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Sample records for aged rats received

  1. Differential hippocampal protein expression between normal aged rats and aged rats with postoperative cognitive dysfunction: A proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wang, Saiying; Ran, Ke; Hu, Zhonghua; Liu, Zhaoqian; Duan, Kaiming

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the differences in the expression of hippocampal proteins between normal control aged rats and aged rats with postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). A total of 24 aged rats were randomly divided into a surgery group (n=12) and a control group (n=12). The rats in the surgery group were treated with 2 h isoflurane anesthesia and splenectomy, while the rats in the control group received 40% oxygen for 2 h without surgery. The cognitive functions of the two groups were examined using a Y-maze test. The protein expression profiles of the hippocampus of six aged rats (three rats with POCD and three from the normal control group) were assessed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. A total of three differential proteins were further confirmed between the POCD rats and normal rats using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The expression levels of 21 proteins in the rats with POCD were significantly different compared with the normal control rats. These proteins were functionally clustered to synaptic plasticity (three proteins), oxidative stress (four proteins), energy production (six proteins), neuroinflammation (three proteins) and glutamate metabolism (two proteins). In addition, three proteins (fatty acid binding protein 7, brain, glutamate dehydrogenase 1 and glutamine synthetase), associated with astrocytic function, were significantly different in the rats with POCD compared with those in the normal control (P<0.05). Similar changes in the mRNA expression levels of the three proteins in the hippocampi of POCD rats were also detected using RT-qPCR. Neuroinflammation, glutamate toxicity and oxidative stress were possibly involved in the pathological mechanism underlying POCD in aged rats. In addition, astrocytes may also be important in POCD in aged rats. PMID:25936412

  2. Age, Dose, and Time-Dependency of Plasma and Tissue Distribution of Deltamethrine in Immature Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objective of this project was to characterize the systemic disposition of the pyrethroid, deltamethrin (DLT), in immature rats, with emphasis on the age-dependence of target organ (brain) dosimetry. Postnatal day (PND) 10, 21, and 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0...

  3. Incentive relativity in middle aged rats.

    PubMed

    Justel, N; Mustaca, A; Boccia, M; Ruetti, E

    2014-01-24

    Response to a reinforcer is affected by prior experience with different reward values of that reward, a phenomenon known as incentive relativity. Two different procedures to study this phenomenon are the incentive downshift (ID) and the consummatory anticipatory negative contrast (cANC), the former is an emotional-cognitive protocol and the latter cognitive one. Aged rodents, as also well described in aged humans, exhibit alterations in cognitive functions. The main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of age in the incentive' assessment using these two procedures. The results indicated that aged rats had an adequate assessment of the rewards but their performance is not completely comparable to that of young subjects. They recover faster from the ID and they had a cognitive impairment in the cANC. The results are discussed in relation to age-related changes in memory and emotion.

  4. Elevated RhoA/Rho-kinase activity in the aged rat penis: mechanism for age-associated erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liming; Liu, Tongyun; Lagoda, Gwen A; Champion, Hunter C; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Burnett, Arthur L

    2006-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that aging accounts significantly for the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED). The pathophysiology of ED during aging and its underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. We hypothesized that increased RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling is a major factor in the pathogenesis of age-associated ED and the mechanism involves increased penile smooth muscle contractility through inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase. Male Fischer 344 young (4 month old) and aged (20-22 month old) rats underwent erectile function testing in vivo by measuring intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) upon electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. The data demonstrated that erectile function was significantly lower in aged rats than that in young rats at all voltages tested (P<0.05). Western blot analysis results showed that there were no significant changes in protein expressions of RhoA, Rho-kinase-alpha and -beta isoforms, and myosin light chain phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1); however, membrane-bound RhoA and phosphorylated MYPT1 were increased in aged rat penes by 95 +/- 15 and 56 +/- 8% (P<0.05), respectively, indicating enhanced RhoA and Rho-kinase activity. Inhibition of Rho-kinase with Y27632 maximally increased ICP/MAP to 0.72 +/- 0.05 in aged rats vs. 0.47 +/- 0.06 in young rats (P<0.05). Gene transfer of adeno-associated virus (AAV) encoding dominant negative RhoA (T19NRhoA) to penes of aged and young rats for 7 days markedly improved erectile function in aged rats when compared with that in young rats (P<0.05). These observations were also supported by Rho-kinase activity assay results showing that basal Rho-kinase activity in aged rat penes receiving AAV vehicle treatment was twofold greater than that in young rat penes receiving AAV vehicle treatment, while it was reduced to a level similar to that in young rat penes after gene therapy of T19NRhoA (P<0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that

  5. The pituitary - Aging and spaceflown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Decrements in growth hormone (GH) release we observed in two spaceflight experiments and four tail-suspended rat studies mimic age-associated changes in the mammalian pituitary GH system seen by Meites and others. The spaceflight data suggest that formation of high molecular weight bioactive disulfide-linked aggregates of the 20 and 22K monomeric GH forms may be reduced in microgravity, thereby, reducing target tissue activity. Correlative studies to confirm spaceflight as a model for pituitary GH system aging should include: (1) investigation of mechanisms of intracellular hormone packaging, (2) consequences to biological activity of the hormone molecule, and (3) study of intracellular microtubule dynamics.

  6. Skin tumors in aging Long Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, Adeleh; Loya, Theresa; Lee, Jeffrey L

    2002-06-01

    We report 25 cases of skin neoplasm observed among 30 Long Evans rats serving as controls in a psychosocial behavioral study conducted in the Vivarium at Charles R. Drew University, Los Angeles, CA. The animals were 10 weeks old at the beginning of the study. All the skin tumors developed at 18 to 26 months of age and slowly enlarged over a period of 9 months. Multiple nodules occurred in 8 males and 6 females. None of the tumors regressed. The tumors were located around the hind leg and dorso-medial area and measured 1 to 2 cm. Physical examination revealed firm well demarcated dermal masses. Most of the tumor nodules were intradermal, and some had a central ulcerated or keratin-filled core. Microscopic examination performed on some of the tumors showed findings of classic Keratoacanthoma, whereas others showed histologic features suggestive of squamous cell carcinoma. These findings indicate a high rate (83%) of spontaneous skin neoplasms among aging Long Evans rats. To our knowledge, such a high rate of skin neoplasms in aged rodents has not been described in the literature. Furthermore, further studies should be undertaken to confirm these findings and to assess whether these rodents might serve as a model for studying the alterations in the immune system with aging.

  7. Aging effects on oxidative phosphorylation in rat adrenocortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L

    2014-06-01

    Does aging in itself lead to alteration in adrenocortical mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation? Mitochondria from Fischer 344 (F344) rats (6 and 24 months old), Brown Norway rats (6 and 32 months old) and F344-Brown Norway hybrid rats (6 and 30 months old) were compared. Mitochondria were isolated from extirpated adrenal cortex. The yields of mitochondria were quantitatively similar in all rat strains irrespective of age. In order to assess the activity of each mitochondrial complex, several different substrates were tested and the rate of oxidative phosphorylation measured. Aging does not affect mitochondrial activity except in the F344 rat adrenal cortex where the maximal ADP-stimulated oxidative phosphorylation decreased with age. We hypothesize that impaired synthesis of steroid hormones by the adrenal cortex with age in F344 rats might be due to decreased adrenocortical mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We conclude that aging results in adrenocortical mitochondria effects that are non-uniform across different rat strains.

  8. Depletion and repopulation of Leydig cells in the testes of aging brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Huhtaniemi, I; Zirkin, B R

    1996-08-01

    The capacity of Brown Norway rat Leydig cells to produce testosterone has been shown to decrease with aging. Our objectives herein were to determine 1) whether ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) administration would eliminate the hypofunctional Leydig cells of the aged Brown Norway rat testis; 2) if so, whether a new generation of Leydig cells subsequently would appear; and 3) if so, whether the steroidogenic capacity of the new Leydig cells would be at the relatively low level of the cells they replaced or at the high level of young adult Leydig cells. Young (3-month-old) and aged (18-month-old) rats received an injection of EDS (8.5 mg/100 g BW). One, 5, and 10 weeks thereafter, the serum testosterone concentration and the capacity of the testes and of isolated Leydig cells to produce testosterone were determined. One week after EDS treatment, Leydig cells were not seen in the testes of young or aged rats, and the serum testosterone concentration and testicular testosterone production were reduced to undetectable levels. Five weeks after EDS treatment, serum testosterone levels at both ages were restored to those in age-matched controls, and the capacity of the testes to produce testosterone was restored partially (young rats) or completely (aged rats). By 10 weeks after EDS treatment, the serum testosterone concentration in young rats and the ability of their testes to produce testosterone were at the levels of age-matched controls. In aged rats, however, serum testosterone and testicular testosterone production were at levels that significantly exceeded those of aged-matched controls and, indeed, were not significantly different from those of young control or EDS-treated rats. Consistent with this, the ability of Leydig cells isolated from the testes of young rats and that of cells from aged rats to produce testosterone 10 weeks after the rats were treated with EDS were equivalent. The enhanced ability of the Leydig cells restored to the aged testes to produce

  9. Cardiac and thermal homeostasis in the aging Brown Norway rat.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Brown Norway (BN) rat is a popular strain for aging studies. There is little information on effects of age on baseline cardiac and thermoregulatory parameters in undisturbed BN rats even though cardiac and thermal homeostasis is linked to many pathological deficits in the age...

  10. Environmental enrichment restores neurogenesis and rapid acquisition in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Speisman, Rachel B; Kumar, Ashok; Rani, Asha; Pastoriza, Jessica M; Severance, Jamie E; Foster, Thomas C; Ormerod, Brandi K

    2013-01-01

    Strategies combatting cognitive decline among the growing aging population are vital. We tested whether environmental enrichment could reverse age-impaired rapid spatial search strategy acquisition concomitantly with hippocampal neurogenesis in rats. Young (5-8 months) and aged (20-22 months) male Fischer 344 rats were pair-housed and exposed to environmental enrichment (n = 7 young, 9 aged) or housed individually (n = 7 young, 7 aged) for 10 weeks. After 5 weeks, hidden platform trials (5 blocks of 3 trials; 15 m inter-block interval), a probe trial, and then visible platform trials (5 blocks of 3 trials; 15 m inter-block interval) commenced in the water maze. One week after testing, rats were given 5 daily intraperitoneal bromodeoxyuridine (50 mg/kg) injections and perfused 4 weeks later to quantify neurogenesis. Although young rats outperformed aged rats, aged enriched rats outperformed aged individually housed rats on all behavioral measures. Neurogenesis decreased with age but enrichment enhanced new cell survival, regardless of age. The novel correlation between new neuron number and behavioral measures obtained in a rapid water maze task among aged rats, suggests that environmental enrichment increases their ability to rapidly acquire and flexibly use spatial information along with neurogenesis.

  11. Estradiol impairs response inhibition in young and middle-aged, but not old rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Victor C.; Neese, Steven L.; Korol, Donna L.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens have been shown to have a strong influence on such cognitive domains as spatial memory, response learning, and several tasks of executive function, including both working memory and attention. However, the effects of estrogens on inhibitory control and timing behavior, both important aspects of executive function, have received relatively little attention. We examined the effects of estradiol on inhibitory control and timing using a differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL) task. Ovariectomized young (3 month), middle-aged (12 month), and old (18 month) Long-Evans rats received 5% or 10% 17β-estradiol in cholesterol vehicle or cholesterol vehicle alone via Silastic implants and were tested on a DRL task requiring them to wait 15 seconds between lever presses to receive a food reinforcer. The ratio of reinforced to non-reinforced lever presses did not differ across age in the cholesterol vehicle group. Conversely, 17β-estradiol impaired learning of the DRL task in young and middle-aged rats, but the learning of old rats was not impaired relative to vehicle controls following either 5% or 10% 17β-estradiol treatment. Overall, old rats also made fewer lever presses than both the young and middle-aged rats. These results provide new evidence that estrogens impair inhibitory control, an important aspect of self regulation, and add to existing evidence that estrogens differentially affect cognition at different ages. PMID:21281713

  12. The Burden of Aging: A Theoretical Framework for Understanding the Shifting Balance of Caregiving and Care Receiving as Cohorts Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhlenberg, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Develops a theoretical framework that explicates factors determining the level of care given and care received by cohorts moving through different stages of later life. Specifies four proximate determinants of caregiving and three proximate determinants of care receiving. Focuses on social changes that could reduce the burden of aging. (RJM)

  13. Age-related responses to mild restraint in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rattner, B A; Michael, S D; Altland, P D

    1983-11-01

    Immature, postpubertal, young adult, and middle-aged rats were lightly restrained for 4 h. Relative to untreated controls, restraint uniformly reduced body weight and plasma luteinizing hormone concentration and elevated plasma corticosterone concentration in all age groups. However, restraint increased activities of plasma alanine and aspartate aminotransferase, creatine phosphokinase, and fructose-diphosphate aldolase in only immature and middle-aged animals. This age-related release of tissue enzymes is hypothesized to reflect enhanced responsiveness to catecholamines in immature rats, and possible ischemia related to diminished vasodilatory activity in middle-aged rats. On the basis of these changes, tolerance to restraint in postpubertal and young adults appears to be slightly greater than that of immature and middle-aged rats.

  14. Ischemia-induced Angiogenesis is Attenuated in Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yaohui; Wang, Liuqing; Wang, Jixian; Lin, Xiaojie; Wang, Yongting; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    To study whether focal angiogenesis is induced in aged rodents after permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), young adult (3-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) Fisher 344 rats underwent MCAO and sacrificed up to two months after MCAO. Immunohistochemistry and synchrotron radiation microangiography were performed to examine the number of newly formed blood vessels in both young adult and aged rats post-ischemia. We found that the number of capillaries and small arteries in aged brain was the same as young adult brain. In addition, we found that after MCAO, the number of blood vessels in the peri-infarct region of ipsilateral hemisphere in aged ischemic rats was significantly increased compared to the aged sham rats (p<0.05). We also confirmed that ischemia-induced focal angiogenesis occurred in young adult rat brain while the blood vessel density in young adult ischemic brain was significantly higher than that in the aged ischemic brain (p<0.05). Our data suggests that focal angiogenesis in aged rat brain can be induced in response to ischemic brain injury, and that aging impedes brain repairing and remodeling after ischemic stroke, possible due to the limited response of angiogenesis. PMID:27493831

  15. Aging attenuates acquired heat tolerance and hypothalamic neurogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Katakura, Masanori; Inoue, Takayuki; Hara, Toshiko; Hashimoto, Michio; Shido, Osamu

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated age-dependent changes in heat exposure-induced hypothalamic neurogenesis and acquired heat tolerance in rats. We previously reported that neuronal progenitor cell proliferation and neural differentiation are enhanced in the hypothalamus of long-term heat-acclimated (HA) rats. Male Wistar rats, 5 weeks (Young), 10-11 months (Adult), or 22-25 months (Old) old, were subjected to an ambient temperature of 32°C for 40-50 days (HA rats). Rats underwent a heat tolerance test. In HA rats, increases in abdominal temperature (Tab ) in the the Young, Adult, and Old groups were significantly smaller than those in their respective controls. However, the increase in Tab of HA rats became greater with advancing age. The number of hypothalamic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-immunopositive cells double stained with a mature neuron marker, neuronal nuclei (NeuN), of HA rats was significantly higher in the Young group than that in the control group. In Young HA, BrdU/NeuN-immunopositive cells of the preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus appeared to be the highest among regions examined. Large numbers of newborn neurons were also located in the ventromedial and dorsomedial nuclei, as well as the posterior hypothalamic area, whereas heat exposure did not increase such numbers in the Adult and Old groups. Aging may interfere with heat exposure-induced hypothalamic neurogenesis and acquired heat tolerance in rats.

  16. Cavernous antioxidant effect of green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate with/without sildenafil citrate intake in aged diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, T; Sabry, D; Abdelaal, A M; Mostafa, I; Taymour, M

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the cavernous antioxidant effect of green tea (GT), epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) with/without sildenafil citrate intake in aged diabetic rats. One hundred and four aged male white albino rat were divided into controls that received ordinary chow, streptozotocin (STZ)-induced aged diabetic rats, STZ-induced diabetic rats on infused green tea, induced diabetic rats on epigallocatechin-3-gallate and STZ-induced diabetic rats on sildenafil citrate added to EGCG. After 8 weeks, dissected cavernous tissues were assessed for gene expression of eNOS, cavernous malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and serum testosterone (T). STZ-induced diabetic rats on GT demonstrated significant increase in cavernous eNOS, cGMP, GPx and significant decrease in cavernous MDA compared with diabetic rats. Diabetic rats on EGCG demonstrated significant increase in cavernous eNOS, cGMP, GPx and significant decrease in cavernous MDA compared with diabetic rats or diabetic rats on GT. Diabetic rats on EGCG added to sildenafil showed significant increase in cavernous eNOS, cGMP and significant decrease in cavernous MDA compared with other groups. Serum T demonstrated nonsignificant difference between the investigated groups. It is concluded that GT and EGCG have significant cavernous antioxidant effects that are increased if sildenafil is added.

  17. Efficacy of Female Rat Models in Translational Cardiovascular Aging Research

    PubMed Central

    Rice, K. M.; Fannin, J. C.; Gillette, C.; Blough, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States. Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease as well as cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Aging is a universal process that all humans undergo; however, research in aging is limited by cost and time constraints. Therefore, most research in aging has been done in primates and rodents; however it is unknown how well the effects of aging in rat models translate into humans. To compound the complication of aging gender has also been indicated as a risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system associated with aging and gender for aging research with regard to the applicability of rat derived data for translational application to human aging. PMID:25610649

  18. Effects of Panax ginseng, Turnera diffusa and Heteropterys tomentosa extracts on hippocampal apoptosis of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Andréia Gomes; Smaili, Soraya Soubhi; Lopes, Guiomar Silva; Carlini, Elisaldo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To verify if the medicinal plants Panax ginseng C.A. Mey, Turnera diffusa Willd. ex Schult., and Heteropterys tomentosa O. Mach., which are amply used by the population as tonics and cognition enhancers, could have a protective effect on cell death by apoptosis, since this could be one of the mechanisms of action of these substances. Methods: Aged male Wistar rats (n=24) were divided into four groups. Over 30 days, three groups received treatments with hydroalcoholic extracts of the plants, and one group received saline solution. A fifth group with young adult male Wistar rats (n=4) received saline solution during the same period. Using the TUNEL technique, the percentage of apoptosis in the hippocampus of these animals was evaluated. Results: No differences were observed between the percentage of apoptotic cells in the hippocampus of aged animals and of young control animals. The percentage of apoptosis in the hippocampus of aged animals treated chronically with the extracts from the three plants also did not differ from the percentage of apoptosis in the hippocampus of the control group of aged animals. Conclusion: Treatment with the hydroalcoholic extracts of Panax ginseng, Turnera diffusa, and Heteropterys tomentosa did not influence the apoptosis of the hippocampal cells of aged rats. PMID:23843055

  19. An Observational Assessment Method for Aging Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Pamela M; Jarema, Kimberly A; Kurtz, David M; MacPhail, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth of the aging human population highlights the need for laboratory animal models to study the basic biologic processes of aging and susceptibility to disease, drugs, and environmental pollutants. Methods are needed to evaluate the health of aging animals over time, particularly methods for efficiently monitoring large research colonies. Here we describe an observational assessment method that scores appearance, posture, mobility, and muscle tone on a 5-point scale that can be completed in about 1 min. A score of 1 indicates no deterioration, whereas a score of 5 indicates severe deterioration. Tests were applied to male Brown Norway rats between 12 and 36 mo of age (n = 32). The rats were participating concurrently in experiments on the behavioral effects of intermittent exposure (approximately every 4 mo) to short-acting environmental chemicals. Results demonstrated that aging-related signs of deterioration did not appear before 18 mo of age. Assessment scores and variability then increased with age. Body weights increased until approximately 24 mo, then remained stable, but decreased after 31 mo for the few remaining rats. The incidence of death increased slightly from 20 to 28 mo of age and then rose sharply; median survival age was approximately 30 mo, with a maximum of 36 mo. The results indicate that our observational assessment method supports efficient monitoring of the health of aging rats and may be useful in studies on susceptibility to diseases, drugs, and toxicants during old age. PMID:21205442

  20. Procyanidins extracted from the lotus seedpod ameliorate age-related antioxidant deficit in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiqu; Rong, Shuang; Xie, Bijun; Sun, Zhida; Zhang, Li; Wu, Hailei; Yao, Ping; Hao, Liping; Liu, Liegang

    2010-03-01

    The alleviative effect of procyanidins extracted from the lotus seedpod (LSPC) on oxidative stress in various tissues was evaluated by determining the activities of the antioxidant enzymes and the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) in heart, liver, lung, kidney, skeletal muscle, and serum in aged rats. Aging led to antioxidant deficit in various tissues in this study, which is confirmed by remarkable increased lipid peroxidation, whereas the change patterns of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and GSH were diverse in various tissues of aged rats. LSPC treatment (50 and 100 mg/kg body weight) modified the activity of SOD, CAT, and GPx as well as GSH content alteration in these tissues, which reversed the age-related antioxidant deficit in aged rats. However, the regulatory patterns on the activities of these enzymes and GSH content by LSPC treatment were different according to the tissues in aged rats.

  1. The metabolic response to postnatal leptin in rats varies with age and may be litter dependent.

    PubMed

    Granado, M; Diaz, F; Fuente-Martín, E; García-Cáceres, C; Argente, J; Chowen, J A

    2014-06-01

    Hyperleptinemia during postnatal life induces long-term effects on metabolism. However, these effects are controversial as both increased and decreased propensity towards obesity has been reported. To further analyze the effects of chronic neonatal hyperleptinemia on the subsequent metabolic profile, male Wistar rats proceeding from 18 different litters (8 pups/litter) received a daily subcutaneous injection of either saline (10 ml/kg, n=36) or leptin (3 μg/g, n=36) from postnatal day (PND) 2 to PND9. Rats were sacrificed at 10, 40, or 150 days of age. At 10 days of age, leptin treated rats had decreased body weight (p<0.001) and body fat (p<0.05). Leptin levels and glycemia were increased (p<0.01), whereas insulin, total lipids, triglycerides and glycerol levels were decreased (p<0.05). At PND40 rats receiving leptin had increased glycemia (p<0.01) and plasma HDL and LDL levels, but decreased total lipids (p<0.05). At PND150 neonatal leptin treatment induced different effects in rats raised in different litters. Rats from litter 1 had increased body weight (p<0.05), body fat (p<0.01), and plasma leptin (p<0.001), cholesterol (p<0.001), triglyceride (p<0.001), total lipid (p<0.001), LDL (p<0.05), and glycerol (p<0.001) levels. In rats from litter 2 these parameters did not differ from controls. Rats from litter 3 had decreased body weight (p<0.05), visceral fat (p<0.01) and plasma leptin (p<0.001), cholesterol (p<0.001), triglyceride (p<0.001), glycerol (p<0.001), and HDL (p<0.001) levels. In conclusion, the metabolic response to postnatal leptin varies with age, with the response in adulthood being variable and most likely influenced by other factors, including the genetic make-up.

  2. Aging-Dependent Changes in the Radiation Response of the Adult Rat Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Matthew K. Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Robbins, Mike E.; Riddle, David R.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of aging on the radiation response in the adult rat brain. Methods and Materials: Male rats 8, 18, or 28 months of age received a single 10-Gy dose of whole-brain irradiation (WBI). The hippocampal dentate gyrus was analyzed 1 and 10 weeks later for sensitive neurobiologic markers associated with radiation-induced damage: changes in density of proliferating cells, immature neurons, total microglia, and activated microglia. Results: A significant decrease in basal levels of proliferating cells and immature neurons and increased microglial activation occurred with normal aging. The WBI induced a transient increase in proliferation that was greater in older animals. This proliferation response did not increase the number of immature neurons, which decreased after WBI in young rats, but not in old rats. Total microglial numbers decreased after WBI at all ages, but microglial activation increased markedly, particularly in older animals. Conclusions: Age is an important factor to consider when investigating the radiation response of the brain. In contrast to young adults, older rats show no sustained decrease in number of immature neurons after WBI, but have a greater inflammatory response. The latter may have an enhanced role in the development of radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction in older individuals.

  3. [Behavior of rats kept under conditions of a shifted light/dark regimen and receiving melatonin].

    PubMed

    Pertsov, S S

    2005-07-01

    We studied the effect of shift in the natural light/dark regimen (desynchronosis) and treatment with melatonin on behavioral characteristics of rats with different activity in the open-field test. Experiments were performed on 172 Wistar rats kept under conditions of the natural or shifted light/dark regimen. Some animals were intraperitoneally treated with 1 ml physiological saline or melatonin in doses of 1 and 2 mg/kg, while others did not receive the injections. Desynchronosis altered the normal rhythm of locomotor activity and abolished the differences between daytime and nighttime activity rats not receiving the injections. The influence of melatonin on locomotor activity of rats maintained under normal or shifted light/dark conditions depended on its dose, time of treatment, and initial behavioral characteristics of animals. Our results indicate that the use of melatonin for treatment of disturbances produced by a shift in the light/dark conditions should be performed taking into account individual behavioral characteristics of the organism.

  4. Tail pinch induces fos immunoreactivity within several regions of the male rat brain: effects of age.

    PubMed

    Smith, W J; Stewart, J; Pfaus, J G

    1997-05-01

    Brief, intermittent stressors, such as low-level foot shock or tail pinch, induce a general excitement and autonomic arousal in rats that increases their sensitivity to external incentives. Such stimulation can facilitate a variety of behaviors, including feeding, aggression, sexual activity, parental behavior, and drug taking if the appropriate stimuli exist in the environment. However, the ability of tail pinch to induce general arousal and incentive motivation appears to diminish with age. Here we report on the ability of tail pinch to induce Fos immunoreactivity within several brain regions as a function of age. Young (2-3 months) and middle-aged (12-13 months) male rats were administered either five tail pinches (one every 2 min), one tail pinch, or zero (sham) tail pinches (n = 4 per stimulation condition). Rats were sacrificed 75 min following the onset of stimulation, and their brains were prepared for immunocytochemical detection of Fos protein. Fos immunoreactivity was induced by one and five tail pinches in several brain regions, including the anterior medial preoptic area (mPOA), paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PV-Thal), medial amygdala (MEA), basolateral amygdala (BLA), lateral habenula (LHab), and ventral tegmental area (VTA), of young rats compared with those that received zero tail pinches. In contrast to young rats, middle-aged rats had significantly less Fos induced by one and five tail pinches in the mPOA, PVN, MEA, BLA, and VTA, but an equivalent amount induced in the LHab. Fos immunoreactivity was not found within the medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, striatum, lateral septum, or locus coeruleus in either young or old rats. Tail pinch appears to activate regions of the brain known to be involved in behavioral responses to both incentive cues and stressors. The lower level of cellular reactivity to tail pinch in middle-aged rats suggests a diminished neural responsiveness to

  5. The Laboratory Rat: Relating Its Age With Human's

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Pallav

    2013-01-01

    By late 18th or early 19th century, albino rats became the most commonly used experimental animals in numerous biomedical researches, as they have been recognized as the preeminent model mammalian system. But, the precise correlation between age of laboratory rats and human is still a subject of debate. A number of studies have tried to detect these correlations in various ways, But, have not successfully provided any proper association. Thus, the current review attempts to compare rat and human age at different phases of their life. The overall findings indicate that rats grow rapidly during their childhood and become sexually mature at about the sixth week, but attain social maturity 5-6 months later. In adulthood, every day of the animal is approximately equivalent to 34.8 human days (i.e., one rat month is comparable to three human years). Numerous researchers performed experimental investigations in albino rats and estimated, in general, while considering their entire life span, that a human month resembles every-day life of a laboratory rat. These differences signify the variations in their anatomy, physiology and developmental processes, which must be taken into consideration while analyzing the results or selecting the dose of any research in rats when age is a crucial factor. PMID:23930179

  6. The effects of acute alcohol on motor impairments in adolescent, adult, and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Laura C; Novier, Adelle; Van Skike, Candice E; Diaz-Granados, Jaime L; Matthews, Douglas B

    2015-03-01

    Acute alcohol exposure has been shown to produce differential motor impairments between aged and adult rats and between adolescent and adult rats. However, the effects of acute alcohol exposure among adolescent, adult, and aged rats have yet to be systematically investigated within the same project using a dose-dependent analysis. We sought to determine the age- and dose-dependent effects of acute alcohol exposure on gross and coordinated motor performance across the rodent lifespan. Adolescent (PD 30), adult (PD 70), and aged (approximately 18 months) male Sprague-Dawley rats were tested on 3 separate motor tasks: aerial righting reflex (ARR), accelerating rotarod (RR), and loss of righting reflex (LORR). In a separate group of animals, blood ethanol concentrations (BEC) were determined at multiple time points following a 3.0 g/kg ethanol injection. Behavioral tests were conducted with a Latin square repeated-measures design in which all animals received the following doses: 1.0 g/kg or 2.0 g/kg alcohol or saline over 3 separate sessions via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. During testing, motor impairments were assessed on the RR 10 min post-injection and on ARR 20 min post-injection. Aged animals spent significantly less time on the RR when administered 1.0 g/kg alcohol compared to adult rats. In addition, motor performance impairments significantly increased with age after 2.0 g/kg alcohol administration. On the ARR test, aged rats were more sensitive to the effects of 1.0 g/kg and 2.0 g/kg alcohol compared to adolescents and adults. Seven days after the last testing session, animals were given 3.0 g/kg alcohol and LORR was examined. During LORR, aged animals slept longer compared to adult and adolescent rats. This effect cannot be explained solely by BEC levels in aged rats. The present study suggests that acute alcohol exposure produces greater motor impairments in older rats when compared to adolescent and adult rats and begins to establish a

  7. Cardiac and thermal homeostasis in the aging Brown Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J

    2008-12-01

    The cardiovascular and thermoregulatory systems are considered to be susceptible in the aged population, but little is known about baseline cardiac and thermoregulatory homeostasis in rodent models of aging. Radiotransmitters were implanted in male, Brown Norway rats obtained at 4, 12, and 24 months to monitor the electrocardiogram (ECG), interbeat interval (IBI), heart rate (HR), core temperature (Tc), and motor activity (MA). There was no significant effect of age on resting HR and MA. Daytime Tc of the 24-month-old rats was significantly elevated above those of the 4- and 12-month-old groups. Variability of the IBI was highest in the 24-month-old rats. The elevation in daytime Tc beginning around 8 months of age may be a physiological biomarker of aging and may be an important factor to consider in studies using caloric restriction-induced hypothermia to increase longevity. PMID:19126843

  8. Oxidative stress induces the decline of brain EPO expression in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Chen, Yubao; Shao, Siying; Tang, Qing; Chen, Weihai; Chen, Yi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2016-10-01

    Brain Erythropoietin (EPO), an important neurotrophic factor and neuroprotective factor, was found to be associated with aging. Studies found EPO expression was significantly decreased in the hippocampus of aging rat compared with that of the youth. But mechanisms of the decline of the brain EPO during aging remain unclear. The present study utilized a d-galactose (d-gal)-induced aging model in which the inducement of aging was mainly oxidative injury, to explore underlying mechanisms for the decline of brain EPO in aging rats. d-gal-induced aging rats (2months) were simulated by subcutaneously injecting with d-gal at doses of 50mg·kg(-1), 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1) daily for 8weeks while the control group received vehicle only. These groups were all compared with the aging rats (24months) which had received no other treatment. The cognitive impairment was assessed using Morris water maze (MWM) in the prepared models, and the amount of β-galactosidase, the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) level and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the hippocampus was examined by assay kits. The levels of EPO, EPOR, p-JAK2 and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) in the hippocampus were detected by western blot. Additionally, the correlation coefficient between EPO/EPOR expression and MDA level was analyzed. The MWM test showed that compared to control group, the escape latency was significantly extended and the times of crossing the platform was decreased at the doses of 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1) (p<0.05). Also, the amount of β-galactosidase and the MDA level in the hippocampus were significantly increased but the SOD activity was significantly decreased (p<0.05, 0.01 and 0.01, respectively). Similar to aging rats, the expressions of EPO, EPOR, p-JAK2, and HIF-2αin the brain of d-gal-treated rats were significantly decreased (p<0.05) at 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1). Interestingly, negative correlations were found between EPOR (r=-0

  9. Daily supplementation with mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) improves balance and working memory in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Miller, Marshall G; Gomes, Stacey M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Decline in brain function during normal aging is partly due to the long-term effects of oxidative stress and inflammation. Several fruits and vegetables have been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the effects of dietary mushroom intervention on mobility and memory in aged Fischer 344 rats. We hypothesized that daily supplementation of mushroom would have beneficial effects on behavioral outcomes in a dose-dependent manner. Rats were randomly assigned to receive a diet containing either 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, or 5% lyophilized white button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus); after 8 weeks on the diet, a battery of behavioral tasks was given to assess balance, coordination, and cognition. Rats on the 2% or 5% mushroom-supplemented diet consumed more food, without gaining weight, than rats in the other diet groups. Rats in the 0.5% and 1% group stayed on a narrow beam longer, indicating an improvement in balance. Only rats on the 0.5% mushroom diet showed improved performance in a working memory version of the Morris water maze. When taken together, the most effective mushroom dose that produced improvements in both balance and working memory was 0.5%, equivalent to about 1.5 ounces of fresh mushrooms for humans. Therefore, the results suggest that the inclusion of mushroom in the daily diet may have beneficial effects on age-related deficits in cognitive and motor function.

  10. Daily supplementation with mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) improves balance and working memory in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Miller, Marshall G; Gomes, Stacey M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Decline in brain function during normal aging is partly due to the long-term effects of oxidative stress and inflammation. Several fruits and vegetables have been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the effects of dietary mushroom intervention on mobility and memory in aged Fischer 344 rats. We hypothesized that daily supplementation of mushroom would have beneficial effects on behavioral outcomes in a dose-dependent manner. Rats were randomly assigned to receive a diet containing either 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, or 5% lyophilized white button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus); after 8 weeks on the diet, a battery of behavioral tasks was given to assess balance, coordination, and cognition. Rats on the 2% or 5% mushroom-supplemented diet consumed more food, without gaining weight, than rats in the other diet groups. Rats in the 0.5% and 1% group stayed on a narrow beam longer, indicating an improvement in balance. Only rats on the 0.5% mushroom diet showed improved performance in a working memory version of the Morris water maze. When taken together, the most effective mushroom dose that produced improvements in both balance and working memory was 0.5%, equivalent to about 1.5 ounces of fresh mushrooms for humans. Therefore, the results suggest that the inclusion of mushroom in the daily diet may have beneficial effects on age-related deficits in cognitive and motor function. PMID:26475179

  11. Aging and the disposition and toxicity of mercury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Christy C; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K

    2014-05-01

    Progressive loss of functioning nephrons, secondary to age-related glomerular disease, can impair the ability of the kidneys to effectively clear metabolic wastes and toxicants from blood. Additionally, as renal mass is diminished, cellular hypertrophy occurs in functional nephrons that remain. We hypothesize that these nephrons are exposed to greater levels of nephrotoxicants, such as inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)), and thus are at an increased risk of becoming intoxicated by these compounds. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of aging on the disposition and renal toxicity of Hg(2+) in young adult and aged Wistar rats. Paired groups of animals were injected (i.v.) with either a 0.5μmol·kg(-1) non-nephrotoxic or a 2.5μmol·kg(-1) nephrotoxic dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl2). Plasma creatinine and renal biomarkers of proximal tubular injury were greater in both groups of aged rats than in the corresponding groups of young adult rats. Histologically, evidence of glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial inflammation and fibrosis were significant features of kidneys from aged animals. In addition, proximal tubular necrosis, especially along the straight segments in the inner cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla was a prominent feature in the renal sections from both aged and young rats treated with the nephrotoxic dose of HgCl2. Our findings indicate 1) that overall renal function is significantly impaired in aged rats, resulting in chronic renal insufficiency and 2) the disposition of HgCl2 in aging rats is significantly altered compared to that of young rats. PMID:24548775

  12. Aging and the Disposition and Toxicity of Mercury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Christy C.; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive loss of functioning nephrons, secondary to age-related glomerular disease, can impair the ability of the kidneys to effectively clear metabolic wastes and toxicants from blood. Additionally, as renal mass is diminished, cellular hypertrophy occurs in functional nephrons that remain. We hypothesize that these nephrons are exposed to greater levels of nephrotoxicants, such as inorganic mercury (Hg2+), and thus are at an increased risk of becoming intoxicated by these compounds. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of aging on the disposition and renal toxicity of Hg2+ in young adult and aged Wistar rats. Paired groups of animals were injected (i.v.) with either a 0.5 μmol • kg−1 non-nephrotoxic or a 2.5 μmol • kg−1 nephrotoxic dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl2). Plasma creatinine and renal biomarkers of proximal tubular injury were greater in both groups of aged rats than in the corresponding groups of young adult rats. Histologically, evidence of glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial inflammation and fibrosis were significant features of kidneys from aged animals. In addition, proximal tubular necrosis, especially along the straight segments in the inner cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla was a prominent feature in the renal sections from both aged and young rats treated with the nephrotoxic dose of HgCl2. Our findings indicate 1) that overall renal function is significantly impaired in aged rats, resulting in chronic renal insufficiency and 2) the disposition of HgCl2 in aging rats is significantly altered compared to that of young rats. PMID:24548775

  13. Age-related changes in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Is, Merih; Comunoglu, Nil Ustundag; Comunoglu, Cem; Eren, Bulent; Ekici, Isin Dogan; Ozkan, Ferda

    2008-05-01

    The human brain is uniquely powerful in its cognitive abilities, yet the hippocampal and neocortical circuits that mediate these complex functions are highly vulnerable during aging. In this study, we analyzed age-related changes in the rat hippocampus by studying newborn (1 month), middle-aged (12 months), and older (24 months) male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We evaluated neuronal dystrophy, neuron scattering, and granulovacuolar degeneration in the hippocampal area using light microscopy, according to age and gender. We detected significant neuronal dystrophy in the CA1, CA2, and CA3 areas in male rats, and in the CA1, CA3, and CA4 areas in female rats. Degenerative changes, indicated by neuron scattering, were observed in the CA1, CA2, and CA3 areas of male and the CA2 and CA4 areas of female rats. Changes in all areas of the hippocampus were observed with increasing age; these changes included neuronal dystrophy and neuron scattering and did not differ significantly between male and female rats.

  14. Part 110--Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    This document addresses nondiscrimination on the basis of age in programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance. It consists of the amendments made in the notice of Final Regulations published in the Federal Register on November 13, 2000. Its purpose is to set out the Department of Education's rules for implementing the Age…

  15. Red raspberries can improve motor function in aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Many foods rich in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds have been shown to increase health and reduce markers of aging. A number of berry fruits high in polyphenols are known to ameliorate age-related declines in cellular, cognitive and behavioral function in rats. OBJECTIVES: Thi...

  16. Tart cherries improve working memory in aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show impaired performance on cognitive tasks that require the use of spatial learning and memory. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various dark-colored berry fruits (blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries) in reversing age-related deficits in behavioral and...

  17. Maternal age, reproduction and chromosomal aberrations in Wistar derived rats.

    PubMed

    Niggeschulze, A; Kast, A

    1994-01-01

    The fertility of rats ranges from one to 18 months. In standard teratogenicity testing young, mature females are used which may not reflect the situation in women above 35 years old. Reproduction among different age groups of Wistar ats (strain Chbb: THOM) was compared at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months. At least 20 virgin females were inseminated per age group. The copulation rate did not differ between the groups. From the maternal age of 12 months, the pregnancy rate was significantly decreased, from the age of 9 months, the litter values were significantly lowered and the resorption rates were increased. Maternal age did not influence the incidence of fetal variations and malformations. Additionally, the chromosomal aberration rate in the bone marrow was evaluated in male and female rats. Twelve animals of each sex were scheduled per group, and studied at the age of 1, 3, 6, 12, 15, 18, 21 or 24 months. In males, the aberration rate increased continuously from 0.18 through 3%, while in females the increase continued from 0.33 to 2.29% at 15 months old when a plateau was reached. When testing new compounds for embryotoxicity or genotoxicity in female rats, the animals should be of comparable age to man in order to avoid a misinterpretation of spontaneous abnormalities. From these studies, however, it was concluded that the use of higher age groups of female rats in teratogenicity studies would not improve the risk assessment.

  18. Normal pancreatic and intestinal enzymes in hypophagic growth-retarded rats that received dorsomedial hypothalamic lesions shortly after weaning.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, L L; Lee, P C; Brooks, S; Lebenthal, E

    1984-08-01

    Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral electrolytic lesions in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei (DMNL rats). Sham-operated rats served as controls. After being fed lab chow for two postoperative weeks, the animals were divided into four groups. One group of DMNL rats and controls received a high-caloric diet (high-fat diet, chocolate chip cookies, 32% sucrose solution, potato chips and marshmallows), whereas another group of DMNL rats and controls continued to receive lab chow. The experiment was terminated on the 185th postoperative day. In accordance with previous findings, DMNL rats, irrespective of diet, were lighter and shorter than controls. In addition, DMNL rats fed junk food were lighter than DMNL rats fed lab chow, and junk-fed controls weighed as much as chow-fed controls. Both DMNL rats and controls fed junk food were also shorter and showed higher carcass fat than their chow-fed counterparts. Also, DMNL rats fed junk food had less carcass fat than junk-fed sham-operated controls, whereas in accordance with previous findings, there was no difference between chow-fed DMNL rats and chow-fed sham-operated controls. Irrespective of diet, DMNL rats ate less calories than their respective sham-operated controls. Both absolute and percent pancreas weight and protein/pancreas were unaffected in DMNL rats but were reduced in both junk-fed groups in comparison with their chow-fed counterparts. Both concentrations and contents of pancreatic trypsinogen, amylase and lipase were unaffected in DMNL rats but total activities of all three enzymes were dramatically reduced in the junk-fed compared with the chow-fed DMNL rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Rapamycin suppresses brain aging in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats.

    PubMed

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Vitovtov, Anton O; Muraleva, Natalia A; Akulov, Andrey E; Stefanova, Natalia A; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-06-01

    Cellular and organismal aging are driven in part by the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and rapamycin extends life span inC elegans, Drosophila and mice. Herein, we investigated effects of rapamycin on brain aging in OXYS rats. Previously we found, in OXYS rats, an early development of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to several geriatric disorders in humans, including cerebral dysfunctions. Behavioral alterations as well as learning and memory deficits develop by 3 months. Here we show that rapamycin treatment (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg as a food mixture daily from the age of 1.5 to 3.5 months) decreased anxiety and improved locomotor and exploratory behavior in OXYS rats. In untreated OXYS rats, MRI revealed an increase of the area of hippocampus, substantial hydrocephalus and 2-fold increased area of the lateral ventricles. Rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities, erasing the difference between OXYS and Wister rats (used as control). All untreated OXYS rats showed signs of neurodegeneration, manifested by loci of demyelination. Rapamycin decreased the percentage of animals with demyelination and the number of loci. Levels of Tau and phospho-Tau (T181) were increased in OXYS rats (compared with Wistar). Rapamycin significantly decreased Tau and inhibited its phosphorylation in the hippocampus of OXYS and Wistar rats. Importantly, rapamycin treatment caused a compensatory increase in levels of S6 and correspondingly levels of phospo-S6 in the frontal cortex, indicating that some downstream events were compensatory preserved, explaining the lack of toxicity. We conclude that rapamycin in low chronic doses can suppress brain aging.

  20. Centrophenoxine activates acetylcholinesterase activity in hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D; Singh, R

    1995-05-01

    Age-related changes in the acetylcholinesterase activity were measured in the hippocampus, brain stem and cerebellum of rats (aged 4, 8, 16 and 24 months). The age-dependent decrease in the enzyme activity first appeared in the hippocampus; the brain stem was affected later while the cerebellum remained unaffected. Centrophenoxine, usually considered as an ageing reversal drug and also regarded as a neuroenergeticum in human therapy, increased the acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus of aged rats, the activity was also elevated in the brain stem but no in the cerebellum. The acetylcholinesterase-stimulating influence of the drug is likely to be implicated in the pharmacological reversal of the age related decline of the cholinergic system. This effect of the drug may also mediate its effects on cognitive and neuronal synaptic functions.

  1. Oral administration of squid lecithin-transphosphatidylated phosphatidylserine improves memory impairment in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bombi; Sur, Bong-Jun; Han, Jeong-Jun; Shim, Insop; Her, Song; Lee, Yang-Seok; Lee, Hye-Jung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, lecithin-derived phosphatidylserine (PS), which originates from marine life, has received much attention as a viable alternative to bovine cerebral cortex PS. In this study, the use of squid phosphatidylcholine-transphosphatidylated PS (SQ-PS) was evaluated through examination of its ameliorating effects on age-associated learning and memory deficits in rats. Aged rats were orally administered SQ-PS (10, 20, or 50 mg/kg per day) once a day for seven days 30 min prior to behavioral assessment in a Morris water maze. SQ-PS administration produced significant dose-dependent improvements in escape latency for finding the platform in the Morris water maze in the aged rats even though Soy-PS administration also exhibited comparable improvements with SQ-PS. Biochemical alterations in the hippocampal cholinergic system, including changes in choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase immunoreactivity, were consistent with the behavioral results. In addition, SQ-PS treatment significantly restored age-associated decreases of choline transporter and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 1 mRNA expression in the hippocampus. These results demonstrate that orally administered SQ-PS dose-dependently aids in the improvement of memory deficits that occur during normal aging in rats. This suggests that SQ-PS may be a useful therapeutic agent in the treatment of diminished memory function in elderly people.

  2. Who Receives Speech/Language Services by 5 Years of Age in the United States?

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Farkas, George; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Maczuga, Steve; Cook, Michael; Morano, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to identify factors predictive of or associated with receipt of speech/language services during early childhood. We did so by analyzing data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Birth Cohort (ECLS-B; Andreassen & Fletcher, 2005), a nationally representative data set maintained by the U.S. Department of Education. We addressed two research questions of particular importance to speech-language pathology practice and policy. First, do early vocabulary delays increase children's likelihood of receiving speech/language services? Second, are minority children systematically less likely to receive these services than otherwise similar White children? Method Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed for a population-based sample of 9,600 children and families participating in the ECLS-B. Results Expressive vocabulary delays by 24 months of age were strongly associated with and predictive of children's receipt of speech/language services at 24, 48, and 60 months of age (adjusted odds ratio range = 4.32–16.60). Black children were less likely to receive speech/language services than otherwise similar White children at 24, 48, and 60 months of age (adjusted odds ratio range = 0.42–0.55). Lower socioeconomic status children and those whose parental primary language was other than English were also less likely to receive services. Being born with very low birth weight also significantly increased children's receipt of services at 24, 48, and 60 months of age. Conclusion Expressive vocabulary delays at 24 months of age increase children’s risk for later speech/language services. Increased use of culturally and linguistically sensitive practices may help racial/ethnic minority children access needed services. PMID:26579989

  3. Immunohistochemical and neurochemical correlates of learning deficits in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Stemmelin, J; Lazarus, C; Cassel, S; Kelche, C; Cassel, J C

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether cholinergic and monoaminergic dysfunctions in the brain could be related to spatial learning capabilities in 26-month-old, as compared to three-month-old, Long-Evans female rats. Performances were evaluated in the water maze task and used to constitute subgroups with a cluster analysis statistical procedure. In the first experiment (histological approach), the first cluster contained young rats and aged unimpaired rats, the second one aged rats with moderate impairment and the third one aged rats with severe impairment. Aged rats showed a reduced number of choline acetyltransferase- and p75(NTR)-positive neurons in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and choline acetyltransferase-positive neurons in the striatum. In the second experiment (neurochemical approach), the three clusters comprised young rats, aged rats with moderate impairment and aged rats with severe impairment. Alterations related to aging consisted of reduced concentration of acetylcholine, norepinephrine and serotonin in the striatum, serotonin in the occipital cortex, dopamine and norepinephrine in the dorsal hippocampus, and norepinephrine in the ventral hippocampus. In the first experiment, there were significant correlations between water maze performance and the number of; (i) choline acetyltransferase- and p75(NTR)-positive neurons in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis; (ii) choline acetyltransferase-positive neurons in the striatum and; (iii) p75(NTR)-positive neurons in the medial septum. In the second experiment, water maze performance was correlated with the concentration of; (i) acetylcholine and serotonin in the striatum; (ii) serotonin and norepinephrine in the dorsal hippocampus; (iii) norepinephrine in the frontoparietal cortex and; (iv) with other functional markers such as the 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/serotonin ratio in the striatum, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio in the dorsal hippocampus, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/serotonin and

  4. Cerebrolysin improves memory and ameliorates neuronal atrophy in spontaneously hypertensive, aged rats.

    PubMed

    Solis-Gaspar, Carlos; Vazquez-Roque, Ruben A; De Jesús Gómez-Villalobos, Ma; Flores, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rat has been used as an animal model of vascular dementia (VD). Our previous report showed that, SH rats exhibited dendritic atrophy of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 dorsal hippocampus and layers 3 and 5 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) at 8 months of age. In addition, we showed that cerebrolysin (Cbl), a neurotrophic peptide mixture, reduces the dendritic atrophy in aged animal models. This study aimed to determine whether Cbl was capable of reducing behavioral and neuronal alterations, in old female SH rats. The level of diastolic and systolic pressure was measured every month for the 6 first months and only animals with more than 160 mm Hg of systolic pressure were used. Female SH rats (6 months old) received 6 months of Cbl treatment. Immediately after the Cbl treatment, two behavioral tests were applied, the Morris water maze test for memory and learning and locomotor activity in novel environments. Immediately after the last behavioral test, dendritic morphology was studied with the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by a Sholl analysis. Clearly, SH rats with Cbl showed an increase in the dendritic length and dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 in the dorsal hippocampus and layers 3 and 5 of the PFC. Interestingly, Cbl improved memory of the old SH rats. Our results support the possibility that Cbl may have beneficial effects on the management of brain alterations in an animal model with VD. Synapse 70:378-389, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Aging increases the susceptibility to develop anhedonia in male rats.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Pérez, J J; Martínez-Mota, L; Fernández-Guasti, A

    2008-12-12

    The objective of this study was to establish the effect of aging on the development of anhedonia, a core feature of depression. Young and old male Wistar rats (of around 3-5 and 12-15 months, respectively) were exposed to a chronic variable stress (CVS) schedule for 3 weeks. CVS produced anhedonia, indicated by a reduction in the intake of a sucrose solution (1%), in 8 out of 23 (35%) young rats and in 19 out of 26 (73%) old rats, implying that old animals are more susceptible to stress and develop anhedonia more readily than young animals. Young and old anhedonic rats showed a similar temporal course in the reduction of sucrose consumption, reaching the anhedonic state after 2 weeks of CVS exposure. Compared with young animals, old rats had lower basal serum testosterone and estradiol levels. The systemic levels of corticosterone did not vary between both age groups. No significant pathological condition was detected in old animals. It is suggested that the higher susceptibility to develop anhedonia in male rats could be associated to neuroendocrine changes consequent to aging.

  6. Effect of age on respiratory function of Fischer-344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The respiratory function of adult male and female specific pathogen free Fischer-344 rats in three age groups was measured by plethysmography. Groups included young adults at 102 days, mid-adults at 538 days and old adults at 815 days of age. Measurements included spontaneous breathing patterns, subdivisions of lung volume, quasistatic lung pressure-volume relationships and CO diffusing capacity. The mid-adult and old rats were larger in body size than the young rats and had larger values for breathing pattern variables and lung volumes. The mid-adult rats had lower values for functional residual capacity and residual volume and a greater quasistatic lung compliance than the young or old rats. There were no age-related differences in the position of the mid-portion of the quasistatic pressure-volume curve; however, when volumes were expressed as percentages of maximal lung volume, the curves of the older groups lay to the right of the curve for the youngest group. Although these differences suggested the possibility of a slight reduction of respiratory efficiency in the old rats, there was no clear indication of a major loss of respiratory function with age. Differences between males and females were largely related to body size, although young and mid-adult females had larger size-adjusted values for lung volumes than males. Rat lungs undergo significant changes during adulthood, due primarily to continued lung growth, but the pattern of change may be different than that of man and the degrees of the changes suggesting a possible function loss in aged subjects were less than those observed in many at an equivalent portion of the life span.

  7. Ovarian hormone replacement to aged ovariectomized female rats benefits acquisition of the morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Markham, J A; Pych, J C; Juraska, J M

    2002-11-01

    Ovarian steroids have been suggested to aid in preserving cognitive functioning during aging in both humans and other animals. Spatial memory relies heavily on the hippocampus, a structure that is sensitive to the influence of both ovarian hormones and aging. The present study investigated the outcome of ovarian hormone replacement during aging on performance in a spatial version of the Morris water maze. Female rats were ovariectomized at 14 months of age and received one of three types of replacement prior to testing at 16 months: acute estrogen replacement (2 days), chronic estrogen replacement (28 days), or chronic replacement of both estrogen and progesterone (28 days). Control animals, which did not receive replacement hormones, displayed significant overnight forgetting during acquisition of the task. Ovarian hormone replacement, both acute and chronic, prevented forgetting. Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of ovarian hormones are detrimental to performance of young adult female rats on this task (Warren and Juraska, 1997; Chesler and Juraska, 2000). The current study found an opposite effect during aging: ovarian hormone replacement was beneficial. This suggests that animal models of menopause, aimed at exploring the protective effects of hormone replacement therapy on cognition during human female aging, require the use of aged female animals.

  8. Effects of Chinese herbal medicine fuzhisan on aged rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu Ling; Wang, De Sheng; Zhao, Bao Quan; Li, Qian; Qu, Heng Yan; Zhang, Ting; Zhou, Jian Ping; Sun, Man Ji

    2008-09-01

    Fuzhisan (FZS), a Chinese herbal complex prescription, has been used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) for more than 15 years. Previous studies showed that FZS enhanced the cognitive ability in AD patients and AD model rats. FZS modulated the impaired cellular functions, and attenuated the damage caused by beta-amyloid protein, dose-dependently regulated and ameliorated the cholinergic functions of the Abeta(25-35)-induced AD-model mice. The SPECT imaging revealed that FZS improved the blood flow of the frontal and temporal lobes and the callosal gyrus in AD patients. However, little investigation of the effects of FZS on the naturally aged rats was reported. The underlying mechanism also remains to be explored. Recently we investigated the effects of the aqueous extract of FZS on the cognitive functions of the aged rats and the pharmacological basis for its therapeutic efficacy. The results showed a significant improvement made by FZS (0.3, 0.6, and 1.2 g/kg/d) for impaired cognitive functions of the aged rats. The rats manifested a shortened latency in Morris water maze test after intra-gavage administration (ig) of FZS for 30 consecutive days. The micro-positron emission tomography (microPET) using (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) as the tracer demonstrated that FZS promoted the glucose metabolism in the whole brains especially the temporal and parietal regions in the aged rats. The spectrophotometry and Western blot showed that FZS obviously increased the activity and the production of choline O-acetyltransferase (ChAT, EC 2.3.1.6) and the acetylcholine (ACh) contents in the hippocampus, thus regulated and ameliorated the impaired cholinergic functions of the aged rats. The therapeutical effects of FZS on the learning and memory of the aged rats were dose-dependent. The mechanism of action of FZS in ameliorating the memory dysfunction of the aged rats is ascribed to the reinforcement of the function of the cholinergic system and the

  9. Distinct manifestations of executive dysfunction in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Beas, B. Sofia; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Different components of executive function such as working memory, attention, and cognitive flexibility can be dissociated both behaviorally and mechanistically; however, the within-subject influences of normal aging on different aspects of executive function remain ill-defined. To better define these relationships, young adult and aged male F344 rats were cross-characterized on an attentional set-shifting task that assesses cognitive flexibility and a delayed response task that assesses working memory. Across tasks, aged rats were impaired relative to young; however, there was significant variability in individual performance within the aged cohort. Notably, performance on the set-shifting task and performance at long delays on the delayed response task were inversely related among aged rats. Additional experiments showed no relationship between aged rats’ performance on the set-shifting task and performance on a hippocampal-dependent spatial reference memory task. These data indicate that normal aging can produce distinct manifestations of executive dysfunction, and support the need to better understand the unique mechanisms contributing to different forms of prefrontal cortical-supported executive decline across the lifespan. PMID:23601673

  10. Toy Age-Labeling: An Overview for Pediatricians of How Toys Receive Their Age Safety and Developmental Designations.

    PubMed

    Kulak, Shuli; Stein, Ruth E K

    2016-07-01

    Injuries related to toys continue to cause significant childhood morbidity and mortality, despite considerable government regulation of the toy industry. Recent controversy related to toys that contain strong magnets demonstrate the dangers they pose to children. The pediatric community is often unaware of how toys receive their developmental and safety labeling and the degree to which age-labeling on toys can be discretionary. Toy labeling has 2 basic manifestations. The first, safety labeling for hazards like small parts, balloons, or small balls that may present a choking risk, is mandatory. The second, "developmental" age-labeling, describes the age of the children for which the toy is intended, and sometimes has discretionary components. This article provides a review of the regulations governing toy age-safety standards and how they are reflected on toy packaging to help pediatric practitioners apply safety advice across settings and patient characteristics. We review the existing age-labeling regulations and processes and discuss the major areas where children remain vulnerable despite labeling. Finally, we list some recommendations for counseling parents about toy safety. PMID:27273747

  11. The effect of aging on fracture healing in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bak, B; Andreassen, T T

    1989-11-01

    The effect of age on the biomechanical properties of healing tibial fractures was studied by comparing the fracture healing in 2-year-old male Wistar rats with the fracture healing in 3-month-old male Wistar rats after 40 and 80 days of healing. There were no significant differences in the mechanical parameters after 40 days of healing, but after 80 days, a considerable delay in the fracture healing process was noted in the old rats compared with the young adult rats when evaluated by maximum load, maximum stress, stiffness, and energy absorption in a three-point bending procedure. In the contralateral, nonfractured bones, the tibiae from the old animals sustained higher loads and had higher stiffness than the bones from the young adult animals, but stress values, elastic modulus, and capacity for energy absorption was much lower in the old animals.

  12. Factors influencing adverse skin responses in rats receiving repeated subcutaneous injections and potential impact on neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Levoe, S. Nikki; Flannery, Brenna M.; Brignolo, Laurie; Imai, Denise M.; Koehne, Amanda; Austin, Adam T.; Bruun, Donald A.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated subcutaneous (s.c.) injection is a common route of administration in chronic studies of neuroactive compounds. However, in a pilot study we noted a significant incidence of skin abnormalities in adult male Long-Evans rats receiving daily s.c. injections of peanut oil (1.0 ml/kg) in the subscapular region for 21 d. Histopathological analyses of the lesions were consistent with a foreign body reaction. Subsequent studies were conducted to determine factors that influenced the incidence or severity of skin abnormalities, and whether these adverse skin reactions influenced a specific neurobehavioral outcome. Rats injected daily for 21 d with food grade peanut oil had an earlier onset and greater incidence of skin abnormalities relative to rats receiving an equal volume (1.0 ml/kg/d) of reagent grade peanut oil or triglyceride of coconut oil. Skin abnormalities in animals injected daily with peanut oil were increased in animals housed on corncob versus paper bedding. Comparison of animals obtained from different barrier facilities exposed to the same injection paradigm (reagent grade peanut oil, 1.0 ml/kg/d s.c.) revealed significant differences in the severity of skin abnormalities. However, animals from different barrier facilities did not perform differently in a Pavlovian fear conditioning task. Collectively, these data suggest that environmental factors influence the incidence and severity of skin abnormalities following repeated s.c. injections, but that these adverse skin responses do not significantly influence performance in at least one test of learning and memory. PMID:25705100

  13. Spontaneous Object Recognition Memory in Aged Rats: Complexity versus Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamiz, Fernando; Gallo, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Previous work on the effect of aging on spontaneous object recognition (SOR) memory tasks in rats has yielded controversial results. Although the results at long-retention intervals are consistent, conflicting results have been reported at shorter delays. We have assessed the potential relevance of the type of object used in the performance of…

  14. Dexmedetomidine alleviates postoperative cognitive dysfunction by inhibiting neuron excitation in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Bo; Shi, Qiqing; Fang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The perioperative stress response is one of the factors leading to postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Dexmedetomidine (Dex) can reduce the stress response and hippocampus neuroapoptosis, but its mechanism of action on POCD remains unknown. This study investigated the protective effect and possible mechanism of Dex on POCD in aged rats. Ninety-six aged male rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 24 rats per group): a non-surgical control group, a surgical (model) group, a surgical group receiving a high dose of Dex (12 μg/kg), and a surgical group receiving a low dose of Dex (3 μg/kg). Cognitive function and neuronal apoptosis were evaluated after splenectomy. Compared with the control group, the model group had significantly longer escape latencies and fewer platform crossings in the Morris water-maze test. Immunohistochemistry showed that relaxin-3 and c-fos positive neurons in the hippocampus increased on postoperative days 1 and 3. Greater downregulation of the Bcl-2 protein and upregulation of Fas, caspase-8, and caspase-9 significantly increased neuroapoptosis in the model group. Compared with the model group, rats given Dex had (1) shorter escape latencies, (2) more platform crossings, (3) fewer relaxin-3 and c-fos positive neurons in the hippocampal CA1 area, (4) upregulation of Bcl-2, (5) downregulation of Fas, caspase-8, and caspase-9 proteins, and (6) decreased neuroapoptosis in the hippocampus. Thus, our data suggest that Dex may improve cognitive functioning in aged rats by inhibiting neural over-excitability. The mechanism may operate by restraining relaxin-3 and c-fos expression. PMID:27069541

  15. Aging of recipient oocytes reduces the development of cloned embryos receiving cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohui; Kato, Yoko; Tsunoda, Yukio

    2007-08-01

    Parthenogenetic activation is an important factor in successful production of cloned mammals. Because it has been reported that aged oocytes are more sensitive to parthenogenetic activation than young oocytes, the present study examined the effects of oocyte aging on the in vitro and in vivo developmental potential of nuclear-transferred (NT) mouse oocytes receiving cumulus cells. The potentials of young NT oocytes (14 h after human chorionic gonadotrophin [hCG] injection) to develop into blastocysts was, however, significantly higher than that of aged oocytes (20 h after hCG injection; 16% vs 6%). When the nuclei of NT oocytes at the 2-cell stage were fused with enucleated fertilized 2-cell embryos, the potentials of the serial NT embryos to develop into blastocysts were no different for both young and aged oocytes (74% vs 74%). Live young, however, were obtained only after transfer of serial NT blastocysts developed from young NT oocytes (2%). In contrast to a report using embryonic nuclei as the nuclear donors, the results of the present study indicate that young oocytes are superior to aged oocytes as a source of recipient cytoplasm for mouse somatic cell cloning. PMID:17389775

  16. 42 CFR 435.320 - Medically needy coverage of the aged in States that cover individuals receiving SSI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medically needy coverage of the aged in States that cover individuals receiving SSI. 435.320 Section 435.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... individuals receiving SSI. If the agency provides Medicaid to individuals receiving SSI and elects to...

  17. Coccomyxa Gloeobotrydiformis Improves Learning and Memory in Intrinsic Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Luning; Jin, Ying; Dong, Liming; Sui, Hai-juan; Sumi, Ryo; Jahan, Rabita; Hu, Dahai; Li, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Declining in learning and memory is one of the most common and prominent problems during the aging process. Neurotransmitter changes, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal signal transduction were considered to participate in this process. In the present study, we examined the effects of Coccomyxa gloeobotrydiformis (CGD) on learning and memory ability of intrinsic aging rats. As a result, CGD treated (50 mg/kg·d or 100 mg/kg ·d for a duration of 8 weeks) 22-month-old male rats, which have shown significant improvement on learning and spatial memory ability compared with control, which was evidently revealed in both the hidden platform tasks and probe trials. The following immunohistochemistry and Western blot experiments suggested that CGD could increase the content of Ach and thereby improve the function of the cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus, and therefore also improving learning and memory ability of the aged rats by acting as an anti-inflammatory agent. The effects of CGD on learning and memory might also have an association with the ERK/CREB signalling. The results above suggest that the naturally made drug CGD may have several great benefit as a multi-target drug in the process of prevention and/or treatment of age-dependent cognitive decline and aging process. PMID:26078724

  18. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in rat receiving nilotinib

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhi-yong; Wan, Li-li; Yang, Quan-jun; Han, Yong-long; Li, Yan; Yu, Qi; Guo, Cheng; Li, Xiao

    2013-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent chemotherapy drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Nilotinib, a small-molecule Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was reported to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transmembrane transporters. The present study aimed to investigate nilotinib's affection on the steady-state pharmacokinetics, disposition and cardiotoxicity of DOX. A total of 24 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomized into four groups (6 in each) and received the following regimens: saline, intravenous DOX (5 mg/kg) alone, and DOX co-administrated with either 20 or 40 mg/kg nilotinib. Blood was withdrawn at 12 time points till 72 h after DOX injection and the concentrations of DOX and its metabolite doxorubicinol (DOXol) in serum and cardiac tissue were assayed by LC–MS–MS method. To determine the cardiotoxicity, the following parameters were investigated: creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase. Histopathological examination of heart section was carried out to evaluate the extent of cardiotoxicity after treatments. The results showed that pretreatment of 40 mg/kg nilotinib increased the AUC{sub 0–t} and C{sub max} of DOX and DOXol. However, their accumulation in cardiac tissue was significantly decreased when compared with the group that received DOX alone. In addition, biochemical and histopathological results showed that 40 mg/kg nilotinib reduced the cardiotoxicity induced by DOX administration. In conclusion, co-administration of nilotinib increased serum exposure, but significantly decreased the accumulation of DOX in cardiac tissue. Consistent with in vitro profile, oral dose of 40 mg/kg nilotinib significantly decreased the cardiotoxicity of DOX in rat by enhancing P-gp activity in the heart.

  19. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in rat receiving nilotinib.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Wan, Li-Li; Yang, Quan-Jun; Han, Yong-Long; Li, Yan; Yu, Qi; Guo, Cheng; Li, Xiao

    2013-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent chemotherapy drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Nilotinib, a small-molecule Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was reported to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transmembrane transporters. The present study aimed to investigate nilotinib's affection on the steady-state pharmacokinetics, disposition and cardiotoxicity of DOX. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups (6 in each) and received the following regimens: saline, intravenous DOX (5mg/kg) alone, and DOX co-administrated with either 20 or 40mg/kg nilotinib. Blood was withdrawn at 12 time points till 72h after DOX injection and the concentrations of DOX and its metabolite doxorubicinol (DOXol) in serum and cardiac tissue were assayed by LC-MS-MS method. To determine the cardiotoxicity, the following parameters were investigated: creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase. Histopathological examination of heart section was carried out to evaluate the extent of cardiotoxicity after treatments. The results showed that pretreatment of 40mg/kg nilotinib increased the AUC0-t and Cmax of DOX and DOXol. However, their accumulation in cardiac tissue was significantly decreased when compared with the group that received DOX alone. In addition, biochemical and histopathological results showed that 40mg/kg nilotinib reduced the cardiotoxicity induced by DOX administration. In conclusion, co-administration of nilotinib increased serum exposure, but significantly decreased the accumulation of DOX in cardiac tissue. Consistent with in vitro profile, oral dose of 40mg/kg nilotinib significantly decreased the cardiotoxicity of DOX in rat by enhancing P-gp activity in the heart.

  20. Effect of altitude exposure on induction of streptococcal endocarditis in young and middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Altland, P D

    1982-01-01

    Young (age 2 months) and middle-aged (age 10 month) rats were injected once with a culture of Streptococcus sanguis and exposed for 24 h to 7620 m altitude. At 6 d 54% of the exposed and 30% of the unexposed middle-aged rats had bacterial endocarditis. Myocarditis developed in 63% of the injected exposed rats of both ages, in 11% of the injected unexposed middle-aged rats, and in none of the unexposed young adults. Interstitial nephritis was found in 46-66% of the injected, unexposed young and middle-aged rats and in 70-86% of the injected, exposed young and middle-aged rats, respectively. About 95% of all injected rats survived 6 d. No evidence of hemoconcentration was found. The increase in cardiac disease induced by altitude was probably due to deleterious effects of hypoxia on the myocardium, and cellular defenses, and to physiological and possible immunological changes associated with aging.

  1. Low intensity laser therapy accelerates muscle regeneration in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Rodrigues, Natalia C.; Assis, Livia L.; Peviani, Sabrina S.; Durigan, Joao L.; Moreira, Fernando M.A.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Parizotto, Nivaldo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elderly people suffer from skeletal muscle disorders that undermine their daily activity and quality of life; some of these problems can be listed as but not limited to: sarcopenia, changes in central and peripheral nervous system, blood hypoperfusion, regenerative changes contributing to atrophy, and muscle weakness. Determination, proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in the regenerative process are regulated by specific transcription factors, known as myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). In the elderly, the activation of MRFs is inefficient which hampers the regenerative process. Recent studies found that low intensity laser therapy (LILT) has a stimulatory effect in the muscle regeneration process. However, the effects of this therapy when associated with aging are still unknown. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of LILT (λ=830 nm) on the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of aged rats. Subjects and methods The total of 56 male Wistar rats formed two population sets: old and young, with 28 animals in each set. Each of these sets were randomly divided into four groups of young rats (3 months of age) with n=7 per group and four groups of aged rats (10 months of age) with n=7 per group. These groups were submitted to cryoinjury + laser irradiation, cryoinjury only, laser irradiation only and the control group (no cryoinjury/no laser irradiation). The laser treatment was performed for 5 consecutive days. The first laser application was done 24 h after the injury (on day 2) and on the seventh day, the TA muscle was dissected and removed under anesthesia. After this the animals were euthanized. Histological analyses with toluidine blue as well as hematoxylin-eosin staining (for counting the blood capillaries) were performed for the lesion areas. In addition, MyoD and VEGF mRNA was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The results showed significant elevation (p<0.05) in MyoD and VEGF genes expression levels

  2. Effect of tongue exercise on protrusive force and muscle fiber area in aging rats

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Jackson, Michelle A.; Mann, Laura; Kluender, Keith R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Age-related changes in tongue function may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. Our purpose was to investigate whether aged rats that have undergone tongue exercise would manifest increased protrusive tongue forces and increased genioglossus (GG) muscle fiber cross sectional areas. Method Forty-eight young adult, middle-aged and old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats received 8 weeks of tongue exercise. Protrusive tongue forces were measured before and after exercise. GG muscle fiber cross sectional area was measured in exercised rats and compared with cross sectional areas in a no-exercise control group. Results A significant increase in maximum tongue force was found following exercise in all age groups. In addition, a trend for increased GG muscle fiber cross sectional area, and a significant increase in variability of GG muscle fiber cross sectional area were identified post-exercise. Conclusion The findings of this study have implications for treatment of elderly persons with dysphagia using tongue exercise programs. Specifically, increases in tongue force that occur following 8 weeks of progressive resistance tongue exercise may be accompanied by alterations in tongue muscle fiber morphology. These changes may provide greater strength and endurance for goal-oriented actions associated with the oropharyngeal swallow and should be investigated in future research. PMID:18723593

  3. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Heather M; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9-12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors.

  4. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging

    PubMed Central

    Buechel, Heather M.; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L.; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9–12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors. PMID:24575039

  5. Dietary inulin intake and age can significantly affect intestinal absorption of calcium and magnesium in rats: a stable isotope approach

    PubMed Central

    Coudray, Charles; Rambeau, Mathieu; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Tressol, Jean Claude; Demigne, Christian; Gueux, Elyett; Mazur, Andrzej; Rayssiguier, Yves

    2005-01-01

    Background previous studies have shown that non-digestible inulin-type fructan intake can increase intestinal mineral absorption in both humans and animals. However, this stimulatory effect on intestinal absorption may depend on experimental conditions such as duration of fermentable fiber intake, mineral diet levels and animals' physiological status, in particular their age. Objectives the aim of this study was to determine the effect of inulin intake on Ca and Mg absorption in rats at different age stages. Methods eighty male Wistar rats of four different ages (2, 5, 10 and 20 months) were randomized into either a control group or a group receiving 3.75% inulin in their diet for 4 days and then 7.5% inulin for three weeks. The animals were fed fresh food and water ad libitum for the duration of the experiment. Intestinal absorption of Ca and Mg was determined by fecal monitoring using stable isotopic tracers. Ca and Mg status was also assessed. Results absorption of Ca and Mg was significantly lower in the aged rats (10 and 20 mo) than in the young and adult rat groups. As expected, inulin intake increased Ca and Mg absorption in all four rat groups. However, inulin had a numerically greater effect on Ca absorption in aged rats than in younger rats whereas its effect on Mg absorption remained similar across all four rat age groups. Conclusion the extent of the stimulatory effect of inulin on absorption of Ca may differ according to animal ages. Further studies are required to explore this effect over longer inulin intake periods, and to confirm these results in humans. PMID:16253138

  6. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Gregory P.; Sepe, Joseph J.; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.; Diffee, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  7. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Gregory P.; Sepe, Joseph J.; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.; Diffee, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart.

  8. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Barton, Gregory P; Sepe, Joseph J; McKiernan, Susan H; Aiken, Judd M; Diffee, Gary M

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  9. Grape Powder Improves Age-Related Decline in Mitochondrial and Kidney Functions in Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Quaisar

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects and mechanism of grape powder- (GP-) mediated improvement, if any, on aging kidney function. Adult (3-month) and aged (21-month) Fischer 344 rats were treated without (controls) and with GP (1.5% in drinking water) and kidney parameters were measured. Control aged rats showed higher levels of proteinuria and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), which decreased with GP treatment in these rats. Renal protein carbonyls (protein oxidation) and gp91phox-NADPH oxidase levels were high in control aged rats, suggesting oxidative stress burden in these rats. GP treatment in aged rats restored these parameters to the levels of adult rats. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion were low in control aged rats suggesting compromised kidney function, which improved with GP treatment in aged rats. Interestingly, low renal mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels in control aged rats were associated with reduced levels of mitochondrial biogenesis marker MtTFA. Also, Nrf2 proteins levels were reduced in control aged rats. GP treatment increased levels of MtTFA and Nrf2 in aged rats. These results suggest that GP by potentially regulating Nrf2 improves aging mitochondrial and kidney functions. PMID:27528887

  10. Grape Powder Improves Age-Related Decline in Mitochondrial and Kidney Functions in Fischer 344 Rats.

    PubMed

    Pokkunuri, Indira; Ali, Quaisar; Asghar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects and mechanism of grape powder- (GP-) mediated improvement, if any, on aging kidney function. Adult (3-month) and aged (21-month) Fischer 344 rats were treated without (controls) and with GP (1.5% in drinking water) and kidney parameters were measured. Control aged rats showed higher levels of proteinuria and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), which decreased with GP treatment in these rats. Renal protein carbonyls (protein oxidation) and gp (91phox) -NADPH oxidase levels were high in control aged rats, suggesting oxidative stress burden in these rats. GP treatment in aged rats restored these parameters to the levels of adult rats. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion were low in control aged rats suggesting compromised kidney function, which improved with GP treatment in aged rats. Interestingly, low renal mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels in control aged rats were associated with reduced levels of mitochondrial biogenesis marker MtTFA. Also, Nrf2 proteins levels were reduced in control aged rats. GP treatment increased levels of MtTFA and Nrf2 in aged rats. These results suggest that GP by potentially regulating Nrf2 improves aging mitochondrial and kidney functions. PMID:27528887

  11. Neuroprotective effect of Shenqi Fuzheng injection pretreatment in aged rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ying-min; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Peng-bo; Zhen, Lu-ming; Sun, Xiao-ju; Wang, Zhi-ling; Xu, Ren-yan; Xue, Rong-liang

    2016-01-01

    Shenqi Fuzheng injection is extracted from the Chinese herbs Radix Astragali and Radix Codonopsis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Shenqi Fuzheng injection in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. Aged rats (20–22 months) were divided into three groups: sham, model, and treatment. Shenqi Fuzheng injection or saline (40 mL/kg) was injected into the tail vein daily for 1 week, after which a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury model was established. Compared with model rats that received saline, rats in the treatment group had smaller infarct volumes, lower brain water and malondialdehyde content, lower brain Ca2+ levels, lower activities of serum lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase, and higher superoxide dismutase activity. In addition, the treatment group showed less damage to the brain tissue ultrastructure and better neurological function. Our findings indicate that Shenqi Fuzheng injection exerts neuroprotective effects in aged rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and that the underlying mechanism relies on oxygen free radical scavenging and inhibition of brain Ca2+ accumulation. PMID:26981095

  12. Characterization of recovery, repair, and inflammatory processes following contusion spinal cord injury in old female rats: is age a limitation?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the incidence of spinal cord injury (SCI) is steadily rising in the elderly human population, few studies have investigated the effect of age in rodent models. Here, we investigated the effect of age in female rats on spontaneous recovery and repair after SCI. Young (3 months) and aged (18 months) female rats received a moderate contusion SCI at T9. Behavioral recovery was assessed, and immunohistocemical and stereological analyses performed. Results Aged rats demonstrated greater locomotor deficits compared to young, beginning at 7 days post-injury (dpi) and lasting through at least 28 dpi. Unbiased stereological analyses revealed a selective increase in percent lesion area and early (2 dpi) apoptotic cell death caudal to the injury epicenter in aged versus young rats. One potential mechanism for these differences in lesion pathogenesis is the inflammatory response; we therefore assessed humoral and cellular innate immune responses. No differences in either acute or chronic serum complement activity, or acute neutrophil infiltration, were observed between age groups. However, the number of microglia/macrophages present at the injury epicenter was increased by 50% in aged animals versus young. Conclusions These data suggest that age affects recovery of locomotor function, lesion pathology, and microglia/macrophage response following SCI. PMID:25512759

  13. Differential expression of sirtuins in the aging rat brain.

    PubMed

    Braidy, Nady; Poljak, Anne; Grant, Ross; Jayasena, Tharusha; Mansour, Hussein; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; Smythe, George; Sachdev, Perminder; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    Although there are seven mammalian sirtuins (SIRT1-7), little is known about their expression in the aging brain. To characterize the change(s) in mRNA and protein expression of SIRT1-7 and their associated proteins in the brain of "physiologically" aged Wistar rats. We tested mRNA and protein expression levels of rat SIRT1-7, and the levels of associated proteins in the brain using RT-PCR and western blotting. Our data shows that SIRT1 expression increases with age, concurrently with increased acetylated p53 levels in all brain regions investigated. SIRT2 and FOXO3a protein levels increased only in the occipital lobe. SIRT3-5 expression declined significantly in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, associated with increases in superoxide and fatty acid oxidation levels, and acetylated CPS-1 protein expression, and a reduction in MnSOD level. While SIRT6 expression declines significantly with age acetylated H3K9 protein expression is increased throughout the brain. SIRT7 and Pol I protein expression increased in the frontal lobe. This study identifies previously unknown roles for sirtuins in regulating cellular homeostasis and healthy aging. PMID:26005404

  14. Effects of Ginkgo biloba on chemically-induced mammary tumors in rats receiving tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) is used extensively by breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with Tamoxifen (TAM). Thus, the present study investigated the effects of GbE in female Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats bearing chemically-induced mammary tumors and receiving TAM. Methods Animals bearing mammary tumors (≥1 cm in diameter) were divided into four groups: TAM [10 mg/kg, intragastrically (i.g.)], TAM plus GbE [50 and 100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)] or an untreated control group. After 4 weeks, the therapeutic efficacy of the different treatments was evaluated by measuring the tumor volume (cm3) and the proportions of each tumor that were alive, necrotic or degenerative (mm2). In addition, labeling indexes (LI%) were calculated for cell proliferation (PCNA LI%) and apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3 LI%), expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) and p63 biomarkers. Results Overall, the tumor volume and the PCNA LI% within live tumor areas were reduced by 83% and 99%, respectively, in all TAM-treated groups when compared to the untreated control group. GbE treatment (100 mg/kg) reduced the proportions of live (24.8%) and necrotic areas (2.9%) (p = 0.046 and p = 0.038, respectively) and significantly increased the proportion of degenerative areas (72.9%) (p = 0.004) in mammary tumors when compared to the group treated only with TAM. The expression of ER-α, p63 and cleaved caspase-3 in live tumor tissues was not modified by GbE treatment. Conclusions Co-treatment with 100 mg/kg GbE presented a slightly beneficial effect on the therapeutic efficacy of TAM in female SD rats bearing mammary tumors. PMID:23634930

  15. Pulpal responses to cavity preparation in aged rat molars.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, Eriko; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Nomura, Shuichi; Ohshima, Hayato

    2006-10-01

    The dentin-pulp complex is capable of repair after tooth injuries including dental procedures. However, few data are available concerning aged changes in pulpal reactions to such injuries. The present study aimed to clarify the capability of defense in aged pulp by investigating the responses of odontoblasts and cells positive for class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to cavity preparation in aged rat molars (300-360 days) and by comparing the results with those in young adult rats (100 days). In untreated control teeth, immunoreactivity for intense heat-shock protein (HSP)-25 and nestin was found in odontoblasts, whereas class-II-MHC-positive cells were densely distributed in the periphery of the pulp. Cavity preparation caused two types of pulpal reactions based on the different extent of damage in the aged rats. In the case of severe damage, destruction of the odontoblast layer was conspicuous at the affected site. By 12 h after cavity preparation, numerous class-II-MHC-positive cells appeared along the pulp-dentin border but subsequently disappeared together with HSP-25-immunopositive cells, and finally newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells took the place of the degenerated odontoblasts and acquired immunoreactivity for HSP-25 and nestin by postoperative day 3. In the case of mild damage, no remarkable changes occurred in odontoblasts after operation, and some survived through the experimental stages. These findings indicate that aged pulp tissue still possesses a defense capacity, and that a variety of reactions can occur depending on the difference in the status of dentinal tubules and/or odontoblast processes in individuals.

  16. Differential mechanisms of ang (1-7)-mediated vasodepressor effect in adult and aged candesartan-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Bosnyak, S; Widdop, R E; Denton, K M; Jones, E S

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin (1-7) (Ang (1-7)) causes vasodilator effects in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) via angiotensin type 2 receptors (AT(2)R). However, the role of vascular AT(2)R in aging is not known. Therefore, we examined the effect of aging on Ang (1-7)-mediated vasodepressor effects and vascular angiotensin receptor localization in aging. Blood pressure was measured in conscious adult (~17 weeks) and aged (~19 months) normotensive rats that received drug combinations in a randomised fashion over a 4-day protocol: (i) Ang (1-7) alone, (ii) AT(1)R antagonist, candesartan, alone, (iii) Ang (1-7) and candesartan, or (iv) Ang-(1-7), candesartan, and the AT(2)R antagonist, PD123319. In a separate group of animals, the specific MasR antagonist, A779, was administered in place of PD123319. Receptor localisation was also assessed in aortic sections from adult and aged WKY rats by immunofluorescence. Ang (1-7) reduced blood pressure (~15 mmHg) in adult normotensive rats although this effect was dependant on the background dose of candesartan. This depressor effect was reversed by AT(2)R blockade. In aged rats, the depressor effect of Ang (1-7) was evident but was now inhibited by either AT(2)R blockade or MasR blockade. At the same time, AT(2)R, MasR, and ACE2 immunoreactivity was markedly elevated in aortic sections from aged animals. These results indicate that the Ang (1-7)-mediated depressor effect was preserved in aged animals. Whereas Ang (1-7) effects were mediated exclusively via stimulation of AT(2)R in adult WKY, with aging the vasodepressor effect of Ang (1-7) involved both AT(2)R and MasR.

  17. Effects of soy phytoestrogens on pituitary-ovarian function in middle-aged female rats.

    PubMed

    Medigović, Ivana M; Živanović, Jasmina B; Ajdžanović, Vladimir Z; Nikolić-Kokić, Aleksandra L; Stanković, Sanja D; Trifunović, Svetlana L; Milošević, Verica Lj; Nestorović, Nataša M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of genistein (G) and daidzein (D) on the histological, hormonal, and functional parameters of the pituitary-ovarian axis in middle-aged female rats, and to compare these effects with the effects of estradiol (E), commonly used in the prevention and treatment of menopausal symptoms. Middle-aged (12 month old) Wistar female rats subcutaneously received 35 mg/kg of G, or 35 mg/kg of D, or 0.625 mg/kg of E every day for 4 weeks. Each of the treated groups had a corresponding control group. An intact control group was also established. G and D did not change the intracellular protein content within gonadotropic and lactotropic cells, but vacuolization was observed in all the cell types. In contrast, E caused an inhibition of gonadotropic and stimulation of lactotropic cells. Also, ovaries of middle-aged female rats exposed to G or D have more healthy primordial and primary follicles and less atretic follicles. E treatment in the ovaries had a mostly negative effect, which is reflected by the increased number of atretic follicles in all tested classes. G and D provoked decrease in CuZnSOD and CAT activity, while E treatment increased MnSOD and decreased CuZnSOD and GSHPx activity. All the treatments increased serum estradiol and decreased testosterone levels, while D and E increased the serum progesterone level. In conclusion, soy phytoestrogens exhibited beneficial effects on pituitary-ovarian function in middle-aged female rats, as compared to estradiol.

  18. Age-dependence of intracranial viscoelastic properties in living rats.

    PubMed

    Shulyakov, Alexander V; Cenkowski, Stefan S; Buist, Richard J; Del Bigio, Marc R

    2011-04-01

    To explore the effect of maturation on intracranial mechanical properties, viscoelastic parameters were determined in 44 live rats at ages 1-2, 10-12, 21, 56-70, and 180 days using instrumented indentation. With the dura mater intact, the apparent modulus of elasticity, the indentation modulus, and viscous behavior were measured in vivo, as well as 1 h after death. In a separate group of 25 rats, brain water, and protein content were determined. A significant increase of the elastic and indentation moduli beginning at 10-12 days after birth and continuing to 180 days was observed. The creep behavior decreased in the postnatal period and stabilized at 21 days. Changes in intracranial biomechanical properties corresponded to a gradual decrease of brain water, and an increase in total protein content, including glial fibrillary acidic protein, myelin basic protein, and neurofilament light chain. Elastic properties were not significantly different comparing the live and dead states. However, there were significant postmortem changes in viscous behavior. Viscoelastic properties of living rat intracranial contents are shown to be age dependent, reflecting the physical and biochemical changes during postnatal development. This may be important for understanding why young and mature brains respond differently in situations of brain trauma and hydrocephalus.

  19. The Expression Changes of Inflammasomes in the Aging Rat Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Song, Fei; Ma, Yuxiang; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms of kidney aging are not yet clear. Studies have shown that immunological inflammation is related to kidney aging. Inflammasomes are important components of innate immune system in the body. However, the function of inflammasomes and their underlying mechanisms in renal aging remain unclear. In this study, for the first time, we systematically investigated the role of the inflammasomes and the inflammatory responses activated by inflammasomes during kidney aging. We found that during kidney aging, the expression levels of the molecules associated with the activation of inflammasomes, including toll-like receptor-4 and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R), were significantly increased; their downstream signaling pathway molecule interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 (IRAK4) was markedly activated (Phospho-IRAK4 was obviously increased); the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway was activated (the activated NF-κB pathway molecules Phospho-IKKβ, Phospho-IκBα, and Phospho-NF-κBp65 were significantly elevated); the levels of the inflammasome components NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3), NLRC4, and pro-caspase-1 were prominently upregulated; and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were notably increased in the kidneys of 24-month-old (elderly group) rats. These results showed that inflammasomes are markedly activated during the renal aging process and might induce inflamm-aging by promoting the maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. PMID:26219846

  20. Adolescent rats are more prone to binge eating behavior: a study of age and obesity as risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bekker, Liza; Barnea, Royi; Brauner, Akiva; Weller, Aron

    2014-08-15

    Binge eating (BE) is characterized by repeated, intermittent over-consumption of food in a brief period of time. This study aims to advance the understanding of potential risk factors for BE such as obesity, overeating and adolescence as an age group. We used the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat, a genetic overeating-induced obesity model with increased preferences for sweet and fat. Adolescent and adult rats from both strains (OLETF and the lean control strain, Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka [LETO]) received limited access to a palatable liquid diet (Ensure vanilla) for three weeks. Water and chow were available throughout the study, but access to Ensure was limited to two hours, three times a week (3TW group) or every work day (5TW group). As expected, OLETF rats consumed more Ensure and were more BE-prone (BEP) than LETO rats at both ages. Adolescent rats showed a significantly larger binge size as demonstrated by a greater increase in Ensure intake, compared to adults. Furthermore, while the adults reduced their chow intake, compensating for increased Ensure intake, the adolescents increased their chow intake too. Finally, the adolescent rats showed binge like behavior earlier in the study and they tended to be BEP more than the adults. Our findings in rats suggest that adolescents and in particular obese adolescents are at risk for BE, and BE can lead to overweight, thus providing the basis for examination of biological mechanisms of this process in animal models. PMID:24815316

  1. Grape powder treatment prevents anxiety-like behavior in a rat model of aging.

    PubMed

    Patki, Gaurav; Ali, Quaisar; Pokkunuri, Indira; Asghar, Mohammad; Salim, Samina

    2015-06-01

    Earlier, we have reported that grape powder (GP) treatment prevented pharmacologic and psychological stress-induced anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment in rats. Protective effects of GP were attributed to its antioxidant effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that age-associated behavioral and cognitive deficits such as anxiety and memory impairment will be ameliorated with GP treatment. Using a National Institute of Aging recommended rodent model of aging, we examined a potentially protective role of antioxidant-rich GP in age-associated anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment. Male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups: young rats (3 months old) provided with tap water or with 15 g/L GP dissolved in tap water for 3 weeks, aged rats (21 months old) provided with tap water or with GP-treated tap water for 3 weeks (AG-GP). Anxiety-like behavior was significantly greater in aged rats compared with young rats, GP-treated young rats, or aged control rats (P < .05). Also, GP treatment prevented age-induced anxiety-like behavior in AG-GP rats (P < .05). Neither short-term nor long-term age-associated memory deficits improved with GP treatment in AG-GP rats. Furthermore, aged rats showed increased level of physiological stress (corticosterone) and increased oxidative stress in the plasma (8-isoprostane) as well as in selected brain areas (protein carbonylation). Grape powder treatment prevented age-induced increase in corticosterone levels and plasma 8-isoprostane levels in aged rats (P < .05), whereas protein carbonylation was recovered in the amygdala region only (P < .05). Grape powder by regulating oxidative stress ameliorates age-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats, whereas age-associated memory deficits seem unaffected with GP treatment.

  2. Anti-aging Effect and Gene Expression Profiling of Aged Rats Treated with G. bimaculatus Extract

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Kim, Min-Ji; Park, Kun-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Extract from Gryllus bimaculatus crickets inhibits oxidation at the DNA level, with reduced production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Microarray analyses were performed with a rat 28K cDNA clone set array to identify the gene expression profiles of aged (10 months old) Wistar Kyoto rats treated for one month with 100 mg/kg G. bimaculatus ethanol extract to assess the effects. The extract produced a meaningful anti-edema effect, evident by the inhibition of creatinine phosphokinase activity. The weights of abdominal and ovarian adipose tissues were reduced and the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissues was increased in an extract dose-dependent manner. Compared with untreated control rats, rats treated with the extract displayed the upregulation of 1053 genes including Fas (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 6), Amigo3 (adhesion molecule with an immunoglobulin-like domain), Reticulon 4, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme (Hmgcr; a reductase), related anti-fatigue (enzyme metabolism), and Rtn antioxidant, and the downregulation of 73 genes including Ugt2b (UDP glycosyltransferase 2 family), Early growth response 1, and Glycoprotein m6a. Data suggest that G. bimaculatus extract may have value in lessening the effects of aging, resulting in a differential gene expression pattern indicative of a marked stress response and lower expression of metabolic and biosynthetic genes. PMID:26191384

  3. [GLIATILIN CORRECTION OF WORKING AND REFERENCE SPATIAL MEMORY IMPAIRMENT IN AGED RATS].

    PubMed

    Tyurenkov, I N; Volotova, E V; Kurkin, D V

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at evaluating the influence of gliatilin administration on the spatial memory in aged rats. Cognitive function and spatial memory in animals was evaluated using radial (8-beam) maze test. Errors of working spatial memory and reference memory were used as indicators of impaired cognitive function. It was found that aged (24-month) rats compared with younger (6-months) age group exhibited cognitive impairment, as manifested by deterioration of short- and long-term memory processes. Course administration of gliatilin in rats of the older age group at a dose of 100 mg/kg resulted in significant improvement of the working and reference spatial memory in aged rats.

  4. The impact of a diphenyl diselenide-supplemented diet and aerobic exercise on memory of middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Cechella, José L; Leite, Marlon R; Gai, Rafaela M; Zeni, Gilson

    2014-08-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element for human health and has received attention for its role as a nutrient. The combination of exercise and nutrients has been proposed to promote health. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a diet supplemented with diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 and swimming exercise on memory of middle-aged rats. Male Wistar rats (12months) received standard diet chow supplemented with 1ppm of (PhSe)2 for 4weeks. Rats were submitted to swimming training (20min per day for 4weeks). After 4weeks, memory was evaluated in the object recognition test (ORT) and in the object location test (OLT). The hippocampal levels of phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) were determined. The results of the present study demonstrated that the association of (PhSe)2-supplemented diet and swimming exercise improved short-term memory, long-term memory and spatial learning, and this effect was not related to the increase in hippocampal p-CREB levels in middle-age rats. This study also revealed that middle-aged rats in the swimming exercise group had the best performance in short- and long-term memory. In conclusion, we demonstrated that swimming exercise, (PhSe)2-supplemented diet or the association of these factors improved learning and memory functioning. The hippocampal levels of CREB were not directly related to the benefits of swimming exercise and (PhSe)2-supplemented diet association in memory of middle-aged rats.

  5. Beneficial effects of folic acid on enhancement of memory and antioxidant status in aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rashmi; Kanwar, Shalinder S; Sood, Pooja K; Nehru, Bimla

    2011-01-01

    As our population ages, diseases affecting memory and daily functioning will affect an increasing number of individuals, their families and the healthcare system. Therefore, there is a need to study and evaluate effects of certain conditions for anti-aging of the brain. Nutrient supplementation can modify the brain function. The chemistry and function of both the developing and the mature brain are influenced by diet (Fernstrom, Am J Clinical Nutrition 71:1669S-1673S, 2000). Clinical, biochemical, and pathological aspects have shown a correlation between mental symptoms, especially depression and cognitive decline, with high incidence of folate deficiency (Bottiglieri et al., J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 69:562, 2000). In the present study, consequences of folic acid supplementation on brain dysfunction as a result of aging were studied in cerebral cortex, mid brain, and cerebellar regions of rat brain. This study was carried out on 6-, 11-, and 16-month-old rats, which received folic acid at a dose of 5 mg/kg body weight/day for a period of 8 weeks. Respective control groups of the same age groups were also taken. At the end of the treatment duration, behavioral studies were performed and later the animals were killed for various biochemical and histological investigations. Results indicated significant improvement in memory as assessed by active avoidance, passive avoidance, and plus maze tests in the folic acid supplemented aged animals. Significant improvement was also seen in the cellular protective mechanisms where by the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes increased in folic acid supplemented group and so was the glutathione content. Increased lipid peroxidation content, a marker of aging, was also found to be decreased during folic acid supplementation in all the three regions of brain in our study. Thus, it can be concluded that folic acid helps in improving the memory status by reducing oxidative stress and maintaining the integrity of

  6. METABOLIC RATE AS A FUNCTION OF AGE IN BROWN NORWAY AND LONG-EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brown Norway (BN) rats are commonly used in aging studies but relatively little is known on their metabolism as it varies with age. In fact, there is considerable disagreement on the wholebody metabolism of aging rats with some studies indicating a decrease and others showing an...

  7. Acute effects of 17 β-estradiol and genistein on insulin sensitivity and spatial memory in aged ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ana; González-Pardo, Héctor; Garrido, Pablo; Conejo, Nélida M; Llaneza, Plácido; Díaz, Fernando; Del Rey, Carmen González; González, Celestino

    2010-12-01

    Aging is characterized by decline in metabolic function and insulin resistance, and both seem to be in the basis of neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive dysfunction. Estrogens prevent age-related changes, and phytoestrogens influence learning and memory. Our hypothesis was that estradiol and genistein, using rapid-action mechanisms, are able to modify insulin sensitivity, process of learning, and spatial memory. Young and aged ovariectomized rats received acute treatment with estradiol or genistein. Aged animals were more insulin-resistant than young. In each age, estradiol and genistein-treated animals were less insulin-resistant than the others, except in the case of young animals treated with high doses of genistein. In aged rats, no differences between groups were found in spatial memory test, showing a poor performance in the water maze task. However, young females treated with estradiol or high doses of genistein performed well in spatial memory task like the control group. Only rats treated with high doses of genistein showed an optimal spatial memory similar to the control group. Conversely, acute treatment with high doses of phytoestrogens improved spatial memory consolidation only in young rats, supporting the critical period hypothesis for the beneficial effects of estrogens on memory. Therefore, genistein treatment seems to be suitable treatment in aged rats in order to prevent insulin resistance but not memory decline associated with aging. Acute genistein treatment is not effective to restore insulin resistance associated to the early loss of ovarian function, although it can be useful to improve memory deficits in this condition. PMID:20467821

  8. Effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on the structure of Cornu Ammonis in aged rat: A morphometric study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-sharifabad, Mohammad; Anvari, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Growing evidence indicates that extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb) attenuates hippocampal-dependent memory deficit in aged individuals; however, very little is known about the effect of EGb on the structure of hippocampus. Therefore we examined the EGb-induced morphological changes of the Cornu Ammonis (CA) region in aged rats. Materials and Methods: Sixteen aged male Wistar rats, 24 months old, were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group was orally administered EGb (100 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks), and the control group received a similar volume of water. The volume estimation of CA hippocampal field was done by Cavalieri principle and a quantitative Golgi study was also used for analysis of dendritic arborizations of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells. Results: Results revealed that EGb-treated aged rats had greater volumes than control animals in the layers of pyramidal and radiatum lacunosum moleculare in both CA3 and CA1 subfields. The neurons of CA3 and CA1 in experimental rats had more dendritic segments and larger total dendritic length compared to the control. The results also showed that the aged rats treated by EGb had more numerical branching density in the apical dendrites of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells. Conclusion: The results of the present study show that long-term administration of EGb could produce morphometrical changes in hippocampal pyramidal cells in aged rats. Results also provide a neuroanatomical basis for memory improvement due to chronic treatment with EGb. PMID:26523225

  9. Polyphenols decreased liver NADPH oxidase activity, increased muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and decreased gastrocnemius age-dependent autophagy in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Caroline; Chabi, Beatrice; Fouret, Gilles; Py, Guillaume; Sairafi, Badie; Elong, Cecile; Gaillet, Sylvie; Cristol, Jean Paul; Coudray, Charles; Feillet-Coudray, Christine

    2012-09-01

    This study explored major systems of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and their consequences on oxidative stress, mitochondriogenesis and muscle metabolism in aged rats, and evaluated the efficiency of 30-day oral supplementation with a moderate dose of a red grape polyphenol extract (RGPE) on these parameters. In the liver of aged rats, NADPH oxidase activity was increased and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities were altered, while xanthine oxidase activity remained unchanged. In muscles, only mitochondrial activity was modified with aging. The oral intake of RGPE decreased liver NADPH oxidase activity in the aged rats without affecting global oxidative stress, suggesting that NADPH oxidase was probably not the dominant detrimental source of production of O(2)·(-) in the liver. Interestingly, RGPE supplementation increased mitochondrial biogenesis and improved antioxidant status in the gastrocnemius of aged rats, while it had no significant effect in soleus. RGPE supplementation also decreased age-dependent autophagy in gastrocnemius of aged rats. These results extended existing findings on the beneficial effects of RGPE on mitochondriogenesis and muscle metabolism in aged rats.

  10. Efficacy of Cinnamomum cassia Blume. in age induced sexual dysfunction of rats

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin; Jamwal, Rohitash; Dethe, Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cinnamomum cassia has been suggested in Ayurveda for the management of sexual dysfunction. This research work was conducted to shed some light on the mechanism of action of the extract, and evaluate the efficacy of its methanol extract in age induced sexual dysfunction in male Wistar rats. Secondary objective of the project was to study the effect of treatment on sperm parameters and smooth muscle:collagen level in rat penile tissue. Methods Young and aged male rats were treated with methanol extract of Cinnamomum cassia at a dose of 100 mg/kg and sexual behavior was observed on 28th day in presence of female rats in estrous phase. Sildenafil was used as standard medicine. Effect of treatment was studied on epididymal sperm parameters, and Massons trichrome staining of rat penile tissues was performed to know the level of smooth muscle:collagen. Results The treatment significantly increased sexual function in aged rats that had decreased in comparison to young rats, but did not have any significant effect on sperm count, live and defective sperm percentage. However, treatment induced an increase in smooth muscle level and a decrease in collagen level in the aged rat penile tissue in comparison to that of age matched control. Conclusion Based on our studies, we found that Cinnamomum cassia extract was effective in management of sexual dysfunction in aged rats and hence we propose a possible mechanism of action for Cinnamomum cassia which could be responsible for restoring sexual activity in aged rat. PMID:24563594

  11. Folic acid supplementation for 4 weeks affects liver morphology in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Roncalés, María; Achón, María; Manzarbeitia, Félix; Maestro de las Casas, Carmen; Ramírez, Carmen; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Julia

    2004-05-01

    Several countries have approved universal folic acid (FA) fortification to prevent neural tube defects and/or high homocysteine levels; this has led to a chronic intake of FA. Traditionally, the vitamin is considered to be safe and nontoxic, except for the potential masking of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Recent reports from our laboratories showed several effects of high-dose folate supplementation in rats. In this work, we compared the effect of FA on the liver of weanling (3 wk) and aged (18 mo) male rats fed either a diet supplemented with 40 mg FA/kg diet or a control diet (1 mg FA/kg diet) for 4 wk. FA supplementation did not alter serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, urea, glucose oxidase, total bilirubin, or uric acid. Routine histological staining as well as immunohistochemistry with proliferating cell nuclear antibody for dividing cells, and cytokeratin-8 against bile ductal cells, showed that aged, supplemented rats had the same number of hepatocytes as both control and supplemented weanling rats, and tended to have more (17%, P = 0.07) hepatocytes than aged, control rats. Moreover, the bile duct cells of aged, control rats proliferated and transformed into cholestatic rosettes at a higher frequency than in aged, supplemented rats. The morphology of the liver in weanling rats was similar in both diet groups, and comparable to the supplemented, aged rats, thus indicating that a high intake of FA improves normal liver morphology in livers of aged rats.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid complexed to albumin provides neuroprotection after experimental stroke in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Eady, Tiffany N; Khoutorova, Larissa; Obenaus, Andre; Mohd-Yusof, Alena; Bazan, Nicolas G; Belayev, Ludmila

    2014-02-01

    Recently we have shown that docosahexaenoic acid complexed to albumin (DHA-Alb) is neuroprotective after experimental stroke in young rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether treatment with DHA-Alb would be protective in aged rats after focal cerebral ischemia. Isoflurane/nitrous oxide-anesthetized normothermic (brain temperature 36-36.5°C) Sprague-Dawley aged rats (18-months old) received 2h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) by poly-l-lysine-coated intraluminal suture. The neurological status was evaluated during occlusion (60min) and on days 1, 2, 3 and 7 after MCAo; a grading scale of 0-12 was employed. DHA (5mg/kg), Alb (0.63g/kg), DHA-Alb (5mg/kg+0.63g/kg) or saline was administered i.v. 3h after onset of stroke (n=8-10 per group). Ex vivo T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) of the brains was conducted on an 11.7T MRI on day 7 and 3D reconstructions were generated. Infarct volumes and number of GFAP (reactive astrocytes), ED-1 (activated microglia/microphages), NeuN (neurons)-positive cells and SMI-71 (positive vessels) were counted in the cortex and striatum at the level of the central lesion. Physiological variables were entirely comparable between groups. Animals treated with DHA-Alb showed significantly improved neurological scores compared to vehicle rats; 33% improvement on day 1; 39% on day 2; 41% on day 3; and 45% on day 7. Total and cortical lesion volumes computed from T2WI were significantly reduced by DHA-Alb treatment (62 and 69%, respectively). In addition, treatment with DHA-Alb reduced cortical and total brain infarction while promoting cell survival. We conclude that DHA-Alb therapy is highly neuroprotective in aged rats following focal cerebral ischemia and has potential for the effective treatment of ischemic stroke in aged individuals. PMID:24063996

  13. Radiation and mortality of workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: positive associations for doses received at older ages.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, D B; Wing, S

    1999-01-01

    We examined associations between low-level exposure to ionizing radiation and mortality among 14,095 workers hired at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1943 and 1972. Workers at the facility were individually monitored for external exposure to ionizing radiation and have been followed through 1990 to ascertain cause of death information. Positive associations were observed between low-level exposure to external ionizing radiation and mortality. These associations were larger for doses received after 45 years of age, larger under longer lag assumptions, and primarily due to cancer causes of death. All cancer mortality was estimated to increase 4.98% [standard error (SE) = 1.5] per 10-mSv cumulative dose received after age 45 under a 10-year lag, and 7.31% (SE = 2.2) per 10-mSv cumulative dose received after age 45 under a 20-year lag. Associations between radiation dose and lung cancer were of similar magnitude to associations between radiation dose and all cancers except lung cancer. Nonmalignant respiratory disease exhibited a positive association with cumulative radiation dose received after age 45, whereas ischemic heart disease exhibited no association with radiation dose. These findings suggest increases in cancer mortality associated with low-level external exposure to ionizing radiation and potentially greater sensitivity to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation with older ages at exposure. Images Figure 1 PMID:10417363

  14. Receiving of emotional signal of pain from conspecifics in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Satoshi F; Ukezono, Masatoshi; Nishida, Hiroshi; Sudo, Ryunosuke; Takano, Yuji

    2015-04-01

    Though recent studies have shown that rodents express emotions with their face, whether emotional expression in rodents has a communicative function between conspecifics is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate the ability of visual recognition of emotional expressions in laboratory rats. We found that Long-Evans rats avoid images of pain expressions of conspecifics but not those of neutral expressions. The results indicate that rats use visual emotional signals from conspecifics to adjust their behaviour in an environment to avoid a potentially dangerous place. Therefore, emotional expression in rodents, rather than just a mere 'expression' of emotional states, might have a communicative function. PMID:26064632

  15. Relationship between local brain glucose metabolism and maze patrolling in adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Jucker, M; Meier-Ruge, W; Bättig, K

    1989-10-01

    Rats in the tunnel maze are not rewarded or punished. The active information gathering of the rats in this apparatus is supposed to be guided by learning and memory processes. As assessed by the 2-deoxyglucose method the age-related behavioral changes in rats in this maze are partly reflected in functional-metabolic changes in cortical and hippocampal structures.

  16. Green tea polyphenols supplementation improves bone microstructure in orchidectomized middle-Aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent study shows that green tea polyphenols (GTP) attenuate trabecular bone loss in ovariectomized middle-aged female rats. To investigate whether GTP prevents bone loss in male rats, 40 rats with and without oriectomy (ORX) were assigned to 4 groups in a 2 (sham vs. ORX)× 2 (no GTP and 0.5% G...

  17. [Effect of small doses of interferon-alpha on food conditioning in young and ageing rats].

    PubMed

    Loseva, E V; Loginova, N A; Biriukovan, L M; Mats, V N; Pasikova, N V

    2007-04-01

    Low doses (10 or 350 ME) of human interferon-alpha (HIA) were intranasally applied to young (3-4 months) and ageing (12-15 months) Wistar rats during food conditioning. In control groups, development of the conditioned reflex to acoustic stimulus (tone) did not differ significantly in young and ageing rats in the course of chronic applications of the HIA. However, the control ageing rats were better than young rats in time-interval conditioning. Small doses of HIA do not cause anorexia in rats whereas large doses do so. Tone-conditioning did not change in rats of both ages when they were treated with 10 ME of the HIA; moreover, 350 ME increased food motivation, especially in young rats. Time-interval conditioning in aging rats was descended by both doses to the level of young rats, whereas in young rats it did not change at all. We suggest that these differences between ages may by accounted for be different affinity and concentration of micro-opiod receptors (which are the targets for the HIA) in the brain structures responsible for food behaviour, and for counting time intervals.

  18. Late enrichment maintains accurate recent and remote spatial memory only in aged rats that were unimpaired when middle aged.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Fanny; Herbeaux, Karine; Aufrere, Noémie; Kelche, Christian; Mathis, Chantal; Barbelivien, Alexandra; Majchrzak, Monique

    2016-06-01

    Exposure of rodents to a stimulating environment has beneficial effects on some cognitive functions that are impaired during physiological aging, and especially spatial reference memory. The present study investigated whether environmental enrichment rescues these functions in already declining subjects and/or protects them from subsequent decline. Subgroups of 17-mo-old female rats with unimpaired versus impaired performance in a spatial reference memory task (Morris water maze) were housed until the age of 24 mo in standard or enriched environment. They were then trained in a second reference memory task, conducted in a different room than the first, and recent (1 d) and remote (10 d) memory were assessed. In unimpaired subgroups, spatial memory declined from 17 to 24 mo in rats housed in standard conditions; an enriched environment during this period allowed maintenance of accurate recent and remote spatial memory. At 24 mo, rats impaired at the age of 17 mo housed in enriched environment learned the task and displayed substantial recent memory, but their performance remained lower than that of unimpaired rats, showing that enrichment failed to rescue spatial memory in already cognitively declining rats. Controls indicated carryover effects of the first water maze training, especially in aged rats housed in standard condition, and confirmed the beneficial effect of enrichment on remote memory of aged rats even if they performed poorly than young adults housed for the same duration in standard or enriched condition.

  19. Loss of perforated synapses in the dentate gyrus: morphological substrate of memory deficit in aged rats.

    PubMed Central

    Geinisman, Y; de Toledo-Morrell, L; Morrell, F

    1986-01-01

    Most, but not all, aged rats exhibit a profound deficit in spatial memory when tested in a radial maze--a task known to depend on the integrity of the hippocampal formation. In this study, animals were divided into three groups based on their spatial memory capacity: young adult rats with good memory, aged rats with impaired memory, and aged rats with good memory. Memory-impaired aged animals showed a loss of perforated axospinous synapses in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation in comparison with either young adults or aged rats with good memory. This finding suggests that the loss of perforated axospinous synapses in the hippocampal formation underlies the age-related deficit in spatial memory. Images PMID:3458260

  20. Effect of aging on ultrasonic vocalizations and laryngeal sensorimotor neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Basken, Jaime N; Connor, Nadine P; Ciucci, Michelle R

    2012-06-01

    While decline in vocal quality is prevalent in an aging population, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms contributing to age-related dysphonia are unknown and difficult to study in humans. Development of an animal model appears critical for investigating this issue. Using an established aging rat model, we evaluated if 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in 10, 32-month-old (old) Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats differed from those in 10, 9-month-old (young adult) rats. The retrograde tracer, Cholera Toxin β, was injected to the thyroarytenoid muscle to determine if motoneuron loss in the nucleus ambiguus was associated with age. Results indicated that older rats had vocalizations with diminished acoustic complexity as demonstrated by reduced bandwidth, intensity, and peak frequency, and these changes were dependent on the type of 50-kHz vocalization. Simple calls of old rats had reduced bandwidth, peak frequency, and intensity while frequency-modulated calls of old rats had reduced bandwidth and intensity. Surprisingly, one call type, step calls, had increased duration in the aged rats. These findings reflect phonatory changes observed in older humans. We also found significant motoneuron loss in the nucleus ambiguus of aged rats, which suggests that motoneuron loss may be a contributing factor to decreased complexity and quality of ultrasonic vocalizations. These findings suggest that a rat ultrasonic phonation model may be useful for studying age-related changes in vocalization observed in humans.

  1. Vascular wall dysfunction in JCR:LA-cp rats: effects of age and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    O'brien, S F; Russell, J C; Davidge, S T

    1999-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that aging and insulin resistance interact to increase vascular dysfunction by comparing the function of isolated mesenteric resistance arteries in obese, insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats and lean, insulin-sensitive rats of the same strain at 3, 6, 9, and 12 mo of age. The peak constrictor responses to norepinephrine, phenylephrine, and high potassium were elevated in arteries from obese rats. Responses to these agents increased with age in both obese and lean rats. An eicosanoid constrictor contributed substantially to vasoconstriction in the arteries from both lean and obese animals. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase increased the vasoconstrictor response to norepinephrine in both obese and lean rats. This effect increased with age in lean rats only. Vascular relaxation in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was impaired in the obese rats and did not alter with age. The results suggest that obese JCR:LA-cp rats have enhanced maximal constriction, which originates in the arterial smooth muscle and increases with age. There is evidence that the ability of the arteries to compensate for the enhanced contractility is impaired in obese rats, particularly with advanced age.

  2. Sex differences in endothelial function of aged hypertriglyceridemic rats – effect of atorvastatin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bacova, Barbora; Vlkovicova, Jana; Navarova, Jana; Tribulova, Narcis

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that the effect of atorvastatin on endothelium-dependent relaxation of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) may differ in male vs. female aged hypertriglyceridemic rats (HTGs). Experiments were performed on 11-month-old male and female Prague hereditary HTGs. Atorvastatin (ATO) was administered p.o. in the dose of 0.30 mg/100g/day. Controls received vehiculum. After two months of ATO administration blood pressure, serum triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (CHOL) were determined. Endothelial function of SMA was studied in vitro using evaluation of relaxant responses of precontracted SMA to acetylcholine. The serum TG of control male HTGs were found to be statistically higher than those of female controls, while CHOL and blood pressure did not share gender differences. Responses of SMA of female control HTGs were statistically decreased compared to their male counterparts. ATO treatment induced decrease in blood pressure and TG of both males and females, yet CHOL values were reduced only in females. The protective effect of ATO on SMA endothelial function was much more pronounced in females compared to males. We conclude that vascular endothelial dysfunction of aged HTG rats is more severe and more attenuated by ATO in females compared to males. The protective effect of ATO on vascular endothelial function does not seem to depend solely on its lipid lowering action. PMID:23554556

  3. Ageing and gonadectomy have similar effects on hypoglossal long-term facilitation in male Fischer rats

    PubMed Central

    Zabka, AG; Mitchell, GS; Behan, M

    2005-01-01

    Long-term facilitation (LTF), a form of serotonin-dependent respiratory plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia, decreases with increasing age or following gonadectomy in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Ageing is accompanied by decreasing levels of testosterone, which in turn influences serotonergic function. In addition, LTF in young male rats differs among strains. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that LTF is similar in middle-aged and gonadectomized young male rats of an inbred rat strain commonly used in studies on ageing (F344) by comparison with SD rats. We further tested whether the magnitude of LTF correlates with circulating serum levels of testosterone and/or progesterone. Young and middle-aged intact and young gonadectomized (GDX) male Fischer 344 rats were anaesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked and ventilated. Integrated phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) nerve activities were measured before, during and 60 min following three 5-min episodes of isocapnic hypoxia. LTF was observed in phrenic motor output in young and middle-aged intact and young GDX rats. In contrast, XII LTF was observed only in young intact rats. In middle-aged and young GDX rats, XII LTF was significantly lower than in young intact rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, XII LTF was positively correlated with the testosterone/progesterone ratio. These data show that serotonin-dependent plasticity in upper airway respiratory output is similar in F344 and SD rat strains. Furthermore, LTF is similarly impaired in middle-aged and gonadectomized male rats, suggesting that gonadal hormones play an important role in modulating the capacity for neuroplasticity in upper airway motor control. PMID:15613371

  4. Supplementation with green tea polyphenols improves bone microstructure and quality in aged, orchidectomized rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies show that green tea polyphenols (GTP) attenuate bone loss and microstructure deterioration in ovariectomized aged female rats, a model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, it is not known if such an osteo-protective role of GTP is demonstrable in androgen-deficient aged rats, a mo...

  5. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  6. Aged Rats Are Impaired on an Attentional Set-Shifting Task Sensitive to Medial Frontal Cortex Damage in Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Barense, Morgan D.; Fox, Matthew T.; Baxter, Mark G.

    2002-01-01

    Normal aging is associated with disruption of neural systems that subserve different aspects of cognitive function, particularly in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Abnormalities in hippocampal function have been well investigated in rodent models of aging, but studies of frontal cortex function in aged rodents are few. We tested young (4–5 mo old) and aged (27–28 mo old) male Long-Evans rats on an attentional set-shifting task modified slightly from previous publication. After training on two problems in which the reward was consistently associated with the same stimulus dimension, and a reversal of one problem, a new problem was presented in which the reward was consistently associated with the previously irrelevant stimulus dimension (extradimensional shift [EDS]). Aged rats as a group were significantly impaired on the EDS, although some individual aged rats performed as well as young rats on this phase. In addition, some aged rats were impaired on the reversal, although a group effect did not reach significance in this phase. Impairment in neither reversal nor EDS was associated with impairments in spatial learning in the Morris water maze. Young rats with neurotoxic lesions of medial frontal cortex are also selectively impaired on the EDS. These results indicate that normal aging in rats is associated with impaired medial frontal cortex function. Furthermore, age-related declines in frontal cortex function are independent of those in hippocampal function. These results provide a possible basis for correlating age-related changes in neurobiological markers in frontal cortex with cognitive decline. PMID:12177232

  7. [Condition of protective intestinal microbiota populations under stress exposure in rats received different diets with bioactive food components].

    PubMed

    Markova, Yu M; Sidorova, Yu S

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of the levels of major colon microbiota populations (lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, enterobacteria) was carried out in two 15-days experiments on Wistar rats, exposed to stress factor (electric shock) and fed with different diets with the addition of biologic active micronutrients [extract from the leaves of Serratula coronata L. and Enzymatic hydrolyzate of the mussels meat (EHMM)]. In the first experiment animals were fed with a common vivarium diet. In the experimental group the water extract from leaves of Serratula coronata L. as a phytoecdysteroid source (5 mg per 1 kg body weight) was added to water. In the second experiment rats received balanced semisynthetic diet. In the diet of the experimental group the part of the protein (casein) was replaced by the peptides from EHMM. During the experiment the animal body weight was measured. On the 14th day of the experiment the animals were subjected to stress stimulation [electrodermal stimulation on paws (electric current 0.4 mA for 8 seconds)]. On the last day of the experiment the animals were euthanized by decapitation and micro-ecological research of protective microbiota populations in the cecal contents was carried out. The relative body weight increase was recorded in both experiments. In the second experiment in animals receiving EHMM this index (68.2 ± 3.0%) was considerably higher than in the control group and in the experimental group receiving no EHMM (57.2 ± 4.0 and 59.7 ± 2.8% respectively). The results of the microecological study showed different effect of diets with biologically active micronutrients on the population levels of lactobacilli. In the experiment with common vivarium diet no significant changes of the levels of the studied colon microbiota populations had been recorded in the rats of control group compared with rats of experimental group, exposed to stress factor but received no extract from Serratula coronata L. The decrease of the levels of lactobacilli by the end

  8. Behavioral effects of basal forebrain cholinergic lesions in young adult and aging rats.

    PubMed

    Paban, Véronique; Chambon, Caroline; Jaffard, Magali; Alescio-Lautier, Béatrice

    2005-08-01

    The interactive effects of age and cholinergic damage were assessed behaviorally in young and middle-aged rats. Rats were lesioned at either 3 or 17 months of age by injection of 192 IgG-saporin immunotoxin into the medial septum and the nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and they were then tested on a range of behavioral tasks: a nonmatching-to-position task in a T-maze, an object-recognition task, an object-location task, and an open-field activity test. Depending on the task used, only an age or a lesion effect was observed, but there was no Age X Lesion interaction. Middle-aged and young rats responded to the cholinergic lesions in the same manner. These results show that in the middle-aged rats in which cholinergic transmission was affected, additional injury to the system was not always accompanied by major cognitive dysfunctions. PMID:16187821

  9. Genetic and Behavioral Influences on Received Aggression during Observed Play among Unfamiliar Preschool-Aged Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLalla, Lisabeth Fisher; John, Sufna Gheyara

    2014-01-01

    Peer victimization appears heritable, but it is unclear whether the traits that confer genetic risk require time and familiarity with a perpetrator to manifest or whether novel and brief interactions can lead to received aggression that demonstrates similar genetic risk. We examined 20-minute, peer-play interactions between 5-year-olds, pairing…

  10. Cognitive effects of long-term dydrogesterone treatment used alone or with estrogen on rat menopausal models of different ages.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lin, H; Huang, Y; Liu, Y; Wang, B; Su, F

    2015-04-01

    Menopause can cause cognitive decline. Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is the most effective treatment for the climacteric symptoms. However, its cognitive effect has not been well clarified, especially for the progestin component. The study investigated the effects of dydrogesterone (DG) on spatial learning and memory of the ovariectomized (OVX) rat models and the impact of aging on its cognitive effects. Eighty female Sprague-Dawley rats were included in the experiment. They belonged to two cohorts, the adult (7 months) and the aged (18 months). Each cohort was divided into five groups: Sham, OVX, OVX+E2 (OVX+17β-estrogen), OVX+E2/DG and OVX+DG. The replacement therapy lasted for 20 weeks. Two classical behavioral tests were performed: open field test (OFT) and the Morris water maze (MWM). The breast morphology and uterine weight were obtained to assess the safety and complication of dydrogesterone. In MWM, the OVX group displayed prolonged latency and less target quadrant time than the other groups. Across 5 days' testing, all the adult groups receiving hormone therapy, except the OVX+DG group, performed better than the OVX group (P<0.001); but there was no significant difference among the aged groups. The uterus weight/body weight ratio of OVX+E2/DG group was lower than the sham and OVX+E2 group. The mammary glands of OVX+E2/DG group displayed normal structure or mild hyperplasia. The results suggested that DG-alone treatment had no significant benefit for the OVX rats of both adult and aged groups on the behavioral tests. DG combined with E2 could ameliorate cognition in adult rats with uterus protection and without breast harm. The cognitive-improve effects were more remarkable for the adult rats than the aged ones. The findings support the potential clinical application of dydrogesterone combined with estrogen in preventing cognitive decline, especially for the early iatrogenic menopausal women. PMID:25637796

  11. Delayed onset of persistent estrus in aged rats raised from parathyroidectomized mothers.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Yamamoto, N

    1983-01-01

    Descendants of rats possessing lower responsiveness to the removal of the parathyroid gland [4] were examined for the aging process of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. The first generation rats of these descendants were born to mothers parathyroidectomized (Px) on the fifth day of gestation and subsequent generation rats were developed by brother-sister mating without any special treatment. More than 50% of the eighth to tenth generation (F8-F10) offsprings of the Px-rats showed regular 4-day estrous cycles at 15-16 months of age, while nearly 80% of normal F8-F10 rats developed persistent estrus at 13-14 months of age. In 14-15 month-old Px-offspring rats the LH and FSH surges occurred at 1630-1730 h of proestrus to a similar extent as those shown in 3-4 month-old normal rats. The release of LH and FSH following a single injection of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) in 13 month-old Px-offspring rats was nearly normal, reaching a maximal level at 15 min as in young adult rats. In 13 month-old normal rats, serum LH measured after an injection of LHRH increased progressively until 60 min. The ovaries of the Px-offspring rats were heavier than those of age-matched normal rats and included well-developed corpora lutea and follicles in several sizes. The results suggest a delay in the aging process of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis of the Px-offspring rats.

  12. Long-term treatment with N-acetylcysteine, but not caloric restriction, protects mesenchymal stem cells of aged rats against tumor necrosis factor-induced death.

    PubMed

    Muscari, Claudio; Bonafe', Francesca; Farruggia, Giovanna; Stanic, Ivana; Gamberini, Chiara; Carboni, Marco; Basile, Ilaria; Giordano, Emanuele; Caldarera, Claudio Marcello; Guarnieri, Carlo

    2006-08-01

    The survival of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) stimulation was evaluated after a long-term antioxidant treatment, or caloric restriction, in aged rats. MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of 30-month-old rats which orally received N-acetylcysteine in the last 18 months. The necrotic cell death-induced in vitro by TNFalpha, determined by trypan blue exclusion, was markedly attenuated in MSCs obtained from treated vs. control aged rats (percent mean+/-SEM: 10.9+/-2.17 vs. 17.8+/-0.53; p<0.05). Also, the proliferation rate of MSCs from control, but not N-acetylcysteine-treated, aged rats evaluated up to 2 weeks was significantly higher than that of MSCs from younger (4-month-old) rats. No significant effect was observed relative to the parameters investigated when the aged rats were previously subjected to a hypocaloric diet for 18 months. In conclusion, a prolonged supplementation with N-acetylcysteine in rats can increase resistance to necrotic death of MSCs and may also counteract an excessive rate of MSC proliferation.

  13. Impact of Age and Sex on QT Prolongation in Patients Receiving Psychotropics

    PubMed Central

    Rabkin, Simon W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess older age and female sex, 2 of the major risk factors for potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death in patients prescribed psychotropics, within the context of electrocardiographic evidence of time between start of Q wave and end of T wave (QT) interval prolongation, which is an indicator of an increased risk for potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Method: The literature on the relation between age, sex, and QT interval with respect to psychotropic drugs was reviewed. Results: The QT interval must be corrected (QTc) for heart rate. Because slower heart rates prolong and faster heart rates shorten the QT interval, people with faster heart rates may have a prolonged QT interval that is not apparent until the correction is performed. QTc values for apparently healthy post-pubertal people are less than 450 ms for males and less than 470 ms for females. The longer QT intervals in women may account for their increased risk of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias on psychotropics. QTc increases with increasing age. Assessment of QTc in older people is especially important to identify people with a longer QTc who are more likely to attain a serious QT level with drugs that prolong QTc. The age-related increase in QTc is more evident in men than women, suggesting that male sex does not afford protection against potentially fatal arrhythmias at older age. Conclusion: The association of increasing age and female sex with greater QT intervals indicates the need to have an increased awareness of the QTc prior to use of these psychotropics and to evaluate the QTc after initiation of therapy. PMID:26174524

  14. Metallurgical properties of reduced activation martensitic steel Eurofer'97 in the as-received condition and after thermal ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, P.; Lancha, A. M.; Lapeña, J.; Serrano, M.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.

    2002-12-01

    This paper describes the microstructural studies and the mechanical testing (hardness, tensile and charpy tests) performed on the Eurofer'97 steel in the as-received condition and after thermal ageing treatments up to 600 °C. In addition, fracture toughness tests on the as-received condition have been carried out in order to determine the Master Curve. During the thermal ageing treatments studied (500 °C/5000 h and 600 °C/1000 h) the general microstructure of the steel (tempered martensite with M 23C 6 and MX precipitates) remained stable. Only a slight growth of the particles has been observed. In terms of mechanical properties, the Eurofer'97 steel exhibited similar values of tensile properties (tensile and yield strength) and ductile-brittle transition temperature regardless of the material condition studied.

  15. Sensitivity to cholinergic drug treatments of aged rats with variable degrees of spatial memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Stemmelin, J; Cassel, J C; Will, B; Kelche, C

    1999-01-01

    As a first step, the present experiment aimed at characterizing learning and memory capabilities, as well as some motor and sensorimotor faculties, in aged (24-26.5 months) Long-Evans female rats. As a second step, a psychopharmacological approach was undertaken in order to examine the sensitivity of aged rats to muscarinic blockade and to cholinomimetic treatments. Young adult (3-5.5 months) and aged rats were tested for beam-walking performance, locomotor activity in the home cage and an open field, and spatial learning/memory performance in a water maze and a radial maze. Spontaneous alternation rates were assessed in a T-maze. Statistical analysis discriminated between aged rats showing moderate impairment (AMI) and those showing severe impairment (ASI) in the water maze test. Beside their different degrees of impairment in the water maze, AMI and ASI rats were similarly (no significant difference) impaired in beam-walking capabilities, home cage activity and radial maze performance. In the spontaneous alternation task aged rats were not impaired and, in the open-field test, AMI rats were hypoactive, but not as much as ASI rats. Neither of the cognitive deficits was correlated with a locomotor or a sensorimotor variable, or with the body weight. When tested in the radial maze, a low dose of scopolamine (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) produced memory impairments which were significant in AMI and ASI rats, but not in young rats. Combined injections of scopolamine and physostigmine (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) or tacrine (THA, 3 mg/kg) showed physostigmine (0.1 mg/kg) to compensate for the scopolamine-induced impairments only in AMI rats. whereas THA was efficient in both AMI and ASI rats. The results indicate: (i) that rats with different degrees of spatial memory impairment in the water maze are similarly hypersensitive to muscarinic blockade when tested in a radial maze test; and (ii) that under the influence of a dose of scopolamine which is subamnesic in young rats, aged rats

  16. Age-related differences in susceptibility to toxic effects of valproic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Espandiari, Parvaneh; Zhang, Jun; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Miller, Terry J; Knapton, Alan; Herman, Eugene H; Beger, Richard D; Hanig, Joseph P

    2008-07-01

    A multi-age rat model was evaluated as a means to identify a potential age-related difference in liver injury following exposure to valproic acid (VPA), a known pediatric hepatotoxic agent. Different age groups of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (10-, 25-, 40-, 80-day-old) were administered VPA at doses of 160, 320, 500 or 650 mg kg(-1) (i.p.) for 4 days. Animals from all age groups developed toxicity after treatment with VPA; however, the patterns of toxicity were dissimilar within each age group. The high dose of VPA caused significant lethality in 10- and 25-day-old rats. All doses of VPA caused decrease in the platelet counts (10-, 25-day-old rats) and the rate of growth (40-day-old rats) and increases in the urine creatine concentration (high dose, 80-day-old rats). VPA induced hepatic and splenic alterations in all age groups. The most severe lesions were found mostly in 10- and 80-day-old rats. Significant changes in blood urea nitrogen, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were observed in 10-day-old pups after treatment with low doses of VPA. The highest VPA dose caused significant decreases in the levels of serum total protein (40- and 80-day-old rats). Principal component analysis of spectra derived from terminal urine samples of all age groups showed that each age group clusters separately. In conclusion, this study showed that the vulnerability profile of each age group was different indicating that a multi-age pediatric animal model is appropriate to assess more completely age-dependent changes in drug toxicity.

  17. Aging and regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaasik, Priit; Aru, Maire; Alev, Karin; Seene, Teet

    2012-07-01

    The objective of the study was to examine skeletal muscle regeneration capacity of young and very old rats during autotransplantation. In 3.5 and 30 month-old Wistar rats, gastrocnemius muscle was removed and grafted back to its original bed. Incorporation of 3H leucine into myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein fractions, their relative contents in autografts and synthesis rate of MyHC and actin were recorded. The relative muscle mass of old rats was about 67% of that of young rats; the absolute mass of autografted muscle was 61% intact in the young rat group and 51% in the old rat group. Content of myofibrillar protein in the autografts of young rats was 46% of the intact muscle content, and 39% in the old rat group. In conclusion, the difference in skeletal muscle regeneration capacity of young and very old rats is about ten percent. In the autografts of both young and old rats, the regeneration of the contractile apparatus is less effective in comparison with the sarcoplasmic compartment.

  18. Maitake Mushroom Extracts Ameliorate Progressive Hypertension and Other Chronic Metabolic Perturbations in Aging Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Harry G.; Echard, Bobby; Bagchi, Debasis; Perricone, Nicholas V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the ability of two commercially-available fractions labeled SX and D derived from the edible maitake mushroom to overcome many age-associated metabolic perturbations such as progressive, age-related elevation of blood pressure, over activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), decreased insulin sensitivity, and inflammation in an in vivo laboratory model. Design and Method: We divided forty mature, female Sprague-Dawley rats (SD) into five groups of eight. SD ingested regular rat chow containing added sucrose (20% w/w). The groups received baseline diet alone (control) or baseline diet containing captopril, niacin-bound chromium, maitake fraction SX, or maitake fraction D. In addition to blood pressure readings, the following procedures were implemented: losartan and insulin challenges, evaluation of serum ACE activity, glucose tolerance testing, blood chemistries, LNAME challenge, and measurement of various circulating cytokines. Results: We found that implementation of all test conditions stopped the gradual elevation of systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the SD over the four months of study, even reversing some of the previous elevation that occurred over time. In general, the treatment groups showed decreased activity of the RAS estimated by less lowering of SBP after losartan challenge and decreased serum ACE activity and were more sensitive to exogenous insulin challenge. TNFa levels decreased in all four test groups suggesting a lessening of the inflammatory state. Conclusions: We believe our data suggest that maitake mushroom fractions lessen age-related hypertension, at least in part, via effects on the RAS; enhance insulin sensitivity; and reduce some aspects of inflammation -- actions that should lead to a longer, healthier life span. PMID:20567593

  19. Health: support provided and received in advanced old age. A five-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Armi, F; Guilley, E; Lalive d'Epinay, C J

    2008-02-01

    While research focuses mainly on support provided to the elderly, this paper deals with the very old as a support provider to his family as much as a care recipient from both his family and a formal network. We hypothesize that elders with declining health will try to maintain the provision of services, even when they require and receive help.A total of 340 octogenarians from the Swiss Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Study on the Oldest Old (SWILSOO) were interviewed up to five times over five years (N=1225 interviews). A multilevel model was applied to assess the effects of health, controlled for socio-demographic and family network variables, on the frequency of services that the old persons provided to their family and received from their family and formal networks. Health is operationalized in three statuses: ADL-dependent, ADL-independent frail, and robust.While the recourse to the informal network increased progressively with the process of frailty, the recourse to the formal network drastically increased for ADL-dependent individuals. Being ADL-dependent seriously altered the capacity to provide services, but ADL-independent frail persons were providers with the same frequency as the robust oldest old, showing their ability to preserve a principle of reciprocity in their exchanges with their family network. This continuity of roles may help frail persons to maintain their self-esteem and well-being.

  20. Improving Bone Microarchitecture in Aging with Diosgenin Treatment: A Study in Senescence-Accelerated OXYS Rats.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Maria A; Ting, Che-Hao; Kolosova, Nataliya G; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Chen, Jian-Horng; Huang, Chi-Wen; Tseng, Ging-Ting; Hung, Ching-Sui; Kao, Pan-Fu; Amstislavskaya, Tamara G; Ho, Ying-Jui

    2015-10-31

    Osteoporosis is a major disease associated with aging. We have previously demonstrated that diosgenin prevents osteoporosis in both menopause and D-galactose-induced aging rats. OXYS rats reveal an accelerated senescence and are used as a suitable model of osteoporosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze microarchitecture and morphological changes in femur of OXYS rats using morphological tests and microcomputed tomography scanning, and to evaluate the effects of oral administration of diosgenin at 10 and 50 mg/kg/day on femur in OXYS rats. The result showed that, compared with age-matched Wistar rats, the femur of OXYS rats revealed lower bone length, bone weight, bone volume, frame volume, frame density, void volume, porosity, external and internal diameters, cortical bone area, BV/TV, Tb.N, and Tb.Th, but higher Tb.Sp. Eight weeks of diosgenin treatment decreased porosity and Tb.Sp, but increased BV/TV, cortical bone area, Tb.N and bone mineral density, compared with OXYS rats treated with vehicle. These data reveal that microarchitecture and morphological changes in femur of OXYS rats showed osteoporotic aging features and suggest that diosgenin may have beneficial effects on aging-induced osteoporosis. PMID:26387656

  1. Expert perspectives on Western European prison health services: do ageing prisoners receive equivalent care?

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Wiebke; Elger, Bernice Simone

    2014-09-01

    Health care in prison and particularly the health care of older prisoners are increasingly important topics due to the growth of the ageing prisoner population. The aim of this paper is to gain insight into the approaches used in the provision of equivalent health care to ageing prisoners and to confront the intuitive definition of equivalent care and the practical and ethical challenges that have been experienced by individuals working in this field. Forty interviews took place with experts working in the prison setting from three Western European countries to discover their views on prison health care. Experts indicated that the provision of equivalent care in prison is difficult mostly due to four factors: variability of care in different prisons, gatekeeper systems, lack of personnel, and delays in providing access. This lack of equivalence can be fixed by allocating adequate budgets and developing standards for health care in prison.

  2. Expert perspectives on Western European prison health services: do ageing prisoners receive equivalent care?

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Wiebke; Elger, Bernice Simone

    2014-09-01

    Health care in prison and particularly the health care of older prisoners are increasingly important topics due to the growth of the ageing prisoner population. The aim of this paper is to gain insight into the approaches used in the provision of equivalent health care to ageing prisoners and to confront the intuitive definition of equivalent care and the practical and ethical challenges that have been experienced by individuals working in this field. Forty interviews took place with experts working in the prison setting from three Western European countries to discover their views on prison health care. Experts indicated that the provision of equivalent care in prison is difficult mostly due to four factors: variability of care in different prisons, gatekeeper systems, lack of personnel, and delays in providing access. This lack of equivalence can be fixed by allocating adequate budgets and developing standards for health care in prison. PMID:24965437

  3. Oxidant balance in brain of rats receiving different compounds of selenium.

    PubMed

    Musik, Irena; Kiełczykowska, Małgorzata; Kocot, Joanna

    2013-10-01

    The influence of two organic selenocompounds and sodium selenite on oxidant processes in rat brain tissue was investigated. The study was performed on male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups: I-control; II-administered with sodium selenite; III-provided with selenoorganic compound A of chain structure 4-(o-tolyl-)-selenosemicarbazide of 2-chlorobenzoic acid and IV-provided with selenoorganic compound B of ring structure 3-(2-chlorobenzoylamino-)-2-(o-tolylimino-)-4-methyl-4-selenazoline. Rats were treated by stomach tube at a dose of 5 × 10(-4) mg of selenium/g of b.w. once a day for a period of 10 days. In brain homogenates total antioxidant status (TAS), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), concentrations of ascorbic acid (AA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) as well as concentration of malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) were determined. TAS was insignificantly diminished in all selenium-supplemented groups versus control. SOD was not significantly influenced by administration of selenium. GPx was markedly decreased in group III versus control, whereas increased in group IV versus control and group III. Selenosemicarbazide depleted AA in well-marked way versus group II. GSH was significantly depressed in group III versus both control and group II and diminished in group IV versus group II. MDA was significantly decreased in group III versus both control and group II, whereas in group IV increased versus group III. As selenazoline A did not decrease elements of antioxidant barrier and increased GPx activity, it seems to be a promising agent for future studies concerning its possible application as a selenium supplement.

  4. Homeostasis of chosen bioelements in organs of rats receiving lithium and/or selenium.

    PubMed

    Kiełczykowska, Małgorzata; Musik, Irena; Żelazowska, Renata; Lewandowska, Anna; Kurzepa, Jacek; Kocot, Joanna

    2016-10-01

    Lithium is an essential trace element, widely used in medicine and its application is often long-term. Despite beneficial effects, its administration can lead to severe side effects including hyperparathyroidism, renal and thyroid disorders. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the influence of lithium and/or selenium treatment on magnesium, calcium and silicon levels in rats' organs as well as the possibility of using selenium as an adjuvant in lithium therapy. The study was performed on rats divided into four groups (six animals each): control-treated with saline; Li-treated with Li2CO3 (2.7 mg Li/kg b.w.); Se-treated with Na2SeO3·H2O (0.5 mg Se/kg b.w.); Se + Li-treated simultaneously with Li2CO3 and Na2SeO3·H2O (2.7 mg Li/kg b.w. and of 0.5 mg Se/kg b.w., respectively). The administration was performed in form of water solutions by stomach tube once a day for 3 weeks. In the organs (liver, kidney, brain, spleen, heart, lung and femoral muscle) the concentrations of magnesium, calcium and silicon were determined. Magnesium was increased in liver of Se and Se + Li given rats. Lithium decreased tissue Ca and co-administration of selenium reversed this effect. Silicon was not affected by any treatment. The beneficial effect of selenium on disturbances of calcium homeostasis let suggest that further research on selenium application as an adjuvant in lithium therapy is worth being performed.

  5. Aged rats show dominant modulation of lower frequency hippocampal theta rhythm during running.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yi; Kuo, Terry B J; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2016-10-01

    Aging causes considerable decline in both physiological and mental functions, particularly cognitive function. The hippocampal theta rhythm (4-12Hz) is related to both cognition and locomotion. Aging-related findings of the frequency and amplitude of hippocampal theta oscillations are inconsistent and occasionally contradictory. This inconsistency may be due to the effects of the sleep/wake state and different frequency subbands being overlooked. We assumed that aged rats have lower responses of the hippocampal theta rhythm during running, which is mainly due to the dominant modulation of theta frequency subbands related to cognition. By simultaneously recording electroencephalography, physical activity (PA), and the heart rate (HR), this experiment explored the theta oscillations before, during, and after treadmill running at a constant speed in 8-week-old (adult) and 60-week-old (middle-aged) rats. Compared with adult rats, the middle-aged rats exhibited lower theta activity in all frequency ranges before running. Running increased the theta frequency (Frq, 4-12Hz), total activity of the whole theta band (total power, TP), activity of the middle theta frequency (MT, 6.5-9.5Hz), and PA in both age groups. However, the middle-aged rats still showed fewer changes in these parameters during the whole running process. After the waking baseline values were substracted, middle-aged rats showed significantly fewer differences in ΔFrq, ΔTP, and ΔMT but significantly more differences in low-frequency theta activity (4.0-6.5Hz) and HR than the adult rats did. Therefore, the decreasing activity and response of the whole theta band in the middle-aged rats resulted in dominant modulation of the middle to lower frequency (4.0-9.5Hz) theta rhythm. The different alterations in the theta rhythm during treadmill running in the two groups may reflect that learning decline with age.

  6. Aged rats show dominant modulation of lower frequency hippocampal theta rhythm during running.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yi; Kuo, Terry B J; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2016-10-01

    Aging causes considerable decline in both physiological and mental functions, particularly cognitive function. The hippocampal theta rhythm (4-12Hz) is related to both cognition and locomotion. Aging-related findings of the frequency and amplitude of hippocampal theta oscillations are inconsistent and occasionally contradictory. This inconsistency may be due to the effects of the sleep/wake state and different frequency subbands being overlooked. We assumed that aged rats have lower responses of the hippocampal theta rhythm during running, which is mainly due to the dominant modulation of theta frequency subbands related to cognition. By simultaneously recording electroencephalography, physical activity (PA), and the heart rate (HR), this experiment explored the theta oscillations before, during, and after treadmill running at a constant speed in 8-week-old (adult) and 60-week-old (middle-aged) rats. Compared with adult rats, the middle-aged rats exhibited lower theta activity in all frequency ranges before running. Running increased the theta frequency (Frq, 4-12Hz), total activity of the whole theta band (total power, TP), activity of the middle theta frequency (MT, 6.5-9.5Hz), and PA in both age groups. However, the middle-aged rats still showed fewer changes in these parameters during the whole running process. After the waking baseline values were substracted, middle-aged rats showed significantly fewer differences in ΔFrq, ΔTP, and ΔMT but significantly more differences in low-frequency theta activity (4.0-6.5Hz) and HR than the adult rats did. Therefore, the decreasing activity and response of the whole theta band in the middle-aged rats resulted in dominant modulation of the middle to lower frequency (4.0-9.5Hz) theta rhythm. The different alterations in the theta rhythm during treadmill running in the two groups may reflect that learning decline with age. PMID:27496645

  7. Alterations in lenticular proteins during ageing and selenite-induced cataractogenesis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakthivel, Muniyan; Elanchezhian, Rajan; Thomas, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine putative alterations in the major lenticular proteins in Wistar rats of different ages and to compare these alterations with those occurring in rats with selenite-induced cataract. Methods Lenticular transparency was determined by morphological examination using slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Alterations in lenticular protein were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE (SDS–PAGE) and confirmed immunologically by western blot. Results Morphological examination did not reveal observable opacities in the lenses of the rats of different age groups; however, dense nuclear opacities were noted in lenses of rats in the selenite-cataract group. Western blot assays revealed age-related changes in soluble and urea-soluble lenticular proteins. Decreased αA- and βB1-crystallins in the soluble fraction and aggregation of αA-crystallin, in addition to the degraded fragment of βB1-crystallin, in the urea-soluble fraction appeared to occur in relation to increasing age of the rats from which the lenses were taken; similarly, cytoskeletal proteins appeared to decline with increasing age. The lenses from rats in the selenite-cataract group exhibited similar changes, except that there was also high molecular weight aggregation of αA-crystallin. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that there is loss, as well as aggregation, of αA-crystallin in the aging rat lens, although there is no accompanying loss of lenticular transparency. PMID:20300567

  8. Acetyl-L-Carnitine: chronic treatment improves spatial acquisition in a new environment in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, A; Markowska, A L; Olton, D S

    1995-07-01

    Chronic Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR) treatment prevents some age-related memory impairment. The present experiment examined the effects of aging and ALCAR in Fischer 344 rats on retention of spatial discrimination test in a familiar environment (FE), and on the acquisition of a spatial discrimination in a novel environment (NE). Rats 18 months or 3 months old were trained with a new procedure to assess spatial discrimination in the Morris water maze. Performance during acquisition in FE was used to assign each old rat to one of two classes: Good Performers (GP) and Poor Performers (PP) based on their swim time to reach the platform. The old rats displayed heterogeneous performance and a spatial discrimination deficit. Chronic ALCAR treatment enhanced spatial acquisition in the NE of rats with age-related behavioral impairments and had a slight effect on retention of the spatial discrimination in the FE.

  9. Age-related differences in the toxicity of ochratoxin A in female rats.

    PubMed

    Dortant, P M; Peters-Volleberg, G W; Van Loveren, H; Marquardt, R R; Speijers, G J

    2001-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin found in food and feedstuffs of plant and animal origin. OTA exposure is related to nephropathy in humans. Age-related differences, especially in nephro- and immunotoxicity of OTA, were investigated in young adult (aged 12 weeks) and old (aged 27-30 months) female SPF Wag rats, treated by gavage with 0, 0.07, 0.34 or 1.68 mg OTA/kg body weight for 4 weeks. In both age groups, survival was significantly decreased in the highest dose group. Clinical condition, body weight, clinical chemistry parameters (ALAT, ASAT, creatinin and urea) and target organs (as identified by weight and pathology - kidney, liver, adrenals, forestomach and brain) were affected by age and dose, but often more severely in old than in young rats. OTA induced primarily nephropathy. Old rats were more sensitive to induction of tubular karyomegaly and vacuolation/necrosis. In young rats, OTA induced a dose-related thickening of the basement membrane and reduction in splenic T-cell fraction. Decreased IgG levels were seen at 0.34 mg/kg OTA (young and old rats) and 1.68 mg/kg OTA (young rats). Vacuolation of the white brain matter (cerebellar medulla and ventral parts of the brain stem) was significantly increased in young rats at 0.34 and 1.68 mg/kg OTA and in old rats at 0.07 and 0.34 mg/kg OTA. It was concluded that: (1) the profiles of OTA toxicity for both age groups are similar, with the kidney and possibly the brain being primary target organs; (2) based on clinical and pathological data old rats are more sensitive to OTA than young rats; and (3) the immune system is probably not the primary target of OTA toxicity.

  10. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  11. Ozone Induces Glucose Intolerance and Systemic Metabolic Effects in Young and Aged Brown Norway Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone could impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in very young and aged rats. Brown Norway (BN) rats, 1,4, 12, and 24 months ol...

  12. Age differences affecting induction of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes by methaqualone and phenobarbital in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mathur, P P; Boren, J A; Smyth, R D; Reavey-Cantwell, N H

    1975-05-01

    Methaqualone pretreatment for 3 or 6 days caused an induction of hepatic enzymes in the young male rat as measured by a reduction in hexobarbital-hypnosis. However, methaqualone pretreatment had no effect on the hexobarbital-hypnotic response in older male rats. Phenobarbital was a more potent enzyme inducer than methaqualone, and caused induction of liver enzymes in both age groups.

  13. HIV-1 Transgenic Rats Display Alterations in Immunophenotype and Cellular Responses Associated with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Abbondanzo, Susan J.; Chang, Sulie L.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in anti-retroviral therapy over the last two decades have allowed life expectancy in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus to approach that of the general population. The process of aging in mammalian species, including rats, results in immune response changes, alterations in immunological phenotypes, and ultimately increased susceptibility to many infectious diseases. In order to investigate the immunological pathologies associated with chronic HIV-1 disease, particularly in aging individuals, the HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat model was utilized. HIV-1Tg rats were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to determine immunological alterations during the aging process. LPS is known to cause an imbalance in cytokine and chemokine release, and provides a method to identify changes in immune responses to bacterial infection in an HIV animal model. An immune profile and accompanying cellular consequences as well as changes in inflammatory cytokine and chemokine release related to age and genotype were assessed in HIV-1Tg rats. The percentage of T cells decreased with age, particularly T cytotoxic cells, whereas T helper cells increased with age. Neutrophils and monocytes increased in HIV-1Tg rats during maturation compared to age-matched F344 control rats. Aging HIV-1Tg rats displayed a significant increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α, along with an increase in the chemokine, KC/GRO, in comparison to age-matched controls. Our data indicate that immunophenotype and immune responses can change during aging in HIV-positive individuals. This information could be important in determining the most beneficial age-dependent therapeutic treatment for HIV patients. PMID:25127062

  14. Comparison of catalase immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between young, adult and aged mice and rats

    PubMed Central

    AHN, JI HYEON; CHEN, BAI HUI; SHIN, BICH-NA; LEE, TAE-KYEONG; CHO, JEONG HWI; KIM, IN HYE; PARK, JOON HA; LEE, JAE-CHUL; TAE, HYUN-JIN; LEE, CHOONG-HYUN; WON, MOO-HO; LEE, YUN LYUL; CHOI, SOO YOUNG; HONG, SEONGKWEON

    2016-01-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an important antioxidant enzyme and is crucial in modulating synaptic plasticity in the brain. In this study, CAT expression as well as neuronal distribution was compared in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged mice and rats. Male ICR mice and Sprague Dawley rats were used at postnatal month (PM) 1, PM 6 and PM 24 as the young, adult and aged groups, respectively (n=14/group). CAT expression was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. In addition, neuronal distribution was examined by NeuN immunohistochemistry. In the present study, the mean number of NeuN-immunoreactive neurons was marginally decreased in mouse and rat hippocampi during aging, although this change was not identified to be significantly different. However, CAT immunoreactivity was significantly increased in pyramidal and granule neurons in the adult mouse and rat hippocampi and was significantly decreased in the aged mouse and rat hippocampi compared with that in the young animals. CAT protein levels in the hippocampus were also lowest in the aged mouse and rat hippocampus. These results indicate that CAT expression is significantly decreased in the hippocampi of aged animals and decreased CAT expression may be closely associated with aging. PMID:27221506

  15. Long term facilitation of respiratory motor output decreases with age in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Zabka, A G; Behan, M; Mitchell, G S

    2001-01-01

    Long term facilitation (LTF) is a serotonin-dependent augmentation of respiratory motor output (phrenic and hypoglossal) following episodic hypoxia. Since ageing influences respiratory control mechanisms and serotonergic function, we tested the hypothesis that LTF decreases with age in male rats. Young (3-4 month) and aged (13 month) male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with urethane, vagotomized, paralysed and pump ventilated. Integrated phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) nerve activities were measured before (baseline), during and for 60 min after three 5 min episodes of isocapnic hypoxia (Pa,O2 35-45 mmHg) separated by 5 min of hyperoxia (Pa,O2 > 150 mmHg). In young rats, LTF was observed as an augmentation in peak integrated phrenic (n = 8) and XII (n = 7) amplitudes following episodic hypoxia (56 ± 14 and 73 ± 16 % (means ±s.e.m.) at 60 min post-hypoxia, respectively; both P < 0.05). In aged rats, LTF was significantly increased compared to baseline in phrenic (25 ± 8 % at 60 min, P < 0.05), but not in XII (4 ± 7 %, P > 0.05) motor output. LTF was significantly greater in young than in aged rats in both motor outputs (P < 0.05). Decreased phrenic and XII LTF suggests that serotonergic modulation of respiratory motor output decreases in ageing male rats. We speculate that decreased serotonergic modulation may contribute to age-related breathing disorders. PMID:11230522

  16. The effects of two Lactobacillus plantarum strains on rat lipid metabolism receiving a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Salaj, Rastislav; Stofilová, Jana; Soltesová, Alena; Hertelyová, Zdenka; Hijová, Emília; Bertková, Izabela; Strojný, Ladislav; Kružliak, Peter; Bomba, Alojz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of the different probiotic strains, Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96, on lipid metabolism and body weight in rats fed a high fat diet. Compared with the high fat diet group, the results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 reduced serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, but Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 decreased triglycerides and VLDL, while there was no change in the serum HDL level and liver lipids. Both probiotic strains lowered total bile acids in serum. Our strains have no significant change in body weight, gain weight, and body fat. These findings indicate that the effect of lactobacilli on lipid metabolism may differ among strains and that the Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 can be used to improve lipid profile and can contribute to a healthier bowel microbial balance.

  17. Melatonin effect on rat body weight regulation in response to high-fat diet at middle age.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, Stephaney S; Green, Jill N; Rasmussen, Dennis D

    2003-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that daily melatonin administration to middle-aged rats to restore youthful plasma melatonin levels also decreased body weight, visceral fat, plasma leptin, and plasma insulin to more youthful levels, without detectable changes in consumption of chow diet. We now evaluate: (a) whether melatonin alters consumption of a more precisely quantifiable liquid diet similar in high-fat content to the typical American diet; (b) differences between melatonin-induced endocrine responses in the fasted vs fed state; and (c) time course of these responses. Ten-month-old male Sprague- Dawley rats received liquid diet containing either 0.2 micro g/mL melatonin (MELATONIN) or vehicle (CONTROL) (n = 14/treatment); the diet was available throughout each night, but was removed for the final 10 h of each daytime. MELATONIN rats gained 4% body weight during the first 2 wk and then stabilized, whereas CONTROL rats continued to gain for an additional week, achieving 8% gain (p < 0.05 vs MELATONIN). During the first 3 wk, afternoon tail-blood leptin, but not insulin, levels decreased in melatonin-treated rats (p < 0.05 vs CONTROL). After 8 wk, half of the rats were killed at the midpoint of the dark period (NIGHT; fed) and half at the end of the light period (DAYTIME; fasted). NIGHT but not DAYTIME plasma leptin levels were decreased in MELATONIN rats, whereas DAYTIME but not NIGHT plasma insulin levels were decreased (p < 0.05 vs CONTROL). Melatonin treatment did not alter cumulative food consumption. Thus, melatonin decreased weight gain in response to high-fat diet, decreased plasma leptin levels within 3 wk-before decreasing plasma insulin-and exerted these metabolic effects independent of total food consumption.

  18. [Effect of different light regimens on the development of metabolic syndrome of aging rats].

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, I A

    2007-01-01

    During two years the influence of light regimens (standard lightning--LD, constant lightning--LL, natural lightning of the North-West of Russia--NL) and of melatonin on the development of metabolic syndrome of ageing LIO rats was studied. It was found out that during the process of ageing of rats kept in the conditions of the broken rhythm of day and night, different breaches of metabolism in the form of abdominal obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia, hyperbetalipoproteinemia and glycosuria occurred. These breaches can be considered to be metabolic syndrome or the syndrome of insulinoresistancy. The use of melatonin at night time starting from the rats' age of four months slowed down the age breaches of metabolism in rats. This fact proves indirectly the lack of this hormone in the conditions of natural lightning of the North-West of Russia.

  19. Alterations in the molecular weight distribution of proteins in rat brain synaptosomes during aging and centrophenoxine treatment of old rats.

    PubMed

    Nagy, K; Nagy, I

    1984-12-01

    Properly prepared membrane proteins of brain synaptosomes of 2-, 12- and 24-month-old CFY female rats were filtrated on a Sepharose 2B gel. The molecular weight distribution showed an age-dependence: there was a clear shift toward the higher molecular weights in the adult and old rats. The observed alterations reflect an increased cross-linking of the proteins during aging due most probably to the OH free radical damage of the cell components. Centrophenoxine treatment for 2 months reversed this phenomenon in the old animals: the high molecular weight fractions decreased and the lower ones increased in the treated animals as compared to the old, untreated rats. The results support the membrane hypothesis of aging and contribute to a better understanding of the biological effects of centrophenoxine.

  20. Chronic ethanol consumption depresses hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, C.J.; Bestervelt, L.L.; Mousigian, C.A.; Maimansomsuk, P.; Yong Cai; Piper, W.N. )

    1991-01-01

    In separate experiments, nine (n=20) and fifteen (n=12) month old rats were treated with either 6% ethanol or 12% sucrose in the drinking water to examine the effect of chronic ethanol consumption on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of aged rats. Blood was collected and plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone were determined by radioimmunoassay. Adrenal glands were cleaned, quartered and used to test in vitro responsiveness to ACTH. Anterior pituitary glands from all 15 month old rats and one half of the nine month old rats were collected, frozen and extracted for measurement of tissue ACTH concentration. The remaining anterior pituitary glands from the nine month old rats were challenged with corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) to test in vitro responsiveness. In nine month old rats, chronic ethanol consumption decreased plasma ACTH and corticosterone. Pituitary ACTH concentrations were unchanged in treated nine month old rats, but the amount of pituitary ACTH released in response to CRH was decreased in rats consuming ethanol. In vitro responsiveness of the adrenal gland to ACTH in nine month old rats consuming ethanol was unchanged. Plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations were also decreased in 15 month old rats chronically consuming ethanol. No differences were noted in responsiveness of the adrenal gland or in the amount of pituitary ACTH due to ethanol consumptions in 15 month old rats.

  1. Secondhand Smoke Exposure Enhances Cardiac Fibrosis Effects on the Aging Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Ping; Chang-Lee, Shu Nu; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Chung, Li-Chin; Hwang, Jin-Ming; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Examining aging rats exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS) engenders changes in left ventricular remodeling due to age- or disease-dependent alterations. Methods Rats were placed in whole-body exposure chambers and exposed to 10 cigarettes. Filtered air was introduced into the chamber at a low rate. Rats were exposed to SHS for 30 min, twice a day, 5 days per week for 1 month. After 4 weeks SHS exposure, rats were sacrificed for morphological study with trichome staining and left ventricular remodeling related protein analysis using western blot. Results Characteristic fibrotic morphology in the left ventricle increased significantly with aging and exposure to SHS. Exposure to SHS elevated TGFβ1/p-Smad2/3/CTGF and MMP2/MMP9 protein expression levels (p < 0.05). No significant differences in FGF-2 and UPA protein expression were noted as a result of SHS exposure. However, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, TIMP-3 and TIMP-4 protein expression were suppressed by SHS exposure. We also observed increased TGFβ1/p-Smad2/3/CTGF (p < 0.01), FGF-2/UPA (p < 0.05) and decreased TIMPs protein expression levels. Corresponding MMP2 and MMP9 upregulation occurred with aging and exposure to SHS. TGFβ1/p-Smad2/3/CTGF and FGF-2/UPA protein expression from SHS exposure were higher than that from aging. In contrast, MMP2 and MMP9 were increased in aging rats compared with SHS exposed rats (p < 0.05); however, TIMP-1 (p < 0.01), TIMP-2 (p < 0.01) and TIMP-3 (p < 0.05) were decreased. TIMP-4 protein expression levels were decreased compared with SHS exposed rats (p < 0.01). Conclusions Aging and SHS exposure in rats will produce elevated fibrosis. Exposure to SHS will accelerate aging and left ventricular fibrosis. PMID:27713609

  2. Heart function in magnetic resonance imaging and the mesenteric artery reactivity in rats receiving lead-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Skoczynska, A; Skórka, T; Wojakowska, A; Nowacki, D; Turczyn, B; Poręba, R; Tyrankiewicz, U; Byk, K; Szuba, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lead (Pb)-contaminated drinking water on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-estimated cardiac function, vascular reactivity, and serum lipids in rats. For 3 months, male Wistar rats, aged 4-6 weeks, were given drinking water with the addition of lead acetate at a concentration of 100 ppm Pb (10 rats) or water free from Pb (8 control rats). The cardiac MRI was performed at rest and under β-adrenergic stimulation on a 4.7 T scanner using electrocardiogram-triggered gradient echo (FLASH) cine sequence. After 1-2 weeks of the MRI test, experiments were performed ex vivo. After stabilization of perfusion pressure (PP), norepinephrine at doses from 0.01 to 5.0 μg was dissolved in Krebs solution, injected in a volume of 100 μl, and next infused at a concentration of 0.5 μg/ml into the isolated mesenteric artery. In this manner, preconstricted mesenteric bed was used to determine PP changes induced by acetylcholine, given at doses from 0.05 to 5.0 μg, before and during the infusion of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (1.0 μg/ml). At the end, dobutamine (5 mg), followed by potassium chloride (10.5 mg), was injected. Lipid levels were determined enzymatically, blood Pb level was measured by the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. This study showed that Pb impairs the left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pb-induced changes in response to resistance of vessels to vasoactive agents may be secondary to the reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. The high-density lipoprotein subfraction 2 (HDL2) is involved in the cardiovascular effect of Pb.

  3. [Activity of aldehyde scavenger enzymes in the heart of rats of different age during immobilized stress].

    PubMed

    Grabovetskaia, E R; Davydov, V V

    2009-01-01

    This study was made to determine the activity of aldehyde scavenger enzymes in the heart's postmitochondrial fraction of rats of different age during immobilization stress. Our study demonstrated, that immobilization of 1.5-, 2- and 12-month rats was accompanied by inhibiting activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase. At the same time we observed an increase in glutathione transferase activity in immobilized 1.5-month-old rats and that in reductase activity in 24-month-old rats. The revealed changes can lead to a decrease in the rate of endogenous aldehyde utilization in the heart during stress at puberty.

  4. Comparison of antioxidants in the ability to prevent cataract in prematurely aging OXYS rats.

    PubMed

    Kolosova, N G; Lebedev, P A; Dikalova, A E

    2004-03-01

    The biological model of prematurely aging OXYS rats is proposed for evaluation of anticataract activity of preparations. Pathological changes in the lens develop in 2-month-old OXYS rats. By the 6th month of life cataract morbidity rate attains 100%. Adrusen Zinco, Mirtilene Forte, blueberry extract, and vitamin E (Russian and from Sigma) possessing antioxidant properties and given with food decreased the number of OXYS rats with cataract. The preparation from blueberry Mirtilene Forte and blueberry extract normalized the content of lipid peroxidation products in the blood. Blueberry extract manufactured in Russia decreased the index of lipid atherogenicity that was high in OXYS rats. PMID:15232631

  5. Cognitive aging: a common decline of episodic recollection and spatial memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Robitsek, R Jonathan; Fortin, Norbert J; Koh, Ming Teng; Gallagher, Michela; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2008-09-01

    In humans, recognition memory declines with aging, and this impairment is characterized by a selective loss in recollection of previously studied items contrasted with relative sparing of familiarity for items in the study list. Rodent models of cognitive aging have focused on water maze learning and have demonstrated an age-associated loss in spatial, but not cued memory. The current study examined odor recognition memory in young and aged rats and compared performance in recognition with that in water maze learning. In the recognition task, young rats used both recollection and familiarity. In contrast, the aged rats showed a selective loss of recollection and relative sparing of familiarity, similar to the effects of hippocampal damage. Furthermore, performance on the recall component, but not the familiarity component, of recognition was correlated with spatial memory and recollection was poorer in aged rats that were also impaired in spatial memory. These results extend the pattern of impairment in recollection and relative sparing of familiarity observed in human cognitive aging to rats, and suggest a common age-related impairment in both spatial learning and the recollective component of nonspatial recognition memory.

  6. Consequences of age on ischemic wound healing in rats: altered antioxidant activity and delayed wound closure.

    PubMed

    Moor, Andrea N; Tummel, Evan; Prather, Jamie L; Jung, Michelle; Lopez, Jonathan J; Connors, Sarah; Gould, Lisa J

    2014-04-01

    Advertisements targeted at the elderly population suggest that antioxidant therapy will reduce free radicals and promote wound healing, yet few scientific studies substantiate these claims. To better understand the potential utility of supplemental antioxidant therapy for wound healing, we tested the hypothesis that age and tissue ischemia alter the balance of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Using a bipedicled skin flap model, ischemic and non-ischemic wounds were created on young and aged rats. Wound closure and the balance of the critical antioxidants superoxide dismutase and glutathione in the wound bed were determined. Ischemia delayed wound closure significantly more in aged rats. Lower superoxide dismutase 2 and glutathione in non-ischemic wounds of aged rats indicate a basal deficit due to age alone. Ischemic wounds from aged rats had lower superoxide dismutase 2 protein and activity initially, coupled with decreased ratios of reduced/oxidized glutathione and lower glutathione peroxidase activity. De novo glutathione synthesis, to restore redox balance in aged ischemic wounds, was initiated as evidenced by increased glutamate cysteine ligase. Results demonstrate deficiencies in two antioxidant pathways in aged rats that become exaggerated in ischemic tissue, culminating in profoundly impaired wound healing and prolonged inflammation.

  7. Decreases in bone blood flow and bone material properties in aging Fischer-344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Susan A.; Hogan, Harry A.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify precisely aging-induced changes in skeletal perfusion and bone mechanical properties in a small rodent model. Blood flow was measured in conscious juvenile (2 months old), adult (6 months old), and aged (24 months old) male Fischer-344 rats using radiolabeled microspheres. There were no significant differences in bone perfusion rate or vascular resistance between juvenile and adult rats. However, blood flow was lower in aged versus adult rats in the forelimb bones, scapulas, and femurs. To test for functional effects of this decline in blood flow, bone mineral density and mechanical properties were measured in rats from these two age groups. Bone mineral density and cross-sectional moment of inertia in femoral and tibial shafts and the femoral neck were significantly larger in the aged versus adult rats, resulting in increased (+14%-53%) breaking strength and stiffness. However, intrinsic material properties at midshaft of the long bones were 12% to 25% lower in the aged rats. Although these data are consistent with a potential link between decreased perfusion and focal alterations in bone remodeling activity related to clinically relevant bone loss, additional studies are required to establish the mechanisms for this putative relationship.

  8. Alterations in activation and deactivation of mutagens in aging rat liver.

    PubMed

    Masuda, M; Nukuzuma, C; Kazusaka, A; Fujita, S

    1995-09-01

    Age-associated alternations in activation and deactivation of benzo[a]pyrene (BP), furylfuramide (AF2), and 2-nitrofluorene (NF) in rat liver were investigated. A modified Ames mutagenicity test system used liver 9000 g supernatant (S-9) from male Fischer 344 rats aged 3, 6, 12, and 24 months fortified with NADPH generating system alone or together with cofactors of conjugating enzymes. The numbers of revertant colonies due to mutagenic activation of BP during preincubation were markedly high in young rats and decreased with aging. They were decreased by the addition of UDP-glucuronic acid (15 mM) or glutathione (30 mM), the cofactors of UDP-glucuronyl transferase and glutathione S-transferase, respectively, in the preincubation mixture. The difference in the BP activation by liver S-9 from different age groups almost disappeared by the addition of reduced glutathione. A direct mutagen, AF2, was not metabolized during preincubation in the absence of cofactors of conjugating enzymes, but detoxified up to about 50% by the addition of glutathione to the preincubation mixture containing liver S-9 from rats of any age group. Another direct mutagen, NF, was partly detoxified during preincubation by liver S-9 from 3-month-old rats more than by that from 24-month-old rats. It is suggested that incidence of chemical carcinogenesis may increase along with aging due to the altered xenobiotics metabolism. PMID:7671022

  9. Physicochemical properties of the aging and diabetic sand rat intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Ziv, I; Moskowitz, R W; Kraise, I; Adler, J H; Maroudas, A

    1992-03-01

    Hydration, fixed charge density, (FCD) and hydration under various osmotic pressures were compared in young, old, and young diabetic sand rats. This rat is a desert animal that may develop diabetes when fed a regular diet; it is also known to have radiographic and histologic evidence of intervertebral disc (IVD) disease. Forty-five rats and 180 IVD were used in this study; they were divided into three equal groups: young healthy, old healthy, and young diabetics. IVD, cancellous bone, and muscle were sampled from distal lumbar spines. The young diabetic rats (YD) were considerably heavier than the age-matched controls, had higher insulin and glucose levels, and all YD had cataracts. The discs of the young diabetic animals demonstrated decreased hydration, FCD and ability to resist compression under osmotic pressures as compared with the young and healthy discs and were more similar to the discs from old rats. The IVD is the most affected musculoskeletal connective tissue in sand rats with aging and diabetes. The aged and diabetic discs in the sand rat demonstrated changes similar to human changes with regard to lower hydration, FCD, and ability to resist osmotic pressure. Therefore, the sand rat may be a suitable animal model for studying the pathogenesis of disc degeneration.

  10. Glutamatergic signaling and low prodynorphin expression are associated with intact memory and reduced anxiety in rat models of healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2014-01-01

    The LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain is considered a model of healthy aging due to its increased longevity, maintenance of stable body weight (BW) throughout life and low incidence of age-related diseases. However, aging LOU rat cognitive and anxiety status has yet to be investigated. In the present study, male and female LOU rat cognitive performances (6–42 months) were assessed using novel object recognition and Morris Water Maze tasks. Recognition memory remained intact in all LOU rats up to 42 months of age. As for spatial memory, old LOU rat performed similarly as young animals for learning acquisition, reversal learning, and retention. While LOU rat BW remained stable despite aging, 20-month-old ad-libitum-fed (OAL) male Sprague Dawley rats become obese. We determined if long-term caloric restriction (LTCR) prevents age-related BW increase and cognitive deficits in this rat strain, as observed in the obesity-resistant LOU rats. Compared to young animals, recognition memory was impaired in OAL but intact in 20-month-old calorie-restricted (OCR) rats. Similarly, OAL spatial learning acquisition was impaired but LTCR prevented the deficits. Exacerbated stress responses may favor age-related cognitive decline. In the elevated plus maze and open field tasks, LOU and OCR rats exhibited high levels of exploratory activity whereas OAL rats displayed anxious behaviors. Expression of prodynorphin (Pdyn), an endogenous peptide involved in stress-related memory impairments, was increased in the hippocampus of OAL rats. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and immediate early genes Homer 1a and Arc expression, both associated with successful cognitive aging, were unaltered in aging LOU rats but lower in OAL than OCR rats. Altogether, our results, supported by principal component analysis and correlation matrix, suggest that intact memory and low anxiety are associated with glutamatergic signaling and low Pdyn expression in the hippocampus of non-obese aging rats. PMID

  11. Caffeine and diphenyl diselenide improve long-term memory impaired in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Leite, Marlon R; Marcondes Sari, Marcel Henrique; de Freitas, Mayara L; Oliveira, Lia P; Dalmolin, Laíza; Brandão, Ricardo; Zeni, Gilson

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 supplemented diet (10ppm) associated to the administration of caffeine (15mg/kg; i.g.) for 30days on the novel object recognition memory in middle-aged rats. The present findings showed that (PhSe)2-supplemented diet enhanced short-term memory, but not long-term memory, of middle-aged rats in the novel object recognition task. The (PhSe)2 supplemented diet associated with caffeine administration improved long-term memory, but did not alter short-term memory, impaired in middle-aged rats. Daily caffeine administration to middle-aged rats had no effect on the memory tasks. Diet supplemented with (PhSe)2 plus caffeine administration increased the number of crossings and rearings reduced in middle-aged rats. Caffeine administration plus (PhSe)2 diets were effective in increasing the number of rearings and crossings, respectively, in middle-aged rats, [(3)H] glutamate uptake was reduced in hippocampal slices of rats from (PhSe)2 and caffeine plus (PhSe)2 groups. In addition, animals supplemented with (PhSe)2 showed an increase in the pCREB/CREB ratio whereas pAkt/Akt ratio was not modified. These results suggest that the effects of (PhSe)2 on the short-term memory may be related to its ability to decrease the uptake of glutamate, influencing the increase of CREB phosphorylation. (PhSe)2-supplemented diet associated to the administration of caffeine improved long-term memory impaired in middle-aged rats, an effect independent of CREB and Akt phosphorylation.

  12. Age-Related Decrease in the Schaffer Collateral-Evoked EPSP in Awake, Freely, Behaving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, C. A.; Rao, G.; Orr, G.

    2000-01-01

    Synaptic response size in the CA1 region of the hippocampus in aged rats is reduced for a given stimulus intensity, compared with that elicited in young rats. Consistent with the in vitro findings of reduced Schaffer collateral-evoked CA1 EPSPs in old rats, the population currents evoked to iontophoretically applied AMPA are also smaller relative to the presynaptic fiber potential amplitude. On the other hand, the size of the presynaptic fiber potential and amplitude of unitary intra-cellularly recorded EPSP responses do not change across age in the CA1 region. These electrophysiological findings are consistent with the hypothesis that old rats have fewer functional synaptic contacts per Schaffer collateral axon than do young rats. The possibility that this age change arises as a result of a differential tissue recovery response to in vitro preparation was examined in the present study. CA1 presynaptic fiber potential and EPSP amplitudes evoked by the stimulation of Schaffer collateral afferents were studied in intact, freely behaving young and old rats. We confirmed in vivo the pattern of electrophysiophysiological results previously reported in vitro and found significant correlations between the synaptic response amplitudes and the accuracy of spatial behavior in the Morris swim task. The data suggest that changes in functional connectivity of old rats may be a significant contributor to cognitive changes during aging. PMID:11147459

  13. Water maze training in aged rats: effects on brain metabolic capacity and behavior.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, J S; Gonzalez-Lima, F; Berndt, J; Barea-Rodriguez, E J

    2002-06-01

    The effects of Morris water maze training on brain metabolism and behavior were compared between aged (20-22 months) and young (2-4 months) Fischer 344 male rats. Each group had yoked controls, which swam the same amount of time as the trained rats but without the platform. This was followed after 9 days by quantitative histochemical mapping of brain cytochrome oxidase, the terminal enzyme for cellular respiration. The aged rats spent a significantly lower percent of time in the correct quadrant and had a longer latency to escape to the hidden platform, relative to the young rats. Metabolic differences between trained aged and young rats were found in regions related to escape under stress: perirhinal cortex, basolateral amygdala and lateral habenula; and vestibular nuclei that guide orientation in three-dimensional space. These differences were not found in the yoked swimming rats. The results suggest that, at the time point investigated, water maze training in aged Fischer 344 rats produces altered oxidative energy metabolism in task-relevant limbic and vestibular regions.

  14. Up-regulation of serotonin receptor 2B mRNA and protein in the peri-infarcted area of aged rats and stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Bădescu, George Mihai; Bogdan, Catalin; Weston, Ria; Slevin, Mark; Di Napoli, Mario; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that a high proportion of elderly stroke patients develop mood disorders, the mechanisms underlying late-onset neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive symptoms have so far received little attention in the field of neurobiology. In rodents, aged animals display depressive symptoms following stroke, whereas young animals recover fairly well. This finding has prompted us to investigate the expression of serotonin receptors 2A and 2B, which are directly linked to depression, in the brains of aged and young rats following stroke. Although the development of the infarct was more rapid in aged rats in the first 3 days after stroke, by day 14 the cortical infarcts were similar in size in both age groups i.e. 45% of total cortical volume in young rats and 55.7% in aged rats. We also found that the expression of serotonin receptor type B mRNA was markedly increased in the perilesional area of aged rats as compared to the younger counterparts. Furthermore, histologically, HTR2B protein expression in degenerating neurons was closely associated with activated microglia both in aged rats and human subjects. Treatment with fluoxetine attenuated the expression of Htr2B mRNA, stimulated post-stroke neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and was associated with an improved anhedonic behavior and an increased activity in the forced swim test in aged animals. We hypothesize that HTR2B expression in the infarcted territory may render degenerating neurons susceptible to attack by activated microglia and thus aggravate the consequences of stroke. PMID:27013593

  15. Enhancement of aging rat laryngeal muscles with endogenous growth factor treatment.

    PubMed

    Stemple, Joseph C; Andreatta, Richard D; Seward, Tanya S; Angadi, Vrushali; Dietrich, Maria; McMullen, Colleen A

    2016-05-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that laryngeal muscle dysfunction is associated with human aging. Studies in animal models have reported morphological changes consistent with denervation in laryngeal muscles with age. Life-long laryngeal muscle activity relies on cytoskeletal integrity and nerve-muscle communication at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). It is thought that neurotrophins enhance neuromuscular transmission by increasing neurotransmitter release. We hypothesized that treatment with neurotrophin 4 (NTF4) would modify the morphology and functional innervation of aging rat laryngeal muscles. Fifty-six Fischer 344xBrown Norway rats (6- and 30-mo age groups) were used to evaluate to determine if NTF4, given systemically (n = 32) or directly (n = 24), would improve the morphology and functional innervation of aging rat thyroarytenoid muscles. Results demonstrate the ability of rat laryngeal muscles to remodel in response to neurotrophin application. Changes were demonstrated in fiber size, glycolytic capacity, mitochondrial, tyrosine kinase receptors (Trk), NMJ content, and denervation in aging rat thyroarytenoid muscles. This study suggests that growth factors may have therapeutic potential to ameliorate aging-related laryngeal muscle dysfunction.

  16. Influence of Age on Incident Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Prostate Cancer Survivors Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morgans, Alicia K.; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Koyama, Tatsuki; Albertsen, Peter C.; Goodman, Michael; Hamilton, Ann S.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Stanford, Janet L.; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Resnick, Matthew J.; Barocas, Daniel A.; Penson, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Observational data suggest that androgen deprivation therapy increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Using data from the population based PCOS we evaluated whether age at diagnosis and comorbidity impact the association of androgen deprivation therapy with incident diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods We identified men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer diagnosed from 1994 to 1995 who were followed through 2009 to 2010. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the relationship of androgen deprivation therapy exposure (2 or fewer years, greater than 2 years or none) with incident diabetes and cardiovascular disease, adjusting for age at diagnosis, race, stage and comorbidity. Results Of 3,526 eligible study participants 2,985 without diabetes and 3,112 without cardiovascular disease comprised the cohorts at risk. Androgen deprivation therapy was not associated with an increased risk of diabetes or cardiovascular disease in men diagnosed with prostate cancer before age 70 years. Prolonged androgen deprivation therapy and increasing age at diagnosis in older men was associated with an increased risk of diabetes (at age 76 years OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.0–4.4) and cardiovascular disease (at age 74 years OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0–3.5). Men with comorbidities were at greater risk for diabetes (OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.3–7.9) and cardiovascular disease (OR 8.1, 95% CI 4.3–15.5) than men without comorbidities. Conclusions Prolonged androgen deprivation therapy exposure increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in men diagnosed with prostate cancer who are older than approximately 75 years, especially those with other comorbidities. Older men who receive prolonged androgen deprivation therapy should be closely monitored for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25451829

  17. Age and altitude tolerance in rats - Temperature, plasma enzymes, and corticosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Altland, P.D.; Rattner, B.A.

    1981-02-01

    The influence of age on altitude tolerance in rats is investigated on the basis of changes in body weight and temperature, plasma enzyme levels and corticosterone concentration as indicators of condition. Immature (24-34 days), young adult (130-140 days) and old (600-625 days) rats were exposed to simulated altitudes from 6096 to 8230 m for four hours, and plasma activities of aspartate amino transferase (AsAT), fructose diphosphate aldolase (FDA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase were determined, along with body weight and temperature and corticosterone. A critical survival threshold of 8230 m is obtained for the immature rats, while mortality was observed in some young adult and old rats at 7620 m, indicating the greater altitude tolerance of the immature animals. The degree of hypothermia and corticosterone elevation induced by altitude exposure in immature rats, but not young adult or old rats, is found to be directly related to the severity of hypoxia. Plasma enzyme activities are found to be relatively unchanged in immature rats, but AsAT and LDH activities in old rats, as well as FDA in young adults, were elevated at the critical survival threshold. Results thus indicate the usefulness of body temperature and plasma corticosterone in determining the altitude tolerance of immature rats, and enzyme activities for tolerance assessment in young adult and old rats.

  18. Preventive effect of safranal against oxidative damage in aged male rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Samini, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    An imbalance between production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and its elimination by antioxidant defense system in the body has been implicated for causes of aging and neurodegenerative diseases. This study was design to assess the changes in activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase), lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in the brain of 2, 10 and 20 month old rats, and to determine the effect of safranal on the status of selected oxidative stress indices in the 10 and 20 month old rats. The aged rats (10 and 20 months) were given intraperitoneal injections of safranal (0.5 mg/kg day) daily for one month. The results of this study demonstrated that aging caused significant increase in the level of lipid peroxidation as well decrease in the GSH level and activities of SOD and GST in the brain of aging rats. The results of this study showed that safranal ameliorated the increased lipid peroxidation level as well as decreased GSH content of the brain of 10 and 20 month old rats. In addition, safranal treatment to the 20 month old rats, which restored the SOD and GST activities. In conclusion, safranal can be effective to protect susceptible aged brain from oxidative damage by increasing antioxidant defenses. PMID:25312506

  19. Spatial reference memory in normal aging Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats.

    PubMed

    McQuail, Joseph A; Nicolle, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 (F344 × BN-F1) hybrid rats express greater longevity with improved health relative to aging rodents of other strains; however, few behavioral reports have thoroughly evaluated cognition across the F344 × BN-F1 lifespan. Consequently, this study evaluated spatial reference memory in F344 × BN-F1 rats at 6, 18, 24, or 28 months of age in the Morris water maze. Reference memory decrements were observed between 6 and 18 months and 18 and 24 months. At 28 months, spatial learning was not worse than 24 months, but swim speed was significantly slower. Reliable individual differences revealed that ∼50% of 24- to 28-month-old rats performed similarly to 6 months, whereas others were spatial learning impaired. Aged rats were impaired at learning within daily training sessions but not impaired at retaining information between days of training. Aged rats were also slower to learn to escape onto the platform, regardless of strategy. In summary, these data clarify the trajectory of cognitive decline in aging F344 × BN-F1 rats and elucidate relevant behavioral parameters.

  20. Unprovoked atrial tachyarrhythmias in aging spontaneously hypertensive rats: the role of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Scridon, Alina; Gallet, Clément; Arisha, Moussa M; Oréa, Valérie; Chapuis, Bruno; Li, Na; Tabib, Alain; Christé, Georges; Barrès, Christian; Julien, Claude; Chevalier, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Experimental models of unprovoked atrial tachyarrhythmias (AT) in conscious, ambulatory animals are lacking. We hypothesized that the aging, spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) may provide such a model. Baseline ECG recordings were acquired with radiotelemetry in eight young (14-wk-old) and eight aging (55-wk-old) SHRs and in two groups of four age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Quantification of AT and heart rate variability (HRV) analysis were performed based on 24-h ECG recordings in unrestrained rats. All animals were submitted to an emotional stress protocol (air-jet). In SHRs, carbamylcholine injections were also performed. Spontaneous AT episodes were observed in all eight aging SHRs (median, 91.5; range, 4-444 episodes/24 h), but not in young SHRs or WKY rats. HRV analysis demonstrated significantly decreased low frequency components in aging SHRs compared with age-matched WKY rats (P < 0.01) and decreased low/high frequency ratios in both young (P < 0.01) and aging (P = 0.01) SHRs compared with normotensive controls. In aging SHRs, emotional stress significantly reduced the number of arrhythmic events, whereas carbamylcholine triggered AT and significantly increased atrial electrical instability. This study reports the occurrence of unprovoked episodes of atrial arrhythmia in hypertensive rats, and their increased incidence with aging. Our results suggest that autonomic imbalance with relative vagal hyperactivity may be responsible for the increased atrial arrhythmogenicity observed in this model. We also provide evidence that, in this model, the sympatho-vagal imbalance preceded the occurrence of arrhythmia. These results indicate that aging SHRs may provide valuable insight into the understanding of atrial arrhythmias.

  1. Exercise induces age-dependent changes on epigenetic parameters in rat hippocampus: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Lovatel, Gisele Agustini; Moysés, Felipe; Bertoldi, Karine; Spindler, Christiano; Cechinel, Laura Reck; Muotri, Alysson Renato; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2013-02-01

    Regular exercise improves learning and memory, including during aging process. Interestingly, the imbalance of epigenetic mechanisms has been linked to age-related cognitive deficits. However, studies about epigenetic alterations after exercise during the aging process are rare. In this preliminary study we investigated the effect of aging and exercise on DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) and H3-K9 methylation levels in hippocampus from 3 and 20-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two exercise protocols: single session or chronic treadmill protocol. DNMT1 and H3-K9 methylation levels were decreased in hippocampus from aged rats. The single exercise session decreased both DNMT3b and DNMT1 levels in young adult rats, without any effect in the aged group. Both exercise protocols reduced H3-K9 methylation levels in young adult rats, while the single session reversed the changes on H3-K9 methylation levels induced by aging. Together, these results suggest that an imbalance on DNMTs and H3-K9 methylation levels might be linked to the brain aging process and that the outcome to exercise seems to vary through lifespan.

  2. Evaluation of an injectable bone substitute (betaTCP/hydroxyapatite/hydroxy-propyl-methyl-cellulose) in severely osteopenic and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Blouin, S; Moreau, M F; Weiss, P; Daculsi, G; Baslé, M F; Chappard, D

    2006-09-01

    The use of injectable biomaterials is of interest in osteoporotic patients to locally restore bone mass in sites at risk of fracture. An injectable bone substitute (IBS1 made of betaTCP/hydroxyapatite as a calcium phosphate substitute and hydroxy-propyl-methyl-cellulose as a polymer carrier) was used in a severely osteopenic rat model obtained by combining orchidectomy (ORX) and disuse (paralysis induced by botulinum toxin - BTX). Fifty-six aged male rats were randomized into three groups: 18 were SHAM operated; 38 were ORX and BTX injected in the right hindlimb; they constituted the OP (osteoporotic) group. One month after ORX-BTX surgery, 20 of these OP rats received a IBS1 injection in the right femur (OP-IBS1 rats). Animals were studied at the time of IBS1 injection 1 month post ORX-BTX (M1), 1 month (M2) and 2 months (M3) after IBS1 injection. Bone mass (BV/TV) and microarchitectural parameters were measured by microCT. BV/TV was decreased after ORX-BTX; ORX and BTX had cumulative effects on bone loss (differences maximized on the right femur). BV/TV (combining the volume of both bone and material in OP-IBS1 rats) was elevated at M1 but decreased at M2. Marked bone formation was found onto the biomaterial granules but bone had a woven texture. A marked increase in the number of nonosteoclastic TRAcP+ cells was found in the implanted area. IBS1 induced new bone formation shortly after implantation but both IBS1 and woven bone were resorbed without inducing lamellar bone. Biomaterial trials must be conducted with long-term implantation periods, in aged osteoporotic animals.

  3. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats due to age-related arginase activation in intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nara, Akina; Nagai, Hisashi; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Ogura, Sayoko; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Kuwahira, Ichiro; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is prevalent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Aging induces arginase activation and reduces nitric oxide (NO) production in the arteries. Intermittent hypoxia (IH), conferred by cycles of brief hypoxia and normoxia, contributes to OSAS pathogenesis. Here, we studied the role of arginase and aging in the pathogenesis of PAH in adult (9-mo-old) and young (2-mo-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to IH or normoxia for 4 weeks and analyzed them with a pressure-volume catheter inserted into the right ventricle (RV) and by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Western blot analysis was conducted on arginase, NO synthase isoforms, and nitrotyrosine. IH induced PAH, as shown by increased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, in adult rats but not in young rats. IH increased expression levels of arginase I and II proteins in the adult rats. IH also increased arginase I expression in the pulmonary artery endothelium and arginase II in the pulmonary artery adventitia. Furthermore, IH reduced pulmonary levels of nitrate and nitrite but increased nitrotyrosine levels in adult rats. An arginase inhibitor (N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-1-arginine) prevented IH-induced PAH and normalized nitrite and nitrate levels in adult rats. IH induced arginase up-regulation and PAH in adult rats, but not in young rats, through reduced NO production. Our findings suggest that arginase inhibition prevents or reverses PAH. PMID:25490411

  4. The anti-osteoporotic effect of Eurycoma Longifolia in aged orchidectomised rat model.

    PubMed

    Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun; Abu Bakar, Mohd Firdaus; Abdul Shukor, Tajul Ariff; Muhammad, Norliza; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana

    2011-09-01

    Osteoporosis in elderly men is becoming an important health issue with the aging society. Elderly men with androgen deficiency are exposed to osteoporosis and can be treated with testosterone replacement. In this study, Eurycoma longifolia (EL), a plant with androgenic effects, was supplemented to an androgen-deficient osteoporotic aged rat as alternative to testosterone. Aged 12 months old Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into groups of normal control (NC), sham-operated (SO), orchidectomised-control (OrxC), orchidectomised and supplemented with EL (Orx + El) and orchidectomised and given testosterone (Orx + T). After 6 weeks of treatment, serum osteocalcin, serum terminal C-telopeptide Type 1 collagen (CTX) and the fourth lumbar bone calcium were measured. There were no significant differences in the osteocalcin levels before and after treatment in all the groups. The CTX levels were also similar for all the groups before treatment. However, after treatment, orchidectomy had caused significant elevation of CTX compared to normal control rats. Testosterone replacements in orchidectomised rats were able to prevent the rise of CTX. Orchidectomy had also reduced the bone calcium level compared to normal control rats. Both testosterone replacement and EL supplementation to orchidectomised rats were able to maintain the bone calcium level, with the former showing better effects. As a conclusion, EL prevented bone calcium loss in orchidectomised rats and therefore has the potential to be used as an alternative treatment for androgen deficient osteoporosis.

  5. Effects of aging on peripheral and central auditory processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Margarida; Lepore, Franco; Prévost, François; Guillemot, Jean-Paul

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss is a hallmark sign in the elderly population. Decline in auditory perception provokes deficits in the ability to localize sound sources and reduces speech perception, particularly in noise. In addition to a loss of peripheral hearing sensitivity, changes in more complex central structures have also been demonstrated. Related to these, this study examines the auditory directional maps in the deep layers of the superior colliculus of the rat. Hence, anesthetized Sprague-Dawley adult (10 months) and aged (22 months) rats underwent distortion product of otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to assess cochlear function. Then, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were assessed, followed by extracellular single-unit recordings to determine age-related effects on central auditory functions. DPOAE amplitude levels were decreased in aged rats although they were still present between 3.0 and 24.0 kHz. ABR level thresholds in aged rats were significantly elevated at an early (cochlear nucleus - wave II) stage in the auditory brainstem. In the superior colliculus, thresholds were increased and the tuning widths of the directional receptive fields were significantly wider. Moreover, no systematic directional spatial arrangement was present among the neurons of the aged rats, implying that the topographical organization of the auditory directional map was abolished. These results suggest that the deterioration of the auditory directional spatial map can, to some extent, be attributable to age-related dysfunction at more central, perceptual stages of auditory processing. PMID:27306460

  6. Effects of aging on peripheral and central auditory processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Margarida; Lepore, Franco; Prévost, François; Guillemot, Jean-Paul

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss is a hallmark sign in the elderly population. Decline in auditory perception provokes deficits in the ability to localize sound sources and reduces speech perception, particularly in noise. In addition to a loss of peripheral hearing sensitivity, changes in more complex central structures have also been demonstrated. Related to these, this study examines the auditory directional maps in the deep layers of the superior colliculus of the rat. Hence, anesthetized Sprague-Dawley adult (10 months) and aged (22 months) rats underwent distortion product of otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to assess cochlear function. Then, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were assessed, followed by extracellular single-unit recordings to determine age-related effects on central auditory functions. DPOAE amplitude levels were decreased in aged rats although they were still present between 3.0 and 24.0 kHz. ABR level thresholds in aged rats were significantly elevated at an early (cochlear nucleus - wave II) stage in the auditory brainstem. In the superior colliculus, thresholds were increased and the tuning widths of the directional receptive fields were significantly wider. Moreover, no systematic directional spatial arrangement was present among the neurons of the aged rats, implying that the topographical organization of the auditory directional map was abolished. These results suggest that the deterioration of the auditory directional spatial map can, to some extent, be attributable to age-related dysfunction at more central, perceptual stages of auditory processing.

  7. Treadmill exercise slows cognitive deficits in aging rats by antioxidation and inhibition of amyloid production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feng; Xu, Bo; Song, Chenghui; Ji, Liu; Zhang, Xianliang

    2013-04-17

    Chronic administration of D-galactose simulates the changes in natural senescence and accelerates aging in animal models and has been used in aging research. The present study was undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of exercise on learning and memory in rats with D-galactose-induced aging. The learning and memory performance in aging rats, either after exercise or without exercise, was assessed with the Morris water maze test. The effect of treadmill exercise on the expression of amyloid-β 42 and two key enzymes involved in processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein, a disintegrase and metalloprotease domain 17 and β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1, in the hippocampi of rats were monitored using real-time quantitative PCR. Moreover, oxidative stress-associated changes, including changes in superoxide dismutase activity and malondialdehyde content, in the hippocampi were assessed after exercise. Our results showed that treadmill exercise significantly improved learning and memory performance in aging rats. The behavioral changes were likely induced by repression of amyloid-β 42 protein levels, through the upregulation of a disintegrase and metalloprotease domain 17 mRNA and downregulation of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 mRNA, and a concomitant increase in superoxide dismutase activity and decrease in malondialdehyde content, in rat hippocampi. Our data suggest that exercise may be an effective therapy for alleviating learning and memory decline due to aging or the onset of neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Effects of niacin-bound chromium, Maitake mushroom fraction SX and (-)-hydroxycitric acid on the metabolic syndrome in aged diabetic Zucker fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Talpur, Nadeem; Echard, Bobby W; Yasmin, Taharat; Bagchi, Debasis; Preuss, Harry G

    2003-10-01

    Previous studies in our laboratories have demonstrated that niacin-bound chromium (NBC), Maitake mushroom and (-)-hydroxycitric acid (HCA-SX) can ameliorate hypertension, dyslipidemias and diabetes mellitus, and therefore may be useful in weight management. In the present study, we used aged, diabetic Zucker fatty rats (ZFR) (70-75 weeks) in order to determine whether NBC, fraction SX of Maitake mushroom (MSX) and 60% (-)-hydroxycitric acid (HCA-SX) from Garcinia cambogia, alone or in combination, can affect certain aspects of the metabolic syndrome. Syndrome X or metabolic syndrome has been described as a concurrence of disturbed glucose and insulin metabolism, overweight and abdominal fat distribution, mild dyslipidemia, and hypertension, which are associated with subsequent development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Four groups of eight ZFR were gavaged daily with different supplements. For the initial three weeks, the control group of ZFR received only water, the second group received NBC 40 mcg elemental chromium/day, the third group received MSX 100 mg/day and the last group received HCA-SX 200 mg/day. During weeks 4-6, the doses of each treatment were doubled. The control animals lost approximately 50 g body weight (BW) per rat over 6 weeks of treatment, which is characteristic of these animals in declining health. In contrast, eight ZFR receiving NBC lost approximately 9 g BW per rat, while rats consuming MSX lost 16 g BW per rat. However, ZFR receiving HCA-SX simulated the pattern in the control group because these animals lost approximately 46 g BW per rat. The wide individual variations resulted in a lack of statistical significance among groups. Nevertheless, 75% of the ZFR in the control group lost more than 50 g BW over the 6 weeks duration, whereas none of the ZFR receiving NBC, 25% of the ZFR receiving MSX and 57% of the ZFR receiving HCA-SX lost over 50 g BW over the 6 weeks of the study. ZFR in all 3 treatment groups

  9. Comparison of electroretinographic responses between two different age groups of adult Dark Agouti rats

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lin; Lo, Amy Cheuk Yin; Lai, Jimmy Shiu Ming; Shih, Kendrick Co

    2015-01-01

    AIM To describe and compare the differences in electroretinographic responses between two different age groups of adult Dark Agouti (DA) rats and to better understand the effect of age on retinal histology and function. METHODS The electroretinographic responses of two different age groups of adult DA rats were compared. Animals were divided into younger adult DA rats 10-12wk (n=8) and older adult DA rats 17-19wk (n=8). Full field electroretinography (ERG) was recorded simultaneously from both eyes after dark adaption and light adaption and parameters including the positive scotopic threshold response (pSTR), negative scotopic threshold response (nSTR), scotopic a-wave, b-wave, photopic a-wave, b-wave and photopic negative response (PhNR) were compared between groups. RESULTS The older adult rats displayed lower stimulation thresholds of the STRs (pSTR and nSTR) and higher amplitudes of pSTR, scotopic a-wave and b-wave, photopic b-wave and PhNR amplitudes, with shorter implicit times. Photopic a-wave amplitudes were however higher in the younger adult rats. CONCLUSION In summary, for the rod system, photoreceptor, bipolar cell and RGC activity was enhanced in the older adult rats. For the cone system, RGC and bipolar cell activity was enhanced, while photoreceptor activity was depressed in the older adult rats. Such age-related selective modification of retinal cell function needs to be considered when conducting ophthalmic research in adult rats. PMID:26558198

  10. Age-related changes in the fracture resistance of male Fischer F344 rat bone.

    PubMed

    Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Granke, Mathilde; Makowski, Alexander J; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2016-02-01

    In addition to the loss in bone volume that occurs with age, there is a decline in material properties. To test new therapies or diagnostic tools that target such properties as material strength and toughness, a pre-clinical model of aging would be useful in which changes in bone are similar to those that occur with aging in humans. Toward that end, we hypothesized that similar to human bone, the estimated toughness and material strength of cortical bone at the apparent-level decreases with age in the male Fischer F344 rat. In addition, we tested whether the known decline in trabecular architecture in rats translated to an age-related decrease in vertebra (VB) strength and whether non-X-ray techniques could quantify tissue changes at micron and sub-micron length scales. Bones were harvested from 6-, 12-, and 24-month (mo.) old rats (n=12 per age). Despite a loss in trabecular bone with age, VB compressive strength was similar among the age groups. Similarly, whole-bone strength (peak force) in bending was maintained (femur) or increased (radius) with aging. There was though an age-related decrease in post-yield toughness (radius) and bending strength (femur). The ability to resist crack initiation was actually higher for the 12-mo. and 24-mo. than for 6-mo. rats (notch femur), but the estimated work to propagate the crack was less for the aged bone. For the femur diaphysis region, porosity increased while bound water decreased with age. For the radius diaphysis, there was an age-related increase in non-enzymatic and mature enzymatic collagen crosslinks. Raman spectroscopy analysis of embedded cross-sections of the tibia mid-shaft detected an increase in carbonate subsitution with advanced aging for both inner and outer tissue.

  11. Effect of Tongue Exercise on Protrusive Force and Muscle Fiber Area in Aging Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Jackson, Michelle A.; Mann, Laura; Kluender, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related changes in tongue function may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. The authors' purpose was to investigate whether aged rats that have undergone tongue exercise would manifest increased protrusive tongue forces and increased genioglossus (GG) muscle fiber cross-sectional areas. Method: Forty-eight young adult,…

  12. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Pérez, José Jaime; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT) expression associated with low testosterone (T) levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1) if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2) if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months) and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population. PMID:26317087

  13. UNDERNUTRITION IN EARLY LIFE DOES NOT IMPAIR LEARNING IN YOUNG OR AGING RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prenatal undernutrition is associated with increased incidence of obesity, heart disease, diabetes. Effects of pre- and post-natal undernutrition on nervous system function in middle-aged and aging male SD rats were examined. Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was induced by ...

  14. Human neural progenitors differentiate into astrocytes and protect motor neurons in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Melanie M; Avalos, Pablo; Suezaki, Patrick; Godoy, Marlesa; Garcia, Leslie; Chang, Christine D; Vit, Jean-Philippe; Shelley, Brandon; Gowing, Genevieve; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-06-01

    Age-associated health decline presents a significant challenge to healthcare, although there are few animal models that can be used to test potential treatments. Here, we show that there is a significant reduction in both spinal cord motor neurons and motor function over time in the aging rat. One explanation for this motor neuron loss could be reduced support from surrounding aging astrocytes. Indeed, we have previously shown using in vitro models that aging rat astrocytes are less supportive to rat motor neuron function and survival over time. Here, we test whether rejuvenating the astrocyte niche can improve the survival of motor neurons in an aging spinal cord. We transplanted fetal-derived human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) into the aging rat spinal cord and found that the cells survive and differentiate into astrocytes with a much higher efficiency than when transplanted into younger animals, suggesting that the aging environment stimulates astrocyte maturation. Importantly, the engrafted astrocytes were able to protect against motor neuron loss associated with aging, although this did not result in an increase in motor function based on behavioral assays. We also transplanted hNPCs genetically modified to secrete glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) into the aging rat spinal cord, as this combination of cell and protein delivery can protect motor neurons in animal models of ALS. During aging, GDNF-expressing hNPCs protected motor neurons, though to the same extent as hNPCs alone, and again had no effect on motor function. We conclude that hNPCs can survive well in the aging spinal cord, protect motor neurons and mature faster into astrocytes when compared to transplantation into the young spinal cord. While there was no functional improvement, there were no functional deficits either, further supporting a good safety profile of hNPC transplantation even into the older patient population. PMID:27032721

  15. Age-dependent inhibition of pentobarbital sleeping time by ozone in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, A.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Leonard, D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of age on the metabolism of pentobarbital in mice and rats was investigated following exposure to 0.3 ppm of ozone for 3.75 hr. Young animals were 2.5 months of age and the mature were 18 months. The pentobarbital sleeping time was significantly prolonged following the ozone exposure in both the mice and rats when compared with an air control. No ozone effect on sleeping time was found in the young animals. The results indicate that there may be an age-related sensitivity to the occurrence of ozone-related inhibition of pentobarbital metabolism.

  16. Effects of age on recovery of body weight following REM sleep deprivation of rats.

    PubMed

    Koban, Michael; Stewart, Craig V

    2006-01-30

    Chronically enforced rapid eye (paradoxical) movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD) of rats leads to a host of pathologies, of which hyperphagia and loss of body weight are among the most readily observed. In recent years, the etiology of many REM-SD-associated pathologies have been elucidated, but one unexplored area is whether age affects outcomes. In this study, male Sprague-Dawley rats at 2, 6, and 12 months of age were REM sleep-deprived with the platform (flowerpot) method for 10-12 days. Two-month-old rats resided on 7-cm platforms, while 10-cm platforms were used for 6- and 12-month-old rats; rats on 15-cm platforms served as tank controls (TCs). Daily changes in food consumption (g/kg(0.67)) and body weight (g) during baseline, REM-SD or TCs, and post-experiment recovery in home cages were determined. Compared to TCs, REM-SD resulted in higher food intake and decreases in body weight. When returned to home cages, food intake rapidly declined to baseline levels. Of primary interest was that rates of body weight gain during recovery differed between the age groups. Two-month-old rats rapidly restored body weight to pre-REM-SD mass within 5 days; 6-month-old rats were extrapolated by linear regression to have taken about 10 days, and for 12-month-old rats, the estimate was about 35 days. The observation that restoration of body weight following its loss during REM-SD may be age-dependent is in general agreement with the literature on aging effects on how mammals respond to stress. PMID:16243367

  17. Effect of aging on islet beta-cell function and its mechanisms in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhaoyan; Du, Yingzhen; Liu, Yu; Ma, Lichao; Li, Lin; Gong, Yanping; Tian, Hui; Li, Chunlin

    2012-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by islet β-cell dysfunction and its incidence increases with age. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of aging on islet β-cell function are not fully understood. We characterized β-cell function in 4-month-old (young), 14-month-old (adult), and 24-month-old (old) male Wistar rats, and found that islet β-cell function decreased gradually with age. Old rats displayed oral glucose intolerance and exhibited a decrease in glucose-stimulated insulin release (GSIR) and palmitic acid-stimulated insulin release (PSIR). Furthermore, total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity decreased, whereas serum malondialdehyde (MDA) levels increased in the older rats. Moreover, we detected a significant reduction in β-cell proliferation and an increase in the frequency of apoptotic β-cells in the islets of rats in the old group. Finally, Anxa1 expression in the islets of old rats was significantly upregulated. These data provide new insights into the development of age-related β-cell dysfunction in rats.

  18. [Experimental techniques for developing new drugs acting on dementia (4)--Aged rats].

    PubMed

    Egashira, T

    1994-08-01

    We have devised a method for the procurement and breeding of aged rats used for aiding in the development of drugs for disease, involving Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular dementia. The changes in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), muscarinic receptor binding (mAChR) and Na(+)-dependent high affinity choline uptake (HACU) are generally consistent with age-dependent declines in cholinergic neurotransmission, although these decreases may include differences in strain/species, sex, tissue sampling and assay procedures. So, the choice of time points during the life cycle selected for comparison between young and aged rats is particularly important when using laboratory animals. These observations support the utility of the senescent rat model in studying aging and development of nootropic drugs.

  19. A Computational Model of Inferior Colliculus Responses to Amplitude Modulated Sounds in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rabang, Cal F.; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Venkataraman, Yamini; Fisher, Zachery L.; Gardner, Stephanie M.; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) receives ascending excitatory and inhibitory inputs from multiple sources, but how these auditory inputs converge to generate IC spike patterns is poorly understood. Simulating patterns of in vivo spike train data from cellular and synaptic models creates a powerful framework to identify factors that contribute to changes in IC responses, such as those resulting in age-related loss of temporal processing. A conductance-based single neuron IC model was constructed, and its responses were compared to those observed during in vivo IC recordings in rats. IC spike patterns were evoked using amplitude-modulated tone or noise carriers at 20–40 dB above threshold and were classified as low-pass, band-pass, band-reject, all-pass, or complex based on their rate modulation transfer function tuning shape. Their temporal modulation transfer functions were also measured. These spike patterns provided experimental measures of rate, vector strength, and firing pattern for comparison with model outputs. Patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic convergence to IC neurons were based on anatomical studies and generalized input tuning for modulation frequency. Responses of modeled ascending inputs were derived from experimental data from previous studies. Adapting and sustained IC intrinsic models were created, with adaptation created via calcium-activated potassium currents. Short-term synaptic plasticity was incorporated into the model in the form of synaptic depression, which was shown to have a substantial effect on the magnitude and time course of the IC response. The most commonly observed IC response sub-types were recreated and enabled dissociation of inherited response properties from those that were generated in IC. Furthermore, the model was used to make predictions about the consequences of reduction in inhibition for age-related loss of temporal processing due to a reduction in GABA seen anatomically with age. PMID:23129994

  20. Noise exposure at young age impairs the auditory object exploration behavior of rats in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiping; Chen, Liang; Gao, Fei; Pu, Qing; Sun, Xinde

    2008-09-01

    Environment noise is ubiquitous in our daily life. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of postnatal exposure to moderate-level noise on the auditory object exploration behavior of adult rats by comparing the ability of three groups of rats to locate a sound source in a water maze. Two groups of rats, either in the critical period of hearing development or in adulthood, were exposed to 80 dB SPL interrupted white noise for 8 h per day for two weeks. The control group of rats was not exposed to the noise. The ability of the rats to locate a hidden platform that was situated near a sound source in a water maze was tested starting on postnatal day 77. A continuous improvement in the performance of control rats and rats exposed to noise in adulthood was observed during training, whereas rats exposed to noise at a young age exhibited a significantly worse performance. These findings indicated that long-term exposure of young rats to moderate-level noise caused significant impairment of their auditory object exploration behavior compared to exposure of adult animals to the same moderate-level noise.

  1. Age-related audiovisual interactions in the superior colliculus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Costa, M; Piché, M; Lepore, F; Guillemot, J-P

    2016-04-21

    It is well established that multisensory integration is a functional characteristic of the superior colliculus that disambiguates external stimuli and therefore reduces the reaction times toward simple audiovisual targets in space. However, in a condition where a complex audiovisual stimulus is used, such as the optical flow in the presence of modulated audio signals, little is known about the processing of the multisensory integration in the superior colliculus. Furthermore, since visual and auditory deficits constitute hallmark signs during aging, we sought to gain some insight on whether audiovisual processes in the superior colliculus are altered with age. Extracellular single-unit recordings were conducted in the superior colliculus of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley adult (10-12 months) and aged (21-22 months) rats. Looming circular concentric sinusoidal (CCS) gratings were presented alone and in the presence of sinusoidally amplitude modulated white noise. In both groups of rats, two different audiovisual response interactions were encountered in the spatial domain: superadditive, and suppressive. In contrast, additive audiovisual interactions were found only in adult rats. Hence, superior colliculus audiovisual interactions were more numerous in adult rats (38%) than in aged rats (8%). These results suggest that intersensory interactions in the superior colliculus play an essential role in space processing toward audiovisual moving objects during self-motion. Moreover, aging has a deleterious effect on complex audiovisual interactions.

  2. Placental transfer of cadmium in rats: influence of dose and gestational age.

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, B R; Nordberg, M; Nordberg, G F; Lucier, G W

    1975-01-01

    Placental transfer rates of cadmium were investigated in rats in relation to dose (0.1, 0.4, and 1.6 mg Cd/kg) and the gestational age (12, 15, and 20 days) when rats were treated. Pregnant rats were injected intravenously with a single dose of 109CdCl2 (approximately 20 muCi/animal), and animals were sacrificed after 24 hr. 109Cd concentrations were measured in the fetus, placenta, maternal liver, and blood. Cadmium crossed the placenta at all doses and at all gestational ages tested. However, higher percentages of administered cadmium accumulated in the fetus with increasing dose and increasing gestational age. For example, after pregnant rats were injected with low, middle, and high doses of Cd on day 12 of gestation, fetuses accumulated 0.0001, 0.0028, and 0.0095 per cent of the injected dose, respectively. Percentages of administered Cd detected in placental tissue did not change consistently with dose but Cd levels did increase with gestational age. Placental to maternal blood Cd concentration ratios increased with gestational age but not with dose. Maternal liver to fetal liver concentration ratios were 295, 137, and 27 for low, middle and high doses, respectively, 24 hr after pregnant rats were treated on day 20 of gestation. These results are discussed in relation to placental damage, metallothionein inducibility, and fetotoxicity. PMID:1227867

  3. Effect of crocin on aged rat kidney through inhibition of oxidative stress and proinflammatory state.

    PubMed

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Borji, Abasalt; Farkhondeh, Tahereh

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated whether crocin, a bioactive component of saffron, has a protective effect on kidney through reducing the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in aged rats. In this study the changes in activities of antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, glutathione (GSH) levels and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the serum and renal tissue were evaluated by ELISA and RT-PCR, respectively. The middle and aged rats were given intraperitoneal injections of crocin (10, 20, 30 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks, animals were anesthetized with diethyl ether. The kidney samples were taken for biochemical analysis. The results revealed the aging was associated with a significant decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, and GSH content with increase in lipid peroxidation level in kidney of the aged rats (p < 0.001). The increased levels of serum renal functional parameter, oxidative parameters (p < 0.01) and also pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were significantly reduced by crocin administration (p < 0.05). The aged rats exhibited a dysregulation of the oxidative stress, and inflammation in the kidneys, but crocin treatment significantly reduced the expression of the inflammatory genes. These results provide pivotal documentation that crocin has a renoprotective effects against the development of oxidative stress and inflammation in the kidney of old rats. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27279282

  4. Circadian disruption induced by light-at-night accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Irina A.; Anisimov, Vladimir N.; Bukalev, Andrey V.; Semenchenko, Anna V.; Zabezhinski, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span and tumorigenesis in rats. Two hundred eight male and 203 females LIO rats were subdivided into 4 groups and kept at various light/dark regimens: standard 12:12 light/dark (LD); natural lighting of the North-West of Russia (NL); constant light (LL), and constant darkness (DD) since the age of 25 days until natural death. We found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, shortened life span both in male and females rats as compared to the standard LD regimen. We conclude that circadian disruption induced by light-at-night accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in rats. This observation supports the conclusion of the International Agency Research on Cancer that shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans. PMID:20157558

  5. Effect of exercise training on ethanol-induced oxidative damage in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Mallikarjuna, K; Nishanth, K; Hou, Chien-Wen; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Sathyavelu Reddy, K

    2009-02-01

    It is well known that lipid peroxidation increases with age, and alcohol drinking further exacerbates this damage. The present study determined the effect of regular exercise training on alcohol-induced oxidative damage and antioxidant status in the liver of aged animals. The age-matched Wistar albino rats (3 months young, n=24; 18 months old, n=24) were evenly divided into four groups: control (C), exercise trained (Ex), ethanol drinking (Et), and exercise plus ethanol drinking (Ex+Et). With ethanol drinking, hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) level was significantly elevated above control (P<.001), whereas glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) contents were significantly decreased below control. These changes were found to be greater in the aged rats than those of the young rats. For both age groups, exercise training significantly reversed the increase in MDA and decreases in GSH and ascorbic acid induced by ethanol drinking. The present study showed that ethanol-induced deterioration in lipid peroxidation and reduction in antioxidant status in the liver were exacerbated with age. Here, we found that exercise training significantly reversed the adverse conditions that were caused by ethanol in aged rats. PMID:19185211

  6. TRC150094, a novel functional analog of iodothyronines, reduces adiposity by increasing energy expenditure and fatty acid oxidation in rats receiving a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Federica; Zambad, Shitalkumar P; Chhipa, Laxmikant; Senese, Rosalba; Busiello, Rosa Anna; Tuli, Davinder; Munshi, Siralee; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; Gupta, Ramesh C; Chauthaiwale, Vijay; Dutt, Chaitanya; de Lange, Pieter; Silvestri, Elena; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Chronic overnutrition and modern lifestyles are causing a worldwide epidemic of obesity and associated comorbidities, which is creating a demand to identify underlying biological mechanisms and to devise effective treatments. In rats receiving a high-fat diet (HFD), we analyzed the effects of a 4-wk administration of a novel functional analog of iodothyronines, TRC150094 (TRC). HFD-TRC rats exhibited increased energy expenditure (+24% vs. HFD rats; P<0.05) and body weight (BW) gain comparable to that of standard chow-fed (N) rats [N, HFD, and HFD-TRC rats, +97 g, +140 g (P<0.05 vs. N), and +98 g (P<0.05 vs. HFD)]. HFD-TRC rats had significantly less visceral adipose tissue (vs. HFD rats) and exhibited altered metabolism in two major tissues that are very active metabolically. In liver, mitochondrial fatty acid import and oxidation were increased (+56 and +32%, respectively; P<0.05 vs. HFD rats), and consequently the hepatic triglyceride content was lower (-35%; P<0.05 vs. HFD rats). These effects were independent of the AMP-activated protein kinase-acetyl CoA-carboxylase-malonyl CoA pathway but involved sirtuin 1 activation. In skeletal muscle, TRC induced a fiber shift toward the oxidative type in tibialis anterior muscle, increasing its capacity to oxidize fatty acids. HFD-TRC rats had lower (vs. HFD rats) plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. If reproduced in humans, these results will open interesting possibilities regarding the counteraction of metabolic dysfunction associated with ectopic/visceral fat accumulation.

  7. Effects of age on aneural regeneration of soleus muscle in rat.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D M; Schmalbruch, H

    1995-01-01

    1. The ability of autografted soleus muscles to regenerate without innervation was investigated in young (two groups: 17 days or 35 g and 5 weeks or 100 g) and old (10 weeks or 300 g and 19 months or 700 g) rats. 2. Tetanic force and fibre area of the regenerated muscles were followed in 35, 100 and 300 g rats and found to reach a maximum 10-15 days after the operation and then declined. 3. Maximal tetanic force and fibre area were greater in old than in young rats; the largest increase was seen between 100 and 300 g rats. The relaxation phase of the twitch became shorter in the 700 g animals. The force per cross-sectional area appeared to fall with age. The length of the new fibres, inferred from the width of the length-force curve, increased only slightly with age. 4. Ten days after grafting, autophagocytosis of necrotic fibres was completed in young but not in old rats. The new fibres in young rats had one central nucleus per cross-section and fibre size was unimodally distributed; fibres in old rats had multiple internal nuclei and the size distribution was bimodal due to the presence of large fibres. 5. Previous results indicating greater muscle regeneration in young than in old rats may reflect more vigorous reinnervation in young animals rather than a greater myogenic potential. Increased fibre size of regenerated muscles of old compared with young rats may be attributed to the larger amount of necrotic material which is mitogenic for satellite cells, or to age-dependent changes of the expression of cell adhesion molecules. Enhanced lateral fusion of myotubes would give rise to large fibres with multiple internal nuclei. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8568686

  8. Histopathological lesions in the pancreas of the BB Wistar rat as a function of age and duration of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wright, J; Yates, A; Sharma, H; Thibert, P

    1985-01-01

    Pancreatic histopathology was studied in 121 BBWd, 43 BBWnd, and 33 Wistar rats. Insulitis was the most common inflammatory lesion in both BBW and BBWnd rats. The incidence was inversely associated with age and with duration of diabetes in BBWd rats, but there was no age-related pattern in BBWnd rats. Small end-stage islets were typical of BBWd rats but were not seen in BBWnd rats. Several BBWd rats showed hyperplastic islets months after the onset of diabetes, a pattern that is also seen in a small percentage of human JOD patients. Several non-specific exocrine inflammatory lesions occurred in both BBWd and BBWnd rats: acute and/or chronic pancreatitis, eosinophilic infiltrates, granulomatous lesions and acute and/or chronic interstitial inflammation. Only chronic interstitial inflammation was seen in outbred Wistar rats. PMID:3882779

  9. Histopathological lesions in the pancreas of the BB Wistar rat as a function of age and duration of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wright, J; Yates, A; Sharma, H; Thibert, P

    1985-01-01

    Pancreatic histopathology was studied in 121 BBWd, 43 BBWnd, and 33 Wistar rats. Insulitis was the most common inflammatory lesion in both BBW and BBWnd rats. The incidence was inversely associated with age and with duration of diabetes in BBWd rats, but there was no age-related pattern in BBWnd rats. Small end-stage islets were typical of BBWd rats but were not seen in BBWnd rats. Several BBWd rats showed hyperplastic islets months after the onset of diabetes, a pattern that is also seen in a small percentage of human JOD patients. Several non-specific exocrine inflammatory lesions occurred in both BBWd and BBWnd rats: acute and/or chronic pancreatitis, eosinophilic infiltrates, granulomatous lesions and acute and/or chronic interstitial inflammation. Only chronic interstitial inflammation was seen in outbred Wistar rats.

  10. Metabolomic profiling reveals severe skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of metabolism in aged FBN rats.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sean M; Dugle, Janis E; Kennedy, Adam D; McDunn, Jonathan E; Kline, William; Guo, Lining; Guttridge, Denis C; Pereira, Suzette L; Edens, Neile K

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles exhibit age-related adaptive and pathological remodeling. Several muscles in particular undergo progressive atrophy and degeneration beyond median lifespan. To better understand myocellular responses to aging, we used semi-quantitative global metabolomic profiling to characterize trends in metabolic changes between 15-month-old adult and 32-month-old aged Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (FBN) male rats. The FBN rat gastrocnemius muscle exhibits age-dependent atrophy, whereas the soleus muscle, up until 32 months, exhibits markedly fewer signs of atrophy. Both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed, as well as plasma and urine. Compared to adult gastrocnemius, aged gastrocnemius showed evidence of reduced glycolytic metabolism, including accumulation of glycolytic, glycogenolytic, and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates. Pyruvate was elevated with age, yet levels of citrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide were reduced, consistent with mitochondrial abnormalities. Indicative of muscle atrophy, 3-methylhistidine and free amino acids were elevated in aged gastrocnemius. The monounsaturated fatty acids oleate, cis-vaccenate, and palmitoleate also increased in aged gastrocnemius, suggesting altered lipid metabolism. Compared to gastrocnemius, aged soleus exhibited far fewer changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but did show reductions in several glycolytic intermediates, fumarate, malate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. Plasma biochemicals showing the largest age-related increases included glycocholate, heme, 1,5-anhydroglucitol, 1-palmitoleoyl-glycerophosphocholine, palmitoleate, and creatine. These changes suggest reduced insulin sensitivity in aged FBN rats. Altogether, these data highlight skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of glucose and lipid metabolism consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction in aged FBN rats. PMID:24652515

  11. Pattern of follicular growth and steroidogenesis in the ovary of aging cycling rats.

    PubMed

    Peluso, J J; Steger, R W; Huang, H; Meites, J

    1979-08-01

    Prior to the cessation of reproductive cycles, older female rats exhibit irregular and prolonged cycles due to alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. In order to evaluate the age-related changes in the ovary, the histology, and estradiol, testosterone and progesterone concentrations within the ovaries of mature regular cycling (4--5 mo. old) and older irregular cycling (10--11 mo. old) rats were examined. At estrus, the number of non-atretic growing follicles (150--300u in diameter) was greater in the mature than in the older rats (18 +/- 1.5 vs 4.5 +/- 1.4). However, the number of preovulatory follicles on proestrus did not differ (6.0 +/- 1.2 vs 5.5 +/- 0.6). Estradiol, testosterone and progesterone concentrations on proestrus in mature rats averaged 38.8 pg, 56.1 pg, and 1.0 ng/ml of ovary, respectively. In the older proestrous rat, only estradiol was altered, increasing to 124.3 pg/mg. In addition, many of the preovulatory follicles within the aged ovary were larger (greater than 600u in diameter) than those within the mature ovary. On the day of estrus virtually all preovulatory follicles ovulated in the mature rat, whereas large follicles, less than or equal to 600u in diameter, remained in the older ovary. In addition, estradiol levels remained elevated and ovarian cysts were observed in the aged ovary. Thus, in the older irregular cycling rat, 1) pre-ovulatory follicles develop, but many do not ovulate; 2) these non-ovulatory follicles form ovarian cysts which remain within the ovary. The number of cysts may increase with age until a polycystic ovary develops and the rat enters a constant estrous state.

  12. Maternal obesity disturbs the postnatal development of gonocytes in the rat without impairment of testis structure at prepubertal age.

    PubMed

    Christante, Caroline Maria; Taboga, Sebastião Roberto; Pinto-Fochi, Maria Etelvina; Góes, Rejane Maira

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we evaluated whether maternal obesity (MO) affects testis development and gonocyte differentiation in the rat from 0.5 to 14.5 postnatal days. Male Wistar rats were used at 0.5, 4.5, 7.5, and 14.5 days post partum (dpp). These rats were born from obese mothers, previously fed with a high-fat diet (20% saturated fat), for 15 weeks, or normal mothers that had received a balanced murine diet (4% lipids). MO did not affect testis weight or histology at birth but changed the migratory behavior of gonocytes. The density of relocated cells was higher in MO pups at 0.5 dpp, decreased at 4.5 dpp, and differed from those of control pups, where density increased exponentially from 0.5 to 7.5 dpp. The numerical density of gonocytes within seminiferous cords did not vary in MO, in relation to control neonates, for any age considered, but the testis weight was 50% lower at 4.5 dpp. A wide variation in plasmatic testosterone and estrogen levels was observed among the groups during the first week of age and MO pups exhibited higher steroid concentrations at 4.5 dpp, in comparison with controls. At this age, higher estrogen levels of MO pups impaired the gonocyte proliferation. At 7.5 dpp, the testicular size and other parameters of gonocyte development are retrieved. In conclusion, MO and saturated lipid diets disturb gonocyte development and sexual steroid levels during the first days of life, with recovery at prepubertal age.

  13. Regrowth after skeletal muscle atrophy is impaired in aged rats, despite similar responses in signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    White, Jena R.; Confides, Amy L.; Moore-Reed, Stephanie; Hoch, Johanna M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regrowth after atrophy is impaired in the aged and in this study we hypothesized that this can be explained by a blunted response of signaling pathways and cellular processes during reloading after hind limb suspension in muscles from old rats. Male Brown Norway Fisher 344 rats at 6 (young) and 32 (old) months of age were subjected to normal ambulatory conditions (amb), hind limb suspension for 14 days (HS), and HS followed by reloading through normal ambulation for 14 days (RE); soleus muscles were used for analysis of intracellular signaling pathways and cellular processes. Soleus muscle regrowth was blunted in old compared to young rats which coincided with a recovery of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in young but not old. However, the response to reloading for p-Akt, p-p70s6k and p-GSK3β protein abundance was similar between muscles from young and old rats, even though main effects for age indicate an increase in activation of this protein synthesis pathway in the aged. Similarly, MAFbx mRNA levels in soleus muscle from old rats recovered to the same extent as in the young, while Murf-1 was unchanged. mRNA abundance of autophagy markers Atg5 and Atg7 showed an identical response in muscle from old compared to young rats, but beclin did not. Autophagic flux was not changed at either age at the measured time point. Apoptosis was elevated in soleus muscle from old rats particularly with HS, but recovered in HSRE and these changes were not associated with differences in caspase-3, -8 or-9 activity in any group. Protein abundance of apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruitment domain (ARC), cytosolic EndoG, as well as cytosolic and nuclear apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were lower in muscle from old rats, and there was no age-related difference in the response to atrophy or regrowth. Soleus muscles from old rats had a higher number of ED2 positive macrophages in all groups and these decreased with HS, but recovered in HSRE in the old, while no

  14. The effect of aging on acetaminophen pharmacokinetics, toxicity and Nrf2 in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Mach, John; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; Cogger, Victoria C; McKenzie, Catriona; Le Couteur, David G; Jones, Brett E; de Cabo, Rafael; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the effect of aging on hepatic pharmacokinetics and the degree of hepatotoxicity following a toxic dose of acetaminophen. Young and old male Fischer 344 rats were treated with 800 mg/kg acetaminophen (young n = 8, old n = 5) or saline (young n = 9, old n = 9). Serum measurements showed old rats treated with acetaminophen had significantly lower serum alanine aminotransferase and higher acetaminophen and acetaminophen glucuronide levels and creatinine, compared with acetaminophen treated young rats (p < .05). Immunoblotting and activity assays showed old saline-treated rats had twofold lower cytochrome P450 2E1 activity and threefold higher NAD(P)H quinone oxireductase 1 protein expression and activity than young saline-treated rats (p < .05), although Nrf2, glutathione cysteine ligase-modulatory subunit, glutathione cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit, and cytochrome P450 2E1 protein expressions were unchanged. Primary hepatocytes isolated from young rats treated with 10 mM acetaminophen had lower survival than those from old rats (52.4% ± 5.8%, young; 83.6% ± 1.7%, old, p < .05). The pharmacokinetic changes described may decrease susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity but may increase risk of nephrotoxicity in old age.

  15. Survey of spontaneous dystrophic mineralisation of pineal gland in ageing rats.

    PubMed

    Majeed, S K

    1997-11-01

    The survey included 151 rats from several carcinogenicity studies up to 104 weeks and 260 rats from short-term studies up to 52 weeks. All studies were performed during the period 1990-1996. Young rats up to 52 weeks of age showed normal structural appearance, in 134 male rats the incidence of mineralisation was 6.3% and in 126 females the incidence was only slightly less at 5.6%. In ageing rats, 70-104 weeks, 88 males and 63 females showed far higher incidence of mineralisation, 83% and 57% respectively, showing that the incidence of mineralisation in ageing rats was higher in males than females. The focal mineralisation occurred mainly at the margin of the gland in the subcapsular region mostly adjacent to small blood vessels. On occasions these involved the parenchymal cells in the middle part of the gland. The focal mineralisation stained positive with von Kossa indicating presence of calcium and also with PAS (Pariodic Acid-Schiff method), indicating presence of neutral mucopolysaccharide. There was no evidence of positivity with Perl's stain (for ferric salts), Toluidine blue (for protein) or Alcian blue (for acid mucopolysaccharides). With Oil Red O there was evidence of presence of fat or lipid in pinealocytes. PMID:9428987

  16. Aqueous Extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill Prevents Age-Related Changes in the Myenteric Plexus of the Jejunum in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Santi-Rampazzo, Ana Paula; Schoffen, João Paulo Ferreira; Cirilo, Carla Possani; Zapater, Mariana Cristina Vicente Umada; Vicentini, Fernando Augusto; Soares, Andréia Assunção; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Buttow, Nilza Cristina; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the supplementation with aqueous extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM) on biometric and blood parameters and quantitative morphology of the myenteric plexus and jejunal wall in aging Wistar rats. The animals were euthanized at 7 (C7), 12 (C12 and CA12), and 23 months of age (C23 and CA23). The CA12 and CA23 groups received a daily dose of ABM extract (26 mg/animal) via gavage, beginning at 7 months of age. A reduction in food intake was observed with aging, with increases in the Lee index, retroperitoneal fat, intestinal length, and levels of total cholesterol and total proteins. Aging led to a reduction of the total wall thickness, mucosa tunic, villus height, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells. In the myenteric plexus, aging quantitatively decreased the population of HuC/D+ neuronal and S100+ glial cells, with maintenance of the nNOS+ nitrergic subpopulation and increase in the cell body area of these populations. Supplementation with the ABM extract preserved the myenteric plexus in old animals, in which no differences were detected in the density and cell body profile of neurons and glial cells in the CA12 and CA23 groups, compared with C7 group. The supplementation with the aqueous extract of ABM efficiently maintained myenteric plexus homeostasis, which positively influenced the physiology and prevented the death of the neurons and glial cells. PMID:25960748

  17. From Humans to Rats and Back Again: Bridging the Divide between Human and Animal Studies of Recognition Memory with Receiver Operating Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koen, Joshua D.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristics (ROCs) have been used extensively to study the processes underlying human recognition memory, and this method has recently been applied in studies of rats. However, the extent to which the results from human and animal studies converge is neither entirely clear, nor is it known how the different methods used to…

  18. Effects of aging on pituitary and testicular luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors in the rat.

    PubMed

    Limonta, P; Dondi, D; Maggi, R; Martini, L; Piva, F

    1988-01-01

    Aging exerts profound influences on the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular-axis. This work has been performed in order to verify whether, in male rats, the decreased secretion of LH and testosterone (T) occurring in old animals is reflected by modifications of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors at the level of the anterior pituitary and of the testes. To this purpose, the affinity constant (Ka) and the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) for the LHRH analog [D-Ser(tBu)6]des-Gly10-LHRH-N-ethylamide were evaluated, by means of a receptor binding assay, in membrane preparations derived from the anterior pituitary and testicular Leydig cells of male rats of 3 and 19 months of age. Serum levels of LH and T were measured by specific RIAs. The results obtained show that, in aged male rats, the concentration of pituitary LHRH receptors is significantly lower than that found in young animals. On the other hand, the concentration of LHRH binding sites is significantly increased on the membranes of Leydig cells of old rats. In no instance the Ka for the LHRH analog is significantly affected. Serum levels of LH and T are significantly lower in old than in young male rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that the reduced secretion of LH in old male rats may be linked, at least partially, to a decrease of the number of pituitary LHRH receptors. The impaired production of testosterone occurring in aged rats is accompanied by a significant increase of the number of testicular LHRH receptors, indicating that also the intratesticular mechanisms controlling testosterone release undergo significant alterations with aging.

  19. Spontaneous malignant craniopharyngioma in an aged Wistar rat

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Martin; Ernst, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are extremely rare epithelial tumors of the sellar region in human beings and domestic and laboratory animals. A craniopharyngioma, 0.6 cm in diameter, was observed grossly in the sellar and parasellar regions of an untreated 23-month-old male Wistar-derived rat sacrificed moribund. The tumor was composed of cords, columns, and nests of neoplastic stratified squamous epithelium with marked hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis. Neoplastic cells formed solid or cystic areas, infiltrating the base of the skull, brain, and pituitary gland. Immunocytochemical evaluation revealed a strong cytoplasmic reaction for pan-cytokeratin in all tumor cells. Malignant craniopharyngioma should be considered a differential diagnosis in the rat when a tumor with stratified squamous epithelial features and a locally aggressive growth pattern is observed in the sellar or suprasellar region. PMID:27559246

  20. Spontaneous malignant craniopharyngioma in an aged Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Martin; Ernst, Heinrich

    2016-07-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are extremely rare epithelial tumors of the sellar region in human beings and domestic and laboratory animals. A craniopharyngioma, 0.6 cm in diameter, was observed grossly in the sellar and parasellar regions of an untreated 23-month-old male Wistar-derived rat sacrificed moribund. The tumor was composed of cords, columns, and nests of neoplastic stratified squamous epithelium with marked hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis. Neoplastic cells formed solid or cystic areas, infiltrating the base of the skull, brain, and pituitary gland. Immunocytochemical evaluation revealed a strong cytoplasmic reaction for pan-cytokeratin in all tumor cells. Malignant craniopharyngioma should be considered a differential diagnosis in the rat when a tumor with stratified squamous epithelial features and a locally aggressive growth pattern is observed in the sellar or suprasellar region. PMID:27559246

  1. Effects of exposure to heavy particles and aging on object recognition memory in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Bernard; Joseph, James; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Shannahan, Ryan; Hering, Kathleen

    Exposure to HZE particles produces changes in neurocognitive performance. These changes, including deficits in spatial learning and memory, object recognition memory and operant responding, are also observed in the aged organism. As such, it has been proposed that exposure to heavy particles produces "accelerated aging". Because aging is an ongoing process, it is possible that there would be an interaction between the effects of exposure and the effects of aging, such that doses of HZE particles that do not affect the performance of younger organisms will affect the performance of organisms as they age. The present experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that young rats that had been exposed to HZE particles would show a progressive deterioration in object recognition memory as a function of the age of testing. Rats were exposed to 12 C, 28 S or 48 Ti particles at the N.A.S.A. Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Following irradiation the rats were shipped to UMBC for behavioral testing. HZE particle-induced changes in object recognition memory were tested using a standard procedure: rats were placed in an open field and allowed to interact with two identical objects for up to 30 sec; twenty-four hrs later the rats were again placed in the open field, this time containing one familiar and one novel object. Non-irradiated control animals spent significantly more time with the novel object than with the familiar object. In contrast, the rats that been exposed to heavy particles spent equal amounts of time with both the novel and familiar object. The lowest dose of HZE particles which produced a disruption of object recognition memory was determined three months and eleven months following exposure. The threshold dose needed to disrupt object recognition memory three months following irradiation varied as a function of the specific particle and energy. When tested eleven months following irradiation, doses of HZE particles that did

  2. Young and Middle-Aged Rats Exhibit Isometric Forelimb Force Control Deficits in a Model of Early-Stage Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bethel-Brown, Crystal S.; Morris, Jill K.; Stanford, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in manual motor control often accompany the early stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD), and are often revealed through isometric force tasks. In order to determine whether similar deficits occur in a rat model of early-stage PD, young (8 months) and middle-aged (18 months) rats were trained to produce sustained press-hold-release isometric forelimb responses that allowed for analyses of force output and spectral analysis of forelimb stability and tremor. Rats then received a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) infusion into the striatum contralateral to the trained forelimb and were tested for four weeks post-lesion. The resulting partial striatal dopamine depletions (which at 41 ± 12% and 43 ± 6% in young and middle-aged rats, respectively, did not differ between the two groups) resulted in isometric forelimb deficits. Specifically, rats exhibited significantly diminished force stability and increased high frequency (10–25 Hz) tremor, indicating potential postural disturbances and increased postural tremor respectively. Durations of press-hold-release bouts were also increased post-lesion, suggesting difficulty in task disengagement. Despite pre-lesion differences in some of the force measures, the effects of partial nigrostriatal DA depletion did not differ between the two age groups. These results support the use of the press-while-licking task in preclinical studies modeling isometric force control deficits in PD. PMID:21767573

  3. The effects of stress on plasma ACTH and corticosterone in young and aging pregnant rats and their fetuses

    SciTech Connect

    Erisman, S. ); Carnes, M. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison ); Takahashi, L.K.; Lent, S.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Compared to younger rats, old rats exhibit prolonged elevations of plasma ACTH and corticosterone (CORT) in response to stress. In addition, CORT crosses the placenta. To investigate whether fetuses of older rats may be exposed to higher concentrations of CORT during development than fetuses of young rats, we compared the effects of stress on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in young and aging pregnant rats and their 19-day-old fetuses. The plasma of the mothers and fetuses was assayed for ACTH and CORT by radioimmunoassay. Both young and aging pregnant rats showed a significant increase in plasma ACTH and CORT immediately after exposure to stress. However, aging rats had more prolonged elevation of ACTH and CORT than young rats. This suggests that, like old male rats, aging pregnant rats have an alteration in feedback inhibition of the HPA axis. Prolonged elevation of CORT was also seen in fetuses of aging mothers. These results have important implications concerning the effects of stress during pregnancy at different maternal ages, and for the potential deleterious consequences of prolonged prenatal elevation in stress hormones on the offspring of aging females.

  4. Increased mitochondrial DNA deletions in substantia nigra dopamine neurons of the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2014-01-01

    The dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN), which constitute the origin of the nigrostriatal system, are vulnerable to age-related degenerative processes. For example, in humans there is a relatively small age-related loss of neurons but a marked decline of the dopaminergic phenotype associated with impaired voluntary motor control. However, the mechanisms responsible for the dysfunction and degeneration of SN dopamine neurons remain poorly understood. One potential contributor is mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting from an increased abundance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations such as deletions. Human studies have identified relatively high levels of mtDNA deletions in these cells in both aging and Parkinson's disease (>35%), with a higher abundance of deletions (>60%) in individual neurons with mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether similar mtDNA mutations occur in other species such as the rat. In the present study, we quantified mtDNA deletion abundance in laser microdissected SN dopaminergic neurons from young and old F344 rats. Our results indicate that mtDNA deletions accumulated with age, with approximately 20% more mtDNA deletions in SN dopaminergic neurons from old compared to young animals. Thus, while rat SN dopaminergic neurons do accumulate mtDNA deletions with aging, this does not reflect the deletion burden in humans, and other mechanisms may be operating to compensate for age-related mtDNA damage in the rat SN dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25612740

  5. Lifespan Changes in the Countermanding Performance of Young and Middle Aged Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Beuk, Jonathan; Beninger, Richard J.; Paré, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control can be investigated with the countermanding task, which requires subjects to make a response to a go signal and cancel that response when a stop signal is presented occasionally. Adult humans performing the countermanding task typically exhibit impaired response time (RT), stop signal response time (SSRT) and response accuracy as they get older, but little change in post-error slowing. Rodent models of the countermanding paradigm have been developed recently, yet none have directly examined age-related changes in performance throughout the lifespan. Male Wistar rats (N = 16) were trained to respond to a visual stimulus (go signal) by pressing a lever directly below an illuminated light for food reward, but to countermand the lever press subsequent to a tone (stop signal) that was presented occasionally (25% of trials) at a variable delay. Subjects were tested in 1 h sessions at approximately 7 and 12 months of age with intermittent training in between. Rats demonstrated longer go trial RT, a higher proportion of go trial errors and performed less total trials at 12, compared to 7 months of age. Consistent SSRT and post-error slowing were observed for rats at both ages. These results suggest that the countermanding performance of rats does vary throughout the lifespan, in a manner similar to humans, suggesting that rodents may provide a suitable model for behavioral impairment related to normal aging. These findings also highlight the importance of indicating the age at which rodents are tested in countermanding investigations. PMID:27555818

  6. Lifespan Changes in the Countermanding Performance of Young and Middle Aged Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Beuk, Jonathan; Beninger, Richard J; Paré, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control can be investigated with the countermanding task, which requires subjects to make a response to a go signal and cancel that response when a stop signal is presented occasionally. Adult humans performing the countermanding task typically exhibit impaired response time (RT), stop signal response time (SSRT) and response accuracy as they get older, but little change in post-error slowing. Rodent models of the countermanding paradigm have been developed recently, yet none have directly examined age-related changes in performance throughout the lifespan. Male Wistar rats (N = 16) were trained to respond to a visual stimulus (go signal) by pressing a lever directly below an illuminated light for food reward, but to countermand the lever press subsequent to a tone (stop signal) that was presented occasionally (25% of trials) at a variable delay. Subjects were tested in 1 h sessions at approximately 7 and 12 months of age with intermittent training in between. Rats demonstrated longer go trial RT, a higher proportion of go trial errors and performed less total trials at 12, compared to 7 months of age. Consistent SSRT and post-error slowing were observed for rats at both ages. These results suggest that the countermanding performance of rats does vary throughout the lifespan, in a manner similar to humans, suggesting that rodents may provide a suitable model for behavioral impairment related to normal aging. These findings also highlight the importance of indicating the age at which rodents are tested in countermanding investigations. PMID:27555818

  7. Impaired up-regulation of type II corticosteroid receptors in hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, J C; Fleenor, D G; Kerr, D S; Landfield, P W

    1989-01-30

    Several recent investigations have reported a decline of rat hippocampal corticosteroid-binding receptors (CSRs) with aging. This decline has been proposed to be an initial cause (through disinhibition) of the elevated adrenal steroid secretion that apparently occurs with aging; however, it could instead be an effect of corticoid elevation (through down-regulation). In order to assess the effects of age on CSR biosynthetic capacity in the absence of down-regulatory influences of endogenous corticoids, as well as to study aging changes in CSR plasticity, we examined the up-regulation of hippocampal CSR that follows adrenalectomy (ADX). The rat hippocampus contains at least two types of CSR binding and differential analysis of types I and II CSR was accomplished by selective displacement of [3H]corticosterone with RU-28362, a specific type II agonist. In young (3 months old) Fischer-344 rat hippocampus, up-regulation of type II binding above 2-day ADX baseline was present by 3-7 days and increased still further by 8-10 days post-ADX; type I CSR density did not change significantly between 1 and 10 days post-ADX. However, in aged (24-26 months old) rats, type II CSR up-regulation did not occur over the 10 day post-ADX period. Thus, the age-related impairment of type II up-regulation may reflect an intrinsic deficit in CSR biosynthesis or lability that is independent of the acute endogenous adrenal steroid environment.

  8. Decrease in PTEN and increase in Akt expression and neuron size in aged rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues De Amorim, Miguel Augusto; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Portiansky, Enrique Leo

    2010-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene known to play an important role in the regulation of cell size. In this study we compared PTEN expression in the spinal cord of young (5 mo.) versus aged (32 mo.) female rats and correlated them with alterations in neuron size and morphology in the same animals. Total and phosphorylated PTEN (pPTEN) as well as its downstream target phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) were assessed by western blotting. Spinal cord neurons were morphometrically characterized. Total PTEN, pPTEN and total Akt expression were significantly higher in young rats than in aged animals. Expression of pAkt was stronger in aged animals. A significant increase in neuronal size was observed in large motoneurons of aged as compared with young rats. Our data show that in the spinal cord of rats, neuronal PTEN expression diminishes with advanced age while neuronal size increases. These results suggest that in the spinal cord, an age-related reduction in PTEN and increase of pAkt expression may be involved in the progressive enlargement of neurons. PMID:20347952

  9. Effects of hydrogen-rich water on aging periodontal tissues in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kawabata, Yuya; Kasuyama, Kenta; Endo, Yasumasa; Yoneda, Toshiki; Yamane, Mayu; Azuma, Tetsuji; Ekuni, Daisuke; Morita, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage is involved in age-related inflammatory reactions. The anti-oxidative effects of hydrogen-rich water suppress oxidative damage, which may aid in inhibiting age-related inflammatory reactions. We investigated the effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on aging periodontal tissues in healthy rats. Four-month-old male Fischer 344 rats (n = 12) were divided into two groups: the experimental group (hydrogen-rich water treatment) and the control group (distilled water treatment). The rats consumed hydrogen-rich water or distilled water until 16 months of age. The experimental group exhibited lower periodontal oxidative damage at 16 months of age than the control group. Although protein expression of interleukin-1β did not differ, gene expression of Nod-like receptor protein 3 inflammasomes was activated in periodontal tissues from the experimental group as compared with the control group. Drinking hydrogen-rich water is proposed to have anti-aging effects on periodontal oxidative damage, but not on inflammatory reactions in healthy rats. PMID:24985521

  10. Effect of age and exercise on the viscoelastic properties of rat tail tendon.

    PubMed

    LaCroix, Andrew S; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E; Brickson, Stacey; Akins, Tiffany L; Diffee, Gary; Aiken, Judd; Vanderby, Ray; Lakes, Roderic S

    2013-06-01

    Tendon mechanical properties are thought to degrade during aging but improve with exercise. A remaining question is whether exercise in aged animals provides sufficient regenerative, systemic stimulus to restore younger mechanical behaviors. Herein we address that question with tail tendons from aged and exercised rats, which would be subject to systemic effects but not direct loading from the exercise regimen. Twenty-four month old rats underwent one of three treadmill exercise training protocols for 12 months: sedentary (walking at 0° incline for 5 min/day), moderate (running at 0° incline for 30 min/day), or high (running at 4° incline for 30 min/day). A group of 9 month old rats were used to provide an adult control, while a group of 3 month old rats provided a young control. Tendons were harvested at sacrifice and mechanically tested. Results show significant age-dependent differences in modulus, ultimate stress, relaxation rate, and percent relaxation. Relaxation rate was strain-dependent, consistent with nonlinear superposition or Schapery models but not with quasilinear viscoelasticity (QLV). Trends in exercise data suggest that with exercise, tendons assume the elastic character of younger rats (lower elastic modulus and ultimate stress).

  11. Differences in cooperative behavior among Damaraland mole rats are consequences of an age-related polyethism.

    PubMed

    Zöttl, Markus; Vullioud, Philippe; Mendonça, Rute; Torrents Ticó, Miquel; Gaynor, David; Mitchell, Adam; Clutton-Brock, Tim

    2016-09-13

    In many cooperative breeders, the contributions of helpers to cooperative activities change with age, resulting in age-related polyethisms. In contrast, some studies of social mole rats (including naked mole rats, Heterocephalus glaber, and Damaraland mole rats, Fukomys damarensis) suggest that individual differences in cooperative behavior are the result of divergent developmental pathways, leading to discrete and permanent functional categories of helpers that resemble the caste systems found in eusocial insects. Here we show that, in Damaraland mole rats, individual contributions to cooperative behavior increase with age and are higher in fast-growing individuals. Individual contributions to different cooperative tasks are intercorrelated and repeatability of cooperative behavior is similar to that found in other cooperatively breeding vertebrates. Our data provide no evidence that nonreproductive individuals show divergent developmental pathways or specialize in particular tasks. Instead of representing a caste system, variation in the behavior of nonreproductive individuals in Damaraland mole rats closely resembles that found in other cooperatively breeding mammals and appears to be a consequence of age-related polyethism. PMID:27588902

  12. Exogenous nerve growth factor stimulates choline acetyltransferase activity in aging Fischer 344 male rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, L R

    1991-01-01

    The effect of age and exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) infusion on choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) specific activity is examined in microdissections of cerebral and hippocampal cortices, and the cholinergic nuclei of the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB), the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM), and striatum of Fischer 344 male rats. Significant, 20% losses in ChAT activity are found in the MS/DB and striatum of 24-month-old rats (n = 21) compared to 4-month-old animals, but there is no apparent loss of enzyme activity in the NBM. Loss of ChAT activity in the MS/DB is only observed in animals older than 19 months of age, while a striatal deficit is found in animals older than 7 months. Treatment for 2 weeks with NGF at 1.2 micrograms/day results in significant 70% increases of ChAT activity in the MS/DB and striatum of 24-month-old rats compared to untreated and vehicle-treated 4-month-old rats, but does not stimulate activity in the NBM. Sensitivity of ChAT activity in the MS/DB and striatum to exogenous NGF increases with age. These experiments indicate that in the MS/DB, NBM, and striatum of Fischer 344 male rat there is an age-associated, differential regulation of ChAT enzyme activity and sensitivity to exogenous NGF.

  13. Differences in cooperative behavior among Damaraland mole rats are consequences of an age-related polyethism.

    PubMed

    Zöttl, Markus; Vullioud, Philippe; Mendonça, Rute; Torrents Ticó, Miquel; Gaynor, David; Mitchell, Adam; Clutton-Brock, Tim

    2016-09-13

    In many cooperative breeders, the contributions of helpers to cooperative activities change with age, resulting in age-related polyethisms. In contrast, some studies of social mole rats (including naked mole rats, Heterocephalus glaber, and Damaraland mole rats, Fukomys damarensis) suggest that individual differences in cooperative behavior are the result of divergent developmental pathways, leading to discrete and permanent functional categories of helpers that resemble the caste systems found in eusocial insects. Here we show that, in Damaraland mole rats, individual contributions to cooperative behavior increase with age and are higher in fast-growing individuals. Individual contributions to different cooperative tasks are intercorrelated and repeatability of cooperative behavior is similar to that found in other cooperatively breeding vertebrates. Our data provide no evidence that nonreproductive individuals show divergent developmental pathways or specialize in particular tasks. Instead of representing a caste system, variation in the behavior of nonreproductive individuals in Damaraland mole rats closely resembles that found in other cooperatively breeding mammals and appears to be a consequence of age-related polyethism.

  14. Analyses of smooth endoplasmic reticulum of cerebellar parallel fibers in aging, ethanol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Dlugos, Cynthia A

    2005-01-01

    The smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER), a calcium storage organelle, is essential for normal neuronal function. Dilation of the SER is pathologic and a threat to neuronal calcium homeostasis. Dilation of the SER has been reported within the dendrites of cerebellar Purkinje neurons of aging rats after lengthy ethanol treatment. Ethanol-related alterations of parallel fiber SER have not been investigated despite the fact that such dilation may precede and contribute transsynaptically to SER dilation and degeneration in Purkinje neuron dendrites. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 120; age = 12 months old) were randomly divided into three dietary groups (40 rats per group) and fed rat chow, the AIN-93M liquid control diet, or the AIN-93M liquid ethanol diet (without water) for 5, 10, 20, or 40 weeks (30 rats per time point). Sections from posterior vermal lobules were viewed with the electron microscope. Maximum and minimum diameters of parallel fiber SER profiles were measured. Ethanol-related dilation of parallel fiber SER was not found after 5, 10, 20, or 40 weeks of treatment. Age-related dilation of parallel fiber SER profiles did occur. These findings support the suggestions that (1) parallel fiber SER, unlike the SER in Purkinje neurons, is insensitive to ethanol and (2) the mechanisms by which ethanol and aging alter cerebellar function and structure are different.

  15. Superficially projecting principal neurons in layer V of medial entorhinal cortex in the rat receive excitatory retrosplenial input.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Rafał; Sugar, Jørgen; Zhang, Sheng-Jia; Couey, Jonathan J; Ye, Jing; Witter, Menno P

    2013-10-01

    Principal cells in layer V of the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) have a nodal position in the cortical-hippocampal network. They are the main recipients of hippocampal output and receive inputs from several cortical areas, including a prominent one from the retrosplenial cortex (RSC), likely targeting basal dendrites of layer V neurons. The latter project to extrahippocampal structures but also relay information to the superficial layers of MEC, closing the hippocampal-entorhinal loop. In the rat, we electrophysiologically and morphologically characterized RSC input into MEC and conclude that RSC provides an excitatory input to layer V pyramidal cells. Ultrastructural analyses of anterogradely labeled RSC projections showed that RSC axons in layer V of MEC form predominantly asymmetrical, likely excitatory, synapses on dendritic spines (90%) or shafts (8%), with 2% symmetrical, likely inhibitory, synapses on shafts and spines. The overall excitatory nature of the RSC input was confirmed by an optogenetic approach. Patterned laser stimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing presynaptic RSC axons evoked exclusively EPSPs in recorded postsynaptic layer V cells. All responding layer V pyramidal cells had an axon extending toward the white matter. Half of these neurons also sent an axon to superficial layers. Confocal imaging of RSC synapses onto MEC layer V neurons shown to project superficially by way of retrogradely labeling from superficial layers confirmed that proximal dendrites of superficially projecting cells are among the targets of inputs from RSC. The excitatory RSC input thus interacts with both entorhinal-cortical and entorhinal-hippocampal circuits.

  16. The effect of zinc deficiency on erythrocyte membrane lipids of force-fed rats receiving a diet containing coconut oil or fish oil.

    PubMed

    Eder, K; Kirchgessner, M

    1994-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of zinc deficiency on erythrocyte membrane lipids of force-fed rats that received either a diet with coconut oil and safflower oil (86:14, w/w) or a diet with fish oil and safflower oil (91:9, w/w) was investigated. Zinc deficiency caused in the rats fed both types of dietary fat an increase in the amounts of total phospholipids and individual phospholipid classes in erythrocyte membranes. In the rats fed the coconut oil diet, zinc deficiency caused an increase in the proportion of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6) in phosphatidylcholine (PC), diacyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS), and in total erythrocyte membrane fatty acids. In contrast, in the rats fed the fish oil diet, zinc deficiency caused an increase in the proportion of docosahexaenoic acid only in PC, but not in the other phospholipids. However, in these rats, changes in the ratio between eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5) and the n-3 fatty acids with 20 and 22 carbon atoms were observed in PC, diacyl PE and plasmalogen PE. The most pronounced changes in fatty acid composition due to zinc deficiency in the rats fed both types of fat occurred in PC. There was a relationship between the changes in the composition of plasma total fatty acids and the changes in fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membrane PC caused by zinc deficiency in the rats fed both types of dietary fat. The amount of cholesterol was similar in all treatment groups. However, zinc-deficient rats fed the coconut oil diet-but not those fed the fish oil diet-had an increased ratio between total phospholipids and cholesterol. Thus, the study shows that the effect of zinc deficiency on erythrocyte membrane lipids is to some degree similar for rats fed a coconut oil diet and rats fed a fish oil diet, and to some degree different.

  17. Age effects on the social interaction test in early adulthood male rats.

    PubMed

    Garau, A; Martí, M A; Sala, J; Balada, F

    2000-01-01

    The effects of age on active and passive social interaction were studied in Wistar rats using the social interaction test (S.I.T.). Individual behaviors such as ambulation, rearing, and defecation were also studied. Despite the widespread use of the S.I.T. in anxiety research, the effects of age on the S.I.T. have not been studied thoroughly. Male Wistar rats of 75, 135, and 180 days old were used. Our results showed age effects on active social contact, passive social contact, ambulation, rearing, and defecation. At 135 days old, animals presented the lowest scores on active social behavior and the highest scores on defecation. Moreover, exploratory behavior measured by ambulation and rearing decreased with age. These results suggest that age could be a relevant variable in the social interaction test.

  18. SERUM BIOMARKERS OF AGING IN THE BROWN NORWAY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum biomarkers to identify susceptibility to disease in aged humans are well researched. On the other hand, our understanding of biomarkers in animal models of aging is limited. Hence, we applied a commercially available panel of 58 serum analytes to screen for possible biomark...

  19. Changes in parvalbumin immunoreactivity with aging in the central auditory system of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ouda, Ladislav; Druga, Rastislav; Syka, Josef

    2008-08-01

    Changes in the levels of calcium binding proteins are known to occur in different parts of the brain during aging. In our study we attempted to define the effect that aging has on the parvalbumin-expressing system of neurons in the higher parts of the central auditory system. Age-related changes in parvalbumin immunoreactivity were investigated in the inferior colliculus (IC), medial geniculate body (MGB) and auditory cortex (AC) in two rat strains, normally aging Long-Evans (LE) and fast aging Fischer 344 (F344). The results demonstrate that the changes in PV-immunoreactivity are strain-dependent with an increase in the number of PV-immunoreactive (PV-ir) neurons occurring in the inferior colliculus of old LE rats and a pronounced decline in the number of PV-ir neurons appearing in the auditory cortex of aged F344 animals. In some parts of the AC of old F344 animals no PV-ir neurons were present at all. The number of PV-ir neurons in the MGB in all examined animals was very low independent of the strain and age. The loss of PV-ir neurons in the auditory cortex of Fischer 344 rats with aging may contribute to the substantial deterioration of hearing function in this strain. PMID:18486384

  20. Effects of normal aging on myelin sheath ultrastructures in the somatic sensorimotor system of rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Liang, Ping; Fu, Han; Zhang, Jiu-Cong; Chen, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have presented qualitative and quantitative data regarding the morphological changes that occur peripherally in myelin sheaths and nerve fibers of rats during their lifespan. However, studies on ultrastructural features of myelinated fibers (MFs) in the central nervous system (CNS) remain limited. In the present study, morphological analyses of the somatic sensorimotor MFs in rats at time‑points between postnatal day 14 and postnatal month (PNM) 26 were conducted using electron microscopy. Significant alterations in the myelin sheath were observed in the sensorimotor system of aging and aged rats, which became aggravated with age. The ultrastructural pattern of myelin lamellae also exhibited age dependence. The transformation of the myelin intraperiod line from complete to incomplete fusion occurred after PNM 5, leading to an expansion of periodicity in myelin lamellae. These pathological changes in the myelin structure occurred very early and showed a significant correlation with age, indicating that myelin was the part of the CNS with the highest susceptibility to the influence of aging, and may be the main target of aging effects. In addition to the myelin breakdown, continued myelin production and remyelination were observed in the aging sensorimotor system, suggesting the presence of endogenous mechanisms of myelin repair.

  1. [Morphofunctional state of reproductive system of ageing male rats in case of using nanocerium].

    PubMed

    Nosenko, N D; Zholobak, N M; Poliakova, L I; Sinitsyn, P V; Lymarieva, A A; Shcherbakov, O V; Spivak, M Ia; Reznikov, O H

    2014-01-01

    The influence of nanocrystalline cerium dioxide (NCD, 1 and 100 mg/kg per os daily for 10 days) on morphofuctional state of reproductive system was investigated in ageing male rats. It has been established that activation of hormone-producing testicular Leydig's cells, as well as of secretory and proliferative processes in prostate, underlies the stimulating effect of NCD at a dose 1 mg/kg on hormonal function of testis and spermatogenesis of ageing male rats. NCD used at a dose 100 mg/kg had no significant effect on the assessed indices of morphofuctional state of reproductive system.

  2. Adaptive and regulatory mechanisms in aged rats with postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yanlin; Liu, Shuyun; Yu, Xinjuan; Wang, Mingshan; Wang, Yuelan

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation may play a role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction. 5′ Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-kappa B, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α are involved in inflammation. Therefore, these inflammatory mediators may be involved in postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Western immunoblot analysis revealed 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappa B in the hippocampus of aged rats were increased 1–7 days after splenectomy. Moreover, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α were upregulated and gradually decreased. Therefore, these inflammatory mediators may participate in the splenectomy model of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged rats. PMID:25206851

  3. Age-dependent decrease in the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of ouabain in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohta, M; Kanai, S; Sato, Y; Kitani, K

    1988-03-01

    The biliary excretion of i.v. injected ouabain was examined in male and female Wistar-derived rats in relation to age. The hepatic uptake velocity for ouabain was also determined in isolated hepatocyte preparations obtained from male rats of various ages. Biliary recovery values of ouabain (percent of the dose) were fairly comparable for young male and female rats (3-4 month old). Recovery progressively decreased with age, the first 10-min recoveries at 24 months being about one-third those of respective young values in both sexes. A significant linear relation was demonstrated between the first 10-min recovery (Y, percent of the dose) and rat age (X, month), yielding the relations of Y = 17.75-0.43X for males and Y = 18.99-0.43X for females respectively. Similarly, the initial uptake velocity (Y, nmol/mg/min) for ouabain decreased in a linear fashion with age (X, month), yielding a significant negative correlation (Y = 0.704-0.0021X, r = -0.839, P less than 0.005, N = 21) at an ouabain concentration of 8 microM. Kinetic studies using non-linear regression analysis revealed a significantly lower Vmax value (0.533 +/- 0.041 nmol/mg/min) in old (24-29 months) rats compared to the young (4-4.5 months) value (1.193 +/- 0.105 nmol per mg/min, P less than 0.05), while the affinity constant (Km, microM) did not differ significantly between young and old animals (203.12 +/- 25.42 microM in young rats vs 283.68 +/- 28.90 microM in old rats, mean +/- SE, 0.05 less than P less than 0.1). The results of the present study suggest that the age-dependent decrease in the biliary recovery of i.v. injected ouabain in rats can be largely explained by the decrease with age in the hepatic uptake of ouabain. Furthermore, the results provide further support for our previous thesis that the decrease in the lateral mobility of hepatocyte plasma membrane proteins, as revealed by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique, may play a significant role in the age

  4. Prior parity positively regulates learning and memory in young and middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Zimberknopf, Erica; Xavier, Gilberto F; Kinsley, Craig H; Felicio, Luciano F

    2011-08-01

    Reproductive experience in female rats modifies acquired behaviors, induces long-lasting functional neuroadaptations and can also modify spatial learning and memory. The present study supports and expands this knowledge base by employing the Morris water maze, which measures spatial memory. Age-matched young adult (YNG) nulliparous (NULL; nonmated) and primiparous (PRIM; one pregnancy and lactation) female rats were tested 15 d after the litter's weaning. In addition, corresponding middle-aged (AGD) PRIM (mated in young adulthood so that pregnancy, parturition, and lactation occurred at the same age as in YNG PRIM) and NULL female rats were tested at 18 mo of age. Behavioral evaluation included: 1) acquisition of reference memory (platform location was fixed for 14 to 19 d of testing); 2) retrieval of this information associated with extinction of the acquired response (probe test involving removal of the platform 24 h after the last training session); and 3) performance in a working memory version of the task (platform presented in a novel location every day for 13 d, and maintained in a fixed location within each day). YNG PRIM outperformed NULL rats and showed different behavioral strategies. These results may be related to changes in locomotor, mnemonic, and cognitive processes. In addition, YNG PRIM exhibited less anxiety-like behavior. Compared with YNG rats, AGD rats showed less behavioral flexibility but stronger memory consolidation. These data, which were obtained by using a well-documented spatial task, demonstrate long lasting modifications of behavioral strategies in both YNG and AGD rats associated with a single reproductive experience.

  5. Endogenous leptin contributes to baroreflex suppression within the solitary tract nucleus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Diz, Debra I

    2014-12-01

    The decline in cardiovagal baroreflex function that occurs with aging is accompanied by an increase in circulating leptin levels. Our previous studies showed that exogenous leptin impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate in younger rats, but the contribution of this hormone to baroreflex dysfunction during aging is unknown. Thus we assessed the effect of bilateral leptin microinjection (500 fmol/60 nl) within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) on the baroreflex sensitivity in older (66 ± 2 wk of age) urethane/chloralose anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats with elevated circulating leptin levels. In contrast to the 63% reduction observed in younger rats, leptin did not alter the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia evoked by phenylephrine in older rats (0.76 ± 0.19 baseline vs. 0.71 ± 0.15 ms/mmHg after leptin; P = 0.806). We hypothesized that this loss of sensitivity reflected endogenous suppression of the baroreflex by elevated leptin, rather than cardiovascular resistance to the peptide. Indeed, NTS administration of a leptin receptor antagonist (75 pmol/120 nl) improved the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in older rats (0.73 ± 0.13 baseline vs. 1.19 ± 0.26 at 10 min vs. 1.87 ± 0.32 at 60 min vs. 1.22 ± 0.54 ms/mmHg at 120 min; P = 0.002), with no effect in younger rats. There was no effect of the leptin antagonist on the baroreflex sensitivity for tachycardia, responses to cardiac vagal chemosensitive fiber activation, or resting hemodynamics in older rats. These findings suggest that the actions of endogenous leptin within the NTS, either produced locally or derived from the circulation, contribute to baroreflex suppression during aging. PMID:25260611

  6. Increased dendritic extent in hippocampal CA1 neurons from aged F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Pyapali, G K; Turner, D A

    1996-01-01

    Age-related dendritic alterations were evaluated in F344 rats following a water maze assessment of spatial memory. Based on the probe trial times, 39% of the aged animals were designated impaired. CA1 pyramidal neurons were labeled intracellularly with neurobiotin in brain slices prepared from these animals. Neurons (aged: n = 15; young: n = 11) were reconstructed using a microscope-based three-dimensional system. Increased dendritic length was observed in the aged neurons both for basal dendrites (aged = 4.54 mm and young = 3.33 mm) and the entire neurons (aged = 14.8 mm and young = 10.8 mm). However, dendritic length values did not correlate with the individual animal's probe trial time. Sholl analysis revealed a diffuse increase in dendritic branch intersections in the cells from aged rats, which on branch order analysis was noted to be due to an increased number of distal branches. Mean electrotonic distance to dendritic terminals, a functional assessment of synaptic efficacy, was longer in the aged neurons (aged = 0.67 lambda and young = 0.55 lambda). These results suggest a lengthening and increased complexity of CA1 pyramidal neurons with successful aging, which may represent either an intrinsic response to aging or a reactive partial denervation response to a loss of afferent inputs.

  7. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone

  8. The missing link between long-term stimulation of nicotinic receptors and the increases of acetylcholine release and vasodilation in the cerebral cortex of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae; Hotta, Harumi; Misawa, Hidemi; Kawashima, Koichiro

    2013-03-01

    In adult rats (4-9 months), chronic nicotine infusion increases the basal level of acetylcholine (ACh) release in the cerebral cortex and enhances responses of cortical ACh release and cortical vasodilation elicited by nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) stimulation. In the present study, we examined whether these effects of nicotine are detected in aged rats. Aged rats (27-30 months) received sustained subcutaneous nicotine (100 μg/kg/h) or saline for 14 days. Under urethane anesthesia, ACh release and regional blood flow in the parietal cortex were measured. The basal level of ACh release in the cerebral cortex was not changed by chronic nicotine. In addition, the magnitudes of ACh release and vasodilation by NBM stimulation were similar between the saline-treated and nicotine-treated groups. The lack of an effect of chronic nicotine in aged rats may be due to a decrease in nicotinic receptors in the cerebral cortex during aging (Nordberg et al., J Neurosci Res 31:103-111, 1992).

  9. Potent therapeutic effect of melatonin on aging skin in pinealectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Eşrefoğlu, Mukaddes; Seyhan, Muammer; Gül, Mehmet; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Batçioğlu, Kadir; Uyumlu, Burçin

    2005-10-01

    It is generally agreed that one of the major contributors to skin aging is reactive oxygen species. As organisms reach advanced age, free radical generation increases and the activity of tissue antioxidant enzyme system decreases. Melatonin is an antioxidant and free radical scavenger. The present study was first aimed to determine the morphometric and biochemical changes caused by long-term pinealectomy in order to investigate the role of melatonin as skin architecture. Secondly, the effect of exogenous melatonin administration on these changes was determined. Rats were pinealectomized or sham operated (control) for 6 months. Half of the pinealectomized rats were treated with 4 mg/kg melatonin during the last month of the experiment. Pinealectomy resulted in important morphometric and biochemical changes in the back, abdominal and thoracic skin. The thickness of epidermis and dermis and the number of dermal papillae and hair follicles were reduced. Melatonin administration to pinealectomized rats significantly improved these alterations in all body areas (P < 0.005). On the contrary, in pinealectomized rats the levels of antioxidant enzymes, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased. Melatonin restored the levels of these enzymes. The pinealectomy-induced increases in lipid peroxidation in the abdominal and thoracic skin were significantly reduced by melatonin treatment (P < 0.005 and 0.01 respectively). These results suggest that melatonin is highly efficient anti-aging factor and, as melatonin levels decrease with age, melatonin treatment may reduce age-related skin changes. PMID:16150102

  10. Interactions of aging, overload, and creatine supplementation in rat plantaris muscle.

    PubMed

    Schuenke, Mark D; Brooks, Naomi E; Hikida, Robert S

    2011-01-01

    Attenuation of age-related sarcopenia by creatine supplementation has been equivocal. In this study, plantaris muscles of young (Y; 5m) and aging (A; 24m) Fisher 344 rats underwent four weeks of either control (C), creatine supplementation (Cr), surgical overload (O), or overload plus creatine (OCr). Creatine alone had no effect on muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) or heat shock protein (HSP70) and increased myonuclear domain (MND) only in young rats. Overload increased CSA and HSP70 content in I and IIA fibers, regardless of age, and MND in IIA fibers of YO rats. CSA and MND increased in all fast fibers of YOCr, and CSA increased in I and IIA fibers of AOCr. OCR did not alter HSP70, regardless of age. MND did not change in aging rats, regardless of treatment. These data indicate creatine alone had no significant effect. Creatine with overload produced no additional hypertrophy relative to overload alone and attenuated overload-induced HSP70 expression. PMID:21876808

  11. Age-Related Changes in Hepatic Activity and Expression of Detoxification Enzymes in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vyskočilová, Erika; Szotáková, Barbora; Skálová, Lenka; Bártíková, Hana; Hlaváčová, Jitka

    2013-01-01

    Process of aging is accompanied by changes in the biotransformation of xenobiotics and impairment of normal cellular functions by free radicals. Therefore, this study was designed to determine age-related differences in the activities and/or expressions of selected drug-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in young and old rats. Specific activities of 8 drug-metabolizing enzymes and 4 antioxidant enzymes were assessed in hepatic subcellular fractions of 6-week-old and 21-month-old male Wistar rats. Protein expressions of carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were determined using immunoblotting. Remarkable age-related decrease in specific activities of CYP2B, CYP3A, and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase was observed, whereas no changes in activities of CYP1A2, flavine monooxygenase, aldo-keto reductase 1C, and antioxidant enzymes with advancing age were found. On the other hand, specific activity of CBR1 and GST was 2.4 folds and 5.6 folds higher in the senescent rats compared with the young ones, respectively. Interindividual variability in CBR1 activity increased significantly with rising age. We suppose that elevated activities of GST and CBR1 may protect senescent rats against xenobiotic as well as eobiotic electrophiles and reactive carbonyls, but they may alter metabolism of drugs, which are CBR1 and especially GSTs substrates. PMID:23971034

  12. Influence of age on inducibility and cholinergic modulation of arrhythmia in isolated rat right atria.

    PubMed

    Faria, D M; Viviane, A G; Galvão, K M; Caricati-Neto, A; Godoy, C M G

    2009-03-01

    The effects of carbachol and atropine on the number of trains (NT) and on the train stimulus strength (SS) necessary to induce arrhythmia were studied in isolated right atria of infant, young, adult and mature rats submitted to electric field stimulation (66.7 Hz, 5 ms pulse-duration, 250 pulses). Carbachol (1 microM) decreased NT from four (control) to two in all ages tested. Atropine (1 microM) prevented tachyarrhythmia induction in tissue of all ages, even with NT equal to 12, except for mature rats (typically four trains). The SS decreases from infant to adult age [5- to 2-fold atrial threshold (AT)] and increases in mature animals (5-fold AT). Carbachol changes this result only for mature rats (5- to 2-fold AT). The SS was decreased by carbachol (1 microM) from 5- to 3-fold AT in mature rats, but atropine did not modify SS in this age. These results indicate that inducibility and cholinergic modulation of atrial tachyarrhythmia is influenced by age. PMID:19234768

  13. Effects of 900 MHz radiofrequency on corticosterone, emotional memory and neuroinflammation in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Bouji, Marc; Lecomte, Anthony; Hode, Yannick; de Seze, René; Villégier, Anne-Sophie

    2012-06-01

    The widespread use of mobile phones raises the question of the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF, 900 MHz) on the brain. Previous studies reported increased levels of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the rat's brain after a single exposure to 900 MHz global system for mobile (GSM) signal, suggesting a potential inflammatory process. While this result was obtained in adult rats, no data is currently available in older animals. Since the transition from middle-age to senescence is highly dependent on environment and lifestyle, we studied the reactivity of middle-aged brains to EMF exposure. We assessed the effects of a single 15 min GSM exposure (900 MHz; specific absorption rate (SAR)=6 W/kg) on GFAP expression in young adults (6 week-old) and middle-aged rats (12 month-old). Brain interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, plasmatic levels of corticosterone (CORT), and emotional memory were also assessed. Our data indicated that, in contrast to previously published work, acute GSM exposure did not induce astrocyte activation. Our results showed an IL-1β increase in the olfactory bulb and enhanced contextual emotional memory in GSM-exposed middle-aged rats, and increased plasmatic levels of CORT in GSM-exposed young adults. Altogether, our data showed an age dependency of reactivity to GSM exposure in neuro-immunity, stress and behavioral parameters. Reproducing these effects and studying their mechanisms may allow a better understanding of mobile phone EMF effects on neurobiological parameters.

  14. Activity of cholinesterases of blood and heart in rats of different sex and age during muscular loads and hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanova, V. D.; Antonova, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The activity of acetylcholinesterase (Ache) and butyrilcholinesterase (Bche) in the blood and the heart of 3 and 13 month old control male rats is considerably lower than in female rats. In 25 month old rats, no sex differences in the Ache and Bche were revealed in the heart. In 3 and 13 month old male and female rats, under conditions of muscular exercises, the Ache and Bche activity is lower, and in hypokinetic male rats -- higher than that in respective control animals. In all the rats, irrespective of sex, age, and motor conditions, Ache and Bche activity tended to decrease from the sinoatrial node to the heart apex.

  15. TNF-α receptor antagonist attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, NENGLI; LIANG, YAFENG; YANG, PEI; WANG, WEIJIAN; ZHANG, XUEZHENG; WANG, JUNLU

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a common clinical in aged patients, is characterized by deficits in cognitive functions in patients following anesthesia and surgery. It has been demonstrated that isoflurane may lead to cognitive impairment in aged rats; however, effective clinical interventions for preventing this disorder are limited. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been suggested to be involved in neuroinflammation as well as the development of POCD. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate whether TNF-α signaling is involved in the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats, and whether TNF-α receptor antagonist are able to attenuate isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. A population of 20-month-old rats were administered TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 or an equal volume of saline by intraperitoneal injection 12 h prior to exposure to isoflurane to model cognitive impairment following anesthesia in old patients. Then the rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane for 4 h. In the control group, rats showed impaired cognitive functions evaluated by Morris water maze assay after isoflurane exposure. Furthermore, isoflurane exposure induced marked upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in the hippocampus tissue. In the experimental group, intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 significantly attenuated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Further investigation revealed that intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 notably suppressed isoflurane-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Collectively, the present results suggest that TNF-α receptor antagonist may serve as a potential agent for the prevention of anesthesia-induced cognitive decline in aged patients. PMID:27347079

  16. PTZ-induced seizures in rats: effects of age and strain.

    PubMed

    Klioueva, I A; van Luijtelaar, E L; Chepurnova, N E; Chepurnov, S A

    2001-02-01

    The susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures during postnatal ontogeny [postnatal day (PN) 10-220] was investigated in two rat strains. The WAG/Rij strain, genetically prone for developing generalized absence epilepsy, and Wistar rats were tested and compared at PN 10, 26, 30, 70, 90, 125, and 220 on the PTZ-convulsive threshold. A subconvulsive dose of 25-mg/kg PTZ was administered every 15 min, and the occurrence of clonic and tonic-clonic seizures was scored. The 10-day-old pups were quite sensitive to PTZ and showed mainly clonic seizures. The highest threshold and latency of PTZ-induced clonic and tonic-clonic convulsions were observed at PN 26 in both strains. From that age onwards, the seizure threshold significantly decreased and reached a minimum at PN 220. Between strain comparisons showed that WAG/Rij rats have a lower tonic-clonic seizure threshold than Wistar rats. The data indicate that changes in susceptibility first quickly decreases until PN 26-30 and then tend to monotonically increase with age, and that genetically prone nonconvulsive WAG/Rij rats are more vulnerable to convulsive seizures induced by PTZ than Wistar rats. PMID:11274687

  17. A role for the protein phosphatase 2B in altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Jouvenceau, Anne; Dutar, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity following NMDA application on hippocampal slices from young (3-5 months) and aged (24-27 months) rats was compared. In young rats, NMDA (20 microM) induced opposite effects depending on the duration of the application. A short (1 min) or long (5 min) application induced a long-term depression of synaptic activity while a 3 min application induced a potentiation. In aged rats, however, NMDA application always induced depression, regardless of the duration. To identify mechanisms which could explain the difference observed between young and aged rats, we explored changes in NMDA receptor activation and changes in kinase/phosphatase balance. We first demonstrate that the potentiation present in slices from young rats was not restored in aged rats by exogenous application of the co-agonist of NMDA receptor d-serine (which compensates for the changes in NMDAR activation seen in aged rats). This suggested that alterations in synaptic plasticity activation mainly involve intracellular mechanisms. We next showed that the participation of the kinases PKA and CaMKII in the NMDA-induced potentiation in young rats is negligible. Finally, we determined the consequences of phosphatase inhibition in aged rats. Incubation of slices in okadaic acid (a PP1/PP2B antagonist) did not affect the depression induced by a 3min NMDA application in aged rats. The PP2B antagonist FK506 restored potentiation in aged rats (3 min NMDA application). In hippocampal neurons from aged rats, a depression is always observed, suggesting a preferential activation of PP2B by NMDA in these neurons.

  18. Age-dependent changes in rat liver prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Thelin, A; Runquist, M; Ericsson, J; Swiezewska, E; Dallner, G

    1994-10-20

    Mevalonate pathway lipids including cholesterol, ubiquinone and dolichol, are of great importance for cellular function. Many of the enzymes of this pathway are thus strictly regulated. During development of the rat, the cellular levels of certain of these lipids vary. Prenyltransferases have been investigated and it is reported here that farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase activity in rat liver cytosol decreases after birth to a lower, steady level. This decrease is not paralleled by the level of synthase protein, which shows two maxima, one immediately after birth and the other 30 days later. cis-Prenyltransferase activity is low after birth, increases continuously up to day-54 and then decreases to a low level which was maintained throughout the remainder of the study (365 days). Squalene synthase exhibits high activity after birth, but decreases during the first 100 days thereafter, and subsequently remains at the low level thus reached. In contrast to these changes in the activities of the prenyltransferases, the level of cholesterol is constant and the dolichol concentration increases continuously throughout the entire period studied.

  19. The Importance of Efficacy: Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to Examine Factors Related to Preschool-Age Children Enrolled in Medicaid Receiving Preventive Dental Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askelson, Natoshia M.; Chi, Donald L.; Momany, Elizabeth T.; Kuthy, Raymond A.; Carter, Knute D.; Field, Kathryn; Damiano, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Early preventive dental visits are vital to the oral health of children. Yet many children, especially preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid, do not receive early visits. This study attempts to uncover factors that can be used to encourage parents to seek preventive dental care for preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid. The extended…

  20. Neurotrophin receptor proteins immunoreactivity in the rat cerebellar cortex as a function of age.

    PubMed

    Torres, J M; Javier Naves, F; Esteban, I; Del Valle, M E; Vega, J A

    1995-08-31

    The influence of age on immunohistochemically demonstrable neurotrophin receptor proteins (p75, trkA-, trkB-, and trkC-proteins) was studied in the cerebellar cortex of Wistar male rats aged 3 (young), 12 (adult) and 24 (old) months. The number of Purkinje neurons displaying p75, trkA- and trkC-like proteins immunoreactivity (IR), as well as the intensity of p75 and trkA-like protein IR, were significantly reduced in aged rats in comparison with 3 and 12-month-old rats. The intensity of trkC-like protein in the cytoplasm of Purkinje neurons remained unchanged for all the period studied. Moreover, no significant age-dependent changes were observed in the density of p75 or trkC-like proteins IR in the granule neurons layer. The molecular layer showed faint p75 IR which decreased as a function of age. No immunolabelling for neuronal trkB-like proteins was observed, but trkB- and trkC-like proteins IR was found in non-neuronal cells. These results suggest that cerebellar cortex neurons are responsive to and/or dependent upon different neurotrophins. Moreover, the age-dependent impairment in the expression of some neurotrophin receptors in Purkinje neurons, but not in the granule neurons, lends support to a role for neurotrophins in cerebellar aging.

  1. Tualang Honey Attenuates Noise Stress-Induced Memory Deficits in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Khairunnuur Fairuz; Abdul Aziz, Che Badariah; Othman, Zahiruddin

    2016-01-01

    Ageing and stress exposure may lead to memory impairment while oxidative stress is thought to be one of the underlying mechanisms involved. This study aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of Tualang honey supplementation on memory performance in aged rats exposed to noise stress. Tualang honey supplementation was given orally, 200 mg/kg body weight for 28 days. Rats in the stress group were subjected to loud noise, 100 dB(A), 4 hours daily for 14 days. All rats were subjected to novel object recognition test for evaluation of memory performance. It was observed that the rats subjected to noise stress exhibited significantly lower memory performance and higher oxidative stress as evident by elevated malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels and reduction of antioxidant enzymes activities compared to the nonstressed rats. Tualang honey supplementation was able to improve memory performance, decrease oxidative stress levels, increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration, decrease acetylcholinesterase activity, and enhance neuronal proliferation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus. In conclusion, Tualang honey protects against memory decline due to stress exposure and/or ageing via enhancement of mPFC and hippocampal morphology possibly secondary to reduction in brain oxidative stress and/or upregulation of BDNF concentration and cholinergic system. PMID:27119005

  2. [Age-related changes in the rat lacrimal gland: specific morphology and unknown nature].

    PubMed

    Gancharova, O S; Manskikh, V N

    2014-01-01

    The rat lacrimal apparatus includes several glands; among them, the exorbital gland plays the central role. Its parenchyma and stroma undergo prominent morphologic changes with age. The parenchymal transformation includes metaplasia of some of its acini and their turning into Harderian gland-like structures (harderization), accumulation of gland ducts ("ductularization"), and morphologic dysplasia-cytomegaly, karyomegaly, and'cell and nuclearpolymorphism in the other part of acini. All these transformations are hormone-dependent andsex-specific: theyoften appear in males. On the final stages of age-related transformations, the lacrimal gland tissue is morphologically similar to the neoplasm and has neoplastic morphology but no other features of a tumor. Therefore, the rat lacrimal gland is an interesting object to study tissue and cell atypia. In the rat glandular stroma, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis appear with age; these changes are similar to processes taking place in human lacrimal apparatus involved in the pathogenesis of senile dry eye syndrome. The spontaneous changes in the rat lacrimal gland, predominantly in male rats, can be used as a model of the human lacrimal apparatus disorders.

  3. Effect of aging and drug-induced weight reduction on rat vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Feletou, M; Moreau, N; Boulanger, M; Duhault, J

    1993-01-01

    We determined the effects of D-fenfluramine treatment on the changes in vascular reactivity induced by aging. Nine- and 49-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats (a strain known to develop hyperinsulinemia and glucose intolerance during the aging process) were treated for 3 weeks either with D-fenfluramine 2.5 mg/kg twice daily orally or with vehicle. The rats were then exsanguinated and the abdominal aorta was carefully removed, cut into rings, and suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording. Control old rats (vehicle) had a significantly lower glucose infusion rate (an index of insulin resistance), and higher blood pressure (BP), glycemia, and insulinemia than young rats. The D-fenfluramine treatment in the aged animals produced a significant decrease in insulinemia and body weight. In aorta from the older treated and nontreated animals, the contraction to alpha-adrenergic stimulation and to the thromboxane analogue U46619 was significantly reduced as compared with that in young animals, but the response to KCl was unaffected. In contrast, in the old nontreated rats, the aorta was hyperresponsive to serotonin. D-Fenfluramine abolished this hyperreactivity. The response to beta-adrenergic stimulation and to forskolin was inhibited in the older animals but was not influenced by the treatment. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine were not statistically different in the various groups, but the endothelium-dependent relaxation to ADP was reduced in the control group of older animals. D-Fenfluramine treatment restored the response to ADP. PMID:7678666

  4. Retinas from albino rats are more susceptible to ischaemic damage than age-matched pigmented animals.

    PubMed

    Safa, R; Osborne, N N

    2000-04-17

    Age- and sex-matched pigmented (Lister Hooded) and albino (Wistar) rats were used in this study. The retinas of the animals were subjected to pressure-induced ischaemia (35 min, 120 mmHg) and reperfusion (3 days) in precisely the same way. The b-wave of the electroretinogram (ERG) in the pigmented animals recovered to normal levels while those of the albino rats were reduced by more than 80%. Moreover, the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity associated with a sub-set of amacrine cells was almost completely obliterated in the retinas from the albino rats but unaffected in the retinas of the pigmented rats. Also, in certain areas of the retina from albino rats there was a suggestion that the calretinin-immunoreactivity was affected. This was never seen in the retinas of the pigmented animals. The GABA-immunoreactivity in the retina of both albino and pigmented rats appeared to be unaffected by ischaemia/reperfusion. The data presented show that retinas from albino rats are more susceptible to ischaemia/reperfusion than retinas from pigmented animals. The results also show that reduction of the b-wave of the ERG and changes in the nature of the ChAT immunoreactivity represent sensitive markers to detect the effect of ischaemia/reperfusion to the retina.

  5. Intestinal absorption of triglyceride and vitamin D3 in aged and young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, P.R.; Dominguez, A.A.

    1981-12-01

    (3H)Trioleyl glycerol (TO) and (14C)vitamin D3 were perfused intraduodenally for 5 hr in aged (19-21 months) and young adult (4-5 months) Sprague-Dawley rats. The rate of intestinal uptake from the gastrointestinal lumen and transport into the body of these lipids were decreased in the aged animals. Since the distribution of TO lipolytic products in the lumen was unchanged, reduced intestinal uptake rate probably occurred at the mucosal membrane. Furthermore, in the aged rats, the rate of transintestinal transport of both trioleyl glycerol and vitamin D3 was impaired. No evidence for impaired mucosal TO reesterification or for accumulation of vitamin D3 metabolites was found, suggesting that intestinal lipid accumulation resulted from a defect in lipoprotein assembly or in discharge from the mucosal cell. Impaired absorption of lipids may contribute to malnutrition and osteopenia of advancing age.

  6. Effects of age and sex on the water maze performance and hippocampal cholinergic fibers in rats.

    PubMed

    Lukoyanov, N V; Andrade, J P; Dulce Madeira, M; Paula-Barbosa, M M

    1999-07-16

    We have examined if age-related deterioration of spatial memory and cholinergic innervation of the dentate gyrus is gender-specific. Aging progressively affected the performance of male and female rats in place discrimination version of the water maze task. On repeated acquisition task, only old males, but not old females, were significantly impaired relative to young and adult animals of both sexes. In parallel, we found that the age-associated reduction of the density of cholinergic fibers in the dentate gyrus was significantly more profound in old males than in age-matched females. These results suggest that, although male and female rats have an identical pattern of reference memory decline, impairment of the working memory and deterioration of the hippocampal cholinergic system are slower to develop in females than in males.

  7. [The assessment of modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic radiation on cognitive function in rats of different ages].

    PubMed

    Priakhin, E A; Triapitsyna, G A; Andreev, S S; Kolomiets, I A; Polevik, N D; Akleev, A V

    2007-01-01

    The modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic radiation influence on cognitive function of male uninbred Wister rat exposed at the age of sexual maturation (2 months) and at the age of morphofunctional maturity (3.5 months) was examined. Animals were subjected to pulse electromagnetic radiation (925 MHz) modulated as a GSM standard with the power density 1.2 mW/cm2 for 10 minutes every day for 12 days. At day 8 of exposure the cognitive function were examined with the Morris water maze. In the result of investigation it was determines that modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic radiation at the sexual maturation age did not affect the spatial learning and improve the visual orientation performance. Modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic exposure of animals at the sex maturity age did not affect the visual performance and improve the spatial performance of male rats.

  8. Onion flesh and onion peel enhance antioxidant status in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyeon; Kim, Joohee; Kim, Mi Kyung

    2007-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary onion flesh or onion peel on lipid peroxides and DNA damage in aged rats. Sprague Dawley male rats (n=40, 16 mo old) were blocked into five groups and raised for 3 mo with either an onion-free control diet or onion diets (Allium cepa L., intermediate-day variety) containing either 5% (w/w) powdered dried onion flesh, 5% (w/w) powdered dried onion peel or ethanol extracts of the two powdered forms of onion. Total antioxidant status (TAS) and levels of total polyphenols and quercetin were greatest in onion peel ethanol extract, followed by onion peel powder, onion flesh ethanol extract, and onion flesh powder. Plasma quercetin and isorhamnetin levels were markedly increased by onion peel powder and onion peel ethanol extract. Rats fed onion flesh powder or onion peel powder had a higher plasma TAS than rats fed the control diet. Onion peel powder reduced liver thiobarbituric reactive substances relative to those of the control diet in aged rats (p<0.05). Brain 8-isoprostane levels were markedly decreased by all four onion diets and the decrease was significant for the onion flesh powder and onion peel powder diets (p<0.05). There was no significant decrease in cellular DNA damage in the kidney or brain tissue among rats fed the four onion diets. Onion flesh or onion peel enhanced antioxidant status in aged rats and may be beneficial for the elderly as a means of lowering lipid peroxide levels. PMID:17484375

  9. Prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide results in cognitive deficits in age-increasing offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Hao, L Y; Hao, X Q; Li, S H; Li, X H

    2010-03-31

    Studies have suggested that maternal infection/inflammation maybe a major risk factor for neurodevelopmental brain damage. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of prenatal exposure to a low level of inflammatory stimulation lipopolysaccharide (LPS) repeatedly on spatial learning and memory performances in rat offspring's lifetime. Sixteen pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups. The rats in the LPS group were treated i.p. with LPS (0.79 mg/kg) at gestation day 8, 10 and 12; meanwhile the rats in the control group were treated with saline. After delivery, the rat offspring at 3- (young), 10- (adult) and 20-mon-old (aged) were allocated. Spatial learning and memory abilities were tested by Morris water maze. The structure of hippocampal CA1 region was observed by light microscopy. The expression of synaptophysin (SYP) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in hippocampal CA1 region were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results showed that the rat offspring of LPS group needed longer escape latency and path-length in the Morris water maze and presented a significant neuron loss, decreased expression of SYP, increased expression of GFAP in CA1 region in histological studies. All these changes were more significant with the age increasing. These findings support the hypothesis that maternal systemic inflammation may alter the state of astrocytes in rat offspring for a long time, the alteration may affect neurons and synapse development in neural system, increase the neurons' vulnerability to environment especially as the age increasing, at last result in distinct learning and memory impairment. PMID:20074621

  10. Voluntary exercise impairs initial delayed spatial alternation performance in estradiol treated ovariectomized middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Neese, Steven L; Korol, Donna L; Schantz, Susan L

    2013-09-01

    Estrogens differentially modulate behavior in the adult female rodent. Voluntary exercise can also impact behavior, often reversing age associated decrements in memory processes. Our research group has published a series of papers reporting a deficit in the acquisition of an operant working memory task, delayed spatial alternation (DSA), following 17β-estradiol treatment to middle-aged ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The current study examined if voluntary exercise could attenuate the 17β-estradiol induced deficits on DSA performance. OVX 12-month old Long-Evans rats were implanted with a Silastic capsule containing 17β-estradiol (10% in cholesterol: low physiological range) or with a blank capsule. A subset of the 17β-estradiol and OVX untreated rats were given free access to a running wheel in their home cage. All rats were tested for 40 sessions on the DSA task. Surprisingly, we found running wheel access to impair initial acquisition of the DSA task in 17β-estradiol treated rats, an effect not seen in OVX untreated rats given running wheel access. This deficit was driven by an increase in perseverative responding on a lever no longer associated with reinforcement. We also report for the first time a 17β-estradiol induced impairment on the DSA task following a long intertrial delay (18-sec), an effect revealed following more extended testing than in our previous studies (15 additional sessions). Overall, running wheel access increased initial error rate on the DSA task in 17β-estradiol treated middle-aged OVX rats, and failed to prevent the 17β-estradiol induced deficits in performance of the operant DSA task in later testing sessions.

  11. The Canalicular Structure of Compact Bone in the Rat at Different Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shigenori; Yoshida, Shigemitsu; Ashrafi, Shahid H.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2002-04-01

    Osteocytes communicate through a canalicular system that maintains the vitality and mineral metabolism of bone. Casting the vascular canals and canaliculi of compact bone with methacrylate and viewing them with scanning electron microscopy shows their extent and relationships. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of the same specimen before corrosion establishes the degree of calcification of the different tissue components. These methods were used to compare basal with alveolar compact bone in the rat mandible at different ages. Sections of the mandibular molar region were placed in a methacrylate resin. After polymerization and study with confocal microscopy, the organic matrix was removed. Juvenile rats had large irregular central vascular canals and lacunae that were more concentric in the basal than the alveolar bone. Cast lacunae were round, and the canaliculi from these lacunae were short and thick in both bones. Adult rats had regular concentrically arranged lacunae in the basal bone. Cast lacunae were ellipsoid and flatter in the basal bone than in the alveolar bone. The intercommunicating canaliculi were increased and canaliculi had more branching than the juvenile rats. The aged rats had fewer vascular canals, lacunae, and canaliculi and had osteoporotic changes. The cast lacunae were slender and flat especially in the basal bone. The porosity of the mandible became more pronounced in the alveolar than in the basal bone with aging. The canaliculi of mandibular compact bone thinned and developed extensive branching with adulthood but decreased in size and number with advanced age. Lacunae proceed from the large circular structures of youth to the flat forms of the aged. These studies show that the internal structure of compact bone changes with age and mirrors its functional state.

  12. Age-related differences in the bone mineralization pattern of rats following exercise

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.; Hegenauer, J.; Saltman, P.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of 12 weeks of treadmill exercise on the mineralization of trabecular and cortical bone was studied in rats 7, 14, and 19 months of age. Bone mineralization was evaluated by measuring concentrations of Ca, Mg, and hydroxyproline as well as uptake of 45Ca concentration in the femur, humerus, rib and calvaria. The 7- and 14-month-old rats increased mineralization in those cortical bones directly involved in exercise. The 19-month animal responded to exercise by increasing mineralization in all bones examined, including the nonweight bearing trabecular calvaria and cortical rib. From these data, it is apparent that the older animals undergo a total skeletal mineralization in response to exercise compared with local adaptation in the younger animal. Further, we provide evidence to support the use of the rat as a model in which to study mammalian bone physiology during the aging process.

  13. Age effects on rat hindlimb muscle atrophy during suspension unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Joseph M.; Fell, Ronald D.; Geoghegan, Thomas E.; Ringel, Lisa C.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of hindlimb unloading on muscle mass and biochemical responses were examined and compared in adult (450-g) and juvenile (200-g) rats after 1, 7, or 14 days of whole-body suspension. Quantitatively and qualitatively the soleus, gastrocnemius, plantaris, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of the hindlimb exhibited a differential sensitivity to suspension and weightlessness unloading in both adults and juveniles. The red slow-twitch soleus exhibited the most pronounced atrophy under both conditions, with juvenile responses being greater than adult. In contrast, the fast-twitch EDL hypertrophied during suspension and atrophied during weightlessness, with no significant difference between adults and juveniles. Determination of biochemical parameters (total protein, RNA, and DNA) indicates a less rapid rate of response in adult muscles.

  14. Relationships between silicon content and glutathione peroxidase activity in tissues of rats receiving lithium in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kiełczykowska, Małgorzata; Musik, Irena; Pasternak, Kazimierz

    2008-02-01

    Lithium salts are widely used in psychiatry, but their presence in organism can result in both beneficial and adverse effects. Silicon, the third most abundant trace element in humans as well as antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx) play important roles in organism. The disturbance of their level can cause severe disorders. The aim of our work was to evaluate the influence of Li2CO3 administration in drinking water for a period of 4 weeks on Si content and GPx activity in the tissues of liver, kidney, brain and femoral muscle in rats. The concentrations of provided solutions were 0.7, 1.4, 2.6, 3.6, 7.1 and 10.7 mmol Li+ x dm-3. GPx activity was decreased versus control as a consequence of Li treatment, particularly in kidney and brain. This effect could be suggested to contribute to renal abnormalities which could occur during Li therapy. Si tissue level was significantly enhanced versus control in liver and femoral muscle in groups receiving high Li doses. In brain no well-marked changes were observed, whereas in kidney we observed the depletion in low-Li-groups, restoration of Si level in higher-Li-groups and unexpected decrease in the highest-Li-group. Positive correlations between Si content and GPx activity in the tissues of kidney (r = 0.677) and brain (r = 0.790) as well as negative correlation (r = -0.819) in femoral muscle were found. We consider that our results give some reason for suggesting that monitoring of silicon level in patients undergoing Li therapy could be recommended. However, more investigations should be performed, particularly regarding the relationships between Si and GPx in blood and urine Si excretion during lithium administration.

  15. Beneficial effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin on spatial learning and the dendritic tree of dentate gyrus granule cells in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Mohammad; Kamali-Ardakani, Razieh; Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The hippocampal formation, particularly the dentate gyrus (DG), shows age-related morphological changes that could cause memory decline. It is indicated that Boswellia resins attenuates memory deficits and the major component of Boswellia serrata (Bs) gum resin, beta boswellic acid increased neurite outgrowth and branching in hippocampal neurons. This study was designed to investigate the effect of Boswellia treatment on spatial learning performance and the morphology of dentate granule cells in aged rats. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male Wistar rats (24 months old) were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group was intragastrically administered with the aqueous extract of Bs (100 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks) and control group received a similar volume of water. Spatial learning performance of rats was tested using Morris water maze task. At the end of experiment, the brain was removed and the right hippocampus was serially sectioned for morphometric analysis. The Cavalieri principle was employed to estimate the volume of the DG. A quantitative Golgi study was used to analyze the dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. Results: Chronic treatment with Bs improved spatial learning capability during the three acquisition days. Comparisons also revealed that Bs-treated aged rat had greater DG with increased dendritic complexity in the dentate granule cells than control rats. Hippocampal granule cells of Bs-treated aged rats had more dendritic segments, larger arbors, more numerical branching density and more dendritic spines in comparison to control animals. Conclusion: This study provided a neuro-anatomical basis for memory improvement due to chronic treatment with Bs. PMID:27222832

  16. Calorie restriction: A new therapeutic intervention for age-related dry eye disease in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Motoko; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Okada, Naoko; Ogawa, Yoko; Murat, Dogru; Nakamura, Shigeru; Nakashima, Hideo; Shimmura, Shigeto; Shinmura, Ken; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2010-07-09

    A decrease in lacrimal gland secretory function is closely related to aging and leads to an increased prevalence of dry eye syndrome. Since calorie restriction (CR) is considered to prevent functional decline of various organs due to aging, we hypothesized that CR could prevent age-related lacrimal dysfunction. Six-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were randomly divided into ad libitum (AL) and CR (-35%) groups. After 6 months of CR, tear function was examined under conscious state. After euthanasia, lacrimal glands were subjected to histological examination, tear protein secretion stimulation test with Carbachol, and assessment of oxidative stress with 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) antibodies. CR significantly improved tear volume and tended to increase tear protein secretion volume after stimulation with Carbachol compared to AL. The acinar unit density was significantly higher in the CR rats compared to AL rats. Lacrimal glands in the CR rats showed a lesser degree of interstitial fibrosis. CR reduced the concentration of 8-OHdG and the extent of staining with HNE in the lacrimal gland, compared to AL. Furthermore, our electron microscopic observations showed that mitochondrial structure of the lacrimal gland obtained from the middle-aged CR rats was preserved in comparison to the AL rats. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that CR may attenuate oxidative stress related damage in the lacrimal gland with preservation of lacrimal gland functions. Although molecular mechanism(s) by which CR maintains lacrimal gland function remains to be resolved, CR might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for treating dry eye syndrome.

  17. Autophagy Is Involved in the Sevoflurane Anesthesia-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction of Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Youfa; Xu, Mingmin; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is associated with regulation of both the survival and death of neurons, and has been linked to many neurodegenerative diseases. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is commonly observed in elderly patients following anesthesia, but the pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unexplored. Similar effects have been found in aged rats under sevoflurane anesthesia; however, the role of autophagy in sevoflurane anesthesia-induced hippocampal neuron apoptosis of older rats remains elusive. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of autophagy on the sevoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction in aged rats, and to identify the role of autophagy in sevoflurane-induced neuron apoptosis. We used 20-month-old rats under sevoflurane anesthesia to study memory performance, neuron apoptosis, and autophagy. The results demonstrated that sevoflurane anesthesia significantly impaired memory performance and induced hippocampal neuron apoptosis. Interestingly, treatment of rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, improved the cognitive deficit observed in the aged rats under sevoflurane anesthesia by improving autophagic flux. Rapamycin treatment led to the rapid accumulation of autophagic bodies and autophagy lysosomes, decreased p62 protein levels, and increased the ratio of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 II (LC3-II) to LC3-I in hippocampal neurons through the mTOR signaling pathway. However, administration of an autophagy inhibitor (chloroquine) attenuated the autophagic flux and increased the severity of sevoflurane anesthesia-induced neuronal apoptosis and memory impairment. These findings suggest that impaired autophagy in the hippocampal neurons of aged rats after sevoflurane anesthesia may contribute to cognitive impairment. Therefore, our findings represent a potential novel target for pro-autophagy treatments in patients with sevoflurane anesthesia-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:27111854

  18. Forced limb-use enhanced neurogenesis and behavioral recovery after stroke in the aged rats.

    PubMed

    Qu, H L; Zhao, M; Zhao, S S; Xiao, T; Song, C G; Cao, Y P; Jolkkonen, J; Zhao, C S

    2015-02-12

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) after stroke enhances not only functional reorganization but also structural plasticity of the brain in the adult rats. We examined whether forced limb-use which mimicked CIMT could influence ischemia-induced neurogenesis, apoptosis and behavioral recovery in the aged rats. Aged rats were divided into a sham group, an ischemia group, and an ischemia group with forced limb-use. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by injection of endothelin-1. Forced limb-use began on post-stroke day 7 by fitting a plaster cast around the unimpaired upper limbs of rats for 3 weeks. Behavioral recovery was evaluated by tapered/ledged beam-walking test on postoperative day 32. The expression of doublecortin, neuronal nuclei, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Iba-1 were measured by single or double immunohistochemistry, and apoptosis was measured by TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The production of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone (SVZ) was significantly increased after stroke. Forced limb-use enhanced the proliferation of newborn neurons in the SVZ, as well as increased the long-term survival of newborn neurons. Furthermore, forced limb-use suppressed apoptosis and improved the motor functions after stroke in the aged rats. Forced limb-use exerted few effects on inflammation. Neither the number nor dendritic complexity of newborn granule cells in the hippocampus was affected by forced limb-use. Forced limb-use is effective in enhancing neurogenesis and behavioral recovery after stroke even in the aged rats. PMID:25463522

  19. Age-related increases in F344 rat intestine microsomal quercetin glucuronidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to establish the extent age modifies intestinal quercetin glucuronidation capacity. Pooled microsomal fractions of three equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats (n=8/group) were employed to model the enzyme kinetics of UDP-gl...

  20. Microsomal quercetin glucuronidation in rat small intestine depends on age and segment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity toward the flavonoid quercetin and UGT protein were characterized in 3 equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats, n=8/age using villin to control for enterocyte content. SI microsomal intrinsic clearance of quercetin...

  1. Single-nephron filtration rate and proximal reabsorption in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Corman, B; Roinel, N

    1991-01-01

    Age-related changes in the function of individual nephrons were investigated by micropuncture experiments measuring single-nephron filtration rates (SNGFR) and proximal reabsorptions in 10-, 20-, and 30-mo-old rats. The animals were female WAG/Rij rats with low incidence of chronic progressive nephropathy, no loss of nephrons, and renal hypertrophy of both kidneys in the oldest animals. Mean SNGFR values per gram kidney weight were 41.4 +/- 1.1, 37.1 +/- 1.5, and 32.2 +/- 1.1 nl.min-1.g kidney wt-1 (n = 41) in the 10-, 20-, and 30-mo-old animals, respectively. This age-related decrease in filtration was no longer apparent when SNGFR values were expressed per nephron (means 24.3 +/- 0.7, 23.7 +/- 0.9, and 24.4 +/- 0.9 nl/min. Individual filtered loads of sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium and their absolute reabsorption by the proximal tubule were not different in the three age groups; however, absolute and fractional reabsorptions of phosphate decreased significantly in the 30-mo-old rats. These results indicate that, with the exception of phosphate, individual filtrations and proximal reabsorptions are well maintained in aging rats free of disease. This may be related to the observed renal hypertrophy. PMID:1992782

  2. Coordinated Changes in Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression in Aging Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to gain better insight on aging and susceptibility, we characterized the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) from the livers of rats to evaluate the change in capacity to respond to xenobiotics across the adult lifespan. Gene expression profiles for XMEs...

  3. Age-related changes in body composition in laboratory rats: Strain and gender comparisons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long Evans (LE), Sprague Dawley (SD), Fischer 344 (F344), and Brown Norway (BN) rats are all commonly used as laboratory research subjects. These strains have been studied under many conditions, but few studies have measured changes in body composition as the animals age. Underst...

  4. Food restriction prevents an age-associated increase in rat liver beta-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dax, E.M.; Ingram, D.K.; Partilla, J.S.; Gregerman, R.I.

    1989-05-01

    In male Wistar rats fed ad libitum (24% protein, 4.5 Kcal/gm), the (/sup 125/I)iodopindolol binding capacity of the beta-adrenergic receptors in liver of 24-month-old animals is 3-4 times greater than that of 6-month-old counterparts. In rats fed the same diet, on alternate days from weaning, the receptor capacity did not increase significantly between 6 and 24 months (10.20 +/- 0.55 vs 9.20 +/- 0.72 fmol/mg) or between 24 and 30 months. This was not due to acute dietary deprivation, as rats food-restricted for only 2 weeks, at 23.5 months of age, also showed elevated receptor capacities compared to 6-month-old ad libitum fed animals. Moreover, intermittent feeding produced no significant effects among 6-month-old animals, whether restricted since weaning or for two weeks prior to sacrifice. Many biochemical parameters that decrease with aging in rats fed ad libitum are prevented by dietary restriction. Our results demonstrate that a reproducible biochemical process that increases with aging is also prevented with dietary restriction. The age-related, liver beta-receptor increase may be a potentially reliable marker for studying biochemical perturbations that modify life span.

  5. Age-related changes in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YALI; LIU, JIAN; GAO, DENGFENG; WEI, JIN; YUAN, HAIFENG; NIU, XIAOLIN; ZHANG, QIAOJUN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age-related alterations in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the underlying mechanisms. Aging resulted in a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and apoptotic cells in the SHR group, which was accompanied by increased expression of oxidative stress markers (iNOS and gp47phox) and apoptotic regulatory proteins (Bax and caspase-3). In addition, the expression of PPAR-γ and Bcl-2 were progressively reduced with increasing age in the SHR group. The 32 and 64-week-old SHRs exhibited significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells, oxidative stress markers and pro-apoptotic proteins compared with age-matched WKY rats, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PPAR-γ. Compared with the 16 and 32-week-old WKY group, the 64-week-old WKY rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and pro-apoptotic markers, and increased levels apoptotic cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that both aging and hypertension enhanced brain damage and oxidative stress injury in the hippocampi of SHRs, indicated by an increased presence of apoptotic cells and astrocytes. In addition, reduced expression of PPAR-γ may contribute to the age-related brain damage in SHRs. PMID:26846626

  6. An observational assessment method for aging laboratory rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The growth of the aging population highlights the need for laboratory animal models to study the basic biological processes ofaging and susceptibility to toxic chemicals and disease. Methods to evaluate health ofaging animals over time are needed, especially efficient methods for...

  7. AN OBSERVATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF AGING IN BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The growth of the aging population highlights the need for laboratory animal models that can be used to (1) efficiently monitor the health ofaging research colonies, and (2) aid in unraveling the mechanisms ofsusceptibility to toxic chemicals and disease. An observational assessm...

  8. AGING-RELATED CARBARYL EFFECTS IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid increase in older adults in the population highlights the importance ofunderstanding the role of aging in susceptibility to environmental contaminants. Aspart of a larger research program on life-stage susceptibility, this experiment determined the effect of the carbama...

  9. Changes in Angiotensin Receptor Distribution and in Aortic Morphology Are Associated with Blood Pressure Control in Aged Metabolic Syndrome Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Torrico-Lavayen, Rocío; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; Carvajal-Aguilera, Karla G.; Castrejón-Tellez, Vicente; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther

    2016-01-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in blood pressure regulation in MS during aging is unknown. It participates in metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging regulating vascular tone and remodeling. RAS might participate in a compensatory mechanism decreasing blood pressure and allowing MS rats to reach 18 months of age and it might form part of therapeutical procedures to ameliorate MS. We studied histological changes and distribution of RAS receptors in aortas of MS aged rats. Electron microscopy images showed premature aging in MS since the increased fibrosis, enlarged endothelium, and invasion of this layer by muscle cells that was present in control 18-month-old aortas were also found in 6-month-old aortas from MS rats. AT1, AT2, and Mas receptors mediate the effects of Ang II and Ang 1-7, respectively. Fluorescence from AT2 decreased with age in control and MS aortas, while fluorescence of AT1 increased in aortas from MS rats at 6 months and diminished during aging. Mas expression increased in MS rats and remained unchanged in control rats. In conclusion, there is premature aging in the aortas from MS rats and the elevated expression of Mas receptor might contribute to decrease blood pressure during aging in MS. PMID:27293881

  10. Changes in Angiotensin Receptor Distribution and in Aortic Morphology Are Associated with Blood Pressure Control in Aged Metabolic Syndrome Rats.

    PubMed

    Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Torrico-Lavayen, Rocío; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; Carvajal-Aguilera, Karla G; Castrejón-Tellez, Vicente; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther

    2016-01-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in blood pressure regulation in MS during aging is unknown. It participates in metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging regulating vascular tone and remodeling. RAS might participate in a compensatory mechanism decreasing blood pressure and allowing MS rats to reach 18 months of age and it might form part of therapeutical procedures to ameliorate MS. We studied histological changes and distribution of RAS receptors in aortas of MS aged rats. Electron microscopy images showed premature aging in MS since the increased fibrosis, enlarged endothelium, and invasion of this layer by muscle cells that was present in control 18-month-old aortas were also found in 6-month-old aortas from MS rats. AT1, AT2, and Mas receptors mediate the effects of Ang II and Ang 1-7, respectively. Fluorescence from AT2 decreased with age in control and MS aortas, while fluorescence of AT1 increased in aortas from MS rats at 6 months and diminished during aging. Mas expression increased in MS rats and remained unchanged in control rats. In conclusion, there is premature aging in the aortas from MS rats and the elevated expression of Mas receptor might contribute to decrease blood pressure during aging in MS. PMID:27293881

  11. Glucolipotoxicity age-dependently impairs beta cell function in rats despite a marked increase in beta cell mass

    PubMed Central

    Fontés, G.; Zarrouki, B.; Hagman, D. K.; Latour, M. G.; Semache, M.; Roskens, V.; Moore, P. C.; Prentki, M.; Rhodes, C. J.; Jetton, T. L.

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Prolonged exposure of pancreatic beta cells to excessive levels of glucose and fatty acids, referred to as glucolipotoxicity, is postulated to contribute to impaired glucose homeostasis in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the relative contribution of defective beta cell function vs diminished beta cell mass under glucolipotoxic conditions in vivo remains a subject of debate. We therefore sought to determine whether glucolipotoxicity in rats is due to impaired beta cell function and/or reduced beta cell mass, and whether older animals are more susceptible to glucolipotoxic condition. Methods Wistar rats (2 and 6 months old) received a 72 h infusion of glucose + intravenous fat emulsion or saline control. In vivo insulin secretion and sensitivity were assessed by hyperglycaemic clamps. Ex vivo insulin secretion, insulin biosynthesis and gene expression were measured in isolated islets. Beta cell mass and proliferation were examined by immunohistochemistry. Results A 72 h infusion of glucose + intravenous fat emulsion in 2-month-old Wistar rats did not affect insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion or beta cell mass. In 6-month-old rats by contrast it led to insulin resistance and reduced insulin secretion in vivo, despite an increase in beta cell mass and proliferation. This was associated with: (1) diminished glucose-stimulated second-phase insulin secretion and proinsulin biosynthesis; (2) lower insulin content; and (3) reduced expression of beta cell genes in isolated islets. Conclusions/interpretation In this in vivo model, glucolipotoxicity is characterised by an age-dependent impairment of glucose-regulated beta cell function despite a marked increase in beta cell mass. PMID:20628728

  12. Age-related and site-specific changes in the pulpodentinal morphology of rat molars.

    PubMed

    Lovschall, H; Fejerskov, O; Josephsen, K

    2002-05-01

    The rat molars are frequently used as experimental models in endodontic research, but there is little systematic information available on the influence of age on the pulpodentinal organ in Wistar rat molars and it is often difficult to evaluate more subtle changes following experimental interventions. The aim here was to describe changes with age in first upper Wistar rat molars with specific reference to the pulpodentinal organ. Animals were perfused with glutaraldehyde at 19 days, 1, 3, 6, 8, 12, 16, or 24 months of age. First upper molars from 56 animals were demineralized in EDTA, embedded in Epon, and processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. Substantial variation in the structure of the dentine and odontoblasts was observed within the root canals and the coronal pulp chamber. In general, odontoblasts changed from a tall, columnar morphology in the coronal pulp chamber to a more cuboidal or flattened shape near the apex, particularly towards the interradicular space. Secondary dentine formation was more pronounced along the mesial aspect of the root chamber and corresponding to the bottom of fissures. Local tertiary dentine formation was layered in the upper pulp chamber, corresponding to occlusal attrition of the cusp. In several molars a local formation of irregular tertiary dentine was observed cervically in the mesial pulp chamber. After 1 year, a distinct protrusion of irregular dentine extended into the mesiocervical pulp, apparently corresponding to a denudation of cervical root dentine. Experimental pulp-capping studies frequently use first upper rat molars with perforations made through the mesial aspect of the crown; such perforations might be close to the irregular dentine in the mesiocervical region. In conclusion, this study identifies age-associated and regional changes of pulpodentinal morphology in first upper rat molars. Therefore, evaluation of morphological alterations following vital-pulp experiments should be done in

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of primordial follicles from ovaries of immature and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Vijayakumar; Rao, A Jagannadha

    2015-01-01

    Age related decline in reproductive performance in women is well documented and apoptosis has been considered as one of the reasons for the decline of primordial follicle reserve. Recently we observed a decline in the efficiency of DNA repair ability in aged rat primordial follicles as demonstrated by decreased mRNA levels of DNA repair genes BRCA1 and H2AX. In the present study, a two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) proteomic approach was employed to identify differentially expressed proteins in primordial follicles isolated from ovaries of immature (∼20 days) and aged (∼400-450 days) rats. Using MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, we identified 13 differentially expressed proteins (p < 0.05) which included seven up-regulated and six down-regulated proteins in aged primordial follicles. These proteins are involved in a wide range of biological functions including apoptosis, DNA repair, and the immune system. Interestingly, the differentially expressed proteins such as FIGNL1 (DNA repair) and BOK (apoptotic protein) have not been previously reported in the rat primordial follicles and these proteins can be related to some common features of ovarian aging such as loss of follicle reserve and genome integrity. The quantitative differences of two important proteins BOK and FIGNL1 observed by the proteomic analysis were correlated with the transcript levels, as determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Our results improve the current knowledge about protein factors associated with molecular changes in rat primordial follicles as a function of aging and our understanding of the proteomic processes involved in degenerative changes observed in aging primordial follicles. PMID:26391928

  14. Exercise restores beta-adrenergic vasorelaxation in aged rat carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Leosco, Dario; Iaccarino, Guido; Cipolletta, Ersilia; De Santis, Domenico; Pisani, Eliana; Trimarco, Valentina; Ferrara, Nicola; Abete, Pasquale; Sorriento, Daniela; Rengo, Franco; Trimarco, Bruno

    2003-07-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) signaling and reduction in cardiovascular responses to beta-AR stimulation. Because exercise can attenuate age-related impairment in myocardial beta-AR signaling and function, we tested whether training could also exert favorable effects on vascular beta-AR responses. We evaluated common carotid artery responsiveness in isolated vessel ring preparations from 8 aged male Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats trained for 6 wk in a 5 days/wk swimming protocol, 10 untrained age-matched rats, and 10 young WKY rats. Vessels were preconstricted with phenylephrine (10-6 M), and vasodilation was assessed in response to the beta-AR agonist isoproterenol (10-10-3 x 10-8 M), the alpha2-AR agonist UK-14304 (10-9-10-6 M), the muscarinic receptor agonist ACh (10-9-10-6 M), and nitroprusside (10-8-10-5 M). beta-AR density and cytoplasmic beta-AR kinase (beta-ARK) activity were tested on pooled carotid arteries. beta-ARK expression was assessed in two endothelial cell lines from bovine aorta and aorta isolated from a 12-wk WKY rat. beta-AR, alpha2-AR, and muscarinic responses, but not that to nitroprusside, were depressed in untrained aged vs. young animals. Exercise training restored beta-AR and muscarinic responses but did not affect vasodilation induced by UK-14304 and nitroprusside. Aged carotid arteries showed reduced beta-AR number and increased beta-ARK activity. Training counterbalanced these phenomena and restored beta-AR density and beta-ARK activity to levels observed in young rat carotids. Our data indicate that age impairs beta-AR vasorelaxation in rat carotid arteries through beta-AR downregulation and desensitization. Exercise restores this response and reverts age-related modification in beta-ARs and beta-ARK. Our data support an important role for beta-ARK in vascular beta-AR vasorelaxation.

  15. Quantitative analysis of development and aging of genital corpuscles in glans penis of the rat.

    PubMed

    Shiino, Mizuho; Hoshi, Hideo; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Ishikawa, Youichi; Takayanagi, Masaaki; Murakami, Kunio; Kishi, Kiyoshi; Sato, Fumi

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present postnatal developmental study was to determine densities of unique genital corpuscles (GCs) in glans penis of developing and aged rats. GCs were identified as corpuscular endings consisting of highly branched and coiled axons with many varicosities, which were immunoreactive for protein gene product 9.5. In addition, GCs were immunoreactive for calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P, but not for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and neuropeptide Y. GCs were not found in the glans penis of 1 week old rats. Densities of GCs were low at 3 weeks, significantly increased at 5 and 10 weeks, reached the peak of density at 40 weeks, and tended to decrease at 70 and 100 weeks. Sizes of GCs were small in 3 weeks old rats, increased at 5 and 10 weeks, reached the peak-size at 40 weeks and reduced in size at 70 and 100 weeks. Considering sexual maturation of the rat, the results reveal that GCs of the rat begins to develop postnatal and reaches to the peak of their development after puberty and continues to exist until old age, in contrast to prenatal and early postnatal development of other sensory receptors of glabrous skin.

  16. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals novel mitochondrial targets of estrogen deficiency in the aged female rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, T. S.; Jefferson, S. J.; Hunter, J. Craig; Lopez, Veronica; Van Eyk, J. E.; Lakatta, E. G.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of myocardial infarction rises sharply at menopause, implicating a potential role for estrogen (E2) loss in age-related increases in ischemic injury. We aimed to identify quantitative changes to the cardiac mitochondrial proteome of aging females, based on the hypothesis that E2 deficiency exacerbates age-dependent disruptions in mitochondrial proteins. Mitochondria isolated from left ventricles of adult (6 mo) and aged (24 mo) F344 ovary-intact or ovariectomized (OVX) rats were labeled with 8plex isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ; n = 5–6/group). Groups studied were adult, adult OVX, aged, and aged OVX. In vivo coronary artery ligation and in vitro mitochondrial respiration studies were also performed in a subset of rats. We identified 965 proteins across groups and significant directional changes in 67 proteins of aged and/or aged OVX; 32 proteins were unique to aged OVX. Notably, only six proteins were similarly altered in adult OVX (voltage-dependent ion channel 1, adenine nucleotide translocator 1, cytochrome c oxidase subunits VIIc and VIc, catalase, and myosin binding protein C). Proteins affected by aging were primarily related to cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, and cell death. The largest change occurred in monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), a source of oxidative stress. While acute MAO-A inhibition induced mild uncoupling in aged mitochondria, reductions in infarct size were not observed. Age-dependent alterations in mitochondrial signaling indicate a highly selective myocardial response to E2 deficiency. The combined proteomic and functional approaches described here offer possibility of new protein targets for experimentation and therapeutic intervention in the aged female population. PMID:22930739

  17. Effects of melatonin on aluminium-induced neurobehavioral and neurochemical changes in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Allagui, M S; Feriani, A; Saoudi, M; Badraoui, R; Bouoni, Z; Nciri, R; Murat, J C; Elfeki, A

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of melatonin (Mel) against aluminium-induced neurodegenerative changes in aging Wistar rats (24-28months old). Herein, aluminium chloride (AlCl3) (50mg/kg BW/day) was administered by gavage, and melatonin (Mel) was co-administered to a group of Al-treated rats by an intra-peritoneal injection at a daily dose of 10mg/kg BW for four months. The findings revealed that aluminium administration induced a significant decrease in body weight associated with marked mortality for the old group of rats, which was more pronounced in old Al-treated rats. Behavioural alterations were assessed by 'open fields', 'elevated plus maze' and 'Radial 8-arms maze' tests. The results demonstrated that Mel co-administration alleviated neurobehavioral changes in both old and old Al-treated rats. Melatonin was noted to play a good neuroprotective role, reducing lipid peroxidation (TBARs), and enhancing enzymatic (SOD, CAT and GPx) activities in the brain organs of old control and old Al-treated rats. Mel treatment also reversed the decrease of AChE activity in the brain tissues, which was confirmed by histological sections. Overall, the results showed that Mel administration can induce beneficial effects for the treatment of Al-induced neurobehavioral and neurochemical changes in the central nervous system (CNS).

  18. Regression of Some High-risk Features of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in Patients Receiving Intensive Statin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vavvas, Demetrios G.; Daniels, Anthony B.; Kapsala, Zoi G.; Goldfarb, Jeremy W.; Ganotakis, Emmanuel; Loewenstein, John I.; Young, Lucy H.; Gragoudas, Evangelos S.; Eliott, Dean; Kim, Ivana K.; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K.; Miller, Joan W.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) remains the leading cause of blindness in developed countries, and affects more than 150 million worldwide. Despite effective anti-angiogenic therapies for the less prevalent neovascular form of AMD, treatments are lacking for the more prevalent dry form. Similarities in risk factors and pathogenesis between AMD and atherosclerosis have led investigators to study the effects of statins on AMD incidence and progression with mixed results. A limitation of these studies has been the heterogeneity of AMD disease and the lack of standardization in statin dosage. Objective We were interested in studying the effects of high-dose statins, similar to those showing regression of atherosclerotic plaques, in AMD. Design Pilot multicenter open-label prospective clinical study of 26 patients with diagnosis of AMD and the presence of many large, soft drusenoid deposits. Patients received 80 mg of atorvastatin daily and were monitored at baseline and every 3 months with complete ophthalmologic exam, best corrected visual acuity (VA), fundus photographs, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and blood work (AST, ALT, CPK, total cholesterol, TSH, creatinine, as well as a pregnancy test for premenopausal women). Results Twenty-three subjects completed a minimum follow-up of 12 months. High-dose atorvastatin resulted in regression of drusen deposits associated with vision gain (+ 3.3 letters, p = 0.06) in 10 patients. No subjects progressed to advanced neovascular AMD. Conclusions High-dose statins may result in resolution of drusenoid pigment epithelial detachments (PEDs) and improvement in VA, without atrophy or neovascularization in a high-risk subgroup of AMD patients. Confirmation from larger studies is warranted. PMID:27077128

  19. Renal brush-border Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange activity in the aging rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, J.L.; Sacktor, B.

    1987-04-01

    Amiloride-sensitive Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange activity in brush-border membrane vesicles isolated from male rat proximal tubules was decreased in the senescent rat (24 mo) compared with the young adult (6 mo). There was no significant loss in Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange activity in the kidneys of animals between 6 and 18 mo of age. Amiloride-insensitive /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake and the rate of pH gradient dissipation were not altered during aging. The decrease in sodium-dependent (/sup 32/P) phosphate transport preceded the decline in Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange activity by at least 6 mo. Sodium-dependent D-(/sup 3/H) glucose transport was not significantly altered during aging. Thus various renal plasma membrane transport functions were affected differently in the aging rat. The decrease in Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ exchange activity during aging contrasted with the increase in exchange activity reported previously in acute ablation models of chronic renal failure.

  20. Renal Pathology in a Nontraditional Aging Model: The Naked Mole-Rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    PubMed

    Delaney, M A; Kinsel, M J; Treuting, P M

    2016-03-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR; Heterocephalus glaber) is growing in popularity as a model for aging research due to its extreme longevity (up to 30 years), highly adapted physiology, and resistance to cancer, particularly when compared with traditional aging models such as laboratory mice and rats. Despite the NMR's seemingly lengthy health span, several age-related lesions have been documented. During a 15-year retrospective evaluation of a zoo-housed population, histologic changes in the kidneys were reported in 127 of 138 (92%) adult NMRs. Of these, renal tubular mineralization was very common (115 of 127; 90.6%) and found in NMRs without concurrent renal lesions (36 of 127; 28.3%). Many of the other described lesions were considered progressive stages of a single process, generally referred to as chronic nephritis or nephropathy, and diagnosed in 73 of 127 (57.5%), while end-stage renal disease was reported in only 12 (9.4%) NMRs. Renal lesions of these NMRs were comparable to disease entities reported in laboratory rats and certain strains of inbred and noninbred mice. Although many lesions of NMR kidneys were similar to those found in aged laboratory rodents, some common urinary diseases were not represented in the examined colonies. The goal of this study was to describe renal lesions in NMRs from a zoologic setting to familiarize investigators and pathologists with an apparently common and presumably age-related disease in this nontraditional model.

  1. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  2. Immune marker CD68 correlates with cognitive impairment in normally aged rats.

    PubMed

    Farso, Mark; Ménard, Caroline; Colby-Milley, Jessica; Quirion, Rémi

    2013-08-01

    The relationship between heightened neuroinflammation and cognitive decline in the normally aged brain is still debatable, as most data are derived from insult-related models. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to determine whether a link could be established for 2 immune markers at the post-transcriptional level; CD68 and MHC-II, in a normally aged (24-month-old) rat population discriminated for their learning abilities. Using the Morris Water Maze (MWM) task, aged rats were divided into aged learning-impaired (AI) or -unimpaired (AU) groups. Western immunoblots of hippocampal tissue revealed a significant increase of CD68 in AI rats compared to the AU group. Moreover, up-regulated CD68 expression correlated with increased latency times in the MWM task. Immunofluorescence for CD68 revealed intense staining in the white matter regions and CA3 subregion of the hippocampus in the AI group. Despite expression of MHC-II in the AI group, no correlation was found. Overall, these data suggest that CD68 could play a role associated with cognitive decline in a subgroup of the normally aged population. PMID:23523271

  3. Protective Effects of Gelam Honey against Oxidative Damage in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sahhugi, Zulaikha; Jubri, Zakiah

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by progressive decline in physiological and body function due to increase in oxidative damage. Gelam honey has been accounted to have high phenolic and nonphenolic content to attenuate oxidative damage. This study was to determine the effect of local gelam honey on oxidative damage of aged rats. Twenty-four male Spraque-Dawley rats were divided into young (2 months) and aged (19 months) groups. Each group was further divided into control (fed with plain water) and supplemented with 2.5 mg/kg body weight of gelam honey for 8 months. DNA damage level was determined by comet assay and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activity of blood and cardiac antioxidant enzymes was determined by spectrophotometer. The DNA damage and MDA level were reduced in both gelam honey supplemented groups. Gelam honey increases erythrocytes CAT and cardiac SOD activities in young and cardiac CAT activity in young and aged groups. The DNA damage was increased in the aged group compared to young group, but reduced at the end of the study. The decline of oxidative damage in rats supplemented with gelam honey might be through the modulation of antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:25505937

  4. Castration- and aging-induced changes in the expression of zinc transporter and metallothionein in rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Morihara, Naoaki; Usui, Shigeyuki; Hayama, Minoru; Sugimura, Yoshiki; Hirano, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Prostate tissue contains high concentrations of zinc. Zinc content in the prostate gland changes in prostatic disease, such as benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer, which occur more frequently with increasing age. Prostate zinc content is also known to decrease after castration in animal models. It is not clear how prostate zinc content is regulated; therefore, to clarify the mechanisms underlying zinc homeostasis, we examined zinc content and the expression of zinc transporters and metallothioneins in the prostates of aged or castrated rats. Zinc concentration was measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The mRNA expression of zinc transporters and metallothioneins was determined by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis. The expression of the zinc transporter Slc30a2 (Znt2) in ventral prostate (VP) of aged rats (21 months) was approximately 21-fold higher than that in VP of young rats (4 months), and zinc levels in VP of young rats increased significantly compared with that in aged rats. Zinc content in lateral prostate (LP) and dorsal prostate did not differ between young and aged rats. Decreased metallothionein-3 (Mt3) expression was observed in LP of castrated rats, and this reduction was prevented by testosterone replacement. Zinc content and Mt3 expression levels correlated significantly in rat LP. Our findings suggest that Mt3 could play a critical role in zinc homeostasis in rat LP. PMID:20798384

  5. [CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RETINA IN CHRONIC STRESS IN LABORATORY RATS OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS].

    PubMed

    Nesterova, A A; Yermilov, V V; Tiurenkov, I N; Smirnov, A V; Grigoriyeva, N V; Zagrebin, V L; Rogova, L N; Antoshkin, O N; Dovgalyov, A O

    2016-01-01

    The retina was studied in albino laboratory male rats of two age groups (12 and 24 months), 10 animals in each subjected to chronic combined stress. The stress was caused in animals by simultaneous exposure to pulsed light, loud sound, swinging and restriction of mobility for 7 days, 30 mm daily. The retina of intact rats of the corresponding age groups (n = 20) served as control. Enucleated eyes of stressed and control animals were processed with standard histological technique and stained with Nissl's method and hematoxylin-eosin. The retina of the stressed animals of both age groups showed the decrease in the number of cells and the disarrangement of its layers, most pronounced in the layers of photoreceptor neurons and ganglion cells. The comparative morphometric analysis demonstrated a reduction of the layer thickness and cell numerical density in the retina of stressed animals, both young (12 months) and old (24 months), as compared to that of control animals. PMID:27487662

  6. Changes in the dielectric properties of rat tissue as a function of age at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyman, A.; Rezazadeh, A. A.; Gabriel, C.

    2001-06-01

    The dielectric properties of ten rat tissues at six different ages were measured at 37 °C in the frequency range of 130 MHz to 10 GHz using an open-ended coaxial probe and a computer controlled network analyser. The results show a general decrease of the dielectric properties with age. The trend is more apparent for brain, skull and skin tissues and less noticeable for abdominal tissues. The variation in the dielectric properties with age is due to the changes in the water content and the organic composition of tissues. The percentage decrease in the dielectric properties of certain tissues in the 30 to 70 day old rats at cellular phone frequencies have been tabulated. These data provide an important input in the provision of rigorous dosimetry in lifetime-exposure animal experiments. The results provide some insight into possible differences in the assessment of exposure for children and adults.

  7. Age-dependent changes in expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors in rat myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, W.; Williams, R.S.

    1986-07-16

    The expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors within ventricular myocardium of rats ranging in age from 21 days of fetal life to 24 months after birth was measured from (/sup 125/I) 2-(..beta.. hydroxy phenyl) ethylaminomethyl tetralone binding isotherms. No difference was observed in binding affinity between any of the age groups studied. The number of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors was found to be 60-120% higher in membranes from fetal or immature rats up to 25 days of age when compared with adult animals. The increased expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors in the developing heart relative to that observed in adult heart is consistent with the hypothesis that alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor stimulation may modulate protein synthesis and growth in mammalian myocardium.

  8. Fine structural changes in the lateral vestibular nucleus of aging rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Miquel, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fine structure of the lateral vestibular nucleus was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, that were sacrified at 4 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 6-8 months, and 18-20 months of age. In the neuronal perikaria, the following age-associated changes were seen with increasing frequency with advancing age: rodlike nuclear inclusions and nuclear membrane invaginations; cytoplasmic dense bodies with the characteristics of lipofuscin; and moderate disorganization of the granular endoplasmic reticulum. Dense bodies were also seen in glial cells. Rats 18 to 20 months old showed dendritic swellings, axonal degeneration, and an apparent increase in the number of axosomatic synaptic terminals containing flattened vesicles (presumed to be inhibitory in function).

  9. Supplementation with green tea polyphenols improves bone microstructure and quality in aged, orchidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Cao, Jay J; Dagda, Raul Y; Tenner, Thomas E; Chyu, Ming-Chien; Yeh, James K

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies show that green tea polyphenols (GTPs) attenuate bone loss and microstructure deterioration in ovariectomized aged female rats, a model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. This study evaluated the efficacy of GTPs at mitigating bone loss and microstructure deterioration along with related mechanisms in androgen-deficient aged rats, a model of male osteoporosis. A 2 (sham vs. orchidectomy) × 2 (no GTP and 0.5% GTP in drinking water) factorial design was studied for 16 weeks using 40 aged male rats. An additional 10 rats (baseline group) were killed at the beginning of study to provide baseline parameters. There was no difference in femoral mineral density between baseline and the sham only group. Orchidectomy suppressed serum testosterone and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase concentrations, liver glutathione peroxidase activity, bone mineral density, and bone strength. Orchidectomy also decreased trabecular bone volume, number, and thickness in the distal femur and proximal tibia and bone-formation rate in trabecular bone of proximal tibia but increased serum osteocalcin concentrations and bone-formation rates in the endocortical tibial shaft. GTP supplementation resulted in increased serum osteocalcin concentrations, bone mineral density, and trabecular volume, number, and strength of femur; increased trabecular volume and thickness and bone formation in both the proximal tibia and periosteal tibial shaft; decreased eroded surface in the proximal tibia and endocortical tibial shaft; and increased liver glutathione peroxidase activity. We conclude that GTP supplementation attenuates trabecular and cortical bone loss through increasing bone formation while suppressing bone resorption due to its antioxidant capacity.

  10. Age-associated expression of HCN channel isoforms in rat sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Yang, Pei; Yang, Zhao; Zhang, Hong; Ma, Aiqun

    2016-02-01

    The expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel isoforms varies among species, cardiac tissues, developmental stages, and disease generation. However, alterations in the HCN channels during aging remain unclear. We investigated the protein expressions of HCN channel isoforms, HCN1-HCN4, in the sinoatrial nodes (SANs) from young (1-month-old), adult (4-month-old), and aged (30-month-old) rats. We found that HCN2 and HCN4 proteins were present in rat SAN using immunohistochemistry; therefore, we quantitatively analyzed their expression by Western blot. Aim to correlate protein expression and pacemaking function, specific blockade of HCN channels with 3 µmol/L ivabradine prolonged the cycle length in the intact rat heart. During the senescent process, the HCN2 and HCN4 protein levels declined, which was accompanied with a decreased effect of ivabradine on rat SAN automaticity. These results indicated the age-associated expression and relative function of HCN channel isoforms.

  11. Age-associated expression of HCN channel isoforms in rat sinoatrial node

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Yang, Pei; Yang, Zhao; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel isoforms varies among species, cardiac tissues, developmental stages, and disease generation. However, alterations in the HCN channels during aging remain unclear. We investigated the protein expressions of HCN channel isoforms, HCN1-HCN4, in the sinoatrial nodes (SANs) from young (1-month-old), adult (4-month-old), and aged (30-month-old) rats. We found that HCN2 and HCN4 proteins were present in rat SAN using immunohistochemistry; therefore, we quantitatively analyzed their expression by Western blot. Aim to correlate protein expression and pacemaking function, specific blockade of HCN channels with 3 µmol/L ivabradine prolonged the cycle length in the intact rat heart. During the senescent process, the HCN2 and HCN4 protein levels declined, which was accompanied with a decreased effect of ivabradine on rat SAN automaticity. These results indicated the age-associated expression and relative function of HCN channel isoforms. PMID:26341471

  12. Age-related changes in endothelial permeability and distribution volume of albumin in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Belmin, J; Corman, B; Merval, R; Tedgui, A

    1993-03-01

    Age-related changes in macromolecular transport across the arterial wall were investigated in 10-, 20-, and 30-mo-old WAG/Rij rats. Animals were injected with 125I- and 131I-labeled albumin, 90 and 5 min before they were killed, respectively. The transmural distribution of relative concentration of tracers in the aortic wall was obtained using en face serial sectioning technique. The apparent endothelial permeability to albumin calculated from the distribution of 5-min 131I-labeled albumin concentrations was significantly enhanced in 20- and 30-mo-old rats compared with 10-mo-old rats. The apparent distribution volume of albumin within the media, estimated as the mean medial 125I-labeled albumin concentration, was not significantly changed in 20-mo-old rats but was significantly decreased in the 30-mo-old animals. These age-related changes in the macromolecular transport suggest that the entry of plasma macromolecules in the aged arterial wall might be enhanced, whereas the efflux through the media may be impeded, possibly contributing to their trapping in the subendothelium. PMID:8456970

  13. Cross-activation and detraining effects of tongue exercise in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Schaser, Allison J; Ciucci, Michelle R; Connor, Nadine P

    2016-01-15

    Voice and swallowing deficits can occur with aging. Tongue exercise paired with a swallow may be used to treat swallowing disorders, but may also benefit vocal function due to cross-system activation effects. It is unknown how exercise-based neuroplasticity contributes to behavior and maintenance following treatment. Eighty rats were used to examine behavioral parameters and changes in neurotrophins after tongue exercise paired with a swallow. Tongue forces and ultrasonic vocalizations were recorded before and after training/detraining in young and old rats. Tissue was analyzed for neurotrophin content. Results showed tongue exercise paired with a swallow was associated with increased tongue forces at all ages. Gains diminished after detraining in old rats. Age-related changes in vocalizations, neurotrophin 4 (NT4), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were found. Minimal cross-system activation effects were observed. Neuroplastic benefits were demonstrated with exercise in old rats through behavioral improvements and up-regulation of BDNF in the hypoglossal nucleus. Tongue exercise paired with a swallow should be developed, studied, and optimized in human clinical research to treat swallowing and voice disorders in elderly people.

  14. [Deformability of the erythrocytes membrane in rats of different age in hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Berezniakova, A I; Zhemela, O D

    2013-01-01

    Using modern ("laser tweezers", low ionic strength Liss, definition of microviscosity of erythrocyte membranes by fluorescence probe pyrene) and classical methods of investigation the osmotic resistance of red blood cells and protein membrane of red blood cells, the authors have esteblisheshed that deformation of the red blood cells in hemic hypoxia varies depending on the animals' age. The maximum capacity of red blood cells to deform was detected in rats of prepubertal period (40.2%). In the group of old rats this parameter reached the minimum level (19.7%). Age changes in erythrocyte membranes during hypoxia are manifested in an increase in the viscosity of the lipid bilayer (microviscosity index reduced in old rats compared with young adult animals by 69.5%) and an increase in the percentage of skeletal protein spectrin (by 53.0%). These changes determine the reduction in deformation capacity of red blood cells. The relationship between the age-related changes of erythrocyte membrane deformation and the state of regional microcirculation has been determined. In old rats a perfusion volume is reduced by 43.8%, the fractional volume of red blood cells passing per unit time through microvessels reduced by 59.3%, the proportion of oxygen consumption in tissues decreased by 6.6% and the perfusion of oxygen saturation decreased by 50.0%.

  15. Spontaneous hyperplasia of the ventral lobe of the prostate in aging genetically hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Golomb, E; Rosenzweig, N; Eilam, R; Abramovici, A

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the prostatic autonomic innervation takes part in its homeostasis and growth. Other works showed that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) show excessive sympathetic activity, accompanied by lower urinary tract symptoms, increased growth capacity of prostatic stromal cells, and increased levels of androgens and their receptors. Furthermore, young SHR were reported to present incipient stages of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The aim of the present study was to examine whether this strain indeed develops spontaneous BPH with age, and can thus serve as a genuine natural model for this disorder. For this purpose, ventral lobes of prostates of one-year-old, male SHR and their normotensive counterparts, Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, were examined histopathologically, and the degree of hyperplasia was evaluated according to a score-chart protocol (histoscore). SHR exhibited severe adenomatous spontaneous BPH, characterized by piling-up of epithelial cells, with papillary formations, accompanied by a mild increase in the amount of fibrocytes and smooth muscle cells in the stroma. This was reflected by histoscore values of 38 +/-2. Thickening of prostatic arterioles also was noted, as well as mild chronic inflammatory exudate. WKY rats did not show any of these features of BPH despite their age (histoscore 17 +/- 3, significantly different from that of SHR). We conclude that SHR can serve as a rodent model for the spontaneous development of BPH with age, most probably due to the excessive neuroendocrine activity characteristic of this rat strain.

  16. [Influence of the season of birth of male rats on some parameters of biological age].

    PubMed

    Matveeva, Iu P; Lotosh, T A; Iunash, V D; Vinogradova, I A

    2013-11-01

    The influence of the duration of daylight in the condition of natural lightning in the North-West part of Russia on the dynamics of parameters of biological age in male rats according to the season of birth had been studied during two years. It was found out that alteration of the duration of daylight regardless of the male rats season of birth modified rate of sexual maturation, growth, weight, food and water consumption, daily urine output and blood glucose compared with the analogous parameters in the condition of standard light and dark interchange.

  17. [Influence of the season of birth of male rats on some parameters of biological age].

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    The influence of the duration of daylight in the condition of natural lightning in the North-West part of Russia on the dynamics of parameters of biological age in male rats according to the season of birth had been studied during two years. It was found out that alteration of the duration of daylight regardless of the male rats season of birth modified rate of sexual maturation, growth, weight, food and water consumption, daily urine output and blood glucose compared with the analogous parameters in the condition of standard light and dark interchange. PMID:25507636

  18. [Influence of the season of birth of male rats on some parameters of biological age].

    PubMed

    Matveeva, Iu P; Lotosh, T A; Iunash, V D; Vinogradova, I A

    2013-11-01

    The influence of the duration of daylight in the condition of natural lightning in the North-West part of Russia on the dynamics of parameters of biological age in male rats according to the season of birth had been studied during two years. It was found out that alteration of the duration of daylight regardless of the male rats season of birth modified rate of sexual maturation, growth, weight, food and water consumption, daily urine output and blood glucose compared with the analogous parameters in the condition of standard light and dark interchange. PMID:25427386

  19. Elevated dynorphin in the hippocampal formation of aged rats: Relation to cognitive impairment on a spatial learning task

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hannkuang; Owyang, V.; Hong, Jaushyong; Gallagher, M. )

    1989-04-01

    Radioimmunoassay revealed increased dynorphin A(1-8)-like immunoreactivity (dynA(1-8)LI) in the aged rat brain. Among a number of brain regions examined, an age-related dynA(1-8)LI elevation was found only in the hippocampal formation and frontal cortex. Moreover, the increase in dynA(1-8)LI in the aged hippocampus was associated with a decline in spatial learning ability: dynA(1-8)LI distinguished aged rats that were behaviorally impaired from aged cohorts that learned the spatial task as rapidly as younger animals. Northern blot hybridization using a {sup 32}P-labeled complementary RNA probe encoding rat prodynorphin indicated that the abundance of prodynorphin mRNA was also significantly increased in the hippocampal formation of aged rats with identified spatial learning impairments.

  20. Maturation promoting factor destabilization facilitates postovulatory aging-mediated abortive spontaneous egg activation in rat.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Shilpa; Koch, Biplob; Chaube, Shail K

    2016-04-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether destabilization of maturation promoting factor (MPF) leads to postovulatory aging-mediated abortive spontaneous egg activation (SEA). If so, we wished to determine whether changes in Wee-1 as well as Emi2 levels are associated with MPF destabilization during postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA in rats eggs aged in vivo. For this purpose, sexually immature female rats were given a single injection (20 IU IM) of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin for 48 h followed by single injection of human chorionic gonadotropin (20 IU). Ovulated eggs were collected after 14, 17, 19 and 21 h post-hCG surge to induce postovulatory aging in vivo. The morphological changes, Wee1, phosphorylation status of cyclin dependent kinase 1(Cdk1), early mitotic inhibitor 2 (Emi2), anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), cyclin B1, mitotic arrest deficient protein (MAD2) levels and Cdk1 activity were analyzed. The increased Wee 1 level triggered phosphorylation of Thr-14/Tyr-15 and dephosphorylation of Thr-161 residues of Cdk1. The decrease of Emi2 level was associated with increased APC/C level and decreased cyclin B1 level. Changes in phosphorylation status of Cdk1 and reduced cyclin B1 level resulted in destabilization of MPF. The destabilized MPF finally led to postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA in rat eggs. It was concluded that the increase of Wee 1 but decrease of Emi2 level triggers MPF destabilization and thereby postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA in rat eggs. PMID:26991553

  1. Chronic Ampakine Treatments Stimulate Dendritic Growth and Promote Learning in Middle-Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lauterborn, Julie C.; Palmer, Linda C.; Jia, Yousheng; Pham, Danielle T.; Hou, Bowen; Wang, Weisheng; Trieu, Brian H.; Cox, Conor D.; Kantorovich, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (ampakines) have been shown to rescue synaptic plasticity and reduce neuropathology in rodent models of cognitive disorders. Here we tested whether chronic ampakine treatment offsets age-related dendritic retraction in middle-aged (MA) rats. Starting at 10 months of age, rats were housed in an enriched environment and given daily treatment with a short half-life ampakine or vehicle for 3 months. Dendritic branching and spine measures were collected from 3D reconstructions of Lucifer yellow-filled CA1 pyramidal cells. There was a substantial loss of secondary branches, relative to enriched 2.5-month-old rats, in apical and basal dendritic fields of vehicle-treated, but not ampakine-treated, 13-month-old rats. Baseline synaptic responses in CA1 were only subtly different between the two MA groups, but long-term potentiation was greater in ampakine-treated rats. Unsupervised learning of a complex environment was used to assess treatment effects on behavior. Vehicle- and drug-treated rats behaved similarly during a first 30 min session in the novel environment but differed markedly on subsequent measures of long-term memory. Markov sequence analysis uncovered a clear increase in the predictability of serial movements between behavioral sessions 2 and 3 in the ampakine, but not vehicle, group. These results show that a surprising degree of dendritic retraction occurs by middle age and that this can be mostly offset by pharmacological treatments without evidence for unwanted side effects. The functional consequences of rescue were prominent with regard to memory but also extended to self-organization of behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain aging is characterized by a progressive loss of dendritic arbors and the emergence of impairments to learning-related synaptic plasticity. The present studies show that dendritic losses are evident by middle age despite housing in an enriched environment and can be

  2. Influence of age on the late retrograde effects of sciatic nerve section in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kerezoudi, E; King, R H; Muddle, J R; O'Neill, J A; Thomas, P K

    1995-01-01

    The influence of age on the late retrograde effects of unilateral sciatic nerve section was investigated in rats. Operations were performed on young rats aged 3 months and older rats aged 15 and 18 months, with survival times ranging from 6 to 15 months depending upon age at the time of operation. As in previous studies, axonal atrophy was found in myelinated fibres proximal to nerve transection. This was observed to be greater in animals operated upon at 3 months of age than in those in which the sciatic nerve was transected at 15 and 18 months. In the sciatic nerve, focal intramyelinic oedema was present at a low frequency on the operated side just proximal to the section at all survival times but not on the unoperated side except in 1 old animal. Its frequency increased with age both in the dorsal and ventral roots on both sides but it was not more common on the operated side. Retrograde axonal atrophy is therefore unlikely to contribute to its occurrence. In the dorsal root ganglia the main abnormality was the presence of vacuolated neurons on the operated side. Nuclear eccentricity was also observed on the operated side in young animals in a proportion of the neurons; its frequency increased with age on the normal side and there was no difference in the older animals between operated and control sides. The possibility is discussed that growth factor deprivation secondary to axotomy is implicated in these changes. If so, there are age differences in its effect in giving rise to axonal atrophy and neuronal vacuolation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7591983

  3. Effects of aging on vasoconstrictor and mechanical properties of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller-Delp, Judy; Spier, Scott A.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Lesniewski, Lisa A.; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Humphrey, J. D.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise capacity and skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise are reduced with advancing age. This reduction in blood flow capacity may be related to increased reactivity of skeletal muscle resistance vessels to vasoconstrictor stimuli. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that aging results in increased vasoconstrictor responses of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles. First-order (1A) arterioles (90-220 microm) from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of young (4 mo) and aged (24 mo) Fischer-344 rats were isolated, cannulated, and pressurized via hydrostatic reservoirs. Vasoconstriction in response to increases in norepinephrine (NE; 1 x 10(-9)-1 x 10(-4) M) and KCl (20-100 mM) concentrations and increases in intraluminal pressure (10-130 cmH(2)O) were evaluated in the absence of flow. Responses to NE and KCl were similar in both soleus and gastrocnemius muscle arterioles from young and aged rats. In contrast, active myogenic responses to changes in intraluminal pressure were diminished in soleus and gastrocnemius arterioles from aged rats. To assess whether alterations in the mechanical properties of resistance arterioles underlie altered myogenic responsiveness, passive diameter responses to pressure and mechanical stiffness were evaluated. There was no effect of age on the structural behavior (passive pressure-diameter relationship) or stiffness of arterioles from either the soleus or gastrocnemius muscles. These results suggest that aging does not result in a nonspecific decrease in vasoconstrictor responsiveness of skeletal muscle arterioles. Rather, aging-induced adaptations of vasoreactivity of resistance arterioles appear to be limited to mechanisms that are uniquely involved in the signaling of the myogenic response.

  4. Targeting AGEs Signaling Ameliorates Central Nervous System Diabetic Complications in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Mohamed Naguib; El-Bassossy, Hany M.; Barakat, Waleed

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic endocrine disorder associated with several complications as hypertension, advanced brain aging, and cognitive decline. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is an important mechanism that mediates diabetic complications. Upon binding to their receptor (RAGE), AGEs mediate oxidative stress and/or cause cross-linking with proteins in blood vessels and brain tissues. The current investigation was designed to investigate the effect of agents that decrease AGEs signaling, perindopril which increases soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and alagebrium which cleaves AGEs cross-links, compared to the standard antidiabetic drug, gliclazide, on the vascular and central nervous system (CNS) complications in STZ-induced (50 mg/kg, IP) diabetes in rats. Perindopril ameliorated the elevation in blood pressure seen in diabetic animals. In addition, both perindopril and alagebrium significantly inhibited memory decline (performance in the Y-maze), neuronal degeneration (Fluoro-Jade staining), AGEs accumulation in serum and brain, and brain oxidative stress (level of reduced glutathione and activities of catalase and malondialdehyde). These results suggest that blockade of AGEs signaling after diabetes induction in rats is effective in reducing diabetic CNS complications. PMID:26491434

  5. Involvement of cellular metabolism in age-related LTP modifications in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Drulis-Fajdasz, Dominika; Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-06-10

    Recent studies emphasized crucial role of astrocytic glycogen metabolism in regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity in young animals. However, the interplay between age-related synaptic plasticity impairments and changes in energetic metabolism remains obscure. To address this issue, we investigated, in hippocampal slices of young (one month) and aged rats (20-22-months), the impact of glycogen degradation inhibition on LTP, mRNA expression for glycogen metabolism enzymes and morphology of dendritic spines. We show that, whereas in young hippocampi, inhibition of glycogen phosphorolysis disrupts the late phase of LTP in the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pathway, in aged rats, blockade of glycogen phosphorylase tends to enhance it. Gene expression for key energy metabolism enzymes, such as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase and glutamine synthetase showed marked differences between young and aged groups and changes in expression of these enzymes preceded plasticity phenomena. Interestingly, in the aged group, a prominent expression of these enzymes was found also in neurons. Concluding, we show that LTP in the considered pathway is differentially modulated by metabolic processes in young and aging animals, indicating a novel venue of studies aiming at preventing cognitive decline during aging. PMID:26101857

  6. Short-term environmental enrichment enhances synaptic plasticity in hippocampal slices from aged rats.

    PubMed

    Stein, Liana R; O'Dell, Kazuko A; Funatsu, Michiyo; Zorumski, Charles F; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2016-08-01

    Age-associated changes in cognition are mirrored by impairments in cellular models of memory and learning, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In young rodents, environmental enrichment (EE) can enhance memory, alter LTP and LTD, as well as reverse cognitive deficits induced by aging. Whether short-term EE can benefit cognition and synaptic plasticity in aged rodents is unclear. Here, we tested if short-term EE could overcome age-associated impairments in induction of LTP and LTD. LTP and LTD could not be induced in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices in control, aged rats using standard stimuli that are highly effective in young rats. However, exposure of aged littermates to EE for three weeks enabled successful induction of LTP and LTD. EE-facilitated LTP was dependent upon N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). These alterations in synaptic plasticity occurred with elevated levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein and vascular endothelial growth factor, but in the absence of changes in several other synaptic and cellular markers. Importantly, our study suggests that even a relatively short period of EE is sufficient to alter synaptic plasticity and molecular markers linked to cognitive function in aged animals.

  7. Greater Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation in Hippocampus of Aged Rats Sensitizes Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Ruth M.; Thompson, Vanessa M.; Kitt, Meagan M.; Amat, Jose; Hale, Matthew W.; Frank, Matthew G.; Crysdale, Nicole Y.; Stamper, Christopher E.; Hennessey, Patrick A.; Watkins, Linda R.; Spencer, Robert L.; Lowry, Christopher A.; Maier, Steven F.

    2014-01-01

    Healthy aging individuals are more likely to suffer profound memory impairments following an immune challenge than are younger adults. These challenges produce a brain inflammatory response that is exaggerated with age. Sensitized microglia found in the normal aging brain are responsible for this amplified response, which in turn interferes with processes involved in memory formation. Here, we examine factors that may lead aging to sensitize microglia. Aged rats exhibited higher CORT levels in the hippocampus, but not in plasma, throughout the daytime (diurnal inactive phase). These elevated hippocampal CORT levels were associated with increased hippocampal 11β-HSD1 protein expression, the enzyme that catalyzes glucocorticoid formation, and greater hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation. Intracisternal administration of mifepristone, a GR antagonist, effectively reduced immune-activated proinflammatory responses, specifically from hippocampal microglia, and prevented E. coli-induced memory impairments in aged rats. Voluntary exercise as a therapeutic intervention significantly reduced total hippocampal GR expression. These data strongly suggest that increased GR activation in the aged hippocampus plays a critical role in sensitizing microglia. PMID:25559333

  8. Targeting AGEs Signaling Ameliorates Central Nervous System Diabetic Complications in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohamed Naguib; El-Bassossy, Hany M; Barakat, Waleed

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic endocrine disorder associated with several complications as hypertension, advanced brain aging, and cognitive decline. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is an important mechanism that mediates diabetic complications. Upon binding to their receptor (RAGE), AGEs mediate oxidative stress and/or cause cross-linking with proteins in blood vessels and brain tissues. The current investigation was designed to investigate the effect of agents that decrease AGEs signaling, perindopril which increases soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and alagebrium which cleaves AGEs cross-links, compared to the standard antidiabetic drug, gliclazide, on the vascular and central nervous system (CNS) complications in STZ-induced (50 mg/kg, IP) diabetes in rats. Perindopril ameliorated the elevation in blood pressure seen in diabetic animals. In addition, both perindopril and alagebrium significantly inhibited memory decline (performance in the Y-maze), neuronal degeneration (Fluoro-Jade staining), AGEs accumulation in serum and brain, and brain oxidative stress (level of reduced glutathione and activities of catalase and malondialdehyde). These results suggest that blockade of AGEs signaling after diabetes induction in rats is effective in reducing diabetic CNS complications. PMID:26491434

  9. Greater glucocorticoid receptor activation in hippocampus of aged rats sensitizes microglia.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Ruth M; Thompson, Vanessa M; Kitt, Meagan M; Amat, Jose; Hale, Matthew W; Frank, Matthew G; Crysdale, Nicole Y; Stamper, Christopher E; Hennessey, Patrick A; Watkins, Linda R; Spencer, Robert L; Lowry, Christopher A; Maier, Steven F

    2015-03-01

    Healthy aging individuals are more likely to suffer profound memory impairments following an immune challenge than are younger adults. These challenges produce a brain inflammatory response that is exaggerated with age. Sensitized microglia found in the normal aging brain are responsible for this amplified response, which in turn interferes with processes involved in memory formation. Here, we examine factors that may lead aging to sensitize microglia. Aged rats exhibited higher corticosterone levels in the hippocampus, but not in plasma, throughout the daytime (diurnal inactive phase). These elevated hippocampal corticosterone levels were associated with increased hippocampal 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 protein expression, the enzyme that catalyzes glucocorticoid formation and greater hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation. Intracisternal administration of mifepristone, a GR antagonist, effectively reduced immune-activated proinflammatory responses, specifically from hippocampal microglia and prevented Escherichia coli-induced memory impairments in aged rats. Voluntary exercise as a therapeutic intervention significantly reduced total hippocampal GR expression. These data strongly suggest that increased GR activation in the aged hippocampus plays a critical role in sensitizing microglia.

  10. Age-dependent increase of etheno-DNA-adducts in liver and brain of ROS overproducing OXYS rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Jagadeesan; Sinitsina, Olga; Vasunina, Elena A.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.; Laval, Jacques; Bartsch, Helmut . E-mail: h.bartsch@dkfz.de

    2005-10-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) play a role in aging and degenerative diseases. To correlate oxidative stress and LPO-derived DNA damage, we determined etheno-DNA-adducts in liver and brain from ROS overproducing OXYS rats in comparison with age-matched Wistar rats. Liver DNA samples from 3- and 15-month-old OXYS and Wistar rats were analyzed for 1,N {sup 6}-ethenodeoxyadenosine ({epsilon}dA) and 3,N {sup 4}-ethenodeoxycytidine ({epsilon}dC) by immunoaffinity/{sup 32}P-postlabelling. While {epsilon}dA and {epsilon}dC levels were not different in young rats, adduct levels were significantly higher in old OXYS rats when compared to old Wistar or young OXYS rats. Frozen rat brain sections were analyzed for {epsilon}dA by immunostaining of nuclei. Brains from old OXYS rats accumulated {epsilon}dA more frequently than age-matched Wistar rats. Our results demonstrate increased LPO-induced DNA damage in organs of OXYS rats which correlates with their known shorter life-span and elevated frequency of chronic degenerative diseases.

  11. Physical activity ameliorates cartilage degeneration in a rat model of aging: a study on lubricin expression.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, G; Castrogiovanni, P; Trovato, F M; Imbesi, R; Giunta, S; Szychlinska, M A; Loreto, C; Castorina, S; Mobasheri, A

    2015-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common musculoskeletal disorder characterized by slow progression and joint tissue degeneration. Aging is one of the most prominent risk factors for the development and progression of OA. OA is not, however, an inevitable consequence of aging and age-related changes in the joint can be distinguished from those that are the result of joint injury or inflammatory disease. The question that remains is whether OA can be prevented by undertaking regular physical activity. Would moderate physical activity in the elderly cartilage (and lubricin expression) comparable to a sedentary healthy adult? In this study we used physical exercise in healthy young, adult, and aged rats to evaluate the expression of lubricin as a novel biomarker of chondrocyte senescence. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to evaluate the expression of lubricin in articular cartilage, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to quantify lubricin in synovial fluid. Morphological evaluation was done by histology to monitor possible tissue alterations. Our data suggest that moderate physical activity and normal mechanical joint loading in elderly rats improve tribology and lubricative properties of articular cartilage, promoting lubricin synthesis and its elevation in synovial fluid, thus preventing cartilage degradation compared with unexercised adult rats.

  12. Ageing diminishes endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and tetrahydrobiopterin content in rat skeletal muscle arterioles.

    PubMed

    Delp, Michael D; Behnke, Bradley J; Spier, Scott A; Wu, Guoyao; Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2008-02-15

    Ageing reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilatation through an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) signalling pathway. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arginase activity diminishes endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in skeletal muscle arterioles from old rats, and whether NOS substrate (L-arginine) and cofactor (tetrahydrobiopterin; BH(4)) concentrations are reduced. First-order arterioles were isolated from the soleus muscle of young (6 months old) and old (24 months old) male Fischer 344 rats. In vitro changes in luminal diameter in response to stepwise increases in flow were determined in the presence of the NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10(-5) mol l(-1)), the arginase inhibitor N(omega)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (NOHA, 5 x 10(-4) mol l(-1)), exogenous L-arginine (3 x 10(-3) mol l(-1)) or the precursor for BH(4) synthesis sepiapterin (1 micromol l(-1)). Arteriolar L-arginine and BH(4) content were determined via HPLC. Ageing decreased flow-mediated vasodilatation by 52%, and this difference was abolished with NOS inhibition. Neither inhibition of arginase activity nor addition of exogenous L-arginine had any effect on flow-mediated vasodilatation; arteriolar l-arginine content was also not different between age groups. BH(4) content was lower in arterioles from old rats (94 +/- 8 fmol (mg tissue)(-1)) relative to controls (234 +/- 21 fmol (mg tissue)(-1)), and sepiapterin elevated flow-mediated vasodilatation in arterioles from old rats. These results demonstrate that the impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation induced by old age is due to an altered nitric oxide signalling mechanism in skeletal muscle arterioles, but is not the result of increased arginase activity and limited L-arginine substrate. Rather, the age-related deficit in flow-mediated vasodilatation appears to be the result, in part, of limited BH(4) bioavailability.

  13. Aging reduces the efficacy of estrogen substitution to attenuate cardiac hypertrophy in female spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Jazbutyte, Virginija; Hu, Kai; Kruchten, Patricia; Bey, Emmanuel; Maier, Sebastian K G; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Prelle, Katja; Hegele-Hartung, Christa; Hartmann, Rolf W; Neyses, Ludwig; Ertl, Georg; Pelzer, Theo

    2006-10-01

    Clinical trials failed to show a beneficial effect of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy, whereas experimental studies in young animals reported a protective function of estrogen replacement in cardiovascular disease. Because these diverging results could in part be explained by aging effects, we compared the efficacy of estrogen substitution to modulate cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac gene expression among young (age 3 months) and senescent (age 24 months) spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), which were sham operated or ovariectomized and injected with placebo or identical doses of 17beta-estradiol (E2; 2 microg/kg body weight per day) for 6 weeks (n=10/group). Blood pressure was comparable among sham-operated senescent and young SHRs and not altered by ovariectomy or E2 treatment among young or among senescent rats. Estrogen substitution inhibited uterus atrophy and gain of body weight in young and senescent ovariectomized SHRs, but cardiac hypertrophy was attenuated only in young rats. Cardiac estrogen receptor-alpha expression was lower in intact and in ovariectomized senescent compared with young SHRs and increased with estradiol substitution in aged rats. Plasma estradiol and estrone levels were lower not only in sham-operated but surprisingly also in E2-substituted senescent SHRs and associated with a reduction of hepatic 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 enzyme activity, which converts weak (ie, estrone) into potent estrogens, such as E2. Aging attenuates the antihypertrophic effect of estradiol in female SHRs and is associated with profound alterations in cardiac estrogen receptor-alpha expression and estradiol metabolism. These observations contribute to explain the lower efficiency of estrogen substitution in senescent SHRs.

  14. Effects of age and sex on cerebrovascular function in the rat middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of estrogen on cerebrovascular function are well known, the age-dependent deleterious effects of estrogen are largely unstudied. It was hypothesized that age and sex interact in modulating cerebrovascular reactivity to vasopressin (VP) by altering the role of prostanoids in vascular function. Methods Female (F) Sprague–Dawley rats approximating key stages of “hormonal aging” in humans were studied: premenopausal (mature multigravid, MA, cyclic, 5–6 months) and postmenopausal (reproductively senescent, RS, acyclic, 10–12 months). Age-matched male (M) rats were also studied. Reactivity to VP (10−12–10−7 M) was measured in pressurized middle cerebral artery segments in the absence or presence of selective inhibitors of COX-1 (SC560, SC, 1 μM) or COX-2 (NS398, NS, 10 μM). VP-stimulated release of PGI2 and TXA2 were measured using radioimmunoassay of 6-keto-PGF1α and TXB2 (stable metabolites, pg/mg dry wt/45 min). Results In M, there were no changes in VP-induced vasoconstriction with age. Further, there were no significant differences in basal or in low- or high-VP-stimulated PGI2 or TXA2 production in younger or older M. In contrast, there were marked differences in cerebrovascular reactivity and prostanoid release with advancing age in F. Older RS F exhibited reduced maximal constrictor responses to VP, which can be attributed to enhanced COX-1 derived dilator prostanoids. VP-induced vasoconstriction in younger MA F utilized both COX-1 and COX-2 derived constrictor prostanoids. Further, VP-stimulated PGI2 and TXA2 production was enhanced by endogenous estrogen and decreased with advancing age in F, but not in M rats. Conclusions This is the first study to examine the effects of age and sex on the mechanisms underlying cerebrovascular reactivity to VP. Interestingly, VP-mediated constriction was reduced by age in F, but was unchanged in M rats. Additionally, it was observed

  15. Layer V Perirhinal Cortical Ensemble Activity during Object Exploration: A Comparison between Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Burke, S.N.; Hartzell, A.L.; Lister, J.P.; Hoang, L.T.; Barnes, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Object recognition memory requires the perirhinal cortex (PRC) and this cognitive function declines during normal aging. Recent electrophysiological recordings from young rats have shown that neurons in layer V of the PRC are activated by 3-dimensional objects. Thus, it is possible that age-related object recognition deficits result from alterations in PRC neuron activity in older animals. To examine this, the present study used cellular compartment analysis of temporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (catFISH) with confocal microscopy to monitor cellular distributions of activity-induced Arc RNA in layer V of the PRC. Activity was monitored during two distinct epochs of object exploration. In one group of rats (6 young/6 aged) animals were placed in a familiar testing arena and allowed to explore five different 3-dimensional objects for two 5-min sessions separated by a 20-min rest (AA). The second group of animals (6 young/6 aged) also explored the same objects for two 5-min sessions, but the environment was changed between the first and the second epoch (AB). Behavioral data showed that both age groups spent less time exploring objects during the second epoch, even when the environment changed, indicating successful recognition. Although the proportion of active neurons between epochs did not change in the AA group, in the AB group more neurons were active during epoch 2 of object exploration. This recruitment of neurons into the active neural ensemble could serve to signal that familiar stimuli are being encountered in a new context. When numbers of Arc positive neurons were compared between age groups, the old rats had significantly lower proportions of Arc-positive PRC neurons in both the AA and AB behavioral conditions. These data support the hypothesis that age-associated functional alterations in the PRC contribute to declines in stimulus recognition over the lifespan. PMID:22987683

  16. Layer V perirhinal cortical ensemble activity during object exploration: a comparison between young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Burke, S N; Hartzell, A L; Lister, J P; Hoang, L T; Barnes, C A

    2012-10-01

    Object recognition memory requires the perirhinal cortex (PRC) and this cognitive function declines during normal aging. Recent electrophysiological recordings from young rats have shown that neurons in Layer V of the PRC are activated by three-dimensional objects. Thus, it is possible that age-related object recognition deficits result from alterations in PRC neuron activity in older animals. To examine this, the present study used cellular compartment analysis of temporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (catFISH) with confocal microscopy to monitor cellular distributions of activity-induced Arc RNA in layer V of the PRC. Activity was monitored during two distinct epochs of object exploration. In one group of rats (6 young/6 aged) animals were placed in a familiar testing arena and allowed to explore five different three-dimensional objects for two 5-min sessions separated by a 20-min rest (AA). The second group of animals (6 young/6 aged) also explored the same objects for two 5-min sessions, but the environment was changed between the first and the second epoch (AB). Behavioral data showed that both age groups spent less time exploring objects during the second epoch, even when the environment changed, indicating successful recognition. Although the proportion of active neurons between epochs did not change in the AA group, in the AB group more neurons were active during epoch 2 of object exploration. This recruitment of neurons into the active neural ensemble could serve to signal that familiar stimuli are being encountered in a new context. When numbers of Arc positive neurons were compared between age groups, the old rats had significantly lower proportions of Arc-positive PRC neurons in both the AA and AB behavioral conditions. These data support the hypothesis that age-associated functional alterations in the PRC contribute to declines in stimulus recognition over the lifespan.

  17. Exercise-induced hippocampal anti-inflammatory response in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; Simões, Priscila Santos Rodrigues; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; da Graça Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2013-01-01

    Aging is often accompanied by cognitive decline, memory impairment and an increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders. Most of these age-related alterations have been associated with deleterious processes such as changes in the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Indeed, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lower levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines are found in the aged brain. This perturbation in pro- and anti-inflammatory balance can represent one of the mechanisms that contribute to age-associated neuronal dysfunction and brain vulnerability. We conducted an experimental study to investigate whether an aerobic exercise program could promote changes in inflammatory response in the brains of aged rats. To do so, we evaluated the levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin 1 beta (IL1β), interleukin 6 (IL6) and interleukin 10 (IL10) in the hippocampal formation of 18 month old rats that underwent treadmill training over 10 consecutive days. Quantitative immunoassay analyses showed that the physical exercise increased anti-inflammatory cytokine levels IL10 in the hippocampal formation of aged rats, when compared to the control group. The hippocampal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL1β, IL6 and TNFα were not statistically different between the groups. However, a significant reduction in IL1β/IL10, IL6/IL10 and TNFα/IL10 ratio was observed in the exercised group in relation to the control group. These findings indicate a favorable effect of physical exercise in the balance between hippocampal pro- and anti-inflammatory during aging, as well as reinforce the potential therapeutic of exercise in reducing the risk of neuroinflammation-linked disorders.

  18. Age-dependent expression of forkhead box O proteins in the duodenum of rats*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pan; Zhou, Zhen-qi; Huang, Rui-hua; Zhou, Bo; Wei, Quan-wei; Shi, Fang-xiong

    2011-01-01

    The O subfamily of forkhead box (FoxO) proteins is the downstream effector of the insulin-like growth factor-1/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (IGF-1/PI3K/PKB) signal pathway. The objective of the present study was to examine the expressions of three members of FoxO proteins, FoxO1, FoxO3a, and FoxO4 in the duodenum of Sprague-Dawley rats at different ages. The result demonstrated that the expression of FoxO4 in rat duodenum showed an age-dependent manner. At Day 21, there were no detectable localization and expression of FoxO4 in the duodenum, while, at Months 2 and 6, localization and expression of FoxO4 were distinct. In addition, FoxO4 staining was primarily concentrated in the cell nuclei of the lamina propria around the intestinal gland of the duodenum in 2-month-old rats, but was not detectable in the same area in 6-month-old rats. Our results showed also that although FoxO3a existed in the cytoplasm of the lamina propria at a low level at the 2- and 6-month marks, it was still not detectable at Day 21. Besides, FoxO1 was not detectable in all parts and stages. Taken together, our findings suggested that the cell-specific and age-dependent expressional patterns of FoxO4 and FoxO3a proteins in the duodenum play some roles in the development and growth performance of the rat duodenum. PMID:21887848

  19. Mechanical properties of the rat colon: the effect of age, sex and different conditions of storage.

    PubMed

    Watters, D A; Smith, A N; Eastwood, M A; Anderson, K C; Elton, R A

    1985-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the rat colon were studied in old and young Sprague-Dawley rats which were also grouped by sex. Different storage media were used. Rings of colonic tissue were submitted to pulls on an Instron 1026 tensiometer. Gender did not affect the properties of the young rat colon. The rat colon has a tensile strength of around 50 g/mm2 (which places it between the dog and the cat). It increased in strength from proximal to distal, though the rectum was weaker than the colon. The pre-strain of the rat colon was 10% and it was capable of stretching to 200% of its original dimensions. The strength and ability to stretch fell with age, although it initially increased, in the first year of life. Physiological saline at 4 degrees C preserved the burst strength, percentage elongation, hysteresis and Young's modulus between 25 and 100 g stress for up to 1 week. Young's modulus between 125 and 200 g fell progressively with each day of storage. Stress relaxation rose in the first 24 h and thereafter remained constant. Salt appeared to be a good long-term storage medium. Irradiation of the colons before storage did not affect the mechanical properties.

  20. Reversed palatal perforation by upper incisors in ageing blind mole-rats (Spalax ehrenbergi)

    PubMed Central

    ZURI, I.; TERKEL, J.

    2001-01-01

    Blind mole-rats (Spalax ehrenbergi) are fossorial solitary rodents that present striking morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations to the subterranean environment in which they live. Previous studies have shown that mole-rats are specialised in tooth-digging. The rapid eruption-rate of their incisors has evolved to compensate for their excessive wear by excavation. Males use their incisors more than females for digging and fighting, and their rate of incisor eruption is significantly more rapid than in females. Since mole-rats use their incisors for digging throughout the year, we suggest that continuous mechanical pressure on their oral tissues concentrated at the apical sites of the upper incisors leads to cell and tissue fatigue. We provide evidence for 5 stages of palatal perforation by the upper incisors at their apical sites, with maximum perforation characterising aged males. Interspecies comparisons with 7 other fossorial and semi-fossorial rodent species, and with beavers, which expose their incisors to enormous mechanical pressure, revealed that this palatal perforation is unique to the male mole-rat. We suggest that while the fast eruption rate of incisors in the mole-rat compensates for the rapid wear resulting from digging, evolutionary adaptation to continuous tooth-digging is still ongoing, since the physical pressure of digging at the apical sites of the upper incisors leads to tissue destruction, breakage of the palatal bone and possibly to death, as a result of maxillary inflammation. PMID:11760890

  1. The effects of acute ethanol exposure and ageing on rat brain glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sommavilla, Michela; Sánchez-Villarejo, M Victoria; Almansa, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Vallejo, Violeta; Barcia, Jorge M; Romero, Francisco Javier; Miranda, María

    2012-09-01

    Binge alcohol consumption in adolescents is increasing, and it has been proposed that immature brain deals poorly with oxidative stress. The aim of our work was to study the effect of an acute dose of ethanol on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum of juvenile and adult rats. We have observed no change in levels of glutathione produced by acute alcohol in the three brain areas studied of juvenile and adult rats. Only in the frontal cortex the ratio of GSH/GSSG was increased in the ethanol-treated adult rats. GSH levels in the hippocampus and striatum were significantly higher in adult animals compared to young ones. Higher glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in adult rats was observed in frontal cortex and in striatum. Our data show an increased GSH concentration and GPx activity in different cerebral regions of the adult rat, compared to the young ones, suggesting that age-related variations of total antioxidant defences in brain may predispose young brain structures to ethanol-induced, oxidative stress-mediated tissue damage.

  2. In vivo and in vitro assessment of brain bioenergetics in aging rats

    PubMed Central

    Vančová, Ol’ga; Bačiak, Ladislav; Kašparová, Svatava; Kucharská, Jarmila; Palacios, Hector H; Horecký, Jaromír; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Brain energy disorders can be present in aged men and animals. To this respect, the mitochondrial and free radical theory of aging postulates that age-associated brain energy disorders are caused by an imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidants that can result in oxidative stress. Our study was designed to investigate brain energy metabolism and the activity of endogenous antioxidants during their lifespan in male Wistar rats. In vivo brain bioenergetics were measured using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and in vitro by polarographic analysis of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. When compared to the young controls, a significant decrease of age-dependent mitochondrial respiration and adenosine-3-phosphate (ATP) production measured in vitro correlated with significant reduction of forward creatine kinase reaction (kfor) and with an increase in phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP, PCr/Pi and PME/ATP ratio measured in vivo. The levels of enzymatic antioxidants catalase, GPx and GST significantly decreased in the brain tissue as well as in the peripheral blood of aged rats. We suppose that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative inactivation of endogenous enzymes may participate in age-related disorders of brain energy metabolism. PMID:19906014

  3. Age Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation is improved by resveratrol in rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gocmez, Semil S; Scarpace, Philip J; Whidden, Melissa A; Erdos, Benedek; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Sakarya, Yasemin; Utkan, Tijen; Tumer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether resveratrol improves the adverse effects age on vascular function in mesenteric arteries (MAs), and diminishes the hyperactivity in adrenal gland with age. [Methods] Male F344 x Brown Norway rats were assigned to 6-month control (YC), 6-month resveratrol (YR), 24-month control (OC) and 24-month resveratrol (OR). Resveratrol (15 mg/kg) was provided to resveratrol groups in drinking water for 14 days. [Results] Concentration response curves to phenylephrine (PE, 10-9-10-5M), acetylcholine (Ach, 10-9-10-5M) and resveratrol (10-8-10-4M) were evaluated in pressurized isolated MAs. The Ach concentration-response curve was right shifted with maximal response diminished in OC compared with YC rats. These effects were reversed by resveratrol treatment. The resveratrol-mediated relaxant responses were unchanged with age or resveratrol suggesting an endothelium-independent mechanism. Resveratrol tended to increase endothelial nitric oxide synthase; caused no effect on copper-zinc superoxide dismutase; and normalized the age-related elevatation in DβH and NPY levels in adrenal medulla, two indicators of sympathetic activity [Conclusion] These data indicate that resveratrol reverses age-related dysfunction in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in MAs and partially reverses hyperactivity of adrenomedullary function with age. This treatment may have a therapeuticpotential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or hypertension in the elderly. PMID:27298812

  4. AGING AFFECTS MORPHOLOGY BUT NOT STIMULATED SECRETION OF SALIVA IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Lasisi, T.J.; Shittu, S.T.; Oguntokun, M.M.; Tiamiyu, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of aging on the salivary gland function still remains controversial and inconclusive. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of aging on the morphology and secretion of salivary glands using male Wistar rats. Method: There were three age groups; group A (3 months old; n = 8), group B (6 months old; n = 8), and group C (9 months old; n = 8). Body weights, salivary gland weights, salivary flow rates, pH and salivary levels of sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride, bicarbonate, phosphate and total protein were measured and compared. Hematoxylin-eosin stained histological slides of the salivary glands were assessed for morphological changes. Results: Body weights increased with age while mean parotid gland weight was significantly higher in group B than in groups A and C. Mean salivary flow rate was significantly higher in group B and C than in group A, and mean salivary pH was significantly higher in group B and C than group A. Analysis of salivary electrolytes and total protein showed that mean levels of sodium, potassium and bicarbonate increased with age significantly while mean levels of calcium, chloride, phosphate and total protein did not show significant change among the groups. Conclusion: These findings showed that varying changes were observed in the morphology of salivary glands of aging rats without impaired function. PMID:25960701

  5. Sympathetic axonopathies and hyperinnervation in the small intestine smooth muscle of aged Fischer 344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert J.; Hudson, Cherie N.; Powley, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    It is well documented that the intrinsic enteric nervous system of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract sustains neuronal losses and reorganizes as it ages. In contrast, age-related remodeling of the extrinsic sympathetic projections to the wall of the gut is poorly characterized. The present experiment, therefore, surveyed the sympathetic projections to the aged small intestine for axonopathies. Furthermore, the experiment evaluated the specific prediction that catecholaminergic inputs undergo hyperplastic changes. Jejunal tissue was collected from 3-, 8-, 16-, and 24-month-old male Fischer 344 rats, prepared as whole mounts consisting of the muscularis, and processed immunohistochemically for tyrosine hydroxylase, the enzymatic marker for norepinephrine, and either the protein CD163 or the protein MHCII, both phenotypical markers for macrophages. Four distinctive sympathetic axonopathy profiles occurred in the small intestine of the aged rat: (1) swollen and dystrophic terminals, (2) tangled axons, (3) discrete hyperinnervated loci in the smooth muscle wall, including at the bases of Peyer's patches, and (4) ectopic hyperplastic or hyperinnervating axons in the serosa/subserosal layers. In many cases, the axonopathies occurred at localized and limited foci, involving only a few axon terminals, in a pattern consistent with incidences of focal ischemic, vascular, or traumatic insult. The present observations underscore the complexity of the processes of aging on the neural circuitry of the gut, with age-related GI functional impairments likely reflecting a constellation of adjustments that range from selective neuronal losses, through accumulation of cellular debris, to hyperplasias and hyperinnervation of sympathetic inputs. PMID:24104187

  6. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer ({sup 14}C)-{alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels.

  7. Daily exercise improves memory, stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis and modulates immune and neuroimmune cytokines in aging rats

    PubMed Central

    Speisman, Rachel. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Rani, Asha; Foster, Thomas C.; Ormerod, Brandi K.

    2012-01-01

    We tested whether daily exercise modulates immune and neuroimmune cytokines, hippocampus-dependent behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis in aging male F344 rats (18 mo upon arrival). Twelve weeks after conditioned running or control group assignment (n = 6 per group), the rats were trained and tested in a rapid water maze followed by an inhibitory avoidance task. The rats were BrdU-injected beginning 12 days after behavioral testing and killed 3 weeks later to quantify cytokines and neurogenesis. Daily exercise increased neurogenesis and improved immediate and 24 h water maze discrimination index (DI) scores and 24 h inhibitory avoidance retention latencies. Daily exercise decreased cortical VEGF, hippocampal IL-1β and serum MCP-1, GRO-KC and leptin levels but increased hippocampal GRO-KC and IL-18 concentrations. Serum leptin concentration correlated negatively with new neuron number and both DI scores while hippocampal IL-1β concentration correlated negatively with memory scores in both tasks. Cortical VEGF, serum GRO-KC and serum MCP-1 levels correlated negatively with immediate DI score and we found a novel positive correlation between hippocampal IL-18 and GRO-KC levels and new neuron number. Pathway analyses revealed distinct serum, hippocampal and cortical compartment cytokine relationships. Our results suggest that daily exercise potentially improves cognition in aging rats by modulating hippocampal neurogenesis and immune and neuroimmune cytokine signaling. PMID:23078985

  8. Influence of age on mechanical properties of healing fractures and intact bones in rats.

    PubMed

    Ekeland, A; Engesoeter, L B; Langeland, N

    1982-08-01

    Mechanical properties of fractured and intact femora have been studied in young and adult, male rats. A standardized, closed, mid-diaphyseal fracture was produced in the left femur, the right femur serving as control. The fracture was left to heal without immobilization. At various intervals, both fractured and intact femora were loaded in torsion until failure. The fractured femora regained the mechanical properties of the contralateral, intact bones after about 4 weeks in young and after about 12 weeks in adult rats. For intact bones, both the ultimate torsional moment (strength) and the torsional stiffness increased with age of the animals, whereas the ultimate torsional angle remained unchanged. For bone as a material, however, the ultimate torsional stress (strength) and the modulus of rigidity (stiffness) increased with age only in young rats, being almost constant in the adult animals. The various biomechanical parameters of the healing fractures did not reach those of the contralateral, intact bones simultaneously. The torsional moment required to twist a healing femoral fracture 20 degrees (0.35 radians), a deformation close to what an intact femur can resist, proved to be a functional and simple measure of the degree of fracture repair in rats.

  9. Smooth endoplasmic reticulum dilation and degeneration in Purkinje neuron dendrites of aging ethanol-fed female rats.

    PubMed

    Dlugos, Cynthia A

    2006-01-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol consumption on the extensive Purkinje neuron (PN) dendritic arbor of male rats include dilation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and dendritic regression. The purpose of the present study was to examine the molecular layer of female rats for the presence of ethanol-related SER dilation and evidence of degeneration within the PN dendritic arbor. Twenty-one 12-month-old Fischer 344 female rats (n = 7/treatment group) received a liquid ethanol, liquid control, or rat chow diet for a period of 40 weeks. Ethanol-fed rats received 35% of their dietary calories as ethanol. Pair-fed rats received a liquid control diet that was isocaloric to the ethanol diet. Chow-fed rats received standard laboratory rat chow ad libitum. At the end of treatment, tissues from the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellar vermis were viewed and photographed with the electron microscope. The diameters of SER profiles were measured and the density of degenerating bodies within the PN dendritic arbor was quantitated. In the posterior lobe, ethanol-related SER dilation was apparent. In the anterior lobe, the density of degenerating bodies within PN dendritic shafts was significantly increased but SER dilation in PN dendritic shafts was absent. These results confirm that SER dilation and dendritic degeneration in PN dendrites may precede and contribute to ethanol-related regression in female rats. In addition, comparison of these results with data obtained in male rats from a previous study suggests that PN dendrites in females may be more sensitive to the effects of ethanol.

  10. Attenuation of circadian rhythms of food intake and respiration in aging diabetes-prone BHE/Cdb rats.

    PubMed

    Mathews, C E; Wickwire, K; Flatt, W P; Berdanier, C D

    2000-07-01

    The hypothesis that BHE/Cdb rats with mutations in their mitochondrial genome might accommodate this mutation by changing their food intake patterns was tested. Four experiments were conducted. Experiments 1 and 2 examined food intake patterns of BHE/Cdb rats fed a stock diet or BHE/Cdb and Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet from weaning. Experiment 3 examined the daily rhythms of respiration and heat production in these rats at 200 days of age. Experiment 4 examined the effects of diet composition on these measurements at 50-day intervals. The Sprague-Dawley rats, regardless of diet, had the typical day-night rhythms of feeding and respiration. In contrast, the BHE/Cdb rats fed the high-fat diet showed normal rhythms initially, but with age, these rhythms were attenuated. The changes in rhythms preceded the development of glucose intolerance.

  11. Effect of Eurycoma longifolia Jack on orientation activities in middle-aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Ang, H H; Lee, K L

    2002-12-01

    The effects of various fractions of Eurycoma longifolia Jack were studied on the orientation activities of the inbred, adult middle-aged Sprague-Dawley rats, 9 months old and retired breeders towards the receptive females (anogenital sniffing, licking, mounting), the environment (climbing, raring, exploration), themselves (nongenital grooming, genital grooming) and mobility (restricted, unrestricted) after treating these subjects twice daily for 10 days. Results showed that subjects treated with 800 mg/kg of E. longifolia Jack increased orientation activities towards the receptive females (anogenital sniffing, licking and mounting), increased genital grooming towards themselves and restricted movements to a particular area of the cage but decreased interest in the external environment (climbing, raring, exploration) as compared with the controls during the investigation period. In conclusion, this study gives further evidences that different fractions of E. longifolia Jack modified the orientation activities of the middle-aged male rats. PMID:12685506

  12. Age-dependent decline in learning and memory performances of WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical studies revealed emotional and cognitive impairments associated with absence epilepsy. Preclinical research with genetic models of absence epilepsy however have primarily focused on dysfunctional emotional processes and paid relatively less attention to cognitive impairment. In order to bridge this gap, we investigated age-dependent changes in learning and memory performance, anxiety-like behavior, and locomotor activity of WAG/Rij rats (a valid model of generalized absence epilepsy) using passive avoidance, Morris water maze, elevated plus maze, and locomotor activity cage. We tested 5 month-old and 13 month-old WAG/Rij rats and compared their performance to age-matched Wistar rats. Results revealed a decline in emotional and spatial memory of WAG/Rij rats compared to age-matched Wistar rats only at 13 months of age. Importantly, there were no significant differences between WAG/Rij and Wistar rats in terms of anxiety-like behavior and locomotor activity at either age. Results pointed at age-dependent learning and memory deficits in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy. PMID:22998946

  13. Aerobic exercise prevents age-dependent cognitive decline and reduces anxiety-related behaviors in middle-aged and old rats.

    PubMed

    Pietrelli, A; Lopez-Costa, J; Goñi, R; Brusco, A; Basso, N

    2012-01-27

    Recent research involving human and animals has shown that aerobic exercise of moderate intensity produces the greatest benefit on brain health and behavior. In this study we investigated the effects on cognitive function and anxiety-related behavior in rats at different ages of aerobic exercise, performed regularly throughout life. We designed an aerobic training program with the treadmill running following the basic principles of human training, and assuming that rats have the same physiological adaptations. The intensity was gradually adjusted to the fitness level and age, and maintained at 60-70% of maximum oxygen consumption (max.VO(2)). In middle age (8 months) and old age (18 months), we studied the cognitive response with the radial maze (RM), and anxiety-related behaviors with the open field (OF) and the elevated plus maze (EPM). Aerobically trained (AT) rats had a higher cognitive performance measured in the RM, showing that exercise had a cumulative and amplifier effect on memory and learning. The analysis of age and exercise revealed that the effects of aerobic exercise were modulated by age. Middle-aged AT rats were the most successful animals; however, the old AT rats met the criteria more often than the middle-aged sedentary controls (SC), indicating that exercise could reverse the negative effects of sedentary life, partially restore the cognitive function, and protect against the deleterious effects of aging. The results in the OF and EPM showed a significant decrease in key indicators of anxiety, revealing that age affected most of the analyzed variables, and that exercise had a prominent anxiolytic effect, particularly strong in old age. In conclusion, our results indicated that regular and chronic aerobic exercise has time and dose-dependent, neuroprotective and restorative effects on physiological brain aging, and reduces anxiety-related behaviors.

  14. Epinephrine and glucose modulate training-related CREB phosphorylation in old rats: relationships to age-related memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ken A; Gold, Paul E

    2013-02-01

    Epinephrine enhances memory in young adult rats, in part, by increasing blood glucose levels needed to modulate memory. In old rats, epinephrine is deficient at raising blood glucose levels and thus is only moderately effective at enhancing memory. In contrast, systemic glucose injections improve memory in old rats, with resulting memory performance equal to that of young rats. The diminished response of glucose to training in old rats may blunt downstream neurochemical and molecular mechanisms needed to upregulate memory processes. In the first experiment, young adult and old rats were trained on an inhibitory avoidance task with immediate post-training injections of aCSF or glucose into the dorsal hippocampus. Old rats had significant memory impairments compared to young rats 7 days after training. Intrahippocampal injections of glucose reversed age-related deficits, improving memory scores in old rats to values seen in young rats. A second experiment examined age-related changes in activation of the transcription factor CREB, which is widely implicated in memory formation and may act downstream of hormonal and metabolic signals. Activation was assessed in response to training with systemic injections of epinephrine and glucose at doses known to enhance memory. Young adult and old rats were trained on inhibitory avoidance with immediate post-training systemic injections of saline, epinephrine, or glucose. After training, old rats had significant impairments in CREB phosphorylation in area CA1 and the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus, and in the basolateral and lateral amygdala. Epinephrine and glucose attenuated age-related deficits in CREB phosphorylation, but were more effective in the amygdala and hippocampus, respectively. Together, these results support the view that age-related changes in blood glucose responses to epinephrine contribute to memory impairments, which may be related to alterations in regional patterns of CREB phosphorylation.

  15. Age-related functional changes of the glutamate receptor channels in rat Meynert neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Akaike, N; Rhee, J S

    1997-01-01

    1. The developmental changes of glutamate receptors (GluRs) in acutely dissociated rat Meynert neurones were investigated using the conventional whole cell and nystatin perforated patch recording modes under voltage-clamp conditions. 2. The neurones became less responsive to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) with age, most dramatically between 1 day and 2 weeks, while the responses to kainic acid (KA) and L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) gradually increased. The metabotropic GluR response appeared a few days after birth, but thereafter no further change was observed. 3. The decrease in the NMDA response during postnatal development was due to an abrupt reduction in the number of receptors without affecting the affinity, voltage-dependent Mg2+ blockade or high Ca2+ permeability (PCa/PCs approximately 7.0). 4. PCa/PCs in the presence of KA decreased from 2.8 in the 1-day-old (1D) rat neurones to 1.1 and 0.44 in the 2-week-old (2W) and 6-month-old (6M) rat neurones, respectively. The concentration-response relationship for KA shifted to the left with age. The KA response was not affected by NS-102, a KA-selective antagonist, thus indicating that the increased affinity of the receptor for the ligand resulted from the change in the AMPA receptor channel subunits. 5. The AMPA response in the presence of 10(-4) M cyclothiazide showed a change in the inward rectifying current-voltage relationship with age. The KA response was strongly cross-desensitized by the addition of AMPA and was also blocked by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), whereas a rapid desensitization of the AMPA response was removed in a concentration-dependent manner by cyclothiazide. These results indicate that the non-NMDA receptor channels are assembled from the subunits of the AMPA receptor family without the GluR-2 subunit, thus resulting in a high Ca2+ permeability. 6. The L-glutamate (Glu)-induced responses were more sensitive to DL-2-amino-5

  16. Oxidative damage to DNA during aging: 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in rat organ DNA and urine.

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, C G; Shigenaga, M K; Park, J W; Degan, P; Ames, B N

    1990-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA is shown to be extensive and could be a major cause of the physiological changes associated with aging and the degenerative diseases related to aging such as cancer. The oxidized nucleoside, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (oh8dG), one of the approximately 20 known oxidative DNA damage products, has been measured in DNA isolated from various organs of Fischer 344 rats of different ages. oh8dG was present in the DNA isolated from all the organs studied: liver, brain, kidney, intestine, and testes. Steady-state levels of oh8dG ranged from 8 to 73 residues per 10(6) deoxyguanosine residues or 0.2-2.0 x 10(5) residues per cell. Levels of oh8dG in DNA increased with age in liver, kidney, and intestine but remained unchanged in brain and testes. The urinary excretion of oh8dG, which presumably reflects its repair from DNA by nuclease activity, decreased with age from 481 to 165 pmol per kg of body weight per day for urine obtained from 2-month- and 25-month-old rats, respectively. 8-Hydroxyguanine, the proposed repair product of a glycosylase activity, was also assayed in the urine. We estimate approximately 9 x 10(4) oxidative hits to DNA per cell per day in the rat. The results suggest that the age-dependent accumulation of oh8dG residues observed in DNA from liver, kidney, and intestine is principally due to the slow loss of DNA nuclease activity; however, an increase in the rate of oxidative DNA damage cannot be ruled out. PMID:2352934

  17. Effect of centrophenoxine on the antioxidative enzymes in various regions of the aging rat brain.

    PubMed

    Roy, D; Pathak, D N; Singh, R

    1983-01-01

    This study investigated the effect (in vivo) of centrophenoxine (Helfergin) on the activity of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase GSH-PER, glutathione reductase GSSG-RED, superoxide dismutase SOD and catalase) in subcellular fractions from the regions of the brain (cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem) of rats aged 6, 9 and 12 months. In all age groups, normal (control) activity of GSH-PER, GSSG-RED and SOD in the three brain regions was higher in the soluble fractions than in the particulate fractions. The three regions of the brain showed different levels of the enzyme activities. Enzymes in soluble fractions (except GSSG-RED in cerebrum of rats aged 12 months) did not change with age. In particulate fractions, however, the enzymes showed age-related changes: GSH-PER decreased with age in cerebellum and brain stem, but showed an age-related increase in cerebrum, GSSG-RED and SOD increased with age in all the three brain regions. Catalase activity in all the three brain regions remained unchanged in all age groups. Six week administration of centrophenoxine (once a day in doses of 80 mg/Kg and 120 mg/Kg) to the experimental animals produced increases in the activity of SOD, GSH-PER and GSSG-RED in particulate fractions from all the three brain regions. In the soluble fractions, however, only SOD and GSH-PER activity was increased. In vitro also centrophenoxine stimulated the activity of GSH-PER. A dosage of 80 mg/Kg produced greater changes than a 120 mg/Kg dosage. The drug had no effect on the activity of catalase. Centrophenoxine also reduced lipofuscin deposits (studied both biochemically and histochemically) thus indicating that the drug inhibited lipofuscin accumulation by elevating the activity of the antioxidant enzymes. The data suggest that alleviation of senescence by centrophenoxine may, at least, partly be due to activation by it of antioxidant enzymes.

  18. Modulatory effects of centrophenoxine on different regions of ageing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Punita; Nehru, Bimla

    2005-10-01

    The debilitating consequences of age-related brain deterioration are widespread and extremely costly in terms of quality of life and longevity. Free radical induced damage is thought to be responsible, at least in part, for the degenerative effects of aging. This may be largely due to high-energy requirements, high oxygen consumption, high tissue concentration of iron and low of antioxidant enzymes in brain. Therefore, supplementing an external source of free radical scavenger would greatly benefit in ameliorating the free radical damage which may thus be beneficial in aging. In the present study, an important nootropic agent Centrophenoxine, which has an easy access to brain, has been administered to aged animals (16 months old). Rats aged 6 months (young group) and 16 months old (old group) were chosen for the study. Both groups were administered Centrophenoxine (dissolved in physiological saline) intraperitoneally once a day for 6 weeks. Our study indicates an increased activity of Catalase, Superoxide Dismutase, Glutathione reductase, as well as an increase in the reduced, oxidized, and total glutathione content thus resulting in an altered redox state. A substantial increase in the malondialdehyde content was also reported as a result of aging. Whereas, following Centrophenoxine administration (100 mg/kg body weight/day, injected i.p) alterations in the activities of Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione reductase as well as in the reduced and oxidized glutathione content was reported in aged rat brain. Lipid peroxidation was also reported to be significantly decreased in aged animals after Centrophenoxine supplementation for 6 weeks. The use of an extraneous antioxidant substance may prove beneficial in combating the conditions of oxidative stress in ageing brain.

  19. Aging contributes to inflammation in upper extremity tendons and declines in forelimb agility in a rat model of upper extremity overuse.

    PubMed

    Kietrys, David M; Barr-Gillespie, Ann E; Amin, Mamta; Wade, Christine K; Popoff, Steve N; Barbe, Mary F

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine if tendon inflammatory and histopathological responses increase in aged rats compared to young rats performing a voluntary upper extremity repetitive task, and if these changes are associated with motor declines. Ninety-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the rat model of upper extremity overuse: 67 aged and 29 young adult rats. After a training period of 4 weeks, task rats performed a voluntary high repetition low force (HRLF) handle-pulling task for 2 hrs/day, 3 days/wk for up to 12 weeks. Upper extremity motor function was assessed, as were inflammatory and histomorphological changes in flexor digitorum and supraspinatus tendons. The percentage of successful reaches improved in young adult HRLF rats, but not in aged HRLF rats. Forelimb agility decreased transiently in young adult HRLF rats, but persistently in aged HRLF rats. HRLF task performance for 12 weeks lead to increased IL-1beta and IL-6 in flexor digitorum tendons of aged HRLF rats, compared to aged normal control (NC) as well as young adult HRLF rats. In contrast, TNF-alpha increased more in flexor digitorum tendons of young adult 12-week HRLF rats than in aged HRLF rats. Vascularity and collagen fibril organization were not affected by task performance in flexor digitorum tendons of either age group, although cellularity increased in both. By week 12 of HRLF task performance, vascularity and cellularity increased in the supraspinatus tendons of only aged rats. The increased cellularity was due to increased macrophages and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)-immunoreactive fibroblasts in the peritendon. In conclusion, aged rat tendons were overall more affected by the HRLF task than young adult tendons, particularly supraspinatus tendons. Greater inflammatory changes in aged HRLF rat tendons were observed, increases associated temporally with decreased forelimb agility and lack of improvement in task success.

  20. Moderate treadmill running exercise prior to tendon injury enhances wound healing in aging rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianying; Yuan, Ting; Wang, James H-C.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of exercise on wound healing in aging tendon was tested using a rat moderate treadmill running (MTR) model. The rats were divided into an MTR group that ran on a treadmill for 4 weeks and a control group that remained in cages. After MTR, a window defect was created in the patellar tendons of all rats and wound healing was analyzed. We found that MTR accelerated wound healing by promoting quicker closure of wounds, improving the organization of collagen fibers, and decreasing senescent cells in the wounded tendons when compared to the cage control. MTR also lowered vascularization, increased the numbers of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs) and TSC proliferation than the control. Besides, MTR significantly increased the expression of stem cell markers, OCT-4 and Nanog, and tenocyte genes, Collagen I, Collagen III and tenomodulin, and down-regulated PPAR-γ, Collagen II and Runx-2 (non-tenocyte genes). These findings indicated that moderate exercise enhances healing of injuries in aging tendons through TSC based mechanisms, through which exercise regulates beneficial effects in tendons. This study reveals that appropriate exercise may be used in clinics to enhance tendon healing in aging patients. PMID:26885754

  1. Age-related changes in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yali; Liu, Jian; Gao, Dengfeng; Wei, Jin; Yuan, Haifeng; Niu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Qiaojun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age‑related alterations in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the underlying mechanisms. Aging resulted in a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and apoptotic cells in the SHR group, which was accompanied by increased expression of oxidative stress markers (iNOS and gp47phox) and apoptotic regulatory proteins (Bax and caspase‑3). In addition, the expression of PPAR‑γ and Bcl‑2 were progressively reduced with increasing age in the SHR group. The 32 and 64‑week‑old SHRs exhibited significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells, oxidative stress markers and pro‑apoptotic proteins compared with age‑matched WKY rats, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PPAR‑γ. Compared with the 16 and 32‑week‑old WKY group, the 64‑week‑old WKY rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and pro‑apoptotic markers, and increased levels apoptotic cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that both aging and hypertension enhanced brain damage and oxidative stress injury in the hippocampi of SHRs, indicated by an increased presence of apoptotic cells and astrocytes. In addition, reduced expression of PPAR‑γ may contribute to the age‑related brain damage in SHRs. PMID:26846626

  2. Isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia induces increases in NMDA receptor subunit NR2B protein expression in the aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, Lana J; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Alonso, Ofelia F; Jimenez, Christopher A; Furones, Concepción; Moreno, W Javier; Lewis, Michael C; Dietrich, W Dalton; Bramlett, Helen M

    2012-01-11

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction, POCD, afflicts a large number of elderly surgical patients following surgery with general anesthesia. Mechanisms of POCD remain unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, critical in learning and memory, that display protein expression changes with age are modulated by inhalation anesthetics. The aim of this study was to identify protein expression changes in NMDA receptor subunits and downstream signaling pathways in aged rats that demonstrated anesthesia-induced spatial learning impairments. Three-month-old and 18-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned to receive 1.8% isoflurane/70% nitrous oxide (N(2)O) anesthesia for 4h or no anesthesia. Spatial learning was assessed at 2weeks and 3months post-anesthesia in Morris water maze. Hippocampal and cortical protein lysates of 18-month-old rats were immunoblotted for activated caspase 3, NMDA receptor subunits, and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. In a separate experiment, Ro 25-6981 (0.5mg/kg dose) was administered by I.P. injection before anesthesia to 18-month-old rats. Immunoblotting of NR2B was performed on hippocampal protein lysates. At 3months post-anesthesia, rats treated with anesthesia at 18-months-old demonstrated spatial learning impairment corresponding to acute and long-term increases in NR2B protein expression and a reduction in phospho-ERK1/2 in the hippocampus and cortex. Ro 25-6981 pretreatment attenuated the increase in acute NR2B protein expression. Our findings suggest a role for disruption of NMDA receptor mediated signaling pathways in the hippocampus and cortex of rats treated with isoflurane/ N(2)O anesthesia at 18-months-old, leading to spatial learning deficits in these animals. A potential therapeutic intervention for anesthesia associated cognitive deficits is discussed. PMID:22137658

  3. Age and hypertension strongly induce aortic stiffening in rats at basal and matched blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Lindesay, George; Ragonnet, Christophe; Chimenti, Stefano; Villeneuve, Nicole; Vayssettes-Courchay, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Age and hypertension are major causes of large artery remodeling and stiffening, a cardiovascular risk factor for heart and kidney damage. The aged spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model is recognized for human cardiovascular pathology, but discrepancies appeared in studies of arterial stiffness. We performed experiments using a robust analysis via echo tracking in 20-week adult (n = 8) and 80-week-old SHR (n = 7), with age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY, n = 6;6) at basal and matched levels of blood pressure (BP). After anesthesia with pentobarbital, abdominal aortic diameter and pressure were recorded and BP was decreased by clonidine i.v. At basal BP, aortic pulse distension, compliance, and distensibility (AD) were reduced and stiffness index increased with age and hypertension and further altered with age + hypertension. When BP was adjusted in SHR to that of normotensive rats (130 mmHg), there was no difference between 20-week-old SHR and WKY Importantly, the age effect was maintained in both WKY and SHR and accentuated by hypertension in old rats. At 130 mmHg, with similar pulse pressure in the four groups, AD (kPa(-3)) = 24.2 ± 1 in 20 weeks WKY, 19.7 ± 1.4 in 20 weeks SHR, 12.4 ± 1.3 in 80 weeks WKY and 6.6 ± 0.6 in 80 weeks SHR; distension = 7.6 ± 0.4%, 6.7 ± 0.6%, 3.7 ± 0.3%, and 1.8 ± 0.2% in the same groups. In conclusion, reduced distensibility, that is, stiffening due to age is clearly shown here in both WKY and SHR as well as a synergistic effect of age and hypertension. This technique will allow new studies on the mechanisms responsible and drug intervention. PMID:27233301

  4. Volumetric studies on the red nucleus of the rat at different ages.

    PubMed

    Boseila, A W; Hashem, S M; Badawy, Y H

    1975-01-01

    The postnatal development of the red nucleus in albino rat was quantitatively studied. Planimetric studies on stained paraffin sections of the midbrain showed that the red nucleus has a rounded contour with tapering ends and a broad centre. The volume of the red nucleus revealed an increase from birth, to reach its maximum at the age of 3 months, then declines until the age of 2 years. However, the size does not regain its newly born value. On the other hand, the number of cells remains constant during the entire life span of the animal.

  5. Effects of carnosine plus vitamin E and betaine treatments on oxidative stress in some tissues of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Jale; Bingül, Ilknur; Yesil-Mizrak, Kubra; Dogru-Abbasoglu, Semra; Oztezcan, Serdar; Uysal, Mujdat

    2013-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in aging. Effects of several antioxidants on age-related oxidative stress have been investigated. Carnosine (CAR) and betaine have antioxidant actions. The combination of CAR with vitamin E(CAR+E) increases its antioxidant efficiency. We investigated the effects of CAR+E and betaine treatments on oxidative and antioxidative status in liver, heart and brain tissues of aged rats. Experiments were carried out on young (5 months)and aged (22 months) male Wistar rats. Aged rats were given CAR (250 mg/kg; i.p.; 5 days per week) and vitamin E (200mg/kg; i.m.; twice per week) or betaine (1% w/v) for two months. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and diene conjugate (DC)levels and antioxidants were measured. MDA and DC levels were higher in tissues of aged rats than young rats. Glutathione(GSH) levels decreased in liver, but not heart and brain. There were no changes in vitamin E and vitamin C levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities in tissues of aged rats. CAR+E treatment was observed to decrease MDA and DC levels in tissues of aged rats. However, betaine decreased only hepatic MDA and DC levels. Both CAR+E and betaine increased hepatic GSH and vitamin E levels, but these treatments did not affect antioxidant enzyme activities. These results suggest that CAR+E treatment seems to be useful to decrease oxidative stress in liver, heart and brain tissues, but betaine is only effective in liver tissue of aged rats. PMID:23701646

  6. Protective effect of supercritical fluid rosemary extract, Rosmarinus officinalis, on antioxidants of major organs of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Posadas, S J; Caz, V; Largo, C; De la Gándara, B; Matallanas, B; Reglero, G; De Miguel, E

    2009-01-01

    Rosemary leaves, "Rosmarinus officinalis", possess a variety of antioxidant, anti-tumoral and anti-inflammatory bioactivities. We hypothesized that rosemary extract could enhance antioxidant defenses and improve antioxidant status in aged rats. This work evaluates whether supplementing their diet with supercritical fluid (SFE) rosemary extract containing 20% antioxidant carnosic acid (CA) reduces oxidative stress in aged rats. Aged Wistar rats (20 months old) were included in the study. Rats were fed for 12 weeks with a standard kibble (80%) supplemented with turkey breast (20%) containing none or one of two different SFE rosemary concentrations (0.2% and 0.02%). After sacrifice, tissue samples were collected from heart and brain (cortex and hippocampus). Enzyme activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were quantitatively analyzed. Lipid peroxidation and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also determined. Rosemary decreased lipid peroxidation in both brain tissues. The levels of catalase activities in heart and cortex were decreased in the rosemary-treated groups. The SFE rosemary-treated rats presented lower NOS levels in heart and lower ROS levels in hippocampus than the control rats. Supplementing the diet of aged rats with SFE rosemary extract produced a decrease in antioxidant enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation and ROS levels that was significant for catalase activity in heart and brain, NOS in heart, and LPO and ROS levels in different brain tissues. These observations suggest that the rosemary supplement improved the oxidative stress status in old rats.

  7. Reproductive toxicity of a single dose of 1,3-dinitrobenzene in two ages of young adult male rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    These studies evaluated the reproductive response and the possible influence of testicular maturation on the reproductive parameters, in male rats treated with 1,3-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB). Young adult male rats (75 or 105 days of age) were given a single oral dose of 0, 8, 16, 24,...

  8. The Extract of Aster Koraiensis Prevents Retinal Pericyte Apoptosis in Diabetic Rats and Its Active Compound, Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits AGE Formation and AGE/RAGE Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Jo, Kyuhyung; Lee, Ik-Soo; Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    Retinal capillary cell loss is a hallmark of early diabetic retinal changes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to contribute to retinal microvascular cell loss in diabetic retinopathy. In this study, the protective effects of Aster koraiensis extract (AKE) against damage to retinal vascular cells were investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. To examine this issue further, AGE accumulation, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were investigated using retinal trypsin digests from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In the diabetic rats, TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling)-positive retinal microvascular cells were markedly increased. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that AGEs were accumulated within the retinal microvascular cells, and this accumulation paralleled the activation of NF-κB and the expression of iNOS in the diabetic rats. However, AKE prevented retinal microvascular cell apoptosis through the inhibition of AGE accumulation and NF-κB activation. Moreover, to determine the active compounds of AKE, two major compounds, chlorogenic acid and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, were tested in an in vitro assay. Among these compounds, chlorogenic acid significantly reduced AGE formation as well as AGE/RAGE (receptor for AGEs) binding activity. These results suggest that AKE, particularly chlorogenic acid, is useful in inhibiting AGE accumulation in retinal vessels and exerts a preventive effect against the injuries of diabetic retinal vascular cells. PMID:27657123

  9. Compensation aids skilled reaching in aging and in recovery from forelimb motor cortex stroke in the rat.

    PubMed

    Alaverdashvili, M; Whishaw, I Q

    2010-04-28

    Compensatory movements mediate success in skilled reaching for food after stroke to the forelimb region of motor cortex (MtCx) in the rat. The present study asks whether the neural plasticity that enables compensation after motor stroke is preserved in aging. In order to avoid potential confounding effects of age-related negative-learning, rats were trained in a single pellet reaching task during young-adulthood. Subgroups were retested before and after contralateral forelimb MtCx stroke via pial stripping given at 3, 18, or 23 months of age. Over a two-month post-stroke rehabilitation period, end point measures were made of learned nonuse, recovery, retention, and performance ratings were made of reaching movement elements. Prior to stroke, young and aged rats maintained equivalent end point performance but older rats displayed compensatory changes in limb use as measured with ratings of the elements of forelimb movement. Following stroke, the aged groups of rats were more impaired on end point, movement, and anatomical measures. Nevertheless, the aged rats displayed substantial recovery via the use of compensatory movements. Thus, this study demonstrates that the neural plasticity that mediates compensatory movements after stroke in young adults is preserved prior to and following stroke in aging.

  10. 75 FR 31738 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Assistance From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... (see 75 FR 7212 (Feb. 18, 2010)). EEOC's NPRM defines the term ``reasonable factors other than age... January 8, 1981 (46 FR 2306-2312). The Age Discrimination Act provisions were not included in the final... interested in the ADEA action should refer to the Federal Register; 75 FR 7212 (Feb. 18, 2010). The...

  11. Aging of the rat adrenocortical cell: response to ACTH and cyclic AMP in vitro.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S; Carsia, R V

    1983-03-01

    To study intrinsic age-related changes in adrenocortical steroid production, cells isolated from rats of different ages (3 to 24 months) were used. Acute (2 hour) corticosterone production in response to stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) was measured by radioimmunoassay. With age, adrenocortical cells lose much of their ability to produce corticosterone in the absence or presence of ACTH or cAMP. The loss is progressive from 6 to 24 months of age. Analysis of the data suggests that from 6 to 12 months, an intracellular steroidogenic lesion develops; in addition there may be a loss in ACTH receptors on the plasma membrane. After 12 months these defects increase and are accompanied by a decrease in receptor sensitivity to ACTH.

  12. Potential targets for protecting against hippocampal cell apoptosis after transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiangyu; Zhang, Li’na; Liu, Ran; Liu, Yingzhi; Song, Jianfang; Dong, He; Jia, Yanfang; Zhou, Zangong

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in neuronal apoptosis caused by cerebral ischemia, and the role is mediated by the expression of mitochondrial proteins. This study investigated the involvement of mitochondrial proteins in hippocampal cell apoptosis after transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in aged rats using a comparative proteomics strategy. Our experimental results show that the aged rat brain is sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion injury and that transient ischemia led to cell apoptosis in the hippocampus and changes in memory and cognition of aged rats. Differential proteomics analysis suggested that this phenomenon may be mediated by mitochondrial proteins associated with energy metabolism and apoptosis in aged rats. This study provides potential drug targets for the treatment of transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25206771

  13. Caffeine suppresses exercise-enhanced long-term and location memory in middle-aged rats: Involvement of hippocampal Akt and CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Cechella, José L; Leite, Marlon R; da Rocha, Juliana T; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Gai, Bibiana M; Soares, Félix A A; Bresciani, Guilherme; Royes, Luiz F F; Zeni, Gilson

    2014-11-01

    The cognitive function decline is closely related with brain changes generated by age. The ability of caffeine and exercise to prevent memory impairment has been reported in animal models and humans. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether swimming exercise and caffeine administration enhance memory in middle-aged Wistar rats. Male Wistar rats (18months) received caffeine at a dose of 30mg/kg, 5days per week by a period of 4weeks. Animals were subjected to swimming training with a workload (3% of body weight, 20min per day for 4weeks). After 4weeks, the object recognition test (ORT) and the object location test (OLT) were performed. The results of this study demonstrated that caffeine suppressed exercise-enhanced long-term (ORT) and spatial (OLT) memory in middle-aged and this effect may be related to a decrease in hippocampal p-CREB signaling. This study also provided evidence that the effects of this protocol on memory were not accompanied by alterations in the levels of activated Akt. The [(3)H] glutamate uptake was reduced in hippocampus of rats administered with caffeine and submitted to swimming protocol. PMID:25260559

  14. Caffeine suppresses exercise-enhanced long-term and location memory in middle-aged rats: Involvement of hippocampal Akt and CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Cechella, José L; Leite, Marlon R; da Rocha, Juliana T; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Gai, Bibiana M; Soares, Félix A A; Bresciani, Guilherme; Royes, Luiz F F; Zeni, Gilson

    2014-11-01

    The cognitive function decline is closely related with brain changes generated by age. The ability of caffeine and exercise to prevent memory impairment has been reported in animal models and humans. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether swimming exercise and caffeine administration enhance memory in middle-aged Wistar rats. Male Wistar rats (18months) received caffeine at a dose of 30mg/kg, 5days per week by a period of 4weeks. Animals were subjected to swimming training with a workload (3% of body weight, 20min per day for 4weeks). After 4weeks, the object recognition test (ORT) and the object location test (OLT) were performed. The results of this study demonstrated that caffeine suppressed exercise-enhanced long-term (ORT) and spatial (OLT) memory in middle-aged and this effect may be related to a decrease in hippocampal p-CREB signaling. This study also provided evidence that the effects of this protocol on memory were not accompanied by alterations in the levels of activated Akt. The [(3)H] glutamate uptake was reduced in hippocampus of rats administered with caffeine and submitted to swimming protocol.

  15. Histochemical and ultrastructural changes of sternomastoid muscle in aged Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ciena, Adriano Polican; de Almeida, Sonia Regina Yokomizo; Alves, Paulo Henrique de Matos; Bolina-Matos, Regina de Sousa; Dias, Fernando José; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki; Watanabe, Ii-sei

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate histochemically and ultrastructurally the sternomastoid muscle (SM) of adults and aged rats, employing histochemic (NADH-TR reaction) and transmission electron microscopic methods. It was used 20 rats, divided into two groups: adults (n=10), animals with 4 months of age, and aged group (n=10), animals with 24 months of age. Five animals from each group were anesthetized with an overdose of urethane (3g/kg i.p.), and the muscles dissected after the samples processing for histochemical reaction (NADH-TR). Three types of fibers were identified by their metabolic characteristics: fibers with high oxidative capacity (O), intermediate oxidative capacity (OG) and low oxidative capacity (G). For transmission electron microscopic method, the animals were anesthetized and perfused by modified Karnovsky solution and the tissues were postfixed in 1% osmium tetroxide solution, dehydrated and embedded in Spurr resin. It was performed ultra-thin sections for transmission electron microscopic analysis. The SM showed heterogeneity in their composition according to the fiber types, with significant difference (p<0.05) when comparing the fibers types between the superficial and deep regions and between the adult and aged groups. It was observe a decrease between the comparison of the total fibers density and GO fiber, and an increase of the O fiber in aged group. Ultrastructural characteristics of muscle cells in aged group showed typical morphological changes, characterizing muscular atrophy. We conclude based on physiological ageing process, changes in muscle fibers classification, and ultrastructuraly, morphological alterations on muscle cells, characterizing a muscular atrophy. PMID:21767955

  16. Novel sandwich ELISAs for rat DMP1: age-related decrease of circulatory DMP1 levels in male rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Sunao; Hashimoto, Jun; Usami, Yu; Ohyama, Kaname; Isogai, Yukihiro; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Maruyama, Nobuhiro; Komori, Toshihisa; Kuroda, Tatsuhiko; Toyosawa, Satoru

    2013-12-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), a noncollagenous bone matrix protein produced by osteocytes, regulates matrix mineralization and phosphate homeostasis. The lack of a precise assay for circulating DMP1 levels impairs further investigation of the protein's biological significance. Because full-length precursor DMP1 is cleaved into NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments during the secretory process, we developed two new sandwich ELISAs for the NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments of rat DMP1. One of these ELISAs, ELISA 1-2, is based on two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against the DMP1-1 and DMP1-2 peptides of the NH2-terminal fragment, whereas the other, ELISA 4-3, is based on two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against the DMP1-3 and DMP1-4 peptides of the COOH-terminal fragment. The polyclonal antibodies were characterized in immunohistochemical and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) studies. Immunohistochemical analyses of rat bone using these polyclonal antibodies revealed DMP1 immunoreactivity in osteocytes and pericanalicular matrix, consistent with the previously reported osteocyte-specific expression of DMP1. LC-MS/MS analyses of rat plasma-derived immunoreactive products affinity-extracted with these antibodies revealed the presence of DMP1 in circulating blood. The ELISAs established with these antibodies met accepted standards for reproducibility, repeatability, precision, and accuracy. Circulating DMP1 and levels of other biochemical markers (osteocalcin, Trap5b, Dkk-1, and SOST) were measured in 2-, 4-, 8-, 12-, 18-, 24-, 72-, and 96-week-old Wistar male rats. Circulating DMP1 levels determined by ELISAs 1-2 and 4-3 significantly decreased with age. During rapid skeletal growth (2-12weeks), DMP1 levels measured by ELISA 4-3 were over three times higher than those measured by ELISA 1-2; however, DMP1 levels in old animals (72 and 96weeks) were almost the same when measured by either ELISA. DMP1 levels

  17. Effects of sex hormones on genioglossal muscle contractility and SR Ca2+-ATPase activity in aged rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Hua; Qi, Juan; Hou, Yu-Xia; Wang, Fei

    2008-04-01

    This investigation was designed to examine whether short-term administration of sex hormones could produce changes in contractile properties and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) function in genioglossal muscle (GG) of aged male rats. Twenty-four aged male rats were randomly divided into three groups to receive an intramuscular injection of either 0.1mg/kg oestrogen (group A), 2.5 mg/kg testosterone (group B), or 0.2 ml sterile peanut oil (group C, control), twice a week, during 4 weeks. After hormone treatment, in vivo isometric contractile properties were determined using surgically prepared GG muscles with platinum electrodes for stimulation of the medial branch of the hypoglossus nerve. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was measured in muscle homogenates by detecting the amount of inorganic phosphorus ion released in a standard coupled enzyme assay. SERCA1 mRNA level was observed using a real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR). It was found that, compared with group C, testosterone treatment decreased the fatigue resistance in GG muscles (p<.05), whereas no change was observed in the isometric twitch (P(t)) and tetanic tension (P(0)) (p>.05). By contrast, in oestrogen treated GG muscles, no significant modification was found either in the contractile or in endurance properties (p>.05). The change in GG fatigue resistance of group B was associated with a marked decrease in SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity when compared with that of the control group (p<.01). Furthermore, SERCA1 mRNA level was also down regulated in group B (p<.05). No prominent differences in SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and SERCA1 mRNA expression existed between group A and group C (p>.05). The present results show that exogenous testosterone produces more pronounced changes in GG muscle fatigue resistance than oestrogen does by acting at SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and SERCA gene expression.

  18. Changes in the plastic properties of hippocampal dendritic spines underlie the attenuation of place learning in healthy aged rats.

    PubMed

    González-Ramírez, Myrna M; Velázquez-Zamora, Dulce A; Olvera-Cortés, María Esther; González-Burgos, Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    Normal aging is characterized by slight impairments in spatial memory, and the modification of some electrophysiological parameters that underlie place learning and associated reference memory. However, the morphological mechanisms underlying these impairments remain unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the spine density and the proportion of thin, mushroom, stubby, wide, branched and double spines on pyramidal neuron dendrites in the hippocampal CA1 field of young and aged rats. These parameters were assessed both before and after evaluating place learning and reference memory in the Morris water maze. Aged rats adopted an egocentric strategy to resolve the task, swimming slower and further, and taking longer to locate the sunken platform. While probe trials revealed that aged animals could recall the platform position, these animals spent more time exploring incorrect quadrants than young rats. An increase in spine density was observed after task performance in both young and aged rats, but aging provoked a decrease in the density of thin spines. In addition, there was an increase in the density of mushroom and wide spines in aged animals after task performance as compared with the untested aged counterparts. Moreover, in aged animals there were fewer thin spines and more wide spines after task performance than in the young tested animals. These findings support the view that aging attenuates but does not abolish spatial memory, a process that may be associated with plastic changes in the type of dendritic spines on aged hippocampal CA1 neurons.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction in aging rat brain regions upon chlorpyrifos toxicity and cold stress: an interactive study.

    PubMed

    Basha, P Mahaboob; Poojary, Annappa

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and consequent energy depletion are the major causes of oxidative stress resulting to bring alterations in the ionic homeostasis causing loss of cellular integrity. Our previous studies have shown the age-associated interactive effects in rat central nervous system (CNS) upon co-exposure to chlorpyrifos (CPF) and cold stress leading to macromolecular oxidative damage. The present study elucidates a possible mechanism by which CPF and cold stress interaction cause(s) mitochondrial dysfunction in an age-related manner. In this study, the activity levels of Krebs cycle enzymes and electron transport chain (ETC) protein complexes were assessed in the isolated fraction of mitochondria. CPF and cold stress (15 and 20 °C) exposure either individually or in combination decreased the activity level of Krebs cycle enzymes and ETC protein complexes in discrete regions of rat CNS. The findings confirm that cold stress produces significant synergistic effect in CPF intoxicated aging rats. The synergism between CPF and cold stress at 15 °C caused a higher depletion of respiratory enzymes in comparison with CPF and cold stress alone and together at 20 °C indicating the extent of deleterious functional alterations in discrete regions of brain and spinal cord (SC) which may result in neurodegeneration and loss in neuronal metabolic control. Hence, co-exposure of CPF and cold stress is more dangerous than exposure of either alone. Among the discrete regions studied, the cerebellum and medulla oblongata appears to be the most susceptible regions when compared to cortex and SC. Furthermore, the study reveals a gradual decrease in sensitivity to CPF toxicity as the rat matures.

  20. Chronic administration of resveratrol prevents morphological changes in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Monserrat Hernández-Hernández, Elizabeth; Serrano-García, Carolina; Antonio Vázquez-Roque, Rubén; Díaz, Alfonso; Monroy, Elibeth; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio; Florán, Benjamin; Flores, Gonzalo

    2016-05-01

    Resveratrol may induce its neuroprotective effects by reducing oxidative damage and chronic inflammation apart from improving vascular function and activating longevity genes, it also has the ability to promote the activity of neurotrophic factors. Morphological changes in dendrites of the pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus have been reported in the brain of aging humans, or in humans with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. These changes are reflected particularly in the decrement of both the dendritic tree and spine density. Here we evaluated the effect of resveratrol on the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the PFC (Layers 3 and 5), CA1- and CA3-dorsal hippocampus (DH) as well as CA1-ventral hippocampus, dentate gyrus (DG), and medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens of aged rats. 18-month-old rats were administered resveratrol (20 mg/kg, orally) daily for 60 days. Dendritic morphology was studied by the Golgi-Cox stain procedure, followed by Sholl analysis on 20-month-old rats. In all resveratrol-treated rats, a significant increase in dendritic length and spine density in pyramidal neurons of the PFC, CA1, and CA3 of DH was observed. Interestingly, the enhancement in dendritic length was close to the soma in pyramidal neurons of the PFC, whereas in neurons of the DH and DG, the increase in dendritic length was further from the soma. Our results suggest that resveratrol induces modifications of dendritic morphology in the PFC, DH, and DG. These changes may explain the therapeutic effect of resveratrol in aging and in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26789275

  1. Differential Effects of Radiation and Age on Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peiffer, Ann M; Shi, Lei; Olson, John; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K

    2010-01-01

    Greater than 50% of adults and ∼100% of children who survive >6 months after fractionated partial or whole-brain radiotherapy develop cognitive impairments. Noninvasive methods are needed for detecting and tracking the radiation-induced brain injury associated with these impairments. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we sought to detect structural changes associated with brain injury in our rodent model of fractionated whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) induced cognitive impairment and to compare those changes with alterations that occur during the aging process. Middle aged rats were given a clinically relevant dose of fWBI (40 Gy: two 5 Gy fractions/wk for 4 wk) and scanned approximately one year post-irradiation to obtain whole-brain T2 and diffusion tensor images (DTI); control groups of sham-irradiated age-matched and young rats were also scanned. No gross structural changes were evident in the T2 structural images, and no detectable fWBI-induced DTI changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) were found in heavily myelinated white matter (corpus callosum, cingulum, and deep cortical white matter). However, significant fWBI-induced variability in FA distribution was present in the superficial parietal cortex due to an fWBI-induced decline in FA in the more anterior slices through parietal cortex. Young rats had significantly lower FA values relative to both groups of older rats, but only within the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that targets of the fWBI-induced change in this model may be the less myelinated or unmyelinated axons, extracellular matrix, or synaptic fields rather than heavily myelinated tracts. PMID:20599817

  2. Brain Tissue Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress Induced by Obstructive Apneas is Different in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dalmases, Mireia; Torres, Marta; Márquez-Kisinousky, Leonardo; Almendros, Isaac; Planas, Anna M.; Embid, Cristina; Martínez-Garcia, Miguel Ángel; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep Maria

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypotheses that brain oxygen partial pressure (PtO2) in response to obstructive apneas changes with age and that it might lead to different levels of cerebral tissue oxidative stress. Design: Prospective controlled animal study. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: Sixty-four male Wistar rats: 32 young (3 mo old) and 32 aged (18 mo). Interventions: Protocol 1: Twenty-four animals were subjected to obstructive apneas (50 apneas/h, lasting 15 sec each) or to sham procedure for 50 min. Protocol 2: Forty rats were subjected to obstructive apneas or sham procedure for 4 h. Measurements and Results: Protocol 1: Real-time PtO2 measurements were performed using a fast-response oxygen microelectrode. During successive apneas cerebral cortex PtO2 presented a different pattern in the two age groups; there was a fast increase in young rats, whereas it remained without significant changes between the beginning and the end of the protocol in the aged group. Protocol 2: Brain oxidative stress assessed by lipid peroxidation increased after apneas in young rats (1.34 ± 0.17 nmol/mg of protein) compared to old ones (0.63 ± 0.03 nmol/mg), where a higher expression of antioxidant enzymes was observed. Conclusions: The results suggest that brain oxidative stress in aged rats is lower than in young rats in response to recurrent apneas, mimicking obstructive sleep apnea. This could be due to the different PtO2 response observed between age groups and the increased antioxidant expression in aged rats. Citation: Dalmases M, Torres M, Márquez-Kisinousky L, Almendros I, Planas AM, Embid C, Martínez-Garcia MA, Navajas D, Farré R, Montserrat JM. Brain tissue hypoxia and oxidative stress induced by obstructive apneas is different in young and aged rats. SLEEP 2014;37(7):1249-1256. PMID:25061253

  3. Peripheral injection of human umbilical cord blood stimulates neurogenesis in the aged rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Bachstetter, Adam D; Pabon, Mibel M; Cole, Michael J; Hudson, Charles E; Sanberg, Paul R; Willing, Alison E; Bickford, Paula C; Gemma, Carmelina

    2008-01-01

    Background Neurogenesis continues to occur throughout life but dramatically decreases with increasing age. This decrease is mostly related to a decline in proliferative activity as a result of an impoverishment of the microenvironment of the aged brain, including a reduction in trophic factors and increased inflammation. Results We determined that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCBMC) given peripherally, by an intravenous injection, could rejuvenate the proliferative activity of the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. This increase in proliferation lasted for at least 15 days after the delivery of the UCBMC. Along with the increase in proliferation following UCBMC treatment, an increase in neurogenesis was also found in the aged animals. The increase in neurogenesis as a result of UCBMC treatment seemed to be due to a decrease in inflammation, as a decrease in the number of activated microglia was found and this decrease correlated with the increase in neurogenesis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that a single intravenous injection of UCBMC in aged rats can significantly improve the microenvironment of the aged hippocampus and rejuvenate the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. Our results raise the possibility of a peripherally administered cell therapy as an effective approach to improve the microenvironment of the aged brain. PMID:18275610

  4. Preserved neuron number in the hippocampus of aged rats with spatial learning deficits.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, P R; Gallagher, M

    1996-01-01

    Hippocampal neuron loss is widely viewed as a hallmark of normal aging. Moreover, neuronal degeneration is thought to contribute directly to age-related deficits in learning and memory supported by the hippocampus. By taking advantage of improved methods for quantifying neuron number, the present study reports evidence challenging these long-standing concepts. The status of hippocampal-dependent spatial learning was evaluated in young and aged Long-Evans rats using the Morris water maze, and the total number of neurons in the principal cell layers of the dentate gyrus and hippocampus was quantified according to the optical fractionator technique. For each of the hippocampal fields, neuron number was preserved in the aged subjects as a group and in aged individuals with documented learning and memory deficits indicative of hippocampal dysfunction. The findings demonstrate that hippocampal neuronal degeneration is not an inevitable consequence of normal aging and that a loss of principal neurons in the hippocampus fails to account for age-related learning and memory impairment. The observed preservation of neuron number represents an essential foundation for identifying the neurobiological effects of hippocampal aging that account for cognitive decline. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8790433

  5. Expression of groups I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors in the rat brain during aging.

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Agnes; Ngomba, Richard T; Storto, Marianna; Catania, Maria V; Miller, Laura A; Youngs, Brian; DiGiorgi-Gerevini, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Sun, Grace Y

    2005-05-10

    Age-dependent changes in the expression of group I and II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors were studied by in situ hybridization, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Male Fisher 344 rats of three ages (3, 12 and 25 months) were tested. Age-related increases in mGlu1 receptor mRNA levels were found in several areas (thalamic nuclei, hippocampal CA3) with parallel increases in mGlu1a receptor protein expression. However, a slight decrease in mGlu1a receptor mRNA expression in individual Purkinje neurons and a decline in cerebellar mGlu1a receptor protein levels were detected in aged animals. In contrast, mGlu1b receptor mRNA levels increased in the cerebellar granule cell layer. Although mGlu5 receptor mRNA expression decreased in many regions, its protein expression remained unchanged during aging. Compared to the small changes in mGlu2 receptor mRNA levels, mGlu3 receptor mRNA levels showed substantial age differences. An increased mGlu2/3 receptor protein expression was found in the frontal cortex, thalamus, hippocampus and corpus callosum in aged animals. These results demonstrate region- and subtype-specific, including splice variant specific changes in the expression of mGlu receptors in the brain with increasing age. PMID:15862522

  6. Effects of aged garlic extract on left ventricular diastolic function and fibrosis in a rat hypertension model.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuki; Noda, Akiko; Miyata, Seiko; Minoshima, Makoto; Sugiura, Mari; Kojima, Jun; Otake, Masafumi; Furukawa, Mayuko; Cheng, Xian Wu; Nagata, Kohzo; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2013-01-01

    Daily consumption of garlic is known to lower the risk of hypertension and ischemic heart disease. In this study, we examined whether aged garlic extract (AGE) prevents hypertension and the progression of compensated left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. DS rats were randomly divided into three groups: those fed an 8% NaCl diet until 18 weeks of age (8% NaCl group), those additionally treated with AGE (8% NaCl + AGE group), and control rats maintained on a diet containing 0.3% NaCl until 18 weeks of age (0.3% NaCl group). AGE was administered orally by gastric gavage once a day until 18 weeks of age. LV mass was significantly higher in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 0.3% NaCl group at 18 weeks of age, but significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 8% NaCl group. No significant differences were observed in systolic blood pressure (SBP) between the 8% NaCl and 8% NaCl + AGE groups at 12 and 18 weeks of age. LV end-diastolic pressure and pressure half-time at 12 and 18 weeks of age were significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group compared with the 8% NaCl group. AGE significantly reduced LV interstitial fibrosis at 12 and 18 weeks of age. Chronic AGE intake attenuated LV diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis without significantly decreasing SBP in hypertensive DS rats.

  7. Effects of aged garlic extract on left ventricular diastolic function and fibrosis in a rat hypertension model.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuki; Noda, Akiko; Miyata, Seiko; Minoshima, Makoto; Sugiura, Mari; Kojima, Jun; Otake, Masafumi; Furukawa, Mayuko; Cheng, Xian Wu; Nagata, Kohzo; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2013-01-01

    Daily consumption of garlic is known to lower the risk of hypertension and ischemic heart disease. In this study, we examined whether aged garlic extract (AGE) prevents hypertension and the progression of compensated left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. DS rats were randomly divided into three groups: those fed an 8% NaCl diet until 18 weeks of age (8% NaCl group), those additionally treated with AGE (8% NaCl + AGE group), and control rats maintained on a diet containing 0.3% NaCl until 18 weeks of age (0.3% NaCl group). AGE was administered orally by gastric gavage once a day until 18 weeks of age. LV mass was significantly higher in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 0.3% NaCl group at 18 weeks of age, but significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 8% NaCl group. No significant differences were observed in systolic blood pressure (SBP) between the 8% NaCl and 8% NaCl + AGE groups at 12 and 18 weeks of age. LV end-diastolic pressure and pressure half-time at 12 and 18 weeks of age were significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group compared with the 8% NaCl group. AGE significantly reduced LV interstitial fibrosis at 12 and 18 weeks of age. Chronic AGE intake attenuated LV diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis without significantly decreasing SBP in hypertensive DS rats. PMID:24172194

  8. Age-dependent changes in material properties of the brain and braincase of the rat.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Amit; Gefen, Nurit; Zhu, Qiliang; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Margulies, Susan S

    2003-11-01

    Clinical and biomechanical evidence indicates that mechanisms and pathology of head injury in infants and young children may be different from those in adults. Biomechanical computer-based modeling, which can be used to provide insight into the thresholds for traumatic tissue injury, requires data on material properties of the brain, skull, and sutures that are specific for the pediatric population. In this study, brain material properties were determined for rats at postnatal days (PND) 13, 17, 43, and 90, and skull/suture composite (braincase) properties were determined at PND 13, 17, and 43. Controlled 1 mm indentation of a force probe into the brain was used to measure naive, non-preconditioned (NPC) and preconditioned (PC) instantaneous (G(i)) and long-term (G( infinity )) shear moduli of brain tissue both in situ and in vitro. Brains at 13 and 17 PND exhibited statistically indistinguishable shear moduli, as did brains at 43 and 90 PND. However, the immature (average of 13 and 17 PND) rat brain (G(i) = 3336 Pa NPC, 1754 Pa PC; G( infinity )= 786 Pa NPC, 626 Pa PC) was significantly stiffer (p < 0.05) than the mature (average of 43 and 90 PND) brains (G(i) = 1721 Pa NPC, 1232 Pa PC; G( infinity ) = 508 Pa NPC, 398 Pa PC). A "reverse engineering" finite element model approach, which simulated the indentation of the force probe into the intact braincase, was used to estimate the effective elastic moduli of the braincase. Although the skull of older rats was significantly thicker than that of the younger rats, there was no significant age-dependent change in the effective elastic modulus of the braincase (average value = 6.3 MPa). Thus, the increase in structural rigidity of the braincase with age (up to 43 PND) was due to an increase in skull thickness rather than stiffening of the tissue. These observations of a stiffer brain and more compliant braincase in the immature rat compared with the adult rat will aid in the development of age-specific experimental

  9. Cognitive decline is associated with reduced surface GluR1 expression in the hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan-Jian; Chen, Hai-Bo; Wei, Bo; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Ping-Liang; Zhan, Jin-Qiong; Hu, Mao-Rong; Yan, Kun; Hu, Bin; Yu, Bin

    2015-03-30

    Individual differences in cognitive aging exist in humans and in rodent populations, yet the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Activity-dependent delivery of GluR1-containing AMPA receptor (AMPARs) plays an essential role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. We hypothesize that alterations of surface GluR1 expression in the hippocampus might correlate with age-related cognitive decline. To test this hypothesis, the present study evaluated the cognitive function of young adult and aged rats using Morris water maze. After the behavioral test, the surface expression of GluR1 protein in hippocampal CA1 region of rats was determined using Western blotting. The results showed that the surface expression of GluR1 in the hippocampus of aged rats that are cognitively impaired was much lower than that of young adults and aged rats with preserved cognitive abilities. The phosphorylation levels of GluR1 at Ser845 and Ser831 sites, which promote the synaptic delivery of GluR1, were also selectively decreased in the hippocampus of aged-impaired rats. Correlation analysis reveals that greater decrease in surface GluR1 expression was associated with worse behavioral performance. These results suggest that reduced surface GluR1 expression may contribute to cognitive decline that occurs in normal aging, and different pattern of surface GluR1 expression might be responsible for the individual differences in cognitive aging. PMID:25697598

  10. Dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in aging rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Binjiang; Li, Xue

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of α2 adrenergic receptor agonists, dexmedetomidine generates sedation, anti-anxiety and anesthesia effects by hyperpolarizing noradrenergic nerve cells in locus coeruleus. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective of dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment, and the possible underlying mechanism in aging rat. Firstly, we used isoflurane-induced aging rat model to analyze the therapeutical effect of dexmedetomidine on cognitive impairment. Next, commercial ELISA kits were used to analyze tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and caspase-3 levels. In addition, Western blotting was used to detect the protein expression of P38 MAPK, PTEN and phosphorylation-Akt (p-Akt) expression. Our results showed that the neuroprotective of dexmedetomidine significantly attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aging rat. Moreover, dexmedetomidine significantly inhibited these TNF-α, IL-1β, MDA, SOD and caspase-3 activities in isoflurane-induced aging rat. Meanwhile, the neuroprotective effects of dexmedetomidine on isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment significantly suppressed Bcl-xL/Bad rate, P38 MAPK and PTEN protein expression and activated p-Akt protein expression in aging rat. Collectively, neuroprotective effect of dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in aging rat. PMID:26770320

  11. Effects of Eurycoma longifolia on Testosterone Level and Bone Structure in an Aged Orchidectomised Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tajul Ariff, Abdul Shukor; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Pramanik, J.; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone replacement is the choice of treatment in androgen-deficient osteoporosis. However, long-term use of testosterone is potentially carcinogenic. Eurycoma longifolia (EL) has been reported to enhance testosterone level and prevent bone calcium loss but there is a paucity of research regarding its effect on the bone structural parameters. This study was conducted to explore the bone structural changes following EL treatment in normal and androgen-deficient osteoporosis rat model. Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 12 months were divided into normal control, normal rat supplemented with EL, sham-operated, orchidectomised-control, orchidectomised with testosterone replacement, and orchidectomised with EL supplementation groups. Testosterone serum was measured both before and after the completion of the treatment. After 6 weeks of the treatment, the femora were processed for bone histomorphometry. Testosterone replacement was able to raise the testosterone level and restore the bone volume of orchidectomised rats. EL supplementation failed to emulate both these testosterone actions. The inability of EL to do so may be related to the absence of testes in the androgen deficient osteoporosis model for EL to stimulate testosterone production. PMID:22966245

  12. Ovarian failure-resistant effects of catalpol in aged female rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Lu, Ye; Liu, Daniel; Ru, Wenwen

    2014-01-01

    Catalpol, an iridoid glycoside obtained from various natural sources, has many biological functions. However, its ovarian failure-resistant effect has scarcely been studied. The present study used senile 14-month-old Sprague-Dawley female rats to examine the in vivo ovarian failure-resistant activity of catalpol. Daily oral graded doses of catalpol (1, 3, or 5 mg/kg/d) for 4 weeks significantly increased the levels of serum 17β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) but reduced follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone levels. Electron microscopic analysis and flow cytometry showed that catalpol significantly retarded apoptosis of the ovarian granulocytes of the rats. These findings suggest that catalpol works on the sex organs by nourishing ovarian tissues and improving both the quality and quantity of follicles, thus leading to rebalanced E2 and P4 levels in aged rats so that catalpol has a direct in vivo antiaging effect on the rat ovarian system. PMID:25177027

  13. Deferoxamine reduces intracerebral hemorrhage-induced white matter damage in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wei; Okauchi, Masanobu; Hatakeyama, Tetsuhiro; Gu, Yuxiang; Keep, Richard F; Xi, Guohua; Hua, Ya

    2015-10-01

    Iron contributes to c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) activation in young rats and white matter injury in piglets after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In the present study, we examined the effect of deferoxamine on ICH-induced white matter injury and JNK activation and in aged rats. Male Fischer 344 rats (18months old) had either an intracaudate injection of 100μl of autologous blood or a needle insertion (sham). The rats were treated with deferoxamine or vehicle with different regimen (dosage, duration and time window). White matter injury and activation of JNK were examined. We found that a dose of DFX should be at more than 10mg/kg for a therapeutic duration more than 2days with a therapeutic time window of 12h to reduce ICH-induced white matter loss at 2months. ICH-induced white matter injury was associated with JNK activation. The protein levels of phosphorylated-JNK (P-JNK) were upregulated at day-1 after ICH and then gradually decreased. P-JNK immunoreactivity was mostly located in white matter bundles. ICH-induced JNK activation was reduced by DFX treatment. This study demonstrated that DFX can reduce ICH-induced JNK activation and white matter damage.

  14. Directional variations of mechanical parameters in rat skin depending on maturation and age.

    PubMed

    Vogel, H G

    1981-06-01

    Mechanical properties of rat back skin at low loads and at failure were studied in 2 directions, e.g., perpendicular and longitudinal to body axis beginning with early maturation (from 1 week onwards) until senescence (at 24 mo). Anisotropic behavior, known for human skin, has also been found in rats. Surprisingly, the changes due to maturation and aging were not the same for one area of skin regardless of the direction. Ultimate extension was more influenced by the aging process in samples perpendicular to the body axis than in those parallel to body axis. Elongation at zero load, that means load not measurable under the described conditions, was higher in the longitudinal samples than in the perpendicular ones in young and very old animals, whereas this difference was absent in mature animals. In contrast, ultimate load, tensile strength and modulus of elasticity were higher in perpendicular samples than in samples longitudinal to the body axis for young and very old, but not for mature animals. Elongation at low loads or low stresses shows a different pattern than at medium loads or medium stresses when both directions are compared. Apparently, elements contributing to the mechanical properties in the various directions are differently influenced by the maturation and aging processes. Moreover, the elements contributing to the changes at low loads react differently to the aging process from those responsible for the effects at medium and high loads.

  15. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E.; Hernandez, Jessica Soto; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  16. Treadmill exercise induces age and protocol-dependent epigenetic changes in prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cechinel, Laura Reck; Basso, Carla Giovana; Bertoldi, Karine; Schallenberger, Bruna; de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2016-10-15

    Some studies have linked age-related beneficial effects of exercise and epigenetic mechanisms. Although, the impact of treadmill exercise on histone acetylation, histone and DNA methylation marks in aged cortices yet remains poorly understood. Considering the role of frontal cortex on brain functions, we investigated the potential of different exercise protocols, single session and daily exercise, to modulate epigenetic marks, namely global H4 acetylation, histone methyltransferase activity (HMT H3K27) and levels of DNA methytransferase (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) in prefrontal cortices from 3 and 21-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two treadmill exercise protocols, single session (20min) or daily moderate (20min/day during 14days). The daily exercise protocol induced an increased in histone H4 acetylation levels in prefrontal cortices of 21-months-old rats, without any effects in young adult group. DNMT3b levels were increased in aged cortices of animals submitted to single session of exercise. These results indicate that prefrontal cortex is susceptible to epigenetic changes in a protocol dependent-manner and that H4 acetylation levels and DNMT3b content changes might be linked at least in part to exercise-induced effects on brain functions. PMID:27418438

  17. Antiatherogenic and Cardioprotective Effects of Black Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) Juice in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, Elena; Delchev, Slavi; Peeva, Yulia; Vladimirova-Kitova, Lyudmila; Kratchanova, Maria; Kratchanov, Christo; Denev, Petko

    2015-01-01

    Age-related diseases are a social problem of global significance and their prevention by natural products is a research area of particular interest. The present study is an approach to counteract the risk factors for atherosclerosis arising in the aging process by supplementation of chokeberry juice. It employed a model of healthy adult rats monitored for a number of somatometric, serum lipidogram, and histopathological parameters, related to risk factors and their response to supplementation with antioxidant-rich chokeberry juice. The results were used to calculate different atherogenic and cardioprotective indices, and all results were compared to those of young healthy rats. Chokeberry juice proved an extremely rich source of polyphenols resulting in very high antioxidant activity. Treatment with Aronia juice significantly lowered the proatherogenic low-density lipoprotein fraction of the animals studied and led to a 16.5% decrease in their total cholesterol. Atherogenic indices in Aronia-supplemented animals clearly showed lower atherogenic risk and cardioprotective indices indicated protection of the cardiovascular system. Besides that, chokeberry juice retarded the age-related changes in the aortic wall and can be recommended as a prophylactic tool for healthy aging. PMID:26351516

  18. Differential cloning of growth hormone-regulated hepatic transcripts in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Tollet-Egnell, P; Flores-Morales, A; Odeberg, J; Lundeberg, J; Norstedt, G

    2000-03-01

    It has been suggested that aging or at least some of its symptoms are related to a physiological decline in GH levels with age. This study was performed to elucidate age-related changes in GH-dependent effects at the level of gene expression. Through the application of complementary DNA representational difference analysis (RDA) we have identified gene products that are reduced during aging in rat liver. The expression of these genes was restored upon GH treatment. Results from reverse Northern and ribonuclease protection analysis confirmed that the RDA products were truly differentially expressed. In addition to well characterized GH-regulated genes, including CYP2C12, CYP2C13, and alpha2u-globulin, we demonstrate the differential expression of at least 11 genes previously not known to be under GH control. Several hepatic transcripts encoding enzymes and receptors involved in the metabolism of protein, carbohydrates, and lipids were identified. Other RDA products consisted of transcripts encoding proteins involved in ATP synthesis, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, or immune responses. This list of GH-regulated genes in the old rat may shed further light on the action and mechanism behind the positive effects of GH on, for example, body composition and the immune system that have been observed in different animal and human studies. PMID:10698165

  19. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle.

  20. In vivo molecular imaging of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in the aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, Elseline; Rojas, Santiago; Herance, Raúl; Pareto, Deborah; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Figueiras, Francisca P; Popota, Foteini; Ruiz, Alba; Flotats, Núria; Fernández, Francisco J; Rocha, Milagros; Rovira, Mariana; Víctor, Víctor M; Gispert, Juan D

    2012-07-01

    The GABA-ergic system, known to regulate neural tissue genesis during cortical development, has been postulated to play a role in cerebral aging processes. Using in vivo molecular imaging and voxel-wise quantification, we aimed to assess the effects of aging on the benzodiazepine (BDZ) recognition site of the GABA(A) receptor. To visualize BDZ site availability, [(11)C]-flumazenil microPET acquisitions were conducted in young and old rats. The data were analyzed and region of interest analyses were applied to validate the voxel-wise approach. We observed decreased [(11)C]-flumazenil binding in the aged rat brains in comparison with the young control group. More specifically, clusters of reduced radioligand uptake were detected in the bilateral hippocampus, cerebellum, midbrain, and bilateral frontal and parieto-occipital cortex. Our results support the pertinence of voxel-wise quantification in the analysis of microPET data. Moreover, these findings indicate that the aging process involves declines in neural BDZ recognition site availability, proposed to reflect alterations in GABA(A) receptor subunit polypeptide expression.

  1. Treadmill exercise induces age and protocol-dependent epigenetic changes in prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cechinel, Laura Reck; Basso, Carla Giovana; Bertoldi, Karine; Schallenberger, Bruna; de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2016-10-15

    Some studies have linked age-related beneficial effects of exercise and epigenetic mechanisms. Although, the impact of treadmill exercise on histone acetylation, histone and DNA methylation marks in aged cortices yet remains poorly understood. Considering the role of frontal cortex on brain functions, we investigated the potential of different exercise protocols, single session and daily exercise, to modulate epigenetic marks, namely global H4 acetylation, histone methyltransferase activity (HMT H3K27) and levels of DNA methytransferase (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) in prefrontal cortices from 3 and 21-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two treadmill exercise protocols, single session (20min) or daily moderate (20min/day during 14days). The daily exercise protocol induced an increased in histone H4 acetylation levels in prefrontal cortices of 21-months-old rats, without any effects in young adult group. DNMT3b levels were increased in aged cortices of animals submitted to single session of exercise. These results indicate that prefrontal cortex is susceptible to epigenetic changes in a protocol dependent-manner and that H4 acetylation levels and DNMT3b content changes might be linked at least in part to exercise-induced effects on brain functions.

  2. Acetyl-L-carnitine increases mitochondrial protein acetylation in the aged rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Janos; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Lee, Kwangwon; Virmani, Ashraf; Koverech, Aleardo; Cavazza, Claudio; Chance, Mark R; Hoppel, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that in vivo treatment of elderly Fisher 344 rats with acetylcarnitine abolished the age-associated defect in respiratory chain complex III in interfibrillar mitochondria and improved the functional recovery of the ischemic/reperfused heart. Herein, we explored mitochondrial protein acetylation as a possible mechanism for acetylcarnitine's effect. In vivo treatment of elderly rats with acetylcarnitine restored cardiac acetylcarnitine content and increased mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and increased the number of lysine-acetylated proteins in cardiac subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria. Enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial β-oxidation, and ATP synthase of the respiratory chain showed the greatest acetylation. Acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, complex V, and aspartate aminotransferase was accompanied by decreased catalytic activity. Several proteins were found to be acetylated only after treatment with acetylcarnitine, suggesting that exogenous acetylcarnitine served as the acetyl-donor. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that acetylcarnitine treatment also induced changes in mitochondrial protein amount; a two-fold or greater increase/decrease in abundance was observed for thirty one proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the first time that in the aged rat heart in vivo administration of acetylcarnitine provides acetyl groups for protein acetylation and affects the amount of mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25660059

  3. Calcium and vitamin D enriched diets increase and preserve vertebral mineral content in aging laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Schapira, D; Linn, S; Sarid, M; Mokadi, S; Kabala, A; Silbermann, M

    1995-05-01

    To assess the long-term effect of vitamin D or calcium supplementation on the skeletal metabolism of aging laboratory rodents, 1.5-month-old female Wistar rats were fed with diets containing twice the concentration of vitamin D (group 2) and of calcium (group 3) as in the usual rat chow. Follow-up to 24 months of age did not show significant differences between the enriched-diet groups and the controls (group 1) in terms of the vertebral body weight and protein content. Significantly higher bone mineral contents were found in groups 2 and 3 than were found in controls, as revealed by an increased bone mineral density (BMD: +62%, group 2; +48%, group 3) and vertebral calcium content (+73%, group 2; +84%, group 3). The vertebral alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity was significantly lower in the enriched diet groups than in controls (-47%, group 2; -45%, group 3). The ratio alkaline phosphatase/acid phosphatase activity was markedly reduced in groups 2 and 3 (-57% and -59%, respectively), which might indicate a diminished rate of bone turnover. The trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) decreased in all groups during senescence, being significantly elevated in group 3 as compared to controls. Vitamin D and calcium dietary supplementations increase the axial mineral bone content in laboratory rats and might reduce the bone turnover. Their influence on the trabecular bone volume has yet to be examined.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway mediates isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis and cognitive impairments in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hong-Wei; Hu, Wen-Wen; Ma, Lei-Lei; Kong, Fei-Juan

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is increasingly being recognized as an important clinical syndrome. Although it has been documented that volatile anesthetics induce neuronal apoptosis and cognitive deficits in several aged animal models, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is considered as an initial or early response of cells under stress and linked to neuronal death in various neurodegenerative diseases. The study was designed to explore the possible role of ERS pathway in isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis and cognitive impairments. In the present study, twenty-month-old rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane for 4h. Two weeks later, the rats were subjected to behavioral study. Protein and mRNA expressions of ERS markers were evaluated. Meanwhile, hippocampal neuronal apoptosis was also detected. We found that isoflurane triggered ERS as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (EIF) 2α, and increased expression of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), activating transcription factor (ATF) 4 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Furthermore, the level of apoptosis in the hippocampus was significantly up-regulated after isoflurane exposure, and salubrinal (ERS inhibitor) treatment attenuated the increase. More importantly, cognitive impairments caused by isoflurane were also effectively alleviated by salubrinal pretreatment. These results indicate that ERS-mediated apoptotic pathway is involved in isoflurane neurotoxicity in aged rats. Inhibition of ERS overactivation contributes to the relief of isoflurane-induced neurohistopathologic changes. PMID:26162760

  5. Estrogen depletion increases blood pressure and hypothalamic norepinephrine in middle-aged spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ning; Clark, John T; Wei, Chi-Chang; Wyss, J Michael

    2003-05-01

    In male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) a high NaCl diet increases arterial pressure via a reduction in anterior hypothalamic nucleus norepinephrine release. Young female SHR are relatively well protected from this NaCl-sensitive hypertension, but depletion of both endogenous and dietary estrogens greatly exacerbates NaCl-sensitive hypertension. This study tests the hypothesis that estrogen also protects late middle-aged female SHR from NaCl-sensitive hypertension and that this effect is mediated by an estrogen-related effect on hypothalamic norepinephrine release. Ten-month-old female SHR were ovariectomized and placed on a phytoestrogen-free diet containing either basal or high NaCl. Each rat was implanted with a silastic tube containing 17beta estradiol or vehicle. Three months later, arterial pressure and hypothalamic norepinephrine metabolite levels (MOPEG) were measured. On the basal NaCl diet, estrogen-depleted rats displayed increased arterial pressure (12 mm Hg) and decreased anterior hypothalamic nucleus MOPEG (20%). Both effects were reversed by estrogen treatment. In all groups, the high NaCl diet increased arterial pressure by over 35 mm Hg and reduced anterior hypothalamic nucleus MOPEG by >60%. Across all groups, there was a significant inverse correlation between arterial pressure and anterior hypothalamic nucleus MOPEG. These data suggest that both dietary NaCl excess and estrogen depletion raise arterial pressure in middle-aged female SHR by a decreasing hypothalamic norepinephrine.

  6. Effects of Chamomilla recutita flavonoids on age-related liver sphingolipid turnover in rats.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Nataliya A; Shakhova, Elena G

    2006-01-01

    The increased sphingolipid turnover in the liver is associated with elevation of free radical production and state of chronic inflammation at old age. Plant polyphenols are reported to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present paper, the lipids contents and ceramide production in the liver and hepatocytes as well as the correction of sphingolipid metabolism at old age using the mixture of Chamomilla recutita flavonoids (chamiloflan) or apigenin-7-glucoside or luteolin-7-glucoside alone have been investigated. To study the sphingolipids turnover, the [14C]serine-pre-labeled hepatocytes and [14C-methyl]- or [14C]palmitate-pre-labeled sphingomyelin (SM) and ceramide were used. The ceramide content was higher in the liver and hepatocytes of 24- and 27-28-month-old animals as compared to adult 3-month-old Wistar rats. An addition of flavonoids to the culture medium did not influence significantly on the lipids contents and metabolism in the isolated hepatocytes. The administration of flavonoids to old rats decreased the elevated neutral and acid SMases activities and ceramide mass and did not affect both the lipid content in the liver of adult animals and ceramide conversion to the sphingosine or SM. These results suggest that the SMases play a key role in the flavonoid-induced decrease of ceramide levels in the liver of old rats. PMID:16183236

  7. Associations among within-litter differences in early mothering received and later emotional behaviors, mothering, and cortical tryptophan hydroxylase-2 expression in female laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Ragan, Christina M; Harding, Kaitlyn M; Lonstein, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". The effects of differential maternal care received on offspring phenotype in rodents has been extensively studied between litters, but the consequences of differential mothering within litters on offspring neurobehavioral development have been rarely examined. We here investigated how variability in maternal care received among female rat siblings (measured four times daily on postnatal days 4, 6, 8, and 10) relates to the siblings' later emotional and maternal behaviors. As previously reported, we found that some female pups received up to three times more maternal licking bouts compared to their sisters; this difference was positively correlated with the pups' body weights. The number of maternal licking bouts that females received was negatively correlated with their later neophobic behaviors in an open field during periadolescence, but positively correlated with their anxiety-related behavior in an elevated plus maze during adulthood. Licking received was also positively correlated with females' later likelihood to retrieve pups in a maternal sensitization paradigm. In addition, females' neophobia during adolescence and anxiety-related behavior during adulthood predicted some aspects of both postpartum and sensitized maternal responsiveness. Medial prefrontal cortex expression of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2; enzyme necessary for serotonin synthesis) was negatively associated with early maternal licking received. Interestingly, cortical TPH2 was positively associated with the maternal responsiveness of sensitized virgins but negatively associated with it in postpartum females. These results indicate that within-litter differences in maternal care received is an often neglected, but important, contributor to individual differences in offspring socioemotional behaviors as well as to the cortical serotonin neurochemistry that may influence these behaviors.

  8. Cadmium effect on microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity in rat livers with respect to differences in age and sex

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of cadmium on the hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme system was investigated. Cadmium chloride caused the conversion of cytochrome P-450 to P-420 in rat liver microsomes. The destruction of cytochrome P-450 by cadmium caused the reduction of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity and prolonged the pentobarbital sleeping time. There is a sex-related difference in the ability of cadmium to inhibit the hepatic drug metabolism in rats: male rats are more sensitive to cadmium than females. The effective period when cadmium prolonged their sleep depended upon the age of rats; older rats were more sensitive to cadmium than younger ones. The maximum increase of sleeping time depended upon the dose level of cadium, and the rate constant of the equations seems to depend upon the age of the animals.

  9. Lymphatic Muscle Cells in Rat Mesenteric Lymphatic Vessels of Various Ages

    PubMed Central

    Bridenbaugh, Eric A.; Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Jupiter, Daniel; Nagai, Takashi; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chatterjee, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent studies on aging-associated changes in mesenteric lymph flow in situ demonstrated predominance of the severe negative chronotropic effect of aging on the contractility of aged mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLV). At the same time, contraction amplitude of the aged vessels was only slightly diminished by aging and can be rapidly stimulated within 5–15 minutes. However, the detailed quantitative evaluation of potential aging-associated changes in muscle cells investiture in MLV has never been performed. Methods and Results In this study we, for the first time, performed detailed evaluation of muscle cells investiture in MLV in reference to the position of lymphatic valve in different zones of lymphangion within various age groups (3-mo, 9-mo and 24-mo Fischer-344 rats). Using visual and quantitative analyses of the images of MLV immunohistochemically labeled for actin, we confirmed that the zones located close upstream (pre-valve zones) and above lymphatic valves (valve zones) possess the lowest investiture of lymphatic muscle cells. Most of the high muscle cells investiture zones exist downstream to the lymphatic valve (post-valve zones). The muscle cells investiture of these zones is not affected by aging, while pre-valve and valve zones demonstrate significant aging-associated decrease in muscle cells investiture. Conclusions The low muscle cells investiture zones in lymphatic vessels consist of predominantly longitudinally oriented muscle cells which are positioned in pre-valve and valve zones and connect adjacent lymphangions. These cells may provide important functional impact on the biomechanics of the lymphatic valve gating and electrical coupling between lymphangions, while their aging-associated changes may delimit adaptive reserves of aged lymphatic vessels. PMID:23531183

  10. Desensitized morphological and cytokine response after stretch-shortening muscle contractions as a feature of aging in rats.

    PubMed

    Rader, Erik P; Layner, Kayla N; Triscuit, Alyssa M; Kashon, Michael L; Gu, Ja K; Ensey, James; Baker, Brent A

    2015-12-01

    Recovery from contraction-induced injury is impaired with aging. At a young age, the secondary response several days following contraction-induced injury consists of edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and segmental muscle fiber degeneration to aid in the clearance of damaged tissue and repair. This morphological response has not been wholly established at advanced age. Our aim was to characterize muscle fiber morphology 3 and 10 days following stretch-shortening contractions (SSCs) varying in repetition number (i.e. 0, 30, 80, and 150) for young and old rats. For muscles of young rats, muscle fiber degeneration was overt at 3 days exclusively after 80 or 150 SSCs and returned significantly closer to control values by 10 days. For muscles of old rats, no such responses were observed. Transcriptional microarray analysis at 3 days demonstrated that muscles of young rats differentially expressed up to 2144 genes while muscles of old rats differentially expressed 47 genes. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that cellular movement was a major biological process over-represented with genes that were significantly altered by SSCs especially for young rats. Protein levels in muscle for various cytokines and chemokines, key inflammatory factors for cell movement, increased 3- to 50-fold following high-repetition SSCs for young rats with no change for old rats. This age-related differential response was insightful given that for control (i.e. 0 SSCs) conditions, protein levels of circulatory cytokines/chemokines were increased with age. The results demonstrate ongoing systemic low-grade inflammatory signaling and subsequent desensitization of the cytokine/chemokine and morphological response to contraction-induced injury with aging - features which accompany age-related impairment in muscle recovery.

  11. Immunocytochemical profiles of inferior colliculus neurons in the rat and their changes with aging

    PubMed Central

    Ouda, Ladislav; Syka, Josef

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) plays a strategic role in the central auditory system in relaying and processing acoustical information, and therefore its age-related changes may significantly influence the quality of the auditory function. A very complex processing of acoustical stimuli occurs in the IC, as supported also by the fact that the rat IC contains more neurons than all other subcortical auditory structures combined. GABAergic neurons, which predominantly co-express parvalbumin (PV), are present in the central nucleus of the IC in large numbers and to a lesser extent in the dorsal and external/lateral cortices of the IC. On the other hand, calbindin (CB) and calretinin (CR) are prevalent in the dorsal and external cortices of the IC, with only a few positive neurons in the central nucleus. The relationship between CB and CR expression in the IC and any neurotransmitter system has not yet been well established, but the distribution and morphology of the immunoreactive neurons suggest that they are at least partially non-GABAergic cells. The expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) (a key enzyme for GABA synthesis) and calcium binding proteins (CBPs) in the IC of rats undergoes pronounced changes with aging that involve mostly a decline in protein expression and a decline in the number of immunoreactive neurons. Similar age-related changes in GAD, CB, and CR expression are present in the IC of two rat strains with differently preserved inner ear function up to late senescence (Long-Evans and Fischer 344), which suggests that these changes do not depend exclusively on peripheral deafferentation but are, at least partially, of central origin. These changes may be associated with the age-related deterioration in the processing of the temporal parameters of acoustical stimuli, which is not correlated with hearing threshold shifts, and therefore may contribute to central presbycusis. PMID:23049499

  12. Influence of maturation and aging on mechanical and biochemical properties of connective tissue in rats.

    PubMed

    Vogel, H G

    1980-01-01

    The influence of maturation and age on the physical and chemical properties of various organs of connective tissue has been studied in rats at ages of 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 4 monhs, 1 year and 2 years. The changes between young (4 weeks old) and adult (4 months to 1 year old) animals were considered as the effects of maturation, whereas the changes between adult and senescent (2 years old) rats were regarded as the effects of aging. Ultimate values, such as ultimate load, tensile strength and breaking strength, or ultimate modulus of elasticity, showed a sharp rise during maturation and a smaller but significant decrease during aging in all organs, such as skin strips, tail tendons, shaft bones, epiphyseal cartilage and aorta rings. Ultimate strain showed a similar pattern, but the maximum occurred earlier. These changes were parallel with the content of insoluble collagen. Other chemical parameters such as soluble collagen or glycosaminoglycans, showed a continuous decrease during the life span, whereas elastin rose continuously. More detailed analysis of mechanical properties in rat skin gave insight into the viscoelastic behaviour of skin. In creep experiments time until break under constant load rose continuously during the life span, whereas ultimate extension rate showed a sharp fall during maturation and a slow decrease during senescence. Stress at low extension degree and moduli of elasticity at low extension degree were decreased by maturation and increased by senescence, exactly the opposite of the changes at high extension degrees. The so-called step phenomenon was increased due to maturation and decreased due to aging. Relaxation and mechanical recovery were changed in the same direction by maturation and aging. Relative viscoelastic parameters, such as the hysteresis phenomenon and relative decrease of stress under cyclic strain, were barely influenced by the aging process. Changes of most of the mechanical parameters at high extension degrees during

  13. Microglial AGE-albumin is critical in promoting alcohol-induced neurodegeneration in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyunghee; Bayarsaikhan, Delger; Bayarsaikhan, Enkhjargal; Son, Myeongjoo; Oh, Seyeon; Lee, Jaesuk; Son, Hye-In; Won, Moo-Ho; Kim, Seung U; Song, Byoung-Joon; Lee, Bonghee

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a neurotoxic agent, since long-term heavy ingestion of alcohol can cause various neural diseases including fetal alcohol syndrome, cerebellar degeneracy and alcoholic dementia. However, the molecular mechanisms of alcohol-induced neurotoxicity are still poorly understood despite numerous studies. Thus, we hypothesized that activated microglial cells with elevated AGE-albumin levels play an important role in promoting alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. Our results revealed that microglial activation and neuronal damage were found in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex following alcohol treatment in a rat model. Increased AGE-albumin synthesis and secretion were also observed in activated microglial cells after alcohol exposure. The expressed levels of receptor for AGE (RAGE)-positive neurons and RAGE-dependent neuronal death were markedly elevated by AGE-albumin through the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Treatment with soluble RAGE or AGE inhibitors significantly diminished neuronal damage in the animal model. Furthermore, the levels of activated microglial cells, AGE-albumin and neuronal loss were significantly elevated in human brains from alcoholic indivisuals compared to normal controls. Taken together, our data suggest that increased AGE-albumin from activated microglial cells induces neuronal death, and that efficient regulation of its synthesis and secretion is a therapeutic target for preventing alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:25140518

  14. Myosin heavy chain composition in the rat diaphragm - Effect of age and exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, Luc E.; Betlach, Michael; Vailas, Arthur C.; Greaser, Marion L.; Thomas, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of aging and exercise training on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition were determined in both the costal and crural diaphragm regions of female Fischer 344 rats. Treadmill running at 75 percent maximal oxygen consumption resulted in similar increases in plantaris muscle citrate synthase activity in both young (5 mo) and old (23mo) trained animals (P less than 0.05). It was found that the ratio of fast to slow MHC was significantly higher (P less than 0.005) in the crural compared with costal diaphragm region in both age groups. A significant age-related increase in persentage of slow MHC was observed in both diaphragm regions. The relative proportion of slow MHC in either costal or crural region was not changed by exercise training.

  15. Protein synthesis rates in rat brain regions and subcellular fractions during aging

    SciTech Connect

    Avola, R.; Condorelli, D.F.; Ragusa, N.; Renis, M.; Alberghina, M.; Giuffrida Stella, A.M.; Lajtha, A.

    1988-04-01

    In vivo protein synthesis rates in various brain regions (cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and striatum) of 4-, 12-, and 24-month-old rats were examined after injection of a flooding dose of labeled valine. The incorporation of labeled valine into proteins of mitochondrial, microsomal, and cytosolic fractions from cerebral cortex and cerebellum was also measured. At all ages examined, the incorporation rate was 0.5% per hour in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus and 0.4% per hour in striatum. Of the subcellular fractions examined, the microsomal proteins were synthesized at the highest rate, followed by cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins. The results obtained indicate that the average synthesis rate of proteins in the various brain regions and subcellular fractions examined is fairly constant and is not significantly altered in the 4 to 24-month period of life of rats.

  16. A Rat Model System to Study Complex Disease Risks, Fitness, Aging, and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Lauren Gerard; Britton, Steven L.; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    The association between low exercise capacity and all-cause morbidity and mortality is statistically strong yet mechanistically unresolved. By connecting clinical observation with a theoretical base, we developed a working hypothesis that variation in capacity for oxygen metabolism is the central mechanistic determinant between disease and health (aerobic hypothesis). As an unbiased test, we show that two-way artificial selective breeding of rats for low and high intrinsic endurance exercise capacity also produces rats that differ for numerous disease risks including the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular complications, premature aging, and reduced longevity. This contrasting animal model system may prove to be translationally superior, relative to more widely-used simplistic models for understanding geriatric biology and medicine. PMID:22867966

  17. Age-related changes in rat hippocampal theta rhythms: a difference between type 1 and type 2 theta.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; Toyosawa, K

    1999-05-01

    The age-related changes in two types of theta rhythms recorded from the hippocampus in young (4 months-old), mature (12-13 months-old) and aged (22-25 months-old) rats were investigated. The type 1 theta rhythm was measured from hippocampal EEG recorded from walking rats and the type 2 theta was measured from the EEG induced by reticular pontin oralis nucleus (PON) stimulation in urethane anesthetized rats. The peak frequency and the peak power were detected from power spectra calculated on each theta sample by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). No age-related alteration was observed on the peak frequency of type 1 theta rhythm. However, on type 2 theta rhythm, the peak frequency was decreased in the aged rats compared with the young and the mature rats. The type 2 theta rhythm is cholinergic, and therefore this result suggests that age-related deterioration can be clearly observed in the cholinergic system including the hippocampus in rats.

  18. The Effect of Cochinchina momordica Seed Extract on Gastric Acid Secretion and Morphologic Change in Aged Rat Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyun Jin; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Chang, Hyun; Kim, Joo-Hyon; Park, Ji Hyun; Kang, Jung Mook; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Cochinchina momordica seed extract (SK-MS10) has a gastric protective effect. We aimed to assess the effect of SK-MS10 on gastric acid secretion with morphologic changes in the aged rat. Methods Acid secretions were evaluated in the male F344 rats of four different ages (6-, 31-, 74-week, and 2-year). The 31-week-old rats were divided to three groups and continuously administered chow containing vehicle, SK-MS10 and lansoprazole, respectively. At the age of 74 weeks and 2 years, basal and stimulated acid was measured and the expression of mRNA and protein of H+-K+-ATPase were determined. The area of connective tissue of lamina propria was measured. Results Basal and stimulated gastric acid significantly decreased and connective tissue of lamina propria increased with age. The expression of mRNA and protein of H+-K+-ATPase significantly decreased with age. However, 74-week-old rats in the SK-MS10 group had higher stimulated gastric acid secretion than those in the vehicle and lansoprazole groups. In 2-year-old rats of SK-MS10 group, there was no increase of connective tissue. Conclusions As SK-MS10 kept the capacity of acid secretion as well as connective tissue area to comparable to young rats, it might valuable to perform further research regarding mechanism of SK-MS10 as an antiaging agent in the stomach. PMID:24073314

  19. Glucocorticoid-Dependent Hippocampal Transcriptome in Male Rats: Pathway-Specific Alterations With Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuey-Chu; Blalock, Eric M.; Curran-Rauhut, Meredith A.; Kadish, Inga; Blalock, Susan J.; Brewer, Lawrence; Porter, Nada M.

    2013-01-01

    Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are known to exert numerous effects in the hippocampus, their chronic regulatory functions remain poorly understood. Moreover, evidence is inconsistent regarding the long-standing hypothesis that chronic GC exposure promotes brain aging/Alzheimer disease. Here, we adrenalectomized male F344 rats at 15 months of age, maintained them for 3 months with implanted corticosterone (CORT) pellets producing low or intermediate (glucocorticoid receptor–activating) blood levels of CORT, and performed microarray/pathway analyses in hippocampal CA1. We defined the chronic GC-dependent transcriptome as 393 genes that exhibited differential expression between intermediate and low CORT groups. Short-term CORT (4 days) did not recapitulate this transcriptome. Functional processes/pathways overrepresented by chronic CORT–up-regulated genes included learning/plasticity, differentiation, glucose metabolism, and cholesterol biosynthesis, whereas processes overrepresented by CORT–down-regulated genes included inflammatory/immune/glial responses and extracellular structure. These profiles indicate that GCs chronically activate neuronal/metabolic processes while coordinately repressing a glial axis of reactivity/inflammation. We then compared the GC transcriptome with a previously defined hippocampal aging transcriptome, revealing a high proportion of common genes. Although CORT and aging moved expression of some common genes in the same direction, the majority were shifted in opposite directions by CORT and aging (eg, glial inflammatory genes down-regulated by CORT are up-regulated with aging). These results contradict the hypothesis that GCs simply promote brain aging and also suggest that the opposite direction shifts during aging reflect resistance to CORT regulation. Therefore, we propose a new model in which aging-related GC resistance develops in some target pathways, whereas GC overstimulation develops in others, together generating much of the

  20. Decreased myeloperoxidase expressing cells in the aged rat brain after excitotoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Castillo-Ruiz, Maria del Mar; Acarin, Laia; Gonzalez, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2011-09-01

    Brain aging is associated to several morphological and functional alterations that influence the evolution and outcome of CNS damage. Acute brain injury such as an excitotoxic insult induces initial tissue damage followed by associated inflammation and oxidative stress, partly attributed to neutrophil recruitment and the expression of oxidative enzymes such as myeloperoxidase (MPO), among others. However, to date, very few studies have focused on how age can influence neutrophil infiltration after acute brain damage. Therefore, to evaluate the age-dependent pattern of neutrophil cell infiltration following an excitotoxic injury, intrastriatal injection of N-methyl-d-aspartate was performed in young and aged male Wistar rats. Animals were sacrificed at different times between 12h post-lesion (hpl) to 14 days post-lesion (dpl). Cryostat sections were processed for myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohistochemistry, and double labeling for either neuronal cells (NeuN), astrocytes (GFAP), perivascular macrophages (ED-2), or microglia/macrophages (tomato lectin histochemistry). Our observations showed that MPO + cells were observed in the injured striatum from 12 hpl (when maximum values were found) until 7 dpl, when cell density was strongly diminished. However, at all survival times analyzed, the overall density of MPO + cells was lower in the aged versus the adult injured striatum. MPO + cells were mainly identified as neutrophils (especially at 12 hpl and 1 dpl), but it should be noted that MPO + neurons and microglia/macrophages were also found. MPO + neurons were most commonly observed at 12 hpl and reduced in the aged. MPO + microglia/macrophages were the main population expressing MPO from 3 dpl, when density was also reduced in aged subjects. These results point to neutrophil infiltration as another important factor contributing to the different responses of the adult and aged brain to damage, highlighting the need of using aged animals for the study of acute age

  1. Age-related changes in rat cerebellar basket cells: a quantitative study using unbiased stereological methods

    PubMed Central

    HENRIQUE, RUI M. F.; ROCHA, EDUARDO; REIS, ALCINDA; MARCOS, RICARDO; OLIVEIRA, MARIA H.; SILVA, MARIA W.; MONTEIRO, ROGÉRIO A. F.

    2001-01-01

    Cortical cerebellar basket cells are stable postmitotic cells; hence, they are liable to endure age-related changes. Since the cerebellum is a vital organ for the postural control, equilibrium and motor coordination, we aimed to determine the quantitative morphological changes in those interneurons with the ageing process, using unbiased techniques. Material from the cerebellar cortex (Crus I and Crus II) was collected from female rats aged 2, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 mo (5 animals per each age group), fixed by intracardiac perfusion, and processed for transmission electron microscopy, using conventional techniques. Serial semithin sections were obtained (5 blocks from each rat), enabling the determination of the number-weighted mean nuclear volume (by the nucleator method). On ultrathin sections, 25 cell profiles from each animal were photographed. The volume density of the nucleus, ground substance, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus (Golgi) and dense bodies (DB), and the mean surface density of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were determined, by point counting, using a morphometric grid. The mean total volumes of the soma and organelles and the mean total surface area of the RER [s̄N (RER)] were then calculated. The results were analysed with 1-way ANOVA; posthoc pairwise comparisons of group means were performed using the Newman-Keuls test. The relation between age and each of the parameters was studied by regression analysis. Significant age-related changes were observed for the mean volumes of the soma, ground substance, Golgi, DB, and s̄N (RER). Positive linear trends were found for the mean volumes of the ground substance, Golgi, and DB; a negative linear trend was found for the s̄N (RER). These results indicate that rat cerebellar basket cells endure important age-related changes. The significant decrease in the s̄N (RER) may be responsible for a reduction in the rate of protein synthesis. Additionally, it may be implicated in a cascade of events

  2. Age-related changes of dental pulp tissue after experimental tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Von Böhl, Martina; Ren, Yijin; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.; Maltha, Jaap C.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the effect of orthodontic tooth movement on the dental pulp in adolescents is reversible and that it has no long-lasting effect on pulpal physiology. However, it is not clear yet if the same conclusion is also valid for adult subjects. Thus, in two groups of rats, aged 6 and 40 weeks respectively, 3 molars at one side of the maxilla were moved together in a mesial direction with a standardized orthodontic appliance delivering a force of 10 cN. The contralateral side served as a control. Parasagittal histological sections were prepared after tooth movement for 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The pulp tissue was characterized for the different groups, with special emphasis on cell density, inflammatory cells, vascularity, and odontoblasts. Dimensions of dentin and the pulpal horns was determined and related with the duration of orthodontic force application and age ware evaluated. We found that neither in young nor in adult rats, force application led to long-lasting or irreversible changes in pulpal tissues. Dimensional variables showed significant age-related changes. In conclusion, orthodontic tooth movement per se has no long-lasting or irreversible effect on pulpal tissues, neither in the young nor in the adult animals. PMID:26855867

  3. Astrocytes from adult Wistar rats aged in vitro show changes in glial functions.

    PubMed

    Souza, Débora Guerini; Bellaver, Bruna; Raupp, Gustavo Santos; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2015-11-01

    Astrocytes, the most versatile cells of the central nervous system, play an important role in the regulation of neurotransmitter homeostasis, energy metabolism, antioxidant defenses and the anti-inflammatory response. Recently, our group characterized cortical astrocyte cultures from adult Wistar rats. In line with that work, we studied glial function using an experimental in vitro model of aging astrocytes (30 days in vitro after reaching confluence) from newborn (NB), adult (AD) and aged (AG) Wistar rats. We evaluated metabolic parameters, such as the glucose uptake, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and glutathione (GSH) content, as well as the GFAP, GLUT-1 and xCT expression. AD and AG astrocytes take up less glucose than NB astrocytes and had decreased GLUT1 expression levels. Furthermore, AD and AG astrocytes exhibited decreased GS activity compared to NB cells. Simultaneously, AD and AG astrocytes showed an increase in GSH levels, along with an increase in xCT expression. NB, AD and AG astrocytes presented similar morphology; however, differences in GFAP levels were observed. Taken together, these results improve the knowledge of cerebral senescence and represent an innovative tool for brain studies of aging. PMID:26210720

  4. Modification of the uterotropic effect produced by estrogens in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, L M; Tsyrlina, E V; Poroshina, T E; Rozanov, Yu M; Gamayunova, V B; Vasil'ev, D A; Kovalenko, I G

    2002-11-01

    We studied the influence of various methods for correction of age-related changes (administration of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, vitamins C and E, melatonin, and carnosine and swimming training) on the realization of estrogens effects in ovariectomized rats. The proliferation index in the endometrium decreased in 12-14-month-old control animals. The weight of the uterus, percentage of "comets", and average length of their tail in estradiol-treated rats far surpassed the corresponding parameters in control animals. Administration of melatonin and N-acetyl-L-cysteine and swimming training corrected these genotoxic abnormalities. Our results indicate that aging induces incomplete variant of the phenomenon for switching of estrogen's effects (increase in the severity of genotoxic damage without facilitation of the hormonal effect). These methods for correction of age-related changes have not only common, but also distinguishing characteristics compared to correction of changed induced by drinking of ethanol in various concentrations, whole body gamma-irradiation, and exposure to tobacco smoke. PMID:12802459

  5. Effect of Zhuang Jing Decoction on Learning and Memory Ability in Aging Rats.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hao-Bin; Wu, Guang-Liang; Huang, Cen-Han; Huang, Zhong-Shi; Chen, Yun-Bo; Wang, Qi

    2016-08-01

    With the average life span of humans on the rise, aging in the world has drawn considerable attentions. The monoamine neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors in brain areas are involved in learning and memory processes and are an essential part of normal synaptic neurotransmission and plasticity. In the present study, the effect of Zhuang Jing Decoction (ZJD) on the learning and memory ability in aging rats was examined in vivo using Morris water maze. Furthermore, the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors in brain were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. These data showed that oral administration with ZJD at the dose of 30 g·kg(-1) exerted an improved effect on learning and memory ability in aging rats. The results revealed that ZJD could effectively adjust the monoamine neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors, restore the balance of the level of monoamine neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors in brain, and finally attenuate the degeneration of learning and memory ability. These findings suggested that ZJD might be a potential agent as cognitive-enhancing drug in improving learning and memory ability. It may exert through regulating the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors in brain, which demonstrated that ZJD had certain antiaging effects. PMID:26649780

  6. Proteomic identification of age-dependent protein nitration in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kanski, Jaroslaw; Alterman, Michail A; Schöneich, Christian

    2003-11-15

    Age-related protein nitration was studied in skeletal muscle of Fisher 344 and Fisher 344/Brown Norway (BN) F1 rats by a proteomic approach. Proteins from young (4 months) and old (24 months) Fisher 344 rats and young (6 months) and old (34 months) Fisher 344/BN F1 animals were separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Western blot showed an age-related increase in the nitration of a few specific proteins, which were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and ESI-MS/MS. We identified age-dependent apparent nitration of beta-enolase, alpha-fructose aldolase, and creatine kinase, which perform important functions in muscle energy metabolism, suggesting that the nitration of such key proteins can be, in part, responsible for the decline of muscle motor function of the muscle. Furthermore, we have identified the apparent nitration of succinate dehydrogenase, rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta (GdI-2), triosephosphate isomerase, troponin I, alpha-crystallin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

  7. The Post-Ovariectomy Interval Affects the Antidepressant-Like Action of Citalopram Combined with Ethynyl-Estradiol in the Forced Swim Test in Middle Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Vega Rivera, Nelly M; Gallardo Tenorio, Alfredo; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Estrada Camarena, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The use of a combined therapy with low doses of estrogens plus antidepressants to treat depression associated to perimenopause could be advantageous. However the use of these combinations is controversial due to several factors, including the time of intervention in relation to menopause onset. This paper analyzes whether time post-OVX influences the antidepressant-like action of a combination of ethynyl-estradiol (EE₂) and citalopram (CIT) in the forced swim test (FST). Middle-aged (15 months old) female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and after one or three weeks treated with EE₂ (1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat, s.c.; -48 h) or CIT (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 or 10 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and tested in the FST. In a second experiment, after one or three weeks of OVX, rats received a combination of an ineffective dose of EE₂ (1.25 µg/rat, s.c., -48 h) plus CIT (2.5 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and subjected to the FST. Finally, the uteri were removed and weighted to obtain an index of the peripheral effects of EE₂ administration. EE₂ (2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat) reduced immobility after one but not three weeks of OVX. In contrast, no CIT dose reduced immobility at one or three weeks after OVX. When EE₂ (1.25 µg/rat) was combined with CIT (2.5 mg/kg) an antidepressant-like effect was observed at one but not three weeks post-OVX. The weight of the uteri augmented when EE₂ was administrated three weeks after OVX. The data suggest that the time post-OVX is a crucial factor that contributes to observe the antidepressant-like effect of EE₂ alone or in combination with CIT. PMID:27153072

  8. The Post-Ovariectomy Interval Affects the Antidepressant-Like Action of Citalopram Combined with Ethynyl-Estradiol in the Forced Swim Test in Middle Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Vega Rivera, Nelly M; Gallardo Tenorio, Alfredo; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Estrada Camarena, Erika

    2016-05-03

    The use of a combined therapy with low doses of estrogens plus antidepressants to treat depression associated to perimenopause could be advantageous. However the use of these combinations is controversial due to several factors, including the time of intervention in relation to menopause onset. This paper analyzes whether time post-OVX influences the antidepressant-like action of a combination of ethynyl-estradiol (EE₂) and citalopram (CIT) in the forced swim test (FST). Middle-aged (15 months old) female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and after one or three weeks treated with EE₂ (1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat, s.c.; -48 h) or CIT (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 or 10 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and tested in the FST. In a second experiment, after one or three weeks of OVX, rats received a combination of an ineffective dose of EE₂ (1.25 µg/rat, s.c., -48 h) plus CIT (2.5 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and subjected to the FST. Finally, the uteri were removed and weighted to obtain an index of the peripheral effects of EE₂ administration. EE₂ (2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat) reduced immobility after one but not three weeks of OVX. In contrast, no CIT dose reduced immobility at one or three weeks after OVX. When EE₂ (1.25 µg/rat) was combined with CIT (2.5 mg/kg) an antidepressant-like effect was observed at one but not three weeks post-OVX. The weight of the uteri augmented when EE₂ was administrated three weeks after OVX. The data suggest that the time post-OVX is a crucial factor that contributes to observe the antidepressant-like effect of EE₂ alone or in combination with CIT.

  9. IN VITRO SENSITIVITY OF CHOLINESTERASES AND [3H]OXOTREMORINE-M BINDING IN HEART AND BRAIN OF ADULT AND AGING RATS TO ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ANTICHOLINESTERASES

    PubMed Central

    Mirajkar, Nikita; Pope, Carey N.

    2008-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) insecticides elicit toxicity via acetylcholinesterase inhibition, allowing acetylcholine accumulation and excessive stimulation of cholinergic receptors. Some OP insecticides bind to additional macromolecules including butyrylcholinesterase and cholinergic receptors. While neurotoxicity from OP anticholinesterases has been extensively studied, effects on cardiac function have received less attention. We compared the in vitro sensitivity of acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase and [3H]oxotremorine-M binding to muscarinic receptors in the cortex and heart of adult (3 months) and aging (18 months) rats to chlorpyrifos, methyl parathion and their active metabolites chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon. Using selective inhibitors, the great majority of cholinesterase in brain was defined as acetylcholinesterase, while butyrylcholinesterase was the major cholinesterase in heart, regardless of age. In the heart, butyrylcholinesterase was markedly more sensitive than acetylcholinesterase to inhibition by chlorpyrifos oxon, and butyrylcholinesterase in tissues from aging rats was more sensitive than enzyme from adults, possibly due to differences in A-esterase mediated detoxification. Relatively similar differences were noted in brain. In contrast, acetylcholinesterase was more sensitive than butyrylcholinesterase to methyl paraoxon in both heart and brain, but no age-related differences were noted. Both oxons displaced [3H]oxotremorine-M binding in heart and brain of both age groups in a concentration-dependent manner. Chlorpyrifos had no effect but methyl parathion was a potent displacer of binding in heart and brain of both age groups. Such OP and age-related differences in interactions with cholinergic macromolecules may be important because of potential for environmental exposures to insecticides as well as the use of anticholinesterases in age-related neurological disorders. PMID:18761328

  10. Morphological and molecular changes in aging rat prelimbic prefrontal cortical synapses

    PubMed Central

    Bloss, Erik B.; Puri, Rishi; Yuk, Frank; Punsoni, Michael; Hara, Yuko; Janssen, William G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related impairments of executive functions appear to be related to reductions of the number and plasticity of dendritic spine synapses in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Experimental evidence suggests that synaptic plasticity is mediated by the spine actin cytoskeleton, and a major pathway regulating actin-based plasticity is controlled by phosphorylated LIM kinase (pLIMK). We asked whether aging resulted in altered synaptic density, morphology, and pLIMK expression in the rat prelimbic region of the PFC. Using unbiased electron microscopy, we found a ~50% decrease in the density of small synapses with aging, while the density of large synapses remained unchanged. Postembedding immunogold revealed that pLIMK localized predominantly to the postsynaptic density where it was increased in aging synapses by ~50%. Furthermore, the age-related increase in pLIMK occurred selectively within the largest subset of prelimbic PFC synapses. Since pLIMK is known to inhibit actin filament plasticity, these data support the hypothesis that age-related increases in pLIMK may explain the stability of large synapses at the expense of their plasticity. PMID:22727942

  11. Homeostatic regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in aging rats: long-term effects of early exercise

    PubMed Central

    Merkley, Christina M.; Jian, Charles; Mosa, Adam; Tan, Yao-Fang; Wojtowicz, J. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is highly responsive to environmental and physiological factors. The majority of studies to date have examined short-term consequences of enhancing or blocking neurogenesis but long-term changes remain less well understood. Current evidence for age-related declines in neurogenesis warrant further investigation into these long-term changes. In this report we address the hypothesis that early life experience, such as a period of voluntary running in juvenile rats, can alter properties of adult neurogenesis for the remainder of the animal's life. The results indicate that the number of proliferating and differentiating neuronal precursors is not altered in runners beyond the initial weeks post-running, suggesting homeostatic regulation of these processes. However, the rate of neuronal maturation and survival during a 4 week period after cell division was enhanced up to 11 months of age (the end of the study period). This study is the first to show that a transient period of physical activity at a young age promotes changes in neurogenesis that persist over the long-term, which is important for our understanding of the modulation of neurogenesis by exercise with age. Functional integration of adult-born neurons within the hippocampus that resist homeostatic regulation with aging, rather than the absolute number of adult-born neurons, may be an essential feature of adult neurogenesis that promotes the maintenance of neural plasticity in old age. PMID:25071426

  12. Sulindac improves memory and increases NMDA receptor subunits in aged Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Mesches, Michael H; Gemma, Carmelina; Veng, Lone M; Allgeier, Chrissy; Young, David A; Browning, Michael D; Bickford, Paula C

    2004-03-01

    Inflammatory processes in the central nervous system are thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Chronic administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) decreases the incidence of Alzheimer's disease. There are very few studies, however, on the cognitive impact of chronic NSAID administration. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is implicated in learning and memory, and age-related decreases in the NMDA NR2B subunit correlate with memory deficits. Sulindac, an NSAID that is a nonselective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor was chronically administered to aged Fischer 344 rats for 2 months. Sulindac, but not its non-COX active metabolite, attenuated age-related deficits in learning and memory as assessed in the radial arm water maze and contextual fear conditioning tasks. Sulindac treatment also attenuated an age-related decrease in the NR1 and NR2B NMDA receptor subunits and prevented an age-related increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), in the hippocampus. These findings support the inflammation hypothesis of aging and have important implications for potential cognitive enhancing effects of NSAIDs in the elderly.

  13. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study of pituitary folliculostellate cells during aging in rats.

    PubMed

    Cónsole, G M; Jurado, S B; Riccillo, F L; Gómez Dumm, C L

    2000-01-01

    The impact of aging on pituitary folliculostellate (FS) cells is not well known. The aim of the work reported here was to carry out a quantitative immunohistochemical assessment of the FS population in male and female rats during aging and to correlate the findings with possible changes at the ultrastructural level. Young (4 months), old (20 months) and senescent (29 months) Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes were sacrificed by rapid decapitation, their pituitaries dissected and processed by both light immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Serial sections (4 microm) were obtained at different levels and immunostained by means of rabbit anti-S100 serum as the primary antibody and a peroxidase-mediated EnVision System (Dako). Measurement of volume density (VD) and cell density (CD) was made in S100-reacting elements by means of an image analysis system (Imaging Technology, Optimas). These parameters were found to be significantly (p < 0.05) decreased in old and senescent rats as compared to young animals. In senescent females, which presented a high incidence of microprolactinomas, a significant (p < 0.01) increment of VD and CD was observed in FS cells in the area surrounding the adenomas, together with a marked decrease in those parameters within the tumors. Sexual dimorphism was not found except for the prolactinoma-bearing female group. The ultrastructure of FS cells showed the typical characteristics previously described in the pituitary gland. Only moderate changes in the endoplasmic reticulum were observed in old and senescent animals. We conclude that aging has a clear effect on the morphology of the pituitary FS cell population.

  14. Effect of age on the sensitivity of the rat thyroid gland to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio; Kurashige, Tomomi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Shiro; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood is a well-known risk factor for thyroid cancer. Our study evaluated the effect of age on the radiosensitivity of rat thyroid glands. Four-week-old (4W), 7 -week-old (7W), and 8-month-old (8M) male Wistar rats were exposed to 8 Gy of whole-body X-ray irradiation. Thyroids were removed 3-72 h after irradiation, and non-irradiated thyroids served as controls. Ki67-positivity and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) focus formation (a DNA damage response) were evaluated via immunohistochemistry. Amounts of proteins involved in DNA damage response (p53, p53 phosphorylated at serine 15, p21), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), and autophagy (LC3, p62) were determined via western blotting. mRNA levels of 84 key autophagy-related genes were quantified using polymerase chain reaction arrays. Ki67-positive cells in 4W (with high proliferative activity) and 7W thyroids significantly decreased in number post-irradiation. The number of 53BP1 foci and amount of p53 phosphorylated at serine 15 increased 3 h after irradiation, regardless of age. No increase in apoptosis or in the levels of p53, p21 or cleaved caspase-3 was detected for any ages. Levels of LC3-II and p62 increased in irradiated 4W but not 8M thyroids, whereas expression of several autophagy-related genes was higher in 4W than 8M irradiated thyroids. Irradiation increased the expression of genes encoding pro-apoptotic proteins in both 4W and 8M thyroids. In summary, no apoptosis or p53 accumulation was noted, despite the expression of some pro-apoptotic genes in immature and adult thyroids. Irradiation induced autophagy in immature, but not in adult, rat thyroids.

  15. Dysregulation of memory-related proteins in the hippocampus of aged rats and their relation with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Monti, Barbara; Berteotti, Chiara; Contestabile, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    In the present experiments, we used conditioned fear to study whether changes in expression or functional state of proteins known to be involved in hippocampal learning could suggest correlation with age-related memory deficits. We focused on both alterations constitutively present in the hippocampus of aged rats and alterations related to different learning responses. Our results point at the dysregulation of the phosphorylation state of CREB in the hippocampus of aged rats as a primary biochemical correlate of their impaired memory. Other proteins, known to be important for various steps of memory formation and consolidation and linked to CREB, are to some extent altered in their constitutive expression or in the response to learning in the aged hippocampus. In particular, phosphorylated CREB and Arc, a protein functionally related to CREB in memory consolidation, are both present at constitutively higher levels in the hippocampus of aged rats, but they are not susceptible to the learning-related up-regulation occurring in young adults. Two other CREB-regulated proteins involved in memory consolidation, the neurotrophin BDNF and the transcription factor C/EBPbeta, are expressed at similar levels in the hippocampus of young-adult and aged rats, but their response to conditioned fear learning appears dysregulated by aging. Calcineurin, a protein phosphatase having CREB among its substrates and whose expression negatively correlates with learning, is more expressed in the hippocampus of aged rats. However, while calcineurin expression decreases in the hippocampus of young adults after learning, no changes are observed in the hippocampus of aged, learning-impaired rats. PMID:16086428

  16. Treadmill exercise induces age-related changes in aversive memory, neuroinflammatory and epigenetic processes in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lovatel, Gisele Agustini; Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Bertoldi, Karine; Vanzella, Cláudia; Moysés, Felipe Dos Santos; Vizuete, Adriana; Spindler, Christiano; Cechinel, Laura Reck; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Muotri, Alysson Renato; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2013-03-01

    It has been described that exercise can modulate both inflammatory response and epigenetic modifications, although the effect of exercise on these parameters during the normal brain aging process yet remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of aging and treadmill exercise on inflammatory and epigenetic parameters specifically pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines levels, activation of NF-kB and histone H4 acetylation levels in hippocampus from Wistar rats. Additionally, we evaluated aversive memory through inhibitory avoidance task. Rats of 3 and 20 months of age were assigned to non-exercised (sedentary) and exercised (running daily for 20 min for 2 weeks) groups. The effect of daily forced exercise in the treadmill was assessed. The levels of inflammatory and epigenetic parameters were determined 1h, 18 h, 3 days or 7 days after the last training session of exercise. It was observed an age-related decline on aversive memory, as well as aged rats showed increased hippocampal levels of inflammatory markers, such as TNFα, IL1-β and NF-kB and decreased IL-4 levels, an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Moreover, lower levels of global histone H4 acetylation were also observed in hippocampi from aged rats. Interestingly, there was a significant correlation between the biochemical markers and the inhibitory avoidance test performance. The forced exercise protocol ameliorated aging-related memory decline, decreased pro-inflammatory markers and increased histone H4 acetylation levels in hippocampi 20-months-old rats, while increased acutely IL-4 levels in hippocampi from young adult rats. Together, these results suggest that an imbalance of inflammatory markers might be involved to the aging-related aversive memory impairment. Additionally, our exercise protocol may reverse aging-related memory decline through improving cytokine profile.

  17. Rapamycin increases grip strength and attenuates age-related decline in maximal running distance in old low capacity runner rats

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Qian-Li; Yang, Huanle; Li, Hui-Fen; Abadir, Peter M.; Burks, Tyesha N.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Carlson, Joshua; Chen, Laura; Walston, Jeremy D.; Leng, Sean X.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is known to extend lifespan. We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled study of enteric rapamycin-treatment to evaluate its effect on physical function in old low capacity runner (LCR) rats, a rat model selected from diverse genetic background for low intrinsic aerobic exercise capacity without genomic manipulation and characterized by increased complex disease risks and aging phenotypes. The study was performed in 12 male and 16 female LCR rats aged 16-22 months at baseline. The treatment group was fed with rapamycin-containing diet pellets at approximately 2.24mg/kg body weight per day and the placebo group with the same diet without rapamycin for six months. Observation was extended for additional 2 months. Physical function measurements include grip strength measured as maximum tensile force using a rat grip strength meter and maximum running distance (MRD) using rat physical treadmill test. The results showed that rapamycin improved grip strength by 13% (p=.036) and 60% (p<.001) from its baseline in female and male rats, respectively. Rapamycin attenuated MRD decline by 66% (p<.001) and 46% (p=.319) in females and males, respectively. These findings provide initial evidence for beneficial effect of rapamycin on physical functioning in an aging rat model of high disease risks with significant implication in humans. PMID:26997106

  18. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Koziel, Violette; Jazi, Rozat; Audonnet, Sandra; Vert, Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Daval, Jean-Luc; Pourié, Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min) on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence). We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP) kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  19. Loquat leaf extract enhances myogenic differentiation, improves muscle function and attenuates muscle loss in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bokyung; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kim, Min Jo; Kim, Minjung; Jeong, Ji Won; Kim, Cheol Min; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-09-01

    A main characteristic of aging is the debilitating, progressive and generalized impairment of biological functions, resulting in an increased vulnerability to disease and death. Skeletal muscle comprises approximately 40% of the human body; thus, it is the most abundant tissue. At the age of 30 onwards, 0.5‑1% of human muscle mass is lost each year, with a marked acceleration in the rate of decline after the age of 65. Thus, novel strategies that effectively attenuate skeletal muscle loss and enhance muscle function are required to improve the quality of life of older subjects. The aim of the present study was to determine whether loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) leaf extract (LE) can prevent the loss of skeletal muscle function in aged rats. Young (5-month-old) and aged (18‑19-month-old) rats were fed LE (50 mg/kg/day) for 35 days and the changes in muscle mass and strength were evaluated. The age‑associated loss of grip strength was attenuated, and muscle mass and muscle creatine kinase (CK) activity were enhanced following the administration of LE. Histochemical analysis also revealed that LE abrogated the age‑associated decrease in cross‑sectional area (CSA) and decreased the amount of connective tissue in the muscle of aged rats. To investigate the mode of action of LE, C2C12 murine myoblasts were used to evaluate the myogenic potential of LE. The expression levels of myogenic proteins (MyoD and myogenin) and functional myosin heavy chain (MyHC) were measured by western blot analysis. LE enhanced MyoD, myogenin and MyHC expression. The changes in the expression of myogenic genes corresponded with an increase in the activity of CK, a myogenic differentiation marker. Finally, LE activated the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which is involved in muscle protein synthesis during myogenesis. These findings suggest that LE attenuates sarcopenia by promoting myogenic differentiation and subsequently promoting muscle protein synthesis

  20. Loquat leaf extract enhances myogenic differentiation, improves muscle function and attenuates muscle loss in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bokyung; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kim, Min Jo; Kim, Minjung; Jeong, Ji Won; Kim, Cheol Min; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-09-01

    A main characteristic of aging is the debilitating, progressive and generalized impairment of biological functions, resulting in an increased vulnerability to disease and death. Skeletal muscle comprises approximately 40% of the human body; thus, it is the most abundant tissue. At the age of 30 onwards, 0.5‑1% of human muscle mass is lost each year, with a marked acceleration in the rate of decline after the age of 65. Thus, novel strategies that effectively attenuate skeletal muscle loss and enhance muscle function are required to improve the quality of life of older subjects. The aim of the present study was to determine whether loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) leaf extract (LE) can prevent the loss of skeletal muscle function in aged rats. Young (5-month-old) and aged (18‑19-month-old) rats were fed LE (50 mg/kg/day) for 35 days and the changes in muscle mass and strength were evaluated. The age‑associated loss of grip strength was attenuated, and muscle mass and muscle creatine kinase (CK) activity were enhanced following the administration of LE. Histochemical analysis also revealed that LE abrogated the age‑associated decrease in cross‑sectional area (CSA) and decreased the amount of connective tissue in the muscle of aged rats. To investigate the mode of action of LE, C2C12 murine myoblasts were used to evaluate the myogenic potential of LE. The expression levels of myogenic proteins (MyoD and myogenin) and functional myosin heavy chain (MyHC) were measured by western blot analysis. LE enhanced MyoD, myogenin and MyHC expression. The changes in the expression of myogenic genes corresponded with an increase in the activity of CK, a myogenic differentiation marker. Finally, LE activated the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which is involved in muscle protein synthesis during myogenesis. These findings suggest that LE attenuates sarcopenia by promoting myogenic differentiation and subsequently promoting muscle protein synthesis.

  1. The kinetic basis for age-associated changes in quercetin and genistein glucuronidation by rat liver microsomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dietary bioavailability of the isoflavone genistein is decreased in older rats compared to young adults. Since flavonoids are metabolized extensively by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), we hypothesized that UGT flavonoid conjugating activity changes with age. The effect of age on flavono...

  2. Circadian disruption induced by light-at-night accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in young but not in old rats

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Irina A.; Anisimov, Vladimir N.; Bukalev, Andrey V.; Ilyukha, Viktor A.; Khizhkin, Evgeniy A.; Lotosh, Tatiana A.; Semenchenko, Anna V.; Zabezhinski, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of exposure to constant light started at the age of 1 month and at the age of 14 months on the survival, life span, tumorigenesis and age-related dynamics of antioxidant enzymes activity in various organs in comparison to the rats maintained at the standard (12:12 light/dark) light/dark regimen. We found that exposure to constant light started at the age of 1 month accelerated spontaneous tumorigenesis and shortened life span both in male and female rats as compared to the standard regimen. At the same time, the exposure to constant light started at the age of 14 months failed to influence survival of male and female rats. While delaying tumors in males, constant light accelerated tumors in females. We conclude that circadian disruption induced by light-at-night started at the age of 1 month accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in rats, however failed affect survival when started at the age of 14 months. PMID:20354269

  3. Middle-aged rats orally supplemented with gel-encapsulated catechin favorably increases blood cytosolic NADPH levels.

    PubMed

    Cueno, Marni E; Tamura, Muneaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2015-04-15

    Green tea catechins are primarily known to function as free radical scavengers and have several beneficial uses. Orally supplemented catechin (OSC) was previously shown to increase mitochondrial heme and catalase levels in rat heart blood, however, its effect in the cytosol has not been elucidated. Here, we determined the effects of OSC in the rat heart blood cytosol. We used middle-aged (40 week-old) and young (4 week-old) rats throughout the study. We isolated blood cytosol, verified its purity, and determined heme, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels, catalase (CAT) activities, gp91(phox) amounts, NADP and NAD pools, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities, and free fatty acids (FFA). We established that OSC is associated with decreased heme-dependent H2O2 amounts while increasing heme-independent CAT activity. Moreover, we found that OSC-related decrease in NAD(+) amounts among middle-aged rats is associated to increased NADPH levels and SIRT1 activity. In contrast, we associated OSC-related decrease in NAD(+) amounts among young rats to decreased NADPH levels and increased SIRT1 activity. This highlights a major difference between catechin-treated middle-aged and young rats. Furthermore, we observed that cytosolic FFA and GR levels were significantly increased only among OSC-treated middle-aged rats which we hypothesize are related to increased NADPH levels. This insinuates that OSC treatment allows higher catechin amounts to enter the bloodstream of middle-aged rats. We propose that this would favorably increase NADPH amounts and lead to the simultaneous decrease in NADPH-related pro-oxidant activity and increase in NADPH-related biomolecules and anti-oxidant activities.

  4. Effects of ketoprofen for prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Iwata, Hideki; Morikawa, Akihiro; Imori, Satoko; Waki, Sayaka; Tamura, Takahiko; Yamazaki, Fumimoto; Eguchi, Satoru; Kumagai, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a common geriatric complication that may be associated with increased mortality. Here, we investigated the effects of postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen on cognitive functions in aged animals and compared its effectiveness to morphine. Rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups: isoflurane anesthesia without surgery (group C), isoflurane anesthesia with laparotomy (group IL), and isoflurane anesthesia with laparotomy plus postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen or morphine. There was no difference in postoperative locomotor activity among groups. In group IL, postoperative pain levels assessed by the Rat Grimace Scale significantly increased until 8 h after surgery, which was similarly inhibited by both ketoprofen and morphine. Cognitive function was assessed using radial arm maze testing for 12 consecutive days from postoperative day 3. Results showed that the number of memory errors in group IL were significantly higher than those in goup C. However, both ketoprofen and morphine could attenuate the increase in memory errors following surgery to a similar degree. Conversely, ketoprofen showed no effect on cognitive function in the nonsurgical rats that did not experience pain. Our findings suggest that postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen can prevent the development of surgery-associated memory deficits via its pain-relieving effects.

  5. Fractalkine and CX3CR1 regulate hippocampal neurogenesis in adult and aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Bachstetter, Adam D.; Morganti, Josh M.; Jernberg, Jennifer; Schlunk, Andrea; Mitchell, Staten H.; Brewster, Kaelin W.; Hudson, Charles E.; Cole, Michael J; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Bickford, Paula C.; Gemma, Carmelina

    2010-01-01

    Microglia have neuroprotective capacities, yet chronic activation can promote neurotoxic inflammation. Neuronal fractalkine (FKN), acting on CX3CR1, has been shown to suppress excessive microglia activation. We found that disruption in FKN/ CX3CR1 signaling in young adult rodents decreased survival and proliferation of neural progenitor cells through IL-1β. Aged rats were found to have decreased levels of hippocampal FKN protein; moreover, interruption of CX3CR1 function in these animals did not affect neurogenesis. The age-related loss of FKN could be restored by exogenous FKN reversing the age-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis. There were no measureable changes in young animals by the addition of exogenous FKN. The results suggest that FKN/ CX3CR1 signaling has a regulatory role in modulating hippocampal neurogenesis via mechanisms that involve indirect modification of the niche environment. As elevated neuroinflammation is associated with many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, enhancing FKN/ CX3CR1 interactions could provide an alternative therapeutic approach to slow age-related neurodegeneration. PMID:20018408

  6. Region-specific changes in mitochondrial D-loop in aged rat CNS.

    PubMed

    McInerny, Simone C; Brown, Amanda L; Smith, Doug W

    2009-05-01

    Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is considered a cause of aging. A reduction in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and/or transcription may contribute to this OXPHOS diminution. Impairments in the displacement (D) loop, or non-coding, region of the mitochondrial genome, or accumulation of mtDNA mutations, may affect mtDNA replication and transcription. We determined the effects of age on the D-loop and on mtDNA deletion mutations in the spinal cord, medulla, midbrain, cerebellum, striatum, and cerebral cortex of Fischer 344 rats. D-loop, 7S DNA levels were reduced by 3-fold in striatum, 2.5-fold in cortex, and 2-fold in the spinal cord of older animals. We did not detect a population of mtDNA affected by the most prevalent known (ND4-containing) deletions, indicating they do not comprise a significant portion of total mtDNA. However, we detected an age-related and region-specific increase in the common deletion, which comprised 0.0003-0.0007% of total mtDNA. Mitochondrial genome copy number varied between regions, in addition to an overall 18% decrease with age across the whole brain. These results suggest the age-related decline in OXPHOS may be related to a reduction in D-loop function. PMID:19428453

  7. Ethanol feeding enhances age-related deterioration of the rat hepatic mitochondrion

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Alan; Hershman, Stuart; Davies, Adrian; Sykora, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Chronic ethanol feeding damages the hepatic mitochondrion by increasing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) oxidation, lowering mtDNA yields and impairing mitochondrial respiration. These effects are also seen during aging. By employing a 21-day chronic feeding regimen, we investigated the effects of ethanol consumption on mtDNA content and mitochondrial respiration in 2-, 12-, and 24-mo-old male rats. Aging resulted in decreased mtDNA content, increased mtDNA damage (as indicated by inhibition of Taq polymerase progression), and a decline in state 3 respiration; effects that were further exacerbated by ethanol feeding. Additionally, ethanol consumption caused an increase in the levels of citrate synthase while not impacting mitochondrial protein content. In conclusion, ethanol and aging combine to cause deterioration in the structural and functional integrity of the hepatic mitochondrion. The additive effects of aging and ethanol feeding may have serious consequences for hepatic energy metabolism in aged animals, and their detrimental combination may serve as one of the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:16020655

  8. Ethanol feeding enhances age-related deterioration of the rat hepatic mitochondrion.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Alan; Hershman, Stuart; Davies, Adrian; Sykora, Peter

    2005-12-01

    Chronic ethanol feeding damages the hepatic mitochondrion by increasing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) oxidation, lowering mtDNA yields and impairing mitochondrial respiration. These effects are also seen during aging. By employing a 21-day chronic feeding regimen, we investigated the effects of ethanol consumption on mtDNA content and mitochondrial respiration in 2-, 12-, and 24-mo-old male rats. Aging resulted in decreased mtDNA content, increased mtDNA damage (as indicated by inhibition of Taq polymerase progression), and a decline in state 3 respiration; effects that were further exacerbated by ethanol feeding. Additionally, ethanol consumption caused an increase in the levels of citrate synthase while not impacting mitochondrial protein content. In conclusion, ethanol and aging combine to cause deterioration in the structural and functional integrity of the hepatic mitochondrion. The additive effects of aging and ethanol feeding may have serious consequences for hepatic energy metabolism in aged animals, and their detrimental combination may serve as one of the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of alcoholic liver disease.

  9. Angiotensin II and 1-7 during aging in Metabolic Syndrome rats. Expression of AT1, AT2 and Mas receptors in abdominal white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Ruíz, M E; Del Valle-Mondragón, L; Castrejón-Tellez, V; Carreón-Torres, E; Díaz-Díaz, E; Guarner-Lans, V

    2014-07-01

    Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) plays an important role in the development of Metabolic Syndrome (MS) and in aging. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7) has opposite effects to Ang II. All of the components of RAS are expressed locally in adipose tissue and there is over-activation of adipose RAS in obesity and hypertension. We determined serum and abdominal adipose tissue Ang II and Ang 1-7 in control and MS rats during aging and the expression of AT1, AT2 and Mas in white adipose tissue. MS was induced by sucrose ingestion during 6, 12 and 18 months. During aging, an increase in body weight, abdominal fat and dyslipidemia were found but increases in aging MS rats were higher. Control and MS concentrations of serum Ang II from 6-month old rats were similar. Aging did not modify Ang II seric concentration in control rats but decreased it in MS rats. Ang II levels increased in WAT from both groups of rats. Serum and adipose tissue Ang 1-7 increased during aging in MS rats. Western blot analysis revealed that AT1 expression increased in the control group during aging while AT2 and Mas remained unchanged. In MS rats, AT1 and AT2 expression decreased significantly in aged rats. The high concentration of Ang 1-7 and adiponectin in old MS rats might be associated to an increased expression of PPAR-γ. PPAR-γ was increased in adipose tissue from MS rats. It decreased with aging in control rats and showed no changes during aging in MS rats. Ang 1-7/Mas axis was the predominant pathway in WAT from old MS animals and could represent a potential target for therapeutical strategies in the treatment of MS during aging.

  10. Characterization of neuropathology in the HIV-1 transgenic rat at different ages.

    PubMed

    Reid, William C; Ibrahim, Wael G; Kim, Saejeong J; Denaro, Frank; Casas, Rafael; Lee, Dianne E; Maric, Dragan; Hammoud, Dima A

    2016-03-15

    The transgenic HIV-1 rat (Tg) is a commonly used neuroHIV model with documented neurologic/behavioral deficits. Using immunofluorescent staining of the Tg brain, we found astrocytic dysfunction/damage, as well as dopaminergic neuronal loss/dysfunction, both of which worsening significantly in the striatum with age. We saw mild microglial activation in young Tg brains, but this decreased with age. There were no differences in neurogenesis potential suggesting a neurodegenerative rather than a neurodevelopmental process. Gp120 CSF levels exceeded serum gp120 levels in some animals, suggesting local viral protein production in the brain. Further probing of the pathophysiology underlying astrocytic injury in this model is warranted. PMID:26943969

  11. [Functional morphology of the submandibular salivary glands of white rats during aging involution].

    PubMed

    Rybakova, M G

    1979-12-01

    Functional morphology of different zones of submandibular glands of albino rats was studied quantitatively with due regard for the stages of neuroendocrine system involution. It is shown that function of salivary glands during ageing is not altered; cyclic fluctuations with estral cycle phases are maintained similarly to those in young animals. But the basal level of proteins and mucopolysaccharides is reduced, their mean levels being equal to the minimal level in young animals. On the other hand, activation of enzymes responsible for energy and transport processes takes place and their relationships change. The data obtained prove the relationship between salivary and endocrine glands and confirm the viewpoint that in early age involution disintegration occurs between different parameters of the functional activity of salivary glands rather than there take place changes in their function.

  12. The Effect of Age in the Alteration in Fluid Balance of Rats in Response to Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    With an increase in gravity load induced by centrifugation or upon return to Earth following spaceflight, there is a period of adjustment in fluid balance in rats. With centrifugation there is a reduced fluid intake with maintenance of the rate of urine excretion. Following spaceflight there is an increase in urine output and maintenance of fluid intake. The initial period of acclimation to hypergravity is associated with a net loss of fluids. In the present study in response to centrifugation at 2.0 G this period of acclimation is present in mature rats for a longer period of time, about 24 hours. Following this initial response a period of over compensation has previously been reported. In the present study this was not observed. The net effect of these alterations in water intake and output in response to centrifugation for 14 days was slight increase in the percent total body water, with effective compensation seen in both young and mature rats. Older rats have been shown to have a reduced relative thirst and compensatory renal function in response to hypohydration, hyperosmolality and pharmacological stimuli. Responsiveness to these stimuli are delayed and/or attenuated in older animals. Similar findings were noted in the present study in the initial response to centrifugation. The older animal had a delayed return of fluid intake to control levels. The delay of one day did not appear to effect long-term fluid homeostasis, as there was difference in the response of percent total body water at the end of 14 days of centrifugation with both age groups having a slight but significant increase. This increase has been attributed to the increase in lean body mass induced by centrifugation.

  13. Anthocyanins in aged blueberry-fed rats are found centrally and may enhance memory.

    PubMed

    Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Galli, Rachel L; Jauregui, Olga; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M; Joseph, James A

    2005-04-01

    Research has shown that fruits and vegetables containing high levels of polyphenolics (flavonoids) display high total antioxidant activity. Our laboratory found that various fruit and vegetable extracts, particularly blueberry (BB), were effective in reversing age-related deficits in neuronal signaling and behavioral parameters following 8 weeks of feeding, possibly due to their polyphenolic content. However, it was unclear if these phytonutrients were able to directly access the brain from dietary BB supplementation (BBS). The present study examined whether different classes of polyphenols could be found in brain areas associated with cognitive performance following BBS. Thus, 19 month old F344 rats were fed a control or 2% BB diet for 8-10 weeks and tested in the Morris water maze (MWM), a measure of spatial learning and memory. LC-MS analyses of anthocyanins in the diet and subsequently in different brain regions of BBS and control rats were carried out. Several anthocyanins (cyanidin-3-O-beta-galactoside, cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside, cyanidin-3-O-beta-arabinose, malvidin-3-O-beta-galactoside, malvidin-3-O-beta-glucoside, malvidin-3-O-beta-arabinose, peonidin-3-O-beta-arabinose and delphinidin-3-O-beta-galactoside) were found in the cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus or striatum of the BBS rats, but not the controls. These findings are the first to suggest that polyphenolic compounds are able to cross the blood brain barrier and localize in various brain regions important for learning and memory. Correlational analyses revealed a relationship between MWM performance in BBS rats and the total number of anthocyanin compounds found in the cortex. These findings suggest that these compounds may deliver their antioxidant and signaling modifying capabilities centrally.

  14. Initiation of calorie restriction in middle-aged male rats attenuates aging-related motoric decline and bradykinesia without increased striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Michael F; Terrebonne, Jennifer; Fields, Victoria; Nodurft, Danielle; Runfalo, Cori; Latimer, Brian; Ingram, Donald K

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related bradykinesia affects ∼ 15% of those reaching age 65 and 50% of those reaching their 80s. Given this high risk and lack of pharmacologic therapeutics, noninvasive lifestyle strategies should be identified to diminish its risk and identify the neurobiological targets to reduce aging-related bradykinesia. Early-life, long-term calorie restriction (CR) attenuates aging-related bradykinesia in rodents. Here, we addressed whether CR initiation at middle age could attenuate aging-related bradykinesia and motoric decline measured as rotarod performance. A 30% CR regimen was implemented for 6 months duration in 12-month-old male Brown-Norway Fischer 344 F1 hybrid rats after establishing individual baseline locomotor activities. Locomotor capacity was assessed every 6 weeks thereafter. The ad libitum group exhibited predictably decreased locomotor activity, except movement speed, out to 18 months of age. In contrast, in the CR group, movement number and horizontal activity did not decrease during the 6-month trial, and aging-related decline in rotarod performance was attenuated. The response to CR was influenced by baseline locomotor activity. The lower the locomotor activity level at baseline, the greater the response to CR. Rats in the lower 50th percentile surpassed their baseline level of activity, whereas rats in the top 50th percentile decreased at 6 weeks and then returned to baseline by 12 weeks of CR. We hypothesized that nigrostriatal dopamine tissue content would be greater in the CR group and observed a modest increase only in substantia nigra with no group differences in striatum, nucleus accumbens, or ventral tegmental area. These results indicate that initiation of CR at middle age may reduce aging-related bradykinesia, and, furthermore, subjects with below average locomotor activity may increase baseline activity. Sustaining nigral dopamine neurotransmission may be one component of preserving locomotor capabilities during aging.

  15. Increases in norepinephrine release and ovarian cyst formation during ageing in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Eric; Fornes, Romina; Fernandois, Daniela; Garrido, Maritza P; Greiner, Monika; Lara, Hernan E; Paredes, Alfonso H

    2009-01-01

    Background Depletion of ovarian follicles is associated with the end of reproductive function in ageing females. Recently, it has been described that this process parallels increases in the concentration of norepinephrine (NE) in the rat ovary. In sexually mature rats, experimentally-induced increases in the sympathetic tone of the ovary is causally related to ovarian cyst formation and deranged follicular development. Thus, there is a possibility that increased ovarian NE concentrations represent changes in the activity of sympathetic nerves, which consequently participate in the process of ovarian cyst formation observed during ageing in the human and experimental animal models. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats between 6 and 14 months old were used to analyse the capacity of the ovary to release 3H-NE recently incorporated under transmural depolarisation in relation to changes in the ovarian follicular population. Morphometric analysis of ovarian follicles and real time PCR for Bcl2 and Bax mRNA were used to assess follicular atresia. Results From 8 months old, the induced release of recently incorporated 3H-norepinephrine (3H-NE) from the ovary and ovarian NE concentrations increased, reaching their peak values at 12 months old and remained elevated up to 14 months old. Increases in sympathetic nerve activity paralleled changes in the follicular population, as well as disappearance of the corpus luteum. In contrast, luteinised follicles, precystic follicles, and cystic follicles increased. During this period, the relationship between Bax and Bcl2 mRNAs (the proapoptotic/antiapoptotic signals) increased, suggesting atresia as the principal mechanism contributing to the decreased follicular population. When NE tone was increased, the mRNA ratio favoured Bcl2 to Bax and antiapoptotic signals dominated this period of development. Thus, these changing ratios could be responsible for the increase in luteinised follicles, as well as precystic and cystic follicles

  16. Lead-induced cardiac and hematological alterations in aging Wistar male rats: alleviating effects of nutrient metal mixture.

    PubMed

    Basha, D Chand; Basha, S Sadak; Reddy, G Rajarami

    2012-08-01

    Age related mitochondrial impairments are considered to be contributors of cardiovascular disease. This study was designed to examine whether early life exposure to lead (Pb) would lead to the Pb induced age related hematological and cardiac mitochondrial changes in rats, and to further examine the protective effect of nutrient metal mixture containing zinc, iron and calcium. Male albino rats were lactationally exposed to 0.2 % Pb-acetate or 0.2 % Pb-acetate together nutrient metal mixture (0.02 %) in drinking water of the mother from postnatal day 1 (PND1) to PND 21. The hemoglobin level, the activities of serum ceruloplasmin oxidase, cardiac mitochondrial enzymes catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase, copper zinc superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, succinate dehydrogenase, lipid peroxidation and Pb levels were analyzed at PND 45, 12 and 24 months age. The hematological parameters, and the cardiac TCA cycle and antioxidant enzyme markers and lipid peroxidation levels were significantly altered following Pb exposure in young rats (PND 45). These Pb induced changes persisted, though at much lower level in the aged rats. The Pb levels in blood and heart were also significantly higher in PND 45 and remained at detectable levels in older rats. The nutrient metal mixture containing iron, calcium and zinc significantly reversed these changes in all the chosen markers except lipid peroxidation in which the reversal effect was not significant. These data are supportive of age-related cardiac mitochondrial impairments and further provide evidence for the protective efficacy of nutrient metal mixture against Pb-toxicity.

  17. Four-month enriched environment prevents myelinated fiber loss in the white matter during normal aging of male rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu; Lu, Wei; Zhou, De-shan; Tang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    White matter degenerates with normal aging and accordingly results in declines in multiple brain functions. Previous neuroimaging studies have implied that the white matter is plastic by experiences and contributory to the experience-dependent recovery of brain functions. However, it is not clear how and how far enriched environment (EE) plays a role in the white matter remodeling. Male rats exhibit earlier and severer age-related damages in the white matter and its myelinated fibers than female rats; therefore, in this current study, 24 middle-aged (14-month-old) and 24 old-aged (24-month-old) male SD rats were randomly assigned to an EE or standard environment (SE) for 4 months prior to Morris water maze tests. Five rats from each group were then randomly sampled for stereological assessment of the white matter. Results revealed that EE could somewhat induce improvement of spatial learning and significantly increase the white matter volume, the myelinated fiber volume and the myelinated fiber length during normal aging. The EE-induced improvement of spatial learning ability was significantly correlated with the EE-induced increase of the white matter and its myelinated fibers. We suggested that exposure to an EE could delay the progress of age-related changes in the white matter and the effect could extend to old age.

  18. Windows of vulnerability: maternal separation, age, and fluoxetine on adolescent depressive-like behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Freund, N; Thompson, B S; Denormandie, J; Vaccarro, K; Andersen, S L

    2013-09-26

    Early exposure to stressful life events plays a significant role in adolescent depression. Clinical studies have identified a number of factors that increase the risk of depression, including sex of the subject, duration of the stressor, and genetic polymorphisms that elevate serotonin levels. In this study we used the maternal separation (MS) model to investigate to what extent these factors interacted during development to manifest in depressive-like behavior in male and female rats. The triadic model of learned helplessness parses depressive-like behavior into aspects of controllable, uncontrollable, and motivational behaviors. This model was used to investigate how the timing of MS between the ages of postnatal day (P) 2-9 and P9-16 interacted with either simultaneous vehicle (saline; 1ml/kg; i.p.) or fluoxetine (10mg/kg) exposure, which was used to enhance serotonin levels; these experiments also compared the effect of a vehicle injection during these developmental periods to a no injection control. Vehicle injections alone increased helplessness in the controllable condition in male rats when injected between P9-16 only, and did not interact further with MS. MS at both ages decreased controllability in male adolescents; females demonstrated an increase in controllability after MS. Elevated serotonin at P2-9 increased escape latencies in male and female control and MS subjects. Fluoxetine exposure at P9-16 increased helplessness in controls. Fluoxetine decreased helplessness in MS males independent of age, but increases helplessness in MS females. This study highlights the importance of age of MS (MS between P2-9 increases helplessness in males more than females), the duration of the stressor (previous results show females are effected by longer MS [P2-20], but not shorter [this study]), and that elevated serotonin increases escape latencies to a greater extent in females. PMID:23850503

  19. Age-associated disruption of molecular clock expression in skeletal muscle of the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Schroder, Elizabeth; Edelmann, Stephanie E; Hughes, Michael E; Kornacker, Karl; Balke, C William; Esser, Karyn A

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) develop muscle pathologies with hypertension and heart failure, though the mechanism remains poorly understood. Woon et al. (2007) linked the circadian clock gene Bmal1 to hypertension and metabolic dysfunction in the SHR. Building on these findings, we compared the expression pattern of several core-clock genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of aged SHR (80 weeks; overt heart failure) compared to aged-matched control WKY strain. Heart failure was associated with marked effects on the expression of Bmal1, Clock and Rora in addition to several non-circadian genes important in regulating skeletal muscle phenotype including Mck, Ttn and Mef2c. We next performed circadian time-course collections at a young age (8 weeks; pre-hypertensive) and adult age (22 weeks; hypertensive) to determine if clock gene expression was disrupted in gastrocnemius, heart and liver tissues prior to or after the rats became hypertensive. We found that hypertensive/hypertrophic SHR showed a dampening of peak Bmal1 and Rev-erb expression in the liver, and the clock-controlled gene Pgc1α in the gastrocnemius. In addition, the core-clock gene Clock and the muscle-specific, clock-controlled gene Myod1, no longer maintained a circadian pattern of expression in gastrocnemius from the hypertensive SHR. These findings provide a framework to suggest a mechanism whereby chronic heart failure leads to skeletal muscle pathologies; prolonged dysregulation of the molecular clock in skeletal muscle results in altered Clock, Pgc1α and Myod1 expression which in turn leads to the mis-regulation of target genes important for mechanical and metabolic function of skeletal muscle.

  20. Combination of Spirulina with glycyrrhizin prevents cognitive dysfunction in aged obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Madhavadas, Sowmya; Subramanian, Sarada

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the cognition enhancing effect of the combination of Spirulina and glycyrrhizin in monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obese aged rats. Materials and Methods: Obesity was induced in rats by administration of MSG (intraperitoneally, 4 mg/g body weight) for 14 consecutive days from day 1 after birth. Subsequently, the animals were allowed to grow for 18 months with food and water ad libitum. Hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia, leptin resistance, were monitored in these animals. Cognitive status was assessed by Barne's maze task and hippocampal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels. Further, the animals were treated with Spirulina (Sp) (oral route, 1 g/Kg body weight, for 30 days) alone or glycyrrhizin (Gly) alone (intraperitoneal route, 0.1 mg/Kg, on day 15 and day 21), or their combination (SpGly). Counting of the treatment days was done by considering first day of Sp administration as day 1. After the completion of 30 days of Spirulina treatment or 2 doses of Gly administration or the combination (SpGly) treatment, the animals were left for 3 weeks. They were then were assessed for their biochemical and cognitive changes. Results: The combination of Sp with Gly showed a significant reduction (P < 0.0001) in glucose, cholesterol, leptin levels in the serum with improvement in cognitive functions with concomitant reduction in AChE activity in the hippocampal tissue homogenates (P < 0.0001) of the obese rats. Conclusion: SpGly combination has a potential role in reversing cognitive dysfunctions associated with aging and obesity. PMID:25821309

  1. Isoflurane induced cognitive impairment in aged rats through hippocampal calcineurin/NFAT signaling.

    PubMed

    Ni, Cheng; Li, Zhengqian; Qian, Min; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiangyang

    2015-05-15

    Calcineurin (CaN) over-activation constrains synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Upon CaN activation, NFAT imports into the nucleus and guides its downstream genes, which also affect neuronal and synaptic function. Aberrant CaN/NFAT signaling involves in neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, but its role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) remains uninvestigated. Inhaled anesthetic isoflurane facilitates the development of POCD, and the present study investigated the role of CaN/NFAT signaling in isoflurane induced cognitive impairment of aged rats, and the therapeutic effects of CaN inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA). The results indicated that hippocampal CaN activity increased and peaked at 6 h after isoflurane exposure, and NFAT, especially NFATc4, imported into the nucleus following CaN activation. Furthermore, phamacological inhibition of CaN by CsA markedly attenuated isoflurane induced aberrant CaN/NFATc4 signaling in the hippocampus, and rescued relevant spatial learning and memory impairment of aged rats. Overall, the study suggests hippocampal CaN/NFAT signaling as the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced cognitive impairment, and provides potential therapeutic target and possible treatment methods for POCD.

  2. Enriched environment induces higher CNPase positive cells in aged rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yu; Shi, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Hong; Chao, Feng-Lei; Huang, Chun-Xia; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Xuan; Chen, Lin; Lu, Wei; Tang, Yong

    2013-10-25

    It had been reported that enriched environment was beneficial for the brain cognition and for the neurons and synapses in hippocampus. Previous study reported that the oligodendrocyte density in hippocampus was increased when the rats were reared in the enriched environment from weaning to adulthood. However, biological conclusions based on density were difficult to interpret because the changes in density could be due to an alteration of total quantity and/or an alteration in the reference volume. In the present study, we used unbiased stereological methods to investigate the effect of enriched environment on the total number of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) positive cells in CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus in aged rats. Our results indicated that there was significant difference in the total numbers of CNPase positive cells in both CA1 and DG between enriched environment group and standard environment group. The present study provided the first evidence for the protective effects of enriched environment on the CNPase positive cells in aged hippocampus.

  3. THERMAL SENSITIVITY ACROSS AGES AND DURING CHRONIC FENTANYL ADMINISTRATION IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Mitzelfelt, Jeremiah D.; Carter, Christy S.; Morgan, Drake

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Chronic pain is becoming a more common medical diagnosis and is especially prevalent in older individuals. As such, prescribed use of opioids is on the rise, even though the efficacy for pain management in older individuals is unclear. Objectives Thus the present preclinical study assessed the effectiveness of chronic fentanyl administration to produce antinociception in aging rats (16, 20, 24 months). Methods Animals were tested in a thermal sensitivity procedure known to involve neural circuits implicated in chronic pain in humans. Sensitivity to heat and cold thermal stimulation was assessed during 28 days of fentanyl administration (1.0 mg/kg/day), and 28 days of withdrawal. Results Fentanyl resulted in decreased thermal sensitivity to heat but not cold stimulation indicated by more time spent in the hot compartment relative to time spent in the cold or neutral compartments. Unlike previous findings using a hot-water tail withdrawal procedure, tolerance did not develop to the antinociceptive effects of fentanyl over a 28-day period of drug administration. The oldest animals were least sensitive, and the youngest animals most sensitive to the locomotor-stimulating effects of fentanyl. The effect on the antinociceptive response to fentanyl in the oldest group of rats was difficult to interpret due to profound changes in the behavior of saline-treated animals. Conclusions Overall, aging modifies the behavioral effects of opioids, a finding that may inform future studies for devising appropriate treatment strategies. PMID:23900640

  4. Altered KATP Channel Subunits Expression and Vascular Reactivity in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats With Age

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojing; Duan, Peng; Hu, Xingxing; Li, Ruisheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels link membrane excitability to metabolic state to regulate a series of biological activities including the vascular tone. However, their ability to influence hypertension is controversial. Here we aim to investigate possible alteration of KATP channel in vascular smooth muscles (VSMs) during hypertension development process. In this study, we used 16-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), 49-week-old SHRs, and their age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats to study the expression of VSM KATP subunits at the mRNA and protein level and the function of VSM KATP by observing the relaxation reactivity of isolated aorta rings to KATP modulators. We found that the expression of VSM KATP subunits Kir6.1 and sulfonylurea receptor (SUR2B) decreased during hypertension. Moreover, the expression of SUR2B and Kir6.1 in 49-week-old SHRs decreased much more than that in 16-week-old SHRs. Furthermore, the aorta rings of 49-week-old SHRs showed lower reactivity to diazoxide than 16-week-old SHRs. This study suggests that KATP channels in VSM subunits Kir6.1 and SUR2B contribute to modify the functionality of this channel in hypertension with age. PMID:27035370

  5. The effect of increasing age on the prognosis of non-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease receiving stable nephrology care.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Luca; Minutolo, Roberto; Chiodini, Paolo; Borrelli, Silvio; Zoccali, Carmine; Postorino, Maurizio; Iodice, Carmela; Nappi, Felice; Fuiano, Giorgio; Gallo, Ciro; Conte, Giuseppe

    2012-08-01

    To define whether age modifies the prognosis of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on nephrology care, we prospectively followed patients with CKD who have been receiving nephrology care in a clinic for 1 year or more. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), defined by the occurrence of dialysis or transplant, or death without ESRD was estimated by a competing-risk approach, and interactions between age and risk factors tested in Cox models over a median follow-up period of 62.4 months. Of 1248 patients with stage III–V CKD, 481 were younger than 65, 410 were between 65 and 75, and 357 were over 75 years old. Within each age class, the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate(eGFR) was 31, 32, and 29 ml/min per 1.73 m2, respectively. There were 394 ESRD events and 353 deaths. The risk of ESRD was higher than the risk of death without ESRD for ages <60 years, and independent of eGFR. The ESRD risk diminished with aging but still prevailed for eGFRs of 25–35 in patients between 65 and 75 years and with an eGFR below 15 in those up to 85 years old. Proteinuria significantly increased the risk of ESRD with advancing age. Surprisingly, the unfavorable effects of cardiovascular disease on ESRD and of diabetes on survival significantly decreased with increasing age. Male gender, higher phosphate, lower body mass index, and hemoglobin were age-independent predictors for ESRD, while cardiovascular disease, lower hemoglobin, higher proteinuria and uric acid, and ESRD also predicted death. Thus, in older patients on nephrology care, the risk of ESRD prevailed overmortality even when eGFR was not severely impaired. Proteinuria increases ESRD risk, while the predictive role of other modifiable risk factors was unchanged compared with younger patients.

  6. Age-related changes in the cellular, mechanical, and contractile properties of rat tail tendons.

    PubMed

    Lavagnino, Michael; Gardner, Keri; Arnoczky, Steven P

    2013-01-01

    Tendon laxity following injury, cyclic creep, or repair has been shown to alter the normal homeostasis of tendon cells, which can lead to degenerative changes in the extracellular matrix. While tendon cells have been shown to have an inherent contractile mechanism that gives them some ability to retighten lax tendons and reestablish a homeostatic cellular environment, the effect of age on this process is unknown. To determine the effect of aging on cell number, cell shape, and tensile modulus on tendons as well as the rate of cell-mediated contraction of lax tendons, tail tendon fascicles from 1-, 3-, and 12-month-old rats were analyzed. Aging results in a decrease (p <