diet to age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. This study lays the foundation to fully investigate the impact of a western diet on glial responses in aging and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26888450

  7. Involvement of skin barrier dysfunction in itch-related scratching in special diet-fed hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masanori; Nabe, Takeshi; Tomozawa, Junko; Kohno, Shigekatsu

    2006-01-13

    HR-1 hairless mice fed with a special diet develop atopic-like dry skin, characterized by increased transepidermal water loss, and prolonged bouts of spontaneous scratching. In this study, the role of the skin barrier dysfunction in the prolongation of scratching was evaluated. Although the prolonged scratching was dose-dependently inhibited by opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, neither H(1) receptor antagonist, mepyramine, nor 5-HT(1/2) receptor antagonist, methysergide, affected it. Thus, the prolonged scratching could be itch-related response independent of histamine and serotonin. The application of petrolatum ointment on the skin temporarily alleviated the increase of transepidermal water loss for 60 min after treatment. Due to this alleviation in barrier dysfunction, the prolongation of scratching was significantly suppressed. However, when the barrier dysfunction relapsed, the scratching worsened. Taken together, a skin barrier dysfunction is associated with the itch-related response.

  8. Implication of fermentable carbohydrates targeting the gut microbiota on conjugated linoleic acid production in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Druart, Céline; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Dewulf, Evelyne M; De Backer, Fabienne C; Possemiers, Sam; Van de Wiele, Tom; Moens, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc; Cani, Patrice D; Larondelle, Yvan; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2013-09-28

    In vitro experiments have shown that isolated human gut bacteria are able to metabolise PUFA into conjugated PUFA like conjugated linoleic acids (CLA). The hypothesis of the present paper was that high-fat (HF) diet feeding and supplementation with fermentable carbohydrates that have prebiotic properties modulate the in vivo production of CLA by the mouse gut microbiota. Mice were treated for 4 weeks as follows: control (CT) groups were fed a standard diet; HF groups were fed a HF diet rich in linoleic acid (18 : 2n-6); the third groups were fed with the HF diet supplemented with either inulin-type fructans (HF-ITF) or arabinoxylans (HF-Ax). HF diet feeding increased rumenic acid (cis-9,trans-11-18 : 2 CLA) content both in the caecal and liver tissues compared with the CT groups. ITF supplementation had no major effect compared with the HF diet whereas Ax supplementation increased further rumenic acid (cis-9,trans-11-18 : 2 CLA) in the caecal tissue. These differences between both prebiotics may be linked to the high fat-binding capacity of Ax that provides more substrates for bacterial metabolism and to differential modulation of the gut microbiota (specific increase in Roseburia spp. in HF-Ax v. HF). In conclusion, these experiments supply the proof of concept that the mouse gut microbiota produces CLA in vivo, with consequences on the level of CLA in the caecal and liver tissues. We postulate that the CLA-producing bacteria could be a mediator to consider in the metabolic effects of both HF diet feeding and prebiotic supplementation.

  9. Nitric oxide (NO)--production and regulation of insulin secretion in islets of freely fed and fasted mice.

    PubMed

    Eckersten, Dag; Henningsson, Ragnar

    2012-02-10

    Production of nitric oxide through the action of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been detected in the islets of Langerhans. The inducible isoform of NOS (iNOS) is induced by cytokines and might contribute to the development of type-1 diabetes, while the constitutive isoform (cNOS) is thought to be implicated in the physiological regulation of insulin secretion. In the present study we have detected and quantified islet cNOS- and iNOS-derived NO production concomitant with measuring its influence on insulin secretion in the presence of different secretagogues: glucose, L-arginine, L-leucine and α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) both during fasting and freely fed conditions. In intact islets from freely fed mice both cNOS- and iNOS-activity was greatly increased by glucose (20 mmol/l). Fasting induced islet iNOS activity at both physiological (7 mmol/l) and high (20 mmol/l) glucose concentrations. NOS blockade increased insulin secretion both during freely fed conditions and after fasting. L-arginine stimulated islet cNOS activity and did not affect islet iNOS activity. l-leucine or KIC, known to enter the TCA cycle without affecting glycolysis, did not affect either islet cNOS- or iNOS activity. Accordingly, insulin secretion stimulated by L-leucine or KIC was unaffected by addition of L-NAME both during feeding and fasting. We conclude that both high glucose concentrations and fasting increase islet total NO production (mostly iNOS derived) which inhibit insulin secretion. The insulin secretagogues L-leucine and KIC, which do not affect glycolysis, do not interfere with the islet NO-NOS system.

  10. Maternal Dietary Vitamin D Does Not Program Systemic Inflammation and Bone Health in Adult Female Mice Fed an Obesogenic Diet

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Christopher R.; Chen, Jianmin; Wen, Bijun; Sacco, Sandra M.; Taibi, Amel; Ward, Wendy E.; Comelli, Elena M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with systemic inflammation and impaired bone health. Vitamin D regulates bone metabolism, and has anti-inflammatory properties and epigenetic effects. We showed that exposure to high dietary vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation beneficially programs serum concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bone structure in male offspring fed an obesogenic diet. Here we assessed if this effect is also apparent in females. C57BL/6J dams were fed AIN93G diet with high (5000 IU/kg diet) or low (25 IU/kg diet) vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation. Post-weaning, female offspring remained on their respective vitamin D level or were switched and fed a high fat and sucrose diet (44.2% fat, 19.8% sucrose) until age seven months when glucose response, adiposity, serum LPS, and bone mineral, trabecular and cortical structure, and biomechanical strength properties of femur and vertebra were assessed. There was no evidence for a programming effect of vitamin D for any outcomes. However, females exposed to a high vitamin D diet post-weaning had higher bone mineral content (p = 0.037) and density (p = 0.015) of lumbar vertebra. This post-weaning benefit suggests that in females, bone mineral accrual but not bone structure is compromised with low vitamin D status in utero until weaning in an obesogenic context. PMID:27792161

  11. COMPARISON OF GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES FROM MICE FED THREE TOXICOLOGICALLY DIFFERENT TRIAZOLE-BASED CONAZOLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was designed to identify the underlying molecular mechanism for the induction of mouse liver tumors by conazoles. CD-1 mice were treated with the tumor producing conazoles, triadimefon (1800, 500, or 100 ppm), or propiconazole (2500, 500, or 100 ppm), or the non...

  12. Taurine Treatment Modulates Circadian Rhythms in Mice Fed A High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Ana Lucia C.; Figueiredo, Hugo; Rebuffat, Sandra A.; Vieira, Elaine; Gomis, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Close ties have been made among certain nutrients, obesity, type 2 diabetes and circadian clocks. Among nutrients, taurine has been documented as being effective against obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the impact of taurine on circadian clocks has not been elucidated. We investigated whether taurine can modulate or correct disturbances in daily rhythms caused by a high-fat diet in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided in four groups: control (C), control + taurine (C+T), high-fat diet (HFD) and HFD + taurine (HFD+T). They were administered 2% taurine in their drinking water for 10 weeks. Mice were euthanized at 6:00, 12:00, 18:00, and 24:00. HFD mice increased body weight, visceral fat and food intake, as well as higher levels of glucose, insulin and leptin, throughout the 24 h. Taurine prevented increments in food intake, body weight and visceral fat, improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and reduced disturbances in the 24 h patterns of plasma insulin and leptin. HFD downregulated the expression of clock genes Rev-erbα, Bmal1, and Per1 in pancreatic islets. Taurine normalized the gene and protein expression of PER1 in beta-cells, which suggests that it could be beneficial for the correction of daily rhythms and the amelioration of obesity and diabetes. PMID:27857215

  13. Eicosapentaenoic acid regulates brown adipose tissue gene expression and metabolism in high fat fed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a thermogenic tissue, a key regulator of energy balance and a potential therapeutic target for obesity. We previously reported that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) reduced high fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice, independent of energy intake. We hy...

  14. Mango modulates body fat and plasma glucose and lipids in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Edralin A; Li, Wenjia; Peterson, Sandra K; Brown, Angela; Kuvibidila, Solo; Perkins-Veazie, Penny; Clarke, Stephen L; Smith, Brenda J

    2011-11-01

    Consumption of fruits and vegetables has been investigated for their role in the prevention of many chronic conditions. Among the fruits, mango provides numerous bioactive compounds such as carotenoids, vitamin C and phenolic compounds, which have been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study examined the effects of dietary supplementation of freeze-dried mango pulp, in comparison with the hypolipidaemic drug, fenofibrate, and the hypoglycaemic drug, rosiglitazone, in reducing adiposity and alterations in glucose metabolism and lipid profile in mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Male C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into six treatment groups (eight to nine/group): control (10 % energy from fat); HF (60 % energy from fat); HF+1 or 10 % freeze-dried mango (w/w); HF+fenofibrate (500 mg/kg diet); HF+rosiglitazone (50 mg/kg diet). After 8 weeks of treatment, mice receiving the HF diet had a higher percentage body fat (P = 0·0205) and epididymal fat mass (P = 0·0037) compared with the other treatment groups. Both doses of freeze-dried mango, similar to fenofibrate and rosiglitazone, prevented the increase in epididymal fat mass and the percentage of body fat. Freeze-dried mango supplementation at the 1 % dose improved glucose tolerance as shown by approximately 35 % lower blood glucose area under the curve compared with the HF group. Moreover, freeze-dried mango lowered insulin resistance, as indicated by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, to a similar extent as rosiglitazone and modulated NEFA. The present findings demonstrate that incorporation of freeze-dried mango in the diet of mice improved glucose tolerance and lipid profile and reduced adiposity associated with a HF diet.

  15. Protective effect of agaro-oligosaccharides on gut dysbiosis and colon tumorigenesis in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Higashimura, Yasuki; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Ushiroda, Chihiro; Ohnogi, Hiromu; Kudo, Yoko; Yasui, Madoka; Inui, Seina; Hisada, Takayoshi; Honda, Akira; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2016-03-15

    High-fat diet (HFD)-induced alteration in the gut microbial composition, known as dysbiosis, is increasingly recognized as a major risk factor for various diseases, including colon cancer. This report describes a comprehensive investigation of the effect of agaro-oligosaccharides (AGO) on HFD-induced gut dysbiosis, including alterations in short-chain fatty acid contents and bile acid metabolism in mice. C57BL/6N mice were fed a control diet or HFD, with or without AGO. Terminal restriction fragment-length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis produced their fecal microbiota profiles. Profiles of cecal organic acids and serum bile acids were determined, respectively, using HPLC and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry systems. T-RFLP analyses showed that an HFD changed the gut microbiota significantly. Changes in the microbiota composition induced by an HFD were characterized by a decrease in the order Lactobacillales and by an increase in the Clostridium subcluster XIVa. These changes of the microbiota community generated by HFD treatment were suppressed by AGO supplementation. As supported by the data of the proportion of Lactobacillales order, the concentration of lactic acid increased in the HFD + AGO group. Data from the serum bile acid profile showed that the level of deoxycholic acid, a carcinogenic secondary bile acid produced by gut bacteria, was increased in HFD-receiving mice. The upregulation tended to be suppressed by AGO supplementation. Finally, results show that AGO supplementation suppressed the azoxymethane-induced generation of aberrant crypt foci in the colon derived from HFD-treated mice. Our results suggest that oral intake of AGO prevents HFD-induced gut dysbiosis, thereby inhibiting colon carcinogenesis.

  16. The Intestinal Peptide Transporter PEPT1 Is Involved in Food Intake Regulation in Mice Fed a High-Protein Diet

    PubMed Central

    Sailer, Manuela; Daniel, Hannelore

    2011-01-01

    High-protein diets are effective in achieving weight loss which is mainly explained by increased satiety and thermogenic effects. Recent studies suggest that the effects of protein-rich diets on satiety could be mediated by amino acids like leucine or arginine. Although high-protein diets require increased intestinal amino acid absorption, amino acid and peptide absorption has not yet been considered to contribute to satiety effects. We here demonstrate a novel finding that links intestinal peptide transport processes to food intake, but only when a protein-rich diet is provided. When mice lacking the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1 were fed diets containing 8 or 21 energy% of protein, no differences in food intake and weight gain were observed. However, upon feeding a high-protein (45 energy%) diet, Pept1−/− mice reduced food intake much more pronounced than control animals. Although there was a regain in food consumption after a few days, no weight gain was observed which was associated with a reduced intestinal energy assimilation and increased fecal energy losses. Pept1−/− mice on high-protein diet displayed markedly reduced plasma leptin levels during the period of very low food intake, suggesting a failure of leptin signaling to increase energy intake. This together with an almost two-fold elevated plasma arginine level in Pept1−/− but not wildtype mice, suggests that a cross-talk of arginine with leptin signaling in brain, as described previously, could cause these striking effects on food intake. PMID:22031831

  17. Hexim1 heterozygosity stabilizes atherosclerotic plaque and decreased steatosis in ApoE null mice fed atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Rozenberg, Inna; Iqbal, Jahangir; Hussain, M Mahmood; Beckles, Daniel; Mascareno, Eduardo

    2017-02-01

    Hexim-1 is an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II transcription elongation. Decreased Hexim-1 expression in animal models of chronic diseases such as left ventricular hypertrophy, obesity and cancer triggered significant changes in adaptation and remodeling. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Hexim1 in lipid metabolism focused in the progression of atherosclerosis and steatosis. We used the C57BL6 apolipoprotein E (ApoE null) crossed bred to C57BL6Hexim1 heterozygous mice to obtain ApoE null - Hexim1 heterozygous mice (ApoE-HT). Both ApoE null backgrounds were fed high fat diet for twelve weeks. Then, we evaluated lipid metabolism, atherosclerotic plaque formation and liver steatosis. In order to understand changes in the transcriptome of both backgrounds during the progression of steatosis, we performed Affymetrix mouse 430 2.0 microarray. After 12 weeks of HFD, ApoE null and ApoE-HT showed similar increase of cholesterol and triglycerides in plasma. Plaque composition was altered in ApoE-HT. Additionally, liver triglycerides and steatosis were decreased in ApoE-HT mice. Affymetrix analysis revealed that decreased steatosis might be due to impaired inducible SOCS3 expression in ApoE-HT mice. In conclusion, decreased Hexim-1 expression does not alter cholesterol metabolism in ApoE null background after HFD. However, it promotes stable atherosclerotic plaque and decreased steatosis by promoting the anti-inflammatory TGFβ pathway and blocking the expression of the inducible and pro-inflammatory expression of SOCS3 respectively.

  18. Hydrodynamic delivery of FGF21 gene alleviates obesity and fatty liver in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingming; Ma, Yongjie; Cui, Ran; Liu, Dexi

    2014-07-10

    FGF21 is a secreted protein that plays critical roles in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effects of FGF21 gene transfer on C57BL/6 mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). We demonstrate that transfer of the FGF21 gene using a hydrodynamics-based procedure increased mRNA levels of FGF21 exclusively in the liver, consequently generating a sustained high level of FGF21 protein in blood that peaked at 500 ng/ml 1 day after injection, leading to a variety of beneficial effects including blockade of HFD-induced obesity, alleviation of fatty liver and improvement in glucose homeostasis. These effects were associated with altered expression of Ucp1, Dio2, Pgc1α, Pparγ2, Mgat1, F4/80, Mcp1 and Tnfα, which are involved in thermogenesis, lipogenesis and chronic inflammation in the liver and adipose tissues. Transfer of the FGF21 gene in HFD-induced obese mice greatly increased the expression of thermogenic genes in adipose tissue, resulting in similar improvements in systemic metabolism including reduction of adiposity, alleviation of fatty liver and attenuation of insulin resistance. Mechanistic studies on the effects of FGF21 gene transfer in lean mice revealed that mice transferred with FGF21 gene displayed suppressed lipogenesis in the liver and enhanced thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue which was coincident with a significant improvement in glucose tolerance. Collectively, our results suggest that transfer of the FGF21 gene could be considered a promising approach for treating obesity and its complications.

  19. Zinc deficiency augments leptin production and exacerbates macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Jie; Bao, Shengying; Bolin, Eric R; Burris, Dara L; Xu, Xiaohua; Sun, Qinghua; Killilea, David W; Shen, Qiwen; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Belury, Martha A; Failla, Mark L; Knoell, Daren L

    2013-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency and obesity are global public health problems. Zn deficiency is associated with obesity and comorbid conditions that include insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the function of Zn in obesity remains unclear. Using a mouse model of combined high-fat and low-Zn intake (0.5-1.5 mg/kg), we investigated whether Zn deficiency exacerbates the extent of adiposity as well as perturbations in metabolic and immune function. C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to receive either a high-fat diet (HFD) or a control (C) diet for 6 wk, followed by further subdivision into 2 additional groups fed Zn-deficient diets (C-Zn, HFD-Zn), along with a C diet and an HFD, for 3 wk (n = 8-9 mice/group). The extent of visceral fat, insulin resistance, or systemic inflammation was unaffected by Zn deficiency. Strikingly, Zn deficiency significantly augmented circulating leptin concentrations (HFD-Zn vs. HFD: 3.15 ± 0.16 vs. 2.59 ± 0.12 μg/L, respectively) and leptin signaling in the liver of obese mice. Furthermore, gene expression of macrophage-specific markers ADAM8 (A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 8) and CD68 (cluster of differentiation 68) was significantly greater in adipose tissue in the HFD-Zn group than in the HFD group, as confirmed by CD68 protein analysis, indicative of increased macrophage infiltration. Inspection of Zn content and mRNA profiles of all Zn transporters in the adipose tissue revealed alterations of Zn metabolism to obesity and Zn deficiency. Our results demonstrate that Zn deficiency increases leptin production and exacerbates macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue in obese mice, indicating the importance of Zn in metabolic and immune dysregulation in obesity.

  20. Chemoprevention of intestinal polyps in ApcMin/+ mice fed with western or balanced diets by drinking annurca apple polyphenol extract.

    PubMed

    Fini, Lucia; Piazzi, Giulia; Daoud, Yahya; Selgrad, Michael; Maegawa, Shinji; Garcia, Melissa; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Romano, Marco; Graziani, Giulia; Vitaglione, Paola; Carmack, Susanne W; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Genta, Robert M; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Boland, C Richard; Ricciardiello, Luigi

    2011-06-01

    The Western diet (WD) is associated with a higher incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) than the Mediterranean diet. Polyphenols extracted from Annurca apple showed chemopreventive properties in CRC cells. A multifactorial, four-arm study by using wild-type (wt) and Apc(Min/+) mice was carried out to evaluate the effect on polyp number and growth of APE treatment (60 μmol/L) ad libitum in drinking water combined with a WD or a balanced diet (BD) for 12 weeks. Compared with APE treatment, we found a significant drop in body weight (P < 0.0001), severe rectal bleeding (P = 0.0076), presence of extraintestinal tumors, and poorer activity status (P = 0.0034) in water-drinking Apc(Min/+) mice, more remarkably in the WD arm. In the BD and WD groups, APE reduced polyp number (35% and 42%, respectively, P < 0.001) and growth (60% and 52%, respectively, P < 0.0001) in both colon and small intestine. Increased antioxidant activity was found in wt animals fed both diets and in Apc(Min/+) mice fed WD and drinking APE. Reduced lipid peroxidation was found in Apc(Min/+) mice drinking APE fed both diets and in wt mice fed WD. In normal mucosa, mice drinking water had lower global levels of DNA methylation than mice drinking APE. APE treatment is highly effective in reducing polyps in Apc(Min/+) mice and supports the concept that a mixture of phytochemicals, as they are naturally present in foods, represent a plausible chemopreventive agent for CRC, particularly in populations at high risk for colorectal neoplasia.

  1. Beneficial effects of rosuvastatin on insulin resistance, adiposity, inflammatory markers and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice fed on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Fraulob, Julio Cesar; Souza-Mello, Vanessa; Aguila, Marcia Barbosa; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ST (rosuvastatin) and GZ (rosiglitazone) on IR (insulin resistance) and on liver as well as adipose tissue in mice fed on an HF (high-fat) diet. Our data show that treatment with ST resulted in a marked improvement in insulin sensitivity characterized by enhanced glucose clearance during the insulin tolerance test and a 70% decrease in the HOMA-IR (homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) index level (P=0.0008). The ST-treated mice exhibited lower gains in BM (body mass; -8%; P<0.01) and visceral fat pad thickness (-60%; P<0.01) compared with the untreated HF group. In comparison with HF-diet-fed mice, HF+ST-treated mice showed a significant reduction in hepatomegaly and liver steatosis (-6%, P<0.05; and -21%, P<0.01 respectively). In HF+ST-treated mice, the hepatic TAG (triacylglycerol) levels were reduced by 58% compared with the HF group (P<0.01). In addition, the expression of SREBP-1c (sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein-1c) was decreased by 50% in the livers of HF+ST-treated mice (P<0.01) relative to the HF-diet-fed mice. The levels of resistin were lower in the HF+ST-treated group compared with the HF group (44% less, P< 0.01). In conclusion, we demonstrated that ST treatment improved insulin sensitivity and decreased liver steatosis in mice fed on an HF diet. Furthermore, ST reduced BM gains, improved the circulating levels of plasma cholesterol and TAG, and reduced hepatic TAG, which was concomitant with lower resistin levels.

  2. Action of a serotonergic anorectic in meal-fed mice working for food.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly L; Cadiz, Emilia M; Kenney, Jessica; Kwiatkowski, Veronica

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a serotonergic anorectic agent, dexnorfenfluramine (DNOR), on food intake in mice whose meals were constrained to specified periods each day and by effort. Mice were forced to adopt a human-like pattern of regular meals by making food available for four periods of 40 min/24-h period, mostly at night. They lived in behavior test chambers with a closed economy for food and were required to emit a fixed unit price (FUP) of either 2 or 25 nose pokes (FUP2, FUP25) to receive a 20 mg pellet of food. Once responding and intake were stable, mice were injected with a vehicle or DNOR (3 or 6 mg/kg) 1 h before a specified feeding opportunity. Food intake was dose-dependently suppressed at the next meal and to a greater extent when the cost of food was high (FUP25). Within a meal, the effect of the drug was the greatest in the first half of the available time. Therefore, the anorectic effect of DNOR was modified by the concurrent cost of food.

  3. Colonic inflammation and enhanced-beta-catenin signaling accompany an increase of the Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae in the hind gut of high-fat diet-fed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of an obesigenic / high-fat (HF) diet is associated with a high colon cancer risk, and may alter the gut microbiota. To test the hypothesis that a HF feeding accelerates inflammatory process and changes gut microbiome composition, C57BL/6 mice were fed a HF (45% energy) or low-fat (LF) (...

  4. Colonic inflammation and enhanced-beta-catenin signaling accompany an increase of the Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae in the hind gut of high-fat diet-fed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of an obesigenic / high-fat (HF) diet is associated with an increase of inflammation-related colon cancer risk and may alter the gut microbiota. To test the hypothesis that a HF feeding accelerates inflammatory processes and changes gut microbiome composition, C57BL/6 mice were fed a HF ...

  5. Intake of farmed Atlantic salmon fed soybean oil increases hepatic levels of arachidonic acid-derived oxylipins and ceramides in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction of vegetable ingredients in fish feed has affected the fatty acid composition in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L). Here we investigated how changes in fish feed affected the metabolism of mice fed diets containing fillets from such farmed salmon. We demonstrate that replacement of...

  6. Effects of pectin lyase-modified red ginseng extracts in high-fat diet-fed obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hak-Yong; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Park, Young-Mi; Moon, Dae-In; Oh, Hong-Geun; Kwon, Dae-Young; Yang, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Okjin; Kim, Dong-Woo; Yoo, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Se-Chul; Lee, Kun-Hee; Seol, Su-Yeon; Park, Yong-Sik; Park, Jong-Dae

    2014-01-01

    Red ginseng and its extracts have been used as traditional medicines and functional foods in countries worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine the bioavailability of pectin lyase-modified red ginseng extracts (GS-E3D), and the effects of GS-E3D on adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 adipocytes, as well as on metabolic disorders such as hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and fatty liver in high-fat diet fed obese C57BL/6 mice. Mice were divided into 5 groups: normal diet group, high fat diet-vehicle group, high fat diet + 0.1 g/kg GS-E3D (0.1-GS-E3D), high fat diet + 0.3 g/kg (0.3-GS-E3D), high fat diet + 1.0 g/kg (1.0-GS-E3D). Treatment of GS-E3D reduced differentiation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with low cytotoxicity. In the animal model, compared to the high fat diet control, serum glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, TG, and leptin level were reduced in treatment animals in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we found that GS-E3D could decrease total hepatic lipid droplets. These results suggest that GS-E3D, as a dietary supplement, has beneficial effects on obesity and may have useful effects in health-care products. PMID:25628725

  7. Gut Microbiota Modulation Attenuated the Hypolipidemic Effect of Simvastatin in High-Fat/Cholesterol-Diet Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    He, Xuyun; Zheng, Ningning; He, Jiaojiao; Liu, Can; Feng, Jing; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2017-04-10

    The hypolipidemic effect of simvastatin varies greatly among patients. In the current study, we investigated the gut microbial-involved mechanisms underlying the different responses to simvastatin. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into control (Con), high-fat/cholesterol diet (HFD), antibiotic (AB), simvastatin (SV) and antibiotic_simvastatin (AB_SV) groups, respectively. At the end of the experiment, serum samples were collected for lipids and metabolomic analysis, and liver tissues for histology, gene and protein expression analysis. The results showed that antibiotic treatment not only altered the composition of gut microbiota, but attenuated the hypolipidemic effect of SV. A total of 16 differential metabolites between SV and HFD groups were identified with metabolomics, while most of them showed no statistical differences between AB_SV and HFD groups, and similar changes were also observed in bile acids profile. The expressions of several genes and proteins involved in regulating bile acids synthesis were significantly reversed by SV, but not AB_SV in HFD fed mice. In summary, our current study indicated that the hypolipidemic effect of SV was correlated with the composition of the gut microbiota, and the attenuated hypolipidemic effect of SV by gut microbiota modulation was associated with a suppression of bile acids synthesis from cholesterol.

  8. Cinnamaldehyde supplementation prevents fasting-induced hyperphagia, lipid accumulation, and inflammation in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Khare, Pragyanshu; Jagtap, Sneha; Jain, Yachna; Baboota, Ritesh K; Mangal, Priyanka; Boparai, Ravneet K; Bhutani, Kamlesh K; Sharma, Shyam S; Premkumar, Louis S; Kondepudi, Kanthi K; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde, a bioactive component of cinnamon, is increasingly gaining interest for its preventive and therapeutic effects against metabolic complications like type-2 diabetes. This study is an attempt to understand the effect of cinnamaldehyde in high-fat diet (HFD)-associated increase in fasting-induced hyperphagia and related hormone levels, adipose tissue lipolysis and inflammation, and selected cecal microbial count in mice. Cinnamaldehyde, at 40 µM dose, prevented lipid accumulation and altered gene expression toward lipolytic phenotype in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell lines. In vivo, cinnamaldehyde coadministration prevented HFD-induced body weight gain, decreased fasting-induced hyperphagia, as well as circulating leptin and leptin/ghrelin ratio. In addition to that, cinnamaldehyde altered serum biochemical parameters related to lipolysis, that is, glycerol and free fatty acid levels. At transcriptional level, cinnamaldehyde increased anorectic gene expression in hypothalamus and lipolytic gene expression in visceral white adipose tissue. Furthermore, cinnamaldehyde also decreased serum IL-1β and inflammatory gene expression in visceral white adipose tissue. However, cinnamaldehyde did not modulate the population of selected gut microbial (Lactobacillus, Bifidibaceria, and Roseburia) count in cecal content. In conclusion, cinnamaldehyde increased adipose tissue lipolysis, decreased fasting-induced hyperphagia, normalized circulating levels of leptin/ghrelin ratio, and reduced inflammation in HFD-fed mice, which augurs well for its antiobesity role.

  9. Anti-obesity effects of Rapha diet® preparation in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Kyung, Jangbeen; Kim, Dajeong; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Bang, Paul; Park, Dongsun; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2012-12-01

    The anti-obesity activities of Rapha diet® preparation containing silkworm pupa peptide, Garcinia cambogia, white bean extract, mango extract, raspberry extract, cocoa extract, and green tea extract were investigated in mice with dietary obesity. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) containing 3% Rapha diet® preparation for 8 weeks, and blood and tissue parameters of obesity were analyzed. The HFD markedly enhanced body weight gain by increasing the weights of epididymal, perirenal, and mesenteric adipose tissues. The increased body weight gain induced by HFD was significantly reduced by feeding Rapha diet® preparation, in which decreases in the weight of abdominal adipose tissue and the size of abdominal adipocytes were confirmed by microscopic examination. Long-term feeding of HFD increased blood triglycerides and cholesterol levels, leading to hepatic lipid accumulation. However, Rapha diet® preparation not only reversed the blood lipid levels, but also attenuated hepatic steatosis. The results indicate that Rapha diet® preparation could improve HFD-induced obesity by reducing both lipid accumulation and the size of adipocytes.

  10. Purified Betacyanins from Hylocereus undatus Peel Ameliorate Obesity and Insulin Resistance in High-Fat-Diet-Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Haizhao; Chu, Qiang; Xu, Dongdong; Xu, Yang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-13

    Natural bioactive compounds in food have been shown to be beneficial in preventing the development of obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic diseases. Increasing evidence indicates that betacyanins possess free-radical-scavenging and antioxidant activities, suggesting their beneficial effects on metabolic disorders. The main objective of this study was to isolate and identify the betaycanins from Hylocereus undatus (white-fleshed pitaya) peel and evaluate their ability to ameliorate obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis in high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. The purified pitaya peel betacyanins (PPBNs) were identified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), and the male C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat diet, HFD, or HFD supplemented with PPBNs for 14 weeks. Our results showed that the white-fleshed pitaya peel contains 14 kinds of betacyanins and dietary PPBNs reduced HFD-induced body weight gain and ameliorated adipose tissue hypertrophy, hepatosteatosis, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Moreover, the hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that PPBN supplementation increased the expression levels of lipid-metabolism-related genes (AdipoR2, Cpt1a, Cpt1b, Acox1, PPARγ, Insig1, and Insig2) and FGF21-related genes (β-Klotho and FGFR1/2) but decreased the expression level of Fads2, Fas, and FGF21, suggesting that the protective effect of PPBNs might be associated with the induced fatty acid oxidation, decreased fatty acid biosynthesis, and alleviated FGF21 resistance.

  11. Flow cytometric analysis of age-related changes in intestine intraepithelial lymphocyte subsets and their functional preservation after feeding mice on spirulina.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Osamu; Katayanagi, Yuki; Ishii, Kyoko; Kato, Toshimitsu

    2009-10-01

    We investigated age-related changes in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) subsets in mice by flow cytometric analysis and their functional preservation as affected by feeding Spirulina, a cyanobacterium that is known to possess various therapeutic effects, including immune modulation activity. The number of cells possessing the leukocyte-common antigen CD45(+) cells in mice (43 weeks old) of the aged group, used as a representative marker for IELs, was significantly lower than that of adult mice (5 weeks old). Either the proportion or the number of CD45(+)CD8(+) cells of the aged mice was significantly lower than that of adult mice, corresponding to previous reports. Proportions and numbers of CD4(+)CD8(+) cells in aged mice, on the other hand, were higher than those in adult mice. Increased or decreased levels of the cell surface antigens observed in the aged mice tended to be restored in aged mice fed Spirulina (aged-SP group), which ingested a hot water extract of Spirulina (SpHW). In fact, the proportions of CD45(+)CD8(+) cells and CD45(+)TCRgammadelta(+) cells in the aged-SP group significantly increased in comparison to the control aged group, which ingested ordinary chow and water ad libitum. These results suggest that ingestion of SpHW in the aged-SP group may contribute to the functional preservation of the intestinal epithelium as a first line of mucosal barrier against infectious agents through retaining the number of certain IELs. Changes in the number of other IEL subsets and blood cells are also discussed.

  12. Differential Insulin Secretion of High-Fat Diet-Fed C57BL/6NN and C57BL/6NJ Mice: Implications of Mixed Genetic Background in Metabolic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Attané, Camille; Peyot, Marie-Line; Lussier, Roxane; Zhang, Dongwei; Joly, Erik; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Many metabolic studies employ tissue-specific gene knockout mice, which requires breeding of floxed gene mice, available mostly on C57BL/6N (NN) genetic background, with cre or Flp recombinase-expressing mice, available on C57BL/6J (JJ) background, resulting in the generation of mixed C57BL/6NJ (NJ) genetic background mice. Recent awareness of many genetic differences between NN and JJ strains including the deletion of nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (nnt), necessitates examination of the consequence of mixed NJ background on glucose tolerance, beta cell function and other metabolic parameters. Male mice with NN and NJ genetic background were fed with normal or high fat diets (HFD) for 12 weeks and glucose and insulin homeostasis were studied. Genotype had no effect on body weight and food intake in mice fed normal or high fat diets. Insulinemia in the fed and fasted states and after a glucose challenge was lower in HFD-fed NJ mice, even though their glycemia and insulin sensitivity were similar to NN mice. NJ mice showed mild glucose intolerance. Moreover, glucose- but not KCl-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated islets was decreased in HFD-fed NJ vs NN mice without changes in insulin content and beta cell mass. Under normal diet, besides reduced fed insulinemia, NN and NJ mice presented similar metabolic parameters. However, HFD-fed NJ mice displayed lower fed and fasted insulinemia and glucose-induced insulin secretion in vivo and ex vivo, as compared to NN mice. These results strongly caution against using unmatched mixed genetic background C57BL/6 mice for comparisons, particularly under HFD conditions. PMID:27403868

  13. Age Sensitivity of Behavioral Tests and Brain Substrates of Normal Aging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kennard, John A.; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of age sensitivity, the capacity of a behavioral test to reliably detect age-related changes, has utility in the design of experiments to elucidate processes of normal aging. We review the application of these tests in studies of normal aging and compare and contrast the age sensitivity of the Barnes maze, eyeblink classical conditioning, fear conditioning, Morris water maze, and rotorod. These tests have all been implemented to assess normal age-related changes in learning and memory in rodents, which generalize in many cases to age-related changes in learning and memory in all mammals, including humans. Behavioral assessments are a valuable means to measure functional outcomes of neuroscientific studies of aging. Highlighted in this review are the attributes and limitations of these measures in mice in the context of age sensitivity and processes of brain aging. Attributes of these tests include reliability and validity as assessments of learning and memory, well-defined neural substrates, and sensitivity to neural and pharmacological manipulations and disruptions. These tests engage the hippocampus and/or the cerebellum, two structures centrally involved in learning and memory that undergo functional and anatomical changes in normal aging. A test that is less well represented in studies of normal aging, the context pre-exposure facilitation effect (CPFE) in fear conditioning, is described as a method to increase sensitivity of contextual fear conditioning to changes in the hippocampus. Recommendations for increasing the age sensitivity of all measures of normal aging in mice are included, as well as a discussion of the potential of the under-studied CPFE to advance understanding of subtle hippocampus-mediated phenomena. PMID:21647305

  14. Effects of sleep deprivation and aging on long-term and remote memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a month after training, sleep-deprived and control aged animals performed similarly, primarily due to remote memory decay in the control aged animals. Gene expression analysis supported the finding that SD has similar effects on the hippocampus in young and aged mice. PMID:25776037

  15. Effects of Dietary Fibers on Weight Gain, Carbohydrate Metabolism and Gastric Ghrelin Gene Expression in High Fat Diet Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong Q.; Zuberi, Aamir; Zhang, Xian H.; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Qin, Jianhua; Ye, Xin; Son, Leslie; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects for three types of dietary fibers, i.e. sugar cane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY) and cellulose (CEL) on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into four groups that consumed high fat-diets or high fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL respectively. After baseline measurements were assessed for body weight, plasma insulin, glucose, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), animals were treated for 12 weeks. Parameters were re-evaluated at end of study. Whereas there was no difference at the baseline, body weight gains in the PSY and SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL group at end of study, No difference in body weight was observed between the PSY and SCF animals. Body composition analysis demonstrated that fat mass in the SCF group was considerably lower than in the CEL and HFD groups. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and areas under curve of IPGTT were also significantly lower in the SCF and PSY groups than in the CEL and HFD groups. Moreover, fasting plasma concentrations of leptin were significantly lower and GLP-1 level was two-fold higher in the SCF and PSY mice than in the HFD and CEL mice. Ghrelin mRNA levels of stomach in SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL and HFD groups as well. These results suggest differences in response to dietary fiber intake in this animal model as high fat diets incorporating dietary fibers such as SCF and PSY appeared to attenuate weight gain, enhance insulin sensitivity, and modulate leptin and GLP-1 secretion and gastric ghrelin gene expression. PMID:17998014

  16. BSN723T Prevents Atherosclerosis and Weight Gain in ApoE Knockout Mice Fed a Western Diet

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jarrod; Ensor, Charles; Gardner, Scott; Smith, Rebecca; Lodder, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study tests the hypothesis that BSN723T can prevent the development of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- knockout mice fed a Western (high fat, high cholesterol, and high sucrose) diet. BSN723T is a combination drug therapy consisting of D-tagatose and dihydromyricetin (BSN723). Background D-tagatose has an antihyperglycemic effect in animal and human studies and shows promise as a treatment for type 2 diabetes and obesity. Many claims regarding BSN723's pharmacological activities have been made including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-atherosclerotic effects. To our knowledge this is the first study that combines D-tagatose and BSN723 for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and the prevention of atherosclerosis. Methods ApoE-deficient mice were randomized into five groups with equivalent mean body weights. The mice were given the following diets for 8 weeks: Group 1 - Standard diet; Group 2 - Western diet; Group 3 - Western diet formulated with D-tagatose; Group 4 - Western diet formulated with BSN723; Group 5 - Western diet formulated with BSN723T. Mice were measured for weight gain, tissue and organ weights, total serum cholesterol and triglycerides and formation of atherosclerosis. Results The addition of D-tagatose, either alone or in combination with BSN723, prevented the increase in adipose tissue and weight gain brought on by the Western diet. Both D-tagatose and BSN723 alone reduced total cholesterol and the formation of atherosclerosis in the aorta compared to mice on the Western diet. Addition of BSN723 to D-tagatose (BSN723T) did not increase efficacy in prevention of increases in cholesterol or atherosclerosis compared to D-tagatose alone. Conclusion Addition of either D-tagatose or BSN723 alone to a Western diet prevented weight gain, increases in total serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and the formation of atherosclerosis. However, there was no additive or synergistic effect on the

  17. Rosa Mosqueta Oil Prevents Oxidative Stress and Inflammation through the Upregulation of PPAR-α and NRF2 in C57BL/6J Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    González-Mañán, Daniel; D'Espessailles, Amanda; Dossi, Camila G; San Martín, Marcela; Mancilla, Rodrigo A; Tapia, Gladys S

    2017-03-15

    Background: Rosa mosqueta (RM) oil is characterized by high concentrations of antioxidants and α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3). We have previously demonstrated in male C57BL/6J mice that RM decreases hepatic steatosis, a condition strongly associated with oxidative stress and inflammation.Objective: We studied the molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of RM in preventing high-fat diet (HFD)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation.Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice aged 28 d and weighing 12-14 g were divided into the following groups and fed for 12 wk: control diet (CD; 10% fat, 20% protein, and 70% carbohydrates); CD + RM (1.94 mg ALA ⋅ g body weight(-1) ⋅ d(-1) administered by oral gavage); HFD (60% fat, 20% protein, and 20% carbohydrates); and HFD + RM. General parameters (body weight, visceral fat, and histology); glucose metabolism [homeostasis model assessment and blood glucose area under the curve (AUC)]; oxidative stress [hepatic nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like-2 (NRF2) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) concentrations]; and inflammation [hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1) concentrations, blood tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) concentrations, and Tnfa and Il1b mRNA expression in liver and visceral adipose tissue] were evaluated.Results: In the HFD + RM mice, the final body weight (24.8 ± 1.1 g) was 19% lower than in the HFD mice (30.6 ± 2.8 g) (P < 0.05). Visceral fat was 34% lower in the HFD + RM mice than in the HFD mice (P < 0.05). The blood glucose AUC was 29% lower and Tnfa and Il1b expression levels were 47% and 59% lower, respectively, in the HFD + RM mice than in the HFD mice (P < 0.05). HFD + RM mice had 40% less hepatic steatosis (P < 0.05) and lower upregulation of PPAR-α (33%), ACOX1 (50%), NRF2 (39%), and HO-1 (68%) protein concentrations than did the HFD mice (P < 0.05).Conclusions: Our findings suggest that RM supplementation prevents

  18. Runx3 deficiency results in myeloproliferative disorder in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chelsia Qiuxia; Motoda, Lena; Satake, Masanobu; Ito, Yoshiaki; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Osato, Motomi

    2013-07-25

    The RUNX family genes encode transcription factors that are involved in development and human diseases. RUNX1 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human hematological malignancies and is a critical factor for the generation and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells. Another Runx family gene, Runx3, is known to be expressed in hematopoietic cells. However, its involvement in hematopoiesis remains unclear. Here we show the hematopoietic phenotypes in Runx3 conditional knockout (KO) mice (Runx3(fl/fl);Mx1-Cre(+)): whereas young Runx3 KO mice did not exhibit any significant hematopoietic defects, aged Runx3 KO mice developed a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by myeloid-dominant leukocytosis, splenomegaly, and an increase of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Notably, Runx3-deficient cells showed hypersensitivity to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, suggesting enhanced proliferative and mobilization capability of Runx3-deficient HSPCs when stimulated. These results suggest that, besides Runx1, Runx3 also plays a role in hematopoiesis.

  19. Baicalin inhibits the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-6 in the kidneys of apolipoprotein E-knockout mice fed a high cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihua; Liao, Pingping; Wang, Bin; Fang, Xin; Li, Wei; Guan, Siming

    2015-05-01

    Hyperlipidemia is considered an independent risk factor for renal dysfunction and induces a significant increase in the expression of inflammatory mediators, which can be used to evaluate the degree of renal injury. Baicalin is widely used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine and has multiple pharmacological effects. The present study investigated whether baicalin can attenuate the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM‑1) via a reduction in the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 (MCP‑1) and interleukin‑6 (IL‑6) in the kidney of apolipoprotein E (ApoE)‑knockout (KO) mice fed a high cholesterol diet. These mice were used as a model of atherosclerosis and were treated with baicalin (100 mg/kg/day) daily by gavage for a period of 12 weeks. By contrast, wild‑type male C57BL/6J mice were fed a standard diet. Blood samples were obtained from the angular veins of the mice to measure the total cholesterol (TC) and the expression levels of VCAM‑1, MCP‑1 and IL‑6 in the kidney tissues of the mice were analyzed using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Following oral administration of baicalin, no significant difference was observed in the TC in the baicalin group compared with the high cholesterol diet control group. The TC was significantly higher in the AopE‑KO mice compared with the wild‑type male C57BL/6J mice. The expression levels of VCAM‑1, MCP‑1 and IL‑6 in the kidney tissues of the baicalin group were lower compared with those in the high cholesterol diet control group. The results suggested that baicalin decreased the expression levels of pro‑inflammatory mediators and prevented kidney dysfunction in the ApoE‑KO mice fed a high cholesterol diet.

  20. Inulin prolongs survival of intragastrically administered Lactobacillus plantarum No. 14 in the gut of mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Naoki; Hagio, Masahito; Ishizuka, Satoshi; Ito, Hiroyuki; Morita, Tatsuya; Sonoyama, Kei

    2010-11-01

    We tested whether a high-fat diet (HFD) impairs the survival of probiotics in mice. In Expt. 1, after feeding either a HFD (62.7% energy) or a normal-fat diet (NFD; 11.1% energy) for 2 d, C57BL/6 mice were i.g. administered Lactobacillus plantarum No. 14. Fecal recovery of viable L. plantarum was significantly decreased 99% by the HFD compared with the NFD. Total bile acid concentrations in the small intestine and cecum were significantly higher (1.5- and 2.2-fold of NFD, respectively) in mice fed HFD than in those fed NFD. Cholic acid and deoxycholic acid significantly reduced the viability of L. plantarum No. 14 in culture experiments. In Expt. 2, after feeding HFD for 2 d, simultaneous administration of inulin (10 mg) with L. plantarum No. 14 significantly increased (100-fold of that without inulin) the fecal recovery of viable L. plantarum. Inulin administration did not alter intestinal bile acid concentrations. In Expt. 3, after feeding HFD for 2 d, mice were i.g. administered either inulin (10 mg) or vehicle and, after 6 h, cecal contents were subjected to culture experiments. Growth of L. plantarum No. 14 was significantly higher in the cecal contents of inulin-administered mice than vehicle-administered mice. Inulin supplementation to cecal contents of vehicle-administered mice significantly enhanced the growth of L. plantarum No. 14. We propose that HFD impairs the survival of probiotics in the gut due to increased bile acid stress and that simultaneous administration of inulin prolongs the survival of probiotics in mice fed HFD.

  1. Tenderness of pasture versus grain fed beef aged 14 and 28 days

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumer interest in pasture versus grain fed beef has been on the rise in recent years. This interest could be sparked by the public’s concerns of beef management techniques and processing impacts on the nutrition and safety of their food, as well as the environmental impact of each management type...

  2. Memory Deficits Are Associated with Impaired Ability to Modulate Neuronal Excitability in Middle-Aged Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaczorowski, Catherine C.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Normal aging disrupts hippocampal neuroplasticity and learning and memory. Aging deficits were exposed in a subset (30%) of middle-aged mice that performed below criterion on a hippocampal-dependent contextual fear conditioning task. Basal neuronal excitability was comparable in middle-aged and young mice, but learning-related modulation of the…

  3. Mechanisms of aging in senescence-accelerated mice

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Todd A; Greenhall, Jennifer A; Yoshida, Shigeo; Fuchs, Sebastian; Helton, Robert; Swaroop, Anand; Lockhart, David J; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-01-01

    Background Progressive neurological dysfunction is a key aspect of human aging. Because of underlying differences in the aging of mice and humans, useful mouse models have been difficult to obtain and study. We have used gene-expression analysis and polymorphism screening to study molecular senescence of the retina and hippocampus in two rare inbred mouse models of accelerated neurological senescence (SAMP8 and SAMP10) that closely mimic human neurological aging, and in a related normal strain (SAMR1) and an unrelated normal strain (C57BL/6J). Results The majority of age-related gene expression changes were strain-specific, with only a few common pathways found for normal and accelerated neurological aging. Polymorphism screening led to the identification of mutations that could have a direct impact on important disease processes, including a mutation in a fibroblast growth factor gene, Fgf1, and a mutation in and ectopic expression of the gene for the chemokine CCL19, which is involved in the inflammatory response. Conclusion We show that combining the study of inbred mouse strains with interesting traits and gene-expression profiling can lead to the discovery of genes important for complex phenotypes. Furthermore, full-genome polymorphism detection, sequencing and gene-expression profiling of inbred mouse strains with interesting phenotypic differences may provide unique insights into the molecular genetics of late-manifesting complex diseases. PMID:15960800

  4. Lipid emulsion administered intravenously or orally attenuates triglyceride accumulation and expression of inflammatory markers in the liver of nonobese mice fed parenteral nutrition formula.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kyoko; Hao, Lei; Wray, Amanda E; Ross, A Catharine

    2013-03-01

    The accumulation of hepatic TG and development of hepatic steatosis (HS) is a serious complication of the use of parenteral nutrition (PN) formulas containing a high percentage of dextrose. But whether fat emulsions or other nutrients can ameliorate the induction of HS by high-carbohydrate diets is still uncertain. We hypothesized that administration of a lipid emulsion (LE; Intralipid) and/or the vitamin A metabolite retinal (RAL) will reduce hepatic TG accumulation and attenuate indicators of inflammation. C57BL/6 male mice were fed PN formula as their only source of hydration and nutrition for 4-5 wk. In Expt. 1, mice were fed PN only or PN plus treatment with RAL (1 μg/g orally), LE (200 μL i.v.), or both LE and RAL. In Expt. 2, LE was orally administered at 4 and 13.5% of energy to PN-fed mice. All PN mice developed HS compared with mice fed normal chow (NC) and HS was reduced by LE. The liver TG mass was lower in the PN+LE and PN+RAL+LE groups compared with the PN and PN+RAL groups (P < 0.01) and in the 4% and 13.5% PN+LE groups compared with PN alone. Hepatic total retinol was higher in the RAL-fed mice (P < 0.0001), but RAL did not alter TG mass. mRNA transcripts for fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (Srebpf1) were higher in the PN compared with the NC mice, but FAS protein and Srebpf1 mRNA were lower in the PN+LE groups compared with PN alone. The inflammation marker serum amyloid P component was also reduced. In summary, LE given either i.v. or orally may be sufficient to reduce the steatotic potential of orally fed high-dextrose formulas and may suppress the early development of HS during PN therapy.

  5. Restoration of Regenerative Osteoblastogenesis in Aged Mice: Modulation of TNF

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Elizabeth C; Aronson, James; Liu, Lichu; Fowlkes, John L; Thrailkill, Kathryn M; Bunn, Robert C; Skinner, Robert A; Miller, Mike J; Cockrell, Gael E; Clark, Lindsey M; Ou, Yang; Isales, Carlos M; Badger, Thomas M; Ronis, Martin J; Sims, John; Lumpkin, Charles K

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal changes accompanying aging are associated with both increased risk of fractures and impaired fracture healing, which, in turn, is due to compromised bone regeneration potential. These changes are associated with increased serum levels of selected proinflammatory cytokines, e.g., tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). We have used a unique model of bone regeneration to demonstrate (1) that aged-related deficits in direct bone formation can be restored to young mice by treatment with TNF blockers and (2) that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 is a candidate for mediation of the osteoinhibitory effects of TNF. It has been hypothesized recently that TNF antagonists may represent novel anabolic agents, and we believe that the data presented here represent a successful test of this hypothesis. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research PMID:19580462

  6. Postnatal exposure to voluntary exercise but not the antioxidant catechin protects the vasculature after a switch to an atherogenic environment in middle-age mice.

    PubMed

    Leblond, Francois; Nguyen, Albert; Bolduc, Virginie; Lambert, Jean; Yu, Carol; Duquette, Natacha; Thorin, Eric

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the lasting functional imprinting of exercise (EX) and catechin (CAT) on the vascular function of middle-age mice switched to a proatherogenic environment. C57BL/6J mice (n = 10-15 in each group) fed a regular diet (RD) were exposed from the age of 1 to 9 months either to EX (voluntary running; 2.7 ± 0.2 km/day), to the polyphenol CAT (30 mg/kg/day in drinking water), or to physical inactivity (PI). At 9 months of age, EX and CAT were stopped and mice either remained on the RD or were fed a Western diet (WD) for an additional 3 months. At 12 months of age, mice from all groups fed a WD had similar body mass, systolic blood pressure, and plasma total cholesterol, glucose, insulin, and isoprostane. Compared to the RD, the WD induced an indomethacin-sensitive aortic endothelium-dependent and independent dysfunction in PI mice (p < 0.05) that was prevented by both EX and CAT; this benefit was associated with a higher (p < 0.05) non-nitric oxide/non-prostacyclin endothelium-dependent relaxation. While EX, but not PI or CAT, prevented vascular dysfunction induced by the WD in cerebral arteries, it had no effect in femoral arteries. The profiles of activity of antioxidant enzymes and of proinflammatory gene expression in the aorta suggest a better adaptation of EX > CAT > PI mice to stress. In conclusion, our data suggest that a postnatal exposure to EX, but not to CAT, imprints an adaptive defense capacity in the vasculature against a deleterious change in lifestyle.

  7. Early Shifts of Brain Metabolism by Caloric Restriction Preserve White Matter Integrity and Long-Term Memory in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Janet; Bakshi, Vikas; Lin, Ai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of brain integrity with age is highly associated with lifespan determination. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase longevity and healthspan in various species; however, its effects on preserving living brain functions in aging remain largely unexplored. In the study, we used multimodal, non-invasive neuroimaging (PET/MRI/MRS) to determine in vivo brain glucose metabolism, energy metabolites, and white matter structural integrity in young and old mice fed with either control or 40% CR diet. In addition, we determined the animals' memory and learning ability with behavioral assessments. Blood glucose, blood ketone bodies, and body weight were also measured. We found distinct patterns between normal aging and CR aging on brain functions - normal aging showed reductions in brain glucose metabolism, white matter integrity, and long-term memory, resembling human brain aging. CR aging, in contrast, displayed an early shift from glucose to ketone bodies metabolism, which was associated with preservations of brain energy production, white matter integrity, and long-term memory in aging mice. Among all the mice, we found a positive correlation between blood glucose level and body weight, but an inverse association between blood glucose level and lifespan. Our findings suggest that CR could slow down brain aging, in part due to the early shift of energy metabolism caused by lower caloric intake, and we were able to identify the age-dependent effects of CR non-invasively using neuroimaging. These results provide a rationale for CR-induced sustenance of brain health with extended longevity.

  8. Early Shifts of Brain Metabolism by Caloric Restriction Preserve White Matter Integrity and Long-Term Memory in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Janet; Bakshi, Vikas; Lin, Ai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of brain integrity with age is highly associated with lifespan determination. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase longevity and healthspan in various species; however, its effects on preserving living brain functions in aging remain largely unexplored. In the study, we used multimodal, non-invasive neuroimaging (PET/MRI/MRS) to determine in vivo brain glucose metabolism, energy metabolites, and white matter structural integrity in young and old mice fed with either control or 40% CR diet. In addition, we determined the animals’ memory and learning ability with behavioral assessments. Blood glucose, blood ketone bodies, and body weight were also measured. We found distinct patterns between normal aging and CR aging on brain functions – normal aging showed reductions in brain glucose metabolism, white matter integrity, and long-term memory, resembling human brain aging. CR aging, in contrast, displayed an early shift from glucose to ketone bodies metabolism, which was associated with preservations of brain energy production, white matter integrity, and long-term memory in aging mice. Among all the mice, we found a positive correlation between blood glucose level and body weight, but an inverse association between blood glucose level and lifespan. Our findings suggest that CR could slow down brain aging, in part due to the early shift of energy metabolism caused by lower caloric intake, and we were able to identify the age-dependent effects of CR non-invasively using neuroimaging. These results provide a rationale for CR-induced sustenance of brain health with extended longevity. PMID:26617514

  9. The Regulation of Non-Coding RNA Expression in the Liver of Mice Fed DDC

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Joan; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; French, Barbara A; Li, Jun; French, Samuel W

    2010-01-01

    Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs) are found in the liver of patients with alcoholic and chronic nonalcoholic liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Diethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,4,6,-trimethyl-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate (DDC) is used as a model to induce the formation of MDBs in mouse liver. Previous studies in this laboratory showed that DDC induced epigenetic modifications in DNA and histones. The combination of these modifications changes the phenotype of the MDB forming hepatocytes, as indicated by the marker FAT10. These epigenetic modifications are partially prevented by adding to the diet S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) or betaine, both methyl donors. The expression of three imprinted ncRNA genes was found to change in MDB forming hepatocytes, which is the subject of this report. NcRNA expression was quantitated by Real-Time PCR and RNA FISH in liver sections. Microarray analysis showed that the expression of three ncRNAs was regulated by DDC: up regulation of H19, antisense Igf2r (AIR), and down regulation of GTL2 (also called MEG3). S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) feeding prevented these changes. Betaine, another methyl group donor, prevented only H19 and AIR up regulation induced by DDC, on microarrays. The results of the SAMe and betaine groups were confirmed by Real-Time PCR, except for AIR expression. After 1 month of drug withdrawal, the expression of the three ncRNAs tended toward control levels of expression. Liver tumors that developed also showed up regulation of H19 and AIR. The RNA FISH approach showed that the MDB forming cells’ phenotype changed the level of expression of AIR, H19 and GTL2, compared to the surrounding cells. Furthermore, over expression of H19 and AIR was demonstrated in tumors formed in mice withdrawn for 9 months. The disregulation of ncRNA in MDB forming liver cells has been observed for the first time in drug primed mice associated with liver preneoplastic foci and tumors. PMID:19362547

  10. Urinary excretion of orally administered oxalic acid in saccharin and o-phenylphenol-fed NMRI mice.

    PubMed

    Salminen, E; Salminen, S

    1986-01-01

    Both saccharin and o-phenylphenol have been suggested to be carcinogenic to the urinary bladder in experimental animals, but the mechanism has remained unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary saccharin and o-phenylphenol on the urinary excretion of dietary oxalic acid. Male NMRI mice were gradually adapted to either 3% o-phenylphenol or 5% saccharin in their diet. Having being adapted to these diets for 1 week or after consuming them for 3 months, the animals were fasted for 6 h and given a 2.5-microCi oral dose of U-14C-oxalic acid. Dosed animals were kept in metabolism cages for 48 h to monitor urinary and fecal excretion of the label. Adaptation to dietary o-phenylphenol appeared to increase the urinary excretion of orally administered U-14C-oxalic acid when food and water were available during urinary and fecal collections. Adaptation to dietary saccharin had little effect on urinary oxalate levels when compared to control animals. These results indicate that changes in urinary oxalate levels should be more carefully studied in connection with potential urinary bladder carcinogens to avoid the possibility of bladder irritation by increased urinary oxalate excretion.

  11. Beneficial effect of dietary Ephedra sinica on obesity and glucose intolerance in high-fat diet-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    SONG, MOON-KOO; UM, JAE-YOUNG; JANG, HYEUNG-JIN; LEE, BYUNG-CHEOL

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major contributor to both glucose intolerance and metabolic syndrome. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity and anti-hyperglycemic effects of Ephedra sinica on high-fat diet-fed mice. Male ICR mice were divided into four groups; the normal group, the obese and diabetic control group treated with a high-fat diet, the positive control group treated with a high-fat diet containing acarbose, and the experimental group treated with a high-fat diet containing Ephedra sinica. The effects of Ephedra sinica on obesity and glucose intolerance were measured by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), plasma biochemistry, body and epididymal fat weight; the expression of adiponectin, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and leptin was also determined. Ephedra sinica reduced weight gain and epididymal fat accumulation, improved glucose intolerance on the OGTT, decreased triglycerides and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared to the controls. Moreover, it reduced weight gain and fasting glucose levels and improved HDL-cholesterol levels more than acarbose. Gene expression analysis revealed that Ephedra sinica upregulated the expression of adiponectin and PPAR-α, and downregulated the expression of TNF-α. From these results, we suggest that Ephedra sinica may reduce obesity and hyperglycemia by increasing PPAR-α and adiponectin and reducing TNF-α, and that it may have the potential to be used clinically as an ingredient in food or drugs effective in obesity-related glucose intolerance treatments. PMID:22969956

  12. Consequences of exchanging carbohydrates for proteins in the cholesterol metabolism of mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Frédéric; Wang, Long; Moser, Mireille; Metairon, Sylviane; Mansourian, Robert; Zwahlen, Marie-Camille; Kussmann, Martin; Fuerholz, Andreas; Macé, Katherine; Chou, Chieh Jason

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat diets lead to rapid weight loss but the cardioprotective effects of these diets have been questioned. We examined the impact of high-protein and high-fat diets on cholesterol metabolism by comparing the plasma cholesterol and the expression of cholesterol biosynthesis genes in the liver of mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet that has a high (H) or a low (L) protein-to-carbohydrate (P/C) ratio. H-P/C-HF feeding, compared with L-P/C-HF feeding, decreased plasma total cholesterol and increased HDL cholesterol concentrations at 4-wk. Interestingly, the expression of genes involved in hepatic steroid biosynthesis responded to an increased dietary P/C ratio by first down-regulation (2-d) followed by later up-regulation at 4-wk, and the temporal gene expression patterns were connected to the putative activity of SREBF1 and 2. In contrast, Cyp7a1, the gene responsible for the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was consistently up-regulated in the H-P/C-HF liver regardless of feeding duration. Over expression of Cyp7a1 after 2-d and 4-wk H-P/C-HF feeding was connected to two unique sets of transcription regulators. At both time points, up-regulation of the Cyp7a1 gene could be explained by enhanced activations and reduced suppressions of multiple transcription regulators. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the hypocholesterolemic effect of H-P/C-HF feeding coincided with orchestrated changes of gene expressions in lipid metabolic pathways in the liver of mice. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the cholesterol lowering effect of high-protein feeding is associated with enhanced bile acid production but clinical validation is warranted. (246 words).

  13. Suppression of oxidative stress in aging NZB/NZW mice: effect of fish oil feeding on hepatic antioxidant status and guanidino compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, You Jung; Yokozawa, Takako; Chung, Hae Young

    2005-10-01

    Oxidative stress caused by excessive reactive species (RS) and lipid peroxidation is known to be casually linked to age-related inflammation. To test the hypothesis that fish oil (FO) intake has a beneficial effect on nephritis due to its suppressive action of oxidative stress and the enhancement of antioxidant defenses, we examined the effect of dietary FO on various oxidative stress-related parameters and guanidino compound (GC) levels using (NZB x NZW) F1 (B/W) mice. These mice were fed diets supplemented with either 5% corn oil (control) or 5% FO. At 4 and 9 months of age, the hepatic oxidative status was estimated by assessing RS generation produced from xanthine oxidase, the prostaglandin pathway and lipid peroxidation. To evaluate the effect of FO on redox status, including antioxidant defenses, GSH and GSSG levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were measured. To correlate the extent of oxidative status with the nephritic condition, creatinine, guanidino acetic acid and arginine levels were measured. Results indicated that increased levels of lipid peroxidation, RS generation and xanthine oxidase activity with age were all significantly suppressed by FO feeding. Furthermore, reduced GSH levels, GSH/GSSG ratio and antioxidant enzyme activities in the FO-fed mice were effectively enhanced compared to the corn oil-fed mice. Among several GCs, the age-related increase of creatinine level was blunted by FO. Based on these results, we propose that dietary FO exerts beneficial effects in aged, nephritic mice by suppressing RS, superoxide and lipid peroxidation, and by maintaining a higher GSH/GSSG ratio and antioxidant enzyme activities.

  14. Quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone affects energy homeostasis and intestinal fat absorption in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Anne-Sophie; Even, Patrick; Lafont, René; Dioh, Waly; Veillet, Stanislas; Tomé, Daniel; Huneau, Jean-François; Hermier, Dominique; Quignard-Boulangé, Annie

    2014-04-10

    In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a supplementation of a high-fat diet with a quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone (QE) or pure 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) could prevent the development of obesity. In line with the anti-obesity effect of QE, we used indirect calorimetry to examine the effect of dietary QE and 20E in high-fat fed mice on different components of energy metabolism. Mice were fed a high-fat (HF) diet with or without supplementation by QE or pure 20E for 3 weeks. As compared to mice maintained on a low-fat diet, HF feeding resulted in a marked physiological shift in energy homeostasis, associating a decrease in global energy expenditure (EE) and an increase in lipid utilization as assessed by the lower respiratory quotient (RQ). Supplementation with 20E increased energy expenditure while food intake and activity were not affected. Furthermore QE and 20E promoted a higher rate of glucose oxidation leading to an increased RQ value. In QE and 20E-treated HFD fed mice, there was an increase in fecal lipid excretion without any change in stool amount. Our study indicates that anti-obesity effect of QE can be explained by a global increase in energy expenditure, a shift in glucose metabolism towards oxidation to the detriment of lipogenesis and a decrease in dietary lipid absorption leading to reduced dietary lipid storage in adipose tissue.

  15. Effects of high molecular weight water-soluble chitosan on in vitro fertilization and ovulation in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Gon; Kim, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Dong Hoon; Cho, Jung Ran; Kim, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Byung Jin; Jung, Kyu Yong; Choi, Bong Kyu; Shin, Min Kyo; Choo, Young Kug

    2002-04-01

    A high molecular weight water-soluble chitosan (WSC) with an average molecular weight of 300 kD and a deacethylation level of over 90% was produced using a simple multi-step membrane separation process. It is known that WSC prevents obesity induced by a high-fat diet. Consequently, this study investigated whether or not WSC improved the ovarian dysfunction caused by obesity in mice. The mice were fed a high density protein and lipid diet for 4 weeks, followed by the administration of WSC at 480 mg/kg body weight per day for 4 days. Thereafter, the changes in body weight, ovulation rate, in vivo and in vitro fertilization and embryonic development were measured. WSC markedly reduced the body weight of obese mice fed with a high-fat diet, but not in mice fed with a normal diet. WSC had significant effects on the ovulation rate, both the in vivo and in vitro fertilization rates and embryonic development. These results indicate an improvement in the ovarian and oviduct dysfunction caused by obesity, and suggest an adjustment in the internal secretions and metabolic functions.

  16. Tis7 deletion reduces survival and induces intestinal anastomotic inflammation and obstruction in high-fat diet-fed mice with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Amy M; Wakeman, Derek; Lu, Jianyun; Rowley, Christopher; Geisman, Taylor; Butler, Catherine; Bala, Shashi; Swietlicki, Elzbieta A; Warner, Brad W; Levin, Marc S; Rubin, Deborah C

    2014-09-15

    Effective therapies are limited for patients with parenteral nutrition-dependent short bowel syndrome. We previously showed that intestinal expression of the transcriptional coregulator tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-induced sequence 7 (tis7) is markedly increased during the adaptive response following massive small bowel resection and tis7 plays a role in normal gut lipid metabolism. Here, we further explore the functional implications of tis7 deletion in intestinal lipid metabolism and the adaptive response following small bowel resection. Intestinal tis7 transgenic (tis7(tg)), tis7(-/-), and wild-type (WT) littermates were subjected to 50% small bowel resection. Mice were fed a control or a high-saturated-fat (42% energy) diet for 21 days. Survival, body weight recovery, lipid absorption, mucosal lipid analysis, and the morphometric adaptive response were analyzed. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to identify tis7 downstream gene targets. Postresection survival was markedly reduced in high-fat, but not control, diet-fed tis7(-/-) mice. Decreased survival was associated with anastomotic inflammation and intestinal obstruction postresection. High-fat, but not control, diet-fed tis7(-/-) mice had increased intestinal IL-6 expression. Intestinal lipid trafficking was altered in tis7(-/-) compared with WT mice postresection. In contrast, high-fat diet-fed tis7(tg) mice had improved survival postresection compared with WT littermates. High-fat diet feeding in the setting of tis7 deletion resulted in postresection anastomotic inflammation and small bowel obstruction. Tolerance of a calorie-rich, high-fat diet postresection may require tis7 and its target genes. The presence of luminal fat in the setting of tis7 deletion promotes an intestinal inflammatory response postresection.

  17. Differential Responses to Adjuvants of Macrophages from Young Virgin, Aging Virgin and Aging Breeder Mice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Rb-Ai.62 483 DIFFERENTIAL RESPONSES TO ADJUVANTS OF MACROPHAGES FROM i/i YOUNG VIRGIN AGIN (U) MINNESOTA UNIV DULUTH DEPT OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY RN...ADDRESS (City, State. an ZI 0EC 18 198E- Dept. of Medical Microbiology & Immunology 800 N. Quincy Street E1 8 Duluth, MN 55812-2487 Arlington, VA 22217-5...Aging Breeder Mice by Pamela R. Petrequin and Arthur G. Johnson Dept. of Medical Microbiology /Immunology University of Minnesota-Duluth School of

  18. Sex-specific alterations in glucose homeostasis and metabolic parameters during ageing of caspase-2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C H; Nikolic, A; Kentish, S J; Shalini, S; Hatzinikolas, G; Page, A J; Dorstyn, L; Kumar, S

    2016-01-01

    Gender-specific differences are commonly found in metabolic pathways and in response to nutritional manipulation. Previously, we identified a role for caspase-2 in age-related glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism using male caspase-2-deficient (Casp2−/−) mice. Here we show that the resistance to age-induced glucose tolerance does not occur in female Casp2−/− mice and it appears to be independent of insulin sensitivity in males. Using fasting (18 h) as a means to further investigate the role of caspase-2 in energy and lipid metabolism, we identified sex-specific differences in the fasting response and lipid mobilization. In aged (18–22 months) male Casp2−/− mice, a significant decrease in fasting liver mass, but not total body weight, was observed while in females, total body weight, but not liver mass, was reduced when compared with wild-type (WT) animals. Fasting-induced lipolysis of adipose tissue was enhanced in male Casp2−/− mice as indicated by a significant reduction in white adipocyte cell size, and increased serum-free fatty acids. In females, white adipocyte cell size was significantly smaller in both fed and fasted Casp2−/− mice. No difference in fasting-induced hepatosteatosis was observed in the absence of caspase-2. Further analysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) indicated that female Casp2−/− mice may have enhanced fatty acid recycling and metabolism with expression of genes involved in glyceroneogenesis and fatty acid oxidation increased. Loss of Casp2 also increased fasting-induced autophagy in both male and female liver and in female skeletal muscle. Our observations suggest that caspase-2 can regulate glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism in a tissue and sex-specific manner. PMID:27551503

  19. The neurotrophic compound J147 reverses cognitive impairment in aged Alzheimer's disease mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite years of research, there are no disease-modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD), a fatal, age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Screening for potential therapeutics in rodent models of AD has generally relied on testing compounds before pathology is present, thereby modeling disease prevention rather than disease modification. Furthermore, this approach to screening does not reflect the clinical presentation of AD patients which could explain the failure to translate compounds identified as beneficial in animal models to disease modifying compounds in clinical trials. Clearly a better approach to pre-clinical drug screening for AD is required. Methods To more accurately reflect the clinical setting, we used an alternative screening strategy involving the treatment of AD mice at a stage in the disease when pathology is already advanced. Aged (20-month-old) transgenic AD mice (APP/swePS1ΔE9) were fed an exceptionally potent, orally active, memory enhancing and neurotrophic molecule called J147. Cognitive behavioral assays, histology, ELISA and Western blotting were used to assay the effect of J147 on memory, amyloid metabolism and neuroprotective pathways. J147 was also investigated in a scopolamine-induced model of memory impairment in C57Bl/6J mice and compared to donepezil. Details on the pharmacology and safety of J147 are also included. Results Data presented here demonstrate that J147 has the ability to rescue cognitive deficits when administered at a late stage in the disease. The ability of J147 to improve memory in aged AD mice is correlated with its induction of the neurotrophic factors NGF (nerve growth factor) and BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor) as well as several BDNF-responsive proteins which are important for learning and memory. The comparison between J147 and donepezil in the scopolamine model showed that while both compounds were comparable at rescuing short term memory, J147 was superior at rescuing spatial

  20. Dietary fenugreek and onion attenuate cholesterol gallstone formation in lithogenic diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raghunatha R L; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2011-10-01

    An animal study was conducted to evaluate the antilithogenic effect of a combination of dietary fenugreek seeds and onion. Lithogenic conditions were induced in mice by feeding them a high (0.5%) cholesterol diet (HCD) for 10 weeks. Fenugreek (12%) and onion (2%) were included individually and in combination in this HCD. Fenugreek, onion and their combination reduced the incidence of cholesterol gallstones by 75%, 27% and 76%, respectively, with attendant reduction in total cholesterol content by 38-42%, 50-72% and 61-80% in serum, liver and bile respectively. Consequently, the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio was reduced significantly in serum, liver and bile. The cholesterol saturation index of bile was reduced from 4.14 to 1.38 by the combination of fenugreek and onion and to 2.33 by onion alone. The phospholipid and bile acid contents of the bile were also increased. Changes in the hepatic enzyme activities (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase, cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase and cholesterol-27-hydroxylase) induced by HCD were countered by fenugreek, onion and their combination. Hepatic lipid peroxides were reduced by 19-22% and 39-45% with fenugreek, onion and their combination included in the diet along with the HCD. Increased accumulation of fat in the liver and inflammation of the gallbladder membrane produced by HCD were reduced by fenugreek, onion and their combination. The antilithogenic influence was highest with fenugreek alone, and the presence of onion along with it did not further increase this effect. There was also no additive effect of the two spices in the recovery of antioxidant molecules or in the antioxidant enzyme activities.

  1. Autophagy involving age-related cognitive behavior and hippocampus injury is modulated by different caloric intake in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wen; Wang, Rong; Ma, Li-Na; Xu, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Jing-Shuang; Zhao, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Yu-Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicated that different caloric intake may influence neuronal function. Excessive caloric intake associated with accelerated aging of the brain and increased the risk of neurodegenerative disorders. And low caloric intake (caloric restriction, CR) could delay aging, and protect the central nervous system from neurodegenerative disorders. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, thirty six-week-old male C57/BL male mice were randomly divided into three different dietary groups: normal control (NC) group (fed standard diet), CR group (fed low-caloric diet) and high-calorie (HC) group (fed high-caloric diet). After 10 months, spatial memory ability was determined by Morris water maze. Pathological changes of the hippocampus cells were detected with HE and Nissl staining. The expression of proteins involved in autophagy in the hippocampus was determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. The result of Morris water maze showed that the learning and memory capacity significantly increased in the CR group, and significantly decreased in the HC group. HE and Nissl staining showed cells damaged obviously in the HC group. The expression of mTOR and p62 was increased in the HC group, and decreased in the CR group. The expression of Beclin1, LC3 and cathepsin B was decreased in the HC group, and increased in the CR group. Our findings demonstrate that long-term high caloric intake is a risk factor that can significantly contribute to the development of neurological disease via suppressing autophagy, and CR may prevent age-related learning ability impairment via activating autophagy in mice. PMID:26380026

  2. Myelin injury induces axonal transport impairment but not AD-like pathology in the hippocampus of cuprizone-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Junjun; Zhou, Hong; Bai, Feng; Ren, Qingguo; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Both multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are progressive neurological disorders with myelin injury and memory impairment. However, whether myelin impairment could cause AD-like neurological pathology remains unclear. To explore neurological pathology following myelin injury, we assessed cognitive function, the expression of myelin proteins, axonal transport-associated proteins, axonal structural proteins, synapse-associated proteins, tau and beta amyloid and the status of neurons, using the cuprizone mouse model of demyelination. We found the mild impairment of learning ability in cuprizone-fed mice and the decreased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the hippocampus. And anti-LINGO-1 improved learning ability and partly restored MBP level. Furthermore, we also found kinesin light chain (KLC), neurofilament light chain (NFL) and neurofilament heavy chain (NF200) were declined in demyelinated hippocampus, which could be partly improved by treatment with anti-LINGO-1. However, we did not observe the increased expression of beta amyloid, hyperphosphorylation of tau and loss of neurons in demyelinated hippocampus. Our results suggest that demyelination might lead to the impairment of neuronal transport, but not cause increased level of hyperphosphorylated tau and beta amyloid. Our research demonstrates remyelination might be an effective pathway to recover the function of neuronal axons and cognition in MS. PMID:27129150

  3. Morphofunctional Renal Alterations in Progeny of Mice Fed Rhodiola kirilowii Extracts or Epigallocatechin During Pregnancy and Lactation.

    PubMed

    Lewicki, Sławomir; Skopińska-Różewska, Ewa; Bałan, Barbara Joanna; Kalicki, Bolesław; Patera, Janusz; Wilczak, Jacek; Wasiutyński, Aleksander; Zdanowski, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Treating infections in pregnant patients is potentially dangerous even when herbal medicines are used. Many herbal medicines, among them extracts from plants of Rhodiola genus, have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulatory properties owing to their polyphenol content; they may, however, affect fetal development due to their antiangiogenic properties. The aim of this study was to explain whether daily feeding pregnant and lactating mice with 20 mg/kg Rhodiola kirilowii aqueous (RKW) or 50% hydro-alcoholic (RKW-A) extracts, or 0.2 mg/kg epigallocatechin (EGC, antiangiogenic compound of Rhodiola extracts), may lead to abnormalities in morphology and function of the kidneys of adult progeny. Such abnormalities were not observed in the kidneys of 6-week-old offspring, neither in RKW nor in the control group. However, the progeny of RKW-A- or EGC-fed mothers presented morphometric abnormalities in the kidney structure, with a significantly higher number of glomeruli/mm(2) and a lower diameter of glomeruli (RKW-A group) or a significantly higher glomeruli diameter (EGC), than in the control and RKW groups. Abnormalities in serum vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, urea, creatinine, and cystatin C levels were also found. We recommend caution in long-term use of RKW-A extract and EGC-rich foods during pregnancy and lactation.

  4. Phlorizin Supplementation Attenuates Obesity, Inflammation, and Hyperglycemia in Diet-Induced Obese Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Kyung; Cho, Su-Jung; Jung, Un Ju; Ryu, Ri; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-02-16

    Obesity, along with its related complications, is a serious health problem worldwide. Many studies reported the anti-diabetic effect of phlorizin, while little is known about its anti-obesity effect. We investigated the beneficial effects of phlorizin on obesity and its complications, including diabetes and inflammation in obese animal. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups and fed their respective experimental diets for 16 weeks: a normal diet (ND, 5% fat, w/w), high-fat diet (HFD, 20% fat, w/w), or HFD supplemented with phlorizin (PH, 0.02%, w/w). The findings revealed that the PH group had significantly decreased visceral and total white adipose tissue (WAT) weights, and adipocyte size compared to the HFD. Plasma and hepatic lipids profiles also improved in the PH group. The decreased levels of hepatic lipids in PH were associated with decreased activities of enzymes involved in hepatic lipogenesis, cholesterol synthesis and esterification. The PH also suppressed plasma pro-inflammatory adipokines levels such as leptin, adipsin, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interferon-γ, and interleukin-6, and prevented HFD-induced collagen accumulation in the liver and WAT. Furthermore, the PH supplementation also decreased plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance levels. In conclusion, phlorizin is beneficial for preventing diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis, as well as insulin resistance.

  5. Effects of three Chinese herbal medicines on plasma and liver lipids in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tohru; Suzuki, Satoe; Kudo, Hideki; Sassa, Shuji; Nomura, Makoto; Sakamoto, Shinobu

    2007-01-19

    Chinese herbal medicines, Inchinko-to, Bofu-tsusho-san and Dai-saiko-to, containing 3, 18 and 8 components, respectively, have since long been used as an anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, choleretic and diuretic agent for liver disorders and jaundice, as an anti-obesity agent, a hypocholesterolemic agent for liver disorders and a therapeutic and/or preventive agent for cholesterol gallstone disease with hypertriglycerid-emia in China and Japan, respectively. In the present study, we investigated the effects of these three herbal medicines in young male mice fed a high-fat diet. Plasma levels of lipids and the numbers of the fatty droplets in the liver cytoplasm were markedly lowered by the diets supplemented with three herbal medicines. The liver weights and the body growth were reduced by the diet supplemented with Dai-saiko-to, which slightly affected the concentrations of total protein, albumin, creatinine or calcium, and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase. Thus, Dai-saiko-to, besides Bofu-tsusho-san, seems effective in the activities of anti-obesity, anti-hyperlipidemia and anti-hyperlipids in liver cytoplasm, when used carefully.

  6. Prevention of maternal aging-associated oocyte aneuploidy and meiotic spindle defects in mice by dietary and genetic strategies.

    PubMed

    Selesniemi, Kaisa; Lee, Ho-Joon; Muhlhauser, Ailene; Tilly, Jonathan L

    2011-07-26

    Increased meiotic spindle abnormalities and aneuploidy in oocytes of women of advanced maternal ages lead to elevated rates of infertility, miscarriage, and trisomic conceptions. Despite the significance of the problem, strategies to sustain oocyte quality with age have remained elusive. Here we report that adult female mice maintained under 40% caloric restriction (CR) did not exhibit aging-related increases in oocyte aneuploidy, chromosomal misalignment on the metaphase plate, meiotic spindle abnormalities, or mitochondrial dysfunction (aggregation, impaired ATP production), all of which occurred in oocytes of age-matched ad libitum-fed controls. The effects of CR on oocyte quality in aging females were reproduced by deletion of the metabolic regulator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). Thus, CR during adulthood or loss of PGC-1α function maintains female germline chromosomal stability and its proper segregation during meiosis, such that ovulated oocytes of aged female mice previously maintained on CR or lacking PGC-1α are comparable to those of young females during prime reproductive life.

  7. Leprdb/db Mice with Senescence Marker Protein-30 Knockout (Leprdb/dbSmp30Y/−) Exhibit Increases in Small Dense-LDL and Severe Fatty Liver Despite Being Fed a Standard Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Yoshitaka; Hasegawa, Goji; Okada, Hiroshi; Senmaru, Takafumi; Fukui, Michiaki; Nakamura, Naoto; Sawada, Morio; Kitawaki, Jo; Okanoue, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Yuki; Amano, Akiko; Maruyama, Naoki; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Akihito

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) is a 34 kDa protein originally identified in rat liver that shows decreased levels with age. Several functional studies using SMP30 knockout (Smp30Y/−) mice established that SMP30 functions as an antioxidant and protects against apoptosis. To address the potential role of SMP30 in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis, we established Smp30Y/− mice on a Leprdb/db background (Leprdb/dbSmp30Y/− mice). Research Design/Principal Findings Male Leprdb/dbSmp30Y/− mice were fed a standard diet (340 kcal/100 g, fat 5.6%) for 16 weeks whereupon the lipid/lipoprotein profiles, hepatic expression of genes related to lipid metabolism and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were analyzed by HPLC, quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Changes in the liver at a histological level were also investigated. The amount of SMP30 mRNA and protein in livers was decreased in Leprdb/dbSmp30Y/+ mice compared with Leprdb/+Smp30Y/+ mice. Compared with Leprdb/dbSmp30Y/+ mice, 24 week old Leprdb/dbSmp30Y/− mice showed: i) increased small dense LDL-cho and decreased HDL-cho levels; ii) fatty liver accompanied by numerous inflammatory cells and increased oxidative stress; iii) decreased mRNA expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation (PPARα) and lipoprotein uptake (LDLR and VLDLR) but increased CD36 levels; and iv) increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Conclusion Our data strongly suggest that SMP30 is closely associated with NAFLD pathogenesis, and might be a possible therapeutic target for NAFLD. PMID:23755269

  8. Macronutrient balance, reproductive function, and lifespan in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Solon-Biet, Samantha M.; Walters, Kirsty A.; Simanainen, Ulla K.; McMahon, Aisling C.; Ruohonen, Kari; Ballard, John William O.; Raubenheimer, David; Le Couteur, David G.; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    In invertebrates, reproductive output and lifespan are profoundly impacted by dietary macronutrient balance, with these traits achieving their maxima on different diet compositions, giving the appearance of a resource-based tradeoff between reproduction and longevity. For the first time in a mammal, to our knowledge, we evaluate the effects of dietary protein (P), carbohydrate (C), fat (F), and energy (E) on lifespan and reproductive function in aging male and female mice. We show that, as in invertebrates, the balance of macronutrients has marked and largely opposing effects on reproductive and longevity outcomes. Mice were provided ad libitum access to one of 25 diets differing in P, C, F, and E content, with reproductive outcomes assessed at 15 months. An optimal balance of macronutrients exists for reproductive function, which, for most measures, differs from the diets that optimize lifespan, and this response differs with sex. Maximal longevity was achieved on diets containing a P:C ratio of 1:13 in males and 1:11 for females. Diets that optimized testes mass and epididymal sperm counts (indicators of gamete production) contained a higher P:C ratio (1:1) than those that maximized lifespan. In females, uterine mass (an indicator of estrogenic activity) was also greatest on high P:C diets (1:1) whereas ovarian follicle number was greatest on P:C 3:1 associated with high-F intakes. By contrast, estrous cycling was more likely in mice on lower P:C (1:8), and the number of corpora lutea, indicative of recent ovulations, was greatest on P:C similar to those supporting greatest longevity (1:11). PMID:25733862

  9. Dexmedetomidine improves early postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Ming-Zheng; Zhou, Yu-Bing; Zhang, Jing-Min; Han, Li; Peng, You-Mei; Jiang, Jin-hua; Wang, Qing-Duan

    2015-01-05

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a frequent complication following major surgery in the elderly. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms are still unknown. Dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha 2 adrenal receptor agonist, was revealed anesthesia and brain protective role. The present study aimed to examine whether dexmedetomdine protects against POCD induced by major surgical trauma under general anesthesia in aged mice. In the present study, cognitive function was assessed by Y-maze. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), apoptosis-related factor caspase-3 and Bax were detected by real-time PCR, Western blot or immunohistochemistry. The results showed that anesthesia alone caused weak cognitive dysfunction on the first day after general anesthesia. Cognitive function in mice with splenectomy under general anesthesia was significantly exacerbated at the first and third days after surgery, and was significantly improved by dexmedetomidine administration. Splenectomy increased the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, Bax and caspase-3 in hippocampus. These changes were significantly inversed by dexmedetomidine. These results suggest that hippocampal inflammatory response and neuronal apoptosis may contribute to POCD, and selective alpha 2 adrenal receptor excitation play a protective role.

  10. Krill Oil Supplementation Improves Dyslipidemia and Lowers Body Weight in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet Through Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Goowon; Lee, Jihyun; Lee, Sangsu; Kwak, Dongyun; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Kim, Sung Soo; Ha, Joohun

    2016-12-01

    Krill oil is a novel, commercially available marine oil rich in long-chain polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Compared with fish oil, the effects of krill oil supplementation on human health and its underlying action mechanisms are currently poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of krill oil supplementation on metabolic parameters of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Krill oil supplementation in mice fed a HFD for 10 weeks resulted in an ∼15% lower body weight gain and a dramatic suppression of hepatic steatosis. These effects were associated with significantly lower serum triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. We further uncovered a novel underlying mechanism, showing that AMP-activated protein kinase, a master regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, mediates the beneficial effects of krill oil.

  11. Cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus of high-fat diet-fed mice are increased after rosiglitazone treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Kim, Dae Won; Nam, Sung Min; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Won, Moo-Ho

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we determined how rosiglitazone (RSG) differentially affected hippocampal neurogenesis in mice fed a low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD; 60% fat). LFD and HFD were given to the mice for 8 weeks. Four weeks after initiating the LFD and HFD feeding, vehicle or RSG was administered orally once a day to both groups of mice. We measured cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX), respectively, as markers. In addition, we monitored the effects of RSG on the levels of DCX and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampal homogenates. At 8 weeks after the LFD feeding, the numbers of Ki67- and DCX-positive cells as well as hippocampal levels of DCX and BDNF were significantly decreased in the RSG-treated group compared to the vehicle-treated animals. In contrast, the numbers of Ki67- and DCX-positive cells along with hippocampal levels of DCX and BDNF in the HFD fed mice were significantly increased in the RSG-treated mice compared to the vehicle-treated group. Our data demonstrate that RSG can modulate the levels of BDNF, which could play a pivotal role in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. PMID:24136217

  12. Exercise performance and peripheral vascular insufficiency improve with AMPK activation in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Baltgalvis, Kristen A; White, Kathy; Li, Wei; Claypool, Mark D; Lang, Wayne; Alcantara, Raniel; Singh, Baljit K; Friera, Annabelle M; McLaughlin, John; Hansen, Derek; McCaughey, Kelly; Nguyen, Henry; Smith, Ira J; Godinez, Guillermo; Shaw, Simon J; Goff, Dane; Singh, Rajinder; Markovtsov, Vadim; Sun, Tian-Qiang; Jenkins, Yonchu; Uy, Gerald; Li, Yingwu; Pan, Alison; Gururaja, Tarikere; Lau, David; Park, Gary; Hitoshi, Yasumichi; Payan, Donald G; Kinsella, Todd M

    2014-04-15

    Intermittent claudication is a form of exercise intolerance characterized by muscle pain during walking in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Endothelial cell and muscle dysfunction are thought to be important contributors to the etiology of this disease, but a lack of preclinical models that incorporate these elements and measure exercise performance as a primary end point has slowed progress in finding new treatment options for these patients. We sought to develop an animal model of peripheral vascular insufficiency in which microvascular dysfunction and exercise intolerance were defining features. We further set out to determine if pharmacological activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) might counteract any of these functional deficits. Mice aged on a high-fat diet demonstrate many functional and molecular characteristics of PAD, including the sequential development of peripheral vascular insufficiency, increased muscle fatigability, and progressive exercise intolerance. These changes occur gradually and are associated with alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability. Treatment of animals with an AMPK activator, R118, increased voluntary wheel running activity, decreased muscle fatigability, and prevented the progressive decrease in treadmill exercise capacity. These functional performance benefits were accompanied by improved mitochondrial function, the normalization of perfusion in exercising muscle, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and decreased circulating levels of the endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine. These data suggest that aged, obese mice represent a novel model for studying exercise intolerance associated with peripheral vascular insufficiency, and pharmacological activation of AMPK may be a suitable treatment for intermittent claudication associated with PAD.

  13. Emotionality, exploratory behavior, and locomotion in aging inbred strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Elias, P K; Elias, M F; Eleftheriou, B E

    1975-01-01

    Two inbred strains of mice, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J, ranging in age from 2 to 38 months, were tested in an open field using the free exploration method. Scores were obtained for locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and emotionality. Strain differences were observed for all three variables. Beginning at late maturity (12 months), locomotor activity decreased with increasing age. Exploratory behavior was at a low level for DBA/2J mice at all ages. For C57BL/6J mice, exploratory behavior decreased significantly between 2 and 6 months and remained stable thereafter. Emotionality remained unchanged with advancing age for both strains of mice.

  14. Cognitive and neuroinflammatory consequences of mild repeated stress are exacerbated in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, J.B.; Sparkman, N.L.; Chen, J.; Johnson, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Peripheral immune stimulation as well as certain types of psychological stress increases brain levels of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). We have demonstrated that aged mice show greater increases in central inflammatory cytokines, as well as greater cognitive deficits, compared to adults in response to peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Because aged mice are typically more sensitive to systemic stressors such as LPS, and certain psychological stressors induce physiological responses similar to those that follow LPS, we hypothesized that aged mice would be more sensitive to the physiological and cognitive effects of mild stress than adult mice. Here, adult (3–5 mo) and aged (22–23 mo) male BALB/c mice were trained in the Morris water maze for 5 days. Mice were then exposed to a mild restraint stress of 30 minutes before being tested in a working memory version of the water maze over a 3 day period. On day 4 mice were stressed and then killed for collection of blood and brain. In a separate group of animals, mice were killed immediately after one, two or three 30 min restraint sessions and blood for peripheral corticosterone and cytokine protein measurement, and brains were dissected for central cytokine mRNA measurement. Stress disrupted spatial working memory in both adult and aged mice but to a much greater extent in the aged mice. In addition, aged mice showed an increase in stress-induced expression of hippocampal IL-1β mRNA and MHC class II protein compared to non-stressed controls while expression in adult mice was unaffected by stress. These data show that aged mice are more sensitive to both the cognitive and inflammatory effects of mild stress than are adult mice and suggest a possible a role for IL-1β. PMID:18407425

  15. Gut microbiota Modulated by Probiotics and Garcinia cambogia Extract Correlate with Weight Gain and Adipocyte Sizes in High Fat-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jaeyoung; Seo, Minseok; Park, Hwanhee; Lee, Woon Kyu; Guan, Le Luo; Yoon, Joon; Caetano-Anolles, Kelsey; Ahn, Hyeonju; Kim, Se-Young; Kang, Yoon-Mo; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2016-01-01

    Results of recent studies on gut microbiota have suggested that obesogenic bacteria exacerbate obesity and metabolic dysfunction in the host when fed a high fat diet (HFD). In order to explore obesity-associated bacterial candidates and their response to diet, the composition of faecal bacterial communities was investigated by analyzing 16S rRNA gene sequences in mice. Dietary intervention with probiotics and Garcinia cambogia extract attenuated weight gain and adipocyte size in HFD-fed mice. To identify obesity-causative microbiota, two statistical analyses were performed. Forty-eight bacterial species were found to overlap between the two analyses, indicating the commonly identified species as diet-driven and obesity-associated, which would make them strong candidates for host-microbiome interaction on obesity. Finally, correlation based network analysis between diet, microbe, and host revealed that Clostridium aminophilum, a hyper-ammonia-producing bacterium, was highly correlated with obesity phenotypes and other associated bacteria, and shown to be suppressed by the combination of probiotics and Garcinia cambogia extract. Results of the present study suggest that probiotics and Garcinia cambogia extract alleviate weight gain and adiposity, in part via differentially modulating the composition of gut microbiota in HFD fed mice. PMID:27658722

  16. Gut microbiota Modulated by Probiotics and Garcinia cambogia Extract Correlate with Weight Gain and Adipocyte Sizes in High Fat-Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jaeyoung; Seo, Minseok; Park, Hwanhee; Lee, Woon Kyu; Guan, Le Luo; Yoon, Joon; Caetano-Anolles, Kelsey; Ahn, Hyeonju; Kim, Se-Young; Kang, Yoon-Mo; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2016-09-23

    Results of recent studies on gut microbiota have suggested that obesogenic bacteria exacerbate obesity and metabolic dysfunction in the host when fed a high fat diet (HFD). In order to explore obesity-associated bacterial candidates and their response to diet, the composition of faecal bacterial communities was investigated by analyzing 16S rRNA gene sequences in mice. Dietary intervention with probiotics and Garcinia cambogia extract attenuated weight gain and adipocyte size in HFD-fed mice. To identify obesity-causative microbiota, two statistical analyses were performed. Forty-eight bacterial species were found to overlap between the two analyses, indicating the commonly identified species as diet-driven and obesity-associated, which would make them strong candidates for host-microbiome interaction on obesity. Finally, correlation based network analysis between diet, microbe, and host revealed that Clostridium aminophilum, a hyper-ammonia-producing bacterium, was highly correlated with obesity phenotypes and other associated bacteria, and shown to be suppressed by the combination of probiotics and Garcinia cambogia extract. Results of the present study suggest that probiotics and Garcinia cambogia extract alleviate weight gain and adiposity, in part via differentially modulating the composition of gut microbiota in HFD fed mice.

  17. Effects of age on development of digestive organs and performance of chicks fed a corn-soybean meal versus a crystalline amino acid diet.

    PubMed

    Batal, A B; Parsons, C M

    2002-09-01

    Changes in growth performance and physical and morphological development of the digestive organs were examined in chicks fed a crystalline amino acid (AA) diet compared to chicks fed a corn-soybean meal (SBM) diet. Six pens of eight New Hampshire x Columbian male chicks were assigned to one of three dietary regimens: (1) corn-SBM diet from 0 to 21 d of age; (2) cornstarch-crystalline AA diet from 0 to 21 d of age; and (3) corn-SBM diet from 0 to 7 d of age followed by the crystalline AA diet from 8 to 21 d of age. Weight gain was significantly reduced by feeding a crystalline AA diet from 0 to 21 or 8 to 21 d of age. Feeding a crystalline AA diet for the first 7 d of age depressed absolute weight of the small intestine, pancreas, liver, gizzard, and proven-triculus, and continual feeding through 21 d of age further depressed growth of these organs compared with birds fed a corn-SBM diet for 21 d. When expressing organ weight on a relative basis (g/100 g of BW), reductions were observed at 7 d of age due to feeding a crystalline AA diet but not at 21 d of age. Feeding a crystalline AA diet for the first 7 or 21 d of age depressed intestinal villi height and crypt depth. However, chicks fed the crystalline AA diet only from 8 to 21 d of age had further depressed villi height and crypt depth but greater villi width compared with chicks fed the crystalline AA or corn-SBM diet continually from 0 to 21 d of age. These results indicate that the reduced growth of chicks fed a crystalline AA diet is due in part to slower growth and development of the gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Liver Fatty Acid Composition and Inflammation in Mice Fed with High-Carbohydrate Diet or High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    da Silva-Santi, Lorena Gimenez; Antunes, Marina Masetto; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Carbonera, Fabiana; Masi, Laureane Nunes; Curi, Rui; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    Both high-carbohydrate diet (HCD) and high-fat diet (HFD) modulate liver fat accumulation and inflammation, however, there is a lack of data on the potential contribution of carbohydrates and lipids separately. For this reason, the changes in liver fatty acid (FA) composition in male Swiss mice fed with HCD or HFD were compared, at the time points 0 (before starting the diets), and after 7, 14, 28 or 56 days. Activities of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), ∆-6 desaturase (D6D), elongases and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) were estimated. Liver mRNA expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) was evaluated as an additional indicator of the de novo lipogenesis. Myeloperoxidase activity, nitric oxide (NO) production, and mRNA expressions of F4/80, type I collagen, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured as indication of the liver inflammatory state. The HCD group had more intense lipid deposition, particularly of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). This group also showed higher DNL, SCD-1, and D6D activities associated with increased NO concentration, as well as myeloperoxidase activity. Livers from the HFD group showed higher elongase activity, stored more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and had a lower omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid (n-6/n-3) ratio. In conclusion, liver lipid accumulation, fatty acids (FA) composition and inflammation were modulated by the dietary composition of lipids and carbohydrates. The HCD group had more potent lipogenic and inflammatory effects in comparison with HFD. PMID:27801862

  19. Liver Fatty Acid Composition and Inflammation in Mice Fed with High-Carbohydrate Diet or High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Santi, Lorena Gimenez; Antunes, Marina Masetto; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Carbonera, Fabiana; Masi, Laureane Nunes; Curi, Rui; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa

    2016-10-29

    Both high-carbohydrate diet (HCD) and high-fat diet (HFD) modulate liver fat accumulation and inflammation, however, there is a lack of data on the potential contribution of carbohydrates and lipids separately. For this reason, the changes in liver fatty acid (FA) composition in male Swiss mice fed with HCD or HFD were compared, at the time points 0 (before starting the diets), and after 7, 14, 28 or 56 days. Activities of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), ∆-6 desaturase (D6D), elongases and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) were estimated. Liver mRNA expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) was evaluated as an additional indicator of the de novo lipogenesis. Myeloperoxidase activity, nitric oxide (NO) production, and mRNA expressions of F4/80, type I collagen, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured as indication of the liver inflammatory state. The HCD group had more intense lipid deposition, particularly of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). This group also showed higher DNL, SCD-1, and D6D activities associated with increased NO concentration, as well as myeloperoxidase activity. Livers from the HFD group showed higher elongase activity, stored more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and had a lower omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid (n-6/n-3) ratio. In conclusion, liver lipid accumulation, fatty acids (FA) composition and inflammation were modulated by the dietary composition of lipids and carbohydrates. The HCD group had more potent lipogenic and inflammatory effects in comparison with HFD.

  20. Lingonberries alter the gut microbiota and prevent low-grade inflammation in high-fat diet fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Heyman-Lindén, Lovisa; Kotowska, Dorota; Sand, Elin; Bjursell, Mikael; Plaza, Merichel; Turner, Charlotta; Holm, Cecilia; Fåk, Frida; Berger, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background The gut microbiota plays an important role in the development of obesity and obesity-associated impairments such as low-grade inflammation. Lingonberries have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity and low-grade inflammation. However, it is not known whether the effect of lingonberry supplementation is related to modifications of the gut microbiota. The aim of the present study was to describe whether consumption of different batches of lingonberries alters the composition of the gut microbiota, which could be relevant for the protective effect against high fat (HF)-induced metabolic alterations. Methods Three groups of C57BL/6J mice were fed HF diet with or without a supplement of 20% lingonberries from two different batches (Lingon1 and Lingon2) during 11 weeks. The composition and functionality of the cecal microbiota were assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing and PICRUSt. In addition, parameters related to obesity, insulin sensitivity, hepatic steatosis, inflammation and gut barrier function were examined. Results HF-induced obesity was only prevented by the Lingon1 diet, whereas both batches of lingonberries reduced plasma levels of markers of inflammation and endotoxemia (SAA and LBP) as well as modified the composition and functionality of the gut microbiota, compared to the HF control group. The relative abundance of Akkermansia and Faecalibacterium, genera associated with healthy gut mucosa and anti-inflammation, was found to increase in response to lingonberry intake. Conclusions Our results show that supplementation with lingonberries to an HF diet prevents low-grade inflammation and is associated with significant changes of the microbiota composition. Notably, the anti-inflammatory properties of lingonberries seem to be independent of effects on body weight gain. PMID:27125264

  1. TRPA1 contributes to chronic pain in aged mice with CFA-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Sheldon R.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Investigate age-related differences in mechanical sensitivity and determine the contribution of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) to mechanical hypersensitivity during chronic inflammation in young and aged animals. Methods Mechanical sensitivity in young (3-month) and aged (24-month) wild-type (TRPA1+/+) and TRPA1-deficient (TRPA1-/-) mice was measured behaviorally for 8-weeks following injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) into the plantar hindpaw. Histological analysis and hindpaw measurements evaluated inflammation. Ex-vivo skin-saphenous nerve preparations quantified C-fiber sensitivity. Results In naïve wild-type mice, aged animals were less sensitive to mechanical stimuli than young. Afferent recordings from TRPA1-/- mice indicate that TRPA1 contributes to the normal mechanical sensitivity in both age groups. Following CFA injection, both young and aged TRPA1+/+ mice exhibited mechanical hypersensitivity. Development of mechanical hypersensitivity was delayed until week 4 in young TRPA1-/- mice, when they exhibited a sharp decrease (9-fold) in mechanical thresholds. In contrast, CFA-injected aged TRPA1-/- mice did not exhibit mechanical hypersensitivity at any time during the entire 8-weeks. Recordings of C-fibers supported these findings and showed that action potential firing increased in both young (25%) and aged (60%) TRPA1+/+ mice 8 weeks after CFA. Interestingly, mechanical firing increased markedly in C-fibers from young TRPA1-/- mice (80%) but not in C-fibers from aged TRPA1-/- mice after CFA. Conclusions These data reveal marked differences in long-term mechanical behavioral sensitivity of aged and young mice, and suggest that TRPA1 may be a key contributor to the transition from acute to chronic inflammatory mechanical pain and nociceptor sensitization selectively in aged mice. PMID:24891324

  2. Influence on longevity of blueberry, cinnamon, green and black tea, pomegranate, sesame, curcumin, morin, pycnogenol, quercetin, and taxifolin fed iso-calorically to long-lived, F1 hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Stephen R; Mote, Patricia L; Flegal, James M; Teter, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Phytonutrients reportedly extend the life span of Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mice. We tested extracts of blueberry, pomegranate, green and black tea, cinnamon, sesame, and French maritime pine bark (Pycnogenol and taxifolin), as well as curcumin, morin, and quercetin for their effects on the life span of mice. While many of these phytonutrients reportedly extend the life span of model organisms, we found no significant effect on the life span of male F1 hybrid mice, even though the dosages used reportedly produce defined therapeutic end points in mice. The compounds were fed beginning at 12 months of age. The control and treatment groups were iso-caloric with respect to one another. A 40% calorically restricted and other groups not reported here did experience life span extension. Body weights were un-changed relative to controls for all but two supplemented groups, indicating most supplements did not change energy absorption or utilization. Tea extracts with morin decreased weight, whereas quercetin, taxifolin, and Pycnogenol together increased weight. These changes may be due to altered locomotion or fatty acid biosynthesis. Published reports of murine life span extension using curcumin or tea components may have resulted from induced caloric restriction. Together, our results do not support the idea that isolated phytonutrient anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatories are potential longevity therapeutics, even though consumption of whole fruits and vegetables is associated with enhanced health span and life span.

  3. Citrus junos Tanaka Peel Extract Exerts Antidiabetic Effects via AMPK and PPAR-γ both In Vitro and In Vivo in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hee; Hur, Haeng Jeon; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Jae Ho; Sung, Mi Jeong; Kim, Myung Sunny; Kwon, Dae Young; Hwang, Jin-Taek

    2013-01-01

    The antidiabetic effect of the Citrus junos Tanaka (also known as yuja or yuzu) was examined. Ethanol extract of yuja peel (YPEE) significantly stimulated 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG) uptake in C2C12 myotubes. However, ethanol extract of yuja pulp (YpEE) and water extract of yuja peel (YPWE) or pulp (YpWE) did not stimulate glucose uptake. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activities were increased by YPEE in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of AMPK inhibitor decreased the glucose uptake stimulated by YPEE in C2C12 myotubes. We confirmed the anti-diabetic effect of YPEE in mice fed a high fat-diet (HFD). Compared with control mice on a normal diet (ND), these mice showed increased body weight, liver fat, insulin resistance, triacylglycerol (TG), and total cholesterol content. Addition of 5% YPEE significantly reduced the weight gain and rise in liver fat content, serum triacylglycerol (TG), total cholesterol, and insulin resistance found in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Moreover, YPEE reduced the secretion of HFD-induced adipocytokines such as leptin and resistin. YPEE also resulted in increased phosphorylation of AMPK in muscle tissues. These results suggest that ethanol extract of yuja peel exerts anti-diabetic effects via AMPK and PPAR-γ in both cell culture and mouse models. PMID:23762167

  4. Citrus junos Tanaka Peel Extract Exerts Antidiabetic Effects via AMPK and PPAR-γ both In Vitro and In Vivo in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hee; Hur, Haeng Jeon; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Jae Ho; Sung, Mi Jeong; Kim, Myung Sunny; Kwon, Dae Young; Hwang, Jin-Taek

    2013-01-01

    The antidiabetic effect of the Citrus junos Tanaka (also known as yuja or yuzu) was examined. Ethanol extract of yuja peel (YPEE) significantly stimulated 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG) uptake in C2C12 myotubes. However, ethanol extract of yuja pulp (YpEE) and water extract of yuja peel (YPWE) or pulp (YpWE) did not stimulate glucose uptake. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activities were increased by YPEE in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of AMPK inhibitor decreased the glucose uptake stimulated by YPEE in C2C12 myotubes. We confirmed the anti-diabetic effect of YPEE in mice fed a high fat-diet (HFD). Compared with control mice on a normal diet (ND), these mice showed increased body weight, liver fat, insulin resistance, triacylglycerol (TG), and total cholesterol content. Addition of 5% YPEE significantly reduced the weight gain and rise in liver fat content, serum triacylglycerol (TG), total cholesterol, and insulin resistance found in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Moreover, YPEE reduced the secretion of HFD-induced adipocytokines such as leptin and resistin. YPEE also resulted in increased phosphorylation of AMPK in muscle tissues. These results suggest that ethanol extract of yuja peel exerts anti-diabetic effects via AMPK and PPAR-γ in both cell culture and mouse models.

  5. Decreased production of interleukin-6 and prostaglandin E2 associated with inhibition of delta-5 desaturation of omega6 fatty acids in mice fed safflower oil diets supplemented with sesamol.

    PubMed

    Chavali, S R; Forse, R A

    1999-12-01

    The differences in the immune responses in mice fed sesame oil diets and those fed sesamin may be attributed to the presence of other lignans in the non-fat portion of the oil. The fatty acid composition (mean +/- SD mol. %) of liver membrane phospholipids and the levels of endotoxin-induced prostaglandin (PG) E2, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were determined in mice fed diets supplemented with 5% safflower oil (SO) in the absence or presence of 1% sesamol. The levels of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (20:3omega6) were markedly higher (P<0.025) in the livers from mice fed sesamol supplemented SO diets (1.6 +/- 0.1) compared to the controls (1.4 +/- 0.1). These data suggest that sesamol or its metabolite could inhibit the in vivo delta-5 desaturation of omega6 fatty acids. Further, in animals fed sesamol supplemented SO diets, the levels of PGE2 (228 +/- 41 pg/ml) were markedly lower (P<0.01) compared to those fed SO diet alone (1355 +/- 188 pg/ml). Concomitantly, the concentrations of IL-6 were also lower (P<0.01) in mice fed sesamol diet (63 +/- 11 ng/ml) compared to the controls (143 +/- 22 ng/ml). A marked reduction in the levels of PGE2 in animals fed sesamol diets suggests that sesamol or its metabolite could inhibit the activity of cyclooxygenase enzyme.

  6. Dietary Tocotrienol/γ-Cyclodextrin Complex Increases Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and ATP Concentrations in the Brains of Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schloesser, Anke; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Dose, Janina; Ikuta, Naoko; Okamoto, Hinako; Ishida, Yoshiyuki; Terao, Keiji; Matsugo, Seiichi; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Brain aging is accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial function. In vitro studies suggest that tocotrienols, including γ- and δ-tocotrienol (T3), may exhibit neuroprotective properties. However, little is known about the effect of dietary T3 on mitochondrial function in vivo. In this study, we monitored the effect of a dietary T3/γ-cyclodextrin complex (T3CD) on mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in the brain of 21-month-old mice. Mice were fed either a control diet or a diet enriched with T3CD providing 100 mg T3 per kg diet for 6 months. Dietary T3CD significantly increased mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels compared to those of controls. The increase in MMP and ATP due to dietary T3CD was accompanied by an increase in the protein levels of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM). Furthermore, dietary T3CD slightly increased the mRNA levels of superoxide dismutase, γ-glutamyl cysteinyl synthetase, and heme oxygenase 1 in the brain. Overall, the present data suggest that T3CD increases TFAM, mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP synthesis in the brains of aged mice. PMID:26301044

  7. Effect of genetic background on the therapeutic effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in diabetes-obesity mutants and in aged normal mice.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D L; Schwizer, R W; Leiter, E H

    1984-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) was fed at 0.1-0.4% in the diet to genetically diabetic (db/db) or obese (ob/ob) C57BL/KsJ (BL/Ks) or C57BL/6J (BL/6) mice. Treatment of BL/Ks-db/db or ob/ob mice with 0.4% DHEA prevented hyperglycemia, islet atrophy, and severe diabetes associated with this inbred background, but did not affect weight gain and food consumption. Homozygous obese (ob) or diabetes (db) mice on the BL/6 background were more sensitive to DHEA, and the mild, transient hyperglycemia associated with ob or db gene expression on the BL/6 inbred background could be prevented by 0.1% DHEA. Both body weight and food consumption were decreased in BL/6 mutants maintained on 0.1% DHEA whereas this effect was not seen in BL/Ks mutants fed up to 0.4% DHEA. Early therapy with 0.4% DHEA, initiated at 2 wk of age, prevented the development of most diabetes symptoms and decreased the rate of weight gain in pups of all genotypes. In addition to therapeutic effects on both obese mutants, DHEA effected significant changes in an aging study using normal BL/6 female mice. Four weeks of DHEA treatment initiated at 2 yr of age improved glucose tolerance and at the same time reduced plasma insulin to a "younger" level. This suggests that DHEA may act in insulin-resistant mutant mice and in aging normal mice to increase the sensitivity to insulin.

  8. Dietary supplementation with purified mulberry (Morus australis Poir) anthocyanins suppresses body weight gain in high-fat diet fed C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Qi, Xueming; Liu, Yan; Guo, Jun; Zhu, Ruiyu; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ting

    2013-11-01

    We present our experiment about adding anthocyanins to the daily food of mice. Three kinds of anthocyanins (cyanidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-rutinoside and pelargonidin-3-glucoside) purified from Chinese mulberry (Morus australis Poir) were evaluated for suppressing body weight gain of the male C57BL/6 mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD). The results from a 12-week experiment show that consumption of purified mulberry anthocyanins (MACN) of 40 or 200mg/kg can significantly inhibit body weight gain, reduce the resistance to insulin, lower the size of adipocytes, attenuate lipid accumulation and decrease the leptin secretion. Thus, dietary supplementation with MACN can protect against body weight gain of the diet-induced obese mice.

  9. Adiposity induces lethal cytokine storm after systemic administration of stimulatory immunotherapy regimens in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Mirsoian, Annie; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Chen, Mingyi; Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Maverakis, Emanuel; Spencer, Richard G.; Fishbein, Kenneth W.; Siddiqui, Sana; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a contributing factor in cancer occurrence. We recently demonstrated that systemic immunotherapy (IT) administration in aged, but not young, mice resulted in induction of rapid and lethal cytokine storm. We found that aging was accompanied by increases in visceral fat similar to that seen in young obese (ob/ob or diet-induced obese [DIO]) mice. Yet, the effects of aging and obesity on inflammatory responses to immunotherapeutics are not well defined. We determine the effects of adiposity on systemic IT tolerance in aged compared with young obese mice. Both young ob/ob- and DIO-generated proinflammatory cytokine levels and organ pathologies are comparable to those in aged ad libitum mice after IT, culminating in lethality. Young obese mice exhibited greater ratios of M1/M2 macrophages within the peritoneal and visceral adipose tissues and higher percentages of TNF+ macrophages in response to αCD40/IL-2 as compared with young lean mice. Macrophage depletion or TNF blockade in conjunction with αCD40/IL-2 prevented cytokine storms in young obese mice and protected from lethality. Calorie-restricted aged mice contain less visceral fat and displayed reduced cytokine levels, protection from organ pathology, and protection from lethality upon αCD40/IL-2 administration. Our data demonstrate that adiposity is a critical factor in the age-associated pathological responses to systemic anti-cancer IT. PMID:25366964

  10. Suppression of oxidative stress by resveratrol after isometric contractions in gastrocnemius muscles of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael J; Jackson, Janna R; Hao, Yanlei; Williamson, Courtney L; Dabkowski, Erinne R; Hollander, John M; Alway, Stephen E

    2010-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that resveratrol supplementation would lower oxidative stress in exercised muscles of aged mice. Young (3 months) and aged (27 months) C57BL/6 mice received a control or a 0.05% trans-resveratrol-supplemented diet for 10 days. After 7 days of dietary intervention, 20 maximal electrically evoked isometric contractions were obtained from the plantar flexors of one limb in anesthetized mice. Exercise was conducted for three consecutive days. Resveratrol supplementation blunted the exercise-induced increase in xanthine oxidase activity in muscles from young (25%) and aged (53%) mice. Resveratrol lowered H(2)O(2) levels in control (13%) and exercised (38%) muscles from aged animals, reduced Nox4 protein in both control and exercised muscles of young (30%) and aged mice (40%), and increased the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione in exercised muscles from young (38%) and aged (135%) mice. Resveratrol prevented the increase in lipid oxidation, increased catalase activity, and increased MnSOD activity in exercised muscles from aged mice. These data show that dietary resveratrol suppresses muscle indicators of oxidative stress in response to isometric contractions in aged mice.

  11. Diabetes exacerbates amyloid and neurovascular pathology in aging-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Currais, Antonio; Prior, Marguerite; Lo, David; Jolivalt, Corinne; Schubert, David; Maher, Pamela

    2012-12-01

    Mounting evidence supports a link between diabetes, cognitive dysfunction, and aging. However, the physiological mechanisms by which diabetes impacts brain function and cognition are not fully understood. To determine how diabetes contributes to cognitive dysfunction and age-associated pathology, we used streptozotocin to induce type 1 diabetes (T1D) in senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) and senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice. Contextual fear conditioning demonstrated that T1D resulted in the development of cognitive deficits in SAMR1 mice similar to those seen in age-matched, nondiabetic SAMP8 mice. No further cognitive deficits were observed when the SAMP8 mice were made diabetic. T1D dramatically increased Aβ and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of SAMP8 mice and to a lesser extent in age-matched SAMR1 mice. Further analysis revealed aggregated Aβ within astrocyte processes surrounding vessels. Western blot analyses from T1D SAMP8 mice showed elevated amyloid precursor protein processing and protein glycation along with increased inflammation. T1D elevated tau phosphorylation in the SAMR1 mice but did not further increase it in the SAMP8 mice where it was already significantly higher. These data suggest that aberrant glucose metabolism potentiates the aging phenotype in old mice and contributes to early stage central nervous system pathology in younger animals.

  12. A unique combination of micronutrients rejuvenates cognitive performance in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Perez, Sam D; Du, Kristy; Rendeiro, Catarina; Wang, Lin; Wu, Qian; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Vazhappilly, Rema; Baxter, Jeffrey H; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rhodes, Justin S

    2017-03-01

    It is widely believed that diet can influence the onset and severity of cognitive aging, but the optimal combination of micronutrients and molecular and cellular mechanisms remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of eight distinct diets, consisting of various concentrations of selected micronutrients, on learning and memory as well as markers of neuronal plasticity, and metabolic and neuro-immune status of the aged hippocampus. Eighteen-month-old male and female C57BL/6J mice were fed the diets for 16 weeks, followed by learning and memory trials on the active avoidance task. Number of immature neurons were measured by immunohistochemical detection of doublecortin (DCX(+)) in the granule layer of the dentate gyrus. Amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and gene expression of molecular markers of mitochondrial biogenesis (Ppargc1α, Sirt1, Tfam), and neuroinflammation (IL-10, Alox15, Ptgs2, IL-1β, IL-6 and Tnf) were assessed by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) of hippocampal samples. Tissue levels of selected micronutrients and a number of metabolites were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The diet supplemented with RRR d-alpha tocopheryl acetate, citicholine, 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, quercetin and the n-3 fatty acid phosphatidylserine-docosahexaenoic acid, improved performance on the active avoidance learning and memory task compared to all the other less-complex diets. This diet also increased IL-10 expression and attenuated the age-related change in mtDNA content in the hippocampus without affecting metabolite levels. Results suggest cognitive benefits of wholesome diets are partially mediated through combined antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of optimized mixtures of micronutrients.

  13. Dietary linoleic acid elevates the endocannabinoids 2-AG and anandamide and promotes weight gain in mice fed a low fat diet.

    PubMed

    Alvheim, Anita Røyneberg; Torstensen, Bente E; Lin, Yu Hong; Lillefosse, Haldis Haukås; Lock, Erik-Jan; Madsen, Lise; Frøyland, Livar; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Malde, Marian Kjellevold

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intake of linoleic acid (LNA, 18:2n-6) has increased dramatically during the 20th century and is associated with greater prevalence of obesity. The endocannabinoid system is involved in regulation of energy balance and a sustained hyperactivity of the endocannabinoid system may contribute to obesity. Arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6) is the precursor for 2-AG and anandamide (AEA), and we sought to determine if low fat diets (LFD) could be made obesogenic by increasing the endocannabinoid precursor pool of ARA, causing excessive endocannabinoid signaling leading to weight gain and a metabolic profile associated with obesity. Mice (C57BL/6j, 6 weeks of age) were fed 1 en% LNA and 8 en% LNA in low fat (12.5 en%) and medium fat diets (MFD, 35 en%) for 16 weeks. We found that increasing dietary LNA from 1 to 8 en% in LFD and MFD significantly increased ARA in phospholipids (ARA-PL), elevated 2-AG and AEA in liver, elevated plasma leptin, and resulted in larger adipocytes and more macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue. In LFD, dietary LNA of 8 en% increased feed efficiency and caused greater weight gain than in an isocaloric reduction to 1 en% LNA. Increasing dietary LNA from 1 to 8 en% elevates liver endocannabinoid levels and increases the risk of developing obesity. Thus a high dietary content of LNA (8 en%) increases the adipogenic properties of a low fat diet.

  14. Glial dysfunction in parkin null mice: effects of aging.

    PubMed

    Solano, Rosa M; Casarejos, Maria J; Menéndez-Cuervo, Jamie; Rodriguez-Navarro, Jose A; García de Yébenes, Justo; Mena, Maria A

    2008-01-16

    Parkin mutations in humans produce parkinsonism whose pathogenesis is related to impaired protein degradation, increased free radicals, and abnormal neurotransmitter release. The role of glia in parkin deficiency is little known. We cultured midbrain glia from wild-type (WT) and parkin knock-out (PK-KO) mice. After 18-20 d in vitro, PK-KO glial cultures had less astrocytes, more microglia, reduced proliferation, and increased proapoptotic protein expression. PK-KO glia had greater levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH), increased mRNA expression of the GSH-synthesizing enzyme gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and greater glutathione S-transferase and lower glutathione peroxidase activities than WT. The reverse happened in glia cultured in serum-free defined medium (EF12) or in old cultures. PK-KO glia was more susceptible than WT to transference to EF12 or neurotoxins (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, blockers of GSH synthesis or catalase, inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinases), aging of the culture, or combination of these insults. PK-KO glia was less susceptible than WT to Fe2+ plus H2O2 and less responsive to protection by deferoxamine. Old WT glia increased the expression of heat shock protein 70, but PK-KO did not. Glia conditioned medium (GCM) from PK-KO was less neuroprotective and had lower levels of GSH than WT. GCM from WT increased the levels of dopamine markers in midbrain neuronal cultures transferred to EF12 more efficiently than GCM from PK-KO, and the difference was corrected by supplementation with GSH. PK-KO-GCM was a less powerful suppressor of apoptosis and microglia in neuronal cultures. Our data prove that abnormal glial function is critical in parkin mutations, and its role increases with aging.

  15. Changes of Ovarian microRNA Profile in Long-Living Ames Dwarf Mice during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Augusto; Matkovich, Scot J.; Victoria, Berta; Spinel, Lina; Bartke, Andrzej; Golusinski, Pawel; Masternak, Michal M.

    2017-01-01

    The Ames dwarf (df/df) mice have extended longevity and can preserve the ovarian reserve longer than Normal (N) mice. Based on this, the aim of our study was to evaluate the ovarian microRNA (miRNA) profile in young and aged df/df and N mice. Ovarian tissue was collected at 5–6 months and at 21–22 months of age for miRNA sequencing. We detected a total of 404 miRNAs in the ovarian samples, from which the abundance of 22 and 33 miRNAs changed with age in N and df/df mice, respectively. Of these, only three miRNAs were commonly regulated with age between N and df/df mice, indicating a very divergent miRNA profile between genotypes. We also detected that 46 miRNAs were regulated between N and df/df mice, of which 23 were regulated exclusively in young mice, 12 exclusively in old mice and 12 commonly regulated at young and old ages. Many genes likely to be targeted by these miRNAs are involved in the FoxO, mTOR, PI3k/Akt and insulin signaling pathways. These results suggest that the aging process has a differential impact on the ovarian miRNA profile in df/df mice, and suggest that these miRNAs can be central players in the maintenance of a younger ovarian phenotype. PMID:28046124

  16. Splenic Immune Response Is Down-Regulated in C57BL/6J Mice Fed Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Enriched High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Nikul K.; Ross, Alastair B.; Scheers, Nathalie; Savolainen, Otto I.; Nookaew, Intawat; Gabrielsson, Britt G.; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Dietary n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are associated with reduction of inflammation, although the mechanisms are poorly understood, especially how the spleen, as a secondary lymphoid organ, is involved. To investigate the effects of EPA and DHA on spleen gene expression, male C57BL/6J mice were fed high fat diets (HFD) differing in fatty acid composition, either based on corn oil (HFD-CO), or CO enriched with 2 g/100 g EPA and DHA (HFD-ED), for eight weeks. Spleen tissue was analyzed using transcriptomics and for fatty acids profiling. Biological processes (BPs) related to the immune response, including T-cell receptor signaling pathway, T-cell differentiation and co-stimulation, myeloid dendritic cell differentiation, antigen presentation and processing, and the toll like receptor pathway were downregulated by HFD-ED compared with control and HFD-CO. These findings were supported by the down-regulation of NF-κB in HFD-ED compared with HFD-CO fed mice. Lower phospholipid arachidonic acid levels in HFD-ED compared with HFD-CO, and control mice suggest attenuation of pathways via prostaglandins and leukotrienes. The HFD-ED also upregulated BPs related to erythropoiesis and hematopoiesis compared with control and HFD-CO fed mice. Our findings suggest that EPA and DHA down-regulate the splenic immune response induced by HFD-CO, supporting earlier work that the spleen is a target organ for the anti-inflammatory effects of these n-3 fatty acids. PMID:28075380

  17. Chronic leucine supplementation improves lipid metabolism in C57BL/6J mice fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jun; Han, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jia-Ying; Tong, Xing; Yin, Xue-Bin; Yuan, Lin-Xi; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Leucine supplementation has been reported to improve lipid metabolism. However, lipid metabolism in adipose tissues and liver has not been extensively studied for leucine supplementation in mice fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet (HFCD). Design C57BL/6J mice were fed a chow diet, HFCD, HFCD supplemented with 1.5% leucine (HFCD+1.5% Leu group) or 3% leucine (HFCD+3% Leu group) for 24 weeks. The body weight, peritoneal adipose weight, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride in serum and liver, and serum adipokines were analyzed. In addition, expression levels of proteins associated with hepatic lipogenesis, adipocyte lipolysis, and white adipose tissue (WAT) browning were determined. Results Mice in the HFCD group developed obesity and deteriorated lipid metabolism. Compared with HFCD, leucine supplementation lowered weight gain and TC levels in circulation and the liver without changing energy intake. The decrease in body fat was supported by histological examination in the WAT and liver. Furthermore, serum levels of proinflammatory adipokines, such as leptin, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, were significantly decreased by supplemented leucine. At the protein level, leucine potently decreased the hepatic lipogenic enzymes (fatty acid synthase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase) and corresponding upstream proteins. In epididymal WAT, the reduced expression levels of two major lipases by HFCD, namely phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase, were reversed when leucine was supplemented. Uncoupling protein 1, β3 adrenergic receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor g coactivator-1α, and fibroblast growth factor 21 were involved in the thermogenic program and WAT browning. Leucine additionally upregulated their protein expression in both WAT and interscapular brown adipose tissue. Conclusion This study demonstrated that chronic leucine supplementation reduced the body weight and improved the lipid profile of

  18. Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaf supplementation improves antioxidant status in C57BL/6J mice fed high fat high cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeung Hee; Son, Chan Wook; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Min Hee; Kim, Hye Ran; Kwak, Eun Shil; Kim, Sena

    2009-01-01

    The effect of diet supplemented with red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaf on antioxidant status of plasma and tissue was investigated in C57BL/6J mice. The mice were randomly divided into two groups after one-week acclimation, and fed a high fat (20%) and high cholesterol (1%) diet without (control group) or with 8% freeze-dried red beet leaf (RBL group) for 4 weeks. In RBL mice, lipid peroxidation determined as 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS value) was significantly reduced in the plasma and selected organs (liver, heart, and kidney). Levels of antioxidants (glutathione and β-carotene) and the activities of antioxidant enzyme (glutathione peroxidase) in plasma and liver were considerably increased, suggesting that antioxidant defenses were improved by RBL diet. Comet parameters such as tail DNA (%), tail extent moment, olive tail moment and tail length were significantly reduced by 25.1%, 49.4%, 35.4%, and 23.7%, respectively, in plasma lymphocyte DNA of RBL mice compared with control mice, and indicated the increased resistance of lymphocyte DNA to oxidative damage. In addition, the RBL diet controlled body weight together with a significant reduction of fat pad (retroperitoneal, epididymal, inguinal fat, and total fat). Therefore, the present study suggested that the supplementation of 8% red beet leaf in high fat high cholesterol diet could prevent lipid peroxidation and improve antioxidant defense system in the plasma and tissue of C57BL/6J mice. PMID:20016711

  19. N-nitroso compounds in the gastrointestinal tract of rats and in the feces of mice with induced colitis or fed hot dogs or beef.

    PubMed

    Mirvish, Sidney S; Haorah, James; Zhou, Lin; Hartman, Melissa; Morris, Chantey R; Clapper, Marge L

    2003-03-01

    Because colonic N-nitroso compounds (NOC) may be a cause of colon cancer, we determined total NOC levels by Walters' method in the gastrointestinal tract and feces of rodents: (i) feces of C57BL mice fed chow and semi-purified diets contained 3.2 +/- 0.4 and 0.46 +/- 0.06 NOC/g, respectively (P < 0.01, mean +/- SD). (ii) NOC levels for gastrointestinal contents of three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats fed chow diet were 0.9 +/- 0.05 (diet), 0.2 +/- 0 (stomach), 0.3-0.4 (small intestine), 0.7-1.6 (cecum and colon) and 2.6 +/- 0.6 (feces) nmol/g. NOC precursor (NOCP) levels (measured as NOC after mild nitrosation) for two rat groups fed chow diet showed a 16-fold increase from stomach to proximal small intestine (mean, 6.2 micromol/g), and a 1.7-fold increase from distal colon to feces (mean, 11.6 micromol/g). (iii) Eight Min and five C57BL/6J mice received 4% dextran sulfate sodium in drinking water on days 1-4 to induce acute colitis. This increased fecal NOC levels 1.9-fold on day 5 in both strains (P < or = 0.04), probably due to NO synthase-derived nitrosating agents in the colon. (iv) Following studies on humans fed beef [Hughes et al. (2001) Carcinogenesis, 22, 199], Swiss mice received semi-purified diets mixed with 18% of beef plus pork hot dogs or sautéed beef for 7 days. On day 7, individual 24-h fecal NOC outputs were determined. In three hot dog and two beef groups with 5 mice/group, mean fecal NOC output/day was 3.7-5.0 (hot dog) and 2.0-2.9 (beef) times that for control groups fed semi-purified diet alone (P < 0.002 for each of combined groups). These groups showed little change in fecal NOCP output. (v) Initial purification of rat fecal NOCP by adsorption-desorption and HPLC is described. Results should help evaluate the view that colonic NOC causes colon cancer associated with colitis and ingestion of red and nitrite-preserved meat.

  20. Comparative evaluation of anti-obesity effect of Aloe vera and Gymnema sylvestre supplementation in high-fat diet fed C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Pothuraju, Ramesh; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Rather, Sarver Ahmed; Singh, Satvinder

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate, anti-obesity effect of Aloe vera (AV), and Gymnema sylvestre (GS) whole extract powders administration to high-fat diet (HFD) fed C57BL/6J mice for 12 weeks. Materials and Methods: At the end of experiment, different parameters such as body weight, feed intake, organ weights, fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, plasma lipid levels, and expression analysis of adipocytokines were evaluated. Results: At the end of experimental period, oral administration of both herbs showed a significant (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001) decrease in the plasma glucose and lipid levels in HFD fed mice. In addition, increased in the epididymal fat (E. fat) weight in the HFD group was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced on GS administration alone. Finally, quantitative mRNA expression analysis of adiponectin gene was significantly up-regulated in AV supplementation. Further, no effect was observed with the both herbs on pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor-a) in the E. fat tissue of HFD fed group. Conclusions: The anti-obesity and other metabolic studies depend on the type of diet, different parts of herbal extractions, and animal models used. Further studies are required in this area to strengthen the anti-obesity effects of herbs with active component, and it can be used a pro-drug instead of whole extract. PMID:27757271

  1. Rice α-globulin decreases serum cholesterol concentrations in rats fed a hypercholesterolemic diet and ameliorates atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Tong, Li-Tao; Fujimoto, Yumiko; Shimizu, Naoki; Tsukino, Mariko; Akasaka, Taiki; Kato, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Wakako; Shiratake, Sawako; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Sato, Masao

    2012-05-01

    The hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic effects of rice α-globulin remain unclear. We investigated the hypocholesterolemic effect of rice α-globulin in rats fed a hypercholesterolemic diet. The rats were divided into 4 groups and were orally administrated the following three proteins or a vehicle for 4weeks: rice protein, rice α-globulin, or soy β-conglycinin at a dose of 100mg/kg body weight or carboxymethylcellulose to the control rats. In the rice α-globulin group, serum cholesterol concentrations were 28% lower than the control group and fecal neutral steroid excretion was increased by 30%. The hypocholesterolemic effect of rice α-globulin was equal to soy β-conglycinin in SD rats fed the hypercholesterolemic diet. However, the serum cholesterol concentrations in the rice protein group did not change compared to the control group. To investigate the antiatherogenic effects of rice α-globulin, male apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were orally administered the same dose of rice α-globulin for 9weeks. The en face lesion area in the aorta was 46% lower than in the control group. In conclusion, administration of rice α-globulin improves hypercholesterolemia in rats fed a hypercholesterolemic diet by increasing the fecal excretion of neutral sterols, and inhibits atherosclerosis development in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. The anti-atherosclerotic effect exerts by mechanism(s) other than the regulation of serum MCP-1 and NO concentrations.

  2. Momordica charantia ameliorates insulin resistance and dyslipidemia with altered hepatic glucose production and fatty acid synthesis and AMPK phosphorylation in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Ching; Shlau, Min-Tzong; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Wu, Jin-Bin

    2014-03-01

    Momordica charantia Linn. (Cucurbitaceae) fruit is commonly known as bitter melon. C57BL/6J mice were firstly divided randomly into two groups: the control (CON) group was fed with a low-fat diet, whereas the experimental group was fed a 45% high-fat (HF) diet for 8 weeks. Afterwards, the CON group was treated with vehicle, whereas the HF group was subdivided into five groups and still on HF diet and was given orally M. charantia extract (MCE) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or not for 4 weeks. M. charantia decreased the weights of visceral fat and caused glucose lowering. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major cellular regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism. MCE significantly increases the hepatic protein contents of AMPK phosphorylation by 126.2-297.3% and reduces expression of phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose production. Most importantly, MCE decreased expression of hepatic 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydroxygenase (11beta-HSD1) gene, which contributed in attenuating diabetic state. Furthermore, MCE lowered serum triglycerides (TGs) by inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis by dampening sterol response element binding protein 1c and fatty acid synthase mRNA leading to reduction in TGs synthesis. This study demonstrates M. charantia ameliorates diabetic and hyperlipidemic state in HF-fed mice occurred by regulation of hepatic PEPCK, 11beta-HSD1 and AMPK phosphorylation.

  3. Manipulation of Ovarian Function Significantly Influenced Sarcopenia in Postreproductive-Age Mice

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Rhett L.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, transplantation of ovaries from young cycling mice into old postreproductive-age mice increased life span. We anticipated that the same factors that increased life span could also influence health span. Female CBA/J mice received new (60 d) ovaries at 12 and 17 months of age and were evaluated at 16 and 25 months of age, respectively. There were no significant differences in body weight among any age or treatment group. The percentage of fat mass was significantly increased at 13 and 16 months of age but was reduced by ovarian transplantation in 16-month-old mice. The percentages of lean body mass and total body water were significantly reduced in 13-month-old control mice but were restored in 16- and 25-month-old recipient mice by ovarian transplantation to the levels found in six-month-old control mice. In summary, we have shown that skeletal muscle mass, which is negatively influenced by aging, can be positively influenced or restored by reestablishment of active ovarian function in aged female mice. These findings provide strong incentive for further investigation of the positive influence of young ovaries on restoration of health in postreproductive females. PMID:27747096

  4. Exogenous Testosterone, Aging, and Changes in Behavioral Response of Gonadally Intact Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Onaolapo, Olakunle J.; Onaolapo, Adejoke Y.; Omololu, Tope A.; Oludimu, Adedunke T.; Segun-Busari, Toluwalase; Omoleke, Taofeeq

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that aging significantly affects the influence of exogenous testosterone on neurobehavior in gonadally intact male mice. Groups of prepubertal and aged male mice received daily vehicle or testosterone propionate (TP; 2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg intraperitoneal [i.p.]) for 21 days. Behaviors were assessed on days 1 and 21. Weight gain was significant in prepubertal mice. Locomotion and rearing increased in prepubertal mice after first dose and decreased after last dose of TP. Rearing was suppressed in aged mice throughout. Suppression of grooming occurred in both age groups at day 21. Significant increase in working memory in both age groups was seen in the radial-arm maze (at specific doses) and in prepubertal mice in the Y-maze. Elevated plus maze test showed mixed anxiolytic/anxiogenic effects. Aged mice had higher serum testosterone. In conclusion, age is an important determinant for the influence of exogenous testosterone on behavior in gonadally intact male mice. PMID:27158222

  5. Anti-aging effect of Blakeslea trispora powder on adult mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weilian; Dai, Dehui; Li, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Blakeslea trispora powder that contains 1.9 % lycopene was tested for its anti-aging effect on adult mice. 48 adult mice were administered with the powder at 0, 267, 534, 1,068 mg lycopene kg(-1) body daily for 30 days. The body weight, hematology, clinical chemical and antioxidant activities in major organs of adult mice were measured. The powder had no effect on the body weight, hematology, clinical chemical parameters of adult mice but improved the antioxidant activities in major organs of adult mice. Increased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase and a decreased amount of malondialdehyde in liver, brain, kidney and skin of adult mice when a high-dose of the B. trispora powder was administered, suggests that it has the ability to enhance the antioxidation system and improve the anti-aging abilities of adult mice.

  6. Prediabetic changes in gene expression induced by aspartame and monosodium glutamate in Trans fat-fed C57Bl/6 J mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human diet has altered markedly during the past four decades, with the introduction of Trans hydrogenated fat, which extended the shelf-life of dietary oils and promoted a dramatic increase in elaidic acid (Trans-18.1) consumption. Food additives such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame (ASP) were introduced to increase food palatability and reduce caloric intake. Nutrigenomics studies in small-animal models are an established platform for analyzing the interactions between various macro- and micronutrients. We therefore investigated the effects of changes in hepatic and adipose tissue gene expression induced by the food additives ASP, MSG or a combination of both additives in C57Bl/6 J mice fed a Trans fat-enriched diet. Methods Hepatic and adipose tissue gene expression profiles, together with body characteristics, glucose parameters, serum hormone and lipid profiles were examined in C57Bl/6 J mice consuming one of the following four dietary regimens, commencing in utero via the mother’s diet: [A] Trans fat (TFA) diet; [B] MSG + TFA diet; [C] ASP + TFA diet; [D] ASP + MSG + TFA diet. Results Whilst dietary MSG significantly increased hepatic triglyceride and serum leptin levels in TFA-fed mice, the combination of ASP + MSG promoted the highest increase in visceral adipose tissue deposition, serum free fatty acids, fasting blood glucose, HOMA-IR, total cholesterol and TNFα levels. Microarray analysis of significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) showed a reduction in hepatic and adipose tissue PPARGC1a expression concomitant with changes in PPARGC1a-related functional networks including PPARα, δ and γ. We identified 73 DEGs common to both adipose and liver which were upregulated by ASP + MSG in Trans fat-fed mice; and an additional 51 common DEGs which were downregulated. Conclusion The combination of ASP and MSG may significantly alter adiposity, glucose homeostasis, hepatic and adipose tissue gene

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (Fgf21) Gene Expression Is Elevated in the Liver of Mice Fed a High-Carbohydrate Liquid Diet and Attenuated by a Lipid Emulsion but Is Not Upregulated in the Liver of Mice Fed a High-Fat Obesogenic Diet123

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lei; Huang, Kuan-Hsun; Ito, Kyoko; Sae-tan, Sudathip; Lambert, Joshua D; Ross, A Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a regulator of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism; however, the regulation of Fgf21 gene expression by diet remains incompletely understood. Objective: We investigated the effect of a high-carbohydrate (HC) liquid diet, with and without supplementation with a lipid emulsion (LE), and of a high-fat diet (HFD) compared with a low-fat diet (LFD) on the regulation of Fgf21 gene expression in the liver of intact mice. Methods: C57BL/6 male mice were fed standard feed pellets (SFPs), a purified HC liquid diet (adequate in calories and protein), or an HC liquid diet containing an LE at either 4% or 13.5% of energy for 5 wk (Expt. 1) or 1 wk (Expt. 2). In Expt. 3, mice were fed a purified LFD (∼10% fat) or HFD (∼60% fat) or were fed an HFD and given access to a running wheel for voluntary exercise for 16 wk. Results: Fgf21 mRNA in liver and FGF21 protein in plasma were increased by 3.5- to 7-fold in HC mice compared with SFP mice (P < 0.001), whereas the LE dose-dependently attenuated the induction of Fgf21 expression (P < 0.05). After 16 wk, hepatic Fgf21 mRNA did not differ between LFD and HFD mice but was dramatically reduced in the HFD+exercise group to <20% of the level in the HFD group (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: In mice, hepatic Fgf21 expression was upregulated by 1 and 5 wk of feeding a lipogenic HC diet but not by 16 wk of feeding an obesogenic HFD, whereas the addition of fat as an LE to the HC formula significantly reduced Fgf21 gene expression and the plasma FGF21 protein concentration. Our results support a strong and reversible response of hepatic Fgf21 expression to shifts in dietary glucose intake. PMID:26764334

  8. Establishment of a model of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in different weekly-aged ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, K; Tokuno, M; Yamasaki, K; Kadowaki, D; Seo, H; Otagiri, M

    2015-10-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug, has the potential to cause lethal hepatotoxicity. Mice are widely used for developing murine models of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and many researchers have used these models for APAP-related studies including the fields of biology, pharmacology and toxicology. Although drug-induced hepatotoxicity is dependent on a number of factors (species, gender and age), very few studies have investigated the effect of aging on APAP hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated the effect of age on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in different weekly-aged mice to establish a model of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity that is an accurate reflection of general experimental conditions. Male ICR mice 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks old were given APAP intraperitoneally, and mortality, hepatic damage and the plasma concentration of APAP metabolites were evaluated. It was found that younger male ICR mice were relatively resistant to hepatotoxicity induced by intraperitoneal APAP administration. In addition, the APAP-glucuronide concentration in plasma remained essentially the same among the differently-aged mice, while APAP-sulfate levels were dramatically decreased in an age-dependent manner. Thus, it is recommended that mice of the same ages be used in studies related to APAP-induced hepatotoxixity. These results provide evidence in support of not only the age-related changes in susceptibility to APAP-derived hepatotoxicity in mice but also in developing mouse models for APAP-related studies.

  9. Restricting feeding to the active phase in middle-aged mice attenuates adverse metabolic effects of a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M J; Smith, J T; Narbaiza, J; Mueez, F; Bustle, L B; Qureshi, S; Fieseler, C; Legan, S J

    2016-12-01

    Time-restricted feeding ameliorates the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet on body weight and metabolism in young adult mice. Because obesity is highly prevalent in the middle-aged population, this study tested the hypothesis that time-restricted feeding alleviates the adverse effects of a high-fat diet in male middle-aged (12months) mice. C57BL6/J mice were fed one of three diets for 21-25weeks: 1) high-fat diet (60% total calories from fat) ad-libitum (HFD-AL), 2) HFD, time-restricted feeding (HFD-TRF), and 3) low-fat diet (10% total calories from fat) ad-libitum (LFD-AL) (n=15 each). HFD-TRF mice only had food access for 8h/day during their active period. HFD-TRF mice gained significantly less weight than HFD-AL mice (~20% vs 55% of initial weight, respectively). Caloric intake differed between these groups only during the first 8weeks and accounted for most but not all of their body weight difference during this time. TRF of a HFD lowered glucose tolerance in terms of incremental area under the curve (iAUC) (p<0.02) to that of LFD-AL mice. TRF of a HFD lowered liver weight (p<0.0001), but not retroperitoneal or epididymal fat pad weight, to that of LFD-AL mice. Neither HFD-AL nor HFD-TRF had any effect on performance in the novel object recognition or object location memory tests. Circulating corticosterone levels either before or after restraint stress were not affected by diet. In conclusion, TRF without caloric restriction is an effective strategy in middle-aged mice for alleviating the negative effects of a HFD on body weight, liver weight, and glucose tolerance.

  10. Effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on (/sup 3/H)TdR incorporation into DNA in ad lib fed and fasted CD2F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Scheving, L.A.; Tsai, T.H.; Scheving, L.E.; Hoke, W.S.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of EGF on the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)TdR into DNA (DNA synthesis) was determined in the esophagus, liver, pancreas, and kidney in mice standardized to 12 hours (hr) of light alternating with 12 hr of darkness. A question asked was whether intraperitoneally administered EGF could alter the circadian patterns of DNA synthesis in these organs. The most marked effects of EGF were: an increase in DNA synthesis but only after a specific duration of time after treatment, ranging from 8 to 23 hr, which differed for each tissue, a similarity in the response of the esophagus in both ad lib fed and fasted mice, but not in the response of the liver, where the stimulatory effect of EGF observed in fed mice was dramatically reduced in fasted ones, and an advance in the phasing of the circadian rhythm in DNA synthesis of the esophagus by about 12 hr. In addition, no sex differences in fasted animals were found under the conditions of this study.

  11. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of a 46 kDa protein is decreased in brains of ethanol-fed mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nhamburo, P.T.; Hoffman, P.L.; Tabakoff, B.

    1988-01-01

    The acute in vitro effects of ethanol on cerebral cortical adenylate cyclase activity and beta-adrenergic receptor characteristics suggested a site of action of ethanol at Gs, the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein. After chronic ethanol ingestion, the beta-adrenergic receptor appeared to be uncoupled (i.e., the form of the receptor with high affinity for agonist was undetectable), and stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by isoproterenol or guanine nucleotides was reduced, suggesting an alteration in the properties of Gs. To further characterize this change, cholera and pertussis toxin-mediated /sup 32/P-ADP-ribosylation of mouse cortical membranes was assessed in mice that had chronically ingested ethanol in a liquid diet. /sup 32/P-labeled proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantitated by autoradiography. There was a selective 30-50% decrease in cholera toxin-induced labeling of 46 kDa protein band in membranes of ethanol-fed mice, with no apparent change in pertussis toxin-induced labeling. The 46 kDa protein has a molecular weight similar to that of the alpha subunit of Gs, suggesting a reduced amount of this protein or a change in its characteristics as a substrate for cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation in cortical membranes of ethanol-fed mice.

  12. Altered Hippocampal Transcript Profile Accompanies an Age-Related Spatial Memory Deficit in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Yonan, Amanda L.; Malleret, Gael; Kandel, Eric R.; Gilliam, T. Conrad; Pavlidis, Paul

    2004-01-01

    We have carried out a global survey of age-related changes in mRNA levels in the 57BL/6NIA mouse hippocampus and found a difference in the hippocampal gene expression profile between 2-month-old young mice and 15-month-old middle-aged mice correlated with an age-related cognitive deficit in hippocampal-based explicit memory formation. Middle-aged…

  13. Antidiabetic and Antihyperlipidemic Effects of Clitocybe nuda on Glucose Transporter 4 and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation in High-Fat-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Hsing; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Shih, Chun-Ching

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antihyperlipidemic and antihyperglycemic effects and mechanism of the extract of Clitocybe nuda (CNE), in high-fat- (HF-) fed mice. C57BL/6J was randomly divided into two groups: the control (CON) group was fed with a low-fat diet, whereas the experimental group was fed with a HF diet for 8 weeks. Then, the HF group was subdivided into five groups and was given orally CNE (including C1: 0.2, C2: 0.5, and C3: 1.0 g/kg/day extracts) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or vehicle for 4 weeks. CNE effectively prevented HF-diet-induced increases in the levels of blood glucose, triglyceride, insulin (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, resp.) and attenuated insulin resistance. By treatment with CNE, body weight gain, weights of white adipose tissue (WAT) and hepatic triacylglycerol content were reduced; moreover, adipocytes in the visceral depots showed a reduction in size. By treatment with CNE, the protein contents of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) were significantly increased in C3-treated group in the skeletal muscle. Furthermore, CNE reduces the hepatic expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and glucose production. CNE significantly increases protein contents of phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the skeletal muscle and adipose and liver tissues. Therefore, it is possible that the activation of AMPK by CNE leads to diminished gluconeogenesis in the liver and enhanced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. It is shown that CNE exhibits hypolipidemic effect in HF-fed mice by increasing ATGL expression, which is known to help triglyceride to hydrolyze. Moreover, antidiabetic properties of CNE occurred as a result of decreased hepatic glucose production via G6Pase downregulation and improved insulin sensitization. Thus, amelioration of diabetic and dyslipidemic states by CNE in HF-fed mice occurred by regulation of GLUT4, G6Pase, ATGL, and AMPK phosphorylation. PMID:24550994

  14. Combined treatment of betulinic acid, a PTP1B inhibitor, with Orthosiphon stamineus extract decreases body weight in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-Jung; Park, So-Young; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Won, Kyu-Chang; Kim, Bo-Ra; Son, Jong-Keun; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Yong-Woon

    2013-01-01

    Leptin resistance is a common feature of obesity and is accompanied by hyperleptinemia. Although leptin sensitizers improve leptin resistance, they also decrease plasma leptin levels that attenuate the leptin-associated antiobesity effect. We hypothesized that the combinational treatment of leptin sensitizer and endogenous leptin expression stimulant would synergistically induce an antiobesity effect in high-fat-fed obese animals. Betulinic acid (BA) isolated from Saussurea lappa suppressed the hypothalamic protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in mice and enhanced the antiobesity effect of leptin in obese rats. Ethanol extract of Orthosiphon stamineus (OS) induced leptin expressions in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes and mice in a dose-dependent manner. To evaluate our hypothesis, we treated obese mice induced by 6 weeks of high-fat-diet feeding with BA and OS for 2 weeks. Although BA or OS alone did not decrease body weight in obese mice, the combinational treatment of BA and OS decreased body weight significantly compared to either BA- or OS-treated obese mice. These results suggest that combinational treatment of BA and OS would be effective for the treatment of obesity.

  15. Heterozygous Hfe gene deletion leads to impaired glucose homeostasis, but not liver injury in mice fed a high-calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Britton, Laurence; Jaskowski, Lesley; Bridle, Kim; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Reiling, Janske; Musgrave, Nick; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell

    2016-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the Hfe gene have been proposed as cofactors in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Homozygous Hfe deletion previously has been shown to lead to dysregulated hepatic lipid metabolism and accentuated liver injury in a dietary mouse model of NAFLD We sought to establish whether heterozygous deletion of Hfe is sufficient to promote liver injury when mice are exposed to a high-calorie diet (HCD). Eight-week-old wild-type and Hfe(+/-) mice received 8 weeks of a control diet or HCD Liver histology and pathways of lipid and iron metabolism were analyzed. Liver histology demonstrated that mice fed a HCD had increased NAFLD activity score (NAS), steatosis, and hepatocyte ballooning. However, liver injury was unaffected by Hfe genotype. Hepatic iron concentration (HIC) was increased in Hfe(+/-) mice of both dietary groups. HCD resulted in a hepcidin-independent reduction in HIC Hfe(+/-) mice demonstrated raised fasting serum glucose concentrations and HOMA-IR score, despite unaltered serum adiponectin concentrations. Downstream regulators of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (pAKT, SREBP-1, Fas, Scd1) and fatty acid oxidation (AdipoR2, Pparα, Cpt1) were largely unaffected by genotype. In summary, heterozygous Hfe gene deletion is associated with impaired iron and glucose metabolism. However, unlike homozygous Hfe deletion, heterozygous gene deletion did not affect lipid metabolism pathways or liver injury in this model.

  16. Effect of tempol on peripheral neuropathy in diet-induced obese and high fat fed/low dose streptozotocin treated C57Bl6/J mice.

    PubMed

    Obrosov, Alexander; Shevalye, Hanna; Coppey, Lawrence J; Yorek, Mark A

    2017-04-04

    In this study we sought to determine the efficacy of tempol on multiple neuropathic endpoints in a diet-induced obese mouse, a model of pre-diabetes, and a high fat fed low dose streptozotocin treated mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. Tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperdine -1-oxyl) is a low molecular weight, water soluble, membrane permeable and metal independent superoxide dismutase mimetic that has been widely used in cellular studies for the removal of intracellular and extracellular superoxide. This in vivo study was designed to be an early intervention. Fourteen weeks post high fat diet (six weeks post hyperglycemia) control, obese and diabetic mice were divided into no treatment and treatment groups. The treated mice received tempol by gavage (150 mg/kg in water) while the untreated mice received vehicle. The diet-induced obese and diabetic mice were maintained on the high fat diet for the duration of the study while the control group was maintained on the standard diet. Obesity and diabetes caused slowing of motor and sensory nerve conduction, reduction in intraepidermal nerve fiber density, thermal hypoalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Treatment with tempol partially or completely protected obese and diabetic mice from these deficits. These studies suggest that tempol or other effective scavengers of reactive oxygen species may be a viable option for treating neural complications associated with obesity or type 2 diabetes.

  17. Impact of the Consumption of Tea Polyphenols on Early Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation and Intestinal Bifidobacteria in High-Fat-Fed ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhen-Lin; Zeng, Ben-Hua; Wang, Wei; Li, Gui-Hua; Wu, Fei; Wang, Li; Zhong, Qing-Ping; Wei, Hong; Fang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the effect of dietary polyphenols on the intestinal microbiota and the possible associations between this effect and the development of some cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis (AS). However, limited information is available on how these polyphenols affect the gut microbiota and AS development. This study was designed to evaluate the modulation of dietary tea polyphenols (TPs) on intestinal Bifidobacteria (IB) and its correlation with AS development in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice. Fifty C57BL/6 ApoE−/− mice were randomized into one of the five treatment groups (n = 10/group): control group fed normal diet (CK); a group fed a high-fat diet (HFD); and the other three groups fed the same HFD supplemented with TPs in drinking water for 16 weeks. The total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after TP interference. In addition, the TP diet also decreased the plaque area/lumen area (PA/LA) ratios (P < 0.01) in the TP diet group. Interestingly, copies of IB in the gut of ApoE−/− mice were notably increased with TP interference. This increase was dose dependent (P < 0.01) and negatively correlated with the PA/LA ratio (P < 0.05). We conclude that TPs could promote the proliferation of the IB, which is partially responsible for the reduction of AS plaque induced by HFD. PMID:28066771

  18. Enhanced Dopamine Transporter Activity in Middle-Aged Gdnf Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Littrell, Ofelia M.; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Surgener, Stewart; McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Middaugh, Lawrence D.; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Boger, Heather A.

    2010-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) supports the viability of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons that degenerate in Parkinson’s disease. Middle aged, 12-month-old, Gdnf heterozygous (Gdnf+/−) mice have diminished spontaneous locomotor activity and enhanced synaptosomal DA uptake compared to wildtype mice. In this study, dopamine transporter (DAT) function in middle-aged, 12-month-old Gdnf+/− mice was more thoroughly investigated using in vivo electrochemistry. Gdnf+/− mice injected with the DAT inhibitor, nomifensine, exhibited significantly more locomotor activity than wildtype mice. In vivo electrochemistry with carbon fiber microelectrodes demonstrated enhanced clearance of DA in the striatum of Gdnf+/− mice, suggesting greater surface expression of DAT than in wildtype littermates. Additionally, 12 month old Gdnf+/− mice expressed greater D2 receptor mRNA and protein in the striatum than wildtype mice. Neurochemical analyses of striatal tissue samples indicated significant reductions in DA and a faster DA metabolic rate in Gdnf+/− mice than in wildtype mice. Altogether, these data support an important role for GDNF in the regulation of uptake, synthesis, and metabolism of DA during aging. PMID:21144620

  19. Metabolic shifts and structural changes in the gut microbiota upon branched-chain amino acid supplementation in middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Zou, Dayang; Dong, Derong; He, Xiaoming; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-12-01

    The importance of gut microbiota to health has gained extensive attention and is strongly correlated with diet. Dietary supplementation with a branched-chain amino acid-enriched mixture (BCAAem) exerts a variety of beneficial effects in mice and humans. In mice, BCAAem supplementation can promote longevity, but its influence on the gut ecosystem and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. To address this issue, BALB/C mice were fed a BCAAem-supplemented diet and their gut microbiomes were analysed by 16S rDNA sequencing. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to identify Bifidobacterium spp. in the gut, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was conducted for faecal-metabolite detection. The results showed that the structure of the gut microbiota changed, and BCAAem-supplementation in mice slowed the change speed of gut microbiota which is due to age. In addition, the abundance of the Akkermansia and Bifidobacterium increased in BCAAem-supplemented mice, while the ratio of Enterobacteriaceae decreased in BCAAem-supplemented mice. Moreover, 12 different metabolites, representing sugar and lipid metabolism, were altered between the supplemented and control groups. Thus, BCAAem influences the gut microbiota and gut metabolism. In addition, the BCAAem-supplemented group presented lower serum concentrations of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein. The changes are indicative of lower antigen loads in the host gut. These results suggest that dietary supplementation with BCAAem may be considered for improving health and promoting healthy aging.

  20. The energy value of biodiesel glycerine products fed to broilers at different ages.

    PubMed

    Lima, E M C; Rodrigues, P B; Alvarenga, R R; Bernardino, V M P; Makiyama, L; Lima, R R; Cantarelli, V S; Zangeronimo, M G

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the apparent metabolisable energy corrected for nitrogen balance (AMEn) of some products containing glycerine from soybean oil (GOIL), a mixture of frying oil and lard (GMIX) and a semi-purified process (GSP) in broilers of different ages (10, 20, 30 and 40 days post-hatching), using two methodologies. In trial 1, the basal diets were replaced with 100 g/kg of each studied glycerine product and the diets were supplied ad libitum. Three hundred broilers were used in five replicates, with five, four, three and three animals per cage in each age group, respectively. The AMEn was calculated for each experimental unit. In trial 2, dietary treatments included the addition of glycerine at 0, 40, 80 or 120 g/kg for each crude glycerine product, with 900 broilers in six replicates, using the same number of animals per cage as described in trial 1. Depending on the experimental unit, the feeding was restricted in 88%, 92%, 96% and 100% of estimated intake according to the Cobb guide. The AMEn was determined using linear regression between the feed intake and the AMEn of each diet. In both trials, the total excreta collection method was used. Because of the chemical composition, GMIX was not considered crude glycerine. The mean AMEn values of the products were 20.55 MJ/kg, 15.80 MJ/kg and 15.05 MJ/kg for GMIX, GSP and GOIL, respectively. There was a linear decrease (p < 0.01) in the AMEn values with the increasing age of the broilers. Numerically, it was observed that the AMEn values decreased until 28-30 day post-hatching and then remained constant until the finishing phase. It is concluded that products containing glycerine can be used as an energy source for broilers, but that AMEn values can vary according to age. Younger broilers have a higher capacity of energy utilisation from these feedstuffs.

  1. IMMMUNOPHENOTYPE OF SPONTANEOUS HEMATOLYMPHOID TUMORS OCCURRING IN YOUNG AND AGING FEMALE CD-1 MICE

    PubMed Central

    Rehg, Jerold E.; Rahija, Richard; Bush, Dorothy; Bradley, Alys; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    A few reports indicated the incidence of hematolymphoid neoplasms in old CD-1 mice, but the cellular lineage of CD-1 mouse neoplasms has not be published. In this study, immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to characterize the cellular lineage of spontaneous hematolymphoid neoplasms arising in young female CD-1 mice used as health monitoring sentinels and aging female CD-1 mice used as controls in 80 wk carcinogenesis studies. Lymphoblastic lymphomas of T-cell and B-cell lineage were common in mice 12 mo or less of age, whereas a wide range of non-lymphoblastic B-cell lymphomas and lymphoblastic T-cell lymphomas were common in mice > 12 mo old. Renal hyaline droplets positive for lysozyme were observed in aged mice with a histiocytic-associated large B-cell lymphoma (HA-BCL) and a myeloid leukemia. Endogenous ecotropic MuLV genes have been recovered from CD-1 mice, but MuLV protein expression has not been previously demonstrated. We reported for the first time the expression of MuLV protein by IHC in lymphomas and some normal tissues of both young and aging CD-1 mice. This report should help to differentiate spontaneous lymphomas and leukemias in CD-1 mice from those induced by chemicals and other methods. PMID:26224701

  2. Small Molecule Kaempferol Promotes Insulin Sensitivity and Preserved Pancreatic β -Cell Mass in Middle-Aged Obese Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Alkhalidy, Hana; Moore, William; Zhang, Yanling; McMillan, Ryan; Wang, Aihua; Ali, Mostafa; Suh, Kyung-Shin; Zhen, Wei; Cheng, Zhiyong; Jia, Zhenquan; Hulver, Matthew; Liu, Dongmin

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance and a progressive decline in functional β-cell mass are hallmarks of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, searching for natural, low-cost compounds to target these two defects could be a promising strategy to prevent the pathogenesis of T2D. Here, we show that dietary intake of flavonol kaempferol (0.05% in the diet) significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and circulating lipid profile, which were associated with the improved peripheral insulin sensitivity in middle-aged obese mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Kaempferol treatment reversed HF diet impaired glucose transport-4 (Glut4) and AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) expression in both muscle and adipose tissues from obese mice. In vitro, kaempferol increased lipolysis and prevented high fatty acid-impaired glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, AMPK activity, and Glut4 expression in skeletal muscle cells. Using another mouse model of T2D generated by HF diet feeding and low doses of streptozotocin injection, we found that kaempferol treatment significantly improved hyperglycemia, glucose tolerance, and blood insulin levels in obese diabetic mice, which are associated with the improved islet β-cell mass. These results demonstrate that kaempferol may be a naturally occurring anti-diabetic agent by improving peripheral insulin sensitivity and protecting against pancreatic β-cell dysfunction.

  3. Imipramine blocks ethanol-induced ASMase activation, ceramide generation, and PP2A activation, and ameliorates hepatic steatosis in ethanol-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Rahmini, Yasmeen; Ross, Ruth A; Zhao, Zhenwen; Xu, Yan; Crabb, David W

    2012-03-01

    Our previous data showed the inhibitory effect of ethanol on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, which appears to be mediated, in part, through increased levels of hepatic ceramide and activation of protein phosphatase 2A (Liangpunsakul S, Sozio MS, Shin E, Zhao Z, Xu Y, Ross RA, Zeng Y, Crabb DW. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 298: G1004-G1012, 2010). The effect of ethanol on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was reversed by imipramine, suggesting that the generation of ceramide via acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) is stimulated by ethanol. In this study, we determined the effects of imipramine on the development of hepatic steatosis, the generation of ceramide, and downstream effects of ceramide on inflammatory, insulin, and apoptotic signaling pathways, in ethanol-fed mice. The effect of ethanol and imipramine (10 μg/g body wt ip) on ceramide levels, as well as inflammatory, insulin, and apoptotic signaling pathways, was studied in C57BL/6J mice fed the Lieber-DeCarli diet. Ethanol-fed mice developed the expected steatosis, and cotreatment with imipramine for the last 2 wk of ethanol feeding resulted in improvement in hepatic steatosis. Ethanol feeding for 4 wk induced impaired glucose tolerance compared with controls, and this was modestly improved with imipramine treatment. There was a significant decrease in total ceramide concentrations in response to imipramine in ethanol-fed mice treated with and without imipramine (287 ± 11 vs. 348 ± 12 pmol/mg tissue). The magnitude and specificity of inhibition on each ceramide species differed. A significant decrease was observed for C16 (28 ± 3 vs. 33 ± 2 pmol/mg tissue) and C24 (164 ± 9 vs. 201 ± 4 pmol/mg tissue) ceramide. Ethanol feeding increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of ERK slightly and increased phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK substantially. The levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK were reduced by treatment with imipramine. The activation of ASMase and generation

  4. In vivo levels of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide increase with age in mtDNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Logan, Angela; Shabalina, Irina G; Prime, Tracy A; Rogatti, Sebastian; Kalinovich, Anastasia V; Hartley, Richard C; Budd, Ralph C; Cannon, Barbara; Murphy, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    In mtDNA mutator mice, mtDNA mutations accumulate leading to a rapidly aging phenotype. However, there is little evidence of oxidative damage to tissues, and when analyzed ex vivo, no change in production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by mitochondria has been reported, undermining the mitochondrial oxidative damage theory of aging. Paradoxically, interventions that decrease mitochondrial ROS levels in vivo delay onset of aging. To reconcile these findings, we used the mitochondria-targeted mass spectrometry probe MitoB to measure hydrogen peroxide within mitochondria of living mice. Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide was the same in young mutator and control mice, but as the mutator mice aged, hydrogen peroxide increased. This suggests that the prolonged presence of mtDNA mutations in vivo increases hydrogen peroxide that contributes to an accelerated aging phenotype, perhaps through the activation of pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory redox signaling pathways.

  5. Gait disorder as a predictor of spatial learning and memory impairment in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing M.; Meng, Zhaoxiang; Yin, Zhenglu

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether gait dysfunction is a predictor of severe spatial learning and memory impairment in aged mice. Methods A total of 100 12-month-old male mice that had no obvious abnormal motor ability and whose Morris water maze performances were not significantly different from those of two-month-old male mice were selected for the study. The selected aged mice were then divided into abnormal or normal gait groups according to the results from the quantitative gait assessment. Gaits of aged mice were defined as abnormal when the values of quantitative gait parameters were two standard deviations (SD) lower or higher than those of 2-month-old male mice. Gait parameters included stride length, variability of stride length, base of support, cadence, and average speed. After nine months, mice exhibiting severe spatial learning and memory impairment were separated from mice with mild or no cognitive dysfunction. The rate of severe spatial learning and memory impairment in the abnormal and normal gait groups was tested by a chi-square test and the correlation between gait dysfunction and decline in cognitive function was tested using a diagnostic test. Results The 12-month-old aged mice were divided into a normal gait group (n = 75) and an abnormal gait group (n = 25). Nine months later, three mice in the normal gait group and two mice in the abnormal gait group had died. The remaining mice were subjected to the Morris water maze again, and 17 out of 23 mice in the abnormal gait group had developed severe spatial learning and memory impairment, including six with stride length deficits, 15 with coefficient of variation (CV) in stride length, two with base of support (BOS) deficits, five with cadence dysfunction, and six with average speed deficits. In contrast, only 15 out of 72 mice in the normal gait group developed severe spatial learning and memory impairment. The rate of severe spatial learning and memory impairment was significantly higher in

  6. Fatty acid composition in serum correlates with that in the liver and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity scores in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-He; Li, Chun-Yan; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Zhang, Xiu-Ying

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the correlation between the serum fatty acid composition and hepatic steatosis, inflammation, hepatocellular ballooning scores, and liver fatty acids composition in mice fed a high-fat diet. Livers were collected for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease score analysis. Fatty acid compositions were analysed by gas chromatography. Correlations were determined by Pearson correlation coefficient. Exposed to a high-fat diet, mice developed fatty liver disease with varying severity without fibrosis. The serum fatty acid variation became more severe with prolonged exposure to a high-fat diet. This variation also correlated significantly with the variation in livers, with the types of fatty acids corresponding to liver steatosis, inflammation, and hepatocellular ballooning scores. Results of this study lead to the following hypothesis: the extent of serum fatty acid variation may be a preliminary biomarker of fatty liver disease caused by high-fat intake.

  7. Anti-inflammaging effects of Lactobacillus brevis OW38 in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, J-J; Kim, K A; Hwang, Y-J; Han, M J; Kim, D-H

    2016-11-30

    In the present study, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were collected from kimchi and were screened to isolate strains that inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS) production by Escherichia coli and p16 expression and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Oral administration of Lactobacillus brevis OW38 (1×10(9) cfu/mouse) to aged mice (male, 18 months old) for 8 weeks reduced the LPS level in colon fluid and blood. In addition, OW38 treatment also reduced the ratio of Firmicutes or Proteobacteria to Bacteroidetes, which was significantly higher in aged mice than in young mice. Treatment with OW38 in aged mice inhibited the expression of inflammatory markers, such as myeloperoxidase, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin (IL)-1β, and inhibited NF-κB activation. Furthermore, it induced the expression of colonic tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1, occludin, and claudin-1. OW38 treatment also suppressed the expression of senescence markers p16, p53, and SAMHD1 in the colon and the hippocampus of aged mice. In addition, it significantly restored spontaneous alternation as well as the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and doublecortin in aged mice compared to that in young mice (P<0.05). Based on these findings, we conclude that OW38 treatment may ameliorate aging-associated colitis and memory impairment by inhibiting gut microbiota LPS production, NF-κB activation, and p16 expression.

  8. Age-associated changes in hippocampal-dependent cognition in Diversity Outbred mice.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ming Teng; Spiegel, Amy M; Gallagher, Michela

    2014-11-01

    Episodic memory impairment due to aging has been linked to hippocampal dysfunction. Evidence exists for alterations in specific circuits within the hippocampal system that are closely coupled to individual differences in the presence and severity of such memory loss. Here, we used the newly developed Diversity Outbred (DO) mouse that was designed to model the genetic diversity in human populations. Young and aged DO mice were tested in a hippocampal-dependent water maze task. Young mice showed higher proficiency and more robust memory compared to the overall performance of aged mice. A substantial number of the older mice, however, performed on par with the normative performance of the younger mice. Stereological quantification of somatostatin-immunoreactive neurons in the dentate hilus showed that high-performing young and unimpaired aged mice had similar numbers of somatostatin-positive interneurons, while aged mice that were impaired in the spatial task had significantly fewer such neurons. These data in the DO model tie loss of hilar inhibitory network integrity to age-related memory impairment, paralleling data in other rodent models.

  9. Eurycoma longifolia Jack enhances sexual motivation in middle-aged male mice.

    PubMed

    Ang, Hooi Hoon; Lee, Kheng Leng; Kiyoshi, Matsumoto

    2003-01-01

    Eurycoma longifolia Jack was investigated for sexual motivation activity in adult, middle-aged male mice and in retired breeders, using the modified open field and the modified runway choice methods. Each mouse received 500 mg/kg of one of 4 fractions of E. longifolia Jack, viz. chloroform, methanol, butanol, and water, whereas the mice in the control and yohimbine groups received 3 ml/kg of normal saline and 30 mg/kg of yohimbine daily respectively for 10 d. The results show a transient increase in the percentage of male mice responding to the right choice after chronic consumption of the fractions with 50 percent of the adult middle-aged male mice treated with E. longifolia Jack and yohimbine scoring the right choice after 8 and 5 days post-treatment respectively. In conclusion, this study has shown that E. longifolia Jack continues to enhance sexual motivation in adult, middle-aged male mice and in retired breeders.

  10. Bitter gourd inhibits the development of obesity-associated fatty liver in C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Cao, Ke; Li, Yuan; Zou, Xuan; Chen, Cong; Szeto, Ignatius Man-Yau; Dong, Zhizhong; Zhao, Youyou; Shi, Yujie; Wang, Junkuan; Liu, Jiankang; Feng, Zhihui

    2014-04-01

    Bitter gourd (BG) is a popular fruit in Asia with numerous well-known medicinal uses, including as an antidiabetic. In the current study, we aimed to explore the effects of BG on mitochondrial function during the development of obesity-associated fatty liver. C57BL/6 mice were divided into 4 experimental groups: mice fed a normal diet (control; included for reference only), mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), and mice fed an HFD supplemented with freeze-dried BG powder through daily gavage at doses of 0.5 (HFD+0.5BG) and 5 (HFD+5BG) g/kg, respectively. After 16 wk, mice in the HFD+5BG group showed less body and tissue weight gain and less hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia compared with those in the HFD group (P < 0.05). In both HFD+0.5BG and HFD+5BG groups, serum interleukin-6 concentration was lower than that in the HFD group (P < 0.02). The serum C-reactive protein concentration was lower in the HFD+5BG group compared with the HFD group (P < 0.04). An analysis of liver tissue revealed lower liver triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations in both HFD+0.5BG and HFD+5BG groups than in the HFD group (P < 0.01). The HFD+5BG group had less activation of the sterol regulatory element binding protein/fatty acid synthase (SREBP-1/FAS) pathway, greater superoxide dismutase activity, and less total protein and mitochondrial protein oxidation than did the HFD group (P < 0.05). Mitochondrial complex I, II, III, and V activity was greater in the HFD+0.5BG group than in the HFD group (P < 0.03). The HFD+5BG group only had greater complex V activity compared with the HFD group (P < 0.05). Mitochondrial dynamics regulators, including dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1) and mitofusin 1 (MFN1), as well as proapoptotic protein expression levels were restored by BG treatment (P < 0.02). Taken together, our results suggest that BG prevents inflammation and oxidative stress, modulates mitochondrial activity, suppresses apoptosis activation, and inhibits lipid accumulation during the

  11. Dietary aloe vera gel powder and extract inhibit azoxymethane- induced colorectal aberrant crypt foci in mice fed a high- fat diet.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Takeshi; Shimpo, Kan; Kaneko, Takaaki; Beppu, Hidehiko; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Sonoda, Shigeru; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yamada, Muneo; Abe, Fumiaki

    2015-01-01

    Aloe vera gel exhibits protective effects against insulin resistance as well as lipid-lowering and anti-diabetic effects. The anti-diabetic compounds in this gel were identified as Aloe-sterols. Aloe vera gel extract (AVGE) containing Aloe-sterols has recently been produced using a new procedure. We previously reported that AVGE reduced large-sized intestinal polyps in Apc-deficient Min mice fed a high fat diet (HFD), suggesting that Aloe vera gel may protect against colorectal cancer. In the present study, we examined the effects of Aloe vera gel powder (AVGP) and AVGE on azoxymethane-induced colorectal preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in mice fed a HFD. Male C57BL/6J mice were given a normal diet (ND), HFD, HFD containing 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose solution, which was used as a solvent for AVGE (HFDC), HFD containing 3% or 1% AVGP, and HFDC containing 0.0125% (H-) or 0.00375% (L-) AVGE. The number of ACF was significantly lower in mice given 3% AVGP and H-AVGE than in those given HFD or HFDC alone. Moreover, 3% AVGP, H-AVGE and L-AVGE significantly decreased the mean Ki-67 labeling index, assessed as a measure of cell proliferation in the colonic mucosa. In addition, hepatic phase II enzyme glutathione S-transferase mRNA levels were higher in the H-AVGE group than in the HFDC group. These results suggest that both AVGP and AVGE may have chemopreventive effects on colorectal carcinogenesis under the HFD condition. Furthermore, the concentration of Aloe-sterols was similar between 3% AVGP and H-AVGE, suggesting that Aloe-sterols were the main active ingredients in this experiment.

  12. Effect of dry tomato peel supplementation on glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and hepatic markers in mice fed high-saturated-fat/high-cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Zidani, Sofiane; Benakmoum, Amar; Ammouche, Ali; Benali, Yasmine; Bouhadef, Anissa; Abbeddou, Souheila

    2017-02-01

    Many studies have investigated the effect of crude tomato peel in vivo, but no studies have determined the dose-effect of dry tomato peel (DTP) on glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and atherogenic dyslipidemia induced by a high-saturated-fat (HSF) diet in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different doses of DTP on the levels of oxidative stress in mice fed an HSF and cholesterol-rich diet for 12 weeks. The main outcomes are glucose and insulin tolerance, plasma lipids, and hepatic steatosis and inflammation. BALB/c male mice (n=40) (8 weeks old, weighing 22.2±1.0 g) were divided into four treatment groups (10 mice/group): (a) high-fat control diet (HF Ctrl), which contains sunflower oil as a sole source of fat; (b) HSF/high-cholesterol (HC) diet; (c) HSF/HC diet supplemented with 9% DTP and (d) HSF/HC diet supplemented with 17% DTP. The HSF/HC diet significantly increased body weight gain, adipose tissue weight, fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin and lipid peroxidation and caused the development of liver steatosis and inflammation. Supplementation with DTP increased plasma lycopene concentration and reduced the development of indicators of metabolic syndrome, with no consistent effect of the DTP dose. Hepatic steatosis and inflammation were not reversed with DTP supplementation. Among mice fed the HSF/HC diet, DTP supplementation appears to have a beneficial effect on insulin resistance, which confirms the antiatherogenic effect of DTP.

  13. Disparate Metabolic Responses in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet Supplemented with Maize-Derived Non-Digestible Feruloylated Oligo- and Polysaccharides Are Linked to Changes in the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junyi; Bindels, Laure B.; Segura Munoz, Rafael R.; Martínez, Inés; Walter, Jens; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E.; Rose, Devin J.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have suggested links between colonic fermentation of dietary fibers and improved metabolic health. The objectives of this study were to determine if non-digestible feruloylated oligo- and polysaccharides (FOPS), a maize-derived dietary fiber, could counteract the deleterious effects of high-fat (HF) feeding in mice and explore if metabolic benefits were linked to the gut microbiota. C57BL/6J mice (n = 8/group) were fed a low-fat (LF; 10 kcal% fat), HF (62 kcal% fat), or HF diet supplemented with FOPS (5%, w/w). Pronounced differences in FOPS responsiveness were observed: four mice experienced cecal enlargement and enhanced short chain fatty acid production, indicating increased cecal fermentation (F-FOPS). Only these mice displayed improvements in glucose metabolism compared with HF-fed mice. Blooms in the gut microbial genera Blautia and Akkermansia were observed in three of the F-FOPS mice; these shifts were associated with reductions in body and adipose tissue weights compared with the HF-fed control mice. No improvements in metabolic markers or weights were detected in the four mice whose gut microbiota did not respond to FOPS. These findings demonstrate that FOPS-induced improvements in weight gain and metabolic health in mice depended on the ability of an individual’s microbiota to ferment FOPS. PMID:26731528

  14. Obesity-induced chronic inflammation in high fat diet challenged C57BL/6J mice is associated with acceleration of age-dependent renal amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Roel A; Bijzet, Johan; Meijers, Wouter C; Yakala, Gopala K; Kleemann, Robert; Nguyen, Tri Q; de Boer, Rudolf A; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Hazenberg, Bouke P C; Tietge, Uwe J F; Heeringa, Peter

    2015-11-13

    Obesity-induced inflammation presumably accelerates the development of chronic kidney diseases. However, little is known about the sequence of these inflammatory events and their contribution to renal pathology. We investigated the effects of obesity on the evolution of age-dependent renal complications in mice in conjunction with the development of renal and systemic low-grade inflammation (LGI). C57BL/6J mice susceptible to develop age-dependent sclerotic pathologies with amyloid features in the kidney, were fed low (10% lard) or high-fat diets (45% lard) for 24, 40 and 52 weeks. HFD-feeding induced overt adiposity, altered lipid and insulin homeostasis, increased systemic LGI and adipokine release. HFD-feeding also caused renal upregulation of pro-inflammatory genes, infiltrating macrophages, collagen I protein, increased urinary albumin and NGAL levels. HFD-feeding severely aggravated age-dependent structural changes in the kidney. Remarkably, enhanced amyloid deposition rather than sclerosis was observed. The degree of amyloidosis correlated significantly with body weight. Amyloid deposits stained positive for serum amyloid A (SAA) whose plasma levels were chronically elevated in HFD mice. Our data indicate obesity-induced chronic inflammation as a risk factor for the acceleration of age-dependent renal amyloidosis and functional impairment in mice, and suggest that obesity-enhanced chronic secretion of SAA may be the driving factor behind this process.

  15. Obesity-induced chronic inflammation in high fat diet challenged C57BL/6J mice is associated with acceleration of age-dependent renal amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Roel A.; Bijzet, Johan; Meijers, Wouter C.; Yakala, Gopala K.; Kleemann, Robert; Nguyen, Tri Q.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Hazenberg, Bouke P. C.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Heeringa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation presumably accelerates the development of chronic kidney diseases. However, little is known about the sequence of these inflammatory events and their contribution to renal pathology. We investigated the effects of obesity on the evolution of age-dependent renal complications in mice in conjunction with the development of renal and systemic low-grade inflammation (LGI). C57BL/6J mice susceptible to develop age-dependent sclerotic pathologies with amyloid features in the kidney, were fed low (10% lard) or high-fat diets (45% lard) for 24, 40 and 52 weeks. HFD-feeding induced overt adiposity, altered lipid and insulin homeostasis, increased systemic LGI and adipokine release. HFD-feeding also caused renal upregulation of pro-inflammatory genes, infiltrating macrophages, collagen I protein, increased urinary albumin and NGAL levels. HFD-feeding severely aggravated age-dependent structural changes in the kidney. Remarkably, enhanced amyloid deposition rather than sclerosis was observed. The degree of amyloidosis correlated significantly with body weight. Amyloid deposits stained positive for serum amyloid A (SAA) whose plasma levels were chronically elevated in HFD mice. Our data indicate obesity-induced chronic inflammation as a risk factor for the acceleration of age-dependent renal amyloidosis and functional impairment in mice, and suggest that obesity-enhanced chronic secretion of SAA may be the driving factor behind this process. PMID:26563579

  16. Differential response to intrahippocampal interleukin-4/interleukin-13 in aged and exercise mice.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, Alyssa; Kohman, Rachel A

    2017-02-20

    Normal aging is associated with low-grade neuroinflammation that results from age-related priming of microglial cells. Further, aging alters the response to several anti-inflammatory factors, including interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13. One intervention that has been shown to modulate microglia activation in the aged brain, both basally and following an immune challenge, is exercise. However, whether engaging in exercise can improve responsiveness to anti-inflammatory cytokines is presently unknown. The current study evaluated whether prior exercise training increases sensitivity to anti-inflammatory cytokines that promote the M2 (alternative) microglia phenotype in adult (5-month-old) and aged (23-month-old) C57BL/6J mice. After 8weeks of exercise or control housing, mice received bilateral hippocampal injections of an IL-4/IL-13 cocktail or vehicle. Twenty-four hours later hippocampal samples were collected and analyzed for expression of genes associated with the M1 (inflammatory) and M2 microglia phenotypes. Results show that IL-4/IL-13 administration increased expression of the M2-associated genes found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1), chitinase-like 3 (Ym1), Arginase-1 (Arg1), SOCS1, IL-1ra, and CD206. In response to IL-4/IL-13 administration, aged mice showed increased hippocampal expression of the M2-related genes Arg1, SOCS1, Ym1, and CD206 relative to adult mice. Aged mice also showed increased expression of IL-1β relative to adults, which was unaffected by wheel running or IL-4/IL-13. Wheel running was found to have modest effects on expression of Ym1 and Fizz1 in aged and adult mice. Collectively, our findings indicate that aged mice show a differential response to anti-inflammatory cytokines relative to adult mice and that exercise has limited effects on modulating this response.

  17. Age-Dependent Changes in the Inflammatory Nociceptive Behavior of Mice

    PubMed Central

    King-Himmelreich, Tanya S.; Möser, Christine V.; Wolters, Miriam C.; Olbrich, Katrin; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The processing of pain undergoes several changes in aging that affect sensory nociceptive fibers and the endogenous neuronal inhibitory systems. So far, it is not completely clear whether age-induced modifications are associated with an increase or decrease in pain perception. In this study, we assessed the impact of age on inflammatory nociception in mice and the role of the hormonal inhibitory systems in this context. We investigated the nociceptive behavior of 12-month-old versus 6–8-week-old mice in two behavioral models of inflammatory nociception. Levels of TRP channels, and cortisol as well as cortisol targets, were measured by qPCR, ELISA, and Western blot in the differently aged mice. We observed an age-related reduction in nociceptive behavior during inflammation as well as a higher level of cortisol in the spinal cord of aged mice compared to young mice, while TRP channels were not reduced. Among potential cortisol targets, the NF-κB inhibitor protein alpha (IκBα) was increased, which might contribute to inhibition of NF-κB and a decreased expression and activity of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In conclusion, our results reveal a reduced nociceptive response in aged mice, which might be at least partially mediated by an augmented inflammation-induced increase in the hormonal inhibitory system involving cortisol. PMID:26593904

  18. The effect of metformin on neuronal activity in the appetite-regulating brain regions of mice fed a high-fat diet during an anorectic period.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Jin, Bo-Yeong; Oh, Mi-Jeong; Shin, Kyung-Ho; Choi, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Metformin reduces body weight by decreasing food intake in humans and animals. However, the brain regions involved in metformin-induced anorexia remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated c-Fos expression (FOS), a marker of neuronal activity, in the appetite-regulating brain regions after oral administration of metformin (PO, 300mg/kg daily for 1 or 3days) or vehicle. The body weight and food intake decreased in mice treated with metformin for 3days (RM group) and mice that had the same amount of food as the RM group (Pair-fed group; PF) compared to the control group. FOS expression levels increased in the paraventricular nucleus, area postrema, and central amygdala of mice administered an acute single dose of metformin (SM group) compared to the control mice. In the nucleus tractus solitarius, the FOS expression levels increased in both the SM and RM groups compared to the control group. The FOS expression levels also increased in the nucleus accumbens of the RM group compared to other groups. The FOS expression levels decreased in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus in the PF group, but not the RM group, compared to the control group, suggesting a potential hypothalamic area involvement for metformin-induced anorexia. These results suggest that both the hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic regions are associated with metformin-induced anorexia, which is dependent on metformin treatment duration.

  19. Black Mats, Spring-Fed Streams, and Late-Glacial-Age Recharge in the Southern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quade, Jay; Forester, R.M.; Pratt, W.L.; Carter, C.

    1998-01-01

    Black mats are prominent features of the late Pleistocene and Holocene stratigraphic record in the southern Great Basin. Faunal, geochemical, and sedimentological evidence shows that the black mats formed in several microenvironments related to spring discharge, ranging from wet meadows to shallow ponds. Small land snails such as Gastrocopta tappaniana and Vertigo berryi are the most common mollusk taxa present. Semiaquatic and aquatic taxa are less abundant and include Catinellids, Fossaria parva, Gyraulus parvus, and others living today in and around perennial seeps and ponds. The ostracodes Cypridopsis okeechobi and Scottia tumida, typical of seeps and low-discharge springs today, as well as other taxa typical of springs and wetlands, are common in the black mats. Several new species that lived in the saturated subsurface also are present, but lacustrine ostracodes are absent. The ??13C values of organic matter in the black mats range from -12 to -26???, reflecting contributions of tissue from both C3 (sedges, most shrubs and trees) and C4 (saltbush, saltgrass) plants. Carbon-14 dates on the humate fraction of 55 black mats fall between 11,800 to 6300 and 2300 14C yr B.P. to modern. The total absence of mats in our sample between 6300 and 2300 14C yr B.P. likely reflects increased aridity associated with the mid-Holocene Altithermal. The oldest black mats date to 11,800-11,600 14C yr B.P., and the peak in the 14C black mat distribution falls at ???10,000 14C yr B.P. As the formation of black mats is spring related, their abundance reflects refilling of valley aquifers starting no later than 11,800 and peaking after 11,000 14C yrB.P. Reactivation of spring-fed channels shortly before 11,200 14C yr B.P. is also apparent in the stratigraphic records from the Las Vegas and Pahrump Valleys. This age distribution suggests that black mats and related spring-fed channels in part may have formed in response to Younger Dryas (YD)-age recharge in the region. However, the

  20. Black Mats, Spring-Fed Streams, and Late-Glacial-Age Recharge in the Southern Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, Jay; Forester, Richard M.; Pratt, William L.; Carter, Claire

    1998-03-01

    Black mats are prominent features of the late Pleistocene and Holocene stratigraphic record in the southern Great Basin. Faunal, geochemical, and sedimentological evidence shows that the black mats formed in several microenvironments related to spring discharge, ranging from wet meadows to shallow ponds. Small land snails such as Gastrocopta tappanianaand Vertigo berryiare the most common mollusk taxa present. Semiaquatic and aquatic taxa are less abundant and include Catinellids, Fossaria parva, Gyraulus parvus,and others living today in and around perennial seeps and ponds. The ostracodes Cypridopsis okeechobiand Scottia tumida,typical of seeps and low-discharge springs today, as well as other taxa typical of springs and wetlands, are common in the black mats. Several new species that lived in the saturated subsurface also are present, but lacustrine ostracodes are absent. The δ 13C values of organic matter in the black mats range from -12 to -26‰, reflecting contributions of tissue from both C 3(sedges, most shrubs and trees) and C 4(saltbush, saltgrass) plants. Carbon-14 dates on the humate fraction of 55 black mats fall between 11,800 to 6300 and 2300 14C yr B.P. to modern. The total absence of mats in our sample between 6300 and 2300 14C yr B.P. likely reflects increased aridity associated with the mid-Holocene Altithermal. The oldest black mats date to 11,800-11,600 14C yr B.P., and the peak in the 14C black mat distribution falls at ˜10,000 14C yr B.P. As the formation of black mats is spring related, their abundance reflects refilling of valley aquifers starting no later than 11,800 and peaking after 11,000 14C yr B.P. Reactivation of spring-fed channels shortly before 11,200 14C yr B.P. is also apparent in the stratigraphic records from the Las Vegas and Pahrump Valleys. This age distribution suggests that black mats and related spring-fed channels in part may have formed in response to Younger Dryas (YD)-age recharge in the region. However, the

  1. Citrus flavanones prevent systemic inflammation and ameliorate oxidative stress in C57BL/6J mice fed high fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It was investigated the preventive effects of the flavanones hesperidin, eriocitrin and eriodictyol on the oxidative stress and systemic inflammation induced by high-fat diet in C57BL/6J mice. The mice received a standard diet (9.5% kcal from fat), high-fat diet (45% kcal from fat) or high fat diet ...

  2. Manganese-mediated acceleration of age-related hearing loss in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Yajima, Ichiro; Iida, Machiko; Li, Xiang; Oshino, Reina; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y.; Kato, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that manganese (Mn) is known to be a neurotoxic element relevant to age-related disorders, the risk of oral exposure to Mn for age-related hearing loss remains unclear. In this study, we orally exposed wild-type young adult mice to Mn (Mn-exposed WT-mice) at 1.65 and 16.50 mg/L for 4 weeks. Mn-exposed WT-mice showed acceleration of age-related hearing loss. Mn-exposed WT-mice had neurodegeneration of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) with increased number of lipofuscin granules. Mn-exposed WT-mice also had increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (Hif-1α) protein with less hydroxylation at proline 564 and decreased c-Ret protein in SGNs. Mn-mediated acceleration of age-related hearing loss involving neurodegeneration of SGNs was rescued in RET-transgenic mice carrying constitutively activated RET. Thus, oral exposure to Mn accelerates age-related hearing loss in mice with Ret-mediated neurodegeneration of SGNs. PMID:27824154

  3. Joint dysfunction and functional decline in middle age myostatin null mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen; Miller, Andrew D; Pencina, Karol; Wong, Siu; Lee, Amanda; Yee, Michael; Toraldo, Gianluca; Jasuja, Ravi; Bhasin, Shalender

    2016-02-01

    Since its discovery as a potent inhibitor for muscle development, myostatin has been actively pursued as a drug target for age- and disease-related muscle loss. However, potential adverse effects of long-term myostatin deficiency have not been thoroughly investigated. We report herein that male myostatin null mice (mstn(-/-)), in spite of their greater muscle mass compared to wild-type (wt) mice, displayed more significant functional decline from young (3-6months) to middle age (12-15months) than age-matched wt mice, measured as gripping strength and treadmill endurance. Mstn(-/-) mice displayed markedly restricted ankle mobility and degenerative changes of the ankle joints, including disorganization of bone, tendon and peri-articular connective tissue, as well as synovial thickening with inflammatory cell infiltration. Messenger RNA expression of several pro-osteogenic genes was higher in the Achilles tendon-bone insertion in mstn(-/-) mice than wt mice, even at the neonatal age. At middle age, higher plasma concentrations of growth factors characteristic of excessive bone remodeling were found in mstn(-/-) mice than wt controls. These data collectively indicate that myostatin may play an important role in maintaining ankle and wrist joint health, possibly through negative regulation of the pro-osteogenic WNT/BMP pathway.

  4. Antihyperlipidemic and body fat-lowering effects of silk proteins with different fibroin/sericin compositions in mice fed with high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Seo, Chung-Won; Um, In Chul; Rico, Catherine W; Kang, Mi Young

    2011-04-27

    The effect of silk protein with different fibroin/sericin compositions on body weight and lipid metabolism in high fat-fed mice was investigated. The animals were given experimental diets for 6 weeks: normal control (NC), high fat (HF) and high fat diet supplemented with F100 (pure fibroin, HF-F100), F81 (81:19 fibroin/sericin, w/w, HF-F81) or F50 (50:50 fibroin/sericin, w/w, HF-F50). The silk protein-fed mice showed markedly reduced body weight and enhanced lipid profile relative to the HF group. In general, the amount of body fat, triglyceride and total plasma cholesterol levels, atherogenic index and free fatty acid level tended to decrease, while the HDL-cholesterol level increased, with increased amount of sericin in the diet. This hypolipidemic effect was partly due to increased fecal lipid excretion, inhibition of lipogenesis and regulation of adipokine production. These findings illustrate that silk protein, particularly sericin, may be beneficial in the prevention of high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemia and obesity.

  5. Green coffee polyphenols do not attenuate features of the metabolic syndrome and improve endothelial function in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Li Kwok Cheong, J D; Croft, K D; Henry, P D; Matthews, V; Hodgson, J M; Ward, N C

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated the effects of the major polyphenol in coffee, chlorogenic acid (CGA), on obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, systemic oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in a mouse model of the metabolic syndrome. Thirty C57BL6 mice were randomly divided into (n=10/group) (i) normal diet (ND), (ii) high fat diet (HFD), or (iii) high fat diet supplemented with 0.5% w/w green coffee bean extract (GCE) rich in chlorogenic acid (HFD+GCE). The high fat diet consisted of 28% fat and all animals were maintained on their diets for 12 weeks. The mice fed a HFD and HFD+GCE displayed symptoms of the metabolic syndrome compared to their normal fed counterparts, although no endothelial dysfunction was detected in the abdominal aortas after 12 weeks. GCE did not attenuate HFD-induced obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance or systemic oxidative stress. Furthermore, GCE did not protect against ex vivo oxidant (hypochlorous acid)-induced endothelial dysfunction.

  6. Effects of Supplemental Acerola Juice on the Mineral Concentrations in Liver and Kidney Tissue Samples of Mice Fed with Cafeteria Diet.

    PubMed

    Leffa, Daniela Dimer; dos Santos, Carla Eliete Iochims; Daumann, Francine; Longaretti, Luiza Martins; Amaral, Livio; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; da Silva, Juliana; Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the impact of a supplemental acerola juice (unripe, ripe, and industrial) and its main pharmaceutically active components on the concentrations of minerals in the liver and kidney of mice fed with cafeteria diet. Swiss male mice were fed with a cafeteria (CAF) diet for 13 weeks. The CAF consisted of a variety of supermarket products with high energy content. Subsequently, animals received one of the following food supplements for 1 month: water, unripe acerola juice, ripe acerola juice, industrial acerola juice, vitamin C, or rutin. Mineral concentrations of the tissues were determined by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Our study suggests that the simultaneous intake of acerola juices, vitamin C, or rutin in association with a hypercaloric and hyperlipidic diet provides change in the mineral composition of organisms in the conditions of this study, which plays an important role in the antioxidant defenses of the body. This may help to reduce the metabolism of the fat tissue or even to reduce the oxidative stress.

  7. Fenofibrate insulates diacylglycerol in lipid droplet/ER and preserves insulin signaling transduction in the liver of high fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stanley M H; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Sun, Ruo-Qiong; Jo, Eunjung; Zhou, Xiu; Wang, Hao; Li, Songpei; Xu, Aimin; Watt, Matthew J; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2015-07-01

    Hepatic steatosis is often associated with insulin resistance as a hallmark of the metabolic syndrome in the liver. The present study investigated the effects of PPARα activation induced by fenofibrate (FB) on the relationship of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet, which increases lipid influx into the liver. Mice were fed HF diet to induce insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis with or without FB. FB activated PPARα and ameliorated HF diet-induced glucose intolerance and hepatic insulin resistance without altering either hepatic steatosis or inflammation signaling (JNK or IKK). Interestingly, FB treatment simultaneously increased fatty acid (FA) synthesis (50%) and oxidation (66%, both p<0.01) into intermediate lipid metabolites, suggesting a FA oxidation-synthesis cycling in operation. Associated with these effects, diacylglycerols (DAGs) were sequestered within the lipid droplet/ER compartment, thus reducing their deposition in the cellular membrane, which is known to impair insulin signal transduction. These findings suggest that the reduction in membrane DAGs (rather than total hepatic steatosis) may be critical for the protection by fenofibrate-induced PPARα activation against hepatic insulin resistance induced by dietary fat.

  8. Altered hepatic lipid metabolism in C57BL/6 mice fed alcohol: a targeted lipidomic and gene expression study[S

    PubMed Central

    Clugston, Robin D.; Jiang, Hongfeng; Lee, Man Xia; Piantedosi, Roseann; Yuen, Jason J.; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Lewis, Michael J.; Gottesman, Max E.; Huang, Li-Shin; Goldberg, Ira J.; Berk, Paul D.; Blaner, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption is associated with fatty liver disease in mammals. The object of this study was to gain an understanding of dysregulated lipid metabolism in alcohol-fed C57BL/6 mice using a targeted lipidomic approach. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was used to analyze several lipid classes, including free fatty acids, fatty acyl-CoAs, fatty acid ethyl esters, sphingolipids, ceramides, and endocannabinoids, in plasma and liver samples from control and alcohol-fed mice. The interpretation of lipidomic data was augmented by gene expression analyses for important metabolic enzymes in the lipid pathways studied. Alcohol feeding was associated with i) increased hepatic free fatty acid levels and decreased fatty acyl-CoA levels associated with decreased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and decreased fatty acyl-CoA synthesis, respectively; ii) increased hepatic ceramide levels associated with higher levels of the precursor molecules sphingosine and sphinganine; and iii) increased hepatic levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide associated with decreased expression of its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase. The unique combination of lipidomic and gene expression analyses allows for a better mechanistic understanding of dysregulated lipid metabolism in the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:21856784

  9. Proinsulin-producing, hyperglycemia-induced adipose tissue macrophages underlie insulin resistance in high fat-fed diabetic mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose tissue macrophages play an important role in the pathogenesis of obese type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet-induced obesity has been shown to lead to adipose tissue macrophages accumulation in rodents;however, the impact of hyperglycemia on adipose tissue macrophages dynamics in high-fat diet-fed ...

  10. Soshiho-Tang Aqueous Extract Exerts Antiobesity Effects in High Fat Diet-Fed Mice and Inhibits Adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-young; Kang, Byoung-Kab

    2016-01-01

    Soshiho-tang (SST; sho-saiko-to in Japanese; xiaochaihu-tang in Chinese) has generally been used to improve liver fibrosis- and cirrhosis-related symptoms in traditional Korean medicine. Although many studies have investigated the pharmacological properties of SST, its antiobesity effect has not been elucidated. Thus, our present study was carried out to evaluate the antiobesity effect of SST using a high fat diet- (HFD) induced obese mouse model and 3T3-L1 adipose cells. C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 6/group), normal diet (ND), HFD-fed group, and HFD- and SST-fed groups (S200: 200 mg/kg of SST; S600: 600 mg/kg of SST) and given HFD with or without SST extract for 8 weeks. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were differentiated into adipocytes for 8 days with or without SST. In the HFD-fed obese mice, body weight and fat accumulation in adipose tissue were significantly reduced by SST administration. Compared with control-differentiated adipocytes, SST significantly inhibited lipid accumulation by decreasing the triglyceride (TG) content and leptin concentration in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. SST also decreased the expression of adipogenesis-related genes including lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha (C/EBP-α), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ). Our findings suggest that SST has potential as a nontoxic antiobesity medication. PMID:27777595

  11. An inherited mild middle-aged adiposity in wild mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, M. E.; MacSwiney, F. M.

    1979-01-01

    In a warfarin-resistant population of wild mice reared in the laboratory, a dominant gene for adiposity, Ad, was found to segregate. The onset of obesity is at 4--6 months, and adipose mice suffer from hyperinsulinaemia; the sexes differ in penetrance, males having greater penetrance then females. Linkage backcrosses show the gene to be situated on chromosome 7 with about 25% recombination with the closely linked warfarin-resistance genes War, and frizzy, fr. The finding of adipose in two other wild populations also carrying War is discussed as an ecological and physiological problem. PMID:429792

  12. Epidermal Hydration Is Improved by Enhanced Ceramide Metabolism in Aged C57BL/6J Mice After Dietary Supplementation of Royal Jelly.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sanghun; Cho, Yunhi

    2015-09-01

    Epidermal hydration is maintained by the epidermal lipid barrier, of which ceramide (Cer) is the major constituent. We examined the dietary effect of royal jelly (RJ) on epidermal hydration in aged mice. Altered Cer metabolism was further determined by measuring epidermal levels of individual Cer, glucosylceramide (GC), and sphingomyelin (SM) species, and of Cer-metabolizing enzymes. Aged C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet (group AGED) or diets with 1% RJ harvested from two different areas (groups AGED+RJ1:AGED + RJ2) for 16 weeks. Aged C57BL/6J mice with no dietary intervention (the control group: group C) represented the onset of aging. In group AGED, epidermal levels of hydration, Cer1/2/5/6/7, GC-A/B/C/D, SM1/2/3, and β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) protein, an enzyme of GC hydrolysis for Cer generation, were lower than in group C; these levels, as well as those of Cer3/4 and acidic sphingomyelinase (aSMase) protein, an enzyme of SM hydrolysis for Cer generation, were higher in group AGED + RJ1 than in group AGED. Despite increases in GC-B, SM1/2/3, and serine palmitoyltransferase2 protein, an enzyme of de novo Cer synthesis, in group AGED + RJ2 to levels higher than in group AGED, epidermal levels of hydration, Cer1-7, GC-A/C/D, GCase, and aSMase proteins were similar in these two groups. Expression of GCase and aSMase mRNAs, and of Cer synthase3 and ceramidase proteins, enzymes of de novo Cer synthesis and degradation, did not differ among groups. Dietary RJ1 improved epidermal hydration by enhancing Cer metabolism with increased levels of all Cer, GC, and SM species, and of GCase and aSMase proteins.

  13. Improvement in Th1/Th2 immune homeostasis, antioxidative status and resistance to pathogenic E. coli on consumption of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus fermented milk in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rohit; Kapila, Rajeev; Dass, Gulshan; Kapila, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Imbalance in Th1/Th2 immune pathways and cellular antioxidant systems with progressive aging are among the leading causes of increased risk of morbidity and mortality in elderly. Although probiotics have been considered to boost immune system, there is a lack of comprehensive analysis of probiotic effects on aging physiology. The present study aimed at determining anti-immunosenescence potential of milk fermented with probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LR) in 16 months old mice by concurrent analysis of immunosenescence markers associated with Th1/Th2 profile of splenocytes, inflamm-aging in plasma, neutrophil functions and antibody response in intestine along with analysis of antioxidant enzymes in liver and red blood cells (RBCs) after feeding trials of 1 and 2 months, respectively. An enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (ATCC 14948)-based infection model in aging mice was also designed to validate protective attributes of LR. Splenocytes registered increased IFN-γ and decreased IL-4 and IL-10 production in LR-fed animals. Neutrophil respiratory burst enzymes and phagocytosis increased significantly while no aggravation in plasma levels of MCP-1 and TNF-α was observed. Further, owing to increased Th1 response, antibodies registered a decrease in IgG1/IgG2a ratio and IgE levels in LR groups. No significant variations were observed in secretory IgA and IgA + cells in the intestine. Antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase) in LR-fed groups recorded increased activities which were more pronounced in the liver than in RBCs. LR supplementation significantly reduced E. coli translocation to organs (intestine, liver, spleen, peritoneal fluid) by enhancing E. coli-specific antibodies (IgA and IgG1) and inflammatory proteins. In conclusion, LR supplementation alleviated immunosenescence-associated Th1/Th2 imbalance, improved antioxidant capacity, and enhanced resistance of aged mice to E. coli infection thereby signifying its potential

  14. Reduced COX-2 Expression in Aged Mice Is Associated With Impaired Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Amish A; Xie, Chao; Zuscik, Michael J; Kingsley, Paul; Schwarz, Edward M; Awad, Hani; Guldberg, Robert; Drissi, Hicham; Puzas, J Edward; Boyce, Brendan; Zhang, Xinping; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2009-01-01

    The cellular and molecular events responsible for reduced fracture healing with aging are unknown. Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), the inducible regulator of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis, is critical for normal bone repair. A femoral fracture repair model was used in mice at either 7–9 or 52–56 wk of age, and healing was evaluated by imaging, histology, and gene expression studies. Aging was associated with a decreased rate of chondrogenesis, decreased bone formation, reduced callus vascularization, delayed remodeling, and altered expression of genes involved in repair and remodeling. COX-2 expression in young mice peaked at 5 days, coinciding with the transition of mesenchymal progenitors to cartilage and the onset of expression of early cartilage markers. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that COX-2 is expressed primarily in early cartilage precursors that co-express col-2. COX-2 expression was reduced by 75% and 65% in fractures from aged mice compared with young mice on days 5 and 7, respectively. Local administration of an EP4 agonist to the fracture repair site in aged mice enhanced the rate of chondrogenesis and bone formation to levels observed in young mice, suggesting that the expression of COX-2 during the early inflammatory phase of repair regulates critical subsequent events including chondrogenesis, bone formation, and remodeling. The findings suggest that COX-2/EP4 agonists may compensate for deficient molecular signals that result in the reduced fracture healing associated with aging. PMID:18847332

  15. Cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice: age-related vulnerability and exploratory behavior deficit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongkai; Li, Chengren; Wang, Hanzhi; Mei, Feng; Liu, Zhi; Shen, Hai-Ying; Xiao, Lan

    2013-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disease that mainly affects young individuals (15 to 35 years old) but its etiology remains largely undefined. Recently, accumulating evidence indicated that demyelination and/or dysfunction of oligodendrocytes is an important feature of its pathogenesis. We hypothesized that the vulnerability of young individuals to demyelination may contribute to the onset of schizophrenia. In the present study, three different age cohorts of mice, i.e. juvenile (3 weeks), young-adult (6 weeks) and middle-aged (8 months), were subjected to a 6-week diet containing 0.2% cuprizone (CPZ) to create an animal model of acute demyelination. Then, age-related vulnerability to CPZ-induced demyelination, behavioral outcomes, and myelination-related molecular biological changes were assessed. We demonstrated: (1) CPZ treatment led to more severe demyelination in juvenile and young-adult mice than in middle-aged mice in the corpus callosum, a region closely associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia; (2) the higher levels of demyelination in juvenile and young-adult mice were correlated with a greater reduction of myelin basic protein, more loss of CC-1-positive mature oligodendrocytes, and higher levels of astrocyte activation; and (3) CPZ treatment resulted in a more prominent exploratory behavior deficit in juvenile and young-adult mice than in middle-aged mice. Together, our data demonstrate an age-related vulnerability to demyelination with a concurrent behavioral deficit, providing supporting evidence for better understanding the susceptibility of the young to the onset of schizophrenia.

  16. Green tea, black tea, and oolong tea polyphenols reduce visceral fat and inflammation in mice fed high-fat, high-sucrose obesogenic diets.

    PubMed

    Heber, David; Zhang, Yanjun; Yang, Jieping; Ma, Janice E; Henning, Susanne M; Li, Zhaoping

    2014-09-01

    Green tea (GT) and caffeine in combination were shown to increase energy expenditure and fat oxidation, but less is known about the effects of black tea (BT) and oolong tea (OT). This study investigated whether decaffeinated polyphenol extracts from GT, BT, and OT decrease body fat and inflammation in male C57BL/6J mice fed high-fat/high-sucrose [HF/HS (32% energy from fat, 25% energy from sucrose)] diets. Mice were fed either an HF/HS diet with 0.25% of polyphenol from GT, OT, or BT or a low-fat/high-sucrose [LF/HS (10.6% energy from fat, 25% energy from sucrose)] diet for 20 wk. Monomeric tea polyphenols were found in the liver and adipose tissue of mice fed the HF/HS diet with GT polyphenols (GTPs) and OT polyphenols (OTPs) but not BT polyphenols (BTPs). Treatment with GTPs, OTPs, BTPs, and an LF/HS diet led to significantly lower body weight, total visceral fat volume by MRI, and liver lipid weight compared with mice in the HF/HS control group. Only GTPs reduced food intake significantly by ∼10%. GTP, BTP, and LF/HS-diet treatments significantly reduced serum monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) compared with HF/HS controls. In mesenteric fat, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (Mcp1) gene expression was significantly decreased by treatment with GTPs, BTPs, OTPs, and an LF/HS diet and in liver tissue by GTP and BTP treatments. Mcp1 gene expression in epididymal fat was significantly decreased by the BTP and LF/HS diet interventions. In epididymal fat, consistent with an anti-inflammatory effect, adiponectin gene expression was significantly increased by GTPs and OTPs. Angiogenesis during adipose tissue expansion is anti-inflammatory by maintaining adipocyte perfusion. We observed significantly increased gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A by GTPs and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 by BTPs and the LF/HS diet and a decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor gene expression by OTPs and BTPs. In summary, all 3 tea polyphenol

  17. Corn oil versus lard: Metabolic effects of omega-3 fatty acids in mice fed obesogenic diets with different fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Pavlisova, Jana; Bardova, Kristina; Stankova, Barbora; Tvrzicka, Eva; Kopecky, Jan; Rossmeisl, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Mixed results have been obtained regarding the level of insulin resistance induced by high-fat diets rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA) when compared to those enriched by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and how metabolic effects of marine PUFA of n-3 series, i.e. docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), depend on dietary lipid background. Here we compared two high-fat diets, in which the major lipid constituent was based either on SFA in the form of pork lard (LHF diet) or PUFA of n-6 series (Omega-6) as corn oil (cHF diet). Both cHF and LHF parental diets were also supplemented with EPA+DHA (∼30 g/kg diet) to produce cHF+F and LHF+F diet, respectively. Male C57BL/6N mice were fed the experimental diets for 8 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in mice fed LHF and cHF diets, and then metabolic effects of cHF+F and LHF+F diets were assessed focusing on the liver and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). Both LHF and cHF induced comparable weight gain and the level of insulin resistance, however LHF-fed mice showed increased hepatic steatosis associated with elevated activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and lower plasma triacylglycerol levels when compared to cHF. Despite lowering hepatic SCD1 activity, which was concomitant with reduced hepatic steatosis reaching the level observed in cHF+F mice, LHF+F did not decrease adiposity and the weight of eWAT, and rather further impaired insulin sensitivity relative to cHF+F, that tended to improve it. In conclusion, high-fat diets containing as much as ∼35 weight% as lipids induce similar weight gain and impairment of insulin sensitivity irrespective whether they are based on SFA or Omega-6. Although the SFA-rich diet containing EPA+DHA efficiently reduced hepatic steatosis, it did so without a corresponding improvement in insulin sensitivity and in the absence of effect on adiposity.

  18. Ghrelin Receptor Regulates Appetite and Satiety during Aging in Mice by Regulating Meal Frequency and Portion Size but Not Total Food Intake1234

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ligen; Nuotio-Antar, Alli M.; Ma, Xiaojun; Liu, Feng; Fiorotto, Marta L.; Sun, Yuxiang

    2014-01-01

    Aging is often associated with overweight and obesity. There exists a long-standing debate about whether meal pattern also contributes to the development of obesity. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin regulates appetite and satiety by activating its receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). In mice, circulating ghrelin concentrations and brain GHS-R expression were shown to increase with aging. To assess whether GHS-R regulates feeding pattern during aging, we studied meal patterns for the following cohorts of male mice fed a normal unpurified diet: 1) 3–4 mo, young wild-type (WT) mice; 2) 3–4 mo, young Ghsr-null (Ghsr−/−) mice; 3) 12–14 mo, middle-aged WT (WT-M) mice; 4) 12–14 mo, middle-aged Ghsr−/− (Ghsr−/−-M) mice; 5) 24–26 mo, old WT (WT-O) mice; and 6) 24–26 mo, old Ghsr−/− (Ghsr−/−-O) mice. Although the total daily food intake of Ghsr−/− mice was similar to that of WT controls, Ghsr−/−-M and Ghsr−/−-O mice had 9% (P = 0.07) and 16% (P < 0.05) less body weight compared with WT-M and WT-O mice, respectively, primarily due to reduced fat mass (P < 0.05, WT-M vs. Ghsr−/−-M and WT-O vs. Ghsr−/−-O). Intriguingly, Ghsr−/−-M mice ate larger meals (on average, Ghsr−/−-M mice ate 0.117 g/meal and WT-M mice ate 0.080 g/meal; P < 0.01) and took a longer time to eat (Ghsr−/−-M, 196.0 s and WT-M, 128.9 s; P < 0.01), but ate less frequently (Ghsr−/−-M, 31.0 times/d and WT-M, 42.3 times/d; P < 0.05) than WT-M controls. In addition, we found that expression of hypothalamic orexigenic peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP), was relatively lower in aged WT mice (P = 0.09 for NPY and P = 0.06 for AgRP), but anorexic peptide pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) expression remained unchanged between the WT age groups. Interestingly, old Ghsr−/− mice had greater hypothalamic NPY expression (102% higher; P < 0.05) and AgRP expression (P = 0.07) but significantly lower POMC expression

  19. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Impaired Mucosal Immune Responses in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aso, Kazuyoshi; Tsuruhara, Akitoshi; Takagaki, Kentaro; Oki, Katsuyuki; Ota, Megumi; Nose, Yasuhiro; Tanemura, Hideki; Urushihata, Naoki; Sasanuma, Jinichi; Sano, Masayuki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Aso, Rio; McGhee, Jerry R.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) can differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Several clinical trials have shown the ability of AMSCs to regenerate these differentiated cell types. Age-associated dysregulation of the gastrointestinal (GI) immune system has been well documented. Our previous studies showed that impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract occurs earlier during agingthan is seen in the systemic compartment. In this study, we examined the potential of AMSCs to restore the GI mucosal immune system in aged mice. Aged (>18 mo old) mice were adoptively transferred with AMSCs. Two weeks later, mice were orally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) three times at weekly intervals. Seven days after the final immunization, when fecal extract samples and plasma were subjected to OVA- and CT-B-specific ELISA, elevated levels of mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) and plasma IgG antibody (Ab) responses were noted in aged mouse recipients. Similar results were also seen aged mice which received AMSCs at one year of age. When cytokine production was examined, OVA-stimulated Peyer’s patch CD4+ T cells produced increased levels of IL-4. Further, CD4+ T cells from the lamina propria revealed elevated levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ production. In contrast, aged mice without AMSC transfer showed essentially no OVA- or CT-B-specific mucosal SIgA or plasma IgG Ab or cytokine responses. Of importance, fecal extracts from AMSC transferred aged mice showed neutralization activity to CT intoxication. These results suggest that AMSCs can restore impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract of aged mice. PMID:26840058

  20. Telomere shortening in diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscles of aged mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Lund, Troy C; Grange, Robert W; Lowe, Dawn A

    2007-09-01

    The progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is, in part, due to satellite cell senescence driven by high replicative pressure as these muscle stem cells repeatedly divide and fuse to damaged muscle fibers. We hypothesize that telomere shortening in satellite cells underlies their senescence. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the diaphragm and a leg muscle from dystrophic mice of various ages for telomere dynamics. We found 30% telomere shortening in tibialis anterior muscles from 600-day-old mdx mice relative to age-matched wildtype mice. We also found a more severe shortening of telomere length in diaphragm muscles of old mdx mice. In those muscles, telomeres were shortened by approximately 15% and 40% in 100- and 600-day-old mdx mice, respectively. These findings indicate that satellite cells undergo telomere erosion, which may contribute to the inability of these cells to perpetually repair DMD muscle.

  1. Normal aging of offspring mice of mothers with induced inflammation during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Golan, H; Stilman, M; Lev, V; Huleihel, M

    2006-09-15

    Intrauterine inflammation is a major risk for offspring neurodevelopmental brain damage and may result in cognitive limitations and poor cognitive and perceptual outcomes. In the present study we tested the possibility that prenatal exposure to a high level of inflammatory factors may increase the risk for neurodegeneration in aging. The effect of systemic maternal inflammation (MI), induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on offspring brain aging, was examined in 8 month old (adult) and 20 month old (aged) offspring mice. A significant effect of age was found in the distance and velocity of exploration in the open field in both groups. In addition, MI aged offspring covered longer distances and enter frequently to the center of the field compared with the aged control group. Although only little difference was found in the aged MI offspring compared with the control offspring, the overall profile of behavior of these mice differs from that of the control group, as detected by clustering analysis. The expression of the death-associated protein FAS-ligand and the amount of apoptotic cell death were examined in the brains of aged offspring. Similar levels of FAS-ligand expression and parallel density of apoptotic cells were detected in the brains of aged mice of control and MI groups. Altogether, moderate systemic MI was not found to increase the risk for cell death in the aged offspring; limited effect was found in mice profile of behavior.

  2. Exposure to light at night accelerates aging and spontaneous uterine carcinogenesis in female 129/Sv mice

    PubMed Central

    Popovich, Irina G.; Zabezhinski, Mark A.; Panchenko, Andrei V.; Piskunova, Tatiana S.; Semenchenko, Anna V.; Tyndyk, Maragriata L.; Yurova, Maria N.; Anisimov, Vladimir N.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the constant illumination on the development of spontaneous tumors in female 129/Sv mice was investigated. Forty-six female 129/Sv mice starting from the age of 2 mo were kept under standard light/dark regimen [12 h light (70 lx):12hr dark; LD, control group], and 46 of 129/Sv mice were kept under constant illumination (24 h a day, 2,500 lx, LL) from the age of 5 mo until to natural death. The exposure to the LL regimen significantly accelerated body weight gain, increased body temperature as well as acceleration of age-related disturbances in estrous function, followed by significant acceleration of the development of the spontaneous uterine tumors in female 129/Sv mice. Total tumor incidence as well as a total number of total or malignant tumors was similar in LL and LD group (p > 0.05). The mice from the LL groups survived less than those from the LD group (χ2 = 8.5; p = 0.00351, log-rank test). According to the estimated parameters of the Cox’s regression model, constant light regimen increased the relative risk of death in female mice compared with the control (LD) group (p = 0.0041). The data demonstrate in the first time that the exposure to constant illumination was followed by the acceleration of aging and spontaneous uterine tumorigenesis in female 129/Sv mice. PMID:23656779

  3. Haploinsufficiency of the Myc regulator Mtbp extends survival and delays tumor development in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Brian C.; Boyd, Kelli; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Eischen, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of specific genes can modulate aging. Myc, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of many genes involved in critical cellular functions was shown to have a role in controlling longevity. Decreased expression of Myc inhibited many of the deleterious effects of aging and increased lifespan in mice. Without altering Myc expression, reduced levels of Mtbp, a recently identified regulator of Myc, limit Myc transcriptional activity and proliferation, while increased levels promote Myc-mediated effects. To determine the contribution of Mtbp to the effects of Myc on aging, we studied a large cohort of Mtbp heterozygous mice and littermate matched wild-type controls. Mtbp haploinsufficiency significantly increased longevity and maximal survival in mice. Reduced levels of Mtbp did not alter locomotor activity, litter size, or body size, but Mtbp heterozygous mice did exhibit elevated markers of metabolism, particularly in the liver. Mtbp+/− mice also had a significant delay in spontaneous cancer development, which was most prominent in the hematopoietic system, and an altered tumor spectrum compared to Mtbp+/+ mice. Therefore, the data suggest Mtbp is a regulator of longevity in mice that mimics some, but not all, of the properties of Myc in aging. PMID:27803394

  4. Effects of Bofu-Tsusho-San on Diabetes and Hyperlipidemia Associated with AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Glucose Transporter 4 in High-Fat-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Shih, Chun-Ching

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect and mechanism of Bofu-tsusho-san formula (BO) on hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia and in mice fed with a high-fat (HF) diet. The C57BL/6J mice were received control/HF diet for 12 weeks, and oral administration of BO (at three doses) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or vehicle for the last 4 weeks. Blood, skeletal muscle and tissues were examined by means of measuring glycaemia and dyslipidaemia-associated events. BO treatment effectively prevented HF diet-induced increases in the levels of triglyceride (TG), free fatty acid (FFA) and leptin (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.01, respectively). BO treatment exhibited reduced both visceral fat mass and hepatic triacylglycerol content; moreover, BO treatment displayed significantly decreased both the average area of the cut of adipocytes and ballooning of hepatocytes. BO treatment exerted increased the protein contents of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in skeletal muscle, and caused lowered blood glucose levels. BO treatment displayed increased levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both skeletal muscle and liver tissue. Furthermore, BO reduced the hepatic expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose production. Therefore, it is possible that the activation of AMPK by BO leads to diminished gluconeogenesis in liver tissue. BO increased hepatic expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), whereas down-regulating decreasing expressions of fatty acid synthesis, including sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), resulting in a decrease in circulating triglycerides. This study originally provides the evidence that amelioration of dyslipidemic and diabetic state by BO in HF-fed mice occurred by regulation of GLUT4, SREBP1c, FAS, PPARα, adiponectin and AMPK phosphorylation. PMID:25375187

  5. Ursodeoxycholic acid improves insulin sensitivity and hepatic steatosis by inducing the excretion of hepatic lipids in high-fat diet-fed KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Takuma; Shiraishi, Muneshige; Ohta, Tetsuya; Sakai, Kaoru; Ishii, Shinichi

    2012-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is frequently accompanied by fatty liver/nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Hence, accumulation of lipids in the liver is considered to be one of the risk factors for insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is widely used for the treatment of liver dysfunction. We investigated the therapeutic effects of UDCA on type 2 diabetes mellitus exacerbating hepatic steatosis and the underlying mechanisms of its action using KK-A(y) mice fed a high-fat diet. KK-A(y) mice were prefed a high-fat diet; and 50, 150, and 450 mg/kg of UDCA was orally administered for 2 or 3 weeks. Administration of UDCA decreased fasting hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analyses showed that UDCA improved hepatic (but not peripheral) insulin resistance. Hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol contents were significantly reduced by treatment with UDCA, although the genes involved in the synthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol, including fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, were upregulated. Fecal levels of bile acids, neutral sterols, fatty acids, and phospholipids were significantly increased by UDCA treatment. The gene expression levels and protein phosphorylation levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were not changed by UDCA treatment. These results indicate that UDCA ameliorates hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia by improving hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis in high-fat diet-fed KK-A(y) mice. Reduction of hepatic lipids might be due to their excretion in feces, followed by enhanced utilization of glucose for the synthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol. Ursodeoxycholic acid should be effective for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus accompanying hepatic steatosis.

  6. Effects of Bofu-Tsusho-San on diabetes and hyperlipidemia associated with AMP-activated protein kinase and glucose transporter 4 in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Shih, Chun-Ching

    2014-11-04

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect and mechanism of Bofu-tsusho-san formula (BO) on hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia and in mice fed with a high-fat (HF) diet. The C57BL/6J mice were received control/HF diet for 12 weeks, and oral administration of BO (at three doses) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or vehicle for the last 4 weeks. Blood, skeletal muscle and tissues were examined by means of measuring glycaemia and dyslipidaemia-associated events. BO treatment effectively prevented HF diet-induced increases in the levels of triglyceride (TG), free fatty acid (FFA) and leptin (p<0.01, p<0.01, p<0.01, respectively). BO treatment exhibited reduced both visceral fat mass and hepatic triacylglycerol content; moreover, BO treatment displayed significantly decreased both the average area of the cut of adipocytes and ballooning of hepatocytes. BO treatment exerted increased the protein contents of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in skeletal muscle, and caused lowered blood glucose levels. BO treatment displayed increased levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both skeletal muscle and liver tissue. Furthermore, BO reduced the hepatic expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose production. Therefore, it is possible that the activation of AMPK by BO leads to diminished gluconeogenesis in liver tissue. BO increased hepatic expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), whereas down-regulating decreasing expressions of fatty acid synthesis, including sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), resulting in a decrease in circulating triglycerides. This study originally provides the evidence that amelioration of dyslipidemic and diabetic state by BO in HF-fed mice occurred by regulation of GLUT4, SREBP1c, FAS, PPARα, adiponectin and AMPK phosphorylation.

  7. Chamnamul [Pimpinella brachycarpa (Kom.) Nakai] ameliorates hyperglycemia and improves antioxidant status in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Jin; Choi, Ha-Neul; Kang, Min-Jung; Choe, Eunok; Auh, Joong Hyuck; Kim, Jung-In

    2013-12-01

    Chronic consumption of a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet increases insulin resistance and results in type 2 diabetes mellitus in C57BL/6J mice. Hyperglycemia in diabetics increases oxidative stress, which is associated with a high risk of diabetic complications. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypoglycemic and antioxidant effects of chamnamul [Pimpinella brachycarpa (Kom.) Nakai] in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of a 70% ethanol extract of chamnamul was measured in vitro. Five-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a basal or HFHS diet with or without a 70% ethanol extract of chamnamul at a 0.5% level of the diet for 12 weeks after 1 week of adaptation. After sacrifice, serum glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and lipid profiles, and lipid peroxidation of the liver were determined. Homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was determined. Chamnamul extract inhibited α-glucosidase by 26.7%, which was 78.3% the strength of inhibition by acarbose at a concentration of 0.5 mg/mL. Serum glucose, insulin, and cholesterol levels, as well as HOMA-IR values, were significantly lower in the chamnamul group than in the HFHS group. Chamnamul extract significantly decreased the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in the liver compared with the HFHS group. These findings suggest that chamnamul may be useful in prevention of hyperglycemia and reduction of oxidative stress in mice fed a HFHS diet.

  8. Age-independent and age-related deficits in visuospatial learning, sleep-wake states, thermoregulation and motor activity in PDAPP mice.

    PubMed

    Huitrón-Reséndiz, Salvador; Sánchez-Alavez, Manuel; Gallegos, Roger; Berg, Greta; Crawford, Elena; Giacchino, Jeannie L; Games, Dora; Henriksen, Steven J; Criado, José R

    2002-02-22

    Recent studies demonstrated that mice overexpressing the human mutant beta-amyloid precursor protein (hbetaAPP; PDAPP mice) show age-independent and age-related deficits in spatial learning. We used behavioral and electrophysiological techniques to determine in young and aged PDAPP mice whether deficits in spatial learning also involve alterations in sleep-wake states, thermoregulation and motor activity. Consistent with earlier studies, young PDAPP mice exhibited selective age-independent deficits using spatial, but not random and serial strategies in the circular maze. Aged PDAPP mice exhibited deficits using all search strategies. The core body temperature (Tb) in young and aged PDAPP mice was significantly lower than in age-matched non-transgenic (non-Tg) littermates. During the dark period, the motor activity (LMA) was significantly increased in young PDAPP mice, but not in aged PDAPP mice. During the light period, young PDAPP mice showed a reduction in the generation of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. In contrast, aged PDAPP mice exhibited a reduction in the amount of time spent in W and an increase in SWS during the light period. Aged PDAPP mice also showed an increase in the amount of time spent in W and a reduction in REM sleep during the dark period. Our findings support previous reports indicating deficits in spatial learning in young and aged PDAPP mice. These data also suggest that PDAPP mice exhibit age-independent and age-related deficits in neural mechanisms regulating visuospatial learning, the total amount and the circadian distribution of sleep-wake states, thermoregulation and motor activity.

  9. Comparison of mice with accelerated aging caused by distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gurkar, Aditi U.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the primary risk factor for numerous chronic, debilitating diseases. These diseases impact quality of life of the elderly and consume a large portion of health care costs. The cost of age-related diseases will only increase as the world's population continues to live longer. Thus it would be advantageous to consider aging itself as a therapeutic target, potentially stemming multiple age-related diseases simultaneously. While logical, this is extremely challenging as the molecular mechanisms that drive aging are still unknown. Furthermore, clinical trials to treat aging are impractical. Even in preclinical models, testing interventions to extend healthspan in old age is lengthy and therefore costly. One approach to expedite aging studies is to take advantage of mouse strains that are engineered to age rapidly. These strains are genetically and phenotypically quite diverse. This review aims to offer a comparison of several of these strains to highlight their relative strengths and weaknesses as models of mammalian and more specifically human aging. Additionally, careful identification of commonalities amongst the strains may lead to the identification of fundamental pathways of aging. PMID:25617508

  10. Initial evidence linking synaptic superoxide production with poor short-term memory in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sameh S; Young, Jared W; Wallace, Chelsea K; Gresack, Jodi; Jeste, Dilip V; Geyer, Mark A; Dugan, Laura L; Risbrough, Victoria B

    2011-01-12

    Unregulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a marker of cellular and organismal aging linked to cognitive decline in humans and rodents. The sources of elevated ROS contributing to cognitive decline are unknown. Because NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibition may prevent memory decline with age, we hypothesized that Nox and not mitochondrial sources of synaptic ROS production are linked to individual variance in cognitive performance in aged mice. Young (8 months) and aged (26 months) mice were tested in the novel object recognition task (NORT). Mitochondrial and Nox ROS production was assayed in isolated synaptosomes using spin trapping electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Aged mice exhibited variance in NORT performance, with some performing similar to young mice while others exhibited poorer short-term memory. EPR studies indicated that Nox rather than mitochondria was the major ROS source at the synapse, and Nox-induced but not mitochondrial-induced ROS levels correlated with NORT performance in aged mice. Our findings support the hypothesis that variance in Nox-specific synaptic ROS production may predict short-term memory deficits with age.

  11. Reduction of Influenza Virus Titer and Protection against Influenza Virus Infection in Infant Mice Fed Lactobacillus casei Shirota

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Hisako; Kiyoshima, Junko; Hori, Tetsuji

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether oral administration of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota to neonatal and infant mice ameliorates influenza virus (IFV) infection in the upper respiratory tract and protects against influenza infection. In a model of upper respiratory IFV infection, the titer of virus in the nasal washings of infant mice administered L. casei Shirota (L. casei Shirota group) was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that in infant mice administered saline (control group) (102.48 ± 100.31 and 102.78 ± 100.4, respectively). Further, the survival rate of the L. casei Shirota group was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that of the control group (14.3 versus 40.0%). One day after infection, pulmonary NK cell activity and interleukin-12 production by mediastinal lymph node cells of mice in the L. casei Shirota group were significantly greater than those of mice in the control group. These findings suggest that oral administration of L. casei Shirota activates the immature immune system of neonatal and infant mice and protects against IFV infection. Therefore, oral administration of L. casei Shirota may accelerate the innate immune response of the respiratory tract and protect against various respiratory infections in neonates, infants, and children, a high risk group for viral and bacterial infections. PMID:15242940

  12. Bone fragility and decline in stem cells in prematurely aging DNA repair deficient trichothiodystrophy mice.

    PubMed

    Diderich, Karin E M; Nicolaije, Claudia; Priemel, Matthias; Waarsing, Jan H; Day, Judd S; Brandt, Renata M C; Schilling, Arndt F; Botter, Sander M; Weinans, Harrie; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2012-08-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare, autosomal recessive nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder caused by mutations in components of the dual functional NER/basal transcription factor TFIIH. TTD mice, carrying a patient-based point mutation in the Xpd gene, strikingly resemble many features of the human syndrome and exhibit signs of premature aging. To examine to which extent TTD mice resemble the normal process of aging, we thoroughly investigated the bone phenotype. Here, we show that female TTD mice exhibit accelerated bone aging from 39 weeks onwards as well as lack of periosteal apposition leading to reduced bone strength. Before 39 weeks have passed, bones of wild-type and TTD mice are identical excluding a developmental defect. Albeit that bone formation is decreased, osteoblasts in TTD mice retain bone-forming capacity as in vivo PTH treatment leads to increased cortical thickness. In vitro bone marrow cell cultures showed that TTD osteoprogenitors retain the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts. However, after 13 weeks of age TTD females show decreased bone nodule formation. No increase in bone resorption or the number of osteoclasts was detected. In conclusion, TTD mice show premature bone aging, which is preceded by a decrease in mesenchymal stem cells/osteoprogenitors and a change in systemic factors, identifying DNA damage and repair as key determinants for bone fragility by influencing osteogenesis and bone metabolism.

  13. Altered left ventricular performance in aging physically active mice with an ankle sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michael J; Guderian, Sophie; Wikstrom, Erik A; Huot, Joshua R; Peck, Bailey D; Arthur, Susan T; Marino, Joseph S; Hubbard-Turner, Tricia

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the impact of differing physical activity levels throughout the lifespan, using a musculoskeletal injury model, on the age-related changes in left ventricular (LV) parameters in active mice. Forty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three running wheel groups (transected CFL group, transected ATFL/CFL group, SHAM group) or a SHAM Sedentary group (SHAMSED). Before surgery and every 6 weeks after surgery, LV parameters were measured under 2.5 % isoflurane inhalation. Group effects for daily distance run was significantly greater for the SHAM and lesser for the ATLF/CFL mice (p = 0.013) with distance run decreasing with age for all mice (p < 0.0001). Beginning at 6 months of age, interaction (group × age) was noted with LV posterior wall thickness-to-radius ratios (h/r) where h/r increased with age in the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice while the SHAM and CFL mice exhibited decreased h/r with age (p = 0.0002). Passive filling velocity (E wave) was significantly greater in the SHAM mice and lowest for the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice (p < 0.0001) beginning at 9 months of age. Active filling velocity (A wave) was not different between groups (p = 0.10). Passive-to-active filling velocity ratio (E/A ratio) was different between groups (p < 0.0001), with higher ratios for the SHAM mice and lower ratios for the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice in response to physical activity beginning at 9 months of age. Passive-to-active filling velocity ratio decreased with age (p < 0.0001). Regular physical activity throughout the lifespan improved LV structure, passive filling velocity, and E/A ratio by 6 to 9 months of age and attenuated any negative alterations throughout the second half of life. The diastolic filling differences were found to be significantly related to the amount of activity performed by 9 months and at the end of the lifespan.

  14. [Growth of breastfed and bottle-fed infants up to 2 years of age: CLACYD (Lactation, Alimentation, Growth and Development) study 1993-1995].

    PubMed

    Agrelo, F; Lobo, B; Chesta, M; Berra, S; Sabulsky, J

    1999-07-01

    Studies done in various countries show important differences in the growth of breastfed and bottle-fed children. In addition, it has been found that breast-fed children grow more slowly beginning at the age of 2 or 3 months in comparison with the reference pattern of the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and the World Health Organization (WHO). These results cast doubt on whether maximum growth is the same as optimal growth. The objective of this study was to compare the growth in weight and length, from birth to 24 months, for a group of children who were breast-fed with that of a group who were bottle-fed. The study was also intended to describe the growth of the breastfed group in relation to the NCHS/WHO norms and a WHO "12-month breast-fed pooled data set." For this research, data were analyzed from the "Cordoba: lactation, feeding, growth, and development" study (or CLACYD study, for its Spanish-language acronym). That study looked at a representative cohort, stratified by social class, of children born in 1993 in the city of Cordoba, Argentina. The researchers analyzed anthropometric data on 74 children who were breast-fed during the first year of life and on 108 bottle-fed children. The data had been recorded, using standardized techniques, at birth and at 6, 12, and 24 months of age. Both groups were homogenous with respect to the age and schooling of the parents, social stratum, birth order, maternal height, and child's weight and length at birth. The living conditions (housing construction and availability of water and sewer services) were better among the group that was bottle-fed (P = 0.04). The breast-fed children had a lower weight and a shorter length at 6, 12, and 24 months than did the bottle-fed children. The breast-fed children also showed a slowing in growth with respect to the NCHS/WHO guidelines beginning in the second semester. This indicates that the NCHS/WHO norms are not totally adequate for evaluating the growth of breast-fed

  15. Humanized HLA-DR4 Mice Fed with the Protozoan Pathogen of Oysters Perkinsus Marinus (Dermo) Do Not Develop Noticeable Pathology but Elicit Systemic Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kleschenko, Yuliya; Pow-Sang, Luis; Brumeanu, Teodor D.; Villasante, Eileen Franke; Vasta, Gerardo R.; Fernández-Robledo, José-Antonio; Casares, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Perkinsus marinus (Phylum Perkinsozoa) is a marine protozoan parasite responsible for “Dermo” disease in oysters, which has caused extensive damage to the shellfish industry and estuarine environment. The infection prevalence has been estimated in some areas to be as high as 100%, often causing death of infected oysters within 1–2 years post-infection. Human consumption of the parasites via infected oysters is thus likely to occur, but to our knowledge the effect of oral consumption of P. marinus has not been investigated in humans or other mammals. To address the question we used humanized mice expressing HLA-DR4 molecules and lacking expression of mouse MHC-class II molecules (DR4.EA0) in such a way that CD4 T cell responses are solely restricted by the human HLA-DR4 molecule. The DR4.EA0 mice did not develop diarrhea or any detectable pathology in the gastrointestinal tract or lungs following single or repeated feedings with live P. marinus parasites. Furthermore, lymphocyte populations in the gut associated lymphoid tissue and spleen were unaltered in the parasite-fed mice ruling out local or systemic inflammation. Notably, naïve DR4.EA0 mice had antibodies (IgM and IgG) reacting against P. marinus parasites whereas parasite specific T cell responses were undetectable. Feeding with P. marinus boosted the antibody responses and stimulated specific cellular (IFNγ) immunity to the oyster parasite. Our data indicate the ability of P. marinus parasites to induce systemic immunity in DR4.EA0 mice without causing noticeable pathology, and support rationale grounds for using genetically engineered P. marinus as a new oral vaccine platform to induce systemic immunity against infectious agents. PMID:24498105

  16. Male 11β-HSD1 Knockout Mice Fed Trans-Fats and Fructose Are Not Protected From Metabolic Syndrome or Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Larner, Dean P.; Morgan, Stuart A.; Gathercole, Laura L.; Doig, Craig L.; Guest, Phil; Weston, Christopher; Hazeldine, Jon; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.; Stewart, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) defines a spectrum of conditions from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis and is regarded as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. Glucocorticoids can promote steatosis by stimulating lipolysis within adipose tissue, free fatty acid delivery to liver and hepatic de novo lipogenesis. Glucocorticoids can be reactivated in liver through 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) enzyme activity. Inhibition of 11β-HSD1 has been suggested as a potential treatment for NAFLD. To test this, male mice with global (11β-HSD1 knockout [KO]) and liver-specific (LKO) 11β-HSD1 loss of function were fed the American Lifestyle Induced Obesity Syndrome (ALIOS) diet, known to recapitulate the spectrum of NAFLD, and metabolic and liver phenotypes assessed. Body weight, muscle and adipose tissue masses, and parameters of glucose homeostasis showed that 11β-HSD1KO and LKO mice were not protected from systemic metabolic disease. Evaluation of hepatic histology, triglyceride content, and blinded NAFLD activity score assessment indicated that levels of steatosis were similar between 11β-HSD1KO, LKO, and control mice. Unexpectedly, histological analysis revealed significantly increased levels of immune foci present in livers of 11β-HSD1KO but not LKO or control mice, suggestive of a transition to NASH. This was endorsed by elevated hepatic expression of key immune cell and inflammatory markers. These data indicate that 11β-HSD1-deficient mice are not protected from metabolic disease or hepatosteatosis in the face of a NAFLD-inducing diet. However, global deficiency of 11β-HSD1 did increase markers of hepatic inflammation and suggests a critical role for 11β-HSD1 in restraining the transition to NASH. PMID:27384305

  17. Humanized HLA-DR4 mice fed with the protozoan pathogen of oysters Perkinsus marinus (Dermo) do not develop noticeable pathology but elicit systemic immunity.

    PubMed

    Wijayalath, Wathsala; Majji, Sai; Kleschenko, Yuliya; Pow-Sang, Luis; Brumeanu, Teodor D; Villasante, Eileen Franke; Vasta, Gerardo R; Fernández-Robledo, José-Antonio; Casares, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Perkinsus marinus (Phylum Perkinsozoa) is a marine protozoan parasite responsible for "Dermo" disease in oysters, which has caused extensive damage to the shellfish industry and estuarine environment. The infection prevalence has been estimated in some areas to be as high as 100%, often causing death of infected oysters within 1-2 years post-infection. Human consumption of the parasites via infected oysters is thus likely to occur, but to our knowledge the effect of oral consumption of P. marinus has not been investigated in humans or other mammals. To address the question we used humanized mice expressing HLA-DR4 molecules and lacking expression of mouse MHC-class II molecules (DR4.EA(0)) in such a way that CD4 T cell responses are solely restricted by the human HLA-DR4 molecule. The DR4.EA(0) mice did not develop diarrhea or any detectable pathology in the gastrointestinal tract or lungs following single or repeated feedings with live P. marinus parasites. Furthermore, lymphocyte populations in the gut associated lymphoid tissue and spleen were unaltered in the parasite-fed mice ruling out local or systemic inflammation. Notably, naïve DR4.EA(0) mice had antibodies (IgM and IgG) reacting against P. marinus parasites whereas parasite specific T cell responses were undetectable. Feeding with P. marinus boosted the antibody responses and stimulated specific cellular (IFNγ) immunity to the oyster parasite. Our data indicate the ability of P. marinus parasites to induce systemic immunity in DR4.EA(0) mice without causing noticeable pathology, and support rationale grounds for using genetically engineered P. marinus as a new oral vaccine platform to induce systemic immunity against infectious agents.

  18. Effects of high-calcium diets with different whey proteins on weight loss and weight regain in high-fat-fed C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Pilvi, Taru K; Harala, Saara; Korpela, Riitta; Mervaala, Eero M

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of different whey protein-containing high-Ca diets on weight loss and weight regain in a model of diet-induced obesity. Obesity was induced in C57BL/6J mice with a high-fat (60 % of energy) diet. Weight loss by energy restriction was performed on four different high-Ca diets (1.8 % CaCO3) containing different whey proteins (18 % of energy): alpha-lactalbumin (ALA), beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), lactoferrin (LF) and whey protein isolate (WPI). After 7 weeks of energy restriction some of the mice were killed and the rest were fed with the same diets ad libitum for 7 weeks. The mice on the LF diet lost significantly more weight than mice on the WPI diet. The body fat content in the ALA and LF groups was significantly lower than in the WPI group (P < 0.05) and the LF group differed significantly even from the BLG group (P < 0.05). Ad libitum feeding after weight loss resulted in weight regain in all groups and only the ALA diet significantly reduced fat accumulation during weight regain. The weight regain was most pronounced in the LF group, but the adipocyte size was still significantly smaller than in the other groups. There were no differences in food intake or apparent fat digestibility between the groups. It can be concluded that a high-Ca diet with ALA significantly improves the outcome of weight loss and subsequent weight regain during the feeding of a high-fat diet in C57BL/6J mice, in comparison with WPI.

  19. Sirt1 is involved in decreased bone formation in aged apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Xu, Xiao-ya; Qiu, Zhao-hui; Gao, Jian-jun; Wei, Zhan-ying; Zhen, Li; Zhang, Xiao-li; Ye, Zhi-bing

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plays an important role in the transport and metabolism of lipids. Recent studies show that bone mass is increased in young apoE−/− mice. In this study we investigated the bone phenotype and metabolism in aged apoE−/− mice. Methods: Femurs and tibias were collected from 18- and 72-week-old apoE−/− mice and their age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates, and examined using micro-CT and histological analysis. Serum levels of total cholesterol, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and bone turnover markers were measured. Cultured bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from tibias and femurs of 18-week-old apoE−/− mice were used in experiments in vitro. The expression levels of Sirt1 and Runx2 in bone tissue and BMSCs were measured using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results: Compared with age-matched WT littermates, young apoE−/− mice exhibited high bone mass with increased bone formation, accompanied by higher serum levels of bone turnover markers OCN and TRAP5b, and higher expression levels of Sirt1, Runx2, ALP and OCN in bone tissue. In contrast, aged apoE−/− mice showed reduced bone formation and lower bone mass relative to age-matched WT mice, accompanied by lower serum OCN levels, and markedly reduced expression levels of Sirt1, Runx2, ALP and OCN in bone tissue. After BMSCs were exposed to ox-LDL (20 μg/mL), the expression of Sirt1 and Runx2 proteins was significantly increased at 12 h, and then decreased at 72 h. Treatment with the Sirt1 inhibitor EX527 (10 μmol/L) suppressed the expression of Runx2, ALP and OCN in BMSCs. Conclusion: In contrast to young apoE−/− mice, aged apoE−/− mice showe lower bone mass than age-matched WT mice. Long-lasting exposure to ox-LDL decreases the expression of Sirt1 and Runx2 in BMSCs, which may explain the decreased bone formation in aged apoE−/− mice. PMID:26592520

  20. Age-related dystrophic changes in corneal endothelium from DNA repair-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Roh, Danny S; Du, Yiqin; Gabriele, Michelle L; Robinson, Andria R; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Funderburgh, James L

    2013-12-01

    The corneal endothelium (CE) is a single layer of cells lining the posterior face of the cornea providing metabolic functions essential for maintenance of corneal transparency. Adult CE cells lack regenerative potential, and the number of CE cells decreases throughout life. To determine whether endogenous DNA damage contributes to the age-related spontaneous loss of CE, we characterized CE in Ercc1(-/Δ) mice, which have impaired capacity to repair DNA damage and age prematurely. Eyes from 4.5- to 6-month-old Ercc1(-/Δ) mice, age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates, and old WT mice (24- to 34-month-old) were compared by spectral domain optical coherence tomography and corneal confocal microscopy. Histopathological changes in CE were further identified in paraffin tissue sections, whole-mount immunostaining, and scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The CE of old WT mice displayed polymorphism and polymegathism, polyploidy, decreased cell density, increased cell size, increases in Descemet's thickness, and the presence of posterior projections originating from the CE toward the anterior chamber, similar to changes documented for aging human corneas. Similar changes were observed in young adult Ercc1(-/Δ) mice CE, demonstrating spontaneous premature aging of the CE of these DNA repair-deficient mice. CD45(+) immune cells were associated with the posterior surface of CE from Ercc1(-/Δ) mice and the tissue expressed increased IL-1α, Cxcl2, and TNFα, pro-inflammatory proteins associated with senescence-associated secretory phenotype. These data provide strong experimental evidence that DNA damage can promote aging of the CE and that Ercc1(-/Δ) mice offer a rapid and accurate model to study CE pathogenesis and therapy.

  1. Age-related dystrophic changes in corneal endothelium from DNA repair–deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Danny S.; Du, Yiqin; Gabriele, Michelle L.; Robinson, Andria R.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Funderburgh, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The corneal endothelium (CE) is a single layer of cells lining the posterior face of the cornea providing metabolic functions essential for maintenance of corneal transparency. Adult CE cells lack regenerative potential, and the number of CE cells decreases throughout life. To determine whether endogenous DNA damage contributes to the age-related spontaneous loss of CE, we characterized CE in Ercc1−/Δ mice, which have impaired capacity to repair DNA damage and age prematurely. Eyes from 4.5- to 6-month-old Ercc1−/Δ mice, age-matched wild-type (WT) litter-mates, and old WT mice (24- to 34-month-old) were compared by spectral domain optical coherence tomography and corneal confocal microscopy. Histopathological changes in CE were further identified in paraffin tissue sections, whole-mount immunostaining, and scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The CE of old WT mice displayed polymorphism and polymegathism, polyploidy, decreased cell density, increased cell size, increases in Descemet’s thickness, and the presence of posterior projections originating from the CE toward the anterior chamber, similar to changes documented for aging human corneas. Similar changes were observed in young adult Ercc1−/Δ mice CE, demonstrating spontaneous premature aging of the CE of these DNA repair–deficient mice. CD45+ immune cells were associated with the posterior surface of CE from Ercc1−/Δ mice and the tissue expressed increased IL-1α, Cxcl2, and TNFα, proinflammatory proteins associated with senescence-associated secretory phenotype. These data provide strong experimental evidence that DNA damage can promote aging of the CE and that Ercc1−/Δ mice offer a rapid and accurate model to study CE pathogenesis and therapy. PMID:23927039

  2. Betaine improved adipose tissue function in mice fed a high-fat diet: a mechanism for hepatoprotective effect of betaine in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhigang; Yao, Tong; Pini, Maria; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Song, Zhenyuan

    2010-05-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction, featured by insulin resistance and/or dysregulated adipokine production, plays a central role not only in disease initiation but also in the progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Promising beneficial effects of betaine supplementation on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have been reported in both clinical investigations and experimental studies; however, data related to betaine therapy in NAFLD are still limited. In this study, we examined the effects of betaine supplementation on hepatic fat accumulation and injury in mice fed a high-fat diet and evaluated mechanisms underlying its hepatoprotective effects. Male C57BL/6 mice weighing 25 +/- 0.5 (SE) g were divided into four groups (8 mice/group) and started on one of four treatments: control diet, control diet supplemented with betaine, high-fat diet, and high-fat diet supplemented with betaine. Betaine was supplemented in the drinking water at a concentration of 1% (wt/vol) (anhydrous). Our results showed that long-term high-fat feeding caused NAFLD in mice, which was manifested by excessive neutral fat accumulation in the liver and elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase levels. Betaine supplementation alleviated hepatic pathological changes, which were concomitant with attenuated insulin resistance as shown by improved homeostasis model assessment of basal insulin resistance values and glucose tolerance test, and corrected abnormal adipokine (adiponectin, resistin, and leptin) productions. Specifically, betaine supplementation enhanced insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue as shown by improved extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and protein kinase B activations. In adipocytes freshly isolated from mice fed a high-fat diet, pretreatment of betaine enhanced the insulin signaling pathway and improved adipokine productions. Further investigation using whole liver tissues revealed that betaine supplementation alleviated the high-fat diet

  3. Protonated nanostructured aluminosilicate (NSAS) reduces plasma cholesterol concentrations and atherosclerotic lesions in Apolipoprotein E deficient mice fed a high cholesterol and high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Sivak, Olena; Darlington, Jerry; Gershkovich, Pavel; Constantinides, Panayiotis P; Wasan, Kishor M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of chronic administration of protonated nanostructured aluminosilicate (NSAS) on the plasma cholesterol levels and development of atherosclerotic lesions in Apolipoprotein (ApoE) deficient mice fed a high cholesterol and high fat diet. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) deficient mice were divided into the following treatment groups: protonated NSAS 1.4% (w/w), untreated control and 2% (w/w) stigmastanol mixed with high-cholesterol/high-fat diet. Animals were treated for 12 weeks, blood samples were withdrawn every 4 weeks for determination of plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. At the end of the study the aortic roots were harvested for assessment of atherosclerotic lesions. NSAS at 1.4% (w/w) and stigmastanol at 2% (w/w) treatment groups showed significant decreases in plasma cholesterol concentrations at all time points relative to the control animals. The lesion sum area in 1.4% (w/w) NSAS and 2% (w/w) stigmastanol groups were significantly less from the control animals. In conclusion, in this study, the effectiveness of chronic administration of protonated NSAS material in the reduction of plasma cholesterol levels and decrease in development of atherosclerotic lesions was demonstrated in Apo-E deficient mice model. PMID:19638223

  4. Green tea extract supplementation induces the lipolytic pathway, attenuates obesity, and reduces low-grade inflammation in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Cláudio A; Lira, Fábio S; Rosa Neto, José C; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Souza, Gabriel I H; da Silva, Camila Morais Gonçalves; de Souza, Cláudio T; Ribeiro, Eliane B; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia M; Rodrigues, Bruno; de Oliveira Carvalho, Patrícia; Oyama, Lila M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of green tea Camellia sinensis extract on proinflammatory molecules and lipolytic protein levels in adipose tissue of diet-induced obese mice. Animals were randomized into four groups: CW (chow diet and water); CG (chow diet and water + green tea extract); HW (high-fat diet and water); HG (high-fat diet and water + green tea extract). The mice were fed ad libitum with chow or high-fat diet and concomitantly supplemented (oral gavage) with 400 mg/kg body weight/day of green tea extract (CG and HG, resp.). The treatments were performed for eight weeks. UPLC showed that in 10 mg/mL green tea extract, there were 15 μg/mg epigallocatechin, 95 μg/mg epigallocatechin gallate, 20.8 μg/mg epicatechin gallate, and 4.9 μg/mg gallocatechin gallate. Green tea administered concomitantly with a high-fat diet increased HSL, ABHD5, and perilipin in mesenteric adipose tissue, and this was associated with reduced body weight and adipose tissue gain. Further, we observed that green tea supplementation reduced inflammatory cytokine TNFα levels, as well as TLR4, MYD88, and TRAF6 proinflammatory signalling. Our results show that green tea increases the lipolytic pathway and reduces adipose tissue, and this may explain the attenuation of low-grade inflammation in obese mice.

  5. Aerobic endurance training improves nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) features via miR-33 dependent autophagy induction in high fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Ghareghani, Parvin; Shanaki, Mehrnoosh; Ahmadi, Saeideh; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Rezvan, Neda; Meshkani, Reza; Delfan, Maryam; Gorgani-Firuzjaee, Sattar

    2017-02-02

    Due to changes in life style, obesity and obesity related complication such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease caused worldwide health problems. Regular exercise has been frequently prescribed to combat metabolic complication of obesity but its molecular mechanism has not been fully illustrated. We investigated molecular mechanism of lipid lowering effect of exercise training in high fat diet fed mice by focusing on miR-33 expression and autophagy pathway. 24 mice were assigned to normal chow (NC) (n=8), high-fat diet (HFD) (n=16) group and subjected to NC and HFD for 13-weeks. HFD groups were divided to sedentary (HFD n=8) or continuous endurance training (HFD+CET, n=8) subgroups. The HFD+CET mice were subjected to treadmill running for 10-weeks in 23-week HFD course. HFD increased body weight, fasting blood sugar, triglyceride, cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), liver lipogenic genes expression and reduced miR-33 mRNA expression and autopahgy pathway while training program reversed them. Exogenous miR-33 mimic sequence induced autophagy and reduced lipogenesis in HepG2 cells. Autophagy induction by rapamycin reduced lipogenesis and autophagy inhibition by chloroquine, enhanced lipogenesis in HepG2 cells. These findings suggest that aerobic exercise training as a non-pharmacological therapy exerts its lipid lowering effects by miR-33 dependent autophagy induction.

  6. Restoration of Retarded Influenza Virus-specific Immunoglobulin Class Switch in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongxin; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Monica; Liu, Lin; Mbawuike, Innocent N

    2016-01-01

    Objective The declined immune response to infection causes significant higher morbidity and mortality in aging in spite of the coexisted hyperimmunoglobulinemia (HIG). This study is to reveal the cellular basis of HIG and mechanism of weakened HA-specific IgG response in aged mice and to test cell therapy in the treatment of age-related IgG antibody production deficiency with immunocyte adoptive transfer. Methods BALB/c mice was immunized with Influenza A/Taiwan vaccine and challenged with the same strain of virus. ELISA was used to assess the levels of total immunoglobulins and antigen specific antibody response. The flow cytometry and ELISPOT were used to evaluate the frequencies of total immunoglobulin- and specific antibody-producing and secreting B lymphocytes. In vitro expanded mononuclear cells, CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD20+ B lymphocytes from old and young mice were adoptively transferred into influenza virus-challenged aged mice, and HA-specific IgG responses were observed. Results It is found that old mice exhibited higher levels of total serum IgG, IgM and IgA, higher frequencies of IgG+, IgM+ and IgA+ cells, and greater antigen-specific IgM and IgA responses to influenza infection, in comparison to young mice. However, influenza antigen- specific IgG and its subclass responses in old mice were significantly lower. Conclusion The retarded specific IgG response could be attributed to an insufficiency of immunoglobulin class switch in aging. Correlation analysis indicated that HIG and deficient specific IgG production in aged mice could be independent to each other in their pathogenesis. Correction of deficient specific IgG production by adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded and unexpanded CD4+ cells from immunized young mice suggests the CD4+ cell dysfunction contributes to the insufficiency of immunoglobulin class switch in aged mice. The transfusion of in vitro expanded lymphocytes could be a potential effective therapy for the age

  7. Inclusion of tallow and soybean oil to calf starters fed to dairy calves from birth to four months of age on calf performance and digestion.

    PubMed

    Hill, T M; Bateman, H G; Aldrich, J M; Quigley, J D; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2015-07-01

    Energy demands for calves can increase during periods of heat and cold stress. One way to potentially increase energy intake is to increase the energy density of the feed with fat. Trial 1a compared a control starter with no added fat or oil (CON) to starters with 2% tallow (TAL) and 2% soybean oil (SBO). Starters were 20% crude protein (CP) and 45 to 47% starch. Male Holstein calves that were initially 3 to 5d of age were fed a 27% CP, 17% fat milk replacer at 0.66kg of dry matter daily and fully weaned by 42d of a 56-d trial. Trial 1b estimated the digestion of the diets (employed chromic oxide as an indigestible digesta flow marker) using a subset of 5 weaned calves per treatment between d 52 and 56. Trial 2 used Holstein calves initially 59 to 61d of age fed starters CON and SBO blended with 5% chopped grass hay over a 56-d trial. Trial 3 used Holstein calves initially 59 to 61d of age fed starters CON and TAL blended with 5% chopped grass hay over a 56-d trial. Treatments were compared using repeated measures (where appropriate) in a completely randomized design. In trials 1a and 1b, preplanned contrasts compared CON versus TAL and CON versus SBO. Compared with CON, calves fed SBO had reduced starter intake, average daily gain, and digestion of dry matter, organic matter, and CP before 8wk of age. Compared with CON, calves fed SBO had reduced average daily gain and change in hip width from 2 to 4 mo of age. Compared with CON, calves fed TAL had reduced average daily gain and tended to have reduced change in hip width from 2 to 4 mo of age. Calculated metabolizable energy intake was not increased in any trial by added fat or oil. Tallow and soybean oil inclusion at 2% of the starter feed was not advantageous for calf growth before 4 mo of age.

  8. Effect of age and caloric restriction on bleomycin-chelatable and nonheme iron in different tissues of C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Sohal, R S; Wennberg-Kirch, E; Jaiswal, K; Kwong, L K; Forster, M J

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the widely observed age-associated increase in the amounts of macromolecular oxidative damage is due to an elevation in the availability of redox-active iron, that is believed to catalyze the scission of H2O2 to generate the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Concentrations of bleomycin-chelatable iron and nonheme iron were measured in various tissues and different regions of the brain of mice fed on ad libitum (AL) or a calorically restricted (to 60% of AL) diet at different ages. The concentrations of these two pools of iron varied markedly as a function of tissue, age, and caloric intake. There was no consistent ratio between the amounts of nonheme and the bleomycin-chelatable iron pools across these conditions. Nonheme iron concentration increased with age in the liver, kidney, heart, striatum, hippocampus, midbrain and cerebellum of AL animals, whereas bleomycin-chelatable iron increased significantly with age only in the liver. Amounts of both nonheme and bleomycin-chelatable iron remained unaltered during aging in the cerebral cortex and hindbrain of AL mice. Caloric restriction had no effect on iron concentration in the brain or heart, but caused a marked increase in the concentration of both bleomycin-chelatable and nonheme iron in the liver and the kidney. The results do not support the hypothesis that accumulation of oxidative damage with age, or its attenuation by CR, are associated with corresponding variations in redox-active iron.

  9. (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL: a GLP-1 agonist that improves hippocampal neurogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and β-cell function in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Rachael; Porter, David W; Flatt, Peter R; Gault, Victor A

    2013-04-01

    This study examined the biological properties of a novel GLP-1 peptide, (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL, engineered with an Ala(8)→Val(8) substitution and additional incorporation of a C(16) fatty acid moiety at Lys(26) via a glutamic acid linker. GLP-1 underwent 75 % degradation by DPP-IV over 8 h, whereas (Val(8))GLP-1 and (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL remained intact. All GLP-1 peptides significantly stimulated insulin secretion at 5.6 mM (1.3- to 4.9-fold, p<0.01 to p<0.001) and 16.7 mM glucose (1.5- to 2.3-fold, p<0.001). At higher concentrations (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL was significantly more potent at stimulating insulin secretion (1.2- to 1.3-fold, p<0.05). In high-fat-fed mice, all GLP-1 peptides significantly lowered plasma glucose concentrations (41-66 % decrease, p<0.05 to p<0.001), with (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL eliciting protracted glucose-lowering actions (32-59 % decrease, p<0.05 to p<0.01) when administered 8 h prior to a glucose load. Twice-daily administration of (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL in high-fat-fed mice for 21 days had no effect on bodyweight or food intake, but significantly lowered non-fasting plasma glucose (43-46 % decrease, p<0.05). (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL markedly decreased glycemic excursion following intraperitoneal glucose (32-48 % decrease, p<0.05), enhanced insulin response to glucose (2- to 2.3-fold, p<0.05 to p<0.01), and improved insulin sensitivity (25-38 % decrease in plasma glucose, p<0.05). O(2) consumption, CO(2) production, RER, and energy expenditure were not altered by (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL therapy. Treatment with (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL resulted in a significant increase in BrdU-positive cells (1.3-fold, p<0.05) in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. These data demonstrate that (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL is a long-acting GLP-1 peptide that significantly improves hippocampal neurogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and insulin secretion in high-fat-fed mice.

  10. Improved Learning and Memory in Aged Mice Deficient in Amyloid β-Degrading Neutral Endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Thomas; Albrecht, Doris; Becker, Matthias; Schubert, Manja; Kouznetsova, Elena; Wiesner, Burkard; Maul, Björn; Schliebs, Reinhard; Grecksch, Gisela; Furkert, Jens; Sterner-Kock, Anja; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Becker, Axel; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard

    2009-01-01

    Background Neutral endopeptidase, also known as neprilysin and abbreviated NEP, is considered to be one of the key enzymes in initial human amyloid-β (Aβ) degradation. The aim of our study was to explore the impact of NEP deficiency on the initial development of dementia-like symptoms in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that while endogenous Aβ concentrations were elevated in the brains of NEP-knockout mice at all investigated age groups, immunohistochemical analysis using monoclonal antibodies did not detect any Aβ deposits even in old NEP knockout mice. Surprisingly, tests of learning and memory revealed that the ability to learn was not reduced in old NEP-deficient mice but instead had significantly improved, and sustained learning and memory in the aged mice was congruent with improved long-term potentiation (LTP) in brain slices of the hippocampus and lateral amygdala. Our data suggests a beneficial effect of pharmacological inhibition of cerebral NEP on learning and memory in mice due to the accumulation of peptides other than Aβ degradable by NEP. By conducting degradation studies and peptide measurements in the brain of both genotypes, we identified two neuropeptide candidates, glucagon-like peptide 1 and galanin, as first potential candidates to be involved in the improved learning in aged NEP-deficient mice. Conclusions/Significance Thus, the existence of peptides targeted by NEP that improve learning and memory in older individuals may represent a promising avenue for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19240795

  11. Age and sex differences in immune response following LPS treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kyle Chiman; van Mil, Spencer; Murray, Emma; Mallet, Jean-François; Matar, Chantal; Ismail, Nafissa

    2016-11-01

    Puberty is an important developmental event that is marked by the reorganizing and remodeling of the brain. Exposure to stress during this critical period of development can have enduring effects on both reproductive and non-reproductive behaviors. The purpose of this study was to investigate age and sex differences in immune response by examining sickness behavior, body temperature changes, and serum cytokine levels following an immune challenge. The effects of circulating gonadal hormones on age and sex differences in immune response were also examined. Results showed that male mice display more sickness behavior and greater fluctuations in body temperature following LPS treatment than female mice. Moreover, adult male mice display more sickness behavior and a greater drop in body temperature following LPS treatment compared to pubertal male mice. Following gonadectomy, pubertal and adult males displayed steeper and prolonged drops in body temperature compared to sham-operated counterparts. Gonadectomy did not eliminate sex differences in LPS-induced body temperature changes, suggesting that additional factors contribute to the observed differences. LPS treatment increased cytokine levels in all mice. However, the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines was higher in adult compared to pubertal mice, while the increase in anti-inflammatory cytokines was greater in pubertal than in adult mice. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of age and sex differences in acute immune response following LPS treatment and possible mechanisms involved in the enduring alterations in behavior and brain function following pubertal exposure to LPS.

  12. Aging enhances liver fibrotic response in mice through hampering extracellular matrix remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Delire, Bénédicte; Lebrun, Valérie; Selvais, Charlotte; Henriet, Patrick; Bertrand, Amélie; Horsmans, Yves; Leclercq, Isabelle A.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical data identify age as a factor for severe liver fibrosis. We evaluate whether and how aging modulates the fibrotic response in a mouse model. Liver fibrosis was induced by CCl4 injections (thrice weekly for 2 weeks) in 7 weeks- and 15 months-old mice (young and old, respectively). Livers were analyzed for fibrosis, inflammation and remodeling 48 and 96 hours after the last injection. Old mice developed more severe fibrosis compared to young ones as evaluated by sirius red morphometry. Expression of pro-fibrogenic genes was equally induced in the two age-groups but enhanced fibrolysis in young mice was demonstrated by a significantly higher Mmp13 induction and collagenase activity. While fibrosis resolution occurred in young mice within 96 hours, no significant fibrosis attenuation was observed in old mice. Although recruitment of monocytes-derived macrophages was similar in young and old livers, young macrophages had globally a remodeling phenotype while old ones, a pro-fibrogenic phenotype. Moreover, we observed a higher proportion of thick fibers and enhanced expression of enzymes involved in collagen maturation in old mice. Conclusion Impaired fibrolysis of a matrix less prone to remodeling associated with a pro-inflammatory phenotype of infiltrated macrophages contribute to a more severe fibrosis in old mice. PMID:27941216

  13. Age-related changes in pial arterial structure and blood flow in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye-Min; Sohn, Inkyung; Jung, Junyang; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cerebral blood flow decreases are thought to deteriorate cognition and cause senescence, although the related mechanism is unclear. To investigate the relationships between aging and changes in cerebral blood flow and vasculature, we obtained fluorescence images of young (2-month-old) and old (12-month-old) mice using indocyanine green (ICG). First, we found that the blood flow in old mice's brains is lower than that in young mice and that old mice had more curved pial arteries and fewer pial artery junctions than young mice. Second, using Western blotting, we determined that the ratio of collagen to elastin (related to cerebral vascular wall distensibility) increased with age. Finally, we found that the peak ICG intensity and blood flow index decreased, whereas the mean transit time increased, with age in the middle cerebral artery and superior sagittal sinus. Age-related changes in pial arterial structure and composition, concurrent with the observed changes in the blood flow parameters, suggest that age-related changes in the cerebral vasculature structure and distensibility may induce altered brain blood flow.

  14. Evidence for loss of synaptic AMPA receptors in anterior piriform cortex of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Gocel, James; Larson, John

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that age-related impairments in learning and memory may be due to age-related deficits in long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission. For example, olfactory discrimination learning is significantly affected by aging in mice and this may be due, in part, to diminished synaptic plasticity in piriform cortex. In the present study, we tested for alterations in electrophysiological properties and synaptic transmission in this simple cortical network. Whole-cell recordings were made from principal neurons in slices of anterior piriform cortex from young (3-6 months old) and old (24-28 months) C57Bl/6 mice. Miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) mediated by AMPA receptors were collected from cells in presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and held at -80 mV in voltage-clamp. Amplitudes of mEPSCs were significantly reduced in aged mice, suggesting that synaptic AMPA receptor expression is decreased during aging. In a second set of experiments, spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (s/mEPSCs) were recorded in slices from different cohorts of young and old mice, in the absence of TTX. These currents resembled mEPSCs and were similarly reduced in amplitude in old mice. The results represent the first electrophysiological evidence for age-related declines in glutamatergic synaptic function in the mammalian olfactory system.

  15. Homeostatic imbalance between apoptosis and cell renewal in the liver of premature aging Xpd mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Yoon; Cho, Mi-Ook; Leonard, Shanique; Calder, Brent; Mian, I Saira; Kim, Woo Ho; Wijnhoven, Susan; van Steeg, Harry; Mitchell, James; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Cohen, Pinchas; Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin

    2008-06-11

    Unrepaired or misrepaired DNA damage has been implicated as a causal factor in cancer and aging. Xpd(TTD) mice, harboring defects in nucleotide excision repair and transcription due to a mutation in the Xpd gene (R722W), display severe symptoms of premature aging but have a reduced incidence of cancer. To gain further insight into the molecular basis of the mutant-specific manifestation of age-related phenotypes, we used comparative microarray analysis of young and old female livers to discover gene expression signatures distinguishing Xpd(TTD) mice from their age-matched wild type controls. We found a transcription signature of increased apoptosis in the Xpd(TTD) mice, which was confirmed by in situ immunohistochemical analysis and found to be accompanied by increased proliferation. However, apoptosis rate exceeded the rate of proliferation, resulting in homeostatic imbalance. Interestingly, a metabolic response signature was observed involving decreased energy metabolism and reduced IGF-1 signaling, a major modulator of life span. We conclude that while the increased apoptotic response to endogenous DNA damage contributes to the accelerated aging phenotypes and the reduced cancer incidence observed in the Xpd(TTD) mice, the signature of reduced energy metabolism is likely to reflect a compensatory adjustment to limit the increased genotoxic stress in these mutants. These results support a general model for premature aging in DNA repair deficient mice based on cellular responses to DNA damage that impair normal tissue homeostasis.

  16. Aging-associated changes in motor axon voltage-gated Na(+) channel function in mice.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Klein, Dennis; Martini, Rudolf; Krarup, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating myelin abnormalities and conduction slowing occur in peripheral nerves during aging. In mice deficient of myelin protein P0, severe peripheral nervous system myelin damage is associated with ectopic expression of Nav1.8 voltage-gated Na(+) channels on motor axons aggravating the functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular aging on motor axon function with particular emphasis on Nav1.8. We compared tibial nerve conduction and excitability measures by threshold tracking in 12 months (mature) and 20 months (aged) wild-type (WT) mice. With aging, deviations during threshold electrotonus were attenuated and the resting current-threshold slope and early refractoriness were increased. Modeling indicated that, in addition to changes in passive membrane properties, motor fibers in aged WT mice were depolarized. An increased Nav1.8 isoform expression was found by immunohistochemistry. The depolarizing excitability features were absent in Nav1.8 null mice, and they were counteracted in WT mice by a Nav1.8 blocker. Our data suggest that alteration in voltage-gated Na(+) channel isoform expression contributes to changes in motor axon function during aging.

  17. FoxO3 regulates neuronal reprogramming of cells from postnatal and aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahlenius, Henrik; Chanda, Soham; Webb, Ashley E.; Yousif, Issa; Karmazin, Jesse; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Brunet, Anne; Südhof, Thomas C.; Wernig, Marius

    2016-01-01

    We and others have shown that embryonic and neonatal fibroblasts can be directly converted into induced neuronal (iN) cells with mature functional properties. Reprogramming of fibroblasts from adult and aged mice, however, has not yet been explored in detail. The ability to generate fully functional iN cells from aged organisms will be particularly important for in vitro modeling of diseases of old age. Here, we demonstrate production of functional iN cells from fibroblasts that were derived from mice close to the end of their lifespan. iN cells from aged mice had apparently normal active and passive neuronal membrane properties and formed abundant synaptic connections. The reprogramming efficiency gradually decreased with fibroblasts derived from embryonic and neonatal mice, but remained similar for fibroblasts from postnatal mice of all ages. Strikingly, overexpression of a transcription factor, forkhead box O3 (FoxO3), which is implicated in aging, blocked iN cell conversion of embryonic fibroblasts, whereas knockout or knockdown of FoxO3 increased the reprogramming efficiency of adult-derived but not of embryonic fibroblasts and also enhanced functional maturation of resulting iN cells. Hence, FoxO3 has a central role in the neuronal reprogramming susceptibility of cells, and the importance of FoxO3 appears to change during development. PMID:27402759

  18. Intrahippocampal glucocorticoids generated by 11β-HSD1 affect memory in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Yau, Joyce L W; Wheelan, Nicola; Noble, June; Walker, Brian R; Webster, Scott P; Kenyon, Christopher J; Ludwig, Mike; Seckl, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    11Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) locally amplifies active glucocorticoids within specific tissues including in brain. In the hippocampus, 11β-HSD1 messenger RNA increases with aging. Here, we report significantly greater increases in intrahippocampal corticosterone (CORT) levels in aged wild-type (WT) mice during the acquisition and retrieval trials in a Y-maze than age-matched 11β-HSD1(-/-) mice, corresponding to impaired and intact spatial memory, respectively. Acute stress applied to young WT mice led to increases in intrahippocampal CORT levels similar to the effects of aging and impaired retrieval of spatial memory. 11β-HSD1(-/-) mice resisted the stress-induced memory impairment. Pharmacologic inhibition of 11β-HSD1 abolished increases in intrahippocampal CORT levels during the Y-maze trials and prevented spatial memory impairments in aged WT mice. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that dynamic increases in hippocampal 11β-HSD1 regenerated CORT levels during learning and retrieval play a key role in age- and stress-associated impairments of spatial memory.

  19. CD36 expression contributes to age induced cardiomyopathy in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiac remodeling and impaired cardiac performance in the elderly significantly increase the risk of developing heart disease. Although vascular abnormalities associated with aging contribute to the age-related decline in cardiac function, myocardium-specific events may also be involved. We show th...

  20. Impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in ageing aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Biljes, Daniel; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Kadow, Stephanie; Diel, Patrick; Weigt, Carmen; Burkart, Volker; Esser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed homeostasis of glucose and lipid metabolism are dominant features of the so-called metabolic syndrome (MetS) and can increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a severe metabolic disease. T2D prevalence increases with age. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a sensor of small molecules including dietary components. AHR has been identified as potential regulator of glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Epidemiologically, exposure to xenobiotic AHR ligands such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is linked to T2D. We assess here the potential role of the AHR in disturbances of glucose and lipid metabolism in young (age 2-5 months) and old (age > 1,5 years) AHR-deficient (AHR KO) mice. Fasted young wildtype (WT) and AHR-KO mice displayed similar blood glucose kinetics after challenge with intra-peritoneal glucose injection. However, old AHR-KO mice showed lower tolerance than WT to i.p. administered glucose, i.e. glucose levels rose higher and returned more slowly to normal levels. Old mice had overall higher insulin levels than young mice, and old AHR-KO had a somewhat disturbed insulin kinetic in the serum after glucose challenge. Surprisingly, young AHR-KO mice had significantly lower triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein values than WT, i.e., a dyslipidemic profile. With ageing, AHR-KO and WT mice did not differ in these lipid levels, except for slightly reduced levels of triglycerides and cholesterol. In conclusion, our findings in AHR KO mice suggest that AHR expression is relevant for the maintenance of glucose and lipid homeostasis in old mice. PMID:26664351

  1. Longitudinal Attentional Engagement Rescues Mice from Age-Related Cognitive Declines and Cognitive Inflexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matzel, Louis D.; Light, Kenneth R.; Wass, Christopher; Colas-Zelin, Danielle; Denman-Brice, Alexander; Waddel, Adam C.; Kolata, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Learning, attentional, and perseverative deficits are characteristic of cognitive aging. In this study, genetically diverse CD-1 mice underwent longitudinal training in a task asserted to tax working memory capacity and its dependence on selective attention. Beginning at 3 mo of age, animals were trained for 12 d to perform in a dual radial-arm…

  2. Age-dependent inhibition of pentobarbital sleeping time by ozone in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, A.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Leonard, D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of age on the metabolism of pentobarbital in mice and rats was investigated following exposure to 0.3 ppm of ozone for 3.75 hr. Young animals were 2.5 months of age and the mature were 18 months. The pentobarbital sleeping time was significantly prolonged following the ozone exposure in both the mice and rats when compared with an air control. No ozone effect on sleeping time was found in the young animals. The results indicate that there may be an age-related sensitivity to the occurrence of ozone-related inhibition of pentobarbital metabolism.

  3. Fat-specific Dicer deficiency accelerates aging and mitigates several effects of dietary restriction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Felipe C. G.; Branquinho, Jéssica L. O.; Brandão, Bruna B.; Guerra, Beatriz A.; Silva, Ismael D.; Frontini, Andrea; Thomou, Thomas; Sartini, Loris; Cinti, Saverio; Kahn, C. Ronald; Festuccia, William T.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mori, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Aging increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, and this can be prevented by dietary restriction (DR). We have previously shown that DR inhibits the downregulation of miRNAs and their processing enzymes - mainly Dicer - that occurs with aging in mouse white adipose tissue (WAT). Here we used fat-specific Dicer knockout mice (AdicerKO) to understand the contributions of adipose tissue Dicer to the metabolic effects of aging and DR. Metabolomic data uncovered a clear distinction between the serum metabolite profiles of Lox control and AdicerKO mice, with a notable elevation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in AdicerKO. These profiles were associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and increased lactate in WAT of AdicerKO mice and were accompanied by structural and functional changes in mitochondria, particularly under DR. AdicerKO mice displayed increased mTORC1 activation in WAT and skeletal muscle, where Dicer expression is not affected. This was accompanied by accelerated age-associated insulin resistance and premature mortality. Moreover, DR-induced insulin sensitivity was abrogated in AdicerKO mice. This was reverted by rapamycin injection, demonstrating that insulin resistance in AdicerKO mice is caused by mTORC1 hyperactivation. Our study evidences a DR-modulated role for WAT Dicer in controlling metabolism and insulin resistance. PMID:27241713

  4. Adverse Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on the Skeleton of Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Ardura, Juan Antonio; Lozano, Daniel; Bolívar, Oskarina Hernández; López-Herradón, Ana; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Irene; Proctor, Alexander; van der Eerden, Bram; Schreuders-Koedam, Marijke; van Leeuwen, Johannes; Alcaraz, María José; Mulero, Francisca; de la Fuente, Mónica; Esbrit, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the possibility that a diabetic (DM) status might worsen age-related bone deterioration was explored in mice. Male CD-1 mice aged 2 (young control group) or 16 months, nondiabetic or made diabetic by streptozotocin injections, were used. DM induced a decrease in bone volume, trabecular number, and eroded surface, and in mineral apposition and bone formation rates, but an increased trabecular separation, in L1-L3 vertebrae of aged mice. Three-point bending and reference point indentation tests showed slight changes pointing to increased frailty and brittleness in the mouse tibia of diabetic old mice. DM was related to a decreased expression of both vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor 2, which paralleled that of femoral vasculature, and increased expression of the pro-adipogenic gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and adipocyte number, without affecting β-catenin pathway in old mouse bone. Concomitant DM in old mice failed to affect total glutathione levels or activity of main anti-oxidative stress enzymes, although xanthine oxidase was slightly increased, in the bone marrow, but increased the senescence marker caveolin-1 gene. In conclusion, DM worsens bone alterations of aged mice, related to decreased bone turnover and bone vasculature and increased senescence, independently of the anti-oxidative stress machinery.

  5. Suppression of the aging-associated decline in physical performance by a combination of resveratrol intake and habitual exercise in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Murase, Takatoshi; Haramizu, Satoshi; Ota, Noriyasu; Hase, Tadashi

    2009-08-01

    The decline in physical performance with increasing age is a crucial problem in our aging society. We examined the effects of resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound present in grapes, in combination with habitual exercise on the aging-associated decline in physical performance in senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP1). The endurance capacity of SAMP1 mice undergoing an exercise regimen (SAMP1-Ex) decreased over 12 weeks whereas that of SAMP1 mice fed 0.2% (w/w) resveratrol along with exercise (SAMP1-ExRes) remained significantly higher. In the SAMP1-ExRes group, there was a significant increase in oxygen consumption and skeletal muscle mRNA levels of mitochondrial function-related enzymes. These results suggest that the intake of resveratrol, together with habitual exercise, is beneficial for suppressing the aging-related decline in physical performance and that these effects are attributable, at least in part, to improved mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle.

  6. Frequency analysis of functional immunoglobulin C- and V-gene expression by mitogen-reactive B cells in germfree mice fed chemically defined ultra-filtered "antigen-free" diet.

    PubMed

    Hooijkaas, H; van der Linde-Preesman, A A; Bitter, W M; Benner, R; Pleasants, J R; Wostmann, B S

    1985-04-01

    The frequencies of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-reactive B cells and their antibody specificity repertoire have been determined in the spleen and bone marrow (BM) of conventional (CV) and "antigen-free" C3H/HeCr mice of various ages. The antigen-free mice were germfree (GF)-raised and were fed an ultrafiltered solution of chemically defined (CD) low m.w. nutrients, and were thus devoid of exogenous antigenic stimulation. Spleen and BM cells were grown in a limiting dilution culture system that allows the growth and development of every newly formed LPS-reactive B cell into a clone of IgM-secreting cells which are capable of switching to other immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain isotypes (C-gene expression). The secretion of IgM and IgG1 was determined in the protein A plaque assay, whereas specific IgM antibody-secreting cells (V-gene expression) were detected in plaque assays specific for various heterologous erythrocytes and sheep red blood cells (SRBC) coupled with a number of different haptens. The absolute frequency of LPS-reactive B cells and their capacity to switch to IgG1-secretion was not significantly different in 8- to 12-wk-old and 52-wk-old GF-CD mice and their age-matched CV controls. Moreover, no differences were observed in the frequencies of antigen-specific B cells within the pool of LPS reactive B cells. These frequencies ranged from 1 in 20 to 1 in 50 for NIP4-SRBC and NNP2-SRBC, from 1 in 100 to 1 in 150 for NIP0.4-SRBC, from 1 in 50 to 1 in 100 for TNP30-SRBC, and from 1 in 1000 to 1 in 2000 for SRBC and horse red blood cells. Within the limitations of having determined the switching capacity of IgM to IgG1 only and having assessed only a minor fraction of the total B cell antibody-specificity repertoire, the data indicate that young and old GF-CD mice, although devoid of exogenous antigenic and/or mitogenic stimulation, generate B cells with a similar switching capacity and a similar IgM antibody specificity repertoire as CV mice.

  7. Tooth loss early in life accelerates age-related bone deterioration in mice.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Minori; Kondo, Hiroko; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Tamura, Yasuo; Chen, Huayue; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01

    Both osteoporosis and tooth loss are health concerns that affect many older people. Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disease of the elderly, characterized by low bone mass and microstructural deterioration of bone tissue. Chronic mild stress is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Many studies showed that tooth loss induced neurological alterations through activation of a stress hormone, corticosterone, in mice. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that tooth loss early in life may accelerate age-related bone deterioration using a mouse model. Male senescence-accelerated mouse strain P8 (SAMP8) mice were randomly divided into control and toothless groups. Removal of the upper molar teeth was performed at one month of age. Bone response was evaluated at 2, 5 and 9 months of age. Tooth loss early in life caused a significant increase in circulating corticosterone level with age. Osteoblast bone formation was suppressed and osteoclast bone resorption was activated in the toothless mice. Trabecular bone volume fraction of the vertebra and femur was decreased in the toothless mice with age. The bone quality was reduced in the toothless mice at 5 and 9 months of age, compared with the age-matched control mice. These findings indicate that tooth loss early in life impairs the dynamic homeostasis of the bone formation and bone resorption, leading to reduced bone strength with age. Long-term tooth loss may have a cumulative detrimental effect on bone health. It is important to take appropriate measures to treat tooth loss in older people for preventing and/or treating senile osteoporosis.

  8. Measuring aging rates of mice subjected to caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Jacob J E; van Heemst, Diana; van Bodegom, David; Bonkowski, Michael S; Sun, Liou Y; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling have been shown to counteract aging in mice. The effects of these interventions on aging are examined through age-dependent survival or through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale fitted to the Gompertz model. However, these methods have limitations that impede a fully comprehensive disclosure of these effects. Here we examine the effects of these interventions on murine aging through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale without fitting them to a model like the Gompertz model. Whereas these interventions negligibly and non-consistently affected the aging rates when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale, they caused the aging rates to increase at higher ages and to higher levels when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale. These results add to the debate whether these interventions postpone or slow aging and to the understanding of the mechanisms by which they affect aging. Since different methods yield different results, it is worthwhile to compare their results in future research to obtain further insights into the effects of dietary, genetic, and other interventions on the aging of mice and other species.

  9. Measuring aging rates of mice subjected to caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Jacob J.E.; van Heemst, Diana; van Bodegom, David; Bonkowski, Michael S.; Sun, Liou Y.; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling have been shown to counteract aging in mice. The effects of these interventions on aging are examined through age-dependent survival or through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale fitted to the Gompertz model. However, these methods have limitations that impede a fully comprehensive disclosure of these effects. Here we examine the effects of these interventions on murine aging through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale without fitting them to a model like the Gompertz model. Whereas these interventions negligibly and non-consistently affected the aging rates when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale, they caused the aging rates to increase at higher ages and to higher levels when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale. These results add to the debate whether these interventions postpone or slow aging and to the understanding of the mechanisms by which they affect aging. Since different methods yield different results, it is worthwhile to compare their results in future research to obtain further insights into the effects of dietary, genetic, and other interventions on the aging of mice and other species. PMID:26959761

  10. Effect of age on testicular germ cell apoptosis and sperm aneuploidy in MF-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, M H; Schmid, T E

    2003-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation rate in the male germ-line increases with age. The reason for this is unknown, but presumably involves an age-related degeneration in the efficacy of cellular processes. To investigate the possibility that rates of apoptosis and genetic damage (represented by aneuploidy) might vary with age in mice, the testes and sperm of 2- and 12-month-old male MF-1 mice were examined by a modified TUNEL technique and 3-colour sperm-FISH assay, respectively. Sperm were labeled with probes to chromosomes 8, X and Y and 20,000 sperm scored from each of 5 animals per group. A significant increase in gonosomal disomy was found in the aged mice, especially X-X-8. This suggests that advanced paternal age is associated primarily with meiosis II rather than meiosis I disjunction errors. Neither diploidy nor autosomal disomy was affected in the older group. The rate of germ cell apoptosis (apoptotic cells per seminiferous tubule cross-section per animal per group) was higher in the old mice than controls, but not significantly. Considerable inter-animal variability was observed in the older group. The finding of an increase in levels of sperm aneuploidy is novel for 1-year-old mice and confirms the genotoxic effect of ageing in mice. Since apoptosis is assumed to eliminate cells with unrepaired damage, it may be that the apoptotic response in older mice is compromised, resulting in the higher levels of aneuploidy in sperm. However, given the inter-animal variability in testicular germ cell apoptosis, this awaits confirmation.

  11. Peripheral surgical wounding may induce cognitive impairment through interlukin-6-dependent mechanisms in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Xu, Zhipeng; Huang, Lining; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with morbidity, mortality and increased cost of medical care. However, the neuropathogenesis and targeted interventions of POCD remain largely to be determined. We have found that the peripheral surgical wounding induces an age-dependent Aβ accumulation, neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pro-inflammatory cytokine interlukin-6 (IL-6) has been reported to be associated with cognitive impairment in rodents and humans. However, the role of IL-6 in the neuropathogenesis of POCD is unknown. We therefore employed pharmacological (IL-6 antibody) and genetic (knockout of IL-6) approach to investigate whether IL-6 contributed to the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in aged mice. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia (peripheral surgical wounding) was established in 18-month-old wild-type and IL-6 knockout mice (n = 6 to 10 in each group). Brain level of IL-6 and cognitive function in the mice were determined by western blot, ELISA at the end of procedure, and Fear Conditioning System at 7 days after the procedure. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the level of IL-6 in the hippocampus of aged wild-type, but not IL-6 knockout mice. IL-6 antibody ameliorated the per