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Sample records for aged pah-contaminated soil

  1. Long-term assessment of natural attenuation: statistical approach on soils with aged PAH contamination.

    PubMed

    Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Chenot, Elodie-Denise; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Schwartz, Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Natural attenuation processes valorization for PAH-contaminated soil remediation has gained increasing interest from site owners. A misunderstanding of this method and a small amount of data available does not encourage its development. However, monitored natural attenuation (MNA) offers a valuable, cheaper and environmentally friendly alternative to more classical options such as physico-chemical treatments (e.g., chemical oxidation, thermal desorption). The present work proposes the results obtained during a long-term natural attenuation assessment of historically contaminated industrial soils under real climatic conditions. This study was performed after a 10 year natural attenuation period on 60 off-ground lysimeters filled with contaminated soils from different former industrial sites (coking industry, manufactured gas plants) whose initial concentration of PAH varied between 380 and 2,077 mg kg(-1). The analysed parameters included leached water characterization, soil PAH concentrations, evaluation of vegetation cover quality and quantity. Results showed a good efficiency of the PAH dissipation and limited transfer of contaminants to the environment. It also highlighted the importance of the fine soil fractions in controlling PAH reactivity. PAH dissipation through water leaching was limited and did not present a significant risk for the environment. This PAH water concentration appeared however as a good indicator of overall dissipation rate, thereby illustrating the importance of pollutant availability in predicting its degradation potential.

  2. Comparison of the effectiveness of soil heating prior or during in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of aged PAH-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Ranc, Bérénice; Faure, Pierre; Croze, Véronique; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Simonnot, Marie-Odile

    2017-03-15

    Thermal treatments prior or during chemical oxidation of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils have already shown their ability to increase oxidation effectiveness. However, they were never compared on the same soil. Furthermore, oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (O-PACs), by-products of PAH oxidation which may be more toxic and mobile than the parent PAHs, were very little monitored. In this study, two aged PAH-contaminated soils were heated prior (60 or 90 °C under Ar for 1 week) or during oxidation (60 °C for 1 week) with permanganate and persulfate, and 11 O-PACs were monitored in addition to the 16 US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) PAHs. Oxidant doses were based on the stoichiometric oxidant demand of the extractable organic fraction of soils by using organic solvents, which is more representative of the actual contamination than only the 16 US EPA PAHs. Higher temperatures actually resulted in more pollutant degradation. Two treatments were about three times more effective than the others: soil heating to 60 °C during persulfate oxidation and soil preheating to 90 °C followed by permanganate oxidation. The results of this study showed that persulfate effectiveness was largely due to its thermal activation, whereas permanganate was more sensitive to PAH availability than persulfate. The technical feasibility of these two treatments will soon be field-tested in the unsaturated zone of one of the studied aged PAH-contaminated soils.

  3. Effects of soil amendment with different carbon sources and other factors on the bioremediation of an aged PAH-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ying; Luo, Yongming; Ping, Lifeng; Zou, Dexun; Li, Zhengao; Christie, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Carbon supplementation, soil moisture and soil aeration are believed to enhance in situ bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils by stimulating the growth of indigenous microorganisms. However, the effects of added carbon and nitrogen together with soil moisture and soil aeration on the dissipation of PAHs and on associated microbial counts have yet to be fully assessed. In this study the effects on bioremediation of carbon source, carbon-to-nitrogen ratio, soil moisture and aeration on an aged PAH-contaminated agricultural soil were studied in microcosms over a 90-day period. Additions of starch, glucose and sodium succinate increased soil bacterial and fungal counts and accelerated the dissipation of phenanthrene and benzo(a)pyrene in soil. Decreases in phenanthrene and benzo(a)pyrene concentrations were effective in soil supplemented with glucose and sodium succinate (both 0.2 g C kg(-1) dry soil) and starch (1.0 g C kg(-1) dry soil). The bioremediation effect at a C/N ratio of 10:1 was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than at a C/N of either 25:1 or 40:1. Soil microbial counts and PAH dissipation were lower in the submerged soil but soil aeration increased bacterial and fungal counts, enhanced indigenous microbial metabolic activities, and accelerated the natural degradation of phenanthrene and benzo(a)pyrene. The results suggest that optimizing carbon source, C/N ratio, soil moisture and aeration conditions may be a feasible remediation strategy in certain PAH contaminated soils with large active microbial populations.

  4. [Interactive effect of spent mushroom compost and rhamnolipids to enhance the efficiency of alfalfa remediation of aged PAHs contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lin, Xian-Gui; Li, Xuan-Zhen; Yin, Rui

    2010-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of the most widespread organic pollutants, which distributed widely in soil and sediment. Pot experiment was conducted to improve efficiency of phytoremediation using alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in aged PAHs contaminated soil by introducing spent mushroom compost and rhamnolipids. Plant biomass, PAHs concentrations, number of soil microorganism, soil enzyme activity and soil microbial functional diversity were determined after 60 days of alfalfa growth. The results showed that within 60 days, removal ratio of PAHs in treatment of alfalfa alone (AL) reached to 14.43%, while removal ratio of PAHs in treatments of "GZ + RH0.5, + AL" and "GZ + RH1.0 + AL" reached to 32.64% and 36.95%, which were 115.45% and 156.06% higher than that of phytoremediation. Contrasted to the control, the treatment of "GZ + RH1.0 + AL" had more plant biomass than others, shoot and root dry weight were 1.05 g/pot and 0.20 g/pot, respectively. During the process of phytoremediation, the number of soil bacteria and fungi were greatly increased by "GZ + RH1.0 + AL" and reached to 31.37 x 10(6) CFU x g(-1) and 5.86 x 10(6) CFU x g(-1), especially the number of PAHs-degrading bacteria reached to 39.57 x 10(5) MPN x g(-1), which were 29 times more than control treatment and 4 times more than treatment of alfalfa alone (AL). Moreover, soil dehydrogenase activity and the functional diversity of soil microbial community were increased significantly by the treatment of "GZ + RH1.0 + AL", respectively. Therefore, interaction of spent mushroom compost and rhamnolipids to enhance the phytoremediation efficiency had satisfied results in removal aged PAHs from an agricultural soil, the feasibility of this method needed to be further proved by large-area scale field experiment.

  5. Impact of clay mineral, wood sawdust or root organic matter on the bacterial and fungal community structures in two aged PAH-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Bongoua-Devisme, Jeanne; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Faure, Pierre; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Parisot, Nicolas; Peyret, Pierre; Leyval, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    The high organic pollutant concentration of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated wasteland soils is highly recalcitrant to biodegradation due to its very low bioavailability. In such soils, the microbial community is well adapted to the pollution, but the microbial activity is limited by nutrient availability. Management strategies could be applied to modify the soil microbial functioning as well as the PAH contamination through various amendment types. The impact of amendment with clay minerals (montmorillonite), wood sawdust and organic matter plant roots on microbial community structure was investigated on two aged PAH-contaminated soils both in laboratory and 1-year on-site pot experiments. Total PAH content (sum of 16 PAHs of the US-EPA list) and polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (pPAC) were monitored as well as the available PAH fraction using the Tenax method. The bacterial and fungal community structures were monitored using fingerprinting thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) method. The abundance of bacteria (16S rRNA genes), fungi (18S rRNA genes) and PAH degraders (PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase and catechol dioxygenase genes) was followed through qPCR assays. Although the treatments did not modify the total and available PAH content, the microbial community density, structure and the PAH degradation potential changed when fresh organic matter was provided as sawdust and under rhizosphere influence, while the clay mineral only increased the percentage of catechol-1,2-dioxygenase genes. The abundance of bacteria and fungi and the percentage of fungi relative to bacteria were enhanced in soil samples supplemented with wood sawdust and in the plant rhizospheric soils. Two distinct fungal populations developed in the two soils supplemented with sawdust, i.e. fungi related to Chaetomium and Neurospora genera and Brachyconidiellopsis and Pseudallescheria genera, in H and NM soils respectively. Wood sawdust amendment favoured the

  6. Ethanol-enhanced bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.H.; Ong, S.K.; Golchin, J.

    1999-07-01

    Bioremediation of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is highly challenging because of the low solubility and strong sorption properties of PAHs to soil organic matter. Two PAH-contaminated soils from former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites were pretreated with ethanol to enhance the bioavailability of PAH compounds. The biodegradation of various PAHs in the pretreated soils was assessed using soil slurry reactor studies. The time needed to degrade 90% of the total PAH in the pretreated soils was at least 5 days faster than soils that were not pretreated with ethanol. A distinctive advantage with the pretreatment of soils with ethanol was the enhanced removal of 4-ring compounds such as chrysene. Approximately 90% of chrysene in the ethanol-treated soils were removed within 15 days while soils without pretreatment needed more than 30 days to obtain similar removal levels. After 35 days of biotreatment in the slurry reactors, approximately 40% of benzo(a)pyrene were removed in the ethanol-treated soils while only 20% were removed in soils not pretreated with ethanol.

  7. Insight into the Modulation of Dissolved Organic Matter on Microbial Remediation of PAH-Contaminated Soils.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue-Mei; Liu, Yu-Rong; Zhang, Li-Mei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2015-08-01

    Microorganisms play a key role in degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environments. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can enhance microbial degradation of PAHs in soils. However, it is not clear how will the soil microbial community respond to addition of DOM during bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils. In this study, DOMs derived from various agricultural wastes were applied to remediate the aging PAH-contaminated soils in a 90-day microcosm experiment. Results showed that the addition of DOMs offered a more efficient and persistent elimination of soil PAHs compared to the control which had no DOM addition. PAH removal effects were different among treatments with various DOMs; the addition of DOMs with high proportion of hydrophobic fraction could remove PAHs more efficiently from the soil. Low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs were more easily eliminated than that with high-molecular-weight (HMW). Addition of DOMs significantly increased abundance of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), pdo1, nah, and C12O genes and obviously changed community compositions of nah and C12O genes in different ways in the PAH-contaminated soil. Phylogenetic analyses of clone libraries exhibited that all of nah sequences and most of C12O sequences were affiliated into Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. These results suggested that external stimuli produced by DOMs could enhance the microbial degradation of PAHs in soils through not only solubilizing PAHs but also altering abundance and composition of indigenous microbial degraders. Our results reinforce the understanding of role of DOMs in mediating degradation of PAHs by microorganims in soils.

  8. LAND TREATMENT OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SOIL: PERFORMANCE MEASURED BY CHEMICAL AND TOXICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of a soil remediation process can be determined by measuring the reduction in target soil contaminant concentrations and by assessing the treatment's ability to lower soil toxicity. Land treatment of polycyclic armomatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a ...

  9. LAND TREATMENT OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SOIL: PERFORMANCE MEASURED BY CHEMICAL AND TOXICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of a soil remediation process can be determined by measuring the reduction in target soil contaminant concentrations and by assessing the treatment's ability to lower soil toxicity. Land treatment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a ...

  10. Effect of incubation conditions on the enrichment of pyrene-degrading bacteria identified by stable-isotope probing in an aged, PAH-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Jones, Maiysha D; Singleton, David R; Carstensen, Darryl P; Powell, Sabrina N; Swanson, Julie S; Pfaender, Frederic K; Aitken, Michael D

    2008-08-01

    To determine whether the diversity of pyrene-degrading bacteria in an aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil is affected by the addition of inorganic nutrients or by slurrying the soil, various incubation conditions (all including phosphate buffer) were examined by mineralization studies and stable-isotope probing (SIP). The addition of nitrogen to either continuously mixed slurry or static field-wet soil incubations increased the rate and extent of mineralization of [(14)C]pyrene, with the most rapid mineralization observed in slurried, nitrogen-amended soil. Microcosms of slurry and static field-wet soil amended with nitrogen were also examined by SIP with [U-(13)C]pyrene. Recovered (13)C-enriched deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was analyzed by denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene clone libraries. DGGE profiles of (13)C-enriched DNA fractions from both incubation conditions were similar, suggesting that pyrene-degrading bacterial community diversity may be independent of treatment method. The vast majority (67 of 71) of the partial sequences recovered from clone libraries were greater than or equal to 97% similar to one another, 98% similar to sequences of pyrene-degrading bacteria previously detected by SIP with pyrene in different soil, and only 89% similar to the closest cultivated genus. All of the sequences recovered from the field-wet incubation and most of the sequences recovered from the slurry incubation were in this clade. Of the four sequences from slurry incubations not within this clade, three possessed greater than 99% similarity to the 16S rRNA gene sequences of phylogenetically dissimilar Caulobacter spp.

  11. Ecotoxicity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Eom, I C; Rast, C; Veber, A M; Vasseur, P

    2007-06-01

    us to identify inorganic water-extractable pollutants as responsible for toxicity on aquatic species, especially copper for effects on D. magna and C. dubia. The soil toxicity on collembolae and earthworms could be explained by 4 PAH congeners-fluorene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and fluoranthene. Yet, toxicity of the cokery soil as a whole was much lower than toxicity that could be deduced from the concentration of each congener in spiked soils, indicating that pollutants in the soil became less bioavailable with ageing.

  12. Remediation approaches for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contaminated soils: Technological constraints, emerging trends and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Saranya; Thavamani, Palanisami; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Lee, Yong Bok; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2017-02-01

    For more than a decade, the primary focus of environmental experts has been to adopt risk-based management approaches to cleanup PAH polluted sites that pose potentially destructive ecological consequences. This focus had led to the development of several physical, chemical, thermal and biological technologies that are widely implementable. Established remedial options available for treating PAH contaminated soils are incineration, thermal conduction, solvent extraction/soil washing, chemical oxidation, bioaugmentation, biostimulation, phytoremediation, composting/biopiles and bioreactors. Integrating physico-chemical and biological technologies is also widely practiced for better cleanup of PAH contaminated soils. Electrokinetic remediation, vermiremediation and biocatalyst assisted remediation are still at the development stage. Though several treatment methods to remediate PAH polluted soils currently exist, a comprehensive overview of all the available remediation technologies to date is necessary so that the right technology for field-level success is chosen. The objective of this review is to provide a critical overview in this respect, focusing only on the treatment options available for field soils and ignoring the spiked ones. The authors also propose the development of novel multifunctional green and sustainable systems like mixed cell culture system, biosurfactant flushing, transgenic approaches and nanoremediation in order to overcome the existing soil- contaminant- and microbial-associated technological limitations in tackling high molecular weight PAHs. The ultimate objective is to ensure the successful remediation of long-term PAH contaminated soils.

  13. The effects of PAH contamination on soil invertebrate communities

    SciTech Connect

    Snow-Ashbrook, J.L.; Erstfeld, K.M.

    1995-12-31

    Soils were collected from an abandoned industrial site to study the effects of historic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on soil invertebrate communities. Nematode abundance and diversity, microarthropod abundance (orders Collembola and Acarina) and earthworm growth were evaluated. Physical and chemical characteristics of soils may affect both invertebrate community structure and the mobility/bioavailability of pollutants in soils. Soil characteristics were measured and included with PAH data in multiple regression analyses to identify factors which influences the responses observed in the soil invertebrate community. Positive associations were observed between eight invertebrate community endpoints and soil PAH content. For all of these endpoints but one, a higher degree of variability was explained when both PAH content and soil characteristics were considered. It is theorized that the positive response to soil PAH content may be the result of an increased abundance of PAH-degrading soil microbes. Increased microbial abundance could stimulate invertebrate communities by providing a direct food source or increasing the abundance of microbially-produced nutrients. These results suggest that both PAH content and soil characteristics significantly influenced the soil invertebrate community. It is not clear whether these factors influenced the invertebrate community independently, or whether differences in soil characteristics affected the community response by influencing the mobility or bioavailability of PAHs.

  14. Remediation process monitoring of PAH-contaminated soils using laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun-Joung; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Wachsmuth, U

    2004-03-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) for soil remediation process monitoring, the variation in the LIF intensity was studied, in relation to the moisture content and soil particle size distribution for different soil conditions. For each set of conditions, significant correlation was shown between the level of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) and the LIF intensity (R2 > 0.97). Higher fluorescence intensities were measured for PAH contaminated soils with higher sand and moisture contents. The results of the LIF monitoring for the remediation process were compared with the traditional High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) results, after applying a surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic process for the remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. In the electrokinetic (EK) process cell. the PAH concentration, and the normalized LIF intensity near the anode and cathode, showed somewhat contrary trends with respect to the degree of the remediation, even though significantly similar trends were observed in the middle of the soil cell. This may be interpreted as the EK remediation advances, as the electro osmotic flow induce a different moisture and silt/clay, or sand, distribution throughout the soil media, which in turn influences the LIF intensity of the soils. Therefore, in order to overcome these differences, the corrected LIF intensity, using the diffuse reflectance, was applied, which showed a similar remediation trend for the soil specimens in the electrokinetic process cell.

  15. Effect of surfactant amendment to PAHs-contaminated soil for phytoremediation by maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Liao, Changjun; Liang, Xujun; Lu, Guining; Thai, Truonggiang; Xu, Wending; Dang, Zhi

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the uptake of organic pollutants by plants is an important part of the assessment of risks from crops grown on contaminated soils. This study was an investigation of the effects of surfactants added to PAHs-contaminated soil on the uptake and accumulation of PAHs in maize tissues during phytoremediation. The accumulation of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) by maize plant was not influenced significantly by the surfactant amendment to the soil. The distribution of PHE and PYR in maize tissues was not positively correlated with the corresponding lipid contents. Remarkably, the concentrations of PHE (20.9 ng g(-1)) and PYR (0.9 ng g(-1)) in maize grain were similar to or even much lower than those in some foods. Moreover, surfactants could enhance the removal of pollutants from contaminated soil during phytoremediation, which might be due to surfactant desorption ability and microbial activity in soil. The study suggests that use of maize plant with surfactant is an alternative technology for remediation of PAHs-contaminated soils.

  16. Effect of Rhizosphere Enzymes on Phytoremediation in PAH-Contaminated Soil Using Five Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Dai, Yuanyuan; Sun, Libo

    2015-01-01

    A pot experiment was performed to study the effectiveness of remediation using different plant species and the enzyme response involved in remediating PAH-contaminated soil. The study indicated that species Echinacea purpurea, Festuca arundinacea Schred, Fire Phoenix (a combined F. arundinacea), and Medicago sativa L. possess the potential for remediation in PAH-contaminated soils. The study also determined that enzymatic reactions of polyphenol oxidase (except Fire Phoenix), dehydrogenase (except Fire Phoenix), and urease (except Medicago sativa L.) were more prominent over cultivation periods of 60d and 120d than 150d. Urease activity of the tested species exhibited prominently linear negative correlations with alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen content after the tested plants were cultivated for 150d (R2 = 0.9592). The experiment also indicated that alkaline phosphatase activity in four of the five tested species (Echinacea purpurea, Callistephus chinensis, Festuca arundinacea Schred and Fire Phoenix) was inhibited during the cultivation process (at 60d and 120d). At the same time, the study determined that the linear relationship between alkaline phosphatase activity and effective phosphorus content in plant rhizosphere soil exhibited a negative correlation after a growing period of 120d (R2 = 0.665). Phytoremediation of organic contaminants in the soil was closely related to specific characteristics of particular plant species, and the catalyzed reactions were the result of the action of multiple enzymes in the plant rhizosphere soil. PMID:25822167

  17. Effective treatment of PAH contaminated Superfund site soil with the peroxy-acid process.

    PubMed

    Scott Alderman, N; N'Guessan, Adeola L; Nyman, Marianne C

    2007-07-31

    Peroxy-organic acids are formed by the chemical reaction between organic acids and hydrogen peroxide. The peroxy-acid process was applied to two Superfund site soils provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Initial small-scale experiments applied ratios of 3:5:7 (v/v/v) or 3:3:9 (v/v/v) hydrogen peroxide:acetic acid:deionized (DI) water solution to 5g of Superfund site soil. The experiment using 3:5:7 (v/v/v) ratio resulted in an almost complete degradation of the 14 EPA regulated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Bedford LT soil during a 24-h reaction period, while the 3:3:9 (v/v/v) ratio resulted in no applicable degradation in Bedford LT lot 10 soil over the same reaction period. Specific Superfund site soil characteristics (e.g., pH, total organic carbon content and particle size distribution) were found to play an important role in the availability of the PAHs and the efficiency of the transformation during the peroxy-acid process. A scaled-up experiment followed treating 150g of Bedford LT lot 10 soil with and without mixing. The scaled-up processes applied a 3:3:9 (v/v/v) solution resulting in significant decrease in PAH contamination. These findings demonstrate the peroxy-acid process as a viable option for the treatment of PAH contaminated soils. Further work is necessary in order to elucidate the mechanisms of this process.

  18. Determination of biodegradation potential by two culture-independent methods in PAH-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Moon, H S; Kahng, H-Y; Kim, J Y; Kukor, J J; Nam, K

    2006-04-01

    Biodegradation potentials of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined with soil samples collected from various depths of a PAH-contaminated site and of a site nearby where PAHs were not found. Putative dioxygenase genes were amplified by a primer set specific for initial dioxygenases and identified by web-based database homology search. They were further categorized into several groups of which four dioxygenases were selected as probes for DNA hybridization. The hybridization signals according to the presence of putative dioxygenases were positively related to the extent of PAH contamination. However, the signal intensities varied depending on the probes hybridized and moreover were not consistent with PAH biodegradation activities determined by CO2 evolution. Despite widely accepted advantages of molecular biodegradation assessment, our data clearly present the variations of assessment results depending on the genetic information used and suggest that the methodology may tend to underestimate the real biodegradation capacity of a site probably due to the limited dioxygenase database available at the moment. Therefore, the molecular assessment of biodegradation potential should involve a very careful primer and probe design and an extensive microbiological examination of a site of interest to accurately delineate the biodegradation potential of the site.

  19. Importance of organic amendment characteristics on bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lukić, B; Huguenot, D; Panico, A; Fabbricino, M; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the importance of the organic matter characteristics of several organic amendments (i.e., buffalo manure, food and kitchen waste, fruit and vegetables waste, and activated sewage sludge) and their influence in the bioremediation of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-contaminated soil. The removal of low molecular weights (LMW) and high molecular weights (HMW) PAHs was monitored in four bioremediation reactors and used as an indicator of the role of organic amendments in contaminant removal. The total initial concentration of LMW PAHs was 234 mg kg(-1) soil (dry weight), while the amount for HMW PAHs was 422 mg kg(-1) soil (dry weight). Monitoring of operational parameters and chemical analysis was performed during 20 weeks. The concentrations of LMW PAH residues in soil were significantly lower in reactors that displayed a mesophilic phase, i.e., 11 and 15 %, compared to reactors that displayed a thermophilic phase, i.e., 29 and 31 %. Residual HMW PAHs were up to five times higher compared to residual LMW PAHs, depending on the reactor. This demonstrated that the amount of added organic matter and macronutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus, the biochemical organic compound classes (mostly soluble fraction and proteins), and the operational temperature are important factors affecting the overall efficiency of bioremediation. On that basis, this study shows that characterization of biochemical families could contribute to a better understanding of the effects of organic amendments and clarify their different efficiency during a bioremediation process of PAH-contaminated soil.

  20. Land treatment of PAH-contaminated soil: Performance measured by chemical and toxicity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Sayles, G.D.; Acheson, C.M.; Kupferle, M.J.; Shan, Y.; Zhou, Q.; Meier, J.R.; Chang, L.; Brenner, R.C.

    1999-12-01

    The performance of a soil remediation process can be determined by measuring the reduction in target soil contaminant concentrations and by assessing the treatment's ability to lower soil toxicity. Land treatment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a former wood-treating site was simulated at pilot scale in temperature-controlled sol pans. Nineteen two- through six-ring PAHs were monitored with time (initial total PAHs = 2,800 mg/kg). Twenty-five weeks of treatment yielded a final total PAH level of 1,160 mg/kg. Statistically significant decreases in concentrations were seen in total, two-, three-, and four-ring PAHs. Carcinogenic and five- and six-ring PAHs showed no significant change in concentration. Land treatment resulted in significant toxicity reduction based on root elongation, Allium chromosomal aberration, and solid-phase Microtox bioassays. Acute toxicity, as measured by the earthworm survival assay, was significantly reduced and completely removed. The Ames spiral plate mutagenicity assay revealed that the untreated soil was slightly mutagenic and that treatment may have reduced mutagenicity. The variety of results generated from the chemical and toxicity assays emphasize the need for conducting a battery of such tests to fully understand soil remediation processes.

  1. Distribution of the Mycobacterium community and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) among different size fractions of a long-term PAH-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Uyttebroek, Maarten; Breugelmans, Philip; Janssen, Mieke; Wattiau, Pierre; Joffe, Boris; Karlson, Ulrich; Ortega-Calvo, Jose-Julio; Bastiaens, Leen; Ryngaert, Annemie; Hausner, Martina; Springael, Dirk

    2006-05-01

    Summary Mycobacterium is often isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil as degraders of PAHs. In model systems, Mycobacterium shows attachment to the PAH substrate source, which is considered to be a particular adaptation to low bioavailability as it results into increased substrate flux to the degraders. To examine whether PAH-degrading Mycobacterium in real PAH-contaminated soils, in analogy with model systems, are preferentially associated with PAH-enriched soil particles, the distribution of PAHs, of the PAH-mineralizing capacity and of Mycobacterium over different fractions of a soil with an aged PAH contamination was investigated. The clay fraction contained the majority of the PAHs and showed immediate pyrene- and phenanthrene-mineralizing activity upon addition of (14)C-labelled pyrene or phenanthrene. In contrast, the sand and silt fractions showed a lag time of 15-26 h for phenanthrene and 3-6 days for pyrene mineralization. The maximum pyrene and phenanthrene mineralization rates of the clay fraction expressed per gram fraction were three to six times higher than those of the sand and silt fractions. Most-probable-number (MPN)-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that Mycobacterium represented about 10% of the eubacteria in the clay fraction, while this was only about 0.1% in the sand and silt fractions, indicating accumulation of Mycobacterium in the PAH-enriched clay fraction. The Mycobacterium community composition in the clay fraction represented all dominant Mycobacterium populations of the bulk soil and included especially species related to Mycobacterium pyrenivorans, which was also recovered as one of the dominant species in the eubacterial communities of the bulk soil and the clay fraction. Moreover, Mycobacterium could be identified among the major culturable PAH-degrading populations in both the bulk soil and the clay fraction. The results demonstrate that PAH-degrading mycobacteria are mainly associated with the

  2. Aerobic Bioremediation of PAH Contaminated Soil Results in Increased Genotoxicity and Developmental Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chibwe, Leah; Geier, Mitra C.; Nakamura, Jun; Tanguay, Robert L.; Aitken, Michael D.; Simonich, Staci L. Massey

    2015-01-01

    The formation of more polar and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) transformation products is one of the concerns associated with the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils. Soil contaminated with coal tar (pre-bioremediation) from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site was treated in a laboratory scale bioreactor (post-bioremediation) and extracted using pressurized liquid extraction. The soil extracts were fractionated, based on polarity, and analyzed for 88 PAHs (unsubstituted, oxygenated, nitrated, and heterocyclic PAHs). The PAH concentrations in the soil tested, post-bioremediation, were lower than their regulatory maximum allowable concentrations (MACs), with the exception of the higher molecular weight PAHs (BaA, BkF, BbF, BaP, and IcdP), most of which did not undergo significant biodegradation. The soil extract fractions were tested for genotoxicity using the DT40 chicken lymphocyte bioassay and developmental to xicity using the embryonic zebrafish (Danio rerio) bioassay. A statistically significant increase in genotoxicity was measured in the unfractionated soil extract, as well as in four polar soil extract fractions, post-bioremediation (p < 0.05). In addition, a statistically significant increase in developmental toxicity was measured in one polar soil extract fraction, post-bioremediation (p < 0.05). A series of morphological abnormalities, including peculiar caudal fin malformations and hyperpigmentation in the tail, were measured in several soil extract fractions in embryonic zebrafish, both pre- and post-bioremediation. The increased toxicity measured post-bioremediation is not likely due to the 88 PAHs measured in this study (including quinones), because most were not present in the toxic polar fractions and/or because their concentrations did not increase post-bioremediation. However, the increased toxicity measured post-bioremediation is likely due to hydroxylated and carboxylated transformation products of the 3- and 4-ring PAHs

  3. Chemical-assisted phytoremediation of CD-PAHs contaminated soils using Solanum nigrum L.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuanjie; Zhou, Qixing; Wei, Shuhe; Hu, Yahu; Bao, Yanyu

    2011-09-01

    A well-characterized cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulating plant Solanum nigrum was grown in Cd and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) co-contaminated soil that was repeatedly amended with chemicals, including EDTA, cysteine (CY), salicylic acid (Sa), and Tween 80 (TW80), to test individual and combined treatment effects on phytoremediation of Cd-PAHs contaminated soils. Plant growth was negatively affected by exogenous chemicals except for EDTA. S. nigrum could accumulate Cd in tissues without assistant chemicals, while there was no visible effect on the degradation of PAHs. Cysteine had significant effects on phytoextraction of Cd and the highest metal extraction ratio (1.27%) was observed in 0.9 mmol/kg CY treatment. Both salicylic acid and Tween 80 had stimulative effects on the degradation of PAHs and there was the maximal degradation rate (52.6%) of total PAHs while 0.9 mmol/kg Sa was applied. Furthermore, the combined treatment T(0.1EDTA+0.9CY+0.5TW80) and T(0.5EDTA+0.9CY+03Sa) could not only increase the accumulation of Cd in plant tissues, but also promote the degradation of PAHs. These results indicated that S. nigrum might be effective in phytoextracting Cd and enhancing the biodegradation of PAHs in the co-contaminated soils with assistant chemicals.

  4. Bioremediation of poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil by composting

    SciTech Connect

    Loick, N.; Hobbs, P.J.; Hale, M.D.C.; Jones, D.L.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive and critical review of research on different co-composting approaches to bioremediate hydrocarbon contaminated soil, organisms that have been found to degrade PAHs, and PAH breakdown products. Advantages and limitations of using certain groups of organisms and recommended areas of further research effort are identified. Studies investigating the use of composting techniques to treat contaminated soil are broad ranging and differ in many respects, which makes comparison of the different approaches very difficult. Many studies have investigated the use of specific bio-additives in the form of bacteria or fungi with the aim of accelerating contaminant removal; however, few have employed microbial consortia containing organisms from both kingdoms despite knowledge suggesting synergistic relationships exist between them in contaminant removal. Recommendations suggest that further studies should attempt to systemize the investigations of composting approaches to bio-remediate PAH-contaminated soil, to focus on harnessing the biodegradative capacity of both bacteria and fungi to create a cooperative environment for PAH degradation, and to further investigate the array of PAHs that can be lost during the composting process by either leaching or volatilization.

  5. Rhizosphere effects of PAH-contaminated soil phytoremediation using a special plant named Fire Phoenix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Xiao, Nan; Wei, Shuhe; Zhao, Lixing; An, Jing

    2014-03-01

    The rhizosphere effect of a special phytoremediating species known as Fire Phoenix on the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated, including changes of the enzymatic activity and microbial communities in rhizosphere soil. The study showed that the degradation rate of Σ8PAHs by Fire Phoenix was up to 99.40% after a 150-day culture. The activity of dehydrogenase (DHO), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) increased greatly, especially after a 60-day culture, followed by a gradual reduction with an increase in the planting time. The activity of these enzymes was strongly correlated to the higher degradation performance of Fire Phoenix growing in PAH-contaminated soils, although it was also affected by the basic characteristics of the plant species itself, such as the excessive, fibrous root systems, strong disease resistance, drought resistance, heat resistance, and resistance to barren soil. The activity of polyphenoloxidase (PPO) decreased during the whole growing period in this study, and the degradation rate of Σ8PAHs in the rhizosphere soil after having planted Fire Phoenix plants had a significant (R(2)=0.947) negative correlation with the change in the activity of PPO. Using an analysis of the microbial communities, the results indicated that the structure of microorganisms in the rhizosphere soil could be changed by planting Fire Phoenix plants, namely, there was an increase in microbial diversity compared with the unplanted soil. In addition, the primary advantage of Fire Phoenix was to promote the growth of flora genus Gordonia sp. as the major bacteria that can effectively degrade PAHs.

  6. Effect of land use activities on PAH contamination in urban soils of Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ud Din, Ikhtiar; Rashid, Audil; Mahmood, Tariq; Khalid, Azeem

    2013-10-01

    Urbanization can increase the vulnerability of soils to various types of contamination. Increased contamination of urban soils with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) could relate to increased number of petrol pump stations and mechanical workshops-a phenomenon that needs to be constantly monitored. This study was undertaken to explore the soil PAH levels in Rawalpindi and Islamabad urban areas in relation to land use activities. Composite soil samples from petrol pump stations and mechanical workshops (n = 32) areas were evaluated for five PAHs--naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene-and compared with control area locations with minimum petroleum-related activity (n = 16). Surface samples up to 3 cm depth were collected and extraction of analytes was carried out using n-hexane and dichloromethane. Prior to running the samples, standards (100 μg ml(-1)) were run on HPLC to optimize signal to noise ratio using acetonitrile as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.25 ml/min at 40 °C. Significant differences between petrol pump stations and mechanical workshop areas were observed for individual PAH as well as with control area soil samples. Naphthalene was found to be the most abundant PAH in soil, ranging from 2.47 to 24.36 mg kg(-1). Correlation between the benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) level in soil and the total PAH concentration (r = 0.82, P < 0.0001) revealed that BaP can be used as a potential marker for PAH pollution. A clear segregation between petrogenic and pyrogenic sources of contamination was observed when low molecular weight PAHs detected in soil was plotted against high molecular weight PAHs. The former source comprised lubricants and used engine oil found at mechanical workshops, whereas the latter could be mostly attributed to vehicular emission at petrol pumps. The results indicate that PAH contamination in urban areas of Rawalpindi and Islamabad has direct relevance with land use for petroleum

  7. Dynamic changes in bacterial community structure and in naphthalene dioxygenase expression in vermicompost-amended PAH-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Di Gennaro, Patrizia; Moreno, Beatriz; Annoni, Emanuele; García-Rodríguez, Sonia; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Benitez, Emilio

    2009-12-30

    The aim of the present study was to explore the potential for using vermicompost from olive-mill waste as an organic amendment for enhanced bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils. The focus was to analyse the genetic potential and the naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) expression of the bacterial communities involved in the degradation of naphthalene, as chemical model for the degradation of PAH. The structure of the metabolically active bacterial population was evidenced in the RNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles. The relative expression of NDO was determined with real-time PCR in both the soil and the vermicompost cDNA. Naphthalene changed the structure of the metabolically active bacterial community in the vermicompost when this was artificially contaminated. When used as amendment, naphthalene-free vermicompost modified the bacterial population in the PAH-contaminated soil, evidenced in the DGGE gels after 1 month of incubation. In the amended soil, the vermicompost enhanced the NDO enzyme expression with a concomitant biodegradation of naphthalene. The effect of the vermicompost was to induce the expression of biodegradation indicator genes in the autochthonous bacterial community and/or incorporate new bacterial species capable of degrading PAH. The results indicated that vermicompost from olive-mill wastes could be considered a suitable technology to be used in PAH bioremediation.

  8. Remediation of PAH-contaminated soil by the combination of tall fescue, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and epigeic earthworms.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan-Fei; Lu, Mang

    2015-03-21

    A 120-day experiment was performed to investigate the effect of a multi-component bioremediation system consisting of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) (Glomus caledoniun L.), and epigeic earthworms (Eisenia foetida) for cleaning up polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soil. Inoculation with AMF and/or earthworms increased plant yield and PAH accumulation in plants. However, PAH uptake by tall fescue accounted for a negligible portion of soil PAH removal. Mycorrhizal tall fescue significantly enhanced PAH dissipation, PAH degrader density and polyphenol oxidase activity in soil. The highest PAH dissipation (93.4%) was observed in the combination treatment: i.e., AMF+earthworms+tall fescue, in which the soil PAH concentration decreased from an initial value of 620 to 41 mg kg(-1) in 120 days. This concentration is below the threshold level required for Chinese soil PAH quality (45 mg kg(-1) dry weight) for residential use.

  9. Integrated treatment of PAH contaminated soil by soil washing, ozonation and biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Haapea, Pia; Tuhkanen, Tuula

    2006-08-21

    The aim of the study was to optimise three different treatment methods and to find out if the integration of soil washing, ozonation and biological treatment could be a feasible method for the remediation of aged oil contaminated with PAHs. Three different ozone doses and soil washing were studied in different pHs in order to assess their effect to the degradation and enhancement of biodegradability of PAH in the soil and water phase. Main target of the study was to find out a method with which the PAH concentrations could be decreased below the Finnish guideline level for total PAHs. In this case, the initial concentration of PAHs was 1200 mg kg(-1) and therefore almost 85% degradation of PAHs was required. Any of the methods studied was not able to reach this target level alone, but by several combinations of the methods studied achieved 90% reduction of PAHs. The consumption of ozone was 5-10 times lower in the integrated treatments of soil washing, ozonation and biological treatment than without prewashing.

  10. Influence of Vegetation on the In Situ Bacterial Community and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Degraders in Aged PAH-Contaminated or Thermal-Desorption-Treated Soil▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Faure, Pierre; Norini, Marie-Paule; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Leyval, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination, bacterial community, and PAH-degrading bacteria were monitored in aged PAH-contaminated soil (Neuves-Maisons [NM] soil; with a mean of 1,915 mg of 16 PAHs·kg−1 of soil dry weight) and in the same soil previously treated by thermal desorption (TD soil; with a mean of 106 mg of 16 PAHs·kg−1 of soil dry weight). This study was conducted in situ for 2 years using experimental plots of the two soils. NM soil was colonized by spontaneous vegetation (NM-SV), planted with Medicago sativa (NM-Ms), or left as bare soil (NM-BS), and the TD soil was planted with Medicago sativa (TD-Ms). The bacterial community density, structure, and diversity were estimated by real-time PCR quantification of the 16S rRNA gene copy number, temporal thermal gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting, and band sequencing, respectively. The density of the bacterial community increased the first year during stabilization of the system and stayed constant in the NM soil, while it continued to increase in the TD soil during the second year. The bacterial community structure diverged among all the plot types after 2 years on site. In the NM-BS plots, the bacterial community was represented mainly by Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. The presence of vegetation (NM-SV and NM-Ms) in the NM soil favored the development of a wider range of bacterial phyla (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Chloroflexi) that, for the most part, were not closely related to known bacterial representatives. Moreover, under the influence of the same plant, the bacterial community that developed in the TD-Ms was represented by different bacterial species (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria) than that in the NM-Ms. During the 2 years of monitoring, the PAH concentration did not evolve significantly. The abundance of gram-negative (GN

  11. Comparison of commercial DNA extraction kits for isolation and purification of bacterial and eukaryotic DNA from PAH-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Nagissa; Slater, Greg F; Fulthorpe, Roberta R

    2011-08-01

    Molecular characterization of the microbial populations of soils and sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is often a first step in assessing intrinsic biodegradation potential. However, soils are problematic for molecular analysis owing to the presence of organic matter, such as humic acids. Furthermore, the presence of contaminants, such as PAHs, can cause further challenges to DNA extraction, quantification, and amplification. The goal of our study was to compare the effectiveness of four commercial soil DNA extraction kits (UltraClean Soil DNA Isolation kit, PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit, PowerMax Soil DNA Isolation kit, and FastDNA SPIN kit) to extract pure, high-quality bacterial and eukaryotic DNA from PAH-contaminated soils. Six different contaminated soils were used to determine if there were any biases among the kits due to soil properties or level of contamination. Extracted DNA was used as a template for bacterial 16S rDNA and eukaryotic 18S rDNA amplifications, and PCR products were subsequently analyzed using denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE). We found that the FastDNA SPIN kit provided significantly higher DNA yields for all soils; however, it also resulted in the highest levels of humic acid contamination. Soil texture and organic carbon content of the soil did not affect the DNA yield of any kit. Moreover, a liquid-liquid extraction of the DNA extracts found no residual PAHs, indicating that all kits were effective at removing contaminants in the extraction process. Although the PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit gave relatively low DNA yields, it provided the highest quality DNA based on successful amplification of both bacterial and eukaryotic DNA for all six soils. DGGE fingerprints among the kits were dramatically different for both bacterial and eukaryotic DNA. The PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit revealed multiple bands for each soil and provided the most consistent DGGE profiles among replicates for both

  12. Dynamics of nitrogen in a PAHs contaminated soil amended with biosolid or vermicompost in the presence of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Ramos, S M; Alvarez-Bernal, D; Dendooven, L

    2007-05-01

    Nitrogen mineralization in PAHs contaminated soil in presence of Eisenia fetida amended with biosolid or vermicompost was investigated. Sterilized and unsterilized soil was contaminated with PAHs, added with E. fetida and biosolid or vermicompost and incubated aerobically for 70 days, while dynamics of inorganic N were monitored. Addition of E. fetida to sterilized soil increased concentration of NH(4)(+) 100> mg N kg(-1), while concentrations in unsterilized remained <60 mg N kg(-1) except for soil amended with biosolid plus PAHs where it increased to >80 mg kg(-1). Addition of PAHs had no significant effect on concentration of NH(4)(+) compared to the unamended soil, except in the soil added with biosolid. Addition of E. fetida to sterilized soil increased concentration of NO(2)(-) 15> mg N kg(-1) while concentrations in unsterilized soil remained <7.5 mg N kg(-1) except for soil amended with biosolid where it increased to >20 mg kg(-1). Addition of PAHs had no significant effect on concentration of NO(2)(-) compared to the unamended soil. Addition of biosolid and vermicompost increased concentration of NO(3)(-), while addition of E. fetida decreased concentration of NO(3)(-) in biosolid amended soil. It was found that NH(4)(+) and NO(2)(-) oxidizers were present in the gut of E. fetida, but their activity was not sufficient enough to inhibit a temporarily increase in concentrations of NH(4)(+) and NO(2)(-). Contamination with PAHs induced immobilization of N in biosolid or vermicompost amended soil, as did feeding of E. fetida on biosolid or vermicompost.

  13. Differential responses of eubacterial, Mycobacterium, and Sphingomonas communities in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil to artificially induced changes in PAH profile.

    PubMed

    Uyttebroek, Maarten; Spoden, Astrid; Ortega-Calvo, Jose-Julio; Wouters, Katinka; Wattiau, Pierre; Bastiaens, Leen; Springael, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that Mycobacterium is better adapted to soils containing poorly bioavailable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared to Sphingomonas. To study this hypothesis, artificial conditions regarding PAH profile and PAH bioavailability were induced in two PAH-contaminated soils and the response of the eubacterial, Mycobacterium, and Sphingomonas communities to these changed conditions was monitored during laboratory incubation. Soil K3663 with a relatively high proportion of high molecular weight PAHs was amended with phenanthrene or pyrene to artificially change the soil into a soil with a relatively increased bioavailable PAH contamination. Soil AndE with a relatively high proportion of bioavailable low molecular weight PAHs was treated by a single-step Tenax extraction to remove the largest part of the easily bioavailable PAH contamination. In soil K3663, the added phenanthrene or pyrene compounds were rapidly degraded, concomitant with a significant increase in the number of phenanthrene and pyrene degraders, and minor and no changes in the Mycobacterium community and Sphingomonas community, respectively. However, a transient change in the eubacterial community related to the proliferation of several gamma-proteobacteria was noted in the phenanthrene-amended soil. In the extracted AndE soil, the Sphingomonas community initially developed into a more diverse community but finally decreased in size below the detection limit. Mycobacterium in that soil never increased to a detectable size, while the eubacterial community became dominated by a gamma-proteobacterial population. The results suggest that the relative bioavailability of PAH contamination in soil affects bacterial community structure but that the behavior of Mycobacterium and Sphingomonas in soil is more complex than prospected from studies on their ecology and physiology.

  14. Biosurfactant from red ash trees enhances the bioremediation of PAH contaminated soil at a former gasworks site.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Warren; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Morrison, Paul D; Ball, Andrew S

    2015-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent contaminants that accumulate in soil, sludge and on vegetation and are produced through activities such as coal burning, wood combustion and in the use of transport vehicles. Naturally occurring surfactants have been known to enhance PAH-removal from soil by improving PAH solubilization thereby increasing PAH-microbe interactions. The aim of this research was to determine if a biosurfactant derived from the leaves of the Australian red ash (Alphitonia excelsa) would enhance bioremediation of a heavily PAH-contaminated soil and to determine how the microbial community was affected. Results of GC-MS analysis show that the extracted biosurfactant was significantly more efficient than the control in regards to the degradation of total 16 US EPA priority PAHs (78.7% degradation compared to 62.0%) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) (92.9% degradation compared to 44.3%). Furthermore the quantification of bacterial genes by qPCR analysis showed that there was an increase in the number of gene copies associated with Gram positive PAH-degrading bacteria. The results suggest a commercial potential for the use of the Australian red ash tree as a source of biosurfactant for use in the accelerated degradation of hydrocarbons.

  15. PAH contamination in soils adjacent to a coal-transporting facility in Tapin district, south Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mizwar, Andy; Trihadiningrum, Yulinah

    2015-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the level of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), listed as priority pollutants by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), in surface soils around a coal-transporting facility in the western part of South Kalimantan, Indonesia. Three composite soil samples were collected from a coal stockpile, coal-hauling road, and coal port. Identification and quantification of PAH was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The total content of 16 USEPA-PAH ranged from 11.79 to 55.30 mg/kg with arithmetic mean value of 33.14 mg/kg and median of 32.33 mg/kg. The 16 USEPA-PAH measured levels were found to be greater compared with most of the literature values. The levels of high molecular-weight PAH (5- and 6-ring) were dominant and formed 67.77-80.69 % of the total 16 USEPA-PAH The most abundant of individual PAH are indeno[1,2,3-cd] pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene with concentration ranges of 2.11-20.56 and 1.59-17.84 mg/kg, respectively. The degree of PAH contamination and subsequent toxicity assessment suggest that the soils of the study area are highly contaminated and pose a potential health risk to humans.

  16. PAHs contamination in urban soils from Lisbon: spatial variability and potential risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachada, Anabela; Pereira, Ruth; Ferreira da Silva, Eduardo; Duarte, Armando

    2015-04-01

    reason is that once PAHs reach the soils, they can be incorporated into more stable solid phases over time, for instance, they can be retained in the organic phase, and this process known as aging, can be virtually irreversible. This phenomenon can be particularly relevant in urban soils since the highest levels are normally found in historical sites, suggesting a long-term accumulation as observed in the present study. The estimation of this fraction is traditionally performed by using bioassays (bioavailability), yet chemical methods can also be used (chemical availability). Following a higher tier of the risk assessment framework, some selected samples previously identified as representing a potential hazard were tested for their bioavailability (earthworm bioaccumulation assay, OECD test n° 317) and chemical availability (solid phase extraction with Tenax® and water). Results showed that in spite of the very high levels found in some samples, the risks can be negligible, since both the bioavailable and water soluble fractions were very low. The relationship between available fraction and soil properties is not clear, and differences observed between samples are probably related to the age of contamination since lower available fractions were observed in the most contaminated soils.

  17. Risk potentials for humans of original and remediated PAH-contaminated soils: application of biomarkers of effect.

    PubMed

    Roos, Peter H; Tschirbs, Sebastian; Pfeifer, Frank; Welge, Peter; Hack, Alfons; Wilhelm, Michael; Bolt, Hermann M

    2004-12-15

    Contaminated soils represent a potential health risk for the human population. Risk assessment for humans requires specific methods, which must reflect the peculiarities of human behaviour, physiology and biochemistry with respect to contaminant uptake and processing. Biomarkers of effect or exposure have become an appropriate tool. Organic pollutants influence the expression profile of cytochromes P450 (CYP), and CYP1A1 has been shown to be a suitable biomarker for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The latter are widely distributed in soils and constitute an important soil contamination. Upon intake of PAH-contaminated soils, CYP1A1 is induced in various organs of rats and minipigs. Increased CYP1A1-levels in lung, kidney and spleen, after oral soil intake, indicate that contaminants escape the primary duodenal and hepatic metabolism and reach further organs. Dose-response relationships reveal that induction effects are to be expected in children based on known exposure conditions. Generally, CYP1A1-induction does not correlate with results of toxicity tests with lower organisms, performed with the same soils. The organic carbon content is largely responsible for this discrepancy. It severely affects the toxicity of soil bound PAH for microorganisms, but obviously affects the mobilization efficiency for PAH in the gastro-intestinal tract of mammals to a minor extent. Soil remediation by different methods may result in a significant reduction of the PAH content and of toxicity. Ingestion of remediated soils by rats shows, however, that the induction potential for CYP1A1 is only slightly decreased after remediation. This means that the major inducing components resist biological remediation or soil washing and remain in the soil. Because data obtained with experimental animals form the guiding principle for in vitro tests to be developed, the suitability of the animal model used for extrapolations to humans has to be proven. Upon soil ingestion, minipigs show

  18. Efficient biodegradation of phenanthrene by a novel strain Massilia sp. WF1 isolated from a PAH-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haizhen; Lou, Jun; Gu, Haiping; Luo, Xiaoyan; Yang, Li; Wu, Laosheng; Liu, Yong; Wu, Jianjun; Xu, Jianming

    2016-07-01

    A novel phenanthrene (PHE)-degrading strain Massilia sp. WF1, isolated from PAH-contaminated soil, was capable of degrading PHE by using it as the sole carbon source and energy in a range of pH (5.0-8.0), temperatures (20-35 °C), and PHE concentrations (25-400 mg L(-1)). Massilia sp. WF1 exhibited highly effective PHE-degrading ability that completely degraded 100 mg L(-1) of PHE over 2 days at optimal conditions (pH 6.0, 28 °C). The kinetics of PHE biodegradation by Massilia sp. WF1 was well represented by the Gompertz model. Results indicated that PHE biodegradation was inhibited by the supplied lactic acid but was promoted by the supplied carbon sources of glucose, citric acid, and succinic acid. Salicylic acid (SALA) and phthalic acid (PHTA) were not utilized by Massilia sp. WF1 and had no obvious effect on PHE biodegradation. Only two metabolites, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (1H2N) and PHTA, were identified in PHE biodegradation process. Quantitatively, nearly 27.7 % of PHE was converted to 1H2N and 30.3 % of 1H2N was further metabolized to PHTA. However, the PHTA pathway was broken and the SALA pathway was ruled out in PHE biodegradation process by Massilia sp. WF1.

  19. Investigation of the impacts of ethyl lactate based Fenton treatment on soil quality for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Gan, Suyin; Yap, Chiew Lin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Venny

    2013-11-15

    This study aims to investigate the impacts of ethyl lactate (EL) based Fenton treatment on soil quality for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils. Accumulation of oxygenated-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) was observed, but quantitative measurement on the most abundant compound 9,10-anthraquinone (ATQ) showed lower accumulation of the compound than that reported for ethanol (ET) based Fenton treatment. In general, as compared to conventional water (CW) based Fenton treatment, the EL based Fenton treatment exerted either a lower or higher negative impact on soil physicochemical properties depending on the property type and shared the main disadvantage of reduced soil pH. For revegetation, EL based Fenton treatment was most appropriately adopted for soil with native pH >/~ 6.2 in order to obtain a final soil pH >/~ 4.9 subject to the soil buffering capacity.

  20. Long term impact of PAH contamination in soils on the water quality in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateuille, David; Evrard, Olivier; Moreau-Guigon, Elodie; Chevreuil, Marc; Mouchel, Jean-Marie

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons constitute a large family of hazardous contaminants that are mainly released into the environment by incomplete combustion of organic matter. In the Seine River (France), high concentrations of these compounds measured in the water bodies might prevent to meet the international environmental targets requested by EU Water Framework Directive. This issue is of particular concern as PAH emissions have been steadily decreasing for several decades. Consequently, both the origin and the persistence of these pollutants have to be investigated. PAHs are known to bind onto organic matter in soils and large amount of these compounds may be found in this compartment. In order to investigate the role of soils as a contamination buffer, an ambitious sampling strategy was implemented in an upstream agricultural subcatchment (104 km²) for an entire hydrological year. The samples were collected in the different compartments (atmospheric fallout (n = 42), soil (n = 33), river water (n = 26) and suspended sediment (n=101)) and allowed to quantify the current fluxes of PAHs in the environment and to estimate their stocks in soils (12 to 220 kg.km-²). Annual mass balance calculation was conducted at the catchment scale and showed that current PAH losses were mainly due to losses (biodegradation, photo-oxidation and volatilization) within the catchments (about 80%), whereas exports due to soil erosion and riverine transport appeared to be of minor importance. When comparing the stocks in soils and the estimated annual losses, PAHs showed long decontamination times in soils (40 to 1850 years). The fate of PAHs in the catchment varied from one compound to another and was controlled by meteorological and hydrological parameters. This result highlights that soils are likely to play an important role as a secondary source for riverine contamination for a long period of time. To investigate further the relationship between the presence of PAHs in soils and

  1. Modeling in situ ozonation for the remediation of nonvolatile PAH-contaminated unsaturated soils.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Choi, H.; Environmental Research; Kwangju Inst. of Science and Technology

    2002-04-01

    Mathematical models were developed to investigate the characteristics of gaseous ozone transport under various soil conditions and the feasibility of in situ ozone venting for the remediation of unsaturated soils contaminated with phenanthrene. On the basis of assumptions for the mass transfer and reactions of ozone, three approaches were considered: equilibrium, kinetic, and lump models. Water-saturation-dependent reactions of gaseous ozone with soil organic matter (SOM) and phenanthrene were employed. The models were solved numerically by using the finite-difference method, and the model parameters were determined by using the experimental data of Hsu [The use of gaseous ozone to remediate the organic contaminants in the unsaturated soils, PhD Thesis, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, 1995]. The transport of gas-phase ozone is significantly retarded by ozone consumption due to reactions with SOM and phenanthrene, in addition to dissolution. An operation time of 156 h was required to completely remove phenanthrene in a 5-m natural soil column. In actual situations, however, the operation time is likely to be longer than the ideal time because of unknown factors including heterogeneity of the porous medium and the distribution of SOM and contaminant. The ozone transport front length was found to be very limited (<1 m). The sensitivity analysis indicated that SOM is the single most important factor affecting in situ ozonation for the remediation of unsaturated soil contaminated with phenanthrene. Models were found to be insensitive to the reaction mechanisms of phenanthrene with either gas-phase ozone or dissolved ozone. More study is required to quantify the effect of OH{sup {sm_bullet}} formation on the removal of contaminant and on ozone transport in the subsurface.

  2. Evaluation of PAH contamination in soil treated with solid by-products from shale pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Jaqueline; Khan, Muhammad Y; Matsui, M; Côcco, Lílian C; Yamamoto, Carlos I; Lopes, Wilson A; de Andrade, Jailson B; Pillon, Clenio N; Arizaga, Gregorio G Carbajal; Mangrich, Antonio S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils to which solid shale materials (SSMs) were added as soil conditioners. The SSMs were derived from the Petrosix pyrolysis process developed by Petrobras (Brazil). An improved ultrasonic agitation method was used to extract the PAHs from the solid samples (soils amended with SSMs), and the concentrations of the compounds were determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The procedure provided satisfactory recoveries, detection limits, and quantification limits. The two-, three-, and four-ring PAHs were most prevalent, and the highest concentration was obtained for phenanthrene (978 ± 19 μg kg(-1) in a pyrolyzed shale sample). The use of phenanthrene/anthracene and fluoranthene/pyrene ratios revealed that the PAHs were derived from petrogenic rather than pyrogenic sources. The measured PAH concentrations did not exceed national or international limit values, suggesting that the use of SSMs as soil conditioners should not cause environmental damage.

  3. Bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil by composting: a case study.

    PubMed

    Cajthaml, T; Bhatt, M; Sasek, V; Matĕjů, V

    2002-01-01

    Composting technique was used for bioremediation of industrial soil originating from a former tar-contaminated site. The composting process was regulated by aeration to keep optimal temperature gradient and concentrations of O2 and CO2 inside the composting pile. The efficiency of bioremediation was evaluated by performing analysis of 11 individual three- to six-ring unsubstituted aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and estimating of changes in ecotoxicity of the contaminated soil. After 42 d of composting, PAH with 3-4 rings were removed from 42 to 68%, other higher-molar mass PAH from 35 to 57%. Additional 100 d of compost maturation in open-air field did not result in a further decrease of PAH. Ecotoxicity tests performed with bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischerii showed a decrease in toxicity both after composting and maturation phases. However, toxicity tests on mustard-seed germination did not reveal any significant changes during composting and maturation phases.

  4. Bacterial communities in PAH contaminated soils at an electronic-waste processing center in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Rui; Yu, Xie-Zhi; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Wong, M H

    2010-01-01

    Surface soils from Guiyu, China (an intense e-waste processing center) were analyzed for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and variations in composition of the resident bacterial communities. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene showed that e-waste pollution altered the bacterial community structure by promoting changes in species composition and species richness. Bacterial diversity was not decreased at e-waste open-burning sites, compared with a non e-waste site (reservoir site), due to flourishing of possible POPs-consuming bacterial cohorts. PAH-incubated experiments confirmed that different levels of PAHs might affect the bacterial community by suppressing or favoring certain groups of bacteria, for instance, uncultured Clostridium sp. and Massilia sp., respectively. Taxonomic analysis indicated beta-proteobacteria and Firmicutes were abundant bacterial lineages in PAH-polluted soils. This study is the first reporting bacterial community structures at e-waste processing sites, and indicated that crude processing of e-waste has become a biohazard to the terrestrial environment warranting more extensive studies of microbial communities at e-waste polluted environments.

  5. Heavy metal effects on the biodegradation of fluorene by Sphingobacterium sp. KM-02 isolated from PAHs-contaminated mine soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, I.; Chon, C.; Jung, K.; Kim, J.

    2012-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment and occur ubiquitously in fossil fuels as well as in products of incomplete combustion and are known to be strongly toxic, often with carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. Fluorene is one of the 16 PAHs included in the list of priority pollutants of the Environmental Protection Agency. The fluorene-degrading bacterial strain Sphingobacterium sp. KM-02 was isolated from PAHs-contaminated soil near an abandoned mine impacted area by selective enrichment techniques. Fluorene added to the Sphingobacterium sp. KM-02 culture as sole carbon and energy source was 78.4% removed within 120 h. A fluorene degradation pathway is tentatively proposed based on mass spectrometric identification of the metabolic intermediates 9-fluorenone, 4-hydroxy-9-fluorenone, and 8-hydroxy-3,4-benzocoumarin. Further the ability of Sphingobacterium sp. KM-02 to bioremediate 100 mg/kg fluorene in mine soil was examined by composting under laboratory conditions. Treatment of microcosm soil with the strain KM-02 for 20 days resulted in a 65.6% reduction in total amounts. These results demonstrate that Sphingobacterium sp. KM-02 could potentially be used in the bioremediation of fluorene from contaminated soil. Mine impacted area comprises considerable amounts of heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic, and copper. Although some of these metals are necessary for biological life, excessive quantities often result in the inhibition of essential biological reactions via numerous pathways. A number of reports collectively show that various metals, such as Al, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Hg at a range of concentrations have adverse effects on the degradation of organic compounds. However, at present there is only limited information on the effect of individual heavy metals on the biological degradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including fluorene. Moreover, heavy metal effects were not

  6. Tenax TA extraction to understand the rate-limiting factors in methyl-β-cyclodextrin-enhanced bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingming; Luo, Yongming; Teng, Ying; Christie, Peter; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Zhengao

    2013-06-01

    The effectiveness of many bioremediation systems for PAH-contaminated soil may be constrained by low contaminant bioaccessibility due to limited aqueous solubility or large sorption capacity. Information on the extent to which PAHs can be readily biodegraded is of vital importance in the decision whether or not to remediate a contaminated soil. In the present study the rate-limiting factors in methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD)-enhanced bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil were evaluated. MCD amendment at 10 % (w/w) combined with inoculation with the PAH-degrading bacterium Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2 produced maximum removal of total PAHs of up to 35 %. The desorption of PAHs from contaminated soil was determined before and after 32 weeks of bioremediation. 10 % (w/w) MCD amendment (M2) increased the Tenax extraction of total PAHs from 12 to 30 % and promoted degradation by up to 26 % compared to 6 % in the control. However, the percentage of Tenax extraction for total PAHs was much larger than that of degradation. Thus, in the control and M2 treatment it is likely that during the initial phase the bioaccessibility of PAHs is high and biodegradation rates may be limited by microbial processes. On the other hand, when the soil was inoculated with the PAH-degrading bacterium (CKB and MB2), the slowly and very slowly desorbing fractions (F sl and F vl ) became larger and the rate constants of slow and very slow desorption (k sl and k vl ) became extremely small after bioremediation, suggesting that desorption is likely rate limiting during the second, slow phase of biotransformation. These results have practical implications for site risk assessment and cleanup strategies.

  7. Remediation of PAH-contaminated soil at a gas manufacturing plant by a combined two-phase partition system washing and microbial degradation process.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xuan; Xu, Xinyang; Gong, Zongqiang; Li, Xiaojun; Jia, Chunyun; Guo, Meixia; Li, Haibo

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to design a remediation technique using both soil washing and microbial degradation to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soil. PAH biodegradation by inoculation of Mycobacterium sp. was first tested. The effectiveness of washing agents (Tween 80 solution, biodiesel, and a two-phase partition system (TPPS)) was then evaluated with column experiments. Third, the combination of TPPS washing and microbial degradation was studied. PAH bioavailability before and after biodegradation and the joint remediation was also assessed using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) extraction. Only phenanthrene and anthracene were noticeably biodegradable when the soil was inoculated with Mycobacterium sp. TPPS containing 2% (v/v) biodiesel and 2.5% (w/v) Tween 80 was used as the washing agent for the joint remediation test because it gave higher PAH extractions than Tween 80 solution with lower doses, and there was less residue in the soil. Joint TPPS washing and microbial degradation gave a total PAH removal of 92.6%, which was much higher than the results from either the biodegradation or washing experiments alone. Removals of all high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs were improved. Bioavailable concentrations of all PAHs decreased significantly after the joint remediation process, indicating that there were reduced risks from all PAHs. The results demonstrate that the combination of TPPS washing and microbial degradation is a useful and innovative process for remediation of PAH-contaminated soils.

  8. Bioremediation of PAH-contamined soils: Consequences on formation and degradation of polar-polycyclic aromatic compounds and microbial community abundance.

    PubMed

    Biache, Coralie; Ouali, Salma; Cébron, Aurélie; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Colombano, Stéfan; Faure, Pierre

    2017-05-05

    A bioslurry batch experiment was carried out over five months on three polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) contaminated soils to study the PAC (PAH and polar-PAC) behavior during soil incubation and to evaluate the impact of PAC contamination on the abundance of microbial communities and functional PAH-degrading populations. Organic matter characteristics and reactivity, assessed through solvent extractable organic matter and PAC contents, and soil organic matter mineralization were monitored during 5 months. Total bacteria and fungi, and PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase genes were quantified. Results showed that PAHs and polar-PACs were degraded with different degradation dynamics. Differences in degradation rates were observed among the three soils depending on PAH distribution and availability. Overall, low molecular weight compounds were preferentially degraded. Degradation selectivity between isomers and structurally similar compounds was observed which could be used to check the efficiency of bioremediation processes. Bacterial communities were dominant over fungi and were most likely responsible for PAC degradation. Abundance of PAH-degrading bacteria increased during incubations, but their proportion in the bacterial communities tended to decrease. The accumulation of some oxygenated-PACs during the bioslurry experiment underlines the necessity to monitor these compounds during application of remediation treatment on PAH contaminated soils.

  9. {sup 32}P-postlabeling determination of DNA adducts in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris exposed to PAH-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P. |; El Adlouni, C.; Mukhopadhyay, M.J.; Nadeau, D.; Poirier, G.G.; Viel, G.

    1995-05-01

    The importance of the search for reliable biomarkers of DNA damage in environmental health assessment is well recognized by the scientific community and regulatory agencies. Among the major biomarkers of DNA damage is the measurement of DNA adducts in target cells or tissues. Up to now, DNA adduct determinations have been directed mostly toward human exposure to toxic substances from the workplace and environment. Moreover, techniques for measuring DNA adducts, and in particular the {sup 32}P-postlabelling technique, presented also the possibility of determining DNA adduct levels in endogenous animal populations exposed to polluted environments as early warning monitors of ecotoxicity. Soil contamination is becoming a major environmental issue. Therefore, numerous contaminated sites must now be remediated to protect human health and to permit new uses of these sites as agricultural, residential, or industrial areas. Fulfillment of this task requires standardized and sensitive bioassays to carry out site evaluations and to establish scientifically defensible soil quality criteria. To that effect, the earthworm appears to be one of the best organisms for use in soil toxicity evaluation. Earthworms are probably the most relevant soil species, representing 60 to 80% of the total animal biomass in soil. Present soil bioassays focus mostly on plant species with end points like seed germination, root elongation, seedling growth and seedling emergence, and on acute toxicity evaluation (re: LC 50) on the earthworm Eisenia fetida. As yet, a standardized soil invertebrate test for teratogenic or mutagenic end points has not been developed. In this paper, we report the feasibility of DNA adduct determination by {sup 32}P-postlabelling in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris as a way to detect the presence of genotoxic substances in soils. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. [Comparison of bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contaminated soil by composting in the spring and winter].

    PubMed

    Fang, Yun; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Wei, Yuan-Song; Yang, Yu; Shen, Ying; Zheng, Jia-Xi

    2010-06-01

    In this study, lab-scale bioremediation experiments of soil contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) with aerated composting were compared in the Spring and Winter. Results showed that PAHs degradation rate in the winter was higher than that in the spring, and the total PAHs degradation rates were over 70% for both Pile 1 (the dry weight ratio of soil, swine manure and sawdust as 1: 1: 1) and Pile 2 (the dry weight ratio of soil, swine manure and sawdust as 1: 3: 1), but the PAHs degradation rate of Pile 1 as 74.61% was higher than that of Pile 2 the degradation rates of low, middle, high benzene-ring types PAHs were 66.46%, 79.12%, 75.88%, respectively. After composting most of kinds of PAHs contents in soil were less than 1 000 microg/kg (dry weight) except BbF, for example, BbF contents of these two piles in the Spring, 25 000 microg/kg and 20 000 microg/kg, respectively, were much higher than those in the winter experiments, both less than 5 000 microg/kg. The first reaction order model was used to simulate degradation of PAHs during composting, and results showed that the model was fitted better in winter (R2 > 0.6) than in spring, and the half-life of PAHs degradation in winter was about 13 d.

  11. Enhanced bioremediation process: A case study of effectiveness on PAH contamination in soils at a former wood-treating site

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.F.; Matens, B.L.; Buchalter, D.S.; Montgomery, D.N.

    1997-12-31

    The Enhanced Bioremediation Process (EBP) technology is an exsitu biodegradation process that utilizes bacterial and fungal inoculants to effectively oxidize and bioremediate persistent hard to degrade organics in contaminated soils. The EBP fungal inoculants produce highly reactive extracellular peroxidase enzymes that can oxidize and degrade lignin, a complex, natural polymer composed of phenylpropane units that is resistant to decay. The lignin peroxidase enzymes are highly nonspecific because of their ability to oxidize the heterogenic lignin molecule, and are capable of degrading a wide variety of complex organic compounds. Because the chemical sub-structure of lignin (1,2-aryl diethers, alkyl sidechains and connected aryl systems) resembles that of many persistent organic compounds, the EBP inoculants are very effective in biodegrading similar hazardous organic pollutants in contaminated soils. As an inadvertent by-product of these biochemical processes, the EBP organisms reduce the organic constituents to a soluble form. In a soluble form, the indigenous organisms can further degrade the contaminants. The technology is applied in such a manner as to maximize the activity of the indigenous organisms by establishing optimum growth conditions. The efficacy of the EBP technology in degrading persistent environmental pollutants has been documented at both the bench scale and pilot demonstration levels. A recently completed field pilot demonstration was conducted at a creosote contaminated site. The demonstration entailed the treatment of approximately 700 tons of soil contaminated with PAH constituents. Laboratory analyses of pre and post-treated soils indicate that total average PAH concentrations in many samples were reduced by greater than 91 percent over a two month treatment period.

  12. Assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contamination in surface soil of coal stockpile sites in South Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mizwar, Andy; Priatmadi, Bambang Joko; Abdi, Chairul; Trihadiningrum, Yulinah

    2016-03-01

    Concentrations, spatial distribution, and sources of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), listed as priority pollutants by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), were investigated in surface soils of three different coal stockpile, agricultural, and residential sites in South Kalimantan Province, Indonesia. Total PAHs concentration ranged from 4.69 to 22.67 mg kg(-1)-dw. PAHs concentrations in soil of coal stockpile sites were higher than those in agricultural and residential soil. A complex of petrogenic origin and pyrolytic sources was found within the study area, as suggested by the isomeric ratios of PAHs. The results of principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions (PCA/MLR) showed that three sources contributed to the PAHs in the study area, including biomass and coal combustion (48.46%), raw coal (35.49%), and vehicular emission (16.05%). The high value of total benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration (B[a]Peq) suggests that local residents are exposed to a high carcinogenic potential.

  13. Effects of different agricultural wastes on the dissipation of PAHs and the PAH-degrading genes in a PAH-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Han, Xuemei; Hu, Hangwei; Shi, Xiuzhen; Zhang, Limei; He, Jizheng

    2017-04-01

    Land application of agricultural wastes is considered as a promising bioremediation approach for cleaning up soils contaminated by aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, it remains largely unknown about how microbial PAH-degraders, which play a key role in the biodegradation of soil PAHs, respond to the amendments of agricultural wastes. Here, a 90-day soil microcosm study was conducted to compare the effects of three agricultural wastes (i.e. WS, wheat stalk; MCSW, mushroom cultivation substrate waste; and CM, cow manure) on the dissipation of aged PAHs and the abundance and community structure of PAH-degrading microorganisms. The results showed that all the three agricultural wastes accelerated the dissipation of aged PAHs and significantly increased abundances of the bacterial 16S rRNA and PAH-degrading genes (i.e. pdo1 and nah). CM and MCSW with lower ratios of C:N eliminated soil PAHs more efficiently than WS with a high ratio of C:N. Low molecular weight PAHs were dissipated more quickly than those with high molecular weight. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all of the nah and C12O clones were affiliated within Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and application of agricultural wastes significantly changed the community structure of the microorganisms harboring nah and C12O genes, particularly in the CM treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that the three tested agricultural wastes could accelerate the degradation of aged PAHs most likely through changing the abundances and community structure of microbial PAH degraders.

  14. Effectiveness of an anaerobic granular activated carbon fluidized-bed bioreactor to treat soil wash fluids: a proposed strategy for remediating PCP/PAH contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Koran, K M; Suidan, M T; Khodadoust, A P; Sorial, G A; Brenner, R C

    2001-07-01

    An integrated system has been developed to remediate soils contaminated with pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This system involves the coupling of two treatment technologies, soil-solvent washing and anaerobic biotreatment of the extract. Specifically, this study evaluated the effectiveness of a granular activated carbon (GAC) fluidized-bed reactor to treat a synthetic-waste stream of PCP and four PAHs (naphthalene, acenaphthene, pyrene, and benzo(b)fluoranthene) under anaerobic conditions. This waste stream was intended to simulate the wash fluids from a soil washing process treating soils from a wood-preserving site. The reactor achieved a removal efficiency of greater than 99.8% for PCP with conversion to its dechlorination intermediates averaging 46.5%. Effluent, carbon extraction, and isotherm data also indicate that naphthalene and acenaphthene were removed from the liquid phase with efficiencies of 86 and 93%, respectively. Effluent levels of pyrene and benzo(b)fluoranthene were extremely low due to the high-adsorptive capacity of GAC for these compounds. Experimental evidence does not suggest that the latter two compounds were biochemically transformed within the reactor.

  15. Micromorphology and stable-isotope geochemistry of historical pedogenic siderite formed in PAH-contaminated alluvial clay soils, Tennessee, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driese, S.G.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Roberts, J.A.; Fowle, D.A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Smith, J.J.; Vulava, V.M.; McKay, L.D.

    2010-01-01

    Alluvial clay soil samples from six boreholes advanced to depths of 400-450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP) site were examined micromorphologically and geochemically in order to determine if pedogenic siderite (FeCO3) was present and whether siderite occurrence was related to organic contaminant distribution. Samples from shallow depths were generally more heavily contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) than those at greater depth. The upper 1 m in most boreholes consisted of mixtures of anthropogenically remolded clay soil fill containing coal clinker, cinder grains, and limestone gravel; most layers of coarse fill were impregnated with creosote and coal tar. Most undisturbed soil (below 1 m depth) consisted of highly structured clays exhibiting fine subangular blocky ped structures, as well as redox-related features. Pedogenic siderite was abundant in the upper 2 m of most cores and in demonstrably historical (< 100 years old) soil matrices. Two morphologies were identified: (1) sphaerosiderite crystal spherulites ranging from 10 to 200 um in diameter, and (2) coccoid siderite comprising grape-like "clusters" of crystals 5-20 ??n in diameter. The siderite, formed in both macropores and within fine-grained clay matrices, indicates development of localized anaerobic, low-Eh conditions, possibly due to microbial degradation of organic contaminants. Stable-isotope compositions of the siderite have ??13C values spanning over 25%o (+7 to - 18%o VPDB) indicating fractionation of DIC by multiple microbial metabolic pathways, but with relatively constant ??18O values from (-4.8 ?? 0.66%o VPDB) defining a meteoric sphaerosiderite line (MSL). Calculated isotope equilibrium water ??18O values from pedogenic siderites at the CCP site are from 1 to 5 per mil lighter than the groundwater ??18O values that we estimate for the site. If confirmed by field studies in progress, this observation might call for a reevaluation of

  16. Response of microbial activities and diversity to PAHs contamination at coal tar contaminated land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Sun, Yujiao; Ding, Aizhong; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Dayi

    2015-04-01

    Coal tar is one of the most hazardous and concerned organic pollutants and the main hazards are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The indigenous microorganisms in soils are capable to degrade PAHs, with essential roles in biochemical process for PAHs natural attenuation. This study investigated 48 soil samples (from 8 depths of 6 boreholes) in Beijing coking and chemistry plant (China) and revealed the correlation between PAHs contamination, soil enzyme activities and microbial community structure, by 16S rRNA denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). At the site, the key contaminants were identified as naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene and anthracene, and the total PAHs concentration ranged from 0.1 to 923.9 mg/kg dry soil. The total PAHs contamination level was positively correlated (p<0.05) with the bacteria count (0.9×107-14.2×107 CFU/mL), catalase activities (0.554-6.230 mL 0.02 M KMnO4/g•h) and dehydrogenase activities (1.9-30.4 TF μg/g•h soil), showing the significant response of microbial population and degrading functions to the organic contamination in soils. The PAHs contamination stimulated the PAHs degrading microbes and promoted their biochemical roles in situ. The positive relationship between bacteria count and dehydrogenase activities (p<0.05) suggested the dominancy of PAHs degrading bacteria in the microbial community. More interestingly, the microbial community deterioration was uncovered via the decline of microbial biodiversity (richness from 16S rRNA DGGE) against total PAHs concentration (p<0.05). Our research described the spatial profiles of PAHs contamination and soil microbial functions at the PAHs heavily contaminated sites, offering deeper understanding on the roles of indigenous microbial community in natural attenuation process.

  17. PLFA analyses of microbial communities associated with PAH-contaminated riverbank sediment.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Brenda; Riesen, Roland; Johnston, Carl G

    2012-10-01

    Sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems. The microbial community structure of riverbank PAH-contaminated sediments was investigated using phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Surface and subsurface riverbank sediment was collected from a highly contaminated site and from an uncontaminated site along the Mahoning River, OH. PAH concentrations, physical sediment characteristics, and other microbial community parameters (biomass as phospholipid phosphate (PLP) and activity) were also measured. PAHs were detected in all samples but were only quantifiable in the contaminated (250 μg/g g(-1)) subsurface sediment. Subsurface samples from both locations showed very similar PLP values and distribution of PLFAs, with 27-37 % of the microbial community structure being composed of sulfate reducing and other anaerobic bacteria. Principal components analysis indicated no correlation between PAH contamination and PLFA diversity. Although PLP and phospholipid fatty acid measurements of bacterial communities did not reflect the environmental differences among sites, the highly PAH-contaminated sediment showed the highest measured microbial activity (reduction of 1,200 nmol INT g(-1) h(-1)), likely from a population adapted to environmental pollutants, rates that are much higher than measured in many uncontaminated soil and sediment systems. These data warrant further investigation into community structure at the genetic level and indicate potential for bioremediation by indigenous microbes.

  18. Bioavailability and biodegradation kinetics protocol for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil to enhance bioremediation and to achieve environmentally acceptable endpoints during treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, H.H.; Govind, R.; Fu, C.; Gao, C.

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation of polluted soil requires a fundamental understanding of biodegradation kinetics and the physicochemical factors that control the rate of biodegradation. A systematic multi-level indigenous microbiota, the transport and diffusivity parameters of soil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants and oxygen limitation in freshly PAH spiked and PAH contaminated aged soil matrices. Abiotic adsorption and desorption experiments were conducted to obtain nonlinear isotherms described by the Freundlich isotherm equation. Detailed mathematical models were developed for the four bioreactors and abiotic adsorption and desorption studies together with cumulative oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide evolution data are used to derive the PAH contaminant and oxygen diffusivities in the freshly PAH spiked and PAH contaminated aged soil matrices. Studies included the use of microcosms to qualitatively assess the biodegradation rates and testing with radiolabeled compounds to determine mineralization. Studies with PAH contaminated Reilly Tar soils were undertaken to determine the effect of soil properties on the sequestering process that leads to diminished bioavailability; to evaluate the effect of chemical inducers, surfactants, nutrients, cometabolites, inoculum amendments and moisture content on the rate and extent of PAH biodegradation; and to establish the best attainable environmental endpoints for PAH pollutants in aged soils.

  19. Characterization and FATE of PAH-contaminated sediments at the Wyckoff/Eagle Harbor Superfund Site.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Richard C; Magar, Victor S; Ickes, Jennifer A; Abbott, James E; Stout, Scott A; Crecelius, Eric A; Bingler, Linda S

    2002-06-15

    Eagle Harbor, a shallow marine embayment of Bainbridge Island, WA approximately 10 miles west of Seattle, WA), was formerly the site of the Wyckoff wood-treatment facility. The facility used large quantities of creosote in its wood-treating processes from the early 1900s to 1988. Historical creosote seepage into the harbor resulted in substantial accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in the harbor sediments over time. This investigation focused on the distribution and fate of the PAH-contaminated harbor sediments. Analyses of 10 sediment cores using total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) fingerprinting, the distribution of 50 PAH analytes, and sediment age dating revealed the contributions of three distinct sources of PAHs to sediment contamination in the harbor during various periods over the past 100 years; namely, creosote, urban runoff, and natural background. Surface sediments (upper 20-30 cm) in the cores closestto the Wyckoff wood-treatment facility and southeast of an existing cap were dominated by urban runoff and weathered creosote; the deeper sediments (> 30 cm) were heavily contaminated with relatively unweathered creosote and some pure-phase creosote. Cores located the furthest from the area of contamination, in the center of the harbor, were dominated by urban runoff, showed no signs of creosote contamination, and had much lower PAH and TPH concentrations than those adjacent to the facility. In the four cores in the center of the Harbor, farthest from the former Wyckoff facility, PAH concentrations increased significantly (p < 0.01) with proximity to the northern shore of the harbor, which is more heavily developed than the southern shore and is where all automobile traffic enters and exits the island through the Bainbridge Island ferry terminal. Deeper portions of these cores were contaminated primarily with natural background PAHs, likely representing preurbanization sediments. Sedimentation rates ranged from 0.54 to 1.10 gm

  20. Using slow-release permanganate candles to remediate PAH-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Lindy; Sakulthaew, Chainarong; Comfort, Steve

    2012-11-30

    Surface waters impacted by urban runoff in metropolitan areas are becoming increasingly contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Slow-release oxidant candles (paraffin-KMnO(4)) are a relatively new technology being used to treat contaminated groundwater and could potentially be used to treat urban runoff. Given that these candles only release permanganate when submerged, the ephemeral nature of runoff events would influence when the permanganate is released for treating PAHs. Our objective was to determine if slow-release permanganate candles could be used to degrade and mineralize PAHs. Batch experiments quantified PAH degradation rates in the presence of the oxidant candles. Results showed most of the 16 PAHs tested were degraded within 2-4 h. Using (14)C-labled phenanthrene and benzo(a)pyrene, we demonstrated that the wax matrix of the candle initially adsorbs the PAH, but then releases the PAH back into solution as transformed, more water soluble products. While permanganate was unable to mineralize the PAHs (i.e., convert to CO(2)), we found that the permanganate-treated PAHs were much more biodegradable in soil microcosms. To test the concept of using candles to treat PAHs in multiple runoff events, we used a flow-through system where urban runoff water was pumped over a miniature candle in repetitive wet-dry, 24-h cycles. Results showed that the candle was robust in removing PAHs by repeatedly releasing permanganate and degrading the PAHs. These results provide proof-of-concept that permanganate candles could potentially provide a low-cost, low-maintenance approach to remediating PAH-contaminated water.

  1. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH TO EVALUATING IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity tests were used to measure baseline toxicity of sediment samples collected from New Jersey/New York Harbor (NJ/NY) (non-PAH- contaminated) sediment (ERC). Four freshwater toxicity tests were used: 1) amphipod (Hyalella azteca) mortality and...

  2. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH FOR THE EVALUATION OF IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity test were used to measure baseline toxicity of sediment samples collected from New York/New Jersey Harbor (NY/NJH) and East River (ER) (PAH contaminated) sediments and to determine the effectiveness of the developed biotreatment strategies ...

  3. PAH contamination in Beijing’s topsoil: A unique indicator of the megacity’s evolving energy consumption and overall environmental quality

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinguo; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Xiaolin; Lin, Zhongrong; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    To improve its air quality, Beijing, the capital of China, has implemented high-cost pollution control measures mainly focused on shifting its energy mix. However, the effectiveness of these measures has long been questioned, especially given the recent problem of severe haze. The main study objectives are to achieve independent, although indirect, information on Beijing’s air pollution by measuring the level of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in topsoil and to examine how soil contamination reflects energy consumption. Soil sampling data from two years, 2004 and 2013, were used. The key findings are as follows: 1) although the total PAH content in the topsoil did not significantly decrease from 2004 to 2013, the composition changed considerably; 2) as of 2013, vehicle emissions replaced coal combustion as the leading source of soil PAHs, which validates the existing policy measures regarding vehicle purchasing and traffic volume; 3) the regional transport of atmospheric pollutants, as indicated by the contribution of coking sources in 2013, is not negligible; and 4) appropriate policy measures are needed to control the growing practice of burning biomass. Overall, this study demonstrates that the PAH contamination in topsoil represents an informative indicator of Beijing’s energy consumption and overall environmental quality. PMID:27633056

  4. PAH contamination in Beijing’s topsoil: A unique indicator of the megacity’s evolving energy consumption and overall environmental quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinguo; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Xiaolin; Lin, Zhongrong; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xuejun

    2016-09-01

    To improve its air quality, Beijing, the capital of China, has implemented high-cost pollution control measures mainly focused on shifting its energy mix. However, the effectiveness of these measures has long been questioned, especially given the recent problem of severe haze. The main study objectives are to achieve independent, although indirect, information on Beijing’s air pollution by measuring the level of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in topsoil and to examine how soil contamination reflects energy consumption. Soil sampling data from two years, 2004 and 2013, were used. The key findings are as follows: 1) although the total PAH content in the topsoil did not significantly decrease from 2004 to 2013, the composition changed considerably; 2) as of 2013, vehicle emissions replaced coal combustion as the leading source of soil PAHs, which validates the existing policy measures regarding vehicle purchasing and traffic volume; 3) the regional transport of atmospheric pollutants, as indicated by the contribution of coking sources in 2013, is not negligible; and 4) appropriate policy measures are needed to control the growing practice of burning biomass. Overall, this study demonstrates that the PAH contamination in topsoil represents an informative indicator of Beijing’s energy consumption and overall environmental quality.

  5. Comparison of rapid solvent extraction systems for the GC-MS/MS characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aged, contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Haleyur, Nagalakshmi; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Mansur, Abdulatif A; Koshlaf, Eman; Morrison, Paul D; Osborn, A Mark; Ball, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major class of organic hydrocarbons with high molecular weight that originate from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Sixteen PAHs are included in the U.S Environmental Protection agency list of priority pollutants due to their mutagenic, carcinogenic, toxic and teratogenic properties. In this study, the development and optimization of a simplified and rapid solvent extraction for the characterisation of 16 USEPA priority poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aged contaminated soils was established with subsequent analysis by GC-MS/MS. •Five different extraction solvent systems: dichloromethane: acetone, chloroform: methanol, dichloromethane, acetone: hexane and hexane were assessed in terms of their ability to extract PAHs from aged PAH-contaminated soils.•Highest PAH concentrations were extracted using acetone: hexane and chloroform: methanol. Given the greater toxicity associated with chloroform: methanol, acetone: hexane appears the best choice of solvent extraction system.•This protocol enables efficient extraction of PAHs from aged weathered soils.

  6. Phototoxic evaluation of marine sediments collected from a PAH-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Boese, B L; Ozretich, R J; Lamberson, J O; Cole, F A; Swartz, R C; Ferraro, S P

    2000-04-01

    The phototoxicity potential of PAH-contaminated field sediment was evaluated and compared to standard sediment toxicity test results. Marine sediments were collected from 30 sites along a presumed PAH sediment pollution gradient in Elliot Bay, WA. Standard 10-day acute and 28-day chronic sediment toxicity tests were conducted with the infaunal amphipods Rhepoxynius abronius and Leptocheirus plumulosus using mortality and the ability to rebury as endpoints. The survivors of these tests were then subjected to 1-h exposures to UV radiation with mortality and reburial again determined. The most highly toxic sediments identified in these experiments were evaluated further for toxicity and phototoxicity by serially diluting them with uncontaminated sediment and repeating the toxicity tests. Standard 10-day toxicity test results indicated that over 70% of the sites sampled in Elliot Bay exhibited measurable toxicity with nine sites being highly toxic to both species of amphipods. Results of standard 28-day chronic sediment toxicity tests were similar. In contrast, almost all of the sites were found to be highly phototoxic. Results indicated that exposure to UV increased toxicity five- to eightfold. This suggests that standard toxicity tests underestimate the potential ecological risk of PAH-contaminated sediments in animals exposed to sunlight. However, only when PAH contamination was between 0.05 and 1.0 toxic units would conducting a phototoxicity evaluation add information to that gained from conducting a standard sediment toxicity test alone.

  7. Remediation of PAH-contaminated sediments by chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ferrarese, Elisa; Andreottola, Gianni; Oprea, Irina Aura

    2008-03-21

    The aim of this experimental investigation was to assess the feasibility of using chemical oxidation to degrade sorbed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in case of old date sediment contamination. For this purpose several bench scale laboratory tests were performed, with the following liquid reactants: hydrogen peroxide, modified Fenton's reagent, activated sodium persulfate, potassium permanganate, as well as a combination of potassium permanganate and hydrogen peroxide, and a combination of activated sodium persulfate and hydrogen peroxide. The main target of the study was to find out what liquid oxidant was more effective in reducing the pollutant content and to assess the optimal reactant doses. The initial total PAH concentration in sediment samples was about 2800mg/kgSS (light PAHs about 1600mg/kgSS, heavy PAHs about 1200mg/kgSS) and a 95% degradation was required to meet the remediation goals. Based on the results of this study, chemical oxidation proved to be an effective remediation technology, amenably applicable for the ex situ remediation of the sediments of concern. Different reactants resulted however in different removal efficiencies. The best remediation performances were achieved with the use of modified Fenton's reagent, hydrogen peroxide and potassium permanganate, with oxidant dosages about 100mmols per 30g sediment sample. In all these cases the residual heavy PAH concentration in the treated samples was below 100mg/kgSS. The optimal oxidant dosages determined in this study were quite high, as sorbed PAH mineralization requires very vigorous oxidation conditions, especially for soils and sediments with high organic matter content. The results indicated that the optimal oxidant dose must be carefully determined under site-specific conditions. In fact, if the oxidation conditions are not strong enough, the reactants cannot be able to attack the most recalcitrant compounds, while also too high oxidant doses can result in a decrease in the

  8. Review of PAH contamination in food products and their health hazards.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vasudha; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    Public concern over the deleterious effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has grown rapidly due to recognition of their toxicity, carcinogenicity, and teratogenicity. The aim of this review is to describe the status of PAH pollution among different food types, the route of dietary intake, measures for its reduction, and legislative approaches to control PAH. To this end, a comprehensive review is outlined to evaluate the status of PAH contamination in many important food categories along with dietary recommendations. Our discussion is also extended to describe preventive measures to reduce PAH in food products to help reduce the risks associated with human intake.

  9. Molecular and stable carbon isotopic characterization of PAH contaminants at McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonkoo; Kennicutt, Mahlon C; Qian, Yaorong

    2006-12-01

    The molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of contaminant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at McMurdo Station, Antarctica were analyzed in samples collected from land and sub-tidal area. PAHs in the study areas were characterized by high amounts of naphthalene and alkylated naphthalenes from petroleum products introduced by human activities in the area. Principal component analysis (PCA) of PAH composition data identified multiple sources of PAH contamination in the study area. Compositional assignments of origins were confirmed using compound specific stable carbon isotopic analysis.

  10. Monitoring nutrient impact on bacterial community composition during bioremediation of anoxic PAH-contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsu; Bae, Seung Seob; Seol, Mijin; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Oh, Young-Sook

    2008-12-01

    Marine harbor sediments are frequently polluted with significant amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) some of which are naturally toxic, recalcitrant, mutagenic, and carcinogenic. To stimulate biodegradation of PAHs in PAH-contaminated sediments collected from near Gwangyang Bay, Korea, lactate was chosen as a supplementary carbonaceous substrate. Sediment packed into 600 ml air-tight jar was either under no treatment condition or lactate amended condition (1%, w/v). Microbial community composition was monitored by bacteria-specific and archaea-specific PCR-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in addition to measuring the residual PAH concentration. Results showed that lactate amendment enhanced biodegradation rate of PAHs in the sediment by 4 to 8 times, and caused a significant shift in archaebacterial community in terms of structure and diversity with time. Phylogenetic analysis of 23 archaeal clones with distinctive RFLP patterns among 288 archaeal clones indicated that majority of the archaeal members were closest to unculturable environmental rDNA clones from hydrocarbon-contaminated and/or methanogenesis-bearing sediments. Lactate amendment led to the enrichment of some clones that were most closely related to PAH-degrading Methanosarcina species. These results suggest a possible contribution of methanogenic community to PAH degradation and give us more insights on how to effectively remediate PAH-contaminated sediments.

  11. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated microbial activity in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingming; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Zhengao; Teng, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is a widespread environmental problem and the remediation of PAHs from these areas has been a major concern. The effectiveness of many in situ bioremediation systems may be constrained by low contaminant bioavailability due to limited aqueous solubility or a large magnitude of sorption. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) on bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2 of an aged PAH-contaminated soil. When 10% (W/W) MCD amendment was combined with bioaugmentation by the PAH-degrading bacterium Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2, the percentage degradation of total PAHs was significantly enhanced up to 34.8%. Higher counts of culturable PAH-degrading bacteria and higher soil dehydrogenase and soil polyphenol oxidase activities were observed in 10% (W/W) MCD-assisted bioaugmentation soil. This MCD-assisted bioaugmentation strategy showed significant increases (p < 0.05) in the average well color development (AWCD) obtained by the BIOLOG Eco plate assay, Shannon-Weaver index (H) and Simpson index (lambda) compared with the controls, implying that this strategy at least partially restored the microbiological functioning of the PAH-contaminated soil. The results suggest that MCD-aided bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2 may be a promising practical bioremediation strategy for aged PAH-contaminated soils.

  12. Chemical and biological risk assessment of chronic exposure to PAH contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Means, J.; McMillin, D.; Kondapi, N.

    1995-12-31

    Chronically contaminated sediments represent a long-term source of mixtures of contaminants, exposing aquatic ecosystems to PAH through desorption and bioaccumulation. Chronic toxicity assessments must address potential of these bond contaminants. Environmental impacts and ecological health hazards of sediment-bound normal, alkylated and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are functions of their entry into aquatic food webs and are controlled by both abiotic and biotic factors. Laboratory and field microcosm exposures of fish and invertebrates were conducted followed by assessments of effects using chemical analysis and biomarkers of potential genotoxic effects. Chemical analysis of accumulated residues of 62 individual PAH were conducted in oysters, Crassostrea virginica exposed to PAH contaminated sediments in the field. The rates and equilibrium bioaccumulation constants for each were determined. Fish were exposed to the same contaminated sediments in laboratory and field exposures. Measurements of ethoxy-resorufin-o-deethylase activity induction as well as alterations in the expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene were performed on exposed fish liver samples. EROD activities were increased significantly relative to unexposed and laboratory/field control sediment-exposed fish, however, the responses of individuals were highly variable. Fundulus grandis or Gambusia affinis, exposed to contaminated sediments in the laboratory, revealed changes in the expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. The degree to which mutations within the gene occurred was assessed using PCR followed by measurement of single stranded DNA polymorphisms using gel electrophoresis chromatography.

  13. TIE of a PAH-contaminated sediment using reproductive responses and EROD induction in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Brumley, C.M.; Kraak, G. van der; Munkittrick, K.R.

    1995-12-31

    PAH-contaminated sediments have been shown to cause a range of effects in fish. However, identifying the effective compounds can be time consuming and expensive. A toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) involves the analysis of mixtures by initially separating the mixture into toxic and non-toxic constituents. In this study, sediment was collected from Hamilton Harbor, Lake Ontario, and either extracted wet using methanol (MeOH) and dichloromethane (DCM), or freeze-dried and soxhlet extracted with MeOH and DCM. DCM extracts were solvent exchanged with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed through the water to wet, freeze-dried, or extracted sediment, or to the MeOH or DMSO extracts for 4 days. Fish were analyzed for hepatic EROD activity, and plasma DMSO extracts, but was unaffected in fish exposed to extracted sediment. Estradiol levels were increased in fish exposed to the wet sediment, but not in fish exposed to the freeze-dried or extracted sediment, nor either of the solvent extracts. The response of testosterone to wet, freeze-dried and extracted sediment was inconsistent. Results indicate that both of the extraction methods efficiently removed from the sediment the compounds responsible for the effects on EROD activity and estradiol levels. However, neither method retained in the solvent extracts the compounds causing the increases in estradiol levels. Work continues to refine the freeze-drying and extraction methods; extracts will then be further fractionated using HPLC to identify the compounds of concern.

  14. A comparison of bioaugmentation and intrinsic in situ bioremediation of a PAH contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, T.; Mortier, N.; Chaparian, M.

    1995-12-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one of the most common environmental hazards, naturally occurring in petroleum and its by-products. They are encountered at nearly all UST sites, and present an impediment to the use of cost effective intrinsic in situ bioremediation due to their recalcitrant nature. Even bacteria isolated specifically for their ability to degrade PAHs in the laboratory have shown no significant degradative capabilities in the field. This is due to the unique balance that exists at every contaminated site between the microbial ecology, chemical, physical, and environmental factors. Therefore, bacteria indigenous to the site and acclimated to these environmental parameters should be well suited for use in bioaugmentation. Based on this assumption, a new and innovative approach to bioaugmentation has been developed which consists of a series of scientifically-sound, rational steps in the use of this technology. Initially, careful chemical and biological analyses of site samples are conducted using conventional analytical instrumentation and state-of-the-art microbiological, biochemical, and molecular biological techniques. Bacteria from site samples that demonstrate potential PAH degradative capability are isolated. The bacteria are then enriched in culture and re-introduced to the site with appropriate nutrients. Further, this approach encompasses the proposed guidelines for proving the efficacy of in situ bioremediation as set forth by the National Science Foundation. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach, data are presented here of a laboratory-scale trial of a PAH contaminated site.

  15. Assessment of DDT, HCH and PAH contamination and associated ecotoxicological risks in surface sediments of coastal Tema Harbour (Ghana).

    PubMed

    Botwe, Benjamin O; Kelderman, Peter; Nyarko, Elvis; Lens, Piet N L

    2017-02-15

    This study assessed DDTs, HCHs and PAHs contamination in sediments from the Tema Harbour (Ghana) and the associated ecotoxicological risks. The results showed widespread DDTs, HCHs and PAHs contamination in the harbour sediments with mean concentrations ranging from 6.0-12.8, 2.8-12.7 and 2750-5130μg·kg(-1)d·w, respectively. The silt-clay and total organic carbon contents of the sediments poorly correlated with the pollutant concentrations. DDTs and HCHs contamination relate to past use of DDT and lindane, which under the anoxic harbour conditions resulted in disproportionately higher concentrations of p,p'-DDD and γ-HCH in the sediments. No conclusion could be drawn on the sources of PAHs as either petrogenic or pyrogenic. The pollutant concentrations in the harbour sediments, particularly γ-HCH, may pose high ecotoxicological risks. In comparison to a previous study, this study indicates there has been a considerable reduction in PAH contamination in the Tema Harbour since the last major oil spill in 2007.

  16. Application of Equilibrium Partitioning Theory to Soil PAH Contamination (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In March 2004, ORD's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) received a request from the Ecological Risk Assessment Forum (ERAF) to provide insight into the issue of whether equilibrium partitioning (EqP) techniques can be used to predict the toxicity of polycyclic arom...

  17. Characterization of degradation products of PAH contaminated soil after ozone treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Seibel, F.; Stieber, M.; Werner, P.; Frimmel, F.H.

    1995-12-31

    The oxidation effects of an ozone treatment using naphthalene (NAP), phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR) and a mixture of these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed on solid phases were studied. Due to ozonation, a decrease of the applied concentrations of each of the investigated compounds with respect to their molecular weights occurred (up to 86% for NAP, 73% for PHE and 50% for PYR). After ozonation, the formation of o-phthalaldehydic acid, o-phthalaldehyde, o-phthalic acid, oxalic acid, acetic-acid, formic acid, and diphenic acid was observed as oxidation products. Dependent on dosage, ozone was even able to oxidize the PAH to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O to a certain extent.

  18. Ca2+ Promoted the Low Transformation Efficiency of Plasmid DNA Exposed to PAH Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanzheng; Long, Jian; Wang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The effects of interactions between genetic materials and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on gene expression in the extracellular environment remain to be elucidated and little information is currently available on the effect of ionic strength on the transformation of plasmid DNA exposed to PAHs. Phenanthrene and pyrene were used as representative PAHs to evaluate the transformation of plasmid DNA after PAH exposure and to determine the role of Ca2+ during the transformation. Plasmid DNA exposed to the test PAHs demonstrated low transformation efficiency. In the absence of PAHs, the transformation efficiency was 4.7 log units; however, the efficiency decreased to 3.72–3.14 log units with phenanthrene/pyrene exposures of 50 µg·L–1. The addition of Ca2+ enhanced the low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAHs. Based on the co-sorption of Ca2+ and phenanthrene/pyrene by DNA, we employed Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the mechanisms involved in PAH-induced DNA transformation. The observed low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to either phenanthrene or pyrene can be attributed to a broken hydrogen bond in the double helix caused by planar PAHs. Added Ca2+ formed strong electrovalent bonds with “–POO––” groups in the DNA, weakening the interaction between PAHs and DNA based on weak molecular forces. This decreased the damage of PAHs to hydrogen bonds in double-stranded DNA by isolating DNA molecules from PAHs and consequently enhanced the transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAH contaminants. The findings provide insight into the effects of anthropogenic trace PAHs on DNA transfer in natural environments. PMID:23484001

  19. Improved flatfish health following remediation of a PAH-contaminated site in Eagle Harbor, Washington.

    PubMed

    Myers, Mark S; Anulacion, Bernadita F; French, Barbara L; Reichert, William L; Laetz, Cathy A; Buzitis, Jon; Olson, O Paul; Sol, Sean; Collier, Tracy K

    2008-07-30

    Eagle Harbor in Puget Sound, WA became a Superfund site in 1987 due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) released chronically from a nearby creosoting facility. Early studies here (1983-1986) demonstrated up to an approximately 80% prevalence of toxicopathic liver lesions, including neoplasms, in resident English sole (Parophrys vetulus). These lesions in English sole are consistently associated with PAH exposure in multiple field studies, and one laboratory study. Later studies (1986-1988) incorporated biomarkers of PAH exposure and effect, including hepatic CYP1A expression and xenobiotic-DNA adducts, and biliary fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs). Before site remediation, lesion prevalences and other biomarker values in this species from Eagle Harbor were among the highest compared to other sites in Puget Sound and the US Pacific Coast. To sequester PAH-contaminated sediments, in 1993-1994, a primary cap of clean sediment was placed over the most-contaminated 54acres, with a 15-acre secondary cap added from 2000-2002. Lesion prevalences and biomarker values before primary capping were reduced compared to 1983-1986, consistent with facility closure in 1988 and shore-based source controls begun in 1990. Liver lesion risk, hepatic CYP1A activities, and levels of biliary FACs from fish collected immediately after and at regular intervals up to 2 years after primary capping were variable relative to pre-capping. Over the entire monitoring period since primary capping (128 months), but particularly after 3 years, there was a significantly decreasing trend in biliary FACs, hepatic DNA adducts and lesion risk in English sole. In particular, lesion risk has been consistently low (<0.20) compared to primary cap initiation (set at 1.0), from approximately 4 years after primary capping through April 2004. These results show that the sediment capping process has been effective in reducing PAH exposure and associated deleterious biological effects in a resident

  20. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-01-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg−1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 103 to 2.28 × 106 and 4.17 × 102 to 1.99 × 105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites. PMID:26184609

  1. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-07-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg-1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 103 to 2.28 × 106 and 4.17 × 102 to 1.99 × 105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites.

  2. Aging effects on cobalt availability in soils.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Laura A; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Michael J

    2009-08-01

    Aging processes in soils can significantly affect the potential biological availability of introduced metals via incorporation into crystal lattices, diffusion into micropores, or formation of metal precipitates on the surfaces of soil minerals. Over time, metals in contact with the soil solid phase are less freely exchangeable with the soil solution and, hence, less available to soil biota. In the present study, the effects of aging on the fate and behavior of added divalent cobalt (Co2+) in a range of soils with varying physicochemical characteristics was assessed using isotope-exchange techniques, chemical extraction, and plant growth. Following addition to soil, the Co2+ salt rapidly partitioned to the soil solid phase. Particularly in soils with neutral to alkaline pH, a large percentage of the surface-bound Co was fixed in forms no longer in equilibrium with soil solution cobalt through aging reactions. Using techniques commonly applied to estimate metal bioavailability in soil, the lability (E values), plant availability (L values), and extractability of added Co2+ salts with the mild chemical extractants calcium chloride (CaCl2) and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) were observed to markedly decrease with time, particularly in soils with high pH or those containing appreciable quantities of iron/ manganese oxyhydroxide minerals. Results indicated rapid partitioning of added Co2+ into isotopically nonexchangeable pools, with more than 60% of the aging occurring within 15 d in most soils. Soil pH was the primary factor controlling the rate of cobalt aging and extent of exchangeability in the soils examined. Understanding the influence of long-term aging on cobalt availability in soils is necessary to accurately assess the potential risk associated with cobalt contamination of soil environments.

  3. Bioremediation of a PAH-contaminated gasworks site with the Ebiox vacuum heap system

    SciTech Connect

    Eiermann, D.R.; Bolliger, R.

    1995-12-31

    A former gasworks site in the industrial city of Winterthur, Switzerland, was extremely contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX); phenols; ammonia; and mineral oils. Three vacuum heaps, with a total volume of 10,500 m{sup 3} of contaminated soil, were bioremediated during 1993/94. Separating excavated soil material into different soil qualities was of particular importance because of the pathway definition of the specific soil material. Excavation of contamination took longer than 10 months, delivering continuously different contaminated soil-type material for bioremediation. Conditioning and subsequent biostimulation of the large soil volumes were the prerequisites for most advanced milieu optimization. The degradation results demonstrated the potential for successful application of bioremediation on former industrial sites. PAH-concentration reductions ranged from 75 to 83% for the soil values and from 87 to 98% for the elution values. Soil and elution target qualities were met within 6 to 12 months, depending on initial PAH-concentration and soil structure. The achieved target quality for the bioremediated soil allowed subsequent reuse as high-value backfill material for the ongoing building project.

  4. Lead and PAHs contamination of an old shooting range: A case study with a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Seijo, A; Cachada, A; Gavina, A; Duarte, A C; Vega, F A; Andrade, M L; Pereira, R

    2017-01-01

    Soil pollution at firing ranges is an issue of growing importance, due to the accumulation in soils of contaminants derived from ammunition and clay targets. The concentration of Pb and PAHs was determined in five soils of an abandoned shooting range in Galicia (northwest Spain), and an ecotoxicological characterization was performed in order to obtain an assessment of risks. Therefore, the retention capacity of soils was assessed using test organisms of different trophic levels, and the role of soils as habitat for soil invertebrates was assessed by reproduction tests and bioaccumulation assays with earthworms. The sum of 15 PAHs ranged between 38 and 360mgkg(-1), which exceed, together with Pb (160-720mgkg(-1)), the Galician generic reference value for urban and sporting field soils. Bioaccumulation in E. andrei showed contents up to 104,000μgPbkg(-1)dw, and up to 645μgPAHskg(-1)fw. High contents of Pb and PAHs in soil samples and in Eisenia andrei whole body, caused a reduction in the number of juveniles produced, whereas, Vibrio fischeri, Raphidocelis subcapitata and Daphnia magna displayed a slight toxic response to the soil elutriates tested. Therefore, the function of these soils to retain contaminants seemed not compromised, probably due to the high organic matter content and pH values, which are weakly acidic. The habitat function was affected, indicating that soil solution is not the only route of exposure to contaminants to E. andrei. The integration of chemical and ecotoxicological lines of evidence give rise to high risks values, restricting the use of these areas, and pointing for risks to surrounding ecosystems due to possible trophic transferences. The calculation of risks using the chemical and ecotoxicological data, required by Spanish legislation, could be a good approach to communicate with those responsible and/or involved in the management of contaminated sites.

  5. Interrelationship of Pyrogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination in Different Environmental Media

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Kyu; Lee, Dong Soo; Shim, Won Joon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Seung

    2009-01-01

    Interrelationships between pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed in air, soil, water, sediment, and tree leaves by using multi-media monitoring data. Concurrent concentration measurements were taken bimonthly for a year for the multi-media at urban and suburban sites. PAH level correlations between air and other media were observed at the urban site but were less clear at the suburban site. Considering a closer PAHs distribution/fate characteristics to soil than suspended solids, contamination in sediment seemed to be governed primarily by that in soil. The partitioning of PAHs in waters could be better accounted for by sorption onto black carbon and dissolved organic carbon. PMID:22303141

  6. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH FOR EVALUATION OF IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) represent a group of organic contaminants known for their prevalence and persistence in petroleum-impacted environment such as groundwater, soils and sediments. Many high molecular weight PAHs are suspected carcinogens and the existence of...

  7. Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jeanbille, Mathilde; Gury, Jérôme; Duran, Robert; Tronczynski, Jacek; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Agogué, Hélène; Saïd, Olfa Ben; Taïb, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Garnier, Cédric; Auguet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high-throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta-diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales. PMID:27594854

  8. Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments.

    PubMed

    Jeanbille, Mathilde; Gury, Jérôme; Duran, Robert; Tronczynski, Jacek; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Agogué, Hélène; Saïd, Olfa Ben; Taïb, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Garnier, Cédric; Auguet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high-throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta-diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales.

  9. Monitoring PAH contamination in the field (South west Iberian Peninsula): biomonitoring using fluorescence spectrophotometry and physiological assessments in the shore crab Carcinus maenas (L.) (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Awantha; Bamber, Shaw D

    2010-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants of the marine environment, arising predominantly from petrochemical contamination and pyrogenic sources. A biomarker of PAH exposure was employed in a field study (South West, Spain) in both captured (indigenous) and deployed (caged) shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) in the chronic PAH-exposed Bays of Algeciras and Gibraltar (from associated harbour and boating activity) compared to a relatively 'clean' site (Cadiz). Metabolite fluorescence was attributed to the following key priority PAH groups; naphthalenes (NAPs), pyrenes (PYRs) and benzo[a]pyrenes (BAPs). Temporal variability was assessed using deployed populations over an eight week period. Petrogenic and pyrogenic PAH contamination (as an indicator of the PAH type) was demonstrated using a ratio between FF(BAP + PYR)/FF(NAP). Physiological assessments from deployed crabs demonstrated both physiological and cellular alterations as shown by reduced heart rates (at rest) and increased cellular stress in crabs from the PAH contaminated sites.

  10. Characterization and Fate of PAH-contaminated Sediments at the Wyckoff/Eagle Harbor Superfund Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, Richard C.; Magar, Victor S.; Ickes, Jennifer A.; Abbott, James E.; Stout, Scott A.; Crecelius, Eric A. ); Bingler, Linda S. )

    2002-01-01

    This study took place in Eagle Harbor, a shallow marine embayment of Bainbridge Island, WA, and the former site of the Wyckoff wood-treatment facility, which used large quantities of creosote in its wood-treating processes from the early 1900s to 1988. Analyses of 10 sediment cores using TPH fingerprinting, the distribution of 50 PAH analytes, and sediment age dating revealed the contributions of three distinct sources of PAHs to sediment contamination during various periods over the past 100 years; namely, creosote, urban runoff, and natural background. Recognition that urban runoff has been a fairly consistent and ongoing source of PAHs to the harbor's sediment for the past 50-70 years may influence future sediment management decisions for this site with respect to long-term monitoring of surface sediment to assess cap performance. The results provide information on the ability of Eagle Harbor sediment to recover under natural conditions, identified the occurrence of creosote-derived PAH weathering in off-cap surface sediment, and distinguished between these distinct PAH sources in the harbor.

  11. Transformation of PAHs during ethanol-Fenton treatment of an aged gasworks' soil.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt, Staffan; Persson, Ylva; Oberg, Lars

    2006-11-01

    PAH-contaminated soil from a former gasworks site was treated with Fenton's reagent in a number of lab-scale slurry reactors. The degradation result obtained by traditional Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by ethanol treatment were compared. The ethanol pre-treatment enhanced the depletion of all PAHs in the soil by facilitating their desorption from the soil matrix. However, some PAHs, especially anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene and perylene, were more extensively depleted than other PAHs with fewer or equal numbers of fused rings, indicating that the hydroxyl radicals react faster with these PAHs than with other kinds. The ethanol present in the slurry also appeared to influence the relative reactivity of the PAHs. Furthermore, the enhanced oxidation that occurred in the ethanol pre-treated soil resulted in the accumulation of oxidation products. For example, 1-indanone, anthracene-9,10-dione, 1-methylanthracenedione, 2-methylanthracenedione, 1,8-naphthalic anhydride, benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione and two compounds tentatively identified as hydroxy-9-fluorenones were found at higher concentrations after the treatment than before it. The accumulation was most evident for the quinones, and in many cases it could be attributed to extensive oxidation of their parent PAHs, although the total oxidation efficiency in this study was relatively poor.

  12. Aged refinery hydrocarbon biodegradation in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, E.N.; Stokley, K.E.; Calcavecchio, P.

    1995-12-31

    Aged hydrocarbon biodegradation was investigated as a potential cleanup technology for refinery soil. Well-mixed field soil was amended with water and nutrients and tilled weekly for one year in laboratory mesocosms to stimulate biodegradation. Freon infrared analysis of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and triterpane biomarkers were used to determine the extent of biodegradation. Significant reductions in TPH (up to 68%) and methylene chloride extractable material (up to 55%) were observed. The combined trimethylated phenanthrene/anthracenes (C3P/A) were even more highly depleted than TPH. Nutrient amendment increased TPH, methylene chloride, and C3P/A removal, but not biomarker concentrations. Significant reduction of two to five ring PAHs occurred. Expected depletion patterns for PAHs were observed except in the case of naphthalene and derivatives, phenanthrene/anthracene and derivatives, and chrysene. A possible explanation is that the more readily degradable PAHs were already highly biodegraded before the study and the remaining portions were less available for biodegradation. These results are consistent with reports on the effects of aging on PAH biodegradation in soil. Biodegradation was influenced by PAH structure and molecular weight.

  13. Potential of Endophytic Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 Isolated from Plantago asiatica L. for Reduction of PAH Contamination in Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuezhu; Jin, Li; Sun, Kai; Li, Shuang; Ling, Wanting; Li, Xuelin

    2016-01-01

    Endophytes are ubiquitous in plants, and they may have a natural capacity to biodegrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In our study, a phenanthrene-degrading endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 was isolated from P. asiatica L. grown in a PAH-contaminated site. The effects of environmental variables on phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 were studied, and the ability of strain PHE-3 to use high molecular weight PAH (HMW-PAH) as a sole carbon source was also evaluated. Our results indicated that pH value of 4.0–8.0, temperature of 30 °C–42 °C, initial phenanthrene concentration less than 100 mg·L−1, and some additional nutrients are favorable for the biodegradation of phenanthrene by strain PHE-3. The maximum biodegradation efficiency of phenanthrene was achieved at 99.9% after 84 h cultivation with additional glutamate. Moreover, the phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 was positively correlated with the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity (ρ = 0.981, p < 0.05), suggesting that strain PHE-3 had the capability of degrading HMW-PAHs. In the presence of other 2-, 3-ringed PAHs, strain PHE-3 effectively degraded HMW-PAHs through co-metabolism. The results of this study are beneficial in that the re-colonization potential and PAH degradation performance of endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 may be applied towards reducing PAH contamination in plants. PMID:27347988

  14. Potential of Endophytic Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 Isolated from Plantago asiatica L. for Reduction of PAH Contamination in Plant Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuezhu; Jin, Li; Sun, Kai; Li, Shuang; Ling, Wanting; Li, Xuelin

    2016-06-24

    Endophytes are ubiquitous in plants, and they may have a natural capacity to biodegrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In our study, a phenanthrene-degrading endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 was isolated from P. asiatica L. grown in a PAH-contaminated site. The effects of environmental variables on phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 were studied, and the ability of strain PHE-3 to use high molecular weight PAH (HMW-PAH) as a sole carbon source was also evaluated. Our results indicated that pH value of 4.0-8.0, temperature of 30 °C-42 °C, initial phenanthrene concentration less than 100 mg·L(-1), and some additional nutrients are favorable for the biodegradation of phenanthrene by strain PHE-3. The maximum biodegradation efficiency of phenanthrene was achieved at 99.9% after 84 h cultivation with additional glutamate. Moreover, the phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 was positively correlated with the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity (ρ = 0.981, p < 0.05), suggesting that strain PHE-3 had the capability of degrading HMW-PAHs. In the presence of other 2-, 3-ringed PAHs, strain PHE-3 effectively degraded HMW-PAHs through co-metabolism. The results of this study are beneficial in that the re-colonization potential and PAH degradation performance of endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 may be applied towards reducing PAH contamination in plants.

  15. Phytoremediation potential of Brassica juncea in Cu-pyrene co-contaminated soil: comparing freshly spiked soil with aged soil.

    PubMed

    Chigbo, Chibuike; Batty, Lesley

    2013-11-15

    A comparison was made between the dissipation of pyrene as well as the uptake of copper (Cu) in soil freshly spiked with Cu, pyrene or Cu + pyrene and in aged soil. The potential of B juncea for phytoremediation was also investigated. The biomass of Brassica juncea significantly decreased (>50% reduction) in freshly spiked soil when compared to aged soil in all treatments. However, the accumulation of Cu in shoot was significantly reduced (60-88%) in aged soil after 60 days of planting. The total removal of Cu from co-contaminated soil was always higher (>2-3 fold) in aged soil than in freshly spiked soil when lower Cu concentration (50 mg kg(-1)) was co-contaminated with 250 or 500 mg kg(-1) of pyrene while in other co-contaminated treatments, the total removal of Cu from aged soil were significantly lower. The level of pyrene in both planted and un-planted freshly spiked soil decreased significantly (>67%) over the 60 days of plant trial. In aged soils, there were no significant differences in residual pyrene concentration between planted and unplanted soil. This suggests that the presence of B. juncea in aged soil did not enhance the dissipation of pyrene and that the prediction of pyrene dissipation in laboratory prepared soil may not have reflected the true situation in the fields.

  16. Inoculum carrier and contaminant bioavailability affect fungal degradation performances of PAH-contaminated solid matrices from a wood preservation plant.

    PubMed

    Covino, Stefano; Svobodová, Katerina; Cvancarová, Monika; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Federici, Federico; Kresinová, Zdena; Galli, Emanuela; Cajthaml, Tomás

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of chopped wheat straw (CWS), ground corn cobs (GCC) and commercial pellets (CP), as inoculum carriers, on both growth and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) degradation performances of Dichomitus squalens, Pleurotus ostreatus and Coprinus comatus. A historically-contaminated soil (HCS) and creosote-treated shavings (CTS) from the Sobeslav wood preservation plant, characterized by different relative abundances of the PAH bioavailable fractions, were used to assess the contaminated matrix effect and its interaction with both carrier and fungal strain. In HCS, best results were obtained with CP-immobilized P. ostreatus, which was able to deplete benzo[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF), benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) by 69.1%, 29.7%, 39.7%, 32.8% and 85.2%, respectively. Only few high-molecular mass PAHs such as BbF, BkF and BaP were degraded beyond their respective bioavailable fractions and this effect was confined to a limited number of inoculants. In CTS, only phenanthrene degradation exceeded its respective bioavailability from 1.42 to 1.86-fold. Regardless of both inoculum carrier and fungal species, degradation was positively and significantly (P<0.001) correlated with bioavailability in fungal microcosms on HCS and CTS and such correlation was very similar in the two matrices (R(adj)(2) equal to 0.60 and 0.59, respectively). The ability of white-rot fungi to degrade certain PAHs beyond their bioavailability was experimentally proven by this study. Although CTS and HCS considerably differed in their physico-chemical properties, PAH contents and contaminant aging, the relationship between degradation and bioavailability was not significantly affected by the type of matrix.

  17. Aging of nickel added to soils as predicted by soil pH and time.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibing; Lombi, Enzo; McLaughlin, Mike J; Oliver, Ian W; Nolan, Annette L; Oorts, Koen; Smolders, Erik

    2013-08-01

    Although aging processes are important in risk assessment for metals in soils, the aging of Ni added to soils has not been studied in detail. In this study, after addition of water soluble Ni to soils, the changes over time in isotopic exchangeability, total concentrations and free Ni(2+) activity in soil pore water, were investigated in 16 European soils incubated outdoors for 18 months. The results showed that after Ni addition, concentrations of Ni in soil pore water and isotopic exchangeability of Ni in soils initially decreased rapidly. This phase was followed by further decreases in the parameters measured but these occurred at slower rates. Increasing soil pH increased the rate and extent of aging reactions. Semi-mechanistic models, based on Ni precipitation/nucleation on soil surfaces and micropore diffusion, were developed and calibrated. The initial fast processes, which were attributed to precipitation/nucleation, occurred over a short time (e.g. 1h), afterwards the slow processes were most likely controlled by micropore diffusion processes. The models were validated by comparing predicted and measured Ni aging in three additional, widely differing soils aged outdoors for periods up to 15 months in different conditions. These models could be used to scale ecotoxicological data generated in short-term studies to longer aging times.

  18. Field screening of polycyclic hydrocarbons contamination in soil using a portable synchronous scanning spectrofluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarie, Jean P.; Watts, Wendi; Miller, Don; Hyfantis, George J., Jr.; Peeler, George; Engelmann, William H.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1995-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) contamination is a considerable problem at various hazardous waste sites. Sources of PAH contamination include incomplete combustion processes, wood preservatives, and the fuel industry. The development of rapid, cost-effective field screening techniques to qualitate or quantitate potential PAH contamination could result in improved remediation efficiency. We have recently developed a portable spectrofluorometer for screening potential PAH contaminants at field sites using the synchronous fluorescence approach. Synchronous fluorescence differs from the more conventional excitation or emission fluorescence as both monochromators are scanned simultaneously with a constant wavelength offset ((Delta) (lambda) ) between the two. The portable spectrofluorometer was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Exposure Research Laboratory, and recently field tested at the American Creosote Works Superfund Site in Jackson, Tennessee. In this paper, the portable spectrofluorometer was used to field screen several contaminated soil areas located at the Morristown Industrial Site in Morristown, Tennessee using the synchronous fluorescence technique. An attempt to quantify PAH contamination was performed using the NIST 1647a priority pollutant standard to generate a calibration curve. Representative samples were subsequently related to the results obtained from standard laboratory measurements.

  19. Localized enrichment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil, spruce needles, and lake sediments linked to in-situ bitumen extraction near Cold Lake, Alberta.

    PubMed

    Korosi, J B; Irvine, G; Skierszkan, E K; Doyle, J R; Kimpe, L E; Janvier, J; Blais, J M

    2013-11-01

    The extraction of bitumen from the Alberta oil sands using in-situ technologies is expanding at a rapid rate; however, investigations into the environmental impacts of oil sands development have focused on surface mining in the Athabasca region. We measured polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in soils, spruce needles, and lake sediment cores in the Cold Lake oil sands region to provide a historical and spatial perspective on PAH contamination related to in-situ extraction activities. A pronounced increase in PAH concentrations was recorded in one of two study lakes (Hilda Lake) corresponding to the onset of commercial bitumen production in ~1985. Distance from extraction rigs was not an important predictor of PAH concentrations in soils, although two samples located near installations were elevated in alkyl PAHs. Evidence of localized PAH contamination in Hilda Lake and two soil samples suggests that continued environmental monitoring is justified to assess PAH contamination as development intensifies.

  20. Mean age distribution of inorganic soil-nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Dong K.; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-07-01

    Excess reactive nitrogen in soils of intensively managed landscapes causes adverse environmental impact, and continues to remain a global concern. Many novel strategies have been developed to provide better management practices and, yet, the problem remains unresolved. The objective of this study is to develop a model to characterize the "age" of inorganic soil-nitrogen (nitrate, and ammonia/ammonium). We use the general theory of age, which provides an assessment of the time elapsed since inorganic nitrogen has been introduced into the soil system. We analyze a corn-corn-soybean rotation, common in the Midwest United States, as an example application. We observe two counter-intuitive results: (1) the mean nitrogen age in the topsoil layer is relatively high; and (2) mean nitrogen age is lower under soybean cultivation compared to corn although no fertilizer is applied for soybean cultivation. The first result can be explained by cation-exchange of ammonium that retards the leaching of nitrogen, resulting in an increase in the mean nitrogen age near the soil surface. The second result arises because the soybean utilizes the nitrogen fertilizer left from the previous year, thereby removing the older nitrogen and reducing mean nitrogen age. Estimating the mean nitrogen age can thus serve as an important tool to disentangle complex nitrogen dynamics by providing a nuanced characterization of the time scales of soil-nitrogen transformation and transport processes.

  1. Degradation of toxaphene in aged and freshly contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lacayo-Romero, Martha; van Bavel, Bert; Mattiasson, Bo

    2006-04-01

    Degradation of toxaphene in soil from both newly contaminated (from Sweden) and aged spills (from Nicaragua) were studied. The newly contaminated soil contained approximately 11 mg kg(-1) toxaphene while the aged Nicaraguan soil contained approximately 100 mg kg(-1). Degradation was studied in anaerobic bioreactors, some of which were supplied with lactic acid and others with Triton X-114. In this study we found that the lower isomers Parlar 11, 12 were degraded while the concentration of isomer Parlar 15 increased. This supported an earlier evaluation which indicated that less chlorinated isomers are formed from more heavily isomers. Lactic acid when added to the soil, interfere with the degradation of toxaphene. Lactic acid was added; several isomers appeared to degrade rather slowly in newly contaminated Swedish soil. The Swedish soil, without any external carbon source, showed the slowest degradation rate of all the compounds studied. When Triton X-114 at 0.4 mM was added, the degradation rate of the compounds increased. This study illustrates that biodegradation of toxaphene is a complex process and several parameters have to be taken into consideration. Degradation of persistent pollutants in the environment using biotechnology is dependent on bioavailability, carbon sources and formation of metabolites.

  2. Magnetic Properties of Different-Aged Chernozemic Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattakhova, Leysan; Shinkarev, Alexandr; Kosareva, Lina; Nourgaliev, Danis; Shinkarev, Aleksey; Kondrashina, Yuliya

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the magnetic properties and degree of mineral weathering in profiles of different-aged chernozemic soils derived from a uniform parent material. In this work, layer samples of virgin leached chernozem and chernozemic soils formed on the mound of archaeological earthy monument were used. The characterization of the magnetic properties was carried out on the data of the magnetometry and differential thermomagnetic analysis. The evaluation of the weathering degree was carried out on a loss on ignition, cation exchange capacity and X-ray phase analysis on the data of the original soil samples and samples of the heavy fraction of minerals. It was found that the magnetic susceptibility enhancement in humus profiles of newly formed chernozemic soils lagged significantly behind the organic matter content enhancement. This phenomenon is associated with differences in kinetic parameters of humus formation and structural and compositional transformation of the parent material. It is not enough time of 800-900 years to form a relatively "mature" magnetic profile. These findings are well consistent with the chemical kinetic model (Boyle et al., 2010) linking the formation of the soils magnetic susceptibility with the weathering of primary Fe silicate minerals. Different-aged chernozemic soils are at the first stage of formation of a magnetic profile when it is occur an active production of secondary ferrimagnetic minerals from Fe2+ released by primary minerals.

  3. Effect of Soil Aging on the Phytoremediation Potential of Zea mays in Chromium and Benzo[a]Pyrene Contaminated Soils.

    PubMed

    Chigbo, Chibuike

    2015-06-01

    This study compared the phytoremediation potential of Zea mays in soil either aged or freshly amended with chromium (Cr) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). Z. mays showed increased shoot biomass in aged soils than in freshly spiked soils. The shoot biomass in contaminated soils increased by over 50% in aged soil when compared to freshly amended soils, and over 29% more Cr was accumulated in the shoot of Z. mays in aged soil than in freshly amended soil. Planting Z. mays in aged soil helped in the dissipation of more than 31% B[a]P than in freshly spiked soil, but in the absence of plants, there seemed to be no difference between the dissipation rates of B[a]P in freshly and aged co-contaminated soil. Z. mays seemed to enhance the simultaneous removal of Cr and B[a]P in aged soil than in freshly spiked soil and hence can be a good plant choice for phytoremediation of co-contaminated soils.

  4. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soils by Fenton's reagent: a multivariate evaluation of the importance of soil characteristics and PAH properties.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Sofia; Persson, Ylva; Frankki, Sofia; van Bavel, Bert; Lundstedt, Staffan; Haglund, Peter; Tysklind, Mats

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we investigated how the chemical degradability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aged soil samples from various contaminated sites is influenced by soil characteristics and by PAH physico-chemical properties. The results were evaluated using the multivariate statistical tool, partial least squares projections to latent structures (PLS). The PAH-contaminated soil samples were characterised (by pH, conductivity, organic matter content, oxide content, particle size, specific surface area, and the time elapsed since the contamination events, i.e. age), and subjected to relatively mild, slurry-phase Fenton's reaction conditions. In general, low molecular weight PAHs were degraded to a greater extent than large, highly hydrophobic variants. Anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, and pyrene were more susceptible to degradation than other, structurally similar, PAHs; an effect attributed to the known susceptibility of these compounds to reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The presence of organic matter and the specific surface area of the soil were clearly negatively correlated with the degradation of bi- and tri-cyclic PAHs, whereas the amount of degraded organic matter correlated positively with the degradation of PAHs with five or six fused rings. This was explained by enhanced availability of the larger PAHs, which were released from the organic matter as it degraded. Our study shows that sorption of PAHs is influenced by a combination of soil characteristics and physico-chemical properties of individual PAHs. Multivariate statistical tools have great potential for assessing the relative importance of these parameters.

  5. Correlation between biological and physical availabilities of phenanthrene in soils and soil humin in aging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C.; Hunter, M.; Nam, K.; Pignatello, J.J.; Alexander, M.

    1999-08-01

    The bioavailability of an organic compound in a soil or sediment commonly declines with the soil-chemical contact time (aging). A series of parallel desorption and bioavailability experiments was carried out on phenanthrene previously aged up to {approximately}100 d in Mount Pleasant silt loam (Mt. Pleasant, NY, USA) or Pahokee peat soil to determine as a function of the aging period the degree of correlation between the reduction in bioavailability and the rate and extent of desorption and the influence of soil organic matter composition on availability. The mineralization of phenanthrene by two bacteria and the uptake of phenanthrene by earthworms showed expected declines with aging. Likewise, the rate of phenanthrene desorption in the absence of organisms decreased with aging. The decline in initial rate of mineralization or desorption was nearly an order of magnitude after 50 to 60 d of aging. Plots of normalized rates of mineralization or desorption practically coincided. Similarly, plots of normalized fraction mineralized or fraction desorbed during an arbitrary period gave comparable slopes. The partial removal of organic matter from the peat by extraction with dilute NaOH to leave the humin fraction reduced the biodegradation of phenanthrene aged for 38 and 63 d as compared to the nonextracted peat, but the effect disappeared at longer incubation times. The rate of desorption from samples of peat previously extracted with NaOH or Na{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} declined with aging and, for a given aging period, was significantly slower than from nonextracted peat. This work shows that the reduction in bioavailability of phenanthrene over time in soil is directly correlated with reduction of its physical availability due to desorption limitations. In addition, this study shows that removal of extractable humic substances leads to a decline in the rate of desorption and in the bioavailability of the substrate.

  6. Transport of soil-aged silver nanoparticles in unsaturated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumahor, Samuel K.; Hron, Pavel; Metreveli, George; Schaumann, Gabriele E.; Klitzke, Sondra; Lang, Friederike; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles released into soils may be coated with humic substances, potentially modifying their surface properties. Due to their amphiphilic nature, humic coating is expected to affect interaction of nanoparticle at the air-water interface. In this study, we explored the roles of the air-water interface and solid-water interface as potential sites for nanoparticle attachment and the importance of hydrophobic interactions for nanoparticle attachment at the air-water interface. By exposing Ag nanoparticles to soil solution extracted from the upper soil horizon of a floodplain soil, the mobility of the resulting "soil-aged" Ag nanoparticles was investigated and compared with the mobility of citrate-coated Ag nanoparticles as investigated in an earlier study. The mobility was determined as a function of hydrologic conditions and solution chemistry using column breakthrough curves and numerical modeling. Specifically, we compared the mobility of both types of nanoparticles for different unsaturated flow conditions and for pH = 5 and pH = 9. The soil-aged Ag NP were less mobile at pH = 5 than at pH = 9 due to lower electrostatic repulsion at pH = 5 for both types of interfaces. Moreover, the physical flow field at different water contents modified the impact of chemical forces at the solid-water interface. An extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (eDLVO) model did not provide satisfactory explanation of the observed transport phenomena unlike for the citrate-coated case. For instance, the eDLVO model assuming sphere-plate geometry predicts a high energy barrier (> 90 kT) for the solid-water interface, indicating that nanoparticle attachment is less likely. Furthermore, retardation through reversible sorption at the air-water interface was probably less relevant for soil-aged nanoparticles than for citrate-coated nanoparticles. An additional cation bridging mechanism and straining within the flow field may have enhanced nanoparticle retention at the

  7. Soil organic carbon pools in olive groves of different age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaccesi, Luisa; De Feudis, Mauro; Nasini, Luigi; Regni, Luca; D'Ascoli, Rosaria; Castaldi, Simona; Proietti, Primo; Agnelli, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    In the last years, the practices which favor the increase of soil organic carbon in the agroecosystem have been widely studied because of their influence on the reduction of atmospheric CO2 (Lal, 1993; Schlesinger, 2000). The accumulation of the organic carbon into the soil depends to a great extent upon climate and pedological properties (Burke et al., 1989; Miller et al., 1994), although in the agricultural soils the cultivation system also plays a key role. The olive grove might potentially represent a relevant land use to improve C sequestration in soil, but there are few data available to support this hypothesis. In a study site located in central Italy (Deruta, PG), we analyzed the soil organic carbon (SOC) pools in two olive groves of different age (7 and 30 years) and, as control, in a site adjacent to the groves cropped with cereals for at least 30 years. With the aim to isolate and quantify the active, intermediate and passive functional SOC pools in the olive groves and in the control, we used a combined physical and chemical fractionation method (Zimmermann et al., 2007). The main results shown that the total organic carbon content in the Ap horizons was the highest in the 30-years-old olive grove, followed by the 7-years-old olive grove, and then by the control soil. The content of active C, in form of particulate organic matter (POM) and water soluble organic matter (WEOM), was greater in the olive grove compared to the control soil and increase with the age of the grove. About the amount of C in the intermediate and passive pools, no significant differences were found among the olive groves and the control. These preliminary results indicated that the greater total organic C content occurred in the 30-year-old olive grove with respect to the 7-years-old grove and the control, has to be ascribed to the greater content of active organic matter (POM and WEOM), and not to the accumulation in soil of organic C in a more stabilised form.

  8. Use of soil catena field data for estimating relative ages of moraines

    SciTech Connect

    Birkeland, P.W.; Berry, M.E. ); Swanson, D.K. )

    1991-03-01

    Soils at the crests of moraines are commonly used to estimate the relative ages of moraines. However, for various pedologic and geomorphic reasons, soil development at crest sites may not truly reflect the time since moraine formation; for example, some crest soils on moraines of greatly different age are similar in morphology and development. Soil catena data for soils at several sites aligned downslope from the crest can greatly improve on the usefulness of soil data for estimating moraine ages. For this purpose, the authors use the weighted mean catena profile development index, which condenses field data for all of the soils in each catena into a single value.

  9. Aging and soil organic matter content affect the fate of silver nanoparticles in soil.

    PubMed

    Coutris, Claire; Joner, Erik Jautris; Oughton, Deborah Helen

    2012-03-15

    Sewage sludge application on soils represents an important potential source of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to terrestrial ecosystems, and it is thus important to understand the fate of Ag NPs once in contact with soil components. Our aim was to compare the behavior of three different forms of silver, namely silver nitrate, citrate stabilized Ag NPs (5nm) and uncoated Ag NPs (19nm), in two soils with contrasting organic matter content, and to follow changes in binding strength over time. Soil samples were spiked with silver and left to age for 2h, 2 days, 5 weeks or 10 weeks before they were submitted to sequential extraction. The ionic silver solution and the two Ag NP types were radiolabeled so that silver could be quantified by gamma spectrometry by measuring the (110m)Ag tracer in the different sequential extraction fractions. Different patterns of partitioning of silver were observed for the three forms of silver. All types of silver were more mobile in the mineral soil than in the soil rich in organic matter, although the fractionation patterns were very different for the three silver forms in both cases. Over 20% of citrate stabilized Ag NPs was extractible with water in both soils the first two days after spiking (compared to 1-3% for AgNO(3) and uncoated Ag NPs), but the fraction decreased to trace levels thereafter. Regarding the 19nm uncoated Ag NPs, 80% was not extractible at all, but contrary to AgNO(3) and citrate stabilized Ag NPs, the bioaccessible fraction increased over time, and by day 70 was between 8 and 9 times greater than that seen in the other two treatments. This new and unexpected finding demonstrates that some Ag NPs can act as a continuous source of bioaccessible Ag, while AgNO(3) is rapidly immobilized in soil.

  10. Enzymatic bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons by fungal consortia enriched from petroleum contaminated soil and oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Balaji, V; Arulazhagan, P; Ebenezer, P

    2014-05-01

    The present study focuses on fungal strains capable of secreting extracellular enzymes by utilizing hydrocarbons present in the contaminated soil. Fungal strains were enriched from petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil samples collected from Chennai city, India. The potential fungi were isolated and screened for their enzyme secretion such as lipase, laccase, peroxidase and protease and also evaluated fungal enzyme mediated PAHs degradation. Total, 21 potential PAHs degrading fungi were isolated from PAHs contaminated soil, which belongs to 9 genera such as Aspergillus, Curvularia, Drechslera, Fusarium, Lasiodiplodia, Mucor Penicillium, Rhizopus, Trichoderma, and two oilseed-associated fungal genera such as Colletotrichum and Lasiodiplodia were used to test their efficacy in degradation of PAHs in polluted soil. Maximum lipase production was obtained with P. chrysogenum, M. racemosus and L. theobromae VBE1 under optimized cultural condition, which utilized PAHs in contaminated soil as sole carbon source. Fungal strains, P. chrysogenum, M. racemosus and L. theobromae VBE1, as consortia, used in the present study were capable of degrading branched alkane isoprenoids such as pristine (C17) and pyrene (C18) present in PAHs contaminated soil with high lipase production. The fungal consortia acts as potential candidate for bioremediation of PAHs contaminated environments.

  11. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated water and soil samples by immunological and chromatographic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Knopp, D.; Seifert, M.; Vaeaenaenen, V.; Niessner, R.

    2000-05-15

    An immunoassay was developed that can be used for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water, landfill leachate, and soil. As test format an indirect competitive microtiter plate ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) was applied. While groundwater samples from a former manufactured gas plant site could be analyzed directly, soil and landfill leachate had to be extracted and required at least a 100-fold dilution prior to immunochemical measurement. PAHs could be recovered from fortified reference soils as well as aged field samples with high yield using 1-h ultrasonication with acetonitrile. Extraction efficiency was comparable to Soxhlet extraction and ultrasonication with tetrahydrogurane. Recovery was lower with agitation but would still be acceptable for use in an on-site field test to provide rapid, semiquantitative, and reliable test results for making environmental decisions such as identifying hot spots, site mapping, monitoring of remediation processes, and selecting site samples for laboratory analysis. Classification of ELISA data showed that it was possible to estimate the PAH contamination in soils with about 5% false positive and 5% false negative results that may have arisen from heterogeneity of samples, cross-reactivity of compounds with a similar structure, humic acids, or unknown interferences.

  12. Impact of temperature on the aging mechanisms of arsenic in soils: fractionation and bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guanxing; Chen, Zongyu; Wang, Jia; Hou, Qinxuan; Zhang, Ying

    2016-03-01

    The present study focused on the influence of temperature variation on the aging mechanisms of arsenic in soils. The results showed that higher temperature aggravated the decrease of more mobilizable fractions and the increase of less mobilizable or immobilizable fractions in soils over time. During the aging process, the redistribution of both carbonate-bound fraction and specifically sorbed and organic-bound fraction in soils occurred at various temperatures, and the higher temperature accelerated the redistribution of specifically sorbed and organic-bound fraction. The aging processes of arsenic in soils at different temperatures were characterized by several stages, and the aging processes were not complete within 180 days. Arsenic bioaccessibility in soils decreased significantly by the aging, and the decrease was intensified by the higher temperature. In terms of arsenic bioaccessibility, higher temperature accelerated the aging process of arsenic in soils remarkably.

  13. Micromorphology of past urban soils: method and results (France, Iron Age - Middle Age)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammas, Cécilia

    2014-05-01

    Urban soils in French protohistoric and Roman towns and present-day towns of roman origin are several meters thick accumulations, with great spatial and vertical variability due to long duration of occupation. In order to improve our knowledge of both sedimentary and pedological characteristics as well as formation processes of urban soils, micromorphological analysis was carried out on buried towns. The studied sites include Iron Age towns (floodplain sites: Lattes or Lattara, Le Cailar; oppidum: Pech-Maho in the south of France), a roman buried town (Famars or Fanum Martis, North of France), and various towns occupied from the Roman period until now (urban and periurban sites in Paris, Strasbourg, Mâcon… North and East of France). Original method and sampling strategy were elaborated in order to try to encompass both spatial and vertical variability as well as the "mitage" of the present-day cities. In Lattes, representative elementary urban areas such as streets, courtyard, and houses were sampled for micromorphology during extensive excavation. These analyses revealed specific microscopic features related to complex anthropogenic processes (craft and domestic activities discarding, trampling, backfill, building), moisture and heat, and biological activity, which defined each kind of area. Comparison between well preserved buried town and current cities of roman origin, where the sequence of past urban soils is preserved in few place ("mitage") help to identify past activities, building rhythms as well as specific building materials. For example, in Paris, compacted sandy backfills alternate with watertight hardfloors during the Roman period (soils similar to Technosols). At the opposite, various kinds of loose bioturbated laminated dark earth resulting from activities such as craft refuses, backfills, compost or trampled layers were discriminated for Early Medieval Period (soils similar to Cumulic Anthroposol). Moreover, biological activity is usually

  14. A comparison of three bacterial strains for the remediation of town gas soils

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.E.; Akkineni, D.K.; Cutright, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    The contamination of soils from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is widespread. Although PAH contamination still occurs from current industrial processes, accidental spills, and leaking underground storage tanks, the main source of contamination is from abandoned town gas sites. To date there is a conservative estimate of 2500 town gas sites that require remediation. The most cost effective in-situ treatment for these sites is that of bioremediation. Experiments were conducted to compare the efficiencies of three bacterial strains for the remediation of an industrially PAH contaminated soil. Specifically, the efficiencies of Achromobacter sp., Mycobacterium sp., and Nocardia paraffinae were investigated. This paper will address the chemical specificity of each bacterial strains for the PAHs present.

  15. [Status and changes of soil nutrients in rhizosphere of Abelmoschus manihot different planting age].

    PubMed

    Tang, Li-Xia; Tan, Xian-He; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Xiao-Ning

    2013-11-01

    Using soil chemical analysis method and combining with ICP-AES determination of mineral nutrition element content in rhizosphere soil of different planting age Abelmoschus Corolla Results show that along with the increase of planting age, the nitrogen (total N), available P and organic matter in rhizosphere soil of Abelmoschus Corolla content declined year by year and the soil got acidification. Heavy metal element content in agricultural land does not exceed national standards, but the content of element mercury (Hg) in rhizosphere soil of different planting age Abelmoschus Corolla declined. Request of microelement such as manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) had a increase tendency, but the content of magnesium (Mg) and sodium (Na) increased, and other nutrient elements had no changed rules or unchanged apparently. Consequently, exploring the change rules of different planting age Abelmoschus Corolla soil in rhizosphere as theoretical guidance of rational fertilization and subducting continuous cropping obstscles.

  16. Age of respired carbon in differently managed grassland and forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoening, Ingo; Trumbore, Susan; Solly, Emily; Muhr, Jan; Schrumpf, Marion

    2013-04-01

    Grassland management (fertilization, grazing, mowing) and forest management (harvesting, thinning) directly affect biomass production and related leaf and root litter input to the soil. Understanding effects of land management on soil carbon fluxes is therefore critical. We examined the effect of land use and management on soil respiration and the age of respired soil carbon. Soil samples originated from grassland and forest plots in three different German regions. Sieved surface soil samples (0-10 cm) were incubated (20°C, 60% WHC) for 14 days. The respired CO2 was collected and 14C contents in the CO2 of 150 incubated samples were determined with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Large changes recorded in 14C in the atmosphere since atmospheric weapons testing in the 1960s allow precise determination of the mean age of emitted soil carbon. In our study, the rate of respiration was higher in grassland soils (33 ± 10 µg C-CO2 per g dry soil per day) compared to forest soils (14 ± 7 µg C-CO2 per g dry soil per day). Results indicate a strong relation between respiration rates and grassland management with lower soil respiration in more fertilized plots. This relation was not found at sites where degraded peatlands were used as grasslands. At those sites, respiration rates were mainly driven by the soil organic carbon concentration. In forest soils, we did not find any relation between soil respiration and forest management. The 14C contents of the respired CO2 were lower in grassland soils (Percentage Modern carbon content: 104±2%) compared to forest soils (Percentage Modern Carbon content: 108±5%). This indicates that the carbon respired in forests is generally several years to more than a decade older than the carbon respired in grasslands. In grasslands, the 14C is positively related to the respiration rate and negatively related to fertilization. Again, degraded peat soils, where old carbon is released during incubation, were the exception to this

  17. Hydrocarbon status of soils under different ages of oil contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennadiev, A. N.; Pikovskii, Yu. I.; Kovach, R. G.; Koshovskii, T. S.; Khlynina, N. I.

    2016-05-01

    Modifications of the hydrocarbon status (HCS) of soils at the stages of the injection input of oil pollutants and the subsequent self-purification of the soil layer from technogenesis products have been revealed in studies conducted on an oil field. Comparison with the HCS of background soils has been performed. Changes in the composition and concentration of bitumoids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and hydrocarbon gases have been established. The HCS of a freshly contaminated soil is characterized by the predominance of butane (the highest component) in the gaseous phase, an abrupt increase in the concentration of second-kind bitumoids, and a 100-fold increase in the content of PAHs compared to the background soil. In the old contaminated soil, free and fixed methane becomes the predominant gas; the content of bitumoids in the upper soil horizons is lower than in the freshly contaminated soils by two orders of magnitude but higher than in the background soil by an order of magnitude; the PAH composition in the soil with old residual contamination remains slightly more diverse than in the background soil.

  18. POP and PAH contamination in the southern slopes of Mt. Everest (Himalaya, Nepal): Long-range atmospheric transport, glacier shrinkage, or local impact of tourism?

    PubMed

    Guzzella, Licia; Salerno, Franco; Freppaz, Michele; Roscioli, Claudio; Pisanello, Francesca; Poma, Giulia

    2016-02-15

    Due to their physico-chemical properties, POPs and PAHs are subjected to long-range atmospheric transport (LRAT) and may be deposited in remote areas. In this study, the contamination with DDx, PCBs, PBDEs, and PAHs was investigated in sediments and soils collected on the southern slopes of Mt. Everest (Himalaya, Nepal) in two different sampling campaigns (2008 and 2012). The results showed a limited contamination with POPs and PAHs in both soil and sediment samples. Therefore, the southern slopes of Mt. Everest can be considered a remote area in almost pristine condition. The LRAT mechanism confirmed its primary role in the transfer of contaminants to remote regions, while the gradual melting of glaciers, due to global warming, and the subsequent release of contaminants was suggested to be a secondary source of pollution of the lake sediments. In addition, the increase of tourism in this area during the last decades might have influenced the present concentrations of PAHs in the sediments and soils.

  19. Bioavailability of freshly added and aged naphthalene in soils under gastric pH conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Simkins, S.; Xing, B.

    1999-12-01

    The bioavailability of hydrophobic organic chemicals decreases with aging in soil because of sequestration. However, assessments of the risk of exposure to contaminated soils are usually dependent on either chemical concentrations, which are measured using vigorous extraction methods, or models that assume an equilibrium without considering the actual conditions. The objective of this research was to determine the availability and desorption kinetics of freshly added and aged naphthalene from a peat and a mineral soil; naphthalene was desorbed into solutions with pH levels that approximate those found in different gastric regions. Soil and peat samples were spiked with radiolabeled and unlabeled naphthalene at 2 and 20 {micro}g/g and were aged from 0 to 135 d. Desorption kinetics were determined using a simulated stomach solution and a neutral solution that represented the pH of intestinal conditions and most soils. Peat sorbed much more naphthalene than did soil, and it allowed little desorption. Though both acidic and neutral extracting solutions could desorb naphthalene, little apparent effect of aging was observed in peat, whereas desorption from soil declined markedly with aging. In addition, the percentage of naphthalene that desorbed from soil was greater for the higher incubation concentration. The desorption of naphthalene from the peat and soil was higher into the neutral solution than into the gastric solution. These results suggest that aging, exposure conditions, concentration effect, and organic matter content should be taken into account in predictive models and risk assessments.

  20. Soil carbon stock increases in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, M.; Heikkinen, J.; Mäkipää, R.

    2011-02-01

    Changes in the soil carbon stock can potentially have a large influence on global carbon balance between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere. Since carbon sequestration of forest soils is influenced by human activities, reporting of the soil carbon pool is a compulsory part of the national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. Various soil carbon models are applied in GHG inventories, however, the verification of model-based estimates is lacking. In general, the soil carbon models predict accumulation of soil carbon in the middle-aged stands, which is in good agreement with chronosequence studies and flux measurements of eddy sites, but they have not been widely tested with repeated measurements of permanent plots. The objective of this study was to evaluate soil carbon changes in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged forest stands. Soil carbon changes on re-measured sites were analyzed by using soil survey data that was based on composite samples as a first measurement and by taking into account spatial variation on the basis of the second measurement. By utilizing earlier soil surveys, a long sampling interval, which helps detection of slow changes, could be readily available. The range of measured change in the soil organic layer varied from -260 to 1260 g m-2 over the study period of 16-19 years and 23 ± 2 g m-2 per year, on average. The increase was significant in 6 out of the 38 plots from which data were available. Although the soil carbon change was difficult to detect at the plot scale, the overall increase measured across the middle-aged stands agrees with predictions of the commonly applied soil models. Further verification of the soil models is needed with larger datasets that cover wider geographical area and represent all age classes, especially young stands with potentially large soil carbon source.

  1. Soil carbon stock increases in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, M.; Heikkinen, J.; Mäkipää, R.

    2011-05-01

    Changes in the soil carbon stock can potentially have a large influence on global carbon balance between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere. Since carbon sequestration of forest soils is influenced by human activities, reporting of the soil carbon pool is a compulsory part of the national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. Various soil carbon models are applied in GHG inventories, however, the verification of model-based estimates is lacking. In general, the soil carbon models predict accumulation of soil carbon in the middle-aged stands, which is in good agreement with chronosequence studies and flux measurements of eddy sites, but they have not been widely tested with repeated measurements of permanent plots. The objective of this study was to evaluate soil carbon changes in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged forest stands. Soil carbon changes on re-measured sites were analyzed by using soil survey data that was based on composite samples as a first measurement and by taking into account spatial variation on the basis of the second measurement. By utilizing earlier soil surveys, a long sampling interval, which helps detection of slow changes, could be readily available. The range of measured change in the soil organic layer varied from -260 to 1260 g m-2 over the study period of 16-19 years and 23 ± 2 g m-2 per year, on average. The increase was significant in 6 out of the 38 plots from which data were available. Although the soil carbon change was difficult to detect at the plot scale, the overall increase measured across the middle-aged stands agrees with predictions of the commonly applied soil models. Further verification of the soil models is needed with larger datasets that cover wider geographical area and represent all age classes, especially young stands with potentially large soil carbon source.

  2. Different influences of field aging on nickel toxicity to Folsomia candida in two types of soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Rong; Li, Jing; He, Ji-Zheng; Ma, Yi-Bing; Zheng, Yuan-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Metal aging in soils has been considered an important factor influencing its availability and toxicity to organisms. In this study, we report the influence of 5 years field aging on the nickel (Ni) toxicity to collembolan Folsomia candida based on two different types of soil from Dezhou (DZ) and Qiyang (QY) counties in China. Acute and chronic toxicity of Ni to F. candida was assessed in both freshly spiked and field aging contaminated soils. We found that 5 years field aging increased the EC50 and 2d-LC50 values of Ni to F. candida in the DZ soil, while little influence on the Ni toxicity was observed in the QY soil. There was no adverse effect of the long-term field aging on the Ni toxicity to the survival of F. candida in the two tested soils. In addition, field aging of the two soils impacted differently the water-soluble Ni concentrations, which were significantly correlated to the juvenile production of F. candida based on a logistic model. Our study highlights different effects of long-term field aging on the Ni toxicity to F. candida between divergent types of soil, and this should be taken into account in future toxicity testing and risk assessment practices.

  3. [Population structure of soil arthropod in different age Pinus massoniana plantations].

    PubMed

    Tan, Bo; Wu, Fu-zhong; Yang, Wan-qin; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Zhen-feng; Liu, Yang; Gou, Xiao-lin

    2013-04-01

    An investigation was conducted on the population structure of soil arthropod community in the 3-, 8-, 14-, 31-, and 40-years old Pinus massoniana plantations in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River in spring (May) and autumn (October), 2011, aimed to search for the scientific management of the plantation. A total of 4045 soil arthropods were collected, belonging to 57 families. Both the individual density and the taxonomic group number of the soil arthropod community decreased obviously with increasing soil depth, and this trend increased with increasing stand age. The dominant groups and ordinary groups of the soil arthropod community varied greatly with the stand age of P. massoniana plantation, and a significant difference (P<0.05) was observed in the individual density and taxonomic group number among different age P. massoniana plantations. In comparison with other stand age P. massoniana plantations, 3years old P. massoniana plantation had a significant difference in the structure and diversity of soil arthropod community, and the similarity index of the soil arthropod community was lower. The individual density, taxonomic group number, and diversity of soil arthropod community were the highest in 8-years old P. massoniana plantation, and then, decreased obviously with increasing stand age. It was suggested that the land fertility of the P. massoniana plantations could be degraded with increasing stand age, and it would be appropriate to make artificial regulation and restoration in 8-years old P. massoniana plantation.

  4. Effect of aging process on adsorption of diethyl phthalate in soils amended with bamboo biochar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaokai; Sarmah, Ajit K; Bolan, Nanthi S; He, Lizhi; Lin, Xiaoming; Che, Lei; Tang, Caixian; Wang, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    Biochar is a carbonaceous sorbent and can be used as a potential material to reduce the bioavailability of organic pollutants in contaminated soils. In the present study, the adsorption and desorption of diethyl phthalate (DEP) onto soils amended with bamboo biochar was investigated with a special focus on the effect of biochar application rates and aging conditions on the adsorption capacity of the soils. Biochar amendment significantly enhanced the soil adsorption of DEP that increased with increasing application rates of biochar. However, the adsorption capacity decreased by two aging processes (alternating wet and dry, and constantly moist). In the soil with low organic carbon (OC) content, the addition of 0.5% biochar (without aging) increased the adsorption by nearly 98 times compared to the control, and exhibited the highest adsorption capacity among all the treatments. In the soil with high OC content, the adsorption capacity in the treatment of 0.5% biochar without aging was 3.5 and 3 times greater than those of the treatments of biochar aged by alternating wet and dry, and constantly moist, respectively. Moreover, constantly moist resulted in a greater adsorption capacity than alternating wet and dry treatments regardless of biochar addition. This study revealed that biochar application enhanced soil sorption of DEP, however, the enhancement of the adsorption capacity was dependent on the soil organic carbon levels, and aging processes of biochar.

  5. Toxicity of copper to the collembolan Folsomia fimetaria in relation to the age of soil contamination.

    PubMed

    Bruus Pedersen, M; van Gestel, C A

    2001-05-01

    The toxicity of copper to the collembolan Folsomia fimetaria L. was studied in soil incubated with copper sulfate for different periods before the introduction of collembolans, to assess the effect of aging of contamination on the toxicity of copper. Adult survival, reproduction, and juvenile size were assessed. No clear influence of differences in contamination age was detected. The data were compared with results from a study performed in soil sampled at an old copper-contaminated site. Large differences in effects existed between spiked soil and field soil when concentrations were expressed on the basis of total soil copper concentrations. EC(10) and EC(50) values for reproduction in spiked soil were ca. 700 and 1400 mg Cu/kg soil, whereas no effects were found in field soil at copper concentrations up to 2500 mg/kg. Most of the differences disappeared when effects were expressed as a function of 0.01 M CaCl(2)-extractable soil copper. the lack of effects in field soil could be explained from the fact that in this field soil the CaCl(2)-extractable concentration was never higher than one-third of the EC(50) estimated for tests in the laboratory spiked soils.

  6. Soil biogeochemistry in the age of big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cécillon, Lauric; Barré, Pierre; Coissac, Eric; Plante, Alain; Rasse, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Data is becoming one of the key resource of the XXIst century. Soil biogeochemistry is not spared by this new movement. The conservation of soils and their services recently came into the political agenda. However, clear knowledge on the links between soil characteristics and the various processes ensuring the provision of soil services is rare at the molecular or the plot scale, and does not exist at the landscape scale. This split between society's expectations on its natural capital, and scientific knowledge on the most complex material on earth has lead to an increasing number of studies on soils, using an increasing number of techniques of increasing complexity, with an increasing spatial and temporal coverage. From data scarcity with a basic data management system, soil biogeochemistry is now facing a proliferation of data, with few quality controls from data collection to publication and few skills to deal with them. Based on this observation, here we (1) address how big data could help in making sense of all these soil biogeochemical data, (2) point out several shortcomings of big data that most biogeochemists will experience in their future career. Massive storage of data is now common and recent opportunities for cloud storage enables data sharing among researchers all over the world. The need for integrative and collaborative computational databases in soil biogeochemistry is emerging through pioneering initiatives in this direction (molTERdb; earthcube), following soil microbiologists (GenBank). We expect that a series of data storage and management systems will rapidly revolutionize the way of accessing raw biogeochemical data, published or not. Data mining techniques combined with cluster or cloud computing hold significant promises for facilitating the use of complex analytical methods, and for revealing new insights previously hidden in complex data on soil mineralogy, organic matter and biodiversity. Indeed, important scientific advances have

  7. Residual impact of aged nZVI on heavy metal-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, C; Gil-Díaz, M; Costa, G; Alonso, J; Guerrero, A M; Nande, M; Lobo, M C; Martín, M

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, the residual toxicity and impact of aged nZVI after a leaching experiment on heavy metal (Pb, Zn) polluted soils was evaluated. No negative effects on physico-chemical soil properties were observed after aged nZVI exposure. The application of nZVI to soil produced a significant increase in Fe availability. The impact on soil biodiversity was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A significant effect of nZVI application on microbial structure has been recorded in the Pb-polluted soil nZVI-treated. Soil bacteria molecular response, evaluated by RT-qPCR using exposure biomarkers (pykA, katB) showed a decrease in the cellular activity (pykA) due to enhanced intracellular oxidative stress (katB). Moreover, ecotoxicological standardised test on Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) showed a decrease in the growth endpoint in the Pb-polluted soil, and particularly in the nZVI-treated. A different pattern has been observed in Zn-polluted soils: no changes in soil biodiversity, an increase in biological activity and a significant decrease of Zn toxicity on C. elegans growth were observed after aged nZVI exposure. The results reported indicated that the pollutant and its nZVI interaction should be considered to design soil nanoremediation strategies to immobilise heavy metals.

  8. [Effect of Decomposing Products of Immobilized Carriers on Desorption of Pyrene in Contaminated Soil].

    PubMed

    Tong, Dong-li; Shuang, Sheng-qing; Li, Xiao-jun; Deng, Wan-rong; Zhao, Ran-ran; Jia, Chun-yun; Gong, Zong-qiang

    2015-08-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of soluble and insoluble decomposing products (decomposed for 1 day and 120 day; noted by DP1 and DP120, respectively) from immobilized carriers (corncob) on the desorption of pyrene in PAH-contaminated soil (120 d ageing, 20 mg x kg(-1)). It was found that (1) adding decomposing products of immobilized carriers could not only increase the rapidly desorbing fraction, but also improve the desorption rate of pyrene. The desorption rates of pyrene increased from 20% to 81.8% and 84.5% because of adding insoluble DP1 and DP120, and from 40% to 89.6% and 88.5% because of adding soluble DP1 and DP120. (2) The sorption amounts of pyrene by insoluble DP1 and.DP120 were 9. 4 and 16. 6 times higher than that by natural corncob, respectively. The sorption amounts of XAD-2 resins were increased by 1.5 and 3.1 times due to the added soluble DP1 and DP120, respectively. These results indicated that decomposing products of immobilized carries could improve the desorption of pyrene by sorption or activation in contaminated soil.

  9. Genotoxicity of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons declines as they age in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, R.R.; Alexander, M. )

    1999-06-01

    Rifampicin-resistant mutations were induced in Pseudomonas putida A11rUV growing in soil containing 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene and benzo[a]pyrene. Aging of the compounds for 7 d caused a marked decrease in the mutation rates, and the number of mutants was further reduced after 15 d of aging. Longer persistence of the compound in soil did not further diminish the number of mutants. Vigorous solvent extraction showed that the concentration of the compounds had not diminished with the marked decline in genotoxicity. The data demonstrate that genotoxicity of such compounds aged in soil declines with little or no loss of the compound.

  10. Quantification of small-scale variation in the size and composition of phenanthrene-degrader populations and PAH contaminants in traffic-impacted topsoil.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Anders R; Styrishave, Bjarne; Aamand, Jens

    2014-04-01

    Small-scale colocalisation of microbial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degraders and PAHs in contaminated soil is a prerequisite for efficient biodegradation of the PAHs. We therefore tested the hypothesis that phenanthrene-degrading bacteria are colocalised with PAHs at the millimetre-to-centimetre-scale. Microbial populations and PAH concentrations were determined for 40-mg samples from a 112-mm transect of a traffic-impacted topsoil. The spatial distribution of cultivable phenanthrene degraders (0.3 × 10(5) -7.2 × 10(5) cells g(-1) ) mirrored neither the distribution of PAHs, nor the distribution of the total cultivable heterotrophic populations. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis of PAH dioxygenase genes (2 × 10(6) -4 × 10(6) cells g(-1) ) from a second transect showed distributions similar to the cultivable phenanthrene degraders, but at a 20-fold higher level. The omnipresence of high densities of PAH degraders at the millimetre scale indicate that PAH persistence may not be caused by local lack of degrader cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that either MPN of pollutant degraders, qPCR of functional genes, CFU of heterotrophic micro-organisms, or the content of PAHs have been determined with such high spatial resolution.

  11. Ages of Globally Distributed Lunar Paleoregoliths and Soils from 3.9 Ga to the Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Amy L.; Joy, Katherine H.; Bogard, Donald D.; Kring, David A.

    2014-08-01

    This study determines the ages of 191 discrete lunar regolith samples from the Apollo, Luna, and meteorite collections. Model closure ages (for lithified breccias) and appearance ages (for unconsolidated soils) are calculated using the trapped 40Ar and 36Ar abundances of each sample, determined from published Ar data. Model closure ages of regolith breccias span ~3.9 to 0.01 Ga and appearance ages of soils range from ~3.6 to 0.03 Ga; 169 of these ages are published here for the first time, while 22 are recalculated ages. The regolith breccias with the oldest closure ages originate from the ancient highlands and oldest mare surfaces sampled by the Apollo missions. Soils generally have similar ages to each other, regardless of location and collection depth, with most model ages <2.0 Ga. Together, the soils and regolith breccias represent a record of regolith processes over the past 3.9 Ga. The data illustrate that individual landing sites can provide a diversity of ages, which has implications for planning future missions. Differences in maturity between older and younger regolith samples may reflect a change in collisional regimes over time. We note, too, that the closure ages published here are critical data needed for selecting temporally appropriate regolith samples used to decipher the diversity of impactors hitting the lunar surface over time and how the Sun has changed in time.

  12. Mechanisms of Heavy Metal Sequestration in Soils: Plant-Microbe Interactions and Organic Matter Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Teresa W.-M. Fan; Richard M. Higashi; David Crowley; Andrew N. Lane: Teresa A. Cassel; Peter G. Green

    2004-12-31

    For stabilization of heavy metals at contaminated sites, the three way interaction among soil organic matter (OM)-microbes-plants, and their effect on heavy metal binding is critically important for long-term sustainability, a factor that is poorly understood at the molecular level. Using a soil aging system, the humification of plant matter such as wheat straw was probed along with the effect on microbial community on soil from the former McClellan Air Force Base.

  13. Metolachlor Sorption and Degradation in Soil Amended with Fresh and Aged Biochars.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Carmen; Spokas, Kurt A; Hall, Kathleen E; Cox, Lucia; Koskinen, William C

    2016-04-27

    Addition of organic amendments such as biochar to soils can influence pesticide sorption-desorption processes and, in turn, the amount of pesticide readily availability for transport and biodegradation. Sorption-desorption processes are affected by both the physical and chemical properties of soils and pesticides, as well as soil-pesticide contact time, or aging. Changes in sorption-desorption of metolachlor with aging in soil amended with three macadamia nut shell biochars aged 0 (BCmac-fr), 1 year (BCmac-1yr), and 2 years (BCmac-2yr) and two wood biochars aged 0 (BCwood-fr) and 5 years (BCwood-5yr) were determined. Apparent sorption coefficient (Kd-app) values increased with incubation time to a greater extent in amended soil as compared to unamended soils; Kd-app increased by 1.2-fold for the unamended soil, 2.0-fold for BCwood-fr, 1.4-fold for BCwood-5yr, 2.4-fold for BCmac-fr, 2.5-fold for BCmac-1yr, and 1.9-fold for BCmac-4yr. The increase in calculated Kd-app value was the result of a 15% decrease in the metolachlor solution concentration extractable with CaCl2 solution with incubation time in soil as compared to a 50% decrease in amended soil with very little change in the sorbed concentration. Differences could possibly be due to diffusion to less accessible or stronger binding sites with time, a faster rate of degradation (in solution and on labile sites) than desorption, or a combination of the two in the amended soils. These data show that transport models would overpredict the depth of movement of metolachlor in soil if effects of aging or biochar amendments are not considered.

  14. Do Forest Age and Soil Depth Affect Carbon and Nitrogen Adsorption in Mineral Horizons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, P. G.; Lovett, G. M.; Fuss, C. B.; Goodale, C. L.; Lang, A.; Fahey, T.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral soils retain large amounts of organic matter through sorption on the surfaces of mineral soils, the largest pools of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in the forests of the northeastern U.S. In addition to determining organic matter storage, adsorption and desorption processes are important controllers of runoff chemistry. We are studying adsorption dynamics of mineral soils collected from a chronosequence of hardwood forest sites in the White Mountains, NH to determine how soils vary in their DOM adsorption capacities as a function of effective C and N saturation. We hypothesize that forest age determines proximity to saturation because young forests may need to mine soil organic matter (SOM) in mineral soils to obtain nitrogen to meet growth demands, while the soils of older forests have had time to reaccumulate SOM, eventually reaching C and N saturation. Consequently, we expect adsorption capacities to first increase with forest age in young forests, as the trees mine C and N from mineral surfaces. They will then decrease with forest age in older forests as mining slows and C and N begin to re-accumulate. Batch experiments were conducted with mineral soil samples and dilutions of forest floor leachate. However, preliminary results from a mature forest site (about 100 years old), which we predicted to be a low point of C and N saturation from decades of mining, contradict expectations. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) adsorption in its shallow mineral soil layers (0-3 cm below E or A horizons) are lower than younger sites ranging from 20 to about 40 years old. In addition to forest age, soil depths also affect N retention dynamics in forest soils. We hypothesized that deeper mineral soils might have greater adsorption capacities due to the fact that they are exposed to less DOC and DON leaching from organic layers and therefore less saturated. Results from the same mature forest site confirm this. Soils from 3-10 cm depth have more potential to adsorb DOC and

  15. Effect of Straw Amendment on Soil Zn Availability and Ageing of Exogenous Water-Soluble Zn Applied to Calcareous Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanlong; Cui, Juan; Tian, Xiaohong; Zhao, Aiqing; Li, Meng; Wang, Shaoxia; Li, Xiushaung; Jia, Zhou; Liu, Ke

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter plays a key role in availability and transformation of soil Zn (zinc), which greatly controls Zn concentrations in cereal grains and human Zn nutrition level. Accordingly, soils homogenized with the wheat straw (0, 12 g straw kg-1) and Zn fertilizer (0, 7 mg Zn kg-1) were buried and incubated in the field over 210 days to explore the response of soil Zn availability and the ageing of exogenous Zn to straw addition. Results indicated that adding straw alone scarcely affected soil DTPA-Zn concentration and Zn fractions because of the low Zn concentration of wheat straw and the high soil pH, and large clay and calcium carbonate contents. However, adding exogenous Zn plus straw increased the DTPA-Zn abundance by about 5-fold and had the similar results to adding exogenous Zn alone, corresponding to the increased Zn fraction loosely bounded to organic matter, which had a more dominant presence in Zn reaction than soil other constituents such as carbonate and minerals in calcareous soil. The higher relative amount of ineffective Zn (~50%) after water soluble Zn addition also occurred, and at the days of 120–165 and 180–210when the natural temperature and rainfall changed mildly, the ageing process of exogenous Zn over time was well evaluated by the diffusion equation, respectively. Consequently, combining crop residues with exogenous water soluble Zn application is promising strategy to maximize the availability of Zn in calcareous soil, but the higher ageing rate of Zn caused by the higher Zn mobility should be considered. PMID:28081179

  16. Effect of Straw Amendment on Soil Zn Availability and Ageing of Exogenous Water-Soluble Zn Applied to Calcareous Soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanlong; Cui, Juan; Tian, Xiaohong; Zhao, Aiqing; Li, Meng; Wang, Shaoxia; Li, Xiushaung; Jia, Zhou; Liu, Ke

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter plays a key role in availability and transformation of soil Zn (zinc), which greatly controls Zn concentrations in cereal grains and human Zn nutrition level. Accordingly, soils homogenized with the wheat straw (0, 12 g straw kg-1) and Zn fertilizer (0, 7 mg Zn kg-1) were buried and incubated in the field over 210 days to explore the response of soil Zn availability and the ageing of exogenous Zn to straw addition. Results indicated that adding straw alone scarcely affected soil DTPA-Zn concentration and Zn fractions because of the low Zn concentration of wheat straw and the high soil pH, and large clay and calcium carbonate contents. However, adding exogenous Zn plus straw increased the DTPA-Zn abundance by about 5-fold and had the similar results to adding exogenous Zn alone, corresponding to the increased Zn fraction loosely bounded to organic matter, which had a more dominant presence in Zn reaction than soil other constituents such as carbonate and minerals in calcareous soil. The higher relative amount of ineffective Zn (~50%) after water soluble Zn addition also occurred, and at the days of 120-165 and 180-210when the natural temperature and rainfall changed mildly, the ageing process of exogenous Zn over time was well evaluated by the diffusion equation, respectively. Consequently, combining crop residues with exogenous water soluble Zn application is promising strategy to maximize the availability of Zn in calcareous soil, but the higher ageing rate of Zn caused by the higher Zn mobility should be considered.

  17. Interactive effects of biochar ageing in soils related to feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, and historic charcoal production.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitkötter, Julian; Marschner, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Biochar is suggested for soil amelioration and carbon sequestration, based on its assumed role as the key factor for the long-term fertility of Terra preta soils. Several studies have shown that certain biochar properties can undergo changes through ageing processes, especially regarding charge characteristics. However, only a few studies determined the changes of different biochars under the same incubation conditions and in different soils. The objective of this study was to characterize the changes of pine chip (PC)- and corn digestate (CD)-derived biochars pyrolyzed at 400 or 600 °C during 100 days of laboratory incubation in a historical kiln soil and an adjacent control soil. Separation between soil and biochar was ensured by using mesh bags. Especially, changes in charge characteristics depended on initial biochar properties affected by feedstock and pyrolysis temperature and on soil properties affected by historic charcoal production. While the cation exchange capacity (CEC) markedly increased for both CD biochars during incubation, PC biochars showed no or only slight increases in CEC. Corresponding to the changes in CEC, ageing of biochars also increased the amount of acid functional groups with increases being in average about 2-fold higher in CD biochars than in PC biochars. Further and in contrast to other studies, the surface areas of biochars increased during ageing, likely due to ash leaching and degradation of tar residues. Changes in CEC and surface acidity of CD biochars were more pronounced after incubation in the control soil, while surface area increase was higher in the kiln soil. Since the two acidic forest soils used in this this study did not greatly differ in physical or chemical properties, the main process for inducing these differences in the buried biochar most likely is related to the differences in dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Although the kiln soil contained about 50% more soil organic carbon due to the presence of charcoal

  18. Aging activity of DDE in dissimilar rice soils in a greenhouse experiment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fen Xia; Yu, Gui Fen; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xing Lun; Jiang, Xin

    2008-04-01

    A green-house study was conducted in late 2005 to investigate the aging behavior of p,p'-DDE in two types of soil, Hydragric Anthrosols (An) and Hydragric Acrisols (Ac), according to the World Reference Base (WRB) [FAO/ISRIC/ISSS. 1998. World reference base for soil resources. World soil resources reports, Rome. p. 87]. Paddy rice and dry rice were grown in submerged paddy soils and non-submerged upland soils, respectively. The concentration of extractable p,p'-DDE in fresh DDE-spiked soils was 746.2ngg(-1). During the first few weeks of the experiment, the extractability of p,p'-DDE became increasingly low as the aging period prolonged. However, certain amount of p,p'-DDE that had been captured by soil minerals and organic matter (OM) could be released and became extractable in the later period. The extractability of p,p'-DDE in submerged soils was significantly lower than that in non-submerged soil, because flooding could increase the binding of pollutants to soil particles. The plantation of both dry rice and paddy rice slowed down the aging process of p,p'-DDE. After one month's growth of rice, p,p'-DDE bound to soil particles was released and became extractable. The OM and silt content of An are higher than that of Ac, resulting in more bound residues and relative lower extractability of p,p'-DDE in An. In addition, the extractability of p,p'-DDE could be reduced by the addition of rice straw to soils.

  19. Effect of aging of chemicals in soil on their biodegradability and extractability

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Alexander, M.

    1995-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether the time that a compound remains in a soil affects its biodegradability and the ease of its extraction. Phenanthrene and 4-nitrophenol were aged in sterilized loam and muck, and bacteria able to degrade the compounds were then added to the soils. increasingly smaller amounts of phenanthrene in the muck and 4-nitrophenol in both soils were mineralized with increasing duration of aging. Aging also increased the resistance of phenanthrene to biodegradation in nutrient-amended aquifer sand. The rate of miner- alization of the two compounds in both soils declined with increasing periods of aging. The amount of phenanthrene and 4-nitrophenol added to sterile soils that was recovered by butanol extraction declined with duration of aging, but subsequent Soxhlet extraction recovered phenanthrene from the loam but not the muck. The extents of mineralization of phenanthrene previously incubated for up to 27 days with soluble or insoluble organic matter from the muck were similar. Less aged than freshly added phenanthrene was biodegraded if aggregates in the muck were sonically disrupted. The data show that phenanthrene and 4-nitrophenol added to soil become increasingly more resistant with time to biodegradation and extraction.

  20. Experimental determinations of soil copper toxicity to lettuce (Lactuca sativa) growth in highly different copper spiked and aged soils.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Karen S; Borggaard, Ole K; Holm, Peter E; Vijver, Martina G; Hauschild, Michael Z; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-04-01

    Accurate knowledge about factors and conditions determining copper (Cu) toxicity in soil is needed for predicting plant growth in various Cu-contaminated soils. Therefore, effects of Cu on growth (biomass production) of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) were tested on seven selected, very different soils spiked with Cu and aged for 2 months at 35 °C. Cu toxicity was expressed as pEC50(Cu(2+)), i.e., the negative logarithm of the EC50(Cu(2+)) activity to plant growth. The determined pEC50(Cu(2+)) was significantly and positively correlated with both the analytically readily available soil pH and concentration of dissolved organic carbon [DOC] which together could explain 87% of the pEC50(Cu(2+)) variation according to the simple equation: pEC50(Cu(2+)) = 0.98 × pH + 345 × [DOC] - 0.27. Other soil characteristics, including the base cation concentrations (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)), the cation exchange capacity at soil pH (ECEC), and at pH 7 (CEC7), soil organic carbon, clay content, and electric conductivity as well as the distribution coefficient (Kd) calculated as the ratio between total soil Cu and water-extractable Cu did not correlate significantly with pEC50(Cu(2+)). Consequently, Cu toxicity, expressed as the negative log of the Cu(2+) activity, to plant growth increases at increasing pH and DOC, which needs to be considered in future management of plant growth on Cu-contaminated soils. The developed regression equation allows identification of soil types in which the phytotoxicity potential of Cu is highest.

  1. Soil data from Picea mariana stands near delta junction, Alaska of different ages and soil drainage type

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manies, Kristen L.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Silva, Steven R.; Briggs, Paul H.; Schmid, Brian M.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey project Fate of Carbon in Alaskan Landscapes (FOCAL) is studying the effect of fire and soil drainage on soil carbon storage in the boreal forest. This project has selected several sites to study within central Alaska of varying ages (time since fire) and soil drainage types. This report describes the location of these sampling sites, as well as the procedures used to describe, sample, and analyze the soils. This report also contains data tables with this information, including, but not limited to field descriptions, bulk density, particle size distribution, moisture content, carbon (C) concentration, nitrogen (N) concentration, isotopic data for C, and major, minor and trace elemental concentration.

  2. Fate and lability of silver in soils: Effect of ageing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate and lability of added soluble Ag in soils over time was examined by measurement of labile metal (E-value) by isotopic dilution using the 110mAg radioactive isotope and the solid-phase speciation of Ag by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrosco...

  3. Extraction agents for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil in soil washing technologies.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ee Von; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Poh, Phaik Eong

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil have been recognised as a serious health and environmental issue due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic properties. One of the commonly employed soil remediation techniques to clean up such contamination is soil washing or solvent extraction. The main factor which governs the efficiency of this process is the solubility of PAHs in the extraction agent. Past field-scale soil washing treatments for PAH-contaminated soil have mainly employed organic solvents or water which is either toxic and costly or inefficient in removing higher molecular weight PAHs. Thus, the present article aims to provide a review and discussion of the alternative extraction agents that have been studied, including surfactants, biosurfactants, microemulsions, natural surfactants, cyclodextrins, vegetable oil and solution with solid phase particles. These extraction agents have been found to remove PAHs from soil at percentages ranging from 47 to 100% for various PAHs.

  4. Aging reduces the bioavailability of even a weakly sorbed pesticide (carbaryl) in soil.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Riaz; Kookana, Rai S; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Alston, Angus M

    2004-09-01

    We investigated bioavailability and biodegradation of carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) in a soil with a long history of pesticide contamination from a storage facility located at Mamoon Kanjan, Pakistan. Carbaryl is weakly sorbed and generally considered to be easily degradable in soil. Extraction studies revealed that 49% of the total carbaryl in soil (88.0 mg kg(-1)) was not water-extractable and also not bioavailable, as demonstrated by inoculation of the contaminated soil with a carbaryl-degrading, mixed bacterial culture. Inoculation of the contaminated soil with the carbaryl-degrading culture showed that the bacteria were capable of degrading only the available (i.e., water-extractable) fraction of the pesticide. When the soil was pulverized in a ball mill to enhance the release of residue, an additional 19% of the carbaryl became bioavailable. A significant proportion of residue (approximately 33%) remained unavailable. The long (>12 years) contact time between the pesticide and soil (i.e., aging), allowing possible sequestration into soil nanopores and the organic matter matrices, is suggested to have rendered the pesticide unavailable for microbial degradation. High concentration (88.0 mg kg(-1)) in soil facilitated its persistence and sequestration. Results from the present study demonstrate that even a weakly sorbed and easily degradable pesticide, carbaryl, is effectively sequestrated in soil with time, rendering it partly inaccessible to microorganisms and affecting the bioavailability of the compound.

  5. Effect of co-application of nano-zero valent iron and biochar on the total and freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal and toxicity of contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Oleszczuk, Patryk; Kołtowski, Michał

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate co-application of biochar and nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) in order to increase the degradation of PAHs and reduce the toxicity of soils historically contaminated with these compounds. To performed the experiment biochar, biochar with nZVI (2 g kg(-1) or 10 g kg(-1) soil), or nZVI alone (2 g kg(-1) or 10 g kg(-1) soil) were added to the PAHs contaminated soils. The soils alone and soils with amendments were aged by mixing for 7 and 30 days. After that the chemical analysis were carried out and total (Ctot) and Cfree PAH content in the samples were determined. Moreover, the toxicity of aqueous extracts were investigated using the Microtox(®) (Vibrio fischeri) method. Results showed that any of used nZVI dose did not reduce the content of Ctot or Cfree PAHs in contaminated soils, but biochar applied both alone and together with the nZVI significantly reduced Ctot and Cfree PAHs. However, no significant differences in PAH reduction were found between biochar alone and biochar with nZVI addition. This indicates that the observed reduction was mostly associated with the sorption properties of biochar. Moreover, only in the case of co-application of biochar and nZVI reduction of the toxicity of nZVI to V. fischeri was observed. The toxic effect was different and depend on the type of soil and their properties including total organic carbon and black carbon content, which may affect the PAHs reduction efficiency.

  6. [Relationships between soil nutrient contents and soil enzyme activities in Pinus massoniana stands with different ages in Three Gorges Reservoir Area].

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao-Gai; Xiao, Wen-Fa; Zeng, Li-Xiong; Huang, Zhi-Lin; Huang, Ling-Ling; Tan, Ben-Wang

    2012-02-01

    Based on the measurements of soil nutrient contents and enzyme activities and the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA), this paper studied the relationships between soil nutrient contents and soil enzyme activities in different age Pinus massoniana stands in Three Gorges Reservoir Area. Among the test stands, mature stand had the highest contents of organic matter, total nitrogen, ammonium nitrogen, and available phosphorus in 0-20 cm soil layer, followed by middle-aged stand, and nearly-mature stand. With the increase of the stand age, soil invertase activity increased after an initial decrease, cellulase and polyphenoloxidase activities decreased gradually, while urease and peroxidase activities decreased after an initial increase. CCA analysis showed that the effects of the main soil parameters on the soil enzyme activities in the stands ranked in the sequence of total nitrogen > organic matter > pH > bulk density > ammonium nitrogen > available phosphorus. Soil invertase activity had significant positive correlations with soil organic matter, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus, while soil peroxidase activity significantly negatively correlated with soil organic matter, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and bulk density. The soil was rich in main nutrients, invertase activity was relatively high, while peroxidase activity was relatively low. The activities of soil invertase, cellulase and peroxidase could be used as the good biological indicators in evaluating soil quality and fertility.

  7. Assessment of phenanthrene bioavailability in aged and unaged soils by mild extraction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Cheema, Sardar Alam; Shen, Chaofeng; Zhang, Congkai; Tang, Xianjin; Shi, Jiyan; Chen, Xincai; Park, Joonhong; Chen, Yingxu

    2012-01-01

    It has become apparent that the threat of an organic pollutant in soil is directly related to its bioavailable fraction and that the use of total contaminant concentrations as a measure of potential contaminant exposure to plants or soil organisms is inappropriate. In light of this, non-exhaustive extraction techniques are being investigated to assess their appropriateness in determining bioavailability. To find a suitable and rapid extraction method to predict phenanthrene bioavailability, multiple extraction techniques (i.e., mild hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and organic solvents extraction) were investigated in soil spiked to a range of phenanthrene levels (i.e., 1.12, 8.52, 73, 136, and 335 μg g( - 1) dry soil). The bioaccumulation of phenanthrene in earthworm (Eisenia fetida) was used as the reference system for bioavailability. Correlation results for phenanthrene suggested that mild HPCD extraction was a better method to predict bioavailability of phenanthrene in soil compared with organic solvents extraction. Aged (i.e., 150 days) and fresh (i.e., 0 day) soil samples were used to evaluate the extraction efficiency and the effect of soil contact time on the availability of phenanthrene. The percentage of phenanthrene accumulated by earthworms and percent recoveries by mild extractants changed significantly with aging time. Thus, aging significantly reduced the earthworm uptake and chemical extractability of phenanthrene. In general, among organic extractants, methanol showed recoveries comparable to those of mild HPCD for both aged and unaged soil matrices. Hence, this extractant can be suitable after HPCD to evaluate risk of contaminated soils.

  8. Effects of cultivation ages and modes on microbial diversity in the rhizosphere soil of Panax ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chunping; Yang, Limin; Zhang, Lianxue; Liu, Cuijing; Han, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Background Panax ginseng cannot be cultivated on the same land consecutively for an extended period, and the underlying mechanism regarding microorganisms is still being explored. Methods Polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and BIOLOG methods were used to evaluate the microbial genetic and functional diversity associated with the P. ginseng rhizosphere soil in various cultivation ages and modes. Results The analysis of microbial diversity using PCR-DGGE showed that microbial communities were significantly variable in composition, of which six bacterial phyla and seven fungal classes were detected in P. ginseng soil. Among them, Proteobacteria and Hypocreales dominated. Fusarium oxysporum, a soilborne pathogen, was found in all P. ginseng soil samples except R0. The results from functional diversity suggested that the microbial metabolic diversity of fallow soil abandoned in 2003 was the maximum and transplanted soil was higher than direct-seeding soil and the forest soil uncultivated P. ginseng, whereas the increase in cultivation ages in the same mode led to decreases in microbial diversity in P. ginseng soil. Carbohydrates, amino acids, and polymers were the main carbon sources utilized. Furthermore, the microbial diversity index and multivariate comparisons indicated that the augmentation of P. ginseng cultivation ages resulted in decreased bacterial diversity and increased fungal diversity, whereas microbial diversity was improved strikingly in transplanted soil and fallow soil abandoned for at least one decade. Conclusion The key factors for discontinuous P. ginseng cultivation were the lack of balance in rhizosphere microbial communities and the outbreak of soilborne diseases caused by the accumulation of its root exudates. PMID:26843819

  9. Podzol development in S Norway - a soil chronosequence of 31 pedons covering soil ages from 85 to 9650 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Daniela; Svendgård-Stokke, Siri; Sperstad, Ragnhild; Sørensen, Rolf; Fuchs, Markus; Gebers, Henrik; Schülli-Maurer, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    The Oslofjord region in SE-Norway has undergone steady glacio-isostatic uplift all over the Holocene. Hence, in the coastal areas land surface age continuously increases with elevation, providing suitable conditions for studying soil development with time. A chronosequence of soils on beach sand and sandy terraces of the Lågen River, showing progressive podzolization with soil age, was studied on the western side of the Oslofjord. 31 pedons with soil ages ranging from 85 years (0.25 m a. s. l.) to ca. 9650 years (62 m a. s. l.) were described and are currently analysed. Soil ages were estimated by relating elevations of the sites to a Holocene relative sea level curve based on twelve AMS 14C-dates of gyttja from the isolation contact (marine / fresh water boundary) and six marine macrofossil 14C-dates (Sørensen et al., 2012). The climate in the study area is comparatively mild, with mean annual temperatures ranging from 5.3°C (Ramnes) to 6.3°C (Sandefjord, Larvik) and a mean annual precipitation of 909 mm (Sandefjord) - 1150 mm (Stokke). The vegetation consists predominantly of mixed forest. In this soil chronosequence, soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation in the A horizons reaches a steady state in less than 2300 years, while SOM in the B horizons continues to accumulate. Soil pH (in water) drops from pH 6.9 in the recent beach sand to pH 4.6 within about 4500 years and stays constant thereafter, which is attributed to sesquioxide buffering. Base saturation shows an exponential decrease with time. Progressive weathering is reflected by increasing Fed and Ald contents, and proceeding podzolization by increasing amounts of pyrophophate- and oxalate-soluble Fe and Al with soil age. Increases of most Fe and Al fractions can be best described by exponential models. Micromorphological analysis reveals accumulation of cloudy, iron-rich, reddish fine material in the Bs horizons that proceeds with soil age, leading to chitonic c/f-related distribution in the Bs

  10. Soil data from different-age Picea mariana stands near Delta Junction, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manies, Kristen L.; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2011-01-01

    One objective of the U.S. Geological Survey\\'s Fate of Carbon in Alaskan Landscapes (FOCAL) project is to study the effects of fire and soil drainage on soil carbon storage in boreal forests. For this purpose, the project has measured the soil carbon content in several chronosequences (time since disturbance) of various soil-drainage types. One such chronosequence near Delta Junction, Alaska was initially studied in 2000 and 2001. Additional sites in the Delta Junction area were sampled in 2006 to expand the number of stand ages represented in the chronosequence. This report describes these additional sites, as well as the procedures used to describe, sample, and analyze the soils. We also present data tables containing, but not limited to, field descriptions, bulk density, moisture content, and total carbon (C) and total nitrogen (N) content.

  11. PAH RIS{reg_sign} soil test - a rapid, on-site screening test for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, P.P.; Almond, R.E.; Friedman, S.B.

    1994-03-01

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are chemicals of concern when they contaminate the environment. Current detection methods (gas chromatography and liquid chromatography) are laborious, time consuming, and expensive. As an alternative, we developed a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit that can be used on site for the detection of PAHs at 1 ppm in soil. The immunoassay kit includes all the components necessary to conduct the analysis in the field. The test consists of 3 major steps: (1) sample treatment; (2) immunoassay, in which the target compound is bound by a specific antibody followed by the development of an indicator color; and (3) interpretation of results. A sample the develops less color than the standard is interpreted as positive (soil sample contaminated with PAHs at {ge}1 ppm). Validation studies demonstrated that the assay is sensitive and specific. The assay detects PAH contamination in soil at 1 ppm or greater and specifically detects the 3- and 4-ringed aromatics and most of the 5- and 6-ringed aromatics. PAH-free soil samples gave negative results in the assay at a confidence level of >95%. Matrix effects, interperson, and interlot variations were minimal. The test requires <25 min to complete. The test kit is field compatible and provides a cost effective method for screening soils at risk for PAH contamination. 8 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. A statistical method for estimating rates of soil development and ages of geologic deposits: A design for soil-chronosequence studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, P.; Harden, J.W.; Mark, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    A statistical method for estimating rates of soil development in a given region based on calibration from a series of dated soils is used to estimate ages of soils in the same region that are not dated directly. The method is designed specifically to account for sampling procedures and uncertainties that are inherent in soil studies. Soil variation and measurement error, uncertainties in calibration dates and their relation to the age of the soil, and the limited number of dated soils are all considered. Maximum likelihood (ML) is employed to estimate a parametric linear calibration curve, relating soil development to time or age on suitably transformed scales. Soil variation on a geomorphic surface of a certain age is characterized by replicate sampling of soils on each surface; such variation is assumed to have a Gaussian distribution. The age of a geomorphic surface is described by older and younger bounds. This technique allows age uncertainty to be characterized by either a Gaussian distribution or by a triangular distribution using minimum, best-estimate, and maximum ages. The calibration curve is taken to be linear after suitable (in certain cases logarithmic) transformations, if required, of the soil parameter and age variables. Soil variability, measurement error, and departures from linearity are described in a combined fashion using Gaussian distributions with variances particular to each sampled geomorphic surface and the number of sample replicates. Uncertainty in age of a geomorphic surface used for calibration is described using three parameters by one of two methods. In the first method, upper and lower ages are specified together with a coverage probability; this specification is converted to a Gaussian distribution with the appropriate mean and variance. In the second method, "absolute" older and younger ages are specified together with a most probable age; this specification is converted to an asymmetric triangular distribution with mode at the

  13. Release of aged 14C-atrazine residues from soil facilitated by dry-wet cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, N. D.; Yu, K.; Koeppchen, S.; Burauel, P.

    2012-04-01

    Intermittent dry-wet cycles may have an important effect on soil structure and aged pesticide residues release (1). A laboratory study was conducted to assess the maximum potential of water extractable aged atrazine residues influenced by soil drying and wetting. The used soil was obtained from an outdoor lysimeter (gleyic cambisol; Corg: 1.45%), containing environmentally aged (22 years) 14C-atrazine residues. For the experiment, soil from 0-10 cm depth was used since most residual 14C activity was previously found in this layer (2,3). Triplicate soil samples with a residual water content of approx. 8% were either dried (45° C) prior water addition or directly mixed with distilled water (soil+water: 1+2, w:w). The samples were shaken (150 rmp, 60 min, at 21° C), centrifuged (approx. 2000 g), and the supernatants were filtered. Water-extracted residual 14C activity was detected via liquid scintillation counter. The total water-extracted 14C activity (the amount of residual 14C activity in a sample equals 100%) was significantly higher (p

  14. Using synthetic models to simulate aging of Cu contamination in soils.

    PubMed

    Proffit, S; Marin, B; Cances, B; Ponthieu, M; Sayen, S; Guillon, E

    2015-05-01

    The Bureau Commun de Référence (BCR) sequential extraction scheme and micro-synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (μ-SXRF) analysis were used to determine the Cu fractionation in a calcareous vineyard soil and a synthetic soil (mixture of seven constituents: calcite, birnessite, ferrihydrite, goethite, lignocellulosic residue, kaolinite, and quartz) at different Cu contamination rates (190, 1270, and 6350 mg kg(-1) of Cu) and aging times (1, 30, 92, and 181 days). The Cu distribution in the spiked vineyard and synthetic soils was different from the original vineyard one and was influenced by the loading level. The newly added Cu was preferentially present in the acid soluble fraction. Aging of the contaminated vineyard and synthetic soils during 6 months led to the redistribution of Cu from the weakly bound acid soluble fraction to the strongly bound reducible one. The evolution with time could satisfactorily be simulated by the Elovich diffusion model for the synthetic soils. It was less significant as less marked in the contaminated vineyard soil than in the synthetic one, even though the trends observed in both were similar. This study supported the hypothesis that "simple" synthetic models could be used to approach the Cu fractionation and its evolution with time in vineyard soils.

  15. Radiocarbon Ages of Soils and Charcoal in Late Wisconsinan Loess, South-Central Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, David W.; Holen, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    The Farmdale Soil occurs below late Wisconsinan loess throughout the U.S. Midwest. At the La Sena site in the central Great Plains, humates in the Farmdale Interstadial Soil have a corrected age of 21,000 yr B.P. Humates in a buried Bt horizon and a bulk sample of overlying loess 2.5 m above the Farmdale Interstadial Soil have ages of 17,000 and 19,000 yr B.P., respectively. In the Republican River Valley Picea (spruce) charcoal is common in the lower meter of Peoria loess. Near Bloomington, Nebraska, humates from burned organic matter only 60 cm above the base of Peoria loess have a corrected age of ca. 19,000 yr B.P.

  16. Controlling Factors of Soil CO2 Efflux in Pinus yunnanensis across Different Stand Ages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaojun; Zhao, Jixia; Chen, Qibo

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of soil respiration (Rs) across different stand ages have not been well investigated. In this study, we identified temporal variation of Rs and its driving factors under three nature forest stands (e.g. 15-yr-old, 30-yr-old, and 45-yr-old) of Pinus yunnanensis in the Plateau of Mid-Yunnan, China. No consistent tendency was found on the change of Rs with the stand ages. Rs was ranked in the order of 30-yr-old > 45-yr-old >15-yr-old. Rs in 15-yr-old stand was the most sensitive to soil temperature (Ts) among the three sites. However, Ts only explained 30-40% of the seasonal dynamics of Rs at the site. Soil water content (Sw) was the major controlling factor of temporal variation at the three sites. Sw explained 88-93% of seasonal variations of Rs in the 30-yr-old stand, and 63.7-72.7% in the 15-yr-old and 79.1-79.6% in the 45-yr-old stands. In addition, we found that pH, available nitrogen (AN), C/N and total phosphorus (TP) contributed significantly to the seasonal variation of Rs. Sw was significantly related with pH, total nitrogen (TN), AN and TP, suggesting that Sw can affect Rs through improving soil acid-base property and soil texture, and increasing availability of soil nutrient. The results indicated that besides soil water, soil properties (e. g. pH, AN, C/N and TP) were also the important in controlling the temporal variations of Rs across different stand ages in the nature forestry.

  17. Effects of forest age on soil autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration differ between evergreen and deciduous forests.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zeng, Wenjing; Chen, Weile; Yang, Yuanhe; Zeng, Hui

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of forest stand age on soil respiration (SR) including the heterotrophic respiration (HR) and autotrophic respiration (AR) of two forest types. We measured soil respiration and partitioned the HR and AR components across three age classes ~15, ~25, and ~35-year-old Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica (Mongolia pine) and Larix principis-rupprechtii (larch) in a forest-steppe ecotone, northern China (June 2006 to October 2009). We analyzed the relationship between seasonal dynamics of SR, HR, AR and soil temperature (ST), soil water content (SWC) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, a plant greenness and net primary productivity indicator). Our results showed that ST and SWC were driving factors for the seasonal dynamics of SR rather than plant greenness, irrespective of stand age and forest type. For ~15-year-old stands, the seasonal dynamics of both AR and HR were dependent on ST. Higher Q10 of HR compared with AR occurred in larch. However, in Mongolia pine a similar Q10 occurred between HR and AR. With stand age, Q10 of both HR and AR increased in larch. For Mongolia pine, Q10 of HR increased with stand age, but AR showed no significant relationship with ST. As stand age increased, HR was correlated with SWC in Mongolia pine, but for larch AR correlated with SWC. The dependence of AR on NDVI occurred in ~35-year-old Mongolia pine. Our study demonstrated the importance of separating autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration components of SR when stimulating the response of soil carbon efflux to environmental changes. When estimating the response of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration to environmental changes, the effect of forest type on age-related trends is required.

  18. Soil, Leaf and Root Ecological Stoichiometry of Caragana korshinskii on the Loess Plateau of China in Relation to Plantation Age.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Quanchao; Lal, Rattan; Chen, Yanan; An, Shaoshan

    2017-01-01

    Caragana korshinskii, a leguminous shrub, a common specie, is widely planted to prevent soil erosion on the Loess Plateau. The objective of this study was to determine how the plantation ages affected soil, leaf and root nutrients and ecological stoichiometry. The chronosequence ages of C. korshinskii plantations selected for this study were 10, 20 and 30 years. Soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil total nitrogen (STN) of C. korshinskii plantations significantly increased with increase in the chronosequence age. However, soil total phosphorous (STP) was not affected by the chronosequence age. The soil C: N ratio decreased and the soil C: P and N: P ratios increased with increasing plantation age. The leaf and root concentrations of C, N, and P increased and the ratios C: N, C: P, and N: P decreased with age increase. Leaf N: P ratios were >20, indicating that P was the main factor limiting the growth of C. korshinskii. This study also demonstrated that the regeneration of natural grassland (NG) effectively preserved and enhanced soil nutrient contents. Compared with NG, shrub lands (C. korshinskii) had much lower soil nutrient concentrations, especially for long (>20 years) chronosequence age. Thus, the regeneration of natural grassland is an ecologically beneficial practice for the recovery of degraded soils in this area.

  19. Soil, Leaf and Root Ecological Stoichiometry of Caragana korshinskii on the Loess Plateau of China in Relation to Plantation Age

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Quanchao; Lal, Rattan; Chen, Yanan; An, Shaoshan

    2017-01-01

    Caragana korshinskii, a leguminous shrub, a common specie, is widely planted to prevent soil erosion on the Loess Plateau. The objective of this study was to determine how the plantation ages affected soil, leaf and root nutrients and ecological stoichiometry. The chronosequence ages of C. korshinskii plantations selected for this study were 10, 20 and 30 years. Soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil total nitrogen (STN) of C. korshinskii plantations significantly increased with increase in the chronosequence age. However, soil total phosphorous (STP) was not affected by the chronosequence age. The soil C: N ratio decreased and the soil C: P and N: P ratios increased with increasing plantation age. The leaf and root concentrations of C, N, and P increased and the ratios C: N, C: P, and N: P decreased with age increase. Leaf N: P ratios were >20, indicating that P was the main factor limiting the growth of C. korshinskii. This study also demonstrated that the regeneration of natural grassland (NG) effectively preserved and enhanced soil nutrient contents. Compared with NG, shrub lands (C. korshinskii) had much lower soil nutrient concentrations, especially for long (>20 years) chronosequence age. Thus, the regeneration of natural grassland is an ecologically beneficial practice for the recovery of degraded soils in this area. PMID:28076357

  20. [Characteristics of the wetland soil iron under different ages of reclamation].

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan-Chun; Lü, Xian-Guo; Jiang, Ming

    2008-03-01

    The temporal-spatial trends of soil total iron concentration (Fet), free degree (Fed/Fet), activation degree (Feo/Fed) and complex degree (Fep/Fed) of soil iron oxides after reclamation were studied in Sanjiang Plain Wetlands. The result suggests that Fet in the upper tillage layers (0 - 20 cm) are influenced by reclamation more significantly than that in the lower ones (20 - 100 cm), and so does the early ages (0 - 1 years) than the late ages (1 - 25 years). Fet is negatively correlated with organic matter extremely significantly (R = - 0.62), while that with total phosphorus and pH are not significant. Fet of soil layer I (0 - 10 cm) increases obviously during the first 7 years after reclamation, and tends to become stable after 13 years, while those ages of soil layer II (10 - 20 cm) are 8 years and 15 years respectively. Soil layer I shows shorter responding time and better regularity than layer II. Fed/Fet increases rapidly after reclamation, decreases later and then increases again. Feo/Fed indicates exponential decrease with the reclamation ages as well as Fep/Fed. Feo/Fed of layer I decreases radically during the first 4 years after reclamation and tends to become stable after 13 years, while that of layer II decreases dramatically within the first year and keeps stable henceforth. The counterparts of Fep/Fed are 6 years, 14 years, and 2 years respectively. With the fitted experimental equations of Fet, Feo/Fed, and Fep/Fed, the ages of reclamation can be deduced reversely, which indicates the implication of iron on the shifts of soil environment.

  1. Discordant 14C ages from buried tidal-marsh soils in the Cascadia subduction zone, southern Oregon coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    Peaty, tidal-marsh soils interbedded with estuarine mud in late Holocene stratigraphic sequences near Coos Bay, Oregon, may have been submerged and buried during great (M > 8) subduction earthquakes, smaller localized earthquakes, or by nontectonic processes. Radiocarbon dating might help distinguish among these alternatives by showing that soils at different sites were submerged at different times along this part of the Cascadia subduction zone. But comparison of conventional 14C ages for different materials from the same buried soils shows that they contain materials that differ in age by many hundreds of years. Errors in calibrated soil ages represent about the same length of time as recurrence times for submergence events (150-500 yr)-this similarity precludes using conventional 14C ages to distinguish buried soils along the southern Oregon coast. Accelerator mass spectrometer 14C ages of carefully selected macrofossils from the tops of peaty soils should provide more precise estimates of the times of submergence events. ?? 1992.

  2. Pyrolysis-AMS Study of Age Structure of SOC in Volcanic Soils on Kohala Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, K. E.; Galy, V.; Derry, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a complex substrate; the soil matrix has a wide array of chemical inputs, leading to a heterogeneous mixture of carbon compounds. In volcanic soils on Kohala Mountain, Hawaii Island, old organic carbon (OC) (>10,000 years) is associated with short-range order (SRO) minerals with large, reactive surface areas (Torn et al., 1997). Large variations in precipitation generate significant changes in soil pH, secondary minerals and soil redox state. A study to measure the age distribution in a given sample of SOC by the ramped pyrolysis-AMS technique was carried out at Woods Hole NOSAMS facility. Five soil samples, from three sites (precipitation = 2.4m/year, 2.3m/year, 1.78m/year, respectively) on a 350 ka volcanic (Pololu) substrate were analyzed. Samples were freeze-dried, homogenized, and combusted under a programed temperature pyrolysis regime from 25 to 900°C; evolved CO2 was collected in fractions for 14C analysis. The abundance of SRO minerals is characterized through sequential extractions and total elemental analysis. Results include: 1.) The Pu'u Eke profile (2.4m/year), older carbon (bulk radiocarbon age: 2530 years) is deeper (63-74cm) in the soil profile, but it is thermally less stable (thermograph Tmax: 314°C) than the younger carbon, which was in the associated with the 25-36cm sample (radiocarbon age: 1030yr) and Tmax: 324°C. The top horizon of the profile (13-21cm) had a modern radiocarbon age, but a Tmax: 396°C. 2.) The high precipitation site has significantly younger OC (2698 yr) than the drier site (7585 yr). This is coincident with changing redox conditions and loss of nano-crystalline iron oxide minerals (ferrihydrite) from the wet site. 3.) In a given sample, the age distribution is fairly uniform. The initial results support the hypothesis that nano-crystalline ferrihydrite acts to stabilize OC, as older carbon is found in the dryer, ferrihydrite rich sites, while at the wet, Fe-poor site 14C ages were

  3. Phytotoxicity of nitroaromatic energetic compounds freshly amended or weathered and aged in sandy loam soil.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, Sylvie; Kuperman, Roman G; Martel, Majorie; Paquet, Louise; Bardai, Ghalib; Wong, Stephen; Sarrazin, Manon; Dodard, Sabine; Gong, Ping; Hawari, Jalal; Checkai, Ronald T; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2006-01-01

    The toxicities of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) to terrestrial plants alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Japanese millet (Echinochloa crusgalli L.), and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) were determined in Sassafras sandy loam soil using seedling emergence, fresh shoot, and dry mass measurement endpoints. A 13-week weathering and aging of energetic materials in soils, which included wetting and drying cycles, and exposure to sunlight of individual soil treatments, was incorporated into the study design to better reflect the soil exposure conditions in the field than toxicity determinations in freshly amended soils. Definitive toxicity tests showed that dinitrotoluenes were more phytotoxic for all plant species in freshly amended treatments based on EC20 values for dry shoot ranging from 3 to 24mgkg(-1) compared with values for TNB or TNT ranging from 43 to 62mgkg(-1). Weathering and aging of energetic materials (EMs) in soil significantly decreased the toxicity of TNT, TNB or 2,6-DNT to Japanese millet or ryegrass based on seedling emergence, but significantly increased the toxicity of all four EMs to all three plant species based on shoot growth. Exposure of the three plant species to relatively low concentrations of the four compounds initially stimulated plant growth before the onset of inhibition at greater concentrations (hormesis).

  4. Soil microbial communities are shaped by vegetation type and park age in cities under cold climate.

    PubMed

    Hui, Nan; Jumpponen, Ari; Francini, Gaia; Kotze, D Johan; Liu, Xinxin; Romantschuk, Martin; Strömmer, Rauni; Setälä, Heikki

    2017-03-01

    Soil microbes play a key role in controlling ecosystem functions and providing ecosystem services. Yet, microbial communities in urban green space soils remain poorly characterized. Here we compared soil microbial communities in 41 urban parks of (i) divergent plant functional types (evergreen trees, deciduous trees and lawn) and (ii) different ages (constructed 10, ∼50 and >100 years ago). These microbial communities were also compared to those in 5 control forests in southern Finland. Our results indicate that, despite frequent disturbances in urban parks, urban soil microbes still followed the classic patterns typical of plant-microbe associations in natural environments: both bacterial and fungal communities in urban parks responded to plant functional groups, but fungi were under tighter control of plants than bacteria. We show that park age shaped the composition of microbial communities, possibly because vegetation in old parks have had a longer time to modify soil properties and microbial communities than in young parks. Furthermore, control forests harboured distinct but less diverse soil microbial communities than urban parks that are under continuous anthropogenic disturbance. Our results highlight the importance of maintaining a diverse portfolio of urban green spaces and plant communities therein to facilitate complex microbial communities and functions in urban systems.

  5. Mutagenicity of an aged gasworks soil during bioslurry treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Christine L; Lynes, Krista D; White, Paul A; Lundstedt, Staffan; Öberg, Lars; Lambert, Iain B

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated changes in the mutagenic activity of organic fractions from soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during pilot-scale bioslurry remediation. Slurry samples were previously analyzed for changes in PAH and polycyclic aromatic compound content, and this study examined the correspondence between the chemical and toxicological metrics. Nonpolar neutral and semipolar aromatic fractions of samples obtained on days 0, 3, 7, 24, and 29 of treatment were assayed for mutagenicity using the Salmonella mutation assay. Most samples elicited a significant positive response on Salmonella strains TA98, YG1041, and YG1042 with and without S9 metabolic activation; however, TA100 failed to detect mutagenicity in any sample. Changes in the mutagenic activity of the fractions across treatment time and metabolic activation conditions suggests a pattern of formation and transformation of mutagenic compounds that may include a wide range of PAH derivatives such as aromatic amines, oxygenated PAHs, and S-heterocyclic compounds. The prior chemical analyses documented the formation of oxygenated PAHs during the treatment (e.g., 4-oxapyrene-5-one), and the mutagenicity analyses showed high corresponding activity in the semipolar fraction with and without metabolic activation. However, it could not be verified that these specific compounds were the underlying cause of the observed changes in mutagenic activity. The results highlight the need for concurrent chemical and toxicological profiling of contaminated sites undergoing remediation to ensure elimination of priority contaminants as well as a reduction in toxicological hazard. Moreover, the results imply that remediation efficacy and utility be evaluated using both chemical and toxicological metrics. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19274766

  6. Increase in bioavailability of aged phenanthrene in soils by competitive displacement with pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C.; Hunter, M.; Pignatello, J.J.; Alexander, M.

    1999-08-01

    Competitive sorption to natural solids among mixtures of organic compounds has been documented in the literature. This study was conducted to determine co-solute competitive effects on the biological and physical availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils after long contact periods (aging). Sterile suspensions of Mount Pleasant silt loam (Mt. Pleasant, NY, USA) and Pahokee peat soils were spiked with phenanthrene and allowed to age for 3 or 123 d before inoculation with a phenanthrene-degrading bacterium in the presence or absence of the nonbiodegradable co-solute pyrene. As expected, mineralization decreased with aging in the samples not amended with pyrene. However, addition of pyrene just prior to inoculation at 123 d significantly mitigated this decrease; that is, the extent of mineralization was greater in the 123-d pyrene-amended samples than in the 123-d nonamended samples. Parallel experiments on sterile soils showed that pyrene increased the physical availability of phenanthrene by competitive displacement of phenanthrene from sorption sites. First, the addition of pyrene increased recovery of 123-d-aged phenanthrene by mild solvent extraction. Second, addition of pyrene (at three concentrations) dramatically reduced the apparent distribution coefficient (K{sub d}{sup app}) of several concentrations of 60-, 95-, and 111-d-aged phenanthrene. At the lowest phenanthrene and highest pyrene concentrations, reductions in the K{sub d}{sup app} of phenanthrene in the peat soil reached 83%. The competitive displacement effect observed in this study adds further support to the dual mode model of sorption to soil organic matter. The displacement of an aged contaminant by a nonaged co-solute might also prove useful in the development of novel remediation strategies.

  7. Rates of litter decomposition and soil respiration in relation to soil temperature and water in different-aged Pinus massoniana forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenfa; Ge, Xiaogai; Zeng, Lixiong; Huang, Zhilin; Lei, Jingpin; Zhou, Benzhi; Li, Maihe

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the soil carbon dynamics and cycling in terrestrial ecosystems in response to environmental changes, we studied soil respiration, litter decomposition, and their relations to soil temperature and soil water content for 18-months (Aug. 2010-Jan. 2012) in three different-aged Pinus massoniana forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China. Across the experimental period, the mean total soil respiration and litter respiration were 1.94 and 0.81, 2.00 and 0.60, 2.19 and 0.71 µmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1), and the litter dry mass remaining was 57.6%, 56.2% and 61.3% in the 20-, 30-, and 46-year-old forests, respectively. We found that the temporal variations of soil respiration and litter decomposition rates can be well explained by soil temperature at 5 cm depth. Both the total soil respiration and litter respiration were significantly positively correlated with the litter decomposition rates. The mean contribution of the litter respiration to the total soil respiration was 31.0%-45.9% for the three different-aged forests. The present study found that the total soil respiration was not significantly affected by forest age when P. masonniana stands exceed a certain age (e.g. >20 years old), but it increased significantly with increased soil temperature. Hence, forest management strategies need to protect the understory vegetation to limit soil warming, in order to reduce the CO2 emission under the currently rapid global warming. The contribution of litter decomposition to the total soil respiration varies across spatial and temporal scales. This indicates the need for separate consideration of soil and litter respiration when assessing the climate impacts on forest carbon cycling.

  8. Rates of Litter Decomposition and Soil Respiration in Relation to Soil Temperature and Water in Different-Aged Pinus massoniana Forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lixiong; Huang, Zhilin; Lei, Jingpin; Zhou, Benzhi; Li, Maihe

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the soil carbon dynamics and cycling in terrestrial ecosystems in response to environmental changes, we studied soil respiration, litter decomposition, and their relations to soil temperature and soil water content for 18-months (Aug. 2010–Jan. 2012) in three different-aged Pinus massoniana forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China. Across the experimental period, the mean total soil respiration and litter respiration were 1.94 and 0.81, 2.00 and 0.60, 2.19 and 0.71 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1, and the litter dry mass remaining was 57.6%, 56.2% and 61.3% in the 20-, 30-, and 46-year-old forests, respectively. We found that the temporal variations of soil respiration and litter decomposition rates can be well explained by soil temperature at 5 cm depth. Both the total soil respiration and litter respiration were significantly positively correlated with the litter decomposition rates. The mean contribution of the litter respiration to the total soil respiration was 31.0%–45.9% for the three different-aged forests. The present study found that the total soil respiration was not significantly affected by forest age when P. masonniana stands exceed a certain age (e.g. >20 years old), but it increased significantly with increased soil temperature. Hence, forest management strategies need to protect the understory vegetation to limit soil warming, in order to reduce the CO2 emission under the currently rapid global warming. The contribution of litter decomposition to the total soil respiration varies across spatial and temporal scales. This indicates the need for separate consideration of soil and litter respiration when assessing the climate impacts on forest carbon cycling. PMID:25004164

  9. Bioremediation trial on aged PCB-polluted soils--a bench study in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Taru; Mikkonen, Anu; Sigfusson, Bergur; Ólafsdóttir, Kristín; Ragnarsdóttir, Kristín Vala; Guicharnaud, Rannveig

    2014-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) pose a threat to the environment due to their high adsorption capacity to soil organic matter, stability and low reactivity, low water solubility, toxicity and ability to bioaccumulate. With Icelandic soils, research on contamination issues has been very limited and no data has been reported either on PCB degradation potential or rate. The goals of this research were to assess the bioavailability of aged PCBs in the soils of the old North Atlantic Treaty Organization facility in Keflavík, Iceland and to find the best biostimulation method to decrease the pollution. The effectiveness of different biostimulation additives (N fertiliser, white clover and pine needles) at different temperatures (10 and 30 °C) and oxygen levels (aerobic and anaerobic) were tested. PCB bioavailability to soil fauna was assessed with earthworms (Eisenia foetida). PCBs were bioavailable to earthworms (bioaccumulation factor 0.89 and 0.82 for earthworms in 12.5 ppm PCB soil and in 25 ppm PCB soil, respectively), with less chlorinated congeners showing higher bioaccumulation factors than highly chlorinated congeners. Biostimulation with pine needles at 10 °C under aerobic conditions resulted in nearly 38 % degradation of total PCBs after 2 months of incubation. Detection of the aerobic PCB degrading bphA gene supports the indigenous capability of the soils to aerobically degrade PCBs. Further research on field scale biostimulation trials with pine needles in cold environments is recommended in order to optimise the method for onsite remediation.

  10. [Bacteria community in different aged Coptis chinensis planting soil revealed by PCR-DGGE analysis].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuan; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Han-jun; Song, San-duo; Yu, Xiu-mei; Dong, Zhen-huan; Tang, Xue; Zhong, Yu-zhou

    2015-08-01

    In order to reveal the cause of disease occurred in the process of Coptis chinensis growth, this paper studied the bacterial species diversity index of different aged rhizospheric and non-rhizospheric soil planting normal or sick C. chinensis by using PCR-DGGE technique. The representative DGGE bands were chosen to be cloned, and sequenced, the phylogeny were constructed. The results showed that the bacterial communities were very different between the normal and diseased soil samples of C. chinensis, and the diversity index (H) of diseased soil samples were higher than that of normal soil samples. Sequencing analysis of representative cloned DGGE bands showed that the unculturable bacteria were the dominant groups, and bacteria belonged to genus Bacillus, Acidovorax, Acinetobacter, uncultured Kluyvera, and uncultured Comamonas were also existing, but the reported plant pathogenic bacteria were not found in the C. chinensis planting soil. The density and brightness of clone band d in diseased soil samples was higher than that in normal soil sample, and sequencing analysis showed that it belonged to genus Acidovorax. Obviously, during the process of C. chinensis growth, the rhizospheric bacteria population changed, and the quantity of bacteria belong Acidovorax increased, which probably resulted in the disease occurred during C. chinensis growth.

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enriching antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the soils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baowei; He, Rong; Yuan, Ke; Chen, Enzhong; Lin, Lan; Chen, Xin; Sha, Sha; Zhong, Jianan; Lin, Li; Yang, Lihua; Yang, Ying; Wang, Xiaowei; Zou, Shichun; Luan, Tiangang

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in modern environment raises an emerging global health concern. In this study, soil samples were collected from three sites in petrochemical plant that represented different pollution levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Metagenomic profiling of these soils demonstrated that ARGs in the PAHs-contaminated soils were approximately 15 times more abundant than those in the less-contaminated ones, with Proteobacterial being the preponderant phylum. Resistance profile of ARGs in the PAHs-polluted soils was characterized by the dominance of efflux pump-encoding ARGs associated with aromatic antibiotics (e.g., fluoroquinolones and acriflavine) that accounted for more than 70% of the total ARGs, which was significantly different from representative sources of ARG pollution due to wide use of antibiotics. Most of ARGs enriched in the PAHs-contaminated soils were not carried by plasmids, indicating the low possibilities of them being transferred between bacteria. Significant correlation was observed between the total abundance of ARGs and that of Proteobacteria in the soils. Proteobacteria selected by PAHs led to simultaneously enriching of ARGs carried by them in the soils. Our results suggested that PAHs could serve as one of selective stresses for greatly enriching of ARGs in the human-impacted environment.

  12. Comparing the mutagenicity of toxaphene after aging in anoxic soils and accumulating in fish.

    PubMed

    Young, James C; Freeman, Anne D; Bruce, Robert M; Williams, Douglas; Maruya, Keith

    2009-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the mutagenicity of toxaphene residuals extracted from aged soils and from fish collected in creeks near a toxaphene-contaminated site. The ultimate objective was to determine if the residual toxaphene congeners were more or less mutagenic than those in technical-grade toxaphene. The study showed that the mutagenicity of the bioaccumulated toxaphene congeners in fish, expressed as colony revertants per microg of residual toxaphene, was no greater than that of technical-grade toxaphene. The mutagenic impact of the toxaphene residuals in aged soil statistically was less than that for technical-grade toxaphene. Two specific congeners, a hexachlorobornane (labeled Hx-Sd) and a heptachlorobornane (labeled Hp-Sd), were found to accumulate over time in both soil and fish extracts, but did not show increased mutagenic impacts relative to that produced by technical-grade toxaphene.

  13. Influence of soil biochar aging on sorption of the herbicides MCPA, nicosulfuron, terbuthylazine, indaziflam, and fluoroethyldiaminotriazine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorption of four herbicides and a metabolite of indaziflam on a fresh macadamia nut biochar and biochars aged one or two years in soil was characterized. On fresh biochar, the sorption was terbuthylazine (Kd = 595) > indaziflam (Kd = 162) > MCPA (Kd = 7.5) > fluoroethyldiaminotriazine (Kd = 0.26) a...

  14. Effects of redox conditions on the adsorption of dissolved organic matter to soil minerals and differently aged paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, Meike; Hanke, Alexander; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    Effects of redox conditions on the adsorption of dissolved organic matter to soil minerals and differently aged paddy soils Meike Sauerwein1, Alexander Hanke2, Klaus Kaiser3, Karsten Kalbitz2 1) Dept. of Soil Ecology, Bayreuth Centre of Ecology and Environmental Research (BayCEER), University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, meike.sauerwein@gmail.com 2) Institute of ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity, University of Amsterdam, 1018 WV, Netherlands, a.hanke@uva.nl, k.kalbitz@uva.nl 3) Soil Sciences, Martin Luther University Halle, 06099 Halle, Germany, klaus.kaiser@landw.uni-halle.de Current knowledge on dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils is based mainly on observations and experiments in aerobic environments. Adsorption to soil minerals is an important mechanism of DOM retention and stabilization against microbial decay under oxic conditions. Under anoxic conditions where hydrous iron oxides, the potential main adsorbents of DOM, possibly dissolve, the importance of adsorption seems questionable. Therefore, we studied the adsorption of DOM to selected soil minerals and to mineral soils under oxic and anoxic conditions. In detail, we tested the following hypotheses: 1. Minerals and soils adsorb less DOM under anoxic conditions than under oxic ones. 2. The reduced adsorption under anoxic conditions is result of the smaller adsorption to hydrous Fe oxides whereas adsorption to clay minerals and Al hydroxides is not sensitive to changes in redox conditions 3. DOM adsorption will increase with the number of redox cycles, thus time of soil formation, due to increasing contents of poorly crystalline Fe oxides. This will, however, cause a stronger sensitivity to redox changes as poor crystalline Fe oxides are more reactive. 4. Aromatic compounds, being preferentially adsorbed under oxic conditions, will be less strongly adsorbed under anoxic conditions. We chose paddy soils as models because their periodically and regular exposure to changing redox cycles, with

  15. Weathering and aging of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in soil increases toxicity to potworm Enchytraeus crypticus.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Roman G; Checkai, Ronald T; Simini, Michael; Phillips, Carlton T; Kolakowski, Jan E; Kurnas, Carl W

    2005-10-01

    Energetic materials are employed in a wide range of commercial and military activities and often are released into the environment. Scientifically based ecological soil-screening levels (Eco-SSLs) are needed to identify contaminant explosive levels in soil that present an acceptable ecological risk. Insufficient information for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to generate Eco-SSLs for soil invertebrates necessitated toxicity testing. We adapted the standardized Enchytraeid Reproduction Test and selected Enchytraeus crypticus for these studies. Tests were conducted in Sassafras sandy loam soil, which supports relatively high bioavailability of TNT. Weathering and aging procedures for TNT amended to test soil were incorporated into the study design to produce toxicity data that better reflect the soil exposure conditions in the field compared with toxicity in freshly amended soils. This included exposing hydrated TNT-amended soils in open glass containers in the greenhouse to alternating wetting and drying cycles. Definitive tests showed that toxicity for E. crypticus adult survival and juvenile production was increased significantly in weathered and aged soil treatments compared with toxicity in freshly amended soil based on 95% confidence intervals. The median effect concentration and 20% effective concentration for reproduction were 98 and 77 mg/kg, respectively, for TNT freshly amended into soil and 48 and 37 mg/kg, respectively, for weathered and aged TNT soil treatments. These findings of increased toxicity to E. crypticus in weathered and aged TNT soil treatments compared with exposures in freshly amended soils show that future investigations should include a weathering and aging component to generate toxicity data that provide more complete information on ecotoxicological effects of energetic contaminants in soil.

  16. Kinetic characteristic of phenanthrene sorption in aged soil amended with biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanyang; Kim, Yong-Seong; Hyun, Seunghun

    2015-04-01

    Biochar has been recently highlighted as an amendment that affects yield of the crops by increasing pH, cation exchange capacity and water retention, and reduces the lability of contaminants by increasing sorption capacity in the soil system. Biochar's physico-chemical properties, high CEC, surfaces containing abundant micropores and macropores, and various types of functional groups, play important roles in enhancing sorption capacity of contaminants. Aging through a natural weathering process might change physico-chemical properties of biochar amended in soils, which can affect the sorption behavior of contaminants. Thus, in this study, the sorption characteristics of phenanthrene (PHE) on biochar-amended soils were studied with various types of chars depending on aging time. To do this, 1) soil was amended with sludge waste char (SWC), wood char (WC), and municipal waste char (MWC) during 0, 6, and 12 month. Chars were applied to soil at 1% and 2.5% (w/w) ratio. 2) Several batch kinetic and equilibrium studies were conducted. One-compartment first order and two-compartment first order model apportioning the fraction of fast and slow sorbing were selected for kinetic models. Where, qt is PHE concentration in biochar-amended soils at each time t, qeis PHE concentration in biochar-amended soils at equilibrium. ff is fastly sorbing fraction and (1-ff) is slowly sorbing fraction. k is sorption rate constant from one-compartment first order model, k1 and k2 are sorption rate constant from two-compartment first order model, t is time (hr). The equilibrium sorption data were fitted with Fruendlich and Langmuir equation. 3) Change in physico-chemical properties of biochar-amended soils was investigated with aging time. Batch equilibrium sorption results suggested that sorbed amount of PHE on WC was greater than SWC and MWC. The more char contents added to soil, the greater sorption capacity of PHE. Sorption equilibrium was reached after 4 hours and equilibrium pH ranged

  17. Assessment of Bioavailability Limitations During Slurry Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Aged Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

    2003-12-01

    In an effort to determine whether bioavailability limitations are responsible for the slow or incomplete hydrocarbon biodegradation in aged soils, both the rate of desorption (rdes) and biodegradation (rbio) was measured for n-alkanes and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at different times during the slurry biotreatment of six different soils. While all n-alkanes were biodegraded to various degrees depending on their respective carbon number and the soil organic matter content, none of them were desorbed to a significant extent indicating that these saturated hydrocarbons do not need to be transferred from the soil particles into the aqueous phase in order to be metabolized by microorganisms. Most 2 and 3 ring PAHs biodegraded as fast as they were desorbed (rbio=rdes), i.e., desorption rates controlled biodegradation rates. By contrast, the biodegradation kinetics of 4, 5, and 6 ring PAHs was limited by microbial factors during the initial phase (rbio < rdes) while becoming mass-transfer rate limited during the final phase of bioremediation treatment (rbio=rdes). Whenever PAH biodegradation stalled or did not occur at all (rbio=0), it was never due to bioavailability limitations (rdes >> 0) but was more likely caused by microbial factors such as the absence of specific PAH degraders or cometabolic substrates. Consequently, PAHs that are found to be microbially recalcitrant in aged soils may not be so because of limited bioavailability and thus could pose a greater risk to the environment than previously thought.

  18. Does Bioavailability Limit Biodegradability? A Comparison of Hydrocarbon Biodegradation and Desorption Rates in Aged Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine whether bioavailability limits the biodegradability of petroleum hydrocarbons in aged soils, both the biodegradation and abiotic desorption rates of PAHs and n-alkanes were measured at various time points in six different aged soils undergoing slurry bioremediation treatment. Alkane biodegradation rates were always much greater than the respective desorption rates, indicating that these saturated hydrocarbons do not need to be transferred into the aqueous phase prior to metabolism by soil microorganisms. The biodegradation of PAHs was generally not mass-transfer rate limited during the initial phase, while it often became so at the end of the treatment period when biodegradation rates equaled abiotic desorption rates. However, in all cases where PAH biodegradation was not observed or PAH removal temporarily stalled, bioavailability limitations were not deemed responsible for this recalcitrance since these PAHs desorbed rapidly from the soil into the aqueous phase. Consequently, aged PAHs that are often thought to be recalcitrant due to bioavailability limitations may not be so and therefore may pose a greater risk to environmental receptors than previously thought.

  19. Does bioavailability limit biodegradation? A comparison of hydrocarbon biodegradation and desorption rates in aged soils.

    PubMed

    Huesemann, Michael H; Hausmann, Tom S; Fortman, Tim J

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine whether bioavailability limits the biodegradability of petroleum hydrocarbons in aged soils, both the biodegradation and abiotic desorption rates of PAHs and n-alkanes were measured at various time points in six different aged soils undergoing slurry bioremediation treatment. Alkane biodegradation rates were always much greater than the respective desorption rates, indicating that these saturated hydrocarbons apparently do not need to be dissolved into the aqueous phase prior to metabolism by soil microorganisms. The biodegradation of PAHs was generally not mass-transfer rate limited during the initial phase, while it often became so at the end of the treatment period when biodegradation rates equaled abiotic desorption rates. However, in all cases where PAH biodegradation was not observed or PAH removal temporarily stalled, bioavailability limitations were not deemed responsible for this recalcitrance since these PAHs desorbed rapidly from the soil into the aqueous phase. Consequently, aged PAHs that are often thought to be recalcitrant due to bioavailability limitations may not be so and therefore may pose a greater risk to environmental receptors than previously thought.

  20. Ethylene limits abscisic acid- or soil drying-induced stomatal closure in aged wheat leaves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Dodd, Ian C; Davies, William J; Wilkinson, Sally

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of age-induced decreased stomatal sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) and soil drying has been explored here. Older, fully expanded leaves partly lost their ability to close stomata in response to foliar ABA sprays, and soil drying which stimulated endogenous ABA production, while young fully expanded leaves closed their stomata more fully. However, ABA- or soil drying-induced stomatal closure of older leaves was partly restored by pretreating plants with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), which can antagonize ethylene receptors, or by inoculating soil around the roots with the rhizobacterium Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2, which contains 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC)-deaminase. ACC (the immediate biosynthetic precursor of ethylene) sprays revealed higher sensitivity of stomata to ethylene in older leaves than younger leaves, despite no differences in endogenous ACC concentrations or ethylene emission. Taken together, these results indicate that the relative insensitivity of stomatal closure to ABA and soil drying in older leaves is likely due to altered stomatal sensitivity to ethylene, rather than ethylene production. To our knowledge, this is the first study to mechanistically explain diminished stomatal responses to soil moisture deficit in older leaves, and the associated reduction in leaf water-use efficiency.

  1. Enhanced dissipation of PAHs from soil using mycorrhizal ryegrass and PAH-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yu, X Z; Wu, S C; Wu, F Y; Wong, M H

    2011-02-28

    The major aim of this experiment was to test the effects of a multi-component bioremediation system consisting of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-degrading bacteria (Acinetobacter sp.), and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus mosseae) for cleaning up PAHs contaminated soil. Higher dissipation rates were observed in combination treatments: i.e., bacteria+ryegrass (BR), mycorrhizae+ryegrass (MR), and bacteria+mycorrhizae+ryegrass (BMR); than bacteria (B) and ryegrass (R) alone. The growth of ryegrass significantly (p<0.05) increased soil peroxidase activities, leading to enhanced dissipation of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) from soil. Interactions between ryegrass with the two microbes further enhanced the dissipation of PHE and PYR. Mycorrhizal ryegrass (MR) significantly enhanced the dissipation of PYR from soil, PYR accumulation by ryegrass roots and soil peroxidase activities under lower PHE and PYR levels (0 and 50+50 mg kg(-1)). The present results highlighted the contribution of mycorrhiza and PAH-degrading bacteria in phytoremediation of PAH contaminated soil, however more detailed studies are needed.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water, sediment and soil of the Songhua River Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wan-Li; Liu, Li-Yan; Qi, Hong; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Song, Wei-Wei; Shen, Ji-Min; Chen, Zhong-Lin; Ren, Nan-Qi; Grabuski, Josey; Li, Yi-Fan

    2013-10-01

    The Songhua River is the third largest river in China and the primary source of drinking and irrigation water for northeastern China. The distribution of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water [dissolved water (DW) and suspended particulate matter (SPM)], sediment, and soil in the river basin was investigated, and the associated risk of cancer from these PAHs was also assessed. The total concentration of PAHs ranged from 13.9 to 161 ng L(-1) in DW, 9.21 to 83.1 ng L(-1) in SPM, 20.5 to 632 ng g(-1) dw (dry weight) in sediment, and from 30.1 to 870 ng g(-1) dw in soil. The compositional pattern of PAHs indicated that three-ring PAHs were predominant in DW and SPM samples, while four-ring PAHs dominated in sediment and soil samples. The spatial distribution of PAHs revealed some site-specific sources along the river, with principal component analysis indicating that these were from pyrogenic sources (such as coal and biomass combustion, and vehicle emissions) and coke oven emission distinguished as the main source of PAHs in the Songhua River Basin. Based on the ingestion of PAH-contaminated drinking water from the Songhua River, cancer risk was quantitatively estimated by combining the Incremental Lifetime Cancer Risk assessment model and BaP-equivalent concentration for five age groups of people (adults, teenagers, children, toddlers, and infants). Overall, the results suggest that the estimated integrated lifetime cancer risk for all groups was in acceptable levels. This study is the first attempt to provide information on the cancer risk of PAHs in drinking water from the Songhua River.

  3. Identification of Anthraquinone-Degrading Bacteria in Soil Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Vieira, Elyse A.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Adrion, Alden C.; Gold, Avram

    2015-01-01

    Quinones and other oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) are toxic and/or genotoxic compounds observed to be cocontaminants at PAH-contaminated sites, but their formation and fate in contaminated environmental systems have not been well studied. Anthracene-9,10-dione (anthraquinone) has been found in most PAH-contaminated soils and sediments that have been analyzed for oxy-PAHs. However, little is known about the biodegradation of oxy-PAHs, and no bacterial isolates have been described that are capable of growing on or degrading anthraquinone. PAH-degrading Mycobacterium spp. are the only organisms that have been investigated to date for metabolism of a PAH quinone, 4,5-pyrenequinone. We utilized DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) with [U-13C]anthraquinone to identify bacteria associated with anthraquinone degradation in PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site both before and after treatment in a laboratory-scale bioreactor. SIP with [U-13C]anthracene was also performed to assess whether bacteria capable of growing on anthracene are the same as those identified to grow on anthraquinone. Organisms closely related to Sphingomonas were the most predominant among the organisms associated with anthraquinone degradation in bioreactor-treated soil, while organisms in the genus Phenylobacterium comprised the majority of anthraquinone degraders in the untreated soil. Bacteria associated with anthracene degradation differed from those responsible for anthraquinone degradation. These results suggest that Sphingomonas and Phenylobacterium species are associated with anthraquinone degradation and that anthracene-degrading organisms may not possess mechanisms to grow on anthraquinone. PMID:25819957

  4. Efficiency of surfactant-enhanced desorption for contaminated soils depending on the component characteristics of soil-surfactant--PAHs system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjun; Zhu, Lizhong

    2007-05-01

    The sorption of surfactants onto soils has a significant effect on the performance of surfactant enhanced desorption. In this study, the efficiency of surfactants in enhancing desorption for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contaminated soils relative to water was evaluated with a term of relative efficiency coefficient (REC). Since the sorption of surfactants onto soils, surfactants only enhanced PAH desorption when REC values were larger than 1 and the added surfactant concentration was greater than the corresponding critical enhance desorption concentration (CEDC), which was defined as the corresponding surfactant concentration with REC=1. A model was utilized to describe and predict the REC and CEDC values for PAH desorption. The model and experimental results indicated that the efficiency of surfactants in enhancing PAH desorption showed strong dependence on the soil composition, surfactant structure and PAH properties. These results are of practical interest for the selection of surfactant to optimize soil remediation technologies.

  5. Aging effect on the leaching behavior of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, and Cd) in red paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Li, Zhongwu; Huang, Jinquan; Chen, Guiqiu; Nie, Xiaodong; Ma, Wenming; Yao, Hongbo; Zhen, Jiamei; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-08-01

    Aging effect can influence the fractions distribution and mobility of metals after they are added into soil. In this study, incubation and soil column experiments under simulated acid rain condition were conducted to evaluate aging effect on the leaching characteristic of Cu, Zn, and Cd in artificial polluted red paddy soil. Our results showed that aging effect reduced metal contents in exchangeable and HoAc soluble fractions. Power function was the most excellent to describe the variation of exchangeable fraction, while pseudo first- and second-order functions were more successful to describe the leaching characteristic of metals from soil columns. The leaching amount of the metals from the polluted soil only accounted for a small part of their total content in soil, and the leachability of Cu was the weakest. Both the exchangeable and HoAc soluble fraction were available as indicators to evaluate the leachability of metals in red paddy soil. The shorter time the soil was contaminated, the more amounts of metals released from the soil. The reduction of exchangeable fraction caused by aging effect was the main reason for the decrease of metal mobility in soil.

  6. Effects of polyethoxylate lauryl ether (Brij 35) addition on phenanthrene biodegradation in a soil/water system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-T; Hung, Chun-H; Chou, Hsi-L

    2014-01-01

    Non-ionic surfactants usually are often selected for use in surfactant flushing technology, which is a process that can be used as part of PAH-contaminated soil bioremediation. Phenanthrene (PHE) biodegradation in the presence of polyethoxylate lauryl ether (Brij 35) was studied in two soil/water systems. The natural soil organic matter content (SOM) and the present of Brij 35, both above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and below the CMC, changed the rate of PHE biodegradation in the presence of Brij 35. PHE biodegradation is different in the two different soil/water systems: PHE > PHE-Brij 35-Micelle > PHE-Brij 35-Monomer in the clay/water system; PHE-Brij 35-Micelle > PHE-Brij 35-Monomer > PHE in the natural soil/water system. Among the free-living species associated with PHE-Brij 35 biodegradation, Brevundimonas diminuta, Caulobacter spp., Mycoplana bullata, Acidovorax spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa accounted for 90.72% to 99.90% of the bacteria present. Specific hydrolytic enzymes, including esterases, glycosol-hydrolases and phosphatases, are expressed during PHE biodegradation. The information presented here will help the engineering design of more effective PAH bioremediation systems that use Brij 35 series flushing technology. In particular, micelles of Brij 35 can be used to accelerate the rate of remediation of PAH-contaminated soil in natural soil/water systems.

  7. Soil Microbial Community Structure and Metabolic Activity of Pinus elliottii Plantations across Different Stand Ages in a Subtropical Area

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeyan; Haack, Stacey Elizabeth; Lin, Wenxiong; Li, Bailian; Wu, Linkun; Fang, Changxun; Zhang, Zhixing

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbes play an essential role in the forest ecosystem as an active component. This study examined the hypothesis that soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity would vary with the increasing stand ages in long-term pure plantations of Pinus elliottii. The phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) combined with community level physiological profiles (CLPP) method was used to assess these characteristics in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii. We found that the soil microbial communities were significantly different among different stand ages of P. elliottii plantations. The PLFA analysis indicated that the bacterial biomass was higher than the actinomycic and fungal biomass in all stand ages. However, the bacterial biomass decreased with the increasing stand ages, while the fungal biomass increased. The four maximum biomarker concentrations in rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii for all stand ages were 18:1ω9c, 16:1ω7c, 18:3ω6c (6,9,12) and cy19:0, representing measures of fungal and gram negative bacterial biomass. In addition, CLPP analysis revealed that the utilization rate of amino acids, polymers, phenolic acids, and carbohydrates of soil microbial community gradually decreased with increasing stand ages, though this pattern was not observed for carboxylic acids and amines. Microbial community diversity, as determined by the Simpson index, Shannon-Wiener index, Richness index and McIntosh index, significantly decreased as stand age increased. Overall, both the PLFA and CLPP illustrated that the long-term pure plantation pattern exacerbated the microecological imbalance previously described in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii, and markedly decreased the soil microbial community diversity and metabolic activity. Based on the correlation analysis, we concluded that the soil nutrient and C/N ratio most significantly contributed to the variation of soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity in different stand ages of P

  8. Identification of soil bacteria able to degrade phenanthrene bound to a hydrophobic sorbent in situ.

    PubMed

    Regonne, Raïssa Kom; Martin, Florence; Mbawala, Augustin; Ngassoum, Martin Benoît; Jouanneau, Yves

    2013-09-01

    Efficient bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sites is limited by the hydrophobic character and poor bioavailability of pollutants. In this study, stable isotope probing (SIP) was implemented to track bacteria that can degrade PAHs adsorbed on hydrophobic sorbents. Temperate and tropical soils were incubated with (13)C-labeled phenanthrene, supplied by spiking or coated onto membranes. Phenanthrene mineralization was faster in microcosms with PAH-coated membranes than in microcosms containing spiked soil. Upon incubation with temperate soil, phenanthrene degraders found in the biofilms that formed on coated membranes were mainly identified as Sphingomonadaceae and Actinobacteria. In the tropical soil, uncultured Rhodocyclaceae dominated degraders bound to membranes. Accordingly, ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase sequences recovered from this soil matched PAH-specific dioxygenase genes recently found in Rhodocyclaceae. Hence, our SIP approach allowed the detection of novel degraders, mostly uncultured, which differ from those detected after soil spiking, but might play a key role in the bioremediation of PAH-polluted soils.

  9. Soil C and N changes with afforestation of grasslands across gradients of precipitation and plantation age.

    PubMed

    Berthrong, Sean T; Piñeiro, Gervasio; Jobbágy, Esteban G; Jackson, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    Afforestation, the conversion of unforested lands to forests, is a tool for sequestering anthropogenic carbon dioxide into plant biomass. However, in addition to altering biomass, afforestation can have substantial effects on soil organic carbon (SOC) pools, some of which have much longer turnover times than plant biomass. An increasing body of evidence suggests that the effect of afforestation on SOC may depend on mean annual precipitation (MAP). The goal of this study was to test how labile and bulk pools of SOC and total soil nitrogen (TN) change with afforestation across a rainfall gradient of 600-1500 mm in the Rio de la Plata grasslands of Argentina and Uruguay. The sites were all former grasslands planted with Eucalyptus spp. Overall, we found that afforestation increased (up to 1012 kg C x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) or decreased (as much as 1294 kg C x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) SOC pools in this region and that these changes were significantly related to MAP. Drier sites gained, and wetter sites lost, SOC and TN (r2 = 0.59, P = 0.003; and r2 = 0.57, P = 0.004, respectively). Labile C and N in microbial biomass and extractable soil pools followed similar patterns to bulk SOC and TN. Interestingly, drier sites gained more SOC and TN as plantations aged, while losses reversed as plantations aged in wet sites, suggesting that plantation age in addition to precipitation is a critical driver of changes in soil organic matter with afforestation. This new evidence implies that longer intervals between harvests for plantations could improve SOC storage, ameliorating the negative trends found in humid sites. Our results suggest that the value of afforestation as a carbon sequestration tool should be considered in the context of precipitation and age of the forest stand.

  10. Effect of ageing on the availability of heavy metals in soils amended with compost and biochar: evaluation of changes in soil and amendment properties.

    PubMed

    Venegas, A; Rigol, A; Vidal, M

    2016-10-01

    Remediation strategies using soil amendments should consider the time dependence of metal availability to identify amendments that can sustainably reduce available pollutant concentrations over time. Drying-wetting cycles were applied on amendments, soils and soil + amendment mixtures, to mimic ageing at field level and investigate its effect on extractable Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations from three contaminated soils. The amendments investigated were municipal waste organic compost and biochars. The amendments, soils and mixtures were characterised by their physicochemical properties at different ageing times. The amendments were also characterised in terms of sorption capacity for Cd and Cu. The sorption capacity and the physicochemical properties of the amendments remained constant over the period examined. When mixed with the soils, amendments, especially the compost, immediately reduced the extractable metals in the soils with low pH and acid neutralisation capacity, due to the increase in pH and buffering capacity of the mixtures. The amendments had a relatively minor impact on the metal availability concentrations for the soil with substantially high acid neutralisation capacity. The most important changes in extractable metal concentrations were observed at the beginning of the experiments, ageing having a minor effect on metal concentrations when compared with the initial effect of amendments.

  11. Toxicity of emerging energetic soil contaminant CL-20 to potworm Enchytraeus crypticus in freshly amended or weathered and aged treatments.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Roman G; Checkai, Ronald T; Simini, Michael; Phillips, Carlton T; Anthony, J Steven; Kolakowski, Jan E; Davis, Emily A

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the toxicity of an emerging polynitramine energetic material hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) to the soil invertebrate species Enchytraeus crypticus by adapting then using the Enchytraeid Reproduction Test (ISO/16387:2003). Studies were designed to develop ecotoxicological benchmark values for ecological risk assessment of the potential impacts of accidental release of this compound into the environment. Tests were conducted in Sassafras Sandy Loam soil, which supports relatively high bioavailability of CL-20. Weathering and aging procedures for CL-20 amended into test soil were incorporated into the study design to produce toxicity data that better reflect soil exposure conditions in the field compared with the toxicity in freshly amended soils. Concentration-response relationships for measurement endpoints were determined using nonlinear regressions. Definitive tests showed that toxicities for E. crypticus adult survival and juvenile production were significantly increased in weathered and aged soil treatments compared with toxicity in freshly amended soil, based on 95% confidence intervals. The median effect concentration (EC50) and EC20 values for juvenile production were 0.3 and 0.1 mg kg-1, respectively, for CL-20 freshly amended into soil, and 0.1 and 0.035 mg kg-1, respectively, for weathered and aged CL-20 soil treatments. These findings of increased toxicity to E. crypticus in weathered and aged CL-20 soil treatments compared with exposures in freshly amended soils show that future investigations should include a weathering and aging component to generate toxicity data that provide more complete information on ecotoxicological effects of emerging energetic contaminants in soil.

  12. Rb-Sr age of a Luna 16 basalt and the model age of lunar soils.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    An internal isochron was determined on a small basalt fragment (sample B-1) returned from the Luna 16 mission, which yields an age of 3.42 plus or minus 0.8 b.y. and a low initial Sr87/Sr86 value. A comparison is made of the data from four lunar missions to mare sites which shows that the last period of major flooding of the mare basins is confined to a narrow time interval of only 0.55 b.y. The direct evidence of major lunar magmatic activity appears to be confined to the interval from 3.1 to 4.0 b.y. The Sr87/Sr86 values for all mare basalts are extremely primitive and lie in a rather narrow range. A diagram is given for initial Sr87/Sr86 as a function of time for all lunar rocks.

  13. Behavior of MCPA in four intensive cropping soils amended with fresh, composted, and aged olive mill waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Peña, David; Albarrán, Angel; Sánchez-Llerena, Javier; Becerra, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    An evaluation was made of the impact of olive mill waste and its organic matter transformation on the sorption, desorption, leaching, and degradation of the herbicide MCPA when the waste was applied to four Mediterranean soils. The soils were amended in the laboratory with fresh, composted, and field-aged olive mill waste (OW, COW, and AOW treatments, respectively). It was found that the greater the amount of OW applied to the soils, but especially the greater its organic matter maturity, the greater the adsorption of MCPA. Compared with unamended soils, at the 5% rate of application the adsorption capacity increased by between 9.8% and 40%, 148% and 224%, and by 258% for the OW, COW, and AOW amended soils, respectively. The hysteresis coefficients were significantly lower in the OW-amended soils than in AOW or COW-amended soils, indicating that the adsorbed MCPA could be easily desorbed in OW-amended soils if the amendment is not aged or composted. While the OW addition greatly extended the persistence of MCPA, the application of COW enhanced MCPA degradation in all the soils, as corresponded to the increased soil microbial activity indicated by the higher levels of soil dehydrogenase activity. Fresh OW amendment significantly increased the amount of MCPA leached (from 13.7% in the most alkaline soil to 36.7% in the most acidic, at the 5% rate of application), favored by the higher levels of water soluble organic carbon content. However, leaching losses of the herbicide were reduced by up to 39.9% and 55.3% in the COW- and AOW-amended soils at the 5% loading rate, respectively. The use of OW with a high degree of organic matter maturity may be regarded as a potentially useful management practice to reduce MCPA leaching in soils with low organic matter content. The application of fresh OW, however, could well increase the risk of groundwater contamination by this herbicide, especially in acidic soils.

  14. Mechanistic characterization of adsorption and slow desorption of phenanthrene aged in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul Abu; Steve Smith

    2006-09-01

    Long-term adsorption of phenanthrene to soils was characterized in a silt-loam (LHS), a sandy soil (SBS) from an uncontaminated area of a former coal treatment facility in the north of England and a podzolized soil (CNS) by use of the Polanyi-Manes model, a Langmuir-type model, and a black carbon-water distribution coefficient (K{sub BC}) at a relative aqueous concentration (C{sub e}/S{sub w}) of 0.002 - 0.32. Aqueous desorption kinetic tests and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) were also used to evaluate phenanthrene diffusivities and desorption activation energies. Adsorption contribution in soils was 48-70% after 30 days and 64-95% after 270 days. Significant increases in adsorption capacity with aging suggest that accessibility of phenanthrene to fractions of SBS soil matrix was controlled by sorptive diffusion at narrow meso- and micropore constrictions. Similar trends were not significant for LHS silt-loam or CNS podzol. Analysis of TPD profiles reveal desorption activation energies of 35-53 kJ/mol and diffusivities of 1.6 x 10{sup -7-}9.7 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}/s. TPD tests also indicate that the fraction of phenanthrene mass not diffusing from soils was located within micropores and narrow width mesopores with a corresponding volume of 1.83 10{sup -5-}6.3710{sup -5} cm{sup 3}/g. These values were consistent with the modeled adsorption contributions, thus demonstrating the need for such complimentary analytical approach in the risk assessment of organic contaminants. 41 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Root exudates modify bacterial diversity of phenanthrene degraders in PAH-polluted soil but not phenanthrene degradation rates.

    PubMed

    Cébron, Aurélie; Louvel, Brice; Faure, Pierre; France-Lanord, Christian; Chen, Yin; Murrell, J Colin; Leyval, Corinne

    2011-03-01

    To determine whether the diversity of phenanthrene-degrading bacteria in an aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil is affected by the addition of plant root exudates, DNA stable isotope probing (SIP) was used. Microcosms of soil with and without addition of ryegrass exudates and with ¹³C-labelled phenanthrene (PHE) were monitored over 12 days. PHE degradation was slightly delayed in the presence of added exudate after 4 days of incubation. After 12 days, 68% of added PHE disappeared both with and without exudate. Carbon balance using isotopic analyses indicated that a part of the ¹³C-PHE was not totally mineralized as ¹³CO₂ but unidentified ¹³C-compounds (i.e. ¹³C-PHE or ¹³C-labelled metabolites) were trapped into the soil matrix. Temporal thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) analyses of 16S rRNA genes were performed on recovered ¹³C-enriched DNA fractions. 16S rRNA gene banding showed the impact of root exudates on diversity of PHE-degrading bacteria. With PHE as a fresh sole carbon source, Pseudoxanthomonas sp. and Microbacterium sp. were the major PHE degraders, while in the presence of exudates, Pseudomonas sp. and Arthrobacter sp. were favoured. These two different PHE-degrading bacterial populations were also distinguished through detection of PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase (PAH-RHD(α)) genes by real-time PCR. Root exudates favoured the development of a higher diversity of bacteria and increased the abundance of bacteria containing known PAH-RHD(α) genes.

  16. IMPACTS OF AGING ON IN VIVO AND IN VITRO MEASUREMENTS OF SOIL-BOUND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON AVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ingestion of contaminated soil is an exposure pathway at approximately one-half of the Superfund sites in the United States. This study was designed to evaluate the impacts of aging in soil on the availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Two coal tar (CT)-amended ...

  17. Aging well: methanotrophic potential and community structure along a paddy soil chronosequence of 2000 years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Adrian; Frenzel, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Given that rice paddies are anthropogenic methane sources and the inevitable need to increase rice production to sustain human population growth, it is pertinent to identify the effects of long term agriculture on the selection of methanotrophs. Methanotrophs play a crucial role in mitigating methane emission from rice paddies. Therefore, we analyzed the methanotroph community along a chronosequence of paddy soils from China covering recently reclaimed sites to paddies under permanent agriculture since 2000 years (Cheng et al., 2009; doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2009.03.016). Maximum potential methane oxidation rate (PMOR) increased monotonically with age. Our results also showed that long-term agriculture imposes a selection pressure on different groups of methanotrophs. In contrast to younger soils, type Ib methanotrophs were observed to multiply in correspondence with increasing PMOR in ancient soils, while other groups showed a relatively stable community composition as revealed by pmoA-based fingerprints (T-RFLP) and quantitative PCR. Cloning and sequencing the pmoA (a key gene in methane oxidation), the soils were found to harbour known and putative methanotrophs, ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, and interestingly, sequences affiliated to Crenothrix, a methane oxidizer with an unusual pmoA (Stoecker et al., 2006; doi:10.1073/pnas.0506361103). In summary, long-term agriculture shapes the community and allows for an elevated level of potential methane oxidation.

  18. Comparison of PAH Biodegradation and Desorption Kinetics During Bioremediation of Aged Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

    2000-09-20

    It is commonly assumed that mass-transfer limitations are the cause for slow and incomplete biodegradation of PAHs in aged soils. In order to test this hypothesis, the biodegradation rate and the abiotic release rate were measured and compared for selected PAHs in three different soils. It was found that PAH biodegradation was not mass-transfer limited during slurry bioremediation of an aged loamy soil. By contrast, PAH biodegradation rates were much larger than abiotic release rates in kaolinite clay indicating that sorbed-phase PAHs can apparently be biodegraded directly from mineral surfaces without prior desorption or dissolution into the aqueous phase. A comparison of PAH biodegradation rates and abiotic release rates at termination of the slurry bioremediation treatment revealed that abiotic release rates are much larger than the respective biodegradation rates. In addition, it was found that the number of hydrocarbon degraders decreased by four orders of magnitude during the bioremediation treatment. It can therefore be concluded that the slow and incomplete biodegradation of PAHs is not caused by mass-transfer limitations but rather by microbial factors. Consequently, the residual PAHs that remain after extensive bioremediation treatment are still bioavailable and for that reason could pose a greater risk to environmental receptors than previously thought.

  19. Trajectories of soil particles on a hillslope conveyor: Implications for particle age and Be-10 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Many geomorphic systems act as conveyor belts onto which material is loaded at a particular rate, and is transported in one direction toward another system that serves as a sink. In general the material will evolve as it travels: it ages, it changes in grain size, it absorbs and releases nutrients, it weathers and it accumulates cosmogenic radionuclides. Here I address the hillslope conveyor. As many geochemical and physical processes are depth-dependent, the depth history of a particle becomes important to know. I calculate soil particle trajectories in the horizontal-depth plane and address three steady state cases, one in which horizontal speeds decline exponentially with depth, a second in which they are uniform with depth, and a third in which horizontal speeds are also uniform but all profile values are vertically well-mixed. Vertical speeds are governed by conservation of mass, which requires that strain rates in the horizontal enact strains rates of opposite sign in the vertical, and by the boundary conditions of zero vertical particle speed at the soil surface and the particle release rate at the saprolite interface. Particle trajectories must become surface-parallel at the surface. Knowledge of soil particle trajectories allows calculation of residence times and concentration profiles of 10Be in the soil. In all steady cases, the particle age and 10Be structure are uniform with distance from the divide. When significant vertical gradients in horizontal speed occur, the vertical profiles of particle age and 10Be concentration are dominated by the depth scale of the transport process. In unmixed cases, the particle age and 10Be concentration in near-surface samples can greatly exceed the vertically averaged values, reflecting the slowing of vertical speeds as particles approach the surface. Where horizontal speeds vary significantly with depth, the vertically-averaged concentration of 10Be within the soil can significantly under-predict the mean 10Be

  20. Age and origin of Terra Rossa soils in the Coonawarra area of South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mee, Aija C.; Bestland, Erick A.; Spooner, Nigel A.

    2004-03-01

    The famous Terra Rossa soil in the Coonawarra area, South Australia, is dominated by locally derived aeolian detritus, which probably accumulated over the last 120-130 ka. Four soil profiles and associated limestone and lunette deposits were investigated using the following methods: mass balance geochemistry of bulk soil samples (major and trace elements), quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) mineralogy, strontium isotopes (87/86), as well as grain-size analysis and cation exchange capacity. These data show that the Terra Rossa soil from the Coonawarra has a thick, clayey B-horizon which is geochemically homogeneous and dominated by smectite and kaolinite. Mass-balance calculations show unrealistic weathering scenarios when plotted using silicate residuum from the underlying limestone as parent. Realistic weathering scenarios are produced with fine-grained silicate material from local lunette deposits as parent. Strontium isotopes of silicate residuum from Gambier Limestone (0.78) contrast strongly with the clayey B-horizon (0.726). Strontium isotope ratios of silicate material from a local lunette (0.725) are similar to the B-horizon soil values. Strontium isotope ratios from regional geological units indicate that the strontium signature in the lunette and soil B-horizon is dominated by weathering products from the Palaeozoic Kanmantoo shales, extensively exposed upwind to the west on Kangaroo Island and the Fleurieu Peninsula. Optical (optically stimulated luminescence, OSL) dating of 61 individual quartz grains (single aliquot) from three samples in the Coonawarra soil profile (one from the A-horizon and two from the B-horizon) shows that most of the quartz sand grains have been buried for only a few thousand years. Many of the grains, however, have been buried for tens of thousands of years with three grains having exposure ages of between 105 and 109 ka. The large population of young exposure dates represents quartz sands recently exposed in the A-horizon and

  1. Toxicities of dinitrotoluenes and trinitrobenzene freshly amended or weathered and aged in a sandy loam soil to Enchytraeus crypticus.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Roman G; Checkai, Ronald T; Simini, Michael; Phillips, Carlton T; Kolakowski, Jan E; Kurnas, Carl W

    2006-05-01

    Scientifically based ecological soil-screening levels are needed to identify concentrations of contaminant energetic materials (EMs) in soil that present an acceptable ecological risk at a wide range of military installations. Insufficient information regarding the toxicity of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT), and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) to soil invertebrates necessitated toxicity testing. We adapted the standardized Enchytraeid Reproduction Test (International Standardization Organization 16387:2003) and selected Enchytraeus crypticus for these studies. Tests were conducted in Sassafras sandy loam soil, which supports relatively high bioavailability of nitroaromatic EMs. Weathering and aging procedures for EMs amended to test soil were incorporated into the study design to produce toxicity data that better reflect the soil exposure conditions in the field compared with toxicity in freshly amended soils. This included exposing hydrated, EM-amended soils in open glass containers in the greenhouse to alternating wetting and drying cycles. Definitive tests established that the order of EM toxicity to E. crypticus based on the median effect concentration values for juvenile production in either freshly amended or weathered and aged treatments was (from the greatest to least toxicity) TNB > 2,4-DNT > 2,6-DNT. Toxicity to E. crypticus juvenile production was significantly increased in 2,6-DNT weathered and aged soil treatments compared with toxicity in freshly amended soil, based on 95% confidence intervals. This result shows that future investigations should include a weathering and aging component to generate toxicity data that provide more complete information regarding ecotoxicological effects of energetic contaminants in soil.

  2. Effect of aging on the bioavailability and fractionation of arsenic in soils derived from five parent materials in a red soil region of Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanan; Zeng, Xibai; Lu, Yahai; Su, Shiming; Bai, Lingyu; Li, Lianfang; Wu, Cuixia

    2015-12-01

    The effects of aging time and soil parent materials on the bioavailability and fractionations of arsenic (As) in five red soils were studied. The results indicated that As bioavailability in all soils decreased during aging, especially with a sharp decline occurring in the first 30 days. After aging for 360 days, the highest available As concentration, which accounted for 12.3% of the total, was observed in soils derived from purple sandy shale. While 2.67% was the lowest proportion of the available As in soils derived from quaternary red clay. Furthermore, the best fit of the available As changing with aging time was obtained using the pseudo-second-order model (R(2) = 0.939-0.998, P < 0.05). Notably, Al oxides played a more crucial role (R(2) = 0.89, P<0.05) than did Fe oxides in controlling the rate of As aging. The non-specially and specially absorbed As constituted the primary forms of available As.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soils: bioaugmentation of autochthonous bacteria and toxicological assessment of the bioremediation process by means of Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Ruffini Castiglione, Monica; Giorgetti, Lucia; Becarelli, Simone; Siracusa, Giovanna; Lorenzi, Roberto; Di Gregorio, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Two bacterial strains, Achromobacter sp. (ACH01) and Sphingomonas sp. (SPH01), were isolated from a heavily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil (5431.3 ± 102.3 ppm) for their capacity to use a mixture of anthracene, pyrene, phenanthrene and fluorene as sole carbon sources for growth and for the capacity to produce biosurfactants. The two strains were exploited for bioaugmentation in a biopile pilot plant to increase the bioavailability and the degradation of the residual PAH contamination (99.5 ± 7.1 ppm) reached after 9 months of treatment. The denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) profile of the microbial ecology of the soil during the experimentation showed that the bioaugmentation approach was successful in terms of permanence of the two strains in the soil in treatment. The bioaugmentation of the two bacterial isolates positively correlated with the PAH depletion that reached 7.9 ± 2 ppm value in 2 months of treatment. The PAH depletion was assessed by the loss of the phyto-genotoxicity of soil elutriates on the model plant Vicia faba L., toxicological assessment adopted also to determine the minimum length of the decontamination process for obtaining both the depletion of the PAH contamination and the detoxification of the soil at the end of the process. The intermediate phases of the bioremediation process were the most significant in terms of toxicity, inducing genotoxic effects and selective DNA fragmentation in the stem cell niche of the root tip. The selective DNA fragmentation can be related to the selective induction of cell death of mutant stem cells that can compromise offsprings.

  4. Oribatida (Acari) in grassy arable fallows are more affected by soil properties than habitat age and plant species.

    PubMed

    Wissuwa, Janet; Salamon, Jörg-Alfred; Frank, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Oribatid mites are one of the numerically dominant arthropod groups in soils. They play an important role in soil food webs via regulating the decomposition of organic matter and propagating microorganisms within the soil. To our knowledge, the influence of different plant functional groups on oribatid mites has not been studied in abandoned farmland with undisturbed succession before. The density and assemblage structure of oribatid mites in nine grassy arable fallows relative to three habitat age classes (2-3, 6-8, 12-15 years) and three selected plant species (legume: Medicago sativa, forb: Taraxacum officinale, grass: Bromus sterilis) were investigated in soil associated with single plants. Mite density declined marginally not significant with habitat age because of high abundances of the ubiquitous species Tectocepheus velatus sarekensis and Punctoribates punctum in young and mid-aged fallows and their subsequent decline in old fallows. Oribatid mite density and species assemblage were not affected by plant species. Only P. punctum had significantly higher densities in B. sterilis samples than in T. officinale samples due to a higher amount of fine roots. Distance-based linear models revealed that 65% of the variation in mite assemblage was explained by soil properties, soil type, exposition and geographic position, while habitat age was of minor importance. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the mite assemblage was best explained by soil organic and microbial carbon, water content and pH.

  5. Oribatida (Acari) in grassy arable fallows are more affected by soil properties than habitat age and plant species☆

    PubMed Central

    Wissuwa, Janet; Salamon, Jörg-Alfred; Frank, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Oribatid mites are one of the numerically dominant arthropod groups in soils. They play an important role in soil food webs via regulating the decomposition of organic matter and propagating microorganisms within the soil. To our knowledge, the influence of different plant functional groups on oribatid mites has not been studied in abandoned farmland with undisturbed succession before. The density and assemblage structure of oribatid mites in nine grassy arable fallows relative to three habitat age classes (2–3, 6–8, 12–15 years) and three selected plant species (legume: Medicago sativa, forb: Taraxacum officinale, grass: Bromus sterilis) were investigated in soil associated with single plants. Mite density declined marginally not significant with habitat age because of high abundances of the ubiquitous species Tectocepheus velatus sarekensis and Punctoribates punctum in young and mid-aged fallows and their subsequent decline in old fallows. Oribatid mite density and species assemblage were not affected by plant species. Only P. punctum had significantly higher densities in B. sterilis samples than in T. officinale samples due to a higher amount of fine roots. Distance-based linear models revealed that 65% of the variation in mite assemblage was explained by soil properties, soil type, exposition and geographic position, while habitat age was of minor importance. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the mite assemblage was best explained by soil organic and microbial carbon, water content and pH. PMID:26109839

  6. Hexavalent chromium availability and phytoremediation potential of Cichorium spinosum as affect by manure, zeolite and soil ageing.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, Vasileios; Polyzois, Theologos; Golia, Evaggelia E; Petropoulos, Spyridon A

    2017-03-01

    Cichorium spinosum (spiny chicory) is a wild edible vegetable, and a possible suitable species for Cr(VI)-phytoremediation. There are three approaches for altering Cr(VI) dynamics: reduction to Cr(III) by organic matter addition, soil ageing, and Cr(VI) retention by high binding capacity materials added to soil, e.g., zeolite. Our aim was to assess spiny chicory as a phytoremediation species in relation to these three methods of altering Cr(VI) soil dynamics. There were 5 treatments: control (C); soil with 100 mg kg(-1) Cr(VI) (S); soil with zeolite plus 100 mg kg(-1) Cr(VI) (Z); soil with manure plus 100 mg kg(-1) Cr(VI) (M); and soil added with 100 mg kg(-1) Cr(VI) one year before this experiment (AS, "aged soil"). In soil, Cr(VI) was higher at S, while Z, M and AS were lower. In plant, Cr(VI) at Z, S, and AS were similar and significantly higher than M. This indicates that added manure decrease Cr(VI) availability to chicory due to the formation of organometallic complexes. However, chicory uptake amounted to 0.26-0.40 kg Cr(VI) ha(-1) for Z, S, and AS, while uptake at M was lower. In conclusion, manure addition was more successful in decreasing Cr(VI) bioavailability, but it also slowed Cr(VI)-phytoremediation process.

  7. Soil respiration and photosynthetic uptake of carbon dioxide by ground-cover plants in four ages of jack pine forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; Wickland, K.P.

    2001-01-01

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission (soil respiration), net CO2 exchange after photosynthetic uptake by ground-cover plants, and soil CO2 concentration versus depth below land surface were measured at four ages of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) forest in central Saskatchewan. Soil respiration was smallest at a clear-cut site, largest in an 8-year-old stand, and decreased with stand age in 20-year-old and mature (60-75 years old) stands during May-September 1994 (12.1, 34.6, 31.5, and 24.9 mol C??m-2, respectively). Simulations of soil respiration at each stand based on continuously recorded soil temperature were within one standard deviation of measured flux for 48 of 52 measurement periods, but were 10%-30% less than linear interpolations of measured flux for the season. This was probably due to decreased soil respiration at night modeled by the temperature-flux relationships, but not documented by daytime chamber measurements. CO2 uptake by ground-cover plants ranged from 0 at the clear-cut site to 29, 25, and 9% of total growing season soil respiration at the 8-year, 20-year, and mature stands. CO2 concentrations were as great as 7150 ppmv in the upper 1 m of unsaturated zone and were proportional to measured soil respiration.

  8. The impact of biochar on the bioaccessibility of (14)C-phenanthrene in aged soil.

    PubMed

    Ogbonnaya, O U; Adebisi, O O; Semple, K T

    2014-11-01

    Biochar is a carbon rich product from the incomplete combustion of biomass and it has been shown to reduce bioavailability of organic contaminants through adsorption. This study investigated the influence of 0%, 1%, 5% and 10% of two different particle sized wood biochars (≤2 mm and 3-7 mm) on the bioaccessibility of (14)C-phenanthrene (10 mg kg(-1)) in aged soil. The extent of (14)C-phenanthrene mineralisation by phenanthrene-degrading Pseudomonas sp. inoculum was monitored over a 14 day period in respirometric assays and compared to hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) aqueous extraction. Notably, biochar amendments showed significant reduction in extents of mineralisation and HPCD extraction. Linear correlations between HPCD extractability and the total amount mineralised revealed good correlations, with 2 mm biochar showing a best fit (r(2) = 0.97, slope = 1.11, intercept = 1.72). Biochar reduced HPCD extractability and bioaccessibility of (14)C-phenanthrene to microorganisms in a similar manner. Biochar can aid risk reduction to phenanthrene exposure to biota in soil and HPCD can serve as a useful tool to assess the extent of exposure in biochar-amended soils.

  9. Age distribution of permfrost soil & surface water particulate organic carbon in the Lena Delta, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeld, M.; Flerus, R.; Koch, B.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2012-04-01

    Since several millennia huge amounts of organic carbon (OC) are stored frozen in circumarctic permafrost soils making up almost twice the amount of carbon currently present in the atmosphere. During the course of a proposed rapid climate change in the Arctic large quantities of this old OC are expected to be remobilized in dissolved (DOC) and particulate phases (POC) and exported to the Arctic shelf seas. Previous studies have shown that at present, DOC in Arctic river runoff is predominantly composed of relatively fresh organic material likely derived from the uppermost soil horizons. POC age data are scarce and where present show that it is substantially older than DOC. With our study we want to add information on the riverine POC exported by the Lena River to the Laptev Sea. Permafrost soil samples and surface water particulate matter (SPM) were collected in July/August 2009/2010 throughout the delta. Additional SPM samples were taken May/June 2011 during the spring flood and shortly after off the Island of Samoylov within the delta. Particulate organic carbon (POC) contents for 2009 vary between 280µg/L and 2155µg/L with an average of 918µg/L which is within the range of previously reported values. The Δ14C concentrations for POC of the same year show a broad range from -262‰ to -55‰ (average -158‰), which translates into ages of 2380±30yrs BP and 395±35yrs BP respectively (average ca. 1300yrs BP). The POC Δ14C concentrations reflect the age distribution found in the upper 1.4m of a permafrost peat cliff on Samoylov Island (-274‰ or 2510±30yrs BP). Karlsson et al (2011) found that POC samples in the SE Laptev Sea just off the Lena Delta contain young and bioavailable material interpreted to be derived from surface soils, which is in agreement with our late summer data. With the surface water POC contents in the Lena Delta of three consecutive years including one spring flood event presented here we improve our understanding of the interannual

  10. Beryllium geochemistry in soils: Evaluation of 10Be/9Be ratios in authigenic minerals as a basis for age models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barg, E.; Lal, D.; Pavich, M.J.; Caffee, M.W.; Southon, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Soils contain a diverse and complex set of chemicals and minerals. Being an 'open system', both in the chemical and nuclear sense, soils have defied quantitative nuclear dating. However, based on the published studies of the cosmogenic atmospheric 10Be in soils, its relatively long half-life (1.5 Ma), and the fact that 10Be gets quickly incorporated in most soil minerals, this radionuclide appears to be potentially the most useful for soil dating. We therefore studied the natural variations in the specific activities of 10Be with respect to the isotope 9Be in mineral phases in eight profiles of diverse soils from temperate to tropical climatic regimes and evaluated the implications of the data for determining the time of formation of soil minerals, following an earlier suggestion [Lal et al., 1991. Development of cosmogenic nuclear methods for the study of soil erosion and formation rates. Current Sci. 61, 636-639.]. We find that the 10Be/9Be ratios in both bulk soils and in the authigenic mineral phases are confined within a narrower range than in 10Be concentrations. Also, the highest 10Be/9Be ratios in authigenic minerals are observed at the soil-rock interface as predicted by the model. We present model 10Be/9Be ages of the B-horizon and the corresponding soil formation rates for several soil profiles. The present study demonstrates that the 10Be/9Be ratios in the authigenic phases, e.g. clay and Fe-hydroxides, can indeed be used for obtaining useful model ages for soils younger than 10-15 Ma. However, the present work has to be pushed considerably further, to take into account more realistic age models in which, for instance, downward transport of 10Be and clays, and in-situ dissolution of clay minerals at depths, altering the 10Be/9Be ratios of the acidic solutions, are included. We show that in the case of younger soils (< 1 Ma) studied here, their 10Be inventories and 10Be/9Be ratios have been significantly disturbed possibly by mixing with transported

  11. Influence of soil biochar aging on sorption of the herbicides MCPA, nicosulfuron, terbuthylazine, indaziflam, and fluoroethyldiaminotriazine.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Carmen; Spokas, Kurt A; Cox, Lucia; Koskinen, William C

    2014-11-12

    Sorption of four herbicides and a metabolite of indaziflam on a fresh macadamia nut biochar and biochars aged one or two years in soil was characterized. On fresh biochar, the sorption was terbuthylazine (Kd = 595) > indaziflam (Kd = 162) > MCPA (Kd = 7.5) > fluoroethyldiaminotriazine (Kd = 0.26) and nicosulfuron (Kd = 0). Biochar surface area increased with aging attributed to the loss of a surface film. This was also manifested in a decline in water extractable organic carbon with aging. Correspondingly, an increase in the aromaticity was observed. The higher surface area and porosity in aged biochar increased sorption of indaziflam (KdBC-2yr = 237) and fluoroethyldiaminotriazine (KdBC-1yr = 1.2 and KdBC-2yr = 3.0), but interestingly decreased sorption of terbuthylazine (KdBC-1yr = 312 and KdBC-2yr = 221) and MCPA (KdBC-1yr = 2 and KdBC-2yr = 2). These results will facilitate development of biochars for specific remediation purposes.

  12. Effects of soil type, prepercolation, and ageing on bioaccumulation and toxicity of zinc for the springtail Folsomia candida

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, C.E.; Van Gestel, C.A.M.

    1998-06-01

    Soil properties are a major influence on the bioavailability and toxicity of metals and represent one of the important factors that complicate the extrapolation of results from laboratory tests to field situations. The influence of soil characteristics and way of contamination on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of zinc was investigated for the springtail Folsomia candida, and the applicability of chemical extraction techniques for the prediction of zinc uptake and toxicity was evaluated. Bioaccumulation of zinc in F. candida was related to water-soluble zinc concentrations, and uptake was dependent on the test soil used. Effects of zinc for F. candida could not be fully explained by bioaccumulation. This indicates that the existence of a fixed internal threshold concentration of zinc above which physiological functions are impaired is not likely for F. candida. In freshly contaminated soils, zinc toxicity was related to organic matter and clay content of the soil; however, the use of these soils overestimated the effects of zinc for F. candida by a factor of 5 to 8 compared to a test soil that was subjected to ageing under field conditions for 1.5 years. Equilibration of the zinc contamination by percolating the soils with water before use in the toxicity experiment strongly reduced the difference in zinc toxicity between laboratory-treated and aged soils. Water-soluble concentrations are most appropriate to predict effects of zinc on reproduction of F. candida in soils with unknown contamination histories. For laboratory toxicity tests, it is recommended to percolate soils with water after contamination and to include an equilibration period prior to use to achieve a more realistic exposure situation.

  13. Characterization of cultures enriched from acidic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil for growth on pyrene at low pH.

    PubMed

    Uyttebroek, Maarten; Vermeir, Steven; Wattiau, Pierre; Ryngaert, Annemie; Springael, Dirk

    2007-05-01

    Two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils of pH 2 were successfully used as inoculum to enrich cultures growing on phenanthrene and pyrene at different pHs, including pH 3. Selected pyrene-utilizing cultures obtained at pH 3, pH 5, and pH 7 were further characterized. All showed rapid [14C]pyrene mineralization at pH 3 and pH 5 and grew on pyrene at pH values ranging from 2 to 6. Eubacterial and mycobacterial 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting and sequencing indicated that the cultures were dominated by a single bacterium closely related to Mycobacterium montefiorense, belonging to the slow-growing Mycobacterium sp. In contrast, a culture enriched on pyrene at pH 7 from a slightly alkaline soil sampled at the same site was dominated by Pseudomonas putida and a fast-growing Mycobacterium sp. The M. montefiorense-related species dominating the pyrene-utilizing cultures enriched from the acidic soils was also the dominant Mycobacterium species in the acidic soils. Our data indicate that a slow-growing Mycobacterium species is involved in PAH degradation in that culture and show that bacteria able to degrade high-molecular-weight PAHs at low pH are present in acidic PAH-contaminated soil.

  14. Estimation of uncertainty in the sampling and analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soil in Brighton, UK.

    PubMed

    Zhou, John L; Siddiqui, Ertan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan

    2014-11-01

    The heterogeneity of environmental samples is increasingly recognised, yet rarely examined in organic contamination investigations. In this study soil samples from an ex-landfill site in Brighton, UK were analysed for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination by using a balanced sampling protocol. The analytical technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was found to be fit for purpose by the use of duplicate samples and the statistical analysis of variances, as well as of certified reference materials. The sampling uncertainty was found to significantly overweigh the analytical uncertainty, by a factor of 3 and 6 for PCBs and PAHs, respectively. The soil samples showed a general trend of PCB concentration that was under the recommended target level of 20 ng/g dry weight. It is possible that one site alongside the main road may exceed the 20 ng/g target level, after taking into consideration the overall measurement uncertainty (70.8%). The PAH contamination was more severe, with seven sites potentially exceeding the effect-range medium concentrations. The soil samples with relatively high PCB and PAH concentrations were all taken from the grass verge, which also had the highest soil organic carbon content. The measurement uncertainty which was largely due to sampling can be reduced by sampling at a high resolution spacing of 17 m, which is recommended in future field investigations of soil organic contamination.

  15. Chemical changes in soil charcoal of differing ages inferred from DRIFT spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, E. U.; Willgoose, G. R.; Frisia, S.; Jacobsen, G.

    2012-04-01

    Visible charcoal fragments were manually isolated from a sandy soil from the Southern Highlands of NSW, Australia, at depths of 0 - 30 cm and 30 - 60 cm. In the topsoil, the charcoal had a radiocarbon age of 85 ± 35 years BP, whereas the charcoal from the 30 - 60 cm layer was radiocarbon dated at 2540 ± 35 years BP. Diffuse reflectance FTIR (DRIFT) spectra of the charcoal reveal differences in both the number of peaks detected and their magnitudes. In the IR region 750 - 3800 cm-1, the charcoal from the lower depth had less peaks (140) than that of the topsoil (217). In the 1400 - 1600 cm-1 region, generally attributed to aromatics, the peaks were larger and more numerous (22 peaks) in the 0 - 30 cm sample than those of the 30 - 60 cm depth (14 peaks). The C-H stretch of alkenes and aromatics (3000 - 3100 cm-1) was similar at both depths, but the peak generally associated with the C-H stretch of alkanes (methyl and methylene groups) at 2850 - 3000 cm-1 was smaller in 30 - 60 cm depth than in the topsoil. In contrast to the reduction in aromatic and alkane signatures, oxidised forms were more pronounced in the older, deeper charcoal. Peaks associated with the free hydroxyl O-H stretch (alcohols and phenols) at 3640 - 3610 cm-1, carboxylic acids (910 - 950 cm-1), aliphatic O-H (alcohols) (1050 - 1150 cm-1) and cellulose-like structures (1020 cm-1), which contain a large number of uncondensed, oxidised rings, were larger in the charcoal from 30 - 60 cm than in that from the topsoil. Our results confirm that charcoal is highly persistent in soils, being retained for millennia. Aromatic structures are present in both younger and older charcoal, but decay leads to a reduction in the number and area of peaks detected at 1400 - 1600 cm-1, indicating less aromaticity. Alkane C-H also decreases with aging, probably attributable to its preferential degradation by soil microbes compared with condensed aromatic structures. Concurrent with diminished aromatic and alkane

  16. Effects of aging herbicide mixtures on soil respiration and plant survival in soils from a pesticide-contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, E.L.; Anhalt, J.C.; Anderson, T.A.

    1996-10-01

    Three herbicides, atrazine, metolachlor, and pendimethalin, were applied individually and in all possible combinations to soil taken from a pesticide-contaminated site in Iowa. The rate of application for each chemical was 50 {mu}g/g, representative of contamination problems at mixing and loading areas of agrochemical dealer sites. Treated soils were incubated at 24{degrees}C in the dark for 0, 21, and 63 d, and soil moisture tension was maintained at -33 kPa. Soil respiration was measured daily by using an infrared gas analyzer for 10 d at the end of each incubation period. Subsamples of treated soils were used in plant germination and survival studies. Concentrations of each herbicide were determined by gas chromatography at day 0, 21, and 63. Soil respiration was elevated for the first 6 d immediately following treatment, and then declined to very low levels. At the end of day 21 and 63, soil respiration remained at very low levels. The half-lives for atrazine, metolachlor, and pendimethalin individually in soil or in combination with one and/or the other herbicide will be reported. The results of germination and survival studies with kochia, giant foxtail, birdsfoot trefoil, crown vetch, and soybean will also be reported.

  17. Solid phase treatment of an aged soil contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Negri, Marco; Manfredini, Andrea; Saponaro, Sabrina; Sorlini, Claudia; Bonomo, Luca; Valle, Anna; Zanardini, Elisabetta

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory scale tests were carried out in order to evaluate the removal efficiency of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during the different biological treatments of a Manufacturing Gas Plant site aged soil, heavily contaminated by high molecular weight compounds. Biodegradation studies were carried out at nearly 25 degrees C in solid phase reactors. Three tests were performed, over a period of 100 days for each test. In the first test (P1-bioaugmentated), soil was mixed with wood chips and urea at the start of the treatment and after six weeks from the beginning of the test was also periodically inoculated (at 42, 54, 69, 82, and 96 days) with selected consortia of autochthonous PAH-degrading bacteria. The second test (P2-biostimulated) was performed similarly to the previous one, but without any inoculations. In the third test (P3-control) only soil was introduced. All systems were aerated daily and humidified at the occurrence. PAH concentration, total cultivable heterotrophs, PAH-degrading bacteria, mycetes, pH, ATP concentration, and enzymatic activities were monitored every two weeks during the treatments. Tests showed that nearly 50% of light (three rings) PAHs, 35% of benzo-PAHs and 40% of the total PAHs could be removed in the reactor P2 following 100 days of treatment. Lower removal efficiency could be observed for light PAHs (28%) in the inoculated reactor (P1) at the end of the treatment: comparable abatements were obtained for benzo- and total PAHs. In the reactor P3 (control), the concentration of all polyaromatic hydrocarbons was nearly always constant, suggesting that the physical losses were negligible during the solid phase treatments. Therefore the C to N ratio balance resulted to be the key factor in promoting the biodegradation process of all PAHs.

  18. Microbial Factors Rather Than Bioavailability Limit the Rate and Extent of PAH Biodegradation in Aged Crude Oil Contaminated Model Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

    2002-08-01

    The rate and extent of PAH biodegradation in a set of aged, crude oil contaminated model soils were measured in 90-week slurry bioremediation experiments. Soil properties such as organic matter content, mineral type, particle diameter, surface area, and porosity did not significantly influence the PAH biodegradation kinetics among the ten different model soils. A comparison of aged and freshly spiked soils indicates that aging affects the biodegradation rates and extents only for higher molecular weight PAHs while the effects of aging are insignificant for 3-ring PAHs and total PAHs. In all model soils with the exception of kaolinite clay, the rate of abiotic desorption was faster than the rate of biodegradation during the initial phase of bioremediation treatment indicating that PAH biodegradation was limited by microbial factors. Similarly, any of the higher molecular weight PAHs that were still present after 90 weeks of treatment were released rapidly during abiotic desorption tests which demonstrates that bioavailability limitations were not responsible for the recalcitrance of these hydrocarbons. Indeed, an analysis of microbial counts indicates that a severe reduction in hydrocarbon degrader populations may be responsible for the observed incomplete PAH biodegradation. It can therefore be concluded that the recalcitrance of PAHs during bioremediation is not necessarily due to bioavailability limitations and that these residual contaminants might, therefore, pose a greater risk to environmental receptors than previously thought.

  19. Effects of soil enrichment, watering and seedling age on establishment of Mediterranean woody species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siles, Gemma; Rey, Pedro J.; Alcántara, Julio M.; Bastida, Jesús M.; Herreros, Jose L.

    2010-07-01

    Vegetation restoration in strongly degraded lands has inherent limitations. Among the most relevant limitations in Mediterranean Mountains are severe drought and stressful levels of irradiance during summer. Thus, it is common that seedlings planted in open ground incur high rates of early mortality. In the context of a project of restoration of a burned area in Southern Spain, we evaluate the efficiency of watering and enrichment with native soil, and the influence of seedling age on survival and growth of 9 late-successional tall shrubs and trees planted in open ground. We also explore how small-scale variation in environmental variables relates to establishment success. Our results show an overall positive effect of watering on the survival of planted seedlings, while the effects of enrichment with native soil and age of planted seedlings were species-specific. Seedling establishment varied markedly with the presence of ravines, which duplicated seedling survival. This suggests that ravines may be more easily restored, improving their role as corridors in landscape designs of restoration. Independently of the treatment applied, Rosa sp. and Crataegus monogyna, both fleshy-fruited species, had the highest rates of establishment. In conclusion, this study shows the viability of low aggressive restoration techniques to assist vegetation recovery in fire-degraded environments. Specifically, watering and planting in ravines should be considered where restoration practices are applied in areas lacking vegetation cover. Some species highly attractive for animal dispersers and of easy establishment ( Rosa sp. and Crataegus sp.) could be used to enhance spontaneous regeneration within and beyond corridors through increasing seed attraction and dissemination.

  20. Age chronosequence effects on restoration quality of reclaimed coal mine soils in Mississipian agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface coal mining causes drastic disturbances in landscape and soil properties, and reclamation has the potential to improve and re-store soil quality and biomass productivity. However, it is not clear how long it takes for an effective soil reclamation process to restore soil quality to the pre-...

  1. Using soil properties as a tool to differentiate landslide generations and constrain their ages - Rogowiec landslide, Sudetes (SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, Andrzej; Migoń, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    profiles in the landslide body do not show evidence of protracted soil evolution under contemporary climate and hence, are interpreted as having been formed during a fraction of the Holocene. This implies a Holocene age of the landslide. In addition, an older shallow translational landslide has been recognized on the valley side, with the toe buried by the main Rogowiec landslide. The depletion area was identified through the occurrence of thin, truncated soils (compared to the neighbouring slopes). This and the occurrence of weakly horizonated and poorly structural soils in the landslide body itself suggest that this valley-side landslide is of the Holocene age too. Thus, soils proved a powerful tool to establish the relative chronology of landslides and give strong evidence of their Holocene age. Soil research is recommended as a part of landslide hazard and risk assessment for landslides of unknown age.

  2. Reduction of genotoxicity of a creosote-contaminated soil after fungal treatment determined by the tradescantia-micronucleus test

    SciTech Connect

    Baud-Grasset, S.; Baud-Grasset, F.; Bifulco, J.M.; Meier, J.R.; Ma, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    The fungal degradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in a contaminated soil from a hazardous waste site was evaluated in a pilot-scale study. As some PAH are known to be mutagens, the Tradescantia-micronucleus test (TRAD-MCN) was selected to evaluate the genotoxicity of the soil before and after fungal treatment. The genotoxicity test was conducted with Tradescantia clone 4430. Cuttings were exposed for 30 hours to different dilutions of soil extracts from the PAH-contaminated soil before and after fungal treatment. The results indicate that the Trad-MCN test has a potential utility for evaluating the efficiency of bioremediation of genotoxic soil contaminants. (Copyright (c) 1993 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

  3. Toxicity of Selenium, Weathered and Aged in Soil, to the Collembolan Folsomia candida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    ecotoxicological benchmarks for developing the ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSLs) for risk assessments of contaminated soils. For this study, we...developing soil invertebrate-based Eco-SSL for Se. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ecological soil screening level (Eco-SSL) Selenium Selenite Natural soil Folsomia...the assessment of ecological risks at Se-contaminated sites. Much of the previous research published on the ecotoxicology of Se focused primarily on

  4. [Improving Agricultural Safety of Soils Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by In Situ Bioremediation].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hai-huan; Pan, Jian-gang; Xu, Shena-jun; Bai, Zhi-hui; Wang, Dong; Huang, Zhan-bin

    2015-08-01

    In order to reduce the risk of enrichment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in crops, reduce the potential hazards of food-sourced PAHs to human and increase the agricultural safety of PAHs contaminated soils, the bio-augmented removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated through in situ remediation by introducing Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RS) into the agricultural soil contaminated by PAHs. The 50-times diluted RS was sprayed on leaf surface (in area B) or irrigated to roots (in area D). The treatment of spraying water of the equal amount was taken as the control (A) and the wheat field without any treatment as the blank (CK). Treatments were conducted since wheat seeding. Soil and wheat samples were collected in the mature period to analyze the changes of community structure of the soil microorganisms and the concentration of PAHs in soils and investigate the strengthening and restoration effects of RS on PAHs contaminated soils. Compared to the CK Area, the areas B and D revealed that the variation ratio of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) that were the biomarker of soil microorganisms was 29.6%, and the ratio of total PAHs removed was increased 1.59 times and 1.68 times, respectively. The dry weight of wheat grain of 50 spikes was increased by 8.95% and 12.5%, respectively, and the enrichment factor of total PAHs was decreased by 58.9% and 62.2% respectively in the wheat grains. All the results suggested that RS reduced enrichment of PAHs in wheat grains and increased wheat yield, which had great exploitation and utilization potentiality in repairing and improving the agricultural safety of the soils contaminated with PHAs.

  5. Experimental increase in availability of a PAH complex organic contamination from an aged contaminated soil: consequences on biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Cébron, Aurélie; Faure, Pierre; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Leyval, Corinne

    2013-06-01

    Although high PAH content and detection of PAH-degraders, the PAH biodegradation is limited in aged-contaminated soils due to low PAH availability (i.e., 1%). Here, we tried to experimentally increase the soil PAH availability by keeping both soil properties and contamination composition. Organic extract was first removed and then re-incorporated in the raw soil as fresh contaminants. Though drastic, this procedure only allowed a 6-time increase in the PAH availability suggesting that the organic constituents more than ageing were responsible for low availability. In the re-contaminated soil, the mineralization rate was twice more important, the proportion of 5-6 cycles PAH was higher indicating a preferential degradation of lower molecular weight PAH. The extraction treatment induced bacterial and fungal community structures modifications, Pseudomonas and Fusarium solani species were favoured, and the relative quantity of fungi increased. In re-contaminated soil the percentage of PAH-dioxygenase gene increased, with 10 times more Gram negative representatives.

  6. Effect of biochar on cadmium bioavailability and uptake in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in a soil with aged contamination.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Tahir; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Zia-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Farooq Qayyum, Muhammad; Abbas, Farhat; Hannan, Fakhir; Rinklebe, Jörg; Sik Ok, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a well-known and widespread toxic heavy metal while the effects of biochar (BC) on Cd bioavailability and toxicity in wheat, especially in soils with aged contamination are largely unknown. In the present study, the effect of rice straw BC on Cd immobilization in soil and uptake by wheat in an agricultural contaminated-soil was investigated. Different levels of rice straw BC (0%, 1.5%, 3.0% and 5% w/w) were incorporated into the soil and incubated for two weeks. After this, wheat plants were grown in the amended soil until maturity. The results show that the BC treatments increased the soil and soil solution pH and silicon contents in the plant tissues and in the soil solution while decreased the bioavailable Cd in soil. The BC application increased the plant-height, spike-length, shoot and root dry mass and grain yield in a dose additive manner when compared with control treatment. As compared to control, BC application increased the photosynthetic pigments and gas exchange parameters in leaves. Biochar treatments decreased the oxidative stress while increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes in shoots compared to the control. The BC treatments decreased the Cd and Ni while increased Zn and Mn concentrations in shoots, roots, and grains of wheat compared to the control. As compared to the control, Cd concentration in wheat grains decreased by 26%, 42%, and 57% after the application of 1.5%, 3.0%, and 5.0% BC respectively. Overall, the application of rice straw BC might be effective in immobilization of metal in the soil and reducing its uptake and translocation to grains.

  7. Metal accumulation in roadside soil in Melbourne, Australia: Effect of road age, traffic density and vehicular speed.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Shamali; Ball, Andrew S; Huynh, Trang; Reichman, Suzie M

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of vehicular emitted heavy metals in roadside soils result in long term environmental damage. This study assessed the relationships between traffic characteristics (traffic density, road age and vehicular speed) and roadside soil heavy metals. Significant levels were recorded for Cd (0.06-0.59 mg/kg), Cr (18-29 mg/kg), Cu (4-12 mg/kg), Ni (7-20 mg/kg), Mn (92-599 mg/kg), Pb (16-144 mg/kg) and Zn (10.36-88.75 mg/kg), with Mn concentrations exceeding the Ecological Investigation Level. Significant correlations were found between roadside soil metal concentration and vehicular speed (R = 0.90), road age (R = 0.82) and traffic density (R = 0.68). Recently introduced metals in automotive technology (e.g. Mn and Sb) were higher in younger roads, while the metals present for many years (e.g. Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) were higher in medium and old age roads confirming the risk of significant metal deposition and soil metal retention in roadside soils.

  8. Forest Age and Plant Species Composition Determine the Soil Fungal Community Composition in a Chinese Subtropical Forest

    PubMed Central

    Trogisch, Stefan; Both, Sabine; Scholten, Thomas; Bruelheide, Helge; Buscot, François

    2013-01-01

    Fungal diversity and community composition are mainly related to soil and vegetation factors. However, the relative contribution of the different drivers remains largely unexplored, especially in subtropical forest ecosystems. We studied the fungal diversity and community composition of soils sampled from 12 comparative study plots representing three forest age classes (Young: 10–40 yrs; Medium: 40–80 yrs; Old: ≥80 yrs) in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve in South-eastern China. Soil fungal communities were assessed employing ITS rDNA pyrotag sequencing. Members of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota dominated the fungal community, with 22 putative ectomycorrhizal fungal families, where Russulaceae and Thelephoraceae were the most abundant taxa. Analysis of similarity showed that the fungal community composition significantly differed among the three forest age classes. Forest age class, elevation of the study plots, and soil organic carbon (SOC) were the most important factors shaping the fungal community composition. We found a significant correlation between plant and fungal communities at different taxonomic and functional group levels, including a strong relationship between ectomycorrhizal fungal and non-ectomycorrhizal plant communities. Our results suggest that in subtropical forests, plant species community composition is the main driver of the soil fungal diversity and community composition. PMID:23826151

  9. Physicochemical aging mechanisms in soil organic matter assessed by NMR and DSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.; Jaeger, A.; Bertmer, M.; Schlichting, A.; Leinweber, P.; Schaumann, G. E.

    2009-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) controls a variety of processes occurring at biogeochemical interfaces acting as a highly dynamic matrix. Results from previous studies showed that SOM undergoes physicochemical matrix aging. It was hypothesized that the formation and disruption of water molecule bridges are responsible for this aging process. The objective of this study was to evaluate this hypothesis using three peat samples from different sample sites in Germany: a peat from Rhinluch, 60 km northwest of Berlin, a black peat and a white peat from Fuhrberg near Hannover. The composition determined by pyrolysis field ionisation mass spectrometry was similar for the Rhinluch peat and the Fuhrberg black peat, but showed a distinctly higher carbohydrate content for the Fuhrberg white peat. To elucidate mechanisms of physicochemical matrix aging and to evaluate the hypothesis of water molecule bridges we carried out heating-cooling events in hermetically sealed containers and measured the response by NMR and DSC as a function of time. The heating-cooling event started with heating for 10 minutes at 110 °C followed by rapid cooling and isothermal storage at 19 °C for at least four months. All peats show a non-reversing step transition between 40 °C and 65 °C similar to transitions observed in previous studies. The black peat from Fuhrberg showed an additional step transition between 35 °C and 45 °C. The temperature of the non-reversing step transition immediately decreased by 25 °C in response to the heating-cooling event and slowly re-increased upon isothermal storage within several months. The temperature of the reversing transition showed a similar behaviour but not as strongly as the non-reversing transition. The proton NMR in combination with line separation into Lorentz and Gauss lines was used to differentiate between the different kinds of water. In dependence of the water bridge status the portions of these lines on the total wide line spectrum change; at a

  10. Influence of alternating soil drying and wetting on the desorption and distribution of aged 14C-labeled pesticide residues in soil organic fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, N. D.; Mucha, M.; Thiele, B.; Hofmann, D.; Burauel, P.

    2012-04-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of alternating soil drying and wetting on the release of aged 14C-labeled pesticide residues and their distribution in soil organic fractions (humic acids, fulvic acids, and humin substances). The used soils (gleyic cambisol; Corg 1.2%, pH 7.2) were obtained from the upper soil layer of two individual outdoor lysimeter studies containing either environmentally long-term aged 14C residues of the herbicide ethidimuron (ETD; 0-10 cm depth; time of aging: 9 years) or methabenzthiazuron (MBT; 0-30 cm depth; time of aging: 17 years). Triplicate soil samples (10 g dry soil equivalents) were (A=dry/wet) previously dried (45° C) or (B=wet/wet) directly mixed with pure water (1+2, w:w), shaken (150 rpm, 1 h), and centrifuged (~2000 g). The resulting supernatant was removed, filtered (0.45 μm) and subjected to 14C activity analysis via liquid scintillation counter (LSC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis, and LC-MS-MS analysis. This extraction procedure was repeated 15 individual times, for both setups (A) and (B). To determine the distribution of the aged 14C labelled pesticide residues in the soil organic matter fractions, the soil samples were subject to humic and fulvic acids fractionations at cycles 0, 4, 10, and 15. The residual pesticide 14C activity associated with the humic, fulvic, and humin substances (organic fraction remaining in the soil) fractions was determined via LSC. The water-extracted residual 14C activity was significantly higher in the extracts of the dry/wet, compared to the wet/wet soil samples for both pesticides. The total extracted 14C activity in the dry/wet soil extracts accounted for 51.0% (ETD) and 15.4% (MBT) in contrast to 19.0% (ETD) and 4.7% (MBT) in the wet/wet extracts after 15 water extractions. LC-MS-MS analysis revealed the parent compound ETD 27.9 μg kg-1 soil (dry/wet) and 10.7 μg kg-1 soil (wet/wet), accounting for 3.45 and 1.35% of total parent compound

  11. Climate control on soil age and weathering thresholds in young, post-glacial soils of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. L.; Chadwick, O.; Vitousek, P.

    2014-12-01

    Climate is often invoked as a major driver of soil and landscape evolution. But a coherent story has failed to emerge for how climate controls soil properties and weathering rates - partially due to competing influences of mineral residence times and supply rates in eroding landscapes. Here, we combine insights and methods across the related fields of geomorphology, soil science and geochemistry, to explore weathering thresholds in non-eroding, young soils along a strong precipitation gradient (400-4000 mm/yr) in the South Island of New Zealand. We studied ~30 soil profiles developed in thin (~1m) loess deposits that mantle LGM and post LGM moraines and outwash in the Waitaki catchment, extending from Lake Benmore to just below the Tasman glacier in the north. We find repeated thresholds (sharp, non-linear transitions) in soil chemistry, including exchangeable cations, pH and total elemental abundances. Abundance of pedogenic iron and aluminum increase with precipitation, stabilizing at ~2000 mm/yr. Plant-available phosphorous and exchangeable Ca and Mg are rapidly depleted as precipitation exceeds 1000 mm/yr. However total elemental abundances show up to 50% of major cations are retained at wetter sites, likely in less labile minerals. Preliminary numerical modeling of cation weathering kinetics provides some support for this interpretation. Together our data identify nonlinear changes in weathering intensity with rainfall, and show clear climate control on relatively young, post-glacial soil development. Additionally, we measured profiles and inventories of meteoric 10Be to quantify soil residence times across the climate gradient. This nuclide is cosmogenically produced in the atmosphere and binds strongly to reactive surfaces in soil following fallout. Exchangeable beryllium does not decrease with rainfall, despite decreasing pH along the climate gradient. Therefore we are confident that nuclide concentrations do not reflect leaching. Instead, these

  12. Interaction of hydration, aging, and carbon content of soil on the evaporation and skin bioavailability of munition contaminants.

    PubMed

    Reifenrath, William G; Kammen, Harold O; Reddy, Gunda; Major, Michael A; Leach, Glenn J

    2008-01-01

    Water plays a key role in enhancing the permeability of human skin to many substances. To further understand its ability to potentially increase the bioavailability of soil contaminants, artificial sweat was applied to excised pig skin prior to dosing with munition-contaminated soils. Skin was mounted in chambers to allow simultaneous measurement of evaporation and penetration and to control air flow, which changed the dwell time of skin surface water within a l-h period post application of test materials. Additional variables included type of compound, aging of spiked soil samples, and carbon content of soil. To this end, the evaporation and skin penetration of C-14 labeled hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (26DNT), and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) were determined from two soil types, Yolo, having 1.2% carbon, and Tinker, having 9.5% carbon. RDX soil samples aged 27 mo and 62 mo were compared to freshly spiked soils samples. Similarly, 26DNT samples aged 35-36 mo and TNT samples aged 18 mo were compared to freshly spiked samples. Approximately 10 microg/cm(2) of radiolabeled compound was applied in 10 mg/cm(2) of soil. Radiolabel recovered from the dermis and tissue culture media (receptor fluid) was summed to determine percent absorption from the soils. Radiolabel recovered from vapor traps determined evaporation. Mean skin absorption of all compounds was higher for low-carbon soil, regardless of soil age and skin surface water as affected by air flow conditions. For 26DNT, a simultaneous increase in evaporation and penetration with conditions that favored enhanced soil hydration of freshly prepared samples was consistent with a mechanism that involved water displacement of 26DNT from its binding sites. A mean penetration of 17.5 +/- 3.6% was observed for 26DNT in low-carbon soil, which approached the value previously reported for acetone vehicle (24 +/- 6%). 26DNT penetration was reduced to 0.35% under dryer conditions and to 0

  13. Occurrence and Phylogenetic Diversity of Sphingomonas Strains in Soils Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Leys, Natalie M. E. J.; Ryngaert, Annemie; Bastiaens, Leen; Verstraete, Willy; Top, Eva M.; Springael, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial strains of the genus Sphingomonas are often isolated from contaminated soils for their ability to use polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as the sole source of carbon and energy. The direct detection of Sphingomonas strains in contaminated soils, either indigenous or inoculated, is, as such, of interest for bioremediation purposes. In this study, a culture-independent PCR-based detection method using specific primers targeting the Sphingomonas 16S rRNA gene combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was developed to assess Sphingomonas diversity in PAH-contaminated soils. PCR using the new primer pair on a set of template DNAs of different bacterial genera showed that the method was selective for bacteria belonging to the family Sphingomonadaceae. Single-band DGGE profiles were obtained for most Sphingomonas strains tested. Strains belonging to the same species had identical DGGE fingerprints, and in most cases, these fingerprints were typical for one species. Inoculated strains could be detected at a cell concentration of 104 CFU g of soil−1. The analysis of Sphingomonas population structures of several PAH-contaminated soils by the new PCR-DGGE method revealed that soils containing the highest phenanthrene concentrations showed the lowest Sphingomonas diversity. Sequence analysis of cloned PCR products amplified from soil DNA revealed new 16S rRNA gene Sphingomonas sequences significantly different from sequences from known cultivated isolates (i.e., sequences from environmental clones grouped phylogenetically with other environmental clone sequences available on the web and that possibly originated from several potential new species). In conclusion, the newly designed Sphingomonas-specific PCR-DGGE detection technique successfully analyzed the Sphingomonas communities from polluted soils at the species level and revealed different Sphingomonas members not previously detected by culture-dependent detection techniques. PMID

  14. Impact of electrochemical treatment of soil washing solution on PAH degradation efficiency and soil respirometry.

    PubMed

    Mousset, Emmanuel; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Nihal; Guibaud, Gilles; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-04-01

    The remediation of a genuinely PAH-contaminated soil was performed, for the first time, through a new and complete investigation, including PAH extraction followed by advanced oxidation treatment of the washing solution and its recirculation, and an analysis of the impact of the PAH extraction on soil respirometry. The study has been performed on the remediation of genuine PAH-contaminated soil, in the following three steps: (i) PAH extraction with soil washing (SW) techniques, (ii) PAH degradation with an electro-Fenton (EF) process, and (iii) recirculation of the partially oxidized effluent for another SW cycle. The following criteria were monitored during the successive washing cycles: PAH extraction efficiency, PAH oxidation rates and yields, extracting agent recovery, soil microbial activity, and pH of soil. Two representative extracting agents were compared: hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and a non-ionic surfactant, Tween(®) 80. Six PAH with different numbers of rings were monitored: acenaphthene (ACE), phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLA), pyrene (PYR), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP). Tween(®) 80 showed much better PAH extraction efficiency (after several SW cycles) than HPCD, regardless of the number of washing cycles. Based on successive SW experiments, a new mathematical relation taking into account the soil/water partition coefficient (Kd*) was established, and could predict the amount of each PAH extracted by the surfactant with a good correlation with experimental results (R(2) > 0.975). More HPCD was recovered (89%) than Tween(®) 80 (79%), while the monitored pollutants were completely degraded (>99%) after 4 h and 8 h, respectively. Even after being washed with partially oxidized solutions, the Tween(®) 80 solutions extracted significantly more PAH than HPCD and promoted better soil microbial activity, with higher oxygen consumption rates. Moreover, neither the oxidation by-products nor the acidic media (p

  15. Metolachlor sorption and degradation in soil amended with fresh and aged biochar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Addition of organic amendments such as biochar to soils can influence pesticide sorption-desorption processes, and in turn, pesticide availability and biodegradation. Availability is affected by both the physical and chemical properties of soils and pesticides, as well as soil-pesticide contact time...

  16. Development of a differential volume reactor system for soil biodegradation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, O.F.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Reed, G.D.

    1991-12-31

    A bench scale experimental system was developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation by mixed microbial cultures in PAH contaminated Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) soils and on sand. The reactor system was chosen in order to provide a fundamental protocol capable for evaluating the performance of specific mixed microbial cultures on specific soil systems by elucidating the important system variables and their interactions. The reactor design and peripherals are described. A plug flow differential volume reactor (DVR) was used in order to remove performance effects related to reactor type, as opposed to system structure. This reactor system could be well represented mathematically. Methods were developed for on-line quantitative determination of PAH liquid phase concentrations. The mathematical models and experimental data are presented for the biodegradation of naphthalene on artificial and MGP soils.

  17. Effect of freeze-thawing cycles on aging behavior of phenanthrene, pyrene and their mixture in soil.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Xing, Baoshan; Tai, Peidong; Yang, Kun; Li, Hong; Zhang, Lizhu; Lin, Gao; Li, Peijun

    2013-05-01

    This work was initiated to study the competitive sorption effect on phenanthrene and pyrene extraction during the aging process in phaeozem, burozem, aquorizem and krasnozem with or without freeze-thawing cycles. Soils contaminated with 100 μg g(-1) phenanthrene and 100 μg g(-1) pyrene separately and combined were extracted by 10 g L(-1) surfactant SDBS solution at various times over 120 days. The competitive effect on extraction efficiency may either increase or decrease with increasing soil contact time, depending on the properties of the accessible adsorption sites. The increased difference in extraction efficiency change has a positive correlation with soil organic carbon content. The change in extraction efficiency between no freeze-thawing and freeze-thawing in soils contaminated with both hydrocarbons was smaller compared to it with phenanthrene or pyrene alone due to the similar roles freeze-thawing and competitive effect plays, causing contaminant molecules to occupy the high-energy adsorption sites and expanding the glassy domain of soil organic matter. No general conclusions were obtained among the frequency of freeze-thawing cycles, soil moisture and extraction efficiency. This study validates our previous conceptual freeze-thawing model and is expected to help the development of the environmental fate and risk assessment.

  18. Potential nitrogen fixation activity of different aged biological soil crusts from rehabilitated grasslands of the hilly Loess Plateau, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, M.; Belnap, J.

    2010-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) cover up to 60–70% of the soil surface in grasslands rehabilitated during the "Grain for Green" project implemented in the hilly Loess Plateau region in 1999. As biocrusts fix nitrogen (N), they are an important part of restoring soil fertility. We measured nitrogenase activity (NA) in biocrusts from sites rehabilitated at six different time periods to estimate 1) the effects of moisture content and temperature on NA in biocrusts of different ages and 2) the potential N contribution from biocrusts to soils and plants in this region. Results show that NA in the biocrusts was mostly controlled by the species composition, as the activity of biocrusts dominated by free-living soil cyanobacteria was significantly higher than that of moss-dominated biocrusts. Nitrogenase activity was also influenced by soil moisture content and ambient temperature, with a significant decline in activity when moisture levels were decreased to 20% field water-holding capacity. The optimal temperature for NA was 35–40 °C and 30–40 °C for cyanobacteria- and moss-dominated biocrusts, respectively. Biocrust fixed N is likely an important source of N in this ecosystem, as we estimated annual potential N inputs per hectare in these grasslands to be up to 13 kg N ha-1 and 4 kg N ha-1 for cyanobacteria- and moss-dominated biocrusts, respectively.

  19. Influence of age and composition of shelterbelts plants on enzyme activity and auxine - phytophormone IAA concentrations in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciech Szajdak, Lech; Gaca, Wioletta; Meysner, Teresa; Styła, Katarzyna; Maryganova, Victoria

    2010-05-01

    The investigations were carried out in Dezydery Chlapowski Agroecological Landscape Park in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowlands, 16° 45 E and 52° 01 N). The soil samples were taken from two shelterbelts differing the age and the composition of trees. First 200-years-old shelterbelt is consisting mainly by Robinia pseudacacia and small admixture of Quercus robur and Larix deciduas. It has 2 kilometers of length and 36 meters of width. The second one new shelterbelt (many species) was created in 1993 and consists of several species of plants such as: Quercus pertraea and Quercus robur, Larix decidua, Pinus silvestris, Sorbus aucuparia, Sorbus intermedia and Tilia cordata. Its length is 340 meters and its width is 17.5 meters. All shelterbelts and adjoining cultivated fields were introduced on Hapludalfs soils (according to FAO classification). In soil under two shelterbelts and adjoining cultivated fields the activity of the following enzymes nitrate reductase, urease, xanthine oxidase, phenol oxidase, peroxidase activity were measured. In addition, the concentrations of iron ions, indole-3-acetic acids, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, ammonium and nitrates were determined. In soils under shelterbelts compared to adjoining cultivated fields higher content of organic matter was observed, because the accumulation of soil organic matter under shelterbelts is suggested to be the main mechanism of long-term withdrawal of various chemical elements from cycling in the agroecosystems. However, many chemical, biochemical, physical and biological processes control conversions of organic compounds in soils and finally these processes depend on the organic matter content and particularly on humic substances. Due to a very good developed root system of trees in shelterbelts than cultivated plants, they transpire more than 34% water than cultivated fields and intensively take up nutrients and finally improve quality of ground

  20. [Soil microorganisms, nutrients and enzyme activity of Larix kaempferi plantation under different ages in mountainous region of eastern Liaoning Province, China].

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiao-yun; Sun, Xiao-mei; Chen, Dong-sheng; Zhang, Shou-gong

    2015-09-01

    We studied the community of soil microorganisms, enzyme activity and soil nutrients under 11-, 20-, 34-and 47-year-old Larix kaempferi plantations in mountainous region of eastern Liaoning Province to discuss the soil biological properties of L. kaempferi plantations of different stand ages and their relationships with soil nutrients. The results showed that the indexes reflecting soil micro-organisms, enzyme activity and soil nutrients of L. kaempferi plantations were the highest under the 11- or 47-year-old stand and the lowest in the 20- or 34-year-old stand. Soil productivity appeared in a decline trend with the increasing stand age, and the changes of soil microbial community structure and enzyme activity were responsive to soil degradation. The difference of fungi community was more noticeable than that of bacteria community among the plantations with different stand ages. The results of CCA showed soil nutrient and pH had no effect on seasonal difference of community structure, but had effects on community, structure among different stand ages. The total N, organic carbon, C/N, available nitrogen, exchangeable Mg2+ and pH had greater effects on bacteria community, while available P, total K and pH had greater effect on fungi community among different age forests. The main T-RFs of bacteria and fungi had higher correlation with N and P, and the fungi community had higher correlation with organic carbon and K than bacteria community. The microor-ganism community of the 11- and 47-year-old stands had greater correlation with soil nutrients and enzyme activity than that of 20- and 34-year-old stands. Consequently, soil organisms, in particular soil fungi, could be used to indicate soil degradation.

  1. [Aging Law of PAHs in Contaminated Soil and Their Enrichment in Earthworms Characterized by Chemical Extraction Techniques].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-nan; Yang, Xing-lun; Bian, Yong-rong; Gu, Cheng-gang; Liu, Zong-tang; Li, Jiao; Wang, Dai-zhang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of aging on the availability of PAHs, chemical extraction by exhaustive ( ASE extraction) and nonexhaustive techniques (Tenax-TA extraction, hydroxypropyl-p-cyclodextrin ( HPCD ) extraction, n-butyl alcohol ( BuOH) extraction) as well as PAHs accumulation in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were conducted in yellow soil from Baguazhou, Nanjing, China, and red soil from Hainan, China, spiked with phenanthrene, pryene and benzo(a) pyrene and aged 0, 7, 15, 30 and 60 days. The results showed that the concentration of PAHs extracted by ASE and three nonexhaustive techniques and accumulated by earthworms significantly decreased with aging time, except the ASE extracted concentration between 30-and 60-day aging time. Furthermore, the relationships were studied in this experiment between chemical extracted PAHs concentration and accumulated concentration in earthworms. PAHs accumulated concentration in earthworms was not significantly correlated with the exhaustive extracted concentration of PAHs in soil (R² 0.44-0.56), which indicated that ASE extraction techniques could not predict PAHs bioavailability to earthworms because it overestimated the risk of PAHs. However, the PAHs accumulated concentration in earthworms was significantly correlated with the three nonexhaustive extracted concentrations of PAHs in soil, which indicated that all the three nonexhaustive techniques could predict PAHs bioavailability to earthworm to some extent, among which, HPCD extraction (R² 0.94-0.99) was better than Tenax-TA extraction (R² 0.62-0.87) and BuOH extraction (R² 0.69-0.94). So HPCD extraction was a more appropriate and reliable technique to predict bioavailability of PAHs in soil.

  2. Effects of ageing and soil properties on the oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene using a swine model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Luchun; Palanisami, Thavamani; Liu, Yanju; Dong, Zhaomin; Mallavarapu, Megharaj; Kuchel, Tim; Semple, Kirk T; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-09-01

    Oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) was studied in a swine model using eight spiked soil samples after incubation for 50 and/or 90 days. Silica sand was used as a reference material and the relative bioavailability (RB) of B[a]P in soils was calculated as the quotient of the area under the plasma B[a]P curve (AUC) for soil and AUC for the silica sand. Significantly reduced RB was observed in all study soils after 90 days ageing, ranging from 22.1±0.4% to 62.7±10.1%, except for one very sandy soil (sand content 87.6%) where RB was unchanged (108.1±8.0%). Apart from this, bioavailability decreased during ageing with the decrease (from day 50 to day 90) being only significant for a clayey soil containing expandable clay minerals. Statistical analyses of B[a]P RB at day 90 (eight soils) and soil properties showed no direct correlation between RB and specific soil properties such as total organic carbon (TOC) and clay content which were commonly linked to organic contaminant sequestration. However, strongly significant relationships (p<0.001) were found between RB and the fine particle associated carbon (FPAC) defined as (Silt+Clay)/TOC, and between RB and the soil mesopore (<6nm; p<0.001) fraction, after two samples with high pH and high EC being excluded from the analyses. The bioaccessibility estimated by four in vitro extraction methods: dichloromethane/acetone sonication (DCM/Ace), butanol vortex (BuOH), hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin extraction (HPCD) and Milli Q water leaching methods at different sampling time (1 day, 50 days and 90 days after spiking) also showed a decreasing trend. Significant correlations were found between B[a]P RB and DCM/Ace (R(2)=0.67, p<0.05) extractable fraction and BuOH (R(2)=0.75, p<0.01) extractable fraction.

  3. Comparison of plant families in a greenhouse phytoremediation study on an aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Olson, Paul E; Castro, Ana; Joern, Mark; DuTeau, Nancy M; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Reardon, Kenneth F

    2007-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous, recalcitrant, and potentially carcinogenic pollutants. Plants and their associated rhizosphere microbes can promote PAH dissipation, offering an economic and ecologically attractive remediation technique. This study focused on the effects of different types of vegetation on PAH removal and on the interaction between the plants and their associated microorganisms. Aged PAH-polluted soil with a total PAH level of 753 mg kg(-1) soil dry weight was planted with 18 plant species representing eight families. The levels of 17 soil PAHs were monitored over 14 mo. The size of soil microbial populations of PAH degraders was also monitored. Planting significantly enhanced the dissipation rates of all PAHs within the first 7 mo, but this effect was not significant after 14 mo. Although the extent of removal of lower-molecular-weight PAHs was similar for planted and unplanted control soils after 14 mo, the total mass of five- and six-ring PAHs removed was significantly greater in planted soils at the 7- and 14-mo sampling points. Poaceae (grasses) were the most effective of the families tested, and perennial ryegrass was the most effective species; after 14 mo, soils planted with perennial ryegrass contained 30% of the initial total PAH concentration (compared with 51% of the initial concentrations in unplanted control soil). Although the presence of some plant species led to higher populations of PAH degraders, there was no correlation across plant species between PAH dissipation and the size of the PAH-degrading population. Research is needed to understand differences among plant families for stimulating PAH dissipation.

  4. Electro-migration of heavy metals in an aged electroplating contaminated soil affected by the coexisting hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Zhuang, Luwen; Tong, Lizhi; Lo, Irene M C; Qiu, Rongliang

    2012-02-01

    Cr(VI) was often reported to oxidize soil organic matter at acidic environments due to its high ORP, probably thus changing cationic metal species bound to soil organic matter, and influencing their electro-migration patterns. However, such an effect on the electro-migration was not confirmed in most previous studies. Therefore, this study applied a fixed voltage direct current field on an aged electroplating contaminated clayed soil, with a special interest in the direct or indirect influence of Cr(VI) on the electro-migration of other coexisting metals. After 353 h electrokinetic process, 81% of Zn, 53% of Ni and 22% of Cu in the original soil were electro-migrated into the electrolyte, and most of the remaining concentrated near the cathode. The Cr(VI) oxidized some soil organic matter along its migration pathway, with a pronounced reaction occurred near the anode at low pHs. The resulting Cr(III) reversed its original movement, and migrated towards the cathode, leading to the occurrence of a second Cr concentration peak in the soil. Metal species analyses showed that the amount of metals bound to soil organic matter significantly decreased, while a substantial increase in the Cr species bound to Fe/Mn (hydro-)oxides was observed, suggesting an enhancement of cationic metal electro-migration by the reduction of Cr(VI) into Cr(III). However, the Cr(VI) may form some stable lead chromate precipitates, and in turn demobilize Pb in the soil, as the results showed a low Pb removal and an increase in its acid-extractable and residual fractions after electrokinetic remediation.

  5. Toxicity in lead salt spiked soils to plants, invertebrates and microbial processes: Unraveling effects of acidification, salt stress and ageing reactions.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Erik; Oorts, Koen; Peeters, Sofie; Lanno, Roman; Cheyns, Karlien

    2015-12-01

    The fate and effects of toxic trace metals in soil freshly spiked soluble metal salts do not mimic those of metals in the field. This study was set up to test the magnitude of effects of salinity, acidification, and ageing on toxicity of lead (Pb) to plants, invertebrates and soil microbial processes. Three soils were spiked with Pb2+ salts up to a concentration of 8000 mg Pb/kg and were tested either after spiking, after soil leaching followed by pH correction, or after a 5-year outdoor ageing period with free drainage followed by pH correction. Soil solution ionic strength exceeded 150 mmol/L in soils tested directly after spiking and this decreased partially after leaching and returned back to background values after 5-year outdoor equilibration. Chronic toxicity to two plants, two invertebrates, and three microbial endpoints was consistently found in all spiked soils that were not leached. This toxicity significantly decreased or became absent after 5 years of ageing in 19 of the 20 toxicity tests by a factor 8 (median factor; range: 1.4->50), measured by the factor increase of total soil Pb dose required to induce 10% inhibition. The toxicity of Pb in leached soils was intermediate between the other two treatments. The lowest detectable chronic thresholds (EC10) in aged soils ranged 350-5300 mg Pb/kg. Correlation analysis, including data of Pb2+ speciation in soil solution, suggests that reduced ionic strength rather than acidification or true ageing is the main factor explaining the soil treatment effects after spiking. It is suggested that future toxicity studies should test fine PbO powder as a relevant source for Pb in soils to exclude the confounding salt effects.

  6. Using biodegradation kinetics to measure availability of aged phenanthrene to bacteria inoculated into soil

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, E.; Scow, K.M.

    1999-08-01

    The rate of biodegradation of pollutants in soil can be limited by the pollutant's availability to microorganisms. The authors have developed a bioassay for the availability of phenanthrene to bacteria that degrade phenanthrene in soil. The assay uses a soil in which phenanthrene is degraded very slowly. The rate of phenanthrene mineralization in this soil may be increased substantially through bioaugmentation with a bacterial inoculum. By delaying inoculation, it is possible to manipulate the time phenanthrene is present in soil before accelerated biodegradation begins. A phenanthrene concentration much lower than the affinity constant of the inoculum is added; thus, biodegradation kinetics approach first order. Because the phenanthrene first-order rate constant for the inoculum is the same regardless of the phenanthrene residence time in soil, the change in phenanthrene availability to the inoculum can be measured over time. The availability of phenanthrene to bacteria declined in a biphasic double exponential pattern with time. The initial rapid decline in availability resembled the change in amount of phenanthrene extracted from soil with hexane-water. However, after phenanthrene had been present in the soil longer than 300 h, the fraction extracted with hexane-water declined faster than the substrate available to the bacterial inoculum, suggesting that the bacteria are able to access a pool of phenanthrene unavailable to hexane.

  7. Forest age stands affect soil respiration and litterfall in a Black pine forest managed by a shelterwood system in the Central Spain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedo de Santiago, Javier; Borja, Manuel Esteban Lucas; Candel, David; Viñegla Pérez, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects that stand age and forest structure generates on soil respiration and litterfall quantity. The effect of stand age on these variables was studied in a shelterwood system Spanish Black pine chronosequence in central Iberian Peninsula composed of 0-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80, 80-100-year-old. For each stand age, six forest stands with similar characteristics of soil type and site preparation were used. Also, a forest area ranging 80-120 years old and without forest intervention was selected and used as control. We also measured organic matter, C:N ratio, soil moisture and pH in the top 10 mineral soil at each compartment. Soil respiration measurements were carried out in three time points (3, 8 and 12 days). Results showed a clear trend in soil respiration, comparing all the experimental areas. Soil respiration showed the same trend in all stands. It initially showed higher rates, reaching stability in the middle of the measurement process and finally lightly increasing the respiration rate. The older stands had significantly higher soil respiration than the younger stands. Soil organic matter values were also higher in the more mature stands. C:N ratio showed the opposite trend, showing lower values in the less mature stands. More mature stands clearly showed more quantity of litterfall than the younger ones and there was a positive correlation between soil respiration and litterfall. Finally, the multivariate PCA analysis clearly clustered three differenced groups: Control plot; from 100 to 40 years old and from 39 to 1 years old, taking into account both soil respiration and litterfall quantity, also separately. Our results suggest that the control plot has a better soil quality and that extreme forest stand ages (100-80 and 19-1 years old) and the associated forest structure generates differences in soil respiration.

  8. Analysis and Sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soil and Plant Samples of a Coal Mining Area in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ugwu, K E; Ukoha, P O

    2016-03-01

    This study analysed coal, plant and soil samples collected from the vicinity of Okobo coal mine in Nigeria for Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and evaluated the sources of the PAH contamination in the environmental samples. The environmental samples were extracted by sonication using a ternary solvent system and analysed for 16 PAHs by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results of the analysis of the samples identified some of the target PAHs. The ranges of total concentrations (in mg/kg) of PAHs in the coal, plant and soil samples were, 0.00-0.04, 0.00-0.16 and 0.00-0.01 respectively. The evaluation of the results of the PAH analysis of the environmental samples using diagnostic ratios revealed that the PAHs in the soil samples were mainly of petrogenic origin, while those in plant samples indicated mixture of petrogenic and pyrolytic origins.

  9. Sentinel surveillance of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in preschool-aged and school-aged children in selected local government units in the Philippines: follow-up assessment.

    PubMed

    Belizario, Vicente Y; Totañes, Francis Isidore G; de Leon, Winifreda U; Ciro, Raezelle Nadine T; Lumampao, Yvonne F

    2015-03-01

    This study was a follow-up to the baseline nationwide survey of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections in preschool-aged children in the Philippines and in school-aged children in selected sentinel sites to assess the Integrated Helminth Control Program of the Department of Health. The objective of the study was to describe the current prevalence and intensity of STH infections in preschool-aged and school-aged children in 6 sentinel provinces and to compare these data with baseline findings. A cross-sectional study design was used to determine the prevalence and intensity of STH infections. Parasitological assessment involved the examination of stool samples by the Kato-Katz method. Although parasitological parameters in the 2 age groups at follow-up showed significant reductions from the baseline, these parameters remained high despite 3 years of mass drug administration (MDA). Efforts toward achieving high MDA coverage rates, provision of clean water, environmental sanitation, and promotion of hygiene practices must be prioritized.

  10. The effect of salinization on the biomass of microorganisms in the soils of different ages in the forest-steppe zone of Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakutin, M. V.; Anopchenko, L. Yu.; Andrievskii, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    The study of soils of different ages developing on the drying bottom of the shallow-water Yudinsk reach of Lake Chany (Western Siberia) has shown that soil salinization is a powerful factor affecting the biomass and metabolic activity of microorganisms. Strong salinity of parent materials retards the development of microbial population in the young soils. With an increase the soil age of lake depressions, desalinization takes place, and the rate of the formation of microbial biomass increases. Its metabolic activity becomes more pronounced, though the specific rate of metabolic activity slows down. The carbon of the microbial biomass and basal respiration in the soils developing on drying lake bottoms in the forest-steppe zone reach the values typical of the zonal chernozemic soils in about 80 years.

  11. Effect of Simulated Weathering and Aging of TNT in Amended Sandy Loam Soil on Toxicity to the Enchytraeid Worm, Enchytreaeus Crypticus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    necessitated standardized toxicity testing to fill the data gap. In these studies, the Enchytraeid Reproduction Test (ISO/16387:2001) was adapted for...use with Enchytraeus crypticus. Tests were conducted in Sassafras sandy loam soil, which supports relatively high bioavailability of TNT. Weathering...aging procedures for TNT amended to the test soil were included to reflect the exposure conditions in field soils. Definitive toxicity tests conducted

  12. Toxicity Determinations for Five Energetic Materials, Weathered and Aged in Soil, to the Collembolan Folsomia Candida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    and NG that meet the USEPA criteria for inclusion in the development of scientifically based ecological soil-screening levels, which can be used...in ecological risk assessment at sites that are contaminated with energetic materials. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 2,4-Dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT...Toxicity Ecological soil-screening level (Eco-SSL) Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  13. [Effects of aging time on the form transformation and eco-toxicity threshold (ECx) of added Zn in typical China soils].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lei; Chen, Shi-Bao; Liu, Ji-Fang; Ma, Yi-Bing

    2013-07-01

    Six typical China soils with different properties were selected and added with seven concentrations of ZnCl2 to study the effects of different aging time (14, 90, 180, 360, and 540 days) on the form transformation and eco-toxicity threshold (ECx) of added Zn in the soils, with the main affecting factors analyzed. The results indicated that with the increase of aging time, the fraction of 0.01 mol x L(-1) CaCl2-extracted Zn in the soils decreased sharply initially, then slowed down, and reached the dynamic balance after 540 d incubation. The eco-toxicity thresholds (ECx, x = 10, 50) of Zn to bok choy increased significantly with aging time (P < 0.05), which implied the marked decrease of the phyto-toxicity of Zn. The measured aging factors AF10 and AF50 of Zn ranged from 1.077-1.743 and 1.174-1.441, respectively, and increased with aging time. The balanced concentration of Zn in the soils was significantly negatively correlated with soil pH, CEC, and organic carbon (Org-C) content, and soil pH was the most important controlling factor, followed by CEC and Org-C. It took shorter time to reach Zn balance in the soils with higher pH. The prediction model of the ECx of Zn was developed based on the aging factors and the main soil properties, and could be well validated by the measured ECx under field condition. This study would provide theoretical basis for the normalization of the eco-toxicity thresholds of added Zn in different soils and the formulation of the environmental criterion of Zn in China soils.

  14. Sorption Characteristic of Phenanthrene on Biochar-Amended Soils: Effect of feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, and aging duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, S.; Kim, C.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, J.

    2015-12-01

    The high sorption capacity of biochar is widely known in environmental studies. Especially, biochar is effective for removal of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) due to high surface area and porosity. In this study, the sorption characteristic of biochar-amended soil was evaluated by sorption kinetic experiment of phenanthrene (PHE). For PHE sorption test, the effect of biochar feedstock (sludge waste char (SWC), municipal waste char (MWC) and wood char (WC), Giant Miscanthus (GM)), pyrolysis temperature (400°C, 500°C and 700°C,), and duration of amending period (0, 3, 6, and 12 months) was assessed. Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques were used to detect pore structure and the surface functional group of biochar amended soils. For all kinetic tests, apparent sorption equilibrium was attained in 24 hr. The result showed that sorption capacity of biochar amended soils was greatly influenced by biochar feedstock and pyrolysis temperature. For all samples, the sorption capacity of PHE by biochar amended soils decreased with aging period. This observation is due to the fact that the aromatic characters of biochar are different by feedstock and pyrolysis temperature and the amount of O-containing hydrophilic functional groups increased surfaces of biochar by natural oxidation (e.g. carboxyl groups) as confirmed by the result of FT-IR and FE-SEM. In addition, biochar pore blockage by inorganic minerals, which tended to increase with aging period, might attenuate the sorption capacity of samples. In conclusion, biochar derived from various feed stocks are all effective for PHE sorption. But the sorption capacity of biochar amended soils decreased with increasing aging duration most likely due to increasing hydrophilic functional groups of biochar surfaces and pore blockage by inorganic minerals in the weathering processes. Therefore, for the design of biochar amendment to attenuate

  15. The AgroEcoSystem (AgES) response-function model simulates layered soil water dynamics in semi-arid Colorado: sensitivity and calibration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation of vertical soil hydrology is a critical component of simulating even more complex soil water dynamics in space and time, including land-atmosphere and subsurface interactions. The AgroEcoSystem (AgES) model is defined here as a single land unit implementation of the full AgES-W (Watershe...

  16. Biodegradation of aged diesel in diverse soil matrixes: impact of environmental conditions and bioavailability on microbial remediation capacity.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Nora B; van Gaans, Pauline; Langenhoff, Alette A M; Maphosa, Farai; Smidt, Hauke; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2013-07-01

    While bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) is in general a robust technique, heterogeneity in terms of contaminant and environmental characteristics can impact the extent of biodegradation. The current study investigates the implications of different soil matrix types (anthropogenic fill layer, peat, clay, and sand) and bioavailability on bioremediation of an aged diesel contamination from a heterogeneous site. In addition to an uncontaminated sample for each soil type, samples representing two levels of contamination (high and low) were also used; initial TPH concentrations varied between 1.6 and 26.6 g TPH/kg and bioavailability between 36 and 100 %. While significant biodegradation occurred during 100 days of incubation under biostimulating conditions (64.4-100 % remediation efficiency), low bioavailability restricted full biodegradation, yielding a residual TPH concentration. Respiration levels, as well as the abundance of alkB, encoding mono-oxygenases pivotal for hydrocarbon metabolism, were positively correlated with TPH degradation, demonstrating their usefulness as a proxy for hydrocarbon biodegradation. However, absolute respiration and alkB presence were dependent on soil matrix type, indicating the sensitivity of results to initial environmental conditions. Through investigating biodegradation potential across a heterogeneous site, this research illuminates the interplay between soil matrix type, bioavailability, and bioremediation and the implications of these parameters for the effectiveness of an in situ treatment.

  17. Bacterial biodegradation of melamine-contaminated aged soil: influence of different pre-culture media or addition of activation material.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Takashi; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the biodegrading potential of Arthrobacter sp. MCO, Arthrobacter sp. CSP, and Nocardioides sp. ATD6 in melamine-contaminated upland soil (melamine: approx. 10.5 mg/kg dry weight) after 30 days of incubation. The soil sample used in this study had undergone annual treatment of lime nitrogen, which included melamine; it was aged for more than 10 years in field. When R2A broth was used as the pre-culture medium, Arthrobacter sp. MCO could degrade 55 % of melamine after 30 days of incubation, but the other strains could hardly degrade melamine (approximately 25 %). The addition of trimethylglycine (betaine) in soil as an activation material enhanced the degradation rate of melamine by each strain; more than 50 % of melamine was degraded by all strains after 30 days of incubation. In particular, strain MCO could degrade 72 % of melamine. When the strains were pre-cultured in R2A broth containing melamine, the degradation rate of melamine in soil increased remarkably. The highest (72 %) melamine degradation rate was noted when strain MCO was used with betaine addition.

  18. Identification and quantification of biomarkers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an aged mixed contaminated site: from source to soil.

    PubMed

    Kao, Nien-Hsin; Su, Ming-Chien; Fan, Jheng-Rong; Chung, Ying-Yung

    2015-05-01

    The sources of the spill and the contaminated soils of an aged oil spill contaminated site with unknown mixed pollutants were investigated by using a set of developed forensic chemical procedures which include analysis of oil products, site investigation, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) screening, biomarker identification, and finally, the confirmation of pollutants. Adamantanes (17 compounds), 10 bicyclic sesquiterpanes, 6 newly detected compounds, 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 10 alkylated naphthalenes compounds in several gasoline, diesel oil samples, and contaminated soil samples were examined and quantified. GC/MS method, retention indices, relative response factors, and diagnostic ratio were used to identify and quantify pollutant compounds. The study revealed the key factors for distinguishing among gasoline and diesel oil products in the market, created a new set of retention indices for 10 bicyclic sesquiterpane compounds, and discovered 6 quantifiable compounds in analysis of fresh oil products. The suggested diagnostic ratios for BSs and the new compounds in the analysis of the biomarker show the differences among diesel products, link between the source of pollutants with contaminated soil, and the recognition of the signs of an aged spill, and the indications of weathering effects.

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal wheat inoculation promotes alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation: Microcosm experiment on aged-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ingrid, Lenoir; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Frédéric, Laruelle; Yolande, Dalpé; Joël, Fontaine

    2016-06-01

    Very few studies reported the potential of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to dissipate hydrocarbons in aged polluted soils. The present work aims to study the efficiency of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonized wheat plants in the dissipation of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Our results demonstrated that the inoculation of wheat with Rhizophagus irregularis allowed a better dissipation of PAHs and alkanes after 16 weeks of culture by comparison to non-inoculated condition. These dissipations observed in the inoculated soil resulted from several processes: (i) a light adsorption on roots (0.5% for PAHs), (ii) a bioaccumulation in roots (5.7% for PAHs and 6.6% for alkanes), (iii) a transfer in shoots (0.4 for PAHs and 0.5% for alkanes) and mainly a biodegradation. Whereas PAHs and alkanes degradation rates were respectively estimated to 12 and 47% with non-inoculated wheat, their degradation rates reached 18 and 48% with inoculated wheat. The mycorrhizal inoculation induced an increase of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by 56 and 37% compared to the non-inoculated wheat. Moreover, an increase of peroxidase activity was assessed in mycorrhizal roots. Taken together, our findings suggested that mycorrhization led to a better hydrocarbon biodegradation in the aged-contaminated soil thanks to a stimulation of telluric bacteria and hydrocarbon metabolization in mycorrhizal roots.

  20. Environmental fate of the herbicide MCPA in agricultural soils amended with fresh and aged de-oiled two-phase olive mill waste.

    PubMed

    Peña, David; López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Albarrán, Ángel; Becerra, Daniel; Sánchez-Llerena, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Olive oil agrifood industry generates large amounts of waste whose recycling as organic amendment represents an alternative to their disposal. The impact of de-oiled two-phase olive mill waste (DW) on the fate of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in Mediterranean agricultural soils was evaluated. Furthermore, the effect of the transformation of organic matter from this waste under field conditions was assessed. Four Mediterranean agricultural soils were selected and amended in laboratory with fresh DW and field-aged DW (DW and ADW treatments, respectively). Adsorption capacity increased by factors between 1.18 and 3.59, for the DW-amended soils, and by factor of 4.93, for ADW-amended soil, with respect to unamended soils, when 5% amendment was applied. The DW amendment had inhibitory effect on dehydrogenase activity and slowed herbicide dissipation, whereas the opposite effect was observed in ADW treatments. In the field-amended soil, the amount of MCPA leached was significantly reduced from 56.9% for unamended soil to 15.9% at the 5% rate. However, leaching losses of MCPA increased in the laboratory-amended soils, because of their high water-soluble organic carbon values which could enhance MCPA mobility, especially in the acidic soils. Therefore, the application of DW as organic amendment in Mediterranean agricultural soils could be an important management strategy to reduce MCPA leaching, especially if the organic matter had been previously transformed by ageing processes.

  1. Sequencing batch reactor performance treating PAH contaminated lagoon sediments.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Andrea; Stante, Loredana; Pirozzi, Francesco; Cesaro, Raffaele; Bortone, Giuseppe

    2005-03-17

    The applicability of sediment slurry sequencing batch reactors (SBR) to treat Venice lagoon sediments contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated, carrying out experimental tests. The slurry, obtained mixing tap water and contaminated sediments with 17.1 mg kg(-1) TS total PAHs content, was loaded to a 8l lab-scale completely stirred reactor, operated as a sequencing batch reactor. Oxygen uptake rate exerted by the slurry, measured by means of a DO-stat titrator, was used to monitor the in-reactor biological activity and to select the optimal operating conditions for the sediment slurry SBR. The PAHs removal efficiency was evaluated in different operating conditions, obtained changing the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the lab-scale reactor and adding an external carbon source to the slurry. HRT values used during the experiments are 98, 70 and 35 days, whereas the carbon source was added in order to evaluate its effect on the biological activity. The results have shown a stable degradation of PAHs, with a removal efficiency close to 55%, not dependent on the addition of carbon source and the tested HRTs.

  2. Bioventing PAH contamination at the Reilly Tar Site

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Hinchee, R.E.; Brenner, R.C.; McCauley, P.T.

    1995-12-31

    A pilot-scale bioventing demonstration has been in progress since November 1992 to determine if bioventing is an effective remediation treatment for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The Reilly Tar and Chemical Corporation site in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, was selected for this demonstration. The location is the site of a former coal tar refinery and wood-preserving facility at which creosote in mineral oil served as the primary preservative. The goal of the project is to achieve 10% greater PAH removal over background degradation for each year of the 3-year study. Respiration measurements were made to estimate PAH biodegradation as a means of monitoring the progress of the technology. These measurements indicated that 13.4% and 17.3% degradation of the total PAH was possible during the first year and second year, respectively. Although not all of the respiration can be attributed conclusively to PAH metabolism, strong correlations were found between the PAH concentration and biodegradation rates.

  3. PILOT LAND TREATMENT OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazardous dredged sediments are typically placed in confined disposal facilities (CDFs) which are designed to dewater and contain but not treat sediments. Since navigational dredging in the U.S. is quickly filling many CDFs, these facilities have little available capacity for ne...

  4. Mt. Blanco revisited: soil-geomorphic implications for the ages of the upper Cenozoic Blanco and Blackwater Draw Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, V.T.

    1988-06-01

    Mt. Blanco, on the eastern edge of the Southern High Plains of Texas, contains stratigraphic features significant in interpreting the late Cenozoic history of the region and the vertebrate paleontology of the Great Plains; however, the stratigraphic relations are confused in the literature or are unreported. Mt. Blanco is the type locality for the Blanco Formation and the Blanco Local Fauna, which occurs throughout North America and is the type fauna for the Blancan Land Mammal Age in North America. Here also occur exposures of the Blackwater Draw Formation, an extensive (120,000 km/sup 2/) eolian sheet that is the surficial cover of the region and contains the 1.4 Ma Guaje Ash and several buried soils. A reexamination of the section shows that (1) the Blackwater Draw Formation, an eolian deposit, contains three well-expressed buried soils (5 YR hues, argillic horizons greater than or equal to 1 m thick, Stages III and IV calcic horizons) and the similar regional surface soil (Paleustalf); (2) the Guaje Ash is within the lower Blackwater Draw Formation but is separated from the Blanco Formation, a lacustrine unit, by about 1 m of sediment, including the lowest buried soil; and (3) the lowest buried soil shows a Stage IV calcrete formed at the top of the Blanco Formation and the base of the Blackwater Draw Formation and probably took about 200 ka to form. These new data suggested that deposition of the type Blanco sediments may have ended by about 1.6 Ma or earlier. Since that time, the Blackwater Draw Formation has accumulated episodically; periods of nondeposition are characterized by landscape stability and pedogenesis.

  5. The influence of pine forests of different ages on the biological activity of layland soils in the middle Angara River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokina, O. A.; Sorokin, N. D.

    2007-05-01

    The influence of pine forests of different ages (from 25 to 85 years) restoring on old plow land soils is reflected in the biological processes proceeding in them. The drastic decrease in the absolute and relative number of actinomycetes, along with an increase of the fungal population in the microbial complexes of the soils (within the whole profiles), indicates that the microbocenoses acquire “forest” properties. In the soils under the younger pine forests, the processes of microbiological mineralization and specific respiration activity are more active than in the soils under the older pine forests. With the age of the pine forests, the soil profiles become more differentiated according to the eluvial-illuvial type.

  6. Age and thermal stability of particulate organic matter fractions indicate the presence of black carbon in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, Jens; Heiling, Maria; Hajdas, Irka

    2014-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) from incomplete combustion is abundant in many soils. The age of black carbon is often higher than that of typical soil organic carbon (SOC) owing to its higher recalcitrance against microbial decomposition compared to plant residues. Also fossil BC may contribute to the high age of SOC. At the same time, the oxidative thermal stability of BC is known to be higher than that of SOC due to its chemical and physical structure. For a meaningful application of radiocarbon as an indicator for soil carbon age and turnover, the relative contribution of BC needs to be known but BC is difficult to separate physically from soil. Here we analyze particulate organic carbon (POC) fractions from four different field sites in Europe for their thermal stability using oxidative differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and for their radiocarbon signature. POC may be particularly sensitive to BC 'contamination' because it was gained using a combination of size and density separation. One of these sites is essentially free of measurable amounts of BC. Each of the four sites comprised between five and eight individual POC samples taken from different spots. The radiocarbon signature and the calculated POC mean residence time of samples from three out of four sites indicated the presence of very old carbon, resulting in mean residence times (MRT) of several hundreds and up to 3700 years. In contrast, MRT's of POC from the virtually BC-free site were between 50 and 100 years. Two indicators for thermal stability of the POC fractions, i) the amount of heat released at temperatures > 450 °C and ii) the amount of heat released at 500 °C (where the latter represents the peak temperature of charcoal isolated from one of the samples) correlated both significantly and non-linearly with the samples MRT, indicating that samples with high BC content are older. Hence we can conclude that for an individual site with increasing abundance of BC both the age and the thermal stability

  7. Evaluation of soil bioremediation techniques in an aged diesel spill at the Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Hugo E; Peixoto, Raquel S; Cury, Juliano C; van Elsas, Jan D; Rosado, Alexandre S

    2015-12-01

    Many areas on the Antarctic continent already suffer from the direct and indirect influences of human activities. The main cause of contamination is petroleum hydrocarbons because this compound is used as a source of energy at the many research stations around the continent. Thus, the current study aims to evaluate treatments for bioremediation (biostimulation, bioaugmentation, and bioaugmentation + biostimulation) using soils from around the Brazilian Antarctic Station "Comandante Ferraz" (EACF), King George Island, Antarctic Peninsula. The experiment lasted for 45 days, and at the end of this period, chemical and molecular analyses were performed. Those analyses included the quantification of carbon and nitrogen, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis (with gradient denaturation), real-time PCR, and quantification of total hydrocarbons and polyaromatics. Molecular tests evaluated changes in the profile and quantity of the rrs genes of archaea and bacteria and also the alkB gene. The influence of the treatments tested was directly related to the type of soil used. The work confirmed that despite the extreme conditions found in Antarctic soils, the bacterial strains degraded hydrocarbons and bioremediation treatments directly influenced the microbial communities present in these soils even in short periods. Although the majority of the previous studies demonstrate that the addition of fertilizer seems to be most effective at promoting bioremediation, our results show that for some conditions, autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA) treatment is indicated. This work highlights the importance of understanding the processes of recovery of contaminated environments in polar regions because time is crucial to the soil recovery and to choosing the appropriate treatment.

  8. Multivariate analysis of mixed contaminants (PAHs and heavy metals) at manufactured gas plant site soils.

    PubMed

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2012-06-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to provide an overview of the distribution pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals in former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site soils. PCA is the powerful multivariate method to identify the patterns in data and expressing their similarities and differences. Ten PAHs (naphthalene, acenapthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, benzo[a]pyrene) and four toxic heavy metals - lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and zinc (Zn) - were detected in the site soils. PAH contamination was contributed equally by both low and high molecular weight PAHs. PCA was performed using the varimax rotation method in SPSS, 17.0. Two principal components accounting for 91.7% of the total variance was retained using scree test. Principle component 1 (PC1) substantially explained the dominance of PAH contamination in the MGP site soils. All PAHs, except anthracene, were positively correlated in PC1. There was a common thread in high molecular weight PAHs loadings, where the loadings were inversely proportional to the hydrophobicity and molecular weight of individual PAHs. Anthracene, which was less correlated with other individual PAHs, deviated well from the origin which can be ascribed to its lower toxicity and different origin than its isomer phenanthrene. Among the four major heavy metals studied in MGP sites, Pb, Cd and Cr were negatively correlated in PC1 but showed strong positive correlation in principle component 2 (PC2). Although metals may not have originated directly from gaswork processes, the correlation between PAHs and metals suggests that the materials used in these sites may have contributed to high concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cr and Zn. Thus, multivariate analysis helped to identify the sources of PAHs, heavy metals and their association in MGP site, and thereby better characterise the site risk, which would not be possible if one uses chemical analysis

  9. Finger printing of mixed contaminants from former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site soils: Implications to bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Krishnamurti, G S R; McFarland, Ross; Naidu, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Contaminants in general do not occur as single chemicals but as mixtures at any contaminated site. Gasworks sites are the typical mixed contaminated sites. These sites are not only subjected to PAH contamination but also varying degrees of heavy metal contamination. Bioremediation in these sites is often hindered by the presence of heavy metals. The co-occurrence of PAHs with heavy metals has not been systematically investigated. Metals are reported to inhibit the general soil microbiological processes. The total concentration of soluble metal in the system includes both free metal ion and complexed forms. Within bioavailable fraction, the most toxic form is the free metal species, which was not addressed well so far in gas works site characterisation. This study underpins the science and importance of metal bioavailability and speciation based site characterisation in mixed contaminated sites. In this study a detailed elemental chemistry of the gas works site soils are discussed using different methods. The PAH contamination was contributed by both low and high molecular weight PAHs. The total PAHs concentration ranged from 335 to 8645 mg/kg. Among most toxic metals Pb was found in high concentration ranging from 88 to 671 mg/kg, Cd 8 to 112 mg/kg and Zn varied from 64 to 488 mg/kg. Thermodynamic chemical equilibrium model VMINTEQ (Ver 2.52) was used to calculate the free metal species in gas works site soils. The percentage free metal species showed a different trend compared to total metal concentrations, free Zn species ranged 18-86%, free Cd was 26-87% and Pb showed lowest free metal percentage (0-17%). The bioavailable metal species and its implications to bioremediation have also been discussed.

  10. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic studies of hexane-extractable lipids from soils under shelterbelts of different age and composition of plants.

    PubMed

    Szajdak, Lech Wojciech; Maryganova, Victoria; Skakovskii, Eugene; Tychinskaya, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Comparative study of the composition of lipids extracted with n-hexane from soils under shelterbelts of different age and composition of plants and adjoining cultivated fields in agrolandscape has been carried out with the application of (1)Н and (13)С NMR spectroscopy. The lipid content correlates with the organic carbon content in soils and is the highest in the soil under the 200-years old shelterbelt. The data received indicate that hexane-extractable lipids from the soil under the 200-years old shelterbelt have undergone the most significant biochemical and chemical transformations (oxidation, hydrolysis, polymerization) with the accumulation of resistant compounds and destruction of esters of o-phthalic acid as anthropogenic contaminants compared to the lipids from the soil under the 14-years old shelterbelt and soils of adjoining arable fields.

  11. Microbial communities in pyrene amended soil-compost mixture and fertilized soil.

    PubMed

    Adam, Iris K U; Duarte, Márcia; Pathmanathan, Jananan; Miltner, Anja; Brüls, Thomas; Kästner, Matthias

    2017-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are distributed ubiquitously in the environment and form metabolites toxic to most organisms. Organic amendment of PAH contaminated soil with compost and farmyard manure has proven to be efficient for PAH bioremediation mediated by native microorganisms, even though information on the identity of PAH degraders in organic-amended soil is still scarce. Here we provide molecular insight into the bacterial communities in soil amended with compost or farmyard manure for which the degradation mass balances of (13)C-labeled pyrene have been recently published and assess the relevant bacterial genera capable of degrading pyrene as a model PAH. We performed statistical analyses of bacterial genera abundance data based on total DNA and RNA (for comparison) extracted from the soil samples. The results revealed complex pyrene degrading communities with low abundance of individual degraders instead of a limited number of abundant key players. The bacterial degrader communities of the soil-compost mixture and soil fertilized with farmyard manure differed considerably in composition albeit showing similar degradation kinetics. Additional analyses were carried out on enrichment cultures and enabled the reconstruction of several nearly complete genomes, thus allowing to link microcosm and enrichment experiments. However, pyrene mineralizing bacteria enriched from the compost or unfertilized soil-compost samples did not dominate pyrene degradation in the soils. Based on the present findings, evaluations of PAH degrading microorganisms in complex soil mixtures with high organic matter content should not target abundant key degrading species, since the specific degraders may be highly diverse, of low abundance, and masked by high bacterial background.

  12. Response of soil respiration and ecosystem carbon budget to vegetation removal in Eucalyptus plantations with contrasting ages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianping; Liu, Zhanfeng; Huang, Guomin; Chen, Dima; Zhang, Weixin; Shao, Yuanhu; Wan, Songze; Fu, Shenglei

    2014-01-01

    Reforested plantations have substantial effects on terrestrial carbon cycling due to their large coverage area. Although understory plants are important components of reforested plantations, their effects on ecosystem carbon dynamics remain unclear. This study was designed to investigate the effects of vegetation removal/understory removal and tree girdling on soil respiration and ecosystem carbon dynamics in Eucalyptus plantations of South China with contrasting ages (2 and 24 years old). We conducted a field manipulation experiment from 2008 to 2009. Understory removal reduced soil respiration in both plantations, whereas tree girdling decreased soil respiration only in the 2-year-old plantations. The net ecosystem production was approximately three times greater in the 2-year-old plantations (13.4 t C ha−1 yr−1) than in the 24-year-old plantations (4.2 t C h−1 yr−1). The biomass increase of understory plants was 12.6 t ha−1 yr−1 in the 2-year-old plantations and 2.9 t ha−1 yr−1 in the 24-year-old plantations, accounting for 33.9% and 14.1% of the net primary production, respectively. Our findings confirm the ecological importance of understory plants in subtropical plantations based on the 2 years of data. These results also indicate that Eucalyptus plantations in China may be an important carbon sink due to the large plantation area. PMID:25179343

  13. Plagioclase-Rich Itokawa Grains: Space Weathering, Exposure Ages, and Comparison to Lunar Soil Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Berge, E.

    2017-01-01

    Regolith grains returned by the Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa provide the only samples currently available to study the interaction of chondritic asteroidal material with the space weathering environment. Several studies have documented the surface alterations observed on the regolith grains, but most of these studies involved olivine because of its abundance. Here we focus on the rarer Itokawa plagioclase grains, in order to allow comparisons between Itokawa and lunar soil plagioclase grains for which an extensive data set exists.

  14. SCR and GCR exposure ages of plagioclase grains from lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etique, P.; Baur, H.; Signer, P.; Wieler, R.

    1986-01-01

    The concentrations of solar wind implanted Ar-36 in mineral grains extracted from lunar soils show that they were exposed to the solar wind on the lunar surface for an integrated time of 10E4 to 10E5 years. From the bulk soil 61501 plagioclase separates of 8 grain size ranges was prepared. The depletion of the implanted gases was achieved by etching aliquot samples of 4 grain sizes to various degrees. The experimental results pertinent to the present discussion are: The spallogenic Ne is, as in most plagioclases from lunar soils, affected by diffusive losses and of no use. The Ar-36 of solar wind origin amounts to (2030 + or - 100) x 10E-8 ccSTP/g in the 150 to 200 mm size fraction and shows that these grains were exposed to the solar wind for at least 10,000 years. The Ne-21/Ne-22 ratio of the spallogenic Ne is 0.75 + or - 0.01 and in very good agreement with the value of this ratio in a plagioclase separate from rock 76535. This rock has had a simple exposure history and its plagioclases have a chemical composition quite similar to those studied. In addition to the noble gases, the heavy particle tracks in an aliquot of the 150 to 200 mm plagioclase separate were investigated and found 92% of the grains to contain more than 10E8 tracks/sq cm. This corresponds to a mean track density of (5 + or - 1) x 10E8 tracks/sq cm. The exploration of the exposure history of the plagioclase separates from the soil 61501 do not contradict the model for the regolith dynamics but also fail to prove it.

  15. Enhancement of bioremediation of a creosote-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Carriere, P.P.E.; Mesania, F.A.

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing concern in the US about the increasing number of industrial sites containing concentration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in their soil and waste sludge above background levels. PAHs, neutral and non-polar organic compounds, consist of two or more fused benzene rings which are generated from industrial activities such as creosote wood treating, gas manufacturing, coke making, coal tar refining, petroleum refining, and aluminum smelting. Low molecular weight PAHs are generally considered as extremely toxic compounds, whereas the higher molecular weight PAHs are carcinogenic in nature. Bioremediation, a viable option for treatment of PAHs contaminated soil, can be enhanced by the use of surfactant. In this study a nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, was investigated. Abiotic soil desorption experiments were performed to determine the kinetics of release of selected PAH compounds from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Respirometric experiments were also conducted to evaluate the effect of nonionic surfactant on biodegradation. The N-Con system respirometer was used to monitor the oxygen uptake by the microorganisms. The abiotic experiments results indicated that the addition of surfactant to soil/water systems increases the desorption of PAH compounds. The increase in PAHs availability to the microorganisms produced an increase in oxygen uptake.

  16. Formation of nonextractable soil residues: A stable isotope approach

    SciTech Connect

    Richnow, H.H.; Eschenback, A.; Mahro, B.; Kaestner, M.; Annweiler, E.; Seifert, R.; Michaelis, W.

    1999-11-01

    Stable carbon isotopic measurements were employed to characterize the transformation of a {sup 13}C-labeled polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), anthracene, in a closed soil bioreactor system. The {sup 13}C-label was used to calculate a carbon mass balance including mineralization and the formation of nonextractable soil-bound residues. Similar results were obtained from {sup 13}C-labeled carbon and {sup 14}C-labeled carbon mass balance calculations for separate batch experiments with labeled anthracene. In concentration ranges typical for real PAH-contaminated sites, the sensitivity of the {sup 13}C tracer method meets the requirements of classical radiotracer experiments. Therefore, the authors balancing method based on stable isotope-labeled chemicals may supplement or substitute radiotracer experiments under many circumstances. One major advantage of using stable isotope-labeled tracers is the possible application in transformation studies where the use of radioactive substances is of environmental concern. The transformation of {sup 13}C-labeled PAH into nonextractable residues clearly depends on the metabolic activity of the soil microflora and occurs during an early phase of biodegradation. Successive contamination of the soil by anthracene leads to a progressive adaptation of the microflora to a complete mineralization of anthracene in the soil. The extent of residue formation is controlled by the capability of the microflora to degrade the contaminant. Results of long-term experiments indicate that nonextractable residues are relatively stable over time.

  17. Microbial populations related to PAH biodegradation in an aged biostimulated creosote-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lladó, Salvador; Jiménez, Nuria; Viñas, Marc; Solanas, Anna Maria

    2009-09-01

    A previous bioremediation survey on a creosote-contaminated soil showed that aeration and optimal humidity promoted depletion of three-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but residual concentrations of four-ringed benzo(a)anthracene (B(a)A) and chrysene (Chry) remained. In order to explain the lack of further degradation of heavier PAHs such as four-ringed PAHs and to analyze the microbial population responsible for PAH biodegradation, a chemical and microbial molecular approach was used. Using a slurry incubation strategy, soil in liquid mineral medium with and without additional B(a)A and Chry was found to contain a powerful PAH-degrading microbial community that eliminated 89% and 53% of the added B(a)A and Chry, respectively. It is hypothesized that the lack of PAH bioavailability hampered their further biodegradation in the unspiked soil. According to the results of the culture-dependent and independent techniques Mycobacterium parmense, Pseudomonas mexicana, and Sphingobacterials group could control B(a)A and Chry degradation in combination with several microorganisms with secondary metabolic activity.

  18. Effect of aging on arsenic and lead fractionation and availability in soils: coupling sequential extractions with diffusive gradients in thin-films technique.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Guan, Dong-Xing; Ren, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Min; Luo, Jun; Ma, Lena Q

    2014-05-30

    We coupled the diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) technique with two sequential extraction methods to investigate the influence of aging on As and Pb fractionation and availability in three soils spiked with As (40 or 400mgkg(-1)), Pb (150 or 1500mgkg(-1)) or As+Pb (40mgkg(-1) As and 150mgkg(-1) Pb). During aging, As moved from the more available (non-specifically and specifically sorbed) to less available (amorphous and crystallized Fe/Al) fractions while Pb moved from the first three fractions (exchangeable, carbonate and Fe/Mn hydroxide) to organic fraction. However, even after 33-week aging, much more As and Pb were in the least available residual fraction in spiked soils than native soils (11-59% vs. 1.2-12%). Relatively, As in spiked soils was much more available than Pb with 11-14% As and 46-59% Pb in the residual fraction. Correlation analysis indicated that As in the non-specifically and specifically sorbed fractions and Pb in the exchangeable fraction were likely sources of DGT-measured labile As and Pb. The fact that As and Pb distribution and availability in spiked soils were significantly different from native soils suggests caution needs to be exercised when using spiked soils for research.

  19. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  20. Using the accumulation of CBD-extractable iron and clay content to estimate soil age on stable surfaces and nearby slopes, Front Range, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethier, David P.; Birkeland, Peter W.; McCarthy, James A.

    2012-11-01

    In many transport-limited environments, morphology, pedogenic iron and clay content provide a basis for estimating the exposure age of soils and associated landforms. We measured citrate-buffered dithionite (CBD)-extractable Fe (Fed) and clay concentration in fresh rock, saprolite, morainal and colluvial materials, and soil horizons from stable surfaces and hillslopes in the Colorado Front Range. Fresh igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks contain < 1% Fed and 1 to 5% clay. As bedrock and surficial deposits age, Fed and clay accumulate from weathering and dustfall. Late Holocene regolith at warm, dry sites contains small amounts of Fed and clay, but relatively moist soils developed on early Holocene cirque deposits contain as much as 1.5% Fed and 8% clay. Concentrations and total profile accumulation of Fed and clay increase with age in soils developed on stable surfaces of glacial deposits as old as ~ 130 kyr. On stable sites, Fed and clay accumulation from weathering and dust is ~ 0.02 g cm- 2 kyr- 1 and ~ 0.2 g cm- 2 kyr- 1, respectively. We used the Fed and clay inventory in soil profiles at dated, stable Front Range surfaces to calculate accumulation functions, which allowed us to estimate soil age at hillslope sites. Heterogeneous parent material, particularly on hillslopes, and climate-related effects add to variability in measured relations. Mobile regolith in Gordon Gulch, one of the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) catchments, yields profile ages from about 0.5 to 5 × 104 yr, comparable to values measured using other techniques. Calculated profile ages are older on a north- vs. south-facing slope and increase from the drainage divide to the footslope. Ages calculated for stabilized colluvium and well-developed buried profiles at nearby hillslope sites (Lefthand, Ward and Rollinsville) suggest that these soils have stabilized over periods > 105 yr. In the absence of radiometric ages, the accumulation of Fed and clay in soils on stable

  1. Productivity of aboveground coarse wood biomass and stand age related to soil hydrology of Amazonian forests in the Purus-Madeira interfluvial area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintra, B. B. L.; Schietti, J.; Emillio, T.; Martins, D.; Moulatlet, G.; Souza, P.; Levis, C.; Quesada, C. A.; Schöngart, J.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing demand for information on forest productivity has increased the number of permanent monitoring plots across the Amazon. Those plots, however, do not comprise the whole diversity of forest types in the Amazon. The complex effects of soil, climate and hydrology on the productivity of seasonally waterlogged interfluvial wetland forests are still poorly understood. The presented study is the first field-based estimate for tree ages and wood biomass productivity in the vast interfluvial region between the Purus and Madeira rivers. We estimate stand age and wood biomass productivity by a combination of tree-ring data and allometric equations for biomass stocks of eight plots distributed along 600 km in the Purus-Madeira interfluvial area that is crossed by the BR-319 highway. We relate stand age and wood biomass productivity to hydrological and edaphic conditions. Mean productivity and stand age were 5.6 ± 1.1 Mg ha-1 yr-1 and 102 ± 18 yr, respectively. There is a strong relationship between tree age and diameter, as well as between mean diameter increment and mean wood density within a plot. Regarding the soil hydromorphic properties we find a positive correlation with wood biomass productivity and a negative relationship with stand age. Productivity also shows a positive correlation with the superficial phosphorus concentration. In addition, superficial phosphorus concentration increases with enhanced soil hydromorphic condition. We raise three hypotheses to explain these results: (1) the reduction of iron molecules on the saturated soils with plinthite layers close to the surface releases available phosphorous for the plants; (2) the poor structure of the saturated soils creates an environmental filter selecting tree species of faster growth rates and shorter life spans and (3) plant growth on saturated soil is favored during the dry season, since there should be low restrictions for soil water availability.

  2. Assessment of environmentally persistent free radicals in soils and sediments from three Superfund sites.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, Albert Leo N; Cook, Robert L; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Donnelly, Kirby C; Kelley, Matthew A; Cosgriff, David

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the presence of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) in pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated soils at a closed wood treatment facility site in Georgia. The reported EPFRs were pentachlorophenoxyl radicals formed on soils under ambient conditions via electron transfer from PCP to electron acceptors in the soil. In this study, we present results for soil and sediment samples from additional Superfund sites in Montana and Washington. Paramagnetic centers associated with different chemical environments were characterized by distinct g-factors and line widths (ΔHp-p). EPFR concentrations in contaminated samples were ~30×, ~12×, and ~2× higher than background samples at the Georgia, Montana, and Washington sites, respectively. EPR signals in the Montana contaminated soils were very similar to those previously observed for pentachlorophenol contaminated soils at the Georgia site, i.e., g = 2.00300 and ΔHp-p = 6.0 G, whereas signals in the Washington sediment samples were similar to those previously observed for other PAH contaminated soils, i.e., g = 2.00270 and ΔHp-p = 9.0 G. Total carbon content measurements exhibited direct correlation with EPFR concentration. The presence of radicals in sites contaminated a decade to a century ago suggests continuous formation of EPFRs from molecular contaminants in the soil and sediment.

  3. Assessment of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals in Soils and Sediments from Three Superfund Sites

    PubMed Central

    dela Cruz, Albert Leo N.; Cook, Robert L.; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M.; Donnelly, Kirby C.; Kelley, Matthew A.; Cosgriff, David

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the presence of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) in pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated soils at a closed wood treatment facility site in Georgia. The reported EPFRs were pentachlorophenoxyl radicals formed on soils under ambient conditions via electron transfer from PCP to electron acceptors in the soil. In this study, we present results for soil and sediment samples from additional Superfund sites in Montana and Washington. Paramagnetic centers associated with different chemical environments were characterized by distinct g-factors and line widths (ΔHp-p). EPFR concentrations in contaminated samples were ~30x, ~12x, and ~2x higher than background samples at the Georgia, Montana, and Washington sites, respectively. EPR signals in the Montana contaminated soils were very similar to those previously observed for pentachlorophenol contaminated soils at the Georgia site, i.e., g = 2.00300 and ΔHp-p = 6.0 G, whereas signals in the Washington sediment samples were similar to those previously observed for other PAH contaminated soils, i.e., g = 2.00270 and ΔHp-p = 9.0G. Total carbon content measurements exhibited direct correlation with EPFR concentration. The presence of radicals in sites contaminated a decade to a century ago suggests continuous formation of EPFRs from molecular contaminants in the soil and sediment. PMID:24244947

  4. Mineralization of pyrene induced by interaction between Ochrobactrum sp. PW and ryegrass in spiked soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tuo; Wei, Lianshuang; Qiao, Min; Zou, Dexun; Yang, Xiaojin; Lin, Aijun

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the capability of pyrene-degrading bacterium Ochrobactrum sp. PW and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) grown alone and in combination on the degradation of pyrene in soil. After 60 days of ryegrass growth, plant biomass, pyrene-degrading microbial mass, soil enzyme activity (catalase activity and polyphenol oxidase activity) and residual concentration of pyrene in soils were determined. Higher dissipation rates were observed in PW inoculation treatments: ryegrass+PW rhizosphere soil (RP-r) and ryegrass+PW non-rhizosphere soil (RP-nr), than planting of ryegrass alone, rhizosphere (R-r) or non-rhizosphere (R-nr). The inoculation with PW significantly (p<0.05) increased the dry weight of ryegrass root and shoot, nearly 2.8 and 3.3 times higher than ryegrass treatment. The pyrene-degrading microbial mass indicated that a much larger mass of bacteria, actinobacteria were present in RP treatment. The catalase activity in all different treatments were significantly (p<0.05) higher than in with treatment R-nr, and the polyphenol oxidase activity was also significantly (p<0.05) increased by inoculation with PW, leading to enhanced mineralization of pyrene from soil. Our results suggest that adding of PAHs-degrading bacteria to soil can enhance remediation of PAHs contaminated soil, while improving plant growth.

  5. Effects of bacterial inoculation and nonionic surfactants on degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, T.; Kristensen, P.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of introduced bacteria and nonionic surfactants on the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil. Mineralization experiments were conducted with freshly added [{sup 14}C]phenanthrene or [{sup 14}]pyrene, whereas other experiments focused on the degradation of selected PAHs present in a coal tar-contaminated soil. Inoculation of soil samples with phenanthrene-utilizing bacteria stimulated the mineralization of [{sup 14}]phenanthrene. This effect, however, was most notable in soil with a low indigenous potential for PAH degradation, and a large inoculum was apparently required to establish phenanthrene mineralization in the soil. Addition of alcohol ethoxylate and glycoside surfactants to soil samples enhanced the mineralization of [{sup 14}]phenanthrene and [{sup 14}]pyrene. The nonionic surfactants also enhanced the degradation of contaminant PAHs that were present in the soil coal tar. As an example, pyrene, benzo[b,j,k]fluoranthene, and benzo[a]pyrene were resistant to degradation in the absence of surfactants, whereas significant degradation of these PAHs was observed when surfactants were added. The surfactant-related enhancement of the degradation of PAH contaminants was less convincing when a rapidly degradable glycoside surfactant was used. This suggests that surfactants that are mineralized at moderate rates may be more applicable for increasing the availability of PAHs in soil.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in an urban area assessed by Quercus ilex leaves and soil.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, F; Alfani, A; Maisto, G

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the PAH contamination of Naples urban area, densely populated and with high traffic flow, by analyses of environmental matrices: soil and Quercus ilex leaves. Being some PAHs demonstrated to have hazardous effects on human health, the accumulation of carcinogenic and toxic PAHs (expressed as B(a)Peq) was evaluated in the leaves and soil. The main sources of the PAHs were discriminated by the diagnostic ratios in the two matrices. The urban area appeared heavily contaminated by PAHs, showing in soil and leaves total PAH concentrations also fivefold higher than those from the remote area. The soil mainly accumulated heavy PAHs, whereas leaves the lightest ones. Median values of carcinogenic PAH concentrations were higher in soil (440 ng g(-1) d.w.) and leaves (340 ng g(-1) d.w.) from the urban than the remote area (60 and 70 ng g(-1) d.w., respectively, for soil and leaves). Also, median B(a)Peq concentrations were higher both in soil and leaves from the urban (137 and 63 ng g(-1) d.w., respectively) than those from the remote area (19 and 49 ng g(-1) d.w., respectively). Different from the soils, the diagnostic ratios found for the leaves discerned PAH sources in the remote and urban areas, highlighting a great contribution of vehicular traffic emission as main PAH source in the urban area.

  7. Effects of chemical, biological, and physical aging as well as soil addition on the sorption of pyrene to activated carbon and biochar.

    PubMed

    Hale, Sarah E; Hanley, Kelly; Lehmann, Johannes; Zimmerman, Andrewr; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2011-12-15

    In this study, the suitability of biochar and activated carbon (AC) for contaminated soil remediation is investigated by determining the sorption of pyrene to both materials in the presence and absence of soil and before as well as after aging. Biochar and AC were aged either alone or mixed with soil via exposure to (a) nutrients and microorganisms (biological), (b) 60 and 110 °C (chemical), and (c) freeze-thaw cycles (physical). Before and after aging, the pH, elemental composition, cation exchange capacity (CEC), microporous SA, and sorption isotherms of pyrene were quantified. Aging at 110 °C altered the physicochemical properties of all materials to the greatest extent (for example, pH increased by up to three units and CEC by up to 50% for biochar). Logarithmic K(Fr) values ranged from 7.80 to 8.21 (ng kg(-1))(ng L(-1))(-nF) for AC and 5.22 to 6.21 (ng kg(-1))(ng L(-1))(-nF) for biochar after the various aging regimes. Grinding biochar to a smaller particle size did not significantly affect the sorption of d(10) pyrene, implying that sorption processes operate on the subparticle scale. Chemical aging decreased the sorption of pyrene to the greatest extent (up to 1.8 log unit for the biochar+soil). The sorption to AC was affected more by the presence of soil than the sorption to biochar was. Our results suggest that AC and biochar have a high sorption capacity for pyrene that is maintained both in the presence of soil and during harsh aging. Both materials could therefore be considered in contaminated land remediation.

  8. An optical age chronology of late Quaternary extreme fluvial events recorded in Ugandan dambo soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, S.A.; Brown, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    There is little geochonological data on sedimentation in dambos (seasonally saturated, channel-less valley floors) found throughout Central and Southern Africa. Radiocarbon dating is problematic for dambos due to (i) oxidation of organic materials during dry seasons; and (ii) the potential for contemporary biological contamination of near-surface sediments. However, for luminescence dating the equatorial site and semi-arid climate facilitate grain bleaching, while the gentle terrain ensures shallow water columns, low turbidity, and relatively long surface exposures for transported grains prior to deposition and burial. For this study, we focused on dating sandy strata (indicative of high-energy fluvial events) at various positions and depths within a second-order dambo in central Uganda. Blue-light quartz optically stimulated luminescences (OSL) ages were compared with infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) ages from finer grains in the same sample. A total of 8 samples were dated, with 6 intervals obtained at ???35, 33, 16, 10.4, 8.4, and 5.9 ka. In general, luminescence ages were stratigraphically, geomorphically and ordinally consistent and most blue-light OSL ages could be correlated with well-dated climatic events registered either in Greenland ice cores or Lake Victoria sediments. Based upon OSL age correlations, we theorize that extreme fluvial dambo events occur primarily during relatively wet periods, often preceding humid-to-arid transitions. The optical ages reported in this study provide the first detailed chronology of dambo sedimentation, and we anticipate that further dambo work could provide a wealth of information on the paleohydrology of Central and Southern Africa. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genotoxicity assessment of soils from wastewater irrigation areas and bioremediation sites using the Vicia faba root tip micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Song, Y F; Gong, P; Wilke, B M; Zhang, W; Song, X Y; Sun, T H; Ackland, M L

    2007-02-01

    Genotoxicity potential of soils taken from wastewater irrigation areas and bioremediation sites was assessed using the Vicia faba root tip micronucleus assay. Twenty five soils were tested, of which 8 were uncontaminated soils and taken as the control to examine the influence of soil properties; 6 soils were obtained from paddy rice fields with a history of long-term wastewater irrigation; 6 soils were obtained from bioremediation sites to examine effects of bioremediation; and 5 PAH-contaminated soils were used to examine methodological effects between direct soil exposure and exposure to aqueous soil extracts on micronuclei (MN) frequency ( per thousand) in the V. faba root tips. Results indicate that soil properties had no significant influences on MN frequencies (p > 0.05) when soil pH varied between 3.4 to 7.6 and organic carbon between 0.4% and 18.6%. The MN frequency measured in these control soils ranged from 1.6 per thousand to 5.8 per thousand. MN frequencies in soils from wastewater irrigation areas showed 2- to 48-fold increase as compared with the control. Soils from bioremediation sites showed a mixed picture: MN frequencies in some soils decreased after bioremediation, possibly due to detoxification; whereas in other cases remediated soils induced higher MN frequencies, suggesting that genotoxic substances might be produced during bioremediation. Exposure to aqueous soil extracts gave a higher MN frequency than direct exposure in 3 soils. However, the opposite was observed in the other two soils, suggesting that both exposure routes should be tested in case of negative results from one route. Data obtained from this study indicate that the MN assay is a sensitive assay suitable for evaluating genotoxicity of soils.

  10. Linking soil water balance and water age with leaching of nitrate to groundwater in an agricultural setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigler, W.; Ewing, S. A.; Payn, R. A.; Jones, C. A.; Weissmann, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of land management on groundwater chemistry are often poorly understood due to uncertainties about residence times of water and solutes in the unsaturated and the saturated zones. In central Montana, a strath terrace mantled with 20-100 cm of loess-derived clay loam is composed of 5-10 meters of gravel hosting a shallow aquifer overlying shale. The landform is isolated from mountain front stream recharge and drained by springs at the gravel/shale interface surrounding the terrace. Ninety three percent of the terrace surface is cultivated, predominantly for production of small grains. A typical cropping system on the terrace is a three year rotation of winter wheat, spring wheat or barley, and fallow, where each phase represents a different regime of evapotranspiration, recharge, fertilizer application, mineralization and nitrate leaching to groundwater. Age of water in discharge from the perched aquifer in the gravel can potentially be characterized by monitoring springs and streams that are ultimately sourced by infiltration and recharge across the terrace. Work presented here couples a simple daily soil water balance model with ground and surface water chemistry to infer travel times through the unsaturated and saturated zones. These results are evaluated against estimates of groundwater age derived from pool turnover time calculations, finite difference groundwater flow modeling, and use of chemical age tracers.

  11. Assessment of five bioaccessibility assays for predicting the efficacy of petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in aged contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Dandie, Catherine E; Weber, John; Aleer, Samuel; Adetutu, Eric M; Ball, Andy S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the bioaccessibility of petroleum hydrocarbons in aged contaminated soils (1.6-67gkg(-1)) was assessed using four non-exhaustive extraction techniques (100% 1-butanol, 100% 1-propanol, 50% 1-propanol in water and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin) and the persulfate oxidation method. Using linear regression analysis, residual hydrocarbon concentrations following bioaccessibility assessment were compared to residual hydrocarbon concentrations following biodegradation in laboratory-scale microcosms in order to determine whether bioaccessibility assays can predict the endpoint of hydrocarbon biodegradation. The relationship between residual hydrocarbon concentrations following microcosm biodegradation and bioaccessibility assessment was linear (r(2)=0.71-0.97) indicating that bioaccessibility assays have the potential to predict the extent of hydrocarbon biodegradation. However, the slope of best fit varied depending on the hydrocarbon fractional range assessed. For the C(10)-C(14) hydrocarbon fraction, the slope of best fit ranged from 0.12 to 0.27 indicating that the non-exhaustive or persulfate oxidation methods removed 3.5-8 times more hydrocarbons than biodegradation. Conversely, for the higher molecular weight hydrocarbon fractions (C(29)-C(36) and C(37)-C(40)), biodegradation removed up to 3.3 times more hydrocarbons compared to bioaccessibility assays with the resulting slope of best fit ranging from 1.0-1.9 to 2.0-3.3 respectively. For mid-range hydrocarbons (C(15)-C(28)), a slope of approximately one was obtained indicating that C(15)-C(28) hydrocarbon removal by these bioaccessibility assays may approximate the extent of biodegradation. While this study demonstrates the potential of predicting biodegradation endpoints using bioaccessibility assays, limitations of the study include a small data set and that all soils were collected from a single site, presumably resulting from a single contamination source. Further evaluation and validation is

  12. Visualizing and Quantifying Bioaccessible Pores in Field-Aged Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Clay Soils Using Synchrotron-based X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Kim, J.; Zhu, N.; McBeth, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial hydrocarbon degradation is environmentally significant and applicable to contaminated site remediation practices only when hydrocarbons (substrates) are physically bioaccessible to bacteria in soil matrices. Powerful X-rays are produced by synchrotron radiation, allowing for bioaccessible pores in soil (larger than 4 microns), where bacteria can be accommodated, colonize and remain active, can be visualized at a much higher resolution. This study visualized and quantified such bioaccessible pores in intact field-aged, oil-contaminated unsaturated soil fractions, and examined the relationship between the abundance of bioaccessible pores and hydrocarbon biodegradation. Using synchrotron-based X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) at the Canadian Light Source, a large dataset of soil particle characteristics, such as pore volumes, surface areas, number of pores and pore size distribution, was generated. Duplicate samples of five different soil fractions with different soil aggregate sizes and water contents (13, 18 and 25%) were examined. The method for calculating the number and distribution of bioaccessible pores using CT images was validated using the known porosity of Ottawa sand. This study indicated that the distribution of bioaccessible pore sizes in soil fractions are very closely related to microbial enhancement. A follow-up aerobic biodegradation experiment for the soils at 17 °C (average site temperature) over 90 days confirmed that a notable decrease in hydrocarbon concentrations occurred in soils fractions with abundant bioaccessible pores and with a larger number of pores between 10 and 100 μm. The hydrocarbon degradation in bioactive soil fractions was extended to relatively high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons (C16-C34). This study provides quantitative information about how internal soil pore characteristics can influence bioremediation performance.

  13. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in soils in the Region of Valasske Mezirici, the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination of urban, agricultural and forest soil samples was investigated from samples obtained in the surroundings of Valasske Mezirici. Valasske Mezirici is a town located in the north-east mountainous part of the Czech Republic, where a coal tar refinery is situated. 16 PAHs listed in the US EPA were investigated. Organic oxidizable carbon was also observed in the forest soils. The PAH concentrations ranged from 0.86-10.84 (with one anomalous value of 35.14) and 7.66-79.39 mg/kg dm in the urban/agricultural and forest soils, respectively. While the PAH levels in the urban/agricultural soils are within the range typically found in industrialized areas, the forest soils showed elevated PAH concentrations compared to other forest soils in Western and Northern Europe. The PAH concentrations and their molecular distribution ratios were studied as functions of the sample location and the meteorological history. The soils from localities at higher altitudes above sea level have the highest PAH concentrations, and the PAH concentrations decrease with increasing distance from the town. PMID:20003407

  14. Fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in plant-soil systems: Plant responses to a chemical stress in the root zone

    SciTech Connect

    Hoylman, Anne M.

    1994-01-01

    Under laboratory conditions selected to maximize root uptake, plant tissue distribution of PAH-derived 14C was largely limited to root tissue of Malilotus alba. These results suggest that plant uptake of PAHs from contaminated soil via roots, and translocation to aboveground plant tissues (stems and leaves), is a limited mechanism for transport into terrestrial food chains. However, these data also indicate that root surface sorption of PAHs may be important for plants grown in soils containing elevated concentration PAHs. Root surface sorption of PAHs may be an important route of exposure for plants in soils containing elevated concentrations of PAHS. Consequently, the root-soil interface may be the site of plant-microbial interactions in response to a chemical stress. In this study, evidence of a shift in carbon allocation to the root zone of plants exposed to phenanthrene and corresponding increases in soil respiration and heterotrophic plate counts provide evidence of a plant-microbial response to a chemical stress. The results of this study establish the importance of the root-soil interface for plants growing in PAH contaminated soil and indicate the existence of plant-microbial interactions in response to a chemical stress. These results may provide new avenues of inquiry for studies of plant toxicology, plant-microbial interactions in the rhizosphere, and environmental fates of soil contaminants. In addition, the utilization of plants to enhance the biodegradation of soil contaminants may require evaluation of plant physiological changes and plant shifts in resource allocation.

  15. Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections and Nutritional Status in School-age Children from Rural Communities in Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Ana Lourdes; Gabrie, Jose Antonio; Usuanlele, Mary-Theresa; Rueda, Maria Mercedes; Canales, Maritza; Gyorkos, Theresa W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are endemic in Honduras and efforts are underway to decrease their transmission. However, current evidence is lacking in regards to their prevalence, intensity and their impact on children's health. Objectives To evaluate the prevalence and intensity of STH infections and their association with nutritional status in a sample of Honduran children. Methodology A cross-sectional study was done among school-age children residing in rural communities in Honduras, in 2011. Demographic data was obtained, hemoglobin and protein concentrations were determined in blood samples and STH infections investigated in single-stool samples by Kato-Katz. Anthropometric measurements were taken to calculate height-for-age (HAZ), BMI-for-age (BAZ) and weight-for-age (WAZ) to determine stunting, thinness and underweight, respectively. Results Among 320 children studied (48% girls, aged 7–14 years, mean 9.76±1.4) an overall STH prevalence of 72.5% was found. Children >10 years of age were generally more infected than 7–10 year-olds (p = 0.015). Prevalence was 30%, 67% and 16% for Ascaris, Trichuris and hookworms, respectively. Moderate-to-heavy infections as well as polyparasitism were common among the infected children (36% and 44%, respectively). Polyparasitism was four times more likely to occur in children attending schools with absent or annual deworming schedules than in pupils attending schools deworming twice a year (p<0.001). Stunting was observed in 5.6% of children and it was associated with increasing age. Also, 2.2% of studied children were thin, 1.3% underweight and 2.2% had anemia. Moderate-to-heavy infections and polyparasitism were significantly associated with decreased values in WAZ and marginally associated with decreased values in HAZ. Conclusions STH infections remain a public health concern in Honduras and despite current efforts were highly prevalent in the studied community. The role of multiparasite

  16. Biosurfactant-enhanced bioremediation of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in creosote contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Bezza, Fisseha Andualem; Chirwa, Evans M Nkhalambayausi

    2016-02-01

    The potential for biological treatment of an environment contaminated by complex petrochemical contaminants was evaluated using creosote contaminated soil in ex situ bio-slurry reactors. The efficacy of biosurfactant application and stimulation of in situ biosurfactant production was investigated. The biosurfactant produced was purified and characterised using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Biosurfactant enhanced degradation of PAHs was 86.5% (with addition of biosurfactant) and 57% in controls with no biosurfactant and nutrient amendments after incubation for 45 days. A slight decrease in degradation rate observed in the simultaneous biosurfactant and nutrient, NH4NO3 and KH2PO4, supplemented microcosm can be attributed to preferential microbial consumption of the biosurfactant supplemented. The overall removal of PAHs was determined to be mass transport limited since the dissolution rate caused by the biosurfactant enhanced the bioavailability of the PAHs to the microorganisms. The consortium culture was predominated by the aromatic ring-cleaving species Bacillus stratosphericus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  17. Earthworm bioassays and seedling emergence for monitoring toxicity, aging and bioaccumulation of anthropogenic waste indicator compounds in biosolids-amended soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinney, Chad A.; Campbell, Bryan R.; Thompson, Regina; Furlong, Edward T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Werner, Stephen L.; Hay, Anthony G.

    2012-01-01

    Land application of biosolids (treated sewage sludge) can be an important route for introducing xenobiotic compounds into terrestrial environments. There is a paucity of available information on the effects of biosolids amendment on terrestrial organisms. In this study, the influence of biosolids and biosolids aging on earthworm (Eisenia fetida) reproduction and survival and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seedling emergence was investigated. Earthworms were exposed to soils amended with varying quantities of biosolids (0, 1, 2, 3, or 4% dry mass). To investigate the influence of biosolids aging, the biosolids used in the study were aged for differing lengths of time (2 or 8 weeks) prior to exposure. All of the adult earthworms survived in the biosolids–amended soils at all concentrations that were aged for 2 weeks; however, only 20% of the adults survived in the soil amended with the highest concentration of biosolids and aged for 8 weeks. Reproduction as measured by mean number of juveniles and unhatched cocoons produced per treatment correlated inversely with biosolids concentration, although the effects were generally more pronounced in the 8-week aged biosolids–soil samples. Latent seedling emergence and reduced seedling fitness correlated inversely with biosolids concentration, but these effects were tempered in the 8-week aged versus the 2-week aged soil–biosolids mixtures. Anthropogenic waste indicator compounds (AWIs) were measured in the biosolids, biosolids–soil mixtures, and earthworm samples. Where possible, bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were calculated or estimated. A wide variety of AWIs were detected in the biosolids (51 AWIs) and earthworm samples (≤ 19 AWI). The earthworms exposed to the 8-week aged biosolids–soil mixtures tended to accumulate greater quantities of AWIs compared to the 2-week aged mixture, suggesting that the bioavailability of some AWIs was enhanced with aging. The BAFs for a given AWI varied with treatment. Notably large

  18. Short-Term Rhizosphere Effect on Available Carbon Sources, Phenanthrene Degradation, and Active Microbiome in an Aged-Contaminated Industrial Soil

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, François; Cébron, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decades, understanding of the effects of plants on soil microbiomes has greatly advanced. However, knowledge on the assembly of rhizospheric communities in aged-contaminated industrial soils is still limited, especially with regard to transcriptionally active microbiomes and their link to the quality or quantity of carbon sources. We compared the short-term (2–10 days) dynamics of bacterial communities and potential PAH-degrading bacteria in bare or ryegrass-planted aged-contaminated soil spiked with phenanthrene, put in relation with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) sources and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollution. Both resident and active bacterial communities (analyzed from DNA and RNA, respectively) showed higher species richness and smaller dispersion between replicates in planted soils. Root development strongly favored the activity of Pseudomonadales within the first 2 days, and of members of Actinobacteria, Caulobacterales, Rhizobiales, and Xanthomonadales within 6–10 days. Plants slowed down the dissipation of phenanthrene, while root exudation provided a cocktail of labile substrates that might preferentially fuel microbial growth. Although the abundance of PAH-degrading genes increased in planted soil, their transcription level stayed similar to bare soil. In addition, network analysis revealed that plants induced an early shift in the identity of potential phenanthrene degraders, which might influence PAH dissipation on the long-term. PMID:26903971

  19. Rapamycin: An InhibiTOR of Aging Emerges From the Soil of Easter Island.

    PubMed

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-07-01

    Rapamycin (sirolimus) is a macrolide immunosuppressant that inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase and extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. Although rapamycin is an FDA-approved drug for select indications, a diverse set of negative side effects may preclude its wide-scale deployment as an antiaging therapy. mTOR forms two different protein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2; the former is acutely sensitive to rapamycin whereas the latter is only chronically sensitive to rapamycin in vivo. Over the past decade, it has become clear that although genetic and pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 extends lifespan and delays aging, inhibition of mTORC2 has negative effects on mammalian health and longevity and is responsible for many of the negative side effects of rapamycin. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the molecular and physiological effects of rapamycin treatment, and we discuss how the use of alternative rapamycin treatment regimens or rapamycin analogs has the potential to mitigate the deleterious side effects of rapamycin treatment by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Although the side effects of rapamycin are still of significant concern, rapid progress is being made in realizing the revolutionary potential of rapamycin-based therapies for the treatment of diseases of aging.

  20. Soil physical restrictions and hydrology regulate stand age and wood biomass turnover rates of Purus-Madeira interfluvial wetlands in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintra, B. B. L.; Schietti, J.; Emillio, T.; Martins, D.; Moulatlet, G.; Souza, P.; Levis, C.; Quesada, C. A.; Schöngart, J.

    2013-11-01

    In Amazonia, wetlands constitute about 30% of its entire basin, of which ancient fluvial terraces located in vast interfluvial regions cover a large portion. Although the increased number of permanent plots in the recent years has contributed to improved understanding of regional variation in forest dynamics across the Amazon Basin, the functioning of large lowland interfluvial wetlands remain poorly understood. Here we present the first field-based estimate for tree ages, wood biomass productivity and biomass turnover rates for eight 1 ha plots in wetland and non-flooded forests distributed along the BR-319 Highway along a distance of about 600 km crossing the Purus-Madeira rivers interfluvial region in central-southwestern Amazon Basin. We estimate stand age, wood biomass productivity and biomass turnover rates combining tree-ring data and an allometric equation based on diameter, tree height and wood density and relate these structural parameters to physical soil and hydrological restrictions. Wood biomass and productivity varied twofold among the plots, with wood biomass stocks ranging between 138-294 Mg ha-1 and productivity varying between 3.4-6.6 Mg ha-1 yr-1. Soil effective depth, topography, structure and mainly soil water saturation significantly affected stand age (64-103 yr) and forest dynamics in terms of annual biomass turnover rates (2.0-3.2%). On harsher soils characterized by a poor structure, low effective depth and high water saturation, biomass turnover rates were increased and forests stands were younger compared to well-drained sites. We suggest that soil constraints, especially soil water saturation, limit the development of the stand structure, resulting in forests with younger stand ages and higher biomass turnover rates compared to forests growing on well-drained soils. We do not find, however, any relation between physical soil restrictions or hydrology and wood biomass productivity, but there is a trend of increasing wood biomass

  1. Effect of cyclodextrin and transformer oil amendments on the chemical extractability of aged [14C]polychlorinated biphenyl and [14C]polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon residues in soil.

    PubMed

    Doick, Kieron J; Burauel, Peter; Jones, Kevin C; Semple, Kirk T

    2005-09-01

    Sequestration of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in soils limits chemical and biological availability. Concerns exist regarding the long-term stability of sequestered contaminants in the environment, and stability needs to be demonstrated if bioavailability considerations are to be adopted into the risk assessment and remediation of contaminated land. The aim of the present study was to test the short-term influence of two organic amendments on the chemical extractability of HOC residues that had been present in soils for more than 12 years. The amendments investigated were cyclodextrin and transformer oil (a light, nonaqueous phase liquid [LNAPL]). The contaminants investigated were fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene in one soil and the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) 28 and 52 in a second soil. The addition of cyclodextrin to the soils did not result in a significant increase in chemical extractability of the residues after a 36-d contact time. The addition of transformer oil resulted in an increase in chemical extractability of the PCBs after a 14-d soil-LNAPL contact time and a further increase after a 36-d contact time. The present study demonstrates that the chemical availability of aged HOCs in soil may be influenced by the presence of other chemicals and has implications for the long-term management of contaminated land.

  2. Enhanced biodegradation of creosote contaminated soil using a nonionic surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Carriere, P.E.; Mesania, F.A.

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing concern in the US about the increasing number of industrial sites containing concentration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in their soil and waste sludge above background levels. Low molecular weight PAHs are generally considered as extremely toxic compounds, whereas the higher molecular weight PAHs are carcinogenic in nature. The aqueous solubility and volatility of PAHs decrease with increasing molecular weight. Bioremediation, a viable option for treatment of PAH contaminated soils, can reduce PAH concentration to acceptable levels. It is primarily a water-based process influenced by sorption (absorption/desorption), diffusion and dissolution mechanisms which serve to control the accessibility of the organics to the bacteria that are present in water. In most cases, sorption is the rate limiting step controlling, both the rate and extent of biodegradation. The process of bioremediation can be enhanced by application of surfactant by increasing the availability of the organic compounds to the microorganisms. In previous bioremediation studies, the use of several kinds of surfactant was found to enhance the solubility of hydrophobic compounds. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a nonionic surfactant on biodegradation of creosote contaminated soil.

  3. Use of nutrient supplements to increase the microbial degradation of PAH in contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, L.M.; Pfaender, F.K.

    1994-12-31

    The microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is often low in soils due to unavailability of PAH and/or to conditions in the soil that are not favorable to microbial activity. As a result, successful bioremediation of PAH contaminated soils may require the addition of supplements to impact PAH availability or soil conditions. This paper reports on the addition of supplements (Triton X-100, Inopol, nutrient buffer, an organic nutrient solution, salicylic acid) on the fate of (9-{sup 14}C) phenanthrene, a model PAH, in creosote contaminated soils. Phenanthrene metabolism was assessed using a mass balance approach that accounts for metabolism of phenanthrene to CO{sub 2}, relative metabolite production, and uptake of phenanthrene into cells. Most of the supplements did not drastically alter the fate of phenanthrene in the contaminated soils. Additions of Inopol, however, increased phenanthrene mineralization, while salicylic acid decreased phenanthrene mineralization but greatly increased the production of polar and water soluble metabolites. All supplements (excluding salicylic acid and the organic nutrient solution) increased populations of heterotrophic microorganisms, as measured by plate counts. Phenanthrene degrader populations, however, were only slightly increased by additions of the nutrient buffer, as measured by the Most Probable Number assay.

  4. Reduction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from petroleum-contaminated soil using thermal desorption technology

    SciTech Connect

    Silkebakken, D.M.; Davis, H.A.; Ghosh, S.B.; Beardsley, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    The remediation of petroleum-contaminated soil typically requires the selection of a treatment option that addresses the removal of both volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) compounds, can be readily removed from the soil by a variety of well-established technologies. The semivolatile organic compounds, especially the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) that are characteristic of petroleum-contaminated soil, are not as amenable to conventional treatment. Low temperature thermal volatilization (LTTV) can be a viable treatment technology depending on the initial contaminant concentrations present and applicable cleanup objectives that must be attained. A-two-phase treatability study was conducted at 14 former underground storage tank (UST) sites to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness of LTTV for remediation of approximately 31,000 tons of PAH-contaminated soil. The PAHs of primary concern included benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene, dibenz(a,h) anthracene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene. During Phase 1, LTTV operational parameters were varied by trial-and-error and changes in soil treatment effectiveness were monitored. Phase B of the treatability study incorporated the appropriate treatment regime established during Phase 1 to efficiently remediate the remaining contaminated soil.

  5. Effects of enrichment with phthalate on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Singleton, David R; Richardson, Stephen D; Aitken, Michael D

    2008-07-01

    The effect of enrichment with phthalate on the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was tested with bioreactor-treated and untreated contaminated soil from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. Soil samples that had been treated in a bioreactor and enriched with phthalate mineralized (14)C-labeled phenanthrene and pyrene to a greater extent than unenriched samples over a 22.5-h incubation, but did not stimulate benzo[a]pyrene mineralization. In contrast to the positive effects on (14)C-labeled phenanthrene and pyrene, no significant differences were found in the extent of biodegradation of native PAH when untreated contaminated soil was incubated with and without phthalate amendment. Denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of bacterial 16S rRNA genes from unenriched and phthalate-enriched soil samples were substantially different, and clonal sequences matched to prominent DGGE bands revealed that beta-Proteobacteria related to Ralstonia were most highly enriched by phthalate addition. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses confirmed that, of previously determined PAH-degraders in the bioreactor, only Ralstonia-type organisms increased in response to enrichment, accounting for 89% of the additional bacterial 16S rRNA genes resulting from phthalate enrichment. These findings indicate that phthalate amendment of this particular PAH-contaminated soil did not significantly enrich for organisms associated with high molecular weight PAH degradation or have any significant effect on overall degradation of native PAH in the soil.

  6. Remediation of soil-bound polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons using nonionic surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Yeom, IckTae; Ghosh, Mriganka; Cox, C.

    1996-12-31

    The solubilization and biodegradation of soil-bound PAHs from a manufactured gas plant (MGP) site soil was investigated using surfactants. Three nonionic polyoxyethylene (POE) surfactants, Triton X-100, Tween 80, and Brij 35, were used. The fate of four PAHs, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene were monitored during the remediation process. The measured concentrations of solubilized PAHs agreed well with those estimated using micelle-water partitioning coefficient, K{sub m}, and Raoult`s law. The solubilization of soil-bound PAHs by surfactants is a slow, nonequilibrium process. Diffusion of PAH molecules within the weathered soil-tar matrix is proposed as the rate-limiting step in solubilizing PAHs from such soils. A radial diffusion model is used to describe solubilization of PAHs by surfactant washing. The model predicts experimental results fairly well at low surfactant dosages while at high dosages it somewhat overestimates the extent of solubilization. Biodegradation studies were performed using a natural consortium of microorganisms enriched from PAH-contaminated soils. Surfactants enhanced biodegradation of PAHs except for Tween 80. However, biodegradation of surfactants themselves appear to attenuate the beneficial effects of surfactant-mediated bioremediation.

  7. Spatial Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Concentrations in Soils from Bursa, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Gizem

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify regional variations in soil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in Bursa, Turkey, and to determine the distributions and sources of various PAH species and their possible sources. Surface soil samples were collected from 20 different locations. The PAH concentrations in soil samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The total PAH concentrations (∑12 PAH) varied spatially between 8 and 4970 ng/g dry matter (DM). The highest concentrations were measured in soils taken from traffic+barbecue+ residential areas (4970 ng/g DM) and areas with cement (4382 ng/g DM) and iron-steel (4000 ng/g DM) factories. In addition, the amounts of ∑7 carcinogenic PAH ranged from 1 to 3684 ng/g DM, and between 5 and 74 % of the total PAHs consisted of such compounds. Overall, 4-ring PAH compounds (Fl, Pyr, BaA and Chr) were dominant in the soil samples, with 29-82 % of the ∑12 PAH consisting of 4-ring PAH compounds. The ∑12 BaPeq values ranged from 0.1 to 381.8 ng/g DM. Following an evaluation of the molecular diagnostic ratios, it was concluded that the PAH pollution in Bursa soil was related to pyrolytic sources; however, the impact of petrogenic sources should not be ignored.

  8. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance – Part II: Development of an accelerated aging method for roofing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley E.; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea V.; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amandine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-01-09

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products₋single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles₋and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. In conclusion, this accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  9. Bioremediation of a polyaromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil by native soil microbiota and bioaugmentation with isolated microbial consortia.

    PubMed

    Silva, Isis Serrano; Santos, Eder da Costa dos; Menezes, Cristiano Ragagnin de; Faria, Andréia Fonseca de; Franciscon, Elisangela; Grossman, Matthew; Durrant, Lucia Regina

    2009-10-01

    Biodegradation of a mixture of PAHs was assessed in forest soil microcosms performed either without or with bioaugmentation using individual fungi and bacterial and a fungal consortia. Respiratory activity, metabolic intermediates and extent of PAH degradation were determined. In all microcosms the low molecular weight PAH's naphthalene, phenanthrene and anthracene, showed a rapid initial rate of removal. However, bioaugmentation did not significantly affect the biodegradation efficiency for these compounds. Significantly slower degradation rates were demonstrated for the high molecular weight PAH's pyrene, benz[a]anthracene and benz[a]pyrene. Bioaugmentation did not improve the rate or extent of PAH degradation, except in the case of Aspergillus sp. Respiratory activity was determined by CO(2) evolution and correlated roughly with the rate and timing of PAH removal. This indicated that the PAHs were being used as an energy source. The native microbiota responded rapidly to the addition of the PAHs and demonstrated the ability to degrade all of the PAHs added to the soil, indicating their ability to remediate PAH-contaminated soils.

  10. Evaluation of aromatic pathway induction for creosote contaminated soils in slurried soil media designed to achieve environmentally acceptable treatment endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, J.; McCauley, P.; Potter, C.; Herrmann, R.; Dosani, M.

    1995-12-31

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbon contaminants (PAHs) are commonly associated with the use of creosote for wood preservation and the process residues left by municipal gas production. The biological treatment of this set of organic compounds has been found to be difficult since they have low water solubility and reactivity in soil systems. Liquid culture studies have shown that inducer chemicals may assist the biotreatment of PAH contaminated soils. A set of designed experimental treatments were conducted to evaluate the incorporation of potential inducer compounds. The inducers chosen for evaluation were 2-hydroxybenzoic acid and phthalic acid with treatment controls of 3-hydroxybenzoic acid and terephthalic acid at three concentrations in slurried creosote-contaminated soil. An abiotic treatment control of formaldehyde was used for contrast. The designed treatment evaluation used 250mL Erlenmeyer flask slurry reaction vessels. The flask study used an orbital shaker to maintain slurry suspension. At selected time points throughout the study individual flask reactors were sacrificed and the contents were analyzed for PAH concentration, nutrients, and biomass (FAME Analysis). Depletion of individual PAHs, total PAHs, 2 and 3-ring, and 4 and 6-ring PAHs was correlation with the biomass. The effect of selected surfactant addition was also evaluated. Rates of PAH depletion and applications to larger scale investigations will be discussed.

  11. TCP Final Report: Measuring the Effects of Stand Age and Soil Drainage on Boreal Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Goulden

    2007-05-02

    This was a 6-year research project in the Canadian boreal forest that focused on using field observations to understand how boreal forest carbon balance changes during recovery from catastrophic forest fire. The project began with two overarching goals: (1) to develop techniques that would all the year round operation of 7 eddy covariance sites in a harsh environment at a much lower cost than had previously been possible, and (2) to use these measurements to determine how carbon balance changes during secondary succession. The project ended in 2006, having accomplished its primary objectives. Key contributions to DOE during the study were: (1) Design, test, and demonstrate a lightweight, fully portable eddy flux system that exploits several economies of scale to allow AmeriFlux-quality measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange at many sites for a large reduction in cost (Goulden et al. 2006). (2) Added seven year-round sites to AmeriFlux, at a relatively low per site cost using the Eddy Covariance Mesonet approach (Goulden et al. 2006). These data are freely available on the AmeriFlux web site. (3) Tested and rejected the conventional wisdom that forests lose large amounts of carbon during the first decade after disturbance, then accumulate large amounts of carbon for {approx}several decades, and then return to steady state in old age. Rather, we found that boreal forests recovers quickly from fire and begins to accumulate carbon within {approx}5 years after disturbance. Additionally, we found no evidence that carbon accumulation declines in old stands (Goulden et al. 2006, Goulden et al. in prep). (4) Tested and rejected claims based on remote sensing observations (for example, Myneni et al 1996 using AVHRR) that regions of boreal forest have changed markedly in the last 20 years. Rather, we assembled a much richer data set than had been used in the past (eddy covariance observations, tree rings, biomass, NPP, AVHRR, and LandSat), which we used to establish that the

  12. Landscape history and land-use dependent soil erosion in central Bosnia from the Bronze Age to Medieval Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Steffen; Enters, Dirk; Bittmann, Felix

    2010-05-01

    the Bronze and Iron Age and to a lesser extent in Medieval Times was dominated by agriculture, the period of Roman influence between 200 BC and AD 600 (2150-1350 cal. BP) also had a strong extensive pastoral economy, which lasted until Medieval Times. Four consecutive successional cycles of vegetation (Juniperus-Populus-Quercus) illustrate the pattern of land-use changes and landscape development (pasture-abandonment-reforestation) over a period of ca. 1000 years. Another feature of anthropogenically induced landscape change is the occurrence of several conspicuous clay layers which are up to 30 cm thick and free of pollen, i.e. obviously deposited in a very short time span. These layers occur only in those periods of high land-use intensity in which agricultural activities predominated and pasture was subordinate. Highest input of clay takes place at the beginning of each land-use phase, demonstrating that the geomorphologic process system in the catchment area stabilised after an initial peak in soil erosion rates. It can be shown that in spite of a considerable landscape opening the shift to extensive pastoral farming prevented further soil erosion at the Seoce Jezero plateau. The results obtained represent the first well-dated inland record of landscape change in an area of ca. 200 km radius and complement the knowledge about the Holocene vegetation history on the Balkans.

  13. The diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi amplified from grapevine roots (Vitis vinifera L.) in Oregon vineyards is seasonally stable and influenced by soil and vine age.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, R Paul; Mihara, Keiko L

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in 10 Oregon vineyards was assessed by examining spores in soil and amplifying mycorrhizal DNA from roots. Seventeen spore morphotypes were found in soil, including seven species in the Acaulosporaceae. Eighteen phylotypes were amplified from grape roots with AM1 and NS31 primers, and clones were dominated by Glomus spp. (> 99%). A few clones (< 1%) representing a single phylotype within Gigasporaceae, and a single clone within Archaeosporaceae were amplified from roots with AM1-NS31 primers. A separate experiment employing known proportions of grape roots colonized by Glomus intraradices or by Gigaspora rosea showed that fungi within Gigasporaceae might be underrepresented in clone abundance when Glomus spp. co-occur in roots. No clones representing fungi within the Acaulosporaceae were amplified from vineyards, although specific fungi within Acaulosporaceae were shown to colonize Pinot noir roots in sterilized soil and were amplified from these roots. Four Glomus phylotypes, including G. intraradices, were found in roots from all 10 vineyards, and these fungi accounted for 81% of clones. AMF phylotypes amplified from roots did not change during the growing season, although six phylotypes varied with soil type. The presence of three phylotypes was affected by vineyard age, and phylotype richness appeared to decline as vineyard age increased beyond 20 y. PCA analysis supported the hypothesis that the AMF community is different in red-hill soils than in valley soils and indicated certain phylotypes might be associated with lower soil and vine nutrient status. However, the changes in the AMF community in grape roots across vineyards were subtle because most root samples were dominated by the same three or four phylotypes. A separate analysis using primers to amplify AMF from the Archeasporaceae/Paraglomeraceae showed most root samples also were colonized by at least one Paraglomus or Archaeospora phylotype.

  14. Ecotoxicological risks associated with land treatment of petrochemical wastes. I. Residual soil contamination and bioaccumulation by cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus).

    PubMed

    Schroder, Jackie; Basta, Nicholas; Payton, Mark; Wilson, James; Carlson, Ruth; Janz, David; Lochmiller, Robert

    2003-02-28

    Petrochemical waste contains both organic and inorganic contaminants that can pollute soil and may pose significant ecological risks to wildlife. Petrochemical waste typically is disposed of in land treatment units, which are widespread throughout Oklahoma and the United States. Few studies have been conducted evaluating possible toxicity risks to terrestrial organisms residing on these units. In this study, the extent of soil contamination with fluoride (F), metals, and organic hydrocarbons, the bioaccumulation of F and metals in cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), the relationship between contaminants in soil and in tissues of cotton rats, and the level of potentially toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil were determined on land treatment units. Over a 2-yr period, cotton rats and soils were collected and analyzed from 5 land treatment and matched reference units. The number of land treatment units with soil metal contamination (in parentheses) included: Cr, Cu, Pb (5). Al, As, Ni, Sr, Zn (4). Ba (3). and Cd, V (2). The number of land treatment units with soil PAH contamination (in parentheses) were naphthalene, phenanthrene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene (3). acenaphthene, anthracene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene (2). and acenaphthylene, fluorene, fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene (1). Total PAH and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were elevated at all five land treatment units. Mean sums of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) equivalents (BaPequiv ) were not affected on

  15. Effects of aging and mixed nonaqueous-phase liquid sources in soil systems on earthworm bioaccumulation, microbial degradation, sequestration, and aqueous desorption of pyrene.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Elijah J; Tang, Jixin; Weber, Walter J

    2011-04-01

    The effects of loading and aging pyrene in soils in the presence of four environmentally common nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) (hexadecane, 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane [HMN], toluene, and dimethyl phthalate [DMP]) on its subsequent desorption from those soils, earthworm accumulation, biodegradation, and extractability were tested by using two dissimilar soils. The presence of each of the four NAPLs increased fractions and rates of pyrene desorption, and hexadecane slowed the effects of aging on these same parameters. Loading with hexadecane and HMN caused earthworm accumulation of pyrene to decrease. These results contrast with generally observed faster desorption rates resulting from NAPL addition, suggesting that additional factors (e.g., association of pyrene with NAPL phases and NAPL toxicities to earthworms) may impact bioaccumulation. The presence of HMN and toluene increased pyrene biodegradation, whereas hexadecane and DMP had the opposite effects. These results correlate with changes in the extractability of pyrene from the soils. After aging and biodegradation, hexadecane and DMP substantially increased pyrene residues extractable by methanol and decreased nonextractable fractions, whereas HMN and toluene had the opposite effects.

  16. Scale-dependent variation in nitrogen cycling and soil fungal communities along gradients of forest composition and age in regenerating tropical dry forests.

    PubMed

    Waring, Bonnie G; Adams, Rachel; Branco, Sara; Powers, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Rates of ecosystem nitrogen (N) cycling may be mediated by the presence of ectomycorrhizal fungi, which compete directly with free-living microbes for N. In the regenerating tropical dry forests of Central America, the distribution of ectomycorrhizal trees is affected by succession and soil parent material, both of which may exert independent influence over soil N fluxes. In order to quantify these interacting controls, we used a scale-explicit sampling strategy to examine soil N cycling at scales ranging from the microsite to ecosystem level. We measured fungal community composition, total and inorganic N pools, gross proteolytic rate, net N mineralization and microbial extracellular enzyme activity at multiple locations within 18 permanent plots that span dramatic gradients of soil N concentration, stand age and forest composition. The ratio of inorganic to organic N cycling was correlated with variation in fungal community structure, consistent with a strong influence of ectomycorrhiza on ecosystem-scale N cycling. However, on average, > 61% of the variation in soil biogeochemistry occurred within plots, and the effects of forest composition were mediated by this local-scale heterogeneity in total soil N concentrations. These cross-scale interactions demonstrate the importance of a spatially explicit approach towards an understanding of controls on element cycling.

  17. Soil carbon accretion along an age chronosequence formed by the retreat of the Skaftafellsjökull glacier, SE-Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmundardóttir, O. K.; Gísladóttir, G.; Lal, R.

    2015-01-01

    Climate warming has led to glacial retreat worldwide, where surfaces exposed to the atmosphere are subjected to weathering, vegetation colonization and new soil formation. On young soils developing along the recessional path left by the Skaftafellsjökull glacier, SE-Iceland, we investigated the accretion of soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (N), representing an age chronosequence of 120 years. In total, 54 sampling sites were distributed along three moraines deposited in 1890, 1945, and 2003. For comparison, soil samples were collected from nearby birch woodlands (Betula pubescens Ehrh.), representing soils in a mature ecosystem likely to establish on the moraines in the future. Results show that the average SOC and N concentrations increase with time and at faster rates over the latter part of the chronosequence period investigated (1945-1890). After 120 yrs, the soil contains 1.1 kg C m- 2 in the surface layer (0-10 cm), which is still about one third of the 3.2 kg C m- 2 in soil under the birch woodlands. The N stock estimated at 0.06 kg N m- 2 after 120 yrs is almost one fourth of that under the woodlands. The data suggest that landscape affects vegetation establishment and in turn, both landscape and vegetation affect soil development. Thus, concentrations of SOC, N and noncrystalline oxalate extractable Al and Fe are higher within depressions in the proglacial landscape. The comparison of SOC stock in the moraine soils with that under the birch forest shows that the young proglacial soils still have a large potential to accrete SOC within the developing pedosphere. With the observed accrual rate of 9.1 g C m- 2 yr- 1 in the top at 10 cm, it may take the moraine soils an additional period of 220 yrs to accrue SOC stocks comparable with those under the birch forest. Given the fact that all Icelandic glaciers are receding, assessing SOC accretion in new soil formation may be important to off-setting the greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. A soil flushing study for petroleum hydrocarbon removal

    SciTech Connect

    Dedek, K.S.; O`Connell, T.P.; Dell, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    A 5-week soil column treatability study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a closed-loop groundwater recovery and reinjection system to enhance soil flushing and biodegradation of petroleum contaminants. The site soil and groundwater are impacted with BTEX and PAH contaminants due to the release of No. 2 and No. 6 fuel oil from a UST. Nutrients and two nonionic surfactants, Tergitol NP-10 and Tween 80, were evaluated for the potential of enhancing soil flushing and biodegradation. The amendments were added to unimpacted oxygenated site groundwater which was continuously pumped to the top of the soil columns and allowed to percolate vertically downward through the columns to simulate unsaturated flow through the soil. Total heterotrophic microbial plate counts conducted at the end of the 5-week study were highest in soil amended with Tergitol NP-10 and nutrients (1.9 X 10{sup 8} CFU/dry gram soil) compared to 6.2 X 10{sup 6} CFU/dry gram soil in the initial soil sample. Initial concentrations of total BTEX (270 {mu}g/kg) and naphthalene (8,500 {mu}g/kg) were reduced to below detectable limits in all of the soil columns. Total PAH removal rates were 52% and 51% in unamended and nutrient-amended soils, respectively, from an initial total soil PAH concentration of-approximately 70 mg/kg. Amendment with nutrients and Tergitol NP-10 resulted in a 48% reduction in total soil PAHs compared to 39% in a microbially-inhibited Tergitol NP-10 + nutrient-amended soil. The Tween 80 + nutrient-amendment resulted in only a 34% reduction in total soil PAHs. TPH concentrations measured in the effluent groundwater were highest in the Tergitol NP-10 + nutrient-amended soil (37.6 mg/{ell}) after 1 week. However, after 5 weeks, the effluent TPH concentration had leveled off to 6.5 mg/1 compared to 29.4 mg/{ell} in the microbially-inhibited Tergitol NP-10 + nutrient-amended soil.

  19. Native Michigan plants stimulate soil microbial species changes and PAH remediation at a legacy steel mill.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John C; Cable, Edward; Dabkowski, Robert T; Gargala, Stephanie; McCall, Daniel; Pangrazzi, Garett; Pierson, Adam; Ripper, Mark; Russell, Donald K; Rugh, Clayton L

    2013-01-01

    A 1.3-acre phytoremediation site was constructed to mitigate polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination from a former steel mill in Michigan. Soil was amended with 10% (v/v) compost and 5% (v/v) poultry litter. The site was divided into twelve 11.89 m X 27.13 m plots, planted with approximately 35,000 native Michigan perennials, and soils sampled for three seasons. Soil microbial density generally increased in subplots of Eupatorium perfoliatum (boneset), Aster novae-angliae (New England aster), Andropogon gerardii (big bluestem), and Scirpus atrovirens (green bulrush) versus unplanted subplots. Using enumeration assays with root exudates, PAH degrading bacteria were greatest in soils beneath plants. Initially predominant, Arthrobacter were found capable of degrading a PAH cocktail in vitro, especially upon the addition of root exudate. Growth of some Arthrobacter isolates was stimulated by root exudate. The frequency of Arthrobacter declined in planted subplots with a concurrent increase in other species, including secondary PAH degraders Bacillus and Nocardioides. In subplots supporting only weeds, an increase in Pseudomonas density and little PAH removal were observed. This study supports the notion that a dynamic interplay between the soil, bacteria, and native plant root secretions likely contributes to in situ PAH phytoremediation.

  20. Potential production of biosurfactants under electric field supplied to clayey soil

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, L.; Elektorowicz, M.

    1999-07-01

    The possibility of the introduction of nutrients and bacteria into clayey soil using electrokinetic methodology makes bioremediation more popular. However, biodegradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is limited by their low solubility. The potential production of biosurfactants in clayey soil under the electric field was presented in this study. The electrokinetic cell tests were carried out to investigate the production of biosurfactants in the contaminated soil and soil without contaminants. The results showed that there was 1.5 times higher production in the soil contaminated by phenanthrene than that without it. In the middle of the electrokinetic cell, there are more biosurfactants produced than at the anode and the cathode areas. It was observed that there was migration of micelles with the electromigration and electroosmosis. In spite of the anionic properties of biosurfactant, the movement of the micelle was only partially directed to the anode. It was also observed that the electroosmosic flow transported micelles to the cathode. The results suggested the possibility of production of biosurfactants under the electric field and uniform distribution in the subsoil. The results could find a direct applicability in the enhanced remediation of PAH-contaminated sites.

  1. Surfactant-enhanced solubility and mobility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, X.; Puri, R.K.

    1997-12-31

    The role of some selected nonionic, anionic and cationic surfactants was investigated in solubilizing and mobilizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil. The data from the batch experiment showed that Brij 30 (a nonionic surfactant) started transporting the PAHs from soil to water at concentrations well below its apparent critical micelle concentration (ACMC). At its high concentrations, however, Brij 30 transported more PAHs to the aqueous phase. Thus, it showed a great potential in remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The tested anionic and cationic surfactants did not show the solubilization effect until the concentrations reached their ACMCs. The experiment showed that the decomposition of the surfactants was more significant than tat of the PAHs with the passage of time. A considerable portion of the solubilized PAHs was either re-adsorbed by the soil particles or was hanging in the mobile phase after 170 days, depending on the nature and concentration of the individual surfactants. The data showed that the solubilized portion of the PAHs became more persistent in the soil-water system, and its transport is proportional to the concentration and nature of the surfactants studied.

  2. Aging effects on reactivity of an aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residual as a soil amendment.

    PubMed

    Agyin-Birikorang, S; O'Connor, G A

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that drinking-water treatment residuals (WTR) could be used to control mobility of excess phosphorus (P) and other oxyanions in poorly sorbing soils. Presently, only "aged" WTRs (those left, or manipulated, to dewater) are land applied. However, if demand for WTRs increase in the near future, freshly-generated WTRs could be considered for land application. To our knowledge, few studies have examined the reactivity and equilibration time of freshly-generated alum-based WTR (Al-WTR). A laboratory thermal incubation study was, therefore, conducted to determine various extractable Al forms in Al-WTR as a function of WTR "age", and the time required for freshly generated Al-WTR to stabilize. Freshly-generated Al-WTR samples were collected directly from the discharge pumps of a drinking-water treatment plant, and thermally incubated at 52 degrees C, either with or without moisture control, for < or = 24 wk. Additional dewatered Al-WTR samples of various ages (2 wk- to 2 y old) were also included in the study. Various methods of extracting Al [total-, oxalate (200 and 5 mM), and Mehlich 1 extractants] were utilized to assess Al extractability over time. Freshly-generated Al-WTR samples were potentially more reactive (as reflected in greater 5 mM oxalate extractable Al concentration) than dewatered Al-WTR samples stockpiled for > or = 6 mo. Aluminum reactivity of the freshly-generated Al-WTR decreased with time. At least 6 wk of thermal incubation (corresponding to > or = 6 mo of field drying) was required to stabilize the most reactive Al form (5mM oxalate extractable Al concentration) of the Al-WTR. Although no adverse Al-WTR effects have been reported on plants and grazing animals (apparently because of low availability of free Al(3+) in Al-WTR), land application of freshly-generated Al-WTRs (at least, those with similar physicochemical characteristics as the one utilized for the study) should be avoided.

  3. ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION OF COAL - TAR-CONTAMINATED SOIL. INCLUDES THE SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 01, 1998 - JUNE 30, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    Under the conditions used in these experiments, the use of low-level energy acoustic energy did not result in improvements in the biodegradation of PAHs in a PAH-contaminated soil compared to an untreated control. Expected impacts on biodegradation rates by the acoustic energy could not be evaluated as the data were not conducive to this determination. The acoustic energy was only supplied to the treated samples during 10 minutes per day (0.6944 % of a day). It is possible that using longer treatment times, more exposure to the acoustic energy, and alternate types of contamination might have been able to demonstrate the purported ability of acoustic energy to desorb nonpolar contaminants and improve their biodegradation rate and endpoint.

  4. The age of root and soil respired CO2 in a Pacific Northwest old-growth forest: Implications of seasonality and drought effects on carbon source use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A.; Hopkins, F. M.; Lai, C.; Xu, X.; Randerson, J. T.; Bush, S.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Climate change has the potential to impact the carbon (C) cycle in unknown ways. Factors such as temperature, light, and moisture can strongly influence whether forest ecosystems are net sources or sinks of CO2. In this study, we used radiocarbon (14C) to determine the age and source of soil- and root-respired CO2 using a combination of soil chamber and biomass incubation measurements in an old-growth forest at the Wind River Field Station, WA. We had two main goals for this study. The first was to determine if the contribution of recent photosynthate to root respiration changed between spring and summer seasons. 14C measurements were used to determine the average age of respired CO2, since respired CO2 fueled by recent photosynthates have Δ14C values similar to that of the current atmosphere (~ 25‰ in 2012), whereas C stored by trees from prior years would be 30‰ or higher. This study occurred over two growing seasons, examining the effects of seasonality and water stress on root/soil respiration. Because of the summer drought conditions consistently experienced by this old-growth forest, this study provides a new dataset to test the hypothesis that plants allocate their C resources in response to stress. Initial results showed soil organic matter components had Δ14C values 80-120‰ greater than that of the background atmosphere, suggesting turnover times on the order of years to decades. In contrast, root respiration was much lower in Δ14C (~40‰), but still elevated with respect to current atmospheric Δ14C values, suggesting that root respiration was at least partially composed of C stored for > 1 year. The second goal was to partition the contribution of autotrophic to heterotrophic respiration and to determine how this ratio differs on diurnal and seasonal timescales. We used the difference between autotrophic and heterotrophic Δ14C values to partition total soil respiration. Preliminary results for April 2013 showed that ~1/3 of soil

  5. Enhanced dissipation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the rhizosphere of the Athel tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla L. Karst.) grown in saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco.

    PubMed

    Betancur-Galvis, Liliana A; Carrillo, Hernando; Luna-Guido, Marco; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2012-09-01

    Remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contaminated alkaline saline soil with phreatophyte or "water loving plants" was investigated by spiking soil from the former lake Texcoco with 100 mg phenanthrene (Phen) kg(-1) soil, 120 mg anthracene (Ant)kg(-1) soil and 45 mg benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) kg(-1) soil and vegetating it with Athel tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla L Karst.). The growth of the Athel tamarisk was not affected by the PAHs. In soil cultivated with Athel tamarisk, the leaching of PAHs to the 32-34 cm layer decreased 2-fold compared to the uncultivated soil. The BaP concentration decreased to 39% of the initial concentration at a distance smaller than 3 cm from the roots and to 45% at a distance larger than 3cm, but 59% remained in unvegetated soil after 240 days. Dissipation of Ant and Phen decreased with depth, but not BaP. The biodegradation of PAHs was affected by their chemical properties and increased in the presence of T. aphylla, but decreased with depth.

  6. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil spiked with model mixtures of petroleum hydrocarbons and heterocycles using biosurfactants from Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231.

    PubMed

    Ivshina, Irina; Kostina, Ludmila; Krivoruchko, Anastasiya; Kuyukina, Maria; Peshkur, Tatyana; Anderson, Peter; Cunningham, Colin

    2016-07-15

    Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil using biosurfactants (BS) produced by Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231 was studied in soil columns spiked with model mixtures of major petroleum constituents. A crystalline mixture of single PAHs (0.63g/kg), a crystalline mixture of PAHs (0.63g/kg) and polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs), and an artificially synthesized non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) containing PAHs (3.00g/kg) dissolved in alkanes C10-C19 were used for spiking. Percentage of PAH removal with BS varied from 16 to 69%. Washing activities of BS were 2.5 times greater than those of synthetic surfactant Tween 60 in NAPL-spiked soil and similar to Tween 60 in crystalline-spiked soil. At the same time, amounts of removed PAHs were equal and consisted of 0.3-0.5g/kg dry soil regardless the chemical pattern of a model mixture of petroleum hydrocarbons and heterocycles used for spiking. UV spectra for soil before and after BS treatment were obtained and their applicability for differentiated analysis of PAH and PASH concentration changes in remediated soil was shown. The ratios A254nm/A288nm revealed that BS increased biotreatability of PAH-contaminated soils.

  7. Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in agricultural soils at a typical coke production base in Shanxi, China.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yonghong; Shen, Guofeng; Tao, Shu; Hong, Jianping; Chen, Yuanchen; Xue, Miao; Li, Tongchao; Su, Shu; Shen, Huizhong; Fu, Xiaofang; Meng, Qingchun; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Han, Xiaoying; Song, Kang

    2015-05-01

    There is wide concern about polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because of their carcinogenic and mutagenic potential. The coking industry is an important source of PAHs. In this study, 36 arable soil samples, a sensitive medium from the perspective of food safety and health, were collected from one of the largest coke production bases in China. The concentration of total 21 PAHs ranged from 294 to 1665 ng g(-1), with a mean of 822±355 ng g(-1). Approximately 60% of the soil samples were heavily polluted with the level higher than 600 ng g(-1). Particularly high abundances of high molecular weight PAHs were found, and the calculated BaPeq was as high as 54.3 ng g(-1). Soil PAH levels were positively correlated with soil organic matter content. The soil PAHs were from complex mixture sources, and high-temperature pyrogenic sources were most likely responsible for the heavy PAH contamination. Effective control strategies and probable remediation approaches should be proposed to improve soil quality.

  8. The impact of biochars on sorption and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils--a review.

    PubMed

    Anyika, Chinedum; Abdul Majid, Zaiton; Ibrahim, Zahara; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Yahya, Adibah

    2015-03-01

    Amending polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils with biochar may be cheaper and environmentally friendly than other forms of organic materials. This has led to numerous studies on the use of biochar to either bind or stimulate the microbial degradation of organic compounds in soils. However, very little or no attention have been paid to the fact that biochars can give simultaneous impact on PAH fate processes, such as volatilization, sorption and biodegradation. In this review, we raised and considered the following questions: How does biochar affect microbes and microbial activities in the soil? What are the effects of adding biochar on sorption of PAHs? What are the effects of adding biochar on degradation of PAHs? What are the factors that we can manipulate in the laboratory to enhance the capability of biochars to degrade PAHs? A triphasic concept of how biochar can give simultaneous impact on PAH fate processes in soils was proposed, which involves rapid PAH sorption into biochar, subsequent desorption and modification of soil physicochemical properties by biochar, which in turn stimulates microbial degradation of the desorbed PAHs. It is anticipated that biochar can give simultaneous impact on PAH fate processes in soils.

  9. Iron and aluminum soil/paleosol extractions as age/environment indicators: Some examples from a catchment in southern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaney, William C.; Hancock, Ronald G. V.; Somelar, Peeter; Milan, Alison

    2016-10-01

    Various chemical extractions of Fe and Al from bulk soil samples, including Na-pyrophosphate (Fep, Alp), acid ammonium oxalate (Feo, Alo), and Na-dithionite (Fed, Ald), have been used over the last half century to distinguish soil ages over varying time frames from 102 to 106 years and even as far into antiquity as the Oligocene (30 × 106) years. Problems with mineral/chemical uniformity of sediments, free drainage of open system profiles, and variable climate over long time frames have produced problems and uncertainties as to just what each extraction removes from the bulk material analyzed. Some problems have been resolved by the work of Parfitt and Childs (1988); but some persist, especially with respect to the solubility of some extractant forms and the actual composition of others, particularly Alp, Alo, and Ald. A recent test of soils and paleosols in a fluvial chronosequence in southern Ontario illustrates the soil-paleosol evolutionary time trend over a period of ~ 11 ky, essentially post-Iroquois time in the Ontario basin (Jackson et al., 2000). This work highlights the importance of isolated, free draining weathering systems, mineral uniformity, and new relationships between secondary forms of Fed and Ald, the latter previously considered of little importance in age relationship quests.

  10. Impact of ultrasonic power density on elution of super heavy oil and its biomarkers from aging soils using Triton X-100 micellar solution.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xin; Ji, Guodong

    2010-04-15

    An ultrasound-enhanced elution system employing Triton X-100 solutions was used for remedying aging soils contaminated with super heavy oil. The effect of varying the ultrasonic power density on the elution of the oil and three characteristic biomarkers was analyzed using GC/MS and FTRS. The oil and biomarkers remaining in treated soils decreased as a similar first-order function of increasing ultrasonic power density. Elution of the three biomarkers in the absence of ultrasound was closely related to carbon numbers in the marker: smaller molecules were more readily eluted. This trend was reversed upon application of ultrasound at higher power densities, with improved elution of molecules containing a greater carbon numbers. The two ratios, both 22S/(22S+22R) of C(26-34) 17alpha 25-norhopanes and 20S/(20S+20R) of C(26-28) triaromatic steroids, in treated soils decreased with increasing power density from 20 to 100 W L(-1). The results of SEM, FTRS, XRD, and energy spectroscopy experiments indicated that the mineral and chemical compositions of soils eluted at power densities greater than 60 W L(-1) closely resembled clean soils.

  11. Modeling the Interruption of the Transmission of Soil-Transmitted Helminths by Repeated Mass Chemotherapy of School-Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, James; Hollingsworth, T. Déirdre; Anderson, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Background The control or elimination of neglected tropical diseases has recently become the focus of increased interest and funding from international agencies through the donation of drugs. Resources are becoming available for the treatment of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infection through school-based deworming strategies. However, little research has been conducted to assess the impact of STH treatment that could be used to guide the design of efficient elimination programs. Methodology We construct and analyse an age-structured model of STH population dynamics under regular treatment. We investigate the potential for elimination with finite rounds of treatment, and how this depends on the value of the basic reproductive number R0 and treatment frequency. Principal findings Analysis of the model indicates that its behaviour is determined by key parameter groupings describing the basic reproduction number and the fraction of it attributable to the treated group, the timescale of material in the environment and the frequency and efficacy of treatment. Mechanisms of sexual reproduction and persistence of infectious material in the environment are found to be much more important in the context of elimination than in the undisturbed baseline scenario. For a given rate of drug use, sexual reproduction dictates that less frequent, higher coverage treatment is more effective. For a given treatment coverage level, the lifespan of infectious material in the environment places a limit on the effectiveness of increased treatment frequency. Conclusions Our work suggests that for models to capture the dynamics of parasite burdens in populations under regular treatment as elimination is approached, they need to include the effects of sexual reproduction among parasites and the dynamics infectious material in the reservoir. The interaction of these two mechanisms has a strong effect on optimum treatment strategies, both in terms of how frequently to treat and for how long

  12. Application of aqueous saponin on the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takayuki; Kaminaga, Hirohisa; Navarro, Ronald R; Iimura, Yosuke

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of aqueous saponin for the removal and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soil. Dissolution test confirmed the ability of saponin to increase the apparent solubility of the tested 3-5 rings PAH above the critical micelle concentration (approximately 1000 mg/L). Microbial test with pure culture of Sphingomonas sp. showed that saponin significantly enhanced the degradation of pyrene. For example, the percent degradation was 2.1 times higher in the presence of 2500 mg/L saponin than that of control without saponin after 60 hours incubation at around 10(8) CFU/mL initial cell loading. These results suggest that the binding of pyrene with saponin does not pose a serious constraint to bacterial uptake. Contrary to pyrene, saponin was chemically stable against the PAHs degrader. It is also not toxic to the cell at least up to 2500 mg/L. Finally, using a spiked soil sample, extraction tests with 10,000 mg/L of saponin showed that around 52.7% and 0.3% of pyrene was removed from low and high organic spiked soils, respectively. The results from this study indicate that aqueous saponin is appropriate as a washing agent as well as biodegradation enhancer for the detoxification of PAHs-contaminated low organic carbon soil.

  13. Surfactant-Enhanced Desorption and Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongbo; Aitken, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated two nonionic surfactants, one hydrophobic (Brij 30) and one hydrophilic (C12E8), for their ability to enhance the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil after it had been treated in an aerobic bioreactor. The effects of each surfactant were evaluated at doses corresponding to equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations well above the surfactant’s critical micelle concentration (CMC), slightly above the CMC, and below the CMC. The concentrations of all 3- and 4-ring PAHs were significantly lower in the soil amended with Brij 30 at the two lower doses compared to controls, whereas removal of only the 3-ring PAHs was significantly enhanced at the highest Brij 30 dose. In contrast, C12E8 did not enhance PAH removal at any dose. In the absence of surfactant, <5% of any PAH desorbed from the soil over an 18-d period. Brij 30 addition at the lowest dose significantly increased the desorption of most PAHs, whereas the addition of C12E8 at the lowest dose actually decreased the desorption of all PAHs. These findings suggest that the effects of the two surfactants on PAH biodegradation could be explained by their effects on PAH bioavailability. Overall, this study demonstrates that the properties of the surfactant and its dose relative to the corresponding aqueous-phase concentration are important factors in designing systems for surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils in which PAH bioavailability is limited. PMID:20586488

  14. Surfactant-enhanced desorption and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbo; Aitken, Michael D

    2010-10-01

    We evaluated two nonionic surfactants, one hydrophobic (Brij 30) and one hydrophilic (C(12)E(8)), for their ability to enhance the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil after it had been treated in an aerobic bioreactor. The effects of each surfactant were evaluated at doses corresponding to equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations well above the surfactant's critical micelle concentration (CMC), slightly above the CMC, and below the CMC. The concentrations of all 3- and 4-ring PAHs were significantly lower in the soil amended with Brij 30 at the two lower doses compared to controls, whereas removal of only the 3-ring PAHs was significantly enhanced at the highest Brij 30 dose. In contrast, C(12)E(8) did not enhance PAH removal at any dose. In the absence of surfactant, <5% of any PAH desorbed from the soil over an 18 day period. Brij 30 addition at the lowest dose significantly increased the desorption of most PAHs, whereas the addition of C(12)E(8) at the lowest dose actually decreased the desorption of all PAHs. These findings suggest that the effects of the two surfactants on PAH biodegradation could be explained by their effects on PAH bioavailability. Overall, this study demonstrates that the properties of the surfactant and its dose relative to the corresponding aqueous-phase concentration are important factors in designing systems for surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils in which PAH bioavailability is limited.

  15. Arsenic bio-accessibility and bioaccumulation in aged pesticide contaminated soils: A multiline investigation to understand environmental risk.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M S; Reichelt-Brushet, A J; Clark, M W; Farzana, T; Yee, L H

    2017-03-01

    Bio-accessibility and bioavailability of arsenic (As) in historically As-contaminated soils (cattle tick pesticide), and pristine soils were assessed using 3 different approaches. These approaches included human bio-accessibility using an extraction test replicating gastric conditions (in vitro physiologically-based extraction test); an operationally defined bioaccessibility extraction test - 1.0M HCl extraction; and a live organism bioaccumulation test using earthworms. A sequential extraction procedure revealed the soil As-pool that controls bio-accessibility and bioaccumulation of As. Findings show that As is strongly bound to historically contaminated soil with a lower degree of As bio-accessibility (<15%) and bioaccumulation (<9%) compared with freshly contaminated soil. Key to these lower degrees of bio-accessibility and bioaccumulation is the greater fraction of As associated with crystalline Fe/Al oxy-hydroxide and residual phases. The high bio-accessibility and bioaccumulation of freshly sorbed As in pristine soils were from the exchangeable and specifically sorbed As fractions. Arsenic bioaccumulation in earthworms correlates strongly with both the human bio-accessible, and the operationally defined bioavailable fractions. Hence, results suggest that indirect As bioavailability measures, such as accumulation by earthworm, can be used as complementary lines of evidence to reinforce site-wide trends in the bio-accessibility using in vitro physiologically-based extractions and/or operationally defined extraction test. Such detailed knowledge is useful for successful reclamation and management of the As contaminated soils.

  16. Soil weathering and accumulation rates of oxalate-extractable phases derived from alpine chronosequences of up to 1 Ma in age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Dennis; Favilli, Filippo; Krebs, Rolf; Egli, Markus

    2012-05-01

    In this study we compare newly-developed chemical weathering data with previously published data from soils developed along two chronosequences of glacial deposits in the European Alps and the Rocky Mountains (Wind River Range, USA). By combining these chronosequences, we are able to present a comprehensive dataset that represents a time period of > 1 Ma. We describe weathering trends of important elements using a number of weathering indices (e.g., K + Ca/Ti ratio, the weathering 'index B' of Kronberg and Nesbitt (1981) and the open mass transport function). Further, we describe the accumulation of Al, Fe, Si and Mn oxyhydroxides (including partially organic phases) as a function of time, and derive the corresponding accumulation rates. We calculated pedogenetically formed oxyhydroxides using an approach based on immobile elements. Our study represents one of only a few studies that describe rates of soil chemical weathering over a period as long as ~ 1 Ma. Results show that rates of chemical weathering clearly decrease along the chronosequences with increasing age of the soils. We find weathering rates are nearly four orders of magnitude lower in the 1 Ma-old soils than in the young soils. Our results suggest that the older soils may be reaching a steady state for these chemical properties in their present environments. A power function best explains the measured time-trends of the 'index B' and (K + Ca)/Ti) ratios in the soils. The best time-trend model for pedogenic weakly- to poorly crystalline phases and the relative losses/gains (based on the open-system mass transport function) were obtained with an exponential decay model function. In terms of the soil system, the decreases in the accumulation rate of the oxyhydroxides appears to be influenced not only by the factor of time but by climate as well (increased precipitation at higher altitudes slows the decrease in weathering rate over time). Thus, our ~ 1 Ma chronosequences also become pedogenic gradients

  17. Effect of short-chain organic acids on the enhanced desorption of phenanthrene by rhamnolipid biosurfactant in soil-water environment.

    PubMed

    An, Chun-jiang; Huang, Guo-he; Wei, Jia; Yu, Hui

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of short-chain organic acids on biosurfactant-enhanced mobilization of phenanthrene in soil-water system. The desorption characteristics of phenanthrene by soils were assessed in the presence of rhamnolipid and four SCOAs, including acetic acid, oxalic acid, tartaric acid and citric acid. The tests with rhamnolipid and different organic acids could attain the higher desorption of phenanthrene compared to those with only rhamnolipid. Among the different combinations, the series with rhamnolipid and citric acid exhibited more significant effect on the desorption performance. The removal of phenanthrene using rhamnolipid and SCOAs gradually increased as the SCOA concentration increased up to a concentration of 300 mmol/L. The effects of pH, soil dissolved organic matter and ionic strength were further evaluated in the presence of both biosurfactant and SCOAs. The results showed that the extent of phenanthrene desorption was more significant at pH 6 and 9. Desorption of phenanthrene was relatively lower in the DOM-removed soils with the addition of biosurfactant and SCOAs. The presence of more salt ions made phenanthrene more persistent on the solid phase and adversely affected its desorption from contaminated soil. The results from this study may have important implications for soil washing technologies used to treat PAH-contaminated soil and groundwater.

  18. Implications of polluted soil biostimulation and bioaugmentation with spent mushroom substrate (Agaricus bisporus) on the microbial community and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, Carlos; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Pesciaroli, Lorena; Yunta, Felipe; Crognale, Silvia; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    Different applications of spent Agaricus bisporus substrate (SAS), a widespread agro-industrial waste, were investigated with respect to the remediation of a historically polluted soil with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH). In one treatment, the waste was sterilized (SSAS) prior to its application in order to assess its ability to biostimulate, as an organic amendment, the resident soil microbiota and ensuing contaminant degradation. For the other treatments, two bioaugmentation approaches were investigated; the first involved the use of the waste itself and thus implied the application of A. bisporus and the inherent microbiota of the waste. In the second treatment, SAS was sterilized and inoculated again with the fungus to assess its ability to act as a fungal carrier. All these treatments were compared with natural attenuation in terms of their impact on soil heterotrophic and PAH-degrading bacteria, fungal growth, biodiversity of soil microbiota and ability to affect PAH bioavailability and ensuing degradation and detoxification. Results clearly showed that historically PAH contaminated soil was not amenable to natural attenuation. Conversely, the addition of sterilized spent A. bisporus substrate to the soil stimulated resident soil bacteria with ensuing high removals of 3-ring PAH. Both augmentation treatments were more effective in removing highly condensed PAH, some of which known to possess a significant carcinogenic activity. Regardless of the mode of application, the present results strongly support the adequacy of SAS for environmental remediation purposes and open the way to an attractive recycling option of this waste.

  19. Effects of biochar and Arbuscular mycorrhizae on bioavailability of potentially toxic elements in an aged contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuhui; Crowley, David; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Huiqi; Li, Huafen

    2015-11-01

    Biochar pyrolyzed from corn stalks at 300°C/500°C and arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMF) were examined independently and in combination as possible treatments for soil remediation contaminated with Cd, Cr, Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn after 35 years following land application of sewage sludge in the 1970s. The results showed that biochar significantly decreased the heavy metal concentrations and their bioavailability for plants, and both biochars had similar such effects. AMF inoculation of corn plants had little effect on heavy metal bioavailability in either control or biochar amended soil, and no interaction between biochar and AMF was observed. Changes in DTPA extractable metals following biochar addition to soil were correlated with metal uptake by plants, whereas pore water metal concentrations were not predictive indicators. This research demonstrates positive benefits from biochar application for contaminated soil remediation, but remain ambiguous with regard to the benefits of simultaneous AMF inoculation on reduction of heavy metal bioavailability.

  20. Mycoextraction by Clitocybe maxima combined with metal immobilization by biochar and activated carbon in an aged soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Cheng, Guanglei; Jiao, Kai; Shi, Wenjin; Wang, Can; Xu, Heng

    2016-08-15

    To develop an eco-friendly and efficient route to remediate soil highly polluted with heavy metals, the idea of mycoextraction combined with metal immobilization by carbonaceous sorbents (biochar and activated carbon) was investigated in this study. Results showed that the application of carbonaceous amendments decreased acid soluble Cd and Cu by 5.13-14.06% and 26.86-49.58%, respectively, whereas the reducible and oxidizable fractions increased significantly as the amount of carbonaceous amendments added increased. The biological activities (microbial biomass, soil enzyme activities) for treatments with carbonaceous sorbents were higher than those of samples without carbonaceous amendments. Clitocybe maxima (C. maxima) simultaneously increased soil enzyme activities and the total number of microbes. Biochar and activated carbon both showed a positive effect on C. maxima growth and metal accumulation. The mycoextraction efficiency of Cd and Cu in treatments with carbonaceous amendments enhanced by 25.64-153.85% and 15.18-107.22%, respectively, in response to that in non-treated soil, which showed positive correlation to the augment of biochar and activated carbon in soil. Therefore, this work suggested the effectiveness of mycoextraction by C. maxima combined the application of biochar and activated carbon in immobilising heavy metal in contaminated soil.

  1. Electrokinetic-Enhanced Remediation of Phenanthrene-Contaminated Soil Combined with Sphingomonas sp. GY2B and Biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weijia; Guo, Chuling; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Xujun; Wei, Yanfu; Lu, Guining; Dang, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Electrokinetic-microbial remediation (EMR) has emerged as a promising option for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soils. The aim of this study was to enhance degradation of phenanthrene (Phe)-contaminated soils using EMR combined with biosurfactants. The electrokinetic (EK) remediation, combined with Phe-degrading Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, and biosurfactant obtained by fermentation of Pseudomonas sp. MZ01, degraded Phe in the soil with an efficiency of up to 65.1 % at the anode, 49.9 % at the cathode after 5 days of the treatment. The presence of biosurfactants, electricity, and a neutral electrolyte stimulated the growth of the degrading bacteria as shown by a rapid increase in microbial biomass with time. The electrical conductivity and pH changed little during the course of the treatment, which benefitted the growth of microorganisms and the remediation of Phe-contaminated soil. The EMR system with the addition of biosurfactant had the highest Phe removal, demonstrating the biosurfactant may enhance the bioavailability of Phe and the interaction with the microorganism. This study suggests that the EMR combined with biosurfactants can be used to enhance in situ bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentration levels, pattern, source identification and soil toxicity assessment in urban traffic soil of Dhanbad, India.

    PubMed

    Suman, Swapnil; Sinha, Alok; Tarafdar, Abhrajyoti

    2016-03-01

    Present study was carried out to assess and understand potential health risk and to examine the impact of vehicular traffic on the contamination status of urban traffic soils in Dhanbad City with respect to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Eight urban traffic sites and two control/rural site surface soils were analyzed and the contents of 13 priority PAHs was determined. Total PAH concentration at traffic sites ranged from 1.019 μg g(-1) to 10.856 μg g(-1) with an average value of 3.488 μg g(-1). At control/rural site, average concentration of total PAHs was found to be 0.640 μg g(-1). PAH pattern was dominated by four- and five-ring PAHs (contributing >50% to the total PAHs) at all the eight traffic sites. On the other hand, rural soil showed a predominance of low molecular weight three-ring PAHs (contributing >30% to the total PAHs). Indeno[123-cd]pyrene/benz[ghi]perylene (IP/BgP) ratio indicated that PAH load at the traffic sites is predominated by the gasoline-driven vehicles. The ratio of Ant/(Ant+Phe) varied from 0.03 to 0.44, averaging 0.10; Fla/(Fla+Pyr) from 0.39 to 0.954, averaging 0.52; BaA/(BaA+Chry) from 0.156 to 0.60, averaging 0.44; and IP/(IP+BgP) from 0.176 to 0.811, averaging 0.286. The results indicated that vehicular emission was the major source for PAHs contamination with moderate effect of coal combustion and biomass combustion. Carcinogenic potency of PAH load in traffic soil was nearly 6.15 times higher as compared to the control/rural soil.

  3. Structure and function of soil microbial community in artificially planted Sonneratia apetala and S. caseolaris forests at different stand ages in Shenzhen Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Lei, A P; Li, F L; Liu, L N; Zan, Q J; Shin, P K S; Cheung, S G; Tam, N F Y

    2014-08-30

    The present study examined the relationships between soil characteristics, microbial community structure and function in the forests artificially planted with exotic Sonneratia apetala at stand ages of 1-, 2-, 7-, 10- and 14-years and Sonneratia caseolaris of 1-, 4-, 7-, 10- and 14-years in Futian National Nature Reserve, Shenzhen Bay, China. The 7-years old forests of both Sonneratia species reached peak growth and had the highest content of nitrogen and phosphorus, enzymatic activities, including dehydrogenase, cellulase, phosphatase, urease and ß-glucosidase, except arylsulphatase which increased continuously with stand ages. The microbial community structure reflected by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles also reached the maximum value in the 7-years old forests and soil bacterial PLFAs in both forests were significantly higher than fungal PLFAs. The canonical correlation analysis revealed that differences in microbial structural variables were significantly correlated to the differences in their functional variables, and the highest correlation was found between the soil enzymatic activities and the content of carbon and nitrogen.

  4. Leaf-age and soil-plant relationships: key factors for reporting trace-elements hyperaccumulation by plants and design applications.

    PubMed

    Losfeld, Guillaume; L'Huillier, Laurent; Fogliani, Bruno; Mc Coy, Stéphane; Grison, Claude; Jaffré, Tanguy

    2015-04-01

    Relationships between the trace-elements (TE) content of plants and associated soil have been widely investigated especially to understand the ecology of TE hyperaccumulating species to develop applications using TE phytoextraction. Many studies have focused on the possibility of quantifying the soil TE fraction available to plants, and used bioconcentration (BC) as a measure of the plants ability to absorb TE. However, BC only offers a static view of the dynamic phenomenon of TE accumulation. Accumulation kinetics are required to fully account for TE distributions in plants. They are also crucial to design applications where maximum TE concentrations in plant leaves are needed. This paper provides a review of studies of BC (i.e. soil-plant relationships) and leaf-age in relation to TE hyperaccumulation. The paper focuses of Ni and Mn accumulators and hyperaccumulators from New Caledonia who were previously overlooked until recent Ecocatalysis applications emerged for such species. Updated data on Mn hyperaccumulators and accumulators from New Caledonia are also presented and advocate further investigation of the hyperaccumulation of this element. Results show that leaf-age should be considered in the design of sample collection and allowed the reclassification of Grevillea meisneri known previously as a Mn accumulator to a Mn hyperaccumulator.

  5. Partial Transformation Products as Indicators of Microbial Hydrocarbon Degradation in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringfellow, W. T.

    2001-12-01

    Monitored natural decay (intrinsic bioremediation), a cost-effective method for remediating contaminated property, is widely applied to fuel contaminated sites. If an intrinsic bioremediation approach could be supported for the clean up of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated properties, millions of dollars in clean-up costs could potential be saved, especially in transfers of industrial properties that will continue to be used for industrial purposes. Proving intrinsic biodegradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is problematic. Slow PAH biodegradation rates in contaminated soils mean that oxygen mass transfer rates into the soil exceeds bacterial oxygen demand. Likewise carbon dioxide production during degradation is sufficiently slow that carbon dioxide will not accumulate in the soil gas to levels exceeding background, uncontaminated soils. Therefore, oxygen depletion and carbon dioxide accumulation, typical indicators of intrinsic remediation activity at fuel contaminated sites, are of little use in demonstrating intrinsic PAH remediation. Additionally, direct measurement of PAH loss over time is of limited use in the absence of extensive historical records, especially at sites that are still emitting PAHs as part of their operations. PAH loss rates may be in the order of 10% per year, whereas combined sampling and analytical error can be greater than 50%. It is our hypothesis that PAH degradation products, such as aromatic carboxylic acids and dihydrodiols, will be present in soils where biodegradation is occurring and absent in soils that are biologically inactive. We have developed methods for the extraction of PAH biodegradation products from soils and the analysis of these metabolites by both gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. We have tested our hypothesis against soils undergoing both active and passive bioremediation. Our results indicate that PAH degradation products are detectable in many soils

  6. Effect of organic wastes on the plant-microbe remediation for removal of aged PAHs in soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lin, Xiangui; Liu, Weiwei; Wang, Yiming; Zeng, Jun; Chen, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of in-situ bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may be inhibited by low nutrients and organic carbon. To evaluate the effect of organic wastes on the PAHs removal efficiency of a plant-microbe remediation system, contaminated agricultural soils were amended with different dosages of sewage sludge (SS) and cattle manure (CM) in the presence of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and PAHs-degraders (Bacillus sp. and Flavobacterium sp.). The results indicated that the alfalfa mean biomasses varied from 0.56 to 2.23 g/pot in root dry weight and from 1.80 to 4.88 g/pot in shoot dry weight. Low dose amendments, with rates of SS at 0.1% and CM at 1%, had prominent effects on plant growth and soil PAHs degradation. After 60-day incubation, compared with about 5.6% in the control, 25.8% PAHs removal was observed for treatments in the presence of alfalfa and PAHs-degraders; furthermore, when amended with different dosages of SS and CM, the removed PAHs from soils increased by 35.5%-44.9% and 25.5%-42.3%, respectively. In particular, the degradation of high-molecular-weight PAHs was up to 42.4%. Dehydrogenase activities (DH) ranged between 0.41 and 1.83 microg triphenylformazan/(g dry soil x hr) and the numbers of PAHs-degrading microbes (PDM) ranged from 1.14 x 10(6) to 16.6 x 10(6) most-probable-number/g dry soil. Further investigation of the underlying microbial mechanism revealed that both DH and PDM were stimulated by the addition of organic wastes and significantly correlated with the removal ratio of PAHs. In conclusion, the effect of organic waste application on soil PAHs removal to a great extent is dependent on the interactional effect of nutrients and dissolved organic matter in organic waste and soil microorganisms.

  7. Land use history, floodplain development, and soil erosion in the vicinity of a millstone production center since the Iron Age in the Segbachtal near Mayen (eastern Eifel, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotterweich, Markus; Wenzel, Stefan; Schreg, Rainer; Fülling, Alexander; Engel, Max

    2015-04-01

    In Roman times, the stone and pottery production near Mayen in western Germany reached a very high intensity which would have satisfied the needs of a much wider area. The rate and volume of production was unprecedented and never reached the same level thereafter. The Segbach valley study site with an area of only a few square kilometres offers a very special geoarchaeological archive. The Roman land use structures were completely preserved under a 2 meter thick layer of sediment and are now partially exposed in a gully due to erosion. Pedological, sedimentological and geophysical studies at the colluvium and floodplain sediments as well as relict field structures showed that in the last 2500 years there has been a considerable human impact on both water and sediment budgets. This also had various implications on the further development of water courses, soils and relief. Evidence for the development of flood plain sediments can be traced as far back as the late La Tène period, the Roman Iron Age, and since the Middle Ages. On one particular south-facing slope we found evidence of recultivation measures on a former quarry tailing heap dating from the Middle Ages. This and other human construction activities and land uses lead to a significant change in erosion and sedimentation patterns. It is surprising that sedimentation in flood plains was largely absent during the Roman Iron Age despite intensive land use. Evidence shows that flash flood events with intensive accumulation of soil matter in flood plains only occurred during the High Middle Ages. Sediments from the late Middle ages and the Modern Times are largely missing. The research undertaken in Segbach valley not only offers new insights into specific local historical land uses and land use changes but also fundamental knowledge about the principles and impacts of long-term human-environment interactions.

  8. Comparison of the phytoremediation potentials of Medicago falcata L. And Medicago sativa L. in aged oil-sludge-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Leonid; Muratova, Anna; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Thirteen-year monitoring of the vegetation growing in the industrial and adjacent areas of an oil refinery showed the prevalence of yellow medick (Medicago falcata L.) over other plant species, including alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). A comparative field study of the two Medicago species established that yellow medick and alfalfa exhibited similar resistance to soil petroleum hydrocarbons and that the pollutant concentration in their rhizosphere was 30% lower than that in the surrounding bulk soil. In laboratory pot experiments, yellow medick reduced the contaminant content by 18% owing to the degradation of the major heavy oil fractions, such as paraffins, naphthenes, and alcohol and benzene tars; and it was more successful than alfalfa. Both species were equally effective in stimulating the total number of soil microorganisms, but the number of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degraders, was larger in the root zone of alfalfa. In turn, yellow medick provided a favorable balance of available nitrogen. Both Medicago species equally stimulated the dehydrogenase and peroxidase activities of the soil, and yellow medick increased the activity of soil polyphenol oxidase but reduced the activity of catalase. The root tissue activity of catalase, ascorbate oxidase, and tyrosinase was grater in alfalfa than in yellow medick. The peroxidase activity of plant roots was similar in both species, but nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed some differences in the peroxidase profiles of the root extracts of alfalfa and yellow medick. Overall, this study suggests that the phytoremediation potentials of yellow medick and alfalfa are similar, with some differences.

  9. Association of Growth Substrates and Bacterial Genera with Benzo[a]pyrene Mineralization in Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Maiysha D.; Rodgers-Vieira, Elyse A.; Hu, Jing; Aitken, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that is not known to be a bacterial growth substrate. Organisms capable of cometabolizing BaP in complex field-contaminated systems have not previously been identified. We evaluated BaP mineralization by a bacterial community from a bioreactor treating PAH-contaminated soil during coincubation with or after pre-enrichment on various PAHs as growth substrates. Pyrosequence libraries of 16S rRNA genes were used to identify bacteria that were enriched on the added growth substrate as a means of associating specific organisms with BaP mineralization. Coincubating the bioreactor-treated soil with naphthalene, phenanthrene, or pyrene inhibited BaP mineralization, whereas pre-enriching the soil on the same three PAHs enhanced BaP mineralization. Combined, these results suggest that bacteria in the bioreactor community that are capable of growing on naphthalene, phenanthrene, and/or pyrene can metabolize BaP, with coincubation competitively inhibiting BaP metabolism. Anthracene, fluoranthene, and benz[a]anthracene had little effect on BaP mineralization compared to incubations without an added growth substrate under either coincubation or pre-enrichment conditions. Substantial increases in relative abundance after pre-enrichment with phenanthrene, naphthalene, or pyrene, but not the other PAHs, suggest that members of the genera Cupriavidus and Luteimonas may have been associated with BaP mineralization. PMID:25469077

  10. Evolution of bacterial community during bioremediation of PAHs in a coal tar contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lors, Christine; Ryngaert, Annemie; Périé, Frédéric; Diels, Ludo; Damidot, Denis

    2010-11-01

    The monitoring of a windrow treatment applied to soil contaminated by mostly 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs produced by coal tar distillation was performed by following the evolution of both PAH concentration and the bacterial community. Total and PAH-degrading bacterial community structures were followed by 16S rRNA PCR-DGGE in parallel with quantification by bacterial counts and 16 PAH measurements. Six months of biological treatment led to a strong decrease in 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAH concentrations (98, 97 and 82% respectively). This result was associated with the activity of bacterial PAH-degraders belonging mainly to the Gamma-proteobacteria, in particular, the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas genera, which were detected over the course of the treatment. This group was considered to be a good bioindicator to determine the potential PAH biodegradation of contaminated soil. Conversely, other species, like the Beta-proteobacteria, were detected after 3months, when 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs were almost completely degraded. Thus, presence of the Beta-proteobacteria group could be considered a good candidate indicator to estimate the endpoint of biotreatment of this type of PAH-contaminated soil.

  11. Identification of persulfate oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon during remediation of contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoyong; Zhao, Dan; Yan, Xiulan; Huling, Scott G

    2014-07-15

    The extent of PAH transformation, the formation and transformation of reaction byproducts during persulfate oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coking plant soil was investigated. Pre-oxidation analyses indicated that oxygen-containing PAHs (oxy-PAHs) existed in the soil. Oxy-PAHs including 1H-phenalen-1-one, 9H-fluoren-9-one, and 1,8-naphthalic anhydride were also produced during persulfate oxidation of PAHs. Concentration of 1,8-naphthalic anhydride at 4h in thermally activated (50°C) persulfate oxidation (TAPO) treatment increased 12.7 times relative to the oxidant-free control. Additionally, the oxy-PAHs originally present and those generated during oxidation can be oxidized by unactivated or thermally activated persulfate oxidation. For example, 9H-fluoren-9-one concentration decreased 99% at 4h in TAPO treatment relative to the control. Thermally activated persulfate resulted in greater oxy-PAHs removal than unactivated persulfate. Overall, both unactivated and thermally activated persulfate oxidation of PAH-contaminated soil reduced PAH mass, and oxidized most of the reaction byproducts. Consequently, this treatment process could limit environmental risk related to the parent compound and associated reaction byproducts.

  12. Characteristics of PAH tar oil contaminated soils-Black particles, resins and implications for treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Trellu, Clément; Miltner, Anja; Gallo, Rosita; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A; Kästner, Matthias

    2017-04-05

    Tar oil contamination is a major environmental concern due to health impacts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and the difficulty of reaching acceptable remediation end-points. Six tar oil-contaminated soils with different industrial histories were compared to investigate contamination characteristics by black particles. Here we provide a simple method tested on 6 soils to visualize and identify large amounts of black particles (BP) as either solid aggregates of resinified and weathered tar oil or various wood/coke/coal-like materials derived from the contamination history. These materials contain 2-10 times higher PAH concentrations than the average soil and were dominantly found in the sand fraction containing 42-86% of the total PAH. The PAH contamination in the different granulometric fractions was directly proportional to the respective total organic carbon content, since the PAH were associated to the carbonaceous particulate materials. Significantly lower (bio)availability of PAH associated to these carbonaceous phases is widely recognized, thus limiting the efficiency of remediation techniques. We provide a conceptual model of the limited mass transfer of PAH from resinated tar oil phases to the water phase and emphasize the options to physically separate BP based on their lower bulk density and slower settling velocity.

  13. Construction of PAH-degrading mixed microbial consortia by induced selection in soil.

    PubMed

    Zafra, German; Absalón, Ángel E; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Ángel; Fernandez, Francisco J; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2017-04-01

    Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils through the biostimulation and bioaugmentation processes can be a strategy for the clean-up of oil spills and environmental accidents. In this work, an induced microbial selection method using PAH-polluted soils was successfully used to construct two microbial consortia exhibiting high degradation levels of low and high molecular weight PAHs. Six fungal and seven bacterial native strains were used to construct mixed consortia with the ability to tolerate high amounts of phenanthrene (Phe), pyrene (Pyr) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and utilize these compounds as a sole carbon source. In addition, we used two engineered PAH-degrading fungal strains producing heterologous ligninolytic enzymes. After a previous selection using microbial antagonism tests, the selection was performed in microcosm systems and monitored using PCR-DGGE, CO2 evolution and PAH quantitation. The resulting consortia (i.e., C1 and C2) were able to degrade up to 92% of Phe, 64% of Pyr and 65% of BaP out of 1000 mg kg(-1) of a mixture of Phe, Pyr and BaP (1:1:1) after a two-week incubation. The results indicate that constructed microbial consortia have high potential for soil bioremediation by bioaugmentation and biostimulation and may be effective for the treatment of sites polluted with PAHs due to their elevated tolerance to aromatic compounds, their capacity to utilize them as energy source.

  14. Soil-borne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in El Paso, Texas: Analysis of a potential problem in the United States/Mexico border region

    PubMed Central

    De La Torre-Roche, Roberto J.; Lee, Wen-Yee; Campos-Díaz, Sandra I.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasonic extraction followed by Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption inline coupled with Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (TD/GC/MS)was used to perform a comprehensive determination of soil-borne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in El Paso, Texas. The method provided good sensitivity and faster processing time for the analysis. The total PAHs in El Paso soil ranged from 0.1 to 2225.5 µg kg−1. Although the majority of PAH concentrations did not exceed the soil screening levels regulated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the existence of PAHs in this ecosystem is ubiquitous. Naphthalene were found in 100% of the soil samples; while the heavy PAHs (five- and six-ring) were not often detected and mostly remained in closer proximity to industrial areas and major traffic points. The results ruled out the possibility of petroleum refining as the significant source of local soil-borne PAH contamination, but they suggested that the PAHs found in El Paso soil were closely linked to human activities and possible other industrial processes. PMID:18768257

  15. Lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil and house dust in the communities surrounding the Sydney, Nova Scotia, tar ponds.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Timothy W; Lane, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in the residential communities adjacent to the Sydney, Nova Scotia, tar ponds, the area considered Canada's worst contaminated site. The tar pond remediation policy has been limited to the site and some residential properties. We compared background concentrations in 91 soil samples taken 5-20 km from the coke oven site with those in soil samples from the three communities surrounding the tar ponds: Whitney Pier, Ashby, and North End. These surrounding communities were statistically different from background regarding arsenic, lead, and PAHs. Twenty percent of the background soil samples and 95% of the tar pond soil samples were above the Canadian health-risk-based soil guidelines for arsenic (12 ppm), and 5% of the background samples and 80% of the tar pond soil samples were above the Canadian guidelines for lead (140 ppm). Regarding dust lead and arsenic loading, the results provide no evidence that Whitney Pier is significantly different than Ashby and North End. Children in these communities are predicted to have a 1-15% chance of blood lead > 10 microg/dL. The results suggest that lead and arsenic found in the homes originate outside. The lead content of paint in the homes was not evaluated, but consideration of painted wood at the doorway did not confound the results of the study. The results indicate that the residential environment has been adversely affected by PAHs, lead, and arsenic and should be considered for remediation. PMID:14698928

  16. Fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in plant-soil systems: Plant responses to a chemical stress in the root zone

    SciTech Connect

    Hoylman, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Plant uptake and translocation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil was investigated to explore plant-microbial interactions in response to a chemical stress in the root zone. Plant uptake of individual PAHs was examined under laboratory conditions which maximized root exposure. White sweetclover, Melilotus alba, was grown in soils dosed with [sup 14]C-naphthalene, -phenanthrene, -pyrene, and -fluoranthene. The highest [sup 14]C concentrations were associated with roots, with decreasing concentrations observed in stems and leaves; however, the greatest percentage of recoverable [sup 14]C remained in the soil ([ge]86%) for all four PAHs. No evidence of bioaccumulation of the individual PAHs was found in M. alba over a 5-day exposure period. Root uptake and translocation of PAHs from soil to aboveground plant tissues proved to be a limited mechanism for PAH transport into terrestrial food chains. However, root surface sorption of PAHs may be important for plants in soils containing elevated concentrations of PAHs. Consequently, the root-soil interface may be important for plant-microbial interactions in response to a chemical stress. [sup 14]CO[sub 2] pulse-labeling studies provide evidence of a shift in [sup 14]C-allocation from aboveground tissue to the root zone when plants were exposed simultaneously to phenanthrene in soil. In addition, soil respiration and heterotrophic plate counts of rhizosphere microorganisms increased in plants exposed to phenanthrene as compared to controls. This study demonstrates the importance of the root-soil interface for plants growing in PAH contaminated soil and provides supportive evidence for a plant-microbial defense response to chemical toxicants in the root zone. Lipophilic toxicants in soils may reach high concentrations in the root zone, but rhizosphere microbial communities under the influence of the plant may reduce the amount of the compound that is actually taken up by the root.

  17. Human brains found in a fire-affected 4000-years old Bronze Age tumulus layer rich in soil alkalines and boron in Kutahya, Western Anatolia.

    PubMed

    Altinoz, M A; Ince, B; Sav, A; Dincer, A; Cengiz, S; Mercan, S; Yazici, Z; Bilgen, M N

    2014-02-01

    Undecomposed human bodies and organs always attracted interest in terms of understanding biological tissue stability and immortality. Amongst these, cases of natural mummification found in glaciers, bog sediments and deserts caused even more attention. In 2010, an archeological excavation of a Bronze Age layer in a tumulus near the Western Anatolia city Kütahya revealed fire affected regions with burnt human skeletons and charred wooden objects. Inside of the cracked skulls, undecomposed brains were discernible. To analyze the burial taphonomy of the rare phenomenon of brain preservation, we analyzed brains, bone, teeth and surrounding soils elements using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). Adipocere formation or saponification of postmortem tissue fat requires high levels of alkalinity and especially potassium. Indeed, ICP-MS analysis of the brain, teeth and bone and also of the surrounding soil revealed high levels of potassium, magnesium, aluminum and boron, which are compatible with the famous role of Kütahya in tile production with its soil containing high level of alkalines and tile-glazing boron. Fatty acid chromatography revealed simultaneous saturation of fats and protection of fragile unsaturated fatty acids consistent with soil-presence of both pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant trace metals. Computerized tomography revealed protection of diencephalic, metencephalic and occipital tissue in one of the best-preserved specimens. Boron was previously found as an intentional preservative of Tutankhamen and Deir el Bahari mummies. Here, in natural soil with its insect-repellant, anti-bacterial and fire-resistance qualities it may be a factor to preserve heat-affected brains as almost bioporcellain specimens.

  18. The extraction of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) residues from a clay soil using sonication and a Soxhlet procedure: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Guerin, T F

    1999-02-01

    A sonication method was compared with Soxhlet extraction for recovering polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from a clay soil that had been contaminated with tar materials for several decades. Using sonication over an 8 h extraction period, maximum extraction of the 16 US EPA priority PAH was obtained with dichloromethane (DCM)-acetone (1 + 1). The same procedure using hexane-acetone (1 + 1) recovered 86% of that obtained using DCM-acetone (1 + 1). PAH recovery was dependent on time of extraction up to a period of 8 h. The sonication procedure showed that individual PAH are extracted at differing rates depending on the number of fused rings in the molecule. Soxhlet extraction [with DCM-acetone (1 + 1)] over an 8 h period recovered 95% of the PAH removed by the sonication procedure using DCM-acetone (1 + 1), indicating that rigorous sonication can achieve PAH recoveries similar to those obtained by Soxhlet extraction. The lower recovery with the Soxhlet extraction was explained by the observed losses of the volatile PAH components after 1-4 h of extraction. The type of solvent used, the length of time of extraction and extraction method influenced the quantification of PAH in the soil. Therefore, the study has implications for PAH analyses in soils and sediments, and particularly for contaminated site assessments where the data from commercial laboratories are being used. The study emphasizes the importance of establishing (and being consistent in the application of) a vigorous extraction, particularly for commercial laboratories that handle samples of soil in batches (at different times) from a single site investigation or remediation process. The strong binding of PAH to soil, forming aged residues, has significant implications for extraction efficiency. This paper illustrates the problem of the underestimation of PAH using the US EPA method 3550, specifically where a surrogate spike is routinely employed and the efficiency of the extraction procedure for aged

  19. Contamination, source, and input route of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in historic wastewater-irrigated agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, Hong-Bo; Long, Jin-Lin; Cai, Chao; Dai, Jiu-Lan; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Ren-Qing

    2012-12-01

    Contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of historic wastewater-irrigated agricultural topsoil (0-5 cm) and the contribution of groundwater irrigation and atmospheric deposition to soil PAHs were studied in a typical agricultural region, i.e. Hunpu region, Liaoning, China. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged from 0.43 to 2.64 mg kg⁻¹ in topsoil, being lower than those found in other wastewater-irrigated areas. The levels of PAHs in soil declined as the distance from a water source increased. Concentrations of individual PAHs were generally higher in upland than in paddy topsoils. The calculated nemerow composite index showed that agricultural soil in the region was "polluted" by PAHs. A human health risk assessment based on the total toxic equivalent concentration showed that the presence of elevated concentrations of PAHs in the soil might pose a great threat to the health of local residents. Ratios of pairs of PAHs and principal component analysis (PCA) showed that pyrogenesis, such as coal combustion, was the main source of PAHs, while petroleum, to some extent, also had a strong influence on PAHs contamination in upland soil. The distribution patterns of individual PAHs and composition of PAHs differed between irrigation groundwater and topsoil, but were similar between atmospheric deposition and topsoil. There were significant linear correlations (r = 0.90; p < 0.01) between atmospheric deposition rates and average concentrations of the 16 individual PAHs in soils, while no significant relationships were observed between irrigation groundwater and topsoil in levels of PAHs. These suggested that PAHs in agricultural soils were mainly introduced from atmospheric deposition, rather than from groundwater irrigation after the phasing out of wastewater irrigation in the region since 2002. This study provides a reference to ensure agricultural product safety, pollution control, and proper soil management.

  20. PAH-sequestration capacity of granular and powder activated carbon amendments in soil, and their effects on earthworms and plants.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Lena; Hartnik, Thomas; Henriksen, Thomas; Elmquist, Marie; Brändli, Rahel C; Hale, Sarah E; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2012-07-01

    A field lysimeter study was carried out to investigate whether the amendment of 2% powder and granular activated carbon (PAC and GAC) to a soil with moderate PAH contamination had an impact on the PAH bioaccumulation of earthworms and plants, since AC is known to be a strong sorbent for organic pollutants. Furthermore, secondary effects of AC on plants and earthworms were studied through growth and nutrient uptake, and survival and weight gain. Additionally, the effect of AC amendments on soil characteristics like pH, water holding capacity, and the water retention curve of the soil were investigated. Results show that the amendment of 2% PAC had a negative effect on plant growth while the GAC increased the growth rate of plants. PAC was toxic to earthworms, demonstrated by a significant weight loss, while the results for GAC were less clear due to ambiguous results of a field and a parallel laboratory study. Both kinds of AC significantly reduced biota to soil accumulation factors (BSAFs) of PAHs in earthworms and plants. The GAC reduced the BSAFs of earthworms by an average of 47 ± 44% and the PAC amendment reduced them by 72 ± 19%. For the investigated plants the BSAFs were reduced by 46 ± 36% and 53 ± 22% by the GAC and PAC, respectively.

  1. Combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant enhanced biodegradation of polycylic armotic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil-water systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Huang, Guo-He; Xiao, Huining; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

    2014-09-01

    This study systematically investigated the interactive effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) on the biodegradation of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil-water systems. The degradations of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were fitted well with first order kinetic model and the degradation rates were in proportion to the concentration of biosurfactant. In addition, the degradation enhancement of PHE was higher than that of PYR. The addition of soil DOM itself at an environmental level would inhibit the biodegradation of PAHs. However, in the system with co-existence of DOM and biosurfactant, the degradation of PAHs was higher than that in only biosurfactant addition system, which may be attributed to the formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex micelles. Furthermore, under the combined conditions, the degradation of PAH increased with the biosurfactant concentration, and the soil DOM added system showed slightly higher degradation than the compost DOM added system, indicating that the chemical structure and composition of DOM would also affect the bioavailability of PAHs. The study result may broaden knowledge of biosurfactant enhanced bioremediation of PAHs contaminated soil and groundwater.

  2. Effect of pre-heating on the chemical oxidation efficiency: implications for the PAH availability measurement in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Biache, Coralie; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Andriatsihoarana, Sitraka; Colombano, Stéfan; Faure, Pierre

    2015-04-09

    Three chemical oxidation treatments (KMnO4, H2O2 and Fenton-like) were applied on three PAH-contaminated soils presenting different properties to determine the potential use of these treatments to evaluate the available PAH fraction. In order to increase the available fraction, a pre-heating (100 °C under N2 for one week) was also applied on the samples prior oxidant addition. PAH and extractable organic matter contents were determined before and after treatment applications. KMnO4 was efficient to degrade PAHs in all the soil samples and the pre-heating slightly improved its efficiency. H2O2 and Fenton-like treatments presented low efficiency to degrade PAH in the soil presenting poor PAH availability, however, the PAH degradation rates were improved with the pre-heating. Consequently H2O2-based treatments (including Fenton-like) are highly sensitive to contaminant availability and seem to be valid methods to estimate the available PAH fraction in contaminated soils.

  3. Effect of synthetic surfactants on the solubilization and distribution of PAHs in water/soil-water systems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K Y; Wong, J W C

    2006-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of four surfactants, including three non-ionic surfactants (Tween 80, Triton X-100 and Brij 35) and an anionic surfactant SDS on the solubilization and distribution of phenanthrene (Phe) and pyrene (Pyr) in soil-water systems. All four surfactants could enhance the solubilization of Phe and Pyr in aqueous phase linearly when surfactant concentrations exceeded their respective critical micelle concentrations (CMC). Molar solubilization ratio (MSR) which indicated surfactant's solubilization capacity for Phe and Pyr, was highest for Tween 80 for both PAHs, and SDS had the lowest among the four surfactants, while Triton X-100 and Brij 35 had about the same MSR for both PAHs. Moreover, all the surfactants could provide a strong micelle partitioning phase for the more hydrophobic Pyr than Phe as revealed by their high micelle--aqueous phase partition coefficient, K(mc). Batch desorption studies also demonstrated that Tween 80 had the best capacity for the desorption of both Phe and Pyr in the soil-water systems, and followed by Triton X-100 and Brij 35, while SDS seems to have no positive effect on the desorption of PAHs probably due to its relatively high CMC value. Therefore, from the application standpoint, the results obtained in this study suggest that Tween 80 would be the most suitable candidate among the four surfactants in improving solubilization and desorption of PAHs in soil-water system, which are believed to be the prerequisites for successful bioremediation technology for PAH contaminated soil.

  4. Potential use of a self-dying reporter bacterium to determine the bioavailability of aged phenanthrene in soil: comparison with physicochemical measures.

    PubMed

    Shin, Doyun; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2014-01-30

    The potential bioavailability of phenanthrene aged in soil was determined by using a self-dying reporter bacterium, and the results were compared to two physicochemical measures, Tenax TA(®) bead-assisted desorption, and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) extraction. The reporter bacterium, capable of degrading phenanthrene as a sole carbon and energy source, was genetically reconstructed to die when it degrades phenanthrene. Therefore, population change of the reporter cells can be viewed as the quantification of bioavailable phenanthrene. When Ottawa sand was used as an aging matrix, the amounts of bioavailable phenanthrene (i.e. little gradual decrease) were similar, regardless of aging time, and consistent between the reporter bacterium and the two physicochemical measures. However, decrease in bioavailable phenanthrene with aging was readily evident in sandy loam with organic matter of 11.5%, with all three measures. More importantly, when the reporter bacterium was used, a rapid and significant decrease in the bioavailable fraction from 1.00 to 0.0431 was observed. The extent of decrease in bioavailable fraction was less than 40% in the two physicochemical measures, but was nearly 100% in the reporter bacterium, during the first 3 months of aging. Our results suggest that the phenanthrene fraction available to bacterial degradation, and probably the fraction that really manifests toxicity, may be much smaller than the fractions predicted with the physicochemical measures.

  5. Successful Control of Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis in School Age Children in Burkina Faso and an Example of Community-Based Assessment via Lymphatic Filariasis Transmission Assessment Survey

    PubMed Central

    Drabo, François; Ouedraogo, Hamado; Bougma, Roland; Bougouma, Clarisse; Bamba, Issouf; Zongo, Dramane; Bagayan, Mohamed; Barrett, Laura; Yago-Wienne, Fanny; Palmer, Stephanie; Chu, Brian; Toubali, Emily; Zhang, Yaobi

    2016-01-01

    Background Burkina Faso is endemic with soil-transmitted helminth infections. Over a decade of preventive chemotherapy has been implemented through annual lymphatic filariasis (LF) mass drug administration (MDA) for population aged five years and over, biennial treatment of school age children with albendazole together with schistosomiasis MDA and biannual treatment of pre-school age children through Child Health Days. Assessments were conducted to evaluate the current situation and to determine the treatment strategy for the future. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional assessment was conducted in 22 sentinel sites across the country in 2013. In total, 3,514 school age children (1,748 boys and 1,766 girls) were examined by the Kato-Katz method. Overall, soil-transmitted helminth prevalence was 1.3% (95% CI: 1.0–1.8%) in children examined. Hookworm was the main species detected, with prevalence of 1.2% (95% CI: 0.9–1.6%) and mean egg counts of 2.1 epg (95% CI: 0–4.2 epg). Among regions, the Centre Ouest region had the highest hookworm prevalence of 3.4% (95% CI: 1.9–6.1%) and mean egg counts of 14.9 epg (95% CI: 3.3–26.6 epg). A separate assessment was conducted in the Centre Nord region in 2014 using community-based cluster survey design during an LF transmission assessment survey (TAS). In this assessment, 351 children aged 6–7 years and 345 children aged 10–14 years were examined, with two cases (0.6% (95% CI: 0.2–2.1%)) and seven cases (2.0% (95% CI: 1.0–4.1%)) of hookworm infection was identified respectively. The results using both age groups categorized the region to be 2% to <10% in STH prevalence according to the pre-defined cut-off values. Conclusions/Significance Through large-scale preventive chemotherapy, Burkina Faso has effectively controlled STH in school age children in the country. Research should be conducted on future strategies to consolidate the gain and to interrupt STH transmission in Burkina Faso. It is also

  6. Current status of soil-transmitted helminthiases among pre-school and school-aged children from Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sowemimo, O A; Asaolu, S O

    2011-09-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the prevalence and intensity of soil-transmitted helminths among pre-school and school-aged children attending nursery and primary schools in Ile-Ife. Single stool samples were collected between January and March, 2009 from 352 children randomly selected from a total of 456 children attending both private and government schools. The stool samples were processed using the modified Kato-Katz technique, and then examined for the eggs of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs). One hundred and twenty-one (34.4%) samples were positive for STH eggs. The overall prevalences of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm were 33.2%, 3.7% and 0.9%, respectively. The prevalence of STH infection in government schools (47.8%) was significantly higher than in private schools (16.1%) (P < 0.001). The most common type of mixed infection was the combination of A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura (6.8%). The prevalence and intensity of A. lumbricoides rose with age. The lowest prevalence and intensity (7.7%; 0.240 ± 0.136 eggs per gram (epg)) were recorded in the 2- to 3-year-old age group, while the highest prevalence and intensity (58.7%; 1.820 ± 0.237 epg) were recorded in children aged 10 years and above. A questionnaire survey indicated that 73% of the children attending private school had been treated with anthelminthics less than 2 months prior to the collection of stool specimens, while 43% of the children attending government school received anthelminthic treatment during the same period. The findings indicate that STH infections are endemic among schoolchildren in Ile-Ife and that the burden of parasitic infections is greater in government schools than in private schools.

  7. Evaluating the Effects of Bioremediation on Genotoxicity of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil Using Genetically Engineered, Higher Eukaryotic Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Nakamura, Jun; Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation is one of the commonly applied remediation strategies at sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, remediation goals are typically based on removal of the target contaminants rather than on broader measures related to health risks. We investigated changes in the toxicity and genotoxicity of PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site before and after two simulated bioremediation processes: a sequencing batch bioreactor system and a continuous-flow column system. Toxicity and genotoxicity of the residues from solvent extracts of the soil were determined by the chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic cell line and its DNA-repair-deficient mutants. Although both bioremediation processes significantly removed PAHs from the contaminated soil (bioreactor 69% removal; column 84% removal), bioreactor treatment resulted in an increase in toxicity and genotoxicity over the course of a treatment cycle, whereas long-term column treatment resulted in a decrease in toxicity and genotoxicity. However, when screening with a battery of DT40 mutants for genotoxicity profiling, we found that column treatment induced DNA damage types that were not observed in untreated soil. Toxicity and genotoxicity bioassays can supplement chemical analysis-based risk assessment for contaminated soil when evaluating the efficacy of bioremediation. PMID:22443351

  8. Spatial Variability of PAHs and Microbial Community Structure in Surrounding Surficial Soil of Coal-Fired Power Plants in Xuzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Wangyuan; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Shaoliang; Feng, Qiyan; Hou, Huping; Chen, Fu

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the spatial profile and source analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil that surrounds coal-fired power plants in Xuzhou, China. High-throughput sequencing was employed to investigate the composition and structure of soil bacterial communities. The total concentration of 15 PAHs in the surface soils ranged from 164.87 to 3494.81 μg/kg dry weight. The spatial profile of PAHs was site-specific with a concentration of 1400.09–3494.81 μg/kg in Yaozhuang. Based on the qualitative and principal component analysis results, coal burning and vehicle emission were found to be the main sources of PAHs in the surface soils. The phylogenetic analysis revealed differences in bacterial community compositions among different sampling sites. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum, while Acidobacteria was the second most abundant. The orders of Campylobacterales, Desulfobacterales and Hydrogenophilales had the most significant differences in relative abundance among the sampling sites. The redundancy analysis revealed that the differences in bacterial communities could be explained by the organic matter content. They could also be explicated by the acenaphthene concentration with longer arrows. Furthermore, OTUs of Proteobacteria phylum plotted around particular samples were confirmed to have a different composition of Proteobacteria phylum among the sample sites. Evaluating the relationship between soil PAHs concentration and bacterial community composition may provide useful information for the remediation of PAH contaminated sites. PMID:27598188

  9. Evolution of soils and dynamics of the climate of steppes in the southeast of the russian plain during the late eneolithic and bronze ages (fourth to second millennia BC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkin, V. A.; Borisov, A. V.; Demkina, T. S.; Khomutova, T. E.; Kashirskaya, N. N.

    2010-12-01

    On the basis of studies of subkurgan pedochronoseries, the main mechanisms of the development of soils of arid and desert steppes in drained landscapes of the southeastern Russian plain in the Late Eneolithic and Bronze ages (6000-3000 years ago) were established. During the fourth to third millennia BC, evolution of soils took place at the level of subtypes with a shift of boundaries of soil subzones toward the north. In each of the studied natural regions (Central Russian Upland, Volga Upland, Ergeni Hills, and Caspian Depression), an increase in the aridization of the climate in the second half of the third millennium BC can be distinctly traced, owing to which a convergence of the topsoil with the transformation of dark-chestnut, chestnut, and light-chestnut soils in chestnut-like semiarid soils, which dominated the region 4200-3900 years ago, occurred. In the first half of the second millennium BC, another change in the conditions of soil formation occurred that was caused by an increase in the degree of atmospheric humidity. It induced the divergence of the topsoil with a secondary formation of areas of zonal chestnut soils and solonetzes in place of chestnut-like soils by the middle of the second millennium BC. The obtained data gives reason to suggest that the age of modern chestnut solonetz complexes of the region does not exceed 3500 years.

  10. Complete genome sequence of the phenanthrene-degrading soil bacterium Delftia acidovorans Cs1-4

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, Ameesha R.; de Gannes, Vidya; Obi, Chioma C.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; Peters, Linda; Mikhailova, Natalia; Teshima, Hazuki; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren J.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Denef, Vincent J.; Woyke, Tanya; Hickey, William J.

    2015-08-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants and microbial biodegradation is an important means of remediation of PAH-contaminated soil. Delftia acidovorans Cs1-4 (formerly Delftia sp. Cs1-4) was isolated by using phenanthrene as the sole carbon source from PAH contaminated soil in Wisconsin. Its full genome sequence was determined to gain insights into a mechanisms underlying biodegradation of PAH. Three genomic libraries were constructed and sequenced: an Illumina GAii shotgun library (916,416,493 reads), a 454 Titanium standard library (770,171 reads) and one paired-end 454 library (average insert size of 8 kb, 508,092 reads). The initial assembly contained 40 contigs in two scaffolds. The 454 Titanium standard data and the 454 paired end data were assembled together and the consensus sequences were computationally shredded into 2 kb overlapping shreds. Illumina sequencing data was assembled, and the consensus sequence was computationally shredded into 1.5 kb overlapping shreds. Gaps between contigs were closed by editing in Consed, by PCR and by Bubble PCR primer walks. A total of 182 additional reactions were needed to close gaps and to raise the quality of the finished sequence. The final assembly is based on 253.3 Mb of 454 draft data (averaging 38.4 X coverage) and 590.2 Mb of Illumina draft data (averaging 89.4 X coverage). The genome of strain Cs1-4 consists of a single circular chromosome of 6,685,842 bp (66.7 %G+C) containing 6,028 predicted genes; 5,931 of these genes were protein-encoding and 4,425 gene products were assigned to a putative function. Genes encoding phenanthrene degradation were localized to a 232 kb genomic island (termed the phn island), which contained near its 3’ end a bacteriophage P4-like integrase, an enzyme often associated with chromosomal integration of mobile genetic elements. Other biodegradation pathways reconstructed from the genome sequence included: benzoate (by the acetyl-CoA pathway

  11. Complete genome sequence of the phenanthrene-degrading soil bacterium Delftia acidovorans Cs1-4

    DOE PAGES

    Shetty, Ameesha R.; de Gannes, Vidya; Obi, Chioma C.; ...

    2015-08-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants and microbial biodegradation is an important means of remediation of PAH-contaminated soil. Delftia acidovorans Cs1-4 (formerly Delftia sp. Cs1-4) was isolated by using phenanthrene as the sole carbon source from PAH contaminated soil in Wisconsin. Its full genome sequence was determined to gain insights into a mechanisms underlying biodegradation of PAH. Three genomic libraries were constructed and sequenced: an Illumina GAii shotgun library (916,416,493 reads), a 454 Titanium standard library (770,171 reads) and one paired-end 454 library (average insert size of 8 kb, 508,092 reads). The initial assembly contained 40 contigs inmore » two scaffolds. The 454 Titanium standard data and the 454 paired end data were assembled together and the consensus sequences were computationally shredded into 2 kb overlapping shreds. Illumina sequencing data was assembled, and the consensus sequence was computationally shredded into 1.5 kb overlapping shreds. Gaps between contigs were closed by editing in Consed, by PCR and by Bubble PCR primer walks. A total of 182 additional reactions were needed to close gaps and to raise the quality of the finished sequence. The final assembly is based on 253.3 Mb of 454 draft data (averaging 38.4 X coverage) and 590.2 Mb of Illumina draft data (averaging 89.4 X coverage). The genome of strain Cs1-4 consists of a single circular chromosome of 6,685,842 bp (66.7 %G+C) containing 6,028 predicted genes; 5,931 of these genes were protein-encoding and 4,425 gene products were assigned to a putative function. Genes encoding phenanthrene degradation were localized to a 232 kb genomic island (termed the phn island), which contained near its 3’ end a bacteriophage P4-like integrase, an enzyme often associated with chromosomal integration of mobile genetic elements. Other biodegradation pathways reconstructed from the genome sequence included: benzoate (by the acetyl

  12. Activated carbon adsorption of PAHs from vegetable oil used in soil remediation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zongqiang; Alef, Kassem; Wilke, Berndt-Michael; Li, Peijun

    2007-05-08

    Vegetable oil has been proven to be advantageous as a non-toxic, cost-effective and biodegradable solvent to extract polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soils for remediation purposes. The resulting vegetable oil contained PAHs and therefore required a method for subsequent removal of extracted PAHs and reuse of the oil in remediation processes. In this paper, activated carbon adsorption of PAHs from vegetable oil used in soil remediation was assessed to ascertain PAH contaminated oil regeneration. Vegetable oils, originating from lab scale remediation, with different PAH concentrations were examined to study the adsorption of PAHs on activated carbon. Batch adsorption tests were performed by shaking oil-activated carbon mixtures in flasks. Equilibrium data were fitted with the Langmuir and Freundlich isothermal models. Studies were also carried out using columns packed with activated carbon. In addition, the effects of initial PAH concentration and activated carbon dosage on sorption capacities were investigated. Results clearly revealed the effectiveness of using activated carbon as an adsorbent to remove PAHs from the vegetable oil. Adsorption equilibrium of PAHs on activated carbon from the vegetable oil was successfully evaluated by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The initial PAH concentrations and carbon dosage affected adsorption significantly. The results indicate that the reuse of vegetable oil was feasible.

  13. Nutrient-limited biodegradation of PAH in various soil strata at a creosote contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Breedveld, G D; Sparrevik, M

    2000-01-01

    The effects of nutrient addition on the in situ biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in creosote contaminated soil were studied in soil columns taken from various soil strata at a wood preserving plant in Norway. Three samples were used: one from the topsoil (0-0.5 m), one from an organic rich layer (2-2.5 m) and one from the sandy aquifer (4.5-5 m). The addition of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorous stimulated the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the top soil and the aquifer sand. These two soils, which differed strongly in contamination levels, responded similarly to nutrient addition with the corresponding degradation of 4-ring PAHs. The ratio between available nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) might explain the degree of degradation observed for the 4-ring PAHs. However, the degree of degradation of 3-ring PAHs did not significantly increase after nutrient addition. An increase in the respiration rate, after nutrient addition, could only be observed in the topsoil. In the aquifer sand, 4-ring PAH degradation was not accompanied by an increase in the respiration rate or the number of heterotrophic micro-organisms. PAH degradation in the organic layer did not respond to nutrient addition. This was probably due to the low availability of the contaminants for micro-organisms, as a result of sorption to the soil organic matter. Our data illustrate the need for a better understanding of the role of nutrients in the degradation of high molecular weight hydrocarbons for the successful application of bioremediation at PAH contaminated sites.

  14. Occurrence, sources and health risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban (Pudong) and suburban soils from Shanghai in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Tong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xi-Kui; Lei, Bing-Li; Sun, Yan-Feng; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Ming-Hong

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation was conducted to the urban (Pudong) and suburban soils in Shanghai. A total of 154 soil samples were analyzed for 26 PAHs including highly carcinogenic dibenzopyrenes (DBPs). The total concentrations ranged from 25.8 to 7380 μg kg(-1) for Σ26PAHs and 18.8 to 6320 μg kg(-1) for 16 USEPA priority PAHs (Σ16PAHs), respectively. The BaP toxic equivalent (BaPeq) concentrations were between 6.41 and 2880 μg kg(-1) for Σ24PAHs, 1.11 and 620 μg kg(-1) for Σ16PAHs and 2.72 and 2250 μg kg(-1) for Σ4DBPs. The high PAH contamination in green land soils might originate mainly from local road traffic and industrial activities, and sewage sludge application or waste water irrigation for soil. Seven sources of soil PAHs in Shanghai were identified by positive matrix factorization (PMF) model. The mean risk quotient (m-RQ) values indicated that there were medium to high ecological risks in 9.10% of soil samples, pyrene (Pyr), benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF) and benz[a]anthracene (BaA) were the major ecological risk drivers under agricultural use. The cancer risk (CR) values were within the acceptable range at 35.7%, 35.1% and 31.2% of sampling sites for children, youths and adults, respectively. The total lifetime carcinogenic risk (TLCR) values at 57.8% of sampling sites were within the acceptable range. Overall, cancer risks of soil PAHs in all sampling sites in the studied area were below the highest acceptable risk, suggesting that soil PAHs are unlikely to pose a significant cancer risk for population based on ingestion, dermal contact and inhalation exposure pathways.

  15. Epidemiology of Soil-Transmitted Helminth and Intestinal Protozoan Infections in Preschool-Aged Children in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Aiemjoy, Kristen; Gebresillasie, Sintayehu; Stoller, Nicole E; Shiferaw, Ayalew; Tadesse, Zerihun; Chanyalew, Melsew; Aragie, Solomon; Callahan, Kelly; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2017-02-06

    Intestinal parasites are important contributors to global morbidity and mortality and are the second most common cause of outpatient morbidity in Ethiopia. This cross-sectional survey describes the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths and intestinal protozoa in preschool children 0-5 years of age in seven communities in the Amhara region of Ethiopia, and investigates associations between infection, household water and sanitation characteristics, and child growth. Stool samples were collected from children 0-5 years of age, 1 g of sample was preserved in sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin, and examined for intestinal helminth eggs and protozoa cysts ether-concentration method. A total of 212 samples were collected from 255 randomly selected children. The prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworm were 10.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.6-15.1), 1.4% (95% CI = 0-3.0), and 0% (95% CI = 0-1.7), respectively. The prevalence of the pathogenic intestinal protozoa Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica/dispar were 10.4% (95% CI = 6.2-14.6) and 3.3% (95% CI = 0.09-5.7), respectively. Children with A. lumbricoides infections had lower height-for-age z-scores compared with those without, but were not more likely to have stunting. Compared with those without G. lamblia, children with G. lamblia infections had lower weight-for-age and weight-for-height z-scores and were more than five times as likely to meet the z-score definition for wasting (PR = 5.42, 95% CI = 2.97-9.89). This article adds to a growing body of research on child growth and intestinal parasitic infections and has implications for their treatment and prevention in preschool-aged children.

  16. Bioremediation of high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons co-contaminated with metals in liquid and soil slurries by metal tolerant PAHs degrading bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) contaminated soils in the presence of heavy metals have proved to be difficult and often challenging due to the ability of toxic metals to inhibit PAH degradation by bacteria. In this study, a mixed bacterial culture designated as consortium-5 was isolated from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. The ability of this consortium to utilise HMW PAHs such as pyrene and BaP as a sole carbon source in the presence of toxic metal Cd was demonstrated. Furthermore, this consortium has proven to be effective in degradation of HMW PAHs even from the real long term contaminated MGP soil. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate the great potential of this consortium for field scale bioremediation of PAHs in long term mix contaminated soils such as MGP sites. To our knowledge this is the first study to isolate and characterize metal tolerant HMW PAH degrading bacterial consortium which shows great potential in bioremediation of mixed contaminated soils such as MGP.

  17. Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering during Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbate Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Carl I. Steefel; Aaron Thompson; Jon Chorover

    2006-06-01

    The Hanford subsurface has become contaminated with highly alkaline, radioactive waste generated as a result of weapons production. The radioactive brine was stored in underground storage tanks, a number of which developed leaks and contaminated the surrounding subsurface. The high pH and ionic strength of these wastes has been predicted to accelerate the degree of soil weathering to produce new mineral phases--cancrinite and sodalite among the most abundant. Previous work has demonstrated that Cs and Sr, which along with I represent the most radioactive components in the waste, are sequestered by these neo-formed solids. The present work is aimed at assessing the stability of these neo-formed solids, with special emphasis on the degree of Cs, Sr and I release under ambient (neutral pH, low ionic strength) conditions expected to return to the Hanford area after the caustic radioactive brine waste is removed.

  18. A toxaphene-degrading bacterium related to Enterobacter cloacae, strain D1 isolated from aged contaminated soil in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Lacayo-Romero, Martha; Quillaguamán, Jorge; van Bavel, Bert; Mattiasson, Bo

    2005-09-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain D1 is a facultative anaerobic, Gram-negative heterotrophic bacterium isolated from toxaphene-contaminated soil. This organism was identified and characterized through phylogenetic and taxonomic studies. Based on 16S rDNA analysis, the strain D1 was clustered closely with the species Enterobacter cloacae subsp. dissolvens (LMG 2683) and E. cloacae (ATCC 13047T). Strain D1 resembled these E. cloacae strains with respect to various biochemical and nutritional characteristics, but also exhibited differences. Moreover, strain D1 is able to grow and survive with toxaphene supplied in the medium in the range 3-96 mg/L. Amongst the chemical components of toxaphene, octachlorocamphenes, nonachlorobornanes and decachlorobornanes were seen to be rapidly metabolized, although levels of hexachlorocamphenes and heptachlorobornanes were found to be slowly degraded, and subsequently accumulated during the last stage of the cultivation.

  19. Soils, vegetation, and climate of the southern Transural region in the Middle Bronze Age (by the example of the Arkaim fortress)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhod'ko, V. E.; Ivanov, I. V.; Manakhov, D. V.; Gerasimenko, N. P.; Inubushi, K.; Kawahigashi, M.; Nagano, Kh.; Sugihara, S.

    2013-09-01

    Paleosols of the unique fortress of Arkaim located in the steppe zone of the southern Transural region (Chelyabinsk oblast) were investigated. The dating of the buried soils was performed using the radiocarbon method. The time of building this archeological monument is the Middle Bronze Age (the Sintashta culture; the calibrated dating with 1σ confidence is 3700-4000 years ago). Seven pits of paleosols and ten pits of background ordinary chernozems were studied. The soils are loamy and sandy-loamy. The morphological and chemical properties of the buried and background ordinary chernozems are similar; they differ by the lower content of readily soluble salts in the paleosols as compared to the background ones. The sporepollen spectrum of the Arkaim paleosol is transitional from the steppe to the forest-steppe type. During the existence of this settlement, pine forests with fern ground cover grew, and hygrophytic species (alder and spruce) that nowadays are not recorded in the plant cover occurred. The main feature of the paleosols is the presence of pollen of xerophytic and halophytic herbaceous plants there. The few pollen grains of broad-leaved species testify to a higher heat supply as compared to the current one. Judging by the results of the spore-pollen and microbiomorphic analyses, the climate during the time of building the walls of the settlement was somewhat moister and warmer (or less continental) than the present-day climate. The duration of this period appeared to be short; therefore, soil properties corresponding to the changed environment could not be formed. They reflect the situation of the preceding period with the climatic characteristics close to the present-day ones.

  20. Mild acid and alkali treated clay minerals enhance bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in long-term contaminated soil: A (14)C-tracer study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2017-04-01

    Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils requires a higher microbial viability and an increased PAH bioavailability. The clay/modified clay-modulated bacterial degradation could deliver a more efficient removal of PAHs in soils depending on the bioavailability of the compounds. In this study, we modified clay minerals (smectite and palygorskite) with mild acid (HCl) and alkali (NaOH) treatments (0.5-3 M), which increased the surface area and pore volume of the products, and removed the impurities without collapsing the crystalline structure of clay minerals. In soil incubation studies, supplements with the clay products increased bacterial growth in the order: 0.5 M HCl ≥ unmodified ≥ 0.5 M NaOH ≥ 3 M NaOH ≥ 3 M HCl for smectite, and 0.5 M HCl ≥ 3 M NaOH ≥ 0.5 M NaOH ≥ 3 M HCl ≥ unmodified for palygorskite. A(14)C-tracing study showed that the mild acid/alkali-treated clay products increased the PAH biodegradation (5-8%) in the order of 0.5 M HCl ≥ unmodified > 3 M NaOH ≥ 0.5 M NaOH for smectite, and 0.5 M HCl > 0.5 M NaOH ≥ unmodified ≥ 3 M NaOH for palygorskite. The biodegradation was correlated (r = 0.81) with the bioavailable fraction of PAHs and microbial growth as affected particularly by the 0.5 M HCl and 0.5 M NaOH-treated clay minerals. These results could be pivotal in developing a clay-modulated bioremediation technology for cleaning up PAH-contaminated soils and sediments in the field.

  1. Sphingomonas from petroleum-contaminated soils in Shenfu, China and their PAHs degradation abilities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lisha; Li, Hui; Zhang, Ying; Han, Siqin; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Sphingomonas genus are often isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils due to their unique abilities to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are important for in situ bioremediation. In this study, a combined phenotypic and genotypic approach using streptomycin-containing medium and Sphingomonas-specific PCR was developed to isolate and identify culturable Sphingomonas strains present in petroleum-contaminated soils in the Shenfu wastewater irrigation zone. Of the 15 soil samples examined, 12 soils yielded yellow streptomycin-resistant colonies. The largest number of yellow colony-forming units (CFUs) could reach 10(5)CFUsg(-1)soil. The number of yellow CFUs had a significant positive correlation (p<0.05) with the ratio of PAHs to total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), indicating that Sphingomonas may play a key role in degrading the PAH fraction of the petroleum contaminants at this site. Sixty yellow colonies were selected randomly and analyzed by colony PCR using Sphingomonas-specific primers, out of which 48 isolates had PCR-positive signals. The 48 positive amplicons generated 8 distinct restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns, and 7 out of 8 phylotypes were identified as Sphingomonas by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the representative strains. Within these 7 Sphingomonas strains, 6 strains were capable of using fluorene as the sole carbon source, while 2 strains were phenanthrene-degrading Sphingomonas. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to evaluate the relationship between PAHs contamination levels and culturable Sphingomonas in environmental samples.

  2. Ecological and health risk-based characterization of agricultural soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the vicinity of a chemical plant in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Geng; Niu, Junjie; Guo, Wenjiong; An, Xiangsheng; Zhao, Long

    2016-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from chemical plants can cause serious pollution of surrounding agricultural soils. A comprehensive study of agricultural soils was conducted in the vicinity of a chemical plant in China to characterize the soil PAH concentration, as well as their composition and sources. Human health and a screening-level ecological risk assessment were conducted for PAH contamination in agricultural soils. The results showed that the total concentrations of 16 priority PAHs ranged from 250.49 to 9387.26 ng g(-1), with an average of 2780.42 ng g(-1). High molecular weight PAHs (four to six rings) were the dominant component, accounting for more than 60% of all PAHs. Principal component analysis (PCA) and positive matrix factorization model (PMF) suggested that diesel emissions, coal combustion, coke ovens, and fuel combustion and gasoline emissions were the main sources of PAHs in agricultural soils. The ecological risk assessment results based on the effects range-low (ERL), the effects range-median (ERM), and the ecological screening levels (ESL) indicated that the exposure to ∑PAH16 was >ERL, >ERM, and ≥ERL and soil sampling stations, the exposure to ∑PAH16 was >ESL at 78.1% of the soil sampling stations, and could induce biological effects in mammals. The Bapeq concentrations posed a potential carcinogenic risk to humans. Further risk management and control of soil PAHs in these agricultural soils is required to ensure the safety of the biocoenosis and human health.

  3. Determination of the provenance of cocoa by soil protolith ages and assessment of anthropogenic lead contamination by pb/nd and lead isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Manton, William I

    2010-01-27

    The Pb contents of chocolate and the products it flavors are among the highest of all commonly consumed substances. Others have shown that this Pb is acquired by cocoa beans after harvesting and is concentrated in their shells, portions of which are ground up with the cotyledons during processing. It is shown here that the shells also contain the lanthanides Nd and Sm, which they appear to take up more slowly than Pb when dried on bare soil. Consideration of Pb/Nd ratios, model Sm-Nd ages and the isotope ratios of Pb and Sr indicates that, in the absence of contamination, the relationship between Pb and Nd in shells is y = 13.1x(-0.383), where x is the Nd concentration in microg/kg and y is the Pb/Nd ratio. For cocoa powders, the relationship is y = 114x(-0.988). Samples that plot above these curves are probably contaminated. Model ages indicate where the cocoa of cocoa powders is grown, and these same considerations point to African samples being uncontaminated but samples from Asia containing 50% anthropogenic Pb of Australian origin. No measurable Pb contamination occurs during the transport of beans and the manufacture of chocolate.

  4. 16S rDNA-based probes for two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading soil Mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaswami, M.; Feldhake, D.J.; Loper, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    PAHs are a class of widespread pollutants, some of which have been shown to be genotoxic, hence the fate of these compounds in the environment is of considerable interest. Research on the biodegradation of 4 and 5 ring PAHs has been limited by the general lack of microbial isolates or consortia which can completely degrade these toxicants. Heitkamp and Cerniglia have described an oxidative soil Mycobacterium-strain PYR-1 that metabolizes pyrene and fluoranthene more rapidly than the 2 and 3 ring naphthalene and phenanthrene; although some metabolites of benzo-(a)-pyrene (BaP) were detected, no mineralization of BaP was observed. In 1991 Grosser et al. reported the isolation of a Mycobacterium sp. which mineralizes pyrene and also causing some mineralization of BaP. Their study describes a comparative analysis of these two strains, which show very similar colony morphology, growth rate and yellow-orange pigmentation. Genetic differences were shown by DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) using two arbitrary GC-rich octanucleotide primers, and by sequence comparison of PCR amplified 16S rDNA, although both strains show similarity closest to that of the genus Mycobacteria. These 16S rDNA sequences are in use for the construction of strain-specific DNA probes to monitor the presence, survival and growth of these isolates in PAH-contaminated soils in studies of biodegradation.

  5. Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbate Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Chorover, Jon; Mueller, Karl T.; O'Day, Peggy; Serne, R. Jeff; Um, Wooyong; Steefel, Carl

    2006-06-01

    Our work is aimed at developing a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering from caustic waste release and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) fate and transport in waste-impacted sediments across space, time and geochemical gradients that encompass the process-level heterogeneity observed at the Hanford DOE site. Our specific objectives are: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts through sedimentary media; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments (from (1) and (2)) that accurately simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption at the bench-scale, and that can be applied to--and validated at--field sites such as Hanford.

  6. Chemical contamination of soils in the New York City area following Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Mandigo, Amy C; DiScenza, Dana J; Keimowitz, Alison R; Fitzgerald, Neil

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a unique data set of lead, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in soil samples collected from the metropolitan New York City area in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Initial samples were collected by citizen scientists recruited via social media, a relatively unusual approach for a sample collection project. Participants in the affected areas collected 63 usable samples from basements, gardens, roads, and beaches. Results indicate high levels of arsenic, lead, PCBs, and PAHs in an area approximately 800 feet south of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) Superfund site at Newtown Creek. A location adjacent to the Gowanus Canal, another Superfund site, was found to have high PCB concentrations. Areas of high PAH contamination tended to be near high traffic areas or next to sites of known contamination. While contamination as a direct result of Hurricane Sandy cannot be demonstrated conclusively, the presence of high levels of contamination close to known contamination sites, evidence for co-contamination, and decrease in number of samples containing measureable amounts of semi-volatile compounds from samples collected at similar locations 9 months after the storm suggest that contaminated particles may have migrated to residential areas as a result of flooding.

  7. Effects of elevated CO{sub 2}, soil nutrient levels, and foliage age on the performance of two generations of Neodiprion lecontei (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae) feeding on loblolly pine

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.S. |; Thomas, R.B.; Strain, B.R.; Lincoln, D.E.

    1997-12-01

    We investigated how changes in loblolly pine needle phytochemistry caused by elevated CO{sub 2}, leaf age, and soil nutrient levels affected the performance of 2 individual generations of the multivoltine folivorous insect pest Neodiprion lecontei. In 2 feeding trials, mature needles produced in the previous (spring) and current (fall) year from seedlings grown in open-topped chambers under 4 CO{sub 2} and 2 soil nutrient levels were fed to 2 separate generations of red beaded pine sawfly larvae. Strong seasonal differences (i.e., spring versus fall) in leaf nutritional and defensive constituents resulted in significant between-generation differences in the growth, consumption, and growth efficiency of sawfly larvae. Enriched CO{sub 2}-grown needles bad higher levels of starch and starch/nitrogen ratios in older, overwintering spring needles, which were lower in leaf nitrogen and monoterpenes than younger, current year needles (fall). Overall, larval growth was higher and consumption lower on the fall needles, presumably because of higher levels of leaf nitrogen compared with the spring needles. The plant CO{sub 2} concentration significantly contributed to the larval consumption responses between seasons (significant CO{sub 2} X season interaction), demonstrating that the 2 sawfly generations were affected differently by CO{sub 2}-induced phytochemical alterations in spring versus fall needles. The data presented here suggests that when investigating multivoltine folivorous insect responses to elevated CO{sub 2}-grown tree seedlings in which multiple leaf flushes within a growing season expose insects to an array of leaf phytochemical changes, >1 insect generation should be investigated. 54 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbent Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Chorover, J.; Mueller, K. T.; O'Day, P. A.; Serne, R. J.; Steefel, C. I.

    2009-10-30

    This project aimed for a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) transport/fate in caustic waste-impacted sediments. Based on our prior studies of model clay mineral systems, we postulated that contaminant uptake to Hanford sediments would reflect concurrent adsorption and co-precipitation effects. Our specific objectives were: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments [(1) and (2)] that simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption dynamics. Progress toward achieving each of these objectives is discussed below. We observed unique molecular mechanisms for sequestration of Sr, Cs and I during native silicate weathering in caustic waste. Product solids, which included poorly crystalline aluminosilicates and well-crystallized zeolites and feldspathoids, accumulate contaminant species during crystal growth.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil of the Canadian River floodplain in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sartori, F.; Wade, T.L.; Sericano, J.L.; Mohanty, B.P.; Smith, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    The accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in soil, plants, and water may impart negative eff ects on ecosystem and human health. We quantified the concentration and distribution of 41 PAH (n = 32), organic C, total N, and S (n = 140) and investigated PAH sources using a chronosequence of floodplain soils under a natural vegetation succession. Soil samples were collected between 0- and 260-cm depth in bare land (the control), wetland, forest, and grassland areas near a closed municipal landfill and an active asphalt plant (the contaminant sources) in the north bank of the Canadian River near Norman, OK. Principal component, cluster, and correlation analyses were used to investigate the spatial distribution of PAH, in combination with diagnostic ratios to distinguish pyrogenic vs. petrogenic PAH suites. Total PAH concentration (??PAH) had a mean of 1300 ng g-1, minimum of 16 ng g-1, and maximum of 12,000 ng g-1. At 0- to 20-cm depth, ??PAH was 3500 ?? 1600 ng g-1 (mean ?? 1 SE) near the contaminant sources. The most common compounds were nonalkylated, high molecular weight PAH of pyrogenic origin, i.e., fluoranthene (17%), pyrene (14%), phenanthrene (9%), benzo(b)fluoranthene (7%), chrysene (6%), and benzo(a)anthracene (5%). ??PAH in the control (130 ?? 23 ng g -1) was comparable to reported concentrations for the rural Great Plains. Perylene had a unique distribution pattern suggesting biological inputs. The main PAH contamination mechanisms were likely atmospheric deposition due to asphalt production at the 0- to 20-cm depth and past landfill operations at deeper depths. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  10. Soil-transmitted helminth infections and physical fitness in school-aged Bulang children in southwest China: results from a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections have been associated with reduced physical fitness, but available evidence is limited. The aim of this cross-sectional survey was to assess the feasibility of measuring children's physical fitness and to relate it to STH infections. Our study was carried out among school-aged children of the Bulang ethnic group in rural southwest People's Republic of China (P.R. China). Standardized, quality-controlled methods were employed to determine STH infections (Kato-Katz technique), haemoglobin levels, anthropometry (body weight and height) and physical fitness (20-m shuttle run test). Results A compliance of 87% suggested good acceptance of the methods used. Among 69 children with complete data records, infection prevalence of Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides and hookworm were 81%, 44% and 6%, respectively. The maximum volume of oxygen that can be utilized within 1 min during exhaustive exercise (VO2 max estimate) of T. trichiura-infected children was 1.94 ml kg-1 min-1 lower than that of their non-infected counterparts (P = 0.005). Until exhaustion, T. trichiura-infected children had completed 6.14 20-m laps less (P = 0.004). Additionally, the mean VO2 max estimate of stunted children was lowered by 1.63 ml kg-1 min-1 (P = 0.002) and they completed 5.32 20-m laps less (P = 0.001) compared to children of normal stature. No significant association between stunting and infection with any STH species could be established. Conclusions Implementation of physical fitness tests in rural, resource-constraint settings is feasible. The physical fitness of children who are stunted or infected with STHs, particularly T. trichiura, is significantly impaired. We have launched a larger study and will determine the dynamics of school-aged children's physical fitness over a 7-month period after administration of anthelminthic drugs. PMID:22424138

  11. Soil-Transmitted Helminth Reinfection and Associated Risk Factors among School-Age Children in Chencha District, Southern Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zerdo, Zerihun; Yohanes, Tsegaye; Tariku, Befikadu

    2016-01-01

    Mass drug administration (MDA) to the most risky population including school-age children (SAC) is the central strategy to control soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infection. The present study was aimed at estimating the prevalence of STHs reinfection three months posttreatment and associated risk factors among SAC in Chencha district. A cross-sectional study design was employed from April 20 to May 5, 2015, to enroll 408 SAC. Structured questionnaire and Kato-Katz thick smear technique were used to interview parents or guardians and quantify the number of eggs per gram of stool. Pearson chi-square and logistic regression were used to assess the association between predictor variable and STH reinfection. The prevalence of STHs within three months of mass chemotherapy among SAC was 36.8% which is 93.4% of the prevalence (39.4%) before treatment. The estimated prevalence of reinfection (95%CI) for Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworms was 23.8% (21.1–28.2), 16.2% (12.7–20.1), and 1.0% (0.3–2.5), respectively. Children of merchant fathers were more likely to be reinfected by STHs in Chencha district. In conclusion, there is rapid reinfection after mass chemotherapy among SAC in Chencha district. Further studies should be carried out to generate cost efficient methods that can supplement mass drug administration to accelerate the control of STHs. PMID:26941997

  12. Shifts in bryophyte carbon isotope ratio across an elevation × soil age matrix on Mauna Loa, Hawaii: do bryophytes behave like vascular plants?

    PubMed

    Waite, Mashuri; Sack, Lawren

    2011-05-01

    The carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C) of vascular plant leaf tissue is determined by isotope discrimination, primarily mediated by stomatal and mesophyll diffusion resistances and by photosynthetic rate. These effects lead to predictable trends in leaf δ(13)C across natural gradients of elevation, irradiance and nutrient supply. Less is known about shifts in δ(13)C for bryophytes at landscape scale, as bryophytes lack stomata in the dominant gametophyte phase, and thus lack active control over CO(2) diffusion. Twelve bryophyte species were sampled across a matrix of elevation and soil ages on Mauna Loa, Hawaii Island. We tested hypotheses based on previous findings for vascular plants, which tend to have less negative δ(13)C at higher elevations or irradiances, and for leaves with higher leaf mass per area (LMA). Across the matrix, bryophytes spanned the range of δ(13)C values typical of C(3) vascular plants. Bryophytes were remarkably similar to vascular plants in exhibiting less negative δ(13)C with increasing elevation, and with lower overstory cover; additionally δ(13)C was related to bryophyte canopy projected mass per area, a trait analogous to LMA in vascular plants, also correlated negatively with overstory cover. The similarity of responses of δ(13)C in bryophytes and vascular plants to environmental factors, despite differing morphologies and diffusion pathways, points to a strong direct role of photosynthetic rate in determining δ(13)C variation at the landscape scale.

  13. Effects of pig manure compost and nonionic-surfactant Tween 80 on phenanthrene and pyrene removal from soil vegetated with Agropyron elongatum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K Y; Lai, K M; Wong, J W C

    2008-10-01

    This paper evaluates the effects of pig manure compost (PMC) and Tween 80 on the removal of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) from soil cultivated with Agropyron elongatum. Soils spiked with about 300 mg kg(-1) of PHE and PYR were individually amended with 0%, 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% (dry wt) of PMC or 0, 20 and 100 mg kg(-1) of Tween 80. Unplanted and sterile microcosms were prepared as the controls. PAH concentration, total organic matter (TOM), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total heterotrophic and PAH degrading microbial populations in soil were quantified before and after 60d period. The results indicated that A. elongatum could significantly enhance PYR removal (from 46% to 61%) but had less impact on PHE removal (from 96% to 97%). Plant uptake of the PAHs was insignificant. Biodegradation was the key mechanism of PAH removals (<3% losses in the sterile control). Increase in PMC or Tween 80 levels increased the removal of PYR but not of PHE. Maximal PYR removal of 79% and 92% were observed in vegetated soil receiving 100 mg kg(-1) Tween 80 and 7.5% PMC, respectively. Enhanced PYR removal in soil receiving PMC could be explained by the elevated levels of DOC, TOM and microbial populations as suggested by Pearson correlation test. While the positive effect of Tween 80 on PYR removal could probably due to its capacities to enhance PYR bioavailability in soil. This paper suggests that the addition of either PMC or nonionic-surfactant Tween 80 could facilitate phytoremediation of PAH contaminated soil.

  14. Toxicities of RDX or TNT Freshly Amended or Weathered-and-Aged in Five Natural Soils to the Collembolan Folsomia candida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    acid to acidify the water and thereby simulate the soil–water conditions that exist as a result of respiration by soil biota. To retain the effects of...TNT concentrations determined by this method better simulate field soil–water conditions that exist due to respiration by soil biota; also, this...cultures in a natural soil under aerobic conditions. Extensive degradation occurred only under anaerobic conditions after several weeks; the RDX

  15. Microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and cyanide in soils from manufactured gas plant sites

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, YiFong.

    1993-01-01

    The microbial clean-up of cyanide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in soils from manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites is the subject of this study. Cyanide was examined for its inhibition on microbial PAH degradation by an MGP-soil isolate identified as a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by classical differential methods as well as 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probes. A strong cyanide-degrading Bacillus pumilus (ATCC No. 7061) strain was used for facilitating cyanide degradation thereby enhancing PAH biodegradation in this soil. This research has validated cyanide interference with the PAH degrader and shown that adding Bacillus pumilus accomplishes the removal of cyanide which subsequently allows Pseudomonas aeruginosa to metabolize PAHs. In addition to the biodegradation of cyanide and lower ring numbered PAHs, the microbial degradation of 4-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by using a mixed culture obtained from another former coal tar contaminated site was also studied. The rate of biotransformation and the abiotic loss due to volatilization were monitored. The 3-ring PAH used in this project was phenanthrene and the 4-ring PAHs used were fluoranthene and pyrene. The results showed that volatilization loss of naphthalene in the control system was substantial while volatilization of higher molecular weight PAH compounds (fluoranthene and pyrene) was negligible. The biodegradation rates of phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene are 6.56, 1.59 and 0.82 mg/L/day, respectively or 65.6, 15.9, 8.2 mg/gram of cells/day assuming 100 mg cells/L in the system. This study indicates that biodegradation of 3- and 4-ring PAHs by mixed cultures obtained from PAH contaminated sites is very promising. These studies will contribute to the understanding of PAH and cyanide removal from MGP and provide information for the design of a bioremediation project to reclaim unusable land that was contaminated through the previous coal gasification process.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION AND FATE OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AT THE WYCKOFF/EAGLE HARBOR SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eagle Harbor is a shallow marine embayment of Bainbridge Island, WA and formerly the site of the Wyckoff wood-treatment facility. The facility became operational in the early 1900s and used large quantities of creosote in its wood-treating processes. Creosote percolated through t...

  17. PAHs contamination and bacterial communities in mangrove surface sediments of the Jiulong River Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y; Liu, H J; Zheng, T L; Kwon, K K; Kim, S J; Yan, C L

    2008-01-01

    Sixteen sediment samples collected from eight transects in a mangrove swamp of the Jiulong River Estuary, Fujian, China were investigated for their content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the biodegradation potential of the indigenous microorganisms. The bacterial community structures in the mangrove sediments and in enrichment cultures were also investigated. The results showed that the total PAHs concentration of mangrove sediments ranged from 280 to 1074 ng g(-1) dry weight, that the PAHs composition pattern in the mangrove sediments was dominated by high molecular weight PAH components (4-6 rings), and that Benzo[ghi]perylene and Indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene were the most dominant at different stations. Abundant PAH-degrading bacteria were found in all the stations, the values of phenanthrene-degrading bacteria ranged from 5.85 x 10(4) to 7.80 x 10(5) CFU g(-1) dry weight, fluoranthene-degrading bacteria ranged from 5.25 x 10(4) to 5.79 x 10(5) CFU g(-1) dry weight, pyrene-degrading bacteria ranged from 3.10 x 10(4) to 6.97 x 10(5) CFU g(-1) dry weight and the benzo(a)pyrene-degrading bacteria ranged from 5.25 x 10(4) to 7.26 x 10(5) CFU g(-1) dry weight. DGGE analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA gene fragments confirmed that there was a remarkable shift in the composition of the bacterial community due to the addition of the different model PAH compound phenanthrene (three ring PAH), fluoranthene(four ring PAH), pyrene(four ring PAH) and benzo(a)pyrene(five ring PAH) during enrichment batch culture. Eleven strains were obtained with different morphology and different degradation ability. The presence of common bands for microbial species in the cultures and in the native mangrove sediment DNA indicated that these strains could be potential in situ PAH-degraders.

  18. Over a century of PAH contamination history to New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, B.; Bopp, R.; Chillrud, S. N.; Abrajano, T.

    2015-12-01

    Spatially and temporally integrated urban lake sediments have the potential to be used for reconstructing air contamination history, with data being available even before the start of urban air quality monitoring. In a previous study, fine-grained sediment sample cores were collected from the Lower Hudson River basin and dated via radionuclides. An objective source appointment method has been established based on several source-sensitive molecular indicators we found. An over 100 year historical record of energy usage in New York City has been reconstructed in cores from Central Park Lake. The reconstructed history is consistent with historical energy consumption data of NYS complied by the US Department of Energy. Wood combustion was dominant one century ago in Manhattan, followed by coal combustion dominance from the 1900s to the 1940s. Petroleum combustion, mainly from motor vehicles in Manhattan, increased gradually from the 1920s, and became the dominant PAH input after 1940s. In most samples collected from elsewhere in the lower Hudson River Basin, petroleum combustion was the dominant PAH input in the last half century. From 2001 to 2012, indoor and outdoor air filter samples were collected from NYC apartments; though non-volatile PAH levels were quite stable, pyrene, which is a semi-volatile PAHs compound, increased over these 12 years, especially in the heating season. The burning of No.6 oil in NYC boilers is thought to lead to this increase and the recent effort in switching No. 6 heating oil to No.2 oil has the potential to overturn the increasing trend.

  19. PAHs contamination in bank sediment of the Yamuna river, Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Tripti; Khillare, P S; Shridhar, Vijay

    2006-12-01

    This study was performed to elucidate the distribution, concentration trend and possible sources of PAHs in bank sediment of river Yamuna in Delhi, India. The levels of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed during pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons in the sediment fraction < 53 microm. Reference standards and internal standards were used for identification and quantification of PAHs by HPLC. The sum of 16 PAH compounds ranged from 4.50 to 23.53 microg/g with a mean concentration of 10.15 +/- 4.32 microg/g (dry wt.). Among 5 sites studied, the site, Income Tax Office (ITO) was found to be the hotspot attaining highest concentration. Predominance of 2-4 ring PAHs suggests a relatively recent local sources of PAHs in the study area. Moreover, molecular indices based source apportionment also illustrates pyrogenic source fingerprint of PAHs. No significant temporal trend was observed.

  20. UTILIZATION OF BIOREMEDIATION PROCESSES FOR THE TREATMENT OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS. (R825513C020)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. In situ biomonitoring of PAH-contaminated sediments using juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Barbee, Gary C; Barich, John; Duncan, Bruce; Bickham, John W; Matson, Cole W; Hintze, Christopher J; Autenrieth, Robin L; Zhou, Guo-Dong; McDonald, Thomas J; Cizmas, Leslie; Norton, Dale; Donnelly, Kirby C

    2008-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous marine and freshwater sediment contaminants. Extensive data exist to confirm that PAHs are toxic to aquatic receptors. However, limited information is available regarding the bioavailability and genotoxicity of sediment PAHs to aquatic organisms. This study investigated an integrated biomonitoring approach using chemical analyses and biomarkers to characterize the bioavailability and genotoxicity of a complex PAH mixture in freshwater lake sediments associated with a former manufactured gas plant (MGP). Sediment PAH genotoxicity was assessed by flow cytometry (FCM), DNA adduct (32)P-postlabeling, and erythrocyte micronuclei in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) caged in the water column. Significant PAH-induced genotoxicity was observed with FCM and (32)P-postlabeling, but not with erythrocyte micronuclei. Chromosome damage in peripheral blood and hepatic DNA adducts correlated with sediment, but not water column PAH concentrations. Total hepatic DNA adducts in salmon caged nearest the former MGP facility was 39+/-6.5 (RALx10(9)), while salmon caged in a reference lake had 28+/-2.3 total hepatic DNA adducts per 10(9) nucleotides. These results indicate that in situ biomonitoring using biomarkers and caged fish can be a sensitive indicator of genotoxic PAHs in sediments.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING SEDIMENT GUIDELINES IN THE ASSESSMENT OF SEDIMENT PAH CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency used insights and methods from its water quality criteria program to develop ESGs. The discovery that freely-dissolved contaminants were the toxic form led to equilibrium partitioning being chosen to model the distribution of contaminants...

  3. Tenax extraction for exploring rate-limiting factors in methyl-β-cyclodextrin enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of PAHs under denitrifying conditions in a red paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yongming; Jiang, Xin; Kengara, Fredrick Orori

    2014-01-15

    The effectiveness of anaerobic bioremediation systems for PAH-contaminated soil may be constrained by low contaminants bioaccessibility due to limited aqueous solubility and lack of suitable electron acceptors. Information on what is the rate-limiting factor in bioremediation process is of vital importance in the decision in what measures can be taken to assist the biodegradation efficacy. In the present study, four different microcosms were set to study the effect of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and nitrate addition (N) on PAHs biodegradation under anaerobic conditions in a red paddy soil. Meanwhile, sequential Tenax extraction combined with a first-three-compartment model was employed to evaluate the rate-limiting factors in MCD enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of PAHs. Microcosms with both 1% (w/w) MCD and 20mM N addition produced maximum biodegradation of total PAHs of up to 61.7%. It appears rate-limiting factors vary with microcosms: low activity of degrading microorganisms is the vital rate-limiting factor for control and MCD addition treatments (CK and M treatments); and lack of bioaccessible PAHs is the main rate-limiting factor for nitrate addition treatments (N and MN treatments). These results have practical implications for site risk assessment and cleanup strategies.

  4. A novel P450-initiated biphasic process for sustainable biodegradation of benzo[a]pyrene in soil under nutrient-sufficient conditions by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sukanta S; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Shann, Jodi; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2013-10-15

    High molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) are resistant to biodegradation in soil. Conventionally, white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been investigated for HMW-PAH degradation in soil primarily using nutrient-deficient (ligninolytic) conditions, albeit with limited and non-sustainable biodegradation outcomes. In this study, we report development of an alternative novel biphasic process initiated under nutrient-sufficient (non-ligninolytic) culture conditions, by employing an advanced experimental design strategy. During the initial nutrient-sufficient non-ligninolytic phase (16 days), the process showed upregulation (3.6- and 22.3-fold, respectively) of two key PAH-oxidizing P450 monooxygenases pc2 (CYP63A2) and pah4 (CYP5136A3) and formation of typical P450-hydroxylated metabolite. This along with abrogation (84.9%) of BaP degradation activity in response to a P450-specific inhibitor implied key role of these monooxygenases. The subsequent phase triggered on continued incubation (to 25 days) switched the process from non-ligninolytic to ligninolytic resulting in a significantly higher net degradation (91.6% as against 67.4% in the control nutrient-limited set) of BaP with concomitant de novo ligninolytic enzyme expression making it a biphasic process yielding improved sustainable bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil. To our knowledge this is the first report on development of such biphasic process for bioremediation application of a white rot fungus.

  5. Age chronosequence and landscape effects on the quality characteristics of reclaimed coal mine soils under forest and pasture based system in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface coal mining leads to reclamation which uses materials favorable to plant growth; however, these materials may initially be low in organic C. It is important to study the soil organic C sequestration potential of reclaimed mine soils under different land use and management systems. Few studie...

  6. Response of bacterial pdo1, nah, and C12O genes to aged soil PAH pollution in a coke factory area.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue-Mei; Liu, Yu-Rong; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; He, Ji-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Soil pollution caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is threatening human health and environmental safety. Investigating the relative prevalence of different PAH-degrading genes in PAH-polluted soils and searching for potential bioindicators reflecting the impact of PAH pollution on microbial communities are useful for microbial monitoring, risk evaluation, and potential bioremediation of soils polluted by PAHs. In this study, three functional genes, pdo1, nah, and C12O, which might be involved in the degradation of PAHs from a coke factory, were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and clone library approaches. The results showed that the pdo1 and C12O genes were more abundant than the nah gene in the soils. There was a significantly positive relationship between the nah or pdo1 gene abundances and PAH content, while there was no correlation between C12O gene abundance and PAH content. Analyses of clone libraries showed that all the pdo1 sequences were grouped into Mycobacterium, while all the nah sequences were classified into three groups: Pseudomonas, Comamonas, and Polaromonas. These results indicated that the abundances of nah and pdo1 genes were positively influenced by levels of PAHs in soil and could be potential microbial indicators reflecting the impact of soil PAH pollution and that Mycobacteria were one of the most prevalent PAHs degraders in these PAH-polluted soils. Principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation analyses between microbial parameters and environmental factors revealed that total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) had positive effects on the abundances of all PAH-degrading genes. It suggests that increasing TC, TN, and DOC inputs could be a useful way to remediate PAH-polluted soils.

  7. The Soil Series in Soil Classifications of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indorante, Samuel; Beaudette, Dylan; Brevik, Eric C.

    2014-05-01

    Organized national soil survey began in the United States in 1899, with soil types as the units being mapped. The soil series concept was introduced into the U.S. soil survey in 1903 as a way to relate soils being mapped in one area to the soils of other areas. The original concept of a soil series was all soil types formed in the same parent materials that were of the same geologic age. However, within about 15 years soil series became the primary units being mapped in U.S. soil survey. Soil types became subdivisions of soil series, with the subdivisions based on changes in texture. As the soil series became the primary mapping unit the concept of what a soil series was also changed. Instead of being based on parent materials and geologic age, the soil series of the 1920s was based on the morphology and composition of the soil profile. Another major change in the concept of soil series occurred when U.S. Soil Taxonomy was released in 1975. Under Soil Taxonomy, the soil series subdivisions were based on the uses the soils might be put to, particularly their agricultural uses (Simonson, 1997). While the concept of the soil series has changed over the years, the term soil series has been the longest-lived term in U.S. soil classification. It has appeared in every official classification system used by the U.S. soil survey (Brevik and Hartemink, 2013). The first classification system was put together by Milton Whitney in 1909 and had soil series at its second lowest level, with soil type at the lowest level. The second classification system used by the U.S. soil survey was developed by C.F. Marbut, H.H. Bennett, J.E. Lapham, and M.H. Lapham in 1913. It had soil series at the second highest level, with soil classes and soil types at more detailed levels. This was followed by another system in 1938 developed by M. Baldwin, C.E. Kellogg, and J. Thorp. In this system soil series were again at the second lowest level with soil types at the lowest level. The soil type

  8. Distribution of P, K, Ca, Mg, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn in wood and bark age classes of willows and poplars used for phytoextraction on soils contaminated by risk elements.

    PubMed

    Zárubová, Pavla; Hejcman, Michal; Vondráčková, Stanislava; Mrnka, Libor; Száková, Jiřina; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2015-12-01

    Fast-growing clones of Salix and Populus have been studied for remediation of soils contaminated by risk elements (RE) using short-rotation coppice plantations. Our aim was to assess biomass yield and distributions of elements in wood and bark of highly productive willow (S1--[Salix schwerinii × Salix viminalis] × S. viminalis, S2--Salix × smithiana clone S-218) and poplar (P1--Populus maximowiczii × Populus nigra, P2--P. nigra) clones with respect to aging. The field experiment was established in April 2008 on moderately Cd-, Pb- and Zn- contaminated soil. Shoots were harvested after four seasons (February 2012) and separated into annual classes of wood and bark. All tested clones grew on contaminated soils, with highest biomass production and lowest mortality exhibited by P1 and S2. Concentrations of elements, with exception of Ca and Pb, decreased with age and were higher in bark than in wood. The Salix clones were characterised by higher removal of Cd, Mn and Zn compared to the Populus clones. Despite generally higher RE content in young shoots, partly due to lower wood/bark ratios and higher RE concentrations in bark, the overall removal of RE was higher in older wood classes due to higher biomass yield. Thus, longer rotations seem to be more effective when phytoextraction strategy is considered. Of the four selected clones, S1 exhibited the best removal of Cd and Zn and is a good candidate for phytoextraction.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen status of litterfall, litter decomposition and soil in even-aged larch, red pine and rigitaeda pine plantations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choonsig; Jeong, Jaeyeob; Cho, Hyun-Seo; Son, Yowhan

    2010-07-01

    The carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) status in forest ecosystems can change upon establishment of plantations because different tree species have different nutrient cycling mechanisms. This study was carried out to evaluate C and N status of litterfall, litter decomposition and soil in three adjacent plantations consisting of one deciduous (larch: Larix leptolepis) and two evergreen (red pine: Pinus densiflora; rigitaeda pine: P. rigida x P. taeda) species planted in the same year (1963). Both the pine plantations showed comparatively higher C input from needle litter but significantly lower N concentration and input than the larch plantation (P < 0.05). During the decomposition process, the deciduous larch needle litter showed low C concentration and C remaining in soil, but high N concentration and N remaining in soil compared to the two evergreen pine needle litters. However, the soil C and N concentration and their content at a soil depth of 0-10 cm were not affected significantly (P > 0.05) by the plantation type. These results demonstrate the existence of considerable variation in C and N status resulting from needle litter input and litter decomposition in these three plantations grown at sites with similar environmental conditions.

  10. Transformation and accumulation of PAH and bound residues in soil under extreme conditions - a risk assessment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, Annette

    2010-05-01

    The degradation of PAH in contaminated soil does not proceed completely in the majority of cases. However microorganisms which are able to degrade PAH are present in PAH-contaminated soils normally. A total degradation of PAH in contaminated soils is often limited by a lack of bioavailability, which results from a lack of mass transfer. The analytical depletion of contaminants in soil is not only based on degradation processes but also on a fixation or immobilization of the xenobiotic substances as stronger adsorbed to or bound residues in the soil matrix. These bound residues were verified by using 14C-labelled PAH in different soil samples. To evaluate the long term fate of theses PAH-residues the stability and transformation of 14C-labelled non-extractable PAH-residues was investigated in detail under different extreme ecological and climate conditions such as biological stress, freezing and thawing cycles, and chemical worst case conditions. The transformation and remobilization of non-extractable PAH-residues was observed in long-time experiments and was very limited in general (Eschenbach et al. 2001). Only small amounts of non extractable residues were transformed and converted to CO2 and thereby detoxified. However the treatment with a complexing agent led to an increase of extractable 14C-activity. In a further set of experiments the long term risk of a groundwater contamination was assessed. Therefore the elution rate of 14C-PAH was investigated by a routinely usable column test system. It was found that the PAH elution was not solely controlled by desorption processes. The extractable PAH concentrations and elution rates were affected by the mineralization and formation of bound residues as well. For the assessment of the maximum PAH release rate the soil material was treated by extreme and worst case conditions as well. The impact of the elution of bidestillated water, of repeated freeze-thaw cycles and a simulation of acidic rain was investigated. The

  11. Chemical characterization and bioactivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from non-oxidative thermal treatment of pyrene-contaminated soil at 250-1,000 degrees C.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, H; Risoul, V; Lafleur, A L; Plummer, E F; Howard, J B; Peters, W A

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we report yields, identities, and mutagenicities of products from heating a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated, Superfund-related synthetic soil matrix without exogenous oxygen. We heated batch samples of soil pretreated with 5.08 wt% (by weight) pyrene in a tubular furnace under a constant flow of helium gas at 250, 500, 750, and 1,000 +/- 20 degrees C. Dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of cooled residues of heated soil and of volatiles condensed on a cold finger after 1 sec residence time at furnace temperature were assayed gravimetrically and analyzed for PAH by HPLC, HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. All four temperatures volatilized pyrene and generated other PAHs, including alkylated pyrenes. We detected bioactive PAHs in the product volatiles: cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP) at 750 and 1,000 degrees C and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) at 1,000 degrees C. We found a clean soil residue, i.e., no pyrene or other DCM extracts, only at 750 degrees C. Control experiments with uncontaminated soil, pyrene, and Ottawa sand plus 4.89 wt% pyrene revealed no CPP or BaP production from soil itself, but these experiments imply that pyrene interactions with soil, e.g., soil-bound silica, stimulate CPP and BaP production. We detected mutagenicity to human diploid lymphoblasts (in vitro) in volatiles from 1,000 degrees C heating of soil plus pyrene and sand plus pyrene, and in the residue from 500 degrees C heating of soil plus pyrene. Three plausible pathways for pyrene conversion to other PAHs are a) a reaction with light gas species, e.g., soil- or pyrene-derived acetylene; b) loss of C(2)-units followed by reaction with a PAH; and c) dimerization with further molecular weight growth via cyclodehydrogenation. This study shows that thermal treatment of PAH-polluted soil may generate toxic by-products that require further cleanup by oxidation or other measures. Images Figure 2 PMID:10964790

  12. Land use effects on microbial biomass C, ß-glucosidase and ß-glucosaminidase activities, and availability, storage, and age of organic C in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is scant information that describes the functioning of Vertisols in the tropics with regards to C and N storage capacity and turnover, distribution, and biological indicators of ecosystem health as affected by land-use. These soils play a significant role in the amounts of carbon (C) sequeste...

  13. SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY REPORT: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    IT Corporation (IT), Knoxville, Tennessee, in collaboration with U.S. Environmental protection Agency (EPA), investigated the feasibility of combined biological and chemical oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Bioslurry treatment of PAH-contaminated soils was dem...

  14. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tests reported herein were conducted by IT Corporation (IT), Knoxville, TN, to investigate the feasibility of combined biological and chemical treatments to treat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Bioslurry treatment of PAH-contaminated soils was demonstrated under the...

  15. Bioaccumulation and cancer risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in leafy vegetables grown in soils within automobile repair complex and environ in Uyo, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Inam, Edu; Ibanga, Felicia; Essien, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and an incremental lifetime cancer risks (ILCRs) assessment model, the bioaccumulation and cancer risk of 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in leafy vegetables (Vernonia amygdalina and Lasianthera africanum) grown in soils within an automobile repair complex environment in Uyo, Nigeria was studied. The total PAHs concentrations recorded for soils ranged from 0.02 to 1.77 mg/kg. The highest level of 1.77 mg/kg was recorded for soils from the main automobile repair complex (site 1). Low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs were predominant although some high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs suites (0.04 mg/kg of chrysene and 0.04 of benzo[k]fluoranthene) were also found in site 1. The leafy vegetables accumulated PAHs were mostly LMW. Accumulation levels were similar but the extent of PAH uptake in vegetables was species dependent as V. amygdalina accumulated more (0.81 mg/kg). The bioaccumulation factors (BaFs) calculated ranged from 0.22 to 0.63 for L. africanum, and 0.18 to 0.55 for V. amygdalina in site 1 where high PAH levels were recorded in soil. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis revealed a strong positive relation between the PAH content of soil and the amount accumulated by L. africanum (r = 0.5) and V. amygdalina (r = 0.8) at p = 0.05. The vegetable's potential to bioaccumulate PAHs is indicative of their use as good bioindicators for PAH contamination in soil. Only two of the USEPA possible human carcinogenic PAHs were detected, and carcinogenic risk assessment based on occupational exposures to soil particles by adults revealed that the total risk level (7.17 × 10(-5)) contribution from incidental soil ingestion, dermal contact, and soil particle dust inhalation slightly exceed the USEPA acceptable limits (< 1.00 × 10(-5)). There is a need for public education on consumption of vegetables grown in and around automobile repair complexes across Nigeria.

  16. Leaf hydraulic conductance declines in coordination with photosynthesis, transpiration and leaf water status as soybean leaves age regardless of soil moisture

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Anna M.; Ort, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis requires sufficient water transport through leaves for stomata to remain open as water transpires from the leaf, allowing CO2 to diffuse into the leaf. The leaf water needs of soybean change over time because of large microenvironment changes over their lifespan, as leaves mature in full sun at the top of the canopy and then become progressively shaded by younger leaves developing above. Leaf hydraulic conductance (K leaf), a measure of the leaf’s water transport capacity, can often be linked to changes in microenvironment and transpiration demand. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that K leaf would decline in coordination with transpiration demand as soybean leaves matured and aged. Photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g s) and leaf water potential (Ψleaf) were also measured at various leaf ages with both field- and chamber-grown soybeans to assess transpiration demand. K leaf was found to decrease as soybean leaves aged from maturity to shading to senescence, and this decrease was strongly correlated with midday A. Decreases in K leaf were further correlated with decreases in g s, although the relationship was not as strong as that with A. Separate experiments investigating the response of K leaf to drought demonstrated no acclimation of K leaf to drought conditions to protect against cavitation or loss of g s during drought and confirmed the effect of leaf age in K leaf observed in the field. These results suggest that the decline of leaf hydraulic conductance as leaves age keeps hydraulic supply in balance with demand without K leaf becoming limiting to transpiration water flux. PMID:25281701

  17. Leaf hydraulic conductance declines in coordination with photosynthesis, transpiration and leaf water status as soybean leaves age regardless of soil moisture.

    PubMed

    Locke, Anna M; Ort, Donald R

    2014-12-01

    Photosynthesis requires sufficient water transport through leaves for stomata to remain open as water transpires from the leaf, allowing CO2 to diffuse into the leaf. The leaf water needs of soybean change over time because of large microenvironment changes over their lifespan, as leaves mature in full sun at the top of the canopy and then become progressively shaded by younger leaves developing above. Leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)), a measure of the leaf's water transport capacity, can often be linked to changes in microenvironment and transpiration demand. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that K(leaf) would decline in coordination with transpiration demand as soybean leaves matured and aged. Photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g(s)) and leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)) were also measured at various leaf ages with both field- and chamber-grown soybeans to assess transpiration demand. K(leaf) was found to decrease as soybean leaves aged from maturity to shading to senescence, and this decrease was strongly correlated with midday A. Decreases in K(leaf) were further correlated with decreases in g(s), although the relationship was not as strong as that with A. Separate experiments investigating the response of K(leaf) to drought demonstrated no acclimation of K(leaf) to drought conditions to protect against cavitation or loss of g(s) during drought and confirmed the effect of leaf age in K(leaf) observed in the field. These results suggest that the decline of leaf hydraulic conductance as leaves age keeps hydraulic supply in balance with demand without K(leaf)becoming limiting to transpiration water flux.

  18. Conserving Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Designed as enrichment materials for grades six through nine, this program is an interdisciplinary study of soils. As part of the program students: (1) examine soil organisms; (2) research history of local Native Americans to see how they and others have used the land and its soils; (3) investigate how soils are degraded and how they are conserved…

  19. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF COPPER IN SOILS AND SOIL MINERALS - I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioavailability and toxicity of Cu in soils is controlled by a number of soil properties and processes. Some of these such as pH, adsorption/desorption and competition with beneficial cations have been extensively studied. However, the effects of natural attenuation (or aging...

  20. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF COPPER IN SOILS AND SOIL MINERALS - II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioabailability and toxicity of Cu in soils is controlled by a number of soil properties and processes. Some of these such as pH, adsorption/desorption and competition with beneficial cations have been extensively studied. However, the effects of natural attenuation (or aging...

  1. K0-Behavior of Normally Consolidated Fine-Grained Soils during One-Dimensional Secondary Compression Aging and the Quantitative Prediction of the Quasi-Preconsolidation Effect.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    Plastic Kaolinite and three Agsco novaculite, were allowed to age a minimum of 14 days under 2 tsf vertical stress while the Ko-condition was maintained and...16 3.1 Introduction ................................ 16 3.2 Edgar Plastic Kaolinite ....................... 17 3.3 Novaculite...system are provided. "’Six normally consolidated fine-grained specimens, three Edjar Plastic Kaolinite and three Agsco novaculite, were allowed to

  2. Amelioration of soil PAH and heavy metals by combined application of fly ash and biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masto, Reginald; George, Joshy; Ansari, Md; Ram, Lal

    2016-04-01

    Generation of electricity through coal combustion produces huge quantities of fly ash. Sustainable disposal and utilization of these fly ash is a major challenge. Fly ash along with other amendments like biochar could be used for amelioration of soil. In this study, fly ash and biochar were used together for amelioration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil. Field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of fly ash and biochar on the amelioration of soil PAH, and the yield of Zea mays. The treatments were control, biochar (4 t/ha), fly ash (4 t/ha), ash + biochar ( 2 + 2 t/ha). Soil samples were collected after the harvest of maize crop and analysed for chemical and biological parameters. Thirteen PAHs were analysed in the postharvest soil samples. Soil PAHs were extracted in a microwave oven at 120 °C using hexane : acetone (1:1) mixture. The extracted solutions were concentrated, cleaned and the 13 PAHs [Acenaphthene (Ace), fluorene (Flr), phenanthrene (Phn), anthracene(Ant), pyrene(Pyr), benz(a)anthracene (BaA), chrysene (Chy), benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF), benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF), benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP), dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene)(Inp)] were analysed using GC-MS. The mean pH increased from 6.09 in control to 6.64 and 6.58 at biochar and fly ash treated soils, respectively. N content was not affected, whereas addition of biochar alone and in combination with fly ash, has significantly increased the soil organic carbon content. P content was almost double in combined (9.06 mg/kg) treatment as compared to control (4.32 mg/kg). The increase in K due to biochar was 118%, whereas char + ash increased soil K by 64%. Soil heavy metals were decreased: Zn (-48.4%), Ni (-41.4%), Co (-36.9%), Cu (-35.7%), Mn (-34.3%), Cd (-33.2%), and Pb (-30.4%). Soil dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased by ash and biochar treatments and the maximum activity was observed for the combined

  3. Distribution of endophytic bacteria in Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L. from soils contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yanzheng; Chen, Zeyou

    2013-01-01

    The distributions of endophytic bacteria in Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L. grown in soils contaminated with different levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated with polymerase chain reaction followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technology (PCR-DGGE) and cultivation methods. Twelve types of PAHs, at concentrations varying from 0.16 to 180 mg·kg(-1), were observed in the roots and shoots of the two plants. The total PAH concentrations in Alopecurus aequalis Sobol obtained from three different PAH-contaminated stations were 184, 197, and 304 mg·kg(-1), and the total PAH concentrations in Oxalis corniculata L. were 251, 346, and 600 mg·kg(-1), respectively. The PCR-DGGE results showed that the endophytic bacterial communities in the roots and shoots of the two plants were quite different, although most bacteria belonged to Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A total of 68 endophytic bacterial strains were isolated from different tissues of the two plants and classified into three phyla: Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. In both plants, Bacillus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were the dominant cultivable populations. With an increase in the PAH pollution level, the diversity and distribution of endophytic bacteria in the two plants changed correspondingly, and the number of cultivable endophytic bacterial strains decreased rapidly. Testing of the isolated endophytic bacteria for tolerance to each type of PAH showed that most isolates could grow well on Luria-Bertani media in the presence of different PAHs, and some isolates were able to grow rapidly on a mineral salt medium with a single PAH as the sole carbon and energy source, indicating that these strains may have the potential to degrade PAHs in plants. This research provides the first insight into the characteristics of endophytic bacterial populations under different PAH pollution levels and provides a species

  4. Soil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Linton; Butler, Todd; Smith, Mike; Cline, Charles; Scruggs, Steve; Zakhia, Nadim

    1987-01-01

    An experimental procedure was devised to investigate the effects of the lunar environment on the physical properties of simulated lunar soil. The test equipment and materials used consisted of a vacuum chamber, direct shear tester, static penetrometer, and fine grained basalt as the simulant. The vacuum chamber provides a medium for applying the environmental conditions to the soil experiment with the exception of gravity. The shear strength parameters are determined by the direct shear test. Strength parameters and the resistance of soil penetration by static loading will be investigated by the use of a static cone penetrometer. In order to conduct a soil experiment without going to the moon, a suitable lunar simulant must be selected. This simulant must resemble lunar soil in both composition and particle size. The soil that most resembles actual lunar soil is basalt. The soil parameters, as determined by the testing apparatus, will be used as design criteria for lunar soil engagement equipment.

  5. Degradation of PAHs in