Science.gov

Sample records for aged rats compared

  1. Prematurely Delivered Rats Show Improved Motor Coordination During Sensory-evoked Motor Responses Compared to Age-matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Megan E.; Brumley, Michele R.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of postnatal experience for perinatal rats was manipulated by delivering pups one day early (postconception day 21; PC21) by cesarean delivery and comparing their motor behavior to age-matched controls on PC22 (the typical day of birth). On PC22, pups were tested on multiple measures of motor coordination: leg extension response (LER), facial wiping, contact righting, and fore- and hindlimb stepping. The LER and facial wiping provided measures of synchronous hind- and forelimb coordination, respectively, and were sensory-evoked. Contact righting also was sensory-evoked and provided a measure of axial coordination. Stepping provided a measure of alternated forelimb and hindlimb coordination and was induced with the serotonin receptor agonist quipazine. Pups that were delivered prematurely and spent an additional day in the postnatal environment showed more bilateral limb coordination during expression of the LER and facial wiping, as well as a more mature righting strategy, compared to controls. These findings suggest that experience around the time of birth shapes motor coordination and the expression of species-typical behavior in the developing rat. PMID:24680729

  2. The impact of two mild stressors on the nerve growth factor (NGF) immunoreactivity in the amygdala in aged rats compared to adult ones.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Szalewska, Ewa; Ludkiewicz, Beata; Krawczyk, Rafał; Moryś, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) seems to play an important role in the ageing limbic system in response to stress. This study aimed to explore the influence of acute and chronic exposure to high-light open field (HL-OF) or forced swim (FS) stressors on the density of NGF immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the amygdala central (CeA), medial (MeA), lateral (LA) and basolateral (BLA) nuclei in adult (postnatal day 90; P90) and aged (P720) rats. In comparison with non-stressed rats, neither acute nor chronic HL-OF produced significant changes in the density of NGF-ir neurons of studied nuclei in P90 and P720 rats. However, not acute but chronic FS was the factor inducing an increase in the density of NGF-ir neurons in the CeA of both age groups and in the LA of P720 rats. Despite the lack of change in the density of NGF-ir neurons between P90 and P720 non-stressed rats, there were significant age-related changes in NGF-ir cells in FS and/or HL-OF stressed rats in all the tested nuclei, with the exception of the LA. It may be concluded that as far as the influence on NGF-ir cells in amygdaloid nuclei is concerned, HL-OF did not constitute an aggravating factor for rats in the ontogenetic periods studied. Moreover, upregulation of NGF-ir neurons predominantly in CeA after chronic FS seems to be neuroprotective. Age-dependent changes in the density of NGF-ir neurons in stressed rats are probably caused by ageing processes and they may point to dysregulation of excitatory control exerted by the amygdala. PMID:26724365

  3. Time-course, dose-response, and age comparative sensitivity of N-methyl carbamates in rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    N-Methyl carbamate insecticides are reversible inhibitors of central and peripheral acetylcholinesterease (ChE). Despite their widespread use, there are few studies of neurotoxicity in young animals. To study potential age-related differences, we evaluated seven carbamates (carba...

  4. Comparative Endocrinology of Aging and Longevity Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Allard, John B.; Duan, Cunming

    2011-01-01

    Hormones regulate growth, development, metabolism, and other complex processes in multicellular animals. For many years it has been suggested that hormones may also influence the rate of the aging process. Aging is a multifactorial process that causes biological systems to break down and cease to function in adult organisms as time passes, eventually leading to death. The exact underlying causes of the aging process remain a topic for debate, and clues that may shed light on these causes are eagerly sought after. In the last two decades, gene mutations that result in delayed aging and extended longevity have been discovered, and many of the affected genes have been components of endocrine signaling pathways. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the roles of endocrine signaling in the regulation of aging and longevity in various animals. We begin by discussing the notion that conserved systems, including endocrine signaling pathways, “regulate” the aging process. Findings from the major model organisms: worms, flies, and rodents, are then outlined. Unique lessons from studies of non-traditional models: bees, salmon, and naked mole rats, are also discussed. Finally, we summarize the endocrinology of aging in humans, including changes in hormone levels with age, and the involvement of hormones in aging-related diseases. The most well studied and widely conserved endocrine pathway that affects aging is the insulin/insulin-like growth factor system. Mutations in genes of this pathway increase the lifespan of worms, flies, and mice. Population genetic evidence also suggests this pathway’s involvement in human aging. Other hormones including steroids have been linked to aging only in a subset of the models studied. Because of the value of comparative studies, it is suggested that the aging field could benefit from adoption of additional model organisms. PMID:22654825

  5. Incentive relativity in middle aged rats.

    PubMed

    Justel, N; Mustaca, A; Boccia, M; Ruetti, E

    2014-01-24

    Response to a reinforcer is affected by prior experience with different reward values of that reward, a phenomenon known as incentive relativity. Two different procedures to study this phenomenon are the incentive downshift (ID) and the consummatory anticipatory negative contrast (cANC), the former is an emotional-cognitive protocol and the latter cognitive one. Aged rodents, as also well described in aged humans, exhibit alterations in cognitive functions. The main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of age in the incentive' assessment using these two procedures. The results indicated that aged rats had an adequate assessment of the rewards but their performance is not completely comparable to that of young subjects. They recover faster from the ID and they had a cognitive impairment in the cANC. The results are discussed in relation to age-related changes in memory and emotion. PMID:24315974

  6. Aging changes agonist induced contractile responses in permeabilized rat bladder.

    PubMed

    Durlu-Kandilci, N Tugba; Denizalti, Merve; Sahin-Erdemli, Inci

    2015-08-01

    Aging alters bladder functions where a decrease in filling, storage and emptying is observed. These changes cause urinary incontinence, especially in women. The aim of this study is to examine how aging affects the intracellular calcium movements due to agonist-induced contractions in permeabilized female rat bladder. Urinary bladder isolated from young and old female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Small detrusor strips were permeabilized with β-escin. The contractile responses induced with agonists were compared between young and old groups. Carbachol-induced contractions were decreased in permeabilized detrusor from old rats compared to young group. Heparin and ryanodine decreased carbachol-induced contractions in young rats where only heparin inhibited these contractions in olds. Caffeine-induced contractions but not inositol triphosphate (IP3)-induced contractions were decreased in old group compared to youngs. The cumulative calcium response curves (pCa 8-4) were also decreased in old rats. Carbachol-induced calcium sensitization responses did not alter by age where GTP-β-S and GF-109203X but not Y-27632 inhibited these responses. Carbachol-induced contractions decrease with aging in rat bladder detrusor. It can be postulated as IP3-induced calcium release (IICR) is primarily responsible for the contractions in older rats where the decrease in carbachol contractions in aging may be as a result of a decrease in calcium-induced calcium release (CICR), rather than carbachol-induced calcium sensitization. PMID:26153091

  7. Ischemia-induced Angiogenesis is Attenuated in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yaohui; Wang, Liuqing; Wang, Jixian; Lin, Xiaojie; Wang, Yongting; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    To study whether focal angiogenesis is induced in aged rodents after permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), young adult (3-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) Fisher 344 rats underwent MCAO and sacrificed up to two months after MCAO. Immunohistochemistry and synchrotron radiation microangiography were performed to examine the number of newly formed blood vessels in both young adult and aged rats post-ischemia. We found that the number of capillaries and small arteries in aged brain was the same as young adult brain. In addition, we found that after MCAO, the number of blood vessels in the peri-infarct region of ipsilateral hemisphere in aged ischemic rats was significantly increased compared to the aged sham rats (p<0.05). We also confirmed that ischemia-induced focal angiogenesis occurred in young adult rat brain while the blood vessel density in young adult ischemic brain was significantly higher than that in the aged ischemic brain (p<0.05). Our data suggests that focal angiogenesis in aged rat brain can be induced in response to ischemic brain injury, and that aging impedes brain repairing and remodeling after ischemic stroke, possible due to the limited response of angiogenesis. PMID:27493831

  8. Rodents for comparative aging studies: from mice to beavers.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Vera; Bozzella, Michael J; Seluanov, Andrei

    2008-09-01

    After humans, mice are the best-studied mammalian species in terms of their biology and genetics. Gerontological research has used mice and rats extensively to generate short- and long-lived mutants, study caloric restriction and more. Mice and rats are valuable model organisms thanks to their small size, short lifespans and fast reproduction. However, when the goal is to further extend the already long human lifespan, studying fast aging species may not provide all the answers. Remarkably, in addition to the fast-aging species, the order Rodentia contains multiple long-lived species with lifespans exceeding 20 years (naked mole-rat, beavers, porcupines, and some squirrels). This diversity opens great opportunities for comparative aging studies. Here we discuss the evolution of lifespan in rodents, review the biology of slow-aging rodents, and show an example of how the use of a comparative approach revealed that telomerase activity coevolved with body mass in rodents. PMID:19424861

  9. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone treatment on hormone levels and antioxidant parameters in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, F J; Kang, J; Han, N N; Ma, H T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of chronic dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) administration on steroid hormones and antioxidant parameters in aged rats. To this end, three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were compared: young (3 months of age) untreated; aged (19 months old) untreated; and aged rats treated with 20 mg/kg DHEA for 8 weeks. Major organs of aged rats in the untreated group demonstrated physiological atrophy, compared to those of young rats; this effect appeared to have been partially reversed by DHEA treatment. Testosterone and estradiol contents were significantly decreased and aldosterone significantly increased in aged untreated, compared to young untreated rats. Steroid hormone levels were obviously reversed, however, in aged rats treated with DHEA. Additionally, superoxide dismutase activity in serum, brain, heart, and liver was decreased, and maleic dialdehyde content in heart was markedly increased in untreated aged, compared to young, rats. Importantly, these changes in brain and heart of aged rats were reversed by DHEA treatment. Heme oxygenase mRNA levels were increased and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA levels decreased in aged, compared to young, rats; DHEA treatment appeared to reverse these changes. These results indicate that chronic DHEA administration may have effects on steroid hormone levels and antioxidant parameters in aged rats and result in postponement of the aging process. PMID:26400361

  10. Raloxifene prevents endothelial dysfunction in aging ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Ming; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Au, Chak Leung; Tsang, Suk Ying; Fung, Kwok Pui; Laher, Ismail; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Huang, Yu

    2006-05-01

    Lack of an appropriate animal model has delayed the better understanding of mechanisms related to higher cardiovascular risk in women after menopause. The aging female rat may share some menopausal changes observed in women. However, most studies have attempted to mimic menopause by ovariectomizing young (6-12 weeks old) animals without taking into accounts the influence of aging and of declining ovarian function. Therefore, the present study examined changes in vascular reactivity in the aging (15 months old) female rat after ovariectomy and the effects of chronic raloxifene therapy on vascular reactivity and eNOS protein expression. Aortic rings were prepared from the three experimental groups of rats: sham-operated control, ovariectomized and ovariectomized aging rats receiving daily oral administration of raloxifene for 3 months. Aortic rings were suspended in organ baths for the measurement of isometric tension. Rings with endothelium contracted significantly more to phenylephrine after inhibition of nitric oxide/cyclic GMP-signaling pathway by L-NAME or ODQ (as an index of basal nitric oxide release) in control and raloxifene-treated ovariectomized rats than in ovariectomized rats. This effect was abolished upon mechanical removal of the endothelium. Phenylephrine induced greater contractions only in rings with endothelium from ovariectomized rats as compared with control rats and raloxifene treatment normalized this response. In the presence of L-NAME or ODQ, phenylephrine-induced contraction was similar in rings from the three groups. Rings relaxed more to thapsigargin and acetylcholine in raloxifene-treated ovariectomized rats than in ovariectomized rats. There was no significant difference in aortic eNOS protein contents among the different groups. These results suggest that chronic oral administration of raloxifene to aging ovariectomized female rats augmented the bioavailability of endothelial nitric oxide in isolated aortic rings without altering e

  11. The Laboratory Rat: Relating Its Age With Human's

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Pallav

    2013-01-01

    By late 18th or early 19th century, albino rats became the most commonly used experimental animals in numerous biomedical researches, as they have been recognized as the preeminent model mammalian system. But, the precise correlation between age of laboratory rats and human is still a subject of debate. A number of studies have tried to detect these correlations in various ways, But, have not successfully provided any proper association. Thus, the current review attempts to compare rat and human age at different phases of their life. The overall findings indicate that rats grow rapidly during their childhood and become sexually mature at about the sixth week, but attain social maturity 5-6 months later. In adulthood, every day of the animal is approximately equivalent to 34.8 human days (i.e., one rat month is comparable to three human years). Numerous researchers performed experimental investigations in albino rats and estimated, in general, while considering their entire life span, that a human month resembles every-day life of a laboratory rat. These differences signify the variations in their anatomy, physiology and developmental processes, which must be taken into consideration while analyzing the results or selecting the dose of any research in rats when age is a crucial factor. PMID:23930179

  12. Aging and the disposition and toxicity of mercury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Christy C; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K

    2014-05-01

    Progressive loss of functioning nephrons, secondary to age-related glomerular disease, can impair the ability of the kidneys to effectively clear metabolic wastes and toxicants from blood. Additionally, as renal mass is diminished, cellular hypertrophy occurs in functional nephrons that remain. We hypothesize that these nephrons are exposed to greater levels of nephrotoxicants, such as inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)), and thus are at an increased risk of becoming intoxicated by these compounds. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of aging on the disposition and renal toxicity of Hg(2+) in young adult and aged Wistar rats. Paired groups of animals were injected (i.v.) with either a 0.5μmol·kg(-1) non-nephrotoxic or a 2.5μmol·kg(-1) nephrotoxic dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl2). Plasma creatinine and renal biomarkers of proximal tubular injury were greater in both groups of aged rats than in the corresponding groups of young adult rats. Histologically, evidence of glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial inflammation and fibrosis were significant features of kidneys from aged animals. In addition, proximal tubular necrosis, especially along the straight segments in the inner cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla was a prominent feature in the renal sections from both aged and young rats treated with the nephrotoxic dose of HgCl2. Our findings indicate 1) that overall renal function is significantly impaired in aged rats, resulting in chronic renal insufficiency and 2) the disposition of HgCl2 in aging rats is significantly altered compared to that of young rats. PMID:24548775

  13. Neural stem cell protects aged rat brain from ischemia–reperfusion injury through neurogenesis and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yaohui; Wang, Jixian; Lin, Xiaojie; Wang, Liuqing; Shao, Bei; Jin, Kunlin; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) show therapeutic potential for ischemia in young-adult animals. However, the effect of aging on NSC therapy is largely unknown. In this work, NSCs were transplanted into aged (24-month-old) and young-adult (3-month-old) rats at 1 day after stroke. Infarct volume and neurobehavioral outcomes were examined. The number of differentiated NSCs was compared in aged and young-adult ischemic rats and angiogenesis and neurogenesis were also determined. We found that aged rats developed larger infarcts than young-adult rats after ischemia (P<0.05). The neurobehavioral outcome was also worse for aged rats comparing with young-adult rats. Brain infarction and neurologic deficits were attenuated after NSC transplantation in both aged and young-adult rats. The number of survived NSCs in aged rats was similar to that of the young-adult rats (P>0.05) and most of them were differentiated into glial fibrillary acidic protein+ (GFAP+) cells. More importantly, angiogenesis and neurogenesis were greatly enhanced in both aged and young-adult rats after transplantation compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control (P<0.05), accompanied by increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our results showed that NSC therapy reduced ischemic brain injury, along with increased angiogenesis and neurogenesis in aged rats, suggesting that aging-related microenvironment does not preclude a beneficial response to NSCs transplantation during cerebral ischemia. PMID:24714034

  14. Increased sensitivity to transient global ischemia in aging rat brain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Puchowicz, Michelle A; LaManna, Joseph C

    2007-01-01

    Transient global brain ischemia induced by cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR) results in reperfusion injury associated with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is known to produce delayed selective neuronal cell loss and impairment of brainstem function, leading to post-resuscitation mortality. Levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) modified protein adducts, a marker of oxidative stress, was found to be elevated after CAR in rat brain. In this study we investigated the effects of an antioxidant, alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) on the recovery following CAR in the aged rat brain. Male Fischer 344 rats (6, 12 and 24-month old) underwent 7-minute cardiac arrest before resuscitation. Brainstem function was assessed by hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and HNE-adducts were measured by western blot analysis. Our data showed that in the 24-month old rats, overall survival rate, hippocampal CAl neuronal counts and HVR were significantly reduced compared to the younger rats. With PBN treatment, the recovery was improved in the aged rat brain, which was consistent with reduced HNE adducts in brain following CAR. Our data suggest that aged rats are more vulnerable to oxidative stress insult and treatment with PBN improves the outcome following reperfusion injury. The mechanism of action is most likely through the scavenging of reactive oxygen species resulting in reduced lipid peroxidation. PMID:17727265

  15. Silymarin improves vascular function of aged ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Buket; Dost, Turhan; Gokalp, Filiz; Birincioglu, Mustafa

    2014-06-01

    Both aging and estrogen depletion lead to endothelial dysfunction, which is the main reason of many cardiovascular diseases. Previous reports have shown that cell protective effect of silymarin (SM) depends on its antioxidant and phytoestrogenic properties. We investigated the effect of SM on vascular stiffness of aged menopausal rats and the involvement of estrogenic activity in this effect. Isolated rat aortas were obtained from 22-month-old rats, after 18 months of ovariectomy (OVX) follow-up. Each ring was incubated in tissue bath either with SM (50 mg/L) and 17β-estradiol (10 μM, E2) or in the presence of SM/fulvestrant (50 mg/L, 10 μM). Endothelium-intact rings were precontracted with phenylephrine (0.001-30 μM) or high potassium (40 mM); endothelium-dependent/independent relaxant responses were obtained using acetylcholine (0.001-30 μM) and sodium nitroprusside (0.0001-3 μM), respectively. While phenylephrine sensitivity was significantly increased in OVX rats, relaxations were significantly less in aged OVX rats compared with young rats. In spite of the presence of estrogen antagonist, immediate SM treatment restored the endothelial function and vascular tone better than estrogen replacement. Additionally, as a complementary and alternative medicine, it does not cause estrogenic side effects when taken acutely. PMID:24123505

  16. Grape powder treatment prevents anxiety-like behavior in a rat model of aging.

    PubMed

    Patki, Gaurav; Ali, Quaisar; Pokkunuri, Indira; Asghar, Mohammad; Salim, Samina

    2015-06-01

    Earlier, we have reported that grape powder (GP) treatment prevented pharmacologic and psychological stress-induced anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment in rats. Protective effects of GP were attributed to its antioxidant effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that age-associated behavioral and cognitive deficits such as anxiety and memory impairment will be ameliorated with GP treatment. Using a National Institute of Aging recommended rodent model of aging, we examined a potentially protective role of antioxidant-rich GP in age-associated anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment. Male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups: young rats (3 months old) provided with tap water or with 15 g/L GP dissolved in tap water for 3 weeks, aged rats (21 months old) provided with tap water or with GP-treated tap water for 3 weeks (AG-GP). Anxiety-like behavior was significantly greater in aged rats compared with young rats, GP-treated young rats, or aged control rats (P < .05). Also, GP treatment prevented age-induced anxiety-like behavior in AG-GP rats (P < .05). Neither short-term nor long-term age-associated memory deficits improved with GP treatment in AG-GP rats. Furthermore, aged rats showed increased level of physiological stress (corticosterone) and increased oxidative stress in the plasma (8-isoprostane) as well as in selected brain areas (protein carbonylation). Grape powder treatment prevented age-induced increase in corticosterone levels and plasma 8-isoprostane levels in aged rats (P < .05), whereas protein carbonylation was recovered in the amygdala region only (P < .05). Grape powder by regulating oxidative stress ameliorates age-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats, whereas age-associated memory deficits seem unaffected with GP treatment. PMID:26022140

  17. Exercise Training suppresses vascular fibrosis in aging obesity induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Young; Lee, Jin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise training (ET) on vascular fibrosis in aging model rats with diet-induced obesity. [Methods] Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: Aging control (A-C), A-C with high fat diet (AHF), AHF with ET (AHF + ET). Aging was induced by D-galactose (D-gal) and obesity was induced by HFD (60% fat) for 9 weeks. The experimental rats performed swimming (60 min/day, 5 days/week) for 8 weeks. All rat aorta samples were harvested for RT-PCR and morphologic analyses. [Results] The exercise training significantly decreased levels of AT-1, TGF-ß and Coll-1 gene expression compared to AHF group. The AHF + ET group showed a reduced collagen accumulation in the aorta media compared to AHF group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that ET could protect the aging obesity aorta against down-regulation of fibrotic factors (AT-1, TGF-ß and Coll-1 gene) and fibrosis by inhibition of collagen accumulation in the aorta media. PMID:25566453

  18. The effect of aging on distraction osteogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J; Gao, G G; Shen, X C; McLaren, S G; Skinner, R A; Badger, T M; Lumpkin, C K

    2001-05-01

    The effect of age on bone formation in the limb lengthening model of distraction osteogenesis (DO) was investigated in two studies using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats from two colonies at various ages (CAMM: 9 vs 24 months, Harlan: 4 vs 24 months). External fixators were placed on the right tibiae of 30 male SD rats (20 CAMM, 10 Harlan) and mid-diaphyseal osteotomies were performed. Distraction was performed at 0.2 mm bid for 20 days (CAMM) or 14 days (Harlan). The experimental (DO) and control (contra-lateral) tibiae were removed for high-resolution radiography and decalcified histology. Videomicroscopy was used to quantitate radiodensity, histology (matrix type) and relative areas of cell proliferation, which was identified by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunochemistry. Both studies demonstrated an age-related decrease in the percent mineralized bone (radiodensity) in the distraction gap (CAMM 9 vs 24 months: 68% vs 51%, P < 0.003; Harlan 4 vs 24 months: 95% vs 36%, P < 0.001) and no significant colony or distraction time-specific difference was seen between the two colonies of 24-month-old rats. Histology was performed on the Harlan rats. The DO gaps in the 24-month-old rats demonstrated less endosteal new bone compared to the 4-month-old rats (P < 0.01), but equivalent periosteal new bone. In 4-month-old rats, PCNA-immunostained cells were organized along the primary matrix front (where the first deposition of osteoid occurs) extending across both periosteal and endosteal surfaces. In 24-month-old rats, PCNA+ cells were organized in zones along the periosteal new bone fronts only and irregularly scattered throughout the endosteal gap within a fibrovascular non-ossifying matrix. These results indicate that 24-month-old rats have a relative deficit in endosteal bone formation which may not be related to cell proliferation but rather to cell organization. This model reflects the clinical situation where radiographic findings in older patients demonstrate

  19. The pituitary - Aging and spaceflown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Decrements in growth hormone (GH) release we observed in two spaceflight experiments and four tail-suspended rat studies mimic age-associated changes in the mammalian pituitary GH system seen by Meites and others. The spaceflight data suggest that formation of high molecular weight bioactive disulfide-linked aggregates of the 20 and 22K monomeric GH forms may be reduced in microgravity, thereby, reducing target tissue activity. Correlative studies to confirm spaceflight as a model for pituitary GH system aging should include: (1) investigation of mechanisms of intracellular hormone packaging, (2) consequences to biological activity of the hormone molecule, and (3) study of intracellular microtubule dynamics.

  20. Mindspan: Lessons from Rat Models of Neurocognitive Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Michela; Stocker, Amy; Koh, Ming Teng

    2011-01-01

    Research on the biology of aging seeks to enhance understanding of basic mechanisms and thus support improvements in outcomes throughout the lifespan, including longevity itself, susceptibility to disease, and life-long adaptive capacities. The focus of this review is the use of rats as an animal model of cognitive change during aging, and specifically lessons learned from aging rats in behavioral studies of cognitive processes mediated by specialized neural circuitry. An advantage of this approach is the ability to compare brain aging across species where functional homology exists for specific neural systems; in this article we focus on behavioral assessments that target the functions of the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex. We also take a critical look at studies using calorie restriction (CR) as a well-defined experimental approach to manipulating biological aging. We conclude that the effects of CR on cognitive aging in rats are less well established than commonly assumed, with much less supportive evidence relative to its benefits on longevity and susceptibility to disease, and that more research in this area is necessary. PMID:21411856

  1. A stereologic study of the plantar fat pad in young and aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Molligan, Jeremy; Schon, Lew; Zhang, Zijun

    2013-01-01

    Plantar fat pad (PFP) is a tissue structure that absorbs the initial impact of walking and running and ultimately bears body weight at standing. This study was designed to quantify the histomorphological changes of the PFP in aged rats. The most medial PFP was dissected from the hind feet of young rats (4 months old, n = 6) and aged rats (24 months old, n = 6). Histological structure and cellular senescence of PFP were analyzed stereologically and histomorphometrically. Immunohistochemistry of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) was also performed on PFP tissue sections. Compared with young rats, the thickness of epidermis, dermis and septa of the PFP were significantly reduced in the aged rats. The total volume of adipose tissue in the PFP of aged rats was only about 65% of that in the young rats. The microvascular density and the number of fat pad units (FPU), a cluster of adipocytes enclosed by elastin septa, in the PFP were unchanged in the aged rats. In the aged rats, the number of adipocytes per FPU was reduced but the number of simple adipocyte clusters, without surrounding septa, was increased. The shift of the types of adipocyte clusters in the aged PFP was accompanied by degradation of elastin fibers and increased expression of MMP9. In conclusion, the PFP, particularly the elastic septa, degenerates significantly in aged rats and this may contribute to the pathology of PFP-related diseases. PMID:24033117

  2. Mesenteric lymph flow in adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Akl, Tony J; Nagai, Takashi; Coté, Gerard L; Gashev, Anatoliy A

    2011-11-01

    The objective of study was to evaluate the aging-associated changes, contractile characteristics of mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLV), and lymph flow in vivo in male 9- and 24-mo-old Fischer-344 rats. Lymphatic diameter, contraction amplitude, contraction frequency, and fractional pump flow, lymph flow velocity, wall shear stress, and minute active wall shear stress load were determined in MLV in vivo before and after N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) application at 100 μM. The active pumping of the aged rat MLV in vivo was found to be severely depleted, predominantly through the aging-associated decrease in lymphatic contractile frequency. Such changes correlate with enlargement of aged MLV, which experienced much lower minute active shear stress load than adult vessels. At the same time, pumping in aged MLV in vivo may be rapidly increased back to levels of adult vessels predominantly through the increase in contraction frequency induced by nitric oxide (NO) elimination. Findings support the idea that in aged tissues surrounding the aged MLV, the additional source of some yet unlinked lymphatic contraction-stimulatory metabolites is counterbalanced or blocked by NO release. The comparative analysis of the control data obtained from experiments with both adult and aged MLV in vivo and from isolated vessel-based studies clearly demonstrated that ex vivo isolated lymphatic vessels exhibit identical contractile characteristics to lymphatic vessels in vivo. PMID:21873496

  3. Coccomyxa Gloeobotrydiformis Improves Learning and Memory in Intrinsic Aging Rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luning; Jin, Ying; Dong, Liming; Sui, Hai-Juan; Sumi, Ryo; Jahan, Rabita; Hu, Dahai; Li, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Declining in learning and memory is one of the most common and prominent problems during the aging process. Neurotransmitter changes, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal signal transduction were considered to participate in this process. In the present study, we examined the effects of Coccomyxa gloeobotrydiformis (CGD) on learning and memory ability of intrinsic aging rats. As a result, CGD treated (50 mg/kg·d or 100 mg/kg ·d for a duration of 8 weeks) 22-month-old male rats, which have shown significant improvement on learning and spatial memory ability compared with control, which was evidently revealed in both the hidden platform tasks and probe trials. The following immunohistochemistry and Western blot experiments suggested that CGD could increase the content of Ach and thereby improve the function of the cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus, and therefore also improving learning and memory ability of the aged rats by acting as an anti-inflammatory agent. The effects of CGD on learning and memory might also have an association with the ERK/CREB signalling. The results above suggest that the naturally made drug CGD may have several great benefit as a multi-target drug in the process of prevention and/or treatment of age-dependent cognitive decline and aging process. PMID:26078724

  4. The influence of aging on poststroke depression using a rat model via middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Matthew; Kutz, Ruslan; Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Cohen, Hagit; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Shapira, Yoram; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is the most frequent psychological sequela following stroke. While previous studies describe the impact of age on brain infarct volume, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown following ischemia, the role of age on PSD has yet to be described. Here, we examine the influence of age on PSD progression in a rat model of PSD by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). One hundred forty-three rats were divided into three groups. 48 rats 20 weeks of age underwent a sham procedure, 51 rats 20 weeks of age had MCAO, and 44 rats 22-26 months of age had MCAO. Groups were further divided into two subgroups. The first subgroup was used to measure infarct lesion volume, brain edema, and BBB breakdown at 24 h. In the second subgroup at 3 weeks after MCAO, rats were subjected to a sucrose preference test, two-way shuttle avoidance task, forced swimming test, and a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein level measurement. Total and striatal infarct volume, brain edema, and BBB breakdown in the striatum were increased in older rats, as compared with younger rats. While both old and young rats exhibited depressive-like behaviors on each of the behavioral tests and lower BDNF levels post-MCAO, as compared with control rats, there were no differences between old and young rats. Although older rats suffered from larger infarct volumes, increased brain edema and more BBB disruption following MCAO, the lack of behavioral differences between young and old rats suggests that there was no effect of rat age on the incidence of PSD. PMID:23761136

  5. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging

    PubMed Central

    Buechel, Heather M.; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L.; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9–12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors. PMID:24575039

  6. Age-related changes in spleen of Dark Agouti rats immunized for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Djikić, Jasmina; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Pilipović, Ivan; Kosec, Duško; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2015-01-15

    The study was undertaken considering age-related changes in susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and a putative role of spleen in pathogenesis of this disease. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of T splenocytes were examined in young (3-month-old), middle-aged (8-month-old) and aged (26-month-old) Dark Agouti rats immunized for EAE with rat spinal cord in complete Freund's adjuvant. The rat susceptibility to EAE induction, as well as the number of activated CD4+CD134+ lymphocytes retrieved from their spinal cords progressively decreased with aging. To the contrary, in rats immunized for EAE the number of activated CD4+ splenocytes, i.e., CD4+CD134+, CD4+CD25+FoxP3- and CD4+CD40L+ cells, progressively increased with aging. This was associated with age-related increase in (i) CD4+ splenocyte surface expression of CD44, the molecule suggested to be involved in limiting emigration of encephalitogenic CD4+ cells from spleen into blood and (ii) frequency of regulatory T cells, including CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells, which are also shown to control encephalitogenic cell migration from spleen into the central nervous system. In favor of expansion of T-regulatory cell pool in aged rats was the greater concentration of IL-10 in unstimulated, Concanavalin A (ConA)- and myelin basic protein (MBP)-stimulated splenocyte cultures from aged rats compared with the corresponding cultures from young ones. Consistent with the age-related increase in the expression of CD44, which is shown to favor Th1 effector cell survival by interfering with CD95-mediated signaling, the frequency of apoptotic cells among CD4+ splenocytes, despite the greater frequency of CD95+ cells, was diminished in splenocyte cultures from aged compared with young rats. In addition, in control, as well as in ConA- and MBP-stimulated splenocyte cultures from aged rats, despite of impaired CD4+ cell proliferation, IFN-γ concentrations were greater than in corresponding cultures

  7. Enriched environment increases the myelinated nerve fibers of aged rat corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yu; Shi, Xiao-Yan; Qiu, Xuan; Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Li, Chen; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Cheng, Guo-Hua; Tang, Yong

    2012-06-01

    In this study, the effect of enriched environment (EE) on the spatial learning of aged rats was examined, and then the effects of EE on the aged corpus callosum (CC) were investigated by means of the modern stereological methods. We found that EE significantly improved the spatial learning of aged rats. The CC volume, the total volume of the myelinated fibers and total volume of the myelin sheaths in the CC, the total length of the myelinated fibers in the CC of enriched rats were significantly increased when compared to standard rats. The increase of the myelinated fibers in enriched rat CC might provide one of the structural bases for the enrichment-related improvement of the spatial learning. This study provided, to the best of our knowledge, the first evidence of environmental enrichment-induced increases of the CC and the myelinated fibers in the CC of aged rats. PMID:22431229

  8. Tyrosine kinase receptor alteration of renal vasoconstriction in rats is sex- and age-related.

    PubMed

    Passmore, John C; Fleming, John T; Tyagi, Suresh C; Falcone, Jeff C

    2012-10-01

    Male rat renal blood vessels undergo reduced contraction to norepinephrine with aging. There is a greater renal vascular impairment in male compared with female rats. We investigated specific tyrosine kinase receptor inhibition of renal interlobar artery responsiveness to phenylephrine in male and female rats at specifically designated ages. Vessels from young male rats contracted much less to phenylephrine when the vessels were pretreated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors Lavendustin A, HNMPA-(AM)₃, or AG1478. Vessels from adult female rats pretreated with Lavendustin A showed no difference in contraction from control, but did demonstrate a slightly reduced contraction when pretreated with AG1478. Middle-aged male rat vessels treated with Lavendustin A demonstrated no inhibition, but the insulin and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonists both induced a decline in contraction. Vessels from aged male rats demonstrated no effect related to the 3 pretreatments. Middle-aged and aged female rats pretreated with any inhibitor demonstrated no inhibitor-dependent alterations. We conclude that maximum contraction of interlobar arteries from adult male rats is reduced when tyrosine kinase receptor activity is reduced. Female rats demonstrated much less inhibitor-related change of contraction. PMID:22724583

  9. Benzonidazole levels in blood vary with age in rats.

    PubMed

    Bulffer, Romina Fernanda; Castro, José Alberto; Fanelli, Silvia Laura

    2011-05-01

    Benznidazole (Bz) exhibits toxic side effects in animal studies and clinical use. Reductive metabolism of Bz in liver microsomes modulates the duration of its chemotherapeutic effect and its toxicity. The rate of this metabolism depends on age and is less intense in newborns and youngsters than in adults. In the present study, we determined Bz blood levels in rats of different ages that received Bz intragastrically (100 mg/kg). We developed and validated a high-pressure liquid chromatography with UV detector method for determination of Bz levels in whole blood. Bz levels were significantly higher and persisted for longer periods of time in the blood of young rats when compared to that of adult animals. PMID:21655830

  10. Cardiac and thermal homeostasis in the aging Brown Norway rat.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Brown Norway (BN) rat is a popular strain for aging studies. There is little information on effects of age on baseline cardiac and thermoregulatory parameters in undisturbed BN rats even though cardiac and thermal homeostasis is linked to many pathological deficits in the age...

  11. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Barton, Gregory P; Sepe, Joseph J; McKiernan, Susan H; Aiken, Judd M; Diffee, Gary M

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  12. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Gregory P.; Sepe, Joseph J.; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.; Diffee, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction in aging rat brain following transient global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Sun, Xiaoyan; LaManna, Joseph C

    2008-01-01

    Aged rat brain is more sensitive to reperfusion injury induced by cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The mitochondrial respiratory chain, the major source of free radicals during reperfusion, is likely to be the target of lipid peroxidation. Previous work has shown a higher mortality and lower hippocampal neuronal survival in older rats. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major product of lipid peroxidation, was found to be elevated in cortex and brainstem after resuscitation. In this study we investigated the acute changes of mitochondrial function in aging rat brain following cardiac arrest and resuscitation; the effect of an antioxidant, alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) was also tested. Fischer 344 rats, 6 and 24-month old, were subjected to cardiac arrest (7-10 minutes) and allowed to recover 1 hour after resuscitation. Mitochondria of cortex and brainstem were isolated and assayed for respiratory function. Compared to their respective non-arrested control group, 1h untreated groups (both 6 month and 24 month) had similar state 3 (ADP-stimulated) but higher state 4 (resting state) respiratory rates. The respiratory control ratio (state 3/state 4) of cortex in the 1h untreated group was 26% lower than the non-arrested control group; similar results were found in brainstem. The decreased mitochondrial respiratory function was improved by PBN treatment. HNE-modified mitochondrial proteins were elevated 1h after resuscitation, with an evident change in the aged. Treatment with PBN reduced the elevated HNE production in mitochondria of cortex. The data suggest (i) there is increased sensitivity to lipid peroxidation with aging, (ii) mitochondrial respiratory function related to coupled oxidation decreases following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and (iii) treatment with antioxidant, such as PBN, reduces the oxidative damage following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:18290349

  14. The menopause and aging, a comparative perspective

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Caleb E

    2013-01-01

    The neuroendocrinology of menopause is reviewed from a comparative perspective, with emphasis on laboratory rodent models. These changes are compared by the 2011 STRAW Criteria (Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop). Ovarian cell loss begins prenatally in all mammals studied, with exponential depletion of primary follicles and oocytes in association with loss of fecundity by midlife. Rodents and humans also share progressively increasing irregularity in ovulatory cycles and increasing fetal aneuploidy as oocyte depletion become imminent. Hypothalamic impairments of the estrogen-induced surge of pituitary gonadotrophins (luteinizing hormone, LH; follicle stimulating hormone, FSH) are prominent in middle-aged rodents, but sporadic in peri-menopausal women. In aging rodents, hypothalamic impairments of the LH surge have been experimentally associated with prolonged phases of sustained estradiol (E2) and very low progesterone (P4) (‘unopposed estradiol’). Although peri-menopausal women also show hyper-estrogenic cycles, there is no indication for irreversible hypothalamic desensitization by E2. Ongoing cognitive assessments in clinical trials of estrogen therapy with and without P4 or other progestins may further inform about possible persisting effects of unopposed estrogens. PMID:23583565

  15. Testosterone (T)-induced changes in arcuate nucleus cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript and NPY mRNA are attenuated in old compared to young male brown Norway rats: contribution of T to age-related changes in cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript and NPY gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Elliott H; Wolden-Hanson, Tami; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2002-03-01

    The age-related decrease in serum T levels is associated with impairments in food intake and weight regulation and alterations in brain peptides that regulate energy balance. To test the hypothesis that reduced T levels contribute to altered hypothalamic cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and NPY gene expression, the mRNA content of these neuropeptides was measured by in situ hybridization in sham-operated (intact), castrated, and T-replaced castrated young and old male Brown Norway rats. T levels in T-replaced young and old rats were similar to those in intact young animals. Compared with castrated rats, arcuate nucleus CART mRNA was lower and NPY mRNA was higher in both young and old T-replaced castrated animals, suggesting reciprocal regulation of these peptides by T; these T-induced changes were localized primarily in the rostral arcuate and were markedly attenuated in old animals. Compared with intact animals, paraventricular nucleus CART mRNA was lower in castrated animals and similar in T-replaced young and old rats. We conclude that hypothalamic CART and NPY neurons remain responsive to T regulation in old rats, albeit less so than in young animals, suggesting that the age-related reduction of T contributes in part to altered brain neuropeptide gene expression favoring anorexia and wasting with aging. PMID:11861518

  16. Effects of metabolic syndrome on the ultrastructure of the femoral nerve in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues de Souza, Romeu; Gama, Eliane F; El-Razi Neto, Semaan; Maldonado, Diogo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the morphometry of the femoral nerve in aging rats with metabolic syndrome compared to controls. Systolic blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose were measured, and myelinated and unmyelinated fibers in the femoral nerves were quantitatively assessed under electron microscopy. Aging rats exposed to a regimen of metabolic syndrome developed elevation of plasma glucose concentration, mild hypertension and polyneuropathy characterized by a decrease in myelin fiber area, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness and myelin fiber loss in the femoral nerve. The histogram of size distribution for myelinated fibers and axons from the aging rats of the control group was bimodal. For aging MS animals, the histogram turned out to be unimodal. The ultrastructure of unmyelinated fibers and of Schwann cells in 18-month-old rats was well preserved. Granules of lipofuscin were seen in unmyelinated fiber axons of 18-month-old rats with MS. The damage percentage of the large myelinated fibers has increased significantly in 18-month-old and 18-month-old (MS) rats in relation to the controls. No significant difference was observed among the groups for the g-ratio. Comparing the three groups, the number of neurotubules and neurofilaments in myelinated fibers of 18-month-old rats with MS was significantly smaller than for the groups of 18-month-old and 14-month-old rats. The overall changes seen in the femoral nerve from aging rats seem minor compared to the changes in the aging rats with MS, suggesting that long-term MS accelerates the progressive modifications in peripheral nerves that develop in old age. PMID:25866014

  17. Improving Bone Microarchitecture in Aging with Diosgenin Treatment: A Study in Senescence-Accelerated OXYS Rats.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Maria A; Ting, Che-Hao; Kolosova, Nataliya G; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Chen, Jian-Horng; Huang, Chi-Wen; Tseng, Ging-Ting; Hung, Ching-Sui; Kao, Pan-Fu; Amstislavskaya, Tamara G; Ho, Ying-Jui

    2015-10-31

    Osteoporosis is a major disease associated with aging. We have previously demonstrated that diosgenin prevents osteoporosis in both menopause and D-galactose-induced aging rats. OXYS rats reveal an accelerated senescence and are used as a suitable model of osteoporosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze microarchitecture and morphological changes in femur of OXYS rats using morphological tests and microcomputed tomography scanning, and to evaluate the effects of oral administration of diosgenin at 10 and 50 mg/kg/day on femur in OXYS rats. The result showed that, compared with age-matched Wistar rats, the femur of OXYS rats revealed lower bone length, bone weight, bone volume, frame volume, frame density, void volume, porosity, external and internal diameters, cortical bone area, BV/TV, Tb.N, and Tb.Th, but higher Tb.Sp. Eight weeks of diosgenin treatment decreased porosity and Tb.Sp, but increased BV/TV, cortical bone area, Tb.N and bone mineral density, compared with OXYS rats treated with vehicle. These data reveal that microarchitecture and morphological changes in femur of OXYS rats showed osteoporotic aging features and suggest that diosgenin may have beneficial effects on aging-induced osteoporosis. PMID:26387656

  18. Anti-aging Effect and Gene Expression Profiling of Aged Rats Treated with G. bimaculatus Extract

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Kim, Min-Ji; Park, Kun-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Extract from Gryllus bimaculatus crickets inhibits oxidation at the DNA level, with reduced production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Microarray analyses were performed with a rat 28K cDNA clone set array to identify the gene expression profiles of aged (10 months old) Wistar Kyoto rats treated for one month with 100 mg/kg G. bimaculatus ethanol extract to assess the effects. The extract produced a meaningful anti-edema effect, evident by the inhibition of creatinine phosphokinase activity. The weights of abdominal and ovarian adipose tissues were reduced and the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissues was increased in an extract dose-dependent manner. Compared with untreated control rats, rats treated with the extract displayed the upregulation of 1053 genes including Fas (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 6), Amigo3 (adhesion molecule with an immunoglobulin-like domain), Reticulon 4, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme (Hmgcr; a reductase), related anti-fatigue (enzyme metabolism), and Rtn antioxidant, and the downregulation of 73 genes including Ugt2b (UDP glycosyltransferase 2 family), Early growth response 1, and Glycoprotein m6a. Data suggest that G. bimaculatus extract may have value in lessening the effects of aging, resulting in a differential gene expression pattern indicative of a marked stress response and lower expression of metabolic and biosynthetic genes. PMID:26191384

  19. Oxidative Damage in the Aging Heart: an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Gustavo Lenci; Neto, Francisco Filipak; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto de Oliveira; Liebel, Samuel; de Fraga, Rogério; Bueno, Ronaldo da Rocha Loures

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several theories have been proposed to explain the cause of ‘aging’; however, the factors that affect this complex process are still poorly understood. Of these theories, the accumulation of oxidative damage over time is among the most accepted. Particularly, the heart is one of the most affected organs by oxidative stress. The current study, therefore, aimed to investigate oxidative stress markers in myocardial tissue of rats at different ages. Methods: Seventy-two rats were distributed into 6 groups of 12 animals each and maintained for 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and the levels of non-protein thiols, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were determined. Results: Superoxide dismutase, catalase activity and lipid peroxidation were reduced in the older groups of animals, when compared with the younger group. However, protein carbonylation showed an increase in the 12-month group followed by a decrease in the older groups. In addition, the levels of non-protein thiols were increased in the 12-month group and not detected in the older groups. Conclusion: Our data showed that oxidative stress is not associated with aging in the heart. However, an increase in non-protein thiols may be an important factor that compensates for the decrease of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the oldest rats, to maintain appropriate antioxidant defenses against oxidative insults. PMID:27006709

  20. Glutamatergic signaling and low prodynorphin expression are associated with intact memory and reduced anxiety in rat models of healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2014-01-01

    The LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain is considered a model of healthy aging due to its increased longevity, maintenance of stable body weight (BW) throughout life and low incidence of age-related diseases. However, aging LOU rat cognitive and anxiety status has yet to be investigated. In the present study, male and female LOU rat cognitive performances (6-42 months) were assessed using novel object recognition and Morris Water Maze tasks. Recognition memory remained intact in all LOU rats up to 42 months of age. As for spatial memory, old LOU rat performed similarly as young animals for learning acquisition, reversal learning, and retention. While LOU rat BW remained stable despite aging, 20-month-old ad-libitum-fed (OAL) male Sprague Dawley rats become obese. We determined if long-term caloric restriction (LTCR) prevents age-related BW increase and cognitive deficits in this rat strain, as observed in the obesity-resistant LOU rats. Compared to young animals, recognition memory was impaired in OAL but intact in 20-month-old calorie-restricted (OCR) rats. Similarly, OAL spatial learning acquisition was impaired but LTCR prevented the deficits. Exacerbated stress responses may favor age-related cognitive decline. In the elevated plus maze and open field tasks, LOU and OCR rats exhibited high levels of exploratory activity whereas OAL rats displayed anxious behaviors. Expression of prodynorphin (Pdyn), an endogenous peptide involved in stress-related memory impairments, was increased in the hippocampus of OAL rats. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and immediate early genes Homer 1a and Arc expression, both associated with successful cognitive aging, were unaltered in aging LOU rats but lower in OAL than OCR rats. Altogether, our results, supported by principal component analysis and correlation matrix, suggest that intact memory and low anxiety are associated with glutamatergic signaling and low Pdyn expression in the hippocampus of non-obese aging rats. PMID

  1. Glutamatergic signaling and low prodynorphin expression are associated with intact memory and reduced anxiety in rat models of healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2014-01-01

    The LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain is considered a model of healthy aging due to its increased longevity, maintenance of stable body weight (BW) throughout life and low incidence of age-related diseases. However, aging LOU rat cognitive and anxiety status has yet to be investigated. In the present study, male and female LOU rat cognitive performances (6–42 months) were assessed using novel object recognition and Morris Water Maze tasks. Recognition memory remained intact in all LOU rats up to 42 months of age. As for spatial memory, old LOU rat performed similarly as young animals for learning acquisition, reversal learning, and retention. While LOU rat BW remained stable despite aging, 20-month-old ad-libitum-fed (OAL) male Sprague Dawley rats become obese. We determined if long-term caloric restriction (LTCR) prevents age-related BW increase and cognitive deficits in this rat strain, as observed in the obesity-resistant LOU rats. Compared to young animals, recognition memory was impaired in OAL but intact in 20-month-old calorie-restricted (OCR) rats. Similarly, OAL spatial learning acquisition was impaired but LTCR prevented the deficits. Exacerbated stress responses may favor age-related cognitive decline. In the elevated plus maze and open field tasks, LOU and OCR rats exhibited high levels of exploratory activity whereas OAL rats displayed anxious behaviors. Expression of prodynorphin (Pdyn), an endogenous peptide involved in stress-related memory impairments, was increased in the hippocampus of OAL rats. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and immediate early genes Homer 1a and Arc expression, both associated with successful cognitive aging, were unaltered in aging LOU rats but lower in OAL than OCR rats. Altogether, our results, supported by principal component analysis and correlation matrix, suggest that intact memory and low anxiety are associated with glutamatergic signaling and low Pdyn expression in the hippocampus of non-obese aging rats. PMID

  2. Comparison of catalase immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between young, adult and aged mice and rats

    PubMed Central

    AHN, JI HYEON; CHEN, BAI HUI; SHIN, BICH-NA; LEE, TAE-KYEONG; CHO, JEONG HWI; KIM, IN HYE; PARK, JOON HA; LEE, JAE-CHUL; TAE, HYUN-JIN; LEE, CHOONG-HYUN; WON, MOO-HO; LEE, YUN LYUL; CHOI, SOO YOUNG; HONG, SEONGKWEON

    2016-01-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an important antioxidant enzyme and is crucial in modulating synaptic plasticity in the brain. In this study, CAT expression as well as neuronal distribution was compared in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged mice and rats. Male ICR mice and Sprague Dawley rats were used at postnatal month (PM) 1, PM 6 and PM 24 as the young, adult and aged groups, respectively (n=14/group). CAT expression was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. In addition, neuronal distribution was examined by NeuN immunohistochemistry. In the present study, the mean number of NeuN-immunoreactive neurons was marginally decreased in mouse and rat hippocampi during aging, although this change was not identified to be significantly different. However, CAT immunoreactivity was significantly increased in pyramidal and granule neurons in the adult mouse and rat hippocampi and was significantly decreased in the aged mouse and rat hippocampi compared with that in the young animals. CAT protein levels in the hippocampus were also lowest in the aged mouse and rat hippocampus. These results indicate that CAT expression is significantly decreased in the hippocampi of aged animals and decreased CAT expression may be closely associated with aging. PMID:27221506

  3. Comparison of catalase immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between young, adult and aged mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Choong-Hyun; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Yun Lyul; Choi, Soo Young; Hong, Seongkweon

    2016-07-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an important antioxidant enzyme and is crucial in modulating synaptic plasticity in the brain. In this study, CAT expression as well as neuronal distribution was compared in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged mice and rats. Male ICR mice and Sprague Dawley rats were used at postnatal month (PM) 1, PM 6 and PM 24 as the young, adult and aged groups, respectively (n=14/group). CAT expression was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. In addition, neuronal distribution was examined by NeuN immunohistochemistry. In the present study, the mean number of NeuN‑immunoreactive neurons was marginally decreased in mouse and rat hippocampi during aging, although this change was not identified to be significantly different. However, CAT immunoreactivity was significantly increased in pyramidal and granule neurons in the adult mouse and rat hippocampi and was significantly decreased in the aged mouse and rat hippocampi compared with that in the young animals. CAT protein levels in the hippocampus were also lowest in the aged mouse and rat hippocampus. These results indicate that CAT expression is significantly decreased in the hippocampi of aged animals and decreased CAT expression may be closely associated with aging. PMID:27221506

  4. Effect of ethinyl estradiol treatment on lipoproteins and LCAT activity in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Kudchodkar, B J; Lacko, A G

    1992-06-01

    The induction of hepatic lipoprotein (apo B/E) have been investigated in Fischer-344 rats. These studies were aimed to determine the mechanism underlying the previously observed (Lee et al., Mech. Ageing Dev., 61 (1991) 85-98) hypercholesterolemia and the age-related decrease in the fractional rate of endogenous cholesterol esterification. Young (5 months) and aged (22 months) male Fischer-344 rats were treated with pharmacological doses (5 mg/kg per day) of ethinyl estradiol (EE) for 7 days. Reduction of plasma cholesterol (57% in young vs 47% in aged rats) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (64% in young vs 63% in aged rats) occurred in both groups upon EE treatment. Initial low density lipoprotein levels were very low in the plasma of young rats and consequently were not affected by EE treatment. However, in aged rats, the low density lipoprotein levels were much higher initially and were markedly reduced by EE treatment. (18.0 vs 10.0 mg/dl). Very low density lipoproteins were about the same initially but increased in aged rats and decreased in young rats upon EE treatment. Both the lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity (as determined with a proteoliposome substrate) and the fractional rate (FR) of the endogenous cholesterol esterification decreased in treated animals compared to controls. However, the differences in the FR of the endogenous cholesterol esterification between young and aged rats (observed before treatment) were nearly abolished upon treatment. These data suggest that the previously observed age related decrease in the FR of endogenous cholesterol esterification is due to the accumulation of apolipoprotein E-rich (apo E) lipoproteins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1630152

  5. Alterations in lenticular proteins during ageing and selenite-induced cataractogenesis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakthivel, Muniyan; Elanchezhian, Rajan; Thomas, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine putative alterations in the major lenticular proteins in Wistar rats of different ages and to compare these alterations with those occurring in rats with selenite-induced cataract. Methods Lenticular transparency was determined by morphological examination using slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Alterations in lenticular protein were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE (SDS–PAGE) and confirmed immunologically by western blot. Results Morphological examination did not reveal observable opacities in the lenses of the rats of different age groups; however, dense nuclear opacities were noted in lenses of rats in the selenite-cataract group. Western blot assays revealed age-related changes in soluble and urea-soluble lenticular proteins. Decreased αA- and βB1-crystallins in the soluble fraction and aggregation of αA-crystallin, in addition to the degraded fragment of βB1-crystallin, in the urea-soluble fraction appeared to occur in relation to increasing age of the rats from which the lenses were taken; similarly, cytoskeletal proteins appeared to decline with increasing age. The lenses from rats in the selenite-cataract group exhibited similar changes, except that there was also high molecular weight aggregation of αA-crystallin. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that there is loss, as well as aggregation, of αA-crystallin in the aging rat lens, although there is no accompanying loss of lenticular transparency. PMID:20300567

  6. Enhanced Post-Ischemic Neurogenesis in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yao-Fang; Preston, Edward; Wojtowicz, J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis persists in adult mammals, but its rate declines dramatically with age. Evidence indicates that experimentally-reduced levels of neurogenesis (e.g., by irradiation) in young rats has profound influence on cognition as determined by learning and memory tests. In the present study we asked whether in middle-aged, 10- to 13-months-old rats, cell production can be restored toward the level present in young rats. To manipulate neurogenesis we induced bilateral carotid occlusion with hypotension. This procedure is known to increase neurogenesis in young rats, presumably in a compensatory manner, but until now, has never been tested in aging rats. Cell production was measured at 10, 35, and 90 days after ischemia. The results indicate that neuronal proliferation and differentiation can be transiently restored in middle-aged rats. Furthermore, the effects are more pronounced in the dorsal as opposed to ventral hippocampus thus restoring the dorso-ventral gradient seen in younger rats. Our results support previous findings showing that some of the essential features of the age-dependent decline in neurogenesis are reversible. Thus, it may be possible to manipulate neurogenesis and improve learning and memory in old age. PMID:20877422

  7. Review of growth plate closure compared with age at sexual maturity and lifespan in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Kilborn, Susan H; Trudel, Guy; Uhthoff, Hans

    2002-09-01

    Although it is assumed that most mammals experience growth plate closure and cessation of bone growth soon after sexual maturity, bone growth in rats continues throughout their lifespan. The rat was compared to other laboratory animals to assess differences in the duration of bone growth and its relationship to age at sexual maturity and lifespan. We reviewed the literature from 1966 to March 1999 by searching MEDLINE and other databases. Growth closure times and age at sexual maturity were retrieved for the mouse, rabbit, dog, cat, sheep, cow, horse, nonhuman primates, and human. For all species, we calculated the ratios of: 1) age at growth plate closure to lifespan, 2) age at growth plate closure to age at sexual maturity, and 3) age at sexual maturity to average lifespan. The ratio of age at physis closure to the average lifespan was large for the rat (22 to 35) and showed some overlap with that of humans (17 to 25); this ratio was comparatively small in all other nonhuman species (range, 4 to 17). This finding indicates that bone growth continues in the rat for a greater proportion of their lifespan than does that in other species. The ratio of age at physis closure to age at sexual maturity was larger for the rat (5 to 6) than that for other species, indicating that bone growth continues much longer after sexual maturity in rats than in other animals. The ratio of age at sexual maturity to average lifespan was largest for humans and nonhuman primates (13 to 14), indicating the increased time to reach puberty versus that in other species. These differences are important for studies in which animal models are used in research involving bone growth. PMID:12213043

  8. Effects of metrifonate on radial arm maze acquisition in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Dachir, S; Schmidt, B; Levy, A

    1997-11-28

    The efficacy of metrifonate, a well-tolerated cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor, in attenuating the normal aging- and corticosterone-induced impairments of radial maze performance of rats was compared. Middle-aged Fischer 344 rats were screened for their spatial orientation performance in the Morris water escape task. Good and bad performers were selected: good performers (N= 22) were treated with subcutaneous sustained-release corticosterone pellets, resulting in hippocampal cell damage and impaired spatial orientation in the radial maze; age-induced bad performers (N = 20) were tested without additional pharmacological intervention. Metrifonate (MFT), administered daily during radial maze testing, 30 min before training, at a dose of 15 mg/kg p.o., facilitated the acquisition of the task in age-impaired rats, but not in corticosterone-impaired rats. PMID:9449438

  9. Aged rats show dominant modulation of lower frequency hippocampal theta rhythm during running.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yi; Kuo, Terry B J; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2016-10-01

    Aging causes considerable decline in both physiological and mental functions, particularly cognitive function. The hippocampal theta rhythm (4-12Hz) is related to both cognition and locomotion. Aging-related findings of the frequency and amplitude of hippocampal theta oscillations are inconsistent and occasionally contradictory. This inconsistency may be due to the effects of the sleep/wake state and different frequency subbands being overlooked. We assumed that aged rats have lower responses of the hippocampal theta rhythm during running, which is mainly due to the dominant modulation of theta frequency subbands related to cognition. By simultaneously recording electroencephalography, physical activity (PA), and the heart rate (HR), this experiment explored the theta oscillations before, during, and after treadmill running at a constant speed in 8-week-old (adult) and 60-week-old (middle-aged) rats. Compared with adult rats, the middle-aged rats exhibited lower theta activity in all frequency ranges before running. Running increased the theta frequency (Frq, 4-12Hz), total activity of the whole theta band (total power, TP), activity of the middle theta frequency (MT, 6.5-9.5Hz), and PA in both age groups. However, the middle-aged rats still showed fewer changes in these parameters during the whole running process. After the waking baseline values were substracted, middle-aged rats showed significantly fewer differences in ΔFrq, ΔTP, and ΔMT but significantly more differences in low-frequency theta activity (4.0-6.5Hz) and HR than the adult rats did. Therefore, the decreasing activity and response of the whole theta band in the middle-aged rats resulted in dominant modulation of the middle to lower frequency (4.0-9.5Hz) theta rhythm. The different alterations in the theta rhythm during treadmill running in the two groups may reflect that learning decline with age. PMID:27496645

  10. Aging Effect on Post-recovery Hypofusion and Mortality Following Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michelle A; LaManna, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of aging on brain blood flow following transient global ischemia. Male Fisher rats (6 and 24 months old) underwent cardiac arrest (15 min) and resuscitation. Regional brain (cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and cerebellum) blood flow was measured in non-arrested rats and 1-h recovery rats using [14C] iodoantipyrene (IAP) autoradiography; the 4-day survival rate was determined in the two age groups. The pre-arrest baseline blood flows were similar in cortex, brainstem and cerebellum between the 6-month and the 24-month old rats; however, the baseline blood flow in hippocampus was significantly lower in the 24-month old group. At 1 h following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, both 6-month and 24-month groups had significantly lower blood flows in all regions than the pre-arrest baseline values; compared to the 6-month old group, the blood flow was significantly lower (about 40% lower) in all regions in the 24-month old group. The 4-day survival rate for the 6-month old rats was 50% (3/6) whereas none of the 24-month old rats (0/10) survived for 4 days. The data suggest that there is an increased vulnerability to brain ischemic-reperfusion injury in the aged rats; the degree of post-recovery hypoperfusion may contribute to the high mortality in the aged rats following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:26782221

  11. Long term facilitation of respiratory motor output decreases with age in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Zabka, A G; Behan, M; Mitchell, G S

    2001-01-01

    Long term facilitation (LTF) is a serotonin-dependent augmentation of respiratory motor output (phrenic and hypoglossal) following episodic hypoxia. Since ageing influences respiratory control mechanisms and serotonergic function, we tested the hypothesis that LTF decreases with age in male rats. Young (3-4 month) and aged (13 month) male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with urethane, vagotomized, paralysed and pump ventilated. Integrated phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) nerve activities were measured before (baseline), during and for 60 min after three 5 min episodes of isocapnic hypoxia (Pa,O2 35-45 mmHg) separated by 5 min of hyperoxia (Pa,O2 > 150 mmHg). In young rats, LTF was observed as an augmentation in peak integrated phrenic (n = 8) and XII (n = 7) amplitudes following episodic hypoxia (56 ± 14 and 73 ± 16 % (means ±s.e.m.) at 60 min post-hypoxia, respectively; both P < 0.05). In aged rats, LTF was significantly increased compared to baseline in phrenic (25 ± 8 % at 60 min, P < 0.05), but not in XII (4 ± 7 %, P > 0.05) motor output. LTF was significantly greater in young than in aged rats in both motor outputs (P < 0.05). Decreased phrenic and XII LTF suggests that serotonergic modulation of respiratory motor output decreases in ageing male rats. We speculate that decreased serotonergic modulation may contribute to age-related breathing disorders. PMID:11230522

  12. rhEPO affects apoptosis in hippocampus of aging rats by upregulating SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiqin; Wang, Huqing; Zhang, Wenting; Wei, Xuanhui; Zhao, Jiaxin; Yan, Pu; Liu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the signaling pathway involved in the anti-aging effect of erythropoietin (EPO) and to clarify whether recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) affects apoptosis in the aging rat hippocampus by upregulating Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). In this study, a rat model of aging was established using D-galactose. Behavioral changes were monitored by the Morris water maze test. Using immunohistochemistry, we studied the expression of SIRT1, B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 gene (Bcl-2), and Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) expression, and apoptotic cells in the hippocampus of a rat model of aging in which rhEPO was intraperitoneally injected. The escape latency in rats from the EPO group shortened significantly; however, the number of platform passes increased significantly from that in the D-gal group (P < 0.05). Compared to the D-gal group, in the EPO group, the number of SIRT1 and Bcl-2-positive cells increased (P < 0.05), but the number of Bax-positive cells and apoptotic cells decreased in the hippocampus of aging rats (P < 0.05). These results suggest that rhEPO regulates apoptosis-related genes and affects apoptosis in the hippocampus of aging rats by upregulating SIRT. This may be one of the important pathways underlying the anti-aging property of EPO. PMID:26261574

  13. Efficacy of Female Rat Models in Translational Cardiovascular Aging Research

    PubMed Central

    Rice, K. M.; Fannin, J. C.; Gillette, C.; Blough, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States. Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease as well as cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Aging is a universal process that all humans undergo; however, research in aging is limited by cost and time constraints. Therefore, most research in aging has been done in primates and rodents; however it is unknown how well the effects of aging in rat models translate into humans. To compound the complication of aging gender has also been indicated as a risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system associated with aging and gender for aging research with regard to the applicability of rat derived data for translational application to human aging. PMID:25610649

  14. An Observational Assessment Method for Aging Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Pamela M; Jarema, Kimberly A; Kurtz, David M; MacPhail, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth of the aging human population highlights the need for laboratory animal models to study the basic biologic processes of aging and susceptibility to disease, drugs, and environmental pollutants. Methods are needed to evaluate the health of aging animals over time, particularly methods for efficiently monitoring large research colonies. Here we describe an observational assessment method that scores appearance, posture, mobility, and muscle tone on a 5-point scale that can be completed in about 1 min. A score of 1 indicates no deterioration, whereas a score of 5 indicates severe deterioration. Tests were applied to male Brown Norway rats between 12 and 36 mo of age (n = 32). The rats were participating concurrently in experiments on the behavioral effects of intermittent exposure (approximately every 4 mo) to short-acting environmental chemicals. Results demonstrated that aging-related signs of deterioration did not appear before 18 mo of age. Assessment scores and variability then increased with age. Body weights increased until approximately 24 mo, then remained stable, but decreased after 31 mo for the few remaining rats. The incidence of death increased slightly from 20 to 28 mo of age and then rose sharply; median survival age was approximately 30 mo, with a maximum of 36 mo. The results indicate that our observational assessment method supports efficient monitoring of the health of aging rats and may be useful in studies on susceptibility to diseases, drugs, and toxicants during old age. PMID:21205442

  15. Preferential release of triiodothyronine: an intrathyroidal adaptation to reduced serum thyroxine in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Pekary, A E; Hershman, J M; Sugawara, M; Gieschen, K I; Sogol, P B; Reed, A W; Pardridge, W M; Walfish, P G

    1983-11-01

    In order to identify the changes in thyroid regulation and function that are responsible for the age-related decline in T4 secretion, we measured the secretory response of the rat pituitary and thyroid glands to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), plasma T1/2 for 125I-rat thyrotropin (TSH), the molecular weight of pituitary TSH, T4 uptake and conversion to T3 by the liver, amount of T4 and T3 in serum and in thyroglobulin, and the thyroid peroxidase concentration. The molecular weight of TSH and the biexponential plasma clearance of TSH were not affected by aging. TSH response to TRH administered intravenously did not differ between old and young rats. T3 response to TRH was greater and T4 response lower in old compared with young rats despite levels of T4 and T3 in thyroglobulin which were not affected by aging. Aging effects on hepatic conversion of T4 to T3 varied between rat strains. T4 uptake by liver in vivo by old rats was the same as that reported for young animals. The data are consistent with a marked decrease in the ratio of T4 to T3 secreted by the aging rat thyroid in both the basal and stimulated state possibly due to increased intrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3. PMID:6415151

  16. Radiometric Ages of Martian Meteorites compared to Martian Surfaces Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1999-01-01

    The surprisingly young Rb-Sr age of the Shergotty meteorite contributed to early suggestions that it might be of martian origin. their redox state and oxygen isotopic compositions linked the shergottites to the clino-pyroxenite nakhlites and the dunite Chassigny, causing them to be grouped as SNC meteorites. These characteristics, but especially the similarity of the elemental and isotopic compositions of gases trapped in shergottites to those of the martian atmosphere, have caused the martian origin of the SNC and related meteorites to be widely accepted. Although the young ages were one of the early hints of a martian origin for the SNC meteorites, their interpretation has remained somewhat ambiguous. We will review the radiometric ages of the martian meteorites and attempt to place them into the context of martian surface ages.

  17. Cardiac and thermal homeostasis in the aging Brown Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J

    2008-12-01

    The cardiovascular and thermoregulatory systems are considered to be susceptible in the aged population, but little is known about baseline cardiac and thermoregulatory homeostasis in rodent models of aging. Radiotransmitters were implanted in male, Brown Norway rats obtained at 4, 12, and 24 months to monitor the electrocardiogram (ECG), interbeat interval (IBI), heart rate (HR), core temperature (Tc), and motor activity (MA). There was no significant effect of age on resting HR and MA. Daytime Tc of the 24-month-old rats was significantly elevated above those of the 4- and 12-month-old groups. Variability of the IBI was highest in the 24-month-old rats. The elevation in daytime Tc beginning around 8 months of age may be a physiological biomarker of aging and may be an important factor to consider in studies using caloric restriction-induced hypothermia to increase longevity. PMID:19126843

  18. Age-associated changes in rat immune system: lessons learned from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Djikić, Jasmina; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Pilipović, Ivan; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Bufan, Biljana; Kosec, Duško; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2014-10-01

    Aging is associated with the decline in immune response to infectious agents and tumors and increasing risk of autoimmunity, but the incidence of autoimmune diseases does not increase in the elderly. To elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms influencing clinical expression of autoimmunity in aged animals, the phenotypic and functional characteristics of mononuclear cells isolated from the spinal cords of 3-month-old (young) and 26-month-old (aged) Dark Agouti rats immunized to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) - the model of multiple sclerosis, the most common autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, were examined. Aged rats were less susceptible to EAE induction, and the neurological and histological picture was milder in those rats which developed the clinically manifested disease. At the peak of the disease, several times fewer mononuclear cells and T lymphocytes were isolated from the spinal cords of aged rats compared with the young ones. The frequency of CD4+ cells among TCRαβ+ lymphocytes, as well as that of reactivated CD134(OX40)+ cells within its CD4+ T-lymphocyte subpopulation, was less in spinal cords of aged compared with young rats. Additionally, CD134 surface density on CD4+ lymphocytes was decreased in the spinal cord of aged rats. The changes in CD134 expression most likely reflected in part age-related intrinsic changes in CD4+ lymphocytes as the expression of this molecule was also impaired on in vitro stimulated naïve CD4+ splenocytes from aged rats compared with young animals. In addition, greater frequency of CD8+ lymphocytes with regulatory phenotypes could also contribute to impaired CD4+ cell reactivation in aged rats. The increased apoptosis of CD4+ cells from aged rats was consistent with their impaired reactivation and it was accompanied by the greater frequency of CD4+CD11b+CD45(int/high) cells, which are supposed to be actively engaged in apoptotic cell phagocytosis and to have immunoregulatory

  19. Tocotrienol improves learning and memory deficit of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaneai, Nozomi; Sumitani, Kazumi; Fukui, Koji; Koike, Taisuke; Takatsu, Hirokatsu; Urano, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    To define whether tocotrienol (T-3) improves cognitive deficit during aging, effect of T-3 on learning and memory functions of aged rats was assessed. It was found that T-3 markedly counteracts the decline in learning and memory function in aged rats. Quantitative analysis of T-3 content in the rat brain showed that the aged rats fed T-3 mixture-supplemented diet revealed the transport of α- and γ-T-3 to the brain. In contrast, normal young rats fed the same diet did not exhibit brain localization. Furthermore, the T-3 inhibited age-related decreases in the expression of certain blood brain barrier (BBB) proteins, including caludin-5, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM). It was found that the activation of the cellular proto-oncogene c-Src and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cell signaling pathway for neuronal cell death, was markedly inhibited by T-3. These results may reveal that aging induces partial BBB disruption caused by oxidative stress, thereby enabling the transport of T-3 through the BBB to the central nervous system, whereupon neuronal protection may be mediated by inhibition of c-Src and/or ERK activation, resulting in an improvement in age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27013777

  20. Tocotrienol improves learning and memory deficit of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kaneai, Nozomi; Sumitani, Kazumi; Fukui, Koji; Koike, Taisuke; Takatsu, Hirokatsu; Urano, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    To define whether tocotrienol (T-3) improves cognitive deficit during aging, effect of T-3 on learning and memory functions of aged rats was assessed. It was found that T-3 markedly counteracts the decline in learning and memory function in aged rats. Quantitative analysis of T-3 content in the rat brain showed that the aged rats fed T-3 mixture-supplemented diet revealed the transport of α- and γ-T-3 to the brain. In contrast, normal young rats fed the same diet did not exhibit brain localization. Furthermore, the T-3 inhibited age-related decreases in the expression of certain blood brain barrier (BBB) proteins, including caludin-5, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM). It was found that the activation of the cellular proto-oncogene c-Src and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cell signaling pathway for neuronal cell death, was markedly inhibited by T-3. These results may reveal that aging induces partial BBB disruption caused by oxidative stress, thereby enabling the transport of T-3 through the BBB to the central nervous system, whereupon neuronal protection may be mediated by inhibition of c-Src and/or ERK activation, resulting in an improvement in age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27013777

  1. Body protein and lipid deficit in tumour-bearing rats in relation to age.

    PubMed Central

    Oudart, H.; Heitz, A.; Bnouham, M.; Malan, A.; Le Maho, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is among the most dramatic situations of depletion in body energy reserves. To ascertain whether the pattern of body composition alteration during tumour development is influenced by aging as in uncomplicated starvation, we compared the difference of body composition between Yoshida sarcoma bearing rats and young (200 g, 7 weeks) and adult (400 g, 13 weeks) control rats. After the same duration of tumour bearing, mass and composition of tumours were similar in adult and young rats, indicating that they are independent of host age. Food intake decreased to a remarkably similar value in both young and adults. Body water content was elevated in hosts of both ages. The relative deficit of body lipid vs controls was similar for both, the absolute lipid deficit being therefore larger in adult than in young tumour-bearing rats (14.3 +/- 4.4 g vs 6.8 +/- 0.9 g; P < 0.01). In contrast, there was a relatively larger deficit of body protein in young rats. Paradoxically, these rats still maintained a positive nitrogen balance whereas this balance was negative in adult tumour-bearing rats. In conclusion, as previously shown in uncomplicated undernutrition, the anorexia induced by Yoshida sarcoma development is still associated with some protein accretion in young rats whereas cachexia develops in adults. PMID:8217604

  2. Age-dependent inhibition of pentobarbital sleeping time by ozone in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, A.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Leonard, D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of age on the metabolism of pentobarbital in mice and rats was investigated following exposure to 0.3 ppm of ozone for 3.75 hr. Young animals were 2.5 months of age and the mature were 18 months. The pentobarbital sleeping time was significantly prolonged following the ozone exposure in both the mice and rats when compared with an air control. No ozone effect on sleeping time was found in the young animals. The results indicate that there may be an age-related sensitivity to the occurrence of ozone-related inhibition of pentobarbital metabolism.

  3. Acai fruit improves motor and cognitive function in aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show impaired performance on motor and cognitive tasks that require the use of spatial learning and memory. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various berry fruits (blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries) in reversing age-related deficits in behavioral and ne...

  4. Tart cherries improve working memory in aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show impaired performance on cognitive tasks that require the use of spatial learning and memory. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various dark-colored berry fruits (blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries) in reversing age-related deficits in behavioral and...

  5. Red raspberries can improve motor function in aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Many foods rich in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds have been shown to increase health and reduce markers of aging. A number of berry fruits high in polyphenols are known to ameliorate age-related declines in cellular, cognitive and behavioral function in rats. OBJECTIVES: Thi...

  6. Neuropathic pain in aged rats: behavioral responses and astrocytic activation.

    PubMed

    Stuesse, S L; Crisp, T; McBurney, D L; Schechter, J B; Lovell, J A; Cruce, W L

    2001-03-01

    We used the Bennett and Xie (1988) model of chronic neuropathic pain to study the effect of age on thermal and tactile sensitivity and on astrocytic activation in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord after nerve injury. Fischer 344 FBNF1 hybrid rats in three age groups, 4-6, 14-16, and 24-26 months, were studied. Rats were either unligated (day 0, control) or the left sciatic nerve was loosely ligated to cause a chronic constriction injury (CCI). CCI causes a neuropathic pain condition characterized by tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Rats were behaviorally assessed for tactile and thermal sensitivity of their ligated and unligated hind paws up to 35 days postligation. Rats were sacrificed before or at various days postligation, and activated astrocytes were identified at the L4-L5 levels of their spinal cords by use of an antibody to glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP). The number of GFAP-ir astrocytes in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in the control, uninjured condition decreased with age (P < or = 0.001) but increased after CCI in all three age groups. After CCI, astrocytic activation in the cord was less robust in aged rats than in younger ones (P < or = 0.01). Not all the CCI rats displayed hyperalgesia to touch and to heat. Rats with an increased sensitivity to heat had increased levels of GFAP-ir in their cords; however, rats with decreased thermal sensitivity also displayed increased GFAP-ir. Thus the presence of activated astrocytes was not correlated with a single behavioral manifestation of neuropathic pain. PMID:11315551

  7. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) co-localize with AGE receptors in the retinal vasculature of diabetic and of AGE-infused rats.

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, A. W.; Li, Y. M.; Gardiner, T. A.; Bucala, R.; Archer, D. B.; Vlassara, H.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), formed from the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and lipids with reducing sugars, have been implicated in many diabetic complications; however, their role in diabetic retinopathy remains largely unknown. Recent studies suggest that the cellular actions of AGEs may be mediated by AGE-specific receptors (AGE-R). We have examined the immunolocalization of AGEs and AGE-R components R1 and R2 in the retinal vasculature at 2, 4, and 8 months after STZ-induced diabetes as well as in nondiabetic rats infused with AGE bovine serum albumin for 2 weeks. Using polyclonal or monoclonal anti-AGE antibodies and polyclonal antibodies to recombinant AGE-R1 and AGE-R2, immunoreactivity (IR) was examined in the complete retinal vascular tree after isolation by trypsin digestion. After 2, 4, and 8 months of diabetes, there was a gradual increase in AGE IR in basement membrane. At 8 months, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells of the retinal vessels showed dense intracellular AGE IR. AGE epitopes stained most intensely within pericytes and smooth muscle cells but less in basement membrane of AGE-infused rats compared with the diabetic group. Retinas from normal or bovine-serum-albumin-infused rats were largely negative for AGE IR. AGE-R1 and -R2 co-localized strongly with AGEs of vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells of either normal, diabetic, or AGE-infused rat retinas, and this distribution did not vary with each condition. The data indicate that AGEs accumulate as a function of diabetes duration first within the basement membrane and then intracellularly, co-localizing with cellular AGE-Rs. Significant AGE deposits appear within the pericytes after long-term diabetes or acute challenge with AGE infusion conditions associated with pericyte damage. Co-localization of AGEs and AGE-Rs in retinal cells points to possible interactions of pathogenic significance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID

  8. Kangaroo rat bone compared to white rat bone after short-term disuse and exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Reichman, O. J.

    1996-01-01

    Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) were used to study the effects of confinement on mechanical properties of bone with a long range objective of proposing an alternative to the white rat model for the study of disuse osteoporosis. Kangaroo rats exhibit bipedal locomotion, which subjects their limbs to substantial accelerative forces in addition to the normal stress of weight bearing. We subjected groups of kangaroo rats and white rats (Rattus norvegicus) to one of two confinement treatments or to an exercise regime; animals were exercised at a rate calculated to replicate their (respective) daily exercise patterns. White laboratory rats were used as the comparison because they are currently the accepted model used in the study of disuse osteoporosis. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were killed and the long bones of their hind limbs were tested mechanically and examined for histomorphometric changes. We found that kangaroo rats held in confinement had less ash content in their hind limbs than exercised kangaroo rats. In general, treated kangaroo rats showed morphometric and mechanical bone deterioration compared to controls and exercised kangaroo rats appeared to have slightly “stronger” bones than confined animals. White rats exhibited no significant differences between treatments. These preliminary results suggest that kangaroo rats may be an effective model in the study of disuse osteoporosis.

  9. Ageing delays emergence from general anaesthesia in rats by increasing anaesthetic sensitivity in the brain†

    PubMed Central

    Chemali, J. J.; Kenny, J. D.; Olutola, O.; Taylor, N. E.; Kimchi, E. Y.; Purdon, P. L.; Brown, E. N.; Solt, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about ageing-related changes in the brain that affect emergence from general anaesthesia. We used young adult and aged Fischer 344 rats to test the hypothesis that ageing delays emergence from general anaesthesia by increasing anaesthetic sensitivity in the brain. Methods Time to emergence was determined for isoflurane (1.5 vol% for 45 min) and propofol (8 mg kg−1 i.v.). The dose of isoflurane required to maintain loss of righting (LOR) was established in young adult and aged rats. The efficacy of methylphenidate to reverse LOR from general anaesthesia was tested. Separate young adult and aged rats with implanted electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes were used to test whether ageing increases sensitivity to anaesthetic-induced burst suppression. Results Mean time to emergence from isoflurane anaesthesia was 47 s [95% CI 33, 60; young adult) compared with 243 s (95% CI 185, 308; aged). For propofol, mean time to emergence was 13.1 min (95% CI 11.9, 14.0; young adult) compared with 23.1 min (95% CI 18.8, 27.9; aged). These differences were statistically significant. When methylphenidate was administered after propofol, the mean time to emergence decreased to 6.6 min (95% CI 5.9, 7.1; young adult) and 10.2 min (95% CI 7.9, 12.3; aged). These reductions were statistically significant. Methylphenidate restored righting in all rats during continuous isoflurane anaesthesia. Aged rats had lower EEG power and were more sensitive to anaesthetic-induced burst suppression. Conclusions Ageing delays emergence from general anaesthesia. This is due, at least in part, to increased anaesthetic sensitivity in the brain. Further studies are warranted to establish the underlying causes. PMID:26174302

  10. Centrophenoxine activates acetylcholinesterase activity in hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D; Singh, R

    1995-05-01

    Age-related changes in the acetylcholinesterase activity were measured in the hippocampus, brain stem and cerebellum of rats (aged 4, 8, 16 and 24 months). The age-dependent decrease in the enzyme activity first appeared in the hippocampus; the brain stem was affected later while the cerebellum remained unaffected. Centrophenoxine, usually considered as an ageing reversal drug and also regarded as a neuroenergeticum in human therapy, increased the acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus of aged rats, the activity was also elevated in the brain stem but no in the cerebellum. The acetylcholinesterase-stimulating influence of the drug is likely to be implicated in the pharmacological reversal of the age related decline of the cholinergic system. This effect of the drug may also mediate its effects on cognitive and neuronal synaptic functions. PMID:7558197

  11. Comparative study of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of human and rat cortical glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Demushkin, V.P.; Burbaeva, G.S.; Dzhaliashvili, T.A.; Plyashkevich, Y.G.

    1985-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation was a comparative studyof muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human and rat glial cells. (/sup 3/H)Quinuclidinyl-benzylate ((/sup 3/H)-QB), atropine, platiphylline, decamethonium, carbamylcholine, tubocurarine, and nicotine were used. The glial cell fraction was obtained from the cerebral cortex of rats weighing 130-140 g and from the frontal pole of the postmortem brain from men aged 60-70 years. The use of the method of radioimmune binding of (/sup 3/H)-QB with human and rat glial cell membranes demonstrated the presence of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in the glial cells.

  12. Hippocampal long-term potentiation is reduced in mature compared to young male rats but not in female rats.

    PubMed

    Monfort, P; Felipo, V

    2007-05-11

    Aging is associated with a decline in cognitive function which could be due to reduced synaptic plasticity. Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is an activity-dependent form of increased transmission efficacy at synapses that is considered the basis for some forms of learning and memory. We studied the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor-dependent LTP in the CA1 region of hippocampus in young (2 months) and mature (8 months) male and female rats. We have found that in young male rats the tetanus increased the magnitude of excitatory post-synaptic potentials to 204+/-10% of basal while in mature male rats the magnitude of the LTP was significantly lower reaching only 153+/-11% of basal. This decrease did not occur in female rats. Similar changes occurred in the content of the NMDA receptor subunits NR1 and NR2A in hippocampus. The amount of both subunits was reduced significantly (15-16%) in hippocampus of 8-month-old compared with 2-month-old male rats. This decrease was not observed in female rats. Moreover, there is a significant correlation between the content of NR1 subunit and the magnitude of the potentiation. These data suggest that some of the neurobiological changes induced in hippocampus by aging are different in males and females. PMID:17395392

  13. Effects of the anti-dementia drug hopantenate calcium upon striatal dopaminergic neurons in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Toide, K

    1989-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of the anti-dementia drug calcium D-(+)-4-(2,4-dihydroxy-3,3-dimethyl-butyramido) butyrate hemihydrate (hopantenate) on the dopaminergic neurons of rats, and also compared the effects of the drug on dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats (4 months old) and aged rats (21 months old). Hopantenate 1000 mg/kg, p.o. significantly increased striatal dopamine (DA) levels, but displayed almost no effect upon the DOPAC and HVA levels. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of hopantenate upon tyrosine hydroxylase activity by examining NSD-1015-induced L-DOPA accumulation and found that hopantenate 1000 mg/kg, p.o. significantly increased the L-DOPA accumulation. In addition, comparing the effect of hopantenate on dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats and aged rats, we found that the striatal DA, DOPAC and HVA levels were decreased as a concomitant of aging, and hopantenate 1000 mg/kg, p.o. significantly increased DA and DOPAC levels in both ages. The above results clearly indicate that hopantenate enhanced DA biosynthesis by stimulating the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase. Furthermore, the results of hopantenate upon dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats and aged rats suggest that sensitivity to the drug may not be different with age, though the striatal DA, DOPAC and HVA levels of rats were decreased as a concomitant of aging. PMID:2570556

  14. Region-specific changes in presynaptic agmatine and glutamate levels in the aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jing, Y; Liu, P; Leitch, B

    2016-01-15

    During the normal aging process, the brain undergoes a range of biochemical and structural alterations, which may contribute to deterioration of sensory and cognitive functions. Age-related deficits are associated with altered efficacy of synaptic neurotransmission. Emerging evidence indicates that levels of agmatine, a putative neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, are altered in a region-specific manner during the aging process. The gross tissue content of agmatine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of aged rat brains is decreased whereas levels in the temporal cortex (TE) are increased. However, it is not known whether these changes in gross tissue levels are also mirrored by changes in agmatine levels at synapses and thus could potentially contribute to altered synaptic function with age. In the present study, agmatine levels in presynaptic terminals in the PFC and TE regions (300 terminals/region) of young (3month; n=3) and aged (24month; n=3) brains of male Sprague-Dawley rats were compared using quantitative post-embedding immunogold electron-microscopy. Presynaptic levels of agmatine were significantly increased in the TE region (60%; p<0.001) of aged rats compared to young rats, however no significant differences were detected in synaptic levels in the PFC region. Double immunogold labeling indicated that agmatine and glutamate were co-localized in the same synaptic terminals, and quantitative analyses revealed significantly reduced glutamate levels in agmatine-immunopositive synaptic terminals in both regions in aged rats compared to young animals. This study, for the first time, demonstrates differential effects of aging on agmatine and glutamate in the presynaptic terminals of PFC and TE. Future research is required to understand the functional significance of these changes and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26548412

  15. Human neural progenitors differentiate into astrocytes and protect motor neurons in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Melanie M; Avalos, Pablo; Suezaki, Patrick; Godoy, Marlesa; Garcia, Leslie; Chang, Christine D; Vit, Jean-Philippe; Shelley, Brandon; Gowing, Genevieve; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-06-01

    Age-associated health decline presents a significant challenge to healthcare, although there are few animal models that can be used to test potential treatments. Here, we show that there is a significant reduction in both spinal cord motor neurons and motor function over time in the aging rat. One explanation for this motor neuron loss could be reduced support from surrounding aging astrocytes. Indeed, we have previously shown using in vitro models that aging rat astrocytes are less supportive to rat motor neuron function and survival over time. Here, we test whether rejuvenating the astrocyte niche can improve the survival of motor neurons in an aging spinal cord. We transplanted fetal-derived human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) into the aging rat spinal cord and found that the cells survive and differentiate into astrocytes with a much higher efficiency than when transplanted into younger animals, suggesting that the aging environment stimulates astrocyte maturation. Importantly, the engrafted astrocytes were able to protect against motor neuron loss associated with aging, although this did not result in an increase in motor function based on behavioral assays. We also transplanted hNPCs genetically modified to secrete glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) into the aging rat spinal cord, as this combination of cell and protein delivery can protect motor neurons in animal models of ALS. During aging, GDNF-expressing hNPCs protected motor neurons, though to the same extent as hNPCs alone, and again had no effect on motor function. We conclude that hNPCs can survive well in the aging spinal cord, protect motor neurons and mature faster into astrocytes when compared to transplantation into the young spinal cord. While there was no functional improvement, there were no functional deficits either, further supporting a good safety profile of hNPC transplantation even into the older patient population. PMID:27032721

  16. Effects of age on recovery of body weight following REM sleep deprivation of rats.

    PubMed

    Koban, Michael; Stewart, Craig V

    2006-01-30

    Chronically enforced rapid eye (paradoxical) movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD) of rats leads to a host of pathologies, of which hyperphagia and loss of body weight are among the most readily observed. In recent years, the etiology of many REM-SD-associated pathologies have been elucidated, but one unexplored area is whether age affects outcomes. In this study, male Sprague-Dawley rats at 2, 6, and 12 months of age were REM sleep-deprived with the platform (flowerpot) method for 10-12 days. Two-month-old rats resided on 7-cm platforms, while 10-cm platforms were used for 6- and 12-month-old rats; rats on 15-cm platforms served as tank controls (TCs). Daily changes in food consumption (g/kg(0.67)) and body weight (g) during baseline, REM-SD or TCs, and post-experiment recovery in home cages were determined. Compared to TCs, REM-SD resulted in higher food intake and decreases in body weight. When returned to home cages, food intake rapidly declined to baseline levels. Of primary interest was that rates of body weight gain during recovery differed between the age groups. Two-month-old rats rapidly restored body weight to pre-REM-SD mass within 5 days; 6-month-old rats were extrapolated by linear regression to have taken about 10 days, and for 12-month-old rats, the estimate was about 35 days. The observation that restoration of body weight following its loss during REM-SD may be age-dependent is in general agreement with the literature on aging effects on how mammals respond to stress. PMID:16243367

  17. Alcoholic Steatosis in Different Strains of Rat: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Fernando, Harshica; Boor, Paul J.; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Shakeel Ansari, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Different strains of rats have been used to study alcoholic liver disease (ALD) while the reason for selecting a particular rat strain was not apparent. Purpose The aim of our study was to compare outbred (Wistar) and inbred (Fischer) strains to evaluate pathological, biochemical changes, and gene expression differences associated with ethanol-induced early hepatic steatosis. Study Design Male Wistar and Fischer-344 rats were pair-fed for 6 weeks with or without 5% ethanol in Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet. Livers were analyzed for histological and lipid-related differences. Results Hepatic midzonal steatosis was mainly found in Wistar rats while Fischer rats showed mostly pericentral steatosis. Increased hepatic steatosis in ethanol-fed Wistar rats is supported by increases in lipids with related genes and transcription factors involved in fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis. Conclusion Our data showed that Fischer rats are relatively less prone to ethanol-mediated steatosis with pericentral lipid deposition pattern in the liver which is similar to humans and show no trace level of lipid accumulation in pair-fed controls as observed in Wistar (outbred) strain. Therefore, Fischer rats are better suited for lipid studies in an early development of ALD. PMID:27213081

  18. Age-related pathophysiological changes in rats with unilateral renal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Amakasu, Kohei; Suzuki, Katsushi; Katayama, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2011-06-01

    Affected rats of the unilateral urogenital anomalies (UUA) strain show renal agenesis restricted to the left side. To determine whether unilateral renal agenesis is a risk factor for the progression of renal insufficiency, we studied age-related pathophysiological alterations in affected rats. Although body growth and food intake were normal, polydipsia and polyuria with low specific gravity were present at 10 weeks and deteriorated further with age. Blood hemoglobin concentrations were normal, though there was slight erythropenia with increased MCV and MCH. Although hypoalbuminemia, hypercholesterolemia, azotemia, and hypermagnesemia were manifested after age 20 weeks, neither hyperphosphatemia nor hypocalcemia was observed. Plasma Cre and UN concentrations gradually increased with age. Cre clearance was almost normal, whereas fractional UN excretion was consistently lower than normal. Proteinuria increased with age, and albumin was the major leakage protein. In addition to cortical lesions, dilated tubules, cast formation, and interstitial fibrosis were observed in the renal medulla of 50 week-old affected rats. Renal weight was increased 1.7-fold and glomerular number 1.2-fold compared with normal rats. These findings show that the remaining kidney in UUA rats is involved not only in compensatory reactions but experiences pathophysiological alterations associated with progressive renal insufficiency. PMID:21307619

  19. Distinct manifestations of executive dysfunction in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Beas, B. Sofia; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Different components of executive function such as working memory, attention, and cognitive flexibility can be dissociated both behaviorally and mechanistically; however, the within-subject influences of normal aging on different aspects of executive function remain ill-defined. To better define these relationships, young adult and aged male F344 rats were cross-characterized on an attentional set-shifting task that assesses cognitive flexibility and a delayed response task that assesses working memory. Across tasks, aged rats were impaired relative to young; however, there was significant variability in individual performance within the aged cohort. Notably, performance on the set-shifting task and performance at long delays on the delayed response task were inversely related among aged rats. Additional experiments showed no relationship between aged rats’ performance on the set-shifting task and performance on a hippocampal-dependent spatial reference memory task. These data indicate that normal aging can produce distinct manifestations of executive dysfunction, and support the need to better understand the unique mechanisms contributing to different forms of prefrontal cortical-supported executive decline across the lifespan. PMID:23601673

  20. Oxidative stress induces the decline of brain EPO expression in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Chen, Yubao; Shao, Siying; Tang, Qing; Chen, Weihai; Chen, Yi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2016-10-01

    Brain Erythropoietin (EPO), an important neurotrophic factor and neuroprotective factor, was found to be associated with aging. Studies found EPO expression was significantly decreased in the hippocampus of aging rat compared with that of the youth. But mechanisms of the decline of the brain EPO during aging remain unclear. The present study utilized a d-galactose (d-gal)-induced aging model in which the inducement of aging was mainly oxidative injury, to explore underlying mechanisms for the decline of brain EPO in aging rats. d-gal-induced aging rats (2months) were simulated by subcutaneously injecting with d-gal at doses of 50mg·kg(-1), 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1) daily for 8weeks while the control group received vehicle only. These groups were all compared with the aging rats (24months) which had received no other treatment. The cognitive impairment was assessed using Morris water maze (MWM) in the prepared models, and the amount of β-galactosidase, the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) level and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the hippocampus was examined by assay kits. The levels of EPO, EPOR, p-JAK2 and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) in the hippocampus were detected by western blot. Additionally, the correlation coefficient between EPO/EPOR expression and MDA level was analyzed. The MWM test showed that compared to control group, the escape latency was significantly extended and the times of crossing the platform was decreased at the doses of 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1) (p<0.05). Also, the amount of β-galactosidase and the MDA level in the hippocampus were significantly increased but the SOD activity was significantly decreased (p<0.05, 0.01 and 0.01, respectively). Similar to aging rats, the expressions of EPO, EPOR, p-JAK2, and HIF-2αin the brain of d-gal-treated rats were significantly decreased (p<0.05) at 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1). Interestingly, negative correlations were found between EPOR (r=-0

  1. Age-related Declines in Thirst and Salt Appetite Responses in Male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thunhorst, Robert L.; Beltz, Terry; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2014-01-01

    The F344xBN strain is the first generational cross between Fischer 344 (F344) and Brown Norway (BN) rats. The F344xBN strain is widely used in aging studies as it is regarded as a model of “healthy” aging (Sprott, 1991). In the present work, male F344xBN rats aged 4 mo (young, n = 6) and 20 mo (old, n = 9) received a series of experimental challenges to body fluid homeostasis to determine their thirst and salt appetite responses. Corresponding urinary responses were measured in some of the studies. Following sodium depletion, old rats ingested less saline solution (0.3 M NaCl) than young rats on a body weight basis, but both ages drank enough saline solution to completely repair the accrued sodium deficits. Following intracellular dehydration, old rats drank less water than young rats, again on a body weight basis, and were less able than young rats to drink amounts of water proportionate to the osmotic challenge. Compared with young rats, old rats drank less of both water and saline solution after combined food and fluid restriction, and also were refractory to the stimulatory effects of low doses of captopril on water drinking and sodium ingestion. Age differences in urinary water and sodium excretion could not account for the age differences in accumulated water and sodium balances. These results extend observations of diminished behavioral responses of aging animals to the F344xBN rat strain and support the idea that impairments in behavior contribute more to the waning ability of aging animals to respond to body fluid challenges than do declines in kidney function. In addition, the results suggest that behavioral defense of sodium homeostasis is less diminished with age in the F344xBN strain compared to other strains so far studied. PMID:24952266

  2. Effect of magnesium deficiency on erythrocyte aging in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Elin, R. J.; Utter, A.; Tan, H. K.; Corash, L.

    1980-01-01

    Rats placed on a magnesium-deficient diet show decreased erythrocyte magnesium concentration, shortened erythrocyte survival, and erythrocyte membrane ultrastructure defects and become progressively anemic. Whether these pathologic processes are due to abnormal erythropoiesis or occur in the peripheral circulation is unknown. In the present study, magnesium and hemoglobin concentrations, reticulocyte count, erythrocyte pyrophosphatase, and pyruvate kinase activities were determined at weekly intervals for 6 weeks in whole blood and age-dependent erythrocyte fractions isolated from inbred Fisher rats fed a diet deficient in magnesium or the same diet with added magnesium. Freeze-fracture electron microscopic examinations were performed on age-dependent erythrocyte fractions to evaluate the membrane defect. The youngest red cells from magnesium-deficient rats were similar to those of control animals with respect to erythrocyte magnesium concentrations, pyrophosphatase activities, and membrane morphology. The older erythrocyte fractions from magnesium-deficient rats showed significant decreases in magnesium concentrations, pyrophosphatase activity, and the presence of membrane abnormalities. Thus, new erythrocytes produced in magnesium-deficient rats appear to be normal but rapidly develop biochemical and morphologic abnormalities with aging in a magnesium-deficient plasma environment. Images Figure 1 PMID:6106388

  3. Catalpol increases hippocampal neuroplasticity and up-regulates PKC and BDNF in the aged rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, Qiao-Jie; Zou, Wei; Wang, Hong-Xia; Bao, Yong-Ming; Liu, Yu-Xin; An, Li-Jia

    2006-12-01

    Rehmannia, a traditional Chinese medical herb, has a long history in age-related disease therapy. Previous work has indicated that catalpol is a main active ingredient performing neuroprotective effect in rehmannia, while the mechanism underlying the effect remains poorly understood. In this study, we attempt to investigate the effect of catalpol on presynaptic proteins and explore a potential mechanism. The hippocampal levels of GAP-43 and synaptophysin in 3 groups of 4 months (young group), 22-24 months (aged group) and catalpol-treated 22-24 months (catalpol-treated group) rats were evaluated by western blotting. Results clearly showed a significant decrease in synaptophysin (46.6%) and GAP-43 (61.4%) levels in the aged group against the young animals and an increase (45.0% and 31.8% respectively) in the catalpol-treated aged rats in comparison with the untreated aged group. In particular, synaptophysin immunoreactivity (OD) in the dentate granule layer of the hippocampus was increased 0.0251 in the catalpol-treated group as compared with the aged group. The study also revealed a catalpol-associated increase of PKC and BDNF in the hippocampus of the catalpol-treated group in comparison with the aged rats and highly correlated with synaptophysin and GAP-43. Such positive correlations between presynaptic proteins and signaling molecules also existed in the young group. These results suggested that catalpol could increase presynaptic proteins and up-regulate relative signaling molecules in the hippocampus of the aged rats. Consequently, it seemed to indicate that catalpol might ameliorate age-related neuroplasticity loss by "normalizing" presynaptic proteins and their relative signaling pathways in the aged rats. PMID:17078935

  4. Regrowth after skeletal muscle atrophy is impaired in aged rats, despite similar responses in signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    White, Jena R.; Confides, Amy L.; Moore-Reed, Stephanie; Hoch, Johanna M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regrowth after atrophy is impaired in the aged and in this study we hypothesized that this can be explained by a blunted response of signaling pathways and cellular processes during reloading after hind limb suspension in muscles from old rats. Male Brown Norway Fisher 344 rats at 6 (young) and 32 (old) months of age were subjected to normal ambulatory conditions (amb), hind limb suspension for 14 days (HS), and HS followed by reloading through normal ambulation for 14 days (RE); soleus muscles were used for analysis of intracellular signaling pathways and cellular processes. Soleus muscle regrowth was blunted in old compared to young rats which coincided with a recovery of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in young but not old. However, the response to reloading for p-Akt, p-p70s6k and p-GSK3β protein abundance was similar between muscles from young and old rats, even though main effects for age indicate an increase in activation of this protein synthesis pathway in the aged. Similarly, MAFbx mRNA levels in soleus muscle from old rats recovered to the same extent as in the young, while Murf-1 was unchanged. mRNA abundance of autophagy markers Atg5 and Atg7 showed an identical response in muscle from old compared to young rats, but beclin did not. Autophagic flux was not changed at either age at the measured time point. Apoptosis was elevated in soleus muscle from old rats particularly with HS, but recovered in HSRE and these changes were not associated with differences in caspase-3, -8 or-9 activity in any group. Protein abundance of apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruitment domain (ARC), cytosolic EndoG, as well as cytosolic and nuclear apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were lower in muscle from old rats, and there was no age-related difference in the response to atrophy or regrowth. Soleus muscles from old rats had a higher number of ED2 positive macrophages in all groups and these decreased with HS, but recovered in HSRE in the old, while no

  5. Potential urinary aging markers of 20-month-old rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xundou; Gao, Youhe

    2016-01-01

    Urine is a very good source for biomarker discovery because it accumulates changes in the body. However, a major challenge in urinary biomarker discovery is the fact that the urinary proteome is influenced by various elements. To circumvent these problems, simpler systems, such as animal models, can be used to establish associations between physiological or pathological conditions and alterations in the urinary proteome. In this study, the urinary proteomes of young (two months old) and old rats (20 months old; nine in each group) were analyzed using LC-MS/MS and quantified using the Progenesis LC-MS software. A total of 371 proteins were identified, 194 of which were shared between the young and old rats. Based on criteria of a fold change ≥2, P < 0.05 and identification in each rat of the high-abundance group, 33 proteins were found to be changed (15 increased and 18 decreased in old rats). By adding a more stringent standard (protein spectral counts from every rat in the higher group greater than those in the lower group), eight proteins showed consistent changes in all rats of the groups; two of these proteins are also altered in the urinary proteome of aging humans. However, no shared proteins between our results and the previous aging plasma proteome were identified. Twenty of the 33 (60%) altered proteins have been reported to be disease biomarkers, suggesting that aging may share similar urinary changes with some diseases. The 33 proteins corresponded to 28 human orthologs which, according to the Human Protein Atlas, are strongly expressed in the kidney, intestine, cerebellum and lung. Therefore, the urinary proteome may reflect aging conditions in these organs. PMID:27330854

  6. Potential urinary aging markers of 20-month-old rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xundou

    2016-01-01

    Urine is a very good source for biomarker discovery because it accumulates changes in the body. However, a major challenge in urinary biomarker discovery is the fact that the urinary proteome is influenced by various elements. To circumvent these problems, simpler systems, such as animal models, can be used to establish associations between physiological or pathological conditions and alterations in the urinary proteome. In this study, the urinary proteomes of young (two months old) and old rats (20 months old; nine in each group) were analyzed using LC-MS/MS and quantified using the Progenesis LC-MS software. A total of 371 proteins were identified, 194 of which were shared between the young and old rats. Based on criteria of a fold change ≥2, P < 0.05 and identification in each rat of the high-abundance group, 33 proteins were found to be changed (15 increased and 18 decreased in old rats). By adding a more stringent standard (protein spectral counts from every rat in the higher group greater than those in the lower group), eight proteins showed consistent changes in all rats of the groups; two of these proteins are also altered in the urinary proteome of aging humans. However, no shared proteins between our results and the previous aging plasma proteome were identified. Twenty of the 33 (60%) altered proteins have been reported to be disease biomarkers, suggesting that aging may share similar urinary changes with some diseases. The 33 proteins corresponded to 28 human orthologs which, according to the Human Protein Atlas, are strongly expressed in the kidney, intestine, cerebellum and lung. Therefore, the urinary proteome may reflect aging conditions in these organs. PMID:27330854

  7. Spontaneous running activity in male rats - Effect of age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Dolkas, C. B.; Sims, C.; Reaven, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Variations in the intensity and the patterns of spontaneous running activity in wheel cages were studied in male rats aged 7 weeks to one year. Daily running records were obtained for periods of 12 mo, and 24-hour recordings were made for selected runners in order to study variations in running activity during the day. The data indicate that for rats running over two miles/day, the maximum running intensity can be divided into two groups: a group of high achievers running 8 miles/day; and a group of moderate achievers running 4.8 miles/day. For both groups spontaneous activity reached a maximum after 4-5 weeks. An hourly pattern of running activity during the day was identified in rats of increasing age who averaged 9.0, 4.5, 2.6, and 1.2 miles/day, respectively. Progressive losses were observed in both the speed and the duration of spontaneous running as the rats increased in age, with the intensity of exercise falling below 2 miles/day after 7-8 months of age.

  8. Spontaneous Object Recognition Memory in Aged Rats: Complexity versus Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamiz, Fernando; Gallo, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Previous work on the effect of aging on spontaneous object recognition (SOR) memory tasks in rats has yielded controversial results. Although the results at long-retention intervals are consistent, conflicting results have been reported at shorter delays. We have assessed the potential relevance of the type of object used in the performance of…

  9. Increased mitochondrial DNA deletions in substantia nigra dopamine neurons of the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2014-01-01

    The dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN), which constitute the origin of the nigrostriatal system, are vulnerable to age-related degenerative processes. For example, in humans there is a relatively small age-related loss of neurons but a marked decline of the dopaminergic phenotype associated with impaired voluntary motor control. However, the mechanisms responsible for the dysfunction and degeneration of SN dopamine neurons remain poorly understood. One potential contributor is mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting from an increased abundance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations such as deletions. Human studies have identified relatively high levels of mtDNA deletions in these cells in both aging and Parkinson's disease (>35%), with a higher abundance of deletions (>60%) in individual neurons with mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether similar mtDNA mutations occur in other species such as the rat. In the present study, we quantified mtDNA deletion abundance in laser microdissected SN dopaminergic neurons from young and old F344 rats. Our results indicate that mtDNA deletions accumulated with age, with approximately 20% more mtDNA deletions in SN dopaminergic neurons from old compared to young animals. Thus, while rat SN dopaminergic neurons do accumulate mtDNA deletions with aging, this does not reflect the deletion burden in humans, and other mechanisms may be operating to compensate for age-related mtDNA damage in the rat SN dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25612740

  10. Effects of hydrogen-rich water on aging periodontal tissues in rats.

    PubMed

    Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kawabata, Yuya; Kasuyama, Kenta; Endo, Yasumasa; Yoneda, Toshiki; Yamane, Mayu; Azuma, Tetsuji; Ekuni, Daisuke; Morita, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage is involved in age-related inflammatory reactions. The anti-oxidative effects of hydrogen-rich water suppress oxidative damage, which may aid in inhibiting age-related inflammatory reactions. We investigated the effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on aging periodontal tissues in healthy rats. Four-month-old male Fischer 344 rats (n = 12) were divided into two groups: the experimental group (hydrogen-rich water treatment) and the control group (distilled water treatment). The rats consumed hydrogen-rich water or distilled water until 16 months of age. The experimental group exhibited lower periodontal oxidative damage at 16 months of age than the control group. Although protein expression of interleukin-1β did not differ, gene expression of Nod-like receptor protein 3 inflammasomes was activated in periodontal tissues from the experimental group as compared with the control group. Drinking hydrogen-rich water is proposed to have anti-aging effects on periodontal oxidative damage, but not on inflammatory reactions in healthy rats. PMID:24985521

  11. Lifespan Changes in the Countermanding Performance of Young and Middle Aged Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Beuk, Jonathan; Beninger, Richard J; Paré, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control can be investigated with the countermanding task, which requires subjects to make a response to a go signal and cancel that response when a stop signal is presented occasionally. Adult humans performing the countermanding task typically exhibit impaired response time (RT), stop signal response time (SSRT) and response accuracy as they get older, but little change in post-error slowing. Rodent models of the countermanding paradigm have been developed recently, yet none have directly examined age-related changes in performance throughout the lifespan. Male Wistar rats (N = 16) were trained to respond to a visual stimulus (go signal) by pressing a lever directly below an illuminated light for food reward, but to countermand the lever press subsequent to a tone (stop signal) that was presented occasionally (25% of trials) at a variable delay. Subjects were tested in 1 h sessions at approximately 7 and 12 months of age with intermittent training in between. Rats demonstrated longer go trial RT, a higher proportion of go trial errors and performed less total trials at 12, compared to 7 months of age. Consistent SSRT and post-error slowing were observed for rats at both ages. These results suggest that the countermanding performance of rats does vary throughout the lifespan, in a manner similar to humans, suggesting that rodents may provide a suitable model for behavioral impairment related to normal aging. These findings also highlight the importance of indicating the age at which rodents are tested in countermanding investigations. PMID:27555818

  12. Lifespan Changes in the Countermanding Performance of Young and Middle Aged Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Beuk, Jonathan; Beninger, Richard J.; Paré, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control can be investigated with the countermanding task, which requires subjects to make a response to a go signal and cancel that response when a stop signal is presented occasionally. Adult humans performing the countermanding task typically exhibit impaired response time (RT), stop signal response time (SSRT) and response accuracy as they get older, but little change in post-error slowing. Rodent models of the countermanding paradigm have been developed recently, yet none have directly examined age-related changes in performance throughout the lifespan. Male Wistar rats (N = 16) were trained to respond to a visual stimulus (go signal) by pressing a lever directly below an illuminated light for food reward, but to countermand the lever press subsequent to a tone (stop signal) that was presented occasionally (25% of trials) at a variable delay. Subjects were tested in 1 h sessions at approximately 7 and 12 months of age with intermittent training in between. Rats demonstrated longer go trial RT, a higher proportion of go trial errors and performed less total trials at 12, compared to 7 months of age. Consistent SSRT and post-error slowing were observed for rats at both ages. These results suggest that the countermanding performance of rats does vary throughout the lifespan, in a manner similar to humans, suggesting that rodents may provide a suitable model for behavioral impairment related to normal aging. These findings also highlight the importance of indicating the age at which rodents are tested in countermanding investigations. PMID:27555818

  13. Sexual Dimorphism in the Expression of Mitochondria-Related Genes in Rat Heart at Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Vikrant; Han, Tao; Moland, Carrie L.; Kwekel, Joshua C.; Fuscoe, James C.; Desai, Varsha G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Moreover, sex and age are considered major risk factors in the development of CVDs. Mitochondria are vital for normal cardiac function, and regulation of mitochondrial structure and function may impact susceptibility to CVD. To identify potential role of mitochondria in sex-related differences in susceptibility to CVD, we analyzed the basal expression levels of mitochondria-related genes in the hearts of male and female rats. Whole genome expression profiling was performed in the hearts of young (8-week), adult (21-week), and old (78-week) male and female Fischer 344 rats and the expression of 670 unique genes related to various mitochondrial functions was analyzed. A significant (p<0.05) sexual dimorphism in expression levels of 46, 114, and 41 genes was observed in young, adult and old rats, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis revealed the influence of sex on various biological pathways related to cardiac energy metabolism at different ages. The expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism was significantly different between the sexes in young and adult rat hearts. Adult male rats also showed higher expression of genes associated with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex compared to females. In young and adult hearts, sexual dimorphism was not noted in genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation. In old rats, however, a majority of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation had higher expression in females compared to males. Such basal differences between the sexes in cardiac expression of genes associated with energy metabolism may indicate a likely involvement of mitochondria in susceptibility to CVDs. In addition, female rats showed lower expression levels of apoptotic genes in hearts compared to males at all ages, which may have implications for better preservation of cardiac mass in females than in males. PMID:25615628

  14. Calorie restriction: A new therapeutic intervention for age-related dry eye disease in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Motoko; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Okada, Naoko; Ogawa, Yoko; Murat, Dogru; Nakamura, Shigeru; Nakashima, Hideo; Shimmura, Shigeto; Shinmura, Ken; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2010-07-09

    A decrease in lacrimal gland secretory function is closely related to aging and leads to an increased prevalence of dry eye syndrome. Since calorie restriction (CR) is considered to prevent functional decline of various organs due to aging, we hypothesized that CR could prevent age-related lacrimal dysfunction. Six-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were randomly divided into ad libitum (AL) and CR (-35%) groups. After 6 months of CR, tear function was examined under conscious state. After euthanasia, lacrimal glands were subjected to histological examination, tear protein secretion stimulation test with Carbachol, and assessment of oxidative stress with 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) antibodies. CR significantly improved tear volume and tended to increase tear protein secretion volume after stimulation with Carbachol compared to AL. The acinar unit density was significantly higher in the CR rats compared to AL rats. Lacrimal glands in the CR rats showed a lesser degree of interstitial fibrosis. CR reduced the concentration of 8-OHdG and the extent of staining with HNE in the lacrimal gland, compared to AL. Furthermore, our electron microscopic observations showed that mitochondrial structure of the lacrimal gland obtained from the middle-aged CR rats was preserved in comparison to the AL rats. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that CR may attenuate oxidative stress related damage in the lacrimal gland with preservation of lacrimal gland functions. Although molecular mechanism(s) by which CR maintains lacrimal gland function remains to be resolved, CR might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for treating dry eye syndrome.

  15. Age-dependent increase of etheno-DNA-adducts in liver and brain of ROS overproducing OXYS rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Jagadeesan; Sinitsina, Olga; Vasunina, Elena A.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.; Laval, Jacques; Bartsch, Helmut . E-mail: h.bartsch@dkfz.de

    2005-10-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) play a role in aging and degenerative diseases. To correlate oxidative stress and LPO-derived DNA damage, we determined etheno-DNA-adducts in liver and brain from ROS overproducing OXYS rats in comparison with age-matched Wistar rats. Liver DNA samples from 3- and 15-month-old OXYS and Wistar rats were analyzed for 1,N {sup 6}-ethenodeoxyadenosine ({epsilon}dA) and 3,N {sup 4}-ethenodeoxycytidine ({epsilon}dC) by immunoaffinity/{sup 32}P-postlabelling. While {epsilon}dA and {epsilon}dC levels were not different in young rats, adduct levels were significantly higher in old OXYS rats when compared to old Wistar or young OXYS rats. Frozen rat brain sections were analyzed for {epsilon}dA by immunostaining of nuclei. Brains from old OXYS rats accumulated {epsilon}dA more frequently than age-matched Wistar rats. Our results demonstrate increased LPO-induced DNA damage in organs of OXYS rats which correlates with their known shorter life-span and elevated frequency of chronic degenerative diseases.

  16. Aging induced cortical drive alterations during sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciric, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Petrovic, Jelena; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2015-03-01

    We followed the impact of healthy aging on cortical drive during sleep in rats by using the corticomuscular coherence (CMC). We employed the chronic electrodes implantation for sleep recording in adult, male Wistar rats, and followed the aging impact during sleep from 3 to 5.5 months age. We have analyzed the sleep/wake states architecture, and the sleep/wake state related EEG microstructure and CMCs. We evidenced the topographically distinct impact of aging on sleep/wake states architecture within the sensorimotor (SMCx) vs. motor cortex (MCx) from 4.5 to 5.5 months age. Healthy aging consistently altered only the SMCx sleep/wake states architecture, and increased the delta and beta CMCs through both cortical drives during Wake, but only through the MCx drive during REM. According to the delta and beta CMCs values, aging impact through the SMCx drive was opposite, but it was convergent through the MCx drive during Wake vs. REM, and there was a dual and inverse mode for the motor control during REM. PMID:25773067

  17. Age-Related Changes in Hepatic Activity and Expression of Detoxification Enzymes in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vyskočilová, Erika; Szotáková, Barbora; Skálová, Lenka; Bártíková, Hana; Hlaváčová, Jitka

    2013-01-01

    Process of aging is accompanied by changes in the biotransformation of xenobiotics and impairment of normal cellular functions by free radicals. Therefore, this study was designed to determine age-related differences in the activities and/or expressions of selected drug-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in young and old rats. Specific activities of 8 drug-metabolizing enzymes and 4 antioxidant enzymes were assessed in hepatic subcellular fractions of 6-week-old and 21-month-old male Wistar rats. Protein expressions of carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were determined using immunoblotting. Remarkable age-related decrease in specific activities of CYP2B, CYP3A, and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase was observed, whereas no changes in activities of CYP1A2, flavine monooxygenase, aldo-keto reductase 1C, and antioxidant enzymes with advancing age were found. On the other hand, specific activity of CBR1 and GST was 2.4 folds and 5.6 folds higher in the senescent rats compared with the young ones, respectively. Interindividual variability in CBR1 activity increased significantly with rising age. We suppose that elevated activities of GST and CBR1 may protect senescent rats against xenobiotic as well as eobiotic electrophiles and reactive carbonyls, but they may alter metabolism of drugs, which are CBR1 and especially GSTs substrates. PMID:23971034

  18. Markers of Oxidative Stress in Senescent Erythrocytes Obtained from Young and Old Age Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dileep

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The role of oxidative stress during aging is well documented. Evidence is available linking animal life span to the development of oxidative stress. Up to a certain limit of oxidative stress, cells function to counteract the oxidant effects and to restore redox balance by resetting critical homeostatic parameters. Red blood cells (RBCs) offer a very good model to study cellular senescence. In vivo aging of red blood cells is associated with increased cellular density, which corresponds to increased cell age. The present study aims to investigate age-dependent oxidative stress in RBC subpopulations obtained after Percoll density gradient centrifugation from young and old rats. We observe an increase in plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) activity (p<0.001) and lipid peroxidation (p<0.001) between less dense and senescent RBCs in both young and old rats. Our findings provide evidence of a higher level of oxidative stress in senescent erythrocytes, with the effect being more pronounced in old (24-month-old) rats compared to young (4-month-old) rats. The present findings emphasize the role of oxidative stress not only in organismal aging but also in cell senescence. PMID:25065263

  19. Quantitating silver-stained neurodegeneration: the neurotoxicity of trimethlytin (TMT) in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Scallet, A C; Pothuluri, N; Rountree, R L; Matthews, J C

    2000-05-15

    This report describes the development of a histoanalytical procedure to measure the degree of neurodegeneration produced by the organometal toxicant trimethyltin (TMT). Based on a previous, non-quantitated experiment we hypothesized that the same dose of TMT would produce greater damage in animals of increasing age. Male rats aged 6, 12, 18, or 24 months at the time of dosing were given either 4.5 mg/kg TMT or saline (i.p.). One month after dosing, rats were perfused and their brains removed and processed to selectively silver-impregnate degenerating cell bodies as well as axon terminals and dendrites. Neurodegeneration was most prominent in the hippocampi (especially CA1 stratum radiatum) of TMT-treated rats, but not in the controls. Computer-assisted counting of the silver grains marking damage indicated greater neurotoxicity from the same dose of TMT when given to the older animals. Thus the grain density in the 6-month-old TMT-treated rats was not significantly elevated from the 6-month-old controls (P>0.10). The 12-month-old TMT-treated rats had significantly increased grain densities compared to their controls (P<0.05), but still larger increases of grain counts were observed in the 18- and 24-month-old rats (both P-values<0.01). Our findings with TMT are similar to previous, but nonquantitative, reports that the neurotoxic effects of kainic acid and methionine sulfoximine were also greater in older rats. An increased sensitivity to neurotoxicants might help explain the apparently spontaneous degeneration of cortical neurons in aging and in the neurological diseases of old age. The method we report here for quantitation of silver grains marking neurodegeneration should be adaptable to a wide range of histologically-based neurotoxicology investigations. PMID:10837873

  20. Age-related changes in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YALI; LIU, JIAN; GAO, DENGFENG; WEI, JIN; YUAN, HAIFENG; NIU, XIAOLIN; ZHANG, QIAOJUN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age-related alterations in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the underlying mechanisms. Aging resulted in a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and apoptotic cells in the SHR group, which was accompanied by increased expression of oxidative stress markers (iNOS and gp47phox) and apoptotic regulatory proteins (Bax and caspase-3). In addition, the expression of PPAR-γ and Bcl-2 were progressively reduced with increasing age in the SHR group. The 32 and 64-week-old SHRs exhibited significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells, oxidative stress markers and pro-apoptotic proteins compared with age-matched WKY rats, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PPAR-γ. Compared with the 16 and 32-week-old WKY group, the 64-week-old WKY rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and pro-apoptotic markers, and increased levels apoptotic cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that both aging and hypertension enhanced brain damage and oxidative stress injury in the hippocampi of SHRs, indicated by an increased presence of apoptotic cells and astrocytes. In addition, reduced expression of PPAR-γ may contribute to the age-related brain damage in SHRs. PMID:26846626

  1. [CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RETINA IN CHRONIC STRESS IN LABORATORY RATS OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS].

    PubMed

    Nesterova, A A; Yermilov, V V; Tiurenkov, I N; Smirnov, A V; Grigoriyeva, N V; Zagrebin, V L; Rogova, L N; Antoshkin, O N; Dovgalyov, A O

    2016-01-01

    The retina was studied in albino laboratory male rats of two age groups (12 and 24 months), 10 animals in each subjected to chronic combined stress. The stress was caused in animals by simultaneous exposure to pulsed light, loud sound, swinging and restriction of mobility for 7 days, 30 mm daily. The retina of intact rats of the corresponding age groups (n = 20) served as control. Enucleated eyes of stressed and control animals were processed with standard histological technique and stained with Nissl's method and hematoxylin-eosin. The retina of the stressed animals of both age groups showed the decrease in the number of cells and the disarrangement of its layers, most pronounced in the layers of photoreceptor neurons and ganglion cells. The comparative morphometric analysis demonstrated a reduction of the layer thickness and cell numerical density in the retina of stressed animals, both young (12 months) and old (24 months), as compared to that of control animals. PMID:27487662

  2. Age-related differences in the bone mineralization pattern of rats following exercise

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.; Hegenauer, J.; Saltman, P.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of 12 weeks of treadmill exercise on the mineralization of trabecular and cortical bone was studied in rats 7, 14, and 19 months of age. Bone mineralization was evaluated by measuring concentrations of Ca, Mg, and hydroxyproline as well as uptake of 45Ca concentration in the femur, humerus, rib and calvaria. The 7- and 14-month-old rats increased mineralization in those cortical bones directly involved in exercise. The 19-month animal responded to exercise by increasing mineralization in all bones examined, including the nonweight bearing trabecular calvaria and cortical rib. From these data, it is apparent that the older animals undergo a total skeletal mineralization in response to exercise compared with local adaptation in the younger animal. Further, we provide evidence to support the use of the rat as a model in which to study mammalian bone physiology during the aging process.

  3. Insulin-like growth factor 2 rescues aging-related memory loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Adam B; Johnson, Sarah A; Iannitelli, Dylan E; Pollonini, Gabriella; Alberini, Cristina M

    2016-08-01

    Aging is accompanied by declines in memory performance, and particularly affects memories that rely on hippocampal-cortical systems, such as episodic and explicit. With aged populations significantly increasing, the need for preventing or rescuing memory deficits is pressing. However, effective treatments are lacking. Here, we show that the level of the mature form of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2), a peptide regulated in the hippocampus by learning, required for memory consolidation and a promoter of memory enhancement in young adult rodents, is significantly reduced in hippocampal synapses of aged rats. By contrast, the hippocampal level of the immature form proIGF-2 is increased, suggesting an aging-related deficit in IGF-2 processing. In agreement, aged compared to young adult rats are deficient in the activity of proprotein convertase 2, an enzyme that likely mediates IGF-2 posttranslational processing. Hippocampal administration of the recombinant, mature form of IGF-2 rescues hippocampal-dependent memory deficits and working memory impairment in aged rats. Thus, IGF-2 may represent a novel therapeutic avenue for preventing or reversing aging-related cognitive impairments. PMID:27318130

  4. Grape Powder Improves Age-Related Decline in Mitochondrial and Kidney Functions in Fischer 344 Rats.

    PubMed

    Pokkunuri, Indira; Ali, Quaisar; Asghar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects and mechanism of grape powder- (GP-) mediated improvement, if any, on aging kidney function. Adult (3-month) and aged (21-month) Fischer 344 rats were treated without (controls) and with GP (1.5% in drinking water) and kidney parameters were measured. Control aged rats showed higher levels of proteinuria and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), which decreased with GP treatment in these rats. Renal protein carbonyls (protein oxidation) and gp (91phox) -NADPH oxidase levels were high in control aged rats, suggesting oxidative stress burden in these rats. GP treatment in aged rats restored these parameters to the levels of adult rats. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion were low in control aged rats suggesting compromised kidney function, which improved with GP treatment in aged rats. Interestingly, low renal mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels in control aged rats were associated with reduced levels of mitochondrial biogenesis marker MtTFA. Also, Nrf2 proteins levels were reduced in control aged rats. GP treatment increased levels of MtTFA and Nrf2 in aged rats. These results suggest that GP by potentially regulating Nrf2 improves aging mitochondrial and kidney functions. PMID:27528887

  5. Grape Powder Improves Age-Related Decline in Mitochondrial and Kidney Functions in Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Quaisar

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects and mechanism of grape powder- (GP-) mediated improvement, if any, on aging kidney function. Adult (3-month) and aged (21-month) Fischer 344 rats were treated without (controls) and with GP (1.5% in drinking water) and kidney parameters were measured. Control aged rats showed higher levels of proteinuria and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), which decreased with GP treatment in these rats. Renal protein carbonyls (protein oxidation) and gp91phox-NADPH oxidase levels were high in control aged rats, suggesting oxidative stress burden in these rats. GP treatment in aged rats restored these parameters to the levels of adult rats. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion were low in control aged rats suggesting compromised kidney function, which improved with GP treatment in aged rats. Interestingly, low renal mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels in control aged rats were associated with reduced levels of mitochondrial biogenesis marker MtTFA. Also, Nrf2 proteins levels were reduced in control aged rats. GP treatment increased levels of MtTFA and Nrf2 in aged rats. These results suggest that GP by potentially regulating Nrf2 improves aging mitochondrial and kidney functions. PMID:27528887

  6. Tualang Honey Attenuates Noise Stress-Induced Memory Deficits in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Khairunnuur Fairuz; Abdul Aziz, Che Badariah; Othman, Zahiruddin

    2016-01-01

    Ageing and stress exposure may lead to memory impairment while oxidative stress is thought to be one of the underlying mechanisms involved. This study aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of Tualang honey supplementation on memory performance in aged rats exposed to noise stress. Tualang honey supplementation was given orally, 200 mg/kg body weight for 28 days. Rats in the stress group were subjected to loud noise, 100 dB(A), 4 hours daily for 14 days. All rats were subjected to novel object recognition test for evaluation of memory performance. It was observed that the rats subjected to noise stress exhibited significantly lower memory performance and higher oxidative stress as evident by elevated malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels and reduction of antioxidant enzymes activities compared to the nonstressed rats. Tualang honey supplementation was able to improve memory performance, decrease oxidative stress levels, increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration, decrease acetylcholinesterase activity, and enhance neuronal proliferation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus. In conclusion, Tualang honey protects against memory decline due to stress exposure and/or ageing via enhancement of mPFC and hippocampal morphology possibly secondary to reduction in brain oxidative stress and/or upregulation of BDNF concentration and cholinergic system. PMID:27119005

  7. Tualang Honey Attenuates Noise Stress-Induced Memory Deficits in Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Azman, Khairunnuur Fairuz; Zakaria, Rahimah; Abdul Aziz, Che Badariah; Othman, Zahiruddin

    2016-01-01

    Ageing and stress exposure may lead to memory impairment while oxidative stress is thought to be one of the underlying mechanisms involved. This study aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of Tualang honey supplementation on memory performance in aged rats exposed to noise stress. Tualang honey supplementation was given orally, 200 mg/kg body weight for 28 days. Rats in the stress group were subjected to loud noise, 100 dB(A), 4 hours daily for 14 days. All rats were subjected to novel object recognition test for evaluation of memory performance. It was observed that the rats subjected to noise stress exhibited significantly lower memory performance and higher oxidative stress as evident by elevated malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels and reduction of antioxidant enzymes activities compared to the nonstressed rats. Tualang honey supplementation was able to improve memory performance, decrease oxidative stress levels, increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration, decrease acetylcholinesterase activity, and enhance neuronal proliferation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus. In conclusion, Tualang honey protects against memory decline due to stress exposure and/or ageing via enhancement of mPFC and hippocampal morphology possibly secondary to reduction in brain oxidative stress and/or upregulation of BDNF concentration and cholinergic system. PMID:27119005

  8. Effect of fetal hypothyroidism on tolerance to ischemia-reperfusion injury in aged male rats: Role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Jeddi, Sajad; Zaman, Jalal; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2016-05-01

    Aging is associated with increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease. Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life decreases myocardial tolerance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in later life. The long-term effects of fetal hypothyroidism (FH) on response to IR injury in aged rats have not been well documented. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the effect of FH on tolerance to IR injury in young and aged male rats and to determine contribution of iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase), Bax, and Bcl-2. Pregnant female rats were divided into two groups: The FH group received water containing 0.025% 6-propyl-2-thiouracil during gestation and the controls consumed tap water. Isolated perfused hearts from young (3 months) and aged (12 months) rats were subjected to IR. Hemodynamic parameters, infarct size, and heart NOx (nitrite+nitrate) levels were measured; in addition, mRNA expression of iNOS, Bax, and Bcl-2 and their protein levels in heart were measured. Recovery of post-ischemic LVDP and ±dp/dt were lower and infarct sizes were higher than controls in aged FH rats (68.38 ± 6.7% vs. 50.5 ± 1.7%; P < 0.05). Aged FH rats had higher heart NOx values than controls (74.3 ± 2.6 vs. 47.6 ± 2.5 μmol/L, P < 0.05). After IR, in FH rats, mRNA expression of iNOS and Bax were higher and Bcl-2 was lower in both the young (350 and 240% for iNOS and Bax, respectively and 51% for Bcl-2) and aged rats (504 and 567% for iNOS and Bax, respectively and 67% for Bcl-2). Compared to controls, in FH rats protein levels of iNOS (37% for young and 45% for aged rats) and Bax (94% for young and 118% for aged rats) were higher while for Bcl-2 (36% for young and 62% for aged rats) were lower. After IR, in FH rats, aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor, decreased mRNA expression of iNOS and Bax and increased expression of Bcl-2 in both young (65% and 58% for iNOS and Bax, respectively and 152% for Bcl-2) and aged rats (76% and 64% for iNOS and Bax

  9. Kisspeptin is involved in ovarian follicular development during aging in rats.

    PubMed

    Fernandois, D; Na, E; Cuevas, F; Cruz, G; Lara, H E; Paredes, A H

    2016-03-01

    We have previously reported that kisspeptin (KP) may be under the control of the sympathetic innervation of the ovary. Considering that the sympathetic activity of the ovary increases with aging, it is possible that ovarian KP also increases during this period and participates in follicular development. To evaluate this possibility, we determined ovarian KP expression and its action on follicular development during reproductive aging in rats. We measured ovarian KP mRNA and protein levels in 6-, 8-, 10- and 12-month-old rats. To evaluate follicular developmental changes, intraovarian administration of KP or its antagonist, peptide 234 (P234), was performed using a mini-osmotic pump, and to evaluate FSH receptor (FSHR) changes in the senescent ovary, we stimulated cultured ovaries with KP, P234 and isoproterenol (ISO). Our results shows that KP expression in the ovary was increased in 10- and 12-month-old rats compared with 6-month-old rats, and this increase in KP was strongly correlated with the increase in ovarian norepinephrine observed with aging. The administration of KP produced an increase in corpora lutea and type III follicles in 6- and 10-month-old rats, which was reversed by P234 administration at 10 months. In addition, KP decreased the number and size of antral follicles in 6- and 10-month-old rats, while P234 administration produced an increase in these structures at the same ages. In ovarian cultures KP prevented the induction of FSHR by ISO. These results suggest that intraovarian KP negatively participates in the acquisition of FSHR, indicating a local role in the regulation of follicular development and ovulation during reproductive aging. PMID:26698566

  10. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorononanoic acid in Rats and Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is a fluorinated organic chemical found at low levels in the environment, but is detectable in humans and wildlife. This study compared the pharmacokinetic properties of PFNA in two laboratory rodent species. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (n ...

  11. Comparative pharmacokinetics of perfluorononanoic acid in rat and mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is a fluorinated organic chemical found at low levels in the environment, but is detectable in humans and wildlife. The present study compared the pharmacokinetic properties of PFNA in two laboratory rodent species. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rat...

  12. COMPARABILITY OF RAT AND HUMAN VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of experiments was conducted to assess the comparability of physiological processes in rat and human visual systems. n the first set of experiments, transient visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were elicited by the onset of sine-wave gratings of various spatial frequencies....

  13. Aging rat vestibular ganglion: I. Quantitative light microscopic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alidina, A; Lyon, M J

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to quantify age-related changes in the rat vestibular ganglion. Cell number, diameter, and proximal-distal distribution based on size were evaluated. Serial 5-microns plastic sections of the vestibular ganglion from 15 female Wistar rats were examined. Rats were divided into three age groups: young (Y, 3 to 5 months, n = 5), old (0, 24 to 26 months, n = 3), and very old (VO, 28 to 31 months, n = 7). Quantitative analysis indicated no significant differences (P less than .05) in the estimated number of ganglion cells (mean: Y = 1,690, 0 = 2,257, VO = 1,678), ganglion cell profile diameters (mean: Y = 22.5 microns, n = 2,886; O = 23.7 microns, n = 2,313; VO = 22.8 microns, n = 4,061), or proximal-distal localization (proximal: 22.3 microns, 24.4 microns, 22.7 microns; middle: 22.6 microns, 23.1 microns, 22.4 microns; distal: 23.3 microns, 23.4 microns, 23.7 microns; Y, O, and VO, respectively). When pooled, the old animals tended to have slightly larger cell profiles than the other groups. We noted a dramatic age-related increase of aging pigment within the ganglion cell profiles, making the old and very old animals easily distinguishable from the young. In most of the cell profiles, the aging pigment was more or less uniformly distributed throughout the cytoplasm. However, in some, aging pigment was accumulated at one pole of the cell profile. While no typical degenerating cellular profiles were found in any of the sections, several of the ganglion cell profiles from the old animals revealed dense cytoplasm, possibly indicating an early stage of degeneration. PMID:2382785

  14. Potential targets for protecting against hippocampal cell apoptosis after transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiangyu; Zhang, Li’na; Liu, Ran; Liu, Yingzhi; Song, Jianfang; Dong, He; Jia, Yanfang; Zhou, Zangong

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in neuronal apoptosis caused by cerebral ischemia, and the role is mediated by the expression of mitochondrial proteins. This study investigated the involvement of mitochondrial proteins in hippocampal cell apoptosis after transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in aged rats using a comparative proteomics strategy. Our experimental results show that the aged rat brain is sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion injury and that transient ischemia led to cell apoptosis in the hippocampus and changes in memory and cognition of aged rats. Differential proteomics analysis suggested that this phenomenon may be mediated by mitochondrial proteins associated with energy metabolism and apoptosis in aged rats. This study provides potential drug targets for the treatment of transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25206771

  15. LPS alters pattern of sickness behavior but does not affect glutathione level in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Wrotek, Sylwia; Jędrzejewski, Tomasz; Nowakowska, Anna; Kozak, Wiesław

    2016-08-01

    Behavioral symptoms of sickness, such as fever and motor activity are a coordinated set of changes that develop during infection. The aim of study was to compare the sickness behaviour (SB) in healthy old and young rats treated with pyrogenic dose of endotoxin and to check their glutathione level. Before experimentation male Wistar rats were selected according to standard body mass, motor activity, and white blood cells count. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli was used to provoke SB. The level of liver glutathione, interleukin (IL) -6, deep body temperature (Tb) and motor activity were measured. Glutathione level in old and young rats did not differ significantly. In both young and old rats LPS administration provoked fever (the mean value of Tb was 38.06 ± 0.01 °C in old rats, and 38.19 ± 0.06 °C in young rats). LPS injection affected night-time activity in both groups (12 h averages were 1.56 ± 0.40 counts in old LPS-treated rats vs 2.74 ± 0.53 counts in not-treated old rats and 3.44 ± 0.60 counts for young LPS-treated vs 4.28 ± 0.57 counts for young not-treated rats). The injection of LPS provoked an elevation of plasma IL-6 concentration (from values below the lowest detectable standard in not-treated groups of animals to 6322.82 ± 537.00 pg/mL in old LPS-treated rats and 7415.62 ± 451.88 pg/mL in young LPS-treated rats). Based on these data, we conclude that good health of aged rats prevents decrease in the glutathione level. Old rats are still able to develop SB in response to pyrogenic dose of LPS, although its components have changed pattern compared to young animals. PMID:26829940

  16. Effect of a water-maze procedure on the redox mechanisms in brain parts of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Krivova, Natalia A.; Zaeva, Olga B.; Grigorieva, Valery A.

    2015-01-01

    The Morris water maze (MWM) is a tool for assessment of age-related modulations spatial learning and memory in laboratory rats. In our work was investigated the age-related decline of MWM performance in 11-month-old rats and the effect exerted by training in the MWM on the redox mechanisms in rat brain parts. Young adult (3-month-old) and aged (11-month-old) male rats were trained in the MWM. Intact animals of the corresponding age were used as the reference groups. The level of pro- and antioxidant capacity in brain tissue homogenates was assessed using the chemiluminescence method. A reduced performance in the MWM test was found in 11-month-old rats: at the first day of training they showed only 30% of successful MWM trials. However, at the last training day the percentage of successful trials was equal for young adult and aged animals. This indicates that the aged 11-month-old rats can successfully learn in MWM. Therewith, the MWM spatial learning procedure itself produces changes in different processes of redox homeostasis in 11-month-old and 3-month-old rats as compared to intact animals. Young adult rats showed a decrease in prooxidant capacity in all brain parts, while 11-month-old rats demonstrated an increase in antioxidant capacity in the olfactory bulb, pons + medulla oblongata and frontal lobe cortex. Hence, the MWM procedure activates the mechanisms that restrict the oxidative stress in brain parts. The obtained results may be an argument for further development of the animal training procedures aimed to activate the mechanisms that can prevent the age-related deterioration of performance in the learning test. This may be useful not only for the development of training procedures applicable to human patients with age-related cognitive impairments, but also for their rehabilitation. PMID:25814952

  17. Food restriction prevents an age-associated increase in rat liver beta-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dax, E.M.; Ingram, D.K.; Partilla, J.S.; Gregerman, R.I.

    1989-05-01

    In male Wistar rats fed ad libitum (24% protein, 4.5 Kcal/gm), the (/sup 125/I)iodopindolol binding capacity of the beta-adrenergic receptors in liver of 24-month-old animals is 3-4 times greater than that of 6-month-old counterparts. In rats fed the same diet, on alternate days from weaning, the receptor capacity did not increase significantly between 6 and 24 months (10.20 +/- 0.55 vs 9.20 +/- 0.72 fmol/mg) or between 24 and 30 months. This was not due to acute dietary deprivation, as rats food-restricted for only 2 weeks, at 23.5 months of age, also showed elevated receptor capacities compared to 6-month-old ad libitum fed animals. Moreover, intermittent feeding produced no significant effects among 6-month-old animals, whether restricted since weaning or for two weeks prior to sacrifice. Many biochemical parameters that decrease with aging in rats fed ad libitum are prevented by dietary restriction. Our results demonstrate that a reproducible biochemical process that increases with aging is also prevented with dietary restriction. The age-related, liver beta-receptor increase may be a potentially reliable marker for studying biochemical perturbations that modify life span.

  18. Leptin is involved in age-dependent changes in response to systemic inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Sandy; Luheshi, Giamal N; Wenz, Tina; Gerstberger, Rüdiger; Roth, Joachim; Rummel, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    Obesity contributes to a state of subclinical peripheral and central inflammation and is often associated with aging. Here we investigated the source and contribution of adipose tissue derived cytokines and the cytokine-like hormone leptin to age-related changes in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced brain-controlled sickness-responses. Old (24 months) and young (2 months) rats were challenged with LPS or saline alone or in combination with a neutralizing leptin antiserum (LAS) or control serum. Changes in the sickness-response were monitored by biotelemetry. Additionally, ex vivo fat-explants from young and old rats were stimulated with LPS or saline and culture medium collected and analyzed by cytokine-specific bioassays/ELISAs. We found enhanced duration/degree of the sickness-symptoms, including delayed but prolonged fever in old rats. This response was accompanied by increased plasma-levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1ra and exaggerated expression of inflammatory markers in brain and liver analyzed by RT-PCR including inhibitor κBα, microsomal prostaglandin synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 (brain). Moreover, for the first time, we were able to show prolonged elevated plasma leptin-levels in LPS-treated old animals. Treatment with LAS in young rats tended to attenuate the early- and in old rats the prolonged febrile response. Fat-explants exhibited unchanged IL-6 but reduced IL-1ra and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release from adipose tissue of aged compared to young animals. In addition, we found increased expression of the endogenous immune regulator microRNA146a in aged animals suggesting a role for these mediators in counteracting brain inflammation. Overall, our results indicate a role of adipose tissue and leptin in “aging-related-inflammation” and age-dependent modifications of febrile-responses. PMID:24513873

  19. The kinetic basis for age-associated changes in quercetin and genistein glucuronidation by rat liver microsomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dietary bioavailability of the isoflavone genistein is decreased in older rats compared to young adults. Since flavonoids are metabolized extensively by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), we hypothesized that UGT flavonoid conjugating activity changes with age. The effect of age on flavono...

  20. Expression of UCP2 in Wistar rats varies according to age and the severity of obesity.

    PubMed

    Pheiffer, Carmen; Jacobs, Carvern; Patel, Oelfah; Ghoor, Samira; Muller, Christo; Louw, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Obesity, a complex metabolic disorder, is characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Increased expression of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) during obesity is an adaptive response to suppress the production of reactive oxygen species. The aims of this study were to compare the expression of UCP2 in diet-induced obese Wistar rats that differed according to age and their severity of obesity, and to compare UCP2 expression in the liver and muscle of these rats. UCP2 messenger RNA and protein expression was increased 4.6-fold (p < 0.0001) and 3.0-fold (p < 0.05), respectively, in the liver of the older and heavier rats. In contrast, UCP2 expression was decreased twofold (p < 0.005) in the muscle of these rats, while UCP3 messenger RNA (mRNA) was increased twofold (p < 0.01). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) was similarly increased (3.0-fold, p < 0.05) in the liver of the older and more severe obese rats. Total protein content was increased (2.3-fold, p < 0.0001), while 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity was decreased (1.3-fold, p = 0.05) in the liver of the older, heavier rats. No difference in total protein content and AMPK expression was observed in the muscle of these rats. This study showed that the expression of UCP2 varies according to age and the severity of obesity and supports the widely held notion that increased UCP2 expression is an adaptive response to increased fatty acid β-oxidation and reactive oxygen species production that occurs during obesity. An understanding of metabolic adaptation is imperative to gain insight into the underlying causes of disease, thus facilitating intervention strategies to combat disease progression. PMID:26621256

  1. Differences in Retinal Structure and Function between Aging Male and Female Sprague-Dawley Rats are Strongly Influenced by the Estrus Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chaychi, Samaneh; Polosa, Anna; Lachapelle, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Biological sex and age are considered as two important factors that may influence the function and structure of the retina, an effect that might be governed by sexual hormones such as estrogen. The purpose of this study was to delineate the influence that biological sex and age exert on the retinal function and structure of rodents and also clarify the effect that the estrus cycle might exert on the retinal function of female rats. Method The retinal function of 50 normal male and female albino Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was investigated with the electroretinogram (ERG) at postnatal day (P) 30, 60, 100, 200, and 300 (n = 5–6 male and female rats/age). Following the ERG recording sessions, retinal histology was performed in both sexes. In parallel, the retinal function of premenopausal and menopausal female rats aged P540 were also compared. Results Sex and age-related changes in retinal structure and function were observed in our animal model. However, irrespective of age, no significant difference was observed in ERG and retinal histology obtained from male and female rats. Notwithstanding the above we did however notice that between P60 and P200 there was a gradual increase in ERG amplitudes of female rats compared to males. Furthermore, the ERG of premenopausal female rats aged 18 months old (P540) was larger compared to age-matched menopausal female rats as well as that of male rats. Conclusion Our results showed that biological sex and age can influence the retinal function and structure of albino SD rats. Furthermore, we showed that cycled female rats have better retinal function compared to the menopausal female rats suggesting a beneficial effect of the estrus cycle on the retinal function. PMID:26317201

  2. Age- and hypertension-induced changes in abnormal contractions in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Jablonskis, Lina T; Head, Richard J

    2002-12-01

    The current investigation explored the potential age-dependant modulation of abnormal spontaneous constrictions (thromboxane-like) in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) aorta, observed only after the inhibition of endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO). Aortic rings from SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats of varying ages (4, 8, 12, and 18 months) were mounted in organ baths, and changes in tension were monitored. Inhibition of NO with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (NOLA) unmasked a slow contraction, which appeared to be age dependent (p < 0.05). This contraction was found in SHRs of all age groups and in older WKY rats. Denuding the endothelium in young SHRs did not influence the constriction, confirming a nonendothelial cell origin, while in the older groups this led to a 30-40% reduction in contraction. Comparable attenuation of the constrictor response was observed after incubation of endothelium intact rings with superoxide dismutase (100 U/ml) or 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Of the residual activity that was unaffected by free radical scavengers or de-endothelialization, 60-70% was sensitive to cyclooxygenase inhibition by indomethacin and/or ibuprofen. The thromboxane (TxA ) receptor antagonist SQ29548 induced a complete reversal of the abnormal constriction. In contrast, thromboxane synthetase inhibition had no effect, ruling out any involvement of TxA in mediating this abnormality. Collectively, these observations support the view that as compared with the normotensive setting, contraction induced by NO inhibition in the SHR develops prematurely and deteriorates more rapidly during the aging process. In aged rats, prostaglandin endoperoxide intermediates PGG /H and endothelium-derived free radicals rather than TxA per se appear to contribute to the NOLA-dependent TxA -like vasoconstriction. PMID:12451327

  3. [Aspects of stress and aging in the rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Niedermüller, H; Kment, A; Hofecker, G; Skalicky, M

    1981-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats aged 6 to 22 months were stressed for 2, 16 and 9m resp. by the influence of noise (106 dB, 2h/d) and overcrowding (12 rats/Makrolon-IV-cage). Parameters of the plasma, brain, testicles and the liver (enzymes, metabolites and hormones) and well-known age parameters were evaluated to obtain objective criteria for stress influences. The weights of the whole body and some organs were also measured. The most distinct changes were seen in the plasma enzyme activities CPK, ALD, CHE and AP, in the concentrations of CHO and TRG and in the levels of testosterone, corticosterone and aldosterone. The contraction-relaxation of the tail tendon and the soluble collagen of the corium changed in the direction of higher age, just as lipofuscine content in the brain, cerebellum and the adrenals did. Some activities of enzymes and concentrations of metabolites changed in the brain, liver the testicles. Adrenal weights rose sharply in both stress groups; the body weight was lower. There were some differences in the effects of the two stress factors. These investigations gave some information about the relation between stress and aging and provide a simple means of determining the influence of stress. PMID:6112891

  4. Eleutheroside B or E enhances learning and memory in experimentally aged rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Debin; Hu, Zehua; Yu, Zhaofen

    2013-04-25

    Eleutheroside B or E, the main component of Acanthopanax, can relieve fatigue, enhance memory, and improve human cognition. Numerous studies have confirmed that high doses of acetylcholine significantly attenuate clinical symptoms and delay the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The present study replicated a rat model of aging induced by injecting quinolinic acid into the hippocampal CA1 region. These rats were intraperitoneally injected with low, medium and high doses of eleutheroside B or E (50, 100, 200 mg/kg), and rats injected with Huperzine A or PBS were used as controls. At 4 weeks after administration, behavioral tests showed that the escape latencies and errors in searching for the platform in a Morris water maze were dose-dependently reduced in rats treated with medium and high-dose eleutheroside B or E. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that the number of surviving hippocampal neurons was greater and pathological injury was milder in three eleutheroside B or E groups compared with model group. Hippocampal homogenates showed enhanced cholinesterase activity, and dose-dependent increases in acetylcholine content and decreases in choline content following eleutheroside B or E treatment, similar to those seen in the Huperzine A group. These findings indicate that eleutheroside B or E improves learning and memory in aged rats. These effects of eleutheroside B or E may be mediated by activation of cholinesterase or enhanced reuse of choline to accelerate the synthesis of acetylcholine in hippocampal neurons. PMID:25206404

  5. A preliminary study of age-related difference in resistance to sepsis in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Wei, C I; Gilliam, M C; Cohen, M D; Cornell, J A; Moazam, F

    1987-11-01

    Although the pathophysiology of intraabdominal sepsis is well established in the adult animal, there is a paucity of similar information in the newborn animal. Using the Wichterman (K.A. Wichterman, A.E. Baue, and I.H. Chaudry, Journal of Surgical Research 29: 189, 1980) model of intraabdominal sepsis, 42 Sprague-Dawley suckling rat pups and 42 adults underwent cecal ligation followed by a single needle puncture of the cecum. Whereas a mortality of 47.6% was noted in the adult animals, only 7.1% of the suckling animals succumbed by the end of 1 week. After the ip LD50 of Escherichia coli was determined independently in each age group, appropriate doses of the bacteria were injected into the peritoneums of 36 suckling and 30 adult rats. The peritoneal fluid was aspirated at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hr and the bacterial concentration in the suspension was determined. The rate of bacterial clearance from the peritoneum of the suckling rats was found to be significantly greater at 2, 4, and 8 hr as compared with the adult animal. In vitro assay of the phagocytic activity of the peritoneal macrophages demonstrated a significantly higher activity in the cells obtained from the suckling rats than in those from the adult (P less than 0.05). A more efficient bacterial clearance and a higher phagocytic activity in the peritoneal macrophages of the suckling rats may contribute to the difference in the mortality between the two age groups. PMID:3316844

  6. Effects of aging and levodopa on the laryngeal adductor reflex in rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xin; Xu, Zengrui; Butler, Susan G.; Leng, Iris; Zhang, Tan; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission plays an essential role in sensorimotor function, and declines with age. Previously, we found the laryngeal adductor reflex (LAR) was increased in excitation by a dopamine receptor antagonist. If this airway-protective reflex is similarly affected by aging, it will interfere with volitional control in older adults. The current study tested whether the LAR was affected by aging, and whether such deficits were reversed by levodopa administration in aging rats. We recorded thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle activity at rest and during elicitation of LAR responses by stimulation of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (iSLN) in 6-, 18- and 30-month-old rats under alpha-chloralose anesthesia. Using paired stimuli at different inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs), LAR central conditioning, resting muscle activity, and reflex latency and amplitudes were quantified. Numbers of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) were measured using tyrosine hydroxylase staining. We found: (1) increased resting TA muscle activity and LAR amplitude occurred with fewer dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc in 18- and 30-month-old rats; (2) decreases in LAR latency and increases in amplitude correlated with reduced numbers of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc; (3) test responses were greater at 1000 ms ISI in 18-month-old rats compared with 6-month-old rats; and (4) levodopa administration further increased response latency but did not alter muscle activity, response amplitude, or central conditioning. In conclusion, increases in laryngeal muscle activity levels and re-flex amplitudes accompanied age reductions in dopaminergic neurons but were not reversed with levodopa administration. PMID:22824541

  7. Effects of Bak Foong Pills and Menoease Pills on white blood cell distribution in old age female rats.

    PubMed

    Ho, Alice Lok Sze; Gou, Yu Lin; Rowlands, Dewi Kenneth; Chung, Yiu Wa; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2003-12-01

    This study examined the effects of Bak Foong Pills (BFP) and the new BFP-derived post-menopause formula, Menoease Pills (MBFP), on the distribution of peripheral white blood cells (WBC) between BFP/MBFP-treated and non-treated rats. Eighteen months old female SD rats were used to mimic post-menopausal and old age animal models. The percentage distribution of lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes were measured using flow cytometry with and without treatments of BFP or MBFP. Results showed that WBC distribution in old age rats were significantly different from that of adult rats, suggesting that as the animal aged, their WBC distributions were altered. Old age rats were observed to have much lower percentages of lymphocytes, but higher percentages of granulocytes when compared to the adult rats, indicating possible attenuated immunity. Following treatment with BFP or MBFP, WBC populations were found to be redistributed back into the ranges observed in adult animals. Furthermore, MBFP, was found to alter WBC distribution in a dose-dependent manner. When compared to estrogen (E(2)), a well documented regulator of immune function, results showed that MBFP was able to show significantly greater effects on WBC redistribution compared to E(2). However, in ovariectomised (ovx) old age rats, neither MBFP nor E(2) treated groups showed any changes in WBC redistribution. These results indicate that MBFP may share similarities to E(2). Indeed, the effect of MBFP and E(2) seems to require intact ovaries, which are believed to be necessary for the modulation of WBC distributions and immune functions. Overall, our findings suggest that BFP and MBFP may be able to regulate WBC population in old age female rats, and thus, indicate their potential role on improving the attenuated immunity evident in post-menopausal and elderly women. PMID:14646184

  8. Protective effects of resveratrol on aging-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Gocmez, Semil Selcen; Gacar, Nejat; Utkan, Tijen; Gacar, Gulcin; Scarpace, Philip J; Tumer, Nihal

    2016-05-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol phytoalexine, has been shown to play a neuroprotective role in the neurodegenerative process in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improve memory function in dementia. However, the in vivo effect of resveratrol in normal aging models of learning and memory has not yet been evaluated. Therefore, the present neurobehavioral study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of resveratrol on cognitive impairment induced by aging in passive avoidance and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups: young control (4month), young resveratrol (4month+RESV), old control (24month) and old resveratrol (24month+RESV). Resveratrol (50mg/kg/day) was given to the 4month+RESV and 24month+RESV groups orally for 12weeks. There was no significant difference between the groups for the first day of latency, while in aged rats, the second day of latency was significantly shortened compared to the young group in the passive avoidance test (p<0.05). Additionally, in the MWM test, the results showed a decrease in the time spent in the escape platform's quadrant in the probe test in aged rats (p<0.05). The administration of resveratrol at 50mg/kg/day increased the retention scores in the passive avoidance test and the time spent in the escape platform's quadrant in the MWM task (p<0.05). Furthermore resveratrol attenuated the protein levels of TNFα and IL1β in the 24-month group. These findings indicate that aging impairs emotional and spatial learning-memory and resveratrol reverses the effect of age-related learning and memory impairment. The results of this study suggest that resveratrol is effective in preventing cognitive deficit in aged rats by inhibiting the production of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27040098

  9. The Expression Changes of Inflammasomes in the Aging Rat Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Song, Fei; Ma, Yuxiang; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms of kidney aging are not yet clear. Studies have shown that immunological inflammation is related to kidney aging. Inflammasomes are important components of innate immune system in the body. However, the function of inflammasomes and their underlying mechanisms in renal aging remain unclear. In this study, for the first time, we systematically investigated the role of the inflammasomes and the inflammatory responses activated by inflammasomes during kidney aging. We found that during kidney aging, the expression levels of the molecules associated with the activation of inflammasomes, including toll-like receptor-4 and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R), were significantly increased; their downstream signaling pathway molecule interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 (IRAK4) was markedly activated (Phospho-IRAK4 was obviously increased); the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway was activated (the activated NF-κB pathway molecules Phospho-IKKβ, Phospho-IκBα, and Phospho-NF-κBp65 were significantly elevated); the levels of the inflammasome components NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3), NLRC4, and pro-caspase-1 were prominently upregulated; and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were notably increased in the kidneys of 24-month-old (elderly group) rats. These results showed that inflammasomes are markedly activated during the renal aging process and might induce inflamm-aging by promoting the maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. PMID:26219846

  10. Renal brush-border Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange activity in the aging rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, J.L.; Sacktor, B.

    1987-04-01

    Amiloride-sensitive Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange activity in brush-border membrane vesicles isolated from male rat proximal tubules was decreased in the senescent rat (24 mo) compared with the young adult (6 mo). There was no significant loss in Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange activity in the kidneys of animals between 6 and 18 mo of age. Amiloride-insensitive /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake and the rate of pH gradient dissipation were not altered during aging. The decrease in sodium-dependent (/sup 32/P) phosphate transport preceded the decline in Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange activity by at least 6 mo. Sodium-dependent D-(/sup 3/H) glucose transport was not significantly altered during aging. Thus various renal plasma membrane transport functions were affected differently in the aging rat. The decrease in Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange activity during aging contrasted with the increase in exchange activity reported previously in acute ablation models of chronic renal failure.

  11. Protective Effects of Gelam Honey against Oxidative Damage in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sahhugi, Zulaikha; Jubri, Zakiah

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by progressive decline in physiological and body function due to increase in oxidative damage. Gelam honey has been accounted to have high phenolic and nonphenolic content to attenuate oxidative damage. This study was to determine the effect of local gelam honey on oxidative damage of aged rats. Twenty-four male Spraque-Dawley rats were divided into young (2 months) and aged (19 months) groups. Each group was further divided into control (fed with plain water) and supplemented with 2.5 mg/kg body weight of gelam honey for 8 months. DNA damage level was determined by comet assay and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activity of blood and cardiac antioxidant enzymes was determined by spectrophotometer. The DNA damage and MDA level were reduced in both gelam honey supplemented groups. Gelam honey increases erythrocytes CAT and cardiac SOD activities in young and cardiac CAT activity in young and aged groups. The DNA damage was increased in the aged group compared to young group, but reduced at the end of the study. The decline of oxidative damage in rats supplemented with gelam honey might be through the modulation of antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:25505937

  12. Immune marker CD68 correlates with cognitive impairment in normally aged rats.

    PubMed

    Farso, Mark; Ménard, Caroline; Colby-Milley, Jessica; Quirion, Rémi

    2013-08-01

    The relationship between heightened neuroinflammation and cognitive decline in the normally aged brain is still debatable, as most data are derived from insult-related models. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to determine whether a link could be established for 2 immune markers at the post-transcriptional level; CD68 and MHC-II, in a normally aged (24-month-old) rat population discriminated for their learning abilities. Using the Morris Water Maze (MWM) task, aged rats were divided into aged learning-impaired (AI) or -unimpaired (AU) groups. Western immunoblots of hippocampal tissue revealed a significant increase of CD68 in AI rats compared to the AU group. Moreover, up-regulated CD68 expression correlated with increased latency times in the MWM task. Immunofluorescence for CD68 revealed intense staining in the white matter regions and CA3 subregion of the hippocampus in the AI group. Despite expression of MHC-II in the AI group, no correlation was found. Overall, these data suggest that CD68 could play a role associated with cognitive decline in a subgroup of the normally aged population. PMID:23523271

  13. Brain Tissue Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress Induced by Obstructive Apneas is Different in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dalmases, Mireia; Torres, Marta; Márquez-Kisinousky, Leonardo; Almendros, Isaac; Planas, Anna M.; Embid, Cristina; Martínez-Garcia, Miguel Ángel; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep Maria

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypotheses that brain oxygen partial pressure (PtO2) in response to obstructive apneas changes with age and that it might lead to different levels of cerebral tissue oxidative stress. Design: Prospective controlled animal study. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: Sixty-four male Wistar rats: 32 young (3 mo old) and 32 aged (18 mo). Interventions: Protocol 1: Twenty-four animals were subjected to obstructive apneas (50 apneas/h, lasting 15 sec each) or to sham procedure for 50 min. Protocol 2: Forty rats were subjected to obstructive apneas or sham procedure for 4 h. Measurements and Results: Protocol 1: Real-time PtO2 measurements were performed using a fast-response oxygen microelectrode. During successive apneas cerebral cortex PtO2 presented a different pattern in the two age groups; there was a fast increase in young rats, whereas it remained without significant changes between the beginning and the end of the protocol in the aged group. Protocol 2: Brain oxidative stress assessed by lipid peroxidation increased after apneas in young rats (1.34 ± 0.17 nmol/mg of protein) compared to old ones (0.63 ± 0.03 nmol/mg), where a higher expression of antioxidant enzymes was observed. Conclusions: The results suggest that brain oxidative stress in aged rats is lower than in young rats in response to recurrent apneas, mimicking obstructive sleep apnea. This could be due to the different PtO2 response observed between age groups and the increased antioxidant expression in aged rats. Citation: Dalmases M, Torres M, Márquez-Kisinousky L, Almendros I, Planas AM, Embid C, Martínez-Garcia MA, Navajas D, Farré R, Montserrat JM. Brain tissue hypoxia and oxidative stress induced by obstructive apneas is different in young and aged rats. SLEEP 2014;37(7):1249-1256. PMID:25061253

  14. Effects of Aged Garlic Extract on Left Ventricular Diastolic Function and Fibrosis in a Rat Hypertension Model

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yuki; Noda, Akiko; Miyata, Seiko; Minoshima, Makoto; Sugiura, Mari; Kojima, Jun; Otake, Masafumi; Furukawa, Mayuko; Cheng, Xian Wu; Nagata, Kohzo; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2013-01-01

    Daily consumption of garlic is known to lower the risk of hypertension and ischemic heart disease. In this study, we examined whether aged garlic extract (AGE) prevents hypertension and the progression of compensated left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. DS rats were randomly divided into three groups: those fed an 8% NaCl diet until 18 weeks of age (8% NaCl group), those additionally treated with AGE (8% NaCl + AGE group), and control rats maintained on a diet containing 0.3% NaCl until 18 weeks of age (0.3% NaCl group). AGE was administered orally by gastric gavage once a day until 18 weeks of age. LV mass was significantly higher in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 0.3% NaCl group at 18 weeks of age, but significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 8% NaCl group. No significant differences were observed in systolic blood pressure (SBP) between the 8% NaCl and 8% NaCl + AGE groups at 12 and 18 weeks of age. LV end-diastolic pressure and pressure half-time at 12 and 18 weeks of age were significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group compared with the 8% NaCl group. AGE significantly reduced LV interstitial fibrosis at 12 and 18 weeks of age. Chronic AGE intake attenuated LV diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis without significantly decreasing SBP in hypertensive DS rats. PMID:24172194

  15. Effects of aged garlic extract on left ventricular diastolic function and fibrosis in a rat hypertension model.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuki; Noda, Akiko; Miyata, Seiko; Minoshima, Makoto; Sugiura, Mari; Kojima, Jun; Otake, Masafumi; Furukawa, Mayuko; Cheng, Xian Wu; Nagata, Kohzo; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2013-01-01

    Daily consumption of garlic is known to lower the risk of hypertension and ischemic heart disease. In this study, we examined whether aged garlic extract (AGE) prevents hypertension and the progression of compensated left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. DS rats were randomly divided into three groups: those fed an 8% NaCl diet until 18 weeks of age (8% NaCl group), those additionally treated with AGE (8% NaCl + AGE group), and control rats maintained on a diet containing 0.3% NaCl until 18 weeks of age (0.3% NaCl group). AGE was administered orally by gastric gavage once a day until 18 weeks of age. LV mass was significantly higher in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 0.3% NaCl group at 18 weeks of age, but significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 8% NaCl group. No significant differences were observed in systolic blood pressure (SBP) between the 8% NaCl and 8% NaCl + AGE groups at 12 and 18 weeks of age. LV end-diastolic pressure and pressure half-time at 12 and 18 weeks of age were significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group compared with the 8% NaCl group. AGE significantly reduced LV interstitial fibrosis at 12 and 18 weeks of age. Chronic AGE intake attenuated LV diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis without significantly decreasing SBP in hypertensive DS rats. PMID:24172194

  16. Comparing Aging and Fitness Effects on Brain Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mark A; Low, Kathy A; Boyd, Rachel; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Gordon, Brian A; Tan, Chin H; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Sutton, Bradley P; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) mitigates the brain's atrophy typically associated with aging, via a variety of beneficial mechanisms. One could argue that if CRF is generally counteracting the negative effects of aging, the same regions that display the greatest age-related volumetric loss should also show the largest beneficial effects of fitness. To test this hypothesis we examined structural MRI data from 54 healthy older adults (ages 55-87), to determine the overlap, across brain regions, of the profiles of age and fitness effects. Results showed that lower fitness and older age are associated with atrophy in several brain regions, replicating past studies. However, when the profiles of age and fitness effects were compared using a number of statistical approaches, the effects were not entirely overlapping. Interestingly, some of the regions that were most influenced by age were among those not influenced by fitness. Presumably, the age-related atrophy occurring in these regions is due to factors that are more impervious to the beneficial effects of fitness. Possible mechanisms supporting regional heterogeneity may include differential involvement in motor function, the presence of adult neurogenesis, and differential sensitivity to cerebrovascular, neurotrophic and metabolic factors. PMID:27445740

  17. Comparing Aging and Fitness Effects on Brain Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Mark A.; Low, Kathy A.; Boyd, Rachel; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Gordon, Brian A.; Tan, Chin H.; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Sutton, Bradley P.; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) mitigates the brain’s atrophy typically associated with aging, via a variety of beneficial mechanisms. One could argue that if CRF is generally counteracting the negative effects of aging, the same regions that display the greatest age-related volumetric loss should also show the largest beneficial effects of fitness. To test this hypothesis we examined structural MRI data from 54 healthy older adults (ages 55–87), to determine the overlap, across brain regions, of the profiles of age and fitness effects. Results showed that lower fitness and older age are associated with atrophy in several brain regions, replicating past studies. However, when the profiles of age and fitness effects were compared using a number of statistical approaches, the effects were not entirely overlapping. Interestingly, some of the regions that were most influenced by age were among those not influenced by fitness. Presumably, the age-related atrophy occurring in these regions is due to factors that are more impervious to the beneficial effects of fitness. Possible mechanisms supporting regional heterogeneity may include differential involvement in motor function, the presence of adult neurogenesis, and differential sensitivity to cerebrovascular, neurotrophic and metabolic factors. PMID:27445740

  18. Calcium antagonist flunarizine hydrochloride affects striatal D2 dopamine receptors in the young adult and aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, M; Ogawa, N; Haba, K; Hirata, H; Mori, A

    1991-01-01

    The calcium (Ca) antagonist flunarizine hydrochloride (FNZ) has been reported to induce parkinsonism, especially in the elderly. The effects of FNZ on dopamine receptors in rat striatal membranes, especially in aged rats, were studied using radiolabeled receptor assay. Similar displacing potencies in [(3)H]spiperone bindings were exhibited for FNZ and the Ca antagonists verapamil and nicardipine. FNZ was found to directly and competitively effect D2 receptors (D2-Rs) as an antagonist, without effecting D1 receptors. Furthermore, the washing of preoccupied membranes revealed that FNZ has a long-acting potent effect on D2-Rs. The comparative study of FNZ and sulpiride in young-adult and aged rats showed that the effect of FNZ on D2-Rs was more marked in aged rats. These results might be related to FNZ-induced parkinsonism and its high incidence in the elderly. PMID:15374420

  19. Age-dependence of free radical-induced oxidative damage in ischemic-reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Nagy, K; Takács, I E; Pankucsi, C

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen free radical-induced oxidative damage is involved in both aging and ischemia-reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the aging-induced oxidative alterations in rat heart as well as the age-dependence of heart injury following ischemia-reperfusion. A comparative study was performed on young and old ischemic-reperfused rat hearts. Protein oxidation and the ascorbyl radical level in heart tissue were determined in order to characterize the oxidative stress. Comparing the control conditions, old hearts have 31% more oxidized proteins as measured by protein carbonyl content, and 18% lower ascorbyl radical level as determined by ESR, than young ones. The extent of increase of protein oxidation and ascorbyl free radical depletion induced by ischemia-reperfusion is less pronounced in the old hearts (7 and 8% respectively), as compared to the young ones (55 and 21% respectively). Pre-treatment with a free radical scavenger, such as centrophenoxine, diminished the ischemia-reperfusion injury in both young and old rat hearts. PMID:15374178

  20. SRF binding to SRE in the rat heart: influence of age.

    PubMed

    Lu, X G; Azhar, G; Liu, L; Tsou, H; Wei, J Y

    1998-01-01

    One important promoter element at the 5' end of the c-fos gene is the serum response element (SRE). SRE is the site of attachment of the 67-kDa protein serum response factor (SRF) and several accessory proteins (Elk1, SAP1, SAP2/NET), termed the ternary complex factors. The binding of SRF to SRE plays an integral role in c-fos transcription and may occur independently of the association of the ternary complex factors. In the current study, we found that SRF protein expression was increased in the hearts of the old vs young adult rats in the basal condition. The hearts of old rats may have posttranslationally modified SRF proteins that are different compared to that of the young adults. The SRF increase was present both in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus in the old hearts. To test whether SRF protein levels in response to acute stress might be altered with age, we studied hearts of young adult and old rats during myocardial infarction. The young adult rat hearts responded to acute ischemic stress with an increase in both p62 and p67 SRF. The hearts of the old rats, however, did not exhibit a significant change in SRF protein expression. These findings demonstrate qualitative as well as quantitative age differences in SRF protein levels, both at baseline and following stimulation. The reduced SRF expression in response to acute cardiac ischemic stress in the old rats might contribute to the observed age-related decrease in the induction of immediate early genes such as c-fos in the heart. PMID:9467416

  1. Role of hepatic blood flow and metabolism in the pharmacokinetics of ten drugs in lean, aged and obese rats.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Murali; Kurawattimath, Vishwanath; Pocha, Krishna; Freeden, Chris; Rao, Indranil; Mariappan, T Thanga; Marathe, Punit H; Vikramadithyan, Reeba K; Abraham, Pamela; Kulkarni, Chetan P; Katnapally, Prasanna; Nutakki, Ravikumar; Paruchury, Sundeep; Bhutani, Priyadeep; Mandlekar, Sandhya

    2014-12-01

    1. The effect of age and obesity on the pharmacokinetics (PK), hepatic blood flow (HBF) and liver metabolism of 10 compounds was determined in rats. The animals fed a high-fat diet were defined as the diet-induced obese (DIO) group, while the animals that were aged similar to the DIO rats but not fed with high-fat diet were called the age-matched (AM) group. 2. The clearance (CL) values of high CL compounds (CL > 50 mL/min/kg, namely propranolol, diazepam, phenytoin, ethinylestradiol, lorcaserin and fenfluramine) decreased significantly (1.5- to 6-fold) in DIO and AM rats as compared to lean rats, while there was no clear trend for change in CL for the low-to-moderate CL compounds (CL < 50 mL/min/kg, namely atenolol, chlorzoxazone, vancomycin and sibutramine). Hepatocytes incubations revealed a change in half life (t1/2) only for phenytoin. The body weight normalized liver weights and HBF of AM and DIO rats were found to be 2- to 3-fold lower than in lean rats. 3. Our findings suggest that age, and diet to a lesser extent, can reduce HBF and body normalized liver weights and, hence, also reduce CL values for high CL compounds in rats. PMID:24947446

  2. Targeting AGEs Signaling Ameliorates Central Nervous System Diabetic Complications in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohamed Naguib; El-Bassossy, Hany M; Barakat, Waleed

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic endocrine disorder associated with several complications as hypertension, advanced brain aging, and cognitive decline. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is an important mechanism that mediates diabetic complications. Upon binding to their receptor (RAGE), AGEs mediate oxidative stress and/or cause cross-linking with proteins in blood vessels and brain tissues. The current investigation was designed to investigate the effect of agents that decrease AGEs signaling, perindopril which increases soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and alagebrium which cleaves AGEs cross-links, compared to the standard antidiabetic drug, gliclazide, on the vascular and central nervous system (CNS) complications in STZ-induced (50 mg/kg, IP) diabetes in rats. Perindopril ameliorated the elevation in blood pressure seen in diabetic animals. In addition, both perindopril and alagebrium significantly inhibited memory decline (performance in the Y-maze), neuronal degeneration (Fluoro-Jade staining), AGEs accumulation in serum and brain, and brain oxidative stress (level of reduced glutathione and activities of catalase and malondialdehyde). These results suggest that blockade of AGEs signaling after diabetes induction in rats is effective in reducing diabetic CNS complications. PMID:26491434

  3. Targeting AGEs Signaling Ameliorates Central Nervous System Diabetic Complications in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Mohamed Naguib; El-Bassossy, Hany M.; Barakat, Waleed

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic endocrine disorder associated with several complications as hypertension, advanced brain aging, and cognitive decline. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is an important mechanism that mediates diabetic complications. Upon binding to their receptor (RAGE), AGEs mediate oxidative stress and/or cause cross-linking with proteins in blood vessels and brain tissues. The current investigation was designed to investigate the effect of agents that decrease AGEs signaling, perindopril which increases soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and alagebrium which cleaves AGEs cross-links, compared to the standard antidiabetic drug, gliclazide, on the vascular and central nervous system (CNS) complications in STZ-induced (50 mg/kg, IP) diabetes in rats. Perindopril ameliorated the elevation in blood pressure seen in diabetic animals. In addition, both perindopril and alagebrium significantly inhibited memory decline (performance in the Y-maze), neuronal degeneration (Fluoro-Jade staining), AGEs accumulation in serum and brain, and brain oxidative stress (level of reduced glutathione and activities of catalase and malondialdehyde). These results suggest that blockade of AGEs signaling after diabetes induction in rats is effective in reducing diabetic CNS complications. PMID:26491434

  4. Increased hippocampal NgR1 signaling machinery in aged rats with deficits of spatial cognition

    PubMed Central

    VanGuilder Starkey, Heather D.; Sonntag, William E.; Freeman, Willard M.

    2013-01-01

    Myelin-associated inhibitor/NgR1 signaling has important roles in modulation of synaptic plasticity, with demonstrated effects on cognitive function. We have previously demonstrated that NgR1 and its ligands are upregulated in the hippocampus of aged rats with impaired spatial learning and memory, but it is unknown whether increased expression of these proteins indicates a potential increase in pathway signaling because NgR1 requires co-receptors for signal transduction through RhoA. Two co-receptor complexes have been identified to date, comprised of NgR1 and LINGO-1, and either p75 or TROY. In this study, we assessed the expression of LINGO-1, p75 and TROY, and the downstream effector RhoA in mature adult (12 months) and aged (26 months) male Fischer 344/Brown Norway hybrid rats classified as cognitively impaired or cognitively intact by Morris water maze testing. The hippocampal distribution of NgR1 and its co-receptors was assessed to determine whether receptor/co-receptor interaction, and therefore signaling through this pathway, is possible. Protein expression of LINGO-1, p75, TROY, and RhoA was significantly elevated in cognitively impaired, but not intact, aged rats compared to mature adults, and expression levels correlated significantly with water maze performance. Co-localization of NgR1 with LINGO-1, p75 and TROY was observed in hippocampal neurons of aged, cognitively impaired rats. Further, expression profiles of NgR1 pathway components were demonstrated to classify rats as cognitively intact or cognitively impaired with high accuracy. Together, this suggests that hippocampal induction of this pathway is a conserved phenomenon in cognitive decline that may impair learning and memory by suppressing neuronal plasticity. PMID:23438185

  5. Dexmedetomidine alleviates postoperative cognitive dysfunction by inhibiting neuron excitation in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Bo; Shi, Qiqing; Fang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The perioperative stress response is one of the factors leading to postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Dexmedetomidine (Dex) can reduce the stress response and hippocampus neuroapoptosis, but its mechanism of action on POCD remains unknown. This study investigated the protective effect and possible mechanism of Dex on POCD in aged rats. Ninety-six aged male rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 24 rats per group): a non-surgical control group, a surgical (model) group, a surgical group receiving a high dose of Dex (12 μg/kg), and a surgical group receiving a low dose of Dex (3 μg/kg). Cognitive function and neuronal apoptosis were evaluated after splenectomy. Compared with the control group, the model group had significantly longer escape latencies and fewer platform crossings in the Morris water-maze test. Immunohistochemistry showed that relaxin-3 and c-fos positive neurons in the hippocampus increased on postoperative days 1 and 3. Greater downregulation of the Bcl-2 protein and upregulation of Fas, caspase-8, and caspase-9 significantly increased neuroapoptosis in the model group. Compared with the model group, rats given Dex had (1) shorter escape latencies, (2) more platform crossings, (3) fewer relaxin-3 and c-fos positive neurons in the hippocampal CA1 area, (4) upregulation of Bcl-2, (5) downregulation of Fas, caspase-8, and caspase-9 proteins, and (6) decreased neuroapoptosis in the hippocampus. Thus, our data suggest that Dex may improve cognitive functioning in aged rats by inhibiting neural over-excitability. The mechanism may operate by restraining relaxin-3 and c-fos expression. PMID:27069541

  6. Age-related metabolic fatigue during low glucose conditions in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Galeffi, Francesca; Shetty, Pavan K.; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Turner, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that with aging, intrinsic brain tissue changes in cellular bioenergetics may hamper the brain’s ability to cope with metabolic stress. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of age on neuronal sensitivity to glucose deprivation by monitoring changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), tissue Po2, and NADH fluorescence imaging in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices obtained from F344 rats (1–2, 3–6, 12–20, and >22 months). Forty minutes of moderate low glucose (2.5 mM) led to approximately 80% decrease of fEPSP amplitudes and NADH decline in all 4 ages that reversed after reintroduction of 10 mM glucose. However, tissue slices from 12 to 20 months and >22-month-old rats were more vulnerable to low glucose: fEPSPs decreased by 50% on average 8 minutes faster compared with younger slices. Tissue oxygen utilization increased after onset of 2.5 mM glucose in all ages of tissue slices, which persisted for 40 minutes in younger tissue slices. But, in older tissue slices the increased oxygen utilization slowly faded and tissue Po2 levels increased toward baseline values after approximately 25 minutes of glucose deprivation. In addition, with age the ability to regenerate NADH after oxidation was diminished. The NAD+/NADH ratio remained relatively oxidized after low glucose, even during recovery. In young slices, glycogen levels were stable throughout the exposure to low glucose. In contrast, with aging utilization of glycogen stores was increased during low glucose, particularly in hippocampal slices from >22 months old rats, indicating both inefficient metabolism and increased demand for glucose. Lactate addition (20 mM) improved oxidative metabolism by directly supplementing the mitochondrial NADH pool and maintained fEPSPs in young as well as aged tissue slices, indicating that inefficient metabolism in the aging tissue can be improved by directly enhancing NADH regeneration. PMID:25443286

  7. The Effect of Cochinchina momordica Seed Extract on Gastric Acid Secretion and Morphologic Change in Aged Rat Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyun Jin; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Chang, Hyun; Kim, Joo-Hyon; Park, Ji Hyun; Kang, Jung Mook; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Cochinchina momordica seed extract (SK-MS10) has a gastric protective effect. We aimed to assess the effect of SK-MS10 on gastric acid secretion with morphologic changes in the aged rat. Methods Acid secretions were evaluated in the male F344 rats of four different ages (6-, 31-, 74-week, and 2-year). The 31-week-old rats were divided to three groups and continuously administered chow containing vehicle, SK-MS10 and lansoprazole, respectively. At the age of 74 weeks and 2 years, basal and stimulated acid was measured and the expression of mRNA and protein of H+-K+-ATPase were determined. The area of connective tissue of lamina propria was measured. Results Basal and stimulated gastric acid significantly decreased and connective tissue of lamina propria increased with age. The expression of mRNA and protein of H+-K+-ATPase significantly decreased with age. However, 74-week-old rats in the SK-MS10 group had higher stimulated gastric acid secretion than those in the vehicle and lansoprazole groups. In 2-year-old rats of SK-MS10 group, there was no increase of connective tissue. Conclusions As SK-MS10 kept the capacity of acid secretion as well as connective tissue area to comparable to young rats, it might valuable to perform further research regarding mechanism of SK-MS10 as an antiaging agent in the stomach. PMID:24073314

  8. Sinusoidal electromagnetic field of 50 hz helps in retaining calcium in tibias of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Khanduja, K L; Syal, N

    2003-03-01

    Effect of 50Hz sinusoidal electromagnetic field (SEMF) on normal bone physiology was evaluated in young and old female and male Wistar rats. Exposure to SEMF resulted in increased 45Ca retention in tibias of aged animals only. Levels of serum calcium in young female and male rats were significantly less than in respective aged rats. These were further decreased after 4 weeks of SEMF exposure. SEMF exposure did not change the serum calcium levels in aged rats, and inorganic phosphates in young and aged animals. Similarly, the levels of tartrate resistant acid and alkaline phosphatase were significantly decreased in young rats, whereas the levels remained unchanged in aged rats of either sex. The results revealed that SEMF of 1mT can prevent bone calcium loss due to aging in animals. PMID:15267147

  9. Age-related changes in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yali; Liu, Jian; Gao, Dengfeng; Wei, Jin; Yuan, Haifeng; Niu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Qiaojun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age‑related alterations in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the underlying mechanisms. Aging resulted in a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and apoptotic cells in the SHR group, which was accompanied by increased expression of oxidative stress markers (iNOS and gp47phox) and apoptotic regulatory proteins (Bax and caspase‑3). In addition, the expression of PPAR‑γ and Bcl‑2 were progressively reduced with increasing age in the SHR group. The 32 and 64‑week‑old SHRs exhibited significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells, oxidative stress markers and pro‑apoptotic proteins compared with age‑matched WKY rats, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PPAR‑γ. Compared with the 16 and 32‑week‑old WKY group, the 64‑week‑old WKY rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and pro‑apoptotic markers, and increased levels apoptotic cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that both aging and hypertension enhanced brain damage and oxidative stress injury in the hippocampi of SHRs, indicated by an increased presence of apoptotic cells and astrocytes. In addition, reduced expression of PPAR‑γ may contribute to the age‑related brain damage in SHRs. PMID:26846626

  10. Effect of Eurycoma longifolia Jack on orientation activities in middle-aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Ang, H H; Lee, K L

    2002-12-01

    The effects of various fractions of Eurycoma longifolia Jack were studied on the orientation activities of the inbred, adult middle-aged Sprague-Dawley rats, 9 months old and retired breeders towards the receptive females (anogenital sniffing, licking, mounting), the environment (climbing, raring, exploration), themselves (nongenital grooming, genital grooming) and mobility (restricted, unrestricted) after treating these subjects twice daily for 10 days. Results showed that subjects treated with 800 mg/kg of E. longifolia Jack increased orientation activities towards the receptive females (anogenital sniffing, licking and mounting), increased genital grooming towards themselves and restricted movements to a particular area of the cage but decreased interest in the external environment (climbing, raring, exploration) as compared with the controls during the investigation period. In conclusion, this study gives further evidences that different fractions of E. longifolia Jack modified the orientation activities of the middle-aged male rats. PMID:12685506

  11. METABOLIC RATE AS A FUNCTION OF AGE IN BROWN NORWAY AND LONG-EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brown Norway (BN) rats are commonly used in aging studies but relatively little is known on their metabolism as it varies with age. In fact, there is considerable disagreement on the wholebody metabolism of aging rats with some studies indicating a decrease and others showing an...

  12. The influence of triiodothyronine (T3) and inducers on hepatic drug metabolism in rats of different ages.

    PubMed

    Müller, D; Greiling, K; Greiling, H; Klinger, W

    1985-01-01

    After a 3-day treatment with T3 the ethylmorphine N-demethylation rate was diminished in 10- to 60-day-old rats, whereas the ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation rate was distinctly enhanced in some age-groups, particularly in 33-day-old rats. P-450 concentration was decreased in young rats and not changed in 60-day-old ones. Phenobarbital administration enhanced the rate of both reactions and P-450 concentration in all age-groups. This treatment significantly attenuated the T3 effects on P-450 concentration and ethylmorphine N-demethylation. beta-Naphthoflavone induced ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation and P-450 concentration in all age-groups. Compared with non-induced animals, the T3 effects on ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation (increase) and ethylmorphine N-demethylation (decrease) were more distinct, whereas P-450 concentration was scarcely influenced by T3. Age-differences in T3 actions were generally diminished by inducers. PMID:4084270

  13. Effect of age and caloric restriction on cutaneous wound closure in rats and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Roth, G S; Kowatch, M A; Hengemihle, J; Ingram, D K; Spangler, E L; Johnson, L K; Lane, M A

    1997-03-01

    Cutaneous wounds close more slowly in rats and monkeys as age increases. Caloric restriction of 40% in rats and 30% in monkeys did not significantly affect healing rates, although it did exert a trend toward faster closure. Similarly, voluntary exercise did not significantly alter healing rates in rats. Thus, impaired wound healing appears to be a generalized physiological manifestation of aging, but its possible amelioration by "anti-aging" interventions remains to be established. PMID:9060966

  14. In vivo and in vitro assessment of brain bioenergetics in aging rats

    PubMed Central

    Vančová, Ol’ga; Bačiak, Ladislav; Kašparová, Svatava; Kucharská, Jarmila; Palacios, Hector H; Horecký, Jaromír; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Brain energy disorders can be present in aged men and animals. To this respect, the mitochondrial and free radical theory of aging postulates that age-associated brain energy disorders are caused by an imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidants that can result in oxidative stress. Our study was designed to investigate brain energy metabolism and the activity of endogenous antioxidants during their lifespan in male Wistar rats. In vivo brain bioenergetics were measured using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and in vitro by polarographic analysis of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. When compared to the young controls, a significant decrease of age-dependent mitochondrial respiration and adenosine-3-phosphate (ATP) production measured in vitro correlated with significant reduction of forward creatine kinase reaction (kfor) and with an increase in phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP, PCr/Pi and PME/ATP ratio measured in vivo. The levels of enzymatic antioxidants catalase, GPx and GST significantly decreased in the brain tissue as well as in the peripheral blood of aged rats. We suppose that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative inactivation of endogenous enzymes may participate in age-related disorders of brain energy metabolism. PMID:19906014

  15. Age Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation is improved by resveratrol in rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gocmez, Semil S; Scarpace, Philip J; Whidden, Melissa A; Erdos, Benedek; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Sakarya, Yasemin; Utkan, Tijen; Tumer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether resveratrol improves the adverse effects age on vascular function in mesenteric arteries (MAs), and diminishes the hyperactivity in adrenal gland with age. [Methods] Male F344 x Brown Norway rats were assigned to 6-month control (YC), 6-month resveratrol (YR), 24-month control (OC) and 24-month resveratrol (OR). Resveratrol (15 mg/kg) was provided to resveratrol groups in drinking water for 14 days. [Results] Concentration response curves to phenylephrine (PE, 10-9-10-5M), acetylcholine (Ach, 10-9-10-5M) and resveratrol (10-8-10-4M) were evaluated in pressurized isolated MAs. The Ach concentration-response curve was right shifted with maximal response diminished in OC compared with YC rats. These effects were reversed by resveratrol treatment. The resveratrol-mediated relaxant responses were unchanged with age or resveratrol suggesting an endothelium-independent mechanism. Resveratrol tended to increase endothelial nitric oxide synthase; caused no effect on copper-zinc superoxide dismutase; and normalized the age-related elevatation in DβH and NPY levels in adrenal medulla, two indicators of sympathetic activity [Conclusion] These data indicate that resveratrol reverses age-related dysfunction in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in MAs and partially reverses hyperactivity of adrenomedullary function with age. This treatment may have a therapeuticpotential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or hypertension in the elderly. PMID:27298812

  16. A Rat Treated with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Lives to 44 Months of Age.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, Eduardo; Roque, Gustavo; Sosa, Yolanda E; Tarditti, Adrian; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing interest in the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for implementing regenerative medicine. We assessed the effect of intravenous administration of human bone marrow-derived MSC on the life span of a single Sprague-Dawley female rat. The treatment was started when the rat was 6 months old and the cells were administered every 2 weeks afterward. The treatment did not induce any obvious changes in body growth or behavior and the rat showed the typical age changes for this strain, except that, unlike intact counterparts, the animal did not develop mammary tumors or pituitary gland hyperplasia. The more remarkable effect of the treatment was on life span, which was 44 months compared with an average of 36 months for intact laboratory rats. We conclude that despite the low N value, it is likely that the MSC treatment was responsible for the exceptionally long survival of the rat. The potential rewards of confirming the present findings warrant further studies involving higher N values. PMID:26650400

  17. Neuroprotective effect of Shenqi Fuzheng injection pretreatment in aged rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ying-min; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Peng-bo; Zhen, Lu-ming; Sun, Xiao-ju; Wang, Zhi-ling; Xu, Ren-yan; Xue, Rong-liang

    2016-01-01

    Shenqi Fuzheng injection is extracted from the Chinese herbs Radix Astragali and Radix Codonopsis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Shenqi Fuzheng injection in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. Aged rats (20–22 months) were divided into three groups: sham, model, and treatment. Shenqi Fuzheng injection or saline (40 mL/kg) was injected into the tail vein daily for 1 week, after which a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury model was established. Compared with model rats that received saline, rats in the treatment group had smaller infarct volumes, lower brain water and malondialdehyde content, lower brain Ca2+ levels, lower activities of serum lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase, and higher superoxide dismutase activity. In addition, the treatment group showed less damage to the brain tissue ultrastructure and better neurological function. Our findings indicate that Shenqi Fuzheng injection exerts neuroprotective effects in aged rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and that the underlying mechanism relies on oxygen free radical scavenging and inhibition of brain Ca2+ accumulation. PMID:26981095

  18. Unraveling the message: insights into comparative genomics of the naked mole-rat.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kaitlyn N; Soifer, Ilya; Melamud, Eugene; Roy, Margaret; McIsaac, R Scott; Hibbs, Matthew; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-08-01

    Animals have evolved to survive, and even thrive, in different environments. Genetic adaptations may have indirectly created phenotypes that also resulted in a longer lifespan. One example of this phenomenon is the preternaturally long-lived naked mole-rat. This strictly subterranean rodent tolerates hypoxia, hypercapnia, and soil-based toxins. Naked mole-rats also exhibit pronounced resistance to cancer and an attenuated decline of many physiological characteristics that often decline as mammals age. Elucidating mechanisms that give rise to their unique phenotypes will lead to better understanding of subterranean ecophysiology and biology of aging. Comparative genomics could be a useful tool in this regard. Since the publication of a naked mole-rat genome assembly in 2011, analyses of genomic and transcriptomic data have enabled a clearer understanding of mole-rat evolutionary history and suggested molecular pathways (e.g., NRF2-signaling activation and DNA damage repair mechanisms) that may explain the extraordinarily longevity and unique health traits of this species. However, careful scrutiny and re-analysis suggest that some identified features result from incorrect or imprecise annotation and assembly of the naked mole-rat genome: in addition, some of these conclusions (e.g., genes involved in cancer resistance and hairlessness) are rejected when the analysis includes additional, more closely related species. We describe how the combination of better study design, improved genomic sequencing techniques, and new bioinformatic and data analytical tools will improve comparative genomics and ultimately bridge the gap between traditional model and nonmodel organisms. PMID:27364349

  19. Nutraceutical intervention reverses the negative effects of blood from aged rats on stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bickford, Paula C; Kaneko, Yuji; Grimmig, Bethany; Pappas, Colleen; Small, Brent; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun; Douglas Shytle, R

    2015-10-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in function in many of the stem cell niches of the body. An emerging body of literature suggests that one of the reasons for this decline in function is due to cell non-autonomous influences on the niche from the body. For example, studies using the technique of parabiosis have demonstrated a negative influence of blood from aged mice on muscle satellite cells and neurogenesis in young mice. We examined if we could reverse this effect of aged serum on stem cell proliferation by treating aged rats with NT-020, a dietary supplement containing blueberry, green tea, vitamin D3, and carnosine that has been shown to increase neurogenesis in aged rats. Young and aged rats were administered either control NIH-31 diet or one supplemented with NT-020 for 28 days, and serum was collected upon euthanasia. The serum was used in cultures of both rat hippocampal neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Serum from aged rats significantly reduced cell proliferation as measured by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assays in both NPCs and MSCs. Serum from aged rats treated with NT-020 was not different from serum from young rats. Therefore, NT-020 rescued the effect of serum from aged rats to reduce stem cell proliferation. PMID:26410618

  20. Characterization of recovery, repair, and inflammatory processes following contusion spinal cord injury in old female rats: is age a limitation?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the incidence of spinal cord injury (SCI) is steadily rising in the elderly human population, few studies have investigated the effect of age in rodent models. Here, we investigated the effect of age in female rats on spontaneous recovery and repair after SCI. Young (3 months) and aged (18 months) female rats received a moderate contusion SCI at T9. Behavioral recovery was assessed, and immunohistocemical and stereological analyses performed. Results Aged rats demonstrated greater locomotor deficits compared to young, beginning at 7 days post-injury (dpi) and lasting through at least 28 dpi. Unbiased stereological analyses revealed a selective increase in percent lesion area and early (2 dpi) apoptotic cell death caudal to the injury epicenter in aged versus young rats. One potential mechanism for these differences in lesion pathogenesis is the inflammatory response; we therefore assessed humoral and cellular innate immune responses. No differences in either acute or chronic serum complement activity, or acute neutrophil infiltration, were observed between age groups. However, the number of microglia/macrophages present at the injury epicenter was increased by 50% in aged animals versus young. Conclusions These data suggest that age affects recovery of locomotor function, lesion pathology, and microglia/macrophage response following SCI. PMID:25512759

  1. Chronic Oral Administration of the Arginase Inhibitor 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic Acid (ABH) Improves Erectile Function in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Robert; Hannan, Johanna L.; Liu, Xiaopu; Kutlu, Omer; Burnett, Arthur L.; Champion, Hunter C.; Kim, Jae Hyung; Steppan, Jochen; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.

    2014-01-01

    Arginase expression and activity have been noted to be heightened in conditions associated with erectile dysfunction, including aging. Previously, arginase inhibition by chronic administration of the arginase inhibitor 2-(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH) has been shown to improve endothelial dysfunction in aged rats. The objective of this study was to assess whether chronic oral ABH administration affects cavernosal erectile function. Rats were divided into 4 groups: young control, young treated with arginase inhibitor, aged control, and aged treated with arginase inhibitor. Arginase activity was measured and presented as a proportion of young untreated rats. In vivo erectile responses to cavernous nerve stimulation were measured in all cohorts. The cavernous nerve was stimulated with a graded electrical stimulus, and the intracavernosal/ mean arterial pressure ratios and total intracavernosal pressure were recorded. Arginase activity was elevated in the aged rats compared with young controls; however, arginase activity was significantly decreased in aged rats treated with ABH. With the addition of ABH, erectile responses improved in the aged rats (P < .05). Oral inhibition of arginase with ABH results in improved erectile function in aged rats, resulting in erectile hemodynamics similar to young rats. This represents the first documentation of systemic arginase inhibition positively affecting corporal cavernosal function. PMID:22492840

  2. Chronic oral administration of the arginase inhibitor 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH) improves erectile function in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Segal, Robert; Hannan, Johanna L; Liu, Xiaopu; Kutlu, Omer; Burnett, Arthur L; Champion, Hunter C; Kim, Jae Hyung; Steppan, Jochen; Berkowitz, Dan E; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2012-01-01

    Arginase expression and activity have been noted to be heightened in conditions associated with erectile dysfunction, including aging. Previously, arginase inhibition by chronic administration of the arginase inhibitor 2-(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH) has been shown to improve endothelial dysfunction in aged rats. The objective of this study was to assess whether chronic oral ABH administration affects cavernosal erectile function. Rats were divided into 4 groups: young control, young treated with arginase inhibitor, aged control, and aged treated with arginase inhibitor. Arginase activity was measured and presented as a proportion of young untreated rats. In vivo erectile responses to cavernous nerve stimulation were measured in all cohorts. The cavernous nerve was stimulated with a graded electrical stimulus, and the intracavernosal/mean arterial pressure ratios and total intracavernosal pressure were recorded. Arginase activity was elevated in the aged rats compared with young controls; however, arginase activity was significantly decreased in aged rats treated with ABH. With the addition of ABH, erectile responses improved in the aged rats (P < .05). Oral inhibition of arginase with ABH results in improved erectile function in aged rats, resulting in erectile hemodynamics similar to young rats. This represents the first documentation of systemic arginase inhibition positively affecting corporal cavernosal function. PMID:22492840

  3. Green tea polyphenols supplementation improves bone microstructure in orchidectomized middle-Aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent study shows that green tea polyphenols (GTP) attenuate trabecular bone loss in ovariectomized middle-aged female rats. To investigate whether GTP prevents bone loss in male rats, 40 rats with and without oriectomy (ORX) were assigned to 4 groups in a 2 (sham vs. ORX)× 2 (no GTP and 0.5% G...

  4. Moderate treadmill running exercise prior to tendon injury enhances wound healing in aging rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianying; Yuan, Ting; Wang, James H-C.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of exercise on wound healing in aging tendon was tested using a rat moderate treadmill running (MTR) model. The rats were divided into an MTR group that ran on a treadmill for 4 weeks and a control group that remained in cages. After MTR, a window defect was created in the patellar tendons of all rats and wound healing was analyzed. We found that MTR accelerated wound healing by promoting quicker closure of wounds, improving the organization of collagen fibers, and decreasing senescent cells in the wounded tendons when compared to the cage control. MTR also lowered vascularization, increased the numbers of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs) and TSC proliferation than the control. Besides, MTR significantly increased the expression of stem cell markers, OCT-4 and Nanog, and tenocyte genes, Collagen I, Collagen III and tenomodulin, and down-regulated PPAR-γ, Collagen II and Runx-2 (non-tenocyte genes). These findings indicated that moderate exercise enhances healing of injuries in aging tendons through TSC based mechanisms, through which exercise regulates beneficial effects in tendons. This study reveals that appropriate exercise may be used in clinics to enhance tendon healing in aging patients. PMID:26885754

  5. Age-Related Alterations in Blood Biochemical Characterization of Hepatorenal Function in the PCK Rat: A Model of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Yuichi; Brock, William J; Ito, Yuko; Morishita, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    PCK rats develop age-related polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and liver disease and have been used to investigate pharmacotherapies to ameliorate hepatorenal lesions for patients with PKD. The PCK rat may be useful to understand the possible susceptibility to hepatotoxicity observed in the patient with PKD having hepatic polycystic lesions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the background blood biochemical changes that reflect the hepatorenal function of PCK rats as well as the terminal histopathology in order to determine whether this model would be suitable for extrapolating the susceptibility of hepatotoxicity in patients. The blood biochemical parameters of hepatorenal function and histopathology were investigated in PCK rats at ages 5 to 19 weeks and compared to those outcomes in the Sprague Dawley (SD) rat. There were notable blood biochemical changes possibly due to biliary dysgenesis in the PCK rat as early as 5 weeks of age. High levels of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and total bile acids persisted throughout the study compared to the SD rat. Increased aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and hyperlipidemia and a decrease in albumin were also evident at 10 to 19 weeks of age possibly due to progression of cholestatic liver dysfunction secondary to age-related liver cystic progression. Increased liver weights generally correlated with the severity of biliary and hepatic histopathological changes. In male PCK rats, age-related increases in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine at 10 to 19 weeks of age were observed, and the cystic progression was more severe than that in females. These data indicate that the PCK rat showed notable blood biochemical changes reflecting alteration of the liver function compared to the SD rat. Also, there was a large individual variation in these parameters possibly due to variable progression rate of biliary dysgenesis and subsequent liver damages in PCK

  6. Cadmium affects the episodic luteinizing hormone secretion in male rats: possible age-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Márquez, N; Piquero, S; Esquifino, A I

    1999-01-11

    Cadmium affects luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion through unknown mechanisms. The present study was undertaken to assess whether chronic exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may affect the episodic secretion of LH and if these effects are age-dependent. Male rats were given cadmium at a dose of 50 ppm in the drinking water, from day 30 to 60 or from day 60 to 90 of life. Age-matched rats with access to cadmium-free water were used as controls. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected every 7 min for 3 h, from 10:30 to 13.30 in conscious, freely moving rats. In control animals, mean serum LH levels and pulse duration increased with age (P < or = 0.001), and pulse frequency and the relative amplitude of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.001). Cadmium administration, from day 30 to 60 of life, decreased the pulse frequency and mean half-life of the hormone (P < or = 0.05, P < or = 0.01, respectively). However, no changes in any other parameters studied were observed as compared to the control group. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90, mean serum LH levels and the duration of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.05), whereas the pulse frequency increased (P < or = 0.05). The absolute and relative amplitude of the LH peaks and the mean half-life of the hormone were not changed after cadmium administration from day 60 to 90. These results indicate that low doses of cadmium change the pulsatile secretion of LH in male rats and that the effect of cadmium on episodic LH release was age-dependent. PMID:10048746

  7. Insights from comparative analyses of aging in birds and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Ricklefs, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Many laboratory models used in aging research are inappropriate for understanding senescence in mammals, including humans, because of fundamental differences in life history, maintenance in artificial environments, and selection for early aging and high reproductive rate. Comparative studies of senescence in birds and mammals reveal a broad range in rates of aging among a variety of taxa with similar physiology and patterns of development. These comparisons suggest that senescence is a shared property of all vertebrates with determinate growth, that the rate of senescence has been modified by evolution in response to the potential life span allowed by extrinsic mortality factors, and that most variation among species in the rate of senescence is independent of commonly ascribed causes of aging, such as oxidative damage. Individuals of potentially long-lived species, particularly birds, appear to maintain high condition to near the end of life. Because most individuals in natural populations of such species die of aging-related causes, these populations likely harbor little genetic variation for mechanisms that could extend life further, or these mechanisms are very costly. This, and the apparent evolutionary conservatism in the rate of increase in mortality with age, suggests that variation in the rate of senescence reflects fundamental changes in organism structure, likely associated with the rate of development, rather than physiological or biochemical processes influenced by a few genes. Understanding these evolved differences between long-lived and short-lived organisms would seem to be an essential foundation for designing therapeutic interventions with respect to human aging and longevity. PMID:20041859

  8. Combined age- and trauma-related proteomic changes in rat neocortex: a basis for brain vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Mehan, Neal D.; Strauss, Kenneth I.

    2012-01-01

    This proteomic study investigates the widely observed clinical phenomenon, that after comparable brain injuries, geriatric patients fare worse and recover less cognitive and neurologic function than younger victims. Utilizing a rat traumatic brain injury model, sham surgery or a neocortical contusion was induced in 3 age groups. Geriatric (21 months) rats performed worse on behavioral measures than young adults (12–16 weeks) and juveniles (5– 6 weeks). Motor coordination and certain cognitive deficits showed age-dependence both before and after injury. Brain proteins were analyzed using silver-stained two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. Spot volume changes (>2-fold change, p<0.01) were identified between age and injury groups using computer-assisted densitometry. Sequences were determined by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides. The 19 spots identified represented 13 different genes that fell into 4 general age- and injury-dependent expression patterns. Fifteen isoforms changed differentially with respect to both age and injury (p<0.05). Further investigations into the nature and function of these isoforms may yield insights into the vulnerability of older patients and resilience of younger patients in recovery after brain injuries. PMID:22088680

  9. Combined age- and trauma-related proteomic changes in rat neocortex: a basis for brain vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Mehan, Neal D; Strauss, Kenneth I

    2012-09-01

    This proteomic study investigates the widely observed clinical phenomenon, that after comparable brain injuries, geriatric patients fare worse and recover less cognitive and neurologic function than younger victims. Utilizing a rat traumatic brain injury model, sham surgery or a neocortical contusion was induced in 3 age groups. Geriatric (21 months) rats performed worse on behavioral measures than young adults (12-16 weeks) and juveniles (5-6 weeks). Motor coordination and certain cognitive deficits showed age-dependence both before and after injury. Brain proteins were analyzed using silver-stained two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. Spot volume changes (>2-fold change, p<0.01) were identified between age and injury groups using computer-assisted densitometry. Sequences were determined by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides. The 19 spots identified represented 13 different genes that fell into 4 general age- and injury-dependent expression patterns. Fifteen isoforms changed differentially with respect to both age and injury (p<0.05). Further investigations into the nature and function of these isoforms may yield insights into the vulnerability of older patients and resilience of younger patients in recovery after brain injuries. PMID:22088680

  10. Loss of perforated synapses in the dentate gyrus: morphological substrate of memory deficit in aged rats.

    PubMed Central

    Geinisman, Y; de Toledo-Morrell, L; Morrell, F

    1986-01-01

    Most, but not all, aged rats exhibit a profound deficit in spatial memory when tested in a radial maze--a task known to depend on the integrity of the hippocampal formation. In this study, animals were divided into three groups based on their spatial memory capacity: young adult rats with good memory, aged rats with impaired memory, and aged rats with good memory. Memory-impaired aged animals showed a loss of perforated axospinous synapses in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation in comparison with either young adults or aged rats with good memory. This finding suggests that the loss of perforated axospinous synapses in the hippocampal formation underlies the age-related deficit in spatial memory. Images PMID:3458260

  11. Central leptin gene delivery evokes persistent leptin signal transduction in young and aged-obese rats but physiological responses become attenuated over time in aged-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Scarpace, P J; Matheny, M; Zhang, Y; Tümer, N; Frase, C D; Shek, E W; Hong, B; Prima, V; Zolotukhin, S

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if long-term leptin treatment desensitizes leptin signal transduction and the subsequent downstream anorexic and thermogenic responses in normal and leptin-resistant age-related obese rats. To this end, we administered, i.c.v., recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding rat leptin cDNA (rAAV-leptin) or control virus into young and aged-obese rats and after 9 or 46 days, examined food intake, oxygen consumption, body weight, serum leptin, STAT3 phosphorylation, hypothalamic NPY and POMC mRNAs, and UCP1 expression and protein level in brown adipose tissue (BAT). In young rats, rAAV-leptin depleted body fat and both anorexic and thermogenic mechanisms contributed to this effect. Moreover, leptin signal transduction was not desensitized, and there were persistent physiological responses. Similarly, in the aged-obese rats, there was unabated leptin signal transduction, however, both the anorexic and thermogenic responses completely attenuated sometime after day 9. This attenuation, downstream of the leptin receptor, may be contributing to the leptin-resistance and age-related weight gain in these aged-obese rats. Finally, in young rats, although the initial responses to rAAV-leptin were dominated by anorexic responses, by 46 days, the predominant response was thermogenic rather than anorexic, suggesting that energy expenditure may be an important component of long-term weight maintenance. PMID:11955525

  12. Systemic elevation of interleukin-15 in vivo promotes apoptosis in skeletal muscles of young adult and aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Emidio E.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that systemic elevation of IL-15 would attenuate apoptosis in skeletal muscles of aged rats. IL-15 was administered to young adult (n=6) and aged (n=6) rats for 14 days. Apoptosis was quantified using an ELISA assay and verified through TUNEL staining of muscle sections. As expected, apoptosis was greater in muscles from aged control rats, compared to age-matched control. Apoptosis was also greater in the muscles from young adult and aged rats treated with IL-15. These increases in apoptosis were associated with decreases in muscle mass of IL-15 treated rats. These data do not support our initial hypothesis and suggest that systemic elevation of IL-15 promotes apoptosis in skeletal muscle. The proposed anti-apoptotic property of IL-15 may be specific to cell-type and/or the degree of muscle pathology present; however, additional research is required to more clearly decipher its role in skeletal muscle. PMID:18555009

  13. Effects of aging on mineralocorticoid-induced salt appetite in rats.

    PubMed

    Thunhorst, Robert L; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2013-12-15

    This work examined the effects of age on salt appetite measured in the form of daily saline (i.e., 0.3 M NaCl) drinking in response to administration of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA; 5 mg/kg body wt) using young (4 mo), "middle-aged" adult (12 mo), and old (30 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Water and sodium intakes, excretions, and balances were determined daily. The salt appetite response was age dependent with "middle-aged" rats ingesting the most saline solution followed in order by young and then old rats. While old rats drank the least saline solution, the amounts of saline ingested still were copious and comprise an unambiguous demonstration of salt appetite in old rats. Middle-aged rats had the highest saline preference ratios of the groups under baseline conditions and throughout testing consistent with an increased avidity for sodium taste. There were age differences in renal handling of water and sodium that were consistent with a renal contribution to the greater saline intakes by middle-aged rats. There was evidence of impaired renal function in old rats, but this did not account for the reduced saline intakes of the oldest rats. PMID:24133100

  14. Pyridostigmine enhances atrial tachyarrhythmias in aging spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Halil; Scridon, Alina; Oréa, Valérie; Chapuis, Bruno; Chevalier, Philippe; Barrès, Christian; Julien, Claude

    2015-10-01

    This study examined whether chronic administration of pyridostigmine, a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor, would exacerbate episodes of spontaneous atrial tachyarrhythmia (AT) in conscious, aging, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Telemetric recordings of electrocardiogram (ECG, n = 5) and ECG/arterial pressure (n = 3) were performed in male 49-week old SHRs. After a 1-week period of continuous recording under baseline conditions, rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps that delivered pyridostigmine (15 mg/kg/day subcutaneously) for either 1 (n = 8) or 3 (n = 5) weeks. In the latter case, sympathovagal balance was assessed during the last infusion week by measuring heart rate (HR) changes in response to administration of cardiac autonomic blockers. An additional 1-week recording was performed after explantation of minipumps. Significant (P = 0.02) reductions in HR with no consistent changes in arterial pressure were observed. Frequency and duration of AT episodes were increased by pyridostigmine (0.01 ≤ P ≤ 0.07). This increase was sustained across the 3-week treatment period and reversible after cessation of treatment. Autonomic blockade revealed that intrinsic HR was above (P = 0.04) resting HR, pointing to a shift of sympathovagal balance towards vagal predominance. However, the respiratory-related component of HR variability (high-frequency power of RR interval) was lowered (P = 0.01) by pyridostigmine treatment, indicating reduced vagal modulation of HR. The results are consistent with a pathogenic role of the parasympathetic nervous system in the aging SHR model, and raise the possibility that sustained vagal activation may facilitate atrial arrhythmias. PMID:26174159

  15. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guadiana, Sarah M.; Parker, Alexander K.; Filho, Gileno F.; Sequeira, Ashton; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Shaw, Gerry; Mandel, Ronald J.; Foster, Thomas C.; Kumar, Ashok; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344) and F344 × Brown Norway (F344 × BN) rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 × BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus (DG). Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young brain

  16. Ageing and gonadectomy have similar effects on hypoglossal long-term facilitation in male Fischer rats

    PubMed Central

    Zabka, AG; Mitchell, GS; Behan, M

    2005-01-01

    Long-term facilitation (LTF), a form of serotonin-dependent respiratory plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia, decreases with increasing age or following gonadectomy in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Ageing is accompanied by decreasing levels of testosterone, which in turn influences serotonergic function. In addition, LTF in young male rats differs among strains. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that LTF is similar in middle-aged and gonadectomized young male rats of an inbred rat strain commonly used in studies on ageing (F344) by comparison with SD rats. We further tested whether the magnitude of LTF correlates with circulating serum levels of testosterone and/or progesterone. Young and middle-aged intact and young gonadectomized (GDX) male Fischer 344 rats were anaesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked and ventilated. Integrated phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) nerve activities were measured before, during and 60 min following three 5-min episodes of isocapnic hypoxia. LTF was observed in phrenic motor output in young and middle-aged intact and young GDX rats. In contrast, XII LTF was observed only in young intact rats. In middle-aged and young GDX rats, XII LTF was significantly lower than in young intact rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, XII LTF was positively correlated with the testosterone/progesterone ratio. These data show that serotonin-dependent plasticity in upper airway respiratory output is similar in F344 and SD rat strains. Furthermore, LTF is similarly impaired in middle-aged and gonadectomized male rats, suggesting that gonadal hormones play an important role in modulating the capacity for neuroplasticity in upper airway motor control. PMID:15613371

  17. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  18. Supplementation with green tea polyphenols improves bone microstructure and quality in aged, orchidectomized rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies show that green tea polyphenols (GTP) attenuate bone loss and microstructure deterioration in ovariectomized aged female rats, a model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, it is not known if such an osteo-protective role of GTP is demonstrable in androgen-deficient aged rats, a mo...

  19. AGE-RELATED CHANGES IN RECEPTOR-MEDIATED PHOSPHOINOSITIDE HYDROLYSIS IN VARIOUS REGIONS OF RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of age on cholinergic markers and receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis was dined in the frontal cortex and striatum of male Fischer-344 rats. holine acetyltransferase activity was decreased 27% in the striatum of aged (24 month) rats cared to young (3 month...

  20. Age-related increase in prostacyclin production in the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Panganamala, R V; Hanumaiah, B; Merola, A J

    1981-02-01

    Normal Sprague-Dawley rats convert a substantial percentage of exogenous arachidonic acid to prostacyclin. This conversion can be quantitated by an aqueous sampling technique utilizing thin layer chromatography and liquid scintillation counting. There is a clear age-related increase in this conversion that can be demonstrated in aortas from rats of 3 weeks to 20 weeks of age. PMID:7017783

  1. Mannosylated liposomal cytidine 5' diphosphocholine prevent age related global moderate cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced mitochondrial cytochrome c release in aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Das, N; Mandal, A K; Dungdung, S R; Sarkar, S

    2010-12-29

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions generating from cerebral ischemia-reperfusion exert a potential threat on neuronal cell survival and hence, accelerate the aging process and age dependent neuropathology. Thirty min moderate cerebral ischemia induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) followed by 30 min reperfusion caused an increased diene production, depleted glutathione (GSH) content, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities and pyramidal neuronal loss in young (2 months old) and aged (20 months old) rat brain compared to sham operated controls. Cytidine 5' diphosphocholine (CDP-Choline) is a known neuroprotective drug. CDP-Choline after metabolism in the liver suffers hydrolysis and splits into cytidine and choline before entering systemic circulation and hardly circumvents blood brain barrier (BBB) as such. Previous reports show CDP-Choline liposomes significantly increased in vivo uptake compared to "free drug" administration in cerebral ischemia. To enhance the therapeutic concentration build up in brain we sought to formulate mannosylated liposomal CDP-Choline (MLCDP) utilizing the mannose receptors. We tested the therapeutic supremacy of MLCDP over liposomal CDP-Choline (LCDP) in global moderate cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced neuronal damage. CDP-Choline in MLCDP delivery system was found potent to exert substantial protection against global moderate cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced mitochondrial damage in aged rat brain. Membrane lipid peroxidation, GSSG/GSH ratio and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in cerebral tissue were found to be higher in aged, compared to young rat. Further decline of those parameters was observed in aged rat brain by the induction of global moderate cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. MLCDP treatment when compared to free or LCDP treatment prevented global moderate cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induced mitochondrial damage as evident ultra structurally and release of cytochrome c

  2. Adolescent rats are more prone to binge eating behavior: a study of age and obesity as risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bekker, Liza; Barnea, Royi; Brauner, Akiva; Weller, Aron

    2014-08-15

    Binge eating (BE) is characterized by repeated, intermittent over-consumption of food in a brief period of time. This study aims to advance the understanding of potential risk factors for BE such as obesity, overeating and adolescence as an age group. We used the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat, a genetic overeating-induced obesity model with increased preferences for sweet and fat. Adolescent and adult rats from both strains (OLETF and the lean control strain, Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka [LETO]) received limited access to a palatable liquid diet (Ensure vanilla) for three weeks. Water and chow were available throughout the study, but access to Ensure was limited to two hours, three times a week (3TW group) or every work day (5TW group). As expected, OLETF rats consumed more Ensure and were more BE-prone (BEP) than LETO rats at both ages. Adolescent rats showed a significantly larger binge size as demonstrated by a greater increase in Ensure intake, compared to adults. Furthermore, while the adults reduced their chow intake, compensating for increased Ensure intake, the adolescents increased their chow intake too. Finally, the adolescent rats showed binge like behavior earlier in the study and they tended to be BEP more than the adults. Our findings in rats suggest that adolescents and in particular obese adolescents are at risk for BE, and BE can lead to overweight, thus providing the basis for examination of biological mechanisms of this process in animal models. PMID:24815316

  3. [The influence of persistent crowding on the spontaneous motor activity of the aging rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kment, A; Hofecker, G; Skalicky, M; Niedermüller, H

    1982-07-01

    In the course of a long-term cohort study of stress and aging, the spontaneous activity of 169 male Sprague-Dawley rats was measured at various ages from 9 to 30 months. 84 animals were submitted to crowding from the age of 5 months onwards by housing them in groups of 12 per Makrolon-IV cage. 85 rats, kept as usual in groups of 6 per makrolon-IV cage, served as a control. Spontaneous activity was assessed by an electronic instrument (Animex Activity Meter), which also enabled us to distinguish between total and large movements. During senescence, the spontaneous activity of the control animals decreased slightly by approximately 20% after the age of 18 months. In addition to the quantitative change, a progressive flattening of the activity rhythm was observed. The animals kept under crowded conditions did not reveal any age-related decrease in spontaneous activity. At an advanced age, this resulted in significantly higher activity values in the crowded group as compared with the controls. The differences appeared even earlier and seemed to be more pronounced in the number of large movements. However, the progressive disappearance of the endogenous rhythm was apparent in both the crowded and the control group. It can be concluded that at least two types of change in the central nervous system may be responsible for the aging-changes in spontaneous activity: one which disintegrates the "time structure" of the organism, and a second one which affects motivational centers. Crowded conditions seem to improve the latter, whereas they have no effect on the aging of the "biological clock". PMID:6126135

  4. Comparative analysis of ACTH and corticosterone sampling methods in rats.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Torsten P; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Ostrander, Michelle M; Dolgas, C Mark; Elfers, Eileen E; Seeley, Randy J; D'Alessio, David A; Herman, James P

    2005-11-01

    A frequently debated question for studies involving the measurement of stress hormones in rodents is the optimal method for collecting blood with minimal stress to the animal. Some investigators prefer the implantation of indwelling catheters to allow for frequent sampling. Others argue that the implantation of a catheter creates a chronic stress to the animal that confounds stress hormone measures and therefore rely on tail vein sampling. Moreover, some investigators measure hormones in trunk blood samples obtained after anesthesia, a practice that may itself raise hormone levels. To address these controversies, we 1) compared plasma ACTH and corticosterone (Cort) concentrations in pre- and poststress rat blood samples obtained via previously implanted vena cava catheters, tail vein nicks, or clipping the tip off the tail and 2) compared plasma ACTH and Cort in rat blood samples obtained by decapitation with and without anesthesia. Rats sampled via indwelling catheters displayed lower prestress ACTH levels than those sampled by tail vein nick if the time to acquire samples was not limited; however, elevated basal ACTH was not observed in samples obtained by tail clip or tail nick when the samples were obtained within 3 min. Baseline Cort levels were similar in all groups. After restraint stress, the profile of the plasma ACTH and Cort responses was not affected by sampling method. Decapitation with prior administration of CO2 or pentobarbital sodium increased plasma ACTH levels approximately 13- and 2-fold, respectively, when compared with decapitation without anesthesia. These data indicate that tail vein nicking, tail clipping, or indwelling venous catheters can be used for obtaining plasma for ACTH and Cort during acute stress studies without confounding the measurements. However, the elevation in basal ACTH seen in the tail vein nick group at baseline suggests that sampling needs to be completed rapidly (<3 min) to avoid the initiation of the pituitary stress

  5. Differential Effects of Radiation and Age on Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peiffer, Ann M; Shi, Lei; Olson, John; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K

    2010-01-01

    Greater than 50% of adults and ∼100% of children who survive >6 months after fractionated partial or whole-brain radiotherapy develop cognitive impairments. Noninvasive methods are needed for detecting and tracking the radiation-induced brain injury associated with these impairments. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we sought to detect structural changes associated with brain injury in our rodent model of fractionated whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) induced cognitive impairment and to compare those changes with alterations that occur during the aging process. Middle aged rats were given a clinically relevant dose of fWBI (40 Gy: two 5 Gy fractions/wk for 4 wk) and scanned approximately one year post-irradiation to obtain whole-brain T2 and diffusion tensor images (DTI); control groups of sham-irradiated age-matched and young rats were also scanned. No gross structural changes were evident in the T2 structural images, and no detectable fWBI-induced DTI changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) were found in heavily myelinated white matter (corpus callosum, cingulum, and deep cortical white matter). However, significant fWBI-induced variability in FA distribution was present in the superficial parietal cortex due to an fWBI-induced decline in FA in the more anterior slices through parietal cortex. Young rats had significantly lower FA values relative to both groups of older rats, but only within the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that targets of the fWBI-induced change in this model may be the less myelinated or unmyelinated axons, extracellular matrix, or synaptic fields rather than heavily myelinated tracts. PMID:20599817

  6. Skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion injury and cyclosporine A in the aging rat.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Kindo, Michel; Chamaraux-Tran, Thiên-Nga; Charles, Anne-Laure; Lejay, Anne; Kemmel, Véronique; Vogel, Thomas; Chakfe, Nabil; Zoll, Joffrey; Diemunsch, Pierre; Geny, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    Old patients exhibit muscle impairments and increased perioperative risk during vascular surgery procedures. Although aging generally impairs protective mechanisms, data are lacking concerning skeletal muscle in elderly. We tested whether cyclosporine A (CsA), which protects skeletal muscle from ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in young rats, might reduce skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in aging rats submitted to hindlimb IR. Wistar rats aged 71-73 weeks were randomized to IR (3 h unilateral tourniquet application and 2 h reperfusion) or IR + CsA (10 mg/kg cyclosporine IV before reperfusion). Maximal oxidative capacity (VM ax ), acceptor control ratio (ACR), and relative contribution of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes II, III, IV (VS ucc ), and IV (VTMPD /Asc ), together with calcium retention capacity (CRC) a marker of apoptosis, and tissue reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were determined in gastrocnemius muscles from both hindlimbs. Compared to the nonischemic hindlimb, IR significantly reduced mitochondrial coupling, VMax (from 7.34 ± 1.50 to 2.87 ± 1.22 μMO2 /min/g; P < 0.05; -70%), and VS ucc (from 6.14 ± 1.07 to 3.82 ± 0.83 μMO2 /min/g; P < 0.05; -42%) but not VTMPD /Asc . IR also decreased the CRC from 15.58 ± 3.85 to 6.19 ± 0.86 μMCa(2+) /min/g; P < 0.05; -42%). These alterations were not corrected by CsA (-77%, -49%, and -32% after IR for VM ax, VS ucc , and CRC, respectively). Further, CsA significantly increased ROS production in both hindlimbs (P < 0.05; +73%). In old rats, hindlimb IR impairs skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and increases oxidative stress. Cyclosporine A did not show protective effects. PMID:26787364

  7. Myosin heavy chain composition in the rat diaphragm - Effect of age and exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, Luc E.; Betlach, Michael; Vailas, Arthur C.; Greaser, Marion L.; Thomas, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of aging and exercise training on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition were determined in both the costal and crural diaphragm regions of female Fischer 344 rats. Treadmill running at 75 percent maximal oxygen consumption resulted in similar increases in plantaris muscle citrate synthase activity in both young (5 mo) and old (23mo) trained animals (P less than 0.05). It was found that the ratio of fast to slow MHC was significantly higher (P less than 0.005) in the crural compared with costal diaphragm region in both age groups. A significant age-related increase in persentage of slow MHC was observed in both diaphragm regions. The relative proportion of slow MHC in either costal or crural region was not changed by exercise training.

  8. The probiotic mixture IRT5 ameliorates age-dependent colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Woo, Jae-Yeon; Ahn, Young-Tae; Shim, Jae-Hun; Huh, Chul-Sung; Im, Sin-Heog; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of probiotics, we orally administered IRT5 (1×10(9)CFU/rat) for 8 weeks to aged (16 months-old) Fischer 344 rats, and measured parameters of colitis. The expression levels of the inflammatory markers' inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1β were higher in the colons of normal aged rats (18 months-old) than in the colons of normal young rats (6 months-old). Treatment with IRT5 suppressed the age-associated increased expression of iNOS, COX2, TNF-α, and IL-1β, and activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases. In a similar manner, the expression of tight junction proteins in the colon of normal aged rats was suppressed more potently than in normal young rats, and treatment of aged rats with IRT5 decreased the age-dependent suppression of tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1. Treatment with IRT5 suppressed age-associated increases in expressions of senescence markers p16 and p53 in the colon of aged rats, but increased age-suppressed expression of SIRT1. However, treatment with IRT5 inhibited age-associated increased myeloperoxidase activity in the colon. In addition, treatment with IRT5 lowered the levels of LPS in intestinal fluid and blood of aged rats, as well as the reduced concentrations of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, and C-reactive protein in the blood. These findings suggest that IRT5 treatment may suppress age-dependent colitis by inhibiting gut microbiota LPS production. PMID:25907245

  9. Differential Effects of Aging on Fore– and Hindpaw Maps of Rat Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    David-Jürgens, Marianne; Churs, Lydia; Berkefeld, Thomas; Zepka, Roberto F.; Dinse, Hubert R.

    2008-01-01

    Getting older is associated with a decline of cognitive and sensorimotor abilities, but it remains elusive whether age-related changes are due to accumulating degenerational processes, rendering them largely irreversible, or whether they reflect plastic, adaptational and presumably compensatory changes. Using aged rats as a model we studied how aging affects neural processing in somatosensory cortex. By multi-unit recordings in the fore- and hindpaw cortical maps we compared the effects of aging on receptive field size and response latencies. While in aged animals response latencies of neurons of both cortical representations were lengthened by approximately the same amount, only RFs of hindpaw neurons showed severe expansion with only little changes of forepaw RFs. To obtain insight into parallel changes of walking behavior, we recorded footprints in young and old animals which revealed a general age-related impairment of walking. In addition we found evidence for a limb-specific deterioration of the hindlimbs that was not observed in the forelimbs. Our results show that age-related changes of somatosensory cortical neurons display a complex pattern of regional specificity and parameter-dependence indicating that aging acts rather selectively on cortical processing of sensory information. The fact that RFs of the fore- and hindpaws do not co-vary in aged animals argues against degenerational processes on a global scale. We therefore conclude that age-related alterations are composed of plastic-adaptive alterations in response to modified use and degenerational changes developing with age. As a consequence, age-related changes need not be irreversible but can be subject to amelioration through training and stimulation. PMID:18852896

  10. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E.; Hernandez, Jessica Soto; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  11. Antiatherogenic and Cardioprotective Effects of Black Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) Juice in Aging Rats.

    PubMed

    Daskalova, Elena; Delchev, Slavi; Peeva, Yulia; Vladimirova-Kitova, Lyudmila; Kratchanova, Maria; Kratchanov, Christo; Denev, Petko

    2015-01-01

    Age-related diseases are a social problem of global significance and their prevention by natural products is a research area of particular interest. The present study is an approach to counteract the risk factors for atherosclerosis arising in the aging process by supplementation of chokeberry juice. It employed a model of healthy adult rats monitored for a number of somatometric, serum lipidogram, and histopathological parameters, related to risk factors and their response to supplementation with antioxidant-rich chokeberry juice. The results were used to calculate different atherogenic and cardioprotective indices, and all results were compared to those of young healthy rats. Chokeberry juice proved an extremely rich source of polyphenols resulting in very high antioxidant activity. Treatment with Aronia juice significantly lowered the proatherogenic low-density lipoprotein fraction of the animals studied and led to a 16.5% decrease in their total cholesterol. Atherogenic indices in Aronia-supplemented animals clearly showed lower atherogenic risk and cardioprotective indices indicated protection of the cardiovascular system. Besides that, chokeberry juice retarded the age-related changes in the aortic wall and can be recommended as a prophylactic tool for healthy aging. PMID:26351516

  12. Antiatherogenic and Cardioprotective Effects of Black Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) Juice in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, Elena; Delchev, Slavi; Peeva, Yulia; Vladimirova-Kitova, Lyudmila; Kratchanova, Maria; Kratchanov, Christo; Denev, Petko

    2015-01-01

    Age-related diseases are a social problem of global significance and their prevention by natural products is a research area of particular interest. The present study is an approach to counteract the risk factors for atherosclerosis arising in the aging process by supplementation of chokeberry juice. It employed a model of healthy adult rats monitored for a number of somatometric, serum lipidogram, and histopathological parameters, related to risk factors and their response to supplementation with antioxidant-rich chokeberry juice. The results were used to calculate different atherogenic and cardioprotective indices, and all results were compared to those of young healthy rats. Chokeberry juice proved an extremely rich source of polyphenols resulting in very high antioxidant activity. Treatment with Aronia juice significantly lowered the proatherogenic low-density lipoprotein fraction of the animals studied and led to a 16.5% decrease in their total cholesterol. Atherogenic indices in Aronia-supplemented animals clearly showed lower atherogenic risk and cardioprotective indices indicated protection of the cardiovascular system. Besides that, chokeberry juice retarded the age-related changes in the aortic wall and can be recommended as a prophylactic tool for healthy aging. PMID:26351516

  13. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  14. Antioxidant and hypolipidemic potential of aged garlic extract and its constituent, s-allyl cysteine, in rats.

    PubMed

    Asdaq, Syed Mohammed Basheeruddin

    2015-01-01

    Aged garlic extract (AGE) is one of the unique preparations standardized with 100% bioavailable active ingredients found in the bloodstream. The current research was aimed at exploring the role of AGE and its chief active constituent, s-allyl cysteine (SAC) as antioxidant and hypolipidemic agent in rats. At the end of treatment of AGE and SAC, separated serum and freshly prepared liver tissue homogenate were analyzed for biochemical enzymes and biomarkers to evaluate and compare potencies of investigational agents. Both AGE and SAC significantly declined elevated levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, ALP, AST, ALT, malondialdehyde, glutathione peroxidase enzyme activity, total glutathione and oxidised glutathione in serum and inclined superoxide dismutase, catalase, ferric reducing/antioxidant power, and total sulfhydryl values in liver tissue with reduction in thiobarbituric acid reactive species. The protective effects were superior with AGE compared with SAC indicating potential implication of other active constituents apart from SAC in AGE for combating hyperlipidemic stress. PMID:25918544

  15. Age-related changes in neural gap detection thresholds in the rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yin; Xu, Xiaoxiao; He, Juan; Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Jiping

    2015-02-01

    The ability of the auditory system to resolve sound temporal information is crucial for the understanding of human speech and other species-specific communications. Gap detection threshold, i.e. the ability to detect the shortest duration of a silent interval in a sound, is commonly used to study the auditory temporal resolution. Behavioral studies in humans and rats have shown that normal developing infants have higher gap detection thresholds than adults; however, the underlying neural mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, we determined and compared the neural gap detection thresholds in the primary auditory cortex of three age groups of rats: the juvenile group (postnatal day 20-30), adult group I (8-10 weeks), and adult group II (28-30 weeks). We found age-related changes in auditory temporal acuity in the auditory cortex, i.e. the proportion of cortical units with short neural gap detection thresholds (< 5 ms) was much lower in juvenile groups compared with that in both adult groups at a constant sound level, and no significant differences in neural gap detection thresholds were found between the two adult groups. In addition, units in the auditory cortex of each group generally showed better gap detection thresholds at higher sound levels than at lower sound levels, exhibiting a level-dependent temporal acuity. These results provided evidence for neural correlates of age-related changes in behavioral gap detection ability during postnatal hearing development. PMID:25388865

  16. Maternal separation produces alterations of forebrain brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in differently aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Early life adversity, such as postnatal maternal separation (MS), play a central role in the development of psychopathologies during individual ontogeny. In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4 h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1–21) on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and young adult (PND 56) Wistar rats. The results indicated that MS increased BDNF in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent rats as well as in the DG of young adult rats. However, the expression of BDNF in the mPFC in the young adult rats was decreased by MS. Additionally, in the hippocampus, there was decreased BDNF expression with age in both the MS and non separated rats. However, in the mPFC, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the non separated rats; nevertheless, the BDNF expression was significantly decreased in the MS young adult rats. In the NAc, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the male non-maternal separation (NMS) rats, and the young adult female MS rats had less BDNF expression than the adolescent female MS rats. The present study shows unique age-differently changes on a molecular level induced by MS and advances the use of MS as a valid animal model to detect the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of mental disorders. PMID:26388728

  17. Influence of age on the biochemical response of rat lung to ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, M.G.; Elsayed, N.M.; Ospital, J.J.; Hacker, A.D.

    1985-11-01

    We have previously examined the influence of animal age on the pulmonary response to ozone (O3) in rats between 7 and 90 days of age. In the present study, we expanded the age groups of rats, and examined in greater detail the relationship between animal age and pulmonary response to inhaled O3. We exposed 7 groups of specific pathogen free, male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 24, 30, 45, 60, 90, 180, and 365 days, to 0.8 ppm (1568 micrograms/m3) O3 continuously for 3 days. After O3 exposure, we sacrificed the exposed rats and a matched number of controls from each age group, and analyzed their lungs for a series of physical and biochemical parameters, including glutathione metabolizing and NADPH producing enzyme activities. We observed that in control rats all the parameters increased as a function of age. However, the rate of increase was generally slower after age 60 days. After O3 exposure there was an increase in all the parameters for all age groups relative to their corresponding controls, but the extent of increase was significantly larger in rats 60 days and older than in younger rats. A regression of the difference in mean values between control and exposed animals for each parameter against age showed a linear correlation, indicating that the response was age-dependent. Since the magnitude of such increases is thought to reflect the degree of lung injury, the results suggest that O3 exposure causes greater lung injury in older rats than in younger rats. We tested this assumption by exposing rats from four different age groups (24, 45, 60 and 90 days) to a lethal dose of O3 (4 ppm or 7840 micrograms/m3 for 8 hours). The mortality rates were 50% and 83% for 24 and 45 day old rats, respectively, and 100% for 60 and 90 day old rats. The results of these studies further demonstrate that older rats are more susceptible to lung injury from O3 than younger rats.

  18. Effects of aging on mineralocorticoid-induced salt appetite in rats

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Terry G.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2013-01-01

    This work examined the effects of age on salt appetite measured in the form of daily saline (i.e., 0.3 M NaCl) drinking in response to administration of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA; 5 mg/kg body wt) using young (4 mo), “middle-aged” adult (12 mo), and old (30 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Water and sodium intakes, excretions, and balances were determined daily. The salt appetite response was age dependent with “middle-aged” rats ingesting the most saline solution followed in order by young and then old rats. While old rats drank the least saline solution, the amounts of saline ingested still were copious and comprise an unambiguous demonstration of salt appetite in old rats. Middle-aged rats had the highest saline preference ratios of the groups under baseline conditions and throughout testing consistent with an increased avidity for sodium taste. There were age differences in renal handling of water and sodium that were consistent with a renal contribution to the greater saline intakes by middle-aged rats. There was evidence of impaired renal function in old rats, but this did not account for the reduced saline intakes of the oldest rats. PMID:24133100

  19. Possible Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Age-Related Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis in the F344XBN Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Sunil K.; Rice, Kevin M.; Katta, Anjaiah; Paturi, Satyanarayana; Wu, Miaozong; Kolli, Madhukar; Keshavarzian, Saba; Manzoor, Kamran; Wehner, Paulette S.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in treatment, age-related cardiac dysfunction still remains a leading cause of cardiovascular death. Recent data have suggested that increases in cardiomyocyte apoptosis may be involved in the pathological remodeling of heart. Here, we examine the effects of aging on cardiomyocyte apoptosis in 6-, 30-, and 36-month-old Fischer344xBrown Norway F1 hybrid rats (F344XBN). Compared with 6-month hearts, aged hearts exhibited increased TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling–positive nuclei, caspase-3 activation, caspase-dependent cleavage of α-fodrin and diminished phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt (Thr 308). These age-dependent increases in cardiomyocyte apoptosis were associated with alterations in the composition of the cardiac dystrophin glycoprotein complex and elevated cytoplasmic IgG and albumin immunoreactivity. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed these data and demonstrated qualitative differences in localization of dystrophin–glycoprotein complex (DGC) molecules with aging. Taken together, these data suggest that aging-related increases in cardiac apoptotic activity model may be due, at least in part, to age-associated changes in DGC structure. PMID:20056683

  20. Microglial AGE-albumin is critical in promoting alcohol-induced neurodegeneration in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyunghee; Bayarsaikhan, Delger; Bayarsaikhan, Enkhjargal; Son, Myeongjoo; Oh, Seyeon; Lee, Jaesuk; Son, Hye-In; Won, Moo-Ho; Kim, Seung U; Song, Byoung-Joon; Lee, Bonghee

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a neurotoxic agent, since long-term heavy ingestion of alcohol can cause various neural diseases including fetal alcohol syndrome, cerebellar degeneracy and alcoholic dementia. However, the molecular mechanisms of alcohol-induced neurotoxicity are still poorly understood despite numerous studies. Thus, we hypothesized that activated microglial cells with elevated AGE-albumin levels play an important role in promoting alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. Our results revealed that microglial activation and neuronal damage were found in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex following alcohol treatment in a rat model. Increased AGE-albumin synthesis and secretion were also observed in activated microglial cells after alcohol exposure. The expressed levels of receptor for AGE (RAGE)-positive neurons and RAGE-dependent neuronal death were markedly elevated by AGE-albumin through the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Treatment with soluble RAGE or AGE inhibitors significantly diminished neuronal damage in the animal model. Furthermore, the levels of activated microglial cells, AGE-albumin and neuronal loss were significantly elevated in human brains from alcoholic indivisuals compared to normal controls. Taken together, our data suggest that increased AGE-albumin from activated microglial cells induces neuronal death, and that efficient regulation of its synthesis and secretion is a therapeutic target for preventing alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:25140518

  1. Aging enhances serum cytokine response but not task-induced grip strength declines in a rat model of work-related musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously reported early tissue injury, increased serum and tissue inflammatory cytokines and decreased grip in young rats performing a moderate demand repetitive task. The tissue cytokine response was transient, the serum response and decreased grip were still evident by 8 weeks. Thus, here, we examined their levels at 12 weeks in young rats. Since aging is known to enhance serum cytokine levels, we also examined aged rats. Methods Aged and young rats, 14 mo and 2.5 mo of age at onset, respectfully, were trained 15 min/day for 4 weeks, and then performed a high repetition, low force (HRLF) reaching and grasping task for 2 hours/day, for 12 weeks. Serum was assayed for 6 cytokines: IL-1alpha, IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, MIP2, IL-10. Grip strength was assayed, since we have previously shown an inverse correlation between grip strength and serum inflammatory cytokines. Results were compared to naïve (grip), and normal, food-restricted and trained-only controls. Results Serum cytokines were higher overall in aged than young rats, with increases in IL-1alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-6 in aged Trained and 12-week HRLF rats, compared to young Trained and HRLF rats (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively, each). IL-6 was also increased in aged 12-week HRLF versus aged normal controls (p < 0.05). Serum IFN-gamma and MIP2 levels were also increased in young 6-week HRLF rats, but no cytokines were above baseline levels in young 12-week HRLF rats. Grip strength declined in both young and aged 12-week HRLF rats, compared to naïve and normal controls (p < 0.05 each), but these declines correlated only with IL-6 levels in aged rats (r = -0.39). Conclusion Aging enhanced a serum cytokine response in general, a response that was even greater with repetitive task performance. Grip strength was adversely affected by task performance in both age groups, but was apparently influenced by factors other than serum cytokine levels in young rats. PMID:21447183

  2. Sex differences in endothelial function of aged hypertriglyceridemic rats – effect of atorvastatin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bacova, Barbora; Vlkovicova, Jana; Navarova, Jana; Tribulova, Narcis

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that the effect of atorvastatin on endothelium-dependent relaxation of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) may differ in male vs. female aged hypertriglyceridemic rats (HTGs). Experiments were performed on 11-month-old male and female Prague hereditary HTGs. Atorvastatin (ATO) was administered p.o. in the dose of 0.30 mg/100g/day. Controls received vehiculum. After two months of ATO administration blood pressure, serum triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (CHOL) were determined. Endothelial function of SMA was studied in vitro using evaluation of relaxant responses of precontracted SMA to acetylcholine. The serum TG of control male HTGs were found to be statistically higher than those of female controls, while CHOL and blood pressure did not share gender differences. Responses of SMA of female control HTGs were statistically decreased compared to their male counterparts. ATO treatment induced decrease in blood pressure and TG of both males and females, yet CHOL values were reduced only in females. The protective effect of ATO on SMA endothelial function was much more pronounced in females compared to males. We conclude that vascular endothelial dysfunction of aged HTG rats is more severe and more attenuated by ATO in females compared to males. The protective effect of ATO on vascular endothelial function does not seem to depend solely on its lipid lowering action. PMID:23554556

  3. Effects of prepubertal-onset exercise on body weight changes up to middle age in rats.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Daisuke; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Suzuki, Masato

    2014-03-15

    The present study was conducted to examine whether prepubertal-onset exercise might help adults maintain long-term body weight (BW) reduction and increased energy metabolism after the cessation of exercise. Furthermore, the effects of the exercise regimen were compared with those of food restriction. Twenty-three male obese-diabetic [Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF)] rats were randomly assigned to prepubertal-onset exercise (Childhood-Ex), food restriction (Childhood-Diet), and sedentary control (OLETF-Sed) groups. Childhood-Ex rats exercised voluntarily every day using a rotating wheel, while the food volume of the Childhood-Diet group was restricted to achieve a BW similar to that recorded in the Childhood-Ex group. Both treatments were conducted at 5-19 wk of age; after this period, the rats were kept sedentary and allowed ad libitum food intake until 45 wk of age. BW was significantly lower, and percent lean body mass was significantly higher, in the Childhood-Ex group compared with those in the Childhood-Diet and OLETF-Sed groups throughout maturation and middle age after cessation of the interventions. The Childhood-Ex group also demonstrated higher citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase, and phosphofructokinase activity levels, as well as uncoupling protein-3 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle. This study revealed that inhibited BW gain in an animal model of human obese diabetes by prepubertal-onset exercise lasted for a long period after the completion of the exercise intervention. This effect may be facilitated by increased energy metabolism. However, these benefits were not found by prepubertal food restriction treatment. Importantly, to allow translation of our work, these novel insights need to be assessed in obese human individuals. PMID:24458753

  4. The genomic response of the ipsilateral and contralateral cortex to stroke in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Buga, A-M; Sascau, M; Pisoschi, C; Herndon, J G; Kessler, C; Popa-Wagner, A

    2008-01-01

    Aged rats recover poorly after unilateral stroke, whereas young rats recover readily possibly with the help from the contralateral, healthy hemisphere. In this study we asked whether anomalous, age-related changes in the transcriptional activity in the brains of aged rats could be one underlying factor contributing to reduced functional recovery. We analysed gene expression in the periinfarct and contralateral areas of 3-month- and 18-month-old Sprague Dawley rats. Our experimental end-points were cDNA arrays containing genes related to hypoxia signalling, DNA damage and apoptosis, cellular response to injury, axonal damage and re-growth, cell lineage differentiation, dendritogenesis and neurogenesis. The major transcriptional events observed were: (i) Early up-regulation of DNA damage and down-regulation of anti-apoptosis-related genes in the periinfarct region of aged rats after stroke; (ii) Impaired neurogenesis in the periinfarct area, especially in aged rats; (iii) Impaired neurogenesis in the contralateral (unlesioned) hemisphere of both young and aged rats at all times after stroke and (iv) Marked up-regulation, in aged rats, of genes associated with inflammation and scar formation. These results were confirmed with quantitative real-time PCR. We conclude that reduced transcriptional activity in the healthy, contralateral hemisphere of aged rats in conjunction with an early up-regulation of DNA damage-related genes and pro-apoptotic genes and down-regulation of axono- and neurogenesis in the periinfarct area are likely to account for poor neurorehabilitation after stroke in old rats. PMID:18266980

  5. Effects of Dimethylaminoethanol and Compound Amino Acid on D-Galactose Induced Skin Aging Model of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Chen, Zhenyu; Cai, Xia; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Cailing

    2014-01-01

    A lasting dream of human beings is to reverse or postpone aging. In this study, dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) and compound amino acid (AA) in Mesotherapy were investigated for their potential antiaging effects on D-galactose induced aging skin. At 18 days after D-gal induction, each rat was treated with intradermal microinjection of saline, AA, 0.1% DMAE, 0.2% DMAE, 0.1% DMAE + AA, or 0.2% DMAE + AA, respectively. At 42 days after treatment, the skin wound was harvested and assayed. Measurement of epidermal and dermal thickness in 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups appeared significantly thicker than aging control rats. No differences were found in tissue water content among groups. Hydroxyproline in 0.1% DMAE + AA, 0.2% DMAE + AA, and sham control groups was much higher than all other groups. Collagen type I, type III, and MMP-1 expression was highly upregulated in both 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups compared with aging control. In contrast, TIMP-1 expression levels of various aging groups were significantly reduced when compared to sham control. Coinjection of DMAE and AA into target tissue has marked antiaging effects on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat. PMID:25133239

  6. Effects of dimethylaminoethanol and compound amino acid on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Chen, Zhenyu; Cai, Xia; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Cailing; Liu, Fangjun; Liu, Dalie

    2014-01-01

    A lasting dream of human beings is to reverse or postpone aging. In this study, dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) and compound amino acid (AA) in Mesotherapy were investigated for their potential antiaging effects on D-galactose induced aging skin. At 18 days after D-gal induction, each rat was treated with intradermal microinjection of saline, AA, 0.1% DMAE, 0.2% DMAE, 0.1% DMAE + AA, or 0.2% DMAE + AA, respectively. At 42 days after treatment, the skin wound was harvested and assayed. Measurement of epidermal and dermal thickness in 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups appeared significantly thicker than aging control rats. No differences were found in tissue water content among groups. Hydroxyproline in 0.1% DMAE + AA, 0.2% DMAE + AA, and sham control groups was much higher than all other groups. Collagen type I, type III, and MMP-1 expression was highly upregulated in both 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups compared with aging control. In contrast, TIMP-1 expression levels of various aging groups were significantly reduced when compared to sham control. Coinjection of DMAE and AA into target tissue has marked antiaging effects on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat. PMID:25133239

  7. Recovery from volumetric muscle loss injury: A comparison between young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, John T; Kasukonis, Benjamin M; Brown, Lemuel A; Washington, Tyrone A; Wolchok, Jeffrey C

    2016-10-01

    Termed volumetric muscle loss (VML), the bulk loss of skeletal muscle tissue either through trauma or surgery overwhelms the capacity for repair, leading to the formation of non-contractile scar tissue. The myogenic potential, along with other factors that influence wound repair are known to decline with age. In order to develop effective treatment strategies for VML injuries that are effective across a broad range of patient populations, it is necessary to understand how the response to VML injury is affected by aging. Towards this end, this study was conducted to compare the response of young and aged animal groups to a lower extremity VML injury. Young (3months, n=12) and aged (18months, n=8) male Fischer 344 rats underwent surgical VML injury of the tibialis anterior muscle. Three months after VML injury it was found that young TA muscle was on average 16% heavier than aged muscle when no VML injury was performed and 25% heavier when comparing VML treated young and aged animals (p<0.0001, p<0.0001). Peak contractile force for both the young and aged groups was found to decrease significantly following VML injury, producing 65% and 59% of the contralateral limbs' peak force, respectively (p<0.0001). However, there were no differences found for peak contractile force based on age, suggesting that VML affects muscle's ability to repair, regardless of age. In this study, we used the ratio of collagen I to MyoD expression as a metric for fibrosis vs. myogenesis. Decreasing fiber cross-sectional area with advancing age (p<0.005) coupled with the ratio of collagen I to MyoD expression, which increased with age, supports the thought that regeneration is impaired in the aged population in favor of fibrosis (p=0.0241). This impairment is also exacerbated by the contribution of VML injury, where a 77-fold increase in the ratio of collagen I to MyoD was observed in the aged group (p<0.0002). The aged animal model described in this study provides a tool for investigators

  8. Rapamycin Normalizes Serum Leptin by Alleviating Obesity and Reducing Leptin Synthesis in Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Scarpace, Philip J; Matheny, Michael; Strehler, Kevin Y E; Toklu, Hale Zerrin; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Carter, Christy S; Morgan, Drake; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-07-01

    This investigation examines whether a low intermittent dose of rapamycin will avoid the hyperlipidemia and diabetes-like syndrome associated with rapamycin while still decreasing body weight and adiposity in aged obese rats. Furthermore, we examined if the rapamycin-mediated decrease in serum leptin was a reflection of decreased adiposity, diminished leptin synthesis, or both. To these ends, rapamycin (1mg/kg) was administered three times a week to 3 and 24-month old rats. Body weight, food intake, body composition, mTORC1 signaling, markers of metabolism, as well as serum leptin levels and leptin synthesis in adipose tissue were examined and compared to that following a central infusion of rapamycin. Our data suggest that the dosing schedule of rapamycin acts on peripheral targets to inhibit mTORC1 signaling, preferentially reducing adiposity and sparing lean mass in an aged model of obesity resulting in favorable outcomes on blood triglycerides, increasing lean/fat ratio, and normalizing elevated serum leptin with age. The initial mechanism underlying the rapamycin responses appears to have a peripheral action and not central. The peripheral rapamycin responses may communicate an excessive nutrients signal to the hypothalamus that triggers an anorexic response to reduce food consumption. This coupled with potential peripheral mechanism serves to decrease adiposity and synthesis of leptin. PMID:25617379

  9. Age-Dependent Variability in Gene Expression in Male Fischer 344 Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Wright, Fred A.; Royland, Joyce

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that older adults may be a sensitive population with regard to environmental exposure to toxic compounds. One source of this sensitivity could be an enhanced variability in response. Studies on phenotypic differences have suggested that variation in response does increase with age. However, few reports address the question of variation in gene expression as an underlying cause for increased variability of phenotypic response in the aged. In this study, we utilized global analysis to compare variation in constitutive gene expression in the retinae of young (4 months), middle-aged (11 months), and aged (23 months) Fischer 344 rats. Three hundred and forty transcripts were identified in which variance in expression increased from 4 to 23 months of age, while only 12 transcripts were found for which it decreased. Functional roles for identified genes were clustered in basic biological categories including cell communication, function, metabolism, and response to stimuli. Our data suggest that population stochastically induced variability should be considered in assessing sensitivity due to old age. PMID:18936298

  10. Age and sex-related changes in rat brain mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Rocío; Gianotti, Magdalena; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Aging is responsible for the decline in the function of mitochondria and their increase in size and number--adaptive mechanism to restore mitochondrial function. Estrogens increase mitochondrial function, especially in female rats. The aim of this study was to determine the age-related changes in rat brain mitochondrial function focusing on sex differences. Cellular and mitochondrial protein and DNA content, mitochondrial oxidative and phosphorylative function in male and female rat brain from four different age groups (6, 12, 18 and 24 months old) were analyzed. Mitochondria protein/DNA content decreased with aging shifting toward lesser mitochondrial functional capacity and the mitochondria number increased. A sex dimorphism was determined, with female rat brain showing mitochondria with greater functional capacity than males. These sex differences gradually increased during aging. PMID:21471708

  11. Age-dependence of sensorimotor and cerebral electroencephalographic asymmetry in rats subjected to unilateral cerebrovascular stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human population mostly affected by stroke is more than 65 years old. This study was designed to meet the recommendation that models of cerebral ischemia in aged animals are more relevant to the clinical setting than young animal models. Until now the majority of the pre-clinical studies examining age effects on stroke outcomes have used rats of old age. Considering the increasing incidence of stroke among younger than old human population, new translational approaches in animal models are needed to match the rejuvenation of stroke. A better knowledge of alterations in stroke outcomes in middle-aged rats has important preventive and management implications providing clues for future investigations on effects of various neuroprotective and neurorestorative drugs against cerebrovascular accidents that may occur before late senescence. Methods We evaluated the impact of transient focal ischemia, induced by intracerebral unilateral infusion of endothelin-1 (Et-1) near the middle cerebral artery of conscious rats, on volume of brain damage and asymmetry in behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) output measures in middle-aged (11–12 month-old) rats. Results We did not find any age-dependent difference in the volume of ischemic brain damage three days after Et-1 infusion. However, age was an important determinant of neurological and EEG outcomes after stroke. Middle-aged ischemic rats had more impaired somatosensory functions of the contralateral part of the body than young ischemic rats and thus, had greater left-right reflex/sensorimotor asymmetry. Interhemispheric EEG asymmetry was more evident in middle-aged than in young ischemic rats, and this could tentatively explain the behavioral asymmetry. Conclusions With a multiparametric approach, we have validated the endothelin model of ischemia in middle-aged rats. The results provide clues for future studies on mechanisms underlying plasticity after brain damage and motivate investigations of

  12. Transplanted Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Testicular Dysfunction In A D-Galactose-Induced Aging Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Du, Yi-Kuan; Wang, Jun; Luan, Ping; Yang, Qin-Lao; Huang, Wen-Hua; Yuan, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Glycation product accumulation during aging of slowly renewing tissues may be an important mechanism underlying aging of the testis. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have shown promise in a novel tissue regenerative technique and may have utility in treating sexual dysfunction. ADSCs have also been found to be effective in antiaging therapy, although the mechanism underlying their effects remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate the anti-aging effect of ADSCs in a D-galactose (D-gal)-induced aging animal model and to clarify the underlying mechanism. Randomly selected 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were subcutaneously injected with D-gal daily for 8 weeks. Two weeks after completion of treatment, D-gal-induced aging rats were randomized to receive caudal vein injections of 3 × 10(6) 5-bromo 2'deoxy-uridine-labeled ADSCs or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline. Serum testosterone level, steroidogenic enzymes (3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity decreased significantly in aging rats compared with the control group; serum lipid peroxidation, spermatogenic cell apoptosis, and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) expression increased significantly. ADSCs increased the SOD level and reduced the MDA level in the aging animal model and restored levels of serum testosterone, steroidogenic enzymes, and spermatogenic cell apoptosis. These results demonstrate that ADSCs can contribute to testicular regeneration during aging. ADSCs also provide functional benefits through glycation suppression and antioxidant effects in a rat model of aging. Although some ADSCs differentiated into Leydig cells, the paracrine pathway seems to play a main role in this process, resulting in the reduction of apoptosis. PMID:25728126

  13. The comparative metabolism of diisopropyl methylphosphonate in mink and rats.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D J; Geary, R S; Wustenberg, W; Bucci, T J; Perman, V; Baumel, I P; Dacre, J C

    1994-10-01

    This study reports the metabolism of carbon-14labeled diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) in mink and rats, undertaken to better understand the dose-related mortality reported for mink in a previous study. In both male and female mink and rats, DIMP was rapidly absorbed after oral administration; it was metabolized by a saturable pathway to a single metabolite, isopropyl methylphosphonate (IMPA), which was rapidly excreted, primarily in the urine (90%). Fecal radioactivity, also identified as IMPA, was 1.7-3.1% of the administered dose. Female rats had a slower rate of conversion of DIMP to IMPA and less total excretion of IMPA than male rats. Metabolism of DIMP administered intravenously was not very different from that given orally in both species. These data indicate that mink absorb, metabolize, and excrete DIMP (as IMPA) in a manner very similar to mice, rats, and dogs. PMID:7944557

  14. AGE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN RECEPTOR-STIMULATED PHOSPHOINOSITIDE TURNOVER IN THE RAT HIPPOCAMPUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To study the changes in the hippocampal cholinergic system of chronologically old and behaviorally impaired animals, old (21 months of age) and young (3 months of age) male, Fischer-344 rats were used. The aged animals were tested on a reference memory task (Morris water maze) an...

  15. Aging, aluminium and basal forebrain lesions modify substrate kinetics of erythrocyte membrane Na,K-ATPase in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jovicić, Milena Erić; Popović, Miroljub; Nesić, Katica Jovanova; Popović, Natalija; Pavlović, Svetlana Jovicić; Rakić, Ljubisav

    2008-05-01

    Several studies suggested that the activity of erythrocyte Na,K-ATPase declines with aging. Here, it is postulated that alterations in the substrate kinetics of the erythrocyte membrane Na,K-ATPase could be more aggravated in conditions of brain cholinergic dysfunction seen in Alzheimer's disease than in normal aging. To test this hypothesis, we compared the Na,K-ATPase activity (Vmax/Km parameters) in aged rats with those in young rats with brain cholinergic dysfunction induced by electrolytic-, kainic acid-lesioned nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) or by intracerebroventricular AlCl_{3} administration. In the above mentioned groups, Vmax values were significantly lower in comparison to the control animals. Furthermore, Km values were significantly higher in animals with electrolytic-induced NBM lesions, AlCl_{3} treated rats and aged animals. However, Km was significantly lower in kainic acid-induced NBM lesions compared to the control group. The Na,K-ATPase catalytic efficiency, estimated by the ratio Vm/Km, decreased as followed: young animals > aged animals > kainic acid lesion > electrolityc lesion > AlCl_{3}. Our data suggest that neurodegenerative processes similar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease affect the sodium/potassium pump functionality which might be detected in peripheral blood erythrocyte membranes. PMID:18525130

  16. Age, Dose, and Time-Dependency of Plasma and Tissue Distribution of Deltamethrine in Immature Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objective of this project was to characterize the systemic disposition of the pyrethroid, deltamethrin (DLT), in immature rats, with emphasis on the age-dependence of target organ (brain) dosimetry. Postnatal day (PND) 10, 21, and 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0...

  17. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  18. An attenuated immune response by Schwann cells and macrophages inhibits nerve regeneration in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Scheib, Jami L; Höke, Ahmet

    2016-09-01

    Although peripheral nerves are capable of regeneration, advanced age decreases the potential for functional recovery after injury. The cellular mechanisms for this are not currently understood. Here, we performed sciatic nerve grafting with young (2 months old) and aged (18 months old) Brown-Norway male rats, in which 1 cm nerve grafts from young or aged rats were sutured into nerves of young or aged rats. Axons were allowed to regenerate until the nerve grafts and distal nerves were harvested at 1, 3, and 7 days and 2 and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, our data suggested that young nerve grafts supported regeneration better than aged nerve grafts. In addition, myelin debris clearance was inhibited in young nerves when grafted into aged rats, but clearance was faster when aged nerves were grafted into young rats. Further analysis revealed that aged macrophages have delayed migration into injured nerve, and macrophages and Schwann cells from aged rats were less phagocytic for myelin debris in vitro. To understand these impairments, expression levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were analyzed at 1 day after injury. Based on these levels, there was not a clear polarization to either an M1 or M2 phenotype; however, expression levels of IL-6, IL-10, CCL2 (MCP1), and Arg-1 were decreased in aged nerves. Taken together, both macrophages and Schwann cells had attenuated responses to nerve injury in aged rats, leading to inefficient clearance of debris and impaired axonal regeneration. PMID:27459920

  19. Impact of Dietary Genistein and Aging on Executive Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Neese, Steven L.; Wang, Victor C.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Woodling, Kellie A.; Andrade, Juan E.; Helferich, William G.; Korol, Donna L.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Genistein is an estrogenic soy isoflavone widely promoted for healthy aging, but its effects on cognitive function are not well-understood. We examined the cognitive effects of once daily oral genistein treatment at two doses (approximately 162 µg/kg/day low dose and a 323 µg/kg/day high dose) in ovariectomized young (7 month), middle-aged (16 month), and old (22 month) Long-Evans rats. Operant tasks including delayed spatial alternation (DSA), differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL), and reversal learning that tap prefrontal cortical function were used to assess working memory, inhibitory control/timing, and strategy shifting, respectively. At the conclusion of cognitive testing, brains were collected and relative densities of D1 and D2 dopamine receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) were measured in the prefrontal cortex. On the DSA task, the high dose old group performed worse than both the high dose young and middle-aged groups. On the DRL task, the high dose of genistein resulted in a marginally significant impairment in the ratio of reinforced to non-reinforced lever presses. This effect was present across age groups. Age effects were also found as old rats performed more poorly than the young and middle aged rats on the DSA overall. In contrast, middle-aged and old rats made fewer lever presses on the DRL than did the young rats, a pattern of behavior associated with better performance on this task. Moreover, while DAT levels overall decreased with age, genistein treatment produced an increase in DAT expression in old rats relative to similarly aged control rats. D1 and D2 densities did not differ between genistein dose groups or by age. These results highlight the fact that aspects of executive function are differentially sensitive to both genistein exposure and aging and suggest that altered prefrontal dopamine function could potentially play a role in mediating these effects. PMID:19945528

  20. Ocular Inflammation in Uveal Tract in Aged Obese Type 2 Diabetic Rats (Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Fatty Rats)

    PubMed Central

    Kemmochi, Yusuke; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Ohta, Takeshi; Yasui, Yuzo; Toyoda, Kaoru; Kakimoto, Kochi; Shoda, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    We report uveitis observed in an obese type 2 diabetes rat model, Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Leprfa (SDT fatty) rats aged over 50 weeks. The eyes of SDT fatty rats (16 animals: 7 males and 9 females with 50 or 60 weeks of age) were examined histopathologically. Infiltration of inflammatory cells in the uveal tract was observed in 13 of 16 animals. One female showed severe inflammation affecting the entire uveal tract including the iris, ciliary body, and choroid with a variety of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages). Those changes clinically mimic the findings of diabetic iridocyclitis in diabetic patients. Uveitis associated with diabetes can occur in diabetic patients but the pathogenesis still remains unknown. Since increased extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen and abscess in the genital and lower urinary tracts were observed in some SDT fatty rats, increased susceptibility to infection, prolongation of inflammatory states, and disorders of the immune system were considered to be possible factors of the uveitis in aged SDT fatty rats. There have been few reports on how diabetes has influence on the development of uveitis associated with bacterial infection. The SDT fatty rat can be an animal model to investigate diabetes-associated uveitis. PMID:25295283

  1. [Age and the course of nephrotoxic nephritis in rats].

    PubMed

    Samoĭlova, Z T; Kliukina, S S

    1978-12-01

    In experiments on two groups of mongrel rats (4 weeks old and 4 months old) with induced nephrotoxic nephritis it was revealed that in comparison with adult rats the course of nephritis in ratlings was characterized by lesser proteinuria, selective in nature, by lesser reducticn of endogenous creatinine clearance and diuresis. The acido- and ammo-niogenesis decreased in ratlings and adult rats to the same extent. Morphological changes in the kidneys of ratlings were less pronounced than in adult animals, and were mostly localized in the convoluted tubules. The level of DNA-synthetic activity of the epithelial nuclei of the glomeruli prevailed over this index of the convoluted tubules epithelium. The weight index of the kidneys increased less in ratlings with nephritis than in adult rats. beta-lipoproteinemia in ratlings increased 8 times. Normalization of the urine and blood indices occurred more rapidly in ratlings than in adult rats. PMID:31956

  2. Sexual Experience Changes Sex Hormones But Not Hypothalamic Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression in Young and Middle-aged Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    Testosterone is well known to regulate sexual behavior in males, but this is dependent upon prior sexual experience. Aging is associated with decreased libido and changes in testosterone, but the role of experience in these age-related processes has not been systematically studied. We examined effects of age and sexual experience on serum hormones (total testosterone, free testosterone, estradiol, LH) and on numbers of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor α (ERα) immunoreactive cells in the hypothalamus. Extensive sexual experience was given to male rats at 4 months of age. Rats were euthanized at either 4 months (young) or 12 months (middle-aged (MA)). Comparable sexually naïve male rats were handled and placed into the testing arena but did not receive any sexual experience. Thus, we had four groups: young-naïve, young-experienced, MA-naïve and MA-experienced. Serum hormone levels were assayed, and numbers of AR and ERα cells were quantified stereologically in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) and the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV). Sexually experienced males had significantly elevated serum testosterone and free testosterone in both age groups. Both total and free testosterone were higher, and estradiol lower, in middle-aged than young rats. Experience did not alter either AR or ERα expression in the preoptic brain regions studied. Aging was associated with increased expression of AR, but no change in ERα. These results show that sexual experience can induce short-term and long-term alterations in serum hormones but these effects are not manifested upon their receptors in the hypothalamus. PMID:19559704

  3. Effects of acute ethanol administration of female rat liver as a function of aging

    SciTech Connect

    Rikans, L.E.; Snowden, C.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Female Fischer 344 rats, aged 4, 14, and 25 months, received 4.0 g/kg of ethanol by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. Blood alcohol concentrations 2.5, 6 and 16 hr after ethanol injection were similar in the three age groups. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels were diminished 6 hr after ethanol injection, and there were no age-dependent differences in the depleted levels (3.2 {plus minus} 0.1, 3.5 {plus minus} 0.2, and 3.0 {plus minus} 0.5 {mu}g GSH/g liver). However, GSH contents in livers of young-adult rats approached control levels after 16 hr, whereas they remained depressed in older rats. Serum levels of hepatic enzymes were significantly elevated 6 hr after ethanol administration. The increases were greater in middle-aged and old rats than in young-adult rats. The results suggest that middle-aged and old rats are more susceptible than young rats to the acute toxicity of ethanol.

  4. Chronic ethanol consumption depresses hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, C.J.; Bestervelt, L.L.; Mousigian, C.A.; Maimansomsuk, P.; Yong Cai; Piper, W.N. )

    1991-01-01

    In separate experiments, nine (n=20) and fifteen (n=12) month old rats were treated with either 6% ethanol or 12% sucrose in the drinking water to examine the effect of chronic ethanol consumption on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of aged rats. Blood was collected and plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone were determined by radioimmunoassay. Adrenal glands were cleaned, quartered and used to test in vitro responsiveness to ACTH. Anterior pituitary glands from all 15 month old rats and one half of the nine month old rats were collected, frozen and extracted for measurement of tissue ACTH concentration. The remaining anterior pituitary glands from the nine month old rats were challenged with corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) to test in vitro responsiveness. In nine month old rats, chronic ethanol consumption decreased plasma ACTH and corticosterone. Pituitary ACTH concentrations were unchanged in treated nine month old rats, but the amount of pituitary ACTH released in response to CRH was decreased in rats consuming ethanol. In vitro responsiveness of the adrenal gland to ACTH in nine month old rats consuming ethanol was unchanged. Plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations were also decreased in 15 month old rats chronically consuming ethanol. No differences were noted in responsiveness of the adrenal gland or in the amount of pituitary ACTH due to ethanol consumptions in 15 month old rats.

  5. Normal aging in rats and pathological aging in human Alzheimer's disease decrease FAAH activity: modulation by cannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Pascual, A C; Martín-Moreno, A M; Giusto, N M; de Ceballos, M L; Pasquaré, S J

    2014-12-01

    Anandamide is an endocannabinoid involved in several physiological functions including neuroprotection. Anandamide is synthesized on demand and its endogenous level is regulated through its degradation, where fatty acid amide hydrolase plays a major role. The aim of this study was to characterize anandamide breakdown in physiological and pathological aging and its regulation by CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists. Fatty acid amide hydrolase activity was analyzed in an independent cohort of human cortical membrane samples from control and Alzheimer's disease patients, and in membrane and synaptosomes from adult and aged rat cerebral cortex. Our results demonstrate that fatty acid amide hydrolase activity decreases in the frontal cortex from human patients with Alzheimer's disease and this effect is mimicked by Aβ(1-40) peptide. This activity increases and decreases in aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes, respectively. Also, while the presence of JWH-133, a CB2 selective agonist, slightly increases anandamide hydrolysis in human controls, it decreases this activity in adults and aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes. In the presence of WIN55,212-2, a mixed CB1/CB2 agonist, anandamide hydrolysis increases in Alzheimer's disease patients but decreases in human controls as well as in adult and aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes. Although a similar profile is observed in fatty acid amide hydrolase activity between aged rat synaptic endings and human Alzheimer's disease brains, it is differently modulated by CB1/CB2 agonists. This modulation leads to a reduced availability of anandamide in Alzheimer's disease and to an increased availability of this endocannabinoid in aging. PMID:25456842

  6. Sexual dimorphism in the aged rat CD4+ T lymphocyte-mediated immune response elicited by inoculation with spinal cord homogenate.

    PubMed

    Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Pilipović, Ivan; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Kosec, Duško; Bufan, Biljana; Vujnović, Ivana; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2015-12-01

    Considering the crucial pathogenic role of CD4+ T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and the opposite direction of the sexual dimorphism in the severity of the disease in 22-24-and 3-month-old dark agouti rats, sex differences in CD4+ T-cell-mediated immune response in aged rats immunized for EAE were examined and compared with those in young animals. In the inductive phase of EAE, fewer activated CD4+ lymphocytes were retrieved from draining lymph nodes of male (developing less severe disease) compared with female rats, due, at least partly, to their lesser expansion. The former reflected a greater suppressive capacity of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells. Consequently, CD4+ lymphocyte infiltration into the spinal cord of aged male rats was diminished. At the peak of EAE, the frequency of reactivated cells was lower, whereas that of the regulatory CD4+ cells was higher in male rat spinal cord. Consistently, microglial activation and the expression of proinflammatory/damaging cytokines in male rat spinal cord mononuclear cells were diminished. Additionally, the frequency of the highly pathogenic IL-17+IFN-γ+ T lymphocytes infiltrating their spinal cord was lower. Together, these results point to (i) an age-specificity in CD4+ cell-mediated immune response and (ii) mechanisms underlying the sex differences in this response in aged rats. PMID:26408399

  7. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs attenuate the vascular responses in aging metabolic syndrome rats

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Diaz-Diaz, Eulises; Pavón, Natalia; Guarner-Lans, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging are low-grade systemic inflammatory conditions, and inflammation is a key component of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) upon the vascular reactivity in aging MS rats. Methods: MS was induced in young male rats by adding 30% sucrose in drinking water over 6, 12, and 18 months. When the treatment was finished, the blood samples were collected, and aortas were dissected out. The expression of COX isoenzymes and PLA2 in the aortas was analyzed using Western blot analysis. The contractile responses of aortic rings to norepinephrine (1 μmol/L) were measured in the presence or absence of different NSAIDs (10 μmol/L for each). Results: Serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β) in control rats were remained stable during the aging process, whereas serum IL-6 in MS rats were significantly increased at 12 and 18 months. The levels of COX isoenzyme and PLA2 in aortas from control rats increased with the aging, whereas those in aortas from MS rats were irregularly increased with the highest levels at 6 months. Pretreatment with acetylsalicylic acid (a COX-1 preferential inhibitor), indomethacin (a non-selective COX inhibitor) or meloxicam (a COX-2 preferential inhibitor) decreased NE-induced contractions of aortic rings from MS rats at all the ages, with meloxicam being the most potent. Acetylsalicylic acid also significantly reduced the maximum responses of ACh-induced vasorelaxation of aortic rings from MS rats, but indomethacin and meloxicam had no effect. Conclusion: NSAIDs can directly affect vascular responses in aging MS rats. Understanding the effects of NSAIDs on blood vessels may improve the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and MS in the elders. PMID:25263337

  8. Decreases in bone blood flow and bone material properties in aging Fischer-344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Susan A.; Hogan, Harry A.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify precisely aging-induced changes in skeletal perfusion and bone mechanical properties in a small rodent model. Blood flow was measured in conscious juvenile (2 months old), adult (6 months old), and aged (24 months old) male Fischer-344 rats using radiolabeled microspheres. There were no significant differences in bone perfusion rate or vascular resistance between juvenile and adult rats. However, blood flow was lower in aged versus adult rats in the forelimb bones, scapulas, and femurs. To test for functional effects of this decline in blood flow, bone mineral density and mechanical properties were measured in rats from these two age groups. Bone mineral density and cross-sectional moment of inertia in femoral and tibial shafts and the femoral neck were significantly larger in the aged versus adult rats, resulting in increased (+14%-53%) breaking strength and stiffness. However, intrinsic material properties at midshaft of the long bones were 12% to 25% lower in the aged rats. Although these data are consistent with a potential link between decreased perfusion and focal alterations in bone remodeling activity related to clinically relevant bone loss, additional studies are required to establish the mechanisms for this putative relationship.

  9. Effects of treadmill exercise and training frequency on anabolic signaling pathways in the skeletal muscle of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Evasio; Le Douairon Lahaye, Solène; Flati, Vincenzo; Assanelli, Deodato; Corsetti, Giovanni; Speca, Silvia; Bernabei, Roberto; Calvani, Riccardo; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise is the most effective intervention against sarcopenia of aging; however, the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating training-induced adaptations are not yet completely understood. Furthermore, it is unclear whether exercise training initiated late in life affects myocyte anabolic signaling in a dose-dependent manner. Hence, we sought to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise and training frequency on anabolic pathways, including insulin signaling, in the skeletal muscle of old rats. Aged (14-16-month-old) male Wistar rats were trained on a treadmill for 3 (EX3) or 5 days/week (EX5) during 8 weeks and compared with age-matched sedentary controls (SED). Four-month-old rats were used as young controls (YC). Protein expression levels of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), activated (phosphorylated) mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) and glucose transporter GLUT4 were determined in quadriceps muscle extracts via immunoblotting. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity was assessed by histochemical staining, while electron microscopy was employed to quantify the sarcomere volume (V(src)). Body weight (BW) increased, whereas muscle weight (MW) and V(src) decreased with age. EX5, but not EX3 increased MW and V(src), without affecting BW. The expression of IR and GLUT4 was higher in SED rats relative to the YC group. Conversely, protein levels of IRS-1 and p-mTOR as well as COX activity were reduced in advanced age. Compared with SED rats, EX3 animals displayed reduced IR expression and increased IRS-1 levels and COX activity. The expression of GLUT 4 and p-mTOR was unaffected by EX3. EX5 up-regulated IRS-1 and p-mTOR expression and COX activity, while decreasing GLUT4 levels, with no effect on IR expression. In summary, substantial impairments in muscle anabolic pathways, including insulin signaling, were detected in aged sedentary rats. These changes were ameliorated by exercise training, concomitant with

  10. Blood-brain barrier transport of choline is reduced in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Mooradian, A D

    1988-02-01

    An age-related impairment in choline transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may contribute to the cholinergic mechanisms of geriatric memory dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, the brain choline uptake in male Fisher 344 rats at 2, 18 and 24 months of age was studied using the Oldendorf technique. The Vmax of choline transport in the 24-month-old rats (0.05 +/- 0.04 nmol/min/g) was significantly lower than that in the 2-month-old rat (2.5 +/- 1.0 nmol/min/g) (P less than 0.05). The Km of transport in old rats (13 +/- 35 microM) was also significantly smaller than the value in 24-month-old rats (450 +/- 195 microM), while the constant of the non-saturable component of the transport, Kd, was not significantly different in older rats (1.2 +/- 0.3 vs 0.6 +/- 0.1 microliter/min/g). These results indicate that the carrier in old rats has reduced capacity and increased affinity to choline. The reduced choline carrier capacity explains the significant decrease in BBB choline transport in aged rats. PMID:3359216

  11. Decreased stress responsivity of central and peripheral catecholaminergic systems in aged 344/N Fischer rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cizza, G; Pacak, K; Kvetnansky, R; Palkovits, M; Goldstein, D S; Brady, L S; Fukuhara, K; Bergamini, E; Kopin, I J; Blackman, M R

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of stress on central and peripheral sympatho-adrenal and sympatho-neural functions in healthy, intact young (3-4 mo) and aged (24 mo) male Fischer 344/N rats. Extracellular fluid (ECF) levels of the catecholamines norepinephrine (NE), dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were obtained by microdialysis in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus at baseline and during immobilization (IMMO). The baseline levels of these substances were similar in both age groups, and their concentrations increased significantly in response to IMMO. The IMMO-induced increases of NE and MHPG, however, were significantly smaller in old than in young rats. Plasma levels of the catecholamines NE, DHPG, MHPG, DOPAC, dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), epinephrine (EPI), dopamine (DA), and HVA were also determined in young and old rats during IMMO. Basal levels of these substances were significantly higher in old than in young rats. The magnitude of the IMMO-induced increases in the majority of these compounds however, was significantly smaller in old than in young rats. We conclude that, at the basal state, aging in the Fischer rat is associated with normal PVN ECF, but high plasma catecholamine levels; at stress state, however, old rats have substantially lesser activation of their central and peripheral catecholaminergic systems than young rats. Images PMID:7883970

  12. Effects of age on behavioral and physiological responses to carbaryl in rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, R N; Poli, A; Morato, G S; Lima, T C; Zanin, M

    1991-01-01

    Motor, sensory and thermoregulatory functions were examined in young (3 months) and mature (12 months) rats following PO administration of single low doses (10 and 50 mg/kg) of carbaryl, a carbamate insecticide, and these effects were related to blood cholinesterase activity. Carbaryl 50 mg/kg decreased the frequency of ambulation in the open-field arena within 30 min while it enhanced the duration of haloperidol-induced catalepsy in both young and mature rats. Administration of carbaryl also resulted in an increased nociceptive threshold to thermic stimuli mainly in mature rats. An age-related reduction in body temperature was observed at 30, 60 and 90 min after injection. Activity of blood cholinesterase was reduced in young and mature rats at 30 and 60 min following carbaryl exposure. These results indicate that carbaryl can induce an age-related impairment on some behavioral and autonomic functions in rats correlated to the inhibition of cholinesterase activity. PMID:1904531

  13. Impact of streptozotocin on altering normal glucose homeostasis during insulin testing in diabetic rats compared to normoglycemic rats

    PubMed Central

    Qinna, Nidal A; Badwan, Adnan A

    2015-01-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ) is currently the most used diabetogenic agent in testing insulin and new antidiabetic drugs in animals. Due to the toxic and disruptive nature of STZ on organs, apart from pancreas, involved in preserving the body’s normal glucose homeostasis, this study aims to reassess the action of STZ in inducing different glucose response states in diabetic rats while testing insulin. Diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats induced with STZ were classified according to their initial blood glucose levels into stages. The effect of randomizing rats in such a manner was investigated for the severity of interrupting normal liver, pancreas, and kidney functions. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of subcutaneously injected insulin in diabetic and nondiabetic rats were compared. Interruption of glucose homeostasis by STZ was challenged by single and repeated administrations of injected insulin and oral glucose to diabetic rats. In diabetic rats with high glucose (451–750 mg/dL), noticeable changes were seen in the liver and kidney functions compared to rats with lower basal glucose levels. Increased serum levels of recombinant human insulin were clearly indicated by a significant increase in the calculated maximum serum concentration and area under the concentration–time curve. Reversion of serum glucose levels to normal levels pre- and postinsulin and oral glucose administrations to STZ diabetic rats were found to be variable. In conclusion, diabetic animals were more responsive to insulin than nondiabetic animals. STZ was capable of inducing different levels of normal glucose homeostasis disruption in rats. Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of insulin were altered when different initial blood glucose levels of STZ diabetic rats were selected for testing. Such findings emphasize the importance of selecting predefined and unified glucose levels when using STZ as a diabetogenic agent in experimental protocols evaluating new antidiabetic agents

  14. Intracranial Pressure Elevation 24 h after Ischemic Stroke in Aged Rats Is Prevented by Early, Short Hypothermia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Murtha, Lucy A.; Beard, Daniel J.; Bourke, Julia T.; Pepperall, Debbie; McLeod, Damian D.; Spratt, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is predominantly a senescent disease, yet most preclinical studies investigate treatment in young animals. We recently demonstrated that short-duration hypothermia-treatment completely prevented the dramatic intracranial pressure (ICP) rise seen post-stroke in young rats. Here, our aim was to investigate whether a similar ICP rise occurs in aged rats and to determine whether short-duration hypothermia is an effective treatment in aged animals. Experimental middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo-3 h occlusion) was performed on male Wistar rats aged 19–20 months. At 1 h after stroke-onset, rats were randomized to 2.5 h hypothermia-treatment (32.5°C) or normothermia (37°C). ICP was monitored at baseline, for 3.5 h post-occlusion, and at 24 h post-stroke. Infarct and edema volumes were calculated from histology. Baseline pre-stroke ICP was 11.2 ± 3.3 mmHg across all animals. Twenty-four hours post-stroke, ICP was significantly higher in normothermic animals compared to hypothermia-treated animals (27.4 ± 18.2 mmHg vs. 8.0 ± 5.0 mmHg, p = 0.03). Infarct and edema volumes were not significantly different between groups. These data demonstrate ICP may also increase 24 h post-stroke in aged rats, and that short-duration hypothermia treatment has a profound and sustained preventative effect. These findings may have important implications for the use of hypothermia in clinical trials of aged stroke patients. PMID:27303291

  15. Age-related changes in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles: analysis of muscle fibers, muscle fiber proteins, and subneural apparatuses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Taguchi, Aki; Motoyoshi, Kazumi; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Desaki, Junzo

    2013-03-01

    We compared age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of aged and young adult rats by determining the number and diameter of muscle fibers, contractile muscle protein (myosin heavy chain isoforms, MHC) composition, and the morphology of the subneural apparatuses. In aged rats, both the numbers and the diameters of muscle fibers decreased in the cricothyroid (CT) muscle. The number of fibers, but not diameter, decreased in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. In the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle, neither the number nor the diameter of fibers changed significantly. Aging was associated with a decrease in type IIB and an increase in type IIA MHC isoform levels in CT muscle, but no such changes were observed in the TA or PCA muscles. Morphological examination of primary synaptic clefts of the subneural apparatus revealed that aging resulted in decreased labyrinthine and increased depression types in only the CT muscle. In the aged group, morphologically immature subneural apparatuses were found infrequently in the CT muscle, indicating continued tissue remodeling. We suggest, therefore, that age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles primarily involve the CT muscle, whereas the structures of the TA and PCA muscles may better resist aging processes and therefore are less vulnerable to functional impairment. This may reflect differences in their roles; the CT muscle controls the tone of the vocal folds, while the TA and PCA muscles play an essential role in vital activities such as respiration and swallowing. PMID:23100084

  16. [Age-related Peculiarities of Succinate Effect on Induced Lipid Peroxidation in Rat Liver Mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Grishina, E V; Khaustova, Ya V; Vasilieva, A A; Mayevsky, E I

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant effect of succinate and 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation on the kinetics of lipid peroxidation induced by ATP-Fe2+ complex in isolated rat liver mitochondria of old (1.0-1.5 years) and young (3 months) male rats was investigated. The rate of induced lipid peroxidation V(LPO) in rat liver mitochondria and the half-time of oxygen consumption Δt50, which included the lag period and the initiation. phase, was recorded polarographically. Without exogenous oxidative-substrates V(LPO) was slightly higher in mitochondria of old animals, but the onset of lipid peroxidation cascade was significantly earlier than in young animals. Incubation of mitochondria with 5mM succinate for 1 min inhibited V(LPO) by 15% in young animals and by 35% in old animals. However, only in mitochondria of old animals Δt50 increased by 19% as compared to lipid peroxidation without substrates. V(LPO) in mitochondria of young animals did not significantly change during 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation, while in mitochondria of old animals it was reduced by 19% with a slight increase in Δt50. To simulate age-dependent dysfunction we damaged isolated mitochondria by a series of freeze-thaw cycles, which caused a significant increase of V(LPO) of.both age groups. Succinate oxidation inhibited V(LPO) in damaged mitochondria in all cases by 56%, as compared to V(LPO) without oxidative substrates and extended At50 twofold in mitochondria of young animals. Oxidation of 3-hydroxybutyrate had no effect on V(LPO) in damaged mitochondria regardless of animal, age and extended Δt50 by 48% in mitochondria of young animals. Thus, the antioxidant effect of succinate oxidation can prevent lipid peroxidation damage and may exhibit geroprotective action at the level of aging mitochondria. Therefore, the antioxidant effect is due to the process of substrate oxidation in the respiratory chain but not because of an interaction of their structures with membrane lipids per se. PMID:26394470

  17. [Aging-related increase of sensitivity of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore to inductors in the rat heart].

    PubMed

    Sahach, V F; Vavilova, H L; Strutyns'ka, N A; Rudyk, O V

    2004-01-01

    -opening, Ca(2+)-overload and PAO as compared to that typical of adult animals. A higher sensitivity of MPTP-opening in the heart of old rats was accompanied by a higher basal level of expression of mRNA of the bax gene, as compared to that found in adult animals. The expression of the bcl-2 gene showed no age group-related differences. It can be supposed that a proapoptotic agent, the Bax protein, is related to an increase in the sensitivity of the MPTP (in particular to that manifested in the processes of pore formation) in the course of aging. Antioxidants, melathonin and trolox, when applied in 10(-5) mol/l concentration, presented to a certain extent opening of the MPTP-induced by 10(-5) mol/l PAO in samples from adult and old rats. These findings can be used for correction of increased sensitivity of the MPTP to different inductors, which is typical of old rats. We conclude that physiological aging is accompanied by the mitochondrial dysfunction. The MF-released capability of the mitochondria from heart tissue of old rats observed both in the presence and absence of MPTP-opening inductors (probably related to a higher sensitivity of MPTP-opening) is one of the manifestation of such dysfunction. PMID:15174206

  18. Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate ameliorates aging effects in the dendritic tree of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of both male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Kougias, Daniel G; Nolan, Suzanne O; Koss, Wendy A; Kim, Taehyeon; Hankosky, Emily R; Gulley, Joshua M; Juraska, Janice M

    2016-04-01

    Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), a supplement commonly used to maintain muscle in elderly and clinical populations, has been unexplored in the aging brain. In both healthy aging humans and rat models, there are cognitive deficits associated with age-related dendritic shrinkage within the prefrontal cortex. The present study explores the effects of relatively short- and long-term (7 and 31 weeks) oral HMB supplementation starting at 12 months of age in male and female rats on the dendritic tree of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex. Since female rats continue to secrete ovarian hormones after reaching reproductive senescence, middle-aged female rats were ovariectomized to model humans. As expected, there were fewer spines and a retraction of dendritic material in the apical and basilar trees in old age controls of both sexes compared with their middle-aged counterparts. However, these losses did not occur in the HMB-treated rats in either dendrites or the total number of dendritic spines. Thus, HMB forestalled the effects of aging on the dendritic tree of this population of neurons. PMID:26973106

  19. Chorda Tympani Nerve Transection at Different Developmental Ages Produces Differential Effects on Taste Bud Volume and Papillae Morphology in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Sollars, Suzanne I.

    2016-01-01

    Chorda tympani nerve transection (CTX) results in morphological changes to fungiform papillae and associated taste buds. When transection occurs during neonatal development in the rat, the effects on fungiform taste bud and papillae structure are markedly more severe than observed following a comparable surgery in the adult rat. The present study examined the potential “sensitive period” for morphological modifications to tongue epithelium following CTX. Rats received unilateral transection at 65, 30, 25, 20, 15, 10, or 5 days of age. With each descending age at the time of transection, the effects on the structural integrity of fungiform papillae were more severe. Significant losses in total number of taste buds and filiform-like papillae were observed when transection occurred 5–30 days of age. Significant reduction in the number of taste pores was indicated at every age of transection. Another group of rats received chorda tympani transection at 10, 25, or 65 days of age to determine if the time course of taste bud degeneration differed depending on the age of the rat at the time of transection. Taste bud volumes differed significantly from intact sides of the tongue at 2, 8, and 50 days posttransection after CTX at 65 days of age. Volume measurements did not differ 2 days posttransection after CTX at 10 or 25 days of age, but were significantly reduced at the other time points. Findings demonstrate a transitional period throughout development wherein fungiform papillae are highly dependent upon the chorda tympani for maintenance of morphological integrity. PMID:15898061

  20. The Suitability of Propofol Compared with Urethane for Anesthesia during Urodynamic Studies in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moheban, Adam A; Chang, Huiyi H; Havton, Leif A

    2016-01-01

    Urethane anesthesia preserves many reflex functions and is often the preferred anesthetic for urodynamic studies in rats. Because of the toxicity profile of urethane, its use as an anesthetic typically is limited to acute and terminal investigations. Alternative anesthetic options are needed for longitudinal studies of micturition reflexes in rats. In this study, we evaluated propofol anesthesia administered at constant rate infusion at different planes of anesthesia in rats for combined cystometrography and external urethral sphincter (EUS) EMG in rats. No reflex micturition was noted after rats received 100%, 80%, or 60% of a previously reported anesthetic dose of propofol. At 40% of the standard propofol dose, a subset of rats showed reflex voiding, with bladder contractions and associated EUS EMG activity. In contrast, urethane anesthesia at a surgical plane allowed for reflex voiding with bladder contractions and EUS activation. Latency to leaking or voiding was longer in rats under propofol anesthesia than in those under urethane anesthesia. In a subset of rats with reflex voiding under propofol anesthesia, voiding efficiency was decreased compared with that of rats anesthetized with urethane. We conclude that propofol anesthesia suppresses micturition reflexes in rats more efficiently than did urethane. Propofol is a suitable anesthetic for longitudinal studies in rats, but its use for urodynamic evaluations is limited in these animals due to its marked suppression of both bladder contractions and EUS EMG activation. PMID:26817985

  1. Korean red ginseng extract rejuvenates testicular ineffectiveness and sperm maturation process in aged rats by regulating redox proteins and oxidative defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kopalli, Spandana Rajendra; Hwang, Seock-Yeon; Won, Yu-Jin; Kim, Sung-Won; Cha, Kyu-Min; Han, Chang-Kyun; Hong, Jae-Yup; Kim, Si-Kwan

    2015-09-01

    Distortion of intracellular oxidant and antioxidant balances appears to be a common feature that underlies in age-related male sexual impairment. Therefore regulating oxidative defense mechanisms might be an ideal approach in improving male sexual dysfunctions. In the present study, the effect of Korean red ginseng aqueous extract (KRG) on age-induced testicular dysfunction in rats was investigated. KRG (200mg/kg) mixed with regular pellet diet was administered orally for six months and the morphological, spermatogenic and antioxidant enzyme status in testis of aged rats (18months) were evaluated. Data indicated a significant change in morphology and decrease in spermatogenesis-related parameters in aged rats (AC) compared with young rats (YC). Sperm number, germ cell count, Sertoli cell count and Sertoli cell index were significantly (p<0.05) restored in KRG-treated aged rat groups (G-AC). Further the increased lipid peroxidation as measured by malondialdehyde (p<0.05), and altered enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase and catalase) and non-enzymatic (reduced glutathione, ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol) antioxidants (p<0.05) were attenuated by KRG treatment in aged rats to near normal levels as in YC groups. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated differential expression of selected proteins such as phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, fatty acid binding protein-9, triosephosphate isomerase-1 and aldehyde (aldose) reductase-1in aged rats was significantly (p<0.05) protected by KRG treatment. In conclusion, long-term administration of KRG restored aging-induced testicular ineffectiveness in rats by modulating redox proteins and oxidative defense mechanisms. PMID:25980653

  2. Moderate exercise training attenuates aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Po-Hsiang; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Padma, V. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the most important risk factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading causes of death worldwide and the second major cause of death in Taiwan. The major factor in heart failure during aging is heart remodeling, including long-term stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Exercise is good for aging heart health, but the impact of exercise training on aging is not defined. This study used 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats and randomly divided each age group into no exercise training control groups (C3, A12 and A18) and moderate gentle swimming exercise training groups (E3, AE12 and AE18). The protocol of exercise training was swimming five times weekly with gradual increases from the first week from 20 to 60 min for 12 weeks. Analyses of protein from rat heart tissues and sections revealed cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis pathway increases in aged rat groups (A12 and A18), which were improved in exercise training groups (AE12 and AE18). There were no heart injuries in young rat hearts in exercise group E3. These data suggest that moderate swimming exercise training attenuated aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts. PMID:26496028

  3. Age and Workers' Perceptions of Workplace Safety: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyekye, Seth Ayim; Salminen, Simo

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between age and I) safety perception; ii) job satisfaction; iii) compliance with safety management policies; and (iv) accident frequency. Participants were Ghanaian industrial workers (N = 320) categorized into 4 age groups: 19-29 years; 30-39 years; 40-50 years; and 51 years and above. Workplace safety…

  4. Exercise training affects age-induced changes in SOD and heat shock protein expression in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Barbara; Corbi, Graziamaria; Boccuti, Silvia; Filippelli, Walter; Rengo, Giuseppe; Leosco, Dario; Rossi, Francesco; Filippelli, Amelia; Ferrara, Nicola

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of age and chronic exercise training on antioxidant and heat shock protein (Hsp) expression by comparing the hearts of young (Y), sedentary old (SO) and trained old (TO) rats. In SO rats, there were: (a) changes in myocardial structure and function; (b) increased malondialdehyde levels; (c) no changes in superoxide-dismutase (SOD) enzymes; (d) reduced Hsp70 expression; and (e) increased Hsp27 expression. In TO rats, SOD enzymes and Hsp70 expression were increased and Hsp27 was further increased. Malondialdehyde level did not differ between TO and SO rats, which shows that chronic exercise did not affect the peroxidation index. In summary, by increasing Hsp27 and Hs70 levels, prolonged exercise partially counterbalanced the heart age-related effects in the antioxidant system without altering peroxidation levels. These findings suggest that the beneficial effects on aged-related cardiovascular changes could be connected to the "anti-oxidant" effects of prolonged exercise training. PMID:16822632

  5. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the protection of dietary restriction against renal senescence in aged F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Juan; Cai, Guang-Yan; Ning, Yi-Chun; Cui, Jing; Hong, Quan; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Xu, Xiao-Meng; Bu, Ru; Sun, Xue-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Renal aging is always accompanied by increased oxidative stress. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can be up-regulated by 50% dietary restriction (DR) for 7-day and can block mitochondrial oxidative stress. H2S production exerts a critical role in yeast, worm, and fruit fly models of DR-mediated longevity. In this study, we found that renal aging could be attenuated by 30% DR for 6-month (DR-6M) and life-long (DR-LL), but not for 6-week (DR-6W). The expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CGL) and cystathionine-β- synthase (CBS) were improved by DR-6M and DR-LL. Endogenous H2S production shared the same trend with CBS and CGL, while glutathione (GSH) didn't. When comparing efficiencies of DR for different durations, more evident production of H2S was found in DR-6M and DR-LL than in DR-6W. Finally the level of oxidative stress was improved by DR-6M and DR-LL rather than by DR-6W. It concluded that aged rats had the ability to produce enough H2S on 30% DR interventions protecting against renal aging, and the effect of DR for long-term were more significant than that of DR for short-term. PMID:27456368

  6. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the protection of dietary restriction against renal senescence in aged F344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-juan; Cai, Guang-yan; Ning, Yi-chun; Cui, Jing; Hong, Quan; Bai, Xue-yuan; Xu, Xiao-meng; Bu, Ru; Sun, Xue-feng; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2016-01-01

    Renal aging is always accompanied by increased oxidative stress. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can be up-regulated by 50% dietary restriction (DR) for 7-day and can block mitochondrial oxidative stress. H2S production exerts a critical role in yeast, worm, and fruit fly models of DR-mediated longevity. In this study, we found that renal aging could be attenuated by 30% DR for 6-month (DR-6M) and life-long (DR-LL), but not for 6-week (DR-6W). The expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CGL) and cystathionine-β- synthase (CBS) were improved by DR-6M and DR-LL. Endogenous H2S production shared the same trend with CBS and CGL, while glutathione (GSH) didn’t. When comparing efficiencies of DR for different durations, more evident production of H2S was found in DR-6M and DR-LL than in DR-6W. Finally the level of oxidative stress was improved by DR-6M and DR-LL rather than by DR-6W. It concluded that aged rats had the ability to produce enough H2S on 30% DR interventions protecting against renal aging, and the effect of DR for long-term were more significant than that of DR for short-term. PMID:27456368

  7. In vivo and in vitro studies on the regulation of cholinergic neurotransmission in striatum, hippocampus and cortex of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Consolo, S; Wang, J X; Fiorentini, F; Vezzani, A; Ladinsky, H

    1986-05-28

    Young (3 months) and senescent (23 months) rats were challenged with oxotremorine both in vivo, to determine its effects on acetylcholine content in hemispheric regions, and in vitro, to assess its action on K+-evoked release of ACh from brain synaptosomes. The drug failed to inhibit KCl-induced [3H]ACh release from the P2 fraction of striatal and hippocampal homogenates of the senescent animals, whereas it was less efficient in increasing striatal ACh content. In contrast, oxotremorine was still able to stimulate an increase in ACh in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of the aged rats to the same extent as it did in the young ones. The [3H]ACh output from striatal synaptosomes was lower in old rats with respect to young ones at low KCl depolarizing concentrations but was equal in the two groups at a high depolarizing concentration. In the hippocampus of the senescent rats, the release was significantly lower at each concentration of KCl used, resulting in a parallel downward-shift in the concentration-release plot. We also measured cholinergic muscarinic receptor binding in rat hemispheric regions using the radioligand [3H]dexetimide, a classical non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist. It was found, in conformity with some of the literature, that receptor binding was decreased by about 32% in striatum of aged female rats as compared to younger rats. Changes were not observed in cortex and hippocampus. Analysis of the binding data indicated that the observed decrease in specific ligand binding was due to a decrease in the number of binding sites without a change in affinity. The results favor, once again, the cholinergic hypothesis for geriatric dysfunction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3013365

  8. The function of the glutamate–nitric oxide–cGMP pathway in brain in vivo and learning ability decrease in parallel in mature compared with young rats

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, Blanca; Cauli, Omar; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    Aging is associated with cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have recently reported that the ability of rats to learn a Y-maze conditional discrimination task depends on the function of the glutamate–nitric oxide–cGMP pathway in brain. The aims of the present work were to assess whether the ability of rats to learn this task decreases with age and whether this reduction is associated with a decreased function of the glutamate–nitric oxide–cGMP pathway in brain in vivo, as analyzed by microdialysis in freely moving rats. We show that 7-mo-old rats need significantly more (192 ± 64%) trials than do 3-mo-old rats to learn the Y-maze task. Moreover, the function of the glutamate–nitric oxide–cGMP pathway is reduced by 60 ± 23% in 7-mo-old rats compared with 3-mo-old rats. The results reported support the idea that the reduction in the ability to learn the Y-maze task (and likely other types of learning) of mature compared with young rats would be a consequence of reduced function of the glutamate–nitric oxide–cGMP pathway. PMID:17412964

  9. The function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in brain in vivo and learning ability decrease in parallel in mature compared with young rats.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, Blanca; Cauli, Omar; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-04-01

    Aging is associated with cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have recently reported that the ability of rats to learn a Y-maze conditional discrimination task depends on the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in brain. The aims of the present work were to assess whether the ability of rats to learn this task decreases with age and whether this reduction is associated with a decreased function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in brain in vivo, as analyzed by microdialysis in freely moving rats. We show that 7-mo-old rats need significantly more (192 +/- 64%) trials than do 3-mo-old rats to learn the Y-maze task. Moreover, the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway is reduced by 60 +/- 23% in 7-mo-old rats compared with 3-mo-old rats. The results reported support the idea that the reduction in the ability to learn the Y-maze task (and likely other types of learning) of mature compared with young rats would be a consequence of reduced function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway. PMID:17412964

  10. The effect of age on digoxin pharmacokinetics in Fischer-344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.L.; Owens, S.M.; Ruch, S.; Kennedy, R.H.; Seifen, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Digoxin protein binding and pharmacokinetics were studied in 4-, 14-, and 25-month-old male Fischer-344 rats to determine if there were age-dependent changes in digoxin disposition. Serum protein binding did not differ among age groups. The average percentage unbound digoxin for all animals was 61.3 {plus minus} 5.3% (means {plus minus} SD, n = 15). For pharmacokinetic studies, ({sup 3}H)digoxin and 1 mg/kg unlabeled digoxin were administered as an intravenous bolus dose to animals from each age group. The ({sup 3}H)digoxin terminal elimination half-life was 2.0, 2.3, and 2.5 hr, respectively. The steady-state volume of distribution in the three age groups was 1.51, 1.49, and 1.27 liters/kg, respectively. Total body clearance for the three age groups was 14.2, 12.1, and 7.5 ml/min/kg, respectively. Analysis of variance of these data followed by Duncan's multiple range test indicated a significant decrease in clearance in the aged rats (25-month-old, p less than 0.05). This age-dependent decrease in clearance suggested that digoxin pharmacokinetics could be a significant factor in age-related alterations in digoxin cardiotoxicity in the rat, as it is in humans, and that the Fischer-344 rat could be a useful model for studies of digoxin pharmacokinetic changes with age.

  11. Differential expression of the regulator of G protein signaling RGS9 protein in nociceptive pathways of different age rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jun; Moriyama, Kumi; Han, Kyung Ream; Sharma, Manohar; Han, Xiaokang; Xie, Guo-xi; Palmer, Pamela Pierce

    2005-11-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-activating proteins which act as modulators of G-protein-coupled receptors. RGS9 has two alternative splicing variants. RGS9-1 is expressed in the retina. RGS9-2 is expressed in the brain, especially abundant in the striatum. It is believed to be an essential regulatory component of dopamine and opioid signaling. In this study, we compared the expression of RGS9 proteins in the nervous system of different age groups of rats employing immunocytochemistry. In both 3-week- and 1-year-old rats, RGS9 is expressed abundantly in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, and olfactory tubercle. It is also expressed abundantly in the ventral horn of the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. Quantitative analysis showed that the intensities of RGS9 expression in 1-year-old rats are higher than those in the 3-week-old rats in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, periaqueductal gray, and gray matter of the spinal cord. In contrast, in thalamic nuclei and locus coeruleus, the intensities of RGS9 immunostaining in 3-week-old rats are higher than in 1-year-old rats. In DRG cells, there is no significant difference between the two age groups. These data suggest that RGS9 is differentially expressed with age. Such differential expression may play an important role in neuronal differentiation and development as well as in neuronal function, such as dopamine and opioid signaling. PMID:16153714

  12. Secondhand smoke exposure-induced nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HMGB1 in a rat premature skin aging model.

    PubMed

    Chaichalotornkul, Sirintip; Nararatwanchai, Thamthiwat; Narkpinit, Somphong; Dararat, Pornpen; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Maruyama, Ikuro; Tancharoen, Salunya

    2015-01-01

    Secondhand cigarette smoke exposure (SSE) has been linked to carcinogenic, oxidative, and inflammatory reactions. Herein, we investigated whether premature skin aging could be induced by SSE in a rat model, and assessed the cytoplasmic translocation of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein and collagen loss in skin tissues. Animals were divided into two groups: SSE and controls. Whole body SSE was carried out for 12 weeks. Dorsal skin tissue specimens were harvested for HMGB1 and Mallory's azan staining. Correlations between serum HMGB1 and collagen levels were determined. Rat skin exposed to secondhand smoke lost collagen bundles in the papillary dermis and collagen decreased significantly (p<0.05) compared with control rats. In epidermal keratinocytes, cytoplasmic HMGB1 staining was more diffuse and there were more HMGB1-positive cells after four weeks in SSE compared to control rats. A negative correlation between HMGB1 serum and collagen levels (r=-0.631, p=0.28) was also observed. Therefore, cytoplasmic HMGB1 expression in skin tissues might be associated with skin collagen loss upon the initiation of SSE. Additionally, long-term SSE might affect the appearance of the skin, or could accelerate the skin aging process. PMID:25446104

  13. Comparative pathogenicity of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense strains in Swiss white mice and Mastomys natalensis rats.

    PubMed

    Muchiri, Margaret Wanjiku; Ndung'u, Kariuki; Kibugu, James Karuku; Thuita, John Kibuthu; Gitonga, Purity Kaari; Ngae, Geoffrey Njuguna; Mdachi, Raymond Ellie; Kagira, John Maina

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated Mastomys natelensis rat as an animal model for Rhodesian sleeping sickness. Parasitaemia, clinical and pathological characteristics induced by T. b. rhodesiense isolates, KETRI 3439, 3622 and 3637 were compared in Mastomys rats and Swiss white mice. Each isolate was intra-peritonially injected in mice and rat groups (n=12) at 1×10(4) trypanosomes/0.2mL. Pre-patent period (PP) range for KETRI 3439 and KETRI 3622-groups was 3-6 days for mice and 4-5 days for rats while for KETRI 3637-infected mice and rats was 5-9 and 4-12 days, respectively. Pairwise comparison between PP of mice and rats separately infected with either isolate showed no significant difference (p>0.05). The PP's of KETRI 3637-infected mice were significantly (p>0.01) longer than those infected with KETRI 3439 or KETRI 3622, a trend also observed in rats. The second parasitaemic wave was more prominent in mice. Clinical signs included body weakness, dyspnoea, peri-orbital oedema and extreme emaciation which were more common in rats. Survival time for KETRI 3439 and 3622-infected groups was significantly (p<0.05) longer in mice than rats but similar in KETRI 3637-infected groups. Inflammatory lesions were more severe in rats than mice. All mice and KETRI 3622-infected rats had splenomegaly, organ congestion with rats additionally showing prominent lymphadenopathy. KETRI 3439-infected rats showed hemorrhagic pneumonia, enteritis with moderate splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. KETRI 3637-infected rats had the most severe lesions characterized by prominent splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, enlarged adrenal glands, organ congestion, generalized oedemas, gastroenteritis, pneumonia and brain congestion. KETRI 3637-infected Mastomys is a suitable model for studying pathophysiology of HAT. PMID:26099681

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats due to age-related arginase activation in intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nara, Akina; Nagai, Hisashi; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Ogura, Sayoko; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Kuwahira, Ichiro; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is prevalent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Aging induces arginase activation and reduces nitric oxide (NO) production in the arteries. Intermittent hypoxia (IH), conferred by cycles of brief hypoxia and normoxia, contributes to OSAS pathogenesis. Here, we studied the role of arginase and aging in the pathogenesis of PAH in adult (9-mo-old) and young (2-mo-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to IH or normoxia for 4 weeks and analyzed them with a pressure-volume catheter inserted into the right ventricle (RV) and by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Western blot analysis was conducted on arginase, NO synthase isoforms, and nitrotyrosine. IH induced PAH, as shown by increased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, in adult rats but not in young rats. IH increased expression levels of arginase I and II proteins in the adult rats. IH also increased arginase I expression in the pulmonary artery endothelium and arginase II in the pulmonary artery adventitia. Furthermore, IH reduced pulmonary levels of nitrate and nitrite but increased nitrotyrosine levels in adult rats. An arginase inhibitor (N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-1-arginine) prevented IH-induced PAH and normalized nitrite and nitrate levels in adult rats. IH induced arginase up-regulation and PAH in adult rats, but not in young rats, through reduced NO production. Our findings suggest that arginase inhibition prevents or reverses PAH. PMID:25490411

  15. Effects of aging on peripheral and central auditory processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Margarida; Lepore, Franco; Prévost, François; Guillemot, Jean-Paul

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss is a hallmark sign in the elderly population. Decline in auditory perception provokes deficits in the ability to localize sound sources and reduces speech perception, particularly in noise. In addition to a loss of peripheral hearing sensitivity, changes in more complex central structures have also been demonstrated. Related to these, this study examines the auditory directional maps in the deep layers of the superior colliculus of the rat. Hence, anesthetized Sprague-Dawley adult (10 months) and aged (22 months) rats underwent distortion product of otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to assess cochlear function. Then, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were assessed, followed by extracellular single-unit recordings to determine age-related effects on central auditory functions. DPOAE amplitude levels were decreased in aged rats although they were still present between 3.0 and 24.0 kHz. ABR level thresholds in aged rats were significantly elevated at an early (cochlear nucleus - wave II) stage in the auditory brainstem. In the superior colliculus, thresholds were increased and the tuning widths of the directional receptive fields were significantly wider. Moreover, no systematic directional spatial arrangement was present among the neurons of the aged rats, implying that the topographical organization of the auditory directional map was abolished. These results suggest that the deterioration of the auditory directional spatial map can, to some extent, be attributable to age-related dysfunction at more central, perceptual stages of auditory processing. PMID:27306460

  16. Age and dietary form of vitamin K affect menaquinone-4 concentrations in male Fischer 344 rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phylloquinone, the primary dietary form of vitamin K, is converted to menaquinone-4 (MK-4) in certain tissues. MK-4 may have tissue-specific roles independent to those traditionally identified with vitamin K. Fischer 344 male rats of different ages (2, 12 and 24mo, n=20 per age group) were used to...

  17. AGE RELATED PERCUTANEOUS PENETRATION OF 2-SEC-BUTYL 4,6-DINITROPHENOL (DINOSEB) IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of age, dose, and method of dermal penetration assessment on the percutaneous penetration of C14-dinoseb have been determined in the Fischer' rat. ermal absorption was shown to be dependent on age and independent of dose. n vitro measurement of dermal absorption was fo...

  18. CONCENTRATION OF GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN INCREASES WITH AGE IN THE MOUSE AND RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of aging in the expression of the astrocyte protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was examined. n both mice and rats the concentration of GFAP increased throughout the brain as a function of aging. he largest increase (2-fold) was observed in striatum for both...

  19. UNDERNUTRITION IN EARLY LIFE DOES NOT IMPAIR LEARNING IN YOUNG OR AGING RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prenatal undernutrition is associated with increased incidence of obesity, heart disease, diabetes. Effects of pre- and post-natal undernutrition on nervous system function in middle-aged and aging male SD rats were examined. Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was induced by ...

  20. SOME EFFECTS OF CHRONIC TRITIUM EXPOSURE DURING SELECTED AGES IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the implication of age at the time of exposure to chronic irradiation, rats were exposed to constant tritium (HTO) activities of 10 microcuries/ml of body water for 42 days beginning either on the first day of pregnancy or at birth, or at 42 days or 74 days of age. This...

  1. Effects of Blackberries on Motor and Cognitive Function in Aged Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The polyphenolics in fruits and vegetables, when fed to rats from 19-21 months of age, have been shown to retard and even reverse age-related decrements in motor and cognitive performance. These effects may be the result of the polyphenols increasing antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory levels, or ...

  2. Altered perirhinal cortex activity patterns during taste neophobia and their habituation in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Chacón, B; Morillas, E; Gallo, M

    2015-03-15

    Perirhinal cortex (PRh) pathology and chemosensory identification dysfunction are early signs of Alzheimer's disease. We have assessed the impact of normal aging on PRh activity during flavor recognition memory using c-Fos immunoreactivity as a marker for neuronal activity. Adult (5-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) Wistar male rats were exposed to a vinegar solution on a daily basis for a period of six days. Behavioral assessment indicated similar performance in both age groups but suggested slower attenuation of neophobia in aged rats. Regarding c-Fos immunoreactivity, an opposite pattern of PRh activity was found in adult and aged groups drinking the flavor solution during the first (Novel), second (Familiar I) or sixth (Familiar II) exposure as the flavor became familiar. While adult rats exhibited a higher number of PRh c-Fos-positive neurons during the presentation of the novel flavor than during the second and sixth presentation, in aged rats the number of PRh c-Fos-positive neurons was higher during the presentation of the familiar flavor in the last session than in the first and second. The results suggest that the role of the PRh changes during aging and can help to dissociate PRh dysfuntions induced by neurodegenerative diseases and normal aging. PMID:25532913

  3. Effect of Tongue Exercise on Protrusive Force and Muscle Fiber Area in Aging Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Jackson, Michelle A.; Mann, Laura; Kluender, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related changes in tongue function may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. The authors' purpose was to investigate whether aged rats that have undergone tongue exercise would manifest increased protrusive tongue forces and increased genioglossus (GG) muscle fiber cross-sectional areas. Method: Forty-eight young adult,…

  4. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Pérez, José Jaime; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT) expression associated with low testosterone (T) levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1) if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2) if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months) and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population. PMID:26317087

  5. Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation on Bone Growth in Young Rats and Microarchitecture and Remodeling in Ageing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice M. C.; Shandala, Tetyana; Nguyen, Long; Muhlhausler, Beverly S.; Chen, Ke-Ming; Howe, Peter R.; Xian, Cory J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent skeletal disorder in the elderly that causes serious bone fractures. Peak bone mass achieved at adolescence has been shown to predict bone mass and osteoporosis related risk fracture later in life. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol compound, may have the potential to promote bone formation and reduce bone resorption. However, it is unclear whether it can aid bone growth and bone mass accumulation during rapid growth and modulate bone metabolism during ageing. Using rat models, the current study investigated the potential effects of resveratrol supplementation during the rapid postnatal growth period and in late adulthood (early ageing) on bone microarchitecture and metabolism. In the growth trial, 4-week-old male hooded Wistar rats on a normal chow diet were given resveratrol (2.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle control for 5 weeks. In the ageing trial, 6-month-old male hooded Wistar rats were treated with resveratrol (20 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 3 months. Treatment effects in the tibia were examined by μ-computer tomography (μ-CT) analysis, bone histomorphometric measurements and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) gene expression analysis. Resveratrol treatment did not affect trabecular bone volume and bone remodeling indices in the youth animal model. Resveratrol supplementation in the early ageing rats tended to decrease trabecular bone volume, Sirt1 gene expression and increased expression of adipogenesis-related genes in bone, all of which were statistically insignificant. However, it decreased osteocalcin expression (p = 0.03). Furthermore, serum levels of bone resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides type I collagen (CTX-1) were significantly elevated in the resveratrol supplementation group (p = 0.02) with no changes observed in serum levels of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP). These results in rat models suggest that resveratrol supplementation does not significantly affect bone volume

  6. The ultrastructure of hypertrophied paraganglia in aged rats.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, M; Hervonen, A; Rapoport, S I

    1984-01-01

    The catecholamine-storing cells in the paraganglia of old rats showed structural characteristics common to adrenomedullary and paraganglionic cells of young animals. No sign of degeneration was found. Lipofuscin pigment was observed in most cells. The paraganglia were innervated and well supplied by fenestrated sinusoidal capillaries. Their fine structure suggests active endocrine function. An increase in the total bulk of the paraganglia in old rats suggests that they have a physiological role in senescence. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 1 Figs. 4-6 Fig. 7 PMID:6526715

  7. Age-dependent differences in the thermoregulatory response of the immature rat to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Spiers, D E; Fusco, L E

    1991-02-01

    Major improvement in the homeothermic ability of the rat occurs during the first 2 weeks of postnatal development. Changes in thermoregulatory responsiveness to a single injection of ethanol (EtOH) may occur during this period. Immature rats (2-3, 8-9, and 14-15 days of age) were administered either saline or EtOH (2 or 4 g/kg BW; ip) at thermoneutral ambient temperatures (Ta). In one experiment, metabolic rate (MR) and body temperatures (colonic and skin) were recorded for 1-3 hr postinjection. A second experiment determined blood EtOH concentration in rats from the 3 age groups over an 8-hr period following injection of EtOH. 4 g EtOH/kg produced few significant reductions in thermoregulatory function of 2-3 day-old rats, but decreased MR by 16% and colonic temperature by 0.5-0.7 degrees C in 8-15 day-old animals. 2 g EtOH/kg had no effect on 8-9 day-old rats, but reduced MR and colonic temperature in rats aged 14-15 days. In every case, the hypothermic response to EtOH was correlated with a reduction in MR. Back and abdominal skin temperatures decreased with colonic temperature, and tail skin temperature indicated EtOH-induced vasoconstriction in older rats. Blood EtOH concentrations were similar in the three age groups during the first 2 hr postinjection and did not explain differences in metabolic response. The magnitude and duration of thermoregulatory responsiveness to EtOH increases with age in the immature rat. PMID:2024730

  8. BDNF infusion and up-regulation rescue synaptic plasticity in middle-aged ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Kramár, Enikö A.; Chen, Lulu Y; Lauterborn, Julie C; Simmons, Danielle A; Gall, Christine M; Lynch, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) has emerged as a possible broad-spectrum treatment for the plasticity losses found in rodent models of human conditions associated with memory and cognitive deficits. We have tested this strategy in the particular case of ovariectomy. The actin polymerization in spines normally found after patterned afferent stimulation was greatly reduced, along with the stabilization of long-term potentiation, in hippocampal slices prepared from middle-aged ovariectomized rats. Both effects were fully restored by a 60 min infusion of 2 nM BDNF. Comparable rescue results were obtained after elevating endogenous BDNF protein levels in hippocampus with four daily injections of a short half-life ampakine (positive modulator of AMPA-type glutamate receptors). These results provide the first evidence that minimally invasive, mechanism-based drug treatments can ameliorate defects in spine plasticity caused by depressed estrogen levels. PMID:20674095

  9. Comparative hypocholesterolemic effects of five animal oils in cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, M; Ohashi, T; Sekikawa, M; Nakano, M

    1999-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic efficacy of various animal oils was compared in rats given a cholesterol-enriched diet. After acclimatization for one week, male F344 DuCrj rats (8 weeks of age) that had been fed with a conventional diet were assigned to diets containing 5% of oil from emu (Dromaius), Japanese Sika deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis, Heude), sardine, beef tallow, or lard with 0.5% cholesterol for 6 weeks. After this feeding period, the concentrations of serum total cholesterol and of very-low-density lipoprotein + intermediate-density lipoprotein + low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in the sardine oil group were significantly lower than those in the other groups. The serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration in the Japanese Sika deer oil group was significantly higher than that in the other groups. The atherosclerotic index and liver cholesterol concentration in the sardine oil and Japanese Sika deer oil groups were significantly lower than those in the other groups. The fecal cholesterol excretion by the Japanese Sika deer oil group was significantly higher than that of the other groups, except for the sardine oil group, and the fecal bile acid excretion by the sardine oil group was significantly higher than that of the other groups, except for the lard group. These results suggest that Japanese Sika deer oil reduced the atherosclerotic index and liver cholesterol concentration in the presence of excess cholesterol in the diet as well as sardine oil did by increasing the excretion of cholesterol from the intestines of rats. PMID:10052143

  10. Escherichia coli Binding to and Invasion of Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from Humans and Rats of Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Stins, Monique F.; Nemani, Prasadarao V.; Wass, Carol; Kim, Kwang Sik

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli meningitis commonly occurs in the neonatal period, but the basis of this age dependency is unclear. We have previously identified two types of E. coli-brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC) interactions contributing to E. coli traversal of the blood-brain barrier (i.e., binding and invasion). The present study examined whether the age dependency of E. coli meningitis stemmed from differences in the capacities of neonatal and adult BMECs to interact with E. coli. BMECs were isolated from rats of different ages (10 days, 20 days and 3 months) as well as from humans of different ages (fetuses, 4- to 7-year-old children, and a 35-year-old adult, and 60- to 85-year-old geriatrics). The bindings of E. coli to young and old rat BMECs were similar. Also, the abilities of E. coli to invade BMECs were similar for BMECs derived from young and old rats and from human fetuses, children, adults, and geriatrics. These findings suggest that the predominance of E. coli meningitis in neonates is not likely due to greater binding and invasion capacities of newborn compared to adult BMECs. PMID:10496943

  11. Age- and gender-related differences in the time course of behavioral and biochemical effects produced by oral chlorpyrifos in rats.

    PubMed

    Moser, V C; Padilla, S

    1998-03-01

    It is well known that young animals are generally more sensitive to lethal effects of cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides, but there are sparse data comparing less-than-lethal effects. We compared the behavioral and biochemical toxicity of chlorpyrifos in young (postnatal Day 17; PND17) and adult (about 70 days old) rats. First, we established that the magnitude of the age-related differences decreased as the rat matures. Next, we evaluated the time course of a single oral dose of chlorpyrifos in adult and PND17 male and female rats. Behavioral changes were assessed using a functional observational battery (with age-appropriate modifications for pre-weanling rats) and an evaluation of motor activity. Cholinesterase (ChE) activity was measured in brain and peripheral tissues and muscarinic receptor binding assays were conducted on selected tissues. Rats received either vehicle (corn oil) or chlorpyrifos (adult dose: 80 mg/kg; PND17 dose: 15 mg/kg); these doses were equally effective in inhibiting ChE. The rats were tested, and tissues were then taken at 1, 2, 3.5, 6.5, 24, 72, 168, or 336 h after dosing. In adult rats, peak behavioral changes and ChE inhibition occurred in males at 3.5 h after dosing, while in females the onset of functional changes was sooner, the time course was more protracted and recovery was slower. In PND17 rats, maximal behavioral effects and ChE inhibition occurred at 6.5 h after dosing, and there were no gender-related differences. Behavioral changes showed partial to full recovery at 24 to 72 h, whereas ChE inhibition recovered markedly slower. Blood and brain ChE activity in young rats had nearly recovered by 1 week after dosing, whereas brain ChE in adults had not recovered at 2 weeks. Muscarinic-receptor binding assays revealed apparent down-regulation in some brain areas, mostly at 24 and 72 h. PND17 rats generally showed more receptor down-regulation than adults, whereas only adult female rats showed receptor changes in striatal

  12. The effect of ingested sulfite on visual evoked potentials, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant status of brain in normal and sulfite oxidase-deficient aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Ozlem; Aras, Sinem; Ozkan, Ayse; Parlak, Hande; Aslan, Mutay; Yargicoglu, Piraye; Agar, Aysel

    2016-07-01

    Sulfite, commonly used as a preservative in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals, is a very reactive and potentially toxic molecule which is detoxified by sulfite oxidase (SOX). Changes induced by aging may be exacerbated by exogenous chemicals like sulfite. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ingested sulfite on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and brain antioxidant statuses by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Brain lipid oxidation status was also determined via thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in normal- and SOX-deficient aged rats. Rats do not mimic the sulfite responses seen in humans because of their relatively high SOX activity level. Therefore this study used SOX-deficient rats since they are more appropriate models for studying sulfite toxicity. Forty male Wistar rats aged 24 months were randomly assigned to four groups: control (C), sulfite (S), SOX-deficient (D) and SOX-deficient + sulfite (DS). SOX deficiency was established by feeding rats with low molybdenum (Mo) diet and adding 200 ppm tungsten (W) to their drinking water. Sulfite in the form of sodium metabisulfite (25 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was given by gavage. Treatment continued for 6 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, flash VEPs were recorded. Hepatic SOX activity was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. SOX-deficient rats had an approximately 10-fold decrease in hepatic SOX activity compared with the normal rats. The activity of SOX in deficient rats was thus in the range of humans. There was no significant difference between control and treated groups in either latence or amplitude of VEP components. Brain SOD, CAT, and GPx activities and brain TBARS levels were similar in all experimental groups compared with the control group. Our results indicate that exogenous administration of sulfite does not affect VEP components and the antioxidant/oxidant status of aged rat brains. PMID:25342669

  13. Physiological levels of thrombospondin-1 decrease NO-dependent vasodilation in coronary microvessels from aged rats.

    PubMed

    Nevitt, Chris; McKenzie, Grant; Christian, Katelyn; Austin, Jeff; Hencke, Sarah; Hoying, James; LeBlanc, Amanda

    2016-06-01

    Aging and cardiovascular disease are associated with the loss of nitric oxide (NO) signaling and a decline in the ability to increase coronary blood flow reserve (CFR). Thrombospondin-1 (Thbs-1), through binding of CD47, has been shown to limit NO-dependent vasodilation in peripheral vascular beds via formation of superoxide (O2 (-)). The present study tests the hypothesis that, similar to the peripheral vasculature, blocking CD47 will improve NO-mediated vasoreactivity in coronary arterioles from aged individuals, resulting in improved CFR. Isolated coronary arterioles from young (4 mo) or old (24 mo) female Fischer 344 rats were challenged with the NO donor, DEA-NONO-ate (1 × 10(-7) to 1 × 10(-4) M), and vessel relaxation and O2 (-) production was measured before and after Thbs-1, αCD47, and/or Tempol and catalase exposure. In vivo CFR was determined in anesthetized rats (1-3% isoflurane-balance O2) via injected microspheres following control IgG or αCD47 treatment (45 min). Isolated coronary arterioles from young and old rats relax similarly to exogenous NO, but addition of 2.2 nM Thbs-1 inhibited NO-mediated vasodilation by 24% in old rats, whereas young vessels were unaffected. Thbs-1 increased O2 (-) production in coronary arterioles from rats of both ages, but this was exaggerated in old rats. The addition of CD47 blocking antibody completely restored NO-dependent vasodilation in isolated arterioles from aged rats and attenuated O2 (-) production. Furthermore, αCD47 treatment increased CFR from 9.6 ± 9.3 (IgG) to 84.0 ± 23% in the left ventricle in intact, aged animals. These findings suggest that the influence of Thbs-1 and CD47 on coronary perfusion increases with aging and may be therapeutically targeted to reverse coronary microvascular dysfunction. PMID:27199114

  14. Aging-Induced Dysregulation of Dicer1-Dependent MicroRNA Expression Impairs Angiogenic Capacity of Rat Cerebromicrovascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related impairment of angiogenesis is likely to play a central role in cerebromicrovascular rarefaction and development of vascular cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. To test the hypothesis that dysregulation of Dicer1 (ribonuclease III, a key enzyme of the microRNA [miRNA] machinery) impairs endothelial angiogenic capacity in aging, primary cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells (CMVECs) were isolated from young (3 months old) and aged (24 months old) Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats. We found an age-related downregulation of Dicer1 expression both in CMVECs and in small cerebral vessels isolated from aged rats. In aged CMVECs, Dicer1 expression was increased by treatment with polyethylene glycol–catalase. Compared with young cells, aged CMVECs exhibited altered miRNA expression profile, which was associated with impaired proliferation, adhesion to vitronectin, collagen and fibronectin, cellular migration (measured by a wound-healing assay using electric cell–substrate impedance sensing technology), and impaired ability to form capillary-like structures. Overexpression of Dicer1 in aged CMVECs partially restored miRNA expression profile and significantly improved angiogenic processes. In young CMVECs, downregulation of Dicer1 (siRNA) resulted in altered miRNA expression profile associated with impaired proliferation, adhesion, migration, and tube formation, mimicking the aging phenotype. Collectively, we found that Dicer1 is essential for normal endothelial angiogenic processes, suggesting that age-related dysregulation of Dicer1-dependent miRNA expression may be a potential mechanism underlying impaired angiogenesis and cerebromicrovascular rarefaction in aging. PMID:23239824

  15. Brain nitric oxides synthase in major pelvic ganglia of aged (LETO) and diabetic (OLETF) rats.

    PubMed

    Salama, N; Tamura, M; Tsuruo, Y; Ishimura, K; Kagawa, S

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of aging and diabetes mellitus (DM) on brain nitric oxide synthase (bNOS) expression in major pelvic ganglia (MPG) of rats. Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty rats (12, 30, and 70 weeks old), which are genetic models with non-insulin-dependent DM (NIDDM), and age-matched nondiabetic Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka controls were used. The MPG of all rats in this study were subjected to cryo-sectioning and staining with bNOS polyclonal AB and rhodamine-conjugated rabbit IgG. Fluorescence intensities of the stained neurons were assessed in randomly selected fields per each specimen. Animals of both groups revealed significant decline in the staining intensity of their neurons with aging and the progress of DM, but diabetic rats showed more decline than controls. In conclusion, both aging and NIDDM could decrease bNOS expression in rat MPG. However, NIDDM has a more evident effect than aging on that expression. The decrease in bNOS may cause a disturbance in functions of the target pelvic structures of these ganglia under both conditions. PMID:12230824

  16. Aging-Dependent Changes in the Radiation Response of the Adult Rat Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Matthew K. Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Robbins, Mike E.; Riddle, David R.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of aging on the radiation response in the adult rat brain. Methods and Materials: Male rats 8, 18, or 28 months of age received a single 10-Gy dose of whole-brain irradiation (WBI). The hippocampal dentate gyrus was analyzed 1 and 10 weeks later for sensitive neurobiologic markers associated with radiation-induced damage: changes in density of proliferating cells, immature neurons, total microglia, and activated microglia. Results: A significant decrease in basal levels of proliferating cells and immature neurons and increased microglial activation occurred with normal aging. The WBI induced a transient increase in proliferation that was greater in older animals. This proliferation response did not increase the number of immature neurons, which decreased after WBI in young rats, but not in old rats. Total microglial numbers decreased after WBI at all ages, but microglial activation increased markedly, particularly in older animals. Conclusions: Age is an important factor to consider when investigating the radiation response of the brain. In contrast to young adults, older rats show no sustained decrease in number of immature neurons after WBI, but have a greater inflammatory response. The latter may have an enhanced role in the development of radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction in older individuals.

  17. Effect of crocin on aged rat kidney through inhibition of oxidative stress and proinflammatory state.

    PubMed

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Borji, Abasalt; Farkhondeh, Tahereh

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated whether crocin, a bioactive component of saffron, has a protective effect on kidney through reducing the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in aged rats. In this study the changes in activities of antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, glutathione (GSH) levels and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the serum and renal tissue were evaluated by ELISA and RT-PCR, respectively. The middle and aged rats were given intraperitoneal injections of crocin (10, 20, 30 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks, animals were anesthetized with diethyl ether. The kidney samples were taken for biochemical analysis. The results revealed the aging was associated with a significant decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, and GSH content with increase in lipid peroxidation level in kidney of the aged rats (p < 0.001). The increased levels of serum renal functional parameter, oxidative parameters (p < 0.01) and also pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were significantly reduced by crocin administration (p < 0.05). The aged rats exhibited a dysregulation of the oxidative stress, and inflammation in the kidneys, but crocin treatment significantly reduced the expression of the inflammatory genes. These results provide pivotal documentation that crocin has a renoprotective effects against the development of oxidative stress and inflammation in the kidney of old rats. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27279282

  18. Spatial Reference Memory in Normal Aging Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 Hybrid Rats

    PubMed Central

    McQuail, Joseph A.; Nicolle, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 (F344×BN-F1) hybrid rats express greater longevity with improved health relative to aging rodents of other strains; however, few behavioral reports have thoroughly evaluated cognition across the F344×BN-F1 lifespan. Consequently, this study evaluated spatial reference memory in F344×BN-F1 rats at 6, 18, 24 or 28 months (mo) of age in the Morris water maze. Reference memory decrements were observed between 6 mo and 18 mo and between 18 mo and 24 mo. At 28 mo, spatial learning was not worse than 24 mo, but swim speed was significantly slower. Reliable individual differences revealed that ~50% of 24-28 mo performed similarly to 6 mo while others were spatial learning-impaired. Aged rats were impaired at learning within daily training sessions, but not impaired at retaining information between days of training. Aged rats were also slower to learn to escape onto the platform, regardless of strategy. In summary, these data clarify the trajectory of cognitive decline in aging F344×BN-F1 rats and elucidate relevant behavioral parameters. PMID:25086838

  19. Histopathological lesions in the pancreas of the BB Wistar rat as a function of age and duration of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wright, J; Yates, A; Sharma, H; Thibert, P

    1985-01-01

    Pancreatic histopathology was studied in 121 BBWd, 43 BBWnd, and 33 Wistar rats. Insulitis was the most common inflammatory lesion in both BBW and BBWnd rats. The incidence was inversely associated with age and with duration of diabetes in BBWd rats, but there was no age-related pattern in BBWnd rats. Small end-stage islets were typical of BBWd rats but were not seen in BBWnd rats. Several BBWd rats showed hyperplastic islets months after the onset of diabetes, a pattern that is also seen in a small percentage of human JOD patients. Several non-specific exocrine inflammatory lesions occurred in both BBWd and BBWnd rats: acute and/or chronic pancreatitis, eosinophilic infiltrates, granulomatous lesions and acute and/or chronic interstitial inflammation. Only chronic interstitial inflammation was seen in outbred Wistar rats. PMID:3882779

  20. Dopamine receptor dysregulation in hippocampus of aged rats underlies chronic pulsatile L-Dopa treatment induced cognitive and emotional alterations.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Vito S; Luquín, Sonia; Jáuregui-Huerta, Fernando; Corona-Morales, Aleph A; Medina, Mauricio P; Ruíz-Velasco, Silvia; Zhang, Limei

    2014-07-01

    L-Dopa is the major symptomatic therapy for Parkinson's disease, which commonly occurs in elderly patients. However, the effects of chronic use on mood and cognition in old subjects remain elusive. In order to compare the effects of a chronic pulsatile L-Dopa treatment on emotional and cognitive functions in young (3 months) and old (18 months) intact rats, an L-Dopa/carbidopa treatment was administered every 12 h over 4 weeks. Rats were assessed for behavioural despair (repeated forced swimming test, RFST), anhedonia (sucrose preference test, SPT) and spatial learning (Morris water maze, MWM) in the late phase of treatment (T). Neuronal expression of Fos in the hippocampus at the early and late phases of T, as well as after MWM was studied. The density and ratio of dopamine D5r, D3r and D2r receptors were also evaluated in the hippocampus using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Young rats showed similar patterns during behavioural tests, whereas aged treated rats showed increased immobility counts in RFST, diminished sucrose liquid intake in SPT, and spatial learning impairment during MWM. Fos expression was significantly blunted in the aged treated group after MWM. The density of D5r, D3r and D2r was increased in both aged groups. The treatment reduced the ratio of D5r/D3r and D5r/D2r in both groups. Moreover, aged treated subjects had significant lower values of D5r/D3r and higher values of D5r/D2r when compared with young treated subjects. These results indicate that chronic L-Dopa treatment in itself could trigger emotional and cognitive dysfunctions in elderly subjects through dopamine receptor dysregulation. PMID:24291463

  1. Alterations in immune function in rats caused by dietary lipotrope deficiency: effect of age.

    PubMed

    Nauss, K M; Connor, A M; Kavanaugh, A; Newberne, P M

    1982-12-01

    Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained on a control (C), folacin-deficient (F) or marginal methionine-choline diet (M/C) for 3 weeks, 3 months or 12 months. The immunocompetence of the animals was determined by in vivo (response to infection with salmonella typhimurium) and in vitro (lymphocyte transformation assay) methods. It was found that young animals were most sensitive to dietary lipotrope deficiency, and the in vivo response to bacterial infection did not always correlate with in vitro assessment of immune function. Histopathologic examination of spleens from S. typhimurium-infected rats maintained for 3 weeks on the experimental diets showed an overall decreased cellularity especially in the follicular areas, compared to controls. No differences were seen in the spleens of infected animals at later time points. A short-term (3-week) lipotrope deficiency resulted in a depressed lymphocyte transformation response to concanavalin A (Con A) in the spleen, thymus and lymph nodes; to phytohemagglutinin A (PHA) in the spleen and lymph nodes only. After 3 months on the F or M/C diets, a depressed Con A-induced transformation response was still seen in the spleen, but the normal aging-induced immunosuppression resulted in a low response in all animals, with few significant differences existing among groups. PMID:6754890

  2. Dialysable and non-dialysable hydroxyproline in the rat's urine: age related and diurnal variations

    PubMed Central

    Gaggi, Renato; Gianni, Anna Maria; Montanaro, Nicola

    1982-01-01

    1. Urinary dialysable and non-dialysable hydroxyproline, which are considered good indices of bone resorption and neoformation respectively, were determined in rats under conditions that modify skeleton metabolism, such as body growth and parathyroid or calcitonin administration. It was also investigated whether dialysable and non-dialysable hydroxyproline excretions showed significant circadian fluctuations in rats of different ages. 2. Dialysable hydroxyproline excretion sharply decreased from the first to the fifth months of age and underwent further gradual reduction up to the fourteenth month of life. Non-dialysable hydroxyproline excretion followed a smoother decrease up to the fifth month, then remained constant. Urinary excretion of non-dialysable hydroxyproline expressed as a percentage of the total hydroxyprolinuria (n.d.%) slowly increased with advancing rat age. 3. In 2-, 4- and 6-month old rats, dialysable hydroxyproline excretion showed significant circadian fluctuations with minima and maxima at the end of the dark and light fraction of the cycle respectively. Daily fluctuations were greater in young and adult rats (50-65% of the respective average levels) than in 4-month old rats (25%). Non-dialysable hydroxyproline excretion followed similar but less pronounced patterns. Significant circadian fluctuations of n.d.% were detectable only in 2- and 4-month old rats, with peaks at 04.00-05.00 hr, thus indicating that the bone formation/resorption ratio increased in the nocturnal fraction of the cycle. 4. Young rats administered with calcitonin exhibited reduced levels of urinary dialysable but not of non-dialysable hydroxyproline when the hormone was given at 13.30 hr. No changes were observed when calcitonin was injected at 19.30 hr. On the contrary, both diurnal and nocturnal parathyroid hormone administration to young rats caused increased levels of dialysable and non-dialysable hydroxyproline of the same magnitude. PMID:7202048

  3. Testis structure and function in a nongenetic hyperadipose rat model at prepubertal and adult ages.

    PubMed

    França, L R; Suescun, M O; Miranda, J R; Giovambattista, A; Perello, M; Spinedi, E; Calandra, R S

    2006-03-01

    There are few data for hormonal levels and testis structure and function during postnatal development in rats neonatally treated with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG). In our study, newborn male pups were ip injected with MSG (4 mg/g body weight) every 2 d up to 10 d of age and investigated at prepubertal and adult ages. Plasma levels of leptin, LH, FSH, prolactin, testosterone (T), corticosterone, and free T4 (FT4) were measured. MSG rats displayed elevated circulating levels of corticosterone and hyperadiposity/hyperleptinemia, regardless of the age examined; conversely, circulating prolactin levels were not affected. Moreover, prepubertal MSG rats revealed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in testis weight and the number of Sertoli (SC) and Leydig cells per testis. Leptin plasma levels were severalfold higher (2.41 vs. 8.07; P < 0.05) in prepubertal MSG rats, and these animals displayed plasma LH, FSH, T, and FT4 levels significantly decreased (P < 0.05). Taken together, these data indicate that testis development, as well as SC and Leydig cell proliferation, were disturbed in prepubertal MSG rats. Adult MSG rats also displayed significantly higher leptin plasma levels (7.26 vs. 27.04; P < 0.05) and lower (P < 0.05) LH and FSH plasma levels. However, T and FT4 plasma levels were normal, and no apparent alterations were observed in testis structure of MSG rats. Only the number of SCs per testis was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in the adult MSG rats. In conclusion, although early installed hyperadipose/hyperleptinemia phenotype was probably responsible for the reproductive axis damages in MSG animals, it remains to be investigated whether this condition is the main factor for hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis dysfunction in MSG rats. PMID:16339210

  4. Effect of DDAH/ADMA/NOS regulation pathway on cavernae corporum cavernosorum rat penis of different age.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-H; Chen, D; Zhang, K-Q; Zhang, H; Fu, Q

    2016-04-01

    The effect of DDAH/ADMA/NOS pathway in penile tissue of rats of different age was investigated to better understand the mechanism of age-related erectile dysfunction (ED). The Sprague Dawley male rats were assigned as the young group (3 month old, n = 10) and the old group (18 month old, n = 10) respectively. Intracavernous pressure (ICP) was measured before and after papaverine intracavernous injection. Pathology structure of penile tissue was evaluated under transmission electron microscope. The expression amounts of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in penile tissue were detected by ELISA; the expression levels of isoform-specific DDAH and NOS were assessed via Western blot. Compared with the young group, the ICP in the old group rat decreased significantly (33.46 ± 5.37 versus 39.71 ± 3.67 mmHg, P = 0.02) after papaverine injection. Diffused fibrosis and impairment of endothelial cell were observed in corpus cavernosum in the old group rats. Higher level of ADMA (10.83 ± 0.96 versus 7.51 ± 1.39 μmol per gpro, P = 3.14 × 10(-4) ) and lower level of cGMP (29.42 ± 3.84 versus 47.09 ± 6.07 nmol per gpro, P = 1.57 × 10(-6) ) were detected in penile tissue of the old group compared with those of the young group. Expression of DDAH1, DDAH2, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neuronal NOS(nNOS) all decreased significantly in penile tissue of the old group rat. The DDAH/ADMA/NOS regulation pathway changes dramatically accompanying with lower ICP in old group rat compared with those of the young group. Such findings in rats are suggestive in understanding the mechanism of age-related ED in humans. PMID:26011316

  5. Maternal age effects on myometrial expression of contractile proteins, uterine gene expression, and contractile activity during labor in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, Matthew; Szyszka, Alexandra; Pauliat, Caroline; Clifford, Bethan; Daniel, Zoe; Cheng, Zhangrui; Wathes, Claire; McMullen, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Advanced maternal age of first time pregnant mothers is associated with prolonged and dysfunctional labor and significant risk of emergency cesarean section. We investigated the influence of maternal age on myometrial contractility, expression of contractile associated proteins (CAPs), and global gene expression in the parturient uterus. Female Wistar rats either 8 (YOUNG n = 10) or 24 (OLDER n = 10) weeks old were fed laboratory chow, mated, and killed during parturition. Myometrial strips were dissected to determine contractile activity, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglycerides (TAG) content, protein expression of connexin-43 (GJA1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), and caveolin 1 (CAV-1). Maternal plasma concentrations of prostaglandins PGE2, PGF2α, and progesterone were determined by RIA. Global gene expression in uterine samples was compared using Affymetrix Genechip Gene 2.0 ST arrays and Ingenuity Pathway analysis (IPA). Spontaneous contractility in myometrium exhibited by YOUNG rats was threefold greater than OLDER animals (P < 0.027) but maternal age had no significant effect on myometrial CAP expression, lipid profiles, or pregnancy-related hormones. OLDER myometrium increased contractile activity in response to PGF2α, phenylephrine, and carbachol, a response absent in YOUNG rats (all P < 0.002). Microarray analysis identified that maternal age affected expression of genes related to immune and inflammatory responses, lipid transport and metabolism, steroid metabolism, tissue remodeling, and smooth muscle contraction. In conclusion YOUNG laboring rat myometrium seems primed to contract maximally, whereas activity is blunted in OLDER animals and requires stimulation to meet contractile potential. Further work investigating maternal age effects on myometrial function is required with focus on lipid metabolism and inflammatory pathways. PMID:25876907

  6. Aging affects the responsiveness of rat peritoneal macrophages to GM-CSF and IL-4.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Stanojević, Stanislava; Blagojević, Veljko; Ćuruvija, Ivana; Vujnović, Ivana; Petrović, Raisa; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Vujić, Vesna; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages undergo significant functional alterations during aging. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes of rat macrophage functions and response to M1/M2 polarization signals with age. Therefore, resident and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from young (3-month-old) and aged (18-19-month-old) rats were tested for phagocytic capacity and ability to secrete inflammatory mediators following in vitro stimulation with LPS and GM-CSF, and IL-4, prototypic stimulators for classically (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages, respectively. Aging increased the frequency of monocyte-derived (CCR7+ CD68+) and the most mature (CD163+ CD68+) macrophages within resident and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, respectively. The ability to phagocyte zymosan of none of these two cell subsets was affected by either LPS and GM-CSF or IL-4. The upregulated production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 and downregulated that of TGF-β was observed in response to LPS in resident and thioglycollate-elicited macrophages from rats of both ages. GM-CSF elevated production of IL-1β and IL-6 in resident macrophages from aged rats and in thioglycollate-elicited macrophages from young rats. Unexpectedly, IL-4 augmented production of proinflammatory mediators, IL-1β and IL-6, in resident macrophages from aged rats. In both resident and thioglycollate-elicited macrophages aging decreased NO/urea ratio, whereas LPS but not GM-SCF, shifted this ratio toward NO in the macrophages from animals of both ages. Conversely, IL-4 reduced NO/urea ratio in resident and thioglycollate-elicited macrophages from young rats only. In conclusion, our study showed that aging diminished GM-CSF-triggered polarization of elicited macrophages and caused paradoxical IL-4-driven polarization of resident macrophages toward proinflammatory M1 phenotype. This age-related deregulation of macrophage inflammatory mediator secretion and phagocytosis in response to M1/M2

  7. Comparison of age-related changes in in vivo and in vitro measures of testicular steroidogenesis after acute cadmium exposure in the sprague-dawley rat

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, P.V.; Laskey, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that cadmium- induced testicular necrosis is an age-dependent process. However, little information exists on age-related intestitial cell (IC) damage in the rat after acute exposure to Cd. In-vitro and in-vivo measures of testicular damage were utilized to compare the sensitivity of these measures and to further investigate age-related Cd-induced testicular damage. Testes, epididymides, and seminal-vesicle weights, serum testosterone (sT), hCG-stimulated sT, and basal and stimulated IC testosterone (T) production were compared in rats 21 d following an injection of 2 mg Cd/kg at 9, 37, 67, and 97 d of age. The only Cd-related change noted for immature rats was an 84% reduction in sT. In rats injected when 37 d old, hCG-stimulated sT and epididymides and seminal-vesicle weights, although depressed, were not significantly altered. However, all other measurements were significantly depressed. All measures of testicular damage were significantly depressed in rats injected at 67 and 97 d of age. Overall, in vitro measures were more sensitive indicators of Cd-induced testicular damage than in vivo measures.

  8. Age-related changes in p56lck protein levels and phenotypic distribution of T lymphocytes in young rats.

    PubMed

    Hosea, Heather J; Rector, Edward S; Taylor, Carla G

    2005-03-01

    p56lck is involved in the maturation of T-cells from double negative (DN) into double positive (DP) T-cells. The objective of this experiment was to determine changes in the levels of thymic and splenic T-cell p56lck using Western immunoblotting, along with the proportion and number ofT-cell subsets in thymus, spleen and blood using flow cytometry in growing Sprague-Dawley rats. Thymic p56lck levels were negatively correlated with age (r = - 0.42, p = 0.04) and positively correlated with age in the spleen (r = 0.50, p = 0.01). Nine-week-old rats had a higher percentage of thymic DN and CD8 cells with fewer DP cells compared to younger rats. There were minor differences in the proportions of T-cell subsets in the spleen and blood. T-cell numbers remained proportional to body weight in the lymphoid organs; however, the lower absolute number of T-cells in the younger rats might indicate that they are less able to respond to antigens. PMID:15712602

  9. Influence of paradoxical sleep deprivation and sleep recovery on testosterone level in rats of different ages

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Mi Mi; Kim, Jin Wook; Jin, Myeong Heon; Kim, Je Jong; Moon, Du Geon

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to assess serum testosterone alterations induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) and to verify their attenuation during sleep recovery (SR) based on different durations and ages. Wistar male rats aged 12 weeks for the younger group and 20 weeks for the elder group were randomly distributed into one of the following groups: a control group (cage and platform), 3-day SD, 5-day SD, 7-day SD, 1-day SR, 3-day SR and 5-day SR groups. For PSD, the modified multiple platform method was used to specifically limit rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Differences in the testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels between the younger group and the elder group according to duration of PSD and SR recovery were analysed. Testosterone continued to fall during the sleep deprivation period in a time-dependent manner in both the younger (P=0.001, correlation coefficient r=−0.651) and elder groups (P=0.001, correlation coefficient r=−0.840). The elder group showed a significantly lower level of testosterone compared with the younger group after PSD. Upon SR after 3 days of PSD, the testosterone level continued to rise for 5 days after sleep recovery in the younger group (P=0.013), whereas testosterone concentrations failed to recover until day 5 in the elder group. PSD caused a more detrimental effect on serum testosterone in the elder group compared to the younger group with respect to decreases in luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. The replenishment of serum testosterone level was prohibited in the elder group suggesting that the effects of SD/SR may be age-dependent. The mechanism by which SD affects serum testosterone and how age may modify the process are still unclear. PMID:22157981

  10. Survey of spontaneous dystrophic mineralisation of pineal gland in ageing rats.

    PubMed

    Majeed, S K

    1997-11-01

    The survey included 151 rats from several carcinogenicity studies up to 104 weeks and 260 rats from short-term studies up to 52 weeks. All studies were performed during the period 1990-1996. Young rats up to 52 weeks of age showed normal structural appearance, in 134 male rats the incidence of mineralisation was 6.3% and in 126 females the incidence was only slightly less at 5.6%. In ageing rats, 70-104 weeks, 88 males and 63 females showed far higher incidence of mineralisation, 83% and 57% respectively, showing that the incidence of mineralisation in ageing rats was higher in males than females. The focal mineralisation occurred mainly at the margin of the gland in the subcapsular region mostly adjacent to small blood vessels. On occasions these involved the parenchymal cells in the middle part of the gland. The focal mineralisation stained positive with von Kossa indicating presence of calcium and also with PAS (Pariodic Acid-Schiff method), indicating presence of neutral mucopolysaccharide. There was no evidence of positivity with Perl's stain (for ferric salts), Toluidine blue (for protein) or Alcian blue (for acid mucopolysaccharides). With Oil Red O there was evidence of presence of fat or lipid in pinealocytes. PMID:9428987

  11. Daily supplementation with mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) improves balance and working memory in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Miller, Marshall G; Gomes, Stacey M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Decline in brain function during normal aging is partly due to the long-term effects of oxidative stress and inflammation. Several fruits and vegetables have been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the effects of dietary mushroom intervention on mobility and memory in aged Fischer 344 rats. We hypothesized that daily supplementation of mushroom would have beneficial effects on behavioral outcomes in a dose-dependent manner. Rats were randomly assigned to receive a diet containing either 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, or 5% lyophilized white button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus); after 8 weeks on the diet, a battery of behavioral tasks was given to assess balance, coordination, and cognition. Rats on the 2% or 5% mushroom-supplemented diet consumed more food, without gaining weight, than rats in the other diet groups. Rats in the 0.5% and 1% group stayed on a narrow beam longer, indicating an improvement in balance. Only rats on the 0.5% mushroom diet showed improved performance in a working memory version of the Morris water maze. When taken together, the most effective mushroom dose that produced improvements in both balance and working memory was 0.5%, equivalent to about 1.5 ounces of fresh mushrooms for humans. Therefore, the results suggest that the inclusion of mushroom in the daily diet may have beneficial effects on age-related deficits in cognitive and motor function. PMID:26475179

  12. Comparative 90-day dietary study of paraffin wax in Fischer-344 and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Griffis, L C; Twerdok, L E; Francke-Carroll, S; Biles, R W; Schroeder, R E; Bolte, H; Faust, H; Hall, W C; Rojko, J

    2010-01-01

    Highly refined mineral hydrocarbons (MHCs) such as low melting point paraffin wax (LMPW) and low viscosity white oils can cause inflammatory changes in the liver and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of the Fischer-344 (F-344) rat. In contrast, only minimal MLN changes are seen in the Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rat with no changes in the liver. In this study, the response of female F-344 and S-D rats was compared after 90days dietary treatment with 0%, 0.2% or 2% LMPW. Effects in the F-344 rats were significantly greater than in the S-D rats: increased liver and splenic weights and inflammatory changes (hepatic microgranulomas) in these tissues were observed only in the F-344 rats. Microgranulomas in the MLNs were observed in both strains but the effects were substantially greater in the F-344 rats. Cellular markers of inflammation were examined in a subset of rats from each group using immunohistochemical staining. An increase in staining for CD3 (T-cells), CD8a (suppresser/cytotoxic T-cells) and CD4 (helper T-cells) correlated with an increase in lymphoid cells in the livers of treated F-344 rats. The majority of macrophages in the hepatic microgranulomas of treated F-344 rats were negative for the ED2 marker, indicating a likely origin from non-resident macrophages. Electron microscopy showed Kupffer cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia in treated F-344 rats. However, lysozyme staining (indicating activation of epithelioid macrophages) decreased with increasing granuloma size. Non-ED2 expressing cells may have been recruited but not sufficiently activated to be lysozyme positive. Inflammatory changes in the cardiac mitral valve noted in previous studies of LMPW were also seen in the F-344 rats in this study but not in the S-D rats. Chemical analysis showed that MHC accumulated in livers from treated F-344 but not S-D rats and the concentration was more than 2-fold greater in MLNs from the F-344 than from the S-D rats. The F-344 appears to be more immunologically sensitive to

  13. β-Adrenergic Responsive Induction of Insulin Resistance in Liver of Aging Rats.

    PubMed

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Kamat, Amrita; Balas, Bogdan; Giaccari, Andrea; Defronzo, Ralph A; Musi, Nicolas; Katz, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. We previously demonstrated increases in β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) density in rat liver, in association with increased β-AR-mediated stimulation of glucose output in rat hepatocytes, during senescent aging. We therefore hypothesized that pharmacologic β-adrenergic stimulation might induce insulin resistance and glucose output in liver of aging rats in vivo. METHODS. In this study, pancreatic clamps were performed on young adult (4-month-old) and senescent (24-month-old) Fischer 344 male rats by infusing somatostatin (3 μg/kg/min) at time 0 to inhibit insulin secretion, and then infusing insulin (1 mU/kg/min) to replace basal insulin concentrations. At time 0 rats also received either the β-AR agonist isoproterenol (100 ng/kg/min) or saline (control). After 120 min the insulin infusion rate was increased to 4 mU/kg/min for an additional 120 min. Tritiated glucose was infused throughout the study to measure glucose turnover rates. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION. The results of the pancreatic clamp studies demonstrated that under saline control conditions hepatic glucose production (HGP) was suppressed during hyperinsulinemia in both young and old rats, with a trend toward reduced insulin sensitivity in the older animals. Isoproterenol infusion impaired insulin-induced suppression of HGP in both age groups. The results suggest that β-AR stimulation by isoproterenol increases HGP and acutely induces hepatic insulin resistance in both young and old rats. A similar role for β-adrenergic-mediated hepatic insulin resistance in aging humans would suggest a novel therapeutic target for the treatment or prevention of glucose dysregulation and diabetes developing with advancing age. PMID:21438725

  14. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of /sup 125/I-pindolol binding in Fischer 344 rat brain: changes in beta-adrenergic receptor density with aging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Zahniser, N.R.

    1988-05-01

    Age-related changes in beta-adrenergic receptor density in Fischer 344 rat brain were examined using in vitro /sup 125/I-pindolol (IPIN) binding and quantitative autoradiographic analysis. Localized protein concentrations were determined using a new quantitative histological technique, and these were used to normalize the densities of receptors. Saturation binding studies in brain sections revealed 40-50% decreases in beta-adrenergic receptor density in the thalamus of 23-25-month-old and the cerebellum and brainstem of both 18-19-month-old and 23-25-month-old compared to 4-6-month-old rats. The loss of cerebellar beta-adrenergic receptors may be correlated with reports of deficits in sensitivity to beta-adrenergic-mediated transmission in the cerebellum of aged rats. No changes in specific IPIN binding with age were observed in rat cortex or hippocampus. In all areas examined no age-related differences were observed in receptor affinity. No changes in protein concentration were found in any of the areas examined in the different aged animals. These results demonstrate a region-specific loss of beta-adrenergic receptors with age in the brain of Fischer 344 rats.

  15. Effects of exposure to heavy particles and aging on object recognition memory in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Bernard; Joseph, James; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Shannahan, Ryan; Hering, Kathleen

    Exposure to HZE particles produces changes in neurocognitive performance. These changes, including deficits in spatial learning and memory, object recognition memory and operant responding, are also observed in the aged organism. As such, it has been proposed that exposure to heavy particles produces "accelerated aging". Because aging is an ongoing process, it is possible that there would be an interaction between the effects of exposure and the effects of aging, such that doses of HZE particles that do not affect the performance of younger organisms will affect the performance of organisms as they age. The present experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that young rats that had been exposed to HZE particles would show a progressive deterioration in object recognition memory as a function of the age of testing. Rats were exposed to 12 C, 28 S or 48 Ti particles at the N.A.S.A. Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Following irradiation the rats were shipped to UMBC for behavioral testing. HZE particle-induced changes in object recognition memory were tested using a standard procedure: rats were placed in an open field and allowed to interact with two identical objects for up to 30 sec; twenty-four hrs later the rats were again placed in the open field, this time containing one familiar and one novel object. Non-irradiated control animals spent significantly more time with the novel object than with the familiar object. In contrast, the rats that been exposed to heavy particles spent equal amounts of time with both the novel and familiar object. The lowest dose of HZE particles which produced a disruption of object recognition memory was determined three months and eleven months following exposure. The threshold dose needed to disrupt object recognition memory three months following irradiation varied as a function of the specific particle and energy. When tested eleven months following irradiation, doses of HZE particles that did

  16. Spontaneous malignant craniopharyngioma in an aged Wistar rat

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Martin; Ernst, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are extremely rare epithelial tumors of the sellar region in human beings and domestic and laboratory animals. A craniopharyngioma, 0.6 cm in diameter, was observed grossly in the sellar and parasellar regions of an untreated 23-month-old male Wistar-derived rat sacrificed moribund. The tumor was composed of cords, columns, and nests of neoplastic stratified squamous epithelium with marked hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis. Neoplastic cells formed solid or cystic areas, infiltrating the base of the skull, brain, and pituitary gland. Immunocytochemical evaluation revealed a strong cytoplasmic reaction for pan-cytokeratin in all tumor cells. Malignant craniopharyngioma should be considered a differential diagnosis in the rat when a tumor with stratified squamous epithelial features and a locally aggressive growth pattern is observed in the sellar or suprasellar region. PMID:27559246

  17. Spontaneous malignant craniopharyngioma in an aged Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Martin; Ernst, Heinrich

    2016-07-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are extremely rare epithelial tumors of the sellar region in human beings and domestic and laboratory animals. A craniopharyngioma, 0.6 cm in diameter, was observed grossly in the sellar and parasellar regions of an untreated 23-month-old male Wistar-derived rat sacrificed moribund. The tumor was composed of cords, columns, and nests of neoplastic stratified squamous epithelium with marked hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis. Neoplastic cells formed solid or cystic areas, infiltrating the base of the skull, brain, and pituitary gland. Immunocytochemical evaluation revealed a strong cytoplasmic reaction for pan-cytokeratin in all tumor cells. Malignant craniopharyngioma should be considered a differential diagnosis in the rat when a tumor with stratified squamous epithelial features and a locally aggressive growth pattern is observed in the sellar or suprasellar region. PMID:27559246

  18. DECREASED EXPRESSION OF ErbB4 AND TYROSINE HYDROXYLASE mRNA AND PROTEIN IN THE VENTRAL MIDBRAIN OF AGED RATS

    PubMed Central

    DICKERSON, J. W.; HEMMERLE, A. M.; NUMAN, S.; LUNDGREN, K. H.; SEROOGY, K. B.

    2009-01-01

    Decreased availability or efficacy of neurotrophic factors may underlie an increased susceptibility of mesencephalic dopaminergic cells to age-related degeneration. Neuregulins (NRGs) are pleotrophic growth factors for many cell types including mesencephalic dopamine cells in culture and in vivo. The functional NRG receptor ErbB4 is expressed by virtually all midbrain dopamine neurons. To determine if levels of the NRG receptor are maintained during aging in the dopaminergic ventral mesencephalon, expression of ErbB4 mRNA and protein was examined in young (3 months), middle-aged (18 months), and old (24–25 months) Brown Norway/Fischer 344 F1 rats. ErbB4 mRNA levels in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), but not the adjacent ventral tegmental area (VTA) or subtantia nigra pars lateralis (SNl), were significantly reduced in the middle-aged and old animals when compared to young rats. Protein expression of ErbB4 in the ventral midbrain was significantly decreased in the old rats when compared to the young rats. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA levels were significantly reduced in the old rats when compared to young animals in the SNpc, but not in the VTA or SNl. Tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels in the ventral midbrain were also decreased in the old animals when compared to the young animals. These data demonstrate a progressive decline of ErbB4 expression, coinciding with a loss of the dopamine-synthesizing enzyme TH, in the ventral midbrain of aged rats, particularly in the SNpc. These findings may implicate a role for diminished NRG/ErbB4 trophic support in dopamine-related neurodegenerative disorders of aging such as Parkinson’s disease. PMID:19505538

  19. Neurological outcome in preterm small for gestational age infants compared to appropriate for gestational age preterm at the age of 18 months: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Paraskevi; Kyriakidou, Maria; Mitsiakos, Georgios; Chatzioanidis, Helias; Koumbaras, Emmanouel; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Nikolaides, Nikolaos

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurological outcome of premature small for gestational age infants at the corrected age of 18 months by the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination. A prospective trial was conducted comparing 41 preterm infants being small for gestational age with 41 appropriate for gestational age infants. Birth weight was significantly lower in small for gestational age infants compared with appropriate for gestational age infants (1724.6 +/- 433 versus 1221 +/- 328 g). There were no significant differences regarding the median gestational age and Apgar scores. Median global scores differ significantly between both groups: 75 (47-78) versus 76 (72-78) for the small for gestational age and appropriate for gestational age infants, respectively. Both groups had optimal scores. In conclusion, although the small for gestational age group scored lower in the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination, median global score in both groups was within optimal range. PMID:19372094

  20. Effects of simulated increased gravity on the rate of aging of rats - Implications for the rate of living theory of aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economos, A. C.; Ballard, R. C.; Blunden, M.; Miquel, J.; Lindseth, K. A.; Fleming, J.; Philpott, D. E.; Oyama, J.

    1982-01-01

    It was found that the rate of aging of 17 month old rats which had been exposed to 3.14 times normal gravity in an animal centrifuge for 8 months was larger than that of the controls as determined by the apparently elevated lipofuscin content in heart and kidney, reduced numbers and increased size of mitochondria of heart tissue, and inferior liver mitochondria respiration. Steady-state food intake per day per kg body weight, which is presumably proportional to rate of living or specific basal metabolic expenditure, was found to be about 18 percent higher than in the controls after an initial 2 month adaptation period. Although half of the centrifuged animals lived only a little shorter than the controls (average about 343 vs. 364 days on the average, statistically nonsignificant), the remaining half (longest survivors) lived on the centrifuge an average of 520 days (range 483-572) compared to an average of 574 days (range 502-615) for the controls, computed from the onset of centrifugation, or 11 percent shorter. These findings indicate that a moderate increase of the level of basal metabolism of young adult rats adapted to hypergravity compared to controls in normal gravity is accompanied by a roughly similar increase in the rate of organ aging and reduction of survival, in agreement with Pearl's (1928) rate of living theory of aging, previously experimentally demonstrated only in poikilotherms.

  1. The synthesis of glycosaminoglycans in aging rat liver. A brief note.

    PubMed

    Gressner, A M; Schulz, W; Greiling, H

    1979-07-01

    The synthesis of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was studied in liver slices from postnatal (9 days), young (140 days), adult (490 days) and senescent (940 days) rats. It was found that the rate of synthesis was highest in postnatal rat liver and decreased to about half in young rats with no further reduction in adult and senescent age groups. The specific radioactivity of the precursors of GAG synthesis did not change with age. The synthesis pattern of specific types of GAG in postnatal liver was characterized by a significant higher percentage of chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid. In the following age classes the profile of specific GAG synthesis did not change significantly (heparin sulfate: chondroitin sulfate" hyaluronic acid: "keratin sulfate" = 84%:8.3%:1.5%:1.6%). PMID:470468

  2. Electrical and Pharmacological Stimuli Reveal a Greater Susceptibility for CA3 Network Excitability in Hippocampal Slices from Aged vs. Adult Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanak, Daniel J.; Jones, Ryan T.; Tokhi, Ashish; Willingham, Amy L.; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Rose, Gregory M.; Patrylo, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical data and experimental studies in rats have shown that the aged CNS is more susceptible to the proconvulsive effects of the excitotoxic glutamate analogues kainate (KA) and domoate (DA), which bind high-affinity receptors localized at mossy fiber (MF) synapses in the CA3 subregion of the hippocampus. Although decreased renal clearance appears to play a role in the hypersensitivity of the aged hippocampus to systemically-administered DA, it is unclear if the excitability of the CA3 network is also altered with age. Therefore, this study monitored CA3 field potential activity in hippocampal slices from aged and adult male Fischer 344 rats in response to electrical and pharmacological network stimulation targeted to the MF-CA3 circuit. Network challenges with repetitive hilar stimulation or bath application of nanomolar concentrations of KA more readily elicited excitable network activity (e.g. population spike facilitation, multiple population spikes, and epileptiform bursts) in slices from aged vs. adult rats, although basal network excitability was comparable between age groups. Additionally, exposure to 200 nM KA often abolished epileptiform activity and revealed theta or gamma oscillations instead. However, slices from aged rats were less sensitive to the rhythmogenic effects of 200 nM KA. Taken together, these findings suggest that aging decreases the capacity of the CA3 network to constrain the spread of excitability during focal excitatory network challenges. PMID:22396884

  3. Comparative Analysis of Mechanical Properties of PWV, NO and Ascending Aorta between WHY Rats and SHR Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bo; Xu, De-Jun; Sun, Huan; Yang, Kun; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare and analyze the tensile mechanical properties of the ascending aorta (AA) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), for the purpose of providing a biomechanical basis for hypertension prevention. Methods Pulse wave velocities (PWV) and serum nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were determined in 6-month-old WKY rats and SHRs (n = 21, n = 21, respectively). Then, 20 AAs from each group were obtained for longitudinal tensile testing. Results The maximum stress, maximum strain, and strain at a tensile stress of 16 Kpa were greater in WKY rats than in SHRs (p < 0.05). The aortic elastic modulus and PWV value were greater in SHRs than in WKY rats (p < 0.05 for both), while NO concentrations were lower in the SHR group than in the WKY group (p < 0.05). Conclusions The AA tensile mechanical properties differed between the WKY rats and SHRs, and the tensile mechanical properties of the SHR model had changed. PMID:27122902

  4. Age related changes in the lipoprotein substrates for the esterification of plasma cholesterol in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Kudchodkar, B J; Lacko, A G

    1991-11-15

    The activity of the enzyme lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and the properties of its lipoprotein substrates have been investigated in 6- and 19-month-old Fischer-344 rats. These studies were carried out to determine the nature of the relationship between the observed hypercholesterolemia and the age-related decrease in the fractional rate of lipoprotein cholesterol esterification. The distribution of LCAT activity of plasma fractions was determined following gel chromatography and ultracentrifugation respectively. LCAT activity was found to be associated with the high density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction when rat plasma was passed through a Bio-Gel A-5 M column. Upon density gradient ultracentrifugation for 24 h it was found associated with HDL fraction; d = 1.125-1.21 g/ml. However, following prolonged ultracentrifugation (40 h), the majority of the LCAT activity was displaced into the lipoprotein-free infranatant (d greater than 1.225 g/ml). The dissociation of LCAT from its complex with HDL occurred to a smaller extent in aged rat plasma than in young rat plasma. Substrate specificity studies indicated that HDL was a considerably better substrate for LCAT than very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in both young and aged rats. In addition, HDL from young rats was a better substrate for LCAT than the HDL from aged rats. Incubation experiments followed by the isolation of lipoproteins and the subsequent analyses of their cholesterol contents revealed that the age-related hypercholesterolemia was mainly due to an increase in the cholesterol carried by lipoprotein fractions d = 1.025 -1.07 g/ml (LDL + HDL1). These and other low density lipoproteins (d less than 1.025 g/ml) were poor substrates for LCAT. However, these lipoproteins could provide free cholesterol for esterification by first transferring it to HDL (d = 1.07-1.21). The HDL isolated from the plasma of aged rats was enriched with apolipoprotein (apo) E and these lipoprotein particles were found to

  5. Differences in cooperative behavior among Damaraland mole rats are consequences of an age-related polyethism.

    PubMed

    Zöttl, Markus; Vullioud, Philippe; Mendonça, Rute; Torrents Ticó, Miquel; Gaynor, David; Mitchell, Adam; Clutton-Brock, Tim

    2016-09-13

    In many cooperative breeders, the contributions of helpers to cooperative activities change with age, resulting in age-related polyethisms. In contrast, some studies of social mole rats (including naked mole rats, Heterocephalus glaber, and Damaraland mole rats, Fukomys damarensis) suggest that individual differences in cooperative behavior are the result of divergent developmental pathways, leading to discrete and permanent functional categories of helpers that resemble the caste systems found in eusocial insects. Here we show that, in Damaraland mole rats, individual contributions to cooperative behavior increase with age and are higher in fast-growing individuals. Individual contributions to different cooperative tasks are intercorrelated and repeatability of cooperative behavior is similar to that found in other cooperatively breeding vertebrates. Our data provide no evidence that nonreproductive individuals show divergent developmental pathways or specialize in particular tasks. Instead of representing a caste system, variation in the behavior of nonreproductive individuals in Damaraland mole rats closely resembles that found in other cooperatively breeding mammals and appears to be a consequence of age-related polyethism. PMID:27588902

  6. Maze learning impairment is associated with stress hemopoiesis induced by chronic treatment of aged rats with human recombinant erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Rifkind, J M; Abugo, O O; Peddada, R R; Patel, N; Speer, D; Balagopalakrishna, C; Danon, D; Ingram, D K; Spangler, E L

    1999-01-01

    Mean cell volume (MCV) of erythrocytes has been reported to increase with age in humans, and to be negatively correlated with memory performance in humans and rats. We evaluated hematological changes in 21-mo old male Fischer 344 rats undergoing a 3-mo twice weekly subcutaneous injection of human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO). A baseline hematocrit (HCT) was obtained initially and repeated at monthly intervals to determine the effectiveness of EPO treatment. At 24-mo of age and after 3 mo EPO treatment, the rats were tested for their ability to learn a 14-unit T maze. Following maze testing, blood was drawn for hematologic analyses, including HCT, MCV, maximum swollen cell volume (MCVS), mean cell transit time (MCTT), and the membrane shear modulus of elasticity (G), the latter a derived measure of the relative elasticity of the red cell membrane. After 1 mo EPO treatment, HCT significantly increased compared to saline-injected controls. After 2 mo treatment, HCT began to decline but remained elevated above baseline levels even after 3 mo treatment. After 3 mo EPO treatment, MCV was significantly lower in EPO-treated rats compared to controls. These changes imply altered hemopoiesis to produce cells which undergo shrinkage associated with accelerated cellular aging. The lower MCV would have predicted a shorter MCTT which instead was unchanged. This observation suggested the presence of an additional factor contributing to the MCTT. The G, which measures the membrane contribution to deformability, very significantly increased with EPO treatment. This finding indicates an increased contribution of membrane properties to the MCTT after EPO treatment, which cancels the expected decrease in MCTT for smaller cells. After 3 mo of EPO treatment, aged rats exhibited significantly impaired maze learning compared to controls. A relationship between, changes in erythrocyte membrane properties and impaired function was indicated by a significant correlation (r=0.67, p <0

  7. The metabolic response to postnatal leptin in rats varies with age and may be litter dependent.

    PubMed

    Granado, M; Diaz, F; Fuente-Martín, E; García-Cáceres, C; Argente, J; Chowen, J A

    2014-06-01

    Hyperleptinemia during postnatal life induces long-term effects on metabolism. However, these effects are controversial as both increased and decreased propensity towards obesity has been reported. To further analyze the effects of chronic neonatal hyperleptinemia on the subsequent metabolic profile, male Wistar rats proceeding from 18 different litters (8 pups/litter) received a daily subcutaneous injection of either saline (10 ml/kg, n=36) or leptin (3 μg/g, n=36) from postnatal day (PND) 2 to PND9. Rats were sacrificed at 10, 40, or 150 days of age. At 10 days of age, leptin treated rats had decreased body weight (p<0.001) and body fat (p<0.05). Leptin levels and glycemia were increased (p<0.01), whereas insulin, total lipids, triglycerides and glycerol levels were decreased (p<0.05). At PND40 rats receiving leptin had increased glycemia (p<0.01) and plasma HDL and LDL levels, but decreased total lipids (p<0.05). At PND150 neonatal leptin treatment induced different effects in rats raised in different litters. Rats from litter 1 had increased body weight (p<0.05), body fat (p<0.01), and plasma leptin (p<0.001), cholesterol (p<0.001), triglyceride (p<0.001), total lipid (p<0.001), LDL (p<0.05), and glycerol (p<0.001) levels. In rats from litter 2 these parameters did not differ from controls. Rats from litter 3 had decreased body weight (p<0.05), visceral fat (p<0.01) and plasma leptin (p<0.001), cholesterol (p<0.001), triglyceride (p<0.001), glycerol (p<0.001), and HDL (p<0.001) levels. In conclusion, the metabolic response to postnatal leptin varies with age, with the response in adulthood being variable and most likely influenced by other factors, including the genetic make-up. PMID:24446159

  8. SERUM BIOMARKERS OF AGING IN THE BROWN NORWAY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum biomarkers to identify susceptibility to disease in aged humans are well researched. On the other hand, our understanding of biomarkers in animal models of aging is limited. Hence, we applied a commercially available panel of 58 serum analytes to screen for possible biomark...

  9. Age-Related Differences in the Disposition of Nicotine and Metabolites in Rat Brain and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have evaluated the behavioral and neurochemical impact of nicotine administration in rodents. However, the distribution of nicotine and metabolites in rat brain and plasma as a function of age has not been investigated. This is a significant issue because human adolescents have a greater risk for developing nicotine addiction than adults, and reasons underlying this observation have not been fully determined. Thus, in this present study, we evaluated the impact of the transition from adolescence (postnatal day [PND 40]) to adulthood (PND 90) on nicotine distribution in rats. Methods: PND 40, 60, and 90 rats received a single injection of (−) nicotine (0.8mg/kg, subcutaneously). Liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry was used to measure concentration of nicotine and metabolites in selected biological matrices. Results: Nicotine, cotinine, and nornicotine were detected in rat striata and frontal cortex 30min, 1hr, 2hr, and 4hr after a single administration. These and several additional metabolites (nicotine-1′-oxide, cotinine-N-oxide, norcotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine) were also detected in plasma at these same timepoints. The mean concentration of nicotine in brain and plasma was lower in PND 40 versus PND 90 rats. In contrast, the mean concentration of nornicotine was higher in the plasma and brain of PND 40 versus PND 90 rats. Conclusions: Nicotine and metabolite distribution differs between adolescent and adult rats. These data suggest that adolescent rats metabolize nicotine to some metabolites faster than adult rats. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential correlation between age, drug distribution, and nicotine addiction. PMID:23737496

  10. Adaptive and regulatory mechanisms in aged rats with postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yanlin; Liu, Shuyun; Yu, Xinjuan; Wang, Mingshan; Wang, Yuelan

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation may play a role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction. 5′ Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-kappa B, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α are involved in inflammation. Therefore, these inflammatory mediators may be involved in postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Western immunoblot analysis revealed 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappa B in the hippocampus of aged rats were increased 1–7 days after splenectomy. Moreover, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α were upregulated and gradually decreased. Therefore, these inflammatory mediators may participate in the splenectomy model of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged rats. PMID:25206851

  11. Citalopram attenuates tau hyperphosphorylation and spatial memory deficit induced by social isolation rearing in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qing-Guo; Gong, Wei-Gang; Wang, Yan-Juan; Zhou, Qi-Da; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-05-01

    Social isolation (SI) is considered as a chronic stress. Here, middle-aged rats (8 months) were group or isolation reared for 6 weeks. Following the initial two-week period of rearing, citalopram (10 mg/kg i.p.) was administered for 28 days. Changes in recognition memory, depression and anxiety-like behavior, and phosphorylated tau were investigated. We found that SI did not lead to obvious depression/anxiety-like behavior in middle-aged rats. Memory deficits and increased tau hyperphosphorylation at Tau-1, Ser396 episodes could be almost reversed by citalopram. The level of Ser9-phosphorylated GSK-3β (inactive form) was significantly decreased in the SI group which also could be almost reversed by citalopram, suggesting that the citalopram could prevent GSK-3β from SI-induced overactivation. The melatonin level was decreased in SI group compared with group housed (GH) group, and citalopram could partly restore the level of melatonin. We also found that citalopram could increase MT1 and MT2 in mRNA level. Our results demonstrate that citalopram increases the level of melatonin which negatively regulates GSK-3β and attenuates tau hyperphosphorylation and spatial memory deficit induced by SI in middle-aged rats. Suggesting that SI might constitute a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and citalopram may represent a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. PMID:25476250

  12. Endogenous leptin contributes to baroreflex suppression within the solitary tract nucleus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Diz, Debra I

    2014-12-01

    The decline in cardiovagal baroreflex function that occurs with aging is accompanied by an increase in circulating leptin levels. Our previous studies showed that exogenous leptin impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate in younger rats, but the contribution of this hormone to baroreflex dysfunction during aging is unknown. Thus we assessed the effect of bilateral leptin microinjection (500 fmol/60 nl) within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) on the baroreflex sensitivity in older (66 ± 2 wk of age) urethane/chloralose anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats with elevated circulating leptin levels. In contrast to the 63% reduction observed in younger rats, leptin did not alter the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia evoked by phenylephrine in older rats (0.76 ± 0.19 baseline vs. 0.71 ± 0.15 ms/mmHg after leptin; P = 0.806). We hypothesized that this loss of sensitivity reflected endogenous suppression of the baroreflex by elevated leptin, rather than cardiovascular resistance to the peptide. Indeed, NTS administration of a leptin receptor antagonist (75 pmol/120 nl) improved the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in older rats (0.73 ± 0.13 baseline vs. 1.19 ± 0.26 at 10 min vs. 1.87 ± 0.32 at 60 min vs. 1.22 ± 0.54 ms/mmHg at 120 min; P = 0.002), with no effect in younger rats. There was no effect of the leptin antagonist on the baroreflex sensitivity for tachycardia, responses to cardiac vagal chemosensitive fiber activation, or resting hemodynamics in older rats. These findings suggest that the actions of endogenous leptin within the NTS, either produced locally or derived from the circulation, contribute to baroreflex suppression during aging. PMID:25260611

  13. Endogenous leptin contributes to baroreflex suppression within the solitary tract nucleus of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The decline in cardiovagal baroreflex function that occurs with aging is accompanied by an increase in circulating leptin levels. Our previous studies showed that exogenous leptin impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate in younger rats, but the contribution of this hormone to baroreflex dysfunction during aging is unknown. Thus we assessed the effect of bilateral leptin microinjection (500 fmol/60 nl) within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) on the baroreflex sensitivity in older (66 ± 2 wk of age) urethane/chloralose anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats with elevated circulating leptin levels. In contrast to the 63% reduction observed in younger rats, leptin did not alter the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia evoked by phenylephrine in older rats (0.76 ± 0.19 baseline vs. 0.71 ± 0.15 ms/mmHg after leptin; P = 0.806). We hypothesized that this loss of sensitivity reflected endogenous suppression of the baroreflex by elevated leptin, rather than cardiovascular resistance to the peptide. Indeed, NTS administration of a leptin receptor antagonist (75 pmol/120 nl) improved the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in older rats (0.73 ± 0.13 baseline vs. 1.19 ± 0.26 at 10 min vs. 1.87 ± 0.32 at 60 min vs. 1.22 ± 0.54 ms/mmHg at 120 min; P = 0.002), with no effect in younger rats. There was no effect of the leptin antagonist on the baroreflex sensitivity for tachycardia, responses to cardiac vagal chemosensitive fiber activation, or resting hemodynamics in older rats. These findings suggest that the actions of endogenous leptin within the NTS, either produced locally or derived from the circulation, contribute to baroreflex suppression during aging. PMID:25260611

  14. n-3 fatty acids effectively improve the reference memory-related learning ability associated with increased brain docosahexaenoic acid-derived docosanoids in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio; Katakura, Masanori; Tanabe, Yoko; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Inoue, Takayuki; Hossain, Shahdat; Arita, Makoto; Shido, Osamu

    2015-02-01

    We investigated whether a highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and a concentrated n-3 fatty acid formulation (prescription TAK-085) containing EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ethyl ester could improve the learning ability of aged rats and whether this specific outcome had any relation with the brain levels of EPA-derived eicosanoids and DHA-derived docosanoids. The rats were tested for reference memory errors (RMEs) and working memory errors (WMEs) in an eight-arm radial maze. Fatty acid compositions were analyzed by GC, whereas brain eicosanoid/docosanoids were measured by LC-ESI-MS-MS-based analysis. The levels of lipid peroxides (LPOs) were measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The administration of TAK-085 at 300 mg·kg⁻¹day⁻¹ for 17 weeks reduced the number of RMEs in aged rats compared with that in the control rats. Both TAK-085 and EPA administration increased plasma EPA and DHA levels in aged rats, with concurrent increases in DHA and decreases in arachidonic acid in the corticohippocampal brain tissues. TAK-085 administration significantly increased the formation of EPA-derived 5-HETE and DHA-derived 7-, 10-, and 17-HDoHE, PD1, RvD1, and RvD2. ARA-derived PGE2, PGD2, and PGF2α significantly decreased in TAK-085-treated rats. DHA-derived mediators demonstrated a significantly negative correlation with the number of RMEs, whereas EPA-derived mediators did not exhibit any relationship. Furthermore, compared with the control rats, the levels of LPO in the plasma, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus were significantly reduced in TAK-085-treated rats. The findings of the present study suggest that long-term EPA+DHA administration may be a possible preventative strategy against age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25450447

  15. Age and gender differences in excitation-contraction coupling of the rat ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Normand; Chartier, Denis; Gosselin, Hugues; Rouleau, Jean-Lucien

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine potential post-pubertal gender-specific differences in the contractility of papillary muscles, the electrophysiological properties and Ca2+ transients of freshly dissociated ventricular myocytes from the rat heart. The contractions of rat papillary muscles from 2- to 14-month-old male and female rats were studied under isometric and isotonic conditions (29 °C). While the hearts of young (2–4 months) male and female rats displayed a similar contractile profile, papillary muscles of female rats aged 6 months and older exhibited smaller isometric and isotonic contractions, smaller maximal rates of tension and shortening development and decline (±DT/dt and ±DL/dt) velocities during both the onset and relaxation phases, and shorter contractions than age-matched males. To explore the possible cellular basis accounting for these differences, action potentials and macroscopic currents were recorded from freshly dissociated myocytes using the whole-cell patch clamp technique (35 °C). Action potentials from male and female myocytes of 3- and 9-month-old rats did not vary as a function of age or gender. Consistent with these results, the magnitude (expressed in pA pF−1), voltage-dependence and kinetics of the inward rectifier (IK1), transient outward (Ito) and sustained (IK) K+ currents displayed little, if any dependence on age or gender. L-type Ca2+ current (ICa(L)) measured in caesium-loaded myocytes (35 °C) from male and female rats of 3, 6 and 9 months of age exhibited similar characteristics. In contrast, while Ca2+ transients measured with indo-1 were similar between 3-month-old male and female rat myocytes, Ca2+ transients of 10-month-old female myocytes were significantly reduced and showed a diminished rate of relaxation in comparison with those recorded in male rats of similar age. These results suggest that important gender-related changes in excitation-contraction coupling occur following puberty, probably due

  16. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone

  17. Age-dependent changes in rat lacrimal gland anti-oxidant and vesicular related protein expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Thiago Martins; Tomiyoshi, Lilian Midori; Dias, Ana Carolina; Roma, Letícia Prates; Módulo, Carolina Maria; Malki, Leonardo Tannus; Filho, Elísio Bueno Machado; Deminice, Rafael; Jordão, Alceu Afonso; Cunha, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Anti-oxidation and exocytosis are important for maintaining exocrine tissue homeostasis. During aging, functional and structural alterations occur in the lacrimal gland (LG), including oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA. The aims of the present study were to determine in the aging LG: a) the effects of aging on LG structure and secretory activity and b) changes in the expression of oxidative stress markers. Methods To address these goals, tear secretion composition and corneal impression cytology were compared between male Wistar rats of 2 (control) and 24 (aged) months. LG morphology and the expression levels of vitamin E and malonaldehyde (MDA) were evaluated to determine the anti-oxidant activity and lipid peroxidation, respectively. RT–PCR and western blot analysis were used for the analysis of Ras related in brain GTPase protein (Rab) and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins of the secretory machinery (i.e.; Rab 3d, Rab 27, vesicle-associated membrane protein-2 (Vamp-2), and syntaxin). Results Histological analysis of aged rats revealed a higher frequency of corneal epithelia metaplasia. In the acinar cells, organelles underwent degeneration, and lipofucsin-like material accumulated in the cytoplasm along with declines in the anti-oxidant marker vitamin E. Rab3d and Rab27b mRNA levels fell along with Rab3d protein expression, whereas syntaxin levels increased. Conclusions These findings indicate that exocytotic and anti-oxidant mechanisms become impaired with age in the rat LG. In parallel with these structural alterations, functional declines may contribute to the pathophysiology caused by tear film modification in dry eye disease. PMID:22312187

  18. Racemized and Isomerized Proteins in Aging Rat Teeth and Eye Lens.

    PubMed

    Warmack, Rebeccah A; Mansilla, Eduardo; Goya, Rodolfo G; Clarke, Steven G

    2016-08-01

    The quantification of aspartic acid racemization in the proteins of nonmetabolically active tissues can be used as a measure of chronological aging in humans and other long-lived organisms. However, very few studies have been conducted in shorter-lived animals such as rodents, which are increasingly used as genetic and metabolic models of aging. An initial study had reported significant changes in the ratio of d- to l-aspartate in rat molars with age. Using a sensitive HPLC method for the determination of d- and l-aspartate from protein hydrolysates, we found no accumulation of d-aspartate in the molars of 17 rats that ranged in age from 2 to 44 months, and the amount of d-aspartate per molar did not correspond with molar eruption date as had been previously reported. However, developing an alternate approach, we found significant accumulation of isomerized aspartyl residues in eye lens proteins that are also formed by spontaneous degradation processes. In this study, we used the human protein l-isoaspartate/d-aspartate O-methyltransferase (PCMT1) as an analytical reagent in a sensitive and convenient procedure that could be used to rapidly examine multiple samples simultaneously. We found levels of isomerized aspartyl residues to be about 35 times higher in the lens extracts of 18-month-old rats versus 2-month-old rats, suggesting that isomerization may be an effective marker for biological aging in this range of ages. Importantly, we found that the accumulation appeared to plateau in rats of 18 months and older, indicating that potentially novel mechanisms for removing altered proteins may develop with age. PMID:26650547

  19. Probiotic Mixture KF Attenuates Age-Dependent Memory Deficit and Lipidemia in Fischer 344 Rats.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Ahn, Young-Tae; Sim, Jae-Hun; Woo, Jae-Yeon; Huh, Chul-Sung; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the memory-enhancing effect of lactic acid bacteria, we selected the probiotic mixture KF, which consisted of Lactobacillus plantarum KY1032 and Lactobacillus curvatus HY7601 (1 × 10(11) CFU/g of each strain), and investigated its antilipidemic and memoryenhancing effects in aged Fischer 344 rats. KF (1 × 10(10) CFU/rat/day), which was administered orally once a day (6 days per week) for 8 weeks, significantly inhibited age-dependent increases of blood triglyceride and reductions of HDL cholesterol (p < 0.05). KF restored agereduced spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze task to 94.4% of that seen in young rats (p < 0.05). KF treatment slightly, but not significantly, shortened the escape latency daily for 4 days. Oral administration of KF restored age-suppressed doublecortin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in aged rats. Orally administered KF suppressed the expression of p16, p53, and cyclooxygenase-2, the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR, and the activation of NF-κB in the hippocampus of the brain. These findings suggest that KF may ameliorate age-dependent memory deficit and lipidemia by inhibiting NF-κB activation. PMID:25975611

  20. Influence of age on inducibility and cholinergic modulation of arrhythmia in isolated rat right atria.

    PubMed

    Faria, D M; Viviane, A G; Galvão, K M; Caricati-Neto, A; Godoy, C M G

    2009-03-01

    The effects of carbachol and atropine on the number of trains (NT) and on the train stimulus strength (SS) necessary to induce arrhythmia were studied in isolated right atria of infant, young, adult and mature rats submitted to electric field stimulation (66.7 Hz, 5 ms pulse-duration, 250 pulses). Carbachol (1 microM) decreased NT from four (control) to two in all ages tested. Atropine (1 microM) prevented tachyarrhythmia induction in tissue of all ages, even with NT equal to 12, except for mature rats (typically four trains). The SS decreases from infant to adult age [5- to 2-fold atrial threshold (AT)] and increases in mature animals (5-fold AT). Carbachol changes this result only for mature rats (5- to 2-fold AT). The SS was decreased by carbachol (1 microM) from 5- to 3-fold AT in mature rats, but atropine did not modify SS in this age. These results indicate that inducibility and cholinergic modulation of atrial tachyarrhythmia is influenced by age. PMID:19234768

  1. Waon therapy attenuates cardiac hypertrophy and promotes myocardial capillary growth in hypertensive rats: a comparative study with fluvastatin.

    PubMed

    Ihori, Hiroyuki; Nozawa, Takashi; Sobajima, Mitsuo; Shida, Takuya; Fukui, Yasutaka; Fujii, Nozomu; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction are associated with a pro-inflammatory state and reduced NO bioavailability. Effects on myocardial structural and molecular alterations were compared between Waon therapy (WT; repeated dry sauna therapy) and statin in hypertensive rats. Seven-week-old Dahl salt-sensitive rats were assigned to 4 groups: low-salt (LS) diet, high-salt (HS) diet, HS diet with oral fluvastatin (FL; 10 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks) starting from the age of 9 weeks, and HS diet with WT treatment in a far-infrared dry sauna (39 °C for 15 min followed by 34 °C for 20 min once daily for 4 weeks). HS rats developed left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy with preserved LV systolic function. WT reduced LV wall thickness and myocyte cross-sectional area along with decreased levels of myocardial ANP and BNP mRNA expression compared with HS rats. Reduction in LV fibrosis and increase in capillary density in WT animals were accompanied by reductions in myocardial levels of TGF-β1, MMP2, p22(phox) and gp91(phox) mRNA expression, and increases in myocardial levels of VEGF and HSP90 mRNA and phosphorylated eNOS protein. These effects were comparable between WT and FL animals. WT improves structural and molecular alterations in salt-induced hypertensive rats similarly to fluvastatin. PMID:26686369

  2. Activity of cholinesterases of blood and heart in rats of different sex and age during muscular loads and hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanova, V. D.; Antonova, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The activity of acetylcholinesterase (Ache) and butyrilcholinesterase (Bche) in the blood and the heart of 3 and 13 month old control male rats is considerably lower than in female rats. In 25 month old rats, no sex differences in the Ache and Bche were revealed in the heart. In 3 and 13 month old male and female rats, under conditions of muscular exercises, the Ache and Bche activity is lower, and in hypokinetic male rats -- higher than that in respective control animals. In all the rats, irrespective of sex, age, and motor conditions, Ache and Bche activity tended to decrease from the sinoatrial node to the heart apex.

  3. TNF-α receptor antagonist attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, NENGLI; LIANG, YAFENG; YANG, PEI; WANG, WEIJIAN; ZHANG, XUEZHENG; WANG, JUNLU

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a common clinical in aged patients, is characterized by deficits in cognitive functions in patients following anesthesia and surgery. It has been demonstrated that isoflurane may lead to cognitive impairment in aged rats; however, effective clinical interventions for preventing this disorder are limited. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been suggested to be involved in neuroinflammation as well as the development of POCD. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate whether TNF-α signaling is involved in the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats, and whether TNF-α receptor antagonist are able to attenuate isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. A population of 20-month-old rats were administered TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 or an equal volume of saline by intraperitoneal injection 12 h prior to exposure to isoflurane to model cognitive impairment following anesthesia in old patients. Then the rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane for 4 h. In the control group, rats showed impaired cognitive functions evaluated by Morris water maze assay after isoflurane exposure. Furthermore, isoflurane exposure induced marked upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in the hippocampus tissue. In the experimental group, intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 significantly attenuated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Further investigation revealed that intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 notably suppressed isoflurane-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Collectively, the present results suggest that TNF-α receptor antagonist may serve as a potential agent for the prevention of anesthesia-induced cognitive decline in aged patients. PMID:27347079

  4. Effect of age and diet on renal cadmium retention in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kostial, K.

    1984-03-01

    The results of previous and recent work on cadmium metabolism in relation to age and diet are presented. Experiments were performed on albino rats aged 1-26 weeks. In some experiments rats were given different foods (milk, meat, bread) instead of standard rat diet. Some animals received trisodium calcium salt of diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) intraperitoneally to decrease cadmium retention. Radioactive cadmium (/sup 115m/Cd) was administered orally and intraperitoneally. Whole body (WB), carcass (C) and organ (kidney, liver and brain) retentions were determined 1 and 2 weeks after a single radioisotope administration. The results are expressed as percentages of the administered dose (% D) and as percentages of whole body (% WB) and carcass (% C) radioactivities. After oral administration whole-body cadmium retention was higher in sucklings than in weaned animals, primarily due to increased gut retention. The kidney retention of orally administered cadmium was about 5-7 times higher in sucklings than in older rats. Cadmium distribution (% C) was similar after oral and intraperitoneal administration. In sucklings, kidney retention made a lower fraction of the carcass radioactivity one week after /sup 115m/Cd administration but reached adult values a week later. Liver retention in sucklings was a slightly lower fraction of the carcass radioactivity than in older rats at both time intervals. Brain retention (% C) was about 10 times higher in sucklings than in older rats throughout the experiment. 39 references, 5 tables.

  5. Up-regulation of serotonin receptor 2B mRNA and protein in the peri-infarcted area of aged rats and stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Buga, Ana-Maria; Ciobanu, Ovidiu; Bădescu, George Mihai; Bogdan, Catalin; Weston, Ria; Slevin, Mark; Di Napoli, Mario; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2016-04-01

    Despite the fact that a high proportion of elderly stroke patients develop mood disorders, the mechanisms underlying late-onset neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive symptoms have so far received little attention in the field of neurobiology. In rodents, aged animals display depressive symptoms following stroke, whereas young animals recover fairly well. This finding has prompted us to investigate the expression of serotonin receptors 2A and 2B, which are directly linked to depression, in the brains of aged and young rats following stroke. Although the development of the infarct was more rapid in aged rats in the first 3 days after stroke, by day 14 the cortical infarcts were similar in size in both age groups i.e. 45% of total cortical volume in young rats and 55.7% in aged rats. We also found that the expression of serotonin receptor type B mRNA was markedly increased in the perilesional area of aged rats as compared to the younger counterparts. Furthermore, histologically, HTR2B protein expression in degenerating neurons was closely associated with activated microglia both in aged rats and human subjects. Treatment with fluoxetine attenuated the expression of Htr2B mRNA, stimulated post-stroke neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and was associated with an improved anhedonic behavior and an increased activity in the forced swim test in aged animals. We hypothesize that HTR2B expression in the infarcted territory may render degenerating neurons susceptible to attack by activated microglia and thus aggravate the consequences of stroke. PMID:27013593

  6. Up-regulation of serotonin receptor 2B mRNA and protein in the peri-infarcted area of aged rats and stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Bădescu, George Mihai; Bogdan, Catalin; Weston, Ria; Slevin, Mark; Di Napoli, Mario; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that a high proportion of elderly stroke patients develop mood disorders, the mechanisms underlying late-onset neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive symptoms have so far received little attention in the field of neurobiology. In rodents, aged animals display depressive symptoms following stroke, whereas young animals recover fairly well. This finding has prompted us to investigate the expression of serotonin receptors 2A and 2B, which are directly linked to depression, in the brains of aged and young rats following stroke. Although the development of the infarct was more rapid in aged rats in the first 3 days after stroke, by day 14 the cortical infarcts were similar in size in both age groups i.e. 45% of total cortical volume in young rats and 55.7% in aged rats. We also found that the expression of serotonin receptor type B mRNA was markedly increased in the perilesional area of aged rats as compared to the younger counterparts. Furthermore, histologically, HTR2B protein expression in degenerating neurons was closely associated with activated microglia both in aged rats and human subjects. Treatment with fluoxetine attenuated the expression of Htr2B mRNA, stimulated post-stroke neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and was associated with an improved anhedonic behavior and an increased activity in the forced swim test in aged animals. We hypothesize that HTR2B expression in the infarcted territory may render degenerating neurons susceptible to attack by activated microglia and thus aggravate the consequences of stroke. PMID:27013593

  7. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) Independent Microvascular Angiogenesis in the Aged Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ndubuizu, Obinna I.; Tsipis, Constantinos P.; Li, Ang; LaManna, Joseph C.

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a critical component of mammalian brain adaptation to prolonged hypoxia. Hypoxia-induced angiogenesis is mediated by hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) dependent transcriptional activation of growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Microvascular angiogenesis occurs over a three week period in the rodent brain. We have recently reported that HIF-1α accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF target genes in the aged cortex of 24 month F344 rats is significantly attenuated during acute hypoxic exposure. In the present study, we show that cortical HIF-1α accumulation and HIF-1 activation remains absent during chronic hypoxic exposure in the aged rat brain (24 month F344). Despite this lack of HIF-1 activation, there is no significant difference in baseline or post-hypoxic brain capillary density counts between the young (3 month F344) and old age groups. VEGF mRNA and protein levels are significantly elevated in the aged cortex despite the lack of HIF-1 activation. Other HIF-independent mediators of hypoxia inducible genes could be involved during chronic hypoxia in the aged brain. PPAR-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, a known regulator of VEGF gene transcription, is elevated in the young and aged cortex during the chronic hypoxic exposure. Overall, our results suggest a compensatory HIF-1 independent preservation of hypoxic-induced microvascular angiogenesis in the aged rat brain. PMID:20875806

  8. Effects of homozygosity of the nude (rnu) gene in an inbred strain of rats: studies of lymphoid and non--lymphoid organs in different age groups of nude rats of LEW background at a stage in the gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Hougen, H P; Klausen, B

    1984-01-01

    Several age groups of nude homozygous rnu/rnu and heterozygous rnu/+ rats of the same genetic background at an early stage of back-crossing (LEW/Mol) were compared as to body and organ weights, histological appearance and cell density of lymphoid organs, haematological values and differential counts of bone marrow and peripheral blood. No thymic tissue was found in the nude animals. 7-week-old nudes were smaller than control animals and had relatively larger non-lymphoid organs and cell-depleted peripheral lymphoid organs. Other age groups showed little difference. Peripheral blood of nude rats showed no signs of lymphopaenia in contrast with the findings in nude mice. The number of thoracic duct lymphocytes was, however, significantly smaller in all age groups of the nude rats, and the bone marrow tended to contain fewer lymphocytes. PMID:10628778

  9. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex stimulation enhances memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in the middle-aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Albert; Jain, Neeraj; Vyas, Ajai; Lim, Lee Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory dysfunction is a key symptom of age-related dementia. Although recent studies have suggested positive effects of electrical stimulation for memory enhancement, its potential targets remain largely unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that spatially targeted deep brain stimulation of ventromedial prefrontal cortex enhanced memory functions in a middle-aged rat model. Our results show that acute stimulation enhanced the short-, but not the long-term memory in the novel-object recognition task. Interestingly, after chronic high-frequency stimulation, both the short- and long-term memories were robustly improved in the novel-object recognition test and Morris water-maze spatial task compared to sham. Our results also demonstrated that chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex high-frequency stimulation upregulated neurogenesis-associated genes along with enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation. Importantly, these memory behaviors were strongly correlated with the hippocampal neurogenesis. Overall, these findings suggest that chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex high-frequency stimulation may serve as a novel effective therapeutic target for dementia-related disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04803.001 PMID:25768425

  10. The decrease in silicon concentration of the connective tissues with age in rats is a marker of connective tissue turnover.

    PubMed

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Watson, Abigail I E; Pedro, Liliana D; Powell, Jonathan J

    2015-06-01

    Silicon may be important for bone and connective tissue health. Higher concentrations of silicon are suggested to be associated with bone and the connective tissues, compared with the non-connective soft tissues. Moreover, in connective tissues it has been suggested that silicon levels may decrease with age based upon analyses of human aorta. These claims, however, have not been tested under controlled conditions. Here connective and non-connective tissues were collected and analysed for silicon levels from female Sprague-Dawley rats of different ages (namely, 3, 5, 8, 12, 26 and 43 weeks; n=8-10 per age group), all maintained on the same feed source and drinking water, and kept in the same environment from weaning to adulthood. Tissues (696 samples) were digested in nitric acid and analysed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for total silicon content. Fasting serum samples were also collected, diluted and analysed for silicon. Higher concentrations of silicon (up to 50-fold) were found associated with bone and the connective tissues compared with the non-connective tissues. Although total silicon content increased with age in all tissues, the highest connective tissue silicon concentrations (up to 9.98 μg/g wet weight) were found in young weanling rats, decreasing thereafter with age (by 2-6 fold). Fasting serum silicon concentrations reflected the pattern of connective tissue silicon concentrations and, both measures, when compared to collagen data from a prior experiment in Sprague-Dawley rats, mirrored type I collagen turnover with age. Our findings confirm the link between silicon and connective tissues and would imply that young growing rats have proportionally higher requirements for dietary silicon than mature adults, for bone and connective tissue development, although this was not formally investigated here. However, estimation of total body silicon content suggested that actual Si requirements may be substantially lower than

  11. The decrease in silicon concentration of the connective tissues with age in rats is a marker of connective tissue turnover☆

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Watson, Abigail I.E.; Pedro, Liliana D.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon may be important for bone and connective tissue health. Higher concentrations of silicon are suggested to be associated with bone and the connective tissues, compared with the non-connective soft tissues. Moreover, in connective tissues it has been suggested that silicon levels may decrease with age based upon analyses of human aorta. These claims, however, have not been tested under controlled conditions. Here connective and non-connective tissues were collected and analysed for silicon levels from female Sprague–Dawley rats of different ages (namely, 3, 5, 8, 12, 26 and 43 weeks; n = 8–10 per age group), all maintained on the same feed source and drinking water, and kept in the same environment from weaning to adulthood. Tissues (696 samples) were digested in nitric acid and analysed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for total silicon content. Fasting serum samples were also collected, diluted and analysed for silicon. Higher concentrations of silicon (up to 50-fold) were found associated with bone and the connective tissues compared with the non-connective tissues. Although total silicon content increased with age in all tissues, the highest connective tissue silicon concentrations (up to 9.98 μg/g wet weight) were found in young weanling rats, decreasing thereafter with age (by 2–6 fold). Fasting serum silicon concentrations reflected the pattern of connective tissue silicon concentrations and, both measures, when compared to collagen data from a prior experiment in Sprague–Dawley rats, mirrored type I collagen turnover with age. Our findings confirm the link between silicon and connective tissues and would imply that young growing rats have proportionally higher requirements for dietary silicon than mature adults, for bone and connective tissue development, although this was not formally investigated here. However, estimation of total body silicon content suggested that actual Si requirements may be substantially

  12. Intestinal absorption of triglyceride and vitamin D3 in aged and young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, P.R.; Dominguez, A.A.

    1981-12-01

    (3H)Trioleyl glycerol (TO) and (14C)vitamin D3 were perfused intraduodenally for 5 hr in aged (19-21 months) and young adult (4-5 months) Sprague-Dawley rats. The rate of intestinal uptake from the gastrointestinal lumen and transport into the body of these lipids were decreased in the aged animals. Since the distribution of TO lipolytic products in the lumen was unchanged, reduced intestinal uptake rate probably occurred at the mucosal membrane. Furthermore, in the aged rats, the rate of transintestinal transport of both trioleyl glycerol and vitamin D3 was impaired. No evidence for impaired mucosal TO reesterification or for accumulation of vitamin D3 metabolites was found, suggesting that intestinal lipid accumulation resulted from a defect in lipoprotein assembly or in discharge from the mucosal cell. Impaired absorption of lipids may contribute to malnutrition and osteopenia of advancing age.

  13. Behavioral reinforcement of long-term potentiation is impaired in aged rats with cognitive deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Bergado, J A; Almaguer, W; Ravelo, J; Rosillo, J C; Frey, J U

    2001-01-01

    Behavioral stimuli with emotional/motivational content can reinforce long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus, if presented within a distinct time window. A similar effect can be obtained by stimulating the basolateral amygdala, a limbic structure related to emotions. We have previously shown that aging impairs amygdala-hippocampus interactions during long-term potentiation. In this report we show that behavioral reinforcement of long-term potentiation is also impaired in aged rats with cognitive deficits. While among young water-deprived animals drinking 15 min after induction of long-term potentiation leads to a significant prolongation of potentiation, cognitively impaired aged rats are devoid of such reinforcing effects. In contrast, a slight but statistically significant depression develops after drinking in this group of animals. We suggest that an impaired mechanism of emotional/motivational reinforcement of synaptic plasticity might be functionally related to the cognitive deficits shown by aged animals. PMID:11738126

  14. Galanthamine Plus Estradiol Treatment Enhances Cognitive Performance in Aged Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, R.B.; Chipman, A.M.; Hammond, R.; Nelson, D.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that beneficial effects of estradiol on cognitive performance diminish with age and time following menopause due to a progressive decline in basal forebrain cholinergic function. This study tested whether galanthamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor used to treat memory impairment associated with Alzheimer’s disease, could enhance or restore estradiol effects on cognitive performance in aged rats that had been ovariectomized in middle-age. Rats were ovariectomized at 16–17 months of age. At 21–22 months of age rats began receiving daily injections of galanthamine (5 mg/day) or vehicle. After one week, half of each group also received 17ß-estradiol administered subcutaneously. Rats were then trained on a delayed matching to position (DMP) T-maze task, followed by an operant stimulus discrimination/reversal learning task. Treatment with galanthamine + estradiol significantly enhanced the rate of DMP acquisition and improved short-term delay-dependent spatial memory performance. Treatment with galanthamine or estradiol alone were without significant effect. Effects were task-specific in that galanthamine + estradiol treatment did not significantly improve performance on the stimulus discrimination/reversal learning task. In fact, estradiol was associated with a significant increase in incorrect responses on this task after reversal of the stimulus contingency. In addition, treatments did not significantly affect hippocampal choline acetyltransferase activity or acetylcholine release. This may be an effect of age, or possibly is related to compensatory changes associated with long-term cholinesterase inhibitor treatment. The data suggest that treating with a cholinesterase inhibitor can enhance the effects of estradiol on acquisition of a DMP task by old rats following a long period of hormone deprivation. This could be of particular benefit to older women who have not used hormone therapy for many years and are beginning to show signs of mild

  15. Aging gracefully: a comparative study of Japanese and Malaysian women aged 65-75.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jin Kuan; Yap, Yuet Ngor

    2014-12-01

    Longer lives and extended retirement have created a 'young old age' stage of life. How people spend their "young old age" has become increasingly important. This research aims to investigate the different ageing experiences of Japanese and Malaysian women and the activities they engaged in their "young old age". In-depth interviews were conducted to collect data and an adapted grounded theory approach was used for data analysis. Findings reveal many common characteristics for both groups of research participants. The emerging themes show that Japanese and Malaysian Chinese have different life missions evident in their daily activities, one passing on culture and the other passing on family values and life experience. They also differ in their choice of living arrangement (independent versus dependent/interdependent), attitudes to life (fighting versus accepting) and activities in which to engage (aesthetic pursuits versus family oriented activities). PMID:25456622

  16. Dendritic regression dissociated from neuronal death but associated with partial deafferentation in aging rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Flood, D G; Coleman, P D

    1993-01-01

    As neurons are lost in normal aging, the dendrites of surviving neighbor neurons may proliferate, regress, or remain unchanged. In the case of age-related dendritic regression, it has been difficult to distinguish whether the regression precedes neuronal death or whether it is a consequence of loss of afferent supply. The rat supraoptic nucleus (SON) represents a model system in which there is no age-related loss of neurons, but in which there is an age-related loss of afferents. The magnocellular neurosecretory neurons of the SON, that produce vasopressin and oxytocin for release in the posterior pituitary, were studied in male Fischer 344 rats at 3, 12, 20, 27, 30, and 32 months of age. Counts in Nissl-stained sections showed no neuronal loss with age, and confirmed similar findings in other strains of rat and in mouse and human. Nucleolar size increased between 3 and 12 months of age, due, in part, to nucleolar fusion, and was unchanged between 12 and 32 months of age, indicating maintenance of general cellular function in old age. Dendritic extent quantified in Golgi-stained tissue increased between 3 and 12 months of age, was stable between 12 and 20 months, and decreased between 20 and 27 months. We interpret the increase between 3 and 12 months as a late maturational change. Dendritic regression between 20 and 27 months was probably the result of deafferentation due to the preceding age-related loss of the noradrenergic input to the SON from the ventral medulla. PMID:7507575

  17. Effect of aging on phosphate metabolites of rat brain as revealed by the in vivo and in vitro sup 31 P NMR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hsiuchih; Chi, Chinwen; Liu, Tsungyun; Liu, Lianghui ); Luh, Wenming; Hsieh, Changhuain; Wu, Wenguey )

    1991-01-01

    Changes of phosphate metabolism in brains of neonate, weaning and adult rats were compared using both in vivo and in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Ratios of phosphocreatine/nucleoside triphosphate (PCr/NTP) were the same in neonatal brain in both in vivo and in vitro studies, but not in weaning and adult brains. This discrepancy may have resulted from extended cerebral hypoxia due to slowed freezing of the brain by the increased skull thickness and brain mass in the weaning and adult rats. Variations of in vitro extraction condition for this age-related study may lead to systematic errors in the adult rats. Nevertheless, the phosphomonoester/nucleoside triphosphate (PME/NTP) ratios in extracts of brain from neonatal rats were higher than those obtained in vivo. In addition, the glycerophosphorylethanolamine plus glycerophosphorylcholine/nucleoside triphosphate (GPE+GPC/NTP) ratios, which were not measurable in vivo, showed age-dependent increase in extracts of rat brain. Some of the phosphomonoester and phosphodiester molecules in rat brain may be undetectable in in vivo NMR analysis because of their interaction with cellular components. The total in vitro GPE and GPC concentration in brain from neonatal rat was estimated to be 0.34 mmole/g wet tissue.

  18. 'When an old rat smells a cat': A decline in defense-related, but not accessory olfactory, Fos expression in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Glenn E; Van Nieuwenhuijzen, Petra S; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; McGregor, Iain S

    2011-04-01

    Comparisons were made between young (3-6 months) and aged (20-30 months) Wistar rats on locomotor activity, emergence, social interaction and cat odor avoidance. Aged rats were less active and spent less time in the open field during the emergence test than younger rats. Older rats also showed fewer contacts with a novel conspecific in the social interaction test, although total duration of interaction did not differ. There were very few behavioral differences between male and female rats. Older rats were less reactive than younger rats in a test of cat odor avoidance. However, they expressed similar amounts of cat odor-induced Fos in the posterior accessory olfactory bulb, a critical region for processing the predator odor stimulus. Older rats had reduced Fos expression in several defense-related brain regions that are normally activated by predator odors such as the medial amygdala and dorsal premammillary nucleus. These results indicate that aged rats are less reactive than younger rats to predator odors due to decreased responsiveness in defense-related but not necessarily olfactory circuits. PMID:19394115

  19. Comparison of age-related changes in in vivo and in vitro measures of testicular steroidogenesis after acute cadmium exposure in the sprague-dawley rat

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, P.V.; Laskey, J.W. )

    1989-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that cadmium- (Cd-) induced testicular necrosis is an age-dependent process. However, little information exists on age-related intestitial cell (IC) damage in the rat after acute exposure to Cd. In this study in vitro and in vivo measures of testicular damage were utilized to compare the sensitivity of these measures and to further investigate age-related Cd-induced testicular damage. Testes, epididymides, and seminal vesicle weights, serum testosterone (sT), hCG-stimulated sT, and basal and stimulated IC testosterone (T) production were production were compared in rats 21 d following an injection of 2 mg Cd/kg at 9, 37, 67, and 97 d of age. The only Cd-related change noted for immature rats was an 84% reduction in sT. In rats injected when 37 d old, hCG-stimulated sT and epididymides and seminal vesicle weights, although depressed, were not significantly altered. However, all other measurements were significantly depressed. All measures of testicular damage were significantly depressed in rats injected at 67 and 97 d of age. Overall, in vitro measures were more sensitive indicators of Cd-induced testicular damage than in vivo measures. However, sT and hCG-stimulated sT appeared to be useful indicators of Cd effects on the pituitary-gonadal axis. ICs from immature rats (9 d old) were unaffected by Cd exposure, while stimulated T reproduction in ICs from 37-, 67-, and 97-d-old animals was reduced at least 50%. The severity of Cd-induced testicular damage increases with age for all variables measured.

  20. Working Memory in Bisphenol-A Treated Middle-Aged Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Neese, Steven L.; Bandara, Suren B.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Over 90% of the U.S. population has detectable bisphenol-A (BPA) in their urine according to recent biomonitoring data. BPA is best known for its estrogenic properties, and most rodent research on the nervous system effects of BPA has focused on determining if chronic exposures during pre- and perinatal development have organizational effects on brain development and behavior. Estrogens also have important impacts on brain and behavior during adulthood, particularly in females during aging, but the impact of BPA on the adult brain is less studied. We have published a series of studies documenting that chronic exposure to various estrogens including 17β-estradiol, ERβ selective SERMs and soy phytoestrogens impairs performance of middle-aged female rats on an operant working memory task. The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic oral exposure to BPA would alter working memory on this same task. Ovariectomized (OVX) middle-aged Long Evans rats were tested on an operant delayed spatial alternation (DSA) task. Rats were treated for 8–10 weeks with either a 0 (vehicle control), 5 or 50 μg/kg bw/day oral bolus of BPA. A subset of the vehicle control rats were implanted with a Silastic implant containing 17β-estradiol (low physiological range) to serve as a positive control. All rats were tested for 25 sessions on the DSA task. BPA treatment did not influence performance accuracy on the DSA task, whereas 17β-estradiol significantly impaired performance, as previously reported. The results of this study suggest that chronic oral exposure to BPA does not alter working memory processes of middle-aged OVX rats assessed by this operant DSA task. PMID:23339879

  1. Autophagy Is Involved in the Sevoflurane Anesthesia-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction of Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Youfa; Xu, Mingmin; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is associated with regulation of both the survival and death of neurons, and has been linked to many neurodegenerative diseases. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is commonly observed in elderly patients following anesthesia, but the pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unexplored. Similar effects have been found in aged rats under sevoflurane anesthesia; however, the role of autophagy in sevoflurane anesthesia-induced hippocampal neuron apoptosis of older rats remains elusive. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of autophagy on the sevoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction in aged rats, and to identify the role of autophagy in sevoflurane-induced neuron apoptosis. We used 20-month-old rats under sevoflurane anesthesia to study memory performance, neuron apoptosis, and autophagy. The results demonstrated that sevoflurane anesthesia significantly impaired memory performance and induced hippocampal neuron apoptosis. Interestingly, treatment of rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, improved the cognitive deficit observed in the aged rats under sevoflurane anesthesia by improving autophagic flux. Rapamycin treatment led to the rapid accumulation of autophagic bodies and autophagy lysosomes, decreased p62 protein levels, and increased the ratio of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 II (LC3-II) to LC3-I in hippocampal neurons through the mTOR signaling pathway. However, administration of an autophagy inhibitor (chloroquine) attenuated the autophagic flux and increased the severity of sevoflurane anesthesia-induced neuronal apoptosis and memory impairment. These findings suggest that impaired autophagy in the hippocampal neurons of aged rats after sevoflurane anesthesia may contribute to cognitive impairment. Therefore, our findings represent a potential novel target for pro-autophagy treatments in patients with sevoflurane anesthesia-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:27111854

  2. Effect of Cardiac Arrest on Cognitive Impairment and Hippocampal Plasticity in Middle-Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Kunjan R.; Alekseyenko, Aleksey; Binkert, Marc; Stransky, Kenneth; Lin, Hung Wen; Barnes, Carol A.; Wright, Clinton B.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States that usually occurs in the aged population. Cardiac arrest (CA) induces global ischemia, disrupting global cerebral circulation that results in ischemic brain injury and leads to cognitive impairments in survivors. Ischemia-induced neuronal damage in the hippocampus following CA can result in the impairment of cognitive function including spatial memory. In the present study, we used a model of asphyxial CA (ACA) in nine month old male Fischer 344 rats to investigate cognitive and synaptic deficits following mild global cerebral ischemia. These experiments were performed with the goals of 1) establishing a model of CA in nine month old middle-aged rats; and 2) to test the hypothesis that learning and memory deficits develop following mild global cerebral ischemia in middle-aged rats. To test this hypothesis, spatial memory assays (Barnes circular platform maze and contextual fear conditioning) and field recordings (long-term potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation) were performed. We show that following ACA in nine month old middle-aged rats, there is significant impairment in spatial memory formation, paired-pulse facilitation n dysfunction, and a reduction in the number of non-compromised hippocampal Cornu Ammonis 1 and subiculum neurons. In conclusion, nine month old animals undergoing cardiac arrest have impaired survival, deficits in spatial memory formation, and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25933411

  3. AGE-DEPENDENT DIFFERENCES IN THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF RATS TO DELTAMETHRIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Separate groups of weanling and adult rats were exposed to both behaviorally-active and lethal doses of deltamethrin to examine age-dependent toxicity of a pyrethroid over a wide dose range. he acoustic startle response (ASR) was selected for comparison at low doses since it is a...

  4. Age-related changes in body composition in laboratory rats: Strain and gender comparisons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long Evans (LE), Sprague Dawley (SD), Fischer 344 (F344), and Brown Norway (BN) rats are all commonly used as laboratory research subjects. These strains have been studied under many conditions, but few studies have measured changes in body composition as the animals age. Underst...

  5. Coordinated Changes in Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression in Aging Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to gain better insight on aging and susceptibility, we characterized the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) from the livers of rats to evaluate the change in capacity to respond to xenobiotics across the adult lifespan. Gene expression profiles for XMEs...

  6. MODULATION OF HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN THE AGED RAT: THE BLUEBERRY EFFECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The decline of memory with age is associated with a reduction in hippocampal neurogenesis, suggesting that this process may be an important factor in memory modulation. Thus, factors such as head injury, depression and stress that lead to decreases in neurogenesis are all associated with greater rat...

  7. Age-related increases in F344 rat intestine microsomal quercetin glucuronidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to establish the extent age modifies intestinal quercetin glucuronidation capacity. Pooled microsomal fractions of three equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats (n=8/group) were employed to model the enzyme kinetics of UDP-gl...

  8. PHARMACOKINETIC DIFFERENCES MAY EXPLAIN THE AGE-RELATED SENSITIVITY OF DELTAMETHRIN, A PYRETHROID INSECTICIDE, IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to examine the age-related sensitivity to the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin [(S)- -cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (1R,3R)-3-(2,2-dibromomovinyl)2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate], in Long Evans, hooded, male rats. Deltamethrin has been shown to be more ...

  9. Dose-Dependent Effects of Walnuts on Motor and Cognitive Function in Aged Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show decrements in performance on motor and cognitive tasks that require the use of spatial learning and memory. Previously we have shown that these deficits can be reversed by the polyphenolics in fruits and vegetables. Walnuts, which contain the omega-3 fatty acids alpha-linolenic acid (...

  10. AGE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS OF 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE ON LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This experiment examined the effects on locomotor activity of intraventricular 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) administered to developing and adult rats. 6-OHDA was administered subsequent to pargyline treatment at 3 and 6 days of age; or 6-OHDA was administered subsequent to desmethy...

  11. Microsomal quercetin glucuronidation in rat small intestine depends on age and segment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity toward the flavonoid quercetin and UGT protein were characterized in 3 equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats, n=8/age using villin to control for enterocyte content. SI microsomal intrinsic clearance of quercetin...

  12. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products (AGEs) improves glycemic control and decreases adipocyte size in fructose-fed rats by suppressing AGE-RAGE axis.

    PubMed

    Ojima, A; Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Higashimoto, Y; Ueda, S; Fukami, K; Okuda, S; Yamagishi, S

    2015-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) decrease adiponectin expression and suppress insulin signaling in cultured adipocytes through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) via oxidative stress generation. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. This study examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on adipocyte remodeling, AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis, and adiponectin expression in fructose-fed rats. Although AGE-aptamer treatment by an osmotic mini pump for 8 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels, it significantly decreased average fasting blood glucose and had a tendency to inhibit body weight gain in fructose-fed rats. Furthermore, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the increase in adipocyte size and prevented the elevation in AGEs, RAGE, and an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), levels in adipose tissues of fructose-fed rats at 14-week-old, while it restored the decrease in adiponectin mRNA levels. Our present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could improve glycemic control and prevent adipocyte remodeling in fructose-fed rats partly by suppressing the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for fructose-induced metabolic derangements. PMID:25105541

  13. Age-related changes in neurochemical components and retinal projections of rat intergeniculate leaflet.

    PubMed

    Fiuza, Felipe P; Silva, Kayo D A; Pessoa, Renata A; Pontes, André L B; Cavalcanti, Rodolfo L P; Pires, Raquel S; Soares, Joacil G; Nascimento Júnior, Expedito S; Costa, Miriam S M O; Engelberth, Rovena C G J; Cavalcante, Jeferson S

    2016-02-01

    Aging leads to several anatomical and functional deficits in circadian timing system. In previous works, we observed morphological alterations with age in hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, one central component of this system. However, there are few data regarding aging effects on other central components of this system, such as thalamic intergeniculate leaflet (IGL). In this context, we studied possible age-related alterations in neurochemical components and retinal projections of rat IGL. For this goal, young (3 months), adult (13 months), and aged (23 months) Wistar rats were submitted to an intraocular injection of neural tracer, cholera toxin subunit b (CTb), 5 days before a tissue fixation process by paraformaldehyde perfusion. Optical density measurements and cell count were performed at digital pictures of brain tissue slices processed by immunostaining for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), enkephalin (ENK), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and CTb, characteristic markers of IGL and its retinal terminals. We found a significant age-related loss in NPY immunoreactive neurons, but not in immunoreactivity to GAD and ENK. We also found a decline of retinal projections to IGL with age. We conclude aging impairs both a photic environmental clue afferent to IGL and a neurochemical expression which has an important modulatory circadian function, providing strong anatomical correlates to functional deficits of the aged biological clock. PMID:26718202

  14. The effects of strength training and raloxifene on bone health in aging ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Stringhetta-Garcia, Camila Tami; Singulani, Monique Patrício; Santos, Leandro Figueiredo; Louzada, Mário Jefferson Quirino; Nakamune, Ana Cláudia Stevanato; Chaves-Neto, Antonio Hernandes; Rossi, Ana Cláudia; Ervolino, Edilson; Dornelles, Rita Cássia Menegati

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of strength training (ST) and raloxifene (Ral), alone or in combination, on the prevention of bone loss in an aging estrogen-deficient rat model. Aging Wistar female rats were ovariectomized at 14months and allocated to four groups: (1) non-trained and treated with vehicle, NT-Veh; (2) strength training and treated with vehicle, ST-Veh; (3) non-trained and treated with raloxifene, NT-Ral; and (4) strength training and treated with raloxifene, ST-Ral. ST was performed on a ladder three times per week and Ral was administered daily by gavage (1mg/kg/day), both for 120days. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD), strength, microarchitecture, and biomarkers (osteocalcin, OCN; osteoprotegerin, OPG; and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, TRAP) were assessed. Immunohistochemistry was performed for runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), osterix (OSX), OCN, OPG, TRAP, and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The rats that performed ST (ST-Veh) or were treated with Ral (NT-Ral) showed significant improvements in aBMD (p=0.001 and 0.004), bone strength (p=0.001), and bone microarchitecture, such as BV/TV (%) (p=0.001), BS/TV (mm(2)/mm(3)) (p=0.023 and 0.002), Conn.Dn (1/mm(3)) (p=0.001), Tb.N (1/mm) (p=0.012 and 0.011), Tb.Th (1/mm) (p=0.001), SMI (p=0.001 and 0.002), Tb.Sp (p=0.001), and DA (p=0.002 and 0.007); there was also a significant decrease in plasma levels of OCN (p=0.001 and 0.002) and OPG (p=0.003 and 0.014), compared with animals in the NT-Veh group. Ral, with or without ST, promoted an increased immunolabeling pattern for RUNX2 (p=0.0105 and p=0.0006) and OSX (p=0.0105), but a reduced immunolabeling pattern for TRAP (p=0.0056) and RANKL (p=0.033 and 0.004). ST increased the immunolabeling pattern for RUNX2 (p=0.0105), and association with Ral resulted in an increased immunolabeling pattern for OPG (p=0.0034) and OCN (p=0.0024). In summary, ST and Ral administration in aged, estrogen

  15. Student Achievement of 3rd-Graders in Comparable Single-Age and Multiage Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Wendy; Allison, Jeanette; Haladyna, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Compared reading, writing, and mathematics achievement of Title I and non-Title I third graders in comparable multiage and single-age classrooms in three school districts. Found higher achievement among non-Title I students in multiage settings when compared to those in a single-age setting. No setting differences were observed for Title I…

  16. AGING-RELATED CARBARYL EFFECTS IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid increase in older adults in the population highlights the importance ofunderstanding the role of aging in susceptibility to environmental contaminants. Aspart of a larger research program on life-stage susceptibility, this experiment determined the effect of the carbama...

  17. An observational assessment method for aging laboratory rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The growth of the aging population highlights the need for laboratory animal models to study the basic biological processes ofaging and susceptibility to toxic chemicals and disease. Methods to evaluate health ofaging animals over time are needed, especially efficient methods for...

  18. AN OBSERVATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF AGING IN BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The growth of the aging population highlights the need for laboratory animal models that can be used to (1) efficiently monitor the health ofaging research colonies, and (2) aid in unraveling the mechanisms ofsusceptibility to toxic chemicals and disease. An observational assessm...

  19. Effect of Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases and complex I and II of electron transport chain in the brain of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ajith, T A; Sudheesh, N P; Roshny, D; Abishek, G; Janardhanan, K K

    2009-03-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, being direct intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in the pathogenesis of number of ageing associated human disorders. Effect of ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases; complex I and II of electron transport chain have been evaluated in the aged rat brain. Aged male Wistar rats were administered with ethanol extract of G. lucidum (50 and 250mg/kg, p.o) once daily for 15 days. Similarly DL-alpha-lipoic acid (100mg/kg, p.o) administered group was kept as the reference standard. Young and aged rats administered with water were kept as young and aged control, respectively. The effect of treatment was assessed by estimating the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (alpha-KGDH), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), complex I and II in the mitochondria of rat brain. Results of the study demonstrated that the extract of G. lucidum (50 and 250mg/kg) significantly (p<0.01) enhanced the activities of PDH, alpha-KGDH, SDH, complex I and II when compared to that of the aged control animals. The level of the lipid peroxidation was significantly lowered (p<0.01) in the G. lucidum treated group with respect to that of aged control. However, we could not find any statistically significant difference between the activities of enzymes in groups treated with 50 and 250mg/kg of G. lucidum. The activity exhibited by the extract of G. lucidum in the present study can be partially correlated to its antioxidant activity. The results of the study concluded that the extract of G. lucidum may effective to improve the function of mitochondria in aged rat brain, suggest its possible therapeutic application against ageing associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19041385

  20. Changes in Angiotensin Receptor Distribution and in Aortic Morphology Are Associated with Blood Pressure Control in Aged Metabolic Syndrome Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Torrico-Lavayen, Rocío; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; Carvajal-Aguilera, Karla G.; Castrejón-Tellez, Vicente; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther

    2016-01-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in blood pressure regulation in MS during aging is unknown. It participates in metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging regulating vascular tone and remodeling. RAS might participate in a compensatory mechanism decreasing blood pressure and allowing MS rats to reach 18 months of age and it might form part of therapeutical procedures to ameliorate MS. We studied histological changes and distribution of RAS receptors in aortas of MS aged rats. Electron microscopy images showed premature aging in MS since the increased fibrosis, enlarged endothelium, and invasion of this layer by muscle cells that was present in control 18-month-old aortas were also found in 6-month-old aortas from MS rats. AT1, AT2, and Mas receptors mediate the effects of Ang II and Ang 1-7, respectively. Fluorescence from AT2 decreased with age in control and MS aortas, while fluorescence of AT1 increased in aortas from MS rats at 6 months and diminished during aging. Mas expression increased in MS rats and remained unchanged in control rats. In conclusion, there is premature aging in the aortas from MS rats and the elevated expression of Mas receptor might contribute to decrease blood pressure during aging in MS. PMID:27293881

  1. Gender- and region-dependent changes of redox biomarkers in the brain of successfully aging LOU/C rats.

    PubMed

    Moyse, Emmanuel; Arseneault, Madeleine; Gaudreau, Pierrette; Ferland, Guylaine; Ramassamy, Charles

    2015-07-01

    The LOU/C (LOU) rat is an obesity resistant strain with higher longevity and healthspan than common rats. The management of oxidative stress being important to successful aging, we characterized this process in the aging LOU rat. Male/female LOU rats were euthanized at 4, 20, and 29 months. Macrodissected hippocampus, striatum, parietal cortex, cerebellum were assayed for tissue concentrations of glutathione (GSH), gamma-glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase (γ-GCS), total thiols, protein carbonyls, mRNAs of clusterin and the known protective enzymes thioredoxine-1 (TRX-1), glutaredoxine-1 (GLRX-1), superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1). Brain levels of GSH, γ-GCS, total thiols remained constant with age, except for GSH and γ-GCS which decreases in females. Clusterin, TRX-1, GLRX-1, SOD-1 mRNA levels were maintained or increased in the hippocampus with age. Age-dependency of the markers differed between sexes, with SOD-1 and TRX-1 decreases out of hippocampus in females. Since antioxidants were reported to decrease with age in the brain of Wistar rats, maintenance of GSH levels and of protective enzymes mRNA levels in the LOU rat brain could contribute to the preservation of cognitive functions in old age. Altogether, the successful aging of LOU rats may, at least in part, involve the conservation of functional antioxidant mechanisms in the brain, supporting the oxidative stress theory of aging. PMID:25956602

  2. Adaptation of Cancellous Bone to Aging and Immobilization in Growing Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Meng-Meng; Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua-Zhu; Lin, Bai-Yun; Li, Qing-Nan; Li, Xiao-Jian

    1992-01-01

    Two-and-half-month-old female rats were subjected to right hindlimb immobilization or served as controls for 0, 1, 2, 8, 14, and 20 weeks. The right hindlimb was immobilized by bandaging it against the abdomen, thus unloading it. Cancellous bone histomorphometry was performed on microradiographs and double-fluorescent labeled 20 tLm sections of the distal femoral metaphyses. Primary spongiosa bone loss occurred rapidly by 2 weeks, and secondary spongiosa bone loss occurred rapidly by 8 weeks of immobilization, and then equilibrated at 60% less bone mass than age-related controls. The negative bone balance induced by immobilization was caused by transient increase in bone resorption, decrease in bone formation, and longitudinal bone growth. The dynamic data of secondary spongiosa cancellous bone showed that percent eroded perimeter was transiently elevated by 55 to 82% between 1 and 8 weeks, percent labeled perimeter was transiently depressed by 32% to 50% between 1 and 14 weeks, mineral apposition rate was depressed by 23% and 19% at I and 2 weeks, and bone formation rate-bone area referent was transiently depressed by 35% and 59% at 1 and 2 weeks. All the above parameters were at age-related control levels by 20 weeks of immobiliza- tion. However, bone formation rate-tissue area referent was depressed (-65%) throughout the study. Immobilization depressed completely longitudinal bone growth by 2 weeks and remained so. Only 0.65 mm of new metaphysis was generated in the immobilized versus 2.1 mm in controls during the study period. The immobilization induced an early cancellous bone loss which equilibrated at a new steady state with less bone and a normal (age-related control) bone turnover rate. When these findings were compared to an earlier study of 9-month-old virgin females subjected to right hindlimb immobilization up to 26 weeks, we found the adaptive responses of the cancellous bone were identical except that they occurred earlier and equilibrated sooner in

  3. Adaptation of Cancellous Bone to Aging and Immobilization in Growing Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Meng Meng; Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Lin, Bia Yun; Li, Qing Nan; Li, Xiao Jian

    1992-01-01

    Two-and-a half month-old female rats were subjected to right hindlimb immobilization or served as controls for 0, 1, 2, 8, 14, and 20 weeks. The right hindlimb was immobilized by bandaging it against the abdomen, thus unloading it. Cancellous bone histomorphometry was performed on microradiographs and double-fluorescent labeled 20 micron sections of the distal femoral metaphyses. Primary spongiosa bone loss occurred rapidly by 2 weeks, and secondary spongiosa bone loss occurred rapidly by 8 weeks of immobilization, and then equilibrated at 60% less bone mass than age-related controls. The negative bone balance induced by immobilization was caused by transient increase in bone resorption, decrease in bone formation, and longitudinal bone growth. The dynamic data of secondary spongiosa cancellous bone showed that percent eroded perimeter was transiently elevated by 55% to 82% between 1 and 8 weeks, percent labeled perimeter was transiently depressed by 32% to 50% between 1 and 14 weeks, mineral apposition rate was depressed by 23% and 19% at 1 and 2 weeks, and bone formation rate-bone area referent was transiently depressed by 35% and 59%c at 1 and 2 weeks. All the above parameters were at age-related control levels by 20 weeks of immobilization. However, bone formation rate-tissue area referent was depressed (-65%) throughout the study. Immobilization depressed completely longitudinal bone growth by 2 weeks and remained so. Only 0.65 mm of new metaphysis was generated in the immobilized versus 2.1 mm in controls during the study period. The immobilization induced an early cancellous bone loss which equilibrated at a new steady state with less bone and a normal (age-related control) bone turnover rate. When these findings were compared to an earlier study of 9 month-old virgin females subjected to right hindlimb immobilization up to 26 weeks, we found the adaptive responses of the cancellous bone were identical except that they occurred earlier and equilibrated

  4. The rat adequately reflects human responses to exercise in blood biochemical profile: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Goutianos, Georgios; Tzioura, Aikaterini; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Margaritelis, Nikos V; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Dipla, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2015-02-01

    Animal models are widely used in biology and the findings of animal research are traditionally projected to humans. However, recent publications have raised concerns with regard to what extent animals and humans respond similar to physiological stimuli. Original data on direct in vivo comparison between animals and humans are scarce and no study has addressed this issue after exercise. We aimed to compare side by side in the same experimental setup rat and human responses to an acute exercise bout of matched intensity and duration. Rats and humans ran on a treadmill at 86% of maximal velocity until exhaustion. Pre and post exercise we measured 30 blood chemistry parameters, which evaluate iron status, lipid profile, glucose regulation, protein metabolism, liver, and renal function. ANOVA indicated that almost all biochemical parameters followed a similar alteration pattern post exercise in rats and humans. In fact, there were only 2/30 significant species × exercise interactions (in testosterone and globulins), indicating different responses to exercise between rats and humans. On the contrary, the main effect of exercise was significant in 15/30 parameters and marginally nonsignificant in other two parameters (copper, P = 0.060 and apolipoprotein B, P = 0.058). Our major finding is that the rat adequately mimics human responses to exercise in those basic blood biochemical parameters reported here. The physiological resemblance of rat and human blood responses after exercise to exhaustion on a treadmill indicates that the use of blood chemistry in rats for exercise physiology research is justified. PMID:25677548

  5. Comparative effects of indomethacin and nabumetone on urine and electrolyte output in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    bin Long, Idris; Singh, Harbindar Jeet; Rao, Gurubelli Janardhana

    2005-11-01

    The effects of indomethacin and nabumetone on urine and electrolyte excretion in conscious rats were examined. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually for a five-week duration, consisting of acclimatization, control, experimental, and recovery phases. During the experimental phase, rats were given either indomethacin (1.5 mg . kg(-1) body weight . day(-1) in 0.5 ml saline, n = 10), nabumetone (15 mg . kg(-1) body weight . day(-1) 0.5 ml saline, n = 10), or 0.5 ml saline alone (n = 10) for a period of two weeks. Water and food intake, body weight, urine output, and electrolyte excretions were estimated. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Urine output in the indomethacin- and nabumetone-treated groups was not different from the controls, but was significantly different between the drug-treated groups (P<0.01). Sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium excretions were not different between nabumetone-treated and control rats. However, sodium and potassium excretion was significantly lower in rats receiving indomethacin when compared to the control rats. Calcium and magnesium outputs, although did not differ from the controls, nevertheless decreased significantly with indomethacin (P<0.01). It appears that indomethacin and nabumetone when given at maximum human therapeutic doses may affect urine and electrolyte output in conscious rats. PMID:16293937

  6. Comparative human and rat neurospheres reveal species differences in chemical effects on neurodevelopmental key events.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Jenny; Gassmann, Kathrin; Masjosthusmann, Stefan; DeBoer, Denise; Bendt, Farina; Giersiefer, Susanne; Fritsche, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    The developing brain is highly vulnerable to the adverse effects of chemicals, resulting in neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. Currently, animal experiments in the rat are the gold standard for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing; however, these guideline studies are insufficient in terms of animal use, time and costs and bear the issue of species extrapolation. Therefore, the necessity for alternative methods that predict DNT of chemicals faster, cheaper and with a high predictivity for humans is internationally agreed on. In this respect, we developed an in vitro model for DNT key event screening, which is based on primary human and rat neural progenitor cells grown as neurospheres. They are able to mimic basic processes of early fetal brain development and enable an investigation of species differences between humans and rodents in corresponding cellular models. The goal of this study was to investigate to what extent human and rat neurospheres were able to correctly predict the DNT potential of a well-characterized training set of nine chemicals by investigating effects on progenitor cell proliferation, migration and neuronal differentiation in parallel to cell viability, and to compare these chemical responses between human and rat neurospheres. We demonstrate that (1) by correlating these human and rat in vitro results to existing in vivo data, human and rat neurospheres classified most compounds correctly and thus may serve as a valuable component of a modular DNT testing strategy and (2) human and rat neurospheres differed in their sensitivity to most chemicals, reflecting toxicodynamic species differences of chemicals. PMID:26216354

  7. Cilostazol but not sildenafil prevents memory impairment after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Jacqueline; de Oliveira, Janaina Nicolau; Ferreira, Emilene Dias Fiuza; Zaghi, Gislene Gonçalves D; Bacarin, Cristiano Correia; de Oliveira, Rúbia Maria Weffort; Milani, Humberto

    2015-04-15

    We previously reported that the phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitor sildenafil prevented neurodegeneration but not learning deficits in middle-aged rats that were subjected to the permanent, three-stage, four-vessel occlusion/internal carotid artery (4-VO/ICA) model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH). In the present study, we examined whether the PDE3 inhibitor cilostazol alleviates the loss of long-term memory (i.e., retrograde amnesia) caused by CCH. The effect of sildenafil was then compared to cilostazol. Naive rats (12-15 months old) were trained in a non-food-rewarded eight-arm radial maze and subjected to CCH. One week later, retrograde memory was assessed for 5 weeks. Cilostazol (50mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for 42 days or 15 days, beginning approximately 45 min after the first occlusion stage. Sildenafil (3mg/kg, p.o.) was similarly administered for 15 days only. Histological examination was performed after behavioral testing. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion caused persistent retrograde amnesia, which was reversed by cilostazol after both short-term and long-term treatment. This antiamnesic effect of cilostazol was sustained throughout the experiment, even after discontinuing treatment (15-day treatment group). This effect occurred in the absence of neuronal rescue. Sildenafil failed to prevent CCH-induced retrograde amnesia, but it reduced hippocampal cell death. Extending previous findings from this laboratory, we conclude that sildenafil does not afford memory recovery after CCH, despite its neuroprotective effect. In contrast, cilostazol abolished CCH-induced retrograde amnesia, an effect that may not depend on histological neuroprotection. The present data suggest that cilostazol but not sildenafil represents a potential strategy for the treatment of cognitive sequelae associated with CCH. PMID:25623419

  8. Aging-dependent changes in rat heart mitochondrial glutaredoxins--Implications for redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-Huang; Qanungo, Suparna; Pai, Harish V; Starke, David W; Steller, Kelly M; Fujioka, Hisashi; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Kerner, Janos; Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L; Mieyal, John J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and animal studies have documented that hearts of the elderly are more susceptible to ischemia/reperfusion damage compared to young adults. Recently we found that aging-dependent increase in susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to apoptosis was attributable to decrease in cytosolic glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) and concomitant decrease in NF-κB-mediated expression of anti-apoptotic proteins. Besides primary localization in the cytosol, Grx1 also exists in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). In contrast, Grx2 is confined to the mitochondrial matrix. Here we report that Grx1 is decreased by 50-60% in the IMS, but Grx2 is increased by 1.4-2.6 fold in the matrix of heart mitochondria from elderly rats. Determination of in situ activities of the Grx isozymes from both subsarcolemmal (SSM) and interfibrillar (IFM) mitochondria revealed that Grx1 was fully active in the IMS. However, Grx2 was mostly in an inactive form in the matrix, consistent with reversible sequestration of the active-site cysteines of two Grx2 molecules in complex with an iron-sulfur cluster. Our quantitative evaluations of the active/inactive ratio for Grx2 suggest that levels of dimeric Grx2 complex with iron-sulfur clusters are increased in SSM and IFM in the hearts of elderly rats. We found that the inactive Grx2 can be fully reactivated by sodium dithionite or exogenous superoxide production mediated by xanthine oxidase. However, treatment with rotenone, which generates intramitochondrial superoxide through inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I, did not lead to Grx2 activation. These findings suggest that insufficient ROS accumulates in the vicinity of dimeric Grx2 to activate it in situ. PMID:25126518

  9. Age- and brain region-specific differences in mitochondrial bioenergetics in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Jignesh D; Royland, Joyce E; MacPhail, Robert C; Sullivan, Patrick G; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are central regulators of energy homeostasis and play a pivotal role in mechanisms of cellular senescence. The objective of the present study was to evaluate mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters in 5 brain regions (brain stem [BS], frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, hippocampus [HIP]) of 4 diverse age groups (1 month [young], 4 months [adult], 12 months [middle-aged], 24 months [old age]) to understand age-related differences in selected brain regions and their possible contribution to age-related chemical sensitivity. Mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters and enzyme activities were measured under identical conditions across multiple age groups and brain regions in Brown Norway rats (n = 5/group). The results indicate age- and brain region-specific patterns in mitochondrial functional endpoints. For example, an age-specific decline in ATP synthesis (State III respiration) was observed in BS and HIP. Similarly, the maximal respiratory capacities (State V1 and V2) showed age-specific declines in all brain regions examined (young > adult > middle-aged > old age). Amongst all regions, HIP had the greatest change in mitochondrial bioenergetics, showing declines in the 4, 12, and 24-months age groups. Activities of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and electron transport chain complexes I, II, and IV enzymes were also age and brain region specific. In general, changes associated with age were more pronounced with enzyme activities declining as the animals aged (young > adult > middle-aged > old age). These age- and brain region-specific observations may aid in evaluating brain bioenergetic impact on the age-related susceptibility to environmental chemical stressors. PMID:27143418

  10. Cardioprotective effect of pioglitazone in diabetic and non-diabetic rats subjected to acute myocardial infarction involves suppression of AGE-RAGE axis and inhibition of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khodeer, Dina M; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Farag, Noha E; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2016-05-01

    Insulin resistance increases risk of cardiovascular diseases. This work investigated the protective effect of pioglitazone on myocardial infarction (MI) in non-diabetic and diabetic rats, focusing on its role on advanced glycated endproducts (AGEs) and cardiac apoptotic machinery. Male rats were divided into 2 experiments: experiment I and II (non-diabetic and diabetic rats) were assigned as saline, MI (isoproterenol, 85 mg/kg, daily), and MI+pioglitazone (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg). Injection of isoproterenol in diabetic rats produced greater ECG disturbances compared to non-diabetic rats. Treatment with pioglitazone (5 mg/kg) reduced the infarct size and improved some ECG findings. Pioglitazone (10 mg/kg) enhanced ECG findings, improved the histopathological picture and downregulated apoptosis in cardiac tissues. Whereas the higher dose of pioglitazone (20 mg/kg) did not improve most of the measured parameters but rather worsened some of them, such as proapoptotic markers. Importantly, a positive correlation was found between serum AGEs and cardiac AGE receptors (RAGEs) versus caspase 3 expression in the two experiments. Therefore, the current effect of pioglitazone was, at least in part, mediated through downregulation of AGE-RAGE axis and inhibition of apoptosis. Consequently, these data suggest that pioglitazone, at optimized doses, may have utility in protection from acute MI. PMID:27119311

  11. Influence of age on reactivity to diverse emotional challenges in low- and high-anxiety rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luciana C; Gomes, Margareth Z; Brandão, Marcus L

    2011-02-01

    Studies have revealed that the extent of reactivity of high-anxiety rats to diverse challenges is different than low-anxiety rats and have provided important insights into the psychopathology of anxiety. Various factors intervene to allow defensive mechanisms to react to diverse threatening challenges, including ontogeny and the nature of the emotional challenge (e.g., conditioned vs. unconditioned). The present study investigated the extent to which a particular type of fear extrapolates to other emotional responses to diverse threatening challenges. Groups of 30- and 60-day-old rats were assigned to low freezing behavior (LFB) and high freezing behavior (HFB) groups using the contextual fear conditioning paradigm and subjected to either the fear-potentiated startle (FPS) test, novelty-induced ultrasound vocalizations (USVs) or elevated plus-maze (EPM) tests. At 30 days of age, HFB rats exhibited greater FPS than LFB rats. In contrast, prior selection of HFB and LFB did not affect the performance of 30-day-old animals in the EPM and novelty-induced USVs. Sixty-day-old animals exhibited a performance deficit in all three tests. These data suggest that the performance of young rats in animal models of anxiety parallels their selection as LFB and HFB in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm. However, the increased fear-like behavior exhibited by the 60-day-old HFB rats may elicit performance deficits in conditioned and unconditioned fear tests. These results suggest that the interaction between hyperanxiety and age may cause a performance deficit despite the animals' increased fear-like behavior when facing emotional challenges, thus resembling psychiatric patients in many respects. PMID:20833243

  12. Comparative health effects of margarines fortified with plant sterols and stanols on a rat model for hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, W M N; Plouffe, L; L'Abbé, M R; Trick, K; Mueller, R; Hayward, S

    2003-12-01

    There is increased acceptance of fortifying habitual foods with plant sterols and their saturated derivatives, stanols, at levels that are considered safe. These sterols and stanols are recognized as potentially effective dietary components for lowering plasma total and LDL cholesterol. Our previous studies have shown that daily consumption of plant sterols promotes strokes and shortens the life span of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHRSP) rats. These studies question the safety of plant sterol additives. The present study was performed to determine whether a large intake of plant stanols would cause nutritional effects similar to those seen with plant sterols in SHRSP rats. Young SHRSP rats (aged 26-29 d) were fed semipurified diets containing commercial margarines fortified with either plant stanols (1.1 g/100 g diet) or plant sterols (1.4 g/100 g diet). A reference group of SHRSP rats was fed a soybean oil diet (0.02 g plant sterols/100 g diet and no plant stanols). Compared to soybean oil, both plant stanol and plant sterol margarines significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the life span of SHRSP rats. At the initial stages of feeding, there was no difference in the survival rates between the two margarine groups, but after approximately 50 d of feeding, the plant stanol group had a slightly, but significantly (P < 0.05), lower survival rate. Blood and tissue (plasma, red blood cells, liver, and kidney) concentrations of plant sterols in the plant sterol margarine group were three to four times higher than the corresponding tissue concentrations of plant stanols in the plant stanol group. The deformability of red blood cells and the platelet count of SHRSP rats fed the plant sterol margarine were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than those of the plant stanol margarine and soybean oil groups at the end of the study. These parameters did not differ between the soybean oil and plant stanol margarine groups. These results suggest that, at the levels tested in

  13. Comparative pharmacokinetics of arctigenin in normal and type 2 diabetic rats after oral and intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiao-yan; Dong, Shu; He, Nan-nan; Jiang, Chun-jie; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yu-feng

    2015-09-01

    Arctigenin is the main active ingredient of Fructus Arctii for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In this study, the pharmacokinetics of arctigenin in normal and type 2 diabetic rats following oral and intravenous administration was investigated. As compared to normal rats, Cmax and AUC(0-10h) values of oral arctigenin in diabetic rats increased by 356.8% and 223.4%, respectively. In contrast, after intravenous injection, the Cmax and AUC(0-10h) values of arctigenin showed no significant difference between diabetic and normal rats. In order to explore how the bioavailability of oral arctigenin increased under diabetic condition, the absorption behavior of arctigenin was evaluated by in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP). The results indicated that arctigenin was a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The absorption difference of arctigenin in the normal and diabetic rats could be eliminated by the pretreatment of classic P-gp inhibitor verapamil, suggesting that P-gp might be the key factor causing the absorption enhancement of arctigenin in diabetic rats. Further studies revealed that the uptake of rhodamine 123 (Rho123) in diabetic rats was significantly higher, indicating that diabetes mellitus might impair P-gp function. Consistently, a lower mRNA level of P-gp in the intestine of diabetic rats was found. In conclusion, the absorption of arctigenin after oral administration was promoted in diabetic rats, which might be partially attribute to the decreased expression and impaired function of P-gp in intestines. PMID:26102179

  14. Markers of protein oxidation by hydroxyl radical and reactive nitrogen species in tissues of aging rats.

    PubMed

    Leeuwenburgh, C; Hansen, P; Shaish, A; Holloszy, J O; Heinecke, J W

    1998-02-01

    Many lines of evidence implicate oxidative damage in aging. Possible pathways include reactions that modify aromatic amino acid residues on proteins. o-Tyrosine is a stable marker for oxidation of protein-bound phenylalanine by hydroxyl radical, whereas 3-nitrotyrosine is a marker for oxidation of protein-bound tyrosine by reactive nitrogen species. To test the hypothesis that proteins damaged by hydroxyl radical and reactive nitrogen accumulate with aging, we used isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure levels of o-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine in heart, skeletal muscle, and liver from young adult (9 mo) and old (24 mo) female Long-Evans/Wistar hybrid rats. We also measured these markers in young adult and old rats that received antioxidant supplements (alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, butylated hydroxytoluene, and ascorbic acid) from the age of 5 mo. We found that aging did not significantly increase levels of protein-bound o-tyrosine or 3-nitrotyrosine in any of the tissues. Antioxidant supplementation had no effect on the levels of protein-bound o-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine in either young or old animals. These observations indicate that the o-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine do not increase significantly in heart, skeletal muscle, and liver in old rats, suggesting that proteins damaged by hydroxyl radical and reactive nitrogen species do not accumulate in these tissues with advancing age. PMID:9486304

  15. [The motor activity as an age parameter of the rat (authors transl)].

    PubMed

    Hofecker, G; Kment, A; Niedermüller, H

    1978-05-01

    The motor activity as an behavioural parameter provides information about the functional state of the organism as a whole. Therefore it is an important age parameter. The results of activity measurements, however, depend strongly on the method of registration. Using 3 groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 9, 15 and 29 months two methods have been tested: 1) An electronic recording: the rats were registrated in their normal cages on the Animex-Activity-Meter during the dark-phase in complete darkness. The activity measured by this method has been regarded as spontaneous activity. 2) A kinematographic method: the rats were registrated in a changed environment at constant light during the dark-phase. The activity assessed by this method has been regarded as reactive activity. Spontaneous and reactive activity show a different age dependence. For the use of the motor activity as an age parameter, both, spontaneous and reactive activity, should be assessed to get a better information about the ageing of the different functional levels of the systems governing the animal's behaviour. PMID:26274

  16. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  17. Nitric oxide synthase in rat brain: age comparisons quantitated with NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kuo, H; Hengemihle, J; Ingram, D K

    1997-05-01

    We examined age-related differences in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) containing neurons and neuropil in the striatum and hippocampus of male Fischer 344 rats at 6, 12, and 26 mo of age. NADPH-d staining is considered to be a marker for neurons and neuronal processes containing nitric oxide synthase. Rat brains were processed for NADPH-d histochemistry and analyzed morphometrically using computerized image analysis. The following NADPH-d histochemical parameters were examined: neuronal density, neuronal size, and neuropil staining optical density of selected regions. In the striatum, significant age-related declines were observed in NADPH-d-positive neuronal density and in neuropil staining, while neuronal size increased between 6 and 12 mo and then declined between 12 and 26 mo. In the hippocampus no significant age-related changes were noted in NADPH-d-positive neuronal density or size, or in the optical density of the molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Thus, age differences in NADPH-d histochemistry appear to be regionally specific in the Fischer 344 rat. PMID:9158548

  18. Dietary Intake of Resveratrol Enhances the Adaptive Immunity of Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jiangshui; Lu, Linlin; Zhang, Zongliang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract It is well known that immune response declines with aging. Resveratrol, a polyphenol that occurs naturally in several plant species including grapevines and berries, has been shown to have potent antiaging and health-promoting activities. However, the mechanism underlying these activities remains largely unknown. Here we clearly demonstrate that: (1) Dietary intake of resveratrol induced a significant increase in T helper cells (CD4+) in middle-aged (12 months old) and aged (21 months old) Wistar male rats; (2) resveratrol supplementation considerably increased the delayed-type hypersensitivity response, a T cell–mediated immune response, in aged rats; and (3) reveratrol supplementation remarkably promoted the production of total anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) immunoglobulin G (IgG), anti-KLH IgG1, and anti-KLH IgG2α in aged rats without disturbing immune homeostasis. These data together indicate that resveratrol is capable of counteracting immunosenescence, thereby leading to rejuvenation. In practice, resveratrol can be useful to help the elderly generate an improved response to vaccine with stronger humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:22950432

  19. Age-dependent expression of the erythropoietin gene in rat liver and kidneys.

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, K U; Ratcliffe, P J; Tan, C C; Bauer, C; Kurtz, A

    1992-01-01

    Using RNAse protection, we have made quantitative measurements of erythropoietin (EPO) mRNA in liver and kidneys of developing rats (days 1-54), to determine the relative contribution of both organs to the total EPO mRNA, to monitor changes which occur with development, and to compare the hypoxia-induced accumulation of EPO mRNA with the changes in serum EPO concentrations. To determine whether developmental and organ-specific responsiveness is related to the type of hypoxic stimulus, normobaric hypoxia was compared with exposure to carbon monoxide (functional anemia). Under both stimuli EPO mRNA concentration in liver was maximal on day 7 and declined during development. In contrast, EPO mRNA concentration in kidney increased during development from day 1 when it was 30-65% the hepatic concentration to day 54 when it was 12-fold higher than in liver. When organ weight was considered the liver was found to contain the majority of EPO mRNA in the first three to four weeks of life, and although, in stimulated animals, the hepatic proportion declined from 85-91% on day 1, it remained approximately 33% at day 54 and was similar for the two types of stimuli. When normalized for body weight the sum of renal and hepatic EPO mRNA in animals of a particular age was related linearly to serum hormone concentrations. However, the slope of this regression increased progressively with development, suggesting age-dependent alterations in translational efficiency or EPO metabolism. Images PMID:1541670

  20. Fine structural changes in the lateral vestibular nucleus of aging rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Miquel, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fine structure of the lateral vestibular nucleus was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, that were sacrified at 4 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 6-8 months, and 18-20 months of age. In the neuronal perikaria, the following age-associated changes were seen with increasing frequency with advancing age: rodlike nuclear inclusions and nuclear membrane invaginations; cytoplasmic dense bodies with the characteristics of lipofuscin; and moderate disorganization of the granular endoplasmic reticulum. Dense bodies were also seen in glial cells. Rats 18 to 20 months old showed dendritic swellings, axonal degeneration, and an apparent increase in the number of axosomatic synaptic terminals containing flattened vesicles (presumed to be inhibitory in function).

  1. Changes in the dielectric properties of rat tissue as a function of age at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyman, A.; Rezazadeh, A. A.; Gabriel, C.

    2001-06-01

    The dielectric properties of ten rat tissues at six different ages were measured at 37 °C in the frequency range of 130 MHz to 10 GHz using an open-ended coaxial probe and a computer controlled network analyser. The results show a general decrease of the dielectric properties with age. The trend is more apparent for brain, skull and skin tissues and less noticeable for abdominal tissues. The variation in the dielectric properties with age is due to the changes in the water content and the organic composition of tissues. The percentage decrease in the dielectric properties of certain tissues in the 30 to 70 day old rats at cellular phone frequencies have been tabulated. These data provide an important input in the provision of rigorous dosimetry in lifetime-exposure animal experiments. The results provide some insight into possible differences in the assessment of exposure for children and adults.

  2. Decrease in free-radical production with age in rat peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, E; Conde, M; Machado, A; Sobrino, F; Santa Maria, C

    1995-01-01

    The respiratory-burst reaction has been studied in rat peritoneal macrophages of different ages (3, 12 and 24 months) using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to stimulate NADPH oxidase. Production of O2-. and H2O2 decreased with age (about 50 and 75% respectively); however, no difference in NADPH oxidase activity was found. NO. production was also reduced with age (40%). Furthermore, a progressive and significant decrease in the pentose phosphate flux was detected as a function of age in control and PMA-stimulated macrophages. The NADPH/NADP+ ratio decreased with age in control and PMA-stimulated macrophages. Glucose uptake was lower in middle-aged (12 months) and old (24 months) animals but no differences were found between these groups. PMID:8526870

  3. Age-related dendritic hypertrophy and sexual dimorphism in rat basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rubinow, Marisa J.; Drogos, Lauren L.; Juraska, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Little research has examined the influence of aging or sex on anatomical measures in the basolateral amygdala. We quantified spine density and dendritic material in Golgi-Cox stained tissue of the basolateral nucleus in young adult (3–5 months) and aged (20–24 months) male and female Long-Evans rats. Dendritic branching and spine density were measured in principal neurons. Age, but not sex, influenced the dendritic tree, with aged animals displaying significantly more dendritic material. Previous findings from our laboratory in the same set of subjects indicate an opposite effect of aging on dendritic material in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. We also report here a sex difference across ages in dendritic spine density, favoring males. PMID:17570563

  4. The bioavailability of different zinc compounds used as human dietary supplements in rat prostate: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sapota, Andrzej; Daragó, Adam; Skrzypińska-Gawrysiak, Małgorzata; Nasiadek, Marzenna; Klimczak, Michał; Kilanowicz, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The normal human prostate accumulates the highest levels of zinc (Zn) of any soft tissue in the body. The pool of zinc available to the body is known to significantly decrease with age. It is suggested that dietary Zn supplementation protects against oxidative damage and reduces the risk of cancer. Zinc sulfate and zinc gluconate were the most frequently mentioned in per os administration in studies on Zn supplementation. The major aim of the study was to compare the bioavailability of different Zn compounds (sulfate, gluconate and citrate) in the prostate after their daily administration to male rats at three different doses (3.0; 15.0; and 50.0 mg Zn/kg b.w.) for 30 days. The results show that bioavailability in the prostate differs significantly between individual zinc preparations. A significantly elevated Zn concentration in the dorso-lateral lobe of the prostate, compared to controls, was found in the rats supplemented with two compounds only: zinc gluconate and zinc citrate. However, after administration of zinc gluconate, this effect occurred even at the lowest dose. The lowest zinc bioavailability in the prostate was found in the rats administered zinc sulfate: no significant Zn increase was seen in particular zones of the prostate. To sum up, the use of zinc gluconate is worth considering as a possible means of zinc supplementation in men. PMID:24619814

  5. The giant miniature endplate potentials frequency is increased in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Pousinha, Paula A; Correia, Alexandra M; Sebastião, Ana M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2015-01-01

    At the neuromuscular junction, spontaneous giant events (GMEPPs) are enhanced in different conditions when degenerative and/or remodeling processes take place, but no one investigated their incidence upon aging. In the present work, we evaluated evoked and spontaneous neuromuscular transmission events recorded from single muscle fibers. Phrenic-diaphragm preparations of 3-4, 12-16, 36-40 and 70-80 weeks old rat males were used. We found that the occurrence of GMEPPs significantly increases in aged rats. Moreover, in old rats the neuromuscular transmission was significantly impaired due to a significant decrease in the amplitude and quantal content of evoked endplate potentials. Interestingly, the number of observed EPPs failures were ∼ 3 times lower than the predicted value based on the quantal content. This discrepancy was not observed in infant or adult rats. The coincidence of a high GMEPPs frequency with a lower than expected EPPs failure rate suggests that GMEPPs events are needed to preserve effective neuromuscular transmission in aged animals. PMID:25449868

  6. Ginger and alpha lipoic acid ameliorate age-related ultrastructural changes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Y I; Hegazy, H G

    2016-01-01

    Because of the important role that oxidative stress is thought to play in the aging process, antioxidants could be candidates for preventing its related pathologies. We investigated the ameliorative effects of two antioxidant supplements, ginger and alpha lipoic acid (ALA), on hepatic ultrastructural alterations in old rats. Livers of young (4 months) and old (24 months) Wistar rats were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Livers of old rats showed sinusoidal collapse and congestion, endothelial thickening and defenestration, and inconsistent perisinusoidal extracellular matrix deposition. Aged hepatocytes were characterized by hypertrophy, cytoplasmic vacuolization and a significant increase in the volume densities of the nuclei, mitochondria and dense bodies. Lipofuscin accumulation and decreased microvilli in bile canaliculi and space of Disse also were observed. The adverse alterations were ameliorated significantly by both ginger and ALA supplementation; ALA was more effective than ginger. Ginger and ALA appear to be promising anti-aging agents based on their amelioration of ultrastructural alterations in livers of old rats. PMID:26528730

  7. Diminished acute phase response and increased hepatic inflammation of aged rats in response to intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Christian R; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Pérez, Claudio; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Riquelme, Denise M; Ordenes, Gamaliel; Oshima, Kiyoko; Aravena, Mauricio; Pérez, Viviana I; Nishimura, Sumiyo; Sabaj, Valeria; Walter, Robin; Sierra, Felipe

    2008-12-01

    Aging is associated with a deterioration of the acute phase response to inflammatory challenges. However, the nature of these defects remains poorly defined. We analyzed the hepatic inflammatory response after intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) given to Fisher 344 rats aged 6, 15, and 22-23 months. Induction of the acute phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, and T-kininogen was reduced and/or retarded with aging. Initial induction of interleukin-6 in aged rats was normal, but the later response was increased relative to younger counterparts. An exacerbated hepatic injury was observed in aged rats receiving LPS, as evidenced by the presence of multiple microabscesses in portal tracts, confluent necrosis, higher neutrophil accumulation, and elevated serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, relative to younger animals. Our results suggest that aged rats displayed a reduced expression of APPs and increased hepatic injury in response to the inflammatory insult. PMID:19126842

  8. Elevated dynorphin in the hippocampal formation of aged rats: Relation to cognitive impairment on a spatial learning task

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hannkuang; Owyang, V.; Hong, Jaushyong; Gallagher, M. )

    1989-04-01

    Radioimmunoassay revealed increased dynorphin A(1-8)-like immunoreactivity (dynA(1-8)LI) in the aged rat brain. Among a number of brain regions examined, an age-related dynA(1-8)LI elevation was found only in the hippocampal formation and frontal cortex. Moreover, the increase in dynA(1-8)LI in the aged hippocampus was associated with a decline in spatial learning ability: dynA(1-8)LI distinguished aged rats that were behaviorally impaired from aged cohorts that learned the spatial task as rapidly as younger animals. Northern blot hybridization using a {sup 32}P-labeled complementary RNA probe encoding rat prodynorphin indicated that the abundance of prodynorphin mRNA was also significantly increased in the hippocampal formation of aged rats with identified spatial learning impairments.

  9. Comparative effect of water and food-chain mediated cadmium exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Asagba, Samuel Ogheneovo

    2010-12-01

    This study sets out to compare the absorption and toxicity of Cadmium (Cd) administered via the food-chain and inorganic Cd administered in drinking water after 1 and 3 months exposure using rats as animal model. The food-chain was mimicked by exposing rats to diet containing Cd pre-exposed fish. The uptake of Cd by the rats after both mode of exposure was calculated by summing up the Cd burden in the liver and kidneys and was expressed in terms of % intake. The toxicity of Cd was assessed by monitoring biochemical indices of liver function in the plasma and liver. Regardless of the mode of exposure of the rats, the Cd load in the liver and kidney was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the respective controls with the kidney having a significantly higher load than the liver after both periods of exposure. However irrespective of the mode of exposure, more Cd was accumulated in the liver and kidney of the 3 months exposed rats relative to those exposed for 1 month. The uptake of Cd by rats exposed to Cd via the food-chain for 1 and 3 months was significantly (P < 0.05) lower when compared to the corresponding water mediated Cd exposed rats, except for the liver after 3 months of exposure. The liver L-ALT activity of rats administered inorganic Cd in drinking water for 1 and 3 months was significantly (P < 0.05) lower as compared to controls. Parallel analysis of the plasma showed no significant (P > 0.05) difference in L-ALT activity between both groups after the same periods of exposure. The L-AST activity in the plasma of rats similarly exposed to Cd for 1 and 3 months was significantly (P < 0.05) higher as compared to controls with a corresponding reduction in the liver. Conversely no significant (P > 0.05) change was observed in plasma and liver L-ALT and L-AST activities after food-chain mediated exposure to Cd for 1 and 3 months in relation to their respective controls. These findings indicate that Cd incorporated in fish is more easily bioavailable, but

  10. Reproductive senescence, fertility and reproductive tumour profile in ageing female Han Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mitchard, Terri L; Klein, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    A study using vehicle administration in 104 female rats investigated reproductive aging in Han Wistar rats as a useful tool to interprete carcinogenicity studies where hormonal patterns are perturbated. From 16 weeks of age oestrous cycles were monitored every 6 weeks to investigate reproductive ageing. A subset of 20 females was used to assess fertility at 21 months of age. The animals were necropsied after 106-107 weeks on study and female reproductive organs, mammary glands and pituitary glands were examined for hyperplasias and/or tumours. The majority of rats had regular oestrous cycles up to 6 months of age. After this age, there was a rapid decline in the number of rats with regular oestrous cycles and an increase in irregular cycles and cycles in persistent di-oestrus with an occasional pro-oestrus. By the end of the study, the majority of animals were acyclic and the few remaining cyclic animals had irregular cycles. In the fertility assessment, 19/20 animals mated but only four animals became pregnant. These pregnant animals had normal numbers of corpora lutea of pregnancy but had high pre-implantation losses and could not sustain a viable pregnancy. 65 animals (62.5%) showed adenomas and/or pituitary hyperplasia in the pituitary gland at necropsy. The pituitary tumours were likely to be prolactin secreting that give rise to pseudopregnancy and mammary tumours, demonstrated by the fact that 43/65 (66%) of the affected animals had histopathological signs of these conditions. Multiple corpora lutea were found in 61% of all animals at time of termination. Only one uterine tumour was seen in this study probably due to lack of persistent oestrus seen in these animals. PMID:26655996

  11. Chronic Ampakine Treatments Stimulate Dendritic Growth and Promote Learning in Middle-Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lauterborn, Julie C.; Palmer, Linda C.; Jia, Yousheng; Pham, Danielle T.; Hou, Bowen; Wang, Weisheng; Trieu, Brian H.; Cox, Conor D.; Kantorovich, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (ampakines) have been shown to rescue synaptic plasticity and reduce neuropathology in rodent models of cognitive disorders. Here we tested whether chronic ampakine treatment offsets age-related dendritic retraction in middle-aged (MA) rats. Starting at 10 months of age, rats were housed in an enriched environment and given daily treatment with a short half-life ampakine or vehicle for 3 months. Dendritic branching and spine measures were collected from 3D reconstructions of Lucifer yellow-filled CA1 pyramidal cells. There was a substantial loss of secondary branches, relative to enriched 2.5-month-old rats, in apical and basal dendritic fields of vehicle-treated, but not ampakine-treated, 13-month-old rats. Baseline synaptic responses in CA1 were only subtly different between the two MA groups, but long-term potentiation was greater in ampakine-treated rats. Unsupervised learning of a complex environment was used to assess treatment effects on behavior. Vehicle- and drug-treated rats behaved similarly during a first 30 min session in the novel environment but differed markedly on subsequent measures of long-term memory. Markov sequence analysis uncovered a clear increase in the predictability of serial movements between behavioral sessions 2 and 3 in the ampakine, but not vehicle, group. These results show that a surprising degree of dendritic retraction occurs by middle age and that this can be mostly offset by pharmacological treatments without evidence for unwanted side effects. The functional consequences of rescue were prominent with regard to memory but also extended to self-organization of behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain aging is characterized by a progressive loss of dendritic arbors and the emergence of impairments to learning-related synaptic plasticity. The present studies show that dendritic losses are evident by middle age despite housing in an enriched environment and can be

  12. Maternal age as a factor in determining the reproductive and behavioral outcome of rats prenatally exposed to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, C V

    1988-01-01

    Nulliparous Long-Evans rats were bred at one of four different ages and assigned to one of three treatment groups within each age condition. Maternal ages were 9, 18, 32, and 36 weeks. Treatment groups were ethanol (E), administered by gavage as 8 g/kg in two divided doses on days 10-14 of gestation, pair-fed (PF) controls, administered as an isocaloric sucrose solution by gavage on days 10-14 of gestation, and ad lib fed controls (C). All offspring were surrogate fostered shortly after delivery to untreated recently parturient dams. Litter sizes were standardized to 8 on the day of birth. Offspring were assessed longitudinally for growth, mortality, and behavior (olfaction, locomotor activity, maze learning, avoidance acquisition and startle). Approximately 85% of the 36 week old dams did not produce viable litters. In the remaining maternal age conditions, ethanol delayed offspring olfactory orientation and increased locomotor activity, the latter dissipating after 50-60 days of age. These ethanol-related effects occurred independent of maternal age condition. Maternal age, independent of ethanol, was a factor which reduced litter size and offspring weight up to 50 days, but produced few effects on behavior. The combination of maternal age and prenatal ethanol interacted to increase pregnancy loss (oldest maternal age), reduce offspring weight up to day 99 (oldest and middle maternal age), alter olfactory orientation performance (oldest and middle maternal age), reverse the typical ethanol-induced increase in activity for males in the figure-8 test (oldest maternal age group), shift the pattern of open-field activity, and change errors in a complex water maze. Not all of these interactions turned out to be specific to the ethanol X old maternal age condition. Several of the interactions occurred in both the old and middle maternal age conditions. The only effect of old maternal age that interacted strongly with ethanol was in their combined effects on

  13. Influence of Age on the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ion Radiation for Induction of Rat Mammary Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Daino, Kazuhiro; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Doi, Kazutaka; Iizuka, Daisuke; Nishimura, Yukiko; Okutani, Tomomi; Takabatake, Masaru; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The risk of developing secondary cancer after radiotherapy, especially after treatment of childhood cancers, remains a matter of concern. The high biological effects of carbon-ion radiation have enabled powerful radiotherapy, yet the approach is commonly restricted to the treatment of adults. Susceptibility of the fetus to particle radiation–induced cancer is also unclear. The present study is aimed to investigate the effect of carbon-ion irradiation in childhood on breast carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: We irradiated female Sprague-Dawley rats of various ages (embryonic days 3, 13, and 17 and 1, 3, 7, and 15 weeks after birth) with {sup 137}Cs γ rays or a 290-MeV/u monoenergetic carbonion beam (linear energy transfer, 13 keV/μm). All animals were screened weekly for mammary carcinoma by palpation until they were 90 weeks old. Results: Irradiation of fetal and mature (15-week-old) rats with either radiation source at a dose of 0.2 or 1 Gy did not substantially increase the hazard ratio compared with the nonirradiated group. Dose responses (0.2-2.0 Gy) to γ rays were similar among the groups of rats irradiated 1, 3, and 7 weeks after birth. The effect of carbon ions increased along with the age at the time of irradiation, indicating relative biological effectiveness values of 0.2 (−0.3, 0.7), 1.3 (1.0, 1.6), and 2.8 (1.8, 3.9) (mean and 95% confidence interval) for animals that were 1, 3, and 7 weeks of age, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings imply that carbonion therapy may be associated with a risk of secondary breast cancer in humans, the extent of which may depend on the age of the patient at the time of irradiation.

  14. Effects of aging on vasoconstrictor and mechanical properties of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller-Delp, Judy; Spier, Scott A.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Lesniewski, Lisa A.; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Humphrey, J. D.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise capacity and skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise are reduced with advancing age. This reduction in blood flow capacity may be related to increased reactivity of skeletal muscle resistance vessels to vasoconstrictor stimuli. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that aging results in increased vasoconstrictor responses of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles. First-order (1A) arterioles (90-220 microm) from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of young (4 mo) and aged (24 mo) Fischer-344 rats were isolated, cannulated, and pressurized via hydrostatic reservoirs. Vasoconstriction in response to increases in norepinephrine (NE; 1 x 10(-9)-1 x 10(-4) M) and KCl (20-100 mM) concentrations and increases in intraluminal pressure (10-130 cmH(2)O) were evaluated in the absence of flow. Responses to NE and KCl were similar in both soleus and gastrocnemius muscle arterioles from young and aged rats. In contrast, active myogenic responses to changes in intraluminal pressure were diminished in soleus and gastrocnemius arterioles from aged rats. To assess whether alterations in the mechanical properties of resistance arterioles underlie altered myogenic responsiveness, passive diameter responses to pressure and mechanical stiffness were evaluated. There was no effect of age on the structural behavior (passive pressure-diameter relationship) or stiffness of arterioles from either the soleus or gastrocnemius muscles. These results suggest that aging does not result in a nonspecific decrease in vasoconstrictor responsiveness of skeletal muscle arterioles. Rather, aging-induced adaptations of vasoreactivity of resistance arterioles appear to be limited to mechanisms that are uniquely involved in the signaling of the myogenic response.

  15. Four-vessel occlusion model using aged male Wistar rats: a reliable model to resolve the discrepancy related to age in cerebral ischemia research.

    PubMed

    Ancer-Rodríguez, Jesús; Villarreal-Silva, Eliud Enrique; Salazar-Ybarra, Rodolfo Amador; Quiroga-García, Oscar; Rodríguez-Rocha, Humberto; García-García, Aracely; Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Morales-Gómez, Jesús Alberto; Quiroga-Garza, Alejandro; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Xu, Zao Cheng; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo Enrique; Martínez-Ponce-de-León, Angel Raymundo; Guzmán-López, Santos

    2016-06-01

    Animal models of cerebral ischemia have typically been established and performed using young animals, even though cerebral ischemia (CI) affects primarily elderly patients. This situation represents a discrepancy that complicates the translation of novel therapeutic strategies for CI. Models of transient global CI using aged animals have demonstrated an apparent neuroprotective effect on CA1 hippocampal neurons; however, this effect is not completely understood. Our study used a model in which young (3-6 months) and aged (18-21 months) male Wistar rats were subjected to 15 min of transient global CI using the four-vessel occlusion (4 VO) model. We determined that the 4 VO model can be performed on aged rats with a slight increase in mortality rate. In aged rats, the morphological damage was completely established by the 4th day after reperfusion, displaying no difference from their younger counterparts. These results demonstrated the lack of a neuroprotective effect of aging on CA1 hippocampal neurons in aged male Wistar rats. This study determined and characterized the morphological damage to the CA1 area after 15 min of 4 VO in aged male Wistar rats, validating the use of this model in CI and aging research. PMID:25966656

  16. Short-term environmental enrichment enhances synaptic plasticity in hippocampal slices from aged rats.

    PubMed

    Stein, Liana R; O'Dell, Kazuko A; Funatsu, Michiyo; Zorumski, Charles F; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2016-08-01

    Age-associated changes in cognition are mirrored by impairments in cellular models of memory and learning, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In young rodents, environmental enrichment (EE) can enhance memory, alter LTP and LTD, as well as reverse cognitive deficits induced by aging. Whether short-term EE can benefit cognition and synaptic plasticity in aged rodents is unclear. Here, we tested if short-term EE could overcome age-associated impairments in induction of LTP and LTD. LTP and LTD could not be induced in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices in control, aged rats using standard stimuli that are highly effective in young rats. However, exposure of aged littermates to EE for three weeks enabled successful induction of LTP and LTD. EE-facilitated LTP was dependent upon N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). These alterations in synaptic plasticity occurred with elevated levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein and vascular endothelial growth factor, but in the absence of changes in several other synaptic and cellular markers. Importantly, our study suggests that even a relatively short period of EE is sufficient to alter synaptic plasticity and molecular markers linked to cognitive function in aged animals. PMID:27208617

  17. Involvement of cellular metabolism in age-related LTP modifications in rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Drulis-Fajdasz, Dominika; Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies emphasized crucial role of astrocytic glycogen metabolism in regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity in young animals. However, the interplay between age-related synaptic plasticity impairments and changes in energetic metabolism remains obscure. To address this issue, we investigated, in hippocampal slices of young (one month) and aged rats (20-22-months), the impact of glycogen degradation inhibition on LTP, mRNA expression for glycogen metabolism enzymes and morphology of dendritic spines. We show that, whereas in young hippocampi, inhibition of glycogen phosphorolysis disrupts the late phase of LTP in the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pathway, in aged rats, blockade of glycogen phosphorylase tends to enhance it. Gene expression for key energy metabolism enzymes, such as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase and glutamine synthetase showed marked differences between young and aged groups and changes in expression of these enzymes preceded plasticity phenomena. Interestingly, in the aged group, a prominent expression of these enzymes was found also in neurons. Concluding, we show that LTP in the considered pathway is differentially modulated by metabolic processes in young and aging animals, indicating a novel venue of studies aiming at preventing cognitive decline during aging. PMID:26101857

  18. Greater Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation in Hippocampus of Aged Rats Sensitizes Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Ruth M.; Thompson, Vanessa M.; Kitt, Meagan M.; Amat, Jose; Hale, Matthew W.; Frank, Matthew G.; Crysdale, Nicole Y.; Stamper, Christopher E.; Hennessey, Patrick A.; Watkins, Linda R.; Spencer, Robert L.; Lowry, Christopher A.; Maier, Steven F.

    2014-01-01

    Healthy aging individuals are more likely to suffer profound memory impairments following an immune challenge than are younger adults. These challenges produce a brain inflammatory response that is exaggerated with age. Sensitized microglia found in the normal aging brain are responsible for this amplified response, which in turn interferes with processes involved in memory formation. Here, we examine factors that may lead aging to sensitize microglia. Aged rats exhibited higher CORT levels in the hippocampus, but not in plasma, throughout the daytime (diurnal inactive phase). These elevated hippocampal CORT levels were associated with increased hippocampal 11β-HSD1 protein expression, the enzyme that catalyzes glucocorticoid formation, and greater hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation. Intracisternal administration of mifepristone, a GR antagonist, effectively reduced immune-activated proinflammatory responses, specifically from hippocampal microglia, and prevented E. coli-induced memory impairments in aged rats. Voluntary exercise as a therapeutic intervention significantly reduced total hippocampal GR expression. These data strongly suggest that increased GR activation in the aged hippocampus plays a critical role in sensitizing microglia. PMID:25559333

  19. Comparative Metabolism of Carbon Tetrachloride in Rats, Mice and Hamsters Using Gas Uptake and PBPK Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, Karla D. ); Vucelick, Mark E.; Gies, Richard A. ); Zangar, Richard C. ); Weitz, Karl K. ); Poet, Torka S. ); Springer, David L. ); Grant, Donna M. ); Benson, Janet M.

    2000-08-25

    No study has comprehensively compared the rate of metabolism of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) across species. Therefore, the in vivo metabolism of CCl4 was evaluated using groups of male animals (F344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Syrian hamsters) exposed to 40-1800 ppm CCl4 in a closed, recirculating gas-uptake system. For each species, an optimal fit of the family of uptake curves was obtained by adjusting Michaelis-Menten metabolic constants Km (affinity) and Vmax (capacity) using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The results show that the mouse has a slightly higher capacity and lower affinity for metabolizing CCl4 compared to the rat, while the hamster has a higher capacity and lower affinity than either rat or mouse. A comparison of the Vmax to Km ratio, normalized for mg of liver protein (L/hr/mg) across species indicates that hamsters metabolize more CCl4 than either rats or mice, and should be more susceptible to CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. These species comparisons were evaluated against toxicokinetic studies conducted in animals exposed by nose-only inhalation to 20 ppm 14C-labeled CCl4 for 4 hours. The toxicokinetic study results are consistent with the in vivo rates of metabolism, with rats eliminating less radioactivity associated with metabolism (14CO2 and urine/feces) and more radioactivity associated with the parent compound (radioactivity trapped on charcoal) compared to either hamsters or mice. The in vivo metabolic constants determined here, together with in vitro constants determined using rat, mouse, hamster and human liver microsomes, were used to estimate human in vivo metabolic rates of 1.49 mg/hr/kg body weight and 0.25 mg/L for Vmax and Km, respectively. Normalizing the rate of metabolism (Vmax/Km) by mg liver protein, the rate of metabolism of CCl4 differs across species, with hamster > mouse& > rat > human.

  20. The effects of bepridil compared with calcium antagonists on rat and rabbit aorta.

    PubMed

    Winslow, E; Farmer, S; Martorana, M; Marshall, R J

    1986-11-19

    The vasodilator (relaxant) action of the antianginal agent bepridil was compared with that of drugs known to either block membrane calcium channels, to be calmodulin antagonists or to inhibit intracellular calcium flux using rat and rabbit aortic strips. IC50 values were obtained for relaxation of tonic contractions induced by either potassium (K+) or phenylephrine (PE). The order of relaxant specificity against K+ compared with PE in both rabbit and rat tissue preparations was nisoldipine = nifedipine greater than diltiazem greater than verapamil greater than bepridil greater than PrMDI greater than W7 greater than TFP greater than phentolamine. The ratio for flunarizine equalled that of bepridil in rabbit and that of verapamil in rat. The calmodulin antagonist TFP showed additional alpha-adrenoceptor blocking properties. Analysis of concentration response curves to the antagonists together with PE/K+ ratios revealed a different profile for each drug tested on rabbit aorta. The range of PE/K+ ratios was much wider in rabbit compared to rat. The results suggest that, with the method used, rabbit aortic strips offer a simple technique for drug profiling and allows a clearer differentiation between membrane active and intracellularly acting drugs than does rat aorta. The profile of bepridil resembled more that of intracellularly acting drugs suggesting that intracellular actions (possibly calmodulin inhibition) may play a substantial role in its dilator actions on vascular smooth muscle. PMID:3493158

  1. Behaviorally Activated mRNA Expression Profiles Produce Signatures of Learning and Enhanced Inhibition in Aged Rats with Preserved Memory

    PubMed Central

    Haberman, Rebecca P.; Colantuoni, Carlo; Koh, Ming Teng; Gallagher, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Aging is often associated with cognitive decline, but many elderly individuals maintain a high level of function throughout life. Here we studied outbred rats, which also exhibit individual differences across a spectrum of outcomes that includes both preserved and impaired spatial memory. Previous work in this model identified the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus as a region critically affected by age and integral to differing cognitive outcomes. Earlier microarray profiling revealed distinct gene expression profiles in the CA3 region, under basal conditions, for aged rats with intact memory and those with impairment. Because prominent age-related deficits within the CA3 occur during neural encoding of new information, here we used microarray analysis to gain a broad perspective of the aged CA3 transcriptome under activated conditions. Behaviorally-induced CA3 expression profiles differentiated aged rats with intact memory from those with impaired memory. In the activated profile, we observed substantial numbers of genes (greater than 1000) exhibiting increased expression in aged unimpaired rats relative to aged impaired, including many involved in synaptic plasticity and memory mechanisms. This unimpaired aged profile also overlapped significantly with a learning induced gene profile previously acquired in young adults. Alongside the increased transcripts common to both young learning and aged rats with preserved memory, many transcripts behaviorally-activated in the current study had previously been identified as repressed in the aged unimpaired phenotype in basal expression. A further distinct feature of the activated profile of aged rats with intact memory is the increased expression of an ensemble of genes involved in inhibitory synapse function, which could control the phenotype of neural hyperexcitability found in the CA3 region of aged impaired rats. These data support the conclusion that aged subjects with preserved memory recruit adaptive mechanisms to

  2. Behaviorally activated mRNA expression profiles produce signatures of learning and enhanced inhibition in aged rats with preserved memory.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Rebecca P; Colantuoni, Carlo; Koh, Ming Teng; Gallagher, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Aging is often associated with cognitive decline, but many elderly individuals maintain a high level of function throughout life. Here we studied outbred rats, which also exhibit individual differences across a spectrum of outcomes that includes both preserved and impaired spatial memory. Previous work in this model identified the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus as a region critically affected by age and integral to differing cognitive outcomes. Earlier microarray profiling revealed distinct gene expression profiles in the CA3 region, under basal conditions, for aged rats with intact memory and those with impairment. Because prominent age-related deficits within the CA3 occur during neural encoding of new information, here we used microarray analysis to gain a broad perspective of the aged CA3 transcriptome under activated conditions. Behaviorally-induced CA3 expression profiles differentiated aged rats with intact memory from those with impaired memory. In the activated profile, we observed substantial numbers of genes (greater than 1000) exhibiting increased expression in aged unimpaired rats relative to aged impaired, including many involved in synaptic plasticity and memory mechanisms. This unimpaired aged profile also overlapped significantly with a learning induced gene profile previously acquired in young adults. Alongside the increased transcripts common to both young learning and aged rats with preserved memory, many transcripts behaviorally-activated in the current study had previously been identified as repressed in the aged unimpaired phenotype in basal expression. A further distinct feature of the activated profile of aged rats with intact memory is the increased expression of an ensemble of genes involved in inhibitory synapse function, which could control the phenotype of neural hyperexcitability found in the CA3 region of aged impaired rats. These data support the conclusion that aged subjects with preserved memory recruit adaptive mechanisms to

  3. Protective potential of Bacopa monniera (Brahmi) extract on aluminum induced cerebellar toxicity and associated neuromuscular status in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, S; Mahdi, A A; Hasan, M; Mitra, K; Mahdi, F

    2011-01-01

    The present study attempts to assess the comparative effects of Bacopa monniera, (40 mg/kg body weight) and donepezil (2.5 mg/kg b. wt) on aluminum (100 mg / kg b. wt. of AlCl3) mediated oxidative damage in the cerebellum of aged rats (24 months) along with the associated dysfunctioning of neuromuscular coordination and motor activity. A significant decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and increased total reacting oxygen species, lipid and protein peroxidation products observed in aluminum exposed rats. We observed that treatment with B. monniera extract restored the altered antioxidant enzyme activities more, when compared with donepezil. However, acetylcholinesterase showed similar effect both in donepezil and B. monniera treated groups. The content of aluminum was increased in all experimental groups, however, iron content was found increased in all groups except the B. monniera treated groups. Moreover, aluminum treated groups of rats exhibited significant changes in behavioral profiles but these changes were in both B. monniera and donepezil treated groups. The light microscopic and ultrastructural studies revealed damaged Purkinje's neurons and altered granular cell layer along with the increased accumulation of lipofuscin granules in aluminum treated animals. These changes were quite less pronounced in B. monniera group than that of donepezil and this may be due to the reduction of excess iron content by B. monniera. On the basis of our results it may be concluded that Al may be linked with cerebellar degeneration and neuromuscular disorders while Bacopa monniera extract helps in reversing these changes. PMID:21366957

  4. Effect of Aging on Adipose Tissue Inflammation in the Knee Joints of F344BN Rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Huebner, Janet L; Kraus, Virginia B; Griffin, Timothy M

    2016-09-01

    The infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) secretes inflammatory mediators in osteoarthritic knees, but the effect of aging on IFP inflammation is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that aging increases basal and interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-stimulated IFP inflammation in 10-, 20-, and 30-month-old male F344BN F1-hybrid rats. IFPs were cultured ex vivo for 24 hours and treated ±1ng/mL IL-1β to simulate injury-induced inflammation. IFP inflammation was evaluated by measuring secreted cytokine concentrations and by quantitative expression of immunoregulatory and pro- and anti-adipogenic genes. With age, osteoarthritis pathology increased and IFP mass decreased. Although adipocyte size did not change with age, variation in adipocyte size was positively associated with synovial thickness independent of age whereas associations with cartilage damage were age dependent. In the absence of IL-1β, aging was associated with a significant increase in IFP secretion of tumor necrosis factor α by 67% and IL-13 by 35% and a reduction in the expression of immunoregulatory M2 macrophage genes. However, following an IL-1β challenge, adipogenesis markers decreased and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines increased independent of age. The lone exception was leptin, which decreased >70% with age. Thus, although aging promotes osteoarthritis risk by increasing basal inflammation, our findings also revealed a potentially protective effect of aging by decreasing IL-1β-stimulated leptin production. PMID:26450946

  5. Alcohol-induced decrease in muscle protein synthesis associated with increased binding of mTOR and raptor: Comparable effects in young and mature rats

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Charles H; Pruznak, Anne M; Nystrom, Gerald J; Vary, Thomas C

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute alcohol (EtOH) intoxication decreases muscle protein synthesis via inhibition of mTOR-dependent translation initiation. However, these studies have been performed in relatively young rapidly growing rats in which muscle protein accretion is more sensitive to growth factor and nutrient stimulation. Furthermore, some in vivo-produced effects of EtOH vary in an age-dependent manner. The hypothesis tested in the present study was that young rats will show a more pronounced decrement in muscle protein synthesis than older mature rats in response to acute EtOH intoxication. Methods Male F344 rats were studied at approximately 3 (young) or 12 (mature) months of age. Young rats were injected intraperitoneally with 75 mmol/kg of EtOH, and mature rats injected with either 75 or 90 mmol/kg EtOH. Time-matched saline-injected control rats were included for both age groups. Gastrocnemius protein synthesis and the activity of the mTOR pathway were assessed 2.5 h after EtOH using [3H]-labeled phenylalanine and the phosphorylation of various protein factors known to regulate peptide-chain initiation. Results Blood alcohol levels (BALs) were lower in mature rats compared to young rats after administration of 75 mmol/kg EtOH (154 ± 23 vs 265 ± 24 mg/dL). However, injection of 90 mmol/kg EtOH in mature rats produced BALs comparable to that of young rats (281 ± 33 mg/dL). EtOH decreased muscle protein synthesis similarly in both young and high-dose EtOH-treated mature rats. The EtOH-induced changes in both groups were associated with a concomitant reduction in 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, and redistribution of eIF4E between the active eIF4E·eIF4G and inactive eIF4E·4EBP1 complex. Moreover, EtOH increased the binding of mTOR with raptor in a manner which appeared to be AMPK- and TSC-independent. In contrast, although muscle protein synthesis was unchanged in mature rats given low-dose EtOH, compared to control values, the phosphorylation of rpS6 and eIF4G was decreased

  6. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF THE BARK OF FICUS BENGALENSIS IN PLANTS OF DIFFERENT AGE

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vikas V.; Patil, Vijay R.

    2010-01-01

    The medicinal plants have been selected for thorough studies from indigenous folk medicines, Ayurvedic, Unani and Siddha systems of medicines. The aim of this study deals with the comparative evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of the bark of Ficus bengalensis in plants of different age. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by rat paw edema model induced by carrageenan for acute inflammation and cotton pellet granuloma model for chronic inflammation. Indomethacin was used as a standard drug. The various extracts were studied for their anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced hind paw edema in rats and the paw volume was measured plethysmometrically from 0 to 3h after injection. We have determined the anti-inflammatory activity of various extracts of the bark of Ficus bengalensis with oral administration doses of 300 and 600 mg/kg/day of body weight to healthy animals. Positive results for flavonoids, sterols, and triterpene, tannins and saponins compounds were investigated by phytochemical analysis. The ethanolic extract of younger plant showed a greater anti-inflammatory effect compared with the standard drug indomethacin. Present studies besides confirming anti-inflammatory activity of the ethanolic extract of younger more potent than mature plant help to identify from the comparative study of the bark of Ficus bengalensis. PMID:24825975

  7. Radioautographic measurement of electron-induced epidermal kinetic effects in different aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, E.V.; Burns, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    We have previously shown that the ability of rat epidermal cells to repair electron-induced DNA damage decreases as a function of age. The present investigation was performed to examine the relationship between this finding and sensitivity of epidermal cells to the cytotoxic effects of the radiation. Male CD rats at ages 2, 28, 100, 200, 420, and 728 days were injected with (/sup 3/H)-thymidine (( /sup 3/H)Thd) at a dose of 2 mu Ci/g body weight. One hour later, the rats were anesthetized and the dorsal skin irradiated with various doses of 0.8 meV electrons at a dose rate of 660 rads/min. At 24 h after irradiation, radioautographs were made of a sheet of epidermis that was separated by trypsinization from the underlying dermis. Labeled cells were scored either as singlets or doublets (adjacent labeled cells). The percent labeled cells and percent labeled cells as doublets were determined. The estimated labeling index (the proportion of cells labeled by a single exposure to (/sup 3/H)Thd) of the epidermal basal layer decreased as a function of age. The slope of the semilog plot of the percent labeled cells as doublets as a function of electron dose indicates that the Do value decreases with increasing age. The results show, however, that the greatest difference in sensitivity occurs between 2-day (neonatal) and 28-day (pubescent) animals and again between 420-day (adult) and 728-day (senescent) animals.

  8. Progesterone and vitamin D: improvement after traumatic brain injury in middle-aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Huiling; Hua, Fang; Wang, Jun; Sayeed, Iqbal; Wang, Xiaojing; Chen, Zhengjia; Yousuf, Seema; Atif, Fahim; Stein, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone (PROG) and vitamin D hormone (VDH) have both shown promise in treating traumatic brain injury (TBI). Both modulate apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity. We investigated whether 21 days of VDH deficiency would alter cognitive behavior after TBI and whether combined PROG and VDH would improve behavioral and morphological outcomes more than either hormone alone in VDH-deficient middle-aged rats given bilateral contusions of the medial frontal cortex. PROG (16 mg/kg) and VDH (5 µg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally 1 hour post-injury. Eight additional doses of PROG were injected subcutaneously over 7 days post-injury. VDH deficiency itself did not significantly reduce baseline behavioral functions or aggravate impaired cognitive outcomes. Combination therapy showed moderate improvement in preserving spatial and reference memory but was not significantly better than PROG monotherapy. However, combination therapy significantly reduced neuronal loss and the proliferation of reactive astrocytes, and showed better efficacy compared to VDH or PROG alone in preventing MAP-2 degradation. VDH+PROG combination therapy may attenuate some of the potential long-term, subtle, pathophysiological consequences of brain injury in older subjects. PMID:23896206

  9. The role of hepatic & splenic macrophages in E. coli-induced memory impairments in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Ruth M.; Thompson, Vanessa M.; Arnold, T. Hayes; Frank, Matthew G.; Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    2014-01-01

    Bi-directional communication between the peripheral and central nervous systems has been extensively demonstrated. Aged rats exhibit a prolonged proinflammatory response in the hippocampus region of the brain following a peripheral bacterial infection, and this response in turn causes robust memory declines. Here we aimed to determine whether hepatic or splenic macrophages play a role in the maintenance of this central response. Proinflammatory cytokines measured in liver and spleen four days following an E. coli infection revealed a potentiated proinflammatory response in liver, and to a lesser extent in spleen, in aged relative to young rats. To determine whether this potentiated response was caused by impaired bacterial clearance in these organs, E. coli colony forming units in liver and spleen were measured 4 days after infection, and there were no difference between young and aged rats in either organ. No E. coli was detected in the hippocampus, eliminating the possibility that the aged blood brain barrier allowed E. coli to enter the brain. Depletion of hepatic and splenic macrophages with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes effectively eliminated the proinflammatory response to E. coli at four days in both organs. However, this treatment failed to reduce the proinflammatory response in the hippocampus. Moreover, depletion of peripheral macrophages from liver and spleen did not prevent E. coli-induced memory impairment. These data strongly suggest that hepatic and splenic macrophages do not play a major role in the long-lasting maintenance of the proinflammatory response in the hippocampus of aged rats following a bacterial infection, or the memory declines that this response produces. PMID:25043992

  10. Behavior in the elevated plus maze is differentially affected by testing conditions in rats under and over three weeks of age.

    PubMed

    Albani, Sarah H; Andrawis, Marina M; Abella, Rio Jeane H; Fulghum, John T; Vafamand, Naghmeh; Dumas, Theodore C

    2015-01-01

    The late postnatal period in rats is marked by numerous changes in perceptual and cognitive abilities. As such, age-related variation in cognitive test performance might result in part from disparate sensitivities to environmental factors. To better understand how testing conditions might interact with age, we assessed anxiety behavior on an elevated plus maze (EPM) in juvenile rats around 3 weeks of age under diverse testing conditions. Plasma corticosterone and neuronal activation patterns in the forebrain were examined after maze exposure. We found that anxiety was differentially expressed during different stages of late postnatal development. Bright illumination and morning testing encouraged greatest open arm exploration on the EPM in younger animals, while older rats explored open areas more under dim illumination in the morning compared to bright illumination in the afternoon/evening. Older rats exhibited higher plasma corticosterone levels at baseline compared to younger rats; however, this trend was reversed for post-testing corticosterone. Additionally, post-testing corticosterone levels were inversely related to time of testing. Compared to testing in the morning, EPM exposure in the afternoon/evening elicited greater neuronal Arc expression in the amygdala. Arc expression in the amygdala after morning testing was greater at P22-24 than P17-19. In layer 2/3 of primary visual cortex, Arc expression was elevated in younger animals and age interacted with time of testing to produce opposing effects at P17-19 and P22-24. These data suggest that age-related differences in anxiety-associated behavior during the late postnatal period are due in part to changes in light sensitivity and emergence of a circadian cycle for corticosterone. The findings illustrate that late postnatal behavioral development in rodents is a complex orchestration of changes in neural systems involved in perception, cognition, affect and homeostatic regulation. PMID:25741257

  11. Behavior in the elevated plus maze is differentially affected by testing conditions in rats under and over three weeks of age

    PubMed Central

    Albani, Sarah H.; Andrawis, Marina M.; Abella, Rio Jeane H.; Fulghum, John T.; Vafamand, Naghmeh; Dumas, Theodore C.

    2015-01-01

    The late postnatal period in rats is marked by numerous changes in perceptual and cognitive abilities. As such, age-related variation in cognitive test performance might result in part from disparate sensitivities to environmental factors. To better understand how testing conditions might interact with age, we assessed anxiety behavior on an elevated plus maze (EPM) in juvenile rats around 3 weeks of age under diverse testing conditions. Plasma corticosterone and neuronal activation patterns in the forebrain were examined after maze exposure. We found that anxiety was differentially expressed during different stages of late postnatal development. Bright illumination and morning testing encouraged greatest open arm exploration on the EPM in younger animals, while older rats explored open areas more under dim illumination in the morning compared to bright illumination in the afternoon/evening. Older rats exhibited higher plasma corticosterone levels at baseline compared to younger rats; however, this trend was reversed for post-testing corticosterone. Additionally, post-testing corticosterone levels were inversely related to time of testing. Compared to testing in the morning, EPM exposure in the afternoon/evening elicited greater neuronal Arc expression in the amygdala. Arc expression in the amygdala after morning testing was greater at P22–24 than P17–19. In layer 2/3 of primary visual cortex, Arc expression was elevated in younger animals and age interacted with time of testing to produce opposing effects at P17–19 and P22–24. These data suggest that age-related differences in anxiety-associated behavior during the late postnatal period are due in part to changes in light sensitivity and emergence of a circadian cycle for corticosterone. The findings illustrate that late postnatal behavioral development in rodents is a complex orchestration of changes in neural systems involved in perception, cognition, affect and homeostatic regulation. PMID:25741257

  12. Effects of age and sex on cerebrovascular function in the rat middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of estrogen on cerebrovascular function are well known, the age-dependent deleterious effects of estrogen are largely unstudied. It was hypothesized that age and sex interact in modulating cerebrovascular reactivity to vasopressin (VP) by altering the role of prostanoids in vascular function. Methods Female (F) Sprague–Dawley rats approximating key stages of “hormonal aging” in humans were studied: premenopausal (mature multigravid, MA, cyclic, 5–6 months) and postmenopausal (reproductively senescent, RS, acyclic, 10–12 months). Age-matched male (M) rats were also studied. Reactivity to VP (10−12–10−7 M) was measured in pressurized middle cerebral artery segments in the absence or presence of selective inhibitors of COX-1 (SC560, SC, 1 μM) or COX-2 (NS398, NS, 10 μM). VP-stimulated release of PGI2 and TXA2 were measured using radioimmunoassay of 6-keto-PGF1α and TXB2 (stable metabolites, pg/mg dry wt/45 min). Results In M, there were no changes in VP-induced vasoconstriction with age. Further, there were no significant differences in basal or in low- or high-VP-stimulated PGI2 or TXA2 production in younger or older M. In contrast, there were marked differences in cerebrovascular reactivity and prostanoid release with advancing age in F. Older RS F exhibited reduced maximal constrictor responses to VP, which can be attributed to enhanced COX-1 derived dilator prostanoids. VP-induced vasoconstriction in younger MA F utilized both COX-1 and COX-2 derived constrictor prostanoids. Further, VP-stimulated PGI2 and TXA2 production was enhanced by endogenous estrogen and decreased with advancing age in F, but not in M rats. Conclusions This is the first study to examine the effects of age and sex on the mechanisms underlying cerebrovascular reactivity to VP. Interestingly, VP-mediated constriction was reduced by age in F, but was unchanged in M rats. Additionally, it was observed

  13. Cerebrolysin improves memory and ameliorates neuronal atrophy in spontaneously hypertensive, aged rats.

    PubMed

    Solis-Gaspar, Carlos; Vazquez-Roque, Ruben A; De Jesús Gómez-Villalobos, Ma; Flores, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rat has been used as an animal model of vascular dementia (VD). Our previous report showed that, SH rats exhibited dendritic atrophy of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 dorsal hippocampus and layers 3 and 5 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) at 8 months of age. In addition, we showed that cerebrolysin (Cbl), a neurotrophic peptide mixture, reduces the dendritic atrophy in aged animal models. This study aimed to determine whether Cbl was capable of reducing behavioral and neuronal alterations, in old female SH rats. The level of diastolic and systolic pressure was measured every month for the 6 first months and only animals with more than 160 mm Hg of systolic pressure were used. Female SH rats (6 months old) received 6 months of Cbl treatment. Immediately after the Cbl treatment, two behavioral tests were applied, the Morris water maze test for memory and learning and locomotor activity in novel environments. Immediately after the last behavioral test, dendritic morphology was studied with the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by a Sholl analysis. Clearly, SH rats with Cbl showed an increase in the dendritic length and dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 in the dorsal hippocampus and layers 3 and 5 of the PFC. Interestingly, Cbl improved memory of the old SH rats. Our results support the possibility that Cbl may have beneficial effects on the management of brain alterations in an animal model with VD. Synapse 70:378-389, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27164468

  14. Effect of age and diet on renal cadmium retention in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kostial, K

    1984-01-01

    The results of our previous and recent work on cadmium metabolism in relation to age and diet are presented. Experiments were performed on albino rats aged 1-26 weeks. In some experiments rats were given different foods (milk, meat, bread) instead of standard rat diet. Some animals received trisodium calcium salt of diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) intraperitoneally to decrease cadmium retention. Radioactive cadmium (115mCd) was administered orally and intraperitoneally. Whole body (WB), carcass (C) and organ (kidney, liver and brain) retentions were determined 1 and 2 weeks after a single radioisotope administration. The results are expressed as percentages of the administered dose (% D) and as percentages of whole body (% WB) and carcass (% C) radioactivities. After oral administration whole-body cadmium retention was higher in sucklings than in weaned animals, primarily due to increased gut retention. The kidney retention of orally administered cadmium was about 5-7 times higher in sucklings than in older rats. Cadmium distribution (% C) was similar after oral and intraperitoneal administration. In sucklings, kidney retention made a lower fraction of the carcass radioactivity one week after 115mCd administration but reached adult values a week later. Liver retention in sucklings was a slightly lower fraction of the carcass radioactivity than in older rats at both time intervals. Brain retention (% C) was about 10 times higher in sucklings than in older rats throughout the experiment. Preliminary data on the influence of dietary treatments and treatment with DTPA indicate that some treatments which influence cadmium retention also influence cadmium distribution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6734570

  15. The GABAA antagonist bicuculline attenuates progesterone-induced memory impairments in middle-aged ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Braden, B. Blair; Kingston, Melissa L.; Koenig, Elizabeth N.; Lavery, Courtney N.; Tsang, Candy W. S.; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    In women, high levels of natural progesterone have been associated with detrimental cognitive effects via the “maternal amnesia” phenomenon as well as in controlled experiments. In aged ovariectomized (Ovx) rats, progesterone has been shown to impair cognition and impact the GABAergic system in cognitive brain regions. Here, we tested whether the GABAergic system is a mechanism of progesterone’s detrimental cognitive effects in the Ovx rat by attempting to reverse progesterone-induced impairments via concomitant treatment with the GABAA antagonist, bicuculline. Thirteen month old rats received Ovx plus daily vehicle, progesterone, bicuculline, or progesterone+bicuculline injections beginning 2 weeks prior to testing. The water radial-arm maze was used to evaluate spatial working and reference memory. During learning, rats administered progesterone made more working memory errors than those administered vehicle, and this impairment was reversed by the addition of bicuculline. The progesterone impairment was transient and all animals performed similarly by the end of regular testing. On the last day of testing, a 6 hour delay was administered to evaluate memory retention. Progesterone-treated rats were the only group to increase working memory errors with the delay relative to baseline performance; again, the addition of bicuculline prevented the progesterone-induced impairment. The vehicle, bicuculline, and progesterone+bicuculline groups were not impaired by the delay. The current rodent findings corroborate prior research reporting progesterone-induced detriments on cognition in women and in the aging Ovx rat. Moreover, the data suggest that the progesterone-induced cognitive impairment is, in part, related to the GABAergic system. Given that progesterone is included in numerous clinically-prescribed hormone therapies and contraceptives (e.g., micronized), and as synthetic analogs, further research is warranted to better understand the parameters and

  16. Aqueous Extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill Prevents Age-Related Changes in the Myenteric Plexus of the Jejunum in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Santi-Rampazzo, Ana Paula; Schoffen, João Paulo Ferreira; Cirilo, Carla Possani; Zapater, Mariana Cristina Vicente Umada; Vicentini, Fernando Augusto; Soares, Andréia Assunção; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Buttow, Nilza Cristina; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the supplementation with aqueous extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM) on biometric and blood parameters and quantitative morphology of the myenteric plexus and jejunal wall in aging Wistar rats. The animals were euthanized at 7 (C7), 12 (C12 and CA12), and 23 months of age (C23 and CA23). The CA12 and CA23 groups received a daily dose of ABM extract (26 mg/animal) via gavage, beginning at 7 months of age. A reduction in food intake was observed with aging, with increases in the Lee index, retroperitoneal fat, intestinal length, and levels of total cholesterol and total proteins. Aging led to a reduction of the total wall thickness, mucosa tunic, villus height, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells. In the myenteric plexus, aging quantitatively decreased the population of HuC/D+ neuronal and S100+ glial cells, with maintenance of the nNOS+ nitrergic subpopulation and increase in the cell body area of these populations. Supplementation with the ABM extract preserved the myenteric plexus in old animals, in which no differences were detected in the density and cell body profile of neurons and glial cells in the CA12 and CA23 groups, compared with C7 group. The supplementation with the aqueous extract of ABM efficiently maintained myenteric plexus homeostasis, which positively influenced the physiology and prevented the death of the neurons and glial cells. PMID:25960748

  17. Sympathetic axonopathies and hyperinnervation in the small intestine smooth muscle of aged Fischer 344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert J.; Hudson, Cherie N.; Powley, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    It is well documented that the intrinsic enteric nervous system of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract sustains neuronal losses and reorganizes as it ages. In contrast, age-related remodeling of the extrinsic sympathetic projections to the wall of the gut is poorly characterized. The present experiment, therefore, surveyed the sympathetic projections to the aged small intestine for axonopathies. Furthermore, the experiment evaluated the specific prediction that catecholaminergic inputs undergo hyperplastic changes. Jejunal tissue was collected from 3-, 8-, 16-, and 24-month-old male Fischer 344 rats, prepared as whole mounts consisting of the muscularis, and processed immunohistochemically for tyrosine hydroxylase, the enzymatic marker for norepinephrine, and either the protein CD163 or the protein MHCII, both phenotypical markers for macrophages. Four distinctive sympathetic axonopathy profiles occurred in the small intestine of the aged rat: (1) swollen and dystrophic terminals, (2) tangled axons, (3) discrete hyperinnervated loci in the smooth muscle wall, including at the bases of Peyer's patches, and (4) ectopic hyperplastic or hyperinnervating axons in the serosa/subserosal layers. In many cases, the axonopathies occurred at localized and limited foci, involving only a few axon terminals, in a pattern consistent with incidences of focal ischemic, vascular, or traumatic insult. The present observations underscore the complexity of the processes of aging on the neural circuitry of the gut, with age-related GI functional impairments likely reflecting a constellation of adjustments that range from selective neuronal losses, through accumulation of cellular debris, to hyperplasias and hyperinnervation of sympathetic inputs. PMID:24104187

  18. A 3-month age difference profoundly alters the primary rat stromal vascular fraction phenotype.

    PubMed

    Quaade, Marlene Louise; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Sheikh, Søren Paludan

    2016-06-01

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) is a heterogeneous population obtained from collagenase digestion of adipose tissue. When cultured the population becomes more homogeneous and the cells are then termed adipose stromal/stem cells (ASCs). Both the freshly isolated primary SVF population and the cultured ASC population possess regenerative abilities suggested to be mediated by paracrine mechanisms mainly. The use of ASCs and SVF cells, both in animal studies and human clinical studies, has dramatically increased during recent years. However, more knowledge regarding optimal donor characteristics such as age is demanded. Here we report that even a short age difference has an impact on the phenotype of primary SVF cells. We observed that a 3-month difference in relatively young adult rats affects the expression pattern of several mesenchymal stem cell markers in their primary SVF. The younger animals had significantly more CD90+/CD44+/CD29+/PDGFRα+primary cells, than the aged rats, suggesting an age dependent shift in the relative cell type distribution within the population. Taken together with recent studies of much more pronounced age differences, our data strongly suggest that donor age is a very critical parameter that should be taken into account in future stem cell studies, especially when using primary cells. PMID:27265810

  19. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer ({sup 14}C)-{alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels.

  20. Dietary HMB and β-alanine co-supplementation does not improve in situ muscle function in sedentary, aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Russ, David W; Acksel, Cara; Boyd, Iva M; Maynard, John; McCorkle, Katherine W; Edens, Neile K; Garvey, Sean M

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dietary β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) combined with β-alanine (β-Ala) in sedentary, aged male rats. It has been suggested that dietary HMB or β-Ala supplementation may mitigate age-related declines in muscle strength and fatigue resistance. A total of 20 aged Sprague-Dawley rats were studied. At age 20 months, 10 rats were administered a control, purified diet and 10 rats were administered a purified diet supplemented with both HMB and β-Ala (HMB+β-Ala) for 8 weeks (approximately equivalent to 3 and 2.4 g per day human dose). We measured medial gastrocnemius (MG) size, force, fatigability, and myosin composition. We also evaluated an array of protein markers related to muscle mitochondria, protein synthesis and breakdown, and autophagy. HMB+β-Ala had no significant effects on body weight, MG mass, force or fatigability, myosin composition, or muscle quality. Compared with control rats, those fed HMB+β-Ala exhibited a reduced (41%, P = 0.039) expression of muscle RING-finger protein 1 (MURF1), a common marker of protein degradation. Muscle from rats fed HMB+β-Ala also exhibited a 45% reduction (P = 0.023) in p70s6K phosphorylation following fatiguing stimulation. These data suggest that HMB+β-Ala at the dose studied may reduce muscle protein breakdown by reducing MURF1 expression, but has minimal effects on muscle function in this model of uncomplicated aging. They do not, however, rule out potential benefits of HMB+β-Ala co-supplementation at other doses or durations of supplementation in combination with exercise or in situations where extreme muscle protein breakdown and loss of mass occur (e.g., bedrest, cachexia, failure-to-thrive). PMID:26579948

  1. Comparative study of choleretic agents in anesthetized rats as well as in restrained and and unrestrained rats, with or without compensation for biliary loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrid, C.; Dureng, G.; Tachon, J.; Duchene-Marullaz, P.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted on Wistar rats by using 3 control choleretic agents: 1-phenyl-1-hydroxy n-pentane, dehydrocholic acid, and phenyl-dimethylacetic acid. The effects of these agents were compared in different experimental conditions. The comparative study of choleretic agents in anesthetized rats, in restrained and unrestrained rats, with or without compensation for biliary loss by the biliary secretion of restrained or unrestrained rats does not show, in systematic pharmecodynamic investigations, an obvious superiority over the methods based on the simple technique.

  2. Influence of age and of desmotropic drugs on the step phenomenon observed in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Vogel, H G; Hilgner, W

    1979-03-31

    Comprehensive analysis of the mechanical properties of rat skin revealed the "step phenomenon". This particular observation was made after constant strain rate (analysis of stress strain curves) as well as after constant load (creep experiments). Relative low extensions or low loads were necessary to provoke the steps. In most cases two, sometimes three steps were observed. The step phenomenon was found mainly in skin strips punched out perpendicularly to the body axis. Probably some bonds in the fibrous network are broken giving way to additional elongation whereafter stronger links take over the stress. Since earlier studies demonstrated a pronounced influence of age and of desmotropic drugs on mechanical properties at ultimate load, e.g., tensile strength, ultimate modulus of elasticity, and ultimate strain, also the step phenomenon was studied under these conditions. In stress-strain experiments most of the steps were found at the ages of 2 and 4 months. Total stress loss and total work loss due to the steps were the highest at the age of 4 months. If, however, these values were calculated as percentage of ultimate values, the highest figures were found in young animals. Elongation gain due to the steps also showed a maximum at time of maturation, e.g., 4 months. Similar findings were achieved in creep experiments at medium load (200 g). After treatment with prednisolone acetate more steps and after treatment with D-penicillamine fewer steps were observed. In stress-strain experiments total stress loss and total work loss due to steps were more than twice as high than controls after prednisolone treatment and only one half after D-penicillamine. If calculated as percentage of ultimate stress or percentage of work input, these changes disappeared because of similar changes at ultimate load. However, elongation gain due to steps, which was not significantly influenced by prednisolone acetate but significantly decreased by D-penicillamine, showed the same changes

  3. The influence of persistent crowding on the age changes of behavioral parameters and survival characteristics of rats.

    PubMed

    Skalicky, M; Bubna-Littitz, H; Hofecker, G

    1984-12-01

    One hundred fifty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to crowding (12 rats/Makrolon-IV cage) from an age of 5 months onwards. An equal number from the same age cohort served as a control (6 rats/Makrolon-IV cage). As part of an age-test program, behavioral parameters (spontaneous motor activity, reactive motor activity and maze-learning ability) were measured at various ages between 8 and 30 months. The rats were sacrificed for additional measurements after the behavioral tests. Survival curves and age-specific mortality rates were calculated for those rats which died spontaneously in the course of the study. Control rats showed a significant decrease in spontaneous motor activity after an age of 18 months. Reactive motor activity of the controls revealed a fall in the number of large movements between 9 and 15 months, whereas the number of small movements increased up to an age of 30 months. Crowding conditions increased significantly both spontaneous and reactive activity. Maze-learning ability declined significantly with age in the controls whereas crowded rats revealed a tendency to better performance which seemed to be submitted to a seasonal rhythm. Crowded rats showed an improved survival characteristic, beginning at an age of 700 days. Mortality curves turned out to be distinct and parallel by straight line regression. It has been concluded that the positive effects of crowding on behavioral parameters and survival could be attributed to a decrease in vulnerability rather than to a lowered rate of aging. PMID:6521513

  4. Interrogating the Aged Striatum: Robust Survival of Grafted Dopamine Neurons in Aging Rats Produces Inferior Behavioral Recovery and Evidence of Impaired Integration

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Timothy J.; O’Malley, Jennifer; Rademacher, David J.; Stancati, Jennifer A.; Sisson, Kellie A.; Sortwell, Caryl E.; Paumier, Katrina L.; Gebremedhin, Kibrom G.; Steece-Collier, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Advanced age is the primary risk factor for Parkinson disease (PD). In PD patients and rodent models of PD, advanced age is associated with inferior symptomatic benefit following intrastriatal grafting of embryonic dopamine (DA) neurons, a pattern believed to result from decreased survival and reinnervation provided by grafted neurons in the aged host. To help understand the capacity of the aged, parkinsonian striatum to be remodeled with new DA terminals, we used a grafting model and examined whether increasing the number of grafted DA neurons in aged rats would translate to enhanced behavioral recovery. Young (3 mo), middle-aged (15 mo), and aged (22 mo) parkinsonian rats were grafted with proportionately increasing numbers of embryonic ventral mesencephalic (VM) cells to evaluate whether the limitations of the graft environment in subjects of advancing age can be offset by increased numbers of transplanted neurons. Despite robust survival of grafted neurons in aged rats, reinnervation of striatal neurons remained inferior and amelioration of levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) was delayed or absent. This study demonstrates that: 1) counter to previous evidence, under certain conditions the aged striatum can support robust survival of grafted DA neurons; and 2) unknown factors associated with the aged striatum result in inferior integration of graft and host, and continue to present obstacles to full therapeutic efficacy of DA cell-based therapy in this model of aging. PMID:25771169

  5. Hyperactivity in the Gunn rat model of neonatal jaundice: age-related attenuation and emergence of gait deficits

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, John A.; Shuler, Jeffrey M.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Stanford, Kimberly G.; Ma, Delin; Bittel, Douglas C.; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Shapiro, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal jaundice resulting from elevated unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) occurs in 60–80% of newborn infants. Although mild jaundice is generally considered harmless, little is known about its long-term consequences. Recent studies have linked mild bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction (BIND) with a range of neurological syndromes, including attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. The goal of this study was to measure BIND across the lifespan in the Gunn rat model of BIND. Methods Using a sensitive force plate actometer, we measured locomotor activity and gait in jaundiced (jj) Gunn rats versus their non-jaundiced (Nj) littermates. Data were analyzed for young adult (3–4 months), early middle-aged (9–10 months), and late middle-aged (17–20 months) male rats. Results jj rats exhibited lower body weights at all ages and a hyperactivity that resolved at 17–20 months of age. Increased propulsive force and gait velocity accompanied hyperactivity during locomotor bouts at 9–10 months in jj rats. Stride length did not differ between the two groups at this age. Hyperactivity normalized and gait deficits, including decreased stride length, propulsive force, and gait velocity, emerged in the 17–20-month-old jj rats. Conclusions These results demonstrate that, in aging, hyperactivity decreases with the onset of gait deficits in the Gunn rat model of BIND. PMID:25518009

  6. Chronically lowering sympathetic activity protects sympathetic nerves in spleens from aging F344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Sam D.; Kozic, Brooke; Molinaro, Christine; Thyagarajan, Srinivasan; Ghamsary, Mark; Lubahn, Cheri L.; Lorton, Dianne; Bellinger, Denise L.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated how increased sympathetic tone during middle-age affects the splenic sympathetic neurotransmission. Fifteen-month-old F344 rats received rilmenidine (0, 0.5 or 1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p. for 90 days) to lower sympathetic tone. Controls for age were untreated 3 or 18M rats. We report that rilmenidine (1) reduced plasma and splenic norepinephrine concentrations and splenic norepinephrine turnover, and partially reversed the sympathetic nerve loss; and (2) increased β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) density and β-AR-stimulated cAMP production. Collectively, these findings suggest a protective effect of lowering sympathetic tone on sympathetic nerve integrity, and enhanced sympathetic neurotransmission in secondary immune organs. PMID:22546498

  7. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human
    lymphocytes.

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  8. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R.

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  9. Vasodilator responses to dopamine in rat perfused mesentery are age-dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Wanstall, J. C.; O'Donnell, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    1. Dose-dependent vasodilator responses to dopamine, isoprenaline, noradrenaline, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and sodium nitroprusside were obtained in isolated perfused mesentery preparations, taken from reserpine-treated rats of different ages. The preparations were pretreated with phenoxybenzamine (1 microM) and perfused with physiological salt solution containing cocaine (10 microM), additional KCl (20 mM) and vasopressin (0.1 microM). 2. Vasodilator responses to dopamine were abolished by the dopamine1 (DA1)-selective antagonist SCH 23390 (10 nM) and those to isoprenaline by propranolol (1 microM), but the vasodilator responses to noradrenaline were abolished only when SCH 23390 and propranolol were used together. This indicated that dopamine was acting via DA1-receptors, isoprenaline via beta-adrenoceptors and that noradrenaline could act via DA1-receptors and beta-adrenoceptors in this preparation. 3. Responses to all the vasodilator drugs decreased in magnitude between the ages of 1 and 2 months. Responses to dopamine declined further in 4 month-old rats and were negligible at 6 or 22-24 months of age. Responses to isoprenaline were well maintained up to 6 months of age, but were negligible at 22-24 months. 4. It is concluded that, in the rat mesenteric vasculature, there is a non-specific decline in responses to vasodilator drugs during development (1 to 2 months). Subsequently there is a specific decline in DA1-receptor-mediated and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated responses; the former are lost at an earlier age than the latter. This different time course suggests that age influences receptor numbers, or their coupling to adenylate cyclase, rather than a post-receptor event in the adenylate cyclase/cyclic AMP pathway. PMID:2804550

  10. EFFECTS OF SUSTAINED PRONGF BLOCKADE ON ATTENTIONAL CAPACITIES IN AGED RATS WITH COMPROMISED CHOLINERGIC SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    YEGLA, BRITTNEY; PARIKH, VINAY

    2014-01-01

    Disruption in nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling via trkA receptors compromises the integrity of the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system, yielding cognitive, specifically attentional, impairments in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although normal aging is considered a risk factor for AD, the mechanisms underlying the selective vulnerability of the aging cholinergic system to trkA disruption is not clear. The levels of proNGF, a proneurotrophin that possesses higher affinity for p75 receptors, increase in aging. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that cholinergic and attentional dysfunction in aged rats with reduced BF trkA receptors occurs due to the overactivation of endogenous proNGF signaling. We employed a viral vector that produced trkA shRNA to suppress trkA receptors in the corticopetal cholinergic neurons of aged rats. BF trkA suppression impaired animals’ performance on signal trials in both the sustained attention task (SAT) and the cognitively-taxing distractor version of SAT (dSAT) and these deficits were normalized by chronic intracerebroventricular administration of proNGF antibody. Moreover, depolarization-evoked ACh release and the density of cortical cholinergic fibers were partially restored in these animals. However, SAT/dSAT scores reflecting overall performance did not improve following proNGF blockade in trkA knockdown rats due to impaired performance in non-signal trials. Sustained proNGF blockade alone did not alter baseline attentional performance but produced moderate impairments during challenging conditions. Collectively, our findings indicate that barring proNGF-p75 signaling may exert some beneficial effects on attentional capacities specifically when BF trkA signaling is abrogated. However, endogenous proNGF may also possess neurotrophic effects and blockade of this proneurotrophin may not completely ameliorate attentional impairments in AD and potentially hinder performance during periods of high cognitive load

  11. Modulatory effects of centrophenoxine on different regions of ageing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Punita; Nehru, Bimla

    2005-10-01

    The debilitating consequences of age-related brain deterioration are widespread and extremely costly in terms of quality of life and longevity. Free radical induced damage is thought to be responsible, at least in part, for the degenerative effects of aging. This may be largely due to high-energy requirements, high oxygen consumption, high tissue concentration of iron and low of antioxidant enzymes in brain. Therefore, supplementing an external source of free radical scavenger would greatly benefit in ameliorating the free radical damage which may thus be beneficial in aging. In the present study, an important nootropic agent Centrophenoxine, which has an easy access to brain, has been administered to aged animals (16 months old). Rats aged 6 months (young group) and 16 months old (old group) were chosen for the study. Both groups were administered Centrophenoxine (dissolved in physiological saline) intraperitoneally once a day for 6 weeks. Our study indicates an increased activity of Catalase, Superoxide Dismutase, Glutathione reductase, as well as an increase in the reduced, oxidized, and total glutathione content thus resulting in an altered redox state. A substantial increase in the malondialdehyde content was also reported as a result of aging. Whereas, following Centrophenoxine administration (100 mg/kg body weight/day, injected i.p) alterations in the activities of Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione reductase as well as in the reduced and oxidized glutathione content was reported in aged rat brain. Lipid peroxidation was also reported to be significantly decreased in aged animals after Centrophenoxine supplementation for 6 weeks. The use of an extraneous antioxidant substance may prove beneficial in combating the conditions of oxidative stress in ageing brain. PMID:16137852

  12. Determination of the lactate threshold and maximal blood lactate steady state intensity in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Rafael Rodrigues; Cunha, Verusca Najara de Carvalho; Segundo, Paulo Russo; Moreira, Sérgio Rodrigues; Kokubun, Eduardo; Campbell, Carmen Sílvia Grubert; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó; Simões, Herbert Gustavo

    2009-08-01

    The reliability of the lactate threshold (LT) determined in aged rats and its validity to identify an exercise intensity corresponding to the maximal blood lactate steady state (MLSS) were analyzed. Eighteen male aged Wistar rats (approximately 365 days) were submitted to two incremental swimming tests until exhaustion, consisting of an initial load corresponding to 1% of body mass (BM) and increments of 1% BM at each 3-min with blood lactate ([lac]) measurements. The LT was determined by visual inspection (LT(V)) as well by applying a polynomial function on the [lac]/workload ratio (LT(P)) by considering the vertices of the curve. For the MLSS, twelve animals were submitted, on different days, to 3-4 exercise sessions of 30-min with workload corresponding to 4, 5 or 6% BM. The MLSS was considered the highest exercise intensity at which the [lac] variation was not higher than 0.07 mM.min(-1) during the last 20-min. No differences were observed for the test-retest results (4.9 +/- 0.7 and 5.0 +/- 0.8 %BM for LTv; and 6.0 +/- 0.6 and 5.8 +/- 0.6 %BM for LTp) that did not differ from the MLSS (5.4 +/- 0.5 %BM). The LT identified for aged rats in swimming, both by visual inspection and polynomial function, was reliable and did not differ from the MLSS. PMID:19585487

  13. Anatomic variations of the root canal of the rat according to age.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Paula A; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2004-01-01

    The mesial canal of the first lower molar of the rat has been used as an experimental model in Endodontics. The present study involves a detailed analysis of its structural variations as a function of age and thus contributes to its characterization and adequate use as an experimental model. We evaluated 60 molars of Wistar rats of different body weight: (group 1: 300-399 g, n=22; group 2: 400-499 g, n=16; group 3: 600-700 g, n=22). The samples were radiographed employing a standardized system. Total canal length and volume were measured on enlarged projections of the radiographs. Canal diameter was measured at coronary, middle and apical levels and employed to estimate the area of canal cross-section as an indicator of potential flow or metabolic interchange. From the second age group onwards, we detected radicular hypercementosis that increased canal length and resulted in the formation of a complex apical delta. The canal diameter decreased very significantly in the apical third. The estimated flow expressed in terms of the area of cross-section on the projection decreased from 1.2 mm2 in Group 1 to 0.05 mm2 in Group 2. Group 3 did not differ significantly from Group 2. The present results reveal that the spontaneous, age-related variations in canal anatomy described herein must be considered when performing experimental endodontics in rats. PMID:15584260

  14. Comparative and alternative approaches and novel animal models for aging research

    PubMed Central

    Kristan, D. M.

    2008-01-01

    This special issue of AGE showcases powerful alternative or unconventional approaches to basic aging research, including the use of exceptionally long-lived animal model species and comparative methods from evolutionary biology. In this opening paper, we introduce several of these alternative aging research themes, including the comparative phylogenetic approach. This approach applies modern inferential methods for dissecting basic physiological and biochemical mechanisms correlated with phenotypic traits including longevity, slow aging, sustained somatic maintenance, and repair of molecular damage. Comparative methods can be used to assess the general relevance of specific aging mechanisms—including oxidative processes—to diverse animal species, as well as to assess their potential clinical relevance to humans and other mammals. We also introduce several other novel, underexploited approaches with particular relevance to biogerontology, including the use of model animal species or strains that retain natural genetic heterogeneity, studies of effects of infectious disease and parasites on aging and responses to caloric restriction, studies of reproductive