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Sample records for aged rats relative

  1. Incentive relativity in middle aged rats.

    PubMed

    Justel, N; Mustaca, A; Boccia, M; Ruetti, E

    2014-01-24

    Response to a reinforcer is affected by prior experience with different reward values of that reward, a phenomenon known as incentive relativity. Two different procedures to study this phenomenon are the incentive downshift (ID) and the consummatory anticipatory negative contrast (cANC), the former is an emotional-cognitive protocol and the latter cognitive one. Aged rodents, as also well described in aged humans, exhibit alterations in cognitive functions. The main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of age in the incentive' assessment using these two procedures. The results indicated that aged rats had an adequate assessment of the rewards but their performance is not completely comparable to that of young subjects. They recover faster from the ID and they had a cognitive impairment in the cANC. The results are discussed in relation to age-related changes in memory and emotion. PMID:24315974

  2. The Laboratory Rat: Relating Its Age With Human's

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Pallav

    2013-01-01

    By late 18th or early 19th century, albino rats became the most commonly used experimental animals in numerous biomedical researches, as they have been recognized as the preeminent model mammalian system. But, the precise correlation between age of laboratory rats and human is still a subject of debate. A number of studies have tried to detect these correlations in various ways, But, have not successfully provided any proper association. Thus, the current review attempts to compare rat and human age at different phases of their life. The overall findings indicate that rats grow rapidly during their childhood and become sexually mature at about the sixth week, but attain social maturity 5-6 months later. In adulthood, every day of the animal is approximately equivalent to 34.8 human days (i.e., one rat month is comparable to three human years). Numerous researchers performed experimental investigations in albino rats and estimated, in general, while considering their entire life span, that a human month resembles every-day life of a laboratory rat. These differences signify the variations in their anatomy, physiology and developmental processes, which must be taken into consideration while analyzing the results or selecting the dose of any research in rats when age is a crucial factor. PMID:23930179

  3. Age-related increase in prostacyclin production in the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Panganamala, R V; Hanumaiah, B; Merola, A J

    1981-02-01

    Normal Sprague-Dawley rats convert a substantial percentage of exogenous arachidonic acid to prostacyclin. This conversion can be quantitated by an aqueous sampling technique utilizing thin layer chromatography and liquid scintillation counting. There is a clear age-related increase in this conversion that can be demonstrated in aortas from rats of 3 weeks to 20 weeks of age. PMID:7017783

  4. Tyrosine kinase receptor alteration of renal vasoconstriction in rats is sex- and age-related.

    PubMed

    Passmore, John C; Fleming, John T; Tyagi, Suresh C; Falcone, Jeff C

    2012-10-01

    Male rat renal blood vessels undergo reduced contraction to norepinephrine with aging. There is a greater renal vascular impairment in male compared with female rats. We investigated specific tyrosine kinase receptor inhibition of renal interlobar artery responsiveness to phenylephrine in male and female rats at specifically designated ages. Vessels from young male rats contracted much less to phenylephrine when the vessels were pretreated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors Lavendustin A, HNMPA-(AM)₃, or AG1478. Vessels from adult female rats pretreated with Lavendustin A showed no difference in contraction from control, but did demonstrate a slightly reduced contraction when pretreated with AG1478. Middle-aged male rat vessels treated with Lavendustin A demonstrated no inhibition, but the insulin and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonists both induced a decline in contraction. Vessels from aged male rats demonstrated no effect related to the 3 pretreatments. Middle-aged and aged female rats pretreated with any inhibitor demonstrated no inhibitor-dependent alterations. We conclude that maximum contraction of interlobar arteries from adult male rats is reduced when tyrosine kinase receptor activity is reduced. Female rats demonstrated much less inhibitor-related change of contraction. PMID:22724583

  5. Age-related changes in spleen of Dark Agouti rats immunized for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Djikić, Jasmina; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Pilipović, Ivan; Kosec, Duško; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2015-01-15

    The study was undertaken considering age-related changes in susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and a putative role of spleen in pathogenesis of this disease. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of T splenocytes were examined in young (3-month-old), middle-aged (8-month-old) and aged (26-month-old) Dark Agouti rats immunized for EAE with rat spinal cord in complete Freund's adjuvant. The rat susceptibility to EAE induction, as well as the number of activated CD4+CD134+ lymphocytes retrieved from their spinal cords progressively decreased with aging. To the contrary, in rats immunized for EAE the number of activated CD4+ splenocytes, i.e., CD4+CD134+, CD4+CD25+FoxP3- and CD4+CD40L+ cells, progressively increased with aging. This was associated with age-related increase in (i) CD4+ splenocyte surface expression of CD44, the molecule suggested to be involved in limiting emigration of encephalitogenic CD4+ cells from spleen into blood and (ii) frequency of regulatory T cells, including CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells, which are also shown to control encephalitogenic cell migration from spleen into the central nervous system. In favor of expansion of T-regulatory cell pool in aged rats was the greater concentration of IL-10 in unstimulated, Concanavalin A (ConA)- and myelin basic protein (MBP)-stimulated splenocyte cultures from aged rats compared with the corresponding cultures from young ones. Consistent with the age-related increase in the expression of CD44, which is shown to favor Th1 effector cell survival by interfering with CD95-mediated signaling, the frequency of apoptotic cells among CD4+ splenocytes, despite the greater frequency of CD95+ cells, was diminished in splenocyte cultures from aged compared with young rats. In addition, in control, as well as in ConA- and MBP-stimulated splenocyte cultures from aged rats, despite of impaired CD4+ cell proliferation, IFN-γ concentrations were greater than in corresponding cultures

  6. Age and sex-related changes in rat brain mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Rocío; Gianotti, Magdalena; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Aging is responsible for the decline in the function of mitochondria and their increase in size and number--adaptive mechanism to restore mitochondrial function. Estrogens increase mitochondrial function, especially in female rats. The aim of this study was to determine the age-related changes in rat brain mitochondrial function focusing on sex differences. Cellular and mitochondrial protein and DNA content, mitochondrial oxidative and phosphorylative function in male and female rat brain from four different age groups (6, 12, 18 and 24 months old) were analyzed. Mitochondria protein/DNA content decreased with aging shifting toward lesser mitochondrial functional capacity and the mitochondria number increased. A sex dimorphism was determined, with female rat brain showing mitochondria with greater functional capacity than males. These sex differences gradually increased during aging. PMID:21471708

  7. Body protein and lipid deficit in tumour-bearing rats in relation to age.

    PubMed Central

    Oudart, H.; Heitz, A.; Bnouham, M.; Malan, A.; Le Maho, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is among the most dramatic situations of depletion in body energy reserves. To ascertain whether the pattern of body composition alteration during tumour development is influenced by aging as in uncomplicated starvation, we compared the difference of body composition between Yoshida sarcoma bearing rats and young (200 g, 7 weeks) and adult (400 g, 13 weeks) control rats. After the same duration of tumour bearing, mass and composition of tumours were similar in adult and young rats, indicating that they are independent of host age. Food intake decreased to a remarkably similar value in both young and adults. Body water content was elevated in hosts of both ages. The relative deficit of body lipid vs controls was similar for both, the absolute lipid deficit being therefore larger in adult than in young tumour-bearing rats (14.3 +/- 4.4 g vs 6.8 +/- 0.9 g; P < 0.01). In contrast, there was a relatively larger deficit of body protein in young rats. Paradoxically, these rats still maintained a positive nitrogen balance whereas this balance was negative in adult tumour-bearing rats. In conclusion, as previously shown in uncomplicated undernutrition, the anorexia induced by Yoshida sarcoma development is still associated with some protein accretion in young rats whereas cachexia develops in adults. PMID:8217604

  8. AGING-RELATED CARBARYL EFFECTS IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid increase in older adults in the population highlights the importance ofunderstanding the role of aging in susceptibility to environmental contaminants. Aspart of a larger research program on life-stage susceptibility, this experiment determined the effect of the carbama...

  9. Age-related pathophysiological changes in rats with unilateral renal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Amakasu, Kohei; Suzuki, Katsushi; Katayama, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2011-06-01

    Affected rats of the unilateral urogenital anomalies (UUA) strain show renal agenesis restricted to the left side. To determine whether unilateral renal agenesis is a risk factor for the progression of renal insufficiency, we studied age-related pathophysiological alterations in affected rats. Although body growth and food intake were normal, polydipsia and polyuria with low specific gravity were present at 10 weeks and deteriorated further with age. Blood hemoglobin concentrations were normal, though there was slight erythropenia with increased MCV and MCH. Although hypoalbuminemia, hypercholesterolemia, azotemia, and hypermagnesemia were manifested after age 20 weeks, neither hyperphosphatemia nor hypocalcemia was observed. Plasma Cre and UN concentrations gradually increased with age. Cre clearance was almost normal, whereas fractional UN excretion was consistently lower than normal. Proteinuria increased with age, and albumin was the major leakage protein. In addition to cortical lesions, dilated tubules, cast formation, and interstitial fibrosis were observed in the renal medulla of 50 week-old affected rats. Renal weight was increased 1.7-fold and glomerular number 1.2-fold compared with normal rats. These findings show that the remaining kidney in UUA rats is involved not only in compensatory reactions but experiences pathophysiological alterations associated with progressive renal insufficiency. PMID:21307619

  10. Differences in cooperative behavior among Damaraland mole rats are consequences of an age-related polyethism.

    PubMed

    Zöttl, Markus; Vullioud, Philippe; Mendonça, Rute; Torrents Ticó, Miquel; Gaynor, David; Mitchell, Adam; Clutton-Brock, Tim

    2016-09-13

    In many cooperative breeders, the contributions of helpers to cooperative activities change with age, resulting in age-related polyethisms. In contrast, some studies of social mole rats (including naked mole rats, Heterocephalus glaber, and Damaraland mole rats, Fukomys damarensis) suggest that individual differences in cooperative behavior are the result of divergent developmental pathways, leading to discrete and permanent functional categories of helpers that resemble the caste systems found in eusocial insects. Here we show that, in Damaraland mole rats, individual contributions to cooperative behavior increase with age and are higher in fast-growing individuals. Individual contributions to different cooperative tasks are intercorrelated and repeatability of cooperative behavior is similar to that found in other cooperatively breeding vertebrates. Our data provide no evidence that nonreproductive individuals show divergent developmental pathways or specialize in particular tasks. Instead of representing a caste system, variation in the behavior of nonreproductive individuals in Damaraland mole rats closely resembles that found in other cooperatively breeding mammals and appears to be a consequence of age-related polyethism. PMID:27588902

  11. PHARMACOKINETIC DIFFERENCES MAY EXPLAIN THE AGE-RELATED SENSITIVITY OF DELTAMETHRIN, A PYRETHROID INSECTICIDE, IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to examine the age-related sensitivity to the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin [(S)- -cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (1R,3R)-3-(2,2-dibromomovinyl)2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate], in Long Evans, hooded, male rats. Deltamethrin has been shown to be more ...

  12. Sexual Dimorphism in the Expression of Mitochondria-Related Genes in Rat Heart at Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Vikrant; Han, Tao; Moland, Carrie L.; Kwekel, Joshua C.; Fuscoe, James C.; Desai, Varsha G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Moreover, sex and age are considered major risk factors in the development of CVDs. Mitochondria are vital for normal cardiac function, and regulation of mitochondrial structure and function may impact susceptibility to CVD. To identify potential role of mitochondria in sex-related differences in susceptibility to CVD, we analyzed the basal expression levels of mitochondria-related genes in the hearts of male and female rats. Whole genome expression profiling was performed in the hearts of young (8-week), adult (21-week), and old (78-week) male and female Fischer 344 rats and the expression of 670 unique genes related to various mitochondrial functions was analyzed. A significant (p<0.05) sexual dimorphism in expression levels of 46, 114, and 41 genes was observed in young, adult and old rats, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis revealed the influence of sex on various biological pathways related to cardiac energy metabolism at different ages. The expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism was significantly different between the sexes in young and adult rat hearts. Adult male rats also showed higher expression of genes associated with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex compared to females. In young and adult hearts, sexual dimorphism was not noted in genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation. In old rats, however, a majority of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation had higher expression in females compared to males. Such basal differences between the sexes in cardiac expression of genes associated with energy metabolism may indicate a likely involvement of mitochondria in susceptibility to CVDs. In addition, female rats showed lower expression levels of apoptotic genes in hearts compared to males at all ages, which may have implications for better preservation of cardiac mass in females than in males. PMID:25615628

  13. Age-Related Changes in Hepatic Activity and Expression of Detoxification Enzymes in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vyskočilová, Erika; Szotáková, Barbora; Skálová, Lenka; Bártíková, Hana; Hlaváčová, Jitka

    2013-01-01

    Process of aging is accompanied by changes in the biotransformation of xenobiotics and impairment of normal cellular functions by free radicals. Therefore, this study was designed to determine age-related differences in the activities and/or expressions of selected drug-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in young and old rats. Specific activities of 8 drug-metabolizing enzymes and 4 antioxidant enzymes were assessed in hepatic subcellular fractions of 6-week-old and 21-month-old male Wistar rats. Protein expressions of carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were determined using immunoblotting. Remarkable age-related decrease in specific activities of CYP2B, CYP3A, and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase was observed, whereas no changes in activities of CYP1A2, flavine monooxygenase, aldo-keto reductase 1C, and antioxidant enzymes with advancing age were found. On the other hand, specific activity of CBR1 and GST was 2.4 folds and 5.6 folds higher in the senescent rats compared with the young ones, respectively. Interindividual variability in CBR1 activity increased significantly with rising age. We suppose that elevated activities of GST and CBR1 may protect senescent rats against xenobiotic as well as eobiotic electrophiles and reactive carbonyls, but they may alter metabolism of drugs, which are CBR1 and especially GSTs substrates. PMID:23971034

  14. Age related changes in the lipoprotein substrates for the esterification of plasma cholesterol in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Kudchodkar, B J; Lacko, A G

    1991-11-15

    The activity of the enzyme lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and the properties of its lipoprotein substrates have been investigated in 6- and 19-month-old Fischer-344 rats. These studies were carried out to determine the nature of the relationship between the observed hypercholesterolemia and the age-related decrease in the fractional rate of lipoprotein cholesterol esterification. The distribution of LCAT activity of plasma fractions was determined following gel chromatography and ultracentrifugation respectively. LCAT activity was found to be associated with the high density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction when rat plasma was passed through a Bio-Gel A-5 M column. Upon density gradient ultracentrifugation for 24 h it was found associated with HDL fraction; d = 1.125-1.21 g/ml. However, following prolonged ultracentrifugation (40 h), the majority of the LCAT activity was displaced into the lipoprotein-free infranatant (d greater than 1.225 g/ml). The dissociation of LCAT from its complex with HDL occurred to a smaller extent in aged rat plasma than in young rat plasma. Substrate specificity studies indicated that HDL was a considerably better substrate for LCAT than very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in both young and aged rats. In addition, HDL from young rats was a better substrate for LCAT than the HDL from aged rats. Incubation experiments followed by the isolation of lipoproteins and the subsequent analyses of their cholesterol contents revealed that the age-related hypercholesterolemia was mainly due to an increase in the cholesterol carried by lipoprotein fractions d = 1.025 -1.07 g/ml (LDL + HDL1). These and other low density lipoproteins (d less than 1.025 g/ml) were poor substrates for LCAT. However, these lipoproteins could provide free cholesterol for esterification by first transferring it to HDL (d = 1.07-1.21). The HDL isolated from the plasma of aged rats was enriched with apolipoprotein (apo) E and these lipoprotein particles were found to

  15. Insulin-like growth factor 2 rescues aging-related memory loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Adam B; Johnson, Sarah A; Iannitelli, Dylan E; Pollonini, Gabriella; Alberini, Cristina M

    2016-08-01

    Aging is accompanied by declines in memory performance, and particularly affects memories that rely on hippocampal-cortical systems, such as episodic and explicit. With aged populations significantly increasing, the need for preventing or rescuing memory deficits is pressing. However, effective treatments are lacking. Here, we show that the level of the mature form of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2), a peptide regulated in the hippocampus by learning, required for memory consolidation and a promoter of memory enhancement in young adult rodents, is significantly reduced in hippocampal synapses of aged rats. By contrast, the hippocampal level of the immature form proIGF-2 is increased, suggesting an aging-related deficit in IGF-2 processing. In agreement, aged compared to young adult rats are deficient in the activity of proprotein convertase 2, an enzyme that likely mediates IGF-2 posttranslational processing. Hippocampal administration of the recombinant, mature form of IGF-2 rescues hippocampal-dependent memory deficits and working memory impairment in aged rats. Thus, IGF-2 may represent a novel therapeutic avenue for preventing or reversing aging-related cognitive impairments. PMID:27318130

  16. Calorie restriction: A new therapeutic intervention for age-related dry eye disease in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Motoko; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Okada, Naoko; Ogawa, Yoko; Murat, Dogru; Nakamura, Shigeru; Nakashima, Hideo; Shimmura, Shigeto; Shinmura, Ken; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2010-07-09

    A decrease in lacrimal gland secretory function is closely related to aging and leads to an increased prevalence of dry eye syndrome. Since calorie restriction (CR) is considered to prevent functional decline of various organs due to aging, we hypothesized that CR could prevent age-related lacrimal dysfunction. Six-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were randomly divided into ad libitum (AL) and CR (-35%) groups. After 6 months of CR, tear function was examined under conscious state. After euthanasia, lacrimal glands were subjected to histological examination, tear protein secretion stimulation test with Carbachol, and assessment of oxidative stress with 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) antibodies. CR significantly improved tear volume and tended to increase tear protein secretion volume after stimulation with Carbachol compared to AL. The acinar unit density was significantly higher in the CR rats compared to AL rats. Lacrimal glands in the CR rats showed a lesser degree of interstitial fibrosis. CR reduced the concentration of 8-OHdG and the extent of staining with HNE in the lacrimal gland, compared to AL. Furthermore, our electron microscopic observations showed that mitochondrial structure of the lacrimal gland obtained from the middle-aged CR rats was preserved in comparison to the AL rats. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that CR may attenuate oxidative stress related damage in the lacrimal gland with preservation of lacrimal gland functions. Although molecular mechanism(s) by which CR maintains lacrimal gland function remains to be resolved, CR might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for treating dry eye syndrome.

  17. Grape Powder Improves Age-Related Decline in Mitochondrial and Kidney Functions in Fischer 344 Rats.

    PubMed

    Pokkunuri, Indira; Ali, Quaisar; Asghar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects and mechanism of grape powder- (GP-) mediated improvement, if any, on aging kidney function. Adult (3-month) and aged (21-month) Fischer 344 rats were treated without (controls) and with GP (1.5% in drinking water) and kidney parameters were measured. Control aged rats showed higher levels of proteinuria and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), which decreased with GP treatment in these rats. Renal protein carbonyls (protein oxidation) and gp (91phox) -NADPH oxidase levels were high in control aged rats, suggesting oxidative stress burden in these rats. GP treatment in aged rats restored these parameters to the levels of adult rats. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion were low in control aged rats suggesting compromised kidney function, which improved with GP treatment in aged rats. Interestingly, low renal mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels in control aged rats were associated with reduced levels of mitochondrial biogenesis marker MtTFA. Also, Nrf2 proteins levels were reduced in control aged rats. GP treatment increased levels of MtTFA and Nrf2 in aged rats. These results suggest that GP by potentially regulating Nrf2 improves aging mitochondrial and kidney functions. PMID:27528887

  18. Grape Powder Improves Age-Related Decline in Mitochondrial and Kidney Functions in Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Quaisar

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects and mechanism of grape powder- (GP-) mediated improvement, if any, on aging kidney function. Adult (3-month) and aged (21-month) Fischer 344 rats were treated without (controls) and with GP (1.5% in drinking water) and kidney parameters were measured. Control aged rats showed higher levels of proteinuria and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), which decreased with GP treatment in these rats. Renal protein carbonyls (protein oxidation) and gp91phox-NADPH oxidase levels were high in control aged rats, suggesting oxidative stress burden in these rats. GP treatment in aged rats restored these parameters to the levels of adult rats. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion were low in control aged rats suggesting compromised kidney function, which improved with GP treatment in aged rats. Interestingly, low renal mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels in control aged rats were associated with reduced levels of mitochondrial biogenesis marker MtTFA. Also, Nrf2 proteins levels were reduced in control aged rats. GP treatment increased levels of MtTFA and Nrf2 in aged rats. These results suggest that GP by potentially regulating Nrf2 improves aging mitochondrial and kidney functions. PMID:27528887

  19. Age-related changes in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YALI; LIU, JIAN; GAO, DENGFENG; WEI, JIN; YUAN, HAIFENG; NIU, XIAOLIN; ZHANG, QIAOJUN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age-related alterations in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the underlying mechanisms. Aging resulted in a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and apoptotic cells in the SHR group, which was accompanied by increased expression of oxidative stress markers (iNOS and gp47phox) and apoptotic regulatory proteins (Bax and caspase-3). In addition, the expression of PPAR-γ and Bcl-2 were progressively reduced with increasing age in the SHR group. The 32 and 64-week-old SHRs exhibited significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells, oxidative stress markers and pro-apoptotic proteins compared with age-matched WKY rats, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PPAR-γ. Compared with the 16 and 32-week-old WKY group, the 64-week-old WKY rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and pro-apoptotic markers, and increased levels apoptotic cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that both aging and hypertension enhanced brain damage and oxidative stress injury in the hippocampi of SHRs, indicated by an increased presence of apoptotic cells and astrocytes. In addition, reduced expression of PPAR-γ may contribute to the age-related brain damage in SHRs. PMID:26846626

  20. Age-related changes in neurochemical components and retinal projections of rat intergeniculate leaflet.

    PubMed

    Fiuza, Felipe P; Silva, Kayo D A; Pessoa, Renata A; Pontes, André L B; Cavalcanti, Rodolfo L P; Pires, Raquel S; Soares, Joacil G; Nascimento Júnior, Expedito S; Costa, Miriam S M O; Engelberth, Rovena C G J; Cavalcante, Jeferson S

    2016-02-01

    Aging leads to several anatomical and functional deficits in circadian timing system. In previous works, we observed morphological alterations with age in hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, one central component of this system. However, there are few data regarding aging effects on other central components of this system, such as thalamic intergeniculate leaflet (IGL). In this context, we studied possible age-related alterations in neurochemical components and retinal projections of rat IGL. For this goal, young (3 months), adult (13 months), and aged (23 months) Wistar rats were submitted to an intraocular injection of neural tracer, cholera toxin subunit b (CTb), 5 days before a tissue fixation process by paraformaldehyde perfusion. Optical density measurements and cell count were performed at digital pictures of brain tissue slices processed by immunostaining for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), enkephalin (ENK), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and CTb, characteristic markers of IGL and its retinal terminals. We found a significant age-related loss in NPY immunoreactive neurons, but not in immunoreactivity to GAD and ENK. We also found a decline of retinal projections to IGL with age. We conclude aging impairs both a photic environmental clue afferent to IGL and a neurochemical expression which has an important modulatory circadian function, providing strong anatomical correlates to functional deficits of the aged biological clock. PMID:26718202

  1. Ginger and alpha lipoic acid ameliorate age-related ultrastructural changes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Y I; Hegazy, H G

    2016-01-01

    Because of the important role that oxidative stress is thought to play in the aging process, antioxidants could be candidates for preventing its related pathologies. We investigated the ameliorative effects of two antioxidant supplements, ginger and alpha lipoic acid (ALA), on hepatic ultrastructural alterations in old rats. Livers of young (4 months) and old (24 months) Wistar rats were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Livers of old rats showed sinusoidal collapse and congestion, endothelial thickening and defenestration, and inconsistent perisinusoidal extracellular matrix deposition. Aged hepatocytes were characterized by hypertrophy, cytoplasmic vacuolization and a significant increase in the volume densities of the nuclei, mitochondria and dense bodies. Lipofuscin accumulation and decreased microvilli in bile canaliculi and space of Disse also were observed. The adverse alterations were ameliorated significantly by both ginger and ALA supplementation; ALA was more effective than ginger. Ginger and ALA appear to be promising anti-aging agents based on their amelioration of ultrastructural alterations in livers of old rats. PMID:26528730

  2. Involvement of cellular metabolism in age-related LTP modifications in rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Drulis-Fajdasz, Dominika; Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies emphasized crucial role of astrocytic glycogen metabolism in regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity in young animals. However, the interplay between age-related synaptic plasticity impairments and changes in energetic metabolism remains obscure. To address this issue, we investigated, in hippocampal slices of young (one month) and aged rats (20-22-months), the impact of glycogen degradation inhibition on LTP, mRNA expression for glycogen metabolism enzymes and morphology of dendritic spines. We show that, whereas in young hippocampi, inhibition of glycogen phosphorolysis disrupts the late phase of LTP in the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pathway, in aged rats, blockade of glycogen phosphorylase tends to enhance it. Gene expression for key energy metabolism enzymes, such as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase and glutamine synthetase showed marked differences between young and aged groups and changes in expression of these enzymes preceded plasticity phenomena. Interestingly, in the aged group, a prominent expression of these enzymes was found also in neurons. Concluding, we show that LTP in the considered pathway is differentially modulated by metabolic processes in young and aging animals, indicating a novel venue of studies aiming at preventing cognitive decline during aging. PMID:26101857

  3. Age-related metabolic fatigue during low glucose conditions in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Galeffi, Francesca; Shetty, Pavan K.; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Turner, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that with aging, intrinsic brain tissue changes in cellular bioenergetics may hamper the brain’s ability to cope with metabolic stress. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of age on neuronal sensitivity to glucose deprivation by monitoring changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), tissue Po2, and NADH fluorescence imaging in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices obtained from F344 rats (1–2, 3–6, 12–20, and >22 months). Forty minutes of moderate low glucose (2.5 mM) led to approximately 80% decrease of fEPSP amplitudes and NADH decline in all 4 ages that reversed after reintroduction of 10 mM glucose. However, tissue slices from 12 to 20 months and >22-month-old rats were more vulnerable to low glucose: fEPSPs decreased by 50% on average 8 minutes faster compared with younger slices. Tissue oxygen utilization increased after onset of 2.5 mM glucose in all ages of tissue slices, which persisted for 40 minutes in younger tissue slices. But, in older tissue slices the increased oxygen utilization slowly faded and tissue Po2 levels increased toward baseline values after approximately 25 minutes of glucose deprivation. In addition, with age the ability to regenerate NADH after oxidation was diminished. The NAD+/NADH ratio remained relatively oxidized after low glucose, even during recovery. In young slices, glycogen levels were stable throughout the exposure to low glucose. In contrast, with aging utilization of glycogen stores was increased during low glucose, particularly in hippocampal slices from >22 months old rats, indicating both inefficient metabolism and increased demand for glucose. Lactate addition (20 mM) improved oxidative metabolism by directly supplementing the mitochondrial NADH pool and maintained fEPSPs in young as well as aged tissue slices, indicating that inefficient metabolism in the aging tissue can be improved by directly enhancing NADH regeneration. PMID:25443286

  4. Age-related changes in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yali; Liu, Jian; Gao, Dengfeng; Wei, Jin; Yuan, Haifeng; Niu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Qiaojun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age‑related alterations in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the underlying mechanisms. Aging resulted in a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and apoptotic cells in the SHR group, which was accompanied by increased expression of oxidative stress markers (iNOS and gp47phox) and apoptotic regulatory proteins (Bax and caspase‑3). In addition, the expression of PPAR‑γ and Bcl‑2 were progressively reduced with increasing age in the SHR group. The 32 and 64‑week‑old SHRs exhibited significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells, oxidative stress markers and pro‑apoptotic proteins compared with age‑matched WKY rats, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PPAR‑γ. Compared with the 16 and 32‑week‑old WKY group, the 64‑week‑old WKY rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and pro‑apoptotic markers, and increased levels apoptotic cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that both aging and hypertension enhanced brain damage and oxidative stress injury in the hippocampi of SHRs, indicated by an increased presence of apoptotic cells and astrocytes. In addition, reduced expression of PPAR‑γ may contribute to the age‑related brain damage in SHRs. PMID:26846626

  5. IMP production and energy metabolism during exercise in rats in relation to age.

    PubMed Central

    Westra, H G; De Haan, A; van Doorn, J E; de Haan, E J

    1986-01-01

    IMP production in and force exerted by rat quadriceps muscle in situ during various types of exercise were examined in relation to age. During continuous isometric exercise with constant stimulation time, the amount of IMP was linearly and inversely related to the age of the animals; a higher IMP concentration was found in intermittent isometric and dynamic exercise. No relationship was found between the total AMP deaminase activity and age. Exercise influenced neither the total activity nor the activity in the soluble fraction. From the results it is concluded that: the IMP concentration is linearly related to the free intracellular ATP4-/ADP3- ratio and the free AMP2- concentration; older animals are better able to maintain a high intramuscular ATP4-/ADP3- ratio and a low AMP2- concentration; IMP is produced in particular under conditions when the muscle has to work under extreme stress. IMP possibly exerts a feed-back control on the contraction system. PMID:3827826

  6. Age-related changes in the rate of esterification of plasma cholesterol in Fischer-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Carlile, S I; Kudchodkar, B J; Wang, C S; Lacko, A G

    1986-01-01

    Plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels and selected molecular species of plasma cholesteryl esters and triglycerides were determined in 6-, 12-, 15-, 18-, 21-, and 24-month-old Fischer-344 rats. Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity was also determined using two independent methods utilizing endogenous and exogenous substrates. Plasma cholesterol levels increased up to 18 months of age and then plateaued. Of the plasma triglyceride molecular species investigated (C50, C52, C54 and C56), only the levels of C52 increased linearly with age. The concentration of other triglyceride molecular species did not change with age. The fractional rate of plasma cholesterol esterification showed a decreasing trend with age, whereas, the net cholesterol esterification rate showed a gradual age related increase. However, this latter parameter remained unchanged with age when the data were normalized for body weight. The cholesterol esterification rates measured using an exogenous substrate (estimating LCAT enzyme levels) showed essentially no change with age. These data indicate that changes in the levels and/or composition of lipoprotein substrate(s) for LCAT are likely causes of the observed age-related changes in the fractional rate of plasma cholesterol esterification. The net esterification rate of plasma cholesterol was significantly correlated with the plasma triglyceride levels when the animals for all age groups were treated as one experimental group. PMID:3959602

  7. AGE-RELATED CHANGES IN RECEPTOR-MEDIATED PHOSPHOINOSITIDE HYDROLYSIS IN VARIOUS REGIONS OF RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of age on cholinergic markers and receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis was dined in the frontal cortex and striatum of male Fischer-344 rats. holine acetyltransferase activity was decreased 27% in the striatum of aged (24 month) rats cared to young (3 month...

  8. Possible Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Age-Related Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis in the F344XBN Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Sunil K.; Rice, Kevin M.; Katta, Anjaiah; Paturi, Satyanarayana; Wu, Miaozong; Kolli, Madhukar; Keshavarzian, Saba; Manzoor, Kamran; Wehner, Paulette S.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in treatment, age-related cardiac dysfunction still remains a leading cause of cardiovascular death. Recent data have suggested that increases in cardiomyocyte apoptosis may be involved in the pathological remodeling of heart. Here, we examine the effects of aging on cardiomyocyte apoptosis in 6-, 30-, and 36-month-old Fischer344xBrown Norway F1 hybrid rats (F344XBN). Compared with 6-month hearts, aged hearts exhibited increased TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling–positive nuclei, caspase-3 activation, caspase-dependent cleavage of α-fodrin and diminished phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt (Thr 308). These age-dependent increases in cardiomyocyte apoptosis were associated with alterations in the composition of the cardiac dystrophin glycoprotein complex and elevated cytoplasmic IgG and albumin immunoreactivity. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed these data and demonstrated qualitative differences in localization of dystrophin–glycoprotein complex (DGC) molecules with aging. Taken together, these data suggest that aging-related increases in cardiac apoptotic activity model may be due, at least in part, to age-associated changes in DGC structure. PMID:20056683

  9. Elevated dynorphin in the hippocampal formation of aged rats: Relation to cognitive impairment on a spatial learning task

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hannkuang; Owyang, V.; Hong, Jaushyong; Gallagher, M. )

    1989-04-01

    Radioimmunoassay revealed increased dynorphin A(1-8)-like immunoreactivity (dynA(1-8)LI) in the aged rat brain. Among a number of brain regions examined, an age-related dynA(1-8)LI elevation was found only in the hippocampal formation and frontal cortex. Moreover, the increase in dynA(1-8)LI in the aged hippocampus was associated with a decline in spatial learning ability: dynA(1-8)LI distinguished aged rats that were behaviorally impaired from aged cohorts that learned the spatial task as rapidly as younger animals. Northern blot hybridization using a {sup 32}P-labeled complementary RNA probe encoding rat prodynorphin indicated that the abundance of prodynorphin mRNA was also significantly increased in the hippocampal formation of aged rats with identified spatial learning impairments.

  10. Age-related changes in neural gap detection thresholds in the rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yin; Xu, Xiaoxiao; He, Juan; Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Jiping

    2015-02-01

    The ability of the auditory system to resolve sound temporal information is crucial for the understanding of human speech and other species-specific communications. Gap detection threshold, i.e. the ability to detect the shortest duration of a silent interval in a sound, is commonly used to study the auditory temporal resolution. Behavioral studies in humans and rats have shown that normal developing infants have higher gap detection thresholds than adults; however, the underlying neural mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, we determined and compared the neural gap detection thresholds in the primary auditory cortex of three age groups of rats: the juvenile group (postnatal day 20-30), adult group I (8-10 weeks), and adult group II (28-30 weeks). We found age-related changes in auditory temporal acuity in the auditory cortex, i.e. the proportion of cortical units with short neural gap detection thresholds (< 5 ms) was much lower in juvenile groups compared with that in both adult groups at a constant sound level, and no significant differences in neural gap detection thresholds were found between the two adult groups. In addition, units in the auditory cortex of each group generally showed better gap detection thresholds at higher sound levels than at lower sound levels, exhibiting a level-dependent temporal acuity. These results provided evidence for neural correlates of age-related changes in behavioral gap detection ability during postnatal hearing development. PMID:25388865

  11. Age-related changes of dental pulp tissue after experimental tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Von Böhl, Martina; Ren, Yijin; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M; Fudalej, Piotr S; Maltha, Jaap C

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the effect of orthodontic tooth movement on the dental pulp in adolescents is reversible and that it has no long-lasting effect on pulpal physiology. However, it is not clear yet if the same conclusion is also valid for adult subjects. Thus, in two groups of rats, aged 6 and 40 weeks respectively, 3 molars at one side of the maxilla were moved together in a mesial direction with a standardized orthodontic appliance delivering a force of 10 cN. The contralateral side served as a control. Parasagittal histological sections were prepared after tooth movement for 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The pulp tissue was characterized for the different groups, with special emphasis on cell density, inflammatory cells, vascularity, and odontoblasts. Dimensions of dentin and the pulpal horns was determined and related with the duration of orthodontic force application and age ware evaluated. We found that neither in young nor in adult rats, force application led to long-lasting or irreversible changes in pulpal tissues. Dimensional variables showed significant age-related changes. In conclusion, orthodontic tooth movement per se has no long-lasting or irreversible effect on pulpal tissues, neither in the young nor in the adult animals. PMID:26855867

  12. Age-related changes of dental pulp tissue after experimental tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Von Böhl, Martina; Ren, Yijin; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.; Maltha, Jaap C.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the effect of orthodontic tooth movement on the dental pulp in adolescents is reversible and that it has no long-lasting effect on pulpal physiology. However, it is not clear yet if the same conclusion is also valid for adult subjects. Thus, in two groups of rats, aged 6 and 40 weeks respectively, 3 molars at one side of the maxilla were moved together in a mesial direction with a standardized orthodontic appliance delivering a force of 10 cN. The contralateral side served as a control. Parasagittal histological sections were prepared after tooth movement for 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The pulp tissue was characterized for the different groups, with special emphasis on cell density, inflammatory cells, vascularity, and odontoblasts. Dimensions of dentin and the pulpal horns was determined and related with the duration of orthodontic force application and age ware evaluated. We found that neither in young nor in adult rats, force application led to long-lasting or irreversible changes in pulpal tissues. Dimensional variables showed significant age-related changes. In conclusion, orthodontic tooth movement per se has no long-lasting or irreversible effect on pulpal tissues, neither in the young nor in the adult animals. PMID:26855867

  13. Age-related changes in total protein and collagen metabolism in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Mays, P K; McAnulty, R; Laurent, G J

    1991-12-01

    Liver collagen levels are determined by a balance between synthesis and degradation, processes known to have rapid rates in growing animals. We report age-related changes in liver collagen synthesis and degradation rates, as well as protein synthesis rates, in rats at five ages from 1 to 24 mo. Fractional collagen synthesis rates were determined after injection of [14C]proline with a flooding dose of unlabeled proline and its incorporation as hydroxy-[14C]proline into proteins. Fractional protein synthesis rates were based on the uptake of [14C]proline into proteins. Fractional collagen degradation rates were calculated from the difference between collagen fractional synthesis and deposition rates. Fractional rates of collagen synthesis were similar between 1 mo (23.0% +/- 4.6%/day) and 24 mo (19.6% +/- 3.4%/day) of age. Collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix was extremely low at every age studied; therefore degradation pathways accounted for the bulk of the collagen synthesized. The mean fractional synthesis rate for the total protein pool was unaltered between 1 mo (105.0% +/- 7.2%/day) and 15 mo (89.9% +/- 6.0%/day) of age, after which it increased to 234.9% +/- 33.0%/day (p less than 0.05) by 24 mo of age. These results indicate that liver collagen and total protein synthesis rates were maintained at relatively high levels during development and maturity but that protein synthesis rates were highest in senescent animals. PMID:1959872

  14. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  15. 'When an old rat smells a cat': A decline in defense-related, but not accessory olfactory, Fos expression in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Glenn E; Van Nieuwenhuijzen, Petra S; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; McGregor, Iain S

    2011-04-01

    Comparisons were made between young (3-6 months) and aged (20-30 months) Wistar rats on locomotor activity, emergence, social interaction and cat odor avoidance. Aged rats were less active and spent less time in the open field during the emergence test than younger rats. Older rats also showed fewer contacts with a novel conspecific in the social interaction test, although total duration of interaction did not differ. There were very few behavioral differences between male and female rats. Older rats were less reactive than younger rats in a test of cat odor avoidance. However, they expressed similar amounts of cat odor-induced Fos in the posterior accessory olfactory bulb, a critical region for processing the predator odor stimulus. Older rats had reduced Fos expression in several defense-related brain regions that are normally activated by predator odors such as the medial amygdala and dorsal premammillary nucleus. These results indicate that aged rats are less reactive than younger rats to predator odors due to decreased responsiveness in defense-related but not necessarily olfactory circuits. PMID:19394115

  16. Age-related light scattering in rat lenses observed in a 2-year inhalation toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Wegener, A; Kaegler, M; Stinn, W

    2002-01-01

    Normal light scattering in the eye is determined primarily by the size of alpha-crystalline molecules. Ageing effects appear as an increase in normal lens light scattering in distinct layers. Subliminal effects of toxins on lens transparency can also cause an increase in light scattering due to protein molecule aggregation before visible opacities appear. Scheimpflug photography of the anterior eye segment with subsequent densitometric image analysis is the method of choice to evaluate such effects. To gain more insight into normal ageing and the potential effects of complex aerosols, a subset of Wistar rats (both sexes) belonging to a larger chronic inhalation toxicity study was documented at baseline and after 2 years with a Topcon SL-45 Scheimpflug camera on Kodak T(max) 400 ISO film. The recording procedure, film development, and microdensitometric image analysis were all performed according to standard protocol. A second group from the same study was documented at the start and after 5 months of a 6-month posttreatment period immediately following the inhalation period. Rats were nose-only exposed for 6 h/day, 7 days/week, for 2 years to low (3 microg/l) or high (10 microg/l) concentrations of room-aged cigarette sidestream smoke or diesel engine exhaust. Control animals were exposed to filtered fresh air. At the baseline examination, there were no relevant differences between groups with respect to corneal density or density of defined layers in the lens capsule (1), epithelium and superficial cortex (2), deep cortex (3), supranuclear layer (4) and nucleus (5). At the 2-year examination, mean corneal density was significantly lower in females than in males. This same trend, although not significant, was also found in most layers of the lens. The most prominent differences in density over time were measured in lens layers 3 and 4, but neither corneal density nor lenticular density showed any consistent treatment-related effects in any of the layers. The data

  17. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats due to age-related arginase activation in intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nara, Akina; Nagai, Hisashi; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Ogura, Sayoko; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Kuwahira, Ichiro; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is prevalent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Aging induces arginase activation and reduces nitric oxide (NO) production in the arteries. Intermittent hypoxia (IH), conferred by cycles of brief hypoxia and normoxia, contributes to OSAS pathogenesis. Here, we studied the role of arginase and aging in the pathogenesis of PAH in adult (9-mo-old) and young (2-mo-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to IH or normoxia for 4 weeks and analyzed them with a pressure-volume catheter inserted into the right ventricle (RV) and by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Western blot analysis was conducted on arginase, NO synthase isoforms, and nitrotyrosine. IH induced PAH, as shown by increased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, in adult rats but not in young rats. IH increased expression levels of arginase I and II proteins in the adult rats. IH also increased arginase I expression in the pulmonary artery endothelium and arginase II in the pulmonary artery adventitia. Furthermore, IH reduced pulmonary levels of nitrate and nitrite but increased nitrotyrosine levels in adult rats. An arginase inhibitor (N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-1-arginine) prevented IH-induced PAH and normalized nitrite and nitrate levels in adult rats. IH induced arginase up-regulation and PAH in adult rats, but not in young rats, through reduced NO production. Our findings suggest that arginase inhibition prevents or reverses PAH. PMID:25490411

  18. AGE RELATED PERCUTANEOUS PENETRATION OF 2-SEC-BUTYL 4,6-DINITROPHENOL (DINOSEB) IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of age, dose, and method of dermal penetration assessment on the percutaneous penetration of C14-dinoseb have been determined in the Fischer' rat. ermal absorption was shown to be dependent on age and independent of dose. n vitro measurement of dermal absorption was fo...

  19. UV-induced retinal proteome changes in the rat model of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Klobučar, Marko; Sedić, Mirela; Micek, Vedran; Gehrig, Peter; Grossman, Jonas; Pavelić, Krešimir; Vojniković, Božidar

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by irreversible damage of photoreceptors in the central posterior part of the retina, called the macula and is the most common cause of vision loss in those aged over 50. A growing body of evidence shows that cumulative long-term exposure to UV radiation may be harmful to the retina and possibly leads to AMD irrespective of age. In spite of many research efforts, cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to UV-induced retinal damage and possibly retinal diseases such as AMD are not completely understood. In the present study we explored damage mechanisms accounting for UV-induced retinal phototoxicity in the rats exposed to UVA and UVB irradiation using a proteomics approach. Our study showed that UV irradiation induces profound changes in the retinal proteomes of the rats associated with the disruption of energy homeostasis, oxidative stress, DNA damage response and structural and functional impairments of the interphotoreceptor matrix components and their cell surface receptors such as galectins. Two small leucine-rich proteoglycans, biglycan and lumican, were identified as phototoxicity biomarkers associated with UV-induced disruption of interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM). In addition, UVB induced activation of Src kinase, which could account for cytoskeletal rearrangements in the retina was observed at the proteomics level. Pharmacological intervention either to target Src kinase with the aim of preventing cytoskeletal rearrangements in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neuronal retina or to help rebuild damaged IPM may provide fresh avenues of treatment for patients suffering from AMD. PMID:26071645

  20. Dialysable and non-dialysable hydroxyproline in the rat's urine: age related and diurnal variations

    PubMed Central

    Gaggi, Renato; Gianni, Anna Maria; Montanaro, Nicola

    1982-01-01

    1. Urinary dialysable and non-dialysable hydroxyproline, which are considered good indices of bone resorption and neoformation respectively, were determined in rats under conditions that modify skeleton metabolism, such as body growth and parathyroid or calcitonin administration. It was also investigated whether dialysable and non-dialysable hydroxyproline excretions showed significant circadian fluctuations in rats of different ages. 2. Dialysable hydroxyproline excretion sharply decreased from the first to the fifth months of age and underwent further gradual reduction up to the fourteenth month of life. Non-dialysable hydroxyproline excretion followed a smoother decrease up to the fifth month, then remained constant. Urinary excretion of non-dialysable hydroxyproline expressed as a percentage of the total hydroxyprolinuria (n.d.%) slowly increased with advancing rat age. 3. In 2-, 4- and 6-month old rats, dialysable hydroxyproline excretion showed significant circadian fluctuations with minima and maxima at the end of the dark and light fraction of the cycle respectively. Daily fluctuations were greater in young and adult rats (50-65% of the respective average levels) than in 4-month old rats (25%). Non-dialysable hydroxyproline excretion followed similar but less pronounced patterns. Significant circadian fluctuations of n.d.% were detectable only in 2- and 4-month old rats, with peaks at 04.00-05.00 hr, thus indicating that the bone formation/resorption ratio increased in the nocturnal fraction of the cycle. 4. Young rats administered with calcitonin exhibited reduced levels of urinary dialysable but not of non-dialysable hydroxyproline when the hormone was given at 13.30 hr. No changes were observed when calcitonin was injected at 19.30 hr. On the contrary, both diurnal and nocturnal parathyroid hormone administration to young rats caused increased levels of dialysable and non-dialysable hydroxyproline of the same magnitude. PMID:7202048

  1. Age-Related Differences in the Disposition of Nicotine and Metabolites in Rat Brain and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have evaluated the behavioral and neurochemical impact of nicotine administration in rodents. However, the distribution of nicotine and metabolites in rat brain and plasma as a function of age has not been investigated. This is a significant issue because human adolescents have a greater risk for developing nicotine addiction than adults, and reasons underlying this observation have not been fully determined. Thus, in this present study, we evaluated the impact of the transition from adolescence (postnatal day [PND 40]) to adulthood (PND 90) on nicotine distribution in rats. Methods: PND 40, 60, and 90 rats received a single injection of (−) nicotine (0.8mg/kg, subcutaneously). Liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry was used to measure concentration of nicotine and metabolites in selected biological matrices. Results: Nicotine, cotinine, and nornicotine were detected in rat striata and frontal cortex 30min, 1hr, 2hr, and 4hr after a single administration. These and several additional metabolites (nicotine-1′-oxide, cotinine-N-oxide, norcotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine) were also detected in plasma at these same timepoints. The mean concentration of nicotine in brain and plasma was lower in PND 40 versus PND 90 rats. In contrast, the mean concentration of nornicotine was higher in the plasma and brain of PND 40 versus PND 90 rats. Conclusions: Nicotine and metabolite distribution differs between adolescent and adult rats. These data suggest that adolescent rats metabolize nicotine to some metabolites faster than adult rats. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential correlation between age, drug distribution, and nicotine addiction. PMID:23737496

  2. Recovery of functional and structural age-related changes in the rat primary auditory cortex with operant training

    PubMed Central

    de Villers-Sidani, Etienne; Alzghoul, Loai; Zhou, Xiaoming; Simpson, Kimberly L.; Lin, Rick C. S.; Merzenich, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive decline is a virtually universal aspect of the aging process. However, its neurophysiological basis remains poorly understood. We describe here more than 20 age-related cortical processing deficits in the primary auditory cortex of aging versus young rats that appear to be strongly contributed to by altered cortical inhibition. Consistent with these changes, we recorded in old rats a decrease in parvalbumin-labeled inhibitory cortical neurons. Furthermore, old rats were slower to master a simple behavior, with learning progressions marked by more false-positive responses. We then examined the effect of intensive auditory training on the primary auditory cortex in these aged rats by using an oddball discrimination task. Following training, we found a nearly complete reversal of the majority of previously observed functional and structural cortical impairments. These findings suggest that age-related cognitive decline is a tightly regulated plastic process, and demonstrate that most of these age-related changes are, by their fundamental nature, reversible. PMID:20643928

  3. The Role of RFamide-Related Peptide-3 in Age-Related Reproductive Decline in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Anna C; Muroy, Sandra E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Bentley, George E; Kaufer, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive senescence, the point in time when females cease to show estrous cyclicity, is associated with endocrine changes in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonads. However, the mechanisms triggering this transition are not well understood. To gain a better understanding of the top-down control of the transition from reproductive competence to a state of reproductive senescence, we investigated middle-aged female rats exhibiting varying degrees of reproductive decline, including individuals with normal cycles, irregular cycles, and complete cessation of cycles. We identified hormonal changes in the brain that manifest before ovarian cycles exhibit any deterioration. We found that females exhibit an increase in RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP3) mRNA expression in the hypothalamus in middle age prior to changes in estrous cycle length. This increase is transient and followed by subsequent decreases in kisspeptin (KiSS1) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) mRNA expression. Expression of RFRP3 and its receptor also increased locally in the ovaries with advancing age. While it is well known that aging is associated with decreased GnRH release and downstream disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, herein, we provide evidence that reproductive senescence is likely triggered by alterations in a network of regulatory neuropeptides upstream of the GnRH system. PMID:27445974

  4. The Role of RFamide-Related Peptide-3 in Age-Related Reproductive Decline in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Anna C.; Muroy, Sandra E.; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.; Bentley, George E.; Kaufer, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive senescence, the point in time when females cease to show estrous cyclicity, is associated with endocrine changes in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonads. However, the mechanisms triggering this transition are not well understood. To gain a better understanding of the top-down control of the transition from reproductive competence to a state of reproductive senescence, we investigated middle-aged female rats exhibiting varying degrees of reproductive decline, including individuals with normal cycles, irregular cycles, and complete cessation of cycles. We identified hormonal changes in the brain that manifest before ovarian cycles exhibit any deterioration. We found that females exhibit an increase in RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP3) mRNA expression in the hypothalamus in middle age prior to changes in estrous cycle length. This increase is transient and followed by subsequent decreases in kisspeptin (KiSS1) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) mRNA expression. Expression of RFRP3 and its receptor also increased locally in the ovaries with advancing age. While it is well known that aging is associated with decreased GnRH release and downstream disruption of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis, herein, we provide evidence that reproductive senescence is likely triggered by alterations in a network of regulatory neuropeptides upstream of the GnRH system. PMID:27445974

  5. Age-related differences in the bone mineralization pattern of rats following exercise

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.; Hegenauer, J.; Saltman, P.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of 12 weeks of treadmill exercise on the mineralization of trabecular and cortical bone was studied in rats 7, 14, and 19 months of age. Bone mineralization was evaluated by measuring concentrations of Ca, Mg, and hydroxyproline as well as uptake of 45Ca concentration in the femur, humerus, rib and calvaria. The 7- and 14-month-old rats increased mineralization in those cortical bones directly involved in exercise. The 19-month animal responded to exercise by increasing mineralization in all bones examined, including the nonweight bearing trabecular calvaria and cortical rib. From these data, it is apparent that the older animals undergo a total skeletal mineralization in response to exercise compared with local adaptation in the younger animal. Further, we provide evidence to support the use of the rat as a model in which to study mammalian bone physiology during the aging process.

  6. Pairing Cholinergic Enhancement with Perceptual Training Promotes Recovery of Age-Related Changes in Rat Primary Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Patrice; Thomas, Maryse; Chou, You Chien; Cisneros-Franco, José Miguel; Ouellet, Lydia; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    We used the rat primary auditory cortex (A1) as a model to probe the effects of cholinergic enhancement on perceptual learning and auditory processing mechanisms in both young and old animals. Rats learned to perform a two-tone frequency discrimination task over the course of two weeks, combined with either the administration of a cholinesterase inhibitor or saline. We found that while both age groups learned the task more quickly through cholinergic enhancement, the young did so by improving target detection, whereas the old did so by inhibiting erroneous responses to nontarget stimuli. We also found that cholinergic enhancement led to marked functional and structural changes within A1 in both young and old rats. Importantly, we found that several functional changes observed in the old rats, particularly those relating to the processing and inhibition of nontargets, produced cortical processing features that resembled those of young untrained rats more so than those of older adult rats. Overall, these findings demonstrate that combining auditory training with neuromodulation of the cholinergic system can restore many of the auditory cortical functional deficits observed as a result of normal aging and add to the growing body of evidence demonstrating that many age-related perceptual and neuroplastic changes are reversible. PMID:27057359

  7. Pairing Cholinergic Enhancement with Perceptual Training Promotes Recovery of Age-Related Changes in Rat Primary Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Voss, Patrice; Thomas, Maryse; Chou, You Chien; Cisneros-Franco, José Miguel; Ouellet, Lydia; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    We used the rat primary auditory cortex (A1) as a model to probe the effects of cholinergic enhancement on perceptual learning and auditory processing mechanisms in both young and old animals. Rats learned to perform a two-tone frequency discrimination task over the course of two weeks, combined with either the administration of a cholinesterase inhibitor or saline. We found that while both age groups learned the task more quickly through cholinergic enhancement, the young did so by improving target detection, whereas the old did so by inhibiting erroneous responses to nontarget stimuli. We also found that cholinergic enhancement led to marked functional and structural changes within A1 in both young and old rats. Importantly, we found that several functional changes observed in the old rats, particularly those relating to the processing and inhibition of nontargets, produced cortical processing features that resembled those of young untrained rats more so than those of older adult rats. Overall, these findings demonstrate that combining auditory training with neuromodulation of the cholinergic system can restore many of the auditory cortical functional deficits observed as a result of normal aging and add to the growing body of evidence demonstrating that many age-related perceptual and neuroplastic changes are reversible. PMID:27057359

  8. Age-related changes in body composition in laboratory rats: Strain and gender comparisons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long Evans (LE), Sprague Dawley (SD), Fischer 344 (F344), and Brown Norway (BN) rats are all commonly used as laboratory research subjects. These strains have been studied under many conditions, but few studies have measured changes in body composition as the animals age. Underst...

  9. Age-related increases in F344 rat intestine microsomal quercetin glucuronidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to establish the extent age modifies intestinal quercetin glucuronidation capacity. Pooled microsomal fractions of three equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats (n=8/group) were employed to model the enzyme kinetics of UDP-gl...

  10. A preliminary study of age-related difference in resistance to sepsis in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Wei, C I; Gilliam, M C; Cohen, M D; Cornell, J A; Moazam, F

    1987-11-01

    Although the pathophysiology of intraabdominal sepsis is well established in the adult animal, there is a paucity of similar information in the newborn animal. Using the Wichterman (K.A. Wichterman, A.E. Baue, and I.H. Chaudry, Journal of Surgical Research 29: 189, 1980) model of intraabdominal sepsis, 42 Sprague-Dawley suckling rat pups and 42 adults underwent cecal ligation followed by a single needle puncture of the cecum. Whereas a mortality of 47.6% was noted in the adult animals, only 7.1% of the suckling animals succumbed by the end of 1 week. After the ip LD50 of Escherichia coli was determined independently in each age group, appropriate doses of the bacteria were injected into the peritoneums of 36 suckling and 30 adult rats. The peritoneal fluid was aspirated at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hr and the bacterial concentration in the suspension was determined. The rate of bacterial clearance from the peritoneum of the suckling rats was found to be significantly greater at 2, 4, and 8 hr as compared with the adult animal. In vitro assay of the phagocytic activity of the peritoneal macrophages demonstrated a significantly higher activity in the cells obtained from the suckling rats than in those from the adult (P less than 0.05). A more efficient bacterial clearance and a higher phagocytic activity in the peritoneal macrophages of the suckling rats may contribute to the difference in the mortality between the two age groups. PMID:3316844

  11. Age-related dendritic hypertrophy and sexual dimorphism in rat basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rubinow, Marisa J.; Drogos, Lauren L.; Juraska, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Little research has examined the influence of aging or sex on anatomical measures in the basolateral amygdala. We quantified spine density and dendritic material in Golgi-Cox stained tissue of the basolateral nucleus in young adult (3–5 months) and aged (20–24 months) male and female Long-Evans rats. Dendritic branching and spine density were measured in principal neurons. Age, but not sex, influenced the dendritic tree, with aged animals displaying significantly more dendritic material. Previous findings from our laboratory in the same set of subjects indicate an opposite effect of aging on dendritic material in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. We also report here a sex difference across ages in dendritic spine density, favoring males. PMID:17570563

  12. Age-related development of a heterozygous phenotype in solitary neurons of the homozygous Brattleboro rat.

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, F; van der Beek, E; Seger, M; Burbach, P; Ivell, R

    1989-01-01

    A single-base deletion in the single-copy vasopressin gene is the cause of diabetes insipidus in the homozygous Brattleboro rat (di/di). It results in the synthesis of an altered vasopressin precursor of which the axonal transport is blocked. Paradoxically, a small number of solitary hypothalamic neurons displays all the immunoreactivities of the wild-type vasopressin precursor (i.e., vasopressin, neurophysin, and a glycopeptide). In the present paper we provide evidence that these neurons have undergone a switch to a genuine heterozygous (di/+) phenotype; i.e., they contain the immunoreactivities of both the wild-type and the mutated vasopressin precursors. In the neural lobe, glycopeptide fibers are also present, showing that axonal transport of the wild-type precursor is restored. Moreover, the number of neurons displaying this di/+ phenotype increases markedly and in a linear way (from 0.1% up to 3% of the vasopressin cells) with age. These findings indicate that after mitotic division has ceased, genomic alterations occur in somatic neurons in vivo. The molecular event generating the di/+ phenotype in the di/di animal could involve a somatic intrachromosomal gene conversion between the homologous exons of the vasopressin and the related oxytocin genes. Images PMID:2762332

  13. PMK-S005 Alleviates Age-Related Gastric Acid Secretion, Inflammation, and Oxidative Status in the Rat Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Ju Yup; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Suh, Ji Hyung; Lee, Sun Min; Ham, Min Hee; Jo, Hyun Jin; Shim, Young Kwang; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Jong-Chan; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the synthetic S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC) PMK-S005 on gastric acid secretion, inflammation, and antioxidant enzymes in aging rats. Methods The rats were divided into four groups at 31 weeks of age and were continuously fed a diet containing a vehicle control, PMK-S005 (5 or 10 mg/kg), or lansoprazole (5 mg/kg). Gastric acid secretion and connective tissue thickness of the lamina propria were evaluated at 74 weeks and 2 years of age. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and COX-2 levels were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) or Western blot assays. Levels of antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxyganase 1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), were also measured. Results As the rats aged, gastric acid secretion significantly decreased, and the connective tissue of the lamina propria increased. However, 74-week-old rats in the PMK-S005 group exhibited greater levels of gastric acid secretion than those of the control and lansoprazole groups. The increase of TNF-α, IL-1β, and COX-2 expression in 74-week and 2-year-old control rats were inhibited by PMK-S005. In addition, the decrease in HO-1 and NQO-1 protein expression that occurred with aging was inhibited by PMK-S005 in the 74-week-old rats. Conclusions These results suggest that PMK-S005 has therapeutic potential as an antiaging agent to ameliorate age-related gastric acid secretion, inflammation, and oxidative stress in the stomach. PMID:27172930

  14. Age- and Sex-Related Characteristics of Tonic Gaba Currents in the Rat Substantia Nigra Pars Reticulata

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, H.; Bojar, M.; Moshé, S. L.; Galanopoulou, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the pharmacologic effects of GABAergic drugs and the postsynaptic phasic GABAAergic inhibitory responses in the anterior part of the rat substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNRA) are age- and sex-specific. Here, we investigate whether there are age- and sex-related differences in the expression of the δ GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunit and GABAAR mediated tonic currents. We have used δ-specific immunochemistry and whole cell patch clamp to study GABAAR mediated tonic currents in the SNRA of male and female postnatal day (PN) PN5-9, PN11-16, and PN25-32 rats. We observed age-related decline, but no sex-specific changes, in bicuculline (BIM) sensitive GABAAR tonic current density, which correlated with the decline in δ subunit in the SNRA between PN15 and 30. Furthermore, we show that the GABAAR tonic currents can be modified by muscimol (GABAAR agonist; partial GABACR agonist), THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo (5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol: α4β3δ GABAARs agonist and GABACR antagonist), and zolpidem (α1-subunit selective GABAAR agonist) in age-and sex-dependent manner specific for each drug. We propose that the emergence of the GABAAR-sensitive anticonvulsant effects of the rat SNRA during development may depend upon the developmental decline in tonic GABAergic inhibition of the activity of rat SNRA neurons, although other sex-specific factors are also involved. PMID:25645446

  15. Age- and sex-related characteristics of tonic GABA currents in the rat substantia nigra pars reticulata.

    PubMed

    Chudomel, O; Hasson, H; Bojar, M; Moshé, S L; Galanopoulou, A S

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the pharmacologic effects of GABAergic drugs and the postsynaptic phasic GABAAergic inhibitory responses in the anterior part of the rat substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNRA) are age- and sex-specific. Here, we investigate whether there are age- and sex-related differences in the expression of the δ GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunit and GABAAR mediated tonic currents. We have used δ-specific immunochemistry and whole cell patch clamp to study GABAAR mediated tonic currents in the SNRA of male and female postnatal day (PN) PN5-9, PN11-16, and PN25-32 rats. We observed age-related decline, but no sex-specific changes, in bicuculline (BIM) sensitive GABAAR tonic current density, which correlated with the decline in δ subunit in the SNRA between PN15 and 30. Furthermore, we show that the GABAAR tonic currents can be modified by muscimol (GABAAR agonist; partial GABACR agonist), THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo (5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol: α4β3δ GABAARs agonist and GABACR antagonist), and zolpidem (α1-subunit selective GABAAR agonist) in age- and sex-dependent manner specific for each drug. We propose that the emergence of the GABAAR-sensitive anticonvulsant effects of the rat SNRA during development may depend upon the developmental decline in tonic GABAergic inhibition of the activity of rat SNRA neurons, although other sex-specific factors are also involved. PMID:25645446

  16. Combined age- and trauma-related proteomic changes in rat neocortex: a basis for brain vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Mehan, Neal D.; Strauss, Kenneth I.

    2012-01-01

    This proteomic study investigates the widely observed clinical phenomenon, that after comparable brain injuries, geriatric patients fare worse and recover less cognitive and neurologic function than younger victims. Utilizing a rat traumatic brain injury model, sham surgery or a neocortical contusion was induced in 3 age groups. Geriatric (21 months) rats performed worse on behavioral measures than young adults (12–16 weeks) and juveniles (5– 6 weeks). Motor coordination and certain cognitive deficits showed age-dependence both before and after injury. Brain proteins were analyzed using silver-stained two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. Spot volume changes (>2-fold change, p<0.01) were identified between age and injury groups using computer-assisted densitometry. Sequences were determined by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides. The 19 spots identified represented 13 different genes that fell into 4 general age- and injury-dependent expression patterns. Fifteen isoforms changed differentially with respect to both age and injury (p<0.05). Further investigations into the nature and function of these isoforms may yield insights into the vulnerability of older patients and resilience of younger patients in recovery after brain injuries. PMID:22088680

  17. Combined age- and trauma-related proteomic changes in rat neocortex: a basis for brain vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Mehan, Neal D; Strauss, Kenneth I

    2012-09-01

    This proteomic study investigates the widely observed clinical phenomenon, that after comparable brain injuries, geriatric patients fare worse and recover less cognitive and neurologic function than younger victims. Utilizing a rat traumatic brain injury model, sham surgery or a neocortical contusion was induced in 3 age groups. Geriatric (21 months) rats performed worse on behavioral measures than young adults (12-16 weeks) and juveniles (5-6 weeks). Motor coordination and certain cognitive deficits showed age-dependence both before and after injury. Brain proteins were analyzed using silver-stained two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. Spot volume changes (>2-fold change, p<0.01) were identified between age and injury groups using computer-assisted densitometry. Sequences were determined by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides. The 19 spots identified represented 13 different genes that fell into 4 general age- and injury-dependent expression patterns. Fifteen isoforms changed differentially with respect to both age and injury (p<0.05). Further investigations into the nature and function of these isoforms may yield insights into the vulnerability of older patients and resilience of younger patients in recovery after brain injuries. PMID:22088680

  18. Age-related changes in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles: analysis of muscle fibers, muscle fiber proteins, and subneural apparatuses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Taguchi, Aki; Motoyoshi, Kazumi; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Desaki, Junzo

    2013-03-01

    We compared age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of aged and young adult rats by determining the number and diameter of muscle fibers, contractile muscle protein (myosin heavy chain isoforms, MHC) composition, and the morphology of the subneural apparatuses. In aged rats, both the numbers and the diameters of muscle fibers decreased in the cricothyroid (CT) muscle. The number of fibers, but not diameter, decreased in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. In the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle, neither the number nor the diameter of fibers changed significantly. Aging was associated with a decrease in type IIB and an increase in type IIA MHC isoform levels in CT muscle, but no such changes were observed in the TA or PCA muscles. Morphological examination of primary synaptic clefts of the subneural apparatus revealed that aging resulted in decreased labyrinthine and increased depression types in only the CT muscle. In the aged group, morphologically immature subneural apparatuses were found infrequently in the CT muscle, indicating continued tissue remodeling. We suggest, therefore, that age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles primarily involve the CT muscle, whereas the structures of the TA and PCA muscles may better resist aging processes and therefore are less vulnerable to functional impairment. This may reflect differences in their roles; the CT muscle controls the tone of the vocal folds, while the TA and PCA muscles play an essential role in vital activities such as respiration and swallowing. PMID:23100084

  19. [Aging-related increase of sensitivity of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore to inductors in the rat heart].

    PubMed

    Sahach, V F; Vavilova, H L; Strutyns'ka, N A; Rudyk, O V

    2004-01-01

    An age-related increase in the sensitivity of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) to inductors of it's opening, Ca2+ ions and phenylarsineoxide (PAO) was studied in experiments in vitro on isolated heart mitochondria of adult and old rats. Two indices were measured spectrophotometrically (lambda = 520 nm) by a decrease in an optical density (OD), resulting from mitochondrial swelling and a release of mitochondrial unidentified substances (mitochondrial factor, MF) registered also spectrophotometrically in a range of waves lambda = 230-260 nm. Dose-dependent effect of Ca2+ (10(-7)-10(-4) mol/l) and PAO (10(-8)-10(-4) mol/l) on swelling of the mitochondria were observed in samples from both adult and old rats. Swelling of the mitochondria from the heart of old rats induced by application of the above inductors was more intensive than the respective effect in samples from adult rats. In samples from the heart of both adult and old rats Ca2+ ions within the tested concentration range (10(-7)-10(-4) mol/l) evoked the release of MF in a dose-dependent manner. Mitochondria from the heart of old rats were found to be capable of releasing some amounts of MF in the absence of the MPTP inductors PAO. When this inductor was applied in a 10(-9) to 10(-4) mol/l concentration range, isolated mitochondria from the heart of old rats released unidentified substances with the absorption peaks at two wavelength, lambda = 230 nm and lambda = 240-245 nm. The former peak was found to be Cyclosporin A-insensitive, while the latter peak could be practically completely inhibited by this antibiotic. The concentrations of tested solutions (10(-7) mol/l CaCl2 and 10(-9) mol/l PAO), at which the release of the factor from the mitochondria of the old rat heart was observed, were significantly lower than those in adult rats. Our experimental data show that mitochondria isolated from the heart tissue of old rats demonstrate significantly higher sensitivity to inductors of MPTP

  20. Ethanol feeding enhances age-related deterioration of the rat hepatic mitochondrion

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Alan; Hershman, Stuart; Davies, Adrian; Sykora, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Chronic ethanol feeding damages the hepatic mitochondrion by increasing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) oxidation, lowering mtDNA yields and impairing mitochondrial respiration. These effects are also seen during aging. By employing a 21-day chronic feeding regimen, we investigated the effects of ethanol consumption on mtDNA content and mitochondrial respiration in 2-, 12-, and 24-mo-old male rats. Aging resulted in decreased mtDNA content, increased mtDNA damage (as indicated by inhibition of Taq polymerase progression), and a decline in state 3 respiration; effects that were further exacerbated by ethanol feeding. Additionally, ethanol consumption caused an increase in the levels of citrate synthase while not impacting mitochondrial protein content. In conclusion, ethanol and aging combine to cause deterioration in the structural and functional integrity of the hepatic mitochondrion. The additive effects of aging and ethanol feeding may have serious consequences for hepatic energy metabolism in aged animals, and their detrimental combination may serve as one of the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:16020655

  1. Age- and sex-related differences of organic anion-transporting polypeptide gene expression in livers of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Wei-Yu; Xu, Shang-Fu; Zhu, Qiong-Ni; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Cheng, Xing-Guo; Liu, Jie

    2014-10-15

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps) play important roles in transporting endogenous substances and xenobiotics into the liver and are implicated in drug-drug interactions. Many factors could influence their expression and result in alterations in drug disposition, efficacy and toxicity. This study was aimed to examine the development-, aging-, and sex-dependent Oatps expression in livers of rats. The livers from SD rats during development (− 2, 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 60 d) and aging (60, 180, 540 and/or 800 d) were collected and total RNAs were extracted, purified, and subjected to real-time PCR analysis. Total proteins were extracted for western-blot analysis. Results showed that Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, Oatp1a5 and Oatp1b2 were all hardly detectable in fetal rat livers, low at birth, rapidly increased after weaning (21 d), and reached the peak at 60 d. The Oatps remained stable during the age between 60–180 d, and decreased at elderly (540 and/or 800 d). After birth, Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, and Oatp1b2 were all highly expressed in liver, in contrast, Oatp1a5 expression was low. Oatp expressions are male-predominant in rat livers. In the livers of aged rats, the Oatp expression decreased and shared a consistent ontogeny pattern at the mRNA and protein level. In conclusion, this study showed that in rat liver, Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, Oatp1a5 and Oatp1b2 gene expressions are influenced by age and gender, which could provide a basis of individual variation in drug transport, metabolism and toxicity in children, elderly and women. - Highlights: • Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, Oatp1a5 and Oatp1b2 expression in livers of rats. • Ontogenic changes of Oatps at − 2, 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 60 days. • Age-related changes of Oatps at 60, 180, 540, and 800 days. • Sex-difference of Oatps at the both mRNA and protein levels.

  2. [Age-related Peculiarities of Succinate Effect on Induced Lipid Peroxidation in Rat Liver Mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Grishina, E V; Khaustova, Ya V; Vasilieva, A A; Mayevsky, E I

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant effect of succinate and 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation on the kinetics of lipid peroxidation induced by ATP-Fe2+ complex in isolated rat liver mitochondria of old (1.0-1.5 years) and young (3 months) male rats was investigated. The rate of induced lipid peroxidation V(LPO) in rat liver mitochondria and the half-time of oxygen consumption Δt50, which included the lag period and the initiation. phase, was recorded polarographically. Without exogenous oxidative-substrates V(LPO) was slightly higher in mitochondria of old animals, but the onset of lipid peroxidation cascade was significantly earlier than in young animals. Incubation of mitochondria with 5mM succinate for 1 min inhibited V(LPO) by 15% in young animals and by 35% in old animals. However, only in mitochondria of old animals Δt50 increased by 19% as compared to lipid peroxidation without substrates. V(LPO) in mitochondria of young animals did not significantly change during 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation, while in mitochondria of old animals it was reduced by 19% with a slight increase in Δt50. To simulate age-dependent dysfunction we damaged isolated mitochondria by a series of freeze-thaw cycles, which caused a significant increase of V(LPO) of.both age groups. Succinate oxidation inhibited V(LPO) in damaged mitochondria in all cases by 56%, as compared to V(LPO) without oxidative substrates and extended At50 twofold in mitochondria of young animals. Oxidation of 3-hydroxybutyrate had no effect on V(LPO) in damaged mitochondria regardless of animal, age and extended Δt50 by 48% in mitochondria of young animals. Thus, the antioxidant effect of succinate oxidation can prevent lipid peroxidation damage and may exhibit geroprotective action at the level of aging mitochondria. Therefore, the antioxidant effect is due to the process of substrate oxidation in the respiratory chain but not because of an interaction of their structures with membrane lipids per se. PMID:26394470

  3. Age-related changes in renal AQP3 and AQP4 expression in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, X H; Liu, J; Hou, W Y; Gao, Y

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) 3 and AQP4 are important in urine concentrating mechanisms and in other physiological functions such as brain water balance, cell migration, cell proliferation, fat metabolism, and epidermal hydration. The results of studies investigating AQP3 and AQP4 expression in the kidneys are inconsistent, and systematic research is rare. This study aimed to obtain a better understanding of the changes in renal AQP3 and AQP4 mRNA expression that take place with age. The expression of AQP3 and AQP4 mRNA, during prenatal and postnatal development, and during aging, was investigated in kidneys from Sprague-Dawley rats. The pattern of AQP3 expression was similar to that of AQP4 expression during development, and both were detected at gestational day 19 in the rat kidney where they maintained a stable level to postnatal day 14. Subsequently, a significant increase in expression was observed from day 21 to day 35, with peak expression occurring at day 35. No significant change in AQP3 or AQP4 mRNA expression was observed after day 35, apart from AQP4, which increased at day 540. Moreover, the expression of both AQP3 and AQP4 on day 850 was higher than on day -2, and lower than on days 28 and 35. The expression of AQP3 and AQP4 was similar on days 1, 7, 14, and 21. These findings indicate that mRNA expression of AQP3 and AQP4 varies with age, which should be considered when treating kidney disease in pediatric and elderly patients. PMID:27525904

  4. Age-related differences in pulmonary effects of acute and subchronic episodic ozone exposures in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Snow, Samantha J; Gordon, Christopher J; Bass, Virginia L; Schladweiler, Mette C; Ledbetter, Allen D; Jarema, Kimberly A; Phillips, Pamela M; Johnstone, Andrew F; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2016-06-01

    Ozone (O3) is known to induce adverse pulmonary and systemic health effects. Importantly, children and older persons are considered at-risk populations for O3-induced dysfunction, yet the mechanisms accounting for the age-related pulmonary responses to O3 are uncertain. In this study, we examined age-related susceptibility to O3 using 1 mo (adolescent), 4 mo (young adult), 12 mo (adult) and 24 mo (senescent) male Brown Norway rats exposed to filtered air or O3 (0.25 and 1.00 ppm), 6 h/day, two days/week for 1 week (acute) or 13 weeks (subchronic). Ventilatory function, assessed by whole-body plethysmography, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) biomarkers of injury and inflammation were used to examine O3-induced pulmonary effects. Relaxation time declined in all ages following the weekly exposures; however, this effect persisted only in the 24 mo rats following a five days recovery, demonstrating an inability to induce adaptation commonly seen with repeated O3 exposures. PenH was increased in all groups with an augmented response in the 4 mo rats following the subchronic O3 exposures. O3 led to increased breathing frequency and minute volume in the 1 and 4 mo animals. Markers of pulmonary permeability were increased in all age groups. Elevations in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity and lung inflammation following an acute O3 exposure were noted in only the 1 and 4 mo rats, which likely received an increased effective O3 dose. These data demonstrate that adolescent and young adult animals are more susceptible to changes in ventilation and pulmonary injury/inflammation caused by acute and episodic O3 exposure. PMID:27097751

  5. Age-dependent changes in rat lacrimal gland anti-oxidant and vesicular related protein expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Thiago Martins; Tomiyoshi, Lilian Midori; Dias, Ana Carolina; Roma, Letícia Prates; Módulo, Carolina Maria; Malki, Leonardo Tannus; Filho, Elísio Bueno Machado; Deminice, Rafael; Jordão, Alceu Afonso; Cunha, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Anti-oxidation and exocytosis are important for maintaining exocrine tissue homeostasis. During aging, functional and structural alterations occur in the lacrimal gland (LG), including oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA. The aims of the present study were to determine in the aging LG: a) the effects of aging on LG structure and secretory activity and b) changes in the expression of oxidative stress markers. Methods To address these goals, tear secretion composition and corneal impression cytology were compared between male Wistar rats of 2 (control) and 24 (aged) months. LG morphology and the expression levels of vitamin E and malonaldehyde (MDA) were evaluated to determine the anti-oxidant activity and lipid peroxidation, respectively. RT–PCR and western blot analysis were used for the analysis of Ras related in brain GTPase protein (Rab) and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins of the secretory machinery (i.e.; Rab 3d, Rab 27, vesicle-associated membrane protein-2 (Vamp-2), and syntaxin). Results Histological analysis of aged rats revealed a higher frequency of corneal epithelia metaplasia. In the acinar cells, organelles underwent degeneration, and lipofucsin-like material accumulated in the cytoplasm along with declines in the anti-oxidant marker vitamin E. Rab3d and Rab27b mRNA levels fell along with Rab3d protein expression, whereas syntaxin levels increased. Conclusions These findings indicate that exocytotic and anti-oxidant mechanisms become impaired with age in the rat LG. In parallel with these structural alterations, functional declines may contribute to the pathophysiology caused by tear film modification in dry eye disease. PMID:22312187

  6. Age-related behavioral effects of methomyI in Brown Norway rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methomyl is a cholinesterase-inhibiting carbamate pesticide that is used in the field on cotton and a variety of fruits and vegetables. Concerns have been raised generally about age-related differences in susceptibility to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides, especially for chil...

  7. Age-Related Alterations in Blood Biochemical Characterization of Hepatorenal Function in the PCK Rat: A Model of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Yuichi; Brock, William J; Ito, Yuko; Morishita, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    PCK rats develop age-related polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and liver disease and have been used to investigate pharmacotherapies to ameliorate hepatorenal lesions for patients with PKD. The PCK rat may be useful to understand the possible susceptibility to hepatotoxicity observed in the patient with PKD having hepatic polycystic lesions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the background blood biochemical changes that reflect the hepatorenal function of PCK rats as well as the terminal histopathology in order to determine whether this model would be suitable for extrapolating the susceptibility of hepatotoxicity in patients. The blood biochemical parameters of hepatorenal function and histopathology were investigated in PCK rats at ages 5 to 19 weeks and compared to those outcomes in the Sprague Dawley (SD) rat. There were notable blood biochemical changes possibly due to biliary dysgenesis in the PCK rat as early as 5 weeks of age. High levels of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and total bile acids persisted throughout the study compared to the SD rat. Increased aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and hyperlipidemia and a decrease in albumin were also evident at 10 to 19 weeks of age possibly due to progression of cholestatic liver dysfunction secondary to age-related liver cystic progression. Increased liver weights generally correlated with the severity of biliary and hepatic histopathological changes. In male PCK rats, age-related increases in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine at 10 to 19 weeks of age were observed, and the cystic progression was more severe than that in females. These data indicate that the PCK rat showed notable blood biochemical changes reflecting alteration of the liver function compared to the SD rat. Also, there was a large individual variation in these parameters possibly due to variable progression rate of biliary dysgenesis and subsequent liver damages in PCK

  8. Age-related Declines in Thirst and Salt Appetite Responses in Male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thunhorst, Robert L.; Beltz, Terry; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2014-01-01

    The F344xBN strain is the first generational cross between Fischer 344 (F344) and Brown Norway (BN) rats. The F344xBN strain is widely used in aging studies as it is regarded as a model of “healthy” aging (Sprott, 1991). In the present work, male F344xBN rats aged 4 mo (young, n = 6) and 20 mo (old, n = 9) received a series of experimental challenges to body fluid homeostasis to determine their thirst and salt appetite responses. Corresponding urinary responses were measured in some of the studies. Following sodium depletion, old rats ingested less saline solution (0.3 M NaCl) than young rats on a body weight basis, but both ages drank enough saline solution to completely repair the accrued sodium deficits. Following intracellular dehydration, old rats drank less water than young rats, again on a body weight basis, and were less able than young rats to drink amounts of water proportionate to the osmotic challenge. Compared with young rats, old rats drank less of both water and saline solution after combined food and fluid restriction, and also were refractory to the stimulatory effects of low doses of captopril on water drinking and sodium ingestion. Age differences in urinary water and sodium excretion could not account for the age differences in accumulated water and sodium balances. These results extend observations of diminished behavioral responses of aging animals to the F344xBN rat strain and support the idea that impairments in behavior contribute more to the waning ability of aging animals to respond to body fluid challenges than do declines in kidney function. In addition, the results suggest that behavioral defense of sodium homeostasis is less diminished with age in the F344xBN strain compared to other strains so far studied. PMID:24952266

  9. Age-related changes in mRNA levels of hepatic transporters, cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in female rats.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Atsushi; Ito, Ayami; Yamada, Ayano; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    Hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes affect drug pharmacokinetics. Limited information exists on the alteration in mRNA levels of hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes with aging. We examined the effects of aging on the mRNA levels of representative hepatic drug transporters and metabolic enzymes by analyzing their levels in 10-, 30- and 50-week-old male and female rats. Levels of mRNA of drug transporters including multidrug resistance protein (Mdr)1a, multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp)2, breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) and organic anion-transporting polypeptide (Oatp)1a1, and the metabolic enzymes cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A1, CYP3A2 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 were analyzed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The mRNA levels of transporters in male rats did not decrease with age, while the mRNA levels of Bcrp and Oatp1a1 in female rats decreased with age. The mRNA levels of CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 in male rats were higher than those in female rats. The mRNA levels of metabolic enzymes decreased with age in female but not male rats. In particular, the mRNA levels of UGT1A1 in 10-week-old female rats were higher than those in male rats. mRNA expression of hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes are more susceptible to aging in female than male rats. The age-related decreases in the mRNA levels of Bcrp, Oatp1a1, CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 in female rats may affect the metabolism and transport of substrates. This study showed that aging affected the mRNA expression of hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes in rats. PMID:24899460

  10. Influence of Age on the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ion Radiation for Induction of Rat Mammary Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Daino, Kazuhiro; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Doi, Kazutaka; Iizuka, Daisuke; Nishimura, Yukiko; Okutani, Tomomi; Takabatake, Masaru; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The risk of developing secondary cancer after radiotherapy, especially after treatment of childhood cancers, remains a matter of concern. The high biological effects of carbon-ion radiation have enabled powerful radiotherapy, yet the approach is commonly restricted to the treatment of adults. Susceptibility of the fetus to particle radiation–induced cancer is also unclear. The present study is aimed to investigate the effect of carbon-ion irradiation in childhood on breast carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: We irradiated female Sprague-Dawley rats of various ages (embryonic days 3, 13, and 17 and 1, 3, 7, and 15 weeks after birth) with {sup 137}Cs γ rays or a 290-MeV/u monoenergetic carbonion beam (linear energy transfer, 13 keV/μm). All animals were screened weekly for mammary carcinoma by palpation until they were 90 weeks old. Results: Irradiation of fetal and mature (15-week-old) rats with either radiation source at a dose of 0.2 or 1 Gy did not substantially increase the hazard ratio compared with the nonirradiated group. Dose responses (0.2-2.0 Gy) to γ rays were similar among the groups of rats irradiated 1, 3, and 7 weeks after birth. The effect of carbon ions increased along with the age at the time of irradiation, indicating relative biological effectiveness values of 0.2 (−0.3, 0.7), 1.3 (1.0, 1.6), and 2.8 (1.8, 3.9) (mean and 95% confidence interval) for animals that were 1, 3, and 7 weeks of age, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings imply that carbonion therapy may be associated with a risk of secondary breast cancer in humans, the extent of which may depend on the age of the patient at the time of irradiation.

  11. Hyperactivity in the Gunn rat model of neonatal jaundice: age-related attenuation and emergence of gait deficits

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, John A.; Shuler, Jeffrey M.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Stanford, Kimberly G.; Ma, Delin; Bittel, Douglas C.; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Shapiro, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal jaundice resulting from elevated unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) occurs in 60–80% of newborn infants. Although mild jaundice is generally considered harmless, little is known about its long-term consequences. Recent studies have linked mild bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction (BIND) with a range of neurological syndromes, including attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. The goal of this study was to measure BIND across the lifespan in the Gunn rat model of BIND. Methods Using a sensitive force plate actometer, we measured locomotor activity and gait in jaundiced (jj) Gunn rats versus their non-jaundiced (Nj) littermates. Data were analyzed for young adult (3–4 months), early middle-aged (9–10 months), and late middle-aged (17–20 months) male rats. Results jj rats exhibited lower body weights at all ages and a hyperactivity that resolved at 17–20 months of age. Increased propulsive force and gait velocity accompanied hyperactivity during locomotor bouts at 9–10 months in jj rats. Stride length did not differ between the two groups at this age. Hyperactivity normalized and gait deficits, including decreased stride length, propulsive force, and gait velocity, emerged in the 17–20-month-old jj rats. Conclusions These results demonstrate that, in aging, hyperactivity decreases with the onset of gait deficits in the Gunn rat model of BIND. PMID:25518009

  12. Age Related Bioenergetics Profiles in Isolated Rat Cardiomyocytes Using Extracellular Flux Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Mdaki, Kennedy S.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Weaver, Lucinda J.; Baack, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is increasingly recognized and studied as a mediator of heart disease. Extracellular flux analysis (XF) has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate cellular bioenergetics in the context of cardiac health and disease, however its use and interpretation requires improved understanding of the normal metabolic differences in cardiomyocytes (CM) at various stages of maturation. This study standardized XF analyses methods (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test and palmitate oxidation test) and established age related differences in bioenergetics profiles of healthy CMs at newborn (NB1), weaning (3WK), adult (10WK) and aged (12–18MO) time points. Findings show that immature CMs demonstrate a more robust and sustained glycolytic capacity and a relative inability to oxidize fatty acids when compared to older CMs. The study also highlights the need to recognize the contribution of CO2 from the Krebs cycle as well as lactate from anaerobic glycolysis to the proton production rate before interpreting glycolytic capacity in CMs. Overall, this study demonstrates that caution should be taken to assure that translatable developmental time points are used to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction as a cause of cardiac disease. Specifically, XF analysis of newborn CMs should be reserved to study fetal/neonatal disease and older CMs (≥10 weeks) should be used to investigate adult disease pathogenesis. Knowledge gained will aid in improved investigation of developmentally programmed heart disease and stress the importance of discerning maturational differences in bioenergetics when developing mitochondrial targeted preventative and therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease. PMID:26872351

  13. Age Related Bioenergetics Profiles in Isolated Rat Cardiomyocytes Using Extracellular Flux Analyses.

    PubMed

    Mdaki, Kennedy S; Larsen, Tricia D; Weaver, Lucinda J; Baack, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is increasingly recognized and studied as a mediator of heart disease. Extracellular flux analysis (XF) has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate cellular bioenergetics in the context of cardiac health and disease, however its use and interpretation requires improved understanding of the normal metabolic differences in cardiomyocytes (CM) at various stages of maturation. This study standardized XF analyses methods (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test and palmitate oxidation test) and established age related differences in bioenergetics profiles of healthy CMs at newborn (NB1), weaning (3WK), adult (10WK) and aged (12-18MO) time points. Findings show that immature CMs demonstrate a more robust and sustained glycolytic capacity and a relative inability to oxidize fatty acids when compared to older CMs. The study also highlights the need to recognize the contribution of CO2 from the Krebs cycle as well as lactate from anaerobic glycolysis to the proton production rate before interpreting glycolytic capacity in CMs. Overall, this study demonstrates that caution should be taken to assure that translatable developmental time points are used to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction as a cause of cardiac disease. Specifically, XF analysis of newborn CMs should be reserved to study fetal/neonatal disease and older CMs (≥10 weeks) should be used to investigate adult disease pathogenesis. Knowledge gained will aid in improved investigation of developmentally programmed heart disease and stress the importance of discerning maturational differences in bioenergetics when developing mitochondrial targeted preventative and therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease. PMID:26872351

  14. Age-related responses of right ventricle in swim-trained rats: changes in lactate and pyruvate contents and lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Anitha, V; Asha Devi, S

    1996-09-18

    Age related changes in carbohydrate substrates such as, glucose, glycogen, pyruvic acid and lactic acid and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and LDH isoenzyme profile were evaluated in the right ventricle (RV) of swim-trained rats of 6- (adult), 12- (middle-aged) and 18- (old) months-of-age. Moderate hypertrophy was seen in the heart and RV in response to training in all age groups with the 12 months exhibiting a significant increase. While resting levels of pyruvate and glucose in the RV showed small elevations in adult and middle-aged rats, lactic acid showed reductions in all ages. Glycogen supercompensation was seen in the RV of trained animals. These age-related alterations in RV were associated with decreases in blood lactic acid and glucose in the trained rats belonging to all ages. Total protein of the RV decreased with age and exercise increased the content. Total LDH and M4-LDH activities decreased with age. However, training increased their activities in all ages. These changes in the RV suggests that swimming activity produces adaptations (e.g. increased LDH and M4) in all age groups. Considering the degree of adaptations, it can be suggested that adult and middle-aged are suitable for initiating swim-training programs, but not in old age. PMID:8869911

  15. Age-Related Differences in Neuropathic Pain Behavior and Spinal Microglial Activity after L5 Spinal Nerve Ligation in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zeinali, Hossein; Manaheji, Homa; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Bahari, Zahra; Nazemi, Samad; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have reported the involvement of age-related changes in the development of neuropathic pain behaviors. However, limited data are available on the role of age in establishing and maintaining chronic neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury. Methods: In the present study, we examined age-related neuropathic behavior among rats in 4 age groups: pups (4 weeks old; weight, 60–80 g), juvenile rats (6 weeks old; weight, 120–140 g), and mature rats (10–12 weeks old; weight, 200–250 g). Because the exact contribution of spinal microglia and its association with the development of neuropathic pain remains unknown, we also evaluated the expression of spinal Iba1, a microglial marker, by using western blotting before and 5 days after spinal nerve ligation (SNL) as well as after the daily IP administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg). Results: Our results showed that SNL-induced mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia in mature rats but not in pups (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). The expression of spinal Iba1 in the juvenile rats was significantly lower than that in pups and mature rats (P<0.01). Moreover, administration of minocycline decreased the expression of spinal Iba1 in the pup rats more than in juvenile rats (P<0.001) and in the juvenile rats more than in the mature rats (P<0.05). Conclusion: These data suggest that the development of neuropathic behaviors and microglial activation after SNL could be age dependent. PMID:27563413

  16. COMPARISON OF AGE-RELATED CHANGES IN IN VIVO AND IN VITRO MEASURES OF TESTICULAR STEROIDOGENESIS AFTER ACUTE CADMIUM EXPOSURE IN THE SPRAGUE DAWLEY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous reports have demonstrated that cadmium- (Cd-) induced testicular necrosis is an age-dependent process. However, little information exists on age-related intestitial cell (IC) damage in the rat after acute exposure to Cd. In this study in vitro and in vivo measures of tes...

  17. Quantification of Age-Related Tissue-Level Failure Strains of Rat Femoral Cortical Bones Using an Approach Combining Macrocompressive Test and Microfinite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruoxun; Gong, He; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Jiazi; Jia, Zhengbin; Hu, Yanjuan

    2016-04-01

    Bone mechanical properties vary with age; meanwhile, a close relationship exists among bone mechanical properties at different levels. Therefore, conducting multilevel analyses for bone structures with different ages are necessary to elucidate the effects of aging on bone mechanical properties at different levels. In this study, an approach that combined microfinite element (micro-FE) analysis and macrocompressive test was established to simulate the failure of male rat femoral cortical bone. Micro-FE analyses were primarily performed for rat cortical bones with different ages to simulate their failure processes under compressive load. Tissue-level failure strains in tension and compression of these cortical bones were then back-calculated by fitting the experimental stress-strain curves. Thus, tissue-level failure strains of rat femoral cortical bones with different ages were quantified. The tissue-level failure strain exhibited a biphasic behavior with age: in the period of skeletal maturity (1-7 months of age), the failure strain gradually increased; when the rat exceeded 7 months of age, the failure strain sharply decreased. In the period of skeletal maturity, both the macro- and tissue-levels mechanical properties showed a large promotion. In the period of skeletal aging (9-15 months of age), the tissue-level mechanical properties sharply deteriorated; however, the macromechanical properties only slightly deteriorated. The age-related changes in tissue-level failure strain were revealed through the analysis of male rat femoral cortical bones with different ages, which provided a theoretical basis to understand the relationship between rat cortical bone mechanical properties at macro- and tissue-levels and decrease of bone strength with age. PMID:26902102

  18. Frequency and nature of spontaneous age-related eye lesions observed in a 2-year inhalation toxicity study in rats.

    PubMed

    Wegener, A; Kaegler, M; Stinn, W

    2002-01-01

    A group of 160 Wistar rats (both sexes) from a larger chronic inhalation toxicity study was monitored at baseline and after 1 and 2 years with a photo-slitlamp microscope and a direct ophthalmoscope to record spontaneous age-related eye lesions and treatment-related eye lesions over a period of 24 months. A second group from the same study was monitored at the start and after 5 months of a 6-month posttreatment period immediately following the inhalation period. Rats were nose-only exposed for 6 h/day, 7 days/week, for 2 years to low (3 microg/l) or high (10 microg/l) total particulate matter concentrations of room-aged cigarette sidestream smoke (RASS) or diesel engine exhaust (DEE). Control animals were exposed to filtered fresh air. All ophthalmological examinations were performed in mydriasis, and relevant observations were documented on color slide film. At baseline, all animals with eye lesions were excluded from the study. After 1 year, only minor lesions were found: retrolental opacities (14%) and a few cases of corneal dryness with reddish lid margins. After 2 years, 23% of the animals had unilateral or bilateral retrolental opacities, but the most frequent eye lesions were posterior subcapsular cataracts (PSC, 32%). Water clefts and spokes were found in 11% of the lenses and mature cataracts in 6%. All other eye lesions observed were much less frequent. There were a few cases of glaucoma, corneal dryness and stromal neovascularization. The frequency and type of lesion in animals monitored from the start of the posttreatment period was comparable to what was seen after 2 years. Toward the end of this period the frequency of mature cataracts went up to 9% and that of (secondary) glaucomas to 5%. None of the eye lesions observed showed any association in frequency or severity of expression to the treatment, either RASS or DEE, or to the sex of the animals. In comparison to the (limited) literature data available, far fewer corneal lesions were found in this

  19. Rapamycin increases grip strength and attenuates age-related decline in maximal running distance in old low capacity runner rats

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Qian-Li; Yang, Huanle; Li, Hui-Fen; Abadir, Peter M.; Burks, Tyesha N.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Carlson, Joshua; Chen, Laura; Walston, Jeremy D.; Leng, Sean X.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is known to extend lifespan. We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled study of enteric rapamycin-treatment to evaluate its effect on physical function in old low capacity runner (LCR) rats, a rat model selected from diverse genetic background for low intrinsic aerobic exercise capacity without genomic manipulation and characterized by increased complex disease risks and aging phenotypes. The study was performed in 12 male and 16 female LCR rats aged 16-22 months at baseline. The treatment group was fed with rapamycin-containing diet pellets at approximately 2.24mg/kg body weight per day and the placebo group with the same diet without rapamycin for six months. Observation was extended for additional 2 months. Physical function measurements include grip strength measured as maximum tensile force using a rat grip strength meter and maximum running distance (MRD) using rat physical treadmill test. The results showed that rapamycin improved grip strength by 13% (p=.036) and 60% (p<.001) from its baseline in female and male rats, respectively. Rapamycin attenuated MRD decline by 66% (p<.001) and 46% (p=.319) in females and males, respectively. These findings provide initial evidence for beneficial effect of rapamycin on physical functioning in an aging rat model of high disease risks with significant implication in humans. PMID:26997106

  20. Four-vessel occlusion model using aged male Wistar rats: a reliable model to resolve the discrepancy related to age in cerebral ischemia research.

    PubMed

    Ancer-Rodríguez, Jesús; Villarreal-Silva, Eliud Enrique; Salazar-Ybarra, Rodolfo Amador; Quiroga-García, Oscar; Rodríguez-Rocha, Humberto; García-García, Aracely; Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Morales-Gómez, Jesús Alberto; Quiroga-Garza, Alejandro; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Xu, Zao Cheng; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo Enrique; Martínez-Ponce-de-León, Angel Raymundo; Guzmán-López, Santos

    2016-06-01

    Animal models of cerebral ischemia have typically been established and performed using young animals, even though cerebral ischemia (CI) affects primarily elderly patients. This situation represents a discrepancy that complicates the translation of novel therapeutic strategies for CI. Models of transient global CI using aged animals have demonstrated an apparent neuroprotective effect on CA1 hippocampal neurons; however, this effect is not completely understood. Our study used a model in which young (3-6 months) and aged (18-21 months) male Wistar rats were subjected to 15 min of transient global CI using the four-vessel occlusion (4 VO) model. We determined that the 4 VO model can be performed on aged rats with a slight increase in mortality rate. In aged rats, the morphological damage was completely established by the 4th day after reperfusion, displaying no difference from their younger counterparts. These results demonstrated the lack of a neuroprotective effect of aging on CA1 hippocampal neurons in aged male Wistar rats. This study determined and characterized the morphological damage to the CA1 area after 15 min of 4 VO in aged male Wistar rats, validating the use of this model in CI and aging research. PMID:25966656

  1. Comparison of age-related changes in in vivo and in vitro measures of testicular steroidogenesis after acute cadmium exposure in the sprague-dawley rat

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, P.V.; Laskey, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that cadmium- induced testicular necrosis is an age-dependent process. However, little information exists on age-related intestitial cell (IC) damage in the rat after acute exposure to Cd. In-vitro and in-vivo measures of testicular damage were utilized to compare the sensitivity of these measures and to further investigate age-related Cd-induced testicular damage. Testes, epididymides, and seminal-vesicle weights, serum testosterone (sT), hCG-stimulated sT, and basal and stimulated IC testosterone (T) production were compared in rats 21 d following an injection of 2 mg Cd/kg at 9, 37, 67, and 97 d of age. The only Cd-related change noted for immature rats was an 84% reduction in sT. In rats injected when 37 d old, hCG-stimulated sT and epididymides and seminal-vesicle weights, although depressed, were not significantly altered. However, all other measurements were significantly depressed. All measures of testicular damage were significantly depressed in rats injected at 67 and 97 d of age. Overall, in vitro measures were more sensitive indicators of Cd-induced testicular damage than in vivo measures.

  2. AGE-RELATED EFFECTS OF TOLUENE ON THE MOTOR ACTIVITY OF BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Senescence raises many uncertainties regarding susceptibility to environmental exposures. Compromises in reserve and repair mechanisms, and alterations in metabolic capacity, may make the aging population more susceptible to environmental contaminants. Additionally, increased var...

  3. Age- and gender-related differences in the time course of behavioral and biochemical effects produced by oral chlorpyrifos in rats.

    PubMed

    Moser, V C; Padilla, S

    1998-03-01

    It is well known that young animals are generally more sensitive to lethal effects of cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides, but there are sparse data comparing less-than-lethal effects. We compared the behavioral and biochemical toxicity of chlorpyrifos in young (postnatal Day 17; PND17) and adult (about 70 days old) rats. First, we established that the magnitude of the age-related differences decreased as the rat matures. Next, we evaluated the time course of a single oral dose of chlorpyrifos in adult and PND17 male and female rats. Behavioral changes were assessed using a functional observational battery (with age-appropriate modifications for pre-weanling rats) and an evaluation of motor activity. Cholinesterase (ChE) activity was measured in brain and peripheral tissues and muscarinic receptor binding assays were conducted on selected tissues. Rats received either vehicle (corn oil) or chlorpyrifos (adult dose: 80 mg/kg; PND17 dose: 15 mg/kg); these doses were equally effective in inhibiting ChE. The rats were tested, and tissues were then taken at 1, 2, 3.5, 6.5, 24, 72, 168, or 336 h after dosing. In adult rats, peak behavioral changes and ChE inhibition occurred in males at 3.5 h after dosing, while in females the onset of functional changes was sooner, the time course was more protracted and recovery was slower. In PND17 rats, maximal behavioral effects and ChE inhibition occurred at 6.5 h after dosing, and there were no gender-related differences. Behavioral changes showed partial to full recovery at 24 to 72 h, whereas ChE inhibition recovered markedly slower. Blood and brain ChE activity in young rats had nearly recovered by 1 week after dosing, whereas brain ChE in adults had not recovered at 2 weeks. Muscarinic-receptor binding assays revealed apparent down-regulation in some brain areas, mostly at 24 and 72 h. PND17 rats generally showed more receptor down-regulation than adults, whereas only adult female rats showed receptor changes in striatal

  4. AGE-RELATED TOXICITY PATHWAY ANALYSIS IN BROWN NORWAY RAT BRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE TOLUENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental exposures is poorly understood. To investigate-the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we examined the effects of an acute exposure to the volatile organic compound, toluene (0.0 or 1.0 g/kg), i...

  5. Ageing-related tissue-specific alterations in mitochondrial composition and function are modulated by dietary fat type in the rat.

    PubMed

    Quiles, José L; Martínez, Estrella; Ibáñez, Susana; Ochoa, Julio J; Martín, Yolanda; López-Frías, Magdalena; Huertas, Jesús R; Mataix, José

    2002-12-01

    This study investigated the way in which feeding rats with two fat sources (olive or sunflower oils) affected electron-transport components and function of mitotic (liver) and postmitotic (heart and skeletal muscle) tissues during ageing. Rats adapted the mitochondrial-membrane-lipid profile to dietary fat throughout the study, suggesting that the benefits to eat either of the two fats might be maintained lifelong. Liver was more resistant to dietary changes and ageing than heart and skeletal muscle, which showed higher levels of coenzyme Q, cytochrome b, and cytochrome a + a3 with ageing and lower cytochrome c oxidase and complex IV turnover. Dietary fat differentially modulated the response of tissues during ageing, with sunflower oil leading to the highest levels of coenzyme Q and cytochromes b and a + a3. Since high levels of cytochrome b have been related to increased age, it could be hypothesized that olive oil could lead to less aged mitochondria. PMID:12678443

  6. Cognition and Synaptic-Plasticity Related Changes in Aged Rats Supplemented with 8- and 10-Carbon Medium Chain Triglycerides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongmei; Mitchell, Ellen S.

    2016-01-01

    Brain glucose hypometabolism is a common feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that cognition is improved by providing AD patients with an alternate energy source: ketones derived from either ketogenic diet or supplementation with medium chain triglycerides (MCT). Recently, data on the neuroprotective capacity of MCT-derived medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) suggest 8-carbon and 10-carbon MCFA may have cognition-enhancing properties which are not related to ketone production. We investigated the effect of 8 week treatment with MCT8, MCT10 or sunflower oil supplementation (5% by weight of chow diet) in 21 month old Wistar rats. Both MCT diets increased ketones plasma similarly compared to control diet, but MCT diets did not increase ketones in the brain. Treatment with MCT10, but not MCT8, significantly improved novel object recognition memory compared to control diet, while social recognition increased in both MCT groups. MCT8 and MCT10 diets decreased weight compared to control diet, where MCFA plasma levels were higher in MCT10 groups than in MCT8 groups. Both MCT diets increased IRS-1 (612) phosphorylation and decreased S6K phosphorylation (240/244) but only MCT10 increased Akt phosphorylation (473). MCT8 supplementation increased synaptophysin, but not PSD-95, in contrast MCT10 had no effect on either synaptic marker. Expression of Ube3a, which controls synaptic stability, was increased by both MCT diets. Cortex transcription via qPCR showed that immediate early genes related to synaptic plasticity (arc, plk3, junb, egr2, nr4a1) were downregulated by both MCT diets while MCT8 additionally down-regulated fosb and egr1 but upregulated grin1 and gba2. These results demonstrate that treatment of 8- and 10-carbon length MCTs in aged rats have slight differential effects on synaptic stability, protein synthesis and behavior that may be independent of brain ketone levels. PMID:27517611

  7. Cognition and Synaptic-Plasticity Related Changes in Aged Rats Supplemented with 8- and 10-Carbon Medium Chain Triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongmei; Mitchell, Ellen S

    2016-01-01

    Brain glucose hypometabolism is a common feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that cognition is improved by providing AD patients with an alternate energy source: ketones derived from either ketogenic diet or supplementation with medium chain triglycerides (MCT). Recently, data on the neuroprotective capacity of MCT-derived medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) suggest 8-carbon and 10-carbon MCFA may have cognition-enhancing properties which are not related to ketone production. We investigated the effect of 8 week treatment with MCT8, MCT10 or sunflower oil supplementation (5% by weight of chow diet) in 21 month old Wistar rats. Both MCT diets increased ketones plasma similarly compared to control diet, but MCT diets did not increase ketones in the brain. Treatment with MCT10, but not MCT8, significantly improved novel object recognition memory compared to control diet, while social recognition increased in both MCT groups. MCT8 and MCT10 diets decreased weight compared to control diet, where MCFA plasma levels were higher in MCT10 groups than in MCT8 groups. Both MCT diets increased IRS-1 (612) phosphorylation and decreased S6K phosphorylation (240/244) but only MCT10 increased Akt phosphorylation (473). MCT8 supplementation increased synaptophysin, but not PSD-95, in contrast MCT10 had no effect on either synaptic marker. Expression of Ube3a, which controls synaptic stability, was increased by both MCT diets. Cortex transcription via qPCR showed that immediate early genes related to synaptic plasticity (arc, plk3, junb, egr2, nr4a1) were downregulated by both MCT diets while MCT8 additionally down-regulated fosb and egr1 but upregulated grin1 and gba2. These results demonstrate that treatment of 8- and 10-carbon length MCTs in aged rats have slight differential effects on synaptic stability, protein synthesis and behavior that may be independent of brain ketone levels. PMID:27517611

  8. n-3 fatty acids effectively improve the reference memory-related learning ability associated with increased brain docosahexaenoic acid-derived docosanoids in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio; Katakura, Masanori; Tanabe, Yoko; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Inoue, Takayuki; Hossain, Shahdat; Arita, Makoto; Shido, Osamu

    2015-02-01

    We investigated whether a highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and a concentrated n-3 fatty acid formulation (prescription TAK-085) containing EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ethyl ester could improve the learning ability of aged rats and whether this specific outcome had any relation with the brain levels of EPA-derived eicosanoids and DHA-derived docosanoids. The rats were tested for reference memory errors (RMEs) and working memory errors (WMEs) in an eight-arm radial maze. Fatty acid compositions were analyzed by GC, whereas brain eicosanoid/docosanoids were measured by LC-ESI-MS-MS-based analysis. The levels of lipid peroxides (LPOs) were measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The administration of TAK-085 at 300 mg·kg⁻¹day⁻¹ for 17 weeks reduced the number of RMEs in aged rats compared with that in the control rats. Both TAK-085 and EPA administration increased plasma EPA and DHA levels in aged rats, with concurrent increases in DHA and decreases in arachidonic acid in the corticohippocampal brain tissues. TAK-085 administration significantly increased the formation of EPA-derived 5-HETE and DHA-derived 7-, 10-, and 17-HDoHE, PD1, RvD1, and RvD2. ARA-derived PGE2, PGD2, and PGF2α significantly decreased in TAK-085-treated rats. DHA-derived mediators demonstrated a significantly negative correlation with the number of RMEs, whereas EPA-derived mediators did not exhibit any relationship. Furthermore, compared with the control rats, the levels of LPO in the plasma, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus were significantly reduced in TAK-085-treated rats. The findings of the present study suggest that long-term EPA+DHA administration may be a possible preventative strategy against age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25450447

  9. EPA/DHA and Vitamin A Supplementation Improves Spatial Memory and Alleviates the Age-related Decrease in Hippocampal RXRγ and Kinase Expression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Létondor, Anne; Buaud, Benjamin; Vaysse, Carole; Richard, Emmanuel; Layé, Sophie; Pallet, Véronique; Alfos, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and vitamin A are critical to delay aged-related cognitive decline. These nutrients regulate gene expression in the brain by binding to nuclear receptors such as the retinoid X receptors (RXRs) and the retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Moreover, EPA/DHA and retinoids activate notably kinase signaling pathways such as AKT or MAPK, which includes ERK1/2. This suggests that these nutrients may modulate brain function in a similar way. Therefore, we investigated in middle-aged rats the behavioral and molecular effects of supplementations with EPA/DHA and vitamin A alone or combined. 18-month-old rats exhibited reference and working memory deficits in the Morris water maze, associated with a decrease in serum vitamin A and hippocampal EPA/DHA contents. RARα, RXRβ, and RXRγ mRNA expression and CAMKII, AKT, ERK1/2 expression were decreased in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats. A combined EPA/DHA and vitamin A supplementation had a beneficial additive effect on reference memory but not in working memory in middle-aged rats, associated with an alleviation of the age-related decrease in RXRγ, CAMKII, AKT, and ERK1 expression in the hippocampus. This study provides a new combined nutritional strategy to delay brain aging. PMID:27242514

  10. EPA/DHA and Vitamin A Supplementation Improves Spatial Memory and Alleviates the Age-related Decrease in Hippocampal RXRγ and Kinase Expression in Rats.

    PubMed

    Létondor, Anne; Buaud, Benjamin; Vaysse, Carole; Richard, Emmanuel; Layé, Sophie; Pallet, Véronique; Alfos, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and vitamin A are critical to delay aged-related cognitive decline. These nutrients regulate gene expression in the brain by binding to nuclear receptors such as the retinoid X receptors (RXRs) and the retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Moreover, EPA/DHA and retinoids activate notably kinase signaling pathways such as AKT or MAPK, which includes ERK1/2. This suggests that these nutrients may modulate brain function in a similar way. Therefore, we investigated in middle-aged rats the behavioral and molecular effects of supplementations with EPA/DHA and vitamin A alone or combined. 18-month-old rats exhibited reference and working memory deficits in the Morris water maze, associated with a decrease in serum vitamin A and hippocampal EPA/DHA contents. RARα, RXRβ, and RXRγ mRNA expression and CAMKII, AKT, ERK1/2 expression were decreased in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats. A combined EPA/DHA and vitamin A supplementation had a beneficial additive effect on reference memory but not in working memory in middle-aged rats, associated with an alleviation of the age-related decrease in RXRγ, CAMKII, AKT, and ERK1 expression in the hippocampus. This study provides a new combined nutritional strategy to delay brain aging. PMID:27242514

  11. Comparison of age-related changes in in vivo and in vitro measures of testicular steroidogenesis after acute cadmium exposure in the sprague-dawley rat

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, P.V.; Laskey, J.W. )

    1989-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that cadmium- (Cd-) induced testicular necrosis is an age-dependent process. However, little information exists on age-related intestitial cell (IC) damage in the rat after acute exposure to Cd. In this study in vitro and in vivo measures of testicular damage were utilized to compare the sensitivity of these measures and to further investigate age-related Cd-induced testicular damage. Testes, epididymides, and seminal vesicle weights, serum testosterone (sT), hCG-stimulated sT, and basal and stimulated IC testosterone (T) production were production were compared in rats 21 d following an injection of 2 mg Cd/kg at 9, 37, 67, and 97 d of age. The only Cd-related change noted for immature rats was an 84% reduction in sT. In rats injected when 37 d old, hCG-stimulated sT and epididymides and seminal vesicle weights, although depressed, were not significantly altered. However, all other measurements were significantly depressed. All measures of testicular damage were significantly depressed in rats injected at 67 and 97 d of age. Overall, in vitro measures were more sensitive indicators of Cd-induced testicular damage than in vivo measures. However, sT and hCG-stimulated sT appeared to be useful indicators of Cd effects on the pituitary-gonadal axis. ICs from immature rats (9 d old) were unaffected by Cd exposure, while stimulated T reproduction in ICs from 37-, 67-, and 97-d-old animals was reduced at least 50%. The severity of Cd-induced testicular damage increases with age for all variables measured.

  12. Age-related decline in multiple unit action potentials of CA3 region of rat hippocampus: correlation with lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentration and the effect of centrophenoxine.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D; Maurya, A K; Singh, R

    1993-01-01

    Changes in lipid peroxidation, lipofuscin concentration, and multiple unit activity (MUA recorded in conscious animals) in the CA3 region were studied in the hippocampus of male Wistar rats aged 4, 8, 16, and 24 months. The lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentration were increased with age. The MUA, however, declined with age. Correlational analyses were performed for the four age groups to determine the relationship between the age-associated decline in MUA with the age-related alterations in lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentrations. The age-related increase in lipid peroxidation correlated positively with the age-associated increase in lipofuscin concentration. The age-related increases in lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentration correlated negatively with the changes in MUA. Since lipid peroxidation may affect neuronal electrophysiology, our data suggested that age-related increase in lipid peroxidation may contribute to an age-associated decline in neuronal electrical activity. Centrophenoxine effects were studied on the three above-mentioned age-associated changes in the hippocampus. The drug had no effect on all three parameters in 4- and 8-month-old rats. In 16- and 24-month-old rats, however, the drug significantly increased the MUA but concomitantly decreased lipofuscin concentration and lipid peroxidation. Correlational analyses of the data on MUA, lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentration from the centrophenoxine-treated animals showed that the drug-induced diminution in both lipofuscin and lipid peroxidation was significantly correlated with the drug-induced increase in MUA. The differential effect of the drug in younger (4-8 months) and older (16-24 months) animals indicated that the stimulation of MUA was clearly associated with concomitant decrease in lipid peroxidation and lipofuscin concentration. PMID:8367013

  13. Age-related changes in the renal dopaminergic system and expression of renal amino acid transporters in WKY and SHR rats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Vanda; Amaral, João; Silva, Elisabete; Simão, Sónia; Cabral, José Miguel; Afonso, Joana; Serrão, Maria Paula; Gomes, Pedro; Pinho, Maria João; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2011-01-01

    This study examined age-related changes in renal dopaminergic activity and expression of amino acid transporters potentially involved in renal tubular uptake of l-DOPA in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats. Aging (from 13 to 91 weeks) was accompanied by increases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) in both WKY and SHR. The sum of urinary dopamine and DOPAC and the urinary dopamine/l-DOPA ratio were increased in aged SHR but not in aged WKY. The urinary dopamine/renal delivery of l-DOPA ratio was increased in both rat strains with aging. LAT2 abundance was increased in aged WKY and SHR. The expression of 4F2hc was markedly elevated in aged SHR but not in aged WKY. ASCT2 was upregulated in both aged WKY and SHR. Plasma aldosterone levels and urinary noradrenaline levels were increased in aged WKY and SHR though levels of both entities were more elevated in aged SHR. Activation of the renal dopaminergic system is more pronounced in aged SHR than in aged WKY and is associated with an upregulation of renal cortical ASCT2 in WKY and of LAT2/4F2hc and ASCT2 in SHR. This activation may be the consequence of a counter-regulatory mechanism for stimuli leading to sodium reabsorption. PMID:21699911

  14. USE OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS ON A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR CHLOROFORM IN RATS TO DETERMINE AGE-RELATED TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    USE OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS ON A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR CHLOROFORM IN RATS TO DETERMINE AGE-RELATED TOXICITY.
    CR Eklund, MV Evans, and JE Simmons. US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD,PKB, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Chloroform (CHCl3) is a disinfec...

  15. Age-related changes in p56lck protein levels and phenotypic distribution of T lymphocytes in young rats.

    PubMed

    Hosea, Heather J; Rector, Edward S; Taylor, Carla G

    2005-03-01

    p56lck is involved in the maturation of T-cells from double negative (DN) into double positive (DP) T-cells. The objective of this experiment was to determine changes in the levels of thymic and splenic T-cell p56lck using Western immunoblotting, along with the proportion and number ofT-cell subsets in thymus, spleen and blood using flow cytometry in growing Sprague-Dawley rats. Thymic p56lck levels were negatively correlated with age (r = - 0.42, p = 0.04) and positively correlated with age in the spleen (r = 0.50, p = 0.01). Nine-week-old rats had a higher percentage of thymic DN and CD8 cells with fewer DP cells compared to younger rats. There were minor differences in the proportions of T-cell subsets in the spleen and blood. T-cell numbers remained proportional to body weight in the lymphoid organs; however, the lower absolute number of T-cells in the younger rats might indicate that they are less able to respond to antigens. PMID:15712602

  16. Mannosylated liposomal cytidine 5' diphosphocholine prevent age related global moderate cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced mitochondrial cytochrome c release in aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Das, N; Mandal, A K; Dungdung, S R; Sarkar, S

    2010-12-29

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions generating from cerebral ischemia-reperfusion exert a potential threat on neuronal cell survival and hence, accelerate the aging process and age dependent neuropathology. Thirty min moderate cerebral ischemia induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) followed by 30 min reperfusion caused an increased diene production, depleted glutathione (GSH) content, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities and pyramidal neuronal loss in young (2 months old) and aged (20 months old) rat brain compared to sham operated controls. Cytidine 5' diphosphocholine (CDP-Choline) is a known neuroprotective drug. CDP-Choline after metabolism in the liver suffers hydrolysis and splits into cytidine and choline before entering systemic circulation and hardly circumvents blood brain barrier (BBB) as such. Previous reports show CDP-Choline liposomes significantly increased in vivo uptake compared to "free drug" administration in cerebral ischemia. To enhance the therapeutic concentration build up in brain we sought to formulate mannosylated liposomal CDP-Choline (MLCDP) utilizing the mannose receptors. We tested the therapeutic supremacy of MLCDP over liposomal CDP-Choline (LCDP) in global moderate cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced neuronal damage. CDP-Choline in MLCDP delivery system was found potent to exert substantial protection against global moderate cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced mitochondrial damage in aged rat brain. Membrane lipid peroxidation, GSSG/GSH ratio and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in cerebral tissue were found to be higher in aged, compared to young rat. Further decline of those parameters was observed in aged rat brain by the induction of global moderate cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. MLCDP treatment when compared to free or LCDP treatment prevented global moderate cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induced mitochondrial damage as evident ultra structurally and release of cytochrome c

  17. Aging and Intergenerational Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Gary R.

    1987-01-01

    Considers the rapid aging of the American population and the changing age structure of society. Discusses the needs of older adults, the role of the family in providing support to older members, and issues of intergenerational relations. (NB)

  18. S-allyl cysteine ameliorates the quality of sperm and provides protection from age-related sperm dysfunction and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Shigekazu; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Minamiyama, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species play a central role in the pathophysiology of the age-related decrease in male fertility. It has been reported that the total protein of DJ-1 was decreased in a proteomic analysis of seminal plasma from asthenozoospermia patients and a DJ-1 protein acts as a sensor of cellular redox homeostasis. Therefore, we evaluated the age-related changes in the ratio of the oxidized/reduced forms of the DJ-1 protein in the epididymis. In addition, the protective effects of S-allyl cysteine (SAC), a potent antioxidant, were evaluated against sperm dysfunction. Male rats aged 15-75 weeks were used to assess age-associated sperm function and oxidative stress. Sperm count increased until 25 weeks, but then decreased at 50 and 75 weeks. The rate of sperm movement at 75 weeks was decreased to approximately 60% of the rate observed at 25 weeks. Expression of DJ-1 decreased, but oxidized-DJ-1 increased with age. In addition, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal modified proteins in the epididymis increased until 50 weeks of age. The total number and DNA synthetic potential of the sperm increased until 25 weeks, and then decreased. In rats 75 weeks of age, SAC (0.45% diet) attenuated the decrease in the number, motility, and DNA synthesis of sperm and inhibited the oxidized proteins. These results suggest that SAC ameliorates the quality of sperm subjected to age-associated oxidative stress. PMID:25411519

  19. Effects of intermittent fasting on age-related changes on Na,K-ATPase activity and oxidative status induced by lipopolysaccharide in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andrea Rodrigues; Kinoshita, Paula Fernanda; Yshii, Lidia Mitiko; Marques Orellana, Ana Maria; Böhmer, Ana Elisa; de Sá Lima, Larissa; Alves, Rosana; Andreotti, Diana Zukas; Marcourakis, Tania; Scavone, Cristoforo; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko

    2015-05-01

    Chronic neuroinflammation is a common characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling is linked to glutamate-nitric oxide-Na,K-ATPase isoforms pathway in central nervous system (CNS) and also causes neuroinflammation. Intermittent fasting (IF) induces adaptive responses in the brain that can suppress inflammation, but the age-related effect of IF on LPS modulatory influence on nitric oxide-Na,K-ATPase isoforms is unknown. This work compared the effects of LPS on the activity of α1,α2,3 Na,K-ATPase, nitric oxide synthase gene expression and/or activity, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins, and levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in CNS of young and older rats submitted to the IF protocol for 30 days. LPS induced an age-related effect in neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, and levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in rat hippocampus that was linked to changes in α2,3-Na,K-ATPase activity, 3-nitrotyrosine proteins, and inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression. IF induced adaptative cellular stress-response signaling pathways reverting LPS effects in rat hippocampus of young and older rats. The results suggest that IF in both ages would reduce the risk for deficits on brain function and neurodegenerative disorders linked to inflammatory response in the CNS. PMID:25818175

  20. Age-related protective effect of deprenyl on changes in the levels of diagnostic marker enzymes and antioxidant defense enzymes activities in cerebellar tissue in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    James, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    Antioxidants are free radical scavengers and protect living organisms against oxidative damage to tissues. Experimental evidence implicates oxygen-derived free radicals as important causative agents of aging and the present study was designed to evaluate the age-related effects of deprenyl on the antioxidant defense in the cerebellum of male Wistar rats. Experimental rats of three age groups (6, 12, and 18 months old) were administered with liquid deprenyl (2 mg/kg body weight/day for a period of 15 days i.p) and levels of diagnostic marker enzymes (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine phosphokinase) in plasma, lipid peroxides, reduced glutathione and activities of glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase) and antiperoxidative enzymes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) in the cerebellar tissue were determined. Intraperitonial administration of deprenyl (2 mg/kg body weight/day for a period of 15 days) significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated the age-related alterations noted in the levels of diagnostic marker enzymes plasma of experimental animals. Deprenyl also exerted an antioxidant effect against aging process by hindering lipid peroxidation to an extent. Moderate rise in the levels of reduced glutathione and activities of glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzymes and antiperoxidative enzymes was also observed. The results of the present investigation indicated that the protective potential of deprenyl was probably due to the increase of the activity of the free radical scavenging enzymes or to a counteraction of free radicals by its antioxidant nature or to a strengthening of neuronal membrane by its membrane-stabilizing action. Histopathological observations also confirmed the protective effect of deprenyl against the age-related aberrations in rat cerebellum. These data on the effect of deprenyl on parameters of normal aging provides new additional

  1. Aqueous Extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill Prevents Age-Related Changes in the Myenteric Plexus of the Jejunum in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Santi-Rampazzo, Ana Paula; Schoffen, João Paulo Ferreira; Cirilo, Carla Possani; Zapater, Mariana Cristina Vicente Umada; Vicentini, Fernando Augusto; Soares, Andréia Assunção; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Buttow, Nilza Cristina; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the supplementation with aqueous extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM) on biometric and blood parameters and quantitative morphology of the myenteric plexus and jejunal wall in aging Wistar rats. The animals were euthanized at 7 (C7), 12 (C12 and CA12), and 23 months of age (C23 and CA23). The CA12 and CA23 groups received a daily dose of ABM extract (26 mg/animal) via gavage, beginning at 7 months of age. A reduction in food intake was observed with aging, with increases in the Lee index, retroperitoneal fat, intestinal length, and levels of total cholesterol and total proteins. Aging led to a reduction of the total wall thickness, mucosa tunic, villus height, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells. In the myenteric plexus, aging quantitatively decreased the population of HuC/D+ neuronal and S100+ glial cells, with maintenance of the nNOS+ nitrergic subpopulation and increase in the cell body area of these populations. Supplementation with the ABM extract preserved the myenteric plexus in old animals, in which no differences were detected in the density and cell body profile of neurons and glial cells in the CA12 and CA23 groups, compared with C7 group. The supplementation with the aqueous extract of ABM efficiently maintained myenteric plexus homeostasis, which positively influenced the physiology and prevented the death of the neurons and glial cells. PMID:25960748

  2. NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to age-related impairments of endothelium-dependent dilation in rat soleus feed arteries

    PubMed Central

    Trott, Daniel W.; Seawright, John W.; Luttrell, Meredith J.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that age-related endothelial dysfunction in rat soleus muscle feed arteries (SFA) is mediated in part by NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). SFA from young (4 mo) and old (24 mo) Fischer 344 rats were isolated and cannulated for examination of vasodilator responses to flow and acetylcholine (ACh) in the absence or presence of a superoxide anion (O2−) scavenger (Tempol; 100 μM) or an NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor (apocynin; 100 μM). In the absence of inhibitors, flow- and ACh-induced dilations were attenuated in SFA from old rats compared with young rats. Tempol and apocynin improved flow- and ACh-induced dilation in SFA from old rats. In SFA from young rats, Tempol and apocynin had no effect on flow-induced dilation, and apocynin attenuated ACh-induced dilation. To determine the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), dilator responses were assessed in the absence and presence of catalase (100 U/ml) or PEG-catalase (200 U/ml). Neither H2O2 scavenger altered flow-induced dilation, whereas both H2O2 scavengers blunted ACh-induced dilation in SFA from young rats. In old SFA, catalase improved flow-induced dilation whereas PEG-catalase improved ACh-induced dilation. Compared with young SFA, in response to exogenous H2O2 and NADPH, old rats exhibited blunted dilation and constriction, respectively. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the NAD(P)H oxidase subunit gp91phox protein content was greater in old SFA compared with young. These results suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to impaired endothelium-dependent dilation in old SFA. PMID:21233343

  3. NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to age-related impairments of endothelium-dependent dilation in rat soleus feed arteries.

    PubMed

    Trott, Daniel W; Seawright, John W; Luttrell, Meredith J; Woodman, Christopher R

    2011-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that age-related endothelial dysfunction in rat soleus muscle feed arteries (SFA) is mediated in part by NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). SFA from young (4 mo) and old (24 mo) Fischer 344 rats were isolated and cannulated for examination of vasodilator responses to flow and acetylcholine (ACh) in the absence or presence of a superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) scavenger (Tempol; 100 μM) or an NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor (apocynin; 100 μM). In the absence of inhibitors, flow- and ACh-induced dilations were attenuated in SFA from old rats compared with young rats. Tempol and apocynin improved flow- and ACh-induced dilation in SFA from old rats. In SFA from young rats, Tempol and apocynin had no effect on flow-induced dilation, and apocynin attenuated ACh-induced dilation. To determine the role of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), dilator responses were assessed in the absence and presence of catalase (100 U/ml) or PEG-catalase (200 U/ml). Neither H(2)O(2) scavenger altered flow-induced dilation, whereas both H(2)O(2) scavengers blunted ACh-induced dilation in SFA from young rats. In old SFA, catalase improved flow-induced dilation whereas PEG-catalase improved ACh-induced dilation. Compared with young SFA, in response to exogenous H(2)O(2) and NADPH, old rats exhibited blunted dilation and constriction, respectively. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the NAD(P)H oxidase subunit gp91phox protein content was greater in old SFA compared with young. These results suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to impaired endothelium-dependent dilation in old SFA. PMID:21233343

  4. Age-related decrease in the responsiveness of rat articular chondrocytes to EGF is associated with diminished number and affinity for the ligand of cell surface binding sites.

    PubMed

    Ribault, D; Habib, M; Abdel-Majid, K; Barbara, A; Mitrovic, D

    1998-01-12

    The effect of age on the responsiveness of articular chondrocytes (AC) to epidermal growth factor (EGF) was examined. Cells were isolated by digesting cartilage fragments from the humeral and femoral heads of 21-day old, 8- and 14-month old rats with collagenase. The cells were cultured under standard conditions, as monolayers. DNA synthesis was measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation and cell proliferation by the DNA content of subconfluent cultures. [125I]EGF binding and the amounts of EGF and EGF-receptor mRNAs were determined using confluent cells. DNA synthesis was decreased with age of animals. EGF stimulated DNA synthesis in cultures in 1- and 8-month old rats at low serum concentrations (< 5%), and in cultures in 14-month old animals at high serum concentrations. It also increased 5-day DNA content of cultures compared to serum-treated controls but this effect was weak in cultures in 14-month old rats. The number of high affinity binding sites for [125I]EGF decreased from 37,800 in the 1-month old to 1950 in the 14-month old rat AC. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) also decreased with age: 0.18 nmol/l in the 1-month old; 0.12 nmol/l in the 8-month old; and 0.07 nmol/l in the 14-month old cells. AC in older rats contained more EGF mRNA and less EGF-receptor mRNA. Incubation of the cells with EGF resulted in down regulation of the EGF- and upregulation of EGF-receptor mRNA expressions. These findings show the age-related quantitative and qualitative alterations in EGF and EGF-receptor which may account, at least in part, for the diminished responsiveness of senescent AC to EGF. PMID:9509392

  5. Curcumin counteracts the aluminium-induced ageing-related alterations in oxidative stress, Na+, K+ ATPase and protein kinase C in adult and old rat brain regions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Sethi, Pallavi; Hussain, Ezaj; Singh, Rameshwar

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of curcumin on aluminium-induced alterations in ageing-related parameters: lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), protein kinase C (PKC), Na(+), K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the brain of 10- and 24-month-old rats. Measurements taken from aluminium-fed rats were compared with those from rats in which curcumin and aluminium were co-administered. In aluminium-treated rats the levels of lipid peroxidation, PKC and AChE were enhanced while the activities of SOD, GPx, GST and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase were significantly decreased in both the brain regions of both age-groups. In animals co-administered with curcumin and aluminium, the levels of lipid peroxidation, activities of PKC and AChE were significantly lowered while the activities of SOD, GPx, GST and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase were significantly enhanced in the two brain regions studied indicating curcumin's protective effects against aluminium toxicity. Though the magnitudes of curcumin-induced alterations varied in young and old animals, the results of the present study also demonstrated that curcumin exerts a protective effect against aluminium-induced elevation of ageing-related changes by modulating the extent of oxidative stress (by upregulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes) and by regulating the activities of Na(+), K(+) ATPase, PKC and AChE. Therefore, it is suggested that curcumin counters aluminium-induced enhancement in ageing-related processes. PMID:19020987

  6. Age-related changes in thirst, salt appetite, and arterial blood pressure in response to aldosterone-dexamethasone combination in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Baojian; Beltz, Terry G.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2015-01-01

    This work examined the effects of age on daily water and sodium ingestion and cardiovascular responses to chronic administration of the mineralocorticoid, aldosterone (ALDO) either alone or together with the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (DEX). Young (4 mo), adult (12 mo), and aged (30 mo) male Brown Norway rats were prepared for continuous telemetry recording of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Baseline water and sodium (i.e., 0.3 M NaCl) intake, BP, and HR were established for 10 days. Then ALDO (60 μg/day sc) was infused alone, or together with DEX (2.5 or 20 μg/day sc), for another 10 days. Compared with baseline levels, ALDO stimulated comparable increases in daily saline intake at all ages. ALDO together with the higher dose of DEX (i.e., ALDO/DEX20) increased daily saline intake more than did ALDO, but less so in aged rats. Infusion of ALDO/DEX20 increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), and decreased HR, more than did infusion of ALDO. The changes in MAP in response to both treatments depended on age. For all ages, MAP and saline intake increased simultaneously during ALDO, while MAP always increased before saline intake did during ALDO/DEX20. Contrary to our predictions, MAP did not increase more in old rats in response to either treatment. We speculate that age-related declines in cardiovascular responses to glucocorticoids contributed to the attenuated increases in sodium intake in response to glucocorticoids that were observed in older animals. PMID:25833938

  7. The effect of ladder-climbing exercise on atrophy/hypertrophy-related myokine expression in middle-aged male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Jung, Suryun; Ahn, Nayoung; Kim, Sanghyun; Byun, Jayoung; Joo, Youngsik; Kim, Sungwook; Jung, Yeunho; Park, Solee; Hwang, Ilseon; Kim, Kijin

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the change in myokine expression related to hypertrophy (IL-4, IL-6, IL-10) and atrophy (TNF-α, NFκB, IL-1β) in middle-aged rats after resistance exercise with ladder climbing. 50- and 10-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: the sedentary and exercise groups. The exercise groups underwent a ladder-climbing exercise for 8 weeks. While the tibialis anterior muscle mass in the young group significantly increased after the ladder-climbing exercise, the middle-aged group did not show any changes after undergoing the same exercise. To understand the molecular mechanism causing this difference, we analyzed the change in hypertrophy- and atrophy-related myokine levels from the tibialis anterior muscle. After 8 weeks of ladder-climbing exercise, the IL-4 and IL-10 protein levels did not change. However, the IL-6 level significantly increased after exercise training, but the amount of increase in the young training group was higher than in the middle-aged training group. IL-1β and TNF-α as well as NFκB protein levels were significantly higher in the middle-aged group than in the young group. Except for TNF-α, exercise training did not affect IL-1β and NFκB protein levels. The TNF-α level significantly decreased in the middle-aged exercise training group. AMPK and PGC-1α levels also significantly increased after exercise training, but there was no difference between age-related groups. Therefore, 8-week high-intensity exercise training using ladder climbing downregulates the skeletal muscle production of myokine involved in atrophy and upregulates hypertrophic myokine. However, the extent of these responses was lower in the middle-aged than young group. PMID:26223833

  8. Age-related differences in pulmonary effects of acute and subchronic episodic ozone exposures in Brown Norway rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (O3) is known to induce adverse pulmonary and systemic health effects. Importantly, children and older persons are considered at-risk populations for O3-induced dysfunction, yet the mechanisms accounting for the age-related pulmonary responses to O3 are uncertain. In this s...

  9. Age-related qualitative shift in emotional behaviour: paradoxical findings after re-exposure of rats in the elevated-plus maze.

    PubMed

    Bessa, J M; Oliveira, M; Cerqueira, J J; Almeida, O F X; Sousa, N

    2005-07-01

    Several variables, including age, are known to influence anxiety. Previous exposure to the elevated-plus maze (EPM) is known to modify emotional behaviour as retesting in the EPM at a standard age of 3 months increases open-arm avoidance and attenuates the effects of anxiolytic drugs. This study analysed whether similar results are obtained when older animals are subjected to these experimental paradigms. Overall, increasing age was associated with more signs of anxiety. Additionally, we observed a paradoxical behaviour pattern in aged-subjects that were re-exposed to the EPM, with mid-aged and old rats failing to display open arm avoidance (OAA) in the second trial; this qualitative shift in emotional behaviour was not associated with decreased locomotion. An examination of how age influences responsiveness to anxiolytic drugs, with or without previous maze experience, was also conducted. Midazolam (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) proved anxiolytic in maize-naive young animals; in marked contrast, in older animals midazolam at 1 mg/kg resulted in sedation but not anxiolyis. One trial tolerance to midazolam was evident in animals of both ages that were subjected to a second EPM trial; the latter phenomenon was apparently accentuated in older animals as they do not show open arm avoidance upon re-exposure to the EPM. These data suggest that the age-associated 'resistance' to anxiolytic drugs might be related to a qualitative shift in emotional behaviour. PMID:15922074

  10. Effect of irradiation on neovascularization in rat skinfold chambers: Implications for clinical trials of low-dose radiotherapy for wet-type age-related macular degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Katsuyoshi . E-mail: k-hori@idac.tohoku.ac.jp; Saito, Sachiko; Tamai, Makoto

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Wet-type age-related macular degeneration is a refractory eye disease that involves choroidal neovascularization. Randomized controlled trials of low-dose radiotherapy for this disease performed in Japan showed that, at 12 months of follow-up, visual acuity was significantly well preserved and the neovascular membrane size decreased. Because understanding the effect of irradiation on new vascular networks is an important prerequisite for clinical trials, we used a rat skinfold chamber technique to investigate X-ray-induced changes in neovasculature microcirculation. Methods and materials: Neovascularization was induced in rat skinfold chambers via polyvinyl chloride resin plates. Neovessels were irradiated in a single 10-Gy dose, after which, changes in vascular density, blood velocity, tissue blood flow, and interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), were measured. Results: Vascular density, tissue blood flow, and IFP measurements in resin-induced inflammatory tissue were much higher than those measurements in normal tissue. Although overall blood velocity was low and sluggish or blood-flow stasis occurred in the neovascular network, after a single 10-Gy dose of radiation, the velocity increased, stasis improved markedly, and many dilated vessels narrowed. Thereafter, vascular density, blood flow, and IFP significantly decreased and approached normal values. Conclusion: These findings may help explain clinical results related to radiotherapy-induced changes in neovascular membranes in age-related macular degeneration. Both vascular morphology and vascular function in inflammatory tissue returned to normal, without vessel destruction, after an appropriate radiation dose.

  11. Quantitative assessment of myocardial fibrosis in an age-related rat model by ex vivo late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging with histopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Beliveau, Pascale; Cheriet, Farida; Anderson, Stasia A; Taylor, Joni L; Arai, Andrew E; Hsu, Li-Yueh

    2015-10-01

    Late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging can detect the presence of myocardial infarction from ischemic cardiomyopathies (ICM). However, it is more challenging to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis from non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) with this technique due to more subtle and heterogeneous enhancement of the myocardium. This study investigates whether high-resolution LGE CMR can detect age-related myocardial fibrosis using quantitative texture analysis with histological validation. LGE CMR of twenty-four rat hearts (twelve 6-week-old and twelve 2-year-old) was performed using a 7T MRI scanner. Picrosirius red was used as the histopathology reference for collagen staining. Fibrosis in the myocardium was quantified with standard deviation (SD) threshold methods from the LGE CMR images and 3D contrast texture maps that were computed from gray level co-occurrence matrix of the CMR images. There was a significant increase of collagen fibers in the aged compared to the young rat histology slices (2.60±0.27 %LV vs. 1.24±0.29 %LV, p<0.01). Both LGE CMR and texture images showed a significant increase of myocardial fibrosis in the elderly compared to the young rats. Fibrosis in the LGE CMR images correlated strongly with histology with the 3 SD threshold (r=0.84, y=0.99x+0.00). Similarly, fibrosis in the contrast texture maps correlated with the histology using the 4 SD threshold (r=0.89, y=1.01x+0.00). High resolution ex-vivo LGE CMR can detect the presence of diffuse fibrosis that naturally developed in elderly rat hearts. Our results suggest that texture analysis may improve the assessment of myocardial fibrosis in LGE CMR images. PMID:26313531

  12. Aging enhances serum cytokine response but not task-induced grip strength declines in a rat model of work-related musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously reported early tissue injury, increased serum and tissue inflammatory cytokines and decreased grip in young rats performing a moderate demand repetitive task. The tissue cytokine response was transient, the serum response and decreased grip were still evident by 8 weeks. Thus, here, we examined their levels at 12 weeks in young rats. Since aging is known to enhance serum cytokine levels, we also examined aged rats. Methods Aged and young rats, 14 mo and 2.5 mo of age at onset, respectfully, were trained 15 min/day for 4 weeks, and then performed a high repetition, low force (HRLF) reaching and grasping task for 2 hours/day, for 12 weeks. Serum was assayed for 6 cytokines: IL-1alpha, IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, MIP2, IL-10. Grip strength was assayed, since we have previously shown an inverse correlation between grip strength and serum inflammatory cytokines. Results were compared to naïve (grip), and normal, food-restricted and trained-only controls. Results Serum cytokines were higher overall in aged than young rats, with increases in IL-1alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-6 in aged Trained and 12-week HRLF rats, compared to young Trained and HRLF rats (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively, each). IL-6 was also increased in aged 12-week HRLF versus aged normal controls (p < 0.05). Serum IFN-gamma and MIP2 levels were also increased in young 6-week HRLF rats, but no cytokines were above baseline levels in young 12-week HRLF rats. Grip strength declined in both young and aged 12-week HRLF rats, compared to naïve and normal controls (p < 0.05 each), but these declines correlated only with IL-6 levels in aged rats (r = -0.39). Conclusion Aging enhanced a serum cytokine response in general, a response that was even greater with repetitive task performance. Grip strength was adversely affected by task performance in both age groups, but was apparently influenced by factors other than serum cytokine levels in young rats. PMID:21447183

  13. Age-related decrease in the activity of UDP-xylose:core protein xylosyltransferase in rat costal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B; Gressner, A M; Nevo, Z; Greiling, H

    1982-06-01

    The activity of UDP-xylose:core protein xylosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.26) in costal cartilage of young rats (3 months) and old rats (36 months) was measured. The enzyme activity in cartilage of young rats (mean +/- S.D.) is 3370 +/- 1440 Bq h-1 mg-1 DNA, which is about three times higher than that determined in cartilage of old rats (1090 +/- 520 Bq h-1 mg-1 protein). The amount of galactosamine-containing proteoglycosaminoglycans that are extractable with 4 M guanidinium chloride from cartilage is significantly higher in young rats (29.1 +/- 4.8 nmol GalN per mg cartilage wet weight) than in old animals (5.8 +/- 3.0 nmol GalN per mg cartilage wet weight). Thus, if xylosyltransferase activity is referred to the amount of galactosamine-containing proteoglycans in cartilage, nearly identical values are obtained (young rats, 80 +/- 30 Bq h-1 mumol-1 GalN; old rats, 85 +/- 35 Bq h-1 mumol-1 GalN). The results support the assumption that the synthesis of proteochondroitin sulfate is diminished in costal cartilage of old rats by a mechanism involving a reduced activity of xylosyltransferase. PMID:7109714

  14. Chronic administration of thiamine pyrophosphate decreases age-related histological atrophic testicular changes and improves sexual behavior in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Montiel, H L; Vásquez López, C M; González-Loyola, J G; Vega-Anaya, G C; Villagrán-Herrera, M E; Gallegos-Corona, M A; Saldaña, C; Ramos Gómez, M; García Horshman, P; García Solís, P; Solís-S, J C; Robles-Osorio, M L; Ávila Morales, J; Varela-Echavarría, A; Paredes Guerrero, R

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a multifactorial universal process and constitutes the most important risk factor for chronic-degenerative diseases. Although it is a natural process, pathological aging arises when these changes occur quickly and the body is not able to adapt. This is often associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammation, and a decrease in the endogenous antioxidant systems, constituting a physiopathological state commonly found in chronic-degenerative diseases. At the testicular level, aging is associated with tissue atrophy, decreased steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis, and sexual behavior disorders. This situation, in addition to the elevated generation of ROS in the testicular steroidogenesis, provides a critical cellular environment causing oxidative damage at diverse cellular levels. To assess the effects of a reduction in the levels of ROS, thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) was chronically administered in senile Wistar rats. TPP causes an activation of intermediate metabolism routes, enhancing cellular respiration and decreasing the generation of ROS. Our results show an overall decrease of atrophic histological changes linked to aging, with higher levels of serum testosterone, sexual activity, and an increase in the levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes in TPP-treated animals. These results suggest that TPP chronic administration decreases the progression of age-related atrophic changes by improving the intermediate metabolism, and by increasing the levels of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:24371036

  15. Age-related changes in collagen synthesis and degradation in rat tissues. Importance of degradation of newly synthesized collagen in regulating collagen production.

    PubMed

    Mays, P K; McAnulty, R J; Campa, J S; Laurent, G J

    1991-06-01

    During developmental growth, collagens are believed to be continuously deposited into an extracellular matrix which is increasingly stabilized by the formation of covalent cross-links throughout life. However, the age-related changes in rates of synthetic and degradative processes are less well understood. In the present study we measured rates of collagen synthesis in vivo using a flooding dose of unlabelled proline given with [14C]proline and determining production of hydroxy[14C]proline. Degradation of newly synthesized collagen was estimated from the amount of free hydroxy [14C]proline in tissues 30 min after injection. Collagen fractional synthesis rates ranged from about 5%/day in skeletal muscle to 20%/day in hearts of rats aged 1 month. At 15 months of age, collagen fractional synthesis rates had decreased markedly in lung and skin, but in skeletal muscle and heart, rates were unchanged. At 24 months of age, synthesis rates had decreased by at least 10-fold in all tissues, compared with rates at 1 month. The proportion of newly synthesized collagen degraded ranged from 6.4 +/- 0.4% in skin to 61.6 +/- 5.0% in heart at 1 month of age. During aging the proportion degraded increased in all tissues to maximal values at 15 months, ranging from 56 +/- 7% in skin to 96 +/- 1% in heart. These data suggest that there are marked age-related changes in rates of collagen metabolism. They also indicate that synthesis is active even in old animals, where the bulk of collagens produced are destined to be degraded. PMID:2049064

  16. Age related changes in functions and physicochemical properties of rat jejunal brush border membrane after chronic ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Lindi, C; Marciani, P; Omodeo-Sale, F

    1993-02-01

    1. We investigated the chronic effects of a 4 week treatment with ethanol on functions and physicochemical properties of BBM of young and adult rats (2 and 7 months old respectively). 2. In the ethanol treated groups the cholesterol/phospholipid and the protein/lipid ratios as well as the D-glucose uptake and lactase specific activity and Vmax were increased. In spite of a minor alcohol consumption the adult group was the more affected. 3. Membranes from the ethanol fed rats were less fluid and more tolerant to the in vitro addition of ethanol. PMID:8098680

  17. Combined administration of levetiracetam and valproic acid attenuates age-related hyperactivity of CA3 place cells, reduces place field area, and increases spatial information content in aged rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Robitsek, Jonathan; Ratner, Marcia H; Stewart, Tara; Eichenbaum, Howard; Farb, David H

    2015-12-01

    Learning and memory deficits associated with age-related mild cognitive impairment have long been attributed to impaired processing within the hippocampus. Hyperactivity within the hippocampal CA3 region that is associated with aging is mediated in part by a loss of functional inhibitory interneurons and thought to underlie impaired performance in spatial memory tasks, including the abnormal tendency in aged animals to pattern complete spatial representations. Here, we asked whether the spatial firing patterns of simultaneously recorded CA3 and CA1 neurons in young and aged rats could be manipulated pharmacologically to selectively reduce CA3 hyperactivity and thus, according to hypothesis, the associated abnormality in spatial representations. We used chronically implanted high-density tetrodes to record the spatial firing properties of CA3 and CA1 units during animal exploration for food in familiar and novel environments. Aged CA3 place cells have higher firing rates, larger place fields, less spatial information content, and respond less to a change from a familiar to a novel environment than young CA3 cells. We also find that the combination of levetiracetam (LEV) + valproic acid (VPA), previously shown to act as a cognitive enhancer in tests of spatial memory, attenuate CA3 place cell firing rates, reduce place field area, and increase spatial information content in aged but not young adult rats. This is consistent with drug enhancing the specificity of neuronal firing with respect to spatial location. Contrary to expectation, however, LEV + VPA reduces place cell discrimination between novel and familiar environments, i.e., spatial correlations increase, independent of age even though drug enhances performance in cognitive tasks. The results demonstrate that spatial information content, or the number of bits of information encoded per action potential, may be the key correlate for enhancement of spatial memory by LEV + VPA. PMID:25941121

  18. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration What is AMD? Click for more information Age-related macular degeneration, ... the macula allows you to see fine detail. AMD Blurs Central Vision AMD blurs the sharp central ...

  19. Environmental enrichment attenuates the age-related decline in the mRNA expression of steroidogenic enzymes and reduces the methylation state of the steroid 5α-reductase type 1 gene in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, María F; Varayoud, Jorgelina; Moreno-Piovano, Guillermo S; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge G

    2015-09-01

    We analyzed the effects of aging and environmental enrichment on the mRNA expression and DNA methylation state of steroidogenic enzymes in the hippocampus. The effects of aging were evaluated by comparing young adult (90-day-old) and middle-aged (450-day-old) female Wistar rats. To elucidate the effects of environmental enrichment, a subgroup of middle-aged rats exposed to sensory and social stimulation for 105 days was compared to rats housed under standard laboratory conditions. Aging decreased the transcription of neurosteroidogenic-related genes and increased the promoter methylation state of cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage, 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD) and 5α-reductase-1. Exposure of middle-aged rats to environmental enrichment increased mRNA levels of 5α-reductase-1, 3α-HSD and cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase/c17,20-lyase and decreased the methylation state of the 5α-reductase-1 gene. Thus, sensory and social stimulation attenuate the age-related decline in the mRNA expression of hippocampal steroidogenic enzymes. Epigenetic mechanisms associated with differential promoter methylation could be involved. PMID:26021641

  20. AGE-RELATED ALTERATIONS IN THE STIMULATED RELEASE IN VITRO OF CATECHOLAMINES AND LUTEINIZING HORMONE-RELEASING HORMONE FROM THE MALE RAT HYPOTHALAMUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using an in vitro perifusion system, the present study investigated the possibility that alterations in catecholamine and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion from the male rat mediobasal hypothalamus are present during the period of middle-age. The results indi...

  1. Efficacy of Female Rat Models in Translational Cardiovascular Aging Research

    PubMed Central

    Rice, K. M.; Fannin, J. C.; Gillette, C.; Blough, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States. Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease as well as cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Aging is a universal process that all humans undergo; however, research in aging is limited by cost and time constraints. Therefore, most research in aging has been done in primates and rodents; however it is unknown how well the effects of aging in rat models translate into humans. To compound the complication of aging gender has also been indicated as a risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system associated with aging and gender for aging research with regard to the applicability of rat derived data for translational application to human aging. PMID:25610649

  2. Raloxifene prevents endothelial dysfunction in aging ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Ming; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Au, Chak Leung; Tsang, Suk Ying; Fung, Kwok Pui; Laher, Ismail; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Huang, Yu

    2006-05-01

    Lack of an appropriate animal model has delayed the better understanding of mechanisms related to higher cardiovascular risk in women after menopause. The aging female rat may share some menopausal changes observed in women. However, most studies have attempted to mimic menopause by ovariectomizing young (6-12 weeks old) animals without taking into accounts the influence of aging and of declining ovarian function. Therefore, the present study examined changes in vascular reactivity in the aging (15 months old) female rat after ovariectomy and the effects of chronic raloxifene therapy on vascular reactivity and eNOS protein expression. Aortic rings were prepared from the three experimental groups of rats: sham-operated control, ovariectomized and ovariectomized aging rats receiving daily oral administration of raloxifene for 3 months. Aortic rings were suspended in organ baths for the measurement of isometric tension. Rings with endothelium contracted significantly more to phenylephrine after inhibition of nitric oxide/cyclic GMP-signaling pathway by L-NAME or ODQ (as an index of basal nitric oxide release) in control and raloxifene-treated ovariectomized rats than in ovariectomized rats. This effect was abolished upon mechanical removal of the endothelium. Phenylephrine induced greater contractions only in rings with endothelium from ovariectomized rats as compared with control rats and raloxifene treatment normalized this response. In the presence of L-NAME or ODQ, phenylephrine-induced contraction was similar in rings from the three groups. Rings relaxed more to thapsigargin and acetylcholine in raloxifene-treated ovariectomized rats than in ovariectomized rats. There was no significant difference in aortic eNOS protein contents among the different groups. These results suggest that chronic oral administration of raloxifene to aging ovariectomized female rats augmented the bioavailability of endothelial nitric oxide in isolated aortic rings without altering e

  3. Perturbation and age-related changes in the fatty acid pattern of soleus muscle phospholipids and triglycerides in rats depleted in long-chain polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Malaisse, Willy J; Portois, Laurence; Sener, Abdullah; Carpentier, Yvon A

    2007-12-01

    Altered D-glucose metabolism prevails in the soleus muscle of rats depleted in long-chain polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids (omega3). In these animals, the prior intravenous injection of an omega3-rich medium-chain triglyceride:fish oil emulsion (omega3-FO rats), as compared to that of an omega3-poor medium-chain triglyceride:olive oil emulsion (omega3-OO rats), may either correct or aggravate selected metabolic variables. This study deals with the fatty acid pattern of soleus phospholipids and triglycerides in control animals versus omega3-depleted rats not injected with any lipid emulsion (omega3-NI rats) and in omega3-OO versus omega3-FO rats. In each group of omega3-depleted rats, age-related changes were also monitored. The omega3-depleted rats displayed low long-chain polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acid content, facilitated metabolism of long-chain polyunsaturated omega6 fatty acids, and increased Delta9-desaturase activity. Both the age-related changes in lipid variables and those attributable to the prior intravenous injection of the omega3-rich lipid emulsion consisted either in a move towards normalization or in the opposite direction, i.e. towards aggravation of the defect found in the omega3-depleted rats. Emphasis is placed, therefore, on the unusual situation found in the soleus muscle of omega3-depleted rats, in which both lipid and metabolic variables may be either favourably or adversely affected by the same environmental factor(s). PMID:17982700

  4. Acai fruit improves motor and cognitive function in aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show impaired performance on motor and cognitive tasks that require the use of spatial learning and memory. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various berry fruits (blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries) in reversing age-related deficits in behavioral and ne...

  5. Tart cherries improve working memory in aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show impaired performance on cognitive tasks that require the use of spatial learning and memory. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various dark-colored berry fruits (blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries) in reversing age-related deficits in behavioral and...

  6. Red raspberries can improve motor function in aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Many foods rich in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds have been shown to increase health and reduce markers of aging. A number of berry fruits high in polyphenols are known to ameliorate age-related declines in cellular, cognitive and behavioral function in rats. OBJECTIVES: Thi...

  7. Age-related changes in the response of rat adipocytes to insulin: evidence for a critical role for inositol phosphoglycans and cAMP.

    PubMed

    Kunjara, Sirilaksana; Greenbaum, A Leslie; Rademacher, Thomas W; McLean, Patricia

    2010-08-01

    Adipose tissue plays a pivotal role in ageing and longevity; many studies, both human and animal, have focussed on the effects of food limitation. Here we present a new model based on striking differences between two 'normal' inbred strains of albino Wistar rats the Charles River (CR) and Harlan Olac (HO) that have marked differences in age-related accumulation of fat and insulin-stimulated rates of glucose incorporation into lipid in the epididymal fat pads (EFP). The incorporation [U-(14)C]glucose into lipid by adipocytes showed that the CR group had a twofold higher basal rate of lipogenesis and a greater response to insulin in vitro, exceptionally, adipocytes from CR group maintained the high response to insulin to late adulthood while retaining the lower EFP weight/100 g body weight. Inositol phosphoglycan A-type (IPG-A), a putative insulin second messenger, was 3.5-fold higher and cAMP significantly lower per EFP in the CR versus HO groups. Plasma insulin levels were similar and plasma leptin higher in CR versus HO groups. The anomaly of a higher rate of lipogenesis and response to insulin and lower EFP weight in the CR group is interpreted as the resultant effect of a faster turnover of lipid and stimulating effect of leptin in raising fatty acid oxidation by muscle, potentially key to the lower accumulation of visceral fat. The metabolic profile of the CR strain provides a template that could be central to therapies that may lead to the lowering of both adipose and non-adipocyte lipid accumulation in humans in ageing. PMID:20336370

  8. Buspirone before prenatal stress protects against adverse effects of stress on emotional and inflammatory pain-related behaviors in infant rats: age and sex differences.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Irina P; Mikhailenko, Viktor A; Vershinina, Elena A; Otellin, Vladimir A; Aloisi, Anna Maria

    2011-10-24

    Prenatal stress strengthens tonic pain and provokes depression. The serotoninergic system is involved in these processes. We recently showed that maternal buspirone, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, protects against the adverse effects of in utero stress on depression and pain in adult rat offspring. Using a similar maternal treatment with buspirone, we focus here on the infant stage, which is important for the correction of prenatal abnormalities. Maternal buspirone before restraint stress during the last week of pregnancy decreased the time of immobility in the forced swim test in the infant offspring. Prenatal stress increased formalin-induced pain in the second part of the time-course of the response to formalin in males of middle infancy but in the first part of the response in males of late infancy. The effect was reversed by maternal buspirone. Pain dominated in males of both middle and late infancy but the time-course of formalin pain in infant females revealed a slower development of the processes. The results show that the time-course of formalin-induced pain in infant rats reacts to prenatal stress in an age-dependent and sexually dimorphic manner. Our finding of opposite influences of prenatal stress and buspirone before prenatal stress on formalin-induced pain during the interphase indicates that functional maturity of the descending serotonergic inhibitory system occurs in late infancy males (11-day-olds), and 5-HT1A receptors participate in this process. The data provide evidence that maternal treatment with buspirone prior to stress during pregnancy alleviates depression-like and tonic pain-related behaviors in the infant offspring. PMID:21937026

  9. An Observational Assessment Method for Aging Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Pamela M; Jarema, Kimberly A; Kurtz, David M; MacPhail, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth of the aging human population highlights the need for laboratory animal models to study the basic biologic processes of aging and susceptibility to disease, drugs, and environmental pollutants. Methods are needed to evaluate the health of aging animals over time, particularly methods for efficiently monitoring large research colonies. Here we describe an observational assessment method that scores appearance, posture, mobility, and muscle tone on a 5-point scale that can be completed in about 1 min. A score of 1 indicates no deterioration, whereas a score of 5 indicates severe deterioration. Tests were applied to male Brown Norway rats between 12 and 36 mo of age (n = 32). The rats were participating concurrently in experiments on the behavioral effects of intermittent exposure (approximately every 4 mo) to short-acting environmental chemicals. Results demonstrated that aging-related signs of deterioration did not appear before 18 mo of age. Assessment scores and variability then increased with age. Body weights increased until approximately 24 mo, then remained stable, but decreased after 31 mo for the few remaining rats. The incidence of death increased slightly from 20 to 28 mo of age and then rose sharply; median survival age was approximately 30 mo, with a maximum of 36 mo. The results indicate that our observational assessment method supports efficient monitoring of the health of aging rats and may be useful in studies on susceptibility to diseases, drugs, and toxicants during old age. PMID:21205442

  10. Epigenetic modification of PKMζ rescues aging-related cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Xue, Yan-Xue; Han, Ying; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Deng, Jia-Hui; Chen, Na; Bao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Fei-Long; Cao, Lin-Lin; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Shi, Jie; Song, Wei-Hong; Lu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cognition is impacted by aging. However, the mechanisms that underlie aging-associated cognitive impairment are unclear. Here we showed that cognitive decline in aged rats was associated with changes in DNA methylation of protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ) in the prelimbic cortex (PrL). PKMζ is a crucial molecule involved in the maintenance of long-term memory. Using different behavioral models, we confirmed that aged rats exhibited cognitive impairment in memory retention test 24 h after training, and overexpression of PKMζ in the PrL rescued cognitive impairment in aged rats. After fear conditioning, the protein levels of PKMζ and the membrane expression of GluR2 increased in the PrL in young and adult rats but not in aged rats, and the levels of methylated PKMζ DNA in the PrL decreased in all age groups, whereas the levels of unmethylated PKMζ DNA increased only in young and adult rats. We also found that environmentally enriched housing reversed the hypermethylation of PKMζ and restored cognitive performance in aged rats. Inactivation of PKMζ prevented the potentiating effects of environmental enrichment on memory retention in aged rats. These results indicated that PKMζ might be a potential target for the treatment of aging-related cognitive impairment, suggesting a potential therapeutic avenue. PMID:26926225

  11. Tocotrienol improves learning and memory deficit of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaneai, Nozomi; Sumitani, Kazumi; Fukui, Koji; Koike, Taisuke; Takatsu, Hirokatsu; Urano, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    To define whether tocotrienol (T-3) improves cognitive deficit during aging, effect of T-3 on learning and memory functions of aged rats was assessed. It was found that T-3 markedly counteracts the decline in learning and memory function in aged rats. Quantitative analysis of T-3 content in the rat brain showed that the aged rats fed T-3 mixture-supplemented diet revealed the transport of α- and γ-T-3 to the brain. In contrast, normal young rats fed the same diet did not exhibit brain localization. Furthermore, the T-3 inhibited age-related decreases in the expression of certain blood brain barrier (BBB) proteins, including caludin-5, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM). It was found that the activation of the cellular proto-oncogene c-Src and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cell signaling pathway for neuronal cell death, was markedly inhibited by T-3. These results may reveal that aging induces partial BBB disruption caused by oxidative stress, thereby enabling the transport of T-3 through the BBB to the central nervous system, whereupon neuronal protection may be mediated by inhibition of c-Src and/or ERK activation, resulting in an improvement in age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27013777

  12. Tocotrienol improves learning and memory deficit of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kaneai, Nozomi; Sumitani, Kazumi; Fukui, Koji; Koike, Taisuke; Takatsu, Hirokatsu; Urano, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    To define whether tocotrienol (T-3) improves cognitive deficit during aging, effect of T-3 on learning and memory functions of aged rats was assessed. It was found that T-3 markedly counteracts the decline in learning and memory function in aged rats. Quantitative analysis of T-3 content in the rat brain showed that the aged rats fed T-3 mixture-supplemented diet revealed the transport of α- and γ-T-3 to the brain. In contrast, normal young rats fed the same diet did not exhibit brain localization. Furthermore, the T-3 inhibited age-related decreases in the expression of certain blood brain barrier (BBB) proteins, including caludin-5, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM). It was found that the activation of the cellular proto-oncogene c-Src and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cell signaling pathway for neuronal cell death, was markedly inhibited by T-3. These results may reveal that aging induces partial BBB disruption caused by oxidative stress, thereby enabling the transport of T-3 through the BBB to the central nervous system, whereupon neuronal protection may be mediated by inhibition of c-Src and/or ERK activation, resulting in an improvement in age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27013777

  13. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, JM; Bivalacqua, TJ; Lagoda, GA; Burnett, AL; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 ‘young’ (4-month-old) and ‘aged’ (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH4 precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  14. Centrophenoxine activates acetylcholinesterase activity in hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D; Singh, R

    1995-05-01

    Age-related changes in the acetylcholinesterase activity were measured in the hippocampus, brain stem and cerebellum of rats (aged 4, 8, 16 and 24 months). The age-dependent decrease in the enzyme activity first appeared in the hippocampus; the brain stem was affected later while the cerebellum remained unaffected. Centrophenoxine, usually considered as an ageing reversal drug and also regarded as a neuroenergeticum in human therapy, increased the acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus of aged rats, the activity was also elevated in the brain stem but no in the cerebellum. The acetylcholinesterase-stimulating influence of the drug is likely to be implicated in the pharmacological reversal of the age related decline of the cholinergic system. This effect of the drug may also mediate its effects on cognitive and neuronal synaptic functions. PMID:7558197

  15. Confidant Relations of the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tigges, Leann M.; And Others

    The confidant relationship is a qualitatively distinct dimension of the emotional support system of the aged, yet the composition of the confidant network has been largely neglected in research on aging. Persons (N=940) 60 years of age and older were interviewed about their socio-environmental setting. From the enumeration of their relatives,…

  16. Aging and the disposition and toxicity of mercury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Christy C; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K

    2014-05-01

    Progressive loss of functioning nephrons, secondary to age-related glomerular disease, can impair the ability of the kidneys to effectively clear metabolic wastes and toxicants from blood. Additionally, as renal mass is diminished, cellular hypertrophy occurs in functional nephrons that remain. We hypothesize that these nephrons are exposed to greater levels of nephrotoxicants, such as inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)), and thus are at an increased risk of becoming intoxicated by these compounds. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of aging on the disposition and renal toxicity of Hg(2+) in young adult and aged Wistar rats. Paired groups of animals were injected (i.v.) with either a 0.5μmol·kg(-1) non-nephrotoxic or a 2.5μmol·kg(-1) nephrotoxic dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl2). Plasma creatinine and renal biomarkers of proximal tubular injury were greater in both groups of aged rats than in the corresponding groups of young adult rats. Histologically, evidence of glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial inflammation and fibrosis were significant features of kidneys from aged animals. In addition, proximal tubular necrosis, especially along the straight segments in the inner cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla was a prominent feature in the renal sections from both aged and young rats treated with the nephrotoxic dose of HgCl2. Our findings indicate 1) that overall renal function is significantly impaired in aged rats, resulting in chronic renal insufficiency and 2) the disposition of HgCl2 in aging rats is significantly altered compared to that of young rats. PMID:24548775

  17. Macular degeneration - age-related

    MedlinePlus

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD); AMD ... distorted and wavy. There may be a small dark spot in the center of your vision that ... leafy vegetables, may also decrease your risk of age-related macular degeneration. If you have wet AMD, ...

  18. Age- and gender-related differences in GABAA receptor-mediated postsynaptic currents in GABAergic neurons of the substantia nigra reticulata in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chudomel, O; Herman, H; Nair, K; Moshé, S L; Galanopoulou, A S

    2009-09-29

    The responsiveness of the rat anterior substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNR) GABAergic neurons to GABA(A)ergic drugs changes with age and gender, altering its role in seizure control. To determine whether maturational and gender-specific differences in the properties of spontaneous GABA(A)Rs-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) underlie these events, we studied sIPSCs at baseline and after application of the alpha1 GABA(A)Rs subunit selective agonist zolpidem, at postnatal days (PN) 5-9, PN12-15, and PN28-32. Results were correlated with the alpha1 and alpha 3 GABA(A)Rs subunit immunoreactivity (-ir) at PN5, PN15, and PN30, using immunochemistry. The mean frequency, amplitude and charge transfer increased whereas the 10-90% rise time and decay time accelerated with age in both genders. The faster sIPSC kinetics in older rats were paralleled by increased alpha1-ir and decreased alpha 3-ir. At PN5-9, males had more robust sIPSCs (frequency, amplitude, charge carried per event and charge transfer) than females. At PN28-32, males exhibited higher amplitudes and faster kinetics than females. The zolpidem-induced increase of decay times, amplitude and charge transfer and alpha1-ir expression were the lowest in PN5-9 males but increased with age, in both genders. Our findings demonstrate that alterations in GABA(A)Rs subunit expression partially underlie age- and gender-specific sIPSC changes in SNR neurons. However, the observation of gender differences in sIPSC kinetics that cannot be attributed to changes in perisomatic alpha1 expression suggests the existence of additional gender-specific factors that control the sIPSC kinetics in rat SNR. PMID:19531372

  19. Age-related changes in tonic activation of presynaptic versus extrasynaptic γ-amniobutyric acid type B receptors in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Haley E; Kelly, Kyle B; Bizon, Jennifer L; Frazier, Charles J

    2016-09-01

    The present study examined the effect of age on both glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid mediated (GABAergic) signaling in the rodent medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), with an emphasis on revealing novel changes contributing to increased inhibition in age. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from layer 2/3 mPFC pyramidal neurons in acute cortical slices prepared from either young (4 months) or aged (20-24 months) male F344 rats. Results indicated that GABAB receptors on GABAergic, but not on glutamatergic, inputs to layer 2/3 pyramidal cells are tonically activated by ambient GABA in young animals and further demonstrated that this form of tonic inhibition is significantly attenuated in aged mPFC. Moreover, concurrent with loss of tonic presynaptic GABAB autoreceptor activation, layer 2/3 pyramidal cells in aged mPFC are subjected to increased tonic activation of extrasynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors. These data demonstrate a shift in the site of GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory tone in the aged mPFC that clearly promotes increased inhibition of pyramidal cells in aged animals, and that may plausibly contribute to impaired executive function. PMID:27459929

  20. Upregulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor, Flt-1, in rat hippocampal neurons after envenoming by Phoneutria nigriventer; age-related modulation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; Siqueira Soares, Edilene; Miguel Stávale, Leila; Pierre Irazusta, Silvia; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2012-09-15

    This study characterizes the distribution and quantifies the expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor for the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Flt-1, in the rat hippocampus following intra-peritoneal injection of Phoneutria nigriventer venom (PNV). Post-natal day 14 (P14) and 8-10 weeks (adult) old rats were used and analyses were done at 1, 2, 5 and 24 h after venom exposure and compared with saline-injected counterparts. PNV-injected animals showed hippocampal venules with perivascular edema indicating blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. This was accompanied by significant overexpression of Flt-1 which though was not the same for CA1, CA2, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) hippocampal regions, neither for P14 and adult rats. Regional analysis using GIMP methodology showed that Flt-1 was constitutively distributed more densely in neurons of DG, followed by CA1/CA2 and CA3 of both control P14 and adult animals, without variation over time, but significantly more expressed in P14 than in adults. A time-course analysis showed that Flt-1 upregulation was progressive and that neurons VEGFR1/Flt-1+ of PNV-exposed animals are timely and regionally modulated depending on the hippocampal region, being CA2 the least responsive region regardless animal's age, whilst DG was the most susceptible with adult animals having higher upregulation than neonates. Since VEGF has been reported to confer protection in several pathological processes we suggest that VEGF may be involved in hippocampal neurons response via Flt-1 mediation following PNV envenoming; its higher upregulation in adult envenomed rats may be an indication that Flt-1 neuroprotective mediation is more efficient with age. The Flt-1 upregulation and the incidence of perivascular edema in young animals may indicate a pro-inflammatory role of the receptor. PMID:22659541

  1. Age-related changes of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity in rat brain regions and a new phosphodiesterase inhibitor--nootropic agent adafenoxate.

    PubMed

    Stancheva, S L; Alova, L G

    1991-01-01

    1. The low- and high-KM cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (cAMP PDE) activity in cerebral cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and hippocampus of young (4-5-month-old) and aged (22-month-old) rats has been studied. 2. A significant rise in the high-KM cAMP PDE activity in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus in aged rats has been found. 3. The activity of the low-KM cAMP PDE does not change during senescence in all the brain structures studied. 4. In a series of increased concentrations (from 5 x 10(-4) to 1 x 10(-5) M) adafenoxate inhibits low- and high-KM cAMP PDE in most of the brain structures studied in both age groups. 5. The present results provide evidence for realization of the CNS effects of adafenoxate through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and regulation of the intracellular level of cAMP. PMID:1662175

  2. The effect of aging on distraction osteogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J; Gao, G G; Shen, X C; McLaren, S G; Skinner, R A; Badger, T M; Lumpkin, C K

    2001-05-01

    The effect of age on bone formation in the limb lengthening model of distraction osteogenesis (DO) was investigated in two studies using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats from two colonies at various ages (CAMM: 9 vs 24 months, Harlan: 4 vs 24 months). External fixators were placed on the right tibiae of 30 male SD rats (20 CAMM, 10 Harlan) and mid-diaphyseal osteotomies were performed. Distraction was performed at 0.2 mm bid for 20 days (CAMM) or 14 days (Harlan). The experimental (DO) and control (contra-lateral) tibiae were removed for high-resolution radiography and decalcified histology. Videomicroscopy was used to quantitate radiodensity, histology (matrix type) and relative areas of cell proliferation, which was identified by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunochemistry. Both studies demonstrated an age-related decrease in the percent mineralized bone (radiodensity) in the distraction gap (CAMM 9 vs 24 months: 68% vs 51%, P < 0.003; Harlan 4 vs 24 months: 95% vs 36%, P < 0.001) and no significant colony or distraction time-specific difference was seen between the two colonies of 24-month-old rats. Histology was performed on the Harlan rats. The DO gaps in the 24-month-old rats demonstrated less endosteal new bone compared to the 4-month-old rats (P < 0.01), but equivalent periosteal new bone. In 4-month-old rats, PCNA-immunostained cells were organized along the primary matrix front (where the first deposition of osteoid occurs) extending across both periosteal and endosteal surfaces. In 24-month-old rats, PCNA+ cells were organized in zones along the periosteal new bone fronts only and irregularly scattered throughout the endosteal gap within a fibrovascular non-ossifying matrix. These results indicate that 24-month-old rats have a relative deficit in endosteal bone formation which may not be related to cell proliferation but rather to cell organization. This model reflects the clinical situation where radiographic findings in older patients demonstrate

  3. Neural stem cell protects aged rat brain from ischemia–reperfusion injury through neurogenesis and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yaohui; Wang, Jixian; Lin, Xiaojie; Wang, Liuqing; Shao, Bei; Jin, Kunlin; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) show therapeutic potential for ischemia in young-adult animals. However, the effect of aging on NSC therapy is largely unknown. In this work, NSCs were transplanted into aged (24-month-old) and young-adult (3-month-old) rats at 1 day after stroke. Infarct volume and neurobehavioral outcomes were examined. The number of differentiated NSCs was compared in aged and young-adult ischemic rats and angiogenesis and neurogenesis were also determined. We found that aged rats developed larger infarcts than young-adult rats after ischemia (P<0.05). The neurobehavioral outcome was also worse for aged rats comparing with young-adult rats. Brain infarction and neurologic deficits were attenuated after NSC transplantation in both aged and young-adult rats. The number of survived NSCs in aged rats was similar to that of the young-adult rats (P>0.05) and most of them were differentiated into glial fibrillary acidic protein+ (GFAP+) cells. More importantly, angiogenesis and neurogenesis were greatly enhanced in both aged and young-adult rats after transplantation compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control (P<0.05), accompanied by increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our results showed that NSC therapy reduced ischemic brain injury, along with increased angiogenesis and neurogenesis in aged rats, suggesting that aging-related microenvironment does not preclude a beneficial response to NSCs transplantation during cerebral ischemia. PMID:24714034

  4. METABOLIC RATE AS A FUNCTION OF AGE IN BROWN NORWAY AND LONG-EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brown Norway (BN) rats are commonly used in aging studies but relatively little is known on their metabolism as it varies with age. In fact, there is considerable disagreement on the wholebody metabolism of aging rats with some studies indicating a decrease and others showing an...

  5. Distinct manifestations of executive dysfunction in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Beas, B. Sofia; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Different components of executive function such as working memory, attention, and cognitive flexibility can be dissociated both behaviorally and mechanistically; however, the within-subject influences of normal aging on different aspects of executive function remain ill-defined. To better define these relationships, young adult and aged male F344 rats were cross-characterized on an attentional set-shifting task that assesses cognitive flexibility and a delayed response task that assesses working memory. Across tasks, aged rats were impaired relative to young; however, there was significant variability in individual performance within the aged cohort. Notably, performance on the set-shifting task and performance at long delays on the delayed response task were inversely related among aged rats. Additional experiments showed no relationship between aged rats’ performance on the set-shifting task and performance on a hippocampal-dependent spatial reference memory task. These data indicate that normal aging can produce distinct manifestations of executive dysfunction, and support the need to better understand the unique mechanisms contributing to different forms of prefrontal cortical-supported executive decline across the lifespan. PMID:23601673

  6. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Budzinskaia, M V

    2014-01-01

    The review provides an update on the pathogenesis and new treatment modalities for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The impact of polymorphism in particular genes, including complement factor H (CFH), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2/LOC387715), and serine peptidase (HTRA1), on AMD development is discussed. Clinical presentations of different forms of exudative AMD, that is classic, occult, or more often mixed choroidal neovascularization, retinal angiomatous proliferation, and choroidal polypoidal vasculopathy, are described. Particular attention is paid to the results of recent clinical trials and safety issues around the therapy. PMID:25715554

  7. The pituitary - Aging and spaceflown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Decrements in growth hormone (GH) release we observed in two spaceflight experiments and four tail-suspended rat studies mimic age-associated changes in the mammalian pituitary GH system seen by Meites and others. The spaceflight data suggest that formation of high molecular weight bioactive disulfide-linked aggregates of the 20 and 22K monomeric GH forms may be reduced in microgravity, thereby, reducing target tissue activity. Correlative studies to confirm spaceflight as a model for pituitary GH system aging should include: (1) investigation of mechanisms of intracellular hormone packaging, (2) consequences to biological activity of the hormone molecule, and (3) study of intracellular microtubule dynamics.

  8. Age-related hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... is no known single cause of age-related hearing loss. Most commonly, it is caused by changes in the inner ear that occur as you grow older. Your genes and loud noise (from rock concerts or music headphones) may play a large role. The following ...

  9. Mindspan: Lessons from Rat Models of Neurocognitive Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Michela; Stocker, Amy; Koh, Ming Teng

    2011-01-01

    Research on the biology of aging seeks to enhance understanding of basic mechanisms and thus support improvements in outcomes throughout the lifespan, including longevity itself, susceptibility to disease, and life-long adaptive capacities. The focus of this review is the use of rats as an animal model of cognitive change during aging, and specifically lessons learned from aging rats in behavioral studies of cognitive processes mediated by specialized neural circuitry. An advantage of this approach is the ability to compare brain aging across species where functional homology exists for specific neural systems; in this article we focus on behavioral assessments that target the functions of the medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex. We also take a critical look at studies using calorie restriction (CR) as a well-defined experimental approach to manipulating biological aging. We conclude that the effects of CR on cognitive aging in rats are less well established than commonly assumed, with much less supportive evidence relative to its benefits on longevity and susceptibility to disease, and that more research in this area is necessary. PMID:21411856

  10. Coenzyme Q addition to an n-6 PUFA-rich diet resembles benefits on age-related mitochondrial DNA deletion and oxidative stress of a MUFA-rich diet in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Quiles, José L; Pamplona, Reinald; Ramirez-Tortosa, M Carmen; Naudí, Alba; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Araujo-Nepomuceno, Eduardo; López-Frías, Magdalena; Battino, Maurizio; Ochoa, Julio J

    2010-01-01

    Age-related changes in cardiomyocytes reduce the capacity to recover from acute injury or to adapt during chronic disease in advanced age. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6PUFA) lead to higher lipid peroxidation during aging than the less oxidizable monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA); and coenzyme Q (CoQ)-supplemented n-6PUFA lengthens the lifespan and reduces peroxidation in comparison to non-supplemented n-6PUFA. Here, lifelong feeding on MUFA, n-6PUFA, and n-6 PUFA+CoQ was compared regarding age-related alterations in rat heart. Less mitochondrial area and perimeter were reported for aged n-6 PUFA-fed animals while MUFA led to a higher density of mitochondrial cristae. Mitochondrial complexes and cytochrome c oxidase activity decreased with aging (except complex I and cytochrome c oxidase in n-6 PUFA+CoQ), while increased apoptosis-inducing factor was found with aging. MUFA led to lower mitochondrial DNA-deletion frequency. The lowest hydroperoxide levels for aged animals were found for n-6 PUFA+CoQ, which also showed lower concentrations than did n-6 PUFA. For protein oxidation, specific carbonyl compounds were lower in aged animals; meanwhile lipoxidation-derived protein-oxidation markers were higher. The results suggest that MUFA can protect mitochondria from age-related changes, and that CoQ supplementation to n-6 PUFA partially resembles MUFA benefits. Moreover, under our experimental conditions, lipid-derived oxidative damage appears to be more important than the pure protein-derived oxidative damage during aging. PMID:19948181

  11. Age-related Changes in the Proteostasis Network in the Brain of the Naked Mole-Rat: Implications Promoting Healthy Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Judy C.; Tramutola, Antonella; Swomley, Aaron; Kirk, Jessime; Grimes, Kelly; Lewis, Kaitilyn; Orr, Miranda; Rodriguez, Karl; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; Perluigi, Marzia; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2016-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR) is the longest-lived rodent and possesses several exceptional traits: marked cancer resistance, negligible senescence, prolonged genomic integrity, pronounced proteostasis, and a sustained healthspan. The underlying molecular mechanisms that contribute to these extraordinary attributes are currently under investigation to gain insights that may conceivably promote and extended human healthspan and lifespan. The ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosomal systems play a vital role in eliminating cellular detritus to maintain proteostasis and have been previously shown to be more robust in NMRs when compared to shorter-lived rodents. Using a 2-D PAGE proteomics approach, differential expression and phosphorylation levels of proteins involved in proteostasis networks were evaluated in the brains of NMRs in an age-dependent manner. We identified 9 proteins with significantly altered levels and/or phosphorylation states that have key roles involved in proteostasis networks. To further investigate the possible role that autophagy may play in maintaining cellular proteostasis, we examined aspects of the PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) axis as well as levels of Beclin-1, LC3-I, and LC3-II in the brain of the NMR as a function of age. Together, these results show that NMRs maintain high levels of autophagy throughout the majority of their lifespan. PMID:26248058

  12. Age-related neuroinflammation and changes in AKT-GSK-3β and WNT/ β-CATENIN signaling in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Ana Maria Marques; Vasconcelos, Andrea Rodrigues; Leite, Jacqueline Alves; de Sá Lima, Larissa; Andreotti, Diana Zukas; Munhoz, Carolina Demarchi; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko; Scavone, Cristoforo

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process associated with an increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders which can be related to chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation, however, can be characterized by the persistent elevated glucocorticoid (GCs) levels, activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-кB, as well as an increase in cytokines. Interestingly, both NF-кB and cytokines can be even modulated by Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) activity, which is a key protein that can intermediate inflammation and metabolism, once it has a critical role in AKT signaling pathway, and can also intermediate WNT/β-CATENIN signaling pathway. The aim of this study was to verify age-related changes in inflammatory status, as well as in the AKT and WNT signaling pathways. Results showed an age-related increase in neuroinflammation as indicated by NF-кB activation, TNF-α and GCs increased levels, a decrease in AKT activation and an increase in GSK-3β activity in both 12- and 24- month old animals. Aging also seems to induce a progressive decrease in canonical WNT/β-CATENIN signaling pathway once there is a decrease in DVL-2 levels and in the transcription of Axin2 gene. Little is known about the DVL-2 regulation as well as its roles in WNT signaling pathway, but for the first time it was suggested that DVL-2 expression can be changed along aging. PMID:26647069

  13. A stereologic study of the plantar fat pad in young and aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Molligan, Jeremy; Schon, Lew; Zhang, Zijun

    2013-01-01

    Plantar fat pad (PFP) is a tissue structure that absorbs the initial impact of walking and running and ultimately bears body weight at standing. This study was designed to quantify the histomorphological changes of the PFP in aged rats. The most medial PFP was dissected from the hind feet of young rats (4 months old, n = 6) and aged rats (24 months old, n = 6). Histological structure and cellular senescence of PFP were analyzed stereologically and histomorphometrically. Immunohistochemistry of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) was also performed on PFP tissue sections. Compared with young rats, the thickness of epidermis, dermis and septa of the PFP were significantly reduced in the aged rats. The total volume of adipose tissue in the PFP of aged rats was only about 65% of that in the young rats. The microvascular density and the number of fat pad units (FPU), a cluster of adipocytes enclosed by elastin septa, in the PFP were unchanged in the aged rats. In the aged rats, the number of adipocytes per FPU was reduced but the number of simple adipocyte clusters, without surrounding septa, was increased. The shift of the types of adipocyte clusters in the aged PFP was accompanied by degradation of elastin fibers and increased expression of MMP9. In conclusion, the PFP, particularly the elastic septa, degenerates significantly in aged rats and this may contribute to the pathology of PFP-related diseases. PMID:24033117

  14. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  15. [Presbycusis - Age Related Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Fischer, N; Weber, B; Riechelmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Presbycusis or age related hearing loss can be defined as a progressive, bilateral and symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss due to age related degeneration of inner ear structures. It can be considered a multifactorial complex disorder with environmental and genetic factors. The molecular, electrophysiological and histological damage at different levels of the inner ear cause a progressive hearing loss, which usually affects the high frequencies of hearing. The resulting poor speech recognition has a negative impact on cognitive, emotional and social function in older adults. Recent investigations revealed an association between hearing impairment and social isolation, anxiety, depression and cognitive decline in elderly. These findings emphasize the importance of diagnosis and treating hearing loss in the elderly population. Hearing aids are the most commonly used devices for treating presbycusis. The technical progress of implantable hearing devices allows an effective hearing rehabilitation even in elderly with severe hearing loss. However, most people with hearing impairments are not treated adequately. PMID:27392191

  16. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Barton, Gregory P; Sepe, Joseph J; McKiernan, Susan H; Aiken, Judd M; Diffee, Gary M

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  17. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Gregory P.; Sepe, Joseph J.; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.; Diffee, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  18. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Garcia Layana, A

    1998-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the occidental world. Patients suffering this process have an important reduction on their quality of life being handicapped to read, to write, to recognise faces of their friends, or even to watch the television. One of the main problems of that disease is the absence of an effective treatment able to revert the process. Laser treatment is only useful in a limited number of patients, and even in these cases recurrent lesions are frequent. These facts and the progressive ageing of our society establish the ARMD as one of the biggest aim of medical investigations for the next century, and currently is focus of attention in the most industrialised countries. One of the most promising pieces of research is focused in the investigation of the risk factors associated with the age-related macular degeneration, in order to achieve a prophylactic treatment avoiding its appearance. Diet elements such as fat ingestion or reduced antioxidant intakes are being investigated as some of these factors, what open a new possibility for a prophylactic treatment. Finally, research is looking for new therapeutic modalities such as selective radiotherapy in order to improve or maintain the vision of these patients. PMID:10420956

  19. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging

    PubMed Central

    Buechel, Heather M.; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L.; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9–12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors. PMID:24575039

  20. Loss of perforated synapses in the dentate gyrus: morphological substrate of memory deficit in aged rats.

    PubMed Central

    Geinisman, Y; de Toledo-Morrell, L; Morrell, F

    1986-01-01

    Most, but not all, aged rats exhibit a profound deficit in spatial memory when tested in a radial maze--a task known to depend on the integrity of the hippocampal formation. In this study, animals were divided into three groups based on their spatial memory capacity: young adult rats with good memory, aged rats with impaired memory, and aged rats with good memory. Memory-impaired aged animals showed a loss of perforated axospinous synapses in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation in comparison with either young adults or aged rats with good memory. This finding suggests that the loss of perforated axospinous synapses in the hippocampal formation underlies the age-related deficit in spatial memory. Images PMID:3458260

  1. Aging induced cortical drive alterations during sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciric, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Petrovic, Jelena; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2015-03-01

    We followed the impact of healthy aging on cortical drive during sleep in rats by using the corticomuscular coherence (CMC). We employed the chronic electrodes implantation for sleep recording in adult, male Wistar rats, and followed the aging impact during sleep from 3 to 5.5 months age. We have analyzed the sleep/wake states architecture, and the sleep/wake state related EEG microstructure and CMCs. We evidenced the topographically distinct impact of aging on sleep/wake states architecture within the sensorimotor (SMCx) vs. motor cortex (MCx) from 4.5 to 5.5 months age. Healthy aging consistently altered only the SMCx sleep/wake states architecture, and increased the delta and beta CMCs through both cortical drives during Wake, but only through the MCx drive during REM. According to the delta and beta CMCs values, aging impact through the SMCx drive was opposite, but it was convergent through the MCx drive during Wake vs. REM, and there was a dual and inverse mode for the motor control during REM. PMID:25773067

  2. Acetyl-L-carnitine supplementation reverses the age-related decline in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) activity in interfibrillar mitochondria without changing the L-carnitine content in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Luis A; Heath, Shi-Hua D; Hagen, Tory M

    2012-01-01

    The aging heart displays a loss of bioenergetic reserve capacity partially mediated through lower fatty acid utilization. We investigated whether the age-related impairment of cardiac fatty acid catabolism occurs, at least partially, through diminished levels of L-carnitine, which would adversely affect carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acyl-CoA uptake into mitochondria for β-oxidation. Old (24-28 mos) Fischer 344 rats were fed±acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR; 1.5% [w/v]) for up to four weeks prior to sacrifice and isolation of cardiac interfibrillar (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria. IFM displayed a 28% (p<0.05) age-related loss of CPT1 activity, which correlated with a decline (41%, p<0.05) in palmitoyl-CoA-driven state 3 respiration. Interestingly, SSM had preserved enzyme function and efficiently utilized palmitate. Analysis of IFM CPT1 kinetics showed both diminished V(max) and K(m) (60% and 49% respectively, p<0.05) when palmitoyl-CoA was the substrate. However, no age-related changes in enzyme kinetics were evident with respect to L-carnitine. ALCAR supplementation restored CPT1 activity in heart IFM, but not apparently through remediation of L-carnitine levels. Rather, ALCAR influenced enzyme activity over time, potentially by modulating conditions in the aging heart that ultimately affect palmitoyl-CoA binding and CPT1 kinetics. PMID:22322067

  3. Acetyl-L-carnitine supplementation reverses the age-related decline in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) activity in interfibrillar mitochondria without changing the L-carnitine content in the rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Luis A.; Heath, Shi-Hua D.; Hagen, Tory M.

    2014-01-01

    The aging heart displays a loss of bioenergetic reserve capacity partially mediated through lower fatty acid utilization. We investigated whether the age-related impairment of cardiac fatty acid catabolism occurs, at least partially, through diminished levels of L-carnitine, which would adversely affect carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acyl-CoA uptake into mitochondria for β-oxidation. Old (24–28 mos) Fischer 344 rats were fed ± acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR; 1.5% [w/v]) for up to four weeks prior to sacrifice and isolation of cardiac interfibrillar (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria. IFM displayed a 28% (p < 0.05) age-related loss of CPT1 activity, which correlated with a decline (41%, p < 0.05) in palmitoyl-CoA-driven state 3 respiration. Interestingly, SSM had preserved enzyme function and efficiently utilized palmitate. Analysis of IFM CPT1 kinetics showed both diminished Vmax and Km (60% and 49% respectively, p < 0.05) when palmitoyl-CoA was the substrate. However, no age-related changes in enzyme kinetics were evident with respect to L-carnitine. ALCAR supplementation restored CPT1 activity in heart IFM, but not apparently through remediation of L-carnitine levels. Rather, ALCAR influenced enzyme activity over time, potentially by modulating conditions in the aging heart that ultimately affect palmitoyl-CoA binding and CPT1 kinetics. PMID:22322067

  4. Cardiac and thermal homeostasis in the aging Brown Norway rat.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Brown Norway (BN) rat is a popular strain for aging studies. There is little information on effects of age on baseline cardiac and thermoregulatory parameters in undisturbed BN rats even though cardiac and thermal homeostasis is linked to many pathological deficits in the age...

  5. Enriched environment increases the myelinated nerve fibers of aged rat corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yu; Shi, Xiao-Yan; Qiu, Xuan; Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Li, Chen; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Cheng, Guo-Hua; Tang, Yong

    2012-06-01

    In this study, the effect of enriched environment (EE) on the spatial learning of aged rats was examined, and then the effects of EE on the aged corpus callosum (CC) were investigated by means of the modern stereological methods. We found that EE significantly improved the spatial learning of aged rats. The CC volume, the total volume of the myelinated fibers and total volume of the myelin sheaths in the CC, the total length of the myelinated fibers in the CC of enriched rats were significantly increased when compared to standard rats. The increase of the myelinated fibers in enriched rat CC might provide one of the structural bases for the enrichment-related improvement of the spatial learning. This study provided, to the best of our knowledge, the first evidence of environmental enrichment-induced increases of the CC and the myelinated fibers in the CC of aged rats. PMID:22431229

  6. Age-related dose response of selected reproductive parameters to acute cadmium chloride exposure in the male Long-Evans rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groups of Long Evans rats 30, 50, or 70 days old were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with a single dose of between 0 and 52 micromoles Cd/Kg as cadmium (CD) chloride. Sixty days post dosing and two hours prior to sacrifice the rats were injected s.c. with 100 IU of hCG to stimula...

  7. Aging rat vestibular ganglion: I. Quantitative light microscopic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alidina, A; Lyon, M J

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to quantify age-related changes in the rat vestibular ganglion. Cell number, diameter, and proximal-distal distribution based on size were evaluated. Serial 5-microns plastic sections of the vestibular ganglion from 15 female Wistar rats were examined. Rats were divided into three age groups: young (Y, 3 to 5 months, n = 5), old (0, 24 to 26 months, n = 3), and very old (VO, 28 to 31 months, n = 7). Quantitative analysis indicated no significant differences (P less than .05) in the estimated number of ganglion cells (mean: Y = 1,690, 0 = 2,257, VO = 1,678), ganglion cell profile diameters (mean: Y = 22.5 microns, n = 2,886; O = 23.7 microns, n = 2,313; VO = 22.8 microns, n = 4,061), or proximal-distal localization (proximal: 22.3 microns, 24.4 microns, 22.7 microns; middle: 22.6 microns, 23.1 microns, 22.4 microns; distal: 23.3 microns, 23.4 microns, 23.7 microns; Y, O, and VO, respectively). When pooled, the old animals tended to have slightly larger cell profiles than the other groups. We noted a dramatic age-related increase of aging pigment within the ganglion cell profiles, making the old and very old animals easily distinguishable from the young. In most of the cell profiles, the aging pigment was more or less uniformly distributed throughout the cytoplasm. However, in some, aging pigment was accumulated at one pole of the cell profile. While no typical degenerating cellular profiles were found in any of the sections, several of the ganglion cell profiles from the old animals revealed dense cytoplasm, possibly indicating an early stage of degeneration. PMID:2382785

  8. Glutamatergic signaling and low prodynorphin expression are associated with intact memory and reduced anxiety in rat models of healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2014-01-01

    The LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain is considered a model of healthy aging due to its increased longevity, maintenance of stable body weight (BW) throughout life and low incidence of age-related diseases. However, aging LOU rat cognitive and anxiety status has yet to be investigated. In the present study, male and female LOU rat cognitive performances (6-42 months) were assessed using novel object recognition and Morris Water Maze tasks. Recognition memory remained intact in all LOU rats up to 42 months of age. As for spatial memory, old LOU rat performed similarly as young animals for learning acquisition, reversal learning, and retention. While LOU rat BW remained stable despite aging, 20-month-old ad-libitum-fed (OAL) male Sprague Dawley rats become obese. We determined if long-term caloric restriction (LTCR) prevents age-related BW increase and cognitive deficits in this rat strain, as observed in the obesity-resistant LOU rats. Compared to young animals, recognition memory was impaired in OAL but intact in 20-month-old calorie-restricted (OCR) rats. Similarly, OAL spatial learning acquisition was impaired but LTCR prevented the deficits. Exacerbated stress responses may favor age-related cognitive decline. In the elevated plus maze and open field tasks, LOU and OCR rats exhibited high levels of exploratory activity whereas OAL rats displayed anxious behaviors. Expression of prodynorphin (Pdyn), an endogenous peptide involved in stress-related memory impairments, was increased in the hippocampus of OAL rats. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and immediate early genes Homer 1a and Arc expression, both associated with successful cognitive aging, were unaltered in aging LOU rats but lower in OAL than OCR rats. Altogether, our results, supported by principal component analysis and correlation matrix, suggest that intact memory and low anxiety are associated with glutamatergic signaling and low Pdyn expression in the hippocampus of non-obese aging rats. PMID

  9. Glutamatergic signaling and low prodynorphin expression are associated with intact memory and reduced anxiety in rat models of healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2014-01-01

    The LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain is considered a model of healthy aging due to its increased longevity, maintenance of stable body weight (BW) throughout life and low incidence of age-related diseases. However, aging LOU rat cognitive and anxiety status has yet to be investigated. In the present study, male and female LOU rat cognitive performances (6–42 months) were assessed using novel object recognition and Morris Water Maze tasks. Recognition memory remained intact in all LOU rats up to 42 months of age. As for spatial memory, old LOU rat performed similarly as young animals for learning acquisition, reversal learning, and retention. While LOU rat BW remained stable despite aging, 20-month-old ad-libitum-fed (OAL) male Sprague Dawley rats become obese. We determined if long-term caloric restriction (LTCR) prevents age-related BW increase and cognitive deficits in this rat strain, as observed in the obesity-resistant LOU rats. Compared to young animals, recognition memory was impaired in OAL but intact in 20-month-old calorie-restricted (OCR) rats. Similarly, OAL spatial learning acquisition was impaired but LTCR prevented the deficits. Exacerbated stress responses may favor age-related cognitive decline. In the elevated plus maze and open field tasks, LOU and OCR rats exhibited high levels of exploratory activity whereas OAL rats displayed anxious behaviors. Expression of prodynorphin (Pdyn), an endogenous peptide involved in stress-related memory impairments, was increased in the hippocampus of OAL rats. Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and immediate early genes Homer 1a and Arc expression, both associated with successful cognitive aging, were unaltered in aging LOU rats but lower in OAL than OCR rats. Altogether, our results, supported by principal component analysis and correlation matrix, suggest that intact memory and low anxiety are associated with glutamatergic signaling and low Pdyn expression in the hippocampus of non-obese aging rats. PMID

  10. Central leptin gene delivery evokes persistent leptin signal transduction in young and aged-obese rats but physiological responses become attenuated over time in aged-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Scarpace, P J; Matheny, M; Zhang, Y; Tümer, N; Frase, C D; Shek, E W; Hong, B; Prima, V; Zolotukhin, S

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if long-term leptin treatment desensitizes leptin signal transduction and the subsequent downstream anorexic and thermogenic responses in normal and leptin-resistant age-related obese rats. To this end, we administered, i.c.v., recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding rat leptin cDNA (rAAV-leptin) or control virus into young and aged-obese rats and after 9 or 46 days, examined food intake, oxygen consumption, body weight, serum leptin, STAT3 phosphorylation, hypothalamic NPY and POMC mRNAs, and UCP1 expression and protein level in brown adipose tissue (BAT). In young rats, rAAV-leptin depleted body fat and both anorexic and thermogenic mechanisms contributed to this effect. Moreover, leptin signal transduction was not desensitized, and there were persistent physiological responses. Similarly, in the aged-obese rats, there was unabated leptin signal transduction, however, both the anorexic and thermogenic responses completely attenuated sometime after day 9. This attenuation, downstream of the leptin receptor, may be contributing to the leptin-resistance and age-related weight gain in these aged-obese rats. Finally, in young rats, although the initial responses to rAAV-leptin were dominated by anorexic responses, by 46 days, the predominant response was thermogenic rather than anorexic, suggesting that energy expenditure may be an important component of long-term weight maintenance. PMID:11955525

  11. Aging-associated formaldehyde-induced norepinephrine deficiency contributes to age-related memory decline.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yufei; Jiang, Chun; Wan, You; Lv, Jihui; Jia, Jianping; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Xu; Tong, Zhiqian

    2015-08-01

    A norepinephrine (NE) deficiency has been observed in aged rats and in patients with Alzheimer's disease and is thought to cause cognitive disorder. Which endogenous factor induces NE depletion, however, is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of aging-associated formaldehyde (FA) on the inactivation of NE in vitro and in vivo, and on memory behaviors in rodents. The results showed that age-related DNA demethylation led to hippocampal FA accumulation, and when this occurred, the hippocampal NE content was reduced in healthy male rats of different ages. Furthermore, biochemical analysis revealed that FA rapidly inactivated NE in vitro and that an intrahippocampal injection of FA markedly reduced hippocampal NE levels in healthy adult rats. Unexpectedly, an injection of FA (at a pathological level) or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, a NE depletor) can mimic age-related NE deficiency, long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments, and spatial memory deficits in healthy adult rats. Conversely, an injection of NE reversed age-related deficits in both LTP and memory in aged rats. In agreement with the above results, the senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) mice also exhibited a severe deficit in LTP and memory associated with a more severe NE deficiency and FA accumulation, when compared with the age-matched, senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice. Injection of resveratrol (a natural FA scavenger) or NE into SAMP8 mice reversed FA accumulation and NE deficiency and restored the magnitude of LTP and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that accumulated FA is a critical endogenous factor for aging-associated NE depletion and cognitive decline. PMID:25866202

  12. Aging-associated formaldehyde-induced norepinephrine deficiency contributes to age-related memory decline

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yufei; Jiang, Chun; Wan, You; Lv, Jihui; Jia, Jianping; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Xu; Tong, Zhiqian

    2015-01-01

    A norepinephrine (NE) deficiency has been observed in aged rats and in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and is thought to cause cognitive disorder. Which endogenous factor induces NE depletion, however, is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of aging-associated formaldehyde (FA) on the inactivation of NE in vitro and in vivo, and on memory behaviors in rodents. The results showed that age-related DNA demethylation led to hippocampal FA accumulation, and when this occurred, the hippocampal NE content was reduced in healthy male rats of different ages. Furthermore, biochemical analysis revealed that FA rapidly inactivated NE in vitro and that an intrahippocampal injection of FA markedly reduced hippocampal NE levels in healthy adult rats. Unexpectedly, an injection of FA (at a pathological level) or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, a NE depletor) can mimic age-related NE deficiency, long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments, and spatial memory deficits in healthy adult rats. Conversely, an injection of NE reversed age-related deficits in both LTP and memory in aged rats. In agreement with the above results, the senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) mice also exhibited a severe deficit in LTP and memory associated with a more severe NE deficiency and FA accumulation, when compared with the age-matched, senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice. Injection of resveratrol (a natural FA scavenger) or NE into SAMP8 mice reversed FA accumulation and NE deficiency and restored the magnitude of LTP and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that accumulated FA is a critical endogenous factor for aging-associated NE depletion and cognitive decline. PMID:25866202

  13. The genomic response of the ipsilateral and contralateral cortex to stroke in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Buga, A-M; Sascau, M; Pisoschi, C; Herndon, J G; Kessler, C; Popa-Wagner, A

    2008-01-01

    Aged rats recover poorly after unilateral stroke, whereas young rats recover readily possibly with the help from the contralateral, healthy hemisphere. In this study we asked whether anomalous, age-related changes in the transcriptional activity in the brains of aged rats could be one underlying factor contributing to reduced functional recovery. We analysed gene expression in the periinfarct and contralateral areas of 3-month- and 18-month-old Sprague Dawley rats. Our experimental end-points were cDNA arrays containing genes related to hypoxia signalling, DNA damage and apoptosis, cellular response to injury, axonal damage and re-growth, cell lineage differentiation, dendritogenesis and neurogenesis. The major transcriptional events observed were: (i) Early up-regulation of DNA damage and down-regulation of anti-apoptosis-related genes in the periinfarct region of aged rats after stroke; (ii) Impaired neurogenesis in the periinfarct area, especially in aged rats; (iii) Impaired neurogenesis in the contralateral (unlesioned) hemisphere of both young and aged rats at all times after stroke and (iv) Marked up-regulation, in aged rats, of genes associated with inflammation and scar formation. These results were confirmed with quantitative real-time PCR. We conclude that reduced transcriptional activity in the healthy, contralateral hemisphere of aged rats in conjunction with an early up-regulation of DNA damage-related genes and pro-apoptotic genes and down-regulation of axono- and neurogenesis in the periinfarct area are likely to account for poor neurorehabilitation after stroke in old rats. PMID:18266980

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in aging rat brain following transient global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Sun, Xiaoyan; LaManna, Joseph C

    2008-01-01

    Aged rat brain is more sensitive to reperfusion injury induced by cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The mitochondrial respiratory chain, the major source of free radicals during reperfusion, is likely to be the target of lipid peroxidation. Previous work has shown a higher mortality and lower hippocampal neuronal survival in older rats. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major product of lipid peroxidation, was found to be elevated in cortex and brainstem after resuscitation. In this study we investigated the acute changes of mitochondrial function in aging rat brain following cardiac arrest and resuscitation; the effect of an antioxidant, alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) was also tested. Fischer 344 rats, 6 and 24-month old, were subjected to cardiac arrest (7-10 minutes) and allowed to recover 1 hour after resuscitation. Mitochondria of cortex and brainstem were isolated and assayed for respiratory function. Compared to their respective non-arrested control group, 1h untreated groups (both 6 month and 24 month) had similar state 3 (ADP-stimulated) but higher state 4 (resting state) respiratory rates. The respiratory control ratio (state 3/state 4) of cortex in the 1h untreated group was 26% lower than the non-arrested control group; similar results were found in brainstem. The decreased mitochondrial respiratory function was improved by PBN treatment. HNE-modified mitochondrial proteins were elevated 1h after resuscitation, with an evident change in the aged. Treatment with PBN reduced the elevated HNE production in mitochondria of cortex. The data suggest (i) there is increased sensitivity to lipid peroxidation with aging, (ii) mitochondrial respiratory function related to coupled oxidation decreases following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and (iii) treatment with antioxidant, such as PBN, reduces the oxidative damage following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:18290349

  15. Age-related elemental change in bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Eisa, M. H.; Jin, W.; Shen, H.; Mi, Y.; Gao, J.; Zhou, Y.; Yao, H.; Zhao, Y.

    2008-04-01

    To investigate age dependence of the bone element contents and structure, lumbar and femur from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were chosen for their more susceptibility to fracture. These rats were divided into to 5 age groups: 1, 4, 7, 11 and 25 month-age, corresponding human beings from the young to the old. The elements contents were detected by external Proton Induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) method was also applied to obtain information about calcium (Ca) and phosphor (P) structure. It was found that Ca content, Ca/P ratio, valance state of Ca and P and their coordinate structure remains unaltered with age variance, whereas the content of strontium (Sr) was significantly decreasing. Sr concentration may provide a new parameter for diagnosis of bone disorder.

  16. Dietary Vitamin D Deficiency in Rats from Middle- to Old-age Leads to Elevated Tyrosine Nitration and Proteomics Changes in Levels of Key Proteins in Brain: Implications for Low Vitamin D-dependent Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Jeriel T. R.; Förster, Sarah; Sultana, Rukhsana; Brewer, Lawrence D.; Latimer, Caitlin S.; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; Porter, Nada M.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-known effects of vitamin D (VitD) in maintaining bone health, there is increasing appreciation that this vitamin may serve important roles in other organs and tissues, including the brain. Given that VitD deficiency is especially widespread among the elderly, it is important to understand how the range of serum VitD levels that mimic those found in humans (from low to high) affects the brain during aging from middle-age to old-age. To address this issue, twenty-seven male F344 rats were split into three groups and fed isocaloric diets containing low (100 IU/kg food), control (1000 IU/kg food), or high (10000 IU/kg food) VitD beginning at middle-age (12 months) and continued for a period of 4–5 months. We compared the effects of these dietary VitD manipulations on oxidative and nitrosative stress measures in posterior brain cortices. The low VitD group showed global elevation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) compared to control and high VitD treated groups. Further investigation showed that this elevation may involve dysregulation of the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway and NF-κB mediated transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as indicated by translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus and elevation of iNOS levels. Proteomic techniques were used to provide insights into potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Several brain proteins were found at significantly elevated levels in low VitD group compared to the control and high VitD groups. Three of these proteins, 6-phosphofructokinase, triosephosphate isomerase, and pyruvate kinase, are involved directly in glycolysis. Two others, peroxiredoxin-3 and DJ-1/PARK7, have peroxidase activity and are found in mitochondria. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (PPIA or cyclophilin A) has been shown to have multiple roles including protein folding, regulation of protein kinases and phosphatases, immunoregulation, cell signaling, and redox

  17. Dietary vitamin D deficiency in rats from middle to old age leads to elevated tyrosine nitration and proteomics changes in levels of key proteins in brain: implications for low vitamin D-dependent age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Jeriel T R; Förster, Sarah; Sultana, Rukhsana; Brewer, Lawrence D; Latimer, Caitlin S; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Porter, Nada M; Butterfield, D Allan

    2013-12-01

    In addition to the well-known effects of vitamin D (VitD) in maintaining bone health, there is increasing appreciation that this vitamin may serve important roles in other organs and tissues, including the brain. Given that VitD deficiency is especially widespread among the elderly, it is important to understand how the range of serum VitD levels that mimic those found in humans (from low to high) affects the brain during aging from middle age to old age. To address this issue, 27 male F344 rats were split into three groups and fed isocaloric diets containing low (100 IU/kg food), control (1000 IU/kg food), or high (10,000 IU/kg food) VitD beginning at middle age (12 months) and continued for a period of 4-5 months. We compared the effects of these dietary VitD manipulations on oxidative and nitrosative stress measures in posterior brain cortices. The low-VitD group showed global elevation of 3-nitrotyrosine compared to control and high-VitD-treated groups. Further investigation showed that this elevation may involve dysregulation of the nuclear factor κ-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway and NF-κB-mediated transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as indicated by translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus and elevation of iNOS levels. Proteomics techniques were used to provide insight into potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Several brain proteins were found at significantly elevated levels in the low-VitD group compared to the control and high-VitD groups. Three of these proteins, 6-phosphofructokinase, triose phosphate isomerase, and pyruvate kinase, are involved directly in glycolysis. Two others, peroxiredoxin-3 and DJ-1/PARK7, have peroxidase activity and are found in mitochondria. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (cyclophilin A) has been shown to have multiple roles, including protein folding, regulation of protein kinases and phosphatases, immunoregulation, cell signaling, and redox status. Together, these

  18. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  19. Age-related dose response of selected reproductive parameters to acute cadmium chloride exposure in the male Long-Evans rat

    SciTech Connect

    Laskey, J.W.; Rehnberg, G.L.; Laws, S.C.; Hein, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Groups of male Long-Evans rats 30, 50, or 70 d old were injected subcutaneously (sc) with a single dose of 0, 5.5, 11.5, or 24.6 ..mu..mol Cd/kg as cadmium chloride. All animals were killed 60 d after treatment. At 2 h prior to sacrifice, the rats were injected sc with 100 IU human chlorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to maximally stimulate serum testosterone concentrations. After sacrifice the testes, epididymides and seminal vesicles were removed and weighed. Cardiac blood was taken, and serum concentrations of testosterone (sT) and follicle-stimulating hormone (sFSH) were determined. Sperm concentration in luminal fluid collected from the vas deferens was determined. Significant (p < 0.01) dose-dependent effects for all measured reproductive parameters were noted in the 70-d-old animals, while no effects were seen in the 30- to 50-d-old rats in either seminal vesicles weight or hCG-stimulated sT concentration. In the absence of significant (p > 0.05) changes in body weight gain, effects were seen in testes and epididymides weight, sperm concentration, and sFSH in the 70-d-old rats at Cd doses that were lower than those necessary to bring about similar changes in the 30- or 50-d-old animals.

  20. [Aspects of stress and aging in the rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Niedermüller, H; Kment, A; Hofecker, G; Skalicky, M

    1981-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats aged 6 to 22 months were stressed for 2, 16 and 9m resp. by the influence of noise (106 dB, 2h/d) and overcrowding (12 rats/Makrolon-IV-cage). Parameters of the plasma, brain, testicles and the liver (enzymes, metabolites and hormones) and well-known age parameters were evaluated to obtain objective criteria for stress influences. The weights of the whole body and some organs were also measured. The most distinct changes were seen in the plasma enzyme activities CPK, ALD, CHE and AP, in the concentrations of CHO and TRG and in the levels of testosterone, corticosterone and aldosterone. The contraction-relaxation of the tail tendon and the soluble collagen of the corium changed in the direction of higher age, just as lipofuscine content in the brain, cerebellum and the adrenals did. Some activities of enzymes and concentrations of metabolites changed in the brain, liver the testicles. Adrenal weights rose sharply in both stress groups; the body weight was lower. There were some differences in the effects of the two stress factors. These investigations gave some information about the relation between stress and aging and provide a simple means of determining the influence of stress. PMID:6112891

  1. Anti-aging Effect and Gene Expression Profiling of Aged Rats Treated with G. bimaculatus Extract

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Kim, Min-Ji; Park, Kun-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Extract from Gryllus bimaculatus crickets inhibits oxidation at the DNA level, with reduced production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Microarray analyses were performed with a rat 28K cDNA clone set array to identify the gene expression profiles of aged (10 months old) Wistar Kyoto rats treated for one month with 100 mg/kg G. bimaculatus ethanol extract to assess the effects. The extract produced a meaningful anti-edema effect, evident by the inhibition of creatinine phosphokinase activity. The weights of abdominal and ovarian adipose tissues were reduced and the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissues was increased in an extract dose-dependent manner. Compared with untreated control rats, rats treated with the extract displayed the upregulation of 1053 genes including Fas (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 6), Amigo3 (adhesion molecule with an immunoglobulin-like domain), Reticulon 4, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme (Hmgcr; a reductase), related anti-fatigue (enzyme metabolism), and Rtn antioxidant, and the downregulation of 73 genes including Ugt2b (UDP glycosyltransferase 2 family), Early growth response 1, and Glycoprotein m6a. Data suggest that G. bimaculatus extract may have value in lessening the effects of aging, resulting in a differential gene expression pattern indicative of a marked stress response and lower expression of metabolic and biosynthetic genes. PMID:26191384

  2. Male rats exposed in utero to di(n-butyl) phthalate: Age-related changes in Leydig cell smooth endoplasmic reticulum and testicular testosterone-biosynthesis enzymes/proteins.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Masaya; Wempe, Michael F; Mutou, Tomoko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kansaku, Norio; Ikegami, Masahiro; Inomata, Tomo; Asari, Masao; Wakui, Shin

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the age-related (i.e., weeks 5, 7, 9, 14 and 17) morphological changes of Leydig cell smooth endoplasmic reticulum (LCs-ER) and testicular testosterone biosynthesis/protein expression in rats in utero exposed to di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) (intragastrically; 100mg/kg/day) on days 12-21 post-conception. Ultrastructural observations revealed the LCs-ER of the DBP group were non-dilated until peri-puberty, and thereafter decreased and disappeared. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses revealed that StAR and P450scc levels in the DBP group were significantly lower at 5 and 7 weeks compared with the vehicle group but became similar during weeks 9-17. Although 3β-HSD, P450c17, and 17β-HSD levels of mRNA and protein in the DBP group were similar to the vehicle control group at 5 and 7 weeks of age, they were significantly lower during weeks 9-17. In utero DBP exposure results in age-related LCs-ER changes corresponding to reduction of testicular testosterone biosynthesis enzymes/associated proteins. PMID:26706031

  3. Influence of age on the biochemical response of rat lung to ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, M.G.; Elsayed, N.M.; Ospital, J.J.; Hacker, A.D.

    1985-11-01

    We have previously examined the influence of animal age on the pulmonary response to ozone (O3) in rats between 7 and 90 days of age. In the present study, we expanded the age groups of rats, and examined in greater detail the relationship between animal age and pulmonary response to inhaled O3. We exposed 7 groups of specific pathogen free, male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 24, 30, 45, 60, 90, 180, and 365 days, to 0.8 ppm (1568 micrograms/m3) O3 continuously for 3 days. After O3 exposure, we sacrificed the exposed rats and a matched number of controls from each age group, and analyzed their lungs for a series of physical and biochemical parameters, including glutathione metabolizing and NADPH producing enzyme activities. We observed that in control rats all the parameters increased as a function of age. However, the rate of increase was generally slower after age 60 days. After O3 exposure there was an increase in all the parameters for all age groups relative to their corresponding controls, but the extent of increase was significantly larger in rats 60 days and older than in younger rats. A regression of the difference in mean values between control and exposed animals for each parameter against age showed a linear correlation, indicating that the response was age-dependent. Since the magnitude of such increases is thought to reflect the degree of lung injury, the results suggest that O3 exposure causes greater lung injury in older rats than in younger rats. We tested this assumption by exposing rats from four different age groups (24, 45, 60 and 90 days) to a lethal dose of O3 (4 ppm or 7840 micrograms/m3 for 8 hours). The mortality rates were 50% and 83% for 24 and 45 day old rats, respectively, and 100% for 60 and 90 day old rats. The results of these studies further demonstrate that older rats are more susceptible to lung injury from O3 than younger rats.

  4. Aged rats show dominant modulation of lower frequency hippocampal theta rhythm during running.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yi; Kuo, Terry B J; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2016-10-01

    Aging causes considerable decline in both physiological and mental functions, particularly cognitive function. The hippocampal theta rhythm (4-12Hz) is related to both cognition and locomotion. Aging-related findings of the frequency and amplitude of hippocampal theta oscillations are inconsistent and occasionally contradictory. This inconsistency may be due to the effects of the sleep/wake state and different frequency subbands being overlooked. We assumed that aged rats have lower responses of the hippocampal theta rhythm during running, which is mainly due to the dominant modulation of theta frequency subbands related to cognition. By simultaneously recording electroencephalography, physical activity (PA), and the heart rate (HR), this experiment explored the theta oscillations before, during, and after treadmill running at a constant speed in 8-week-old (adult) and 60-week-old (middle-aged) rats. Compared with adult rats, the middle-aged rats exhibited lower theta activity in all frequency ranges before running. Running increased the theta frequency (Frq, 4-12Hz), total activity of the whole theta band (total power, TP), activity of the middle theta frequency (MT, 6.5-9.5Hz), and PA in both age groups. However, the middle-aged rats still showed fewer changes in these parameters during the whole running process. After the waking baseline values were substracted, middle-aged rats showed significantly fewer differences in ΔFrq, ΔTP, and ΔMT but significantly more differences in low-frequency theta activity (4.0-6.5Hz) and HR than the adult rats did. Therefore, the decreasing activity and response of the whole theta band in the middle-aged rats resulted in dominant modulation of the middle to lower frequency (4.0-9.5Hz) theta rhythm. The different alterations in the theta rhythm during treadmill running in the two groups may reflect that learning decline with age. PMID:27496645

  5. The Expression Changes of Inflammasomes in the Aging Rat Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Song, Fei; Ma, Yuxiang; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms of kidney aging are not yet clear. Studies have shown that immunological inflammation is related to kidney aging. Inflammasomes are important components of innate immune system in the body. However, the function of inflammasomes and their underlying mechanisms in renal aging remain unclear. In this study, for the first time, we systematically investigated the role of the inflammasomes and the inflammatory responses activated by inflammasomes during kidney aging. We found that during kidney aging, the expression levels of the molecules associated with the activation of inflammasomes, including toll-like receptor-4 and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R), were significantly increased; their downstream signaling pathway molecule interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 (IRAK4) was markedly activated (Phospho-IRAK4 was obviously increased); the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway was activated (the activated NF-κB pathway molecules Phospho-IKKβ, Phospho-IκBα, and Phospho-NF-κBp65 were significantly elevated); the levels of the inflammasome components NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3), NLRC4, and pro-caspase-1 were prominently upregulated; and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were notably increased in the kidneys of 24-month-old (elderly group) rats. These results showed that inflammasomes are markedly activated during the renal aging process and might induce inflamm-aging by promoting the maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. PMID:26219846

  6. Effect of ethinyl estradiol treatment on lipoproteins and LCAT activity in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Kudchodkar, B J; Lacko, A G

    1992-06-01

    The induction of hepatic lipoprotein (apo B/E) have been investigated in Fischer-344 rats. These studies were aimed to determine the mechanism underlying the previously observed (Lee et al., Mech. Ageing Dev., 61 (1991) 85-98) hypercholesterolemia and the age-related decrease in the fractional rate of endogenous cholesterol esterification. Young (5 months) and aged (22 months) male Fischer-344 rats were treated with pharmacological doses (5 mg/kg per day) of ethinyl estradiol (EE) for 7 days. Reduction of plasma cholesterol (57% in young vs 47% in aged rats) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (64% in young vs 63% in aged rats) occurred in both groups upon EE treatment. Initial low density lipoprotein levels were very low in the plasma of young rats and consequently were not affected by EE treatment. However, in aged rats, the low density lipoprotein levels were much higher initially and were markedly reduced by EE treatment. (18.0 vs 10.0 mg/dl). Very low density lipoproteins were about the same initially but increased in aged rats and decreased in young rats upon EE treatment. Both the lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity (as determined with a proteoliposome substrate) and the fractional rate (FR) of the endogenous cholesterol esterification decreased in treated animals compared to controls. However, the differences in the FR of the endogenous cholesterol esterification between young and aged rats (observed before treatment) were nearly abolished upon treatment. These data suggest that the previously observed age related decrease in the FR of endogenous cholesterol esterification is due to the accumulation of apolipoprotein E-rich (apo E) lipoproteins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1630152

  7. Alterations in lenticular proteins during ageing and selenite-induced cataractogenesis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakthivel, Muniyan; Elanchezhian, Rajan; Thomas, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine putative alterations in the major lenticular proteins in Wistar rats of different ages and to compare these alterations with those occurring in rats with selenite-induced cataract. Methods Lenticular transparency was determined by morphological examination using slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Alterations in lenticular protein were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE (SDS–PAGE) and confirmed immunologically by western blot. Results Morphological examination did not reveal observable opacities in the lenses of the rats of different age groups; however, dense nuclear opacities were noted in lenses of rats in the selenite-cataract group. Western blot assays revealed age-related changes in soluble and urea-soluble lenticular proteins. Decreased αA- and βB1-crystallins in the soluble fraction and aggregation of αA-crystallin, in addition to the degraded fragment of βB1-crystallin, in the urea-soluble fraction appeared to occur in relation to increasing age of the rats from which the lenses were taken; similarly, cytoskeletal proteins appeared to decline with increasing age. The lenses from rats in the selenite-cataract group exhibited similar changes, except that there was also high molecular weight aggregation of αA-crystallin. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that there is loss, as well as aggregation, of αA-crystallin in the aging rat lens, although there is no accompanying loss of lenticular transparency. PMID:20300567

  8. Effects of age on behavioral and physiological responses to carbaryl in rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, R N; Poli, A; Morato, G S; Lima, T C; Zanin, M

    1991-01-01

    Motor, sensory and thermoregulatory functions were examined in young (3 months) and mature (12 months) rats following PO administration of single low doses (10 and 50 mg/kg) of carbaryl, a carbamate insecticide, and these effects were related to blood cholinesterase activity. Carbaryl 50 mg/kg decreased the frequency of ambulation in the open-field arena within 30 min while it enhanced the duration of haloperidol-induced catalepsy in both young and mature rats. Administration of carbaryl also resulted in an increased nociceptive threshold to thermic stimuli mainly in mature rats. An age-related reduction in body temperature was observed at 30, 60 and 90 min after injection. Activity of blood cholinesterase was reduced in young and mature rats at 30 and 60 min following carbaryl exposure. These results indicate that carbaryl can induce an age-related impairment on some behavioral and autonomic functions in rats correlated to the inhibition of cholinesterase activity. PMID:1904531

  9. Ischemia-induced Angiogenesis is Attenuated in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yaohui; Wang, Liuqing; Wang, Jixian; Lin, Xiaojie; Wang, Yongting; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    To study whether focal angiogenesis is induced in aged rodents after permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), young adult (3-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) Fisher 344 rats underwent MCAO and sacrificed up to two months after MCAO. Immunohistochemistry and synchrotron radiation microangiography were performed to examine the number of newly formed blood vessels in both young adult and aged rats post-ischemia. We found that the number of capillaries and small arteries in aged brain was the same as young adult brain. In addition, we found that after MCAO, the number of blood vessels in the peri-infarct region of ipsilateral hemisphere in aged ischemic rats was significantly increased compared to the aged sham rats (p<0.05). We also confirmed that ischemia-induced focal angiogenesis occurred in young adult rat brain while the blood vessel density in young adult ischemic brain was significantly higher than that in the aged ischemic brain (p<0.05). Our data suggests that focal angiogenesis in aged rat brain can be induced in response to ischemic brain injury, and that aging impedes brain repairing and remodeling after ischemic stroke, possible due to the limited response of angiogenesis. PMID:27493831

  10. Pathophysiology of ageing, longevity and age related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bürkle, Alexander; Caselli, Graziella; Franceschi, Claudio; Mariani, Erminia; Sansoni, Paolo; Santoni, Angela; Vecchio, Giancarlo; Witkowski, Jacek M; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-01-01

    On April 18, 2007 an international meeting on Pathophysiology of Ageing, Longevity and Age-Related Diseases was held in Palermo, Italy. Several interesting topics on Cancer, Immunosenescence, Age-related inflammatory diseases and longevity were discussed. In this report we summarize the most important issues. However, ageing must be considered an unavoidable end point of the life history of each individual, nevertheless the increasing knowledge on ageing mechanisms, allows envisaging many different strategies to cope with, and delay it. So, a better understanding of pathophysiology of ageing and age-related disease is essential for giving everybody a reasonable chance for living a long and enjoyable final part of the life. PMID:17683521

  11. Overcoming Age-Related Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agullo, Gloria Luque

    2006-01-01

    One of the most controversial issues in foreign language (FL) teaching is the age at which language learning should start. Nowadays it is recognized that in second language contexts maturational constraints make an early start advisable, but there is still disagreement regarding the problem of when to start or the best way to learn in foreign…

  12. Age-related changes in prefrontal norepinephrine transporter density: The basis for improved cognitive flexibility after low doses of atomoxetine in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Sarah E; Agster, Kara L; Waterhouse, Barry D; McGaughy, Jill A

    2016-06-15

    Adolescence is a period of major behavioral and brain reorganization. As diagnoses and treatment of disorders like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often occur during adolescence, it is important to understand how the prefrontal cortices change and how these changes may influence the response to drugs during development. The current study uses an adolescent rat model to study the effect of standard ADHD treatments, atomoxetine and methylphenidate on attentional set shifting and reversal learning. While both of these drugs act as norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, higher doses of atomoxetine and all doses of methylphenidate also block dopamine transporters (DAT). Low doses of atomoxetine, were effective at remediating cognitive rigidity found in adolescents. In contrast, methylphenidate improved performance in rats unable to form an attentional set due to distractibility but was without effect in normal subjects. We also assessed the effects of GBR 12909, a selective DAT inhibitor, but found no effect of any dose on behavior. A second study in adolescent rats investigated changes in norepinephrine transporter (NET) and dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) density in five functionally distinct sub-regions of the prefrontal cortex: infralimbic, prelimbic, anterior cingulate, medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortices. These regions are implicated in impulsivity and distractibility. We found that NET, but not DBH, changed across adolescence in a regionally selective manner. The prelimbic cortex, which is critical to cognitive rigidity, and the lateral orbitofrontal cortex, critical to reversal learning and some forms of response inhibition, showed higher levels of NET at early than mid- to late adolescence. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26774596

  13. Enhanced Post-Ischemic Neurogenesis in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yao-Fang; Preston, Edward; Wojtowicz, J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis persists in adult mammals, but its rate declines dramatically with age. Evidence indicates that experimentally-reduced levels of neurogenesis (e.g., by irradiation) in young rats has profound influence on cognition as determined by learning and memory tests. In the present study we asked whether in middle-aged, 10- to 13-months-old rats, cell production can be restored toward the level present in young rats. To manipulate neurogenesis we induced bilateral carotid occlusion with hypotension. This procedure is known to increase neurogenesis in young rats, presumably in a compensatory manner, but until now, has never been tested in aging rats. Cell production was measured at 10, 35, and 90 days after ischemia. The results indicate that neuronal proliferation and differentiation can be transiently restored in middle-aged rats. Furthermore, the effects are more pronounced in the dorsal as opposed to ventral hippocampus thus restoring the dorso-ventral gradient seen in younger rats. Our results support previous findings showing that some of the essential features of the age-dependent decline in neurogenesis are reversible. Thus, it may be possible to manipulate neurogenesis and improve learning and memory in old age. PMID:20877422

  14. Nutrition and age-related eye diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vision loss among the elderly is an important health problem. Approximately one person in three has some form of vision-reducing eye disease by the age of 65 [1]. Age-related cataract, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma are the major diseases resulting in visu...

  15. Age-related behavorial changes in methomyl effects on the behavior of labroatory rats: Comparison of operant behavior nad motor activity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid increase in older adults in the population highlights the importance of understanding the role of aging in susceptibility to environmental contaminants. Methomyl is a cholinesteraseinhibiting carbamate pesticide used on a variety of produce. Although the effects of pest...

  16. Effects of metabolic syndrome on the ultrastructure of the femoral nerve in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues de Souza, Romeu; Gama, Eliane F; El-Razi Neto, Semaan; Maldonado, Diogo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the morphometry of the femoral nerve in aging rats with metabolic syndrome compared to controls. Systolic blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose were measured, and myelinated and unmyelinated fibers in the femoral nerves were quantitatively assessed under electron microscopy. Aging rats exposed to a regimen of metabolic syndrome developed elevation of plasma glucose concentration, mild hypertension and polyneuropathy characterized by a decrease in myelin fiber area, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness and myelin fiber loss in the femoral nerve. The histogram of size distribution for myelinated fibers and axons from the aging rats of the control group was bimodal. For aging MS animals, the histogram turned out to be unimodal. The ultrastructure of unmyelinated fibers and of Schwann cells in 18-month-old rats was well preserved. Granules of lipofuscin were seen in unmyelinated fiber axons of 18-month-old rats with MS. The damage percentage of the large myelinated fibers has increased significantly in 18-month-old and 18-month-old (MS) rats in relation to the controls. No significant difference was observed among the groups for the g-ratio. Comparing the three groups, the number of neurotubules and neurofilaments in myelinated fibers of 18-month-old rats with MS was significantly smaller than for the groups of 18-month-old and 14-month-old rats. The overall changes seen in the femoral nerve from aging rats seem minor compared to the changes in the aging rats with MS, suggesting that long-term MS accelerates the progressive modifications in peripheral nerves that develop in old age. PMID:25866014

  17. Impact of Dietary Genistein and Aging on Executive Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Neese, Steven L.; Wang, Victor C.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Woodling, Kellie A.; Andrade, Juan E.; Helferich, William G.; Korol, Donna L.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Genistein is an estrogenic soy isoflavone widely promoted for healthy aging, but its effects on cognitive function are not well-understood. We examined the cognitive effects of once daily oral genistein treatment at two doses (approximately 162 µg/kg/day low dose and a 323 µg/kg/day high dose) in ovariectomized young (7 month), middle-aged (16 month), and old (22 month) Long-Evans rats. Operant tasks including delayed spatial alternation (DSA), differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL), and reversal learning that tap prefrontal cortical function were used to assess working memory, inhibitory control/timing, and strategy shifting, respectively. At the conclusion of cognitive testing, brains were collected and relative densities of D1 and D2 dopamine receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) were measured in the prefrontal cortex. On the DSA task, the high dose old group performed worse than both the high dose young and middle-aged groups. On the DRL task, the high dose of genistein resulted in a marginally significant impairment in the ratio of reinforced to non-reinforced lever presses. This effect was present across age groups. Age effects were also found as old rats performed more poorly than the young and middle aged rats on the DSA overall. In contrast, middle-aged and old rats made fewer lever presses on the DRL than did the young rats, a pattern of behavior associated with better performance on this task. Moreover, while DAT levels overall decreased with age, genistein treatment produced an increase in DAT expression in old rats relative to similarly aged control rats. D1 and D2 densities did not differ between genistein dose groups or by age. These results highlight the fact that aspects of executive function are differentially sensitive to both genistein exposure and aging and suggest that altered prefrontal dopamine function could potentially play a role in mediating these effects. PMID:19945528

  18. Age-Related Declines Evident Before 60

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Exercise for Seniors Healthy Aging Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Exercise for Seniors Healthy Aging About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  19. Glycoconjugate changes in aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Ando, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    The significance of glycosphingolipids and glycoproteins is discussed in their relation to normal aging and pathological aging, aging with diseases. Healthy myelin that looks stable is found to be gradually degraded and reconstructed throughout life for remodeling. An exciting finding is that myelin P0 protein is located in neurons and glycosylated in aging brains. In pathological aging, the roles of glycosphingolipids and glycoproteins as risk factors or protective agents for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are discussed. Intensive studies have been performed aiming to remove the risks from and to restore the functional deficits of the brain. Some of them are expected to be translated to therapeutic means. PMID:25151390

  20. Aging changes agonist induced contractile responses in permeabilized rat bladder.

    PubMed

    Durlu-Kandilci, N Tugba; Denizalti, Merve; Sahin-Erdemli, Inci

    2015-08-01

    Aging alters bladder functions where a decrease in filling, storage and emptying is observed. These changes cause urinary incontinence, especially in women. The aim of this study is to examine how aging affects the intracellular calcium movements due to agonist-induced contractions in permeabilized female rat bladder. Urinary bladder isolated from young and old female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Small detrusor strips were permeabilized with β-escin. The contractile responses induced with agonists were compared between young and old groups. Carbachol-induced contractions were decreased in permeabilized detrusor from old rats compared to young group. Heparin and ryanodine decreased carbachol-induced contractions in young rats where only heparin inhibited these contractions in olds. Caffeine-induced contractions but not inositol triphosphate (IP3)-induced contractions were decreased in old group compared to youngs. The cumulative calcium response curves (pCa 8-4) were also decreased in old rats. Carbachol-induced calcium sensitization responses did not alter by age where GTP-β-S and GF-109203X but not Y-27632 inhibited these responses. Carbachol-induced contractions decrease with aging in rat bladder detrusor. It can be postulated as IP3-induced calcium release (IICR) is primarily responsible for the contractions in older rats where the decrease in carbachol contractions in aging may be as a result of a decrease in calcium-induced calcium release (CICR), rather than carbachol-induced calcium sensitization. PMID:26153091

  1. Histopathological lesions in the pancreas of the BB Wistar rat as a function of age and duration of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wright, J; Yates, A; Sharma, H; Thibert, P

    1985-01-01

    Pancreatic histopathology was studied in 121 BBWd, 43 BBWnd, and 33 Wistar rats. Insulitis was the most common inflammatory lesion in both BBW and BBWnd rats. The incidence was inversely associated with age and with duration of diabetes in BBWd rats, but there was no age-related pattern in BBWnd rats. Small end-stage islets were typical of BBWd rats but were not seen in BBWnd rats. Several BBWd rats showed hyperplastic islets months after the onset of diabetes, a pattern that is also seen in a small percentage of human JOD patients. Several non-specific exocrine inflammatory lesions occurred in both BBWd and BBWnd rats: acute and/or chronic pancreatitis, eosinophilic infiltrates, granulomatous lesions and acute and/or chronic interstitial inflammation. Only chronic interstitial inflammation was seen in outbred Wistar rats. PMID:3882779

  2. Nutritional interventions protect against age-related deficits in behavior: from animals to humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show impaired performance on motor and cognitive tasks. Similar changes in behavior occur in humans with age, and the development of methods to retard or reverse these age-related neuronal and behavioral deficits could increase healthy aging and decrease health care costs. In the present s...

  3. Long noncoding RNAs in aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2016-03-01

    Aging is the universal, intrinsic, genetically-controlled, evolutionarily-conserved and time-dependent intricate biological process characterised by the cumulative decline in the physiological functions and their coordination in an organism after the attainment of adulthood resulting in the imbalance of neurological, immunological and metabolic functions of the body. Various biological processes and mechanisms along with altered levels of mRNAs and proteins have been reported to be involved in the progression of aging. It is one of the major risk factors in the patho-physiology of various diseases and disorders. Recently, the discovery of pervasive transcription of a vast pool of heterogeneous regulatory noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including small ncRNAs (sncRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), in the mammalian genome have provided an alternative way to study and explore the missing links in the aging process, its mechanism(s) and related diseases in a whole new dimension. The involvement of small noncoding RNAs in aging and age-related diseases have been extensively studied and recently reviewed. However, lncRNAs, whose function is far less explored in relation to aging, have emerged as a class of major regulators of genomic functions. Here, we have described some examples of known as well as novel lncRNAs that have been implicated in the progression of the aging process and age-related diseases. This may further stimulate research on noncoding RNAs and the aging process. PMID:26655093

  4. Rat preference for food-related odors.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, E; Ono, T; Uwano, T; Takashima, Y; Kawasaki, M

    1991-01-01

    Preferences for food-related odors and the effects of fasting on those preferences were investigated during rat bar pressing for brief odor presentation. A rat was housed in an equilateral octagonal cage and had free access to food and water, except during fasting. Among 8 food-related odor substances (black pepper, cheese, coffee, milk, nut, peppermint, plum and orange), black pepper, milk and coffee were most preferred, and cheese was least preferred, but even the bar pressing rate for cheese was above the operant level. This data indicates that all 8 odors were preferred by rats, although there were different degrees of preference in individual animals. Fasting substantially increased the rate of bar pressing for odors and changed the odors preferences. This result was probably due to increased search for food and water. Since bar pressing was reinforced by nothing other than odor presentation, the results reveal inherent odor preferences of rats. PMID:1959035

  5. Long term facilitation of respiratory motor output decreases with age in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Zabka, A G; Behan, M; Mitchell, G S

    2001-01-01

    Long term facilitation (LTF) is a serotonin-dependent augmentation of respiratory motor output (phrenic and hypoglossal) following episodic hypoxia. Since ageing influences respiratory control mechanisms and serotonergic function, we tested the hypothesis that LTF decreases with age in male rats. Young (3-4 month) and aged (13 month) male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with urethane, vagotomized, paralysed and pump ventilated. Integrated phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) nerve activities were measured before (baseline), during and for 60 min after three 5 min episodes of isocapnic hypoxia (Pa,O2 35-45 mmHg) separated by 5 min of hyperoxia (Pa,O2 > 150 mmHg). In young rats, LTF was observed as an augmentation in peak integrated phrenic (n = 8) and XII (n = 7) amplitudes following episodic hypoxia (56 ± 14 and 73 ± 16 % (means ±s.e.m.) at 60 min post-hypoxia, respectively; both P < 0.05). In aged rats, LTF was significantly increased compared to baseline in phrenic (25 ± 8 % at 60 min, P < 0.05), but not in XII (4 ± 7 %, P > 0.05) motor output. LTF was significantly greater in young than in aged rats in both motor outputs (P < 0.05). Decreased phrenic and XII LTF suggests that serotonergic modulation of respiratory motor output decreases in ageing male rats. We speculate that decreased serotonergic modulation may contribute to age-related breathing disorders. PMID:11230522

  6. rhEPO affects apoptosis in hippocampus of aging rats by upregulating SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiqin; Wang, Huqing; Zhang, Wenting; Wei, Xuanhui; Zhao, Jiaxin; Yan, Pu; Liu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the signaling pathway involved in the anti-aging effect of erythropoietin (EPO) and to clarify whether recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) affects apoptosis in the aging rat hippocampus by upregulating Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). In this study, a rat model of aging was established using D-galactose. Behavioral changes were monitored by the Morris water maze test. Using immunohistochemistry, we studied the expression of SIRT1, B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 gene (Bcl-2), and Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) expression, and apoptotic cells in the hippocampus of a rat model of aging in which rhEPO was intraperitoneally injected. The escape latency in rats from the EPO group shortened significantly; however, the number of platform passes increased significantly from that in the D-gal group (P < 0.05). Compared to the D-gal group, in the EPO group, the number of SIRT1 and Bcl-2-positive cells increased (P < 0.05), but the number of Bax-positive cells and apoptotic cells decreased in the hippocampus of aging rats (P < 0.05). These results suggest that rhEPO regulates apoptosis-related genes and affects apoptosis in the hippocampus of aging rats by upregulating SIRT. This may be one of the important pathways underlying the anti-aging property of EPO. PMID:26261574

  7. Age-related differences in acquisiton, steady-state performance and carbaryl effects on the operant behavior of Brown Norway rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid increase in older adults in the population highlights the importance of understanding the role of aging in susceptibility to environmental contaminants. As part of a larger program on life-stage susceptibility, this experiment determined the effect of the carbamate pest...

  8. Age-dependent inhibition of pentobarbital sleeping time by ozone in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, A.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Leonard, D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of age on the metabolism of pentobarbital in mice and rats was investigated following exposure to 0.3 ppm of ozone for 3.75 hr. Young animals were 2.5 months of age and the mature were 18 months. The pentobarbital sleeping time was significantly prolonged following the ozone exposure in both the mice and rats when compared with an air control. No ozone effect on sleeping time was found in the young animals. The results indicate that there may be an age-related sensitivity to the occurrence of ozone-related inhibition of pentobarbital metabolism.

  9. Preferential release of triiodothyronine: an intrathyroidal adaptation to reduced serum thyroxine in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Pekary, A E; Hershman, J M; Sugawara, M; Gieschen, K I; Sogol, P B; Reed, A W; Pardridge, W M; Walfish, P G

    1983-11-01

    In order to identify the changes in thyroid regulation and function that are responsible for the age-related decline in T4 secretion, we measured the secretory response of the rat pituitary and thyroid glands to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), plasma T1/2 for 125I-rat thyrotropin (TSH), the molecular weight of pituitary TSH, T4 uptake and conversion to T3 by the liver, amount of T4 and T3 in serum and in thyroglobulin, and the thyroid peroxidase concentration. The molecular weight of TSH and the biexponential plasma clearance of TSH were not affected by aging. TSH response to TRH administered intravenously did not differ between old and young rats. T3 response to TRH was greater and T4 response lower in old compared with young rats despite levels of T4 and T3 in thyroglobulin which were not affected by aging. Aging effects on hepatic conversion of T4 to T3 varied between rat strains. T4 uptake by liver in vivo by old rats was the same as that reported for young animals. The data are consistent with a marked decrease in the ratio of T4 to T3 secreted by the aging rat thyroid in both the basal and stimulated state possibly due to increased intrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3. PMID:6415151

  10. Effects of Blackberries on Motor and Cognitive Function in Aged Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The polyphenolics in fruits and vegetables, when fed to rats from 19-21 months of age, have been shown to retard and even reverse age-related decrements in motor and cognitive performance. These effects may be the result of the polyphenols increasing antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory levels, or ...

  11. Effect of Tongue Exercise on Protrusive Force and Muscle Fiber Area in Aging Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Jackson, Michelle A.; Mann, Laura; Kluender, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related changes in tongue function may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. The authors' purpose was to investigate whether aged rats that have undergone tongue exercise would manifest increased protrusive tongue forces and increased genioglossus (GG) muscle fiber cross-sectional areas. Method: Forty-eight young adult,…

  12. Sports-Related Eye Injuries by Age

    MedlinePlus

    Sports-Related Eye Injuries by Age Activity Estimated Injuries* Ages 0–14 Ages 15+ Basketball 5,237 ... Exercise, Weightlifting) 1,697 401 1,297 Racquet Sports 1,241 233 1,008 Ball Sports, Unspecified ...

  13. Age Related Changes in Preventive Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    Health behavior may be influenced by age, beliefs, and symptomatology. To examine age-related health beliefs and behaviors with respect to six diseases (the common cold, colon-rectal cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, and senility), 396 adults (196 males, 200 females) divided into three age groups completed a questionnaire…

  14. Cardiac and thermal homeostasis in the aging Brown Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J

    2008-12-01

    The cardiovascular and thermoregulatory systems are considered to be susceptible in the aged population, but little is known about baseline cardiac and thermoregulatory homeostasis in rodent models of aging. Radiotransmitters were implanted in male, Brown Norway rats obtained at 4, 12, and 24 months to monitor the electrocardiogram (ECG), interbeat interval (IBI), heart rate (HR), core temperature (Tc), and motor activity (MA). There was no significant effect of age on resting HR and MA. Daytime Tc of the 24-month-old rats was significantly elevated above those of the 4- and 12-month-old groups. Variability of the IBI was highest in the 24-month-old rats. The elevation in daytime Tc beginning around 8 months of age may be a physiological biomarker of aging and may be an important factor to consider in studies using caloric restriction-induced hypothermia to increase longevity. PMID:19126843

  15. Effects of aging on peripheral and central auditory processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Margarida; Lepore, Franco; Prévost, François; Guillemot, Jean-Paul

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss is a hallmark sign in the elderly population. Decline in auditory perception provokes deficits in the ability to localize sound sources and reduces speech perception, particularly in noise. In addition to a loss of peripheral hearing sensitivity, changes in more complex central structures have also been demonstrated. Related to these, this study examines the auditory directional maps in the deep layers of the superior colliculus of the rat. Hence, anesthetized Sprague-Dawley adult (10 months) and aged (22 months) rats underwent distortion product of otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to assess cochlear function. Then, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were assessed, followed by extracellular single-unit recordings to determine age-related effects on central auditory functions. DPOAE amplitude levels were decreased in aged rats although they were still present between 3.0 and 24.0 kHz. ABR level thresholds in aged rats were significantly elevated at an early (cochlear nucleus - wave II) stage in the auditory brainstem. In the superior colliculus, thresholds were increased and the tuning widths of the directional receptive fields were significantly wider. Moreover, no systematic directional spatial arrangement was present among the neurons of the aged rats, implying that the topographical organization of the auditory directional map was abolished. These results suggest that the deterioration of the auditory directional spatial map can, to some extent, be attributable to age-related dysfunction at more central, perceptual stages of auditory processing. PMID:27306460

  16. Decreases in bone blood flow and bone material properties in aging Fischer-344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Susan A.; Hogan, Harry A.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify precisely aging-induced changes in skeletal perfusion and bone mechanical properties in a small rodent model. Blood flow was measured in conscious juvenile (2 months old), adult (6 months old), and aged (24 months old) male Fischer-344 rats using radiolabeled microspheres. There were no significant differences in bone perfusion rate or vascular resistance between juvenile and adult rats. However, blood flow was lower in aged versus adult rats in the forelimb bones, scapulas, and femurs. To test for functional effects of this decline in blood flow, bone mineral density and mechanical properties were measured in rats from these two age groups. Bone mineral density and cross-sectional moment of inertia in femoral and tibial shafts and the femoral neck were significantly larger in the aged versus adult rats, resulting in increased (+14%-53%) breaking strength and stiffness. However, intrinsic material properties at midshaft of the long bones were 12% to 25% lower in the aged rats. Although these data are consistent with a potential link between decreased perfusion and focal alterations in bone remodeling activity related to clinically relevant bone loss, additional studies are required to establish the mechanisms for this putative relationship.

  17. Age-Related Changes in Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos-Ewoldsen, Beverly; Black, Sheila R.; Mccown, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related differences in cognitive processes were used to understand age-related declines in creativity. According to the Geneplore model (Finke, Ward, & Smith, 1992), there are two phases of creativity--generating an idea and exploring the implications of the idea--each with different underlying cognitive processes. These two phases are…

  18. Blood-brain barrier transport of choline is reduced in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Mooradian, A D

    1988-02-01

    An age-related impairment in choline transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may contribute to the cholinergic mechanisms of geriatric memory dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, the brain choline uptake in male Fisher 344 rats at 2, 18 and 24 months of age was studied using the Oldendorf technique. The Vmax of choline transport in the 24-month-old rats (0.05 +/- 0.04 nmol/min/g) was significantly lower than that in the 2-month-old rat (2.5 +/- 1.0 nmol/min/g) (P less than 0.05). The Km of transport in old rats (13 +/- 35 microM) was also significantly smaller than the value in 24-month-old rats (450 +/- 195 microM), while the constant of the non-saturable component of the transport, Kd, was not significantly different in older rats (1.2 +/- 0.3 vs 0.6 +/- 0.1 microliter/min/g). These results indicate that the carrier in old rats has reduced capacity and increased affinity to choline. The reduced choline carrier capacity explains the significant decrease in BBB choline transport in aged rats. PMID:3359216

  19. Increased sensitivity to transient global ischemia in aging rat brain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Puchowicz, Michelle A; LaManna, Joseph C

    2007-01-01

    Transient global brain ischemia induced by cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR) results in reperfusion injury associated with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is known to produce delayed selective neuronal cell loss and impairment of brainstem function, leading to post-resuscitation mortality. Levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) modified protein adducts, a marker of oxidative stress, was found to be elevated after CAR in rat brain. In this study we investigated the effects of an antioxidant, alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) on the recovery following CAR in the aged rat brain. Male Fischer 344 rats (6, 12 and 24-month old) underwent 7-minute cardiac arrest before resuscitation. Brainstem function was assessed by hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and HNE-adducts were measured by western blot analysis. Our data showed that in the 24-month old rats, overall survival rate, hippocampal CAl neuronal counts and HVR were significantly reduced compared to the younger rats. With PBN treatment, the recovery was improved in the aged rat brain, which was consistent with reduced HNE adducts in brain following CAR. Our data suggest that aged rats are more vulnerable to oxidative stress insult and treatment with PBN improves the outcome following reperfusion injury. The mechanism of action is most likely through the scavenging of reactive oxygen species resulting in reduced lipid peroxidation. PMID:17727265

  20. Consequences of Age-Related Cognitive Declines

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Adult age differences in a variety of cognitive abilities are well documented, and many of those abilities have been found to be related to success in the workplace and in everyday life. However, increased age is seldom associated with lower levels of real-world functioning, and the reasons for this lab-life discrepancy are not well understood. This article briefly reviews research concerned with relations of age to cognition, relations of cognition to successful functioning outside the laboratory, and relations of age to measures of work performance and achievement. The final section discusses several possible explanations for why there are often little or no consequences of age-related cognitive declines in everyday functioning. PMID:21740223

  1. Neuropathic pain in aged rats: behavioral responses and astrocytic activation.

    PubMed

    Stuesse, S L; Crisp, T; McBurney, D L; Schechter, J B; Lovell, J A; Cruce, W L

    2001-03-01

    We used the Bennett and Xie (1988) model of chronic neuropathic pain to study the effect of age on thermal and tactile sensitivity and on astrocytic activation in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord after nerve injury. Fischer 344 FBNF1 hybrid rats in three age groups, 4-6, 14-16, and 24-26 months, were studied. Rats were either unligated (day 0, control) or the left sciatic nerve was loosely ligated to cause a chronic constriction injury (CCI). CCI causes a neuropathic pain condition characterized by tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Rats were behaviorally assessed for tactile and thermal sensitivity of their ligated and unligated hind paws up to 35 days postligation. Rats were sacrificed before or at various days postligation, and activated astrocytes were identified at the L4-L5 levels of their spinal cords by use of an antibody to glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP). The number of GFAP-ir astrocytes in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in the control, uninjured condition decreased with age (P < or = 0.001) but increased after CCI in all three age groups. After CCI, astrocytic activation in the cord was less robust in aged rats than in younger ones (P < or = 0.01). Not all the CCI rats displayed hyperalgesia to touch and to heat. Rats with an increased sensitivity to heat had increased levels of GFAP-ir in their cords; however, rats with decreased thermal sensitivity also displayed increased GFAP-ir. Thus the presence of activated astrocytes was not correlated with a single behavioral manifestation of neuropathic pain. PMID:11315551

  2. Age-related differences in memory and in the memory effects of nootropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Petkov, V D; Mosharrof, A H; Petkov, V V; Kehayov, R A

    1990-01-01

    In experiments of 2-, 5-, 10- and 22-month old rats, using active avoidance with punishment reinforcement (maze and shuttle-box) and passive avoidance (step-down), we found that acquisition and retention in aged rats were impaired significantly or only as a trend. The nootropics adafenoxate, meclofenoxate, citicholine, aniracetam and the standardized ginseng extract administered orally for 7 to 10 days usually facilitated learning and improved memory in the rats of all ages. By some of the indices used the drugs gave more pronounced favourable effects in old rats, while by others better effects were observed in young or adult rats. The results demonstrate significant age-related differences in learning and memory in rats and in the effects of nootropic drugs on these processes. PMID:2281798

  3. Increased mitochondrial DNA deletions in substantia nigra dopamine neurons of the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2014-01-01

    The dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN), which constitute the origin of the nigrostriatal system, are vulnerable to age-related degenerative processes. For example, in humans there is a relatively small age-related loss of neurons but a marked decline of the dopaminergic phenotype associated with impaired voluntary motor control. However, the mechanisms responsible for the dysfunction and degeneration of SN dopamine neurons remain poorly understood. One potential contributor is mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting from an increased abundance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations such as deletions. Human studies have identified relatively high levels of mtDNA deletions in these cells in both aging and Parkinson's disease (>35%), with a higher abundance of deletions (>60%) in individual neurons with mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether similar mtDNA mutations occur in other species such as the rat. In the present study, we quantified mtDNA deletion abundance in laser microdissected SN dopaminergic neurons from young and old F344 rats. Our results indicate that mtDNA deletions accumulated with age, with approximately 20% more mtDNA deletions in SN dopaminergic neurons from old compared to young animals. Thus, while rat SN dopaminergic neurons do accumulate mtDNA deletions with aging, this does not reflect the deletion burden in humans, and other mechanisms may be operating to compensate for age-related mtDNA damage in the rat SN dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25612740

  4. Catalpol increases hippocampal neuroplasticity and up-regulates PKC and BDNF in the aged rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, Qiao-Jie; Zou, Wei; Wang, Hong-Xia; Bao, Yong-Ming; Liu, Yu-Xin; An, Li-Jia

    2006-12-01

    Rehmannia, a traditional Chinese medical herb, has a long history in age-related disease therapy. Previous work has indicated that catalpol is a main active ingredient performing neuroprotective effect in rehmannia, while the mechanism underlying the effect remains poorly understood. In this study, we attempt to investigate the effect of catalpol on presynaptic proteins and explore a potential mechanism. The hippocampal levels of GAP-43 and synaptophysin in 3 groups of 4 months (young group), 22-24 months (aged group) and catalpol-treated 22-24 months (catalpol-treated group) rats were evaluated by western blotting. Results clearly showed a significant decrease in synaptophysin (46.6%) and GAP-43 (61.4%) levels in the aged group against the young animals and an increase (45.0% and 31.8% respectively) in the catalpol-treated aged rats in comparison with the untreated aged group. In particular, synaptophysin immunoreactivity (OD) in the dentate granule layer of the hippocampus was increased 0.0251 in the catalpol-treated group as compared with the aged group. The study also revealed a catalpol-associated increase of PKC and BDNF in the hippocampus of the catalpol-treated group in comparison with the aged rats and highly correlated with synaptophysin and GAP-43. Such positive correlations between presynaptic proteins and signaling molecules also existed in the young group. These results suggested that catalpol could increase presynaptic proteins and up-regulate relative signaling molecules in the hippocampus of the aged rats. Consequently, it seemed to indicate that catalpol might ameliorate age-related neuroplasticity loss by "normalizing" presynaptic proteins and their relative signaling pathways in the aged rats. PMID:17078935

  5. Age-associated changes in rat immune system: lessons learned from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Djikić, Jasmina; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Pilipović, Ivan; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Bufan, Biljana; Kosec, Duško; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2014-10-01

    Aging is associated with the decline in immune response to infectious agents and tumors and increasing risk of autoimmunity, but the incidence of autoimmune diseases does not increase in the elderly. To elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms influencing clinical expression of autoimmunity in aged animals, the phenotypic and functional characteristics of mononuclear cells isolated from the spinal cords of 3-month-old (young) and 26-month-old (aged) Dark Agouti rats immunized to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) - the model of multiple sclerosis, the most common autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, were examined. Aged rats were less susceptible to EAE induction, and the neurological and histological picture was milder in those rats which developed the clinically manifested disease. At the peak of the disease, several times fewer mononuclear cells and T lymphocytes were isolated from the spinal cords of aged rats compared with the young ones. The frequency of CD4+ cells among TCRαβ+ lymphocytes, as well as that of reactivated CD134(OX40)+ cells within its CD4+ T-lymphocyte subpopulation, was less in spinal cords of aged compared with young rats. Additionally, CD134 surface density on CD4+ lymphocytes was decreased in the spinal cord of aged rats. The changes in CD134 expression most likely reflected in part age-related intrinsic changes in CD4+ lymphocytes as the expression of this molecule was also impaired on in vitro stimulated naïve CD4+ splenocytes from aged rats compared with young animals. In addition, greater frequency of CD8+ lymphocytes with regulatory phenotypes could also contribute to impaired CD4+ cell reactivation in aged rats. The increased apoptosis of CD4+ cells from aged rats was consistent with their impaired reactivation and it was accompanied by the greater frequency of CD4+CD11b+CD45(int/high) cells, which are supposed to be actively engaged in apoptotic cell phagocytosis and to have immunoregulatory

  6. Age-related preferences and age weighting health benefits.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, A

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the relevance of age in the paradigm of quality adjusted life years (QALYs). The first section outlines two rationales for incorporating age weights into QALYs. One of them is based on efficiency concerns; and the other on equity concerns. Both of these are theoretical constructs. The main purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of published empirical support for such age weighting. The second section is a brief survey of nine empirical studies that elicited age-related preferences from the general public. Six of these quantified the strength of the preferences, and these are discussed in more detail in the third section. The analysis distinguishes three kinds of age-related preference: productivity ageism, utilitarian ageism and egalitarian ageism. The relationship between them and their relevance to the two different rationales for age weighting are then explored. It is concluded that, although there is strong prima facie evidence of public support for both types of age weighting, the empirical evidence to support any particular set of weights is at present weak. PMID:10048783

  7. Aging male bodies, health and the reproduction of age relations.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Ilkka; Ojala, Hanna; King, Neal; Calasanti, Toni

    2013-08-01

    This article explores the ways in which a group of male factory workers uses bodies as bases for hierarchical categorization of men by age in their talk of mundane aspects of their lives. Analysis of interviews about health (4 focus groups and 5 personal interviews) with Finnish working-class men under 40 years old shows that they portray age groups to which they do not belong as careless, even irresponsible toward health and its maintenance. As they categorize youth and old people by age, they leave themselves unmarked by it, providing no vocabulary to describe their own group. Despite their tendency to distance themselves particularly from old people, they also distinguish among older men by familiarity, providing relatively nuanced accounts of their fathers' aging. We discuss the marking of age groups in terms of social inequality and talk of fathers in terms of intergenerational relations. Even family ties among men of diverse ages involve ageism, which familiarity serves both to mitigate and to make less visible. This article documents the maintenance of age inequality in everyday, mundane behavior. PMID:23849422

  8. The effect of age on digoxin pharmacokinetics in Fischer-344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.L.; Owens, S.M.; Ruch, S.; Kennedy, R.H.; Seifen, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Digoxin protein binding and pharmacokinetics were studied in 4-, 14-, and 25-month-old male Fischer-344 rats to determine if there were age-dependent changes in digoxin disposition. Serum protein binding did not differ among age groups. The average percentage unbound digoxin for all animals was 61.3 {plus minus} 5.3% (means {plus minus} SD, n = 15). For pharmacokinetic studies, ({sup 3}H)digoxin and 1 mg/kg unlabeled digoxin were administered as an intravenous bolus dose to animals from each age group. The ({sup 3}H)digoxin terminal elimination half-life was 2.0, 2.3, and 2.5 hr, respectively. The steady-state volume of distribution in the three age groups was 1.51, 1.49, and 1.27 liters/kg, respectively. Total body clearance for the three age groups was 14.2, 12.1, and 7.5 ml/min/kg, respectively. Analysis of variance of these data followed by Duncan's multiple range test indicated a significant decrease in clearance in the aged rats (25-month-old, p less than 0.05). This age-dependent decrease in clearance suggested that digoxin pharmacokinetics could be a significant factor in age-related alterations in digoxin cardiotoxicity in the rat, as it is in humans, and that the Fischer-344 rat could be a useful model for studies of digoxin pharmacokinetic changes with age.

  9. Testosterone (T)-induced changes in arcuate nucleus cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript and NPY mRNA are attenuated in old compared to young male brown Norway rats: contribution of T to age-related changes in cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript and NPY gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Elliott H; Wolden-Hanson, Tami; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2002-03-01

    The age-related decrease in serum T levels is associated with impairments in food intake and weight regulation and alterations in brain peptides that regulate energy balance. To test the hypothesis that reduced T levels contribute to altered hypothalamic cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and NPY gene expression, the mRNA content of these neuropeptides was measured by in situ hybridization in sham-operated (intact), castrated, and T-replaced castrated young and old male Brown Norway rats. T levels in T-replaced young and old rats were similar to those in intact young animals. Compared with castrated rats, arcuate nucleus CART mRNA was lower and NPY mRNA was higher in both young and old T-replaced castrated animals, suggesting reciprocal regulation of these peptides by T; these T-induced changes were localized primarily in the rostral arcuate and were markedly attenuated in old animals. Compared with intact animals, paraventricular nucleus CART mRNA was lower in castrated animals and similar in T-replaced young and old rats. We conclude that hypothalamic CART and NPY neurons remain responsive to T regulation in old rats, albeit less so than in young animals, suggesting that the age-related reduction of T contributes in part to altered brain neuropeptide gene expression favoring anorexia and wasting with aging. PMID:11861518

  10. Age-Related White Matter Changes

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yun Yun; Mok, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Age-related white matter changes (WMC) are considered manifestation of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and are related to age and vascular risk factors. Most recent studies have shown that WMC are associated with a host of poor outcomes, including cognitive impairment, dementia, urinary incontinence, gait disturbances, depression, and increased risk of stroke and death. Although the clinical relevance of WMC has been extensively studied, to date, only very few clinical trials have evaluated potential symptomatic or preventive treatments for WMC. In this paper, we reviewed the current understanding in the pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical importance, chemical biomarkers, and treatments of age-related WMC. PMID:21876810

  11. Silymarin improves vascular function of aged ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Buket; Dost, Turhan; Gokalp, Filiz; Birincioglu, Mustafa

    2014-06-01

    Both aging and estrogen depletion lead to endothelial dysfunction, which is the main reason of many cardiovascular diseases. Previous reports have shown that cell protective effect of silymarin (SM) depends on its antioxidant and phytoestrogenic properties. We investigated the effect of SM on vascular stiffness of aged menopausal rats and the involvement of estrogenic activity in this effect. Isolated rat aortas were obtained from 22-month-old rats, after 18 months of ovariectomy (OVX) follow-up. Each ring was incubated in tissue bath either with SM (50 mg/L) and 17β-estradiol (10 μM, E2) or in the presence of SM/fulvestrant (50 mg/L, 10 μM). Endothelium-intact rings were precontracted with phenylephrine (0.001-30 μM) or high potassium (40 mM); endothelium-dependent/independent relaxant responses were obtained using acetylcholine (0.001-30 μM) and sodium nitroprusside (0.0001-3 μM), respectively. While phenylephrine sensitivity was significantly increased in OVX rats, relaxations were significantly less in aged OVX rats compared with young rats. In spite of the presence of estrogen antagonist, immediate SM treatment restored the endothelial function and vascular tone better than estrogen replacement. Additionally, as a complementary and alternative medicine, it does not cause estrogenic side effects when taken acutely. PMID:24123505

  12. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  13. Diminished acute phase response and increased hepatic inflammation of aged rats in response to intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Christian R; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Pérez, Claudio; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Riquelme, Denise M; Ordenes, Gamaliel; Oshima, Kiyoko; Aravena, Mauricio; Pérez, Viviana I; Nishimura, Sumiyo; Sabaj, Valeria; Walter, Robin; Sierra, Felipe

    2008-12-01

    Aging is associated with a deterioration of the acute phase response to inflammatory challenges. However, the nature of these defects remains poorly defined. We analyzed the hepatic inflammatory response after intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) given to Fisher 344 rats aged 6, 15, and 22-23 months. Induction of the acute phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, and T-kininogen was reduced and/or retarded with aging. Initial induction of interleukin-6 in aged rats was normal, but the later response was increased relative to younger counterparts. An exacerbated hepatic injury was observed in aged rats receiving LPS, as evidenced by the presence of multiple microabscesses in portal tracts, confluent necrosis, higher neutrophil accumulation, and elevated serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, relative to younger animals. Our results suggest that aged rats displayed a reduced expression of APPs and increased hepatic injury in response to the inflammatory insult. PMID:19126842

  14. Translational strategies in aging and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Armanios, Mary; de Cabo, Rafael; Mannick, Joan; Partridge, Linda; van Deursen, Jan; Villeda, Saul

    2015-12-01

    Aging is a risk factor for several of the world's most prevalent diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease. Although our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to the aging process and age-related disease is progressing through the use of model organisms, how to apply this knowledge in the clinic is less clear. In September, Nature Medicine, in collaboration with the Volkswagen Foundation, hosted a conference at the beautiful Herrenhausen Palace in Hannover, Germany with the goal of broadening our understanding of the aging process and its meaning as a 'risk factor' in disease. Here, several of the speakers at that conference answer questions posed by Nature Medicine. PMID:26646495

  15. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Pérez, José Jaime; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT) expression associated with low testosterone (T) levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1) if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2) if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months) and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population. PMID:26317087

  16. Pyridostigmine enhances atrial tachyarrhythmias in aging spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Halil; Scridon, Alina; Oréa, Valérie; Chapuis, Bruno; Chevalier, Philippe; Barrès, Christian; Julien, Claude

    2015-10-01

    This study examined whether chronic administration of pyridostigmine, a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor, would exacerbate episodes of spontaneous atrial tachyarrhythmia (AT) in conscious, aging, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Telemetric recordings of electrocardiogram (ECG, n = 5) and ECG/arterial pressure (n = 3) were performed in male 49-week old SHRs. After a 1-week period of continuous recording under baseline conditions, rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps that delivered pyridostigmine (15 mg/kg/day subcutaneously) for either 1 (n = 8) or 3 (n = 5) weeks. In the latter case, sympathovagal balance was assessed during the last infusion week by measuring heart rate (HR) changes in response to administration of cardiac autonomic blockers. An additional 1-week recording was performed after explantation of minipumps. Significant (P = 0.02) reductions in HR with no consistent changes in arterial pressure were observed. Frequency and duration of AT episodes were increased by pyridostigmine (0.01 ≤ P ≤ 0.07). This increase was sustained across the 3-week treatment period and reversible after cessation of treatment. Autonomic blockade revealed that intrinsic HR was above (P = 0.04) resting HR, pointing to a shift of sympathovagal balance towards vagal predominance. However, the respiratory-related component of HR variability (high-frequency power of RR interval) was lowered (P = 0.01) by pyridostigmine treatment, indicating reduced vagal modulation of HR. The results are consistent with a pathogenic role of the parasympathetic nervous system in the aging SHR model, and raise the possibility that sustained vagal activation may facilitate atrial arrhythmias. PMID:26174159

  17. Inflammatory networks in ageing, age-related diseases and longevity.

    PubMed

    Vasto, Sonya; Candore, Giuseppina; Balistreri, Carmela Rita; Caruso, Marco; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Grimaldi, Maria Paola; Listi, Florinda; Nuzzo, Domenico; Lio, Domenico; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-01-01

    Inflammation is considered a response set by the tissues in response to injury elicited by trauma or infection. It is a complex network of molecular and cellular interactions that facilitates a return to physiological homeostasis and tissue repair. The individual response against infection and trauma is also determined by gene variability. Ageing is accompanied by chronic low-grade inflammation state clearly showed by 2-4-fold increase in serum levels of inflammatory mediators. A wide range of factors has been claimed to contribute to this state; however, the most important role seems to be played by the chronic antigenic stress, which affects immune system thorough out life with a progressive activation of macrophages and related cells. This pro-inflammatory status, interacting with the genetic background, potentially triggers the onset of age-related inflammatory diseases as atherosclerosis. Thus, the analysis of polymorphisms of the genes that are key nodes of the natural immunity response might clarify the patho-physiology of age-related inflammatory diseases as atherosclerosis. On the other hand, centenarians are characterized by marked delay or escape from age-associated diseases that, on average, cause mortality at earlier ages. In addition, centenarian offspring have increased likelihood of surviving to 100 years and show a reduced prevalence of age-associated diseases, as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and less prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. So, genes involved in CVD may play an opposite role in human longevity. Thus, the model of centenarians can be used to understand the role of these genes in successful and unsuccessful ageing. Accordingly, we report the results of several studies in which the frequencies of pro-inflammatory alleles were significantly higher in patients affected by infarction and lower in centenarians whereas age-related controls displayed intermediate values. These findings point to a strong relationship between the genetics

  18. Ageing delays emergence from general anaesthesia in rats by increasing anaesthetic sensitivity in the brain†

    PubMed Central

    Chemali, J. J.; Kenny, J. D.; Olutola, O.; Taylor, N. E.; Kimchi, E. Y.; Purdon, P. L.; Brown, E. N.; Solt, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about ageing-related changes in the brain that affect emergence from general anaesthesia. We used young adult and aged Fischer 344 rats to test the hypothesis that ageing delays emergence from general anaesthesia by increasing anaesthetic sensitivity in the brain. Methods Time to emergence was determined for isoflurane (1.5 vol% for 45 min) and propofol (8 mg kg−1 i.v.). The dose of isoflurane required to maintain loss of righting (LOR) was established in young adult and aged rats. The efficacy of methylphenidate to reverse LOR from general anaesthesia was tested. Separate young adult and aged rats with implanted electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes were used to test whether ageing increases sensitivity to anaesthetic-induced burst suppression. Results Mean time to emergence from isoflurane anaesthesia was 47 s [95% CI 33, 60; young adult) compared with 243 s (95% CI 185, 308; aged). For propofol, mean time to emergence was 13.1 min (95% CI 11.9, 14.0; young adult) compared with 23.1 min (95% CI 18.8, 27.9; aged). These differences were statistically significant. When methylphenidate was administered after propofol, the mean time to emergence decreased to 6.6 min (95% CI 5.9, 7.1; young adult) and 10.2 min (95% CI 7.9, 12.3; aged). These reductions were statistically significant. Methylphenidate restored righting in all rats during continuous isoflurane anaesthesia. Aged rats had lower EEG power and were more sensitive to anaesthetic-induced burst suppression. Conclusions Ageing delays emergence from general anaesthesia. This is due, at least in part, to increased anaesthetic sensitivity in the brain. Further studies are warranted to establish the underlying causes. PMID:26174302

  19. Relative age effect in Japanese male athletes.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Kiwako

    2011-10-01

    The present study investigated the relative age effect, a biased distribution of elite athletes' birthdates, in Japanese male athletes. Japan applies a unique annual-age grouping for sport and education, which is from April 1 to March 31 of the following year. A total of 4,318 male athletes was evaluated from 12 sports: baseball, soccer, basketball, volleyball, handball, golf, horse racing, rugby, American football, sumo, Ekiden (track and field in long distance), and badminton. They played in the top level of Japanese leagues for each sport in 2010. The distribution of the birth dates was examined in each sport and showed significant relative age effect in baseball, soccer, volleyball, Ekiden, basketball, sumo, and horse racing, but not in all sports. The findings suggest that although the school year in Japan starts on April 1, significant relative age effects are observed in some sporting events. PMID:22185072

  20. Age related changes in age of starting to smoke.

    PubMed

    Weinkam, J J; Sterling, T D

    1990-01-01

    The Average Age of Starting to Smoke (AASS) has been reported to decline for younger birth cohorts. That apparent decline has been used to support a conclusion of an increase in smoking among younger individuals. However, in some cases the apparent decline is an artifact of the method of computation which arises when the quantity being averaged is related to a quantity used to classify subjects for comparison. In one other case, a second type of error arises because the distribution of smoking initiation with age changed in such a way that the proportion of individuals taking up smoking at older ages declined more rapidly than the proportion starting at younger ages. In fact, comparison of the 1970 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to the 1979/80 NHIS shows a uniform decrease in starting to smoke among teens and preteens. Examples are discussed which show that estimates of possible disease related factors actually experienced by a cohort are possible only if other suitable data are available for comparable representative sections of the population at different time periods and for different ages. PMID:2303843

  1. Dietary Approaches that Delay Age-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Everitt, Arthur V; Hilmer, Sarah N; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Jamieson, Hamish A; Truswell, A Stewart; Sharma, Anita P; Mason, Rebecca S; Morris, Brian J; Le Couteur, David G

    2006-01-01

    Reducing food intake in lower animals such as the rat decreases body weight, retards many aging processes, delays the onset of most diseases of old age, and prolongs life. A number of clinical trials of food restriction in healthy adult human subjects running over 2–15 years show significant reductions in body weight, blood cholesterol, blood glucose, and blood pressure, which are risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Lifestyle interventions that lower energy balance by reducing body weight such as physical exercise can also delay the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In general, clinical trials are suggesting that diets high in calories or fat along with overweight are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers, and dementia. There is a growing literature indicating that specific dietary constituents are able to influence the development of age-related diseases, including certain fats (trans fatty acids, saturated, and polyunsaturated fats) and cholesterol for cardiovascular disease, glycemic index and fiber for diabetes, fruits and vegetables for cardiovascular disease, and calcium and vitamin D for osteoporosis and bone fracture. In addition, there are dietary compounds from different functional foods, herbs, and neutraceuticals such as ginseng, nuts, grains, and polyphenols that may affect the development of age-related diseases. Long-term prospective clinical trials will be needed to confirm these diet—disease relationships. On the basis of current research, the best diet to delay age-related disease onset is one low in calories and saturated fat and high in wholegrain cereals, legumes, fruits and vegetables, and which maintains a lean body weight. Such a diet should become a key component of healthy aging, delaying age-related diseases and perhaps intervening in the aging process itself. Furthermore, there are studies suggesting that nutrition in childhood

  2. Dietary approaches that delay age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Everitt, Arthur V; Hilmer, Sarah N; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Jamieson, Hamish A; Truswell, A Stewart; Sharma, Anita P; Mason, Rebecca S; Morris, Brian J; Le Couteur, David G

    2006-01-01

    Reducing food intake in lower animals such as the rat decreases body weight, retards many aging processes, delays the onset of most diseases of old age, and prolongs life. A number of clinical trials of food restriction in healthy adult human subjects running over 2-15 years show significant reductions in body weight, blood cholesterol, blood glucose, and blood pressure, which are risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Lifestyle interventions that lower energy balance by reducing body weight such as physical exercise can also delay the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In general, clinical trials are suggesting that diets high in calories or fat along with overweight are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers, and dementia. There is a growing literature indicating that specific dietary constituents are able to influence the development of age-related diseases, including certain fats (trans fatty acids, saturated, and polyunsaturated fats) and cholesterol for cardiovascular disease, glycemic index and fiber for diabetes, fruits and vegetables for cardiovascular disease, and calcium and vitamin D for osteoporosis and bone fracture. In addition, there are dietary compounds from different functional foods, herbs, and neutraceuticals such as ginseng, nuts, grains, and polyphenols that may affect the development of age-related diseases. Long-term prospective clinical trials will be needed to confirm these diet-disease relationships. On the basis of current research, the best diet to delay age-related disease onset is one low in calories and saturated fat and high in wholegrain cereals, legumes, fruits and vegetables, and which maintains a lean body weight. Such a diet should become a key component of healthy aging, delaying age-related diseases and perhaps intervening in the aging process itself. Furthermore, there are studies suggesting that nutrition in childhood and

  3. Effect of magnesium deficiency on erythrocyte aging in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Elin, R. J.; Utter, A.; Tan, H. K.; Corash, L.

    1980-01-01

    Rats placed on a magnesium-deficient diet show decreased erythrocyte magnesium concentration, shortened erythrocyte survival, and erythrocyte membrane ultrastructure defects and become progressively anemic. Whether these pathologic processes are due to abnormal erythropoiesis or occur in the peripheral circulation is unknown. In the present study, magnesium and hemoglobin concentrations, reticulocyte count, erythrocyte pyrophosphatase, and pyruvate kinase activities were determined at weekly intervals for 6 weeks in whole blood and age-dependent erythrocyte fractions isolated from inbred Fisher rats fed a diet deficient in magnesium or the same diet with added magnesium. Freeze-fracture electron microscopic examinations were performed on age-dependent erythrocyte fractions to evaluate the membrane defect. The youngest red cells from magnesium-deficient rats were similar to those of control animals with respect to erythrocyte magnesium concentrations, pyrophosphatase activities, and membrane morphology. The older erythrocyte fractions from magnesium-deficient rats showed significant decreases in magnesium concentrations, pyrophosphatase activity, and the presence of membrane abnormalities. Thus, new erythrocytes produced in magnesium-deficient rats appear to be normal but rapidly develop biochemical and morphologic abnormalities with aging in a magnesium-deficient plasma environment. Images Figure 1 PMID:6106388

  4. Effects of hydrogen-rich water on aging periodontal tissues in rats.

    PubMed

    Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kawabata, Yuya; Kasuyama, Kenta; Endo, Yasumasa; Yoneda, Toshiki; Yamane, Mayu; Azuma, Tetsuji; Ekuni, Daisuke; Morita, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage is involved in age-related inflammatory reactions. The anti-oxidative effects of hydrogen-rich water suppress oxidative damage, which may aid in inhibiting age-related inflammatory reactions. We investigated the effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on aging periodontal tissues in healthy rats. Four-month-old male Fischer 344 rats (n = 12) were divided into two groups: the experimental group (hydrogen-rich water treatment) and the control group (distilled water treatment). The rats consumed hydrogen-rich water or distilled water until 16 months of age. The experimental group exhibited lower periodontal oxidative damage at 16 months of age than the control group. Although protein expression of interleukin-1β did not differ, gene expression of Nod-like receptor protein 3 inflammasomes was activated in periodontal tissues from the experimental group as compared with the control group. Drinking hydrogen-rich water is proposed to have anti-aging effects on periodontal oxidative damage, but not on inflammatory reactions in healthy rats. PMID:24985521

  5. Lifespan Changes in the Countermanding Performance of Young and Middle Aged Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Beuk, Jonathan; Beninger, Richard J; Paré, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control can be investigated with the countermanding task, which requires subjects to make a response to a go signal and cancel that response when a stop signal is presented occasionally. Adult humans performing the countermanding task typically exhibit impaired response time (RT), stop signal response time (SSRT) and response accuracy as they get older, but little change in post-error slowing. Rodent models of the countermanding paradigm have been developed recently, yet none have directly examined age-related changes in performance throughout the lifespan. Male Wistar rats (N = 16) were trained to respond to a visual stimulus (go signal) by pressing a lever directly below an illuminated light for food reward, but to countermand the lever press subsequent to a tone (stop signal) that was presented occasionally (25% of trials) at a variable delay. Subjects were tested in 1 h sessions at approximately 7 and 12 months of age with intermittent training in between. Rats demonstrated longer go trial RT, a higher proportion of go trial errors and performed less total trials at 12, compared to 7 months of age. Consistent SSRT and post-error slowing were observed for rats at both ages. These results suggest that the countermanding performance of rats does vary throughout the lifespan, in a manner similar to humans, suggesting that rodents may provide a suitable model for behavioral impairment related to normal aging. These findings also highlight the importance of indicating the age at which rodents are tested in countermanding investigations. PMID:27555818

  6. Lifespan Changes in the Countermanding Performance of Young and Middle Aged Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Beuk, Jonathan; Beninger, Richard J.; Paré, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control can be investigated with the countermanding task, which requires subjects to make a response to a go signal and cancel that response when a stop signal is presented occasionally. Adult humans performing the countermanding task typically exhibit impaired response time (RT), stop signal response time (SSRT) and response accuracy as they get older, but little change in post-error slowing. Rodent models of the countermanding paradigm have been developed recently, yet none have directly examined age-related changes in performance throughout the lifespan. Male Wistar rats (N = 16) were trained to respond to a visual stimulus (go signal) by pressing a lever directly below an illuminated light for food reward, but to countermand the lever press subsequent to a tone (stop signal) that was presented occasionally (25% of trials) at a variable delay. Subjects were tested in 1 h sessions at approximately 7 and 12 months of age with intermittent training in between. Rats demonstrated longer go trial RT, a higher proportion of go trial errors and performed less total trials at 12, compared to 7 months of age. Consistent SSRT and post-error slowing were observed for rats at both ages. These results suggest that the countermanding performance of rats does vary throughout the lifespan, in a manner similar to humans, suggesting that rodents may provide a suitable model for behavioral impairment related to normal aging. These findings also highlight the importance of indicating the age at which rodents are tested in countermanding investigations. PMID:27555818

  7. Spatial Reference Memory in Normal Aging Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 Hybrid Rats

    PubMed Central

    McQuail, Joseph A.; Nicolle, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 (F344×BN-F1) hybrid rats express greater longevity with improved health relative to aging rodents of other strains; however, few behavioral reports have thoroughly evaluated cognition across the F344×BN-F1 lifespan. Consequently, this study evaluated spatial reference memory in F344×BN-F1 rats at 6, 18, 24 or 28 months (mo) of age in the Morris water maze. Reference memory decrements were observed between 6 mo and 18 mo and between 18 mo and 24 mo. At 28 mo, spatial learning was not worse than 24 mo, but swim speed was significantly slower. Reliable individual differences revealed that ~50% of 24-28 mo performed similarly to 6 mo while others were spatial learning-impaired. Aged rats were impaired at learning within daily training sessions, but not impaired at retaining information between days of training. Aged rats were also slower to learn to escape onto the platform, regardless of strategy. In summary, these data clarify the trajectory of cognitive decline in aging F344×BN-F1 rats and elucidate relevant behavioral parameters. PMID:25086838

  8. Gender Relations and Applied Research on Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calasanti, Toni

    2010-01-01

    As a concept in gerontology, gender appears as lists of traits learned through socialization when theorized at all. I argue for a framework that theorizes the intersections of relations of gender inequality with those of age. This framework holds that men and women gain resources and bear responsibilities, in relation to one another, by virtue of…

  9. Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation on Bone Growth in Young Rats and Microarchitecture and Remodeling in Ageing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice M. C.; Shandala, Tetyana; Nguyen, Long; Muhlhausler, Beverly S.; Chen, Ke-Ming; Howe, Peter R.; Xian, Cory J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent skeletal disorder in the elderly that causes serious bone fractures. Peak bone mass achieved at adolescence has been shown to predict bone mass and osteoporosis related risk fracture later in life. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol compound, may have the potential to promote bone formation and reduce bone resorption. However, it is unclear whether it can aid bone growth and bone mass accumulation during rapid growth and modulate bone metabolism during ageing. Using rat models, the current study investigated the potential effects of resveratrol supplementation during the rapid postnatal growth period and in late adulthood (early ageing) on bone microarchitecture and metabolism. In the growth trial, 4-week-old male hooded Wistar rats on a normal chow diet were given resveratrol (2.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle control for 5 weeks. In the ageing trial, 6-month-old male hooded Wistar rats were treated with resveratrol (20 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 3 months. Treatment effects in the tibia were examined by μ-computer tomography (μ-CT) analysis, bone histomorphometric measurements and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) gene expression analysis. Resveratrol treatment did not affect trabecular bone volume and bone remodeling indices in the youth animal model. Resveratrol supplementation in the early ageing rats tended to decrease trabecular bone volume, Sirt1 gene expression and increased expression of adipogenesis-related genes in bone, all of which were statistically insignificant. However, it decreased osteocalcin expression (p = 0.03). Furthermore, serum levels of bone resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides type I collagen (CTX-1) were significantly elevated in the resveratrol supplementation group (p = 0.02) with no changes observed in serum levels of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP). These results in rat models suggest that resveratrol supplementation does not significantly affect bone volume

  10. Potential urinary aging markers of 20-month-old rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xundou; Gao, Youhe

    2016-01-01

    Urine is a very good source for biomarker discovery because it accumulates changes in the body. However, a major challenge in urinary biomarker discovery is the fact that the urinary proteome is influenced by various elements. To circumvent these problems, simpler systems, such as animal models, can be used to establish associations between physiological or pathological conditions and alterations in the urinary proteome. In this study, the urinary proteomes of young (two months old) and old rats (20 months old; nine in each group) were analyzed using LC-MS/MS and quantified using the Progenesis LC-MS software. A total of 371 proteins were identified, 194 of which were shared between the young and old rats. Based on criteria of a fold change ≥2, P < 0.05 and identification in each rat of the high-abundance group, 33 proteins were found to be changed (15 increased and 18 decreased in old rats). By adding a more stringent standard (protein spectral counts from every rat in the higher group greater than those in the lower group), eight proteins showed consistent changes in all rats of the groups; two of these proteins are also altered in the urinary proteome of aging humans. However, no shared proteins between our results and the previous aging plasma proteome were identified. Twenty of the 33 (60%) altered proteins have been reported to be disease biomarkers, suggesting that aging may share similar urinary changes with some diseases. The 33 proteins corresponded to 28 human orthologs which, according to the Human Protein Atlas, are strongly expressed in the kidney, intestine, cerebellum and lung. Therefore, the urinary proteome may reflect aging conditions in these organs. PMID:27330854

  11. Potential urinary aging markers of 20-month-old rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xundou

    2016-01-01

    Urine is a very good source for biomarker discovery because it accumulates changes in the body. However, a major challenge in urinary biomarker discovery is the fact that the urinary proteome is influenced by various elements. To circumvent these problems, simpler systems, such as animal models, can be used to establish associations between physiological or pathological conditions and alterations in the urinary proteome. In this study, the urinary proteomes of young (two months old) and old rats (20 months old; nine in each group) were analyzed using LC-MS/MS and quantified using the Progenesis LC-MS software. A total of 371 proteins were identified, 194 of which were shared between the young and old rats. Based on criteria of a fold change ≥2, P < 0.05 and identification in each rat of the high-abundance group, 33 proteins were found to be changed (15 increased and 18 decreased in old rats). By adding a more stringent standard (protein spectral counts from every rat in the higher group greater than those in the lower group), eight proteins showed consistent changes in all rats of the groups; two of these proteins are also altered in the urinary proteome of aging humans. However, no shared proteins between our results and the previous aging plasma proteome were identified. Twenty of the 33 (60%) altered proteins have been reported to be disease biomarkers, suggesting that aging may share similar urinary changes with some diseases. The 33 proteins corresponded to 28 human orthologs which, according to the Human Protein Atlas, are strongly expressed in the kidney, intestine, cerebellum and lung. Therefore, the urinary proteome may reflect aging conditions in these organs. PMID:27330854

  12. Spontaneous running activity in male rats - Effect of age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Dolkas, C. B.; Sims, C.; Reaven, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Variations in the intensity and the patterns of spontaneous running activity in wheel cages were studied in male rats aged 7 weeks to one year. Daily running records were obtained for periods of 12 mo, and 24-hour recordings were made for selected runners in order to study variations in running activity during the day. The data indicate that for rats running over two miles/day, the maximum running intensity can be divided into two groups: a group of high achievers running 8 miles/day; and a group of moderate achievers running 4.8 miles/day. For both groups spontaneous activity reached a maximum after 4-5 weeks. An hourly pattern of running activity during the day was identified in rats of increasing age who averaged 9.0, 4.5, 2.6, and 1.2 miles/day, respectively. Progressive losses were observed in both the speed and the duration of spontaneous running as the rats increased in age, with the intensity of exercise falling below 2 miles/day after 7-8 months of age.

  13. Spontaneous Object Recognition Memory in Aged Rats: Complexity versus Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamiz, Fernando; Gallo, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Previous work on the effect of aging on spontaneous object recognition (SOR) memory tasks in rats has yielded controversial results. Although the results at long-retention intervals are consistent, conflicting results have been reported at shorter delays. We have assessed the potential relevance of the type of object used in the performance of…

  14. Exercise Training suppresses vascular fibrosis in aging obesity induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Young; Lee, Jin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise training (ET) on vascular fibrosis in aging model rats with diet-induced obesity. [Methods] Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: Aging control (A-C), A-C with high fat diet (AHF), AHF with ET (AHF + ET). Aging was induced by D-galactose (D-gal) and obesity was induced by HFD (60% fat) for 9 weeks. The experimental rats performed swimming (60 min/day, 5 days/week) for 8 weeks. All rat aorta samples were harvested for RT-PCR and morphologic analyses. [Results] The exercise training significantly decreased levels of AT-1, TGF-ß and Coll-1 gene expression compared to AHF group. The AHF + ET group showed a reduced collagen accumulation in the aorta media compared to AHF group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that ET could protect the aging obesity aorta against down-regulation of fibrotic factors (AT-1, TGF-ß and Coll-1 gene) and fibrosis by inhibition of collagen accumulation in the aorta media. PMID:25566453

  15. Proinflammatory cytokines, aging, and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Martin; Balardy, Laurent; Moulis, Guillaume; Gaudin, Clement; Peyrot, Caroline; Vellas, Bruno; Cesari, Matteo; Nourhashemi, Fati

    2013-12-01

    Inflammation is a physiological process that repairs tissues in response to endogenous or exogenous aggressions. Nevertheless, a chronic state of inflammation may have detrimental consequences. Aging is associated with increased levels of circulating cytokines and proinflammatory markers. Aged-related changes in the immune system, known as immunosenescence, and increased secretion of cytokines by adipose tissue, represent the major causes of chronic inflammation. This phenomenon is known as "inflamm-aging." High levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and C-reactive protein are associated in the older subject with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. In particular, cohort studies have indicated TNF-α and IL-6 levels as markers of frailty. The low-grade inflammation characterizing the aging process notably concurs at the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying sarcopenia. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines (through a variety of mechanisms, such as platelet activation and endothelial activation) may play a major role in the risk of cardiovascular events. Dysregulation of the inflammatory pathway may also affect the central nervous system and be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders (eg, Alzheimer disease).The aim of the present review was to summarize different targets of the activity of proinflammatory cytokines implicated in the risk of pathological aging. PMID:23792036

  16. Relative Attribute SVM+ Learning for Age Estimation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengzheng; Tao, Dacheng; Yang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    When estimating age, human experts can provide privileged information that encodes the facial attributes of aging, such as smoothness, face shape, face acne, wrinkles, and bags under-eyes. In automatic age estimation, privileged information is unavailable to test images. To overcome this problem, we hypothesize that asymmetric information can be explored and exploited to improve the generalizability of the trained model. Using the learning using privileged information (LUPI) framework, we tested this hypothesis by carefully defining relative attributes for support vector machine (SVM+) to improve the performance of age estimation. We term this specific setting as relative attribute SVM+ (raSVM+), in which the privileged information enables separation of outliers from inliers at the training stage and effectively manipulates slack variables and age determination errors during model training, and thus guides the trained predictor toward a generalizable solution. Experimentally, the superiority of raSVM+ was confirmed by comparing it with state-of-the-art algorithms on the face and gesture recognition research network (FG-NET) and craniofacial longitudinal morphological face aging databases. raSVM+ is a promising development that improves age estimation, with the mean absolute error reaching 4.07 on FG-NET. PMID:25850101

  17. Daily supplementation with mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) improves balance and working memory in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Miller, Marshall G; Gomes, Stacey M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Decline in brain function during normal aging is partly due to the long-term effects of oxidative stress and inflammation. Several fruits and vegetables have been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the effects of dietary mushroom intervention on mobility and memory in aged Fischer 344 rats. We hypothesized that daily supplementation of mushroom would have beneficial effects on behavioral outcomes in a dose-dependent manner. Rats were randomly assigned to receive a diet containing either 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, or 5% lyophilized white button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus); after 8 weeks on the diet, a battery of behavioral tasks was given to assess balance, coordination, and cognition. Rats on the 2% or 5% mushroom-supplemented diet consumed more food, without gaining weight, than rats in the other diet groups. Rats in the 0.5% and 1% group stayed on a narrow beam longer, indicating an improvement in balance. Only rats on the 0.5% mushroom diet showed improved performance in a working memory version of the Morris water maze. When taken together, the most effective mushroom dose that produced improvements in both balance and working memory was 0.5%, equivalent to about 1.5 ounces of fresh mushrooms for humans. Therefore, the results suggest that the inclusion of mushroom in the daily diet may have beneficial effects on age-related deficits in cognitive and motor function. PMID:26475179

  18. Behavioral reinforcement of long-term potentiation is impaired in aged rats with cognitive deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Bergado, J A; Almaguer, W; Ravelo, J; Rosillo, J C; Frey, J U

    2001-01-01

    Behavioral stimuli with emotional/motivational content can reinforce long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus, if presented within a distinct time window. A similar effect can be obtained by stimulating the basolateral amygdala, a limbic structure related to emotions. We have previously shown that aging impairs amygdala-hippocampus interactions during long-term potentiation. In this report we show that behavioral reinforcement of long-term potentiation is also impaired in aged rats with cognitive deficits. While among young water-deprived animals drinking 15 min after induction of long-term potentiation leads to a significant prolongation of potentiation, cognitively impaired aged rats are devoid of such reinforcing effects. In contrast, a slight but statistically significant depression develops after drinking in this group of animals. We suggest that an impaired mechanism of emotional/motivational reinforcement of synaptic plasticity might be functionally related to the cognitive deficits shown by aged animals. PMID:11738126

  19. Effect of a water-maze procedure on the redox mechanisms in brain parts of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Krivova, Natalia A.; Zaeva, Olga B.; Grigorieva, Valery A.

    2015-01-01

    The Morris water maze (MWM) is a tool for assessment of age-related modulations spatial learning and memory in laboratory rats. In our work was investigated the age-related decline of MWM performance in 11-month-old rats and the effect exerted by training in the MWM on the redox mechanisms in rat brain parts. Young adult (3-month-old) and aged (11-month-old) male rats were trained in the MWM. Intact animals of the corresponding age were used as the reference groups. The level of pro- and antioxidant capacity in brain tissue homogenates was assessed using the chemiluminescence method. A reduced performance in the MWM test was found in 11-month-old rats: at the first day of training they showed only 30% of successful MWM trials. However, at the last training day the percentage of successful trials was equal for young adult and aged animals. This indicates that the aged 11-month-old rats can successfully learn in MWM. Therewith, the MWM spatial learning procedure itself produces changes in different processes of redox homeostasis in 11-month-old and 3-month-old rats as compared to intact animals. Young adult rats showed a decrease in prooxidant capacity in all brain parts, while 11-month-old rats demonstrated an increase in antioxidant capacity in the olfactory bulb, pons + medulla oblongata and frontal lobe cortex. Hence, the MWM procedure activates the mechanisms that restrict the oxidative stress in brain parts. The obtained results may be an argument for further development of the animal training procedures aimed to activate the mechanisms that can prevent the age-related deterioration of performance in the learning test. This may be useful not only for the development of training procedures applicable to human patients with age-related cognitive impairments, but also for their rehabilitation. PMID:25814952

  20. Region-specific changes in presynaptic agmatine and glutamate levels in the aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jing, Y; Liu, P; Leitch, B

    2016-01-15

    During the normal aging process, the brain undergoes a range of biochemical and structural alterations, which may contribute to deterioration of sensory and cognitive functions. Age-related deficits are associated with altered efficacy of synaptic neurotransmission. Emerging evidence indicates that levels of agmatine, a putative neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, are altered in a region-specific manner during the aging process. The gross tissue content of agmatine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of aged rat brains is decreased whereas levels in the temporal cortex (TE) are increased. However, it is not known whether these changes in gross tissue levels are also mirrored by changes in agmatine levels at synapses and thus could potentially contribute to altered synaptic function with age. In the present study, agmatine levels in presynaptic terminals in the PFC and TE regions (300 terminals/region) of young (3month; n=3) and aged (24month; n=3) brains of male Sprague-Dawley rats were compared using quantitative post-embedding immunogold electron-microscopy. Presynaptic levels of agmatine were significantly increased in the TE region (60%; p<0.001) of aged rats compared to young rats, however no significant differences were detected in synaptic levels in the PFC region. Double immunogold labeling indicated that agmatine and glutamate were co-localized in the same synaptic terminals, and quantitative analyses revealed significantly reduced glutamate levels in agmatine-immunopositive synaptic terminals in both regions in aged rats compared to young animals. This study, for the first time, demonstrates differential effects of aging on agmatine and glutamate in the presynaptic terminals of PFC and TE. Future research is required to understand the functional significance of these changes and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26548412

  1. Behaviorally Activated mRNA Expression Profiles Produce Signatures of Learning and Enhanced Inhibition in Aged Rats with Preserved Memory

    PubMed Central

    Haberman, Rebecca P.; Colantuoni, Carlo; Koh, Ming Teng; Gallagher, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Aging is often associated with cognitive decline, but many elderly individuals maintain a high level of function throughout life. Here we studied outbred rats, which also exhibit individual differences across a spectrum of outcomes that includes both preserved and impaired spatial memory. Previous work in this model identified the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus as a region critically affected by age and integral to differing cognitive outcomes. Earlier microarray profiling revealed distinct gene expression profiles in the CA3 region, under basal conditions, for aged rats with intact memory and those with impairment. Because prominent age-related deficits within the CA3 occur during neural encoding of new information, here we used microarray analysis to gain a broad perspective of the aged CA3 transcriptome under activated conditions. Behaviorally-induced CA3 expression profiles differentiated aged rats with intact memory from those with impaired memory. In the activated profile, we observed substantial numbers of genes (greater than 1000) exhibiting increased expression in aged unimpaired rats relative to aged impaired, including many involved in synaptic plasticity and memory mechanisms. This unimpaired aged profile also overlapped significantly with a learning induced gene profile previously acquired in young adults. Alongside the increased transcripts common to both young learning and aged rats with preserved memory, many transcripts behaviorally-activated in the current study had previously been identified as repressed in the aged unimpaired phenotype in basal expression. A further distinct feature of the activated profile of aged rats with intact memory is the increased expression of an ensemble of genes involved in inhibitory synapse function, which could control the phenotype of neural hyperexcitability found in the CA3 region of aged impaired rats. These data support the conclusion that aged subjects with preserved memory recruit adaptive mechanisms to

  2. Behaviorally activated mRNA expression profiles produce signatures of learning and enhanced inhibition in aged rats with preserved memory.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Rebecca P; Colantuoni, Carlo; Koh, Ming Teng; Gallagher, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Aging is often associated with cognitive decline, but many elderly individuals maintain a high level of function throughout life. Here we studied outbred rats, which also exhibit individual differences across a spectrum of outcomes that includes both preserved and impaired spatial memory. Previous work in this model identified the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus as a region critically affected by age and integral to differing cognitive outcomes. Earlier microarray profiling revealed distinct gene expression profiles in the CA3 region, under basal conditions, for aged rats with intact memory and those with impairment. Because prominent age-related deficits within the CA3 occur during neural encoding of new information, here we used microarray analysis to gain a broad perspective of the aged CA3 transcriptome under activated conditions. Behaviorally-induced CA3 expression profiles differentiated aged rats with intact memory from those with impaired memory. In the activated profile, we observed substantial numbers of genes (greater than 1000) exhibiting increased expression in aged unimpaired rats relative to aged impaired, including many involved in synaptic plasticity and memory mechanisms. This unimpaired aged profile also overlapped significantly with a learning induced gene profile previously acquired in young adults. Alongside the increased transcripts common to both young learning and aged rats with preserved memory, many transcripts behaviorally-activated in the current study had previously been identified as repressed in the aged unimpaired phenotype in basal expression. A further distinct feature of the activated profile of aged rats with intact memory is the increased expression of an ensemble of genes involved in inhibitory synapse function, which could control the phenotype of neural hyperexcitability found in the CA3 region of aged impaired rats. These data support the conclusion that aged subjects with preserved memory recruit adaptive mechanisms to

  3. Pharmacogenetics and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Brantley, Milam A

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics seeks to explain interpatient variability in response to medications by investigating genotype-phenotype correlations. There is a small but growing body of data regarding the pharmacogenetics of both nonexudative and exudative age-related macular degeneration. Most reported data concern polymorphisms in the complement factor H and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 genes. At this time, the data are not consistent and no definite conclusions may be drawn. As clinical trials data continue to accumulate, these relationships may become more apparent. PMID:22046503

  4. Mesenteric lymph flow in adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Akl, Tony J; Nagai, Takashi; Coté, Gerard L; Gashev, Anatoliy A

    2011-11-01

    The objective of study was to evaluate the aging-associated changes, contractile characteristics of mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLV), and lymph flow in vivo in male 9- and 24-mo-old Fischer-344 rats. Lymphatic diameter, contraction amplitude, contraction frequency, and fractional pump flow, lymph flow velocity, wall shear stress, and minute active wall shear stress load were determined in MLV in vivo before and after N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) application at 100 μM. The active pumping of the aged rat MLV in vivo was found to be severely depleted, predominantly through the aging-associated decrease in lymphatic contractile frequency. Such changes correlate with enlargement of aged MLV, which experienced much lower minute active shear stress load than adult vessels. At the same time, pumping in aged MLV in vivo may be rapidly increased back to levels of adult vessels predominantly through the increase in contraction frequency induced by nitric oxide (NO) elimination. Findings support the idea that in aged tissues surrounding the aged MLV, the additional source of some yet unlinked lymphatic contraction-stimulatory metabolites is counterbalanced or blocked by NO release. The comparative analysis of the control data obtained from experiments with both adult and aged MLV in vivo and from isolated vessel-based studies clearly demonstrated that ex vivo isolated lymphatic vessels exhibit identical contractile characteristics to lymphatic vessels in vivo. PMID:21873496

  5. Dendritic regression dissociated from neuronal death but associated with partial deafferentation in aging rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Flood, D G; Coleman, P D

    1993-01-01

    As neurons are lost in normal aging, the dendrites of surviving neighbor neurons may proliferate, regress, or remain unchanged. In the case of age-related dendritic regression, it has been difficult to distinguish whether the regression precedes neuronal death or whether it is a consequence of loss of afferent supply. The rat supraoptic nucleus (SON) represents a model system in which there is no age-related loss of neurons, but in which there is an age-related loss of afferents. The magnocellular neurosecretory neurons of the SON, that produce vasopressin and oxytocin for release in the posterior pituitary, were studied in male Fischer 344 rats at 3, 12, 20, 27, 30, and 32 months of age. Counts in Nissl-stained sections showed no neuronal loss with age, and confirmed similar findings in other strains of rat and in mouse and human. Nucleolar size increased between 3 and 12 months of age, due, in part, to nucleolar fusion, and was unchanged between 12 and 32 months of age, indicating maintenance of general cellular function in old age. Dendritic extent quantified in Golgi-stained tissue increased between 3 and 12 months of age, was stable between 12 and 20 months, and decreased between 20 and 27 months. We interpret the increase between 3 and 12 months as a late maturational change. Dendritic regression between 20 and 27 months was probably the result of deafferentation due to the preceding age-related loss of the noradrenergic input to the SON from the ventral medulla. PMID:7507575

  6. Aging affects the responsiveness of rat peritoneal macrophages to GM-CSF and IL-4.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Stanojević, Stanislava; Blagojević, Veljko; Ćuruvija, Ivana; Vujnović, Ivana; Petrović, Raisa; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Vujić, Vesna; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages undergo significant functional alterations during aging. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes of rat macrophage functions and response to M1/M2 polarization signals with age. Therefore, resident and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from young (3-month-old) and aged (18-19-month-old) rats were tested for phagocytic capacity and ability to secrete inflammatory mediators following in vitro stimulation with LPS and GM-CSF, and IL-4, prototypic stimulators for classically (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages, respectively. Aging increased the frequency of monocyte-derived (CCR7+ CD68+) and the most mature (CD163+ CD68+) macrophages within resident and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, respectively. The ability to phagocyte zymosan of none of these two cell subsets was affected by either LPS and GM-CSF or IL-4. The upregulated production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 and downregulated that of TGF-β was observed in response to LPS in resident and thioglycollate-elicited macrophages from rats of both ages. GM-CSF elevated production of IL-1β and IL-6 in resident macrophages from aged rats and in thioglycollate-elicited macrophages from young rats. Unexpectedly, IL-4 augmented production of proinflammatory mediators, IL-1β and IL-6, in resident macrophages from aged rats. In both resident and thioglycollate-elicited macrophages aging decreased NO/urea ratio, whereas LPS but not GM-SCF, shifted this ratio toward NO in the macrophages from animals of both ages. Conversely, IL-4 reduced NO/urea ratio in resident and thioglycollate-elicited macrophages from young rats only. In conclusion, our study showed that aging diminished GM-CSF-triggered polarization of elicited macrophages and caused paradoxical IL-4-driven polarization of resident macrophages toward proinflammatory M1 phenotype. This age-related deregulation of macrophage inflammatory mediator secretion and phagocytosis in response to M1/M2

  7. Age-related hair pigment loss.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Humans are social animals that communicate disproportionately via potent genetic signals imbued in the skin and hair, including racial, ethnic, health, gender, and age status. For the vast majority of us, age-related hair pigment loss becomes the inescapable signal of our disappearing youth. The hair follicle (HF) pigmentary unit is a wonderful tissue for studying mechanisms generally regulating aging, often before this becomes evident elsewhere in the body. Given that follicular melanocytes (unlike those in the epidermis) are regulated by the hair growth cycle, this cycle is likely to impact the process of aging in the HF pigmentary unit. The formal identification of melanocyte stem cells in the mouse skin has spurred a flurry of reports on the potential involvement of melanocyte stem cell depletion in hair graying (i.e., canities). Caution is recommended, however, against simple extrapolation of murine data to humans. Regardless, hair graying in both species is likely to involve an age-related imbalance in the tissue's oxidative stress handling that will impact not only melanogenesis but also melanocyte stem cell and melanocyte homeostasis and survival. There is some emerging evidence that the HF pigmentary unit may have regenerative potential, even after it has begun to produce white hair fibers. It may therefore be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some aging-associated changes to maintain melanin production for longer. PMID:26370651

  8. Coccomyxa Gloeobotrydiformis Improves Learning and Memory in Intrinsic Aging Rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luning; Jin, Ying; Dong, Liming; Sui, Hai-Juan; Sumi, Ryo; Jahan, Rabita; Hu, Dahai; Li, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Declining in learning and memory is one of the most common and prominent problems during the aging process. Neurotransmitter changes, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal signal transduction were considered to participate in this process. In the present study, we examined the effects of Coccomyxa gloeobotrydiformis (CGD) on learning and memory ability of intrinsic aging rats. As a result, CGD treated (50 mg/kg·d or 100 mg/kg ·d for a duration of 8 weeks) 22-month-old male rats, which have shown significant improvement on learning and spatial memory ability compared with control, which was evidently revealed in both the hidden platform tasks and probe trials. The following immunohistochemistry and Western blot experiments suggested that CGD could increase the content of Ach and thereby improve the function of the cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus, and therefore also improving learning and memory ability of the aged rats by acting as an anti-inflammatory agent. The effects of CGD on learning and memory might also have an association with the ERK/CREB signalling. The results above suggest that the naturally made drug CGD may have several great benefit as a multi-target drug in the process of prevention and/or treatment of age-dependent cognitive decline and aging process. PMID:26078724

  9. Regrowth after skeletal muscle atrophy is impaired in aged rats, despite similar responses in signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    White, Jena R.; Confides, Amy L.; Moore-Reed, Stephanie; Hoch, Johanna M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regrowth after atrophy is impaired in the aged and in this study we hypothesized that this can be explained by a blunted response of signaling pathways and cellular processes during reloading after hind limb suspension in muscles from old rats. Male Brown Norway Fisher 344 rats at 6 (young) and 32 (old) months of age were subjected to normal ambulatory conditions (amb), hind limb suspension for 14 days (HS), and HS followed by reloading through normal ambulation for 14 days (RE); soleus muscles were used for analysis of intracellular signaling pathways and cellular processes. Soleus muscle regrowth was blunted in old compared to young rats which coincided with a recovery of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in young but not old. However, the response to reloading for p-Akt, p-p70s6k and p-GSK3β protein abundance was similar between muscles from young and old rats, even though main effects for age indicate an increase in activation of this protein synthesis pathway in the aged. Similarly, MAFbx mRNA levels in soleus muscle from old rats recovered to the same extent as in the young, while Murf-1 was unchanged. mRNA abundance of autophagy markers Atg5 and Atg7 showed an identical response in muscle from old compared to young rats, but beclin did not. Autophagic flux was not changed at either age at the measured time point. Apoptosis was elevated in soleus muscle from old rats particularly with HS, but recovered in HSRE and these changes were not associated with differences in caspase-3, -8 or-9 activity in any group. Protein abundance of apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruitment domain (ARC), cytosolic EndoG, as well as cytosolic and nuclear apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were lower in muscle from old rats, and there was no age-related difference in the response to atrophy or regrowth. Soleus muscles from old rats had a higher number of ED2 positive macrophages in all groups and these decreased with HS, but recovered in HSRE in the old, while no

  10. Caloric restriction impedes age-related decline of mitochondrial function and neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Coman, Daniel; Jiang, Lihong; Rothman, Douglas L; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) prolongs lifespan and retards many detrimental effects of aging, but its effect on brain mitochondrial function and neuronal activity—especially in healthy aging—remains unexplored. Here we measured rates of neuronal glucose oxidation and glutamate–glutamine neurotransmitter cycling in young control, old control (i.e., healthy aging), and old CR rats using in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found that, compared with the young control, neuronal energy production and neurotransmission rates were significantly reduced in healthy aging, but were preserved in old CR rats. The results suggest that CR mitigated the age-related deceleration of brain physiology. PMID:24984898

  11. Phylogeny of Aging and Related Phenoptotic Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Libertini, G

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of aging as adaptive, i.e. as a phenomenon genetically determined and modulated, and with an evolutionary advantage, implies that aging, as any physiologic mechanism, must have phylogenetic connections with similar phenomena. This review tries to find the phylogenetic connections between vertebrate aging and some related phenomena in other species, especially within those phenomena defined as phenoptotic, i.e. involving the death of one or more individuals for the benefit of other individuals. In particular, the aim of the work is to highlight and analyze similarities and connections, in the mechanisms and in the evolutionary causes, between: (i) proapoptosis in prokaryotes and apoptosis in unicellular eukaryotes; (ii) apoptosis in unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes; (iii) aging in yeast and in vertebrates; and (iv) the critical importance of the DNA subtelomeric segment in unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes. In short, there is strong evidence that vertebrate aging has clear similarities and connections with phenomena present in organisms with simpler organization. These phylogenetic connections are a necessary element for the sustainability of the thesis of aging explained as an adaptive phenomenon, and, on the contrary, are incompatible with the opposite view of aging as being due to the accumulation of random damages of various kinds. PMID:26638678

  12. A blueberry-enriched antioxidant diet reduces an age-related deficit in one trial per day discriminative reward learning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been reported that an antioxidant-rich, blueberry-supplemented rat diet may slow brain aging in the rat and protect against age-related memory impairment as measured by such tasks as the water maze and visual object recognition. The present study determined whether such supplementation could ...

  13. [Age-related changes of sensory system].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Hanyu, Haruo; Umahara, Takahiko

    2013-10-01

    Pathological processes usually superimpose on physiological aging even in the sensory system including visual, hearing, olfactory, taste and somatosensory functions. Representative changes of age-related changes are presbyopia, cataracts, and presbyacusis. Reduced sense of smell is seen in normal aging, but the prominent reduction detected by the odor stick identification test is noticed especially in early stage of Alzheimer or Parkinson disease. Reduced sense of taste is well-known especially in salty sense, while the changes of sweet, bitter, and sour tastes are different among individuals. Finally, deep sensation of vibration and proprioception is decreased with age as well as superficial sensation (touch, temperature, pain). As a result, impaired sensory system could induce deterioration of the activities of daily living and quality of life in the elderly. PMID:24261198

  14. Work related injury among aging women.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tracie; Legarde, Brittany; Kim, Sunhun; Walker, Janiece; Blozis, Shelley; Umberson, Debra

    2013-02-01

    This article reports the experiences of women aged 55 to 75 with mobility impairments who attributed aspects of their limitations to workplace injuries and provides insight into worker's compensation policies. The study sample includes Mexican American (MA) and non-Hispanic White (NHW) women aged 55 to 75 who participated in a 4-year ethnographic study of disablement. Ninety-two of the 122 participants in the study attributed aspects of their functional limitations to employment, and their experiences were analyzed using data from 354 meetings. Using Lipscomb and colleagues' conceptual model of work and health disparities, the women's experiences were grouped into three categories according to type of injury, assistance gained, and the consequences of a workplace injury; the results have broad implications for policies that influence aging outcomes. Workplace injuries causing permanent functional limitations compound the effects of age and gender on employment outcomes. Policies addressing health disparities should consider work related influences. PMID:23528432

  15. Work Related Injury among Aging Women

    PubMed Central

    LeGarde, Brittany; Kim, SungHun; Walker, Janiece; Blozis, Shelley; Umberson, Debra

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the experiences of women age 55 to 75 with mobility impairments who attributed aspects of their limitations to workplace injuries and provides insight into worker’s compensation policies. The study sample includes Mexican American and non-Hispanic White women ages 55–75 who participated in a 4-year ethnographic study of disablement. Ninety-two of the 122 participants in the study attributed aspects of their functional limitations to employment, and their experiences were analyzed using data from 354 meetings. Using Lipscomb and colleagues’ conceptual model of work and health disparities, the women’s experiences were grouped into three categories according to type of injury, assistance gained, and the consequences of a workplace injury; the results have broad implications for policies that influence aging outcomes. Workplace injuries causing permanent functional limitations compound the effects of age and gender on employment outcomes. Policies addressing health disparities should consider work related influences. PMID:23528432

  16. Adaptive processes of the central and autonomic cholinergic neurotransmitter system: Age-related differences

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuna, S.; Pintor, A.; Michalek, H. )

    1991-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the response of the ileum strip longitudinal and circular muscle to repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. The response was measured in terms of both biochemical parameters (acetylcholinesterase-AChE inhibition, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites-mAChRs, choline acetyltransferase-ChAT) and functional responsiveness (contractility of the isolated ileum stimulated by cholinergic agonists). The biochemical data were compared with those obtained for the cerebral cortex. In the ileum strip of control rats there was a significant age-related decline of AChE, maximal density of {sup 3}H-QNB binding sites (Bmax) and ChAT. During the first week of DFP treatment the cholinergic syndrome was more pronounced in aged than in young rats, resulting in 35% and 10% mortality, respectively; subsequently the syndrome attenuated. At the end of DFP treatment ileal AChE were inhibited by about 30%; the down-regulation of mAChRs was about 50% in young and 35% in aged rats. No significant differences in the recovery rate of AChE were noted between young and aged rats. On the contrary, mAChRs normalized within 5 weeks in young and 3 weeks in aged rats.

  17. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  18. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  19. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety, and considers directions for future research. PMID:20046818

  20. Neuromuscular contributions to age-related weakness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related physiological change of neuromuscular function is not a linear process and is likely influenced by various biological and behavioral factors (e.g., genetics, nutrition, physical activity level, comorbidities, etc.). These factors contribute to heterogeneity among older adults, which chal...

  1. Statistical physics of age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in the aging RPE. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the RPE the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  2. The age of astronomy-related organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, A.

    1999-03-01

    The age of currently active astronomy-related organizations is investigated from comprehensive and up-to-date samples. Results for professional institutions, associations, planetariums, and public observatories are commented, as well as specific distributions for astronomy-related publishers and software producers. Some events had a clear impact on the rate of foundation of astronomy-related organizations, such as World War I and II, the beginning of space exploration and the landing of man on the Moon, but not all of them affected in the same way Western Europe and North America. It is still premature to assess the impact of the end of the Cold War. A category such as the software producers would of course not exist nor prosper without the advent of the computer age and the subsequent electronic networking of the planet. Other aspects are discussed in the paper.

  3. Effect of age and diet on renal cadmium retention in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kostial, K.

    1984-03-01

    The results of previous and recent work on cadmium metabolism in relation to age and diet are presented. Experiments were performed on albino rats aged 1-26 weeks. In some experiments rats were given different foods (milk, meat, bread) instead of standard rat diet. Some animals received trisodium calcium salt of diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) intraperitoneally to decrease cadmium retention. Radioactive cadmium (/sup 115m/Cd) was administered orally and intraperitoneally. Whole body (WB), carcass (C) and organ (kidney, liver and brain) retentions were determined 1 and 2 weeks after a single radioisotope administration. The results are expressed as percentages of the administered dose (% D) and as percentages of whole body (% WB) and carcass (% C) radioactivities. After oral administration whole-body cadmium retention was higher in sucklings than in weaned animals, primarily due to increased gut retention. The kidney retention of orally administered cadmium was about 5-7 times higher in sucklings than in older rats. Cadmium distribution (% C) was similar after oral and intraperitoneal administration. In sucklings, kidney retention made a lower fraction of the carcass radioactivity one week after /sup 115m/Cd administration but reached adult values a week later. Liver retention in sucklings was a slightly lower fraction of the carcass radioactivity than in older rats at both time intervals. Brain retention (% C) was about 10 times higher in sucklings than in older rats throughout the experiment. 39 references, 5 tables.

  4. Leptin is involved in age-dependent changes in response to systemic inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Sandy; Luheshi, Giamal N; Wenz, Tina; Gerstberger, Rüdiger; Roth, Joachim; Rummel, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    Obesity contributes to a state of subclinical peripheral and central inflammation and is often associated with aging. Here we investigated the source and contribution of adipose tissue derived cytokines and the cytokine-like hormone leptin to age-related changes in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced brain-controlled sickness-responses. Old (24 months) and young (2 months) rats were challenged with LPS or saline alone or in combination with a neutralizing leptin antiserum (LAS) or control serum. Changes in the sickness-response were monitored by biotelemetry. Additionally, ex vivo fat-explants from young and old rats were stimulated with LPS or saline and culture medium collected and analyzed by cytokine-specific bioassays/ELISAs. We found enhanced duration/degree of the sickness-symptoms, including delayed but prolonged fever in old rats. This response was accompanied by increased plasma-levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1ra and exaggerated expression of inflammatory markers in brain and liver analyzed by RT-PCR including inhibitor κBα, microsomal prostaglandin synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 (brain). Moreover, for the first time, we were able to show prolonged elevated plasma leptin-levels in LPS-treated old animals. Treatment with LAS in young rats tended to attenuate the early- and in old rats the prolonged febrile response. Fat-explants exhibited unchanged IL-6 but reduced IL-1ra and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release from adipose tissue of aged compared to young animals. In addition, we found increased expression of the endogenous immune regulator microRNA146a in aged animals suggesting a role for these mediators in counteracting brain inflammation. Overall, our results indicate a role of adipose tissue and leptin in “aging-related-inflammation” and age-dependent modifications of febrile-responses. PMID:24513873

  5. Benzonidazole levels in blood vary with age in rats.

    PubMed

    Bulffer, Romina Fernanda; Castro, José Alberto; Fanelli, Silvia Laura

    2011-05-01

    Benznidazole (Bz) exhibits toxic side effects in animal studies and clinical use. Reductive metabolism of Bz in liver microsomes modulates the duration of its chemotherapeutic effect and its toxicity. The rate of this metabolism depends on age and is less intense in newborns and youngsters than in adults. In the present study, we determined Bz blood levels in rats of different ages that received Bz intragastrically (100 mg/kg). We developed and validated a high-pressure liquid chromatography with UV detector method for determination of Bz levels in whole blood. Bz levels were significantly higher and persisted for longer periods of time in the blood of young rats when compared to that of adult animals. PMID:21655830

  6. Nitric oxide synthase in rat brain: age comparisons quantitated with NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kuo, H; Hengemihle, J; Ingram, D K

    1997-05-01

    We examined age-related differences in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) containing neurons and neuropil in the striatum and hippocampus of male Fischer 344 rats at 6, 12, and 26 mo of age. NADPH-d staining is considered to be a marker for neurons and neuronal processes containing nitric oxide synthase. Rat brains were processed for NADPH-d histochemistry and analyzed morphometrically using computerized image analysis. The following NADPH-d histochemical parameters were examined: neuronal density, neuronal size, and neuropil staining optical density of selected regions. In the striatum, significant age-related declines were observed in NADPH-d-positive neuronal density and in neuropil staining, while neuronal size increased between 6 and 12 mo and then declined between 12 and 26 mo. In the hippocampus no significant age-related changes were noted in NADPH-d-positive neuronal density or size, or in the optical density of the molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Thus, age differences in NADPH-d histochemistry appear to be regionally specific in the Fischer 344 rat. PMID:9158548

  7. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone treatment on hormone levels and antioxidant parameters in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, F J; Kang, J; Han, N N; Ma, H T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of chronic dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) administration on steroid hormones and antioxidant parameters in aged rats. To this end, three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were compared: young (3 months of age) untreated; aged (19 months old) untreated; and aged rats treated with 20 mg/kg DHEA for 8 weeks. Major organs of aged rats in the untreated group demonstrated physiological atrophy, compared to those of young rats; this effect appeared to have been partially reversed by DHEA treatment. Testosterone and estradiol contents were significantly decreased and aldosterone significantly increased in aged untreated, compared to young untreated rats. Steroid hormone levels were obviously reversed, however, in aged rats treated with DHEA. Additionally, superoxide dismutase activity in serum, brain, heart, and liver was decreased, and maleic dialdehyde content in heart was markedly increased in untreated aged, compared to young, rats. Importantly, these changes in brain and heart of aged rats were reversed by DHEA treatment. Heme oxygenase mRNA levels were increased and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA levels decreased in aged, compared to young, rats; DHEA treatment appeared to reverse these changes. These results indicate that chronic DHEA administration may have effects on steroid hormone levels and antioxidant parameters in aged rats and result in postponement of the aging process. PMID:26400361

  8. Age and gender differences in excitation-contraction coupling of the rat ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Normand; Chartier, Denis; Gosselin, Hugues; Rouleau, Jean-Lucien

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine potential post-pubertal gender-specific differences in the contractility of papillary muscles, the electrophysiological properties and Ca2+ transients of freshly dissociated ventricular myocytes from the rat heart. The contractions of rat papillary muscles from 2- to 14-month-old male and female rats were studied under isometric and isotonic conditions (29 °C). While the hearts of young (2–4 months) male and female rats displayed a similar contractile profile, papillary muscles of female rats aged 6 months and older exhibited smaller isometric and isotonic contractions, smaller maximal rates of tension and shortening development and decline (±DT/dt and ±DL/dt) velocities during both the onset and relaxation phases, and shorter contractions than age-matched males. To explore the possible cellular basis accounting for these differences, action potentials and macroscopic currents were recorded from freshly dissociated myocytes using the whole-cell patch clamp technique (35 °C). Action potentials from male and female myocytes of 3- and 9-month-old rats did not vary as a function of age or gender. Consistent with these results, the magnitude (expressed in pA pF−1), voltage-dependence and kinetics of the inward rectifier (IK1), transient outward (Ito) and sustained (IK) K+ currents displayed little, if any dependence on age or gender. L-type Ca2+ current (ICa(L)) measured in caesium-loaded myocytes (35 °C) from male and female rats of 3, 6 and 9 months of age exhibited similar characteristics. In contrast, while Ca2+ transients measured with indo-1 were similar between 3-month-old male and female rat myocytes, Ca2+ transients of 10-month-old female myocytes were significantly reduced and showed a diminished rate of relaxation in comparison with those recorded in male rats of similar age. These results suggest that important gender-related changes in excitation-contraction coupling occur following puberty, probably due

  9. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone

  10. Age- and brain region-specific differences in mitochondrial bioenergetics in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Jignesh D; Royland, Joyce E; MacPhail, Robert C; Sullivan, Patrick G; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are central regulators of energy homeostasis and play a pivotal role in mechanisms of cellular senescence. The objective of the present study was to evaluate mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters in 5 brain regions (brain stem [BS], frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, hippocampus [HIP]) of 4 diverse age groups (1 month [young], 4 months [adult], 12 months [middle-aged], 24 months [old age]) to understand age-related differences in selected brain regions and their possible contribution to age-related chemical sensitivity. Mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters and enzyme activities were measured under identical conditions across multiple age groups and brain regions in Brown Norway rats (n = 5/group). The results indicate age- and brain region-specific patterns in mitochondrial functional endpoints. For example, an age-specific decline in ATP synthesis (State III respiration) was observed in BS and HIP. Similarly, the maximal respiratory capacities (State V1 and V2) showed age-specific declines in all brain regions examined (young > adult > middle-aged > old age). Amongst all regions, HIP had the greatest change in mitochondrial bioenergetics, showing declines in the 4, 12, and 24-months age groups. Activities of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and electron transport chain complexes I, II, and IV enzymes were also age and brain region specific. In general, changes associated with age were more pronounced with enzyme activities declining as the animals aged (young > adult > middle-aged > old age). These age- and brain region-specific observations may aid in evaluating brain bioenergetic impact on the age-related susceptibility to environmental chemical stressors. PMID:27143418

  11. [Aged woman's vulnerability related to AIDS].

    PubMed

    Silva, Carla Marins; Lopes, Fernanda Maria do Valle Martins; Vargens, Octavio Muniz da Costa

    2010-09-01

    This article is a systhematic literature review including the period from 1994 to 2009, whose objective was to discuss the aged woman's vulnerability in relation to Acquired Imunodeficiency Syndrome (Aids). The search for scientific texts was accomplished in the following databases: Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde, Scientific Eletronic Library Online (SciELO), Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE). The descriptors used were vulnerability, woman and Aids. Eighteen texts were analyzed, including articles in scientific journals, thesis and dissertations. As a conclusion, it was noted that aged women and vulnerability to Aids are directly related, through gender characteristics including submission and that were built historical and socially. We consider as fundamental the development of studies which may generate publications accessible to women, in order to help them see themselves as persons vulnerable to Aids contagion just for being women. PMID:21574329

  12. Galanthamine Plus Estradiol Treatment Enhances Cognitive Performance in Aged Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, R.B.; Chipman, A.M.; Hammond, R.; Nelson, D.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that beneficial effects of estradiol on cognitive performance diminish with age and time following menopause due to a progressive decline in basal forebrain cholinergic function. This study tested whether galanthamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor used to treat memory impairment associated with Alzheimer’s disease, could enhance or restore estradiol effects on cognitive performance in aged rats that had been ovariectomized in middle-age. Rats were ovariectomized at 16–17 months of age. At 21–22 months of age rats began receiving daily injections of galanthamine (5 mg/day) or vehicle. After one week, half of each group also received 17ß-estradiol administered subcutaneously. Rats were then trained on a delayed matching to position (DMP) T-maze task, followed by an operant stimulus discrimination/reversal learning task. Treatment with galanthamine + estradiol significantly enhanced the rate of DMP acquisition and improved short-term delay-dependent spatial memory performance. Treatment with galanthamine or estradiol alone were without significant effect. Effects were task-specific in that galanthamine + estradiol treatment did not significantly improve performance on the stimulus discrimination/reversal learning task. In fact, estradiol was associated with a significant increase in incorrect responses on this task after reversal of the stimulus contingency. In addition, treatments did not significantly affect hippocampal choline acetyltransferase activity or acetylcholine release. This may be an effect of age, or possibly is related to compensatory changes associated with long-term cholinesterase inhibitor treatment. The data suggest that treating with a cholinesterase inhibitor can enhance the effects of estradiol on acquisition of a DMP task by old rats following a long period of hormone deprivation. This could be of particular benefit to older women who have not used hormone therapy for many years and are beginning to show signs of mild

  13. Food restriction prevents an age-associated increase in rat liver beta-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dax, E.M.; Ingram, D.K.; Partilla, J.S.; Gregerman, R.I.

    1989-05-01

    In male Wistar rats fed ad libitum (24% protein, 4.5 Kcal/gm), the (/sup 125/I)iodopindolol binding capacity of the beta-adrenergic receptors in liver of 24-month-old animals is 3-4 times greater than that of 6-month-old counterparts. In rats fed the same diet, on alternate days from weaning, the receptor capacity did not increase significantly between 6 and 24 months (10.20 +/- 0.55 vs 9.20 +/- 0.72 fmol/mg) or between 24 and 30 months. This was not due to acute dietary deprivation, as rats food-restricted for only 2 weeks, at 23.5 months of age, also showed elevated receptor capacities compared to 6-month-old ad libitum fed animals. Moreover, intermittent feeding produced no significant effects among 6-month-old animals, whether restricted since weaning or for two weeks prior to sacrifice. Many biochemical parameters that decrease with aging in rats fed ad libitum are prevented by dietary restriction. Our results demonstrate that a reproducible biochemical process that increases with aging is also prevented with dietary restriction. The age-related, liver beta-receptor increase may be a potentially reliable marker for studying biochemical perturbations that modify life span.

  14. Physics of Age Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    2009-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. In this talk I will discuss a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in AMD [K.I. Mazzitello, C.M. Arizmendi, Fereydoon Family, H. E. Grossniklaus, Physical Review E (2009)]. I will also present an overview of our theoretical and computational efforts in modeling some other aspects of the physics of AMD, including CNV and the breakdown of Bruch's membrane [Ongoing collaboration with Abbas Shirinifard and James A. Glazier, Biocomplexity Institute and Department of Physics, Indiana University, Y. Jiang, Los Alamos, and Hans E. Grossniklaus, Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University].

  15. Age-related crosslink in skin collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Mechanic, G.

    1986-05-01

    A stable crosslinking amino acid was isolated from mature bovine skin collagen and its structure was identified as histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C-NMR. This newly identified crosslink has a linkage between C-2 histidine and C-6 of lysine in the latter's portion of hydroxylysinonorleucine. Quantitative studies using various aged samples of cow and human skin collagen indicated that this acid-heat stable nonreducible compound was the major age-related crosslink. In case of cow skin collagen, for example, during early embryonic development (3 and 5 month old embryos) the content of HHL stayed less than 0.01 residue/mole of collagen, however from the middle of gestation period (7 month old embryo) through the maturation stage it showed rapid increase with age and reached approximately 0.5 residues/mole of collagen in the 3 year old animal. Small increments (up to 0.65 res/mole of collagen) were observed in the 9 year old cow. The amounts of the crosslink unlike pyridinoline do not decrease with aging. Similar patterns were observed in human skin collagen.

  16. Chronic Ampakine Treatments Stimulate Dendritic Growth and Promote Learning in Middle-Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lauterborn, Julie C.; Palmer, Linda C.; Jia, Yousheng; Pham, Danielle T.; Hou, Bowen; Wang, Weisheng; Trieu, Brian H.; Cox, Conor D.; Kantorovich, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (ampakines) have been shown to rescue synaptic plasticity and reduce neuropathology in rodent models of cognitive disorders. Here we tested whether chronic ampakine treatment offsets age-related dendritic retraction in middle-aged (MA) rats. Starting at 10 months of age, rats were housed in an enriched environment and given daily treatment with a short half-life ampakine or vehicle for 3 months. Dendritic branching and spine measures were collected from 3D reconstructions of Lucifer yellow-filled CA1 pyramidal cells. There was a substantial loss of secondary branches, relative to enriched 2.5-month-old rats, in apical and basal dendritic fields of vehicle-treated, but not ampakine-treated, 13-month-old rats. Baseline synaptic responses in CA1 were only subtly different between the two MA groups, but long-term potentiation was greater in ampakine-treated rats. Unsupervised learning of a complex environment was used to assess treatment effects on behavior. Vehicle- and drug-treated rats behaved similarly during a first 30 min session in the novel environment but differed markedly on subsequent measures of long-term memory. Markov sequence analysis uncovered a clear increase in the predictability of serial movements between behavioral sessions 2 and 3 in the ampakine, but not vehicle, group. These results show that a surprising degree of dendritic retraction occurs by middle age and that this can be mostly offset by pharmacological treatments without evidence for unwanted side effects. The functional consequences of rescue were prominent with regard to memory but also extended to self-organization of behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain aging is characterized by a progressive loss of dendritic arbors and the emergence of impairments to learning-related synaptic plasticity. The present studies show that dendritic losses are evident by middle age despite housing in an enriched environment and can be

  17. Muscle-specificity of age-related changes in markers of autophagy and sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Russ, David W; Boyd, Iva M; McCoy, Katherine M; McCorkle, Katherine W

    2015-12-01

    Our previous findings indicate that the gastrocnemius muscle of aging rats exhibits impairments of muscle quality (force/unit muscle tissue) and autophagy and increased sarcoplasmic reticulum stress. The purpose of this study was to examine age-related changes in soleus muscle contractility and in markers of autophagy in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. We assessed in situ muscle force and size in the soleus muscle of adult (7-8 months) and aged (24-26 months) male, F344/BN rats. We used immunoblotting to compare abundance of markers of autophagy, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stress and sphingolipid metabolism in the soleus and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles of these animals. Relative to adults, aged rats maintained soleus muscle quality and increased muscle size, resulting in increased tetanic force production. Immunoblotting revealed a general pattern of an age-related reduction of basal autophagy, despite increases in indicators of SR stress and upstream autophagic pathway activation in the MG. The MG also exhibited changes in markers of sphingolipid metabolism suggestive of increased muscle ceramide. Minimal age-related changes were observed in the soleus. The soleus maintains muscle mass and quality with age, and exhibits fewer age-related changes in markers of stress and autophagy than the MG. Based on these data, we suggest that maintenance of autophagy may preserve muscle quality by preventing excessive SR stress. PMID:26296420

  18. Risk Factors for Age-Related Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Paul P.; Keane, Pearse A.; O'Neill, Evelyn C.; Altaie, Rasha W.; Loane, Edward; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John M.; Beatty, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition. PMID:20339564

  19. Glutamate presynaptic vesicular transporter and postsynaptic receptor levels correlate with spatial memory status in aging rat models.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Vigneault, Erika; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; El Mestikawy, Salah; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2015-03-01

    In humans, memory capacities are generally affected with aging, even without any reported neurologic disorders. The mechanisms behind cognitive decline are not well understood. We studied here whether postsynaptic glutamate receptor and presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) levels may change in the course of aging and be related to cognitive abilities using various age-impaired (AI) or age-unimpaired rat strains. Twenty-four-month-old Long-Evans (LE) rats with intact spatial memory maintained postsynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptor levels in the hippocampal-adjacent cortex similar to those of young animals. In contrast, AI rats showed significantly reduced expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor GluR2, NR2A and NR2B subunits. In AI LE rats, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 levels were increased and negatively correlated with receptor levels as shown by principal component analysis and correlation matrices. We also investigated whether glutamatergic receptors and VGLUT levels were altered in the obesity-resistant LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain which is characterized by intact memory despite aging. No difference was observed between 24-month-old LOU rats and their young counterparts. Taken together, the unaltered spatial memory performance of 24-month-old age-unimpaired LE and LOU rats suggests that intact coordination of the presynaptic and postsynaptic hippocampal-adjacent cortex glutamatergic networks may be important for successful cognitive aging. Accordingly, altered expression of presynaptic and postsynaptic glutamatergic components, such as in AI LE rats, could be considered a marker of age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:25556161

  20. GH binding to liver in young and old female rats: relation to somatomedin-C secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Meites, J.

    1987-11-01

    Age-related changes in binding of /sup 125/I-bovine GH to liver membrane fractions were measured in female Long-Evans rats 2, 6, 12, and 20 months of age. Specific GH binding did not change between 2 and 6 months of age but increased significantly at 12 and 20 months of age. Scatchard analyses showed that the plots were curvilinear and consisted of high- and low-affinity binding sites. The age-related increases in binding sites were mainly due to an increase in number of low-affinity binding sites. Serum somatomedim-C (SM-C) levels in 20-month-old rats were about half those in the 6-month-old rats. Twice daily injections of ovine GH (2 mg/kg body wt) for 7 days depressed liver GH binding and increased serum SM-C levels in 19-month-old female rats, but had no effect on GH binding in 2-month-old female rats. These results suggest that the increase in liver GH binding sites and the decrease in SM-C secretion are associated with our previously reported decrease in GH secretion in old female rats.

  1. GENETICS OF HUMAN AGE RELATED DISORDERS.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, I; Thukral, N; Hasija, Y

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable biological phenomenon. The incidence of age related disorders (ARDs) such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, dementia, osteoporosis, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases increase rapidly with aging. ARDs are becoming a key social and economic trouble for the world's elderly population (above 60 years), which is expected to reach 2 billion by 2050. Advancement in understanding of genetic associations, particularly through genome wide association studies (GWAS), has revealed a substantial contribution of genes to human aging and ARDs. In this review, we have focused on the recent understanding of the extent to which genetic predisposition may influence the aging process. Further analysis of the genetic association studies through pathway analysis several genes associated with multiple ARDs have been highlighted such as apolipoprotein E (APOE), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cadherin 13 (CDH13), CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 1 (CDKAL-1), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), indicating that these genes could play a pivotal role in ARD causation. These genes were found to be significantly enriched in Jak-STAT signalling pathway, asthma and allograft rejection. Further, interleukin-6 (IL-6), insulin (INS), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), estrogen receptor1 (ESR1), transforming growth factor, beta 1(TGFB1) and calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were found to be highly interconnected in network analysis. We believe that extensive research on the presence of common genetic variants among various ARDs may facilitate scientists to understand the biology behind ARDs causation. PMID:26856084

  2. Oxidative Damage in the Aging Heart: an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Gustavo Lenci; Neto, Francisco Filipak; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto de Oliveira; Liebel, Samuel; de Fraga, Rogério; Bueno, Ronaldo da Rocha Loures

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several theories have been proposed to explain the cause of ‘aging’; however, the factors that affect this complex process are still poorly understood. Of these theories, the accumulation of oxidative damage over time is among the most accepted. Particularly, the heart is one of the most affected organs by oxidative stress. The current study, therefore, aimed to investigate oxidative stress markers in myocardial tissue of rats at different ages. Methods: Seventy-two rats were distributed into 6 groups of 12 animals each and maintained for 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and the levels of non-protein thiols, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were determined. Results: Superoxide dismutase, catalase activity and lipid peroxidation were reduced in the older groups of animals, when compared with the younger group. However, protein carbonylation showed an increase in the 12-month group followed by a decrease in the older groups. In addition, the levels of non-protein thiols were increased in the 12-month group and not detected in the older groups. Conclusion: Our data showed that oxidative stress is not associated with aging in the heart. However, an increase in non-protein thiols may be an important factor that compensates for the decrease of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the oldest rats, to maintain appropriate antioxidant defenses against oxidative insults. PMID:27006709

  3. Age-related changes in monocytes exacerbate neointimal hyperplasia after vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Laisel; Gomez, Camilo; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I.

    2015-01-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia is the leading cause of restenosis after endovascular interventions. It is characterized by the accumulation of myofibroblast-like cells and extracellular matrix in the innermost layer of the wall and is exacerbated by inflammation. Monocytes from either young or aged rats were applied perivascularly to injured vascular walls of young recipient animals. Monocytes from aged rats, but not young donors, increased neointima thickness. Accordingly, the gene expression profiles of CD11b+ monocytes from aged rats showed significant up-regulation of genes involved in cellular adhesion, lipid degradation, cytotoxicity, differentiation, and inflammation. These included cadherin 13 (Cdh13), colony stimulating factor 1 (Csf1), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1 (Cxcl1), endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (Esam), and interferon gamma (Ifng). In conclusion, our results suggest that the increased inflammatory and adhesive profile of monocytes contributes to pathological wall remodeling in aged-related vascular diseases. PMID:25965835

  4. Age-related changes in monocytes exacerbate neointimal hyperplasia after vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Laisel; Gomez, Camilo; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I

    2015-07-10

    Neointimal hyperplasia is the leading cause of restenosis after endovascular interventions. It is characterized by the accumulation of myofibroblast-like cells and extracellular matrix in the innermost layer of the wall and is exacerbated by inflammation. Monocytes from either young or aged rats were applied perivascularly to injured vascular walls of young recipient animals. Monocytes from aged rats, but not young donors, increased neointima thickness. Accordingly, the gene expression profiles of CD11b+ monocytes from aged rats showed significant up-regulation of genes involved in cellular adhesion, lipid degradation, cytotoxicity, differentiation, and inflammation. These included cadherin 13 (Cdh13), colony stimulating factor 1 (Csf1), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1 (Cxcl1), endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (Esam), and interferon gamma (Ifng). In conclusion, our results suggest that the increased inflammatory and adhesive profile of monocytes contributes to pathological wall remodeling in aged-related vascular diseases. PMID:25965835

  5. Age-related macular degeneration: choroidal ischaemia?

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, D Jackson; Silverman, Ronald H; Rondeau, Mark J; Lloyd, Harriet O; Khanifar, Aziz A; Chan, R V Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aim Our aim is to use ultrasound to non-invasively detect differences in choroidal microarchitecture possibly related to ischaemia among normal eyes and those with wet and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Prospective case series of subjects with dry AMD, wet AMD and age-matched controls. Methods Digitised 20 MHz B-scan radiofrequency ultrasound data of the region of the macula were segmented to extract the signal from the retina and choroid. This signal was processed by a wavelet transform, and statistical modelling was applied to the wavelet coefficients to examine differences among dry, wet and non-AMD eyes. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate a multivariate classifier. Results In the 69 eyes of 52 patients, 18 did not have AMD, 23 had dry AMD and 28 had wet AMD. Multivariate models showed statistically significant differences between groups. Multiclass ROC analysis of the best model showed an excellent volume-under-curve of 0.892±0.17. The classifier is consistent with ischaemia in dry AMD. Conclusions Wavelet augmented ultrasound is sensitive to the organisational elements of choroidal microarchitecture relating to scatter and fluid tissue boundaries such as seen in ischaemia and inflammation, allowing statistically significant differentiation of dry, wet and non-AMD eyes. This study further supports the association of ischaemia with dry AMD and provides a rationale for treating dry AMD with pharmacological agents to increase choroidal perfusion. ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT00277784. PMID:23740965

  6. Gender relations and applied research on aging.

    PubMed

    Calasanti, Toni

    2010-12-01

    As a concept in gerontology, gender appears as lists of traits learned through socialization when theorized at all. I argue for a framework that theorizes the intersections of relations of gender inequality with those of age. This framework holds that men and women gain resources and bear responsibilities, in relation to one another, by virtue of mundane categorization into naturalized stratified groups. Current research shows that this approach allows explanation of gender differences, which appear in many reports but which usually go untheorized, as responses to social inequality. I illustrate applications to research and practice in relation to three areas of old age experiences: financial security, spousal care work, and health. Throughout, I discuss implications of focusing on inequality to enhance our abilities to engage in effective research, practice, and policy for older people, women and men alike. For instance, an understanding of the gender division of labor and workplace discrimination makes clear that financial status in later life cannot be reduced to individual choices concerning paid labor or retirement planning. And understanding that people orient their behaviors to gender ideals allows us to see that men and women perform spousal care in similar and different ways that require varied responses from practitioners; it also reveals contexts in which men engage in positive health behaviors. Finally, I argue that gerontologists interested in facilitating favorable outcomes for old people should consider research and practice that would disrupt, not reinforce, the bases of gender inequalities in later life. PMID:20956798

  7. Age-related eye disease and gender.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, the prevalence of moderate to severe visual impairment and blindness is 285 millions, with 65% of visually impaired and 82% of all blind people being 50 years and older. Meta-analyses have shown that two out of three blind people are women, a gender discrepancy that holds true for both developed and developing countries. Cataract accounts for more than half of all blindness globally and gender inequity in access to cataract surgery is the major cause of the higher prevalence of blindness in women. In addition to gender differences in cataract surgical coverage, population-based studies on the prevalence of lens opacities indicate that women have a higher risk of developing cataract. Laboratory as well as epidemiologic studies suggest that estrogen may confer antioxidative protection against cataractogenesis, but the withdrawal effect of estrogen in menopause leads to increased risk of cataract in women. For the other major age-related eye diseases; glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy, data are inconclusive. Due to anatomic factors, angle closure glaucoma is more common in women, whereas the dominating glaucoma type; primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), is more prevalent in men. Diabetic retinopathy also has a male predominance and vascular/circulatory factors have been implied both in diabetic retinopathy and in POAG. For AMD, data on gender differences are conflicting although some studies indicate increased prevalence of drusen and neovascular AMD in women. To conclude, both biologic and socioeconomic factors must be considered when investigating causes of gender differences in the prevalence of age-related eye disease. PMID:26508081

  8. Grape powder treatment prevents anxiety-like behavior in a rat model of aging.

    PubMed

    Patki, Gaurav; Ali, Quaisar; Pokkunuri, Indira; Asghar, Mohammad; Salim, Samina

    2015-06-01

    Earlier, we have reported that grape powder (GP) treatment prevented pharmacologic and psychological stress-induced anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment in rats. Protective effects of GP were attributed to its antioxidant effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that age-associated behavioral and cognitive deficits such as anxiety and memory impairment will be ameliorated with GP treatment. Using a National Institute of Aging recommended rodent model of aging, we examined a potentially protective role of antioxidant-rich GP in age-associated anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment. Male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups: young rats (3 months old) provided with tap water or with 15 g/L GP dissolved in tap water for 3 weeks, aged rats (21 months old) provided with tap water or with GP-treated tap water for 3 weeks (AG-GP). Anxiety-like behavior was significantly greater in aged rats compared with young rats, GP-treated young rats, or aged control rats (P < .05). Also, GP treatment prevented age-induced anxiety-like behavior in AG-GP rats (P < .05). Neither short-term nor long-term age-associated memory deficits improved with GP treatment in AG-GP rats. Furthermore, aged rats showed increased level of physiological stress (corticosterone) and increased oxidative stress in the plasma (8-isoprostane) as well as in selected brain areas (protein carbonylation). Grape powder treatment prevented age-induced increase in corticosterone levels and plasma 8-isoprostane levels in aged rats (P < .05), whereas protein carbonylation was recovered in the amygdala region only (P < .05). Grape powder by regulating oxidative stress ameliorates age-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats, whereas age-associated memory deficits seem unaffected with GP treatment. PMID:26022140

  9. Cadmium effect on microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity in rat livers with respect to differences in age and sex

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of cadmium on the hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme system was investigated. Cadmium chloride caused the conversion of cytochrome P-450 to P-420 in rat liver microsomes. The destruction of cytochrome P-450 by cadmium caused the reduction of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity and prolonged the pentobarbital sleeping time. There is a sex-related difference in the ability of cadmium to inhibit the hepatic drug metabolism in rats: male rats are more sensitive to cadmium than females. The effective period when cadmium prolonged their sleep depended upon the age of rats; older rats were more sensitive to cadmium than younger ones. The maximum increase of sleeping time depended upon the dose level of cadium, and the rate constant of the equations seems to depend upon the age of the animals.

  10. Protective effects of resveratrol on aging-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Gocmez, Semil Selcen; Gacar, Nejat; Utkan, Tijen; Gacar, Gulcin; Scarpace, Philip J; Tumer, Nihal

    2016-05-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol phytoalexine, has been shown to play a neuroprotective role in the neurodegenerative process in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improve memory function in dementia. However, the in vivo effect of resveratrol in normal aging models of learning and memory has not yet been evaluated. Therefore, the present neurobehavioral study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of resveratrol on cognitive impairment induced by aging in passive avoidance and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups: young control (4month), young resveratrol (4month+RESV), old control (24month) and old resveratrol (24month+RESV). Resveratrol (50mg/kg/day) was given to the 4month+RESV and 24month+RESV groups orally for 12weeks. There was no significant difference between the groups for the first day of latency, while in aged rats, the second day of latency was significantly shortened compared to the young group in the passive avoidance test (p<0.05). Additionally, in the MWM test, the results showed a decrease in the time spent in the escape platform's quadrant in the probe test in aged rats (p<0.05). The administration of resveratrol at 50mg/kg/day increased the retention scores in the passive avoidance test and the time spent in the escape platform's quadrant in the MWM task (p<0.05). Furthermore resveratrol attenuated the protein levels of TNFα and IL1β in the 24-month group. These findings indicate that aging impairs emotional and spatial learning-memory and resveratrol reverses the effect of age-related learning and memory impairment. The results of this study suggest that resveratrol is effective in preventing cognitive deficit in aged rats by inhibiting the production of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27040098

  11. Desensitized morphological and cytokine response after stretch-shortening muscle contractions as a feature of aging in rats.

    PubMed

    Rader, Erik P; Layner, Kayla N; Triscuit, Alyssa M; Kashon, Michael L; Gu, Ja K; Ensey, James; Baker, Brent A

    2015-12-01

    Recovery from contraction-induced injury is impaired with aging. At a young age, the secondary response several days following contraction-induced injury consists of edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and segmental muscle fiber degeneration to aid in the clearance of damaged tissue and repair. This morphological response has not been wholly established at advanced age. Our aim was to characterize muscle fiber morphology 3 and 10 days following stretch-shortening contractions (SSCs) varying in repetition number (i.e. 0, 30, 80, and 150) for young and old rats. For muscles of young rats, muscle fiber degeneration was overt at 3 days exclusively after 80 or 150 SSCs and returned significantly closer to control values by 10 days. For muscles of old rats, no such responses were observed. Transcriptional microarray analysis at 3 days demonstrated that muscles of young rats differentially expressed up to 2144 genes while muscles of old rats differentially expressed 47 genes. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that cellular movement was a major biological process over-represented with genes that were significantly altered by SSCs especially for young rats. Protein levels in muscle for various cytokines and chemokines, key inflammatory factors for cell movement, increased 3- to 50-fold following high-repetition SSCs for young rats with no change for old rats. This age-related differential response was insightful given that for control (i.e. 0 SSCs) conditions, protein levels of circulatory cytokines/chemokines were increased with age. The results demonstrate ongoing systemic low-grade inflammatory signaling and subsequent desensitization of the cytokine/chemokine and morphological response to contraction-induced injury with aging - features which accompany age-related impairment in muscle recovery. PMID:26454037

  12. Age-related changes in rostral basal forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic projection neurons: Relationship with spatial impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bañuelos, C.; LaSarge, C. L.; McQuail, J. A.; Hartman, J. J.; Gilbert, R. J.; Ormerod, B. K.; Bizon, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Both cholinergic and GABAergic projections from the rostral basal forebrain have been implicated in hippocampal function and mnemonic abilities. While dysfunction of cholinergic neurons has been heavily implicated in age-related memory decline, significantly less is known regarding how age-related changes in co-distributed GABAergic projection neurons contribute to a decline in hippocampal-dependent spatial learning. In the current study, confocal stereology was used to quantify cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunopositive) neurons, GABAergic projection (glutamic decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) immunopositive) neurons, and total (NeuN immunopositive) neurons in the rostral basal forebrain of young and aged rats that were first characterized on a spatial learning task. ChAT immunopositive neurons were significantly but modestly reduced in aged rats. Although ChAT immunopositive neuron number was strongly correlated with spatial learning abilities among young rats, the reduction of ChAT immunopositive neurons was not associated with impaired spatial learning in aged rats. In contrast, the number of GAD67 immunopositive neurons was robustly and selectively elevated in aged rats that exhibited impaired spatial learning. Interestingly, the total number of rostral basal forebrain neurons was comparable in young and aged rats, regardless of their cognitive status. These data demonstrate differential effects of age on phenotypically distinct rostral basal forebrain projection neurons, and implicate dysregulated cholinergic and GABAergic septohippocampal circuitry in age-related mnemonic decline. PMID:22817834

  13. Immune marker CD68 correlates with cognitive impairment in normally aged rats.

    PubMed

    Farso, Mark; Ménard, Caroline; Colby-Milley, Jessica; Quirion, Rémi

    2013-08-01

    The relationship between heightened neuroinflammation and cognitive decline in the normally aged brain is still debatable, as most data are derived from insult-related models. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to determine whether a link could be established for 2 immune markers at the post-transcriptional level; CD68 and MHC-II, in a normally aged (24-month-old) rat population discriminated for their learning abilities. Using the Morris Water Maze (MWM) task, aged rats were divided into aged learning-impaired (AI) or -unimpaired (AU) groups. Western immunoblots of hippocampal tissue revealed a significant increase of CD68 in AI rats compared to the AU group. Moreover, up-regulated CD68 expression correlated with increased latency times in the MWM task. Immunofluorescence for CD68 revealed intense staining in the white matter regions and CA3 subregion of the hippocampus in the AI group. Despite expression of MHC-II in the AI group, no correlation was found. Overall, these data suggest that CD68 could play a role associated with cognitive decline in a subgroup of the normally aged population. PMID:23523271

  14. Cognitive decline is associated with reduced surface GluR1 expression in the hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan-Jian; Chen, Hai-Bo; Wei, Bo; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Ping-Liang; Zhan, Jin-Qiong; Hu, Mao-Rong; Yan, Kun; Hu, Bin; Yu, Bin

    2015-03-30

    Individual differences in cognitive aging exist in humans and in rodent populations, yet the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Activity-dependent delivery of GluR1-containing AMPA receptor (AMPARs) plays an essential role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. We hypothesize that alterations of surface GluR1 expression in the hippocampus might correlate with age-related cognitive decline. To test this hypothesis, the present study evaluated the cognitive function of young adult and aged rats using Morris water maze. After the behavioral test, the surface expression of GluR1 protein in hippocampal CA1 region of rats was determined using Western blotting. The results showed that the surface expression of GluR1 in the hippocampus of aged rats that are cognitively impaired was much lower than that of young adults and aged rats with preserved cognitive abilities. The phosphorylation levels of GluR1 at Ser845 and Ser831 sites, which promote the synaptic delivery of GluR1, were also selectively decreased in the hippocampus of aged-impaired rats. Correlation analysis reveals that greater decrease in surface GluR1 expression was associated with worse behavioral performance. These results suggest that reduced surface GluR1 expression may contribute to cognitive decline that occurs in normal aging, and different pattern of surface GluR1 expression might be responsible for the individual differences in cognitive aging. PMID:25697598

  15. Relative age effect: implications for effective practice.

    PubMed

    Andronikos, Georgios; Elumaro, Adeboye Israel; Westbury, Tony; Martindale, Russell J J

    2016-06-01

    Physical and psychological differences related to birthdate amongst athletes of the same selection year have been characterised as the "relative age effects" (RAEs). RAEs have been identified in a variety of sports, both at youth and adult level, and are linked with dropout of athletes and a reduction of the talent pool. This study examined the existence, mechanisms and possible solutions to RAEs using qualitative methodology. Seven experts in the field of talent identification and development were interviewed. Inductive analysis of the data showed that, while there was mixed evidence for the existence of RAEs across sports, the eradication of RAEs was attributed to controllable features of the development environment. The factors reported included the structure of "categories" used to group athletes within the sport (e.g. age, weight, size, skills), recognition and prioritisation of long-term development over "short term win focus." Education of relevant parties (e.g. coaches, scouts, clubs) about RAEs and the nature of "talent" within a long-term context was suggested, along with careful consideration of the structure of the development environment (e.g. delayed selection, provision for late developers, focus on skills not results, use of challenge). Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:26417709

  16. SRF binding to SRE in the rat heart: influence of age.

    PubMed

    Lu, X G; Azhar, G; Liu, L; Tsou, H; Wei, J Y

    1998-01-01

    One important promoter element at the 5' end of the c-fos gene is the serum response element (SRE). SRE is the site of attachment of the 67-kDa protein serum response factor (SRF) and several accessory proteins (Elk1, SAP1, SAP2/NET), termed the ternary complex factors. The binding of SRF to SRE plays an integral role in c-fos transcription and may occur independently of the association of the ternary complex factors. In the current study, we found that SRF protein expression was increased in the hearts of the old vs young adult rats in the basal condition. The hearts of old rats may have posttranslationally modified SRF proteins that are different compared to that of the young adults. The SRF increase was present both in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus in the old hearts. To test whether SRF protein levels in response to acute stress might be altered with age, we studied hearts of young adult and old rats during myocardial infarction. The young adult rat hearts responded to acute ischemic stress with an increase in both p62 and p67 SRF. The hearts of the old rats, however, did not exhibit a significant change in SRF protein expression. These findings demonstrate qualitative as well as quantitative age differences in SRF protein levels, both at baseline and following stimulation. The reduced SRF expression in response to acute cardiac ischemic stress in the old rats might contribute to the observed age-related decrease in the induction of immediate early genes such as c-fos in the heart. PMID:9467416

  17. Calcium antagonist flunarizine hydrochloride affects striatal D2 dopamine receptors in the young adult and aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, M; Ogawa, N; Haba, K; Hirata, H; Mori, A

    1991-01-01

    The calcium (Ca) antagonist flunarizine hydrochloride (FNZ) has been reported to induce parkinsonism, especially in the elderly. The effects of FNZ on dopamine receptors in rat striatal membranes, especially in aged rats, were studied using radiolabeled receptor assay. Similar displacing potencies in [(3)H]spiperone bindings were exhibited for FNZ and the Ca antagonists verapamil and nicardipine. FNZ was found to directly and competitively effect D2 receptors (D2-Rs) as an antagonist, without effecting D1 receptors. Furthermore, the washing of preoccupied membranes revealed that FNZ has a long-acting potent effect on D2-Rs. The comparative study of FNZ and sulpiride in young-adult and aged rats showed that the effect of FNZ on D2-Rs was more marked in aged rats. These results might be related to FNZ-induced parkinsonism and its high incidence in the elderly. PMID:15374420

  18. Glutamate receptor binding in the frontal cortex and dorsal striatum of aged rats with impaired attentional set-shifting.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Michelle M; Baxter, Mark G

    2003-12-01

    Aged Long-Evans rats exhibit deficits in attentional set shifting, an aspect of executive function, relative to adult rats. Impairments in set shifting and spatial learning are uncorrelated in aged rats, indicating a possible dissociation of the effects of ageing in prefrontal versus hippocampal systems. Ionotropic glutamate receptor binding was assessed using an in vitro autoradiography method in young and aged rats. The rats had been tested on a set-shifting task that measured attentional set shifts and reversal learning, as well as in a spatial learning task in the Morris water maze. [3H]Kainate, [3H]AMPA and NMDA-displaceable [3H]glutamate receptor binding were quantified in orbital cortex, cingulate cortex, medial frontal cortex, dorsolateral and dorsomedial striatum. Age-related decreases in [3H]kainate binding were apparent in all regions measured. Similarly, NMDA-displaceable [3H]glutamate binding was decreased in the aged rats in all the regions measured except for the medial frontal area where no age effects were observed. [3H]AMPA receptor binding was preserved with age in all the regions measured. Lower levels of [3H]kainate binding in the cingulate cortex were significantly correlated with poorer set-shifting performance, whereas higher levels of NMDA binding in the dorsomedial striatum were correlated with poorer set-shifting performance. There were no significant correlations between the levels of ionotropic glutamate receptors and performance in the reversal task or spatial learning in the Morris water maze. These results indicate that age-related behavioural deficits in attentional set shifting are selectively associated with neurobiological alterations in the cingulate cortex and dorsomedial striatum. PMID:14686906

  19. Age-Related Differences in Collagen-Induced Arthritis: Clinical and Imaging Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D; Pratt, Isaac V; Cooper, David M L; Silver, Tawni I; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is among the most common chronic diseases in both children and adults. Although intraarticular inflammation is the feature common among all patients with chronic arthritis there are, in addition to age at onset, clinical characteristics that further distinguish the disease in pediatric and adult populations. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the utility of microCT (µCT) and ultrasonography in characterizing pathologic age-related differences in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Juvenile (35 d old) and young adult (91 d old) male Wistar rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and incomplete Freund adjuvant to induce polyarthritis. Naïve male Wistar rats served as controls. All paws were scored on a scale of 0 (normal paw) to 4 (disuse of paw). Rats were euthanized at 14 d after the onset of arthritis and the hindpaws imaged by µCT and ultrasonography. Young adult rats had more severe signs of arthritis than did their juvenile counterparts. Imaging demonstrated that young adult CIA rats exhibited more widespread and severe skeletal lesions of the phalanges, metatarsals, and tarsal bones, whereas juvenile CIA rats had more localized and less proliferative and osteolytic damage that was confined predominantly to the phalanges and metatarsals. This report demonstrates the utility of imaging modalities to compare juvenile and young adult rats with CIA and provides evidence that disease characteristics and progression differ between the 2 age groups. Our observations indicate that the CIA model could help discern age-related pathologic processes in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24326225

  20. Sympathetic axonopathies and hyperinnervation in the small intestine smooth muscle of aged Fischer 344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert J.; Hudson, Cherie N.; Powley, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    It is well documented that the intrinsic enteric nervous system of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract sustains neuronal losses and reorganizes as it ages. In contrast, age-related remodeling of the extrinsic sympathetic projections to the wall of the gut is poorly characterized. The present experiment, therefore, surveyed the sympathetic projections to the aged small intestine for axonopathies. Furthermore, the experiment evaluated the specific prediction that catecholaminergic inputs undergo hyperplastic changes. Jejunal tissue was collected from 3-, 8-, 16-, and 24-month-old male Fischer 344 rats, prepared as whole mounts consisting of the muscularis, and processed immunohistochemically for tyrosine hydroxylase, the enzymatic marker for norepinephrine, and either the protein CD163 or the protein MHCII, both phenotypical markers for macrophages. Four distinctive sympathetic axonopathy profiles occurred in the small intestine of the aged rat: (1) swollen and dystrophic terminals, (2) tangled axons, (3) discrete hyperinnervated loci in the smooth muscle wall, including at the bases of Peyer's patches, and (4) ectopic hyperplastic or hyperinnervating axons in the serosa/subserosal layers. In many cases, the axonopathies occurred at localized and limited foci, involving only a few axon terminals, in a pattern consistent with incidences of focal ischemic, vascular, or traumatic insult. The present observations underscore the complexity of the processes of aging on the neural circuitry of the gut, with age-related GI functional impairments likely reflecting a constellation of adjustments that range from selective neuronal losses, through accumulation of cellular debris, to hyperplasias and hyperinnervation of sympathetic inputs. PMID:24104187

  1. Age Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation is improved by resveratrol in rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gocmez, Semil S; Scarpace, Philip J; Whidden, Melissa A; Erdos, Benedek; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Sakarya, Yasemin; Utkan, Tijen; Tumer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether resveratrol improves the adverse effects age on vascular function in mesenteric arteries (MAs), and diminishes the hyperactivity in adrenal gland with age. [Methods] Male F344 x Brown Norway rats were assigned to 6-month control (YC), 6-month resveratrol (YR), 24-month control (OC) and 24-month resveratrol (OR). Resveratrol (15 mg/kg) was provided to resveratrol groups in drinking water for 14 days. [Results] Concentration response curves to phenylephrine (PE, 10-9-10-5M), acetylcholine (Ach, 10-9-10-5M) and resveratrol (10-8-10-4M) were evaluated in pressurized isolated MAs. The Ach concentration-response curve was right shifted with maximal response diminished in OC compared with YC rats. These effects were reversed by resveratrol treatment. The resveratrol-mediated relaxant responses were unchanged with age or resveratrol suggesting an endothelium-independent mechanism. Resveratrol tended to increase endothelial nitric oxide synthase; caused no effect on copper-zinc superoxide dismutase; and normalized the age-related elevatation in DβH and NPY levels in adrenal medulla, two indicators of sympathetic activity [Conclusion] These data indicate that resveratrol reverses age-related dysfunction in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in MAs and partially reverses hyperactivity of adrenomedullary function with age. This treatment may have a therapeuticpotential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or hypertension in the elderly. PMID:27298812

  2. A 3-month age difference profoundly alters the primary rat stromal vascular fraction phenotype.

    PubMed

    Quaade, Marlene Louise; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Sheikh, Søren Paludan

    2016-06-01

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) is a heterogeneous population obtained from collagenase digestion of adipose tissue. When cultured the population becomes more homogeneous and the cells are then termed adipose stromal/stem cells (ASCs). Both the freshly isolated primary SVF population and the cultured ASC population possess regenerative abilities suggested to be mediated by paracrine mechanisms mainly. The use of ASCs and SVF cells, both in animal studies and human clinical studies, has dramatically increased during recent years. However, more knowledge regarding optimal donor characteristics such as age is demanded. Here we report that even a short age difference has an impact on the phenotype of primary SVF cells. We observed that a 3-month difference in relatively young adult rats affects the expression pattern of several mesenchymal stem cell markers in their primary SVF. The younger animals had significantly more CD90+/CD44+/CD29+/PDGFRα+primary cells, than the aged rats, suggesting an age dependent shift in the relative cell type distribution within the population. Taken together with recent studies of much more pronounced age differences, our data strongly suggest that donor age is a very critical parameter that should be taken into account in future stem cell studies, especially when using primary cells. PMID:27265810

  3. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer ({sup 14}C)-{alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels.

  4. Induction of mammary tumors in aging rats by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene: role of DNA synthesis during carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.K.; Dao, T.L.

    1980-03-01

    Two routes of administration were used to test the susceptibility of the mammary gland of the rat to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) carcinogenesis in relation to age of the tissue. In one series of experiments, 60-, 70-, 90-, 120-, 150-, and 200-day-old female nonbred Sprague-Dawley rats were given DMBA iv. In parallel experiments, rats of the same ages as those above were given DMBA by local application. Mammary tumors developed in 89 to 90% of the 60- and 70-day-old rats and in 40% of the 90-day-old rats. Rats 120 days old and older were completely refractory to DMBA. In contrast, all rats, irrespective of their ages, developed tumors when DMBA was applied locally. DMBA given iv significantly inhibited DNA synthesis in mammary glands, but DMBA applied locally significantly increased the Li of the mammary glands.

  5. Short-term environmental enrichment enhances synaptic plasticity in hippocampal slices from aged rats.

    PubMed

    Stein, Liana R; O'Dell, Kazuko A; Funatsu, Michiyo; Zorumski, Charles F; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2016-08-01

    Age-associated changes in cognition are mirrored by impairments in cellular models of memory and learning, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In young rodents, environmental enrichment (EE) can enhance memory, alter LTP and LTD, as well as reverse cognitive deficits induced by aging. Whether short-term EE can benefit cognition and synaptic plasticity in aged rodents is unclear. Here, we tested if short-term EE could overcome age-associated impairments in induction of LTP and LTD. LTP and LTD could not be induced in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices in control, aged rats using standard stimuli that are highly effective in young rats. However, exposure of aged littermates to EE for three weeks enabled successful induction of LTP and LTD. EE-facilitated LTP was dependent upon N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). These alterations in synaptic plasticity occurred with elevated levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein and vascular endothelial growth factor, but in the absence of changes in several other synaptic and cellular markers. Importantly, our study suggests that even a relatively short period of EE is sufficient to alter synaptic plasticity and molecular markers linked to cognitive function in aged animals. PMID:27208617

  6. The GABAA antagonist bicuculline attenuates progesterone-induced memory impairments in middle-aged ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Braden, B. Blair; Kingston, Melissa L.; Koenig, Elizabeth N.; Lavery, Courtney N.; Tsang, Candy W. S.; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    In women, high levels of natural progesterone have been associated with detrimental cognitive effects via the “maternal amnesia” phenomenon as well as in controlled experiments. In aged ovariectomized (Ovx) rats, progesterone has been shown to impair cognition and impact the GABAergic system in cognitive brain regions. Here, we tested whether the GABAergic system is a mechanism of progesterone’s detrimental cognitive effects in the Ovx rat by attempting to reverse progesterone-induced impairments via concomitant treatment with the GABAA antagonist, bicuculline. Thirteen month old rats received Ovx plus daily vehicle, progesterone, bicuculline, or progesterone+bicuculline injections beginning 2 weeks prior to testing. The water radial-arm maze was used to evaluate spatial working and reference memory. During learning, rats administered progesterone made more working memory errors than those administered vehicle, and this impairment was reversed by the addition of bicuculline. The progesterone impairment was transient and all animals performed similarly by the end of regular testing. On the last day of testing, a 6 hour delay was administered to evaluate memory retention. Progesterone-treated rats were the only group to increase working memory errors with the delay relative to baseline performance; again, the addition of bicuculline prevented the progesterone-induced impairment. The vehicle, bicuculline, and progesterone+bicuculline groups were not impaired by the delay. The current rodent findings corroborate prior research reporting progesterone-induced detriments on cognition in women and in the aging Ovx rat. Moreover, the data suggest that the progesterone-induced cognitive impairment is, in part, related to the GABAergic system. Given that progesterone is included in numerous clinically-prescribed hormone therapies and contraceptives (e.g., micronized), and as synthetic analogs, further research is warranted to better understand the parameters and

  7. Sinusoidal electromagnetic field of 50 hz helps in retaining calcium in tibias of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Khanduja, K L; Syal, N

    2003-03-01

    Effect of 50Hz sinusoidal electromagnetic field (SEMF) on normal bone physiology was evaluated in young and old female and male Wistar rats. Exposure to SEMF resulted in increased 45Ca retention in tibias of aged animals only. Levels of serum calcium in young female and male rats were significantly less than in respective aged rats. These were further decreased after 4 weeks of SEMF exposure. SEMF exposure did not change the serum calcium levels in aged rats, and inorganic phosphates in young and aged animals. Similarly, the levels of tartrate resistant acid and alkaline phosphatase were significantly decreased in young rats, whereas the levels remained unchanged in aged rats of either sex. The results revealed that SEMF of 1mT can prevent bone calcium loss due to aging in animals. PMID:15267147

  8. Distraction can reduce age-related forgetting.

    PubMed

    Biss, Renée K; Ngo, K W Joan; Hasher, Lynn; Campbell, Karen L; Rowe, Gillian

    2013-04-01

    In three experiments, we assessed whether older adults' generally greater tendency to process distracting information can be used to minimize widely reported age-related differences in forgetting. Younger and older adults studied and recalled a list of words on an initial test and again on a surprise test after a 15-min delay. In the middle (Experiments 1a and 2) or at the end (Experiment 3) of the delay, participants completed a 1-back task in which half of the studied words appeared as distractors. Across all experiments, older adults reliably forgot unrepeated words; however, older adults rarely or never forgot the words that had appeared as distractors, whereas younger adults forgot words in both categories. Exposure to distraction may serve as a rehearsal episode for older adults, and thus as a method by which general distractibility may be co-opted to boost memory. PMID:23426890

  9. Macular carotenoids and age-related maculopathy.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Eamonn; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John; Au Eong, Kah-Guan; Beatty, Stephan

    2006-11-01

    Lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are concentrated at the macula, where they are collectively known as macular pigment (MP), and where they are believed to play a major role in protecting retinal tissues against oxidative stress. Whilst the exact pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy (ARM) remains unknown, the disruption of cellular processes by oxidative stress may play an important role. Manipulation of dietary intake of L and Z has been shown to augment MP, thereby raising hopes that dietary supplementation with these carotenoids might prevent, delay, or modify the course of ARM. This article discusses the scientific rationale supporting the hypothesis that L and Z are protective against ARM, and presents the recent evidence germane to this theory. PMID:17160199

  10. Medical bioremediation of age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Jacques M; Schloendorn, John; Rittmann, Bruce E; Alvarez, Pedro JJ

    2009-01-01

    Catabolic insufficiency in humans leads to the gradual accumulation of a number of pathogenic compounds associated with age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and macular degeneration. Removal of these compounds is a widely researched therapeutic option, but the use of antibodies and endogenous human enzymes has failed to produce effective treatments, and may pose risks to cellular homeostasis. Another alternative is "medical bioremediation," the use of microbial enzymes to augment missing catabolic functions. The microbial genetic diversity in most natural environments provides a resource that can be mined for enzymes capable of degrading just about any energy-rich organic compound. This review discusses targets for biodegradation, the identification of candidate microbial enzymes, and enzyme-delivery methods. PMID:19358742

  11. [Epidemiology of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Brandl, C; Stark, K J; Wintergerst, M; Heinemann, M; Heid, I M; Finger, R P

    2016-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause of blindness in industrialized societies. Population-based epidemiological investigations generate important data on prevalence, incidence, risk factors, and future trends. This review summarizes the most important epidemiological studies on AMD with a focus on their transferability to Germany including existing evidence for the main risk factors for AMD development and progression. Future tasks, such as the standardization of grading systems and the use of recent retinal imaging technology in epidemiological studies are discussed. In Germany, epidemiological data on AMD are scarce. However, the need for epidemiological research in ophthalmology is currently being addressed by several recently started population-based studies. PMID:27541733

  12. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Reddy, Shantan; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although important progress has been made in understanding age-related macular degeneration (AMD), management of the disease continues to be a challenge. AMD research has led to a widening of available treatment options and improved prognostic perspectives. This essay reviews these treatment options. Design: Interpretative essay. Methods: Literature review and interpretation. Results: Current treatments to preserve vision in patients with non-exudative AMD include antioxidant vitamins and mineral supplementations. Exudative AMD is currently most often treated monthly with anti-VEGF intravitreal injections. However, investigators are beginning to experiment with combination therapy and surgical approaches in an attempt to limit the number of treatment and reduce the financial burden on the health care system. Conclusion: By better understanding the basis and pathogenesis of AMD, newer therapies will continue to be developed that target specific pathways in patients with AMD, with the hoped for outcome of better management of the disease and improved visual acuity. PMID:19668560

  13. Hypothalamic leptin gene therapy reduces body weight without accelerating age-related bone loss.

    PubMed

    Turner, Russell T; Dube, Michael; Branscum, Adam J; Wong, Carmen P; Olson, Dawn A; Zhong, Xiaoying; Kweh, Mercedes F; Larkin, Iske V; Wronski, Thomas J; Rosen, Clifford J; Kalra, Satya P; Iwaniec, Urszula T

    2015-12-01

    Excessive weight gain in adults is associated with a variety of negative health outcomes. Unfortunately, dieting, exercise, and pharmacological interventions have had limited long-term success in weight control and can result in detrimental side effects, including accelerating age-related cancellous bone loss. We investigated the efficacy of using hypothalamic leptin gene therapy as an alternative method for reducing weight in skeletally-mature (9 months old) female rats and determined the impact of leptin-induced weight loss on bone mass, density, and microarchitecture, and serum biomarkers of bone turnover (CTx and osteocalcin). Rats were implanted with cannulae in the 3rd ventricle of the hypothalamus and injected with either recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding the gene for rat leptin (rAAV-Leptin, n=7) or a control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (rAAV-GFP, n=10) and sacrificed 18 weeks later. A baseline control group (n=7) was sacrificed at vector administration. rAAV-Leptin-treated rats lost weight (-4±2%) while rAAV-GFP-treated rats gained weight (14±2%) during the study. At study termination, rAAV-Leptin-treated rats weighed 17% less than rAAV-GFP-treated rats and had lower abdominal white adipose tissue weight (-80%), serum leptin (-77%), and serum IGF1 (-34%). Cancellous bone volume fraction in distal femur metaphysis and epiphysis, and in lumbar vertebra tended to be lower (P<0.1) in rAAV-GFP-treated rats (13.5 months old) compared to baseline control rats (9 months old). Significant differences in cancellous bone or biomarkers of bone turnover were not detected between rAAV-Leptin and rAAV-GFP rats. In summary, rAAV-Leptin-treated rats maintained a lower body weight compared to baseline and rAAV-GFP-treated rats with minimal effects on bone mass, density, microarchitecture, or biochemical markers of bone turnover. PMID:26487675

  14. Differential Effects of Aging on Fore– and Hindpaw Maps of Rat Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    David-Jürgens, Marianne; Churs, Lydia; Berkefeld, Thomas; Zepka, Roberto F.; Dinse, Hubert R.

    2008-01-01

    Getting older is associated with a decline of cognitive and sensorimotor abilities, but it remains elusive whether age-related changes are due to accumulating degenerational processes, rendering them largely irreversible, or whether they reflect plastic, adaptational and presumably compensatory changes. Using aged rats as a model we studied how aging affects neural processing in somatosensory cortex. By multi-unit recordings in the fore- and hindpaw cortical maps we compared the effects of aging on receptive field size and response latencies. While in aged animals response latencies of neurons of both cortical representations were lengthened by approximately the same amount, only RFs of hindpaw neurons showed severe expansion with only little changes of forepaw RFs. To obtain insight into parallel changes of walking behavior, we recorded footprints in young and old animals which revealed a general age-related impairment of walking. In addition we found evidence for a limb-specific deterioration of the hindlimbs that was not observed in the forelimbs. Our results show that age-related changes of somatosensory cortical neurons display a complex pattern of regional specificity and parameter-dependence indicating that aging acts rather selectively on cortical processing of sensory information. The fact that RFs of the fore- and hindpaws do not co-vary in aged animals argues against degenerational processes on a global scale. We therefore conclude that age-related alterations are composed of plastic-adaptive alterations in response to modified use and degenerational changes developing with age. As a consequence, age-related changes need not be irreversible but can be subject to amelioration through training and stimulation. PMID:18852896

  15. Effects of aging on vasoconstrictor and mechanical properties of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller-Delp, Judy; Spier, Scott A.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Lesniewski, Lisa A.; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Humphrey, J. D.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise capacity and skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise are reduced with advancing age. This reduction in blood flow capacity may be related to increased reactivity of skeletal muscle resistance vessels to vasoconstrictor stimuli. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that aging results in increased vasoconstrictor responses of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles. First-order (1A) arterioles (90-220 microm) from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of young (4 mo) and aged (24 mo) Fischer-344 rats were isolated, cannulated, and pressurized via hydrostatic reservoirs. Vasoconstriction in response to increases in norepinephrine (NE; 1 x 10(-9)-1 x 10(-4) M) and KCl (20-100 mM) concentrations and increases in intraluminal pressure (10-130 cmH(2)O) were evaluated in the absence of flow. Responses to NE and KCl were similar in both soleus and gastrocnemius muscle arterioles from young and aged rats. In contrast, active myogenic responses to changes in intraluminal pressure were diminished in soleus and gastrocnemius arterioles from aged rats. To assess whether alterations in the mechanical properties of resistance arterioles underlie altered myogenic responsiveness, passive diameter responses to pressure and mechanical stiffness were evaluated. There was no effect of age on the structural behavior (passive pressure-diameter relationship) or stiffness of arterioles from either the soleus or gastrocnemius muscles. These results suggest that aging does not result in a nonspecific decrease in vasoconstrictor responsiveness of skeletal muscle arterioles. Rather, aging-induced adaptations of vasoreactivity of resistance arterioles appear to be limited to mechanisms that are uniquely involved in the signaling of the myogenic response.

  16. Effect of age and caloric restriction on cutaneous wound closure in rats and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Roth, G S; Kowatch, M A; Hengemihle, J; Ingram, D K; Spangler, E L; Johnson, L K; Lane, M A

    1997-03-01

    Cutaneous wounds close more slowly in rats and monkeys as age increases. Caloric restriction of 40% in rats and 30% in monkeys did not significantly affect healing rates, although it did exert a trend toward faster closure. Similarly, voluntary exercise did not significantly alter healing rates in rats. Thus, impaired wound healing appears to be a generalized physiological manifestation of aging, but its possible amelioration by "anti-aging" interventions remains to be established. PMID:9060966

  17. Age-related consequences of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zaepfel, Alysia; Bjornstad, Petter; Nadeau, Kristen J

    2014-01-01

    The severity and frequency of childhood obesity has increased significantly over the past three to four decades. The health effects of increased body mass index as a child may significantly impact obese youth as they age. However, many of the long-term outcomes of childhood obesity have yet to be studied. This article examines the currently available longitudinal data evaluating the effects of childhood obesity on adult outcomes. Consequences of obesity include an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and its associated retinal and renal complications, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, obstructive sleep apnea, polycystic ovarian syndrome, infertility, asthma, orthopedic complications, psychiatric disease, and increased rates of cancer, among others. These disorders can start as early as childhood, and such early onset increases the likelihood of early morbidity and mortality. Being obese as a child also increases the likelihood of being obese as an adult, and obesity in adulthood also leads to obesity-related complications. This review outlines the evidence for childhood obesity as a predictor of adult obesity and obesity-related disorders, thereby emphasizing the importance of early intervention to prevent the onset of obesity in childhood. PMID:24434909

  18. Nutraceutical intervention reverses the negative effects of blood from aged rats on stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bickford, Paula C; Kaneko, Yuji; Grimmig, Bethany; Pappas, Colleen; Small, Brent; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun; Douglas Shytle, R

    2015-10-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in function in many of the stem cell niches of the body. An emerging body of literature suggests that one of the reasons for this decline in function is due to cell non-autonomous influences on the niche from the body. For example, studies using the technique of parabiosis have demonstrated a negative influence of blood from aged mice on muscle satellite cells and neurogenesis in young mice. We examined if we could reverse this effect of aged serum on stem cell proliferation by treating aged rats with NT-020, a dietary supplement containing blueberry, green tea, vitamin D3, and carnosine that has been shown to increase neurogenesis in aged rats. Young and aged rats were administered either control NIH-31 diet or one supplemented with NT-020 for 28 days, and serum was collected upon euthanasia. The serum was used in cultures of both rat hippocampal neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Serum from aged rats significantly reduced cell proliferation as measured by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assays in both NPCs and MSCs. Serum from aged rats treated with NT-020 was not different from serum from young rats. Therefore, NT-020 rescued the effect of serum from aged rats to reduce stem cell proliferation. PMID:26410618

  19. The role of hepatic & splenic macrophages in E. coli-induced memory impairments in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Ruth M.; Thompson, Vanessa M.; Arnold, T. Hayes; Frank, Matthew G.; Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    2014-01-01

    Bi-directional communication between the peripheral and central nervous systems has been extensively demonstrated. Aged rats exhibit a prolonged proinflammatory response in the hippocampus region of the brain following a peripheral bacterial infection, and this response in turn causes robust memory declines. Here we aimed to determine whether hepatic or splenic macrophages play a role in the maintenance of this central response. Proinflammatory cytokines measured in liver and spleen four days following an E. coli infection revealed a potentiated proinflammatory response in liver, and to a lesser extent in spleen, in aged relative to young rats. To determine whether this potentiated response was caused by impaired bacterial clearance in these organs, E. coli colony forming units in liver and spleen were measured 4 days after infection, and there were no difference between young and aged rats in either organ. No E. coli was detected in the hippocampus, eliminating the possibility that the aged blood brain barrier allowed E. coli to enter the brain. Depletion of hepatic and splenic macrophages with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes effectively eliminated the proinflammatory response to E. coli at four days in both organs. However, this treatment failed to reduce the proinflammatory response in the hippocampus. Moreover, depletion of peripheral macrophages from liver and spleen did not prevent E. coli-induced memory impairment. These data strongly suggest that hepatic and splenic macrophages do not play a major role in the long-lasting maintenance of the proinflammatory response in the hippocampus of aged rats following a bacterial infection, or the memory declines that this response produces. PMID:25043992

  20. Cadmium affects the episodic luteinizing hormone secretion in male rats: possible age-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Márquez, N; Piquero, S; Esquifino, A I

    1999-01-11

    Cadmium affects luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion through unknown mechanisms. The present study was undertaken to assess whether chronic exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may affect the episodic secretion of LH and if these effects are age-dependent. Male rats were given cadmium at a dose of 50 ppm in the drinking water, from day 30 to 60 or from day 60 to 90 of life. Age-matched rats with access to cadmium-free water were used as controls. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected every 7 min for 3 h, from 10:30 to 13.30 in conscious, freely moving rats. In control animals, mean serum LH levels and pulse duration increased with age (P < or = 0.001), and pulse frequency and the relative amplitude of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.001). Cadmium administration, from day 30 to 60 of life, decreased the pulse frequency and mean half-life of the hormone (P < or = 0.05, P < or = 0.01, respectively). However, no changes in any other parameters studied were observed as compared to the control group. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90, mean serum LH levels and the duration of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.05), whereas the pulse frequency increased (P < or = 0.05). The absolute and relative amplitude of the LH peaks and the mean half-life of the hormone were not changed after cadmium administration from day 60 to 90. These results indicate that low doses of cadmium change the pulsatile secretion of LH in male rats and that the effect of cadmium on episodic LH release was age-dependent. PMID:10048746

  1. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments

  2. Effect of age and diet on renal cadmium retention in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kostial, K

    1984-01-01

    The results of our previous and recent work on cadmium metabolism in relation to age and diet are presented. Experiments were performed on albino rats aged 1-26 weeks. In some experiments rats were given different foods (milk, meat, bread) instead of standard rat diet. Some animals received trisodium calcium salt of diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) intraperitoneally to decrease cadmium retention. Radioactive cadmium (115mCd) was administered orally and intraperitoneally. Whole body (WB), carcass (C) and organ (kidney, liver and brain) retentions were determined 1 and 2 weeks after a single radioisotope administration. The results are expressed as percentages of the administered dose (% D) and as percentages of whole body (% WB) and carcass (% C) radioactivities. After oral administration whole-body cadmium retention was higher in sucklings than in weaned animals, primarily due to increased gut retention. The kidney retention of orally administered cadmium was about 5-7 times higher in sucklings than in older rats. Cadmium distribution (% C) was similar after oral and intraperitoneal administration. In sucklings, kidney retention made a lower fraction of the carcass radioactivity one week after 115mCd administration but reached adult values a week later. Liver retention in sucklings was a slightly lower fraction of the carcass radioactivity than in older rats at both time intervals. Brain retention (% C) was about 10 times higher in sucklings than in older rats throughout the experiment. Preliminary data on the influence of dietary treatments and treatment with DTPA indicate that some treatments which influence cadmium retention also influence cadmium distribution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6734570

  3. In vivo and in vitro assessment of brain bioenergetics in aging rats

    PubMed Central

    Vančová, Ol’ga; Bačiak, Ladislav; Kašparová, Svatava; Kucharská, Jarmila; Palacios, Hector H; Horecký, Jaromír; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Brain energy disorders can be present in aged men and animals. To this respect, the mitochondrial and free radical theory of aging postulates that age-associated brain energy disorders are caused by an imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidants that can result in oxidative stress. Our study was designed to investigate brain energy metabolism and the activity of endogenous antioxidants during their lifespan in male Wistar rats. In vivo brain bioenergetics were measured using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and in vitro by polarographic analysis of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. When compared to the young controls, a significant decrease of age-dependent mitochondrial respiration and adenosine-3-phosphate (ATP) production measured in vitro correlated with significant reduction of forward creatine kinase reaction (kfor) and with an increase in phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP, PCr/Pi and PME/ATP ratio measured in vivo. The levels of enzymatic antioxidants catalase, GPx and GST significantly decreased in the brain tissue as well as in the peripheral blood of aged rats. We suppose that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative inactivation of endogenous enzymes may participate in age-related disorders of brain energy metabolism. PMID:19906014

  4. Differences in Retinal Structure and Function between Aging Male and Female Sprague-Dawley Rats are Strongly Influenced by the Estrus Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chaychi, Samaneh; Polosa, Anna; Lachapelle, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Biological sex and age are considered as two important factors that may influence the function and structure of the retina, an effect that might be governed by sexual hormones such as estrogen. The purpose of this study was to delineate the influence that biological sex and age exert on the retinal function and structure of rodents and also clarify the effect that the estrus cycle might exert on the retinal function of female rats. Method The retinal function of 50 normal male and female albino Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was investigated with the electroretinogram (ERG) at postnatal day (P) 30, 60, 100, 200, and 300 (n = 5–6 male and female rats/age). Following the ERG recording sessions, retinal histology was performed in both sexes. In parallel, the retinal function of premenopausal and menopausal female rats aged P540 were also compared. Results Sex and age-related changes in retinal structure and function were observed in our animal model. However, irrespective of age, no significant difference was observed in ERG and retinal histology obtained from male and female rats. Notwithstanding the above we did however notice that between P60 and P200 there was a gradual increase in ERG amplitudes of female rats compared to males. Furthermore, the ERG of premenopausal female rats aged 18 months old (P540) was larger compared to age-matched menopausal female rats as well as that of male rats. Conclusion Our results showed that biological sex and age can influence the retinal function and structure of albino SD rats. Furthermore, we showed that cycled female rats have better retinal function compared to the menopausal female rats suggesting a beneficial effect of the estrus cycle on the retinal function. PMID:26317201

  5. Four-month enriched environment prevents myelinated fiber loss in the white matter during normal aging of male rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu; Lu, Wei; Zhou, De-shan; Tang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    White matter degenerates with normal aging and accordingly results in declines in multiple brain functions. Previous neuroimaging studies have implied that the white matter is plastic by experiences and contributory to the experience-dependent recovery of brain functions. However, it is not clear how and how far enriched environment (EE) plays a role in the white matter remodeling. Male rats exhibit earlier and severer age-related damages in the white matter and its myelinated fibers than female rats; therefore, in this current study, 24 middle-aged (14-month-old) and 24 old-aged (24-month-old) male SD rats were randomly assigned to an EE or standard environment (SE) for 4 months prior to Morris water maze tests. Five rats from each group were then randomly sampled for stereological assessment of the white matter. Results revealed that EE could somewhat induce improvement of spatial learning and significantly increase the white matter volume, the myelinated fiber volume and the myelinated fiber length during normal aging. The EE-induced improvement of spatial learning ability was significantly correlated with the EE-induced increase of the white matter and its myelinated fibers. We suggested that exposure to an EE could delay the progress of age-related changes in the white matter and the effect could extend to old age. PMID:24553809

  6. Antiatherogenic and Cardioprotective Effects of Black Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) Juice in Aging Rats.

    PubMed

    Daskalova, Elena; Delchev, Slavi; Peeva, Yulia; Vladimirova-Kitova, Lyudmila; Kratchanova, Maria; Kratchanov, Christo; Denev, Petko

    2015-01-01

    Age-related diseases are a social problem of global significance and their prevention by natural products is a research area of particular interest. The present study is an approach to counteract the risk factors for atherosclerosis arising in the aging process by supplementation of chokeberry juice. It employed a model of healthy adult rats monitored for a number of somatometric, serum lipidogram, and histopathological parameters, related to risk factors and their response to supplementation with antioxidant-rich chokeberry juice. The results were used to calculate different atherogenic and cardioprotective indices, and all results were compared to those of young healthy rats. Chokeberry juice proved an extremely rich source of polyphenols resulting in very high antioxidant activity. Treatment with Aronia juice significantly lowered the proatherogenic low-density lipoprotein fraction of the animals studied and led to a 16.5% decrease in their total cholesterol. Atherogenic indices in Aronia-supplemented animals clearly showed lower atherogenic risk and cardioprotective indices indicated protection of the cardiovascular system. Besides that, chokeberry juice retarded the age-related changes in the aortic wall and can be recommended as a prophylactic tool for healthy aging. PMID:26351516

  7. Antiatherogenic and Cardioprotective Effects of Black Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) Juice in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, Elena; Delchev, Slavi; Peeva, Yulia; Vladimirova-Kitova, Lyudmila; Kratchanova, Maria; Kratchanov, Christo; Denev, Petko

    2015-01-01

    Age-related diseases are a social problem of global significance and their prevention by natural products is a research area of particular interest. The present study is an approach to counteract the risk factors for atherosclerosis arising in the aging process by supplementation of chokeberry juice. It employed a model of healthy adult rats monitored for a number of somatometric, serum lipidogram, and histopathological parameters, related to risk factors and their response to supplementation with antioxidant-rich chokeberry juice. The results were used to calculate different atherogenic and cardioprotective indices, and all results were compared to those of young healthy rats. Chokeberry juice proved an extremely rich source of polyphenols resulting in very high antioxidant activity. Treatment with Aronia juice significantly lowered the proatherogenic low-density lipoprotein fraction of the animals studied and led to a 16.5% decrease in their total cholesterol. Atherogenic indices in Aronia-supplemented animals clearly showed lower atherogenic risk and cardioprotective indices indicated protection of the cardiovascular system. Besides that, chokeberry juice retarded the age-related changes in the aortic wall and can be recommended as a prophylactic tool for healthy aging. PMID:26351516

  8. Green tea polyphenols supplementation improves bone microstructure in orchidectomized middle-Aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent study shows that green tea polyphenols (GTP) attenuate trabecular bone loss in ovariectomized middle-aged female rats. To investigate whether GTP prevents bone loss in male rats, 40 rats with and without oriectomy (ORX) were assigned to 4 groups in a 2 (sham vs. ORX)× 2 (no GTP and 0.5% G...

  9. Neuroanatomical Substrates of Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    There are many reports of relations between age and cognitive variables and of relations between age and variables representing different aspects of brain structure and a few reports of relations between brain structure variables and cognitive variables. These findings have sometimes led to inferences that the age-related brain changes cause the…

  10. Age-Related Changes in the Misinformation Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Rachel; Hayne, Harlene

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments examined relation between age-related changes in retention and age-related changes in the misinformation effect. Found large age-related retention differences when participants were interviewed immediately and after 1 day, but after 6 weeks, differences were minimal. Exposure to misleading information increased commission errors.…

  11. The influence of aging on poststroke depression using a rat model via middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Matthew; Kutz, Ruslan; Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Cohen, Hagit; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Shapira, Yoram; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is the most frequent psychological sequela following stroke. While previous studies describe the impact of age on brain infarct volume, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown following ischemia, the role of age on PSD has yet to be described. Here, we examine the influence of age on PSD progression in a rat model of PSD by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). One hundred forty-three rats were divided into three groups. 48 rats 20 weeks of age underwent a sham procedure, 51 rats 20 weeks of age had MCAO, and 44 rats 22-26 months of age had MCAO. Groups were further divided into two subgroups. The first subgroup was used to measure infarct lesion volume, brain edema, and BBB breakdown at 24 h. In the second subgroup at 3 weeks after MCAO, rats were subjected to a sucrose preference test, two-way shuttle avoidance task, forced swimming test, and a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein level measurement. Total and striatal infarct volume, brain edema, and BBB breakdown in the striatum were increased in older rats, as compared with younger rats. While both old and young rats exhibited depressive-like behaviors on each of the behavioral tests and lower BDNF levels post-MCAO, as compared with control rats, there were no differences between old and young rats. Although older rats suffered from larger infarct volumes, increased brain edema and more BBB disruption following MCAO, the lack of behavioral differences between young and old rats suggests that there was no effect of rat age on the incidence of PSD. PMID:23761136

  12. Association of Age Related Macular Degeneration and Age Related Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Hassan; Pourakbari, Malihe Shahidi; Entezari, Morteza; Yarmohammadi, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and sensory neural hearing impairment (SHI). Methods: In this case-control study, hearing status of 46 consecutive patients with ARMD were compared with 46 age-matched cases without clinical ARMD as a control group. In all patients, retinal involvements were confirmed by clinical examination, fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). All participants were examined with an otoscope and underwent audiological tests including pure tone audiometry (PTA), speech reception threshold (SRT), speech discrimination score (SDS), tympanometry, reflex tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR). Results: A significant (P = 0.009) association was present between ARMD, especially with exudative and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) components, and age-related hearing impairment primarily involving high frequencies. Patients had higher SRT and lower SDS against anticipated presbycusis than control subjects. Similar results were detected in exudative, CNV and scar patterns supporting an association between late ARMD with SRT and SDS abnormalities. ABR showed significantly prolonged wave I and IV latency times in ARMD (P = 0.034 and 0.022, respectively). Average latency periods for wave I in geographic atrophy (GA) and CNV, and that for wave IV in drusen patterns of ARMD were significantly higher than controls (P = 0.030, 0.007 and 0.050, respectively). Conclusion: The association between ARMD and age-related SHI may be attributed to common anatomical components such as melanin in these two sensory organs. PMID:27195086

  13. Age-related hypoxia in CNS pathology.

    PubMed

    Bădescu, George Mihai; Fîlfan, Mădălina; Ciobanu, Ovidiu; Dumbravă, DănuŢ Adrian; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Although neuropathological conditions differ in the etiology of the inflammatory response, cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuroinflammation are probably similar in aging, hypertension, depression and cognitive impairment. Moreover, a number of common risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis are increasingly understood to act as "silent contributors" to neuroinflammation and can underlie the development of disorders such as cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) and subsequent dementia. On the other hand, acute neuroinflammation, such as in response to traumatic or cerebral ischemia, aggravates the acute damage and can lead to a number of pathological such as depression, post-stroke dementia and potentially neurodegeneration. All of those sequelae impair recovery and most of them provide the ground for further cerebrovascular events and a vicious cycle develops. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms associated with vascular dementia, stroke and related complications is of paramount importance in improving current preventive and therapeutic interventions. Likewise, understanding of molecular factors and pathways associated with neuroinflammation will eventually enable the discovery and implementation of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies indicated in a wide range of neurological conditions. PMID:27151686

  14. Molecular mechanisms of ageing and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Human and other multicellular life species age, and ageing processes become dominant during the late phase of life. Recent studies challenge this dogma, suggesting that ageing does not occur in some animal species. In mammals, cell replicative senescence occurs as early as before birth (i.e. in embryos) under physiological conditions. How the molecular machinery operates and why ageing cells dominate under some circumstances are intriguing questions. Recent studies show that cell ageing involves extensive cellular remodelling, including telomere attrition, heterochromatin formation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial disorders and lysosome processing organelles and chromatins. This article provides an update on the molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing of various cell types, the newly described developmental and programmed replicative senescence and the critical roles of cellular organelles and effectors in Parkinson's disease, diabetes, hypertension and dyskeratosis congenita. PMID:24798238

  15. Chronic Blockade of the Androgen Receptor Abolishes Age-Dependent Increases in Blood Pressure in Female Growth-Restricted Rats.

    PubMed

    Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira; Rudsenske, Benjamin R; Davis, Gwendolyn K; Newsome, Ashley D; Alexander, Barbara T

    2016-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction induced via placental insufficiency programs a significant increase in blood pressure at 12 months of age in female growth-restricted rats that is associated with early cessation of estrous cyclicity, indicative of premature reproductive senescence. In addition, female growth-restricted rats at 12 months of age exhibit a significant increase in circulating testosterone with no change in circulating estradiol. Testosterone is positively associated with blood pressure after menopause in women. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that androgen receptor blockade would abolish the significant increase in blood pressure that develops with age in female growth-restricted rats. Mean arterial pressure was measured in animals pretreated with and without the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide (8 mg/kg/day, SC for 2 weeks). Flutamide abolished the significant increase in blood pressure in growth-restricted rats relative to control at 12 months of age. To examine the mechanism(s) by which androgens contribute to increased blood pressure in growth-restricted rats, blood pressure was assessed in rats untreated or treated with enalapril (250 mg/L for 2 weeks). Enalapril eliminated the increase in blood pressure in growth-restricted relative to vehicle- and flutamide-treated controls. Furthermore, the increase in medullary angiotensin type 1 receptor mRNA expression was abolished in flutamide-treated growth-restricted relative to untreated counterparts and controls; cortical angiotensin-converting enzyme mRNA expression was reduced in flutamide-treated growth-restricted versus untreated counterparts. Thus, these data indicate that androgens, via activation of the renin-angiotensin system, are important mediators of increased blood pressure that develops by 12 months of age in female growth-restricted rats. PMID:27113045

  16. Anatomic variations of the root canal of the rat according to age.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Paula A; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2004-01-01

    The mesial canal of the first lower molar of the rat has been used as an experimental model in Endodontics. The present study involves a detailed analysis of its structural variations as a function of age and thus contributes to its characterization and adequate use as an experimental model. We evaluated 60 molars of Wistar rats of different body weight: (group 1: 300-399 g, n=22; group 2: 400-499 g, n=16; group 3: 600-700 g, n=22). The samples were radiographed employing a standardized system. Total canal length and volume were measured on enlarged projections of the radiographs. Canal diameter was measured at coronary, middle and apical levels and employed to estimate the area of canal cross-section as an indicator of potential flow or metabolic interchange. From the second age group onwards, we detected radicular hypercementosis that increased canal length and resulted in the formation of a complex apical delta. The canal diameter decreased very significantly in the apical third. The estimated flow expressed in terms of the area of cross-section on the projection decreased from 1.2 mm2 in Group 1 to 0.05 mm2 in Group 2. Group 3 did not differ significantly from Group 2. The present results reveal that the spontaneous, age-related variations in canal anatomy described herein must be considered when performing experimental endodontics in rats. PMID:15584260

  17. Myosin heavy chain composition in the rat diaphragm - Effect of age and exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, Luc E.; Betlach, Michael; Vailas, Arthur C.; Greaser, Marion L.; Thomas, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of aging and exercise training on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition were determined in both the costal and crural diaphragm regions of female Fischer 344 rats. Treadmill running at 75 percent maximal oxygen consumption resulted in similar increases in plantaris muscle citrate synthase activity in both young (5 mo) and old (23mo) trained animals (P less than 0.05). It was found that the ratio of fast to slow MHC was significantly higher (P less than 0.005) in the crural compared with costal diaphragm region in both age groups. A significant age-related increase in persentage of slow MHC was observed in both diaphragm regions. The relative proportion of slow MHC in either costal or crural region was not changed by exercise training.

  18. Reversal of aging-related emotional memory deficits by norepinephrine via regulating the stability of surface AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi; Zhou, Jun; Li, Ming-Xing; Wu, Peng-Fei; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Ni, Lan; Jin, You; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2015-04-01

    Aging-related emotional memory deficit is a well-known complication in Alzheimer's disease and normal aging. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism. To address this issue, we examined the role of norepinephrine (NE) and its relevant drug desipramine in the regulation of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), surface expression of AMPA receptor, and associative fear memory in rats. We found that there was a defective regulation of NE content and AMPA receptor trafficking during fear conditioning, which were accompanied by impaired emotional memory and LTP in aged rats. Furthermore, we also found that the exogenous upregulation of NE ameliorated the impairment of LTP and emotional memory via enhancing AMPA receptor trafficking in aged rats, and the downregulation of NE impaired LTP in adult rats. Finally, acute treatment with NE or desipramine rescued the impaired emotional memory in aged rats. These results imply a pivotal role for NE in synaptic plasticity and associative fear memory in aging rats and suggest that desipramine is a potential candidate for treating aging-related emotional memory deficit. PMID:25564942

  19. Divergent Thinking and Age-Related Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Di Giacomo, Dina; Passafiume, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Aging can affect cognition in different ways. The extent to which aging affects divergent thinking is unclear. In this study, younger and older adults were compared at the performance on the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking in visual and verbal form. Results showed that older adults can think divergently as younger participants, although they…

  20. Glutamatergic regulation prevents hippocampal-dependent age-related cognitive decline through dendritic spine clustering

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ana C.; Lambert, Hilary K.; Grossman, Yael S.; Dumitriu, Dani; Waldman, Rachel; Jannetty, Sophia K.; Calakos, Katina; Janssen, William G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The dementia of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) results primarily from degeneration of neurons that furnish glutamatergic corticocortical connections that subserve cognition. Although neuron death is minimal in the absence of AD, age-related cognitive decline does occur in animals as well as humans, and it decreases quality of life for elderly people. Age-related cognitive decline has been linked to synapse loss and/or alterations of synaptic proteins that impair function in regions such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. These synaptic alterations are likely reversible, such that maintenance of synaptic health in the face of aging is a critically important therapeutic goal. Here, we show that riluzole can protect against some of the synaptic alterations in hippocampus that are linked to age-related memory loss in rats. Riluzole increases glutamate uptake through glial transporters and is thought to decrease glutamate spillover to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors while increasing synaptic glutamatergic activity. Treated aged rats were protected against age-related cognitive decline displayed in nontreated aged animals. Memory performance correlated with density of thin spines on apical dendrites in CA1, although not with mushroom spines. Furthermore, riluzole-treated rats had an increase in clustering of thin spines that correlated with memory performance and was specific to the apical, but not the basilar, dendrites of CA1. Clustering of synaptic inputs is thought to allow nonlinear summation of synaptic strength. These findings further elucidate neuroplastic changes in glutamatergic circuits with aging and advance therapeutic development to prevent and treat age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25512503

  1. Glutamatergic regulation prevents hippocampal-dependent age-related cognitive decline through dendritic spine clustering.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana C; Lambert, Hilary K; Grossman, Yael S; Dumitriu, Dani; Waldman, Rachel; Jannetty, Sophia K; Calakos, Katina; Janssen, William G; McEwen, Bruce S; Morrison, John H

    2014-12-30

    The dementia of Alzheimer's disease (AD) results primarily from degeneration of neurons that furnish glutamatergic corticocortical connections that subserve cognition. Although neuron death is minimal in the absence of AD, age-related cognitive decline does occur in animals as well as humans, and it decreases quality of life for elderly people. Age-related cognitive decline has been linked to synapse loss and/or alterations of synaptic proteins that impair function in regions such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. These synaptic alterations are likely reversible, such that maintenance of synaptic health in the face of aging is a critically important therapeutic goal. Here, we show that riluzole can protect against some of the synaptic alterations in hippocampus that are linked to age-related memory loss in rats. Riluzole increases glutamate uptake through glial transporters and is thought to decrease glutamate spillover to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors while increasing synaptic glutamatergic activity. Treated aged rats were protected against age-related cognitive decline displayed in nontreated aged animals. Memory performance correlated with density of thin spines on apical dendrites in CA1, although not with mushroom spines. Furthermore, riluzole-treated rats had an increase in clustering of thin spines that correlated with memory performance and was specific to the apical, but not the basilar, dendrites of CA1. Clustering of synaptic inputs is thought to allow nonlinear summation of synaptic strength. These findings further elucidate neuroplastic changes in glutamatergic circuits with aging and advance therapeutic development to prevent and treat age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25512503

  2. Effects of aging on mineralocorticoid-induced salt appetite in rats.

    PubMed

    Thunhorst, Robert L; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2013-12-15

    This work examined the effects of age on salt appetite measured in the form of daily saline (i.e., 0.3 M NaCl) drinking in response to administration of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA; 5 mg/kg body wt) using young (4 mo), "middle-aged" adult (12 mo), and old (30 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Water and sodium intakes, excretions, and balances were determined daily. The salt appetite response was age dependent with "middle-aged" rats ingesting the most saline solution followed in order by young and then old rats. While old rats drank the least saline solution, the amounts of saline ingested still were copious and comprise an unambiguous demonstration of salt appetite in old rats. Middle-aged rats had the highest saline preference ratios of the groups under baseline conditions and throughout testing consistent with an increased avidity for sodium taste. There were age differences in renal handling of water and sodium that were consistent with a renal contribution to the greater saline intakes by middle-aged rats. There was evidence of impaired renal function in old rats, but this did not account for the reduced saline intakes of the oldest rats. PMID:24133100

  3. Modulatory effects of centrophenoxine on different regions of ageing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Punita; Nehru, Bimla

    2005-10-01

    The debilitating consequences of age-related brain deterioration are widespread and extremely costly in terms of quality of life and longevity. Free radical induced damage is thought to be responsible, at least in part, for the degenerative effects of aging. This may be largely due to high-energy requirements, high oxygen consumption, high tissue concentration of iron and low of antioxidant enzymes in brain. Therefore, supplementing an external source of free radical scavenger would greatly benefit in ameliorating the free radical damage which may thus be beneficial in aging. In the present study, an important nootropic agent Centrophenoxine, which has an easy access to brain, has been administered to aged animals (16 months old). Rats aged 6 months (young group) and 16 months old (old group) were chosen for the study. Both groups were administered Centrophenoxine (dissolved in physiological saline) intraperitoneally once a day for 6 weeks. Our study indicates an increased activity of Catalase, Superoxide Dismutase, Glutathione reductase, as well as an increase in the reduced, oxidized, and total glutathione content thus resulting in an altered redox state. A substantial increase in the malondialdehyde content was also reported as a result of aging. Whereas, following Centrophenoxine administration (100 mg/kg body weight/day, injected i.p) alterations in the activities of Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione reductase as well as in the reduced and oxidized glutathione content was reported in aged rat brain. Lipid peroxidation was also reported to be significantly decreased in aged animals after Centrophenoxine supplementation for 6 weeks. The use of an extraneous antioxidant substance may prove beneficial in combating the conditions of oxidative stress in ageing brain. PMID:16137852

  4. Growth factors, aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Priya; Longo, Valter D

    2016-06-01

    Simple organisms including yeast and flies with mutations in the IGF-1 and Tor-S6K pathways are dwarfs, are highly protected from toxins, and survive up to 3 times longer. Similarly, dwarf mice with deficiencies in the growth hormone-IGF-I axis are also long lived and protected from diseases. We recently reported that humans with Growth Hormone Receptor Deficiency (GHRD) rarely develop cancer or diabetes. These findings are in agreement with the effect of defects in the Tor-S6K pathways in causing dwarfism and protection of DNA. Because protein restriction reduces both GHR-IGF-1 axis and Tor-S6K activity, we examined links between protein intake, disease, and mortality in over 6000 US subjects in the NHANES CDC database. Respondents aged 50-65 reporting a high protein intake displayed an increase in IGF-I levels, a 75% increased risk of overall mortality and a 3-4 fold increased risk of cancer mortality in agreement with findings in mouse experiments. These studies point to a conserved link between proteins and amino acids, GHR-IGF-1/insulin, Tor-S6k signaling, aging, and diseases. PMID:26883276

  5. A fine balance: regulation of hippocampal Arc/Arg3.1 transcription, translation and degradation in a rat model of normal cognitive aging

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Bonnie R.; Hill, Gordon S.; Long, Jeffrey M.; Gallagher, Michela; Shapiro, Matthew L.; Rapp, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Memory decline is a common feature of aging. Expression of the immediate-early gene Arc is necessary for normal long-term memory, and although experience dependent Arc transcription is reportedly reduced in the aged rat hippocampus, it has not been clear whether this effect is an invariant consequence of growing older, or a finding linked specifically to age-related memory impairment. Here we show that experience dependent Arc mRNA expression in the hippocampus fails selectively among aged rats with spatial memory deficits. While these findings are consistent with the possibility that blunted Arc transcription contributes to cognitive aging, we also found increased basal ARC protein levels in the CA1 field of the hippocampus in aged rats with memory impairment, together with a loss of the experience dependent increase observed in young and unimpaired aged rats. Follow-up analysis revealed that increased basal translation and blunted ubiquitin mediated degradation may contribute to increased basal ARC protein levels noted in memory impaired aged rats. These findings indicate that Arc expression is regulated at multiple levels, and that several of these mechanisms are altered in cognitively impaired aged rats. Defining the influence of these alterations on the spatial and temporal fidelity of synapse specific, memory-related plasticity in the aged hippocampus is an important challenge. PMID:25151943

  6. Dietary Fish Oil Modestly Attenuates the Effect of Age on Diastolic Function but Has No Effect on Memory or Brain Inflammation in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sergeant, Susan; McQuail, Joseph A.; Riddle, David R.; Chilton, Floyd H.; Ortmeier, Steven B.; Jessup, Jewell A.

    2011-01-01

    Fish oil (FO) mediates a number of cardioprotective benefits in patients with cardiovascular disease. In the absence of cardiovascular disease, however, the effects of FO on cardiac structure and function are not clear. In addition, it is not known if an effective dosing strategy for attenuating age-related cardiac dysfunction is also effective at limiting cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, we determined if 4 months of FO supplementation in aged rats would lessen age-related cardiac dysfunction while concomitantly preventing the cognitive decline that is normally observed in this population. The results indicate that FO initiated late in life modifies diastolic function in a small but positive way by attenuating the age-related increases in filling pressure, posterior wall thickness, and interstitial collagen without mitigating age-related deficits in memory or increases in brain inflammation. These data raise the possibility that FO supplementation for purposes of cardiac and brain protection may need to occur earlier in the life span. PMID:21393424

  7. Aging Is Not a Disease: Distinguishing Age-Related Macular Degeneration from Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ardeljan, Daniel; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the outer retina, characterized most significantly by atrophy of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium accompanied with or without choroidal neovascularization. Development of AMD has been recognized as contingent on environmental and genetic risk factors, the strongest being advanced age. In this review, we highlight pathogenic changes that destabilize ocular homeostasis and promote AMD development. With normal aging, photoreceptors are steadily lost, Bruch's membrane thickens, the choroid thins, and hard drusen may form in the periphery. In AMD, many of these changes are exacerbated in addition to the development of disease-specific factors such as soft macular drusen. Para-inflammation, which can be thought of as an intermediate between basal and robust levels of inflammation, develops within the retina in an attempt to maintain ocular homeostasis, reflected by increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 coupled with shifts in macrophage plasticity from the pro-inflammatory M1 to the anti-inflammatory M2 polarization. In AMD, imbalances in the M1 and M2 populations together with activation of retinal microglia are observed and potentially contribute to tissue degeneration. Nonetheless, the retina persists in a state of chronic inflammation and increased expression of certain cytokines and inflammasomes is observed. Since not everyone develops AMD, the vital question to ask is how the body establishes a balance between normal age-related changes and the pathological phenotypes in AMD. PMID:23933169

  8. Immunocytochemical profiles of inferior colliculus neurons in the rat and their changes with aging

    PubMed Central

    Ouda, Ladislav; Syka, Josef

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) plays a strategic role in the central auditory system in relaying and processing acoustical information, and therefore its age-related changes may significantly influence the quality of the auditory function. A very complex processing of acoustical stimuli occurs in the IC, as supported also by the fact that the rat IC contains more neurons than all other subcortical auditory structures combined. GABAergic neurons, which predominantly co-express parvalbumin (PV), are present in the central nucleus of the IC in large numbers and to a lesser extent in the dorsal and external/lateral cortices of the IC. On the other hand, calbindin (CB) and calretinin (CR) are prevalent in the dorsal and external cortices of the IC, with only a few positive neurons in the central nucleus. The relationship between CB and CR expression in the IC and any neurotransmitter system has not yet been well established, but the distribution and morphology of the immunoreactive neurons suggest that they are at least partially non-GABAergic cells. The expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) (a key enzyme for GABA synthesis) and calcium binding proteins (CBPs) in the IC of rats undergoes pronounced changes with aging that involve mostly a decline in protein expression and a decline in the number of immunoreactive neurons. Similar age-related changes in GAD, CB, and CR expression are present in the IC of two rat strains with differently preserved inner ear function up to late senescence (Long-Evans and Fischer 344), which suggests that these changes do not depend exclusively on peripheral deafferentation but are, at least partially, of central origin. These changes may be associated with the age-related deterioration in the processing of the temporal parameters of acoustical stimuli, which is not correlated with hearing threshold shifts, and therefore may contribute to central presbycusis. PMID:23049499

  9. Ageing and gonadectomy have similar effects on hypoglossal long-term facilitation in male Fischer rats

    PubMed Central

    Zabka, AG; Mitchell, GS; Behan, M

    2005-01-01

    Long-term facilitation (LTF), a form of serotonin-dependent respiratory plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia, decreases with increasing age or following gonadectomy in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Ageing is accompanied by decreasing levels of testosterone, which in turn influences serotonergic function. In addition, LTF in young male rats differs among strains. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that LTF is similar in middle-aged and gonadectomized young male rats of an inbred rat strain commonly used in studies on ageing (F344) by comparison with SD rats. We further tested whether the magnitude of LTF correlates with circulating serum levels of testosterone and/or progesterone. Young and middle-aged intact and young gonadectomized (GDX) male Fischer 344 rats were anaesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked and ventilated. Integrated phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) nerve activities were measured before, during and 60 min following three 5-min episodes of isocapnic hypoxia. LTF was observed in phrenic motor output in young and middle-aged intact and young GDX rats. In contrast, XII LTF was observed only in young intact rats. In middle-aged and young GDX rats, XII LTF was significantly lower than in young intact rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, XII LTF was positively correlated with the testosterone/progesterone ratio. These data show that serotonin-dependent plasticity in upper airway respiratory output is similar in F344 and SD rat strains. Furthermore, LTF is similarly impaired in middle-aged and gonadectomized male rats, suggesting that gonadal hormones play an important role in modulating the capacity for neuroplasticity in upper airway motor control. PMID:15613371

  10. Supplementation with green tea polyphenols improves bone microstructure and quality in aged, orchidectomized rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies show that green tea polyphenols (GTP) attenuate bone loss and microstructure deterioration in ovariectomized aged female rats, a model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, it is not known if such an osteo-protective role of GTP is demonstrable in androgen-deficient aged rats, a mo...

  11. Hippocampal dysregulation of synaptic plasticity-associated proteins with age-related cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    VanGuilder, Heather D.; Farley, Julie A.; Yan, Han; Van Kirk, Colleen A.; Mitschelen, Matthew; Sonntag, William E.; Freeman, Willard M.

    2011-01-01

    Age-related cognitive decline occurs without frank neurodegeneration and is the most common cause of memory impairment in aging individuals. With increasing longevity, cognitive deficits, especially in hippocampus-dependent memory processes, are increasing in prevalence. Nevertheless, the neurobiological basis of age-related cognitive decline remains unknown. While concerted efforts have led to the identification of neurobiological changes with aging, few age-related alterations have been definitively correlated to behavioral measures of cognitive decline. In this work, adult (12 Months) and aged (28 months) rats were categorized by Morris water maze performance as Adult cognitively Intact, Aged cognitively Intact or Aged cognitively Impaired, and protein expression was examined in hippocampal synaptosome preparations. Previously described differences in synaptic expression of neurotransmission-associated proteins (Dnm1, Hpca, Stx1, Syn1, Syn2, Syp, SNAP25, VAMP2 and 14-3-3 eta, gamma, and zeta) were confirmed between Adult and Aged rats, with no further dysregulation associated with cognitive impairment. Proteins related to synaptic structural stability (MAP2, drebrin, Nogo-A) and activity-dependent signaling (PSD-95, 14-3-3θ, CaMKIIα) were up- and down-regulated, respectively, with cognitive impairment but were not altered with increasing age. Localization of MAP2, PSD-95, and CaMKIIα demonstrated protein expression alterations throughout the hippocampus. The altered expression of activity- and structural stability-associated proteins suggests that impaired synaptic plasticity is a distinct phenomenon that occurs with age-related cognitive decline, and demonstrates that cognitive decline is not simply an exacerbation of the aging phenotype. PMID:21440628

  12. Relative Age Effect in Masters Sports: Replication and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medic, Nikola; Starkes, Janet L.; Weir, Patricia L.; Young, Bradley W.; Grove, J. Robert

    2009-01-01

    The relative age effect refers to the performance-related advantage of being born early in a cohort or selection year. Until recently it was unknown whether the relative age effect generalizes across the lifespan. Medic, Starkes, and Young (2007) reasoned that the 5-year age categories that are widely used in masters-level sports to organize…

  13. Genipin ameliorates age-related insulin resistance through inhibiting hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lili; Feng, Haiyan; Gong, Dezheng; Zhao, Xu; Cai, Li; Wu, Qiong; Yuan, Bo; Yang, Mei; Zhao, Jie; Zou, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) increases with age and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are supposed to be major factors leading to age-related IR. Genipin, an extract from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis fruit, has been reported to stimulate insulin secretion in pancreatic islet cells by regulating mitochondrial function. In this study, we first investigated the effects of genipin on insulin sensitivity and the potential mitochondrial mechanisms in the liver of aging rats. The rats were randomly assigned to receive intraperitoneal injections of either 25mg/kg genipin or vehicle once daily for 12days. The aging rats showed hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance as examined by the decreased glucose decay constant rate during insulin tolerance test (kITT). The hepatic tissues showed steatosis and reduced glycogen content. Hepatic malondialdehyde level and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) were higher, and levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP were lower as compared with the normal control rats. Administration of genipin ameliorated systemic and hepatic insulin resistance, alleviated hyperinsulinemia, hyperglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis, relieved hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in aging rats. Furthermore, genipin not only improved insulin sensitivity by promoting insulin-stimulated glucose consumption and glycogen synthesis, inhibited cellular ROS overproduction and alleviated the reduction of levels of MMP and ATP, but also reversed oxidative stress-associated JNK hyperactivation and reduced Akt phosphorylation in palmitate-treated L02 hepatocytes. In conclusion, genipin ameliorates age-related insulin resistance through inhibiting hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24041487

  14. Age Related Changes in Autonomic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Mohammed; Pakhare, Abhijit; Rathi, Preeti; Chaudhary, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) imbalance may trigger or enhance pathology in different organ systems that varies in different age groups hence objective of present study was to evaluate association of different Age-groups with autonomic functions. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 62 healthy volunteers in Department of Physiology LLRM Medical College Meerut, India. Volunteers were divided into three groups as younger (15-45 years), middle (45-60) and elder age (above 60), Autonomic functions were tested in three domains viz. Cardio-vagal, adrenergic and sudomotor functions. Numerical data was summarized as mean and standard deviation and categorical data as count and percentage. ANOVA and Chi-square test were used to find difference among groups, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Mean ± standard deviation OHT(Orthostatic Hypotension Test) among of younger, middle and elder age groups were 8.80±2.28, 13.40±4.64 and 21.82±6.04 respectively which represent decrease in sympathetic functions with age (p<0.001). Cardio-vagal or parasympathetic responses indicated by DBT (Deep Breathing Test) Valsalva and 30:15 ratio of HR response to standing tests has shown statistically significant (p<0.001) decrease in mean response with increasing age. Sudomotor response appeared normal in younger and middle group but was interrupted in more than half of elderly people (p<0.001). Conclusion Sympathetic responses & para-sympathetic responses have shown the significant decline with increasing age group. Sudomotor responses were partially interrupted in elderly age group. PMID:27134865

  15. Choice of diet impacts the incidence of stroke-related symptoms in the spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat model.

    PubMed

    Slemmer, Jennifer E; Shaughnessy, Kevin S; Scanlan, Adam P; Sweeney, Marva I; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine T

    2012-02-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (SHRSP) rat is a commonly used model of cerebrovascular disease and hypertension. SHRSP rats have been shown to develop stroke-related symptoms (SRS) by age 14 weeks when fed a purified diet, such as AIN-93G, supplemented with 1% NaCl. We conducted a pathology pilot study to compare the incidence of SRS in SHRSP rats fed either AIN-93G (with 1% NaCl in drinking water) or commercially available rat chow (with 4% NaCl in the diet), starting at 8 weeks of age. These results prompted us to analyze data from 5 earlier feeding trials using SHRSP rats. Overall, we found that SHRSP rats fed AIN-93G purified diet for 8 or 17 weeks did not demonstrate SRS (n = 18), whereas all SHRSP rats fed lab chow exhibited SRS at age 15.1 ± 0.6 weeks (n = 23). In addition, SHRSP rats fed lab chow had decreased mass gain starting at age 13 weeks, as well as decreased feed efficiencies after the first 5 weeks of feeding (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data suggest that diet composition is a major contributor to the onset of stroke in SHRSP rats and that diet choice should be critically evaluated based on endpoint measures in the SHRSP model. PMID:22316284

  16. Bodacious Berry, Potency Wood and the Aging Monster: Gender and Age Relations in Anti-Aging Ads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calasanti, Toni

    2007-01-01

    This paper situates age discrimination within a broader system of age relations that intersects with other inequalities, and then uses that framework to analyze internet advertisements for the anti-aging industry. Such ads reinforce age and gender relations by positing old people as worthwhile only to the extent that they look and act like those…

  17. Dietary Iron Concentration May Influence Aging Process by Altering Oxidative Stress in Tissues of Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Lorena Fernandes; Arruda, Sandra Fernandes; Campos, Natália Aboudib; de Valencia, Fernando Fortes; Siqueira, Egle Machado de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential element. However, in its free form, iron participates in redox-reactions, leading to the production of free radicals that increase oxidative stress and the risk of damaging processes. Living organisms have an efficient mechanism that regulates iron absorption according to their iron content to protect against oxidative damage. The effects of restricted and enriched-iron diets on oxidative stress and aging biomarkers were investigated. Adult Wistar rats were fed diets containing 10, 35 or 350 mg/kg iron (adult restricted-iron, adult control-iron and adult enriched-iron groups, respectively) for 78 days. Rats aged two months were included as a young control group. Young control group showed higher hemoglobin and hematocrit values, lower levels of iron and lower levels of MDA or carbonyl in the major studied tissues than the adult control group. Restricted-iron diet reduced iron concentrations in skeletal muscle and oxidative damage in the majority of tissues and also increased weight loss. Enriched-iron diet increased hematocrit values, serum iron, gamma-glutamyl transferase, iron concentrations and oxidative stress in the majority of tissues. As expected, young rats showed higher mRNA levels of heart and hepatic L-Ferritin (Ftl) and kidneys SMP30 as well as lower mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and interleukin-1 beta (Il1b) and also lower levels of liver protein ferritin. Restricted-iron adult rats showed an increase in heart Ftl mRNA and the enriched-iron adult rats showed an increase in liver nuclear factor erythroid derived 2 like 2 (Nfe2l2) and Il1b mRNAs and in gut divalent metal transporter-1 mRNA (Slc11a2) relative to the control adult group. These results suggest that iron supplementation in adult rats may accelerate aging process by increasing oxidative stress while iron restriction may retards it. However, iron restriction may also impair other physiological processes that are not associated with aging. PMID:23593390

  18. [The influence of persistent crowding on the spontaneous motor activity of the aging rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kment, A; Hofecker, G; Skalicky, M; Niedermüller, H

    1982-07-01

    In the course of a long-term cohort study of stress and aging, the spontaneous activity of 169 male Sprague-Dawley rats was measured at various ages from 9 to 30 months. 84 animals were submitted to crowding from the age of 5 months onwards by housing them in groups of 12 per Makrolon-IV cage. 85 rats, kept as usual in groups of 6 per makrolon-IV cage, served as a control. Spontaneous activity was assessed by an electronic instrument (Animex Activity Meter), which also enabled us to distinguish between total and large movements. During senescence, the spontaneous activity of the control animals decreased slightly by approximately 20% after the age of 18 months. In addition to the quantitative change, a progressive flattening of the activity rhythm was observed. The animals kept under crowded conditions did not reveal any age-related decrease in spontaneous activity. At an advanced age, this resulted in significantly higher activity values in the crowded group as compared with the controls. The differences appeared even earlier and seemed to be more pronounced in the number of large movements. However, the progressive disappearance of the endogenous rhythm was apparent in both the crowded and the control group. It can be concluded that at least two types of change in the central nervous system may be responsible for the aging-changes in spontaneous activity: one which disintegrates the "time structure" of the organism, and a second one which affects motivational centers. Crowded conditions seem to improve the latter, whereas they have no effect on the aging of the "biological clock". PMID:6126135

  19. The relevance of aging-related changes in brain function to rehabilitation in aging-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Bruce; McGregor, Keith M.; Nocera, Joe R.; Drucker, Jonathan H.; Tran, Stella M.; Butler, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging on rehabilitation of aging-related diseases are rarely a design consideration in rehabilitation research. In this brief review we present strong coincidental evidence from these two fields suggesting that deficits in aging-related disease or injury are compounded by the interaction between aging-related brain changes and disease-related brain changes. Specifically, we hypothesize that some aphasia, motor, and neglect treatments using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in stroke patients may address the aging side of this interaction. The importance of testing this hypothesis and addressing the larger aging by aging-related disease interaction is discussed. Underlying mechanisms in aging that most likely are relevant to rehabilitation of aging-related diseases also are covered. PMID:26074807

  20. The probiotic mixture IRT5 ameliorates age-dependent colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Woo, Jae-Yeon; Ahn, Young-Tae; Shim, Jae-Hun; Huh, Chul-Sung; Im, Sin-Heog; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of probiotics, we orally administered IRT5 (1×10(9)CFU/rat) for 8 weeks to aged (16 months-old) Fischer 344 rats, and measured parameters of colitis. The expression levels of the inflammatory markers' inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1β were higher in the colons of normal aged rats (18 months-old) than in the colons of normal young rats (6 months-old). Treatment with IRT5 suppressed the age-associated increased expression of iNOS, COX2, TNF-α, and IL-1β, and activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases. In a similar manner, the expression of tight junction proteins in the colon of normal aged rats was suppressed more potently than in normal young rats, and treatment of aged rats with IRT5 decreased the age-dependent suppression of tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1. Treatment with IRT5 suppressed age-associated increases in expressions of senescence markers p16 and p53 in the colon of aged rats, but increased age-suppressed expression of SIRT1. However, treatment with IRT5 inhibited age-associated increased myeloperoxidase activity in the colon. In addition, treatment with IRT5 lowered the levels of LPS in intestinal fluid and blood of aged rats, as well as the reduced concentrations of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, and C-reactive protein in the blood. These findings suggest that IRT5 treatment may suppress age-dependent colitis by inhibiting gut microbiota LPS production. PMID:25907245

  1. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  2. Differential Effects of Radiation and Age on Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peiffer, Ann M; Shi, Lei; Olson, John; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K

    2010-01-01

    Greater than 50% of adults and ∼100% of children who survive >6 months after fractionated partial or whole-brain radiotherapy develop cognitive impairments. Noninvasive methods are needed for detecting and tracking the radiation-induced brain injury associated with these impairments. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we sought to detect structural changes associated with brain injury in our rodent model of fractionated whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) induced cognitive impairment and to compare those changes with alterations that occur during the aging process. Middle aged rats were given a clinically relevant dose of fWBI (40 Gy: two 5 Gy fractions/wk for 4 wk) and scanned approximately one year post-irradiation to obtain whole-brain T2 and diffusion tensor images (DTI); control groups of sham-irradiated age-matched and young rats were also scanned. No gross structural changes were evident in the T2 structural images, and no detectable fWBI-induced DTI changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) were found in heavily myelinated white matter (corpus callosum, cingulum, and deep cortical white matter). However, significant fWBI-induced variability in FA distribution was present in the superficial parietal cortex due to an fWBI-induced decline in FA in the more anterior slices through parietal cortex. Young rats had significantly lower FA values relative to both groups of older rats, but only within the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that targets of the fWBI-induced change in this model may be the less myelinated or unmyelinated axons, extracellular matrix, or synaptic fields rather than heavily myelinated tracts. PMID:20599817

  3. Skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion injury and cyclosporine A in the aging rat.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Kindo, Michel; Chamaraux-Tran, Thiên-Nga; Charles, Anne-Laure; Lejay, Anne; Kemmel, Véronique; Vogel, Thomas; Chakfe, Nabil; Zoll, Joffrey; Diemunsch, Pierre; Geny, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    Old patients exhibit muscle impairments and increased perioperative risk during vascular surgery procedures. Although aging generally impairs protective mechanisms, data are lacking concerning skeletal muscle in elderly. We tested whether cyclosporine A (CsA), which protects skeletal muscle from ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in young rats, might reduce skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in aging rats submitted to hindlimb IR. Wistar rats aged 71-73 weeks were randomized to IR (3 h unilateral tourniquet application and 2 h reperfusion) or IR + CsA (10 mg/kg cyclosporine IV before reperfusion). Maximal oxidative capacity (VM ax ), acceptor control ratio (ACR), and relative contribution of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes II, III, IV (VS ucc ), and IV (VTMPD /Asc ), together with calcium retention capacity (CRC) a marker of apoptosis, and tissue reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were determined in gastrocnemius muscles from both hindlimbs. Compared to the nonischemic hindlimb, IR significantly reduced mitochondrial coupling, VMax (from 7.34 ± 1.50 to 2.87 ± 1.22 μMO2 /min/g; P < 0.05; -70%), and VS ucc (from 6.14 ± 1.07 to 3.82 ± 0.83 μMO2 /min/g; P < 0.05; -42%) but not VTMPD /Asc . IR also decreased the CRC from 15.58 ± 3.85 to 6.19 ± 0.86 μMCa(2+) /min/g; P < 0.05; -42%). These alterations were not corrected by CsA (-77%, -49%, and -32% after IR for VM ax, VS ucc , and CRC, respectively). Further, CsA significantly increased ROS production in both hindlimbs (P < 0.05; +73%). In old rats, hindlimb IR impairs skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and increases oxidative stress. Cyclosporine A did not show protective effects. PMID:26787364

  4. Maternal separation produces alterations of forebrain brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in differently aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Early life adversity, such as postnatal maternal separation (MS), play a central role in the development of psychopathologies during individual ontogeny. In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4 h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1–21) on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and young adult (PND 56) Wistar rats. The results indicated that MS increased BDNF in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent rats as well as in the DG of young adult rats. However, the expression of BDNF in the mPFC in the young adult rats was decreased by MS. Additionally, in the hippocampus, there was decreased BDNF expression with age in both the MS and non separated rats. However, in the mPFC, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the non separated rats; nevertheless, the BDNF expression was significantly decreased in the MS young adult rats. In the NAc, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the male non-maternal separation (NMS) rats, and the young adult female MS rats had less BDNF expression than the adolescent female MS rats. The present study shows unique age-differently changes on a molecular level induced by MS and advances the use of MS as a valid animal model to detect the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of mental disorders. PMID:26388728

  5. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E.; Hernandez, Jessica Soto; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  6. Treadmill exercise induces age and protocol-dependent epigenetic changes in prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cechinel, Laura Reck; Basso, Carla Giovana; Bertoldi, Karine; Schallenberger, Bruna; de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2016-10-15

    Some studies have linked age-related beneficial effects of exercise and epigenetic mechanisms. Although, the impact of treadmill exercise on histone acetylation, histone and DNA methylation marks in aged cortices yet remains poorly understood. Considering the role of frontal cortex on brain functions, we investigated the potential of different exercise protocols, single session and daily exercise, to modulate epigenetic marks, namely global H4 acetylation, histone methyltransferase activity (HMT H3K27) and levels of DNA methytransferase (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) in prefrontal cortices from 3 and 21-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two treadmill exercise protocols, single session (20min) or daily moderate (20min/day during 14days). The daily exercise protocol induced an increased in histone H4 acetylation levels in prefrontal cortices of 21-months-old rats, without any effects in young adult group. DNMT3b levels were increased in aged cortices of animals submitted to single session of exercise. These results indicate that prefrontal cortex is susceptible to epigenetic changes in a protocol dependent-manner and that H4 acetylation levels and DNMT3b content changes might be linked at least in part to exercise-induced effects on brain functions. PMID:27418438

  7. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  8. AGE-RELATED SUSCEPTIBILITY: A GENOMICS APPROACH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    By the year 2030 more than 70 million Americans will be over the age of 65. These older adults are a subpopulation that may have special susceptibility to toxic insult due to critical characteristics of their life-stage. Current EPA testing guidelines do not identify the elderl...

  9. Age-Related Changes in Visual Pseudoneglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Remy; Peigneux, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Pseudoneglect is a slight but consistent leftward attentional bias commonly observed in healthy young populations, purportedly explained by right hemispheric dominance. It has been suggested that normal aging might be associated with a decline of the right hemisphere. According to this hypothesis, a few studies have shown that elderly tend to…

  10. Effects of aging on mineralocorticoid-induced salt appetite in rats

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Terry G.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2013-01-01

    This work examined the effects of age on salt appetite measured in the form of daily saline (i.e., 0.3 M NaCl) drinking in response to administration of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA; 5 mg/kg body wt) using young (4 mo), “middle-aged” adult (12 mo), and old (30 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Water and sodium intakes, excretions, and balances were determined daily. The salt appetite response was age dependent with “middle-aged” rats ingesting the most saline solution followed in order by young and then old rats. While old rats drank the least saline solution, the amounts of saline ingested still were copious and comprise an unambiguous demonstration of salt appetite in old rats. Middle-aged rats had the highest saline preference ratios of the groups under baseline conditions and throughout testing consistent with an increased avidity for sodium taste. There were age differences in renal handling of water and sodium that were consistent with a renal contribution to the greater saline intakes by middle-aged rats. There was evidence of impaired renal function in old rats, but this did not account for the reduced saline intakes of the oldest rats. PMID:24133100

  11. Multi-level femoral morphology and mechanical properties of rats of different ages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Gong, He; Zhu, Dong; Ma, Renshi; Fang, Juan; Fan, Yobo

    2015-07-01

    A macro-micro-nano-multi-level study was conducted to explore age-related structural and mechanical properties of bone, as well as the effects of aging on bone properties. A total of 70 male Wistar rats were used, ranging in the ages of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 14, 15, 16, and 17 months (n = 7/age group). After micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning, longitudinal cortical bone specimens with a length of 5mm were cut along the femoral shaft axis from left femur shafts for mechanical testing, and the cross-sectional areas were measured. The macro-mechanical properties obtained in mechanical testing and microarchitecture parameters measured by micro-CT were significantly correlated with the animal age (r(2) = 0.96, p < 0.001). Scanning electron microscopy was used for detecting the microarchitecture features of the fractured surfaces, which exhibited age-related plate-fibrous-mixed fibrous-plate texture, resulting in changes in macro-mechanical properties (r(2) > 0.90, p < 0.001). The mineral phase of the left femoral shaft and head was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Longitudinal and transverse trabecular bone tissues, as well as longitudinal cortical bone tissue, were used for nanoindentation test, and the chemical composition was evaluated by quantitative chemical analyses. The correlations between mineral content and bone material properties (i.e., elastic properties of the bone tissue and size and roughness of bone mineral grains) were highly significant (r > 0.95, p < 0.001). Multi-level femur morphology, mechanical property, and mineral content were significantly correlated with the animal age. The correlations between bone mineral content and bone material morphological and mechanical properties may partly explain the increase in bone fragility with aging, which will provide a theoretical basis for the investigation of age-related bone properties in clinics. PMID:25857690

  12. Age-related forgetting in locomotor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Laura A.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    The healthy aging process affects the ability to learn and remember new facts and tasks. Prior work has shown that motor learning can be adversely affected by non-motor deficits, such as time. Here we investigated how age, and a dual task influence the learning and forgetting of a new walking pattern. We studied healthy younger (<30 yo) and older adults (>50 yo) as they alternated between 5-minute bouts of split-belt treadmill walking and resting. Older subjects learned a new walking pattern at the same rate as younger subjects, but forgot some of the new pattern during the rest breaks. We tested if forgetting was due to reliance on a cognitive strategy that was not fully engaged after rest breaks. When older subjects performed a dual cognitive task to reduce strategic control of split-belt walking, their adaptation rate slowed, but they still forgot much of the new pattern during the rest breaks. Our results demonstrate that the healthy aging process weakens motor memories during rest breaks and that this phenomenon cannot be explained solely by reliance on a conscious strategy in older adults. PMID:26589520

  13. Region-specific changes in mitochondrial D-loop in aged rat CNS.

    PubMed

    McInerny, Simone C; Brown, Amanda L; Smith, Doug W

    2009-05-01

    Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is considered a cause of aging. A reduction in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and/or transcription may contribute to this OXPHOS diminution. Impairments in the displacement (D) loop, or non-coding, region of the mitochondrial genome, or accumulation of mtDNA mutations, may affect mtDNA replication and transcription. We determined the effects of age on the D-loop and on mtDNA deletion mutations in the spinal cord, medulla, midbrain, cerebellum, striatum, and cerebral cortex of Fischer 344 rats. D-loop, 7S DNA levels were reduced by 3-fold in striatum, 2.5-fold in cortex, and 2-fold in the spinal cord of older animals. We did not detect a population of mtDNA affected by the most prevalent known (ND4-containing) deletions, indicating they do not comprise a significant portion of total mtDNA. However, we detected an age-related and region-specific increase in the common deletion, which comprised 0.0003-0.0007% of total mtDNA. Mitochondrial genome copy number varied between regions, in addition to an overall 18% decrease with age across the whole brain. These results suggest the age-related decline in OXPHOS may be related to a reduction in D-loop function. PMID:19428453

  14. Acute effects of 17 β-estradiol and genistein on insulin sensitivity and spatial memory in aged ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ana; González-Pardo, Héctor; Garrido, Pablo; Conejo, Nélida M; Llaneza, Plácido; Díaz, Fernando; Del Rey, Carmen González; González, Celestino

    2010-12-01

    Aging is characterized by decline in metabolic function and insulin resistance, and both seem to be in the basis of neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive dysfunction. Estrogens prevent age-related changes, and phytoestrogens influence learning and memory. Our hypothesis was that estradiol and genistein, using rapid-action mechanisms, are able to modify insulin sensitivity, process of learning, and spatial memory. Young and aged ovariectomized rats received acute treatment with estradiol or genistein. Aged animals were more insulin-resistant than young. In each age, estradiol and genistein-treated animals were less insulin-resistant than the others, except in the case of young animals treated with high doses of genistein. In aged rats, no differences between groups were found in spatial memory test, showing a poor performance in the water maze task. However, young females treated with estradiol or high doses of genistein performed well in spatial memory task like the control group. Only rats treated with high doses of genistein showed an optimal spatial memory similar to the control group. Conversely, acute treatment with high doses of phytoestrogens improved spatial memory consolidation only in young rats, supporting the critical period hypothesis for the beneficial effects of estrogens on memory. Therefore, genistein treatment seems to be suitable treatment in aged rats in order to prevent insulin resistance but not memory decline associated with aging. Acute genistein treatment is not effective to restore insulin resistance associated to the early loss of ovarian function, although it can be useful to improve memory deficits in this condition. PMID:20467821

  15. Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News From NIH Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of ... project sponsored by the NIH's National Institute on Aging (NIA) to learn more about the effects of ...

  16. Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors Past Issues / Summer ... learn more about the effects of sustained low-calorie diets in humans on factors affecting aging. This ...

  17. Effect of age on the sensitivity of the rat thyroid gland to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio; Kurashige, Tomomi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Shiro; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood is a well-known risk factor for thyroid cancer. Our study evaluated the effect of age on the radiosensitivity of rat thyroid glands. Four-week-old (4W), 7 -week-old (7W), and 8-month-old (8M) male Wistar rats were exposed to 8 Gy of whole-body X-ray irradiation. Thyroids were removed 3-72 h after irradiation, and non-irradiated thyroids served as controls. Ki67-positivity and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) focus formation (a DNA damage response) were evaluated via immunohistochemistry. Amounts of proteins involved in DNA damage response (p53, p53 phosphorylated at serine 15, p21), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), and autophagy (LC3, p62) were determined via western blotting. mRNA levels of 84 key autophagy-related genes were quantified using polymerase chain reaction arrays. Ki67-positive cells in 4W (with high proliferative activity) and 7W thyroids significantly decreased in number post-irradiation. The number of 53BP1 foci and amount of p53 phosphorylated at serine 15 increased 3 h after irradiation, regardless of age. No increase in apoptosis or in the levels of p53, p21 or cleaved caspase-3 was detected for any ages. Levels of LC3-II and p62 increased in irradiated 4W but not 8M thyroids, whereas expression of several autophagy-related genes was higher in 4W than 8M irradiated thyroids. Irradiation increased the expression of genes encoding pro-apoptotic proteins in both 4W and 8M thyroids. In summary, no apoptosis or p53 accumulation was noted, despite the expression of some pro-apoptotic genes in immature and adult thyroids. Irradiation induced autophagy in immature, but not in adult, rat thyroids. PMID:25691451

  18. Effect of age on the sensitivity of the rat thyroid gland to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio; Kurashige, Tomomi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Shiro; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood is a well-known risk factor for thyroid cancer. Our study evaluated the effect of age on the radiosensitivity of rat thyroid glands. Four-week-old (4W), 7 -week-old (7W), and 8-month-old (8M) male Wistar rats were exposed to 8 Gy of whole-body X-ray irradiation. Thyroids were removed 3–72 h after irradiation, and non-irradiated thyroids served as controls. Ki67-positivity and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) focus formation (a DNA damage response) were evaluated via immunohistochemistry. Amounts of proteins involved in DNA damage response (p53, p53 phosphorylated at serine 15, p21), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), and autophagy (LC3, p62) were determined via western blotting. mRNA levels of 84 key autophagy-related genes were quantified using polymerase chain reaction arrays. Ki67-positive cells in 4W (with high proliferative activity) and 7W thyroids significantly decreased in number post-irradiation. The number of 53BP1 foci and amount of p53 phosphorylated at serine 15 increased 3 h after irradiation, regardless of age. No increase in apoptosis or in the levels of p53, p21 or cleaved caspase-3 was detected for any ages. Levels of LC3-II and p62 increased in irradiated 4W but not 8M thyroids, whereas expression of several autophagy-related genes was higher in 4W than 8M irradiated thyroids. Irradiation increased the expression of genes encoding pro-apoptotic proteins in both 4W and 8M thyroids. In summary, no apoptosis or p53 accumulation was noted, despite the expression of some pro-apoptotic genes in immature and adult thyroids. Irradiation induced autophagy in immature, but not in adult, rat thyroids. PMID:25691451

  19. Improving Bone Microarchitecture in Aging with Diosgenin Treatment: A Study in Senescence-Accelerated OXYS Rats.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Maria A; Ting, Che-Hao; Kolosova, Nataliya G; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Chen, Jian-Horng; Huang, Chi-Wen; Tseng, Ging-Ting; Hung, Ching-Sui; Kao, Pan-Fu; Amstislavskaya, Tamara G; Ho, Ying-Jui

    2015-10-31

    Osteoporosis is a major disease associated with aging. We have previously demonstrated that diosgenin prevents osteoporosis in both menopause and D-galactose-induced aging rats. OXYS rats reveal an accelerated senescence and are used as a suitable model of osteoporosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze microarchitecture and morphological changes in femur of OXYS rats using morphological tests and microcomputed tomography scanning, and to evaluate the effects of oral administration of diosgenin at 10 and 50 mg/kg/day on femur in OXYS rats. The result showed that, compared with age-matched Wistar rats, the femur of OXYS rats revealed lower bone length, bone weight, bone volume, frame volume, frame density, void volume, porosity, external and internal diameters, cortical bone area, BV/TV, Tb.N, and Tb.Th, but higher Tb.Sp. Eight weeks of diosgenin treatment decreased porosity and Tb.Sp, but increased BV/TV, cortical bone area, Tb.N and bone mineral density, compared with OXYS rats treated with vehicle. These data reveal that microarchitecture and morphological changes in femur of OXYS rats showed osteoporotic aging features and suggest that diosgenin may have beneficial effects on aging-induced osteoporosis. PMID:26387656

  20. Neonatal stress affects the aging trajectory of female rats on the endocrine, temperature, and ventilatory responses to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Sébastien; Gulemetova, Roumiana; Baldy, Cécile; Joseph, Vincent; Kinkead, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Human and animal studies on sleep-disordered breathing and respiratory regulation show that the effects of sex hormones are heterogeneous. Because neonatal stress results in sex-specific disruption of the respiratory control in adult rats, we postulate that it might affect respiratory control modulation induced by ovarian steroids in female rats. The hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) of adult female rats exposed to neonatal maternal separation (NMS) is ∼30% smaller than controls (24), but consequences of NMS on respiratory control in aging female rats are unknown. To address this issue, whole body plethysmography was used to evaluate the impact of NMS on the HVR (12% O2, 20 min) of middle-aged (MA; ∼57 wk old) female rats. Pups subjected to NMS were placed in an incubator 3 h/day for 10 consecutive days (P3 to P12). Controls were undisturbed. To determine whether the effects were related to sexual hormone decline or aging per se, experiments were repeated on bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) young (∼12 wk old) adult female rats. OVX and MA both reduced the HVR significantly in control rats but had little effect on the HVR of NMS females. OVX (but not aging) reduced the anapyrexic response in both control and NMS animals. These results show that hormonal decline decreases the HVR of control animals, while leaving that of NMS female animals unaffected. This suggests that neonatal stress alters the interaction between sex hormone regulation and the development of body temperature, hormonal, and ventilatory responses to hypoxia. PMID:25652536

  1. Aging: ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb+ uptake rate and responsiveness to digoxin in rat left atrial muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.H.; Seifen, E.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work in anesthetized rats has demonstrated that the sensitivity to cardiotoxic actions of cardiotonic steroids is increased in senescence, and studies in crude homogenates and partially purified membrane preparations have suggested that this altered responsiveness is related to an aging-associated reduction in the sarcolemmal content of Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase. This decrease in Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase could enhance the sensitivity to digitalis-like compounds by reducing the reserve capacity of the Na+-pump and thus the extent of digitalis-induced pump inhibition required before the onset of toxicity. Current experiments examined dose-dependent actions of digoxin in atrial muscle isolated from 3-, 12- and 24- to 25-month-old rats and determined if alterations in responsiveness correlated with changes in ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake rate, an estimate of Na+-pump activity. Atrial preparations from aged rats were more sensitive to the cardiotoxic actions of digoxin; however, the inotropic efficacy before the onset of toxicity was not affected by age. Both 1) the maximum attainable ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake rate and 2) the difference between maximum uptake rate and that monitored in preparations stimulated at 4.0 Hz decreased progressively with age. These results indicate that atrial muscle from aged rats is more sensitive to direct toxic effects of digoxin and suggest that this lower tolerance is mediated, at least in part, by a reduction in Na+-pump reserve capacity.

  2. AGE-DEPENDENT MDPV-INDUCED TASTE AVERSIONS AND THERMOREGULATION IN ADOLESCENT AND ADULT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Merluzzi, Andrew P.; Hurwitz, Zachary E.; Briscione, Maria A.; Cobuzzi, Jennifer L.; Wetzell, Bradley; Rice, Kenner C.; Riley, Anthony L.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent rats are more sensitive to the rewarding and less sensitive to the aversive properties of various drugs of abuse than their adult counterparts. Given a nationwide increase in use of “bath salts,” the present experiment employed the conditioned taste aversion procedure to assess the aversive effects of 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV; 0, 1.0, 1.8 or 3.2 mg/kg), a common constituent in “bath salts,” in adult and adolescent rats. As similar drugs induce thermoregulatory changes in rats, temperature was recorded following MDPV administration to assess if thermoregulatory changes were related to taste aversion conditioning. Both age groups acquired taste aversions, although these aversions were weaker and developed at a slower rate in the adolescent subjects. Adolescents increased and adults decreased body temperature following MDPV administration with no correlation to aversions. The relative insensitivity of adolescents to the aversive effects of MDPV suggests that MDPV may confer an increased risk in this population. PMID:24122728

  3. Age-related vulnerability to diencephalic amnesia produced by thiamine deficiency: the role of time of insult.

    PubMed

    Pitkin, Shane R; Savage, Lisa M

    2004-01-01

    Age is a risk factor for the development of many neurological disorders, including alcohol-related neurological disorders. A rodent model of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS), acute pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD), produces diencephalic damage and impairments of memory similar to what is seen in WKS patients. Advanced age increases the vulnerability to the cascade of acute and some chronic neurological events caused by PTD treatment. Interactions between PTD treatment and age at the time of treatment (3, 10, or 21 months), in addition to the effects of an increased recovery period, were examined relative to spatial memory impairment and neuropathology in Fischer 344 rats. Although acute neurological disturbances and medial thalamic brain lesions were more prevalent in middle-aged and senescent rats exposed to PTD treatment, relative to young rats, behavioral data did not support the view that PTD and aging have synergistic effects. In addition, both advanced age and PTD treatment result in a loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, though there was no interaction. Despite the fact that no convincing evidence was found for an effect of extended recovery time on neuropathology measures, young rats given an extensive recovery period displayed less working memory impairment. In summary, these data provide evidence for an increased susceptibility of the aged rat to the acute neurological consequences and diencephalic pathology associated with PTD treatment and indicated a similar vulnerability of the middle-aged rat. However, the synergistic interaction between aging and PTD treatment in thalamic tissue loss did not express behaviorally. PMID:14684251

  4. Decreased myeloperoxidase expressing cells in the aged rat brain after excitotoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Castillo-Ruiz, Maria del Mar; Acarin, Laia; Gonzalez, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2011-09-01

    Brain aging is associated to several morphological and functional alterations that influence the evolution and outcome of CNS damage. Acute brain injury such as an excitotoxic insult induces initial tissue damage followed by associated inflammation and oxidative stress, partly attributed to neutrophil recruitment and the expression of oxidative enzymes such as myeloperoxidase (MPO), among others. However, to date, very few studies have focused on how age can influence neutrophil infiltration after acute brain damage. Therefore, to evaluate the age-dependent pattern of neutrophil cell infiltration following an excitotoxic injury, intrastriatal injection of N-methyl-d-aspartate was performed in young and aged male Wistar rats. Animals were sacrificed at different times between 12h post-lesion (hpl) to 14 days post-lesion (dpl). Cryostat sections were processed for myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohistochemistry, and double labeling for either neuronal cells (NeuN), astrocytes (GFAP), perivascular macrophages (ED-2), or microglia/macrophages (tomato lectin histochemistry). Our observations showed that MPO + cells were observed in the injured striatum from 12 hpl (when maximum values were found) until 7 dpl, when cell density was strongly diminished. However, at all survival times analyzed, the overall density of MPO + cells was lower in the aged versus the adult injured striatum. MPO + cells were mainly identified as neutrophils (especially at 12 hpl and 1 dpl), but it should be noted that MPO + neurons and microglia/macrophages were also found. MPO + neurons were most commonly observed at 12 hpl and reduced in the aged. MPO + microglia/macrophages were the main population expressing MPO from 3 dpl, when density was also reduced in aged subjects. These results point to neutrophil infiltration as another important factor contributing to the different responses of the adult and aged brain to damage, highlighting the need of using aged animals for the study of acute age-related

  5. Review: Axon pathology in age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Adalbert, R; Coleman, M P

    2013-02-01

    'Dying back' axon degeneration is a prominent feature of many age-related neurodegenerative disorders and is widespread in normal ageing. Although the mechanisms of disease- and age-related losses may differ, both contribute to symptoms. Here, we review recent advances in understanding axon pathology in age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and glaucoma. In particular, we highlight the importance of axonal transport, autophagy, traumatic brain injury and mitochondrial quality control. We then place these disease mechanisms in the context of changes to axons and dendrites that occur during normal ageing. We discuss what makes ageing such an important risk factor for many neurodegenerative disorders and conclude that the processes of normal ageing and disease combine at the molecular, cellular or systems levels in a range of disorders to produce symptoms. Pathology identical to disease also occurs at the cellular level in most elderly individuals. Thus, normal ageing and age-related disease are inextricably linked and the term 'healthy ageing' downplays the important contributions of cellular pathology. For a full understanding of normal ageing or age-related disease we must study both processes. PMID:23046254

  6. Age-dependence of sensorimotor and cerebral electroencephalographic asymmetry in rats subjected to unilateral cerebrovascular stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human population mostly affected by stroke is more than 65 years old. This study was designed to meet the recommendation that models of cerebral ischemia in aged animals are more relevant to the clinical setting than young animal models. Until now the majority of the pre-clinical studies examining age effects on stroke outcomes have used rats of old age. Considering the increasing incidence of stroke among younger than old human population, new translational approaches in animal models are needed to match the rejuvenation of stroke. A better knowledge of alterations in stroke outcomes in middle-aged rats has important preventive and management implications providing clues for future investigations on effects of various neuroprotective and neurorestorative drugs against cerebrovascular accidents that may occur before late senescence. Methods We evaluated the impact of transient focal ischemia, induced by intracerebral unilateral infusion of endothelin-1 (Et-1) near the middle cerebral artery of conscious rats, on volume of brain damage and asymmetry in behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) output measures in middle-aged (11–12 month-old) rats. Results We did not find any age-dependent difference in the volume of ischemic brain damage three days after Et-1 infusion. However, age was an important determinant of neurological and EEG outcomes after stroke. Middle-aged ischemic rats had more impaired somatosensory functions of the contralateral part of the body than young ischemic rats and thus, had greater left-right reflex/sensorimotor asymmetry. Interhemispheric EEG asymmetry was more evident in middle-aged than in young ischemic rats, and this could tentatively explain the behavioral asymmetry. Conclusions With a multiparametric approach, we have validated the endothelin model of ischemia in middle-aged rats. The results provide clues for future studies on mechanisms underlying plasticity after brain damage and motivate investigations of

  7. Age-related regulation of genes: slow homeostatic changes and age-dimension technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurachi, Kotoku; Zhang, Kezhong; Huo, Jeffrey; Ameri, Afshin; Kuwahara, Mitsuhiro; Fontaine, Jean-Marc; Yamamoto, Kei; Kurachi, Sumiko

    2002-11-01

    Through systematic studies of pro- and anti-blood coagulation factors, we have determined molecular mechanisms involving two genetic elements, age-related stability element (ASE), GAGGAAG and age-related increase element (AIE), a unique stretch of dinucleotide repeats (AIE). ASE and AIE are essential for age-related patterns of stable and increased gene expression patterns, respectively. Such age-related gene regulatory mechanisms are also critical for explaining homeostasis in various physiological reactions as well as slow homeostatic changes in them. The age-related increase expression of the human factor IX (hFIX) gene requires the presence of both ASE and AIE, which apparently function additively. The anti-coagulant factor protein C (hPC) gene uses an ASE (CAGGAG) to produce age-related stable expression. Both ASE sequences (G/CAGAAG) share consensus sequence of the transcriptional factor PEA-3 element. No other similar sequences, including another PEA-3 consensus sequence, GAGGATG, function in conferring age-related gene regulation. The age-regulatory mechanisms involving ASE and AIE apparently function universally with different genes and across different animal species. These findings have led us to develop a new field of research and applications, which we named “age-dimension technology (ADT)”. ADT has exciting potential for modifying age-related expression of genes as well as associated physiological processes, and developing novel, more effective prophylaxis or treatments for age-related diseases.

  8. Treated effect of silymarin on vascular function of aged rats: Dependant on nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Buket; Demir, Omer; Dost, Turhan; Birincioglu, Mustafa

    2013-11-01

    Abstract Context: Aging leads to endothelial dysfunction and vascular stiffness which are the main causes of many cardiovascular diseases. Previous reports have shown that the cell protective effect of silymarin (SM) is dependent on its antioxidant properties. Objectives: We investigated the effect of SM on vascular functions of aged rats and the involvement of nitric oxide or cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in this effect. Materials and methods: Isolated rat aortas were obtained from 22-month old rats. Each ring was incubated with SM (50 mg/L), SM/l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (100 μM, l-NAME) or SM/indomethacin (10 μM, INDO) in tissue bath. Three- to four-month-old rats were used as young controls. Endothelium-intact rings were precontracted with α-receptor agonist phenylephrine (0.001-30 µM) or voltage-dependent high potassium (40 mM), endothelium dependent/independent relaxant responses were obtained using acetylcholine (0.001-30 µM) and sodium nitroprusside (0.0001-3 µM), respectively. Results: Aging increased phenylephrine sensitivity (6.45 ± 0.08; 6.88 ± 0.09) and decreased KCl contraction (882 ± 118.4; 499 ± 80.4). SM treatment decreased the Emax of both agents (548 ± 109; 223 ± 48.9). Aging deteriorated acetylcholine relaxation (93.9 ± 2.09; 72.0 ± 2.56) and SM improved the response (86.3 ± 1.90). l-NAME prevented the SM effect whereas INDO was ineffective. Discussion and Conclusion: Immediate SM treatment partially restored endothelial dysfunction and vascular tone in aging. The possible mechanism might not be mediated by prostacyclin or the COX pathway in acute administration; the nitric oxide pathway and calcium antagonistic features of SM relate to its action on the vessel. PMID:24188646

  9. Age Related Decline in Postural Control Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelmach, George E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied voluntary and reflexive mechanisms of postural control of young (N=8) and elderly (N=8) adults through measurement of reflexive reactions to large-fast and small-slow ankle rotation postural disturbances. Found reflexive mechanisms relatively intact for both groups although elderly appeared more disadvantaged when posture was under the…

  10. Age-Related Differences in Incidental Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Terry R.

    Research has suggested that memory performance may be related to the extent of stimulus processing during acquisition. To examine processing efficiency and processing deficiency differences between younger and older adults, four studies were conducted. In the first study, young and old adults rated word lists, manipulated for generation specific…

  11. Age-Related Differences in the Production of Textual Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Andrea; Boewe, Anke; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Narratives produced by 69 healthy Italian adults were analyzed for age-related changes of microlinguistic, macrolinguistic and informative aspects. The participants were divided into five age groups (20-24, 25-39, 40-59, 60-74, 75-84). One single-picture stimulus and two cartoon sequences were used to elicit three stories per subject. Age-related…

  12. APOLIPOPROTEIN E GENE AND EARLY AGE-RELATED MACULOPATHY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene and early age-related maculopathy (ARM) in middle-aged persons. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: Participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (n = 10139; age range, 49-73 ye...

  13. The Relative Age Effect among Female Brazilian Youth Volleyball Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okazaki, Fabio H. A.; Keller, Birgit; Fontana, Fabio E.; Gallagher, Jere D.

    2011-01-01

    In sports, the relative age effect (RAE) refers to performance disadvantages of children born late in the competition year compared to those with birthdays soon after the cutoff date. This effect is derived from age grouping, a strategy commonly used in youth sport programs. The purpose of age grouping is to decrease possible cognitive, physical,…

  14. Microsomal Quercetin Glucuronidation in Rat Small Intestine Depends on Age and Segment

    PubMed Central

    Bolling, Bradley W.; Court, Michael H.; Blumberg, Jeffrey B.

    2011-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity toward the flavonoid quercetin and UGT protein were characterized in three equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4-, 12-, 18-, and 28-month-old male Fischer 344 rats (n = 8/age) using villin to control for enterocyte content. SI microsomal intrinsic clearance of quercetin was increased 3- to 9-fold from 4 months in the proximal and distal SI at 12 and 18 months. Likewise, at 30 μM quercetin, SI microsomal glucuronidation activity was increased with age: 4.8- and 3.9-fold greater at 18 months than at 4 months. Quercetin UGT regioselectivity was not changed by age. The distal SI preferentially catalyzed glucuronidation at the 7-position, whereas the proximal SI produced the greatest proportion of 4′- and 3′-conjugates. Enterocyte UGT content in different SI segments was not consistently changed with age. In the proximal SI, UGT1A increased 64 and 150% at 12 and 18 months and UGT1A1, UGT1A7, and UGT1A8 were also increased at 12 and 18 months. However, age-related changes in expression were inconsistent in the medial and distal segments. Microsomal rates of quercetin glucuronidation and UGT expression were positively correlated with UGT1A1 content for all pooled samples (r = 0.467) and at each age (r = 0.538–0.598). UGT1A7 was positively correlated with total, 7-O- and 3-O-quercetin glucuronidation at 18 months. Thus, age-related differences in UGT quercetin glucuronidation depend on intestinal segment, are more pronounced in the proximal and distal segments and may be partially related to UGT1A1 and UGT1A7 content. PMID:21543555

  15. Neuroimaging explanations of age-related differences in task performance

    PubMed Central

    Steffener, Jason; Barulli, Daniel; Habeck, Christian; Stern, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    Advancing age affects both cognitive performance and functional brain activity and interpretation of these effects has led to a variety of conceptual research models without always explicitly linking the two effects. However, to best understand the multifaceted effects of advancing age, age differences in functional brain activity need to be explicitly tied to the cognitive task performance. This work hypothesized that age-related differences in task performance are partially explained by age-related differences in functional brain activity and formally tested these causal relationships. Functional MRI data was from groups of young and old adults engaged in an executive task-switching experiment. Analyses were voxel-wise testing of moderated-mediation and simple mediation statistical path models to determine whether age group, brain activity and their interaction explained task performance in regions demonstrating an effect of age group. Results identified brain regions whose age-related differences in functional brain activity significantly explained age-related differences in task performance. In all identified locations, significant moderated-mediation relationships resulted from increasing brain activity predicting worse (slower) task performance in older but not younger adults. Findings suggest that advancing age links task performance to the level of brain activity. The overall message of this work is that in order to understand the role of functional brain activity on cognitive performance, analysis methods should respect theoretical relationships. Namely, that age affects brain activity and brain activity is related to task performance. PMID:24672481

  16. AGE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN RECEPTOR-STIMULATED PHOSPHOINOSITIDE TURNOVER IN THE RAT HIPPOCAMPUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To study the changes in the hippocampal cholinergic system of chronologically old and behaviorally impaired animals, old (21 months of age) and young (3 months of age) male, Fischer-344 rats were used. The aged animals were tested on a reference memory task (Morris water maze) an...

  17. Aging Effect on Post-recovery Hypofusion and Mortality Following Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michelle A; LaManna, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of aging on brain blood flow following transient global ischemia. Male Fisher rats (6 and 24 months old) underwent cardiac arrest (15 min) and resuscitation. Regional brain (cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and cerebellum) blood flow was measured in non-arrested rats and 1-h recovery rats using [14C] iodoantipyrene (IAP) autoradiography; the 4-day survival rate was determined in the two age groups. The pre-arrest baseline blood flows were similar in cortex, brainstem and cerebellum between the 6-month and the 24-month old rats; however, the baseline blood flow in hippocampus was significantly lower in the 24-month old group. At 1 h following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, both 6-month and 24-month groups had significantly lower blood flows in all regions than the pre-arrest baseline values; compared to the 6-month old group, the blood flow was significantly lower (about 40% lower) in all regions in the 24-month old group. The 4-day survival rate for the 6-month old rats was 50% (3/6) whereas none of the 24-month old rats (0/10) survived for 4 days. The data suggest that there is an increased vulnerability to brain ischemic-reperfusion injury in the aged rats; the degree of post-recovery hypoperfusion may contribute to the high mortality in the aged rats following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:26782221

  18. Age, Dose, and Time-Dependency of Plasma and Tissue Distribution of Deltamethrine in Immature Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objective of this project was to characterize the systemic disposition of the pyrethroid, deltamethrin (DLT), in immature rats, with emphasis on the age-dependence of target organ (brain) dosimetry. Postnatal day (PND) 10, 21, and 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0...

  19. An attenuated immune response by Schwann cells and macrophages inhibits nerve regeneration in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Scheib, Jami L; Höke, Ahmet

    2016-09-01

    Although peripheral nerves are capable of regeneration, advanced age decreases the potential for functional recovery after injury. The cellular mechanisms for this are not currently understood. Here, we performed sciatic nerve grafting with young (2 months old) and aged (18 months old) Brown-Norway male rats, in which 1 cm nerve grafts from young or aged rats were sutured into nerves of young or aged rats. Axons were allowed to regenerate until the nerve grafts and distal nerves were harvested at 1, 3, and 7 days and 2 and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, our data suggested that young nerve grafts supported regeneration better than aged nerve grafts. In addition, myelin debris clearance was inhibited in young nerves when grafted into aged rats, but clearance was faster when aged nerves were grafted into young rats. Further analysis revealed that aged macrophages have delayed migration into injured nerve, and macrophages and Schwann cells from aged rats were less phagocytic for myelin debris in vitro. To understand these impairments, expression levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were analyzed at 1 day after injury. Based on these levels, there was not a clear polarization to either an M1 or M2 phenotype; however, expression levels of IL-6, IL-10, CCL2 (MCP1), and Arg-1 were decreased in aged nerves. Taken together, both macrophages and Schwann cells had attenuated responses to nerve injury in aged rats, leading to inefficient clearance of debris and impaired axonal regeneration. PMID:27459920

  20. Age at Natural Menopause and Related Factors in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Golshiri, Parastoo; Abdollahzadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was aimed to evaluate the age at natural menopause and related factors among women in a population based study in 2015 in Isfahan, Islamic Republic of Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study 960 menopausal women were selected by cluster sampling. Demographic, socioeconomic, lifestyle behavior and reproductive history aspects were collected using a structured questionnaire. Woman and her husband's educational level and occupation with family income were the variables to construct socioeconomic status using principal component analysis. Results Mean and median of natural menopause age were 48.66 and 48 years, respectively. Women body mass index (BMI) more than 30 kg/m2 had significantly higher menopausal age than women with lower BMI (P value = 0.022). The mean of menopausal age was not statistically significant in regard to marital status, physical activity, smoking status, menarche age, age at first pregnancy and history of abortion. Menopause age with pregnancy numbers and age at last pregnancy had a significant positive association. Women with better socioeconomic status had significantly higher natural menopause age. Multiple linear regression shows significant relationship between lower age at menopause with higher age at marriage, higher number of pregnancy and lower socioeconomic status. Conclusion Age at menopause in our studied sample is similar to previous estimates reported for other Iranian populations. Age at marriage, higher number of pregnancy and lower socioeconomic status were the significant factors in relations to age at menopause.

  1. Ocular Inflammation in Uveal Tract in Aged Obese Type 2 Diabetic Rats (Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Fatty Rats)

    PubMed Central

    Kemmochi, Yusuke; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Ohta, Takeshi; Yasui, Yuzo; Toyoda, Kaoru; Kakimoto, Kochi; Shoda, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    We report uveitis observed in an obese type 2 diabetes rat model, Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Leprfa (SDT fatty) rats aged over 50 weeks. The eyes of SDT fatty rats (16 animals: 7 males and 9 females with 50 or 60 weeks of age) were examined histopathologically. Infiltration of inflammatory cells in the uveal tract was observed in 13 of 16 animals. One female showed severe inflammation affecting the entire uveal tract including the iris, ciliary body, and choroid with a variety of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages). Those changes clinically mimic the findings of diabetic iridocyclitis in diabetic patients. Uveitis associated with diabetes can occur in diabetic patients but the pathogenesis still remains unknown. Since increased extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen and abscess in the genital and lower urinary tracts were observed in some SDT fatty rats, increased susceptibility to infection, prolongation of inflammatory states, and disorders of the immune system were considered to be possible factors of the uveitis in aged SDT fatty rats. There have been few reports on how diabetes has influence on the development of uveitis associated with bacterial infection. The SDT fatty rat can be an animal model to investigate diabetes-associated uveitis. PMID:25295283

  2. Comparison of catalase immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between young, adult and aged mice and rats

    PubMed Central

    AHN, JI HYEON; CHEN, BAI HUI; SHIN, BICH-NA; LEE, TAE-KYEONG; CHO, JEONG HWI; KIM, IN HYE; PARK, JOON HA; LEE, JAE-CHUL; TAE, HYUN-JIN; LEE, CHOONG-HYUN; WON, MOO-HO; LEE, YUN LYUL; CHOI, SOO YOUNG; HONG, SEONGKWEON

    2016-01-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an important antioxidant enzyme and is crucial in modulating synaptic plasticity in the brain. In this study, CAT expression as well as neuronal distribution was compared in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged mice and rats. Male ICR mice and Sprague Dawley rats were used at postnatal month (PM) 1, PM 6 and PM 24 as the young, adult and aged groups, respectively (n=14/group). CAT expression was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. In addition, neuronal distribution was examined by NeuN immunohistochemistry. In the present study, the mean number of NeuN-immunoreactive neurons was marginally decreased in mouse and rat hippocampi during aging, although this change was not identified to be significantly different. However, CAT immunoreactivity was significantly increased in pyramidal and granule neurons in the adult mouse and rat hippocampi and was significantly decreased in the aged mouse and rat hippocampi compared with that in the young animals. CAT protein levels in the hippocampus were also lowest in the aged mouse and rat hippocampus. These results indicate that CAT expression is significantly decreased in the hippocampi of aged animals and decreased CAT expression may be closely associated with aging. PMID:27221506

  3. Comparison of catalase immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between young, adult and aged mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Choong-Hyun; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Yun Lyul; Choi, Soo Young; Hong, Seongkweon

    2016-07-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an important antioxidant enzyme and is crucial in modulating synaptic plasticity in the brain. In this study, CAT expression as well as neuronal distribution was compared in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged mice and rats. Male ICR mice and Sprague Dawley rats were used at postnatal month (PM) 1, PM 6 and PM 24 as the young, adult and aged groups, respectively (n=14/group). CAT expression was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. In addition, neuronal distribution was examined by NeuN immunohistochemistry. In the present study, the mean number of NeuN‑immunoreactive neurons was marginally decreased in mouse and rat hippocampi during aging, although this change was not identified to be significantly different. However, CAT immunoreactivity was significantly increased in pyramidal and granule neurons in the adult mouse and rat hippocampi and was significantly decreased in the aged mouse and rat hippocampi compared with that in the young animals. CAT protein levels in the hippocampus were also lowest in the aged mouse and rat hippocampus. These results indicate that CAT expression is significantly decreased in the hippocampi of aged animals and decreased CAT expression may be closely associated with aging. PMID:27221506

  4. Age-related changes of myocardial ATP supply and demand mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    In advanced age, the resting myocardial oxygen consumption (M V̇O2) and cardiac work (CW) in the rat remain intact. However, M V̇O2, CW and cardiac efficiency achieved at high demand are decreased with age, compared to maximal values in the young. Whether this deterioration is due to decrease in myocardial ATP demand, ATP supply, or the control mechanisms that match them, remains controversial. Here we discuss evolving perspectives of age-related changes of myocardial ATP supply and demand mechanisms, and critique experimental models used to investigate aging. Specifically, we evaluate experimental data collected at the level of isolated mitochondria, tissue, or organism, and discuss how mitochondrial energetic mechanisms change in advanced age, both at basal and high energy demand levels. PMID:23845538

  5. [Age and the course of nephrotoxic nephritis in rats].

    PubMed

    Samoĭlova, Z T; Kliukina, S S

    1978-12-01

    In experiments on two groups of mongrel rats (4 weeks old and 4 months old) with induced nephrotoxic nephritis it was revealed that in comparison with adult rats the course of nephritis in ratlings was characterized by lesser proteinuria, selective in nature, by lesser reducticn of endogenous creatinine clearance and diuresis. The acido- and ammo-niogenesis decreased in ratlings and adult rats to the same extent. Morphological changes in the kidneys of ratlings were less pronounced than in adult animals, and were mostly localized in the convoluted tubules. The level of DNA-synthetic activity of the epithelial nuclei of the glomeruli prevailed over this index of the convoluted tubules epithelium. The weight index of the kidneys increased less in ratlings with nephritis than in adult rats. beta-lipoproteinemia in ratlings increased 8 times. Normalization of the urine and blood indices occurred more rapidly in ratlings than in adult rats. PMID:31956

  6. Effects of metrifonate on radial arm maze acquisition in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Dachir, S; Schmidt, B; Levy, A

    1997-11-28

    The efficacy of metrifonate, a well-tolerated cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor, in attenuating the normal aging- and corticosterone-induced impairments of radial maze performance of rats was compared. Middle-aged Fischer 344 rats were screened for their spatial orientation performance in the Morris water escape task. Good and bad performers were selected: good performers (N= 22) were treated with subcutaneous sustained-release corticosterone pellets, resulting in hippocampal cell damage and impaired spatial orientation in the radial maze; age-induced bad performers (N = 20) were tested without additional pharmacological intervention. Metrifonate (MFT), administered daily during radial maze testing, 30 min before training, at a dose of 15 mg/kg p.o., facilitated the acquisition of the task in age-impaired rats, but not in corticosterone-impaired rats. PMID:9449438

  7. Effects of acute ethanol administration of female rat liver as a function of aging

    SciTech Connect

    Rikans, L.E.; Snowden, C.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Female Fischer 344 rats, aged 4, 14, and 25 months, received 4.0 g/kg of ethanol by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. Blood alcohol concentrations 2.5, 6 and 16 hr after ethanol injection were similar in the three age groups. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels were diminished 6 hr after ethanol injection, and there were no age-dependent differences in the depleted levels (3.2 {plus minus} 0.1, 3.5 {plus minus} 0.2, and 3.0 {plus minus} 0.5 {mu}g GSH/g liver). However, GSH contents in livers of young-adult rats approached control levels after 16 hr, whereas they remained depressed in older rats. Serum levels of hepatic enzymes were significantly elevated 6 hr after ethanol administration. The increases were greater in middle-aged and old rats than in young-adult rats. The results suggest that middle-aged and old rats are more susceptible than young rats to the acute toxicity of ethanol.

  8. Relative Age Effects in Dutch Adolescents: Concurrent and Prospective Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Jeronimus, Bertus F.; Stavrakakis, Nikolaos; Veenstra, René; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2015-01-01

    The literature on relative age position effects is rather inconsistent. In this study we examined intra-classroom age position (or relative age) effects on Dutch adolescents’ school progress and performance (as rated by teachers), physical development, temperamental development (fear and frustration), and depressive symptoms, all adjusted for age at the time of measurement. Data were derived from three waves of Tracking Adolescents' Individuals Lives Survey (TRAILS) of 2230 Dutch adolescents (baseline mean age 11.1, SD = 0.6, 51% girls). Albeit relative age predicted school progress (grade retention ORs = 0.83 for each month, skipped grade OR = 1.47, both p<.001), our key observation is the absence of substantial developmental differences as a result of relative age position in Dutch adolescents with a normative school trajectory, in contrast to most literature. For adolescents who had repeated a grade inverse relative age effects were observed, in terms of physical development and school performance, as well as on depressive symptoms, favoring the relatively young. Cross-cultural differences in relative age effect may be partly explained by the decision threshold for grade retention. PMID:26076384

  9. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) co-localize with AGE receptors in the retinal vasculature of diabetic and of AGE-infused rats.

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, A. W.; Li, Y. M.; Gardiner, T. A.; Bucala, R.; Archer, D. B.; Vlassara, H.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), formed from the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and lipids with reducing sugars, have been implicated in many diabetic complications; however, their role in diabetic retinopathy remains largely unknown. Recent studies suggest that the cellular actions of AGEs may be mediated by AGE-specific receptors (AGE-R). We have examined the immunolocalization of AGEs and AGE-R components R1 and R2 in the retinal vasculature at 2, 4, and 8 months after STZ-induced diabetes as well as in nondiabetic rats infused with AGE bovine serum albumin for 2 weeks. Using polyclonal or monoclonal anti-AGE antibodies and polyclonal antibodies to recombinant AGE-R1 and AGE-R2, immunoreactivity (IR) was examined in the complete retinal vascular tree after isolation by trypsin digestion. After 2, 4, and 8 months of diabetes, there was a gradual increase in AGE IR in basement membrane. At 8 months, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells of the retinal vessels showed dense intracellular AGE IR. AGE epitopes stained most intensely within pericytes and smooth muscle cells but less in basement membrane of AGE-infused rats compared with the diabetic group. Retinas from normal or bovine-serum-albumin-infused rats were largely negative for AGE IR. AGE-R1 and -R2 co-localized strongly with AGEs of vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells of either normal, diabetic, or AGE-infused rat retinas, and this distribution did not vary with each condition. The data indicate that AGEs accumulate as a function of diabetes duration first within the basement membrane and then intracellularly, co-localizing with cellular AGE-Rs. Significant AGE deposits appear within the pericytes after long-term diabetes or acute challenge with AGE infusion conditions associated with pericyte damage. Co-localization of AGEs and AGE-Rs in retinal cells points to possible interactions of pathogenic significance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID

  10. Intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment and age-dependent effects on rat cancellous bone and mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Gerald; Turner, Russell T; Evans, Glenda L; Dobnig, Harald

    2007-11-01

    In recent years, intermittent PTH treatment has been investigated extensively for its efficacy in preventing osteoporotic fractures and to improve fracture healing and implant fixation. Although these tasks concern patients of all ages, very little is known about whether aging impacts the bone anabolic response to PTH. Female Sprague-Dawley rats of 1, 3, and 13 months of age were either treated by hPTH-(1-34) or by vehicle solution (CTR) for 1 week. As main outcome measures, we determined the effects on static and dynamic histomorphometry of cancellous bone. In addition, we measured gene expression in femur and serum parameters reflecting bone turnover and mineral metabolism. There was a profound decrease in bone formation rate (BFR) with aging in CTR rats, whereas PTH treatment resulted in a significant relative 1.5-, 3-, and 4.7-fold increase in BFR, without altering indices of bone resorption. Aging decreased and PTH increased mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and growth factors in a gene-specific manner. In younger animals, PTH-induced a marked stimulation in the mineral apposition rate with no effect on osteoblast number, whereas the latter was increased in older animals (1.0-, 1.7-, and 3.1-fold). Treatment with PTH in young rats led to a significant increase in trabecular number (1.6-2.6/mm, p < 0.05), whereas older rats demonstrated increases in trabecular thickness only (52.8-77.8 microm, p < 0.001). Although PTH increased bone formation at all ages, we found significant age-related differences in the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the bone anabolic response to the hormone. PMID:17557320

  11. Chronic ethanol consumption depresses hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, C.J.; Bestervelt, L.L.; Mousigian, C.A.; Maimansomsuk, P.; Yong Cai; Piper, W.N. )

    1991-01-01

    In separate experiments, nine (n=20) and fifteen (n=12) month old rats were treated with either 6% ethanol or 12% sucrose in the drinking water to examine the effect of chronic ethanol consumption on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of aged rats. Blood was collected and plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone were determined by radioimmunoassay. Adrenal glands were cleaned, quartered and used to test in vitro responsiveness to ACTH. Anterior pituitary glands from all 15 month old rats and one half of the nine month old rats were collected, frozen and extracted for measurement of tissue ACTH concentration. The remaining anterior pituitary glands from the nine month old rats were challenged with corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) to test in vitro responsiveness. In nine month old rats, chronic ethanol consumption decreased plasma ACTH and corticosterone. Pituitary ACTH concentrations were unchanged in treated nine month old rats, but the amount of pituitary ACTH released in response to CRH was decreased in rats consuming ethanol. In vitro responsiveness of the adrenal gland to ACTH in nine month old rats consuming ethanol was unchanged. Plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations were also decreased in 15 month old rats chronically consuming ethanol. No differences were noted in responsiveness of the adrenal gland or in the amount of pituitary ACTH due to ethanol consumptions in 15 month old rats.

  12. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26292978

  13. Normal aging in rats and pathological aging in human Alzheimer's disease decrease FAAH activity: modulation by cannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Pascual, A C; Martín-Moreno, A M; Giusto, N M; de Ceballos, M L; Pasquaré, S J

    2014-12-01

    Anandamide is an endocannabinoid involved in several physiological functions including neuroprotection. Anandamide is synthesized on demand and its endogenous level is regulated through its degradation, where fatty acid amide hydrolase plays a major role. The aim of this study was to characterize anandamide breakdown in physiological and pathological aging and its regulation by CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists. Fatty acid amide hydrolase activity was analyzed in an independent cohort of human cortical membrane samples from control and Alzheimer's disease patients, and in membrane and synaptosomes from adult and aged rat cerebral cortex. Our results demonstrate that fatty acid amide hydrolase activity decreases in the frontal cortex from human patients with Alzheimer's disease and this effect is mimicked by Aβ(1-40) peptide. This activity increases and decreases in aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes, respectively. Also, while the presence of JWH-133, a CB2 selective agonist, slightly increases anandamide hydrolysis in human controls, it decreases this activity in adults and aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes. In the presence of WIN55,212-2, a mixed CB1/CB2 agonist, anandamide hydrolysis increases in Alzheimer's disease patients but decreases in human controls as well as in adult and aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes. Although a similar profile is observed in fatty acid amide hydrolase activity between aged rat synaptic endings and human Alzheimer's disease brains, it is differently modulated by CB1/CB2 agonists. This modulation leads to a reduced availability of anandamide in Alzheimer's disease and to an increased availability of this endocannabinoid in aging. PMID:25456842

  14. Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate ameliorates aging effects in the dendritic tree of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of both male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Kougias, Daniel G; Nolan, Suzanne O; Koss, Wendy A; Kim, Taehyeon; Hankosky, Emily R; Gulley, Joshua M; Juraska, Janice M

    2016-04-01

    Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), a supplement commonly used to maintain muscle in elderly and clinical populations, has been unexplored in the aging brain. In both healthy aging humans and rat models, there are cognitive deficits associated with age-related dendritic shrinkage within the prefrontal cortex. The present study explores the effects of relatively short- and long-term (7 and 31 weeks) oral HMB supplementation starting at 12 months of age in male and female rats on the dendritic tree of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex. Since female rats continue to secrete ovarian hormones after reaching reproductive senescence, middle-aged female rats were ovariectomized to model humans. As expected, there were fewer spines and a retraction of dendritic material in the apical and basilar trees in old age controls of both sexes compared with their middle-aged counterparts. However, these losses did not occur in the HMB-treated rats in either dendrites or the total number of dendritic spines. Thus, HMB forestalled the effects of aging on the dendritic tree of this population of neurons. PMID:26973106

  15. The Digital Ageing Atlas: integrating the diversity of age-related changes into a unified resource

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Thomas; Smelick, Chris; Tacutu, Robi; Wuttke, Daniel; Wood, Shona H.; Stanley, Henry; Janssens, Georges; Savitskaya, Ekaterina; Moskalev, Alexey; Arking, Robert; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies characterizing the human ageing phenotype have been conducted for decades. However, there is no centralized resource in which data on multiple age-related changes are collated. Currently, researchers must consult several sources, including primary publications, in order to obtain age-related data at various levels. To address this and facilitate integrative, system-level studies of ageing we developed the Digital Ageing Atlas (DAA). The DAA is a one-stop collection of human age-related data covering different biological levels (molecular, cellular, physiological, psychological and pathological) that is freely available online (http://ageing-map.org/). Each of the >3000 age-related changes is associated with a specific tissue and has its own page displaying a variety of information, including at least one reference. Age-related changes can also be linked to each other in hierarchical trees to represent different types of relationships. In addition, we developed an intuitive and user-friendly interface that allows searching, browsing and retrieving information in an integrated and interactive fashion. Overall, the DAA offers a new approach to systemizing ageing resources, providing a manually-curated and readily accessible source of age-related changes. PMID:25232097

  16. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. PMID:26572116

  17. Relative Weights of the Backpacks of Elementary-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Benjamin P.; Bryant, Judith B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the range of relative backpack weights of one group of elementary-aged children and the extent to which they exceeded recommended levels. A second purpose was to explore whether gender and age help predict the relative weight of children's backpacks. Ninety-five 8- to 12-year-old elementary school…

  18. Unique Relations of Age and Delinquency with Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iselin, Anne-Marie R.; DeCoster, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Context processing has significant empirical support as an explanation of age- and psychopathology-related deficiencies in cognitive control. We examined whether context processing generalizes to younger individuals who are in trouble with the law. We tested whether age and delinquency might have unique relations to context processing skills in…

  19. Altered ventricular torsion and transmural patterns of myocyte relaxation precede heart failure in aging F344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Stuart G.; Haynes, Premi; Kelsey Snapp, W.; Nava, Kristofer E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and explain changes in ventricular and cellular function that contribute to aging-associated cardiovascular disease in aging F344 rats. Three groups of female F344 rats, aged 6, 18, and 22 mo, were studied. Echocardiographic measurements in isoflurane-anesthetized animals showed an increase in peak left ventricular torsion between the 6- and the 18-mo-old groups that was partially reversed in the 22-mo-old animals (P < 0.05). Epicardial, midmyocardial, and endocardial myocytes were subsequently isolated from the left ventricles of each group of rats. Unloaded sarcomere shortening and Ca2+ transients were then measured in these cells (n = >75 cells for each of the nine age-region groups). The decay time of the Ca2+ transient and the time required for 50% length relaxation both increased with age but not uniformly across the three regions (P < 0.02). Further analysis revealed a significant shift in the transmural distribution of these properties between 18 and 22 mo of age, with the largest changes occurring in epicardial myocytes. Computational modeling suggested that these changes were due in part to slower Ca2+ dissociation from troponin in aging epicardial myocytes. Subsequent biochemical assays revealed a >50% reduction in troponin I phosphoprotein content in 22-mo-old epicardium relative to the other regions. These data suggest that between 18 and 22 mo of age (before the onset of heart failure), F344 rats display epicardial-specific myofilament-level modifications that 1) break from the progression observed between 6 and 18 mo and 2) coincide with aberrant patterns of cardiac torsion. PMID:23792678

  20. Sexual Experience Changes Sex Hormones But Not Hypothalamic Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression in Young and Middle-aged Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    Testosterone is well known to regulate sexual behavior in males, but this is dependent upon prior sexual experience. Aging is associated with decreased libido and changes in testosterone, but the role of experience in these age-related processes has not been systematically studied. We examined effects of age and sexual experience on serum hormones (total testosterone, free testosterone, estradiol, LH) and on numbers of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor α (ERα) immunoreactive cells in the hypothalamus. Extensive sexual experience was given to male rats at 4 months of age. Rats were euthanized at either 4 months (young) or 12 months (middle-aged (MA)). Comparable sexually naïve male rats were handled and placed into the testing arena but did not receive any sexual experience. Thus, we had four groups: young-naïve, young-experienced, MA-naïve and MA-experienced. Serum hormone levels were assayed, and numbers of AR and ERα cells were quantified stereologically in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) and the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV). Sexually experienced males had significantly elevated serum testosterone and free testosterone in both age groups. Both total and free testosterone were higher, and estradiol lower, in middle-aged than young rats. Experience did not alter either AR or ERα expression in the preoptic brain regions studied. Aging was associated with increased expression of AR, but no change in ERα. These results show that sexual experience can induce short-term and long-term alterations in serum hormones but these effects are not manifested upon their receptors in the hypothalamus. PMID:19559704

  1. Korean red ginseng extract rejuvenates testicular ineffectiveness and sperm maturation process in aged rats by regulating redox proteins and oxidative defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kopalli, Spandana Rajendra; Hwang, Seock-Yeon; Won, Yu-Jin; Kim, Sung-Won; Cha, Kyu-Min; Han, Chang-Kyun; Hong, Jae-Yup; Kim, Si-Kwan

    2015-09-01

    Distortion of intracellular oxidant and antioxidant balances appears to be a common feature that underlies in age-related male sexual impairment. Therefore regulating oxidative defense mechanisms might be an ideal approach in improving male sexual dysfunctions. In the present study, the effect of Korean red ginseng aqueous extract (KRG) on age-induced testicular dysfunction in rats was investigated. KRG (200mg/kg) mixed with regular pellet diet was administered orally for six months and the morphological, spermatogenic and antioxidant enzyme status in testis of aged rats (18months) were evaluated. Data indicated a significant change in morphology and decrease in spermatogenesis-related parameters in aged rats (AC) compared with young rats (YC). Sperm number, germ cell count, Sertoli cell count and Sertoli cell index were significantly (p<0.05) restored in KRG-treated aged rat groups (G-AC). Further the increased lipid peroxidation as measured by malondialdehyde (p<0.05), and altered enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase and catalase) and non-enzymatic (reduced glutathione, ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol) antioxidants (p<0.05) were attenuated by KRG treatment in aged rats to near normal levels as in YC groups. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated differential expression of selected proteins such as phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, fatty acid binding protein-9, triosephosphate isomerase-1 and aldehyde (aldose) reductase-1in aged rats was significantly (p<0.05) protected by KRG treatment. In conclusion, long-term administration of KRG restored aging-induced testicular ineffectiveness in rats by modulating redox proteins and oxidative defense mechanisms. PMID:25980653

  2. Exercise training affects age-induced changes in SOD and heat shock protein expression in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Barbara; Corbi, Graziamaria; Boccuti, Silvia; Filippelli, Walter; Rengo, Giuseppe; Leosco, Dario; Rossi, Francesco; Filippelli, Amelia; Ferrara, Nicola

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of age and chronic exercise training on antioxidant and heat shock protein (Hsp) expression by comparing the hearts of young (Y), sedentary old (SO) and trained old (TO) rats. In SO rats, there were: (a) changes in myocardial structure and function; (b) increased malondialdehyde levels; (c) no changes in superoxide-dismutase (SOD) enzymes; (d) reduced Hsp70 expression; and (e) increased Hsp27 expression. In TO rats, SOD enzymes and Hsp70 expression were increased and Hsp27 was further increased. Malondialdehyde level did not differ between TO and SO rats, which shows that chronic exercise did not affect the peroxidation index. In summary, by increasing Hsp27 and Hs70 levels, prolonged exercise partially counterbalanced the heart age-related effects in the antioxidant system without altering peroxidation levels. These findings suggest that the beneficial effects on aged-related cardiovascular changes could be connected to the "anti-oxidant" effects of prolonged exercise training. PMID:16822632

  3. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs attenuate the vascular responses in aging metabolic syndrome rats

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Diaz-Diaz, Eulises; Pavón, Natalia; Guarner-Lans, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging are low-grade systemic inflammatory conditions, and inflammation is a key component of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) upon the vascular reactivity in aging MS rats. Methods: MS was induced in young male rats by adding 30% sucrose in drinking water over 6, 12, and 18 months. When the treatment was finished, the blood samples were collected, and aortas were dissected out. The expression of COX isoenzymes and PLA2 in the aortas was analyzed using Western blot analysis. The contractile responses of aortic rings to norepinephrine (1 μmol/L) were measured in the presence or absence of different NSAIDs (10 μmol/L for each). Results: Serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β) in control rats were remained stable during the aging process, whereas serum IL-6 in MS rats were significantly increased at 12 and 18 months. The levels of COX isoenzyme and PLA2 in aortas from control rats increased with the aging, whereas those in aortas from MS rats were irregularly increased with the highest levels at 6 months. Pretreatment with acetylsalicylic acid (a COX-1 preferential inhibitor), indomethacin (a non-selective COX inhibitor) or meloxicam (a COX-2 preferential inhibitor) decreased NE-induced contractions of aortic rings from MS rats at all the ages, with meloxicam being the most potent. Acetylsalicylic acid also significantly reduced the maximum responses of ACh-induced vasorelaxation of aortic rings from MS rats, but indomethacin and meloxicam had no effect. Conclusion: NSAIDs can directly affect vascular responses in aging MS rats. Understanding the effects of NSAIDs on blood vessels may improve the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and MS in the elders. PMID:25263337

  4. Fruits, Nuts, and Brain Aging: Nutritional Interventions Targeting Age-Related Neuronal and Behavioral Deficits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By the year 2050, 30% of the total population of the US will be over 65 years of age. As the aged population expands, the economic burden of care and treatment of those with age-related health disorders also increases, necessitating the immediate implementation of therapeutics to prevent or even rev...

  5. Undergraduate Students' Perceptions and Behaviors Related to the Aged and to Aging Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dussen, Daniel J.; Weaver, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    Aging education is relatively new to the university, and our understanding of the perspectives students bring to aging populations is correspondingly limited. This investigation surveys 546 students at a midsized, Midwestern university to explore students' views toward elders, toward serving elders, and toward the relevance of aging education for…

  6. Topography of age-related changes in sleep spindles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas; Lafortune, Marjolaine; Godbout, Jonathan; Barakat, Marc; Robillard, Rebecca; Poirier, Gaétan; Bastien, Célyne; Carrier, Julie

    2013-02-01

    Aging induces multiple changes to sleep spindles, which may hinder their alleged functional role in memory and sleep protection mechanisms. Brain aging in specific cortical regions could affect the neural networks underlying spindle generation, yet the topography of these age-related changes is currently unknown. In the present study, we analyzed spindle characteristics in 114 healthy volunteers aged between 20 and 73 years over 5 anteroposterior electroencephalography scalp derivations. Spindle density, amplitude, and duration were higher in young subjects than in middle-aged and elderly subjects in all derivations, but the topography of age effects differed drastically. Age-related decline in density and amplitude was more prominent in anterior derivations, whereas duration showed a posterior prominence. Age groups did not differ in all-night spindle frequency for any derivation. These results show that age-related changes in sleep spindles follow distinct topographical patterns that are specific to each spindle characteristic. This topographical specificity may provide a useful biomarker to localize age-sensitive changes in underlying neural systems during normal and pathological aging. PMID:22809452

  7. Age-changes in gene expression in primary mixed glia cultures from young vs old rat cerebral cortex are modified by interactions with neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kremsky, Isaac; Morgan, Todd E.; Hou, Xiaogang; Li, Lei; Finch, Caleb E.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytic GFAP expression increases during normal aging in many brain regions and in primary astrocyte cultures derived from aging rodent brains. As shown below, we unexpectedly found that the age-related increase of GFAP expression was suppressed in mixed glia (astrocytes + microglia). However, the age-related increase of GFAP was observed when E18 neurons were co-cultured with mixed glia. Thus, the presence of microglia can suppress the age-related increase of GFAP, in primary cultures of astrocytes. To more broadly characterize how aging and co-culture with neurons alters glial gene expression, we profiled gene expression in mixed glia from young (3 mo) and old (24 mo) male rat cerebral cortex by Affymetrix microarray (Rat230 2.0). The majority of age changes were independent of the presence of neurons. Overall, the expression of 2-fold more genes increased with age than decreased with age. The minority of age changes that were either suppressed or revealed by the presence of neurons may be useful to analyze glial-neuron interaction during aging. Some in vitro changes are shared with those of aging rat hippocampus in studies from the Landfield group (Rowe et al., 2007; Kadish et al., 2009). PMID:22226781

  8. Decreased stress responsivity of central and peripheral catecholaminergic systems in aged 344/N Fischer rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cizza, G; Pacak, K; Kvetnansky, R; Palkovits, M; Goldstein, D S; Brady, L S; Fukuhara, K; Bergamini, E; Kopin, I J; Blackman, M R

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of stress on central and peripheral sympatho-adrenal and sympatho-neural functions in healthy, intact young (3-4 mo) and aged (24 mo) male Fischer 344/N rats. Extracellular fluid (ECF) levels of the catecholamines norepinephrine (NE), dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were obtained by microdialysis in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus at baseline and during immobilization (IMMO). The baseline levels of these substances were similar in both age groups, and their concentrations increased significantly in response to IMMO. The IMMO-induced increases of NE and MHPG, however, were significantly smaller in old than in young rats. Plasma levels of the catecholamines NE, DHPG, MHPG, DOPAC, dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), epinephrine (EPI), dopamine (DA), and HVA were also determined in young and old rats during IMMO. Basal levels of these substances were significantly higher in old than in young rats. The magnitude of the IMMO-induced increases in the majority of these compounds however, was significantly smaller in old than in young rats. We conclude that, at the basal state, aging in the Fischer rat is associated with normal PVN ECF, but high plasma catecholamine levels; at stress state, however, old rats have substantially lesser activation of their central and peripheral catecholaminergic systems than young rats. Images PMID:7883970

  9. Transcription Profile of Aging and Cognition-Related Genes in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ianov, Lara; Rani, Asha; Beas, Blanca S.; Kumar, Ashok; Foster, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive function depends on transcription; however, there is little information linking altered gene expression to impaired prefrontal cortex function during aging. Young and aged F344 rats were characterized on attentional set shift and spatial memory tasks. Transcriptional differences associated with age and cognition were examined using RNA sequencing to construct transcriptomic profiles for the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), white matter, and region CA1 of the hippocampus. The results indicate regional differences in vulnerability to aging. Age-related gene expression in the mPFC was similar to, though less robust than, changes in the dorsolateral PFC of aging humans suggesting that aging processes may be similar. Importantly, the pattern of transcription associated with aging did not predict cognitive decline. Rather, increased mPFC expression of genes involved in regulation of transcription, including transcription factors that regulate the strength of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, and neural activity-related immediate-early genes was observed in aged animals that exhibit delayed set shift behavior. The specificity of impairment on a mPFC-dependent task, associated with a particular mPFC transcriptional profile indicates that impaired executive function involves altered transcriptional regulation and neural activity/plasticity processes that are distinct from that described for impaired hippocampal function. PMID:27242522

  10. Disconnected aging: cerebral white matter integrity and age-related differences in cognition.

    PubMed

    Bennett, I J; Madden, D J

    2014-09-12

    Cognition arises as a result of coordinated processing among distributed brain regions and disruptions to communication within these neural networks can result in cognitive dysfunction. Cortical disconnection may thus contribute to the declines in some aspects of cognitive functioning observed in healthy aging. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is ideally suited for the study of cortical disconnection as it provides indices of structural integrity within interconnected neural networks. The current review summarizes results of previous DTI aging research with the aim of identifying consistent patterns of age-related differences in white matter integrity, and of relationships between measures of white matter integrity and behavioral performance as a function of adult age. We outline a number of future directions that will broaden our current understanding of these brain-behavior relationships in aging. Specifically, future research should aim to (1) investigate multiple models of age-brain-behavior relationships; (2) determine the tract-specificity versus global effect of aging on white matter integrity; (3) assess the relative contribution of normal variation in white matter integrity versus white matter lesions to age-related differences in cognition; (4) improve the definition of specific aspects of cognitive functioning related to age-related differences in white matter integrity using information processing tasks; and (5) combine multiple imaging modalities (e.g., resting-state and task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging; fMRI) with DTI to clarify the role of cerebral white matter integrity in cognitive aging. PMID:24280637

  11. Age-dependent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response in preweanling rats following oral exposure to the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.; Kousba, Ahmed A.

    2006-03-01

    Juvenile rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute toxicity of organophosphorus insecticides like chlorpyrifos (CPF). Age- and dose-dependent differences in metabolism may be responsible. Of importance is CYP450 activation and detoxification of CPF to CPF-oxon and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), as well as B-esterase (cholinesterase; ChE) and A-esterase (PON-1) detoxification of CPF-oxon to TCP. The pharmacokinetics of CPF, TCP, and the extent of blood (plasma/RBC), and brain ChE inhibition in rats were determined on postnatal days (PND) -5, -12, and -17 following oral gavage administration of 1 and 10 mg CPF/kg of body weight. For all neonatal ages the blood TCP exceeded the CPF concentration, and within each age group there was no evidence of non-linear kinetics over the dose range evaluated. Younger animals demonstrated a greater sensitivity to ChE inhibition as evident by the dose- and age-dependent inhibition of plasma, RBC, and brain ChE. Of particular importance was the observation that even in rats as young as PND-5, the CYP450 metabolic capacity was adequate to metabolize CPF to both TCP and CPF-oxon based on the detection of TCP in blood and extensive ChE inhibition (biomarker of CPF-oxon) at all ages. In addition, the increase in the blood TCP concentration ({approx}3-fold) in PND-17 rats relative to the response in the younger animals, and the higher blood concentrations of CPF in neonatal rats (1.7 to 7.5-fold) relative to adults was consistent with an increase in CYP450 metabolic capacity with age. This is the first reported study that evaluated both the pharmacokinetics of the parent pesticide, the major metabolite and the extent of ChE inhibition dynamics in the same animals as a function of neonatal age. The results suggest that in the neonatal rat, CPF was rapidly absorbed and metabolized, and the extent of metabolism was age-dependent.

  12. Biogenic monoamine uptake by rat brain synaptosomes during aging. Effects of nootropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Stancheva, S L; Alova, L G

    1994-09-01

    1. In experiments on young (3-5-month-old), adult (10-11-month-old) and old (21-22-month-old) rats, it was found that significant age-related changes occurred in the high-affinity uptake of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) by cortical and striatal synaptosomes. 2. Changes in DA, NA and 5-HT uptake during aging are suggested to be neurochemical correlates of cognition and memory deficits that develops in senescence. 3. The in vitro effects of the nootropic drugs piracetam, aniracetam, meclofenoxate and adafenoxate on the DA, NA and 5-HT uptake by cortical and striatal synaptosomes from young rats were studied. Administered in increasing concentrations (1 x 10(-4) to 5 x 10(-3) M) these drugs inhibited monoamine uptake. 4. Adafenoxate proved to be a more potent monoamine uptake inhibitor than the other three drugs; it inhibited the uptake in the frontal cortex and striatum without selectivity for either monoaminergic system. It is suggested that adafenoxate affects cognition through the involvement of central neurotransmission and particularly through the inhibition of monoamine uptake systems. PMID:7835648

  13. The Effect of Age in the Alteration in Fluid Balance of Rats in Response to Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    With an increase in gravity load induced by centrifugation or upon return to Earth following spaceflight, there is a period of adjustment in fluid balance in rats. With centrifugation there is a reduced fluid intake with maintenance of the rate of urine excretion. Following spaceflight there is an increase in urine output and maintenance of fluid intake. The initial period of acclimation to hypergravity is associated with a net loss of fluids. In the present study in response to centrifugation at 2.0 G this period of acclimation is present in mature rats for a longer period of time, about 24 hours. Following this initial response a period of over compensation has previously been reported. In the present study this was not observed. The net effect of these alterations in water intake and output in response to centrifugation for 14 days was slight increase in the percent total body water, with effective compensation seen in both young and mature rats. Older rats have been shown to have a reduced relative thirst and compensatory renal function in response to hypohydration, hyperosmolality and pharmacological stimuli. Responsiveness to these stimuli are delayed and/or attenuated in older animals. Similar findings were noted in the present study in the initial response to centrifugation. The older animal had a delayed return of fluid intake to control levels. The delay of one day did not appear to effect long-term fluid homeostasis, as there was difference in the response of percent total body water at the end of 14 days of centrifugation with both age groups having a slight but significant increase. This increase has been attributed to the increase in lean body mass induced by centrifugation.

  14. Aging-Induced Dysregulation of Dicer1-Dependent MicroRNA Expression Impairs Angiogenic Capacity of Rat Cerebromicrovascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related impairment of angiogenesis is likely to play a central role in cerebromicrovascular rarefaction and development of vascular cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. To test the hypothesis that dysregulation of Dicer1 (ribonuclease III, a key enzyme of the microRNA [miRNA] machinery) impairs endothelial angiogenic capacity in aging, primary cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells (CMVECs) were isolated from young (3 months old) and aged (24 months old) Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats. We found an age-related downregulation of Dicer1 expression both in CMVECs and in small cerebral vessels isolated from aged rats. In aged CMVECs, Dicer1 expression was increased by treatment with polyethylene glycol–catalase. Compared with young cells, aged CMVECs exhibited altered miRNA expression profile, which was associated with impaired proliferation, adhesion to vitronectin, collagen and fibronectin, cellular migration (measured by a wound-healing assay using electric cell–substrate impedance sensing technology), and impaired ability to form capillary-like structures. Overexpression of Dicer1 in aged CMVECs partially restored miRNA expression profile and significantly improved angiogenic processes. In young CMVECs, downregulation of Dicer1 (siRNA) resulted in altered miRNA expression profile associated with impaired proliferation, adhesion, migration, and tube formation, mimicking the aging phenotype. Collectively, we found that Dicer1 is essential for normal endothelial angiogenic processes, suggesting that age-related dysregulation of Dicer1-dependent miRNA expression may be a potential mechanism underlying impaired angiogenesis and cerebromicrovascular rarefaction in aging. PMID:23239824

  15. Glutamatergic treatment strategies for age-related memory disorders.

    PubMed

    Müller, W E; Scheuer, K; Stoll, S

    1994-01-01

    Age-related changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have been found in cortical areas and in the hippocampus of many species. On the basis of a variety of experimental observations it has been suggested that the decrease of NMDA receptor density might be one of the causative factors of the cognitive decline with aging. Based on these findings several strategies have been developed to improve cognition by compensating the NMDA receptor deficits in aging. The most promising approaches are the indirect activation of glutamatergic neurotransmission by agonists of the glycine site or the restoration of the age-related deficit of receptor density by several nootropics. PMID:7997073

  16. Anatomic Alterations in Aging and Age-Related Diseases of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Nickerson, John M.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Bergman, Louise A. M. K.; Berglin, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We described anatomic age-related changes in the human eye to determine potential areas of investigation that may lead to identifying eyes at risk for age-related disease. Methods. A descriptive review of anatomic changes in the eye related to aging was performed in the context of current areas of investigation. The review was performed specifically for differing anatomic ocular structures, including cornea, trabecular meshwork, lens, uveal tract, Bruch's membrane, retina, RPE, vitreous, sclera, and optic nerve. Results. Age-related changes occur in all ocular tissues. The cornea flattens and there is an attrition of endothelial cells. The shape of the trabecular meshwork changes and there is a loss of trabecular endothelium. The lens grows and becomes cataractous. The ciliary body becomes collagenized, there are choroidal vascular changes, and Bruch's membrane thickens. Retinal vessels become hyalinized and there is a loss of rods before cones in the macula. RPE morphometric changes occur with aging. The vitreous becomes liquefied and there is a loss of vitreous compartmentalization. The sclera becomes rigid and may become calcified. The optic nerve exhibits structural changes with age. Conclusions. There are numerous anatomic age-related changes in the human eye. Current areas of investigation related to these changes include adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy imaging of the RPE mosaic in the context of aging, and drug delivery devices that overcome age-related alterations to retinal and macular perfusion. PMID:24335063

  17. Toluene effects on oxidative stress in brain regions of young-adult, middle-age, and senescent Brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.; Royland, Joyce E.; Richards, Judy E.; Besas, Jonathan; MacPhail, Robert C.

    2011-11-15

    resulted in oxidative damage in frontal cortex and cerebellum of 12 month old rats. Although increases in oxidative damage are associated with increases in horizontal motor activity in older rats, further research is warranted to determine if these changes in OS parameters are related to neurobehavioral and neurophysiological effects of toluene in animal models of aging.

  18. Impaired recovery of brain muscarinic receptor sites following an adaptive down-regulation induced by repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; De Angelis, S.; Michalek, H. )

    1990-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the recovery rate of brain cholinesterase activity (ChE) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites (mAChRs) following reduction induced by repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were s.c. injected with DFP on alternate days for 2 weeks and killed 48 hr and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after the last treatment. In the hippocampus and striatum, but not in the cerebral cortex, of control rats there as a significant age-related decline of ChE activity and maximal density of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax). The repeated administration of DFP during the first week caused a syndrome of cholinergic stimulation both in aged and young rats. The syndrome was more pronounced, in terms of intensity and duration in aged than in young animals resulting in 40 and 12% mortality, respectively; during the second week the syndrome attenuated in the two age-groups. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE at the end of DFP treatment did not differ between young and surviving aged rats. The down-regulation of mACRs was present in the three brain regions of both young and age rats (from 20 to 40%). Factorial analysis of variance showed significant differences for age, recovery rate, and significant interaction between age and recovery rate, both for ChE and mAChRs in young rats the three brain areas.

  19. Moderate exercise training attenuates aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Po-Hsiang; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Padma, V. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the most important risk factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading causes of death worldwide and the second major cause of death in Taiwan. The major factor in heart failure during aging is heart remodeling, including long-term stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Exercise is good for aging heart health, but the impact of exercise training on aging is not defined. This study used 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats and randomly divided each age group into no exercise training control groups (C3, A12 and A18) and moderate gentle swimming exercise training groups (E3, AE12 and AE18). The protocol of exercise training was swimming five times weekly with gradual increases from the first week from 20 to 60 min for 12 weeks. Analyses of protein from rat heart tissues and sections revealed cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis pathway increases in aged rat groups (A12 and A18), which were improved in exercise training groups (AE12 and AE18). There were no heart injuries in young rat hearts in exercise group E3. These data suggest that moderate swimming exercise training attenuated aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts. PMID:26496028

  20. Effectiveness of estrogen replacement in restoration of cognitive function after long-term estrogen withdrawal in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Markowska, Alicja L; Savonenko, Alena V

    2002-12-15

    Recent studies suggest that some aspects of learning and memory may be altered by a midlife loss of estrogen, indicating a potential causal relationship between the deficiency of ovarian hormones and cognitive aging. In this study, the effects of estrogen withdrawal and replacement were tested in middle-aged Fischer-344 rats using different memory tasks. Estrogen withdrawal accelerated the rate of cognitive aging. A deficit first occurred 4 months after ovariectomy in working memory, which was tested in a delayed-nonmatching-to-position task, and progressed from long-delay to short-delay trials. Reference memory, which w