Science.gov

Sample records for agencies civilian organizations

  1. 32 CFR 720.11 - Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. Requests by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Naval Investigative Service Command, or other Federal civilian investigative agencies to... employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. 720.11 Section 720.11 National Defense Department...

  2. 32 CFR 720.11 - Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. Requests by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Naval Investigative Service Command, or other Federal civilian investigative agencies to... employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. 720.11 Section 720.11 National Defense Department...

  3. 32 CFR 720.11 - Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. Requests by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Naval Investigative Service Command, or other Federal civilian investigative agencies to... employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. 720.11 Section 720.11 National Defense Department...

  4. 32 CFR 720.11 - Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. Requests by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Naval Investigative Service Command, or other Federal civilian investigative agencies to... employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. 720.11 Section 720.11 National Defense Department...

  5. 32 CFR 720.11 - Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. Requests by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Naval Investigative Service Command, or other Federal civilian investigative agencies to... employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. 720.11 Section 720.11 National Defense Department...

  6. Civilian Agency Industry Working Group EVM World Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerby, Jerald

    2013-01-01

    Objectives include: Promote the use of standards ]based, objective, and quantitative systems for managing projects and programs in the federal government. Understand how civilian agencies in general, manage their projects and programs. Project management survey expected to go out soon to civilian agencies. Describe how EVM and other best practices can be applied by the government to better manage its project and programs irrespective of whether work is contracted out or the types of contracts employed. Develop model policies aimed at project and program managers that are transportable across the government.

  7. Operation Protective Edge - A Unique Challenge for a Civilian EMS Agency.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Eli; Strugo, Refael; Wacht, Oren

    2015-10-01

    During July through August 2014, Operation Protective Edge, a military conflict between Israel and the Hamas regime in Gaza, dramatically affected both populations. Magen David Adom (MDA), the Israeli national Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and a member of the Red Cross, faced a unique challenge during the conflict: to continue providing crucial service to the entire civilian population of Israel, which was under constant missile threat. This challenge included not only providing immediate care for routine EMS calls under missile threat, but also preparing and delivering immediate care to civilians injured in attacks on major cities, as well as small communities, in Israel. This task is a challenge for a civilian EMS agency that normally operates in a non-military environment, yet, in an instant, must enhance its capability to respond to a considerable threat to its population. During Operation Protective Edge, MDA provided care for 842 wounded civilians and utilized a significant amount of its resources. Providing EMS services for a civilian population in a mixed civilian/military scenario is a challenging task on a national level for an EMS system, especially when the threat lasts for weeks. This report describes MDA's preparedness and operations during Operation Protective Edge, and the unique EMS challenges and dilemmas the agency faced.

  8. Dual agency, dual relationships, boundary crossings, and associated boundary violations: a survey of military and civilian psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Hines, A H; Ader, D N; Chang, A S; Rundell, J R

    1998-12-01

    We hypothesized that psychiatrists with high dual-agency potential (military and health maintenance organization [HMO] psychiatrists) were more likely than non-HMO civilian psychiatrists to engage in dual relationships, report pressures to do so, participate in other general boundary-crossing activities, and report associated counter-therapeutic outcomes (boundary violations). Ninety military and 191 demographically matched civilian psychiatrists reported the number of boundary-crossing activities (including dual relationships) and associated counter-therapeutic outcomes in the preceding year with adult patients. Military and HMO psychiatrists reported greater external pressures than non-HMO civilian psychiatrists to engage in dual relationships; however, all three groups were similar in their reported numbers of dual relationships. The reported boundary-crossing activities and dual relationships studied here are not necessarily associated with reported boundary violations. The relative risk of a particular boundary crossing associating with harm to a patient likely depends on the therapeutic context and should be determined on a case-by-case basis. PMID:9866362

  9. [Which relationships between civilian-military actions(CMA), civilian and military cooperation (CIMIC)and non-governmental organizations(NGO)?].

    PubMed

    Grünewald, F; de Geoffroy, V

    2002-01-01

    This article questions the existence of "governmental humanitarianism" in opposition to "non-governmental" humanitarianism. The authors report the growing implication of civilian and military actors representing governments in responding to crises and express their concern that this tendency could ultimately lead to use of humanitarian action for diplomatic and economic purposes. They stress that unlike non-governmental organizations, state-run humanitarian agencies are subject to political, economic, and geographic factors. In the context of increasingly frequent application of the CMA doctrine, the authors analyze the role of non-governmental organizations in the field during post-crisis reconstruction. They underline the growing problem of organizing bilateral and multilateral assistance operations. They restate the hope expressed by many humanitarian organizations for a return of the rule of law and conclude on the need to develop complementary activities in the field.

  10. 41 CFR 102-118.495 - May my agency appeal a decision by the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals (CBCA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May my agency appeal a... Information for All Claims § 102-118.495 May my agency appeal a decision by the Civilian Board of...

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.385 - Is any civilian executive agency exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... executive agency exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft? 102-33.385... requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft? No civilian executive agency is exempt.... intelligence agencies are exempt from the requirement to report to GSA on Government aircraft....

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.385 - Is any civilian executive agency exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... executive agency exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft? 102-33.385... requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft? No civilian executive agency is exempt.... intelligence agencies are exempt from the requirement to report to GSA on Government aircraft....

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.385 - Is any civilian executive agency exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... executive agency exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft? 102-33.385... requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft? No civilian executive agency is exempt.... intelligence agencies are exempt from the requirement to report to GSA on Government aircraft....

  14. 41 CFR 102-33.385 - Is any civilian executive agency exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... executive agency exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft? 102-33.385... requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft? No civilian executive agency is exempt.... intelligence agencies are exempt from the requirement to report to GSA on Government aircraft....

  15. 78 FR 27044 - Agency Organization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... FR 33165 (June 15, 2007). Table of Contents I. Background II. Changes to Part 3002 III. Effective... 39 CFR Part 3002 Agency Organization AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final rule..., seal, and individual office components. This rule reflects changes to the Commission's...

  16. U.S. Metric Study Interim Report. Federal Government: Civilian Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This is the second in a series of reports from the U. S. Metric Study conducted by the National Bureau of Standards, focusing on the impact of universal adoption of the metric system on federal agencies other than the Department of Defense. Fifty-five such agencies participated in this survey, 20 percent of which anticipate increasing metric usage…

  17. 41 CFR 102-33.385 - Is any civilian executive agency exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Is any civilian executive agency exempt from the requirement to report information to GSA on Government aircraft? 102-33.385 Section 102-33.385 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations...

  18. Top management and management science: An exploratory study in 15 Federal civilian agencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    A study of the relation between top managers in Federal agencies and the operations research and management science (OR/MS) group is reported. Sixteen managers were questioned about the following characteristics: closeness of top managers to OR/MS groups; top managers' attitudes toward the OR/MS activities; relation between closeness and these attitudes; and top managers' use of OR/MS groups. It is concluded that OR/MS is relevant to many top managers and that OR/MS has begun to play a role in decisions. Top management attitudes and actions are not related in obvious ways. The consequences to top management's use of and closeness to an OR/MS group need not be the success of the group as a professional, innovative, research-oriented unit.

  19. 77 FR 5020 - Civilian Board of Contract Appeals; Information Collection; Civilian Board of Contract Appeals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Civilian Board of Contract Appeals; Information Collection; Civilian Board of Contract Appeals Rules of Procedure AGENCY: Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, GSA. ACTION: Notice of request for... requirement regarding the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals (CBCA) Rules of Procedure. Public comments...

  20. 78 FR 20820 - Solicitation of Federal Civilian and Uniformed Service Personnel for Contributions to Private...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... reports that document customer feedback, through service satisfaction or utilization surveys or other... Service Personnel for Contributions to Private Voluntary Organizations AGENCY: Office of Personnel... these new regulations to govern the solicitation of Federal civilian and uniformed services personnel...

  1. Ethics from the Viewpoint of Organized Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Rainer; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Four papers on ethics from the viewpoint of organized agencies are presented: (1) "Business, Ethics, and the Physical Activity Field" (R. Martens); (2) "On Old Wine and New Bottles: The Transformation of Ethical Emphasis in Higher Education" (C. Thomas); (3) a reaction to the first two papers; and (4) "American Academy of Physical Education Ethics…

  2. 77 FR 25481 - Civilian Board of Contract Appeals; Submission for OMB Review; Civilian Board of Contract Appeals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... in the Federal Register at 77 FR 5020, on February 1, 2012. No comments were received. Public... ADMINISTRATION Civilian Board of Contract Appeals; Submission for OMB Review; Civilian Board of Contract Appeals Rules of Procedure AGENCY: Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, GSA. ACTION: Notice of request...

  3. 76 FR 50926 - Civilian Board of Contract Appeals; Rules of Procedure of the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... Number 2011-001, Sequence 1] RIN 3090-AJ16 Civilian Board of Contract Appeals; Rules of Procedure of the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals--Electronic Filing of Documents AGENCY: Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, General Services Administration (GSA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This document revises...

  4. The Environmental Protection Agency: Legislation, Programs and Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Library Systems Branch.

    This document is designed to introduce the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its programs. It is organized into four categories which discuss the legislation authorizing EPA activities, the history and present organization, the pollution control programs operated by the Agency, and budgetary appropriations. Specific program…

  5. Teacher Activist Organizations and the Development of Professional Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Rand; Carl, Nicole Mittenfelner

    2015-01-01

    Teacher professional agency refers to the ability of teachers to control their work within structural constraints. In this paper, we show how teacher activist organizations can assist in the development of professional agency. We focus on a teacher activist organization in a large urban district in the United States and identify three…

  6. 15 CFR 1170.5 - Recommendations for agency organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recommendations for agency organization. 1170.5 Section 1170.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE METRIC CONVERSION POLICY FOR FEDERAL AGENCIES § 1170.5 Recommendations for...

  7. Analysis of News Agencies' Descriptive Features of People and Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Shin; Ma, Qiang; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi

    News agencies report news from different viewpoints and with different writing styles. We propose a method to extract characteristic descriptions of a news agency written about people and organizations. To extract the characteristic descriptions of a given person or organization, we analyze words which appear in the same sentence on the basis of their SVO roles. We then extract a description that is often used by the news agency but not commonly used by the others. The experimental results show that our method can elucidate the different features of each agency’s writing style.

  8. 32 CFR 727.9 - Referrals to civilian lawyers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the assistance requested, the client should be referred to a civilian lawyer. When the client does not... organization, lawyer referral service, legal aid society, or other local organization for assistance in... organization. (b) Fees charged by civilian lawyers. Legal assistance clients being referred to a...

  9. Advanced Civilian Aeronautical Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper discusses alternatives to currently deployed systems which could provide revolutionary improvements in metrics applicable to civilian aeronautics. Specific missions addressed include subsonic transports, supersonic transports and personal aircraft. These alternative systems and concepts are enabled by recent and envisaged advancements in electronics, communications, computing and Designer Fluid Mechanics in conjunction with a design approach employing extensive synergistic interactions between propulsion, aerodynamics and structures.

  10. 5 CFR 251.202 - Agency support to organizations representing Federal employees and other organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... determines that such action would benefit the agency's programs or would be warranted as a service to... implemented by 5 CFR part 410, to pay expenses of employees to attend professional organization meetings when... or activities and the agency can derive benefits from employee attendance at such meetings; and...

  11. Employing Civilians for Police Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Alfred I.; And Others

    The study describes the experiences of 13 police departments where civilians were used in jobs normally performed by police officers. The findings are based on interviews with 158 people including police managers, officers in charge of civilian employees, and the civilians themselves. Two types of activities were surveyed: (1) the employment of…

  12. Nonprofit organizations versus government agencies to reduce tobacco use.

    PubMed

    Carver, Vivien; Reinert, Bonita; Range, Lillian M; Campbell, Catherine; Boyd, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    Tobacco settlement money can be allocated to nonprofit organizations or government agencies. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Nonprofit organizations may have relatively (a) more efficiency/flexibility, but less accountability; (b) narrower focus, but less experience; (c) more ability to advocate, but more obligations; (d) more independence from tobacco industry influence, but less funding; and, (e) more public trust, but less visibility. The present case study of the Partnership for a Healthy Mississippi focuses on six interconnected areas: education (school and community), raising awareness, advocacy, service, enforcement, and research. In 1999 and 2000, tobacco use declined in Mississippi, even compared to neighboring states. This unique partnership's multifaceted approach to social change probably facilitated this decline.

  13. Nonprofit organizations versus government agencies to reduce tobacco use.

    PubMed

    Carver, Vivien; Reinert, Bonita; Range, Lillian M; Campbell, Catherine; Boyd, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    Tobacco settlement money can be allocated to nonprofit organizations or government agencies. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Nonprofit organizations may have relatively (a) more efficiency/flexibility, but less accountability; (b) narrower focus, but less experience; (c) more ability to advocate, but more obligations; (d) more independence from tobacco industry influence, but less funding; and, (e) more public trust, but less visibility. The present case study of the Partnership for a Healthy Mississippi focuses on six interconnected areas: education (school and community), raising awareness, advocacy, service, enforcement, and research. In 1999 and 2000, tobacco use declined in Mississippi, even compared to neighboring states. This unique partnership's multifaceted approach to social change probably facilitated this decline. PMID:14601538

  14. 7 CFR 330.207 - Permits for movement of organisms issued by other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permits for movement of organisms issued by other... for movement of organisms issued by other agencies. Inspectors shall recognize permits for the movement of organisms issued under other acts by other Federal agencies. When such organisms are also...

  15. 7 CFR 330.207 - Permits for movement of organisms issued by other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permits for movement of organisms issued by other... for movement of organisms issued by other agencies. Inspectors shall recognize permits for the movement of organisms issued under other acts by other Federal agencies. When such organisms are also...

  16. 7 CFR 330.207 - Permits for movement of organisms issued by other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permits for movement of organisms issued by other... for movement of organisms issued by other agencies. Inspectors shall recognize permits for the movement of organisms issued under other acts by other Federal agencies. When such organisms are also...

  17. 7 CFR 330.207 - Permits for movement of organisms issued by other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permits for movement of organisms issued by other... for movement of organisms issued by other agencies. Inspectors shall recognize permits for the movement of organisms issued under other acts by other Federal agencies. When such organisms are also...

  18. 7 CFR 330.207 - Permits for movement of organisms issued by other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permits for movement of organisms issued by other... for movement of organisms issued by other agencies. Inspectors shall recognize permits for the movement of organisms issued under other acts by other Federal agencies. When such organisms are also...

  19. 32 CFR 169a.13 - CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... basis of civilian performance. (d) A most efficient and cost-effective organization analysis certification is required for studies involving 11 to 45 DoD civilian employees (see Appendix C to this part)....

  20. Global Comparison of Warring Groups in 2002–2007: Fatalities from Targeting Civilians vs. Fighting Battles

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Madelyn Hsiao-Rei; Lee, Uih Ran; Sundberg, Ralph; Spagat, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Warring groups that compete to dominate a civilian population confront contending behavioral options: target civilians or battle the enemy. We aimed to describe degrees to which combatant groups concentrated lethal behavior into intentionally targeting civilians as opposed to engaging in battle with opponents in contemporary armed conflict. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified all 226 formally organized state and non-state groups (i.e. actors) that engaged in lethal armed conflict during 2002–2007: 43 state and 183 non-state. We summed civilians killed by an actor's intentional targeting with civilians and combatants killed in battles in which the actor was involved for total fatalities associated with each actor, indicating overall scale of armed conflict. We used a Civilian Targeting Index (CTI), defined as the proportion of total fatalities caused by intentional targeting of civilians, to measure the concentration of lethal behavior into civilian targeting. We report actor-specific findings and four significant trends: 1.) 61% of all 226 actors (95% CI 55% to 67%) refrained from targeting civilians. 2.) Logistic regression showed actors were more likely to have targeted civilians if conflict duration was three or more years rather than one year. 3.) In the 88 actors that targeted civilians, multiple regressions showed an inverse correlation between CTI values and the total number of fatalities. Conflict duration of three or more years was associated with lower CTI values than conflict duration of one year. 4.) When conflict scale and duration were accounted for, state and non-state actors did not differ. We describe civilian targeting by actors in prolonged conflict. We discuss comparable patterns found in nature and interdisciplinary research. Conclusions/Significance Most warring groups in 2002–2007 did not target civilians. Warring groups that targeted civilians in small-scale, brief conflict concentrated more lethal behavior into

  1. On the Self-Organizing Origins of Agency.

    PubMed

    Kelso, J A Scott

    2016-07-01

    The question of agency and directedness in living systems has puzzled philosophers and scientists for centuries. What principles and mechanisms underlie the emergence of agency? Analysis and dynamical modeling of experiments on human infants suggest that the birth of agency is due to a eureka-like, pattern-forming phase transition in which the infant suddenly realizes it can make things happen in the world. The main mechanism involves positive feedback: when the baby's initially spontaneous movements cause the world to change, their perceived consequences have a sudden and sustained amplifying effect on the baby's further actions. The baby discovers itself as a causal agent. Some implications of this theory are discussed.

  2. Civilian vehicle radar data domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kerry E.; Austin, Christian; Nehrbass, John; Potter, Lee C.

    2010-04-01

    We present a set of simulated X-band scattering data for civilian vehicles. For ten facet models of civilian vehicles, a high-frequency electromagnetic simulation produced fully polarized, far-field, monostatic scattering for 360 degrees azimuth and elevation angles from 30 to 60 degrees. The 369 GB of phase history data is stored in a MATLAB file format. This paper describes the CVDomes data set along with example imagery using 2D backprojection, single pass 3D, and multi-pass 3D.

  3. 15 CFR 1170.5 - Recommendations for agency organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to use of the metric system. (b) Designate a senior policy official to be responsible for agency... the metric system. (e) Provide for internal guidelines, training and documentation to assure employee... Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE METRIC CONVERSION POLICY FOR...

  4. 7 CFR 281.5 - Responsibilities of an Indian tribal organization designated as State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION OF SNAP ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS § 281.5 Responsibilities of an Indian tribal organization designated as State agency. An ITO administering SNAP on a reservation shall adhere to the Food and...

  5. The Civilian Conservation Corps as Educational Technology, 1933-1942

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisneros, Jes Raul

    2010-01-01

    This historical study examined the Civilian Conservation Corps as an educational endeavor during the New Deal era. Specifically, it considered the CCC as an organization which utilized educational technologies of the day, while also serving as a mass medium to communicate what was possible through the New Deal to the American public at large. In…

  6. 41 CFR 60-250.82 - Labor organizations and recruiting and training agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Labor organizations and recruiting and training agencies. 60-250.82 Section 60-250.82 Public Contracts and Property Management Other... OTHER PROTECTED VETERANS Ancillary Matters § 60-250.82 Labor organizations and recruiting and...

  7. 41 CFR 60-250.82 - Labor organizations and recruiting and training agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Labor organizations and recruiting and training agencies. 60-250.82 Section 60-250.82 Public Contracts and Property Management Other... OTHER PROTECTED VETERANS Ancillary Matters § 60-250.82 Labor organizations and recruiting and...

  8. 41 CFR 60-250.82 - Labor organizations and recruiting and training agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Labor organizations and recruiting and training agencies. 60-250.82 Section 60-250.82 Public Contracts and Property Management Other... OTHER PROTECTED VETERANS Ancillary Matters § 60-250.82 Labor organizations and recruiting and...

  9. 41 CFR 60-250.82 - Labor organizations and recruiting and training agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Labor organizations and recruiting and training agencies. 60-250.82 Section 60-250.82 Public Contracts and Property Management Other... OTHER PROTECTED VETERANS Ancillary Matters § 60-250.82 Labor organizations and recruiting and...

  10. 7 CFR 281.5 - Responsibilities of an Indian tribal organization designated as State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION OF THE FOOD STAMP PROGRAM ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS § 281.5 Responsibilities of an Indian tribal organization designated as State agency. An ITO administering the Food Stamp Program on a reservation...

  11. 41 CFR 60-300.82 - Labor organizations and recruiting and training agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Labor organizations and recruiting and training agencies. 60-300.82 Section 60-300.82 Public Contracts and Property Management Other... OR CAMPAIGN BADGE VETERANS, AND ARMED FORCES SERVICE MEDAL VETERANS Ancillary Matters §...

  12. Creating a Learning Organization in Law Enforcement: Maturity Levels for Police Oversight Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filstad, Cathrine; Gottschalk, Petter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a stage model for maturity levels for police oversight agencies. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a literature review covering police oversight organizations and stages of growth models. Findings: As a conceptual paper, the main findings are related to the appropriateness of…

  13. Examining Agency Theory in Training & Development: Understanding Self-Interest Behaviors in the Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Ross E.; Akdere, Mesut

    2011-01-01

    Agency theory has been discussed widely in the business and management literature. However, to date there has been no investigation about its utility and implications for problems in training & development. Whereas organizations are still struggling to develop and implement effective training programs, there is little emphasis on the self-interest…

  14. A research note about military-civilian humanitarianism: more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Weiss, T G

    1997-06-01

    'Military-civilian humanitarianism'--or the coming together of military forces and civilian aid agencies to deal with the human suffering from complex emergencies--has numerous forms, but disenchantment has resulted from the Somalia and Bosnia syndromes. There is little political will at present, but evidence from the immediate post-Cold War era suggests how multilateral military operations could expand or contract in future to the benefit or peril of war victims. Partly a literature review but more importantly a framework for interpreting recent publications, this essay seeks to move beyond exchanging assertions. There is a contextualisation of recent literature; a definition of military-civilian humanitarianism; a discussion of possible military contributions to humanitarian action; a framework to assess the effectiveness of military-civilian humanitarianism; and a preliminary analysis of experience from northern Iraq, Somalia, Bosnia, Rwanda and Haiti. Caveat lector: At this point in time, there are still 'more questions than answers'. PMID:9235222

  15. Interorganizational relationships among family support organizations and child mental health agencies.

    PubMed

    Acri, Mary C; Palinkas, Larry; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Shen, Sa; Schoonover, Diana; Reutz, Jennifer Rolls; Landsverk, John

    2014-07-01

    This study examined: (1) qualitative aspects of close working relationships between family support organizations and child mental health agencies, including effective and ineffective characteristics of the relationship and aspects that they would change, and (2) the impact of the working relationship upon the family support organization. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 directors of family support organizations characterized as having a close working relationship with a child mental health agency. Three main themes emerged regarding the quality of the working relationship: (a) interactional factors, including shared trust, communication, collaboration and service coordination; (b) aspects of the inner context of the family support organization, mental health agency, or both, including alignment of goals and values and perceptions of mental health services; and (c) outer contextual factors external to the organizations, such as financial and county regulations. Responses to the perceived impact of the relationship was divided into two themes: positive impacts (e.g. gained respect, influence and visibility), and negative impacts (e.g. lack of trust). This study lays the foundation for future research to better understand the mechanisms underlying interorganizational relationships in communities among different types of providers to create a more seamless continuum of services for families of children with mental health conditions.

  16. Program summary for the Civilian Reactor Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    1982-07-01

    This Civilian Reactor Development Program document has the prime purpose of summarizing the technical programs supported by the FY 1983 budget request. This section provides a statement of the overall program objectives and a general program overview. Section II presents the technical programs in a format intended to show logical technical interrelationships, and does not necessarily follow the structure of the formal budget presentation. Section III presents the technical organization and management structure of the program.

  17. Conservation Directory, 1979. 24th Edition. A List of Organizations, Agencies, and Officials Concerned with Natural Resource Use and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Jeannette, Ed.

    This annual directory contains lists of organizations, agencies, and officials concerned with natural resource use and management. Five indexes are included in the first section of the directory: (1) U.S. Federal Departments, Agencies, and Offices; (2) International, National, Interstate Organizations, and Commissions; (3) State, Territorial…

  18. 5 CFR 251.202 - Agency support to organizations representing Federal employees and other organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... implemented by 5 CFR part 410, to pay expenses of employees to attend professional organization meetings when...) Following a liberal policy in authorizing excused absence for other employees who are willing to pay...

  19. Military and civilian emergency aeromedical services: common goals and different approaches.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, R A

    1997-01-01

    Military and civilian organizations in the U.S. operate separate but parallel emergency aeromedical services. Despite common origins, military and civilian approaches and methods have diverged. This article compares and contrasts the capabilities, priorities, safety, equipment, training and personnel of the largest military service, the U.S. Army, to civilian rotary wing (helicopter) emergency aeromedical programs. The different successes of military and civilian emergency aeromedical programs can be considered for use to improve the services of each. In general, Army programs operate larger aircraft and utilize two pilots per aircraft. Safety is a high priority and the Army aeromedical safety record is excellent. The Army also places a high degree of emphasis on crashworthiness and protective gear for the crew. Most civilian air Emergency Medical Service (EMS) programs operate small to moderate-sized aircraft flying with a single pilot. The recent safety record has improved dramatically. Civilian programs may add to their safety by considering two pilots and incorporating the crashworthy and protective advancements made by the military. Civilian programs fly with two highly trained medical technicians, nurses or physicians, equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment. Army helicopters fly with one lesser-trained medical crewmember and less equipment. Improved combat casualty care and battlefield survival may be possible by increasing both the number and training of the medical attendants on Army aircraft. PMID:9006884

  20. Behavioral and health implications of civilian spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Wichman, Harvey A

    2005-06-01

    The current enthusiasm over the prospect of space tourism and the belief among many that such civilian spaceflight is imminent are characterized herein. There are many concerns about screening and certifying passengers for future spaceflight. Efforts by several organizations to propose such screening are cited. The problem with some of these proposals, which treat all types of spaceflight the same, is that they are so restrictive that too few people would be eligible for space travel to have a viable tourism industry. However, not all types of spaceflight are the same, so the distinctions between them need to be clarified. Of the five types of spaceflight described, one is proposed as the most likely to be the first significant phase of space tourism: long-term microgravity flight in low Earth orbit. But because of human problems with long-term exposure to microgravity, this phase requires rather conservative screening and extensive training. However, prior to discussing the passenger issues related to this early phase of space tourism, the reasons why Earth-like gravity, as well as microgravity, must be made available to spacefarers before space tourism can take place on a grand scale need to be explained. Finally, major passenger medical and behavioral issues of the first phase of orbital space tourism-long-term microgravity flight-are discussed.

  1. Behavioral and health implications of civilian spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Wichman, Harvey A

    2005-06-01

    The current enthusiasm over the prospect of space tourism and the belief among many that such civilian spaceflight is imminent are characterized herein. There are many concerns about screening and certifying passengers for future spaceflight. Efforts by several organizations to propose such screening are cited. The problem with some of these proposals, which treat all types of spaceflight the same, is that they are so restrictive that too few people would be eligible for space travel to have a viable tourism industry. However, not all types of spaceflight are the same, so the distinctions between them need to be clarified. Of the five types of spaceflight described, one is proposed as the most likely to be the first significant phase of space tourism: long-term microgravity flight in low Earth orbit. But because of human problems with long-term exposure to microgravity, this phase requires rather conservative screening and extensive training. However, prior to discussing the passenger issues related to this early phase of space tourism, the reasons why Earth-like gravity, as well as microgravity, must be made available to spacefarers before space tourism can take place on a grand scale need to be explained. Finally, major passenger medical and behavioral issues of the first phase of orbital space tourism-long-term microgravity flight-are discussed. PMID:15943209

  2. Characteristics of Local Organizations and Service Agencies Conductive to Development: With Special Reference to Farmers' Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Darwin D.

    An attempt to formulate a more global but functional framework for analyzing local organizations as mechanisms for citizen participation in development is presented in this paper. Both the review of the literature and the prescriptive guides to action are presented under the following headings: membership and leadership, management of alienation…

  3. 75 FR 81547 - Defense Support of Civilian Law Enforcement Agencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... of Defense for Reserve Affairs (ASD(RA)), and the Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Nuclear... members of Congress. (See title 18 U.S.C. 351) (5) Assistance in the case of crimes involving nuclear... National Guard in each State for response in both peacetime disasters and national security emergencies....

  4. 78 FR 21826 - Defense Support of Civilian Law Enforcement Agencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ..., December 28, 2010, the Department of Defense published a proposed rule (75 FR 81547) requesting public... Reduction Act'' (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35) It has been certified that 32 CFR part 182 does not impose reporting or recordkeeping requirements under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Executive Order...

  5. Dual embedded agency: physicians implement integrative medicine in health-care organizations.

    PubMed

    Keshet, Yael

    2013-11-01

    The paradox of embedded agency addresses the question of how embedded agents are able to conceive of new ideas and practices and then implement them in institutionalized organizations if social structures exert so powerful an influence on behavior, and agents operate within a framework of institutional constraints. This article proposes that dual embedded agency may provide an explanation of the paradox. The article draws from an ethnographic study that examined the ways in which dual-trained physicians, namely medical doctors trained also in some modality of complementary and alternative medicine, integrate complementary and alternative medicine into the biomedical fortress of mainstream health-care organizations. Participant observations were conducted during the years 2006-2011. The observed physicians were found to be embedded in two diverse medical cultures and to have a hybrid professional identity that comprised two sets of health-care values. Seeking to introduce new ideas and practices associated with complementary and alternative medicine to medical institutions, they maneuvered among the constraints of institutional structures while using these very structures, in an isomorphic mode of action, as a platform for launching complementary and alternative medicine practices and values. They drew on the complementary and alternative medicine philosophical principle of interconnectedness and interdependency of seemingly polar opposites or contrary forces and acted to achieve change by means of nonadversarial strategies. By addressing the structure-agency dichotomy, this study contributes to the literature on change in institutionalized health-care organizations. It likewise contributes both theoretically and empirically to the study of integrative medicine and to the further development of this relatively new area of inquiry within the sociology of medicine.

  6. Directory of Services: Federal Agencies and Non-Federal Organizations Providing Services to Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (ED), Washington, DC. Migrant Education Programs.

    This directory promotes better coordination among agencies and organizations that serve migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFWs) and their families. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Justice, and…

  7. MEASUREMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY THE US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY COMPENDIUM METHOD TO-17 - EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation of performance criteria for US Environmental Protection Agency Compendium Method TO-17 for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air has been accomplished. The method is a solid adsorbent-based sampling and analytical procedure including performance crit...

  8. Occupations: Military--Civilian Occupational Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armed Forces Vocational Testing Group, Universal City, TX.

    Information on enlisted military occupations is offered in the source book to arrive at a comprehensive statement of job tasks in the military service and their similarities to jobs in civilian life. Basic information about five areas of the U.S. military services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) focuses on their military…

  9. 5 CFR 842.304 - Civilian service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1980 (Foreign Service Pension System), provided— (i) The employee or Member waives credit for the service under the Foreign Service Pension System; and (ii) The employee or Member makes the deposit... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.304 Civilian service. (a) Except...

  10. 42 CFR 426.516 - Role of Medicare Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) and State agencies in the NCD review process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Role of Medicare Managed Care Organizations (MCOs... MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM REVIEW... of Medicare Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) and State agencies in the NCD review process....

  11. 8. VIEW EAST, CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP PARSONS GARAGE, MODERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW EAST, CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP PARSONS GARAGE, MODERN SHED, CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP PARSONS BLACKSMITH SHOP, AND MODERN SHED. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  12. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated to... under civilian workmen's compensation laws in that hospitalization is usually completed prior to...

  13. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff....

  14. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff....

  15. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff....

  16. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff....

  17. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff....

  18. 46 CFR 168.10-5 - Civilian nautical school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civilian nautical school. 168.10-5 Section 168.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 168.10-5 Civilian nautical school. The term...

  19. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition...

  20. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition...

  1. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition...

  2. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition...

  3. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition...

  4. Emerging Options and Opportunities in Civilian Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the major problems/issues with civilian aeronautics going forward, the contextual ongoing technology revolutions, the several emerging civilian aeronautical "Big Ideas" and associated enabling technological approaches. The ongoing IT Revolution is increasingly providing, as 5 senses virtual presence/reality becomes available, along with Nano/Molecular Manufacturing, virtual alternatives to Physical transportation for both people and goods. Paper examines the potential options available to aeronautics to maintain and perhaps grow "market share" in the context of this evolving competition. Many of these concepts are not new, but the emerging technology landscape is enhancing their viability and marketability. The concepts vary from the "interesting" to the truly revolutionary and all require considerable research. Paper considers the speed range from personal/general aviation to supersonic transports and technologies from energetics to fabrication.

  5. Discriminating military and civilian traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Reid, Matthew W; Velez, Carmen S

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs at higher rates among service members than civilians. Explosions from improvised explosive devices and mines are the leading cause of TBI in the military. As such, TBI is frequently accompanied by other injuries, which makes its diagnosis and treatment difficult. In addition to postconcussion symptoms, those who sustain a TBI commonly report chronic pain and posttraumatic stress symptoms. This combination of symptoms is so typical they have been referred to as the "polytrauma clinical triad" among injured service members. We explore whether these symptoms discriminate civilian occurrences of TBI from those of service members, as well as the possibility that repeated blast exposure contributes to the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Traumatic Brain Injury'.

  6. 45 CFR 1321.55 - Organization and staffing of the area agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING Area Agency Responsibilities § 1321.55...-purpose agency which functions only for purposes of serving as the area agency on aging. Where the...

  7. 45 CFR 1321.55 - Organization and staffing of the area agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING Area Agency Responsibilities § 1321.55...-purpose agency which functions only for purposes of serving as the area agency on aging. Where the...

  8. 45 CFR 1321.55 - Organization and staffing of the area agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING Area Agency Responsibilities § 1321.55...-purpose agency which functions only for purposes of serving as the area agency on aging. Where the...

  9. 45 CFR 1321.55 - Organization and staffing of the area agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING Area Agency Responsibilities § 1321.55...-purpose agency which functions only for purposes of serving as the area agency on aging. Where the...

  10. 45 CFR 1321.55 - Organization and staffing of the area agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING Area Agency Responsibilities § 1321.55...-purpose agency which functions only for purposes of serving as the area agency on aging. Where the...

  11. Conservation partnerships between Zoos and Aquariums, federal and state agencies, and nongovernmental organizations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathleen N; Shaw, James H; Bettinger, Tammie; Caniglia, Beth; Carter, Tracy

    2007-11-01

    Partnerships are essential for the success of conservation organizations as they strive to achieve the ultimate goal of restoring and preserving biodiversity. Now is a particularly crucial time to develop partnerships owing to increasing financial constraints on all organizations and the urgent need for species recovery and habitat preservation. This study identified characteristics of successful conservation partnerships between Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) accredited institutions and related facilities, US and international governmental agencies, and nongovernmental organizations. One hundred and five AZA accredited zoos and aquariums or related facilities participated in the preliminary survey. Staff at 75 of those zoos and aquariums were interviewed by telephone for a follow-up survey. Respondents were asked which characteristics most contributed to the success of their past and current conservation partnerships. Data were analyzed in two ways: descriptive statistics and principal component analysis. Descriptive statistics showed that effective leadership, clear and consistent communication, and trust between partners were the top three characteristics that led to partnership success. Ineffective leadership by those in charge, lack of clear, consistent communication between partners, and unreliable or insufficient sources of funding were the top three characteristics that inhibited partnership success. Using principal component analysis, the variables for each question on the questionnaire were reduced to a smaller subset of categories. Structure, personalities, process, and commitment were the four principal components of successful conservation partnerships. The three principal components that inhibited conservation partnerships were: communication, partnership personnel, and partner inequality. Results gained from this research are sure to increase the probability of success both for conservation partnerships that have already been established and

  12. Exploring the Unknown: Selected Documents in the History of the U.S. Civilian Space Program. Volume 2; External Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, John M. (Editor); Day, Dwayne A. (Editor); Launius, Roger D. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The documents selected for inclusion in this volume are presented in three chapters, each covering a particular aspect of the evolution of U.S. space exploration. These chapters address (1) the relations between the civilian space program of the United States and the space activities of other countries, (2) the relations between the U.S. civilian space program and the space efforts of national security organizations and the military, and (3) NASA's relations with industry and academic institutions.

  13. Strengthening the nuclear nonproliferation regime : focus on the civilian nuclear fuel cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Saltiel, David H.; Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2005-04-01

    Leaders around the world and across the ideological spectrum agree that the global nonproliferation regime is facing a serious test. The emergence of sophisticated terrorist networks, black markets in nuclear technology, and technological leaps associated with globalization have conspired to threaten one of the most successful examples of international cooperation in history. The rampant proliferation of nuclear weapons that was predicted at the start of the nuclear age has been largely held in check and the use of those weapons avoided. Nonetheless, with the thirty-fifth anniversary of the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the threat of nuclear proliferation seems more serious than ever. Although experts readily concede that there exist many pathways to proliferation, the threat posed by the misuse of the civilian nuclear fuel cycle has received considerable recent attention. While the connection between nuclear energy and nonproliferation has been a topic of discussion since the dawn of the nuclear age, world events have brought the issue to the forefront once again. United States President George W. Bush and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Mohammad ElBaradei are among those who have highlighted proliferation risks associated with civilian nuclear power programs and called for revitalizing the nuclear nonproliferation regime to address new threats. From the possibility of diversion or theft of nuclear material or technology, to the use of national civilian programs as a cover for weapons programs - what some have called latent proliferation - the fuel cycle appears to many to represent a glaring proliferation vulnerability. Just as recognition of these risks is not new, neither is recognition of the many positive benefits of nuclear energy. In fact, a renewed interest in exploiting these benefits has increased the urgency of addressing the risks. Global energy demand is expected to at least double by the middle of

  14. Cost-Benefit and Cost-Effectiveness Analyses: A Bibliography of Applications in the Civilian Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crum, Norman J.

    This annotated and preliminary bibliography emphasizes applications of cost-effectiveness (C/E) and cost-benefit (C/B) analyses to problems in the civilian economy. The entries are organized so that the user may identify works in which these techniques are applied to problems in specific areas such as transportation, communication, and health. No…

  15. Alaska Native Participation in the Civilian Conservation Corps. Alaska Historical Commission Studies in History No. 206.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Connor; And Others

    The report is a finding aid to the sources which document the 1937 federal policy decision mandating that 50% of the enrollees in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in Alaska must be Alaska Natives and provides a list of the Native CCC projects in Alaska. The finding aid section is organized according to the location of the collections and…

  16. 22 CFR 502.5 - Media or organization requests for ongoing subscriptions to broadcast quality agency program...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Media or organization requests for ongoing... BOARD OF GOVERNORS DOMESTIC REQUESTS FOR BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PROGRAM MATERIALS § 502.5 Media...) Upon request, the Agency may make program materials available on an ongoing basis to Media entities,...

  17. 22 CFR 502.4 - Media or organization one-time requests for broadcast quality agency program materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Media or organization one-time requests for... GOVERNORS DOMESTIC REQUESTS FOR BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PROGRAM MATERIALS § 502.4 Media or... provide a broadcast-quality copy of Agency program materials to media entities, educational...

  18. Agencies and Organizations. Made in B.C.: A History of Postsecondary Education in British Columbia. Volume 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowin, Bob

    2012-01-01

    This report describes agencies (established by government) and organizations (established by others) that dealt exclusively with postsecondary education in British Columbia, Canada and which had at least one professional employee and/or were separate legal entities. Of the fifty groups described since 1960, about two dozen existed in 2012. The…

  19. 42 CFR 426.416 - Role of Medicare Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) and State agencies in the LCD review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Role of Medicare Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) and State agencies in the LCD review. 426.416 Section 426.416 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM REVIEW OF...

  20. Trashing the System: Social Movement, Intersectional Rhetoric, and Collective Agency in the Young Lords Organization's Garbage Offensive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enck-Wanzer, Darrel

    2006-01-01

    Examining the nascent rhetoric of the Young Lords Organization's (YLO) 1969 "garbage offensive," this essay argues that the long-standing constraints on agency to which they were responding demanded an inventive rhetoric that was decolonizing both in its aim and in its form. Blending diverse forms of discourse produced an intersectional rhetoric…

  1. 45 CFR 1321.9 - Organization and staffing of the State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities §...

  2. 45 CFR 1321.9 - Organization and staffing of the State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities §...

  3. 45 CFR 1321.9 - Organization and staffing of the State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities §...

  4. 45 CFR 1321.9 - Organization and staffing of the State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities §...

  5. 45 CFR 1321.9 - Organization and staffing of the State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities §...

  6. Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Kouts

    2006-05-10

    The CRD addresses the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3-Change 1, ''Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets'', by providing the Secretarial Acquisition Executive (Level 0) scope baseline and the Program-level (Level 1) technical baseline. The Secretarial Acquisition Executive approves the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) critical decisions and changes against the Level 0 baseline; and in turn, the OCRWM Director approves all changes against the Level 1 baseline. This baseline establishes the top-level technical scope of the CRMWS and its three system elements, as described in section 1.3.2. The organizations responsible for design, development, and operation of system elements described in this document must therefore prepare subordinate project-level documents that are consistent with the CRD. Changes to requirements will be managed in accordance with established change and configuration control procedures. The CRD establishes requirements for the design, development, and operation of the CRWMS. It specifically addresses the top-level governing laws and regulations (e.g., ''Nuclear Waste Policy Act'' (NWPA), 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 63, 10 CFR Part 71, etc.) along with specific policy, performance requirements, interface requirements, and system architecture. The CRD shall be used as a vehicle to incorporate specific changes in technical scope or performance requirements that may have significant program implications. Such may include changes to the program mission, changes to operational capability, and high visibility stakeholder issues. The CRD uses a systems approach to: (1) identify key functions that the CRWMS must perform, (2) allocate top-level requirements derived from statutory, regulatory, and programmatic sources, and (3) define the basic elements of the system architecture and operational concept. Project-level documents address CRD requirements by further

  7. Transportation functions of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Attaway, C.R.; Pope, R.B.; Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L.; Dixon, L.D.; Jones, R.H.; Klimas, M.J.; Peterson, R.W.

    1992-03-01

    Within the framework of Public Law 97.425 and provisions specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 961, the US Department of Energy has the responsibility to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from various organizations which have entered into a contract with the federal government in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers. In implementing these requirements, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, among other things, supported the identification of functions that must be performed by a transportation system (TS) that will accept the waste for transport to a federal facility for storage and/or disposal. This document, through the application of system engineering principles, identifies the functions that must be performed to transport waste under this law.

  8. Orthopaedic outcomes: combat and civilian trauma care.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, Damian M; Mackenzie, Ellen J

    2012-01-01

    Important advances have been made in the management of complex trauma through careful scientific analysis of outcomes. Outcomes analysis in combat extremity trauma is exemplified and highlighted by scholarly work in the treatment of catastrophic lower extremity trauma. The success of this line of research in civilian trauma is exemplified by the Lower Extremity Assessment Project (LEAP) study on the outcomes of civilian lower extremity trauma. This highly successful effort was followed by the Military Extremity Trauma Amputation/Limb Salvage (METALS) study. Current ongoing analysis of both the LEAP and METALS studies by the Major Extremity Trauma Research Consortium seeks to compare and contrast the similarities and differences of both studies and to advance evidence-based patient-centered care. The effects of psychological trauma on the injured individual underscore the global effect of severe trauma and the need for a multidisciplinary approach to trauma care. Statistical modeling is being used to analyze outcomes to further the ability to scientifically and definitively determine the best practices for patient care.

  9. 2. CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS ENROLLERS MARCHING IN THE KAMEHAMEHA DAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS ENROLLERS MARCHING IN THE KAMEHAMEHA DAY PARADE IN HILO. FROM SUPERINTENDENT'S MONTHLY REPORT, JUNE 1934. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Roads, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  10. Coordinating an interdisciplinary disease management conference on a military installation: collaboration between military and civilian communities, lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fleming, Glenda; Knapp, Casey A

    2009-08-01

    The needs of individuals with chronic diseases or disabilities are similar whether within military or civilian communities. With finite resources and the continuing global war on terrorism, military treatment facilities (MTFs) may find collaborative, multidisciplinary, continuing education efforts with community agencies invaluable. Collaborative efforts that bring military and civilian communities together can result in innovative programs that offer cost-effective high-quality information to enhance the knowledge and skill level of military families, providers, and other professionals who provide services and care for military eligible beneficiaries. This article addresses the development and implementation of two major multidisciplinary disease management conferences at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP), Virginia. It provides an overview of lessons learned in the areas of preplanning, team building, program development, implementation, and evaluation. Despite challenges, tremendous benefits may be reaped from efforts to include diverse target populations from military and civilian communities.

  11. Civilian radioactive waste management program plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This revision of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan describes the objectives of the Civilian Radioactive Waste management Program (Program) as prescribed by legislative mandate, and the technical achievements, schedule, and costs planned to complete these objectives. The Plan provides Program participants and stakeholders with an updated description of Program activities and milestones for fiscal years (FY) 1998 to 2003. It describes the steps the Program will undertake to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site in 1998; prepare the Secretary of Energy`s site recommendation to the President in 2001, if the site is found to be suitable for development as a repository; and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2002 for authorization to construct a repository. The Program`s ultimate challenge is to provide adequate assurance to society that an operating geologic repository at a specific site meets the required standards of safety. Chapter 1 describes the Program`s mission and vision, and summarizes the Program`s broad strategic objectives. Chapter 2 describes the Program`s approach to transform strategic objectives, strategies, and success measures to specific Program activities and milestones. Chapter 3 describes the activities and milestones currently projected by the Program for the next five years for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; the Waste Acceptance, Storage and Transportation Project; ad the Program Management Center. The appendices present information on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the history of the Program; the Program`s organization chart; the Commission`s regulations, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in geologic Repositories; and a glossary of terms.

  12. 32 CFR 727.9 - Referrals to civilian lawyers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Referrals to civilian lawyers. 727.9 Section 727.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL LEGAL ASSISTANCE § 727.9 Referrals to civilian lawyers. (a) General. If it is determined that the legal...

  13. Reading Grade Levels of Air Force Civilian Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Randy H.; Mathews, John J.

    A study was conducted to examine the reading levels of United States Air Force civilian employees according to occupational groupings and grade structure. Approximately 1,050 Air Force civilian subjects were tested on the Nelson-Denny Reading Test or the California Reading Test. Subjects were selected from eight Air Force bases representing the…

  14. 32 CFR 644.559 - Civilian component training facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Civilian component training facilities. 644.559 Section 644.559 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Inspections to Insure Compliance with Disposal Conditions § 644.559 Civilian component...

  15. International Cooperation and Competition in Civilian Space Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report assesses the state of international competition in civilian space activities, explores United States civilian objectives in space, and suggests alternative options for enhancing the overall U.S. position in space technologies. It also investigated past, present, and projected international cooperative arrangements for space activities…

  16. A Study of the Army's Advanced Civilian Schooling Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Joseph S.

    The purpose of the study is to review the official and unofficial U.S. Army policy toward graduate level education at civilian institutions. Particular attention is paid to: (1) the Army's advanced civilian schooling programs; (2) whether the Army receives a reasonable return on its financial and manpower expenditures on these programs; (3) what…

  17. Uncommon Schools: An Innovative Approach to Rural Community Organization by County Agencies Utilizing Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Harvey C.

    To recapture the spirit of Thoreau's "uncommon schools," a South Carolina county Department of Social Services (DSS) sought to create a "university" of the community which would provide experiences in the field for students, feed-back to DSS workers from the community and to the local college, and would utilize the resources of the agency, the…

  18. Civilian Aeronautical Futures - The Responsibly Imaginable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1940 Aeronautics has had an immense impact upon Global Human lifestyles and affairs - in both the Civilian and Military arenas. During this period Long distance Train and Ship passenger transport were largely supplanted by Air Travel and Aviation assumed a dominant role in warfare. The early 1940 s to the mid 1970 s was a particularly productive period in terms of Aeronautical Technology. What is interesting is that, since the mid 1970 s, the rate of Aeronautical Technological Progress has been far slower, the basic technology in nearly all of our current Aero Systems dates from the mid 70 s or earlier. This is especially true in terms of Configuration Aerodynamics, Aeronautics appears to have "settled" on the 707, double delta and rotary wing as the approach of choice for Subsonic long haul, supersonic cruise and VTOL respectively. Obviously there have been variants and some niche digression from this/these but in the main Aeronautics, particularly civilian Aeronautics, has become a self-professed "mature", Increasingly "Commodity", Industry. The Industry is far along an existing/deployed technology curve and focused, now for decades, on incremental/evolutionary change - largely Appliers vs. developers of technology. This is, of course, in sharp contrast to the situation in the early-to-later 20th century where Aeronautics was viewed as A Major Technological Engine, much the way IT/Bio/Nano/Energetics/Quantum Technologies are viewed today. A search for Visionary Aeronautical "Futures" papers/projections indicates a decided dearth thereof over the last 20 plus years compared to the previous quarter Century. Aeronautics is part of Aerospace and Aerospace [including Aeronautics] has seen major cutbacks over the last decades. Some numbers for the U.S. Aerospace Industry serve as examples. Order of 600,000 jobs lost, with some 180,000 more on the block over the next 10 years. Approximately 25% of the Aerospace workforce is eligible to retire and the average

  19. Injuries from hand grenades in civilian settings.

    PubMed

    Karger, B; Zweihoff, R F; DuChesne, A

    1999-01-01

    Four cases of hand grenade detonations in civilian life with homicidal intent are reported. The detonations always occurred in close proximity to the victims but there were only two fatalities out of seven victims directly attributable to the hand grenades. The relatively low mortality rate results from the ballistic characteristics of hand grenade missiles such as low mass and sectional density. This leads to rapid deceleration and thus to a poor penetration capacity of intermediate targets and tissue. Window glass at a distance of 2 m was not perforated in one case and the vast majority of fragment wounds showed a short wound tract of small diameter. The potential for physical activity can be unaffected even after a detonation inside a car. However, body parts almost in contact with the hand grenade, such as in a struggle, suffer large lacerations and comminuted fractures. At a distance, the chance of striking a vulnerable body region is increased by the multiple missiles but the wounding potential clearly decreases with increasing distance due to rapid deceleration and decreasing fragment cloud density. The effective range of detonation shock waves from hand grenades is very short and can only contribute to wounding in close-to-contact detonations. The forensic reconstruction is based on the directed radial character of the forces generated and on the sharply decreasing intensity of these forces with increasing distance from the detonation. PMID:10550597

  20. 20 CFR 609.21 - Findings of Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Findings of Federal agency. 609.21 Section... COMPENSATION FOR FEDERAL CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES Responsibilities of Federal Agencies § 609.21 Findings of Federal... Federal findings on a form furnished by the State agency, and prescribed by the Department, a...

  1. 20 CFR 609.21 - Findings of Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Findings of Federal agency. 609.21 Section... COMPENSATION FOR FEDERAL CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES Responsibilities of Federal Agencies § 609.21 Findings of Federal... Federal findings on a form furnished by the State agency, and prescribed by the Department, a...

  2. 20 CFR 609.21 - Findings of Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Findings of Federal agency. 609.21 Section... COMPENSATION FOR FEDERAL CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES Responsibilities of Federal Agencies § 609.21 Findings of Federal... Federal findings on a form furnished by the State agency, and prescribed by the Department, a...

  3. 20 CFR 609.21 - Findings of Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Findings of Federal agency. 609.21 Section... COMPENSATION FOR FEDERAL CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES Responsibilities of Federal Agencies § 609.21 Findings of Federal... Federal findings on a form furnished by the State agency, and prescribed by the Department, a...

  4. Translating civilian and defense technologies for pediatric critical care and rehabilitation research.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nicholas J; Quatrano, Louis A; Nicholson, Carol E

    2006-01-01

    A conference sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) titled "Translating Civilian and Defense Technologies for Pediatric Critical Care and Rehabilitation Research" was held on May 16th and 17th, 2005 in Rockville, Maryland. A summary of presentations from the conference is provided. Topics presented addressed: advances in monitoring and imaging devices used in the pediatric intensive care unit, regulatory issues and recent technological developments relating to medical devices for children, the new role that virtual reality is playing in rehabilitation medicine, and the evolving future of assistive devices for rehabilitation.

  5. Community-based home support agencies: comparing the quality of care of cooperative and non-profit organizations.

    PubMed

    Leviten-Reid, Catherine; Hoyt, Ann

    2009-06-01

    In the province of Québec, services focusing on the instrumental activities of daily living are delivered to seniors by a combination of non-profit organizations and cooperatives. But do these organizations perform differently? This study asks whether home support cooperatives deliver higher-quality care than non-profit home support agencies. The specific effects of consumer and worker participation on the board of directors are also tested. Data were collected in 2006 and 2007 from 831 individuals receiving home support services from nine cooperatives and nine non-profits. Two consumer-centered measures of quality were used: a summated, 39-point satisfaction score and a 4-point overall quality score. Data were analyzed using ordered logistic regression. Results show that although organizational type was not a predictor of the two quality outcomes, worker involvement in governance was positively associated with the satisfaction score, while consumer involvement was positively associated with the overall quality score.

  6. Civilians and war: a review and historical overview of the involvement of non-combatant populations in conflict situations.

    PubMed

    Meddings, D R

    2001-01-01

    The effects of light weapons are now regularly seen on television and are becoming an international issue, particularly regarding their impact on civilians. It is claimed that 80% or more of deaths and injuries in today's wars are civilian; there is no objective evidence for this as little accurate information is available. Recent surveys suggest, however, a proportion of between 35 and 65%--still far too high considering the protection to which civilians are entitled under international humanitarian law. It is proposed the problem arises from twentieth-century killing power in the hands of individuals with fifteenth-century discipline and organization. Recent systematic surveys distinguish between civilian deaths from light weapons in combat and non-combat situations. A high proportion of combat deaths is due to fragmenting weapons such as mortars targeted on populated areas. Many weapon-related deaths in non-combat situations are accidental (cleaning weapons, handling by children during play) and others are related to domestic disputes. The availability and use of weapons also affects civilians indirectly in many ways, such as ill-health in refugees, psychosocial effects on women and children, and economic and environmental consequences. A variety of schemes exist to reduce the availability of light weapons and reintegrate their users into society. The international community must extend and make better use of these measures.

  7. Detail of plate and gears on center pivot. From civilian ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of plate and gears on center pivot. From civilian land. Looking north. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Daggett Road Bridge, Daggett Road traversing Burns Cut Off, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  8. 14. VIEW OF CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS WORK; CHECK, DROP AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS WORK; CHECK, DROP AND TURNOUT IN LATERAL 22 OFF OF THE ARIZONA CANAL Photographer: unknown. January 1937 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. 15. VIEW OF CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS WORK; CHECK, DROP AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS WORK; CHECK, DROP AND TURNOUT IN LATERAL 14.5 OFF OF THE ARIZONA CANAL Photographer: unknown. March 1937 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. 37. PRATER CANYON AND CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP SITE FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. PRATER CANYON AND CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP SITE FROM PRATER GRADE, FACING E. SAME CAMERA LOCATION AS No. 35 AND No. 36. - Mesa Verde National Park Main Entrance Road, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  11. Front (east side) of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Front (east side) of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employees' Quarters, North Hickey Street, West side, 150 feet North of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Front (south side) of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Front (south side) of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North Hickey Street, 725 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North Hickey Street, 725 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. West side of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West side of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North Hickey Street, 725 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. North side of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North side of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North Hickey Street, 725 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. East side of building Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East side of building - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Housing, North end of North Hickey Street, 725 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Garage, North end of North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employee Garage, North end of North Hickey Street, 775 feet North-Northwest of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. 20 CFR 410.470 - Determination by nongovernmental organization or other governmental agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.470 Determination by nongovernmental organization or other... death was or was not due to a particular cause, shall not be determinative of the question of whether...

  19. 20 CFR 410.470 - Determination by nongovernmental organization or other governmental agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.470 Determination by nongovernmental organization or other... death was or was not due to a particular cause, shall not be determinative of the question of whether...

  20. Increasing Research Capacity in Ontario Child Welfare Organizations: A Unique University-Child Welfare Agency Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Barbara; Trocmé, Nico; Van Wert, Melissa; Budau, Krista; Ballantyne, Mary; Lwin, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe the successes and challenges of a unique knowledge mobilization initiative that was funded through the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. This initiative focused on promoting knowledge mobilization by increasing the capacity of child welfare organizations in Ontario to conduct…

  1. Civilian control of professionalizing militaries: implications of the Venezuelan case

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    Highly professionalized militaries whose focus is internal security and national development have been shown to be prone to active, directive involvement in politics. In Latin America, this phenomenon has been most notably evident in Brazil since 1964 and Peru between 1968 and 1980. The Venezuelan military offers a case of a more moderately professionalized military which was exposed to the widely disseminated internal security doctrine of the 1960s but, on the surface, exhibited declining levels of militarism. This study examines the varying levels of civilian control in Venezuela between 1945 and 1979 in the context of increasing military professionalization, and seeks to clarify the theoretical relationship between the two variables by using a unique, if not deviant, case. After developing a theoretical definition of the general concept of control, the study derives a definition of civilian control which employs civilian and military behavior, civilian and military attitudes, and military motivations. Application of this definition to the Venezuelan case indicates that civilian control has been more tenuous than more superficial observation would indicate. The study shows that increases in professionalization led to strains on the consolidation of civilian control, while also showing that limits on the level and content of professionalization enabled Venezuela to avoid authoritarian consequences.

  2. Satisfaction with civilian family medicine residency training

    PubMed Central

    Wolfrom, Brent; Hodgetts, Geoff; Kotecha, Jyoti; Pollock, Emily; Martin, Mary; Han, Han; Morissette, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate satisfaction with civilian residency training programs among serving general duty medical officers within the Canadian Armed Forces. Design A 23-item, cross-sectional survey face-validated by the office of the Surgeon General of the Canadian Armed Forces. Setting Canada. Participants General duty medical officers serving in the Canadian Armed Forces as of February 2014 identified through the Directorate of Health Services Personnel of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group Headquarters. Main outcome measures Satisfaction with and time spent in 7 domains of training: trauma, critical care, emergency medicine, psychiatry, occupational health, sports medicine, and base clinic training. Overall preparedness for leading a health care team, caring for a military population, working in isolated and challenging environments, and being deployed were evaluated on a 5-point Likert scale. Results Among the survey respondents (n = 135, response rate 54%), 77% agreed or strongly agreed that their family medicine residency training was relevant to their role as a general duty medical officer. Most respondents were either satisfied or very satisfied with their emergency medicine training (77%) and psychiatry training (63%), while fewer were satisfied or very satisfied with their sports medicine (47%), base clinic (41%), and critical care (43%) training. Even fewer respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with their trauma (26%) and occupational health (12%) training. Regarding overall preparedness, 57% believed that they were adequately prepared to care for a military patient population, and 52% of respondents believed they were prepared for their first posting. Fewer respondents (38%) believed they were prepared to work in isolated, austere, or challenging environments, and even fewer (32%) believed that residency training prepared them to lead a health care team. Conclusion General duty medical officers were satisfied with many aspects of

  3. Low-cost inflatable lighter-than-air surveillance system for civilian applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiddy, Jason S.; Chen, Peter C.; Niemczuk, John B.

    2002-08-01

    Today's society places an extremely high price on the value of human life and injury. Whenever possible, police and paramilitary actions are always directed towards saving as many lives as possible, whether it is the officer, perpetrator, or innocent civilians. Recently, the advent of robotic systems has enable law enforcement agencies to perform many of the most dangerous aspects of their jobs from relative safety. This is especially true to bomb disposal units but it is also gaining acceptance in other areas. An area where small, remotely operated machines may prove effective is in local aerial surveillance. Currently, the only aerial surveillance assets generally available to law enforcement agencies are costly helicopters. Unfortunately, most of the recently developed unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) are directed towards military applications and have limited civilian use. Systems Planning and Analysis, Inc. (SPA) has conceived and performed a preliminary analysis of a low-cost, inflatable, lighter- than-air surveillance system that may be used in a number of military and law enforcement surveillance situations. The preliminary analysis includes the concept definition, a detailed trade study to determine the optimal configuration of the surveillance system, high-pressure inflation tests, and a control analysis. This paper will provide the details in these areas of the design and provide an insight into the feasibility of such a system.

  4. From conflict to cooperation: The on-site inspection agency as a model for international arms control organizations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Traurig, R.E.

    1993-12-01

    An international system is necessary in a multi-polar world. The problem for today is learning how to develop cooperation, not just assume it. Most striking was the level of cooperation involved in the area of nuclear weapons. The United States and the Soviet Union signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty in 1987 ushered in an unprecedented acceptance of intrusive verification measures. The puzzle surrounding this historic event is how the two sides managed to move from conflict to cooperation, from a zero-sum game to positive gains for both sides. Solving this puzzle may provide lessons that can be applied today to organizations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Special Commission on Iraq. Solving this puzzle will also help students of international relations to better understand how nations learn to cooperate. The search foR a new strategy in the post-Cold War era shows that reality is more complicated in a multi-polar environment. The simpler assumptions that explained the antagonistic situation no longer apply. An attempt must be made to find and develop those structures which may foster overall cooperation. Nations can learn to work together in an area vital to national security, arms control, by working together. Nations can learn by doing if the structure of the organization does not hinder the process. Sustained cooperation, therefore, can be a product and precondition of the organization through the structure of a given treaty.

  5. Civilian exposure to toxic agents: emergency medical response.

    PubMed

    Baker, David

    2004-01-01

    Civilian populations are at risk from exposure to toxic materials as a result of accidental or deliberate exposure. In addition to industrial hazards, toxic agents designed for use in warfare now are a potential hazard in everyday life through terrorist action. Civil emergency medical responders should be able to adapt their plans for dealing with casualties from hazardous materials (HazMat) to deal with the new threat. Chemical and biological warfare (CBW) and HazMat agents can be viewed as a continuous spectrum. Each of these hazards is characterized by qualities of toxicity, latency of action, persistency, and transmissibility. The incident and medical responses to release of any agent is determined by these characteristics. Chemical and biological wardare agents usually are classified as weapons of mass destruction, but strictly, they are agents of mass injury. The relationship between mass injury and major loss of life depends very much on the protection, organization, and emergency care provided. Detection of a civil toxic agent release where signs and symptoms in casualties may be the first indicator of exposure is different from the military situation where intelligence information and tuned detection systems generally will be available. It is important that emergency medical care should be given in the context of a specific action plan. Within an organized and protected perimeter, triage and decontamination (if the agent is persistent) can proceed while emergency medical care is provided at the same time. The provision of advanced life support (TOXALS) in this zone by protected and trained medical responders now is technically feasible using specially designed ventilation equipment. Leaving life support until after decontamination may have fatal consequences. Casualties from terrorist attacks also may suffer physical as well as toxic trauma and the medical response also should be capable of dealing with mixed injuries. PMID:15506255

  6. Reifications of the intellectual: representations, organization and agency in revolutionary China.

    PubMed

    U, Eddy

    2013-12-01

    How did 'intellectuals' evolve from a class of subjects in Marxian thoughts to highly visible populations under communism? Such 'reifications of the intellectual' have deeply affected subjectivity, conflict and organization, but received little attention in the political sociology of communism. This essay draws on research on classifications and social boundaries to address the objective and subjective foundations of the reifications and their impact on communist rule. The intellectual is viewed as an identification formed and performed around multiple social axes (most notably family background, educational achievement, occupational history, institutional affiliation and revolutionary rank) that reflected broader patterns of communist political domination. I use the Chinese Communist movement to demonstrate that (1) interaction of political contests, ruling strategies and institutional developments turned a diversity of persons into 'intellectuals' who were allegedly imbued with reprehensible interests and habits linked to privileged economic classes; (2) constant competitions for power and organizational changes led to classificatory ambiguities and, in turn, allowed individuals some control over their identifications; and (3) the developments profoundly influenced identity, state and class formation. Focusing on the dynamics that produced a highly visible but fluid population of 'intellectuals' opens new pathways for comparative research on communism.

  7. Reifications of the intellectual: representations, organization and agency in revolutionary China.

    PubMed

    U, Eddy

    2013-12-01

    How did 'intellectuals' evolve from a class of subjects in Marxian thoughts to highly visible populations under communism? Such 'reifications of the intellectual' have deeply affected subjectivity, conflict and organization, but received little attention in the political sociology of communism. This essay draws on research on classifications and social boundaries to address the objective and subjective foundations of the reifications and their impact on communist rule. The intellectual is viewed as an identification formed and performed around multiple social axes (most notably family background, educational achievement, occupational history, institutional affiliation and revolutionary rank) that reflected broader patterns of communist political domination. I use the Chinese Communist movement to demonstrate that (1) interaction of political contests, ruling strategies and institutional developments turned a diversity of persons into 'intellectuals' who were allegedly imbued with reprehensible interests and habits linked to privileged economic classes; (2) constant competitions for power and organizational changes led to classificatory ambiguities and, in turn, allowed individuals some control over their identifications; and (3) the developments profoundly influenced identity, state and class formation. Focusing on the dynamics that produced a highly visible but fluid population of 'intellectuals' opens new pathways for comparative research on communism. PMID:24320069

  8. 48 CFR 6103.304 - Reply to the audit division and agency responses [Rule 304].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... division and agency responses . 6103.304 Section 6103.304 Federal Acquisition Regulations System CIVILIAN... the audit division and agency responses . A claimant may file with the Board and serve on the Audit Division and the agency a reply to the Audit Division and agency responses within 30 calendar days...

  9. Comparative analysis of prevalence of intimate partner violence against women in military and civilian communities in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chimah, Carol Uzoamaka; Adogu, Prosper Obunikem Uche; Odeyemi, Kofoworola; Ilika, Amobi Linus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intimate partner violence (IPV) occurs across the world, in various cultures, and affects people across societies irrespective of economic status or gender. Most data on IPV before World Health Organization multicountry study (WHOMCS) usually came from sources other than the military. Result of this study will contribute to the existing body of knowledge and may serve as a baseline for future studies in military populations. This study compares the prevalence of the different types of IPV against women in military and civilian communities in Abuja, Nigeria. Methods Using a multistage sampling technique, 260 women who had intimate male partners were selected from military and civilian communities of Abuja. Collected data on personal characteristics and different types of IPV experienced were analyzed to demonstrate comparison of the association between the different forms of IPV and the respondents’ sociodemographic and partner characteristics in the two study populations using percentages and χ-square statistics, and P-value was assumed to be significant at ≤0.05. Results The prevalence of the four major types of IPV was higher among the military respondents than among civilians: controlling behavior, 37.1% versus 29.1%; emotional/psychological abuse, 42.4% versus 13.4%; physical abuse, 19.7% versus 5.9%, and sexual abuse, 9.2% versus 8.8%. Significantly more respondents from the military population (59 [45.4%]) compared to civilians (21 [19.4%]) were prevented by their partners from seeing their friends (P=0.000). The situation is reversed with regard to permission to seek health care for self, with civilians reporting a significantly higher prevalence (35 [32.4%]) than did military respondents (20 [15.4%]) (P=0.002). The military respondents were clearly at a higher risk of experiencing all the variants of emotional violence than the civilians (P=0.00). The commonest form of physical violence against women was “being slapped or having

  10. Colonic trauma: modern civilian management and military surgical doctrine.

    PubMed Central

    Royle, C A

    1995-01-01

    Colonic trauma, traditionally the domain of the military surgeon, has become commonplace in many parts of the world, where civilian surgeons have developed considerable experience with this complex type of injury. The author highlights the differences between military and civilian management concluding with an overview of current military research into battlefield colonic trauma. This paper reviews military surgical doctrine and summarizes the evolution in civilian surgical practice since the Second World War. South African management is discussed with reference to the author's travelling fellowship visit in 1993. Colonic trauma has been the subject of a military surgical research project, since 1992, with preliminary studies establishing an anastomotic technique suitable for use in the field. This work is summarized with an outline of the research programme. PMID:8537949

  11. Caring for Active Duty Military Personnel in the Civilian Sector

    PubMed Central

    Waitzkin, Howard; Noble, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Due to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the unmet medical and psychological needs of military personnel are creating major challenges. Increasingly, active duty military personnel are seeking physical and mental health services from civilian professionals. The Civilian Medical Resources Network attempts to address these unmet needs. Participants in the Network include primary care and mental health practitioners in all regions of the country. Network professionals provide independent assessments, clinical interventions in acute situations, and documentation that assists GIs in obtaining reassignment or discharge. Most clients who use Network services come from low-income backgrounds and manifest psychological rather than physical disorders. Qualitative themes in professional-client encounters have focused on ethical conflicts, the impact of violence without meaning (especially violence against civilians), and perceived problems in military health and mental health policies. Unmet needs of active duty military personnel deserve more concerted attention from medical professionals and policy makers. PMID:21339846

  12. Cerebellar neurocontroller project, for aerospace applications, in a civilian neurocomputing initiative in the 'decade of the brain'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellionisz, Andras J.; Jorgensen, Charles C.; Werbos, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    A key question is how to utilize civilian government agencies along with an industrial consortium to successfully complement the so far primarily defense-oriented neural network research. Civilian artificial neural system projects, such as artificial cerebellar neurocontrollers aimed at duplicating nature's existing neural network solutions for adaptive sensorimotor coordination, are proposed by such a synthesis. The cerebellum provides an intelligent interface between higher possibly symbolic levels of human intelligence and repetitious demands of real world conventional controllers. The generation of such intelligent interfaces could be crucial to the economic feasibility of the human settlement of space and an improvement in telerobotics techniques to permit the cost-effective exploitation of nonterrestrial materials and planetary exploration and monitoring. The authors propose a scientific framework within which such interagency activities could effectively cooperate.

  13. 32 CFR 719.138 - Fees of civilian witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL Miscellaneous Matters § 719.138 Fees of civilian witnesses. (a... by one of the following: (1) Trial counsel or assistant trial counsel of the court-martial; (2... Regulations, vol. 2, chap. 6), and by a certified copy of the order appointing the court-martial, court...

  14. 32 CFR 719.138 - Fees of civilian witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL Miscellaneous Matters § 719.138 Fees of civilian witnesses. (a... by one of the following: (1) Trial counsel or assistant trial counsel of the court-martial; (2... Regulations, vol. 2, chap. 6), and by a certified copy of the order appointing the court-martial, court...

  15. DOD-Wide Civilian Career Program for Procurement Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The manual, which supersedes the August 4, 1966 manual, is designed to aid in program improvement for career development and advancement opportunities of Department of Defense (DOD) civilian procurement personnel. Program elements covered include: career patterns, career counseling and appraisal, training and development, registration, referral…

  16. Identifying Reverse Malingering in the Civilian Occupational Setting.

    PubMed

    Lurati, Ann R

    2016-07-01

    Malingering is a common phenomenon in the workplace. However, reverse malingering can be just as common, but may have greater negative consequences for employees and employers. The only research on reverse malingering has been conducted in the military; however, little is known about this phenomenon in the civilian setting. PMID:26407595

  17. HEADSTONES OF BERNARD AND MICHAEL JODD, FATHERANDSON CIVILIANS RESPONSIBLE FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HEADSTONES OF BERNARD AND MICHAEL JODD, FATHER-AND-SON CIVILIANS RESPONSIBLE FOR CONSTRUCTION OF BRICK PERIMETER WALL WHO DIED OF YELLOW FEVER DURING WALL CONSTRUCTION. VIEW TO WEST. - Baton Rouge National Cemetery, 220 North 19th Street, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, LA

  18. Barriers to Veterans' Employment Presented by Civilian Licensure and Certification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DynCorp, Reston, VA.

    A study examined the extent to which military training and experience adequately prepared individuals for civilian credentialing (licensure and certification), first in the healthcare and aircraft maintenance fields and then in a variety of other fields. The survey relied on information about occupational credentialing requirements from the…

  19. What does Military Psychology Have to Offer Civilian Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFann, Howard H.

    Military psychology has made three major contributions to civilian education. The first is the systems approach which contains two complementary components: the conceptual and the empirical. The purpose of the conceptual approach is to understand nature to determine on what principle the system works; the purpose of the empirical approach is to…

  20. 32 CFR 719.138 - Fees of civilian witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL Miscellaneous Matters § 719.138 Fees of civilian witnesses. (a... by one of the following: (1) Trial counsel or assistant trial counsel of the court-martial; (2) Summary court officer; (3) Counsel for the court in a court of inquiry; (4) Recorder or junior member of...

  1. Civilian Social Work: Serving the Military and Veteran Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savitsky, Laura; Illingworth, Maria; DuLaney, Megan

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses social work practice areas for civilian social workers who provide services to military service members, veterans, and their families. These practice areas include education, child welfare, domestic violence, mental health, health care, substance abuse, and criminal justice. The authors examine the impact of the contemporary…

  2. Rethinking gender-based violence during war: is violence against civilian men a problem worth addressing?

    PubMed

    Linos, Natalia

    2009-04-01

    Gender-based violence during conflict and post-conflict situations has received increased attention in research and in the work of development agencies. Viewed primarily as a form of violence against women, this commentary questions whether male civilians have also been victims of gender-based violence during conflict, invisible due to stereotypes surrounding masculinity and a culturally permissive approach towards violence perpetrated against men, especially at times of war. The experience of civilian males of violence, including sexual violence, during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina and other contemporary wars, suggests that the discourse on gender-based violence and public health research should begin exploring the specific needs of men. Drawing on Nancy Krieger's (Krieger, N. (2003). Genders, sexes, and health: what are the connections-and why does it matter? International Journal of Epidemiology, 32, 652-657) analysis on the differential role of 'sex' and 'gender' on a given exposure-outcome association, this commentary suggests that the impact of gender-based violence on health during conflict may be different for men and women and may require distinct therapeutic approaches. Given that perpetrators are often male, an extra level of stigma is added when heterosexual men are sexually violated, which may lead to underreporting and reduced health-service seeking behavior. Further public health research is needed to guide the work of humanitarian agencies working with survivors of gender-based violence in conflict and post-conflict settings to ensure equal access to appropriate health services for men and women.

  3. Rethinking gender-based violence during war: is violence against civilian men a problem worth addressing?

    PubMed

    Linos, Natalia

    2009-04-01

    Gender-based violence during conflict and post-conflict situations has received increased attention in research and in the work of development agencies. Viewed primarily as a form of violence against women, this commentary questions whether male civilians have also been victims of gender-based violence during conflict, invisible due to stereotypes surrounding masculinity and a culturally permissive approach towards violence perpetrated against men, especially at times of war. The experience of civilian males of violence, including sexual violence, during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina and other contemporary wars, suggests that the discourse on gender-based violence and public health research should begin exploring the specific needs of men. Drawing on Nancy Krieger's (Krieger, N. (2003). Genders, sexes, and health: what are the connections-and why does it matter? International Journal of Epidemiology, 32, 652-657) analysis on the differential role of 'sex' and 'gender' on a given exposure-outcome association, this commentary suggests that the impact of gender-based violence on health during conflict may be different for men and women and may require distinct therapeutic approaches. Given that perpetrators are often male, an extra level of stigma is added when heterosexual men are sexually violated, which may lead to underreporting and reduced health-service seeking behavior. Further public health research is needed to guide the work of humanitarian agencies working with survivors of gender-based violence in conflict and post-conflict settings to ensure equal access to appropriate health services for men and women. PMID:19269726

  4. Systems analysis of decontamination options for civilian vehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this project, which was supported by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Chemical and Biological Division (CBD), was to investigate options for the decontamination of the exteriors and interiors of vehicles in the civilian setting in order to restore those vehicles to normal use following the release of a highly toxic chemical. The decontamination of vehicles is especially challenging because they often contain sensitive electronic equipment, multiple materials some of which strongly adsorb chemical agents, and in the case of aircraft, have very rigid material compatibility requirements (i.e., they cannot be exposed to reagents that may cause even minor corrosion). A systems analysis approach was taken examine existing and future civilian vehicle decontamination capabilities.

  5. Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion: Military and Civilian Implications.

    PubMed

    Goforth, Carl W; Tranberg, John W; Boyer, Phillip; Silvestri, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage and exsanguination are the leading cause of preventable death, and resuscitative therapy is a critical component for survival. In various combinations, fresh whole blood, blood components, colloids, and crystalloids have all been staples of trauma care. The use of fresh whole blood is a well-established military practice that has saved the lives of thousands of American and coalition military personnel. Civilian use of fresh whole blood is far less established owing to the wide availability of individual blood components. However, this highly tailored blood supply is vulnerable to both natural and man-made disasters. In the event of such disruption, such as a major hurricane, it may be necessary for civilian hospitals to rapidly enact a fresh whole blood program. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the current use of blood therapy for trauma resuscitation, the US military's approach to fresh whole blood, and how maintaining a civilian capacity for fresh whole blood collection in the event of future man-made and natural disasters is key to promoting survival from trauma. PMID:27252101

  6. Military Report More Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use than Civilians

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Bernadette P.; Finch, Michael D.; Bray, Robert M.; Williams, Thomas V.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Hadden, Louise S.; Colleran, Heather L.; Jonas, Wayne B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The study objective was to estimate complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among active duty military and compare data with civilian use. Design A global survey on CAM use in the 12 previous months was conducted. Final participants (16,146) were stratified by gender, service, region, and pay grade. Analysis included prevalence of CAM use, demographic and lifestyle characteristics. Results Approximately 45% of respondents reported using at least one type of CAM therapy. Most commonly used therapies were as follows: prayer for one's own health (24.4%), massage therapy (14.1%), and relaxation techniques (10.8%). After exclusion of prayer for one's own health, adjusting to the 2000 U.S. census, overall CAM use in the military (44.5%) was higher than that in comparable civilian surveys (36.0% and 38.3%). Conclusions Military personnel reported using three CAM stress-reduction therapies at 2.5–7 times the rate of civilians. Among the military, high utilization of CAM practices that reduce stress may serve as markers for practitioners assessing an individual's health and well-being. PMID:23323682

  7. [Psychological distress among civilian police: A gender-based analysis].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Edinilsa Ramos; Franco, Letícia Gastão; Meireles, Camila de Carvalho; Ferreira, Vanessa Tokunaga; Dos Santos, Nilton César

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate potential psychological distress among members of the civilian police force, based on gender differences. It analyzes data from previous research on work, health conditions, and quality of life in the civilian police using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The study included and tested data from the questionnaire applied to a statistically representative sample of 2,746 civilian police (80.8% males and 19.2% females) from the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, according to gender variables and position in the police force (administrative, technical, and operational law enforcement). The study presents an overview of social and economic characteristics, job conditions, health problems, and quality of life, highlighting the areas of information where gender appears as an important factor. The Self-Reported Questionnaire (SRQ-20) was used to investigate psychological distress comparing males and females. The results did not show gender differences in psychological distress, but did identify significant differences in some items in the scale. Female police, especially in technical positions, showed a higher proportion than males. The conclusions corroborate some previous research. PMID:17187109

  8. Audiometric profile of civilian pilots according to noise exposure

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, Taiana Pacheco; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Schütz, Gabriel Eduardo; Mello, Márcia Gomide da Silva; Câmara, Volney de Magalhães

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the audiometric profile of civilian pilots according to the noise exposure level. METHODS This observational cross-sectional study evaluated 3,130 male civilian pilots aged between 17 and 59 years. These pilots were subjected to audiometric examinations for obtaining or revalidating the functional capacity certificate in 2011. The degree of hearing loss was classified as normal, suspected noise-induced hearing loss, and no suspected hearing loss with other associated complications. Pure-tone air-conduction audiometry was performed using supra-aural headphones and acoustic stimulus of the pure-tone type, containing tone thresholds of frequencies between 250 Hz and 6,000 Hz. The independent variables were professional categories, length of service, hours of flight, and right or left ear. The dependent variable was pilots with suspected noise-induced hearing loss. The noise exposure level was considered low/medium or high, and the latter involved periods > 5,000 flight hours and > 10 years of flight service. RESULTS A total of 29.3% pilots had suspected noise-induced hearing loss, which was bilateral in 12.8% and predominant in the left ear (23.7%). The number of pilots with suspected hearing loss increased as the noise exposure level increased. CONCLUSIONS Hearing loss in civilian pilots may be associated with noise exposure during the period of service and hours of flight. PMID:25372170

  9. Epidemiological patterns of suicide terrorism in the civilian Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Junaid Ahmad; Mehmood, Amber; Shahid, Muhammad; Bhatti, Sajjad Akbar; Akhtar, Umbreen; Razzak, Junaid Abdul

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we assessed the epidemiological patterns of suicide terrorism in the civilian population of Pakistan. Information about suicide terrorism-related events, deaths and injuries was extracted from the South-Asian Terrorism Portal (SATP) for the period from 2002 to October 2009. Of 198 events, civilians were involved in 194 events. Civilians accounted for 74.1% (N = 2017) of those who died and 93.8% (N = 6129) of those who were injured. In nine districts, mortality rates were more than one death per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The yearly trend showed a shift of attack targets from foreigners and sectarian targets in 2002-2005 to security forces or general public in 2006-2009. Attacks on public installations (mosques) or political gatherings resulted in a significantly greater (P ≤ 0.02) number of deaths (22 vs. 8) and injuries (59 vs. 24) per event compared with security installations. These results show that prevention might focus on political negotiation with armed groups and that appropriate measures should be taken to protect mosques and political gatherings.

  10. [The structure of agency: Georg Ernst Stahl's model of organic order and the role that it plays for the difference between living and non-living beings].

    PubMed

    Cheung, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    This essay focuses on the structure of agency in Georg Ernst Stahl's model of organic order and the role that it plays for the difference between living and non-living beings in the discourses of medicine and natural history around 1700. Stahl calls the order of organic beings an "organism". He characterizes the "organism" through the notions of tonic movement, energy and ratio. The tonic movement is a mechanism of contraction and relaxation of organic units to direct fluids to certain parts of the body; the energy represents a certain, limited potential of the living body to act spontaneously and to react if it is irritated; and the ratio expresses the logic of a processual, directed order imposed on corporeal dispositions. This ratio inheres in natural agents. However, to establish his theory of agency, Stahl first analyzes the irregular blood movements that characterize diseases. The capacity of the organic body to change these movements and to heal itself in redirecting them, leads him to the assumption that such bodies' can regulate their own order and that self-regulation requires an autonomous agent.

  11. [Typhus fever morbidity among the military personnel and civilians in the regions around Volga river during World War I].

    PubMed

    Raĭkova, S V; Zav'ialov, A I

    2013-07-01

    The article is concerned to the materials about epidemiologic situation of typhus fever in the regions around Volga river (Saratovsky, Samarsky and others) during World War I (1914-1918) among the military personnel of the Russian army and among the civilians. The main reasons for spread of infection, ways of the transmission, and also measures for decreasing of level of morbidity on the different stages of evacuation of patients with typhus fever in the safer hospitals are shown. The most important methods of fighting against epidemic of typhus fever were: isolation of patients in separate special hospitals, desincection and disinfection measures in the foci of infection and organization appropriate sanitary conditions for military man in the army and among civilians. Acquired valuable experience of territorial and military doctors during the period of epidemic of typhus fever allowed receiving complex effective antiepidemic measures of fighting and prevention from this disease.

  12. Civilian Pilot Training Skills, Curricula, and Costs; Defense and Commercial Pilot Procurement, Training and Career Systems. Interim Report. Volume I and Volume II, March 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logistics Management Inst., Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration of the Department of Transportation controls civilian pilot training. Through its regulations and testing and licensing procedures, the FAA sets minimum criteria for course content and knowledge and skill acquisition. Since few training organizations have the economic resources required to do original research…

  13. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 47 - The DoD Civilian/Military Service Review Board and the Advisory Panel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and the Advisory Panel B Appendix B to Part 47 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... Pt. 47, App. B Appendix B to Part 47—The DoD Civilian/Military Service Review Board and the Advisory Panel A. Organization and Management 1. The board shall consist of a president selected from...

  14. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 47 - The DoD Civilian/Military Service Review Board and the Advisory Panel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and the Advisory Panel B Appendix B to Part 47 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... Pt. 47, App. B Appendix B to Part 47—The DoD Civilian/Military Service Review Board and the Advisory Panel A. Organization and Management 1. The board shall consist of a president selected from...

  15. Effectiveness of Mechanisms and Models of Coordination between Organizations, Agencies and Bodies Providing or Financing Health Services in Humanitarian Crises: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Elie A.; El-Jardali, Fadi; Bou Karroum, Lama; El-Eid, Jamale; Brax, Hneine; Akik, Chaza; Osman, Mona; Hassan, Ghayda; Itani, Mira; Farha, Aida; Pottie, Kevin; Oliver, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective coordination between organizations, agencies and bodies providing or financing health services in humanitarian crises is required to ensure efficiency of services, avoid duplication, and improve equity. The objective of this review was to assess how, during and after humanitarian crises, different mechanisms and models of coordination between organizations, agencies and bodies providing or financing health services compare in terms of access to health services and health outcomes. Methods We registered a protocol for this review in PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews under number PROSPERO2014:CRD42014009267. Eligible studies included randomized and nonrandomized designs, process evaluations and qualitative methods. We electronically searched Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the WHO Global Health Library and websites of relevant organizations. We followed standard systematic review methodology for the selection, data abstraction, and risk of bias assessment. We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Results Of 14,309 identified citations from databases and organizations' websites, we identified four eligible studies. Two studies used mixed-methods, one used quantitative methods, and one used qualitative methods. The available evidence suggests that information coordination between bodies providing health services in humanitarian crises settings may be effective in improving health systems inputs. There is additional evidence suggesting that management/directive coordination such as the cluster model may improve health system inputs in addition to access to health services. None of the included studies assessed coordination through common representation and framework coordination. The evidence was judged to be of very low quality. Conclusion This systematic review provides evidence of possible effectiveness of information coordination

  16. 41 CFR 102-79.75 - May Executive agencies assess fees for antenna placements against public service organizations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... assess fees for antenna placements against public service organizations for antenna site outleases on... antenna placements against public service organizations for antenna site outleases on major pedestrian... space, upon approval from GSA, may assess fees for antenna placements against public...

  17. 41 CFR 102-79.75 - May Executive agencies assess fees for antenna placements against public service organizations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... assess fees for antenna placements against public service organizations for antenna site outleases on... antenna placements against public service organizations for antenna site outleases on major pedestrian... space, upon approval from GSA, may assess fees for antenna placements against public...

  18. A civilian perspective on ballistic trauma and gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gun violence is on the rise in some European countries, however most of the literature on gunshot injuries pertains to military weaponry and is difficult to apply to civilians, due to dissimilarities in wound contamination and wounding potential of firearms and ammunition. Gunshot injuries in civilians have more focal injury patterns and should be considered distinct entities. Methods A search of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health MEDLINE database was performed using PubMed. Results Craniocerebral gunshot injuries are often lethal, especially after suicide attempts. The treatment of non space consuming haematomas and the indications for invasive pressure measurement are controversial. Civilian gunshot injuries to the torso mostly intend to kill; however for those patients who do not die at the scene and are hemodynamically stable, insertion of a chest tube is usually the only required procedure for the majority of penetrating chest injuries. In penetrating abdominal injuries there is a trend towards non-operative care, provided that the patient is hemodynamically stable. Spinal gunshots can also often be treated without operation. Gunshot injuries of the extremities are rarely life-threatening but can be associated with severe morbidity. With the exception of craniocerebral, bowel, articular, or severe soft tissue injury, the use of antibiotics is controversial and may depend on the surgeon's preference. Conclusion The treatment strategy for patients with gunshot injuries to the torso mostly depends on the hemodynamic status of the patient. Whereas hemodynamically unstable patients require immediate operative measures like thoracotomy or laparotomy, hemodynamically stable patients might be treated with minor surgical procedures (e.g. chest tube) or even conservatively. PMID:20565804

  19. Responding to the deaf in disasters: establishing the need for systematic training for state-level emergency management agencies and community organizations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deaf and hard-of-hearing (Deaf/HH) individuals have been underserved before and during emergencies. This paper will assess Deaf/HH related emergency preparedness training needs for state emergency management agencies and deaf-serving community-based organizations (CBOs). Methods Four approaches were used: 1) a literature review; 2) results from 50 key informant (KI) interviews from state and territorial-level emergency management and public health agencies; 3) results from 14 KI interviews with deaf-serving CBOs in the San Francisco Bay Area; and 4) a pilot program evaluation of an emergency responder training serving the Deaf/HH in one urban community. Results Results from literature review and state and territorial level KIs indicate that there is a substantive gap in emergency preparedness training on serving Deaf/HH provided by state agencies. In addition, local KI interviews with 14 deaf-serving CBOs found gaps in training within deaf-serving CBOs. These gaps have implications for preparing for and responding to all-hazards emergencies including weather-related or earthquake-related natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and nuclear-chemical disasters. Conclusion Emergency preparedness trainings specific to responding to or promoting preparedness of the Deaf/HH is rare, even for state agency personnel, and frequently lack standardization, evaluation, or institutionalization in emergency management infrastructure. This has significant policy and research implications. Similarly, CBOs are not adequately trained to serve the needs of their constituents. PMID:23497178

  20. Federal Government: Civilian Agencies. U.S. Metric Study Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This second interim report on the feasibility of a United States changeover to a metric system stems from the U.S. Metric Study, which was authorized by Public Law 90-472, and was prepared by the National Bureau of Standards to provide a better basis for Congressional evaluation of this issue. Participating in this national survey were 55 federal…

  1. Prospective markets and design concepts for civilian remotely piloted aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P., Jr.; Gregory, T. J.; Aderhold, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper summarizes a study that examines the technical, economic, and environmental aspects of remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs) in the civil environment. A market survey was conducted in which 35 civil applications of RPVs were identified. For a number of these uses, vehicle and system concepts were defined, benefit and cost comparisons were made with present methods, and the influence of safety and environmental implications was assessed. The results suggest a sizable potential demand for the use of RPVs in the civil sector, and some of the applications show promising cost savings over established methods. A focussed technology effort could provide the safety assurances needed for routine civilian operation of RPVs.

  2. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    This sixth Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) describes activities and expenditures of the Office during fiscal year 1988. An epilogue chapter reports significant events from the end of the fiscal year on September 30, 1988 through March 1989. The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPA) of 1987 made significant changes to the NWPA relating to repository siting and monitored retrievable storage and added new provisions for the establishment of several institutional entities with which OCRWM will interact. Therefore, a dominant theme throughout this report is the implementation of the policy focus and specific provisions of the Amendments Act. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. [Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane: classification and assessment of carcinogenicity, guidelines, threshold values, and standards developed by national and international entities, organizations, and agencies].

    PubMed

    Binetti, R; Costamagna, F M; Marcello, I

    2001-01-01

    International, national and regulatory classification, evaluation, guidelines and occupational exposure values regarding vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane, carried out by European Union (EU). Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Italian National Advisory Toxicological Committee (CCTN), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), World Health Organization (WHO), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) and other institutions, have been considered with particular reference to the carcinogenic effects. Moreover information is reported in support of classification and evaluation and a short historical review since early 1970s, when first evidence that occupational exposure to VC could lead to angiosarcoma was published.

  4. Agency Training Centers for Federal Employes, Fiscal Year 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC. Bureau of Training.

    This publication provides up to date information on Federal agency operated training centers, including data on the number, variety, and general characteristics of program offerings for civilian employees. Locations, purposes, courses and other programs, eligibility for attendance, sources of further information, and other items of potential…

  5. Navy acted properly in seizing civilian's HIV test report.

    PubMed

    1996-09-20

    The U.S. Navy's seizure of a civilian's HIV lab report was upheld by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The Navy's actions were ruled to be key elements of a criminal investigation of an HIV-positive naval officer who engaged in unprotected sex. The civilian [name removed], and the officer, [name removed] [name removed], engaged in unprotected sexual acts on a number of occasions after [name removed] assured [name removed] he was HIV-negative. When [name removed] learned that [name removed] was HIV-positive, he reported [name removed] to his commanding officer. [Name removed] was under orders not to engage in sex without a condom. If [name removed]'s claims were correct, [name removed] could face court martial and discharge from the Navy. The Navy obtained a search warrant for [name removed]'s apartment and discovered a lab report showing [name removed] tested positive for HIV antibodies. The report was seized as evidence against [name removed] sued the Navy investigators claiming violation of his Fourth Amendment protection. A U.S. District Judge and the 9th Circuit Court found in favor of the defendants. The Navy's interest in collecting evidence of a serious crime outweighed [name removed]'s interest in protecting the confidentiality of his HIV status. PMID:11363864

  6. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency International Benchmark on the VENUS-2 MOX Core Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Na, B.-C.; Sartori, Enrico

    2002-09-15

    Within the framework of the Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee, theoretical physics benchmarks and multiple recycling issues related to various mixed-oxide (MOX)-fueled systems have been studied. Many improvements and clarifications in nuclear data libraries and calculation methods have been achieved from the results of the theoretical benchmarks performed. However, it was felt that there was also a need to link these findings to data from experiments. Hence, a blind international benchmark exercise based on the two-dimensional VENUS-2 MOX core measurement data was carried out. Twelve participants from ten countries participated in the benchmark. Both the deterministic and the Monte Carlo methods were applied with different nuclear data sets. This technical note provides a comparative analysis between calculated and measured results. Comparison with experimental results identified the origins of discrepancies between calculations and measurements and enabled the quantitative comparison of the relative merits of the different calculation methods.

  7. Community Resilience of Civilians at War: A New Perspective.

    PubMed

    Eshel, Yohanan; Kimhi, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    A new concept of community resilience pertaining to the community's post adversity strength to vulnerability ratio was associated with five determinants: individual resilience, national resilience, well-being, community size, and sense of coherence. The data was collected four months after Israel's war in the Gaza Strip in 2014. Participants were 251 adult civilians living in southern Israel who have recently been threatened by massive missile attacks, and 259 adults living in northern Israel, which has not been under missile fire recently. The investigated variables predicted community resilience, and their effects were mediated by sense of coherence. Results which were similar for both samples were discussed in terms of the nature of resilience and in terms of proximal and distal exposure to war. PMID:26482587

  8. Community Resilience of Civilians at War: A New Perspective.

    PubMed

    Eshel, Yohanan; Kimhi, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    A new concept of community resilience pertaining to the community's post adversity strength to vulnerability ratio was associated with five determinants: individual resilience, national resilience, well-being, community size, and sense of coherence. The data was collected four months after Israel's war in the Gaza Strip in 2014. Participants were 251 adult civilians living in southern Israel who have recently been threatened by massive missile attacks, and 259 adults living in northern Israel, which has not been under missile fire recently. The investigated variables predicted community resilience, and their effects were mediated by sense of coherence. Results which were similar for both samples were discussed in terms of the nature of resilience and in terms of proximal and distal exposure to war.

  9. Military trauma training at civilian centers: a decade of advancements.

    PubMed

    Thorson, Chad M; Dubose, Joseph J; Rhee, Peter; Knuth, Thomas E; Dorlac, Warren C; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Garcia, George D; Ryan, Mark L; Van Haren, Robert M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2012-12-01

    In the late 1990s, a Department of Defense subcommittee screened more than 100 civilian trauma centers according to the number of admissions, percentage of penetrating trauma, and institutional interest in relation to the specific training missions of each of the three service branches. By the end of 2001, the Army started a program at University of Miami/Ryder Trauma Center, the Navy began a similar program at University of Southern California/Los Angeles County Medical Center, and the Air Force initiated three Centers for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (C-STARS) at busy academic medical centers: R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland (C-STARS Baltimore), Saint Louis University (C-STARS St. Louis), and The University Hospital/University of Cincinnati (C-STARS Cincinnati). Each center focuses on three key areas, didactic training, state-of-the-art simulation and expeditionary equipment training, as well as actual clinical experience in the acute management of trauma patients. Each is integral to delivering lifesaving combat casualty care in theater. Initially, there were growing pains and the struggle to develop an effective curriculum in a short period. With the foresight of each trauma training center director and a dynamic exchange of information with civilian trauma leaders and frontline war fighters, there has been a continuous evolution and improvement of each center's curriculum. Now, it is clear that the longest military conflict in US history and the first of the 21st century has led to numerous innovations in cutting edge trauma training on a comprehensive array of topics. This report provides an overview of the decade-long evolutionary process in providing the highest-quality medical care for our injured heroes.

  10. Military trauma training at civilian centers: a decade of advancements.

    PubMed

    Thorson, Chad M; Dubose, Joseph J; Rhee, Peter; Knuth, Thomas E; Dorlac, Warren C; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Garcia, George D; Ryan, Mark L; Van Haren, Robert M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2012-12-01

    In the late 1990s, a Department of Defense subcommittee screened more than 100 civilian trauma centers according to the number of admissions, percentage of penetrating trauma, and institutional interest in relation to the specific training missions of each of the three service branches. By the end of 2001, the Army started a program at University of Miami/Ryder Trauma Center, the Navy began a similar program at University of Southern California/Los Angeles County Medical Center, and the Air Force initiated three Centers for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (C-STARS) at busy academic medical centers: R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland (C-STARS Baltimore), Saint Louis University (C-STARS St. Louis), and The University Hospital/University of Cincinnati (C-STARS Cincinnati). Each center focuses on three key areas, didactic training, state-of-the-art simulation and expeditionary equipment training, as well as actual clinical experience in the acute management of trauma patients. Each is integral to delivering lifesaving combat casualty care in theater. Initially, there were growing pains and the struggle to develop an effective curriculum in a short period. With the foresight of each trauma training center director and a dynamic exchange of information with civilian trauma leaders and frontline war fighters, there has been a continuous evolution and improvement of each center's curriculum. Now, it is clear that the longest military conflict in US history and the first of the 21st century has led to numerous innovations in cutting edge trauma training on a comprehensive array of topics. This report provides an overview of the decade-long evolutionary process in providing the highest-quality medical care for our injured heroes. PMID:23192074

  11. 32 CFR 705.36 - Government transportation of civilians for public affairs purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Regulations on transportation of civilians vary according to whether: (i) The civilians are news media... authority in this regard. (3) The following policy has been established by DOD for providing all types of... media representatives. (1) This section applies to media representatives who are embarked for...

  12. Military and Civilian L2 Instructors: Decoding Perceptions of U.S. Service Academy Cadets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Zachary F.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether cadets at a U.S. service academy perceived attitudinal differences toward their military and civilian L2 instructors along three variables: foreign language expertise, communicative anxiety, and relatability. Cadets' proficiency levels (divided by beginning and intermediate classes) and current instructor (civilian or…

  13. 46 CFR 9.1 - Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel. 9.1 Section 9.1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.1 Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian...

  14. 46 CFR 9.1 - Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel. 9.1 Section 9.1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.1 Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian...

  15. 46 CFR 9.1 - Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel. 9.1 Section 9.1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.1 Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian...

  16. 46 CFR 9.1 - Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel. 9.1 Section 9.1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.1 Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian...

  17. 46 CFR 9.1 - Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel. 9.1 Section 9.1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.1 Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian...

  18. 5 CFR 792.210 - What is the definition of civilian employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the definition of civilian... Appropriated Funds for Child Care Costs for Lower Income Employees-What Is the Child Care Subsidy Program Legislation and to Whom Does It Apply? § 792.210 What is the definition of civilian employee? The...

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Student Service Member/Veteran and Civilian Student Drinking Motives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; Barry, Adam E.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the nature and correlates of 252 student service members'/military veteran and civilian college students' drinking motivations. Data was collected via electronic survey. Results revealed no differences between military affiliated and civilian students in mean levels of alcohol motivations; however, the links between…

  20. 32 CFR 884.14 - Compliance with court orders by civilian employees and family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... employees and family members. 884.14 Section 884.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.14 Compliance with court orders by civilian employees and family members. (a) The...

  1. 32 CFR 884.14 - Compliance with court orders by civilian employees and family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... employees and family members. 884.14 Section 884.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.14 Compliance with court orders by civilian employees and family members. (a) The...

  2. Violent Deaths of Iraqi Civilians, 2003–2008: Analysis by Perpetrator, Weapon, Time, and Location

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Madelyn Hsiao-Rei; Dardagan, Hamit; Guerrero Serdán, Gabriela; Bagnall, Peter M.; Sloboda, John A.; Spagat, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Armed violence is a major public health and humanitarian problem in Iraq. In this descriptive statistical analysis we aimed to describe for the first time Iraqi civilian deaths caused by perpetrators of armed violence during the first 5 years of the Iraq war: over time; by weapon used; by region (governorate); and by victim demographics. Methods and Findings We analyzed the Iraq Body Count database of 92,614 Iraqi civilian direct deaths from armed violence occurring from March 20, 2003 through March 19, 2008, of which Unknown perpetrators caused 74% of deaths (n = 68,396), Coalition forces 12% (n = 11,516), and Anti-Coalition forces 11% (n = 9,954). We analyzed the subset of 60,481 civilian deaths from 14,196 short-duration events of lethal violence to link individual civilian deaths to events involving perpetrators and their methods. One-third of civilian violent death was from extrajudicial executions by Unknown perpetrators; quadratic regression shows these deaths progressively and disproportionately increased as deaths from other forms of violence increased across Iraq's governorates. The highest average number of civilians killed per event in which a civilian died were in Unknown perpetrator suicide bombings targeting civilians (19 per lethal event) and Coalition aerial bombings (17 per lethal event). In temporal analysis, numbers of civilian deaths from Coalition air attacks, and woman and child deaths from Coalition forces, peaked during the invasion. We applied a Woman and Child “Dirty War Index” (DWI), measuring the proportion of women and children among civilian deaths of known demographic status, to the 22,066 civilian victims identified as men, women, or children to indicate relatively indiscriminate perpetrator effects. DWI findings suggest the most indiscriminate effects on women and children were from Unknown perpetrators using mortar fire (DWI  = 79) and nonsuicide vehicle bombs (DWI  = 54) and from Coalition air

  3. Using Research to Enhance Staff Development: A Collaboration between a State Education Agency and an Independent Research Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappa, Joseph B.; Brown, Patricia P.

    In 1981, TDR Associates, a private, independent research organization in Newton, Massachusetts, began a two and one-half year study of "Knowledge Utilization and School Improvement Through Staff Initiated Inservice Programs." This study was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Education and conducted under an arrangement with the…

  4. Knowledge of infectious disease reporting amongst military and civilian medical officers.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, S F

    1994-10-01

    Anecdotally expressed concern over the military/civilian interface regarding infectious disease notification, and the current review of procedures in both civilian and military settings prompted this study. Its aim was to quantify knowledge of doctors involved in the provision of care to Army personnel and their dependants in the United Kingdom regarding infectious disease reporting and make recommendations to improve the process. A questionnaire was sent to all such military and civilian doctors in the Southern Military District of England. The group was no less knowledgeable than others studied previously. Differences were found in the knowledge of reporting procedures between civilian and military doctors, with military hospital doctors demonstrating particularly poor knowledge. It is recommended that specific instruction on all aspects of infectious disease reporting be given to doctors joining the Army and to civilian GPs involved in care of the Military.

  5. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media... personnel as the Secretary of the Navy may authorize can act as correspondents for civilian media....

  6. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media... personnel as the Secretary of the Navy may authorize can act as correspondents for civilian media....

  7. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media... personnel as the Secretary of the Navy may authorize can act as correspondents for civilian media....

  8. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media... personnel as the Secretary of the Navy may authorize can act as correspondents for civilian media....

  9. The Best of Both Worlds: Psychiatry Training at Combined Civilian-Military Programs.

    PubMed

    Welton, Randon S; Hamaoka, Derrick A; Broderick, Pamela J; Schillerstrom, Jason E

    2015-08-01

    Air Force psychiatry faces the task of training competent military psychiatrists in an era of continuing reductions. Beginning in the 1980s, the Air Force started collaborating with University partners to create hybrid training programs, civilian-military psychiatry residencies. These mergers provide stability for Air Force psychiatry training in the face of increased operational missions and uncertain military recruiting. As a result of these combined programs, Air Force psychiatry residents gain access to a broader range of civilian clinical experience and expertise while maintaining a focus on distinctive military requirements. The combining of programs opens up options for academic activities which may not have otherwise existed. Both military and civilian residents benefit from the occupational psychiatry experiences available within military clinical sites. These programs give civilian residents a chance to assist active duty members and their families and provide insight into the military "lifecycle." These collaborations benefit the universities by providing access to a larger pool of residents and faculty. The synthesis of the military and civilian programs raises some ongoing obstacles such as civilian residents' ability to gain access to military resources. The programs must also accommodate separate mechanisms for selecting residents (the National Residency Matching Program versus the Joint Selection Board for Graduate Medical Education). Military residents must also comply with military standards and requirements while maintaining the universities' standards of conduct and professionalism. Merging military training programs into university programs creates a vibrant opportunity to create exceptional military and civilian psychiatrists.

  10. Civilian Power from Space in the Early 21st Century

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Ishikawa, M; Wood, L

    2003-06-01

    If power beamed from space is to be become widely used on Earth in the first half of the 21St century, several thus-far-persistent impediments must be obviated, including threshold effects and problematic aspects of cost, availability, reliability, hazards and environmental impacts. We sketch a generally-applicable route to doing so, noting key enabling technologies and practical features. Likely-essential features of any successful strategy include vigorous, systematic leveraging of all intrinsic features of space-derived power, e.g., addressing marginal, high-value-added markets for electric power in space- and time-agile manners to conveniently provide power-upon-demand, and incrementally ''wedging'' into ever-larger markets with ever more cost-efficient generations and scales of technology. We suggest that no prudent strategic plan will rely upon large-scale, long-term public subsidies--fiscal, regulatory, etc.--with their attendant ''sovereign risks'' and interminable delays, and that plan-essential governmental support likely will be limited to early feasibility demonstrations, provision of threshold technologies and a rational, competition-neutral licensing environment. If salient realities are uniformly respected and accessible technologies are intelligently leveraged, electricity derived from space-sourced power-beams may come into significant civilian use during the latter part of the first quarter of this century, and may become widely used by the half-century point.

  11. Heavy vehicle automation: transitioning from civilian to military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misener, James A.; Shladover, Steven E.; Empey, Dan; Tan, Han-Shue

    2001-09-01

    We describe potential military robotics applications for the heavy vehicle automation and driver assistance research that has been conducted on at the California Partners for Advanced Transit and Highways (PATH). Specifically, we summarize the state of vehicle automation research at PATH by beginning with a short description of automated platoon operations with eight light duty passenger vehicles. Then we focus on automation of a Class 8 Freightliner Model FLD 125 tractor with 45-ft trailer, and lateral driver assist installed in a 10-wheel International snowplow. We also discuss full automation plans for a Kodiak 4000-ton/hour rotary snowblower, two 40-ft New Flyer buses, one 60-ft New Flyer articulated bus, and three Freightliner Century tractor-trailer combinations. We discuss benefits for civilian applications - congestion relief, driver safety, and fuel economy/emissions reductions. We then follow with a discussion of the benefits from potential military spin-ons which include, as dual-use applications, driver safety and fuel economy/emissions. We end by discussing the additional military benefit in the conduct of tactical resupply operations, where vehicles of similar weight class and performance as those experimented by PATH can be used in automated convoys with savings in manpower and survivability in addition to improved mission operations.

  12. Experimental model for civilian ballistic brain injury biomechanics quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical quantification of projectile penetration using experimental head models can enhance the understanding of civilian ballistic brain injury and advance treatment. Two of the most commonly used handgun projectiles (25-cal, 275 m/s and 9 mm, 395 m/s) were discharged to spherical head models with gelatin and Sylgard simulants. Four ballistic pressure transducers recorded temporal pressure distributions at 308kHz, and temporal cavity dynamics were captured at 20,000 frames/second (fps) using high-speed digital video images. Pressures ranged from 644.6 to -92.8 kPa. Entry pressures in gelatin models were higher than exit pressures, whereas in Sylgard models entry pressures were lower or equivalent to exit pressures. Gelatin responded with brittle-type failure, while Sylgard demonstrated a ductile pattern through formation of micro-bubbles along projectile path. Temporary cavities in Sylgard models were 1.5-2x larger than gelatin models. Pressures in Sylgard models were more sensitive to projectile velocity and diameter increase, indicating Sylgard was more rate sensitive than gelatin. Based on failure patterns and brain tissue rate-sensitive characteristics, Sylgard was found to be an appropriate simulant. Compared with spherical projectile data, full-metal jacket (FMJ) projectiles produced different temporary cavity and pressures, demonstrating shape effects. Models using Sylgard gel and FMJ projectiles are appropriate to enhance understanding and mechanisms of ballistic brain injury. PMID:17166502

  13. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    This seventh Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) describes activities and expenditures of the Office during fiscal years (FY) 1989 and 1990. In November 1989, OCRWM is responsible for disposing of the Nation`s spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. To direct the implementation of its mission, OCRWM has established the following objectives: (1) Safe and timely disposal: to establish as soon as practicable the ability to dispose of radioactive waste in a geologic repository licensed by the NRC. (2) Timely and adequate waste acceptance: to begin the operation of the waste management system as soon as practicable in order to obtain the system development and operational benefits that have been identified for the MRS facility. (3) Schedule confidence: to establish confidence in the schedule for waste acceptance and disposal such that the management of radioactive waste is not an obstacle to the nuclear energy option. (4) System flexibility: to ensure that the program has the flexibility necessary for adapting to future circumstances while fulfilling established commitments. To achieve these objectives, OCRWM is developing a waste management system consisting of a geologic repository for permanent disposed deep beneath the surface of the earth, a facility for MRS, and a system for transporting the waste.

  14. Military and Civilian Burn Injuries During Armed Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Atiyeh, B.S.; Gunn, S.W.A.; Hayek, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment, and war burns have been described for more than 5,000 years of written history. Fire was probably utilized as a weapon long before that. With the ever-increasing destructive power and efficiency of modern weapons, casualties, both fatal and non-fatal, are reaching new highs, particularly among civilians who are becoming the major wartime targets in recent wars, accounting for most of the killed and wounded. Even though medical personnel usually believe that a knowledge of weaponry has little relevance to their ability to effectively treat injuries and that it may in some way be in conflict with their status, accorded under the Geneva and Hague treaties, it is imperative that they know how weapons are used and understand their effects on the human body. The present review explores various categories of weapons of modern warfare that are unfamiliar to most medical and paramedical personnel responsible for burn treatment. The mechanisms and patterns of injury produced by each class of weapons are examined so that a better understanding of burn management in a warfare situation may be achieved. PMID:21991098

  15. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1988-08-01

    This is the fifth Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report covers the activities and expenditures of OCRWM during fiscal year 1987, which ended on September 30, 1987. The activities and accomplishments of OCRWM during fiscal year 1987 are discussed in chapters 1 through 9 of this report. The audited financial statements of the Nuclear Waste Fund are provided in chapter 10. Since the close of the fiscal year, a number of significant events have occurred. Foremost among them was the passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (Amendments Act) on December 21, 1987, nearly 3 months after the end of the fiscal year covered by this report. As a result, some of the plans and activities discussed in chapters 1 through 9 are currently undergoing significant change or are being discontinued. Most prominent among the provisions of the Amendments Act is the designation of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the only candidate first repository site to be characterized. Therefore, the site characterization plans for Deaf Smith, Texas, and Hanford, Washington, discussed in chapter 3, will not be issued. The refocusing of the waste management program under the Amendments Act is highlighted in the epilogue, chapter 11. 68 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. US Civilian Smallpox Preparedness and Response Program, 2003.

    PubMed

    Strikas, Raymond A; Neff, Linda J; Rotz, Lisa; Cono, Joanne; Knutson, Donna; Henderson, Joseph; Orenstein, Walter A

    2008-03-15

    Variola virus, the cause of smallpox disease, has been deemed a possible bioterrorism agent. Since November 2001, federal, state, and local public health partners implemented activities to prepare for a possible smallpox outbreak. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) produced and delivered training and educational materials for smallpox preparedness in many formats, developed detailed smallpox vaccine information statements about vaccine contraindications and vaccination site care, and established mechanisms to monitor and respond to adverse events after smallpox vaccination. The last included enhancements to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, a pregnancy registry for inadvertently vaccinated pregnant women, and a Clinician Telephone Information Line to collect reports about adverse events. The civilian responder vaccination program was conducted with rigorous safety procedures, and few historically recognized adverse events were observed. However, myocarditis and/or pericarditis was newly recognized as an adverse event caused by the New York City Board of Health vaccinia vaccine strain. This smallpox preparedness program put into place a number of measures to advance the United States' readiness for a smallpox outbreak that have assisted in preparedness for other threats. PMID:18284355

  17. Historical civilian nuclear accident based Nuclear Reactor Condition Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Kaylyn Marie

    There are significant challenges to successfully monitoring multiple processes within a nuclear reactor facility. The evidence for this observation can be seen in the historical civilian nuclear incidents that have occurred with similar initiating conditions and sequences of events. Because there is a current lack within the nuclear industry, with regards to the monitoring of internal sensors across multiple processes for patterns of failure, this study has developed a program that is directed at accomplishing that charge through an innovation that monitors these systems simultaneously. The inclusion of digital sensor technology within the nuclear industry has appreciably increased computer systems' capabilities to manipulate sensor signals, thus making the satisfaction of these monitoring challenges possible. One such manipulation to signal data has been explored in this study. The Nuclear Reactor Condition Analyzer (NRCA) program that has been developed for this research, with the assistance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Graduate Fellowship, utilizes one-norm distance and kernel weighting equations to normalize all nuclear reactor parameters under the program's analysis. This normalization allows the program to set more consistent parameter value thresholds for a more simplified approach to analyzing the condition of the nuclear reactor under its scrutiny. The product of this research provides a means for the nuclear industry to implement a safety and monitoring program that can oversee the system parameters of a nuclear power reactor facility, like that of a nuclear power plant.

  18. Management of civilian gunshot injuries to the hip.

    PubMed

    Long, W T; Brien, E W; Boucree, J B; Filler, B; Stark, H H; Dorr, L D

    1995-01-01

    The orthopedic surgeon at a civilian trauma center is likely to encounter a gunshot injury to the hip. The nonmilitary literature regarding this injury gives few guidelines regarding an appropriate diagnostic evaluation or the indication for arthrotomy. We found that the best diagnostic test to detect joint penetration was hip aspiration followed by an arthrogram. Selected cases can be treated successfully with antibiotic therapy without an arthrotomy. These cases involve a low-velocity missile that passes through the joint, causes minimal bone disruption, and is free of bowel contaminants. If an arthrotomy is not performed, the physician must follow the patient with repeated physical examinations, complete blood counts, and a hip aspiration whenever infection is suspected. All transbdominal hip injuries require an immediate arthrotomy. In this series, bullets left in contact with joint fluid resulted in joint destruction or infection. Each patient with a displaced femoral neck fracture had a poor outcome with internal fixation. Hip arthroplasty or fusion should be considered as elective procedures for definitive management of these injuries.

  19. Experimental model for civilian ballistic brain injury biomechanics quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical quantification of projectile penetration using experimental head models can enhance the understanding of civilian ballistic brain injury and advance treatment. Two of the most commonly used handgun projectiles (25-cal, 275 m/s and 9 mm, 395 m/s) were discharged to spherical head models with gelatin and Sylgard simulants. Four ballistic pressure transducers recorded temporal pressure distributions at 308kHz, and temporal cavity dynamics were captured at 20,000 frames/second (fps) using high-speed digital video images. Pressures ranged from 644.6 to -92.8 kPa. Entry pressures in gelatin models were higher than exit pressures, whereas in Sylgard models entry pressures were lower or equivalent to exit pressures. Gelatin responded with brittle-type failure, while Sylgard demonstrated a ductile pattern through formation of micro-bubbles along projectile path. Temporary cavities in Sylgard models were 1.5-2x larger than gelatin models. Pressures in Sylgard models were more sensitive to projectile velocity and diameter increase, indicating Sylgard was more rate sensitive than gelatin. Based on failure patterns and brain tissue rate-sensitive characteristics, Sylgard was found to be an appropriate simulant. Compared with spherical projectile data, full-metal jacket (FMJ) projectiles produced different temporary cavity and pressures, demonstrating shape effects. Models using Sylgard gel and FMJ projectiles are appropriate to enhance understanding and mechanisms of ballistic brain injury.

  20. Safety profile of amateur kickboxing among military and civilian competitors.

    PubMed

    Buse, George J; Wood, Robert M

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify match-ending injuries in amateur kickboxing (KB) among military and civilian competitors. A total of 148 competitors, of whom 5 were on active duty in the U.S. Air Force or Marine Corps, participated in amateur KB matches (N = 74) from 1999 to 2001. Match-ending injuries were observed and managed from ringside by one author (G.J.B.). Of all matches, 23 (31.1%) were stopped because of injury. Of the 23 matches, 15 (65.2%) ended because of traumatic brain injury, 4 (17.4%) because of orthopedic trauma, 3 (13.0%) because of thoracoabdominal trauma, and 1 (4.4%) because of ocular trauma. The incidence of traumatic brain injury was greater than that of all other match-ending injuries combined (p < 0.01). Because of the incidence and potentially serious sequelae of injuries associated with competitive KB, military commanders should exercise operational risk management in an attempt to safeguard personnel from unnecessary hazard.

  1. US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) perspective on AOC (assimilable organic carbon) research as related to coliform colonization and compliance problems

    SciTech Connect

    Reasoner, D.J.; Rice, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    The biological stability of treated drinking water has become a major concern for water utilities. The U.S. E.P.A. is concerned from the perspective of coliform MCL compliance and remediation of coliform biofilm problems. The levels of readily assimilable nutrients present in treated water are affected by water treatment processes, but of greatest concern are those processes, such as ozonation, that cause increases in the levels of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and therefore contribute to biological instability of the water. Thus, the combined use of ozonation (pre-oxidant) and a lower disinfectant residual as an approach to reducing disinfectant byproducts may result in increased bacterial growth, including coliforms, in the distribution system. Information is needed on: the AOC flux level that stimulate coliform growth in biofilm: the specific nutrients and concentrations that can stimulate growth of both coliforms and HPC; treatment strategies to reduce AOC levels and strategies to effectively control biofilm formation where AOC levels cannot be reduced.

  2. 45 CFR 506.1 - “Civilian American citizen” defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPENSATION Civilian... who, being then a citizen of the United States, was captured in Southeast Asia during the...

  3. 45 CFR 506.1 - “Civilian American citizen” defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPENSATION Civilian... who, being then a citizen of the United States, was captured in Southeast Asia during the...

  4. 45 CFR 506.1 - “Civilian American citizen” defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPENSATION Civilian... who, being then a citizen of the United States, was captured in Southeast Asia during the...

  5. 45 CFR 506.1 - “Civilian American citizen” defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPENSATION Civilian... who, being then a citizen of the United States, was captured in Southeast Asia during the...

  6. 45 CFR 506.1 - “Civilian American citizen” defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPENSATION Civilian... who, being then a citizen of the United States, was captured in Southeast Asia during the...

  7. Community-integrated brain injury rehabilitation: Treatment models and challenges for civilian, military, and veteran populations.

    PubMed

    Trudel, Tina M; Nidiffer, F Don; Barth, Jeffrey T

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health problem in civilian, military, and veteran populations. Individuals experiencing moderate to severe TBI require a continuum of care involving acute hospitalization and postacute rehabilitation, including community reintegration and, one would hope, a return home to function as a productive member of the community. In the military, the goal is to help individuals with TBI return to active duty or make an optimal return to civilian life if the extent of their injuries necessitates a "medical board" discharge. Whether civilian, military, or veteran with TBI, individuals who move beyond the need to live in a facility must be reintegrated back into the community. This article discusses four treatment models for community reintegration, reviews treatment standardization and outcome issues, and describes a manualized rehabilitation pilot program designed to provide community reintegration and return to duty/work for civilians, veterans, and military personnel with TBI.

  8. Comparison of DSM-IV and proposed ICD-11 formulations of PTSD among civilian survivors of war and war veterans.

    PubMed

    Morina, Nexhmedin; van Emmerik, Arnold A P; Andrews, Bernice; Brewin, Chris R

    2014-12-01

    The World Health Organization recently proposed a reformulation of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for the 11(th) edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), employing only 6 symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of this reformulation of PTSD as compared to criteria according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) on the prevalence of current PTSD as well as comorbid major depressive episode and anxiety disorders other than PTSD. Study 1 involved previously collected interviews with 560 Kosovar civilian war survivors; Study 2 employed a previously collected sample of 142 British war veterans. Results revealed no change in the diagnostic status under the criteria proposed for ICD-11 in 87.5% of civilian war survivors and 91.5% of war veterans. Participants who only met the newly proposed criteria showed lower rates of comorbid major depressive episode than participants who only met DSM-IV criteria (13.6% vs. 43.8% respectively). Rates of comorbid anxiety disorders did not significantly differ between participants who lost or gained a PTSD diagnosis under the proposed criteria.

  9. Politics, Police Accountability, and Public Health: Civilian Review in Newark, New Jersey.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alecia

    2016-04-01

    Police brutality, a longstanding civil rights issue, has returned to the forefront of American public debate. A growing body of public health research shows that excessive use of force by police and racial profiling have adverse effects on health for African Americans and other marginalized groups. Yet, interventions to monitor unlawful policing have been met with fierce opposition at the federal, state, and local levels. On April 30, 2015, the mayor of Newark, New Jersey signed an executive order establishing a Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB) to monitor the Newark Police Department (NPD). Using a mixed-methods approach, this study examined how advocates and government actors accomplished this recent policy change in the face of police opposition and after a 50-year history of unsuccessful attempts in Newark. Drawing on official public documents, news media, and interviews conducted in April and May 2015, I propose that: (1) a Department of Justice investigation of the NPD, (2) the activist background of the Mayor and his relationships with community organizations, and (3) the momentum provided by the national Black Lives Matter movement were pivotal in overcoming political obstacles to reform. Examining the history of CCRB adoption in Newark suggests when and where advocates may intervene to promote policing reforms in other US cities. PMID:26661578

  10. [Documentation of violence against civilians in a civil war. Examples from Kashmir].

    PubMed

    Petersen, H D; Larsen, M; Mannstaedt, M; Skytt, G L; Vedel, O M; Wandall, J H

    1998-07-13

    Physicians for Human Rights/Denmark visited Kashmir three times in 1993 and 1994. In Indian-held Kashmir we examined victims of torture and gunshots and we assessed similar evidence collected by local lawyers and doctors. In refugee camps for Indian Kashmiries we examined ten children, who were reported to have been tortured at the age of 5-14 years, and ten other children who allegedly had been ill-treated. Furthermore, 17 adults, who reported that they had been tortured, were examined. In nearly all cases there were physical findings in accordance with the histories of torture. In many cases, including those of the children, the findings were highly remarkable by their shape and localization. We interpret them as evidence of intentionally inflicted injuries. In the refugee camps we carried out a prevalence study of exposure to organized violence. Approximately 95% of all families had been exposed to violence; 35% reported that their children had been ill-treated. The physical findings indicate that intentional traumatization of civilians including children in Indian-held Kashmir takes place; the results of the prevalence study suggest that exposure to violence is widespread. PMID:9679433

  11. Politics, Police Accountability, and Public Health: Civilian Review in Newark, New Jersey.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alecia

    2016-04-01

    Police brutality, a longstanding civil rights issue, has returned to the forefront of American public debate. A growing body of public health research shows that excessive use of force by police and racial profiling have adverse effects on health for African Americans and other marginalized groups. Yet, interventions to monitor unlawful policing have been met with fierce opposition at the federal, state, and local levels. On April 30, 2015, the mayor of Newark, New Jersey signed an executive order establishing a Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB) to monitor the Newark Police Department (NPD). Using a mixed-methods approach, this study examined how advocates and government actors accomplished this recent policy change in the face of police opposition and after a 50-year history of unsuccessful attempts in Newark. Drawing on official public documents, news media, and interviews conducted in April and May 2015, I propose that: (1) a Department of Justice investigation of the NPD, (2) the activist background of the Mayor and his relationships with community organizations, and (3) the momentum provided by the national Black Lives Matter movement were pivotal in overcoming political obstacles to reform. Examining the history of CCRB adoption in Newark suggests when and where advocates may intervene to promote policing reforms in other US cities.

  12. 32 CFR 161.21 - Benefits for retired civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... former member by a placement agency (recognized by the Secretary of Defense) or by another source authorized by State or local law to provide adoption placement, in anticipation of the legal adoption by the... self-support because of a mental or physical incapacity that existed before age 21, or occurred...

  13. Health-Related Quality of Life Among US Veterans and Civilians by Race and Ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Luncheon, Cecily

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Among veterans, having been selected into the military and having easy access to medical care during and after military service may reduce premature mortality but not morbidity from mental distress and may not improve health-related quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine whether veterans in different racial/ethnic groups differ in their health-related quality of life from each other and from their civilian counterparts. Methods Among 800,000 respondents to the 2007–2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System surveys, approximately 110,000 identified themselves as veterans and answered questions about their sociodemographic characteristics, self-rated health, and recent health-related quality of life. Nonoverlapping 95% confidence intervals of means distinguished veterans and civilians of different racial/ethnic groups. Results Veteran and civilian American Indians/Alaska Natives reported more physically unhealthy days, mentally unhealthy days, and recent activity limitation days than their veteran and civilian counterparts in other racial/ethnic groups. Non-Hispanic white veterans and Hispanic veterans reported more physically unhealthy days, mentally unhealthy days, and recent activity limitation days than their civilian counterparts. Conclusion Unlike findings in other studies, our findings show that veterans’ health-related quality of life differs from that of civilians both within the same racial/ethnic group and among different racial/ethnic groups. Because once-healthy soldiers may not be as healthy when they return to civilian life, assessing their health-related quality of life over time may identify those who need help to regain their health. PMID:22652126

  14. Youth Media and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauge, Chelsey

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses how capacity is conceived of and understood in youth media/civic education programming, and how beliefs about agency, development, relationality and youth manifests in the discourses, programmes, and practices of organizations operating youth media programmes. Through attention to a youth media and development programme in…

  15. Comparing the surgical timelines of military and civilians traumatic lower limb amputations

    PubMed Central

    Staruch, R.M.T.; Jackson, P.C.; Hodson, J.; Yim, G.; Foster, M.A.; Cubison, T.; Jeffery, S.L.A.

    2016-01-01

    The care and challenges of injured service have been well documented in the literature from a variety of specialities. The aim of this study was to analyse the surgical timelines of military and civilian traumatic amputees and compare the surgical and resuscitative interventions. A retrospective review of patient notes was undertaken. Military patients were identified from the Joint Theatre Trauma Registry (JTTR) in 2009. Civilian patients were identified using the hospital informatics database. Patient demographics, treatment timelines as well as surgical and critical care interventions were reviewed. In total 71 military patients sustained traumatic amputations within this time period. This represented 11% of the total injury demographic in 2009. Excluding upper limb amputees 46 patients sustained lower extremity amputations. These were investigated further. In total 21 civilian patients were identified in a 7-year period. Analysis revealed there was a statistically significant difference between patient age, ITU length of stay, blood products used and number of surgical procedures between military and civilian traumatic amputees. This study identified that military patients were treated for longer in critical care and required more surgical interventions for their amputations. Despite this, their time to stump closure and length of stay were not statistically different compared to civilian patients. Such observations reflect the importance of an Orthoplastic approach, as well as daily surgical theatre co-ordination and weekly multi-disciplinary meetings in providing optimal care for these complex patients. This study reports the epidemiological observed differences between two lower limb trauma groups. PMID:26958343

  16. A direct comparison of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's method 304B and batch tests for determining activated-sludge biodegradation rate constants for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cano, M.L.; Wilcox, M.E.; Compernolle, R. van

    1999-12-01

    Biodegradation rate constants for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in activated-sludge systems are needed to quantify emissions. One current US environmental Protection Agency method for determining a biodegradation rate constant is Method 304B. In this approach, a specific activated-sludge unit is simulated by a continuous biological treatment system with a sealed headspace. Batch experiments, however, can be alternatives to Method 304B. Two of these batch methods are the batch test that uses oxygen addition (BOX) and the serum bottle test (SBT). In this study, Method 304B was directly compared to BOX and SBT experiments. A pilot-scale laboratory reactor was constructed to serve as the Method 304B unit. Biomass from the unit was also used to conduct BOX and modified SBT experiments (modification involved use of a sealed draft-tube reactor with a headspace recirculation pump instead of a serum bottle) for 1,2-dichloroethane, diisopropyl ether, methyl tertiary butyl ether, and toluene. Three experimental runs--each consisting of one Method 304B experiment, one BOX experiment, and one modified SBT experiment--were completed. The BOX and SBT data for each run were analyzed using a Monod model, and best-fit biodegradation kinetic parameters were determined for each experiment, including a first-order biodegradation rate constant (K{sub 1}). Experimental results suggest that for readily biodegradable VOCs the two batch techniques can provide improved means of determining biodegradation rate constants compared with Method 304B. In particular, these batch techniques avoid the Method 304B problem associated with steady-state effluent concentrations below analytical detection limits. However, experimental results also suggest that the two batch techniques should not be used to determine biodegradation rate constants for slowly degraded VOCs (i.e., K{sub 1} {lt} 0.1 L/g VSS-h).

  17. Comparison of occupational hearing losses among military engineers and their civilian counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.L.; Chandler, D.W.

    1983-10-01

    A previous study examined group hearing loss of 209 U.S.Army engineers by comparing current with reference audiograms. The sample was categorized by military occupation specialty, age, and time on job. The present study reports comparable data for 187 civilian engineers on the same Army post exposed to essentially the same noise. These had less hearing loss than their military counterparts. Some reasons are suggested, such as attrition of the civilian workforce because of hearing problems, and a likely greater exposure of the military engineers to noises not job-related. Age was less important than time on the job. Both groups, however, exhibited significantly lower hearing levels than the industrial population of Glorig et al at the 1954 Wisconsin State Fair, possibly because both military and civilian personnel at this Army post had been for some years in an aggressive hearing conservation program.

  18. The Character Strengths of Special Forces Personnel: Insights for Civilian Health Care Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Gayton, Scott D; Kehoe, E James

    2016-09-01

    Civilian employees, contractors, and private community clinicians are increasingly providing health treatment to currently serving and former military personnel. This study addresses recent calls for evidence-based information to assist civilian practitioners in understanding the perspectives of their military clients. To this end, the self-reported character strengths of military personnel were elicited as an operationalized expression of their underlying personal values that shape their perspectives and conduct as soldiers. Specifically, Australian Army Special Forces operators and support personnel (N = 337) were asked to rank themselves on 24 character strengths. The three character strengths of integrity, teamworker, and good judgment were ranked significantly above random assignment. Nearly all the respondents (84%) gave a top rank to at least one of these character strengths. Differences between the operators and support personnel were modest. Results are discussed with respect to establishing an effective relationship between military clients and civilian health care practitioners. PMID:27612343

  19. Cognitive Training Can Reduce Civilian Casualties in a Simulated Shooting Environment.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Adam T; Cain, Matthew S; Mitroff, Stephen R

    2015-08-01

    Shooting a firearm involves a complex series of cognitive abilities. For example, locating an item or a person of interest requires visual search, and firing the weapon (or withholding a trigger squeeze) involves response execution (or inhibition). The present study used a simulated shooting environment to establish a relationship between a particular cognitive ability and a critical shooting error-response inhibition and firing on civilians, respectively. Individual-difference measures demonstrated, perhaps counterintuitively, that simulated civilian casualties were not related to motor impulsivity (i.e., an itchy trigger finger) but rather to an individual's cognitive ability to withhold an already initiated response (i.e., an itchy brain). Furthermore, active-response-inhibition training reduced simulated civilian casualties, which revealed a causal relationship. This study therefore illustrates the potential of using cognitive training to possibly improve shooting performance, which might ultimately provide insight for military and law-enforcement personnel.

  20. Work-related upper extremity injuries: prevalence, cost and risk factors in military and civilian populations.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Andrew J

    2002-01-01

    Persons with musculoskeletal-related disorders represent a prevalent source of outpatient visits, lost work time and disability in the military; however, research concerning the extent of work-related upper extremity disorders (WRUEDs) within this population is lacking. This literature review examined studies in civilian and military settings to ascertain the prevalence, cost and risk factors associated with WRUEDs. The results indicated that the prevalence and cost of WRUEDs in the civilian workforce are significant, justifying the need to research the military population. The literature also outlined physical, individual and psychosocial factors associated with WRUEDs that will help identify potential risk factors within military occupations.

  1. Joint civilian/national guard mass casualty exercise provides model for preparedness training.

    PubMed

    Grant, William D; Secreti, LaLainia

    2007-08-01

    After-action reports on the 2005 hurricane relief efforts pointed to the need for effective and efficient civilian/military operational cooperation. Cited for particular attention was the interface with National Guard units. This article describes an exercise conducted with National Guard units and members of the Central New York Medical Reserve Corps to educate all participants in effective interaction during disaster responses. Using a unique health care facility located at the New York State Fairgrounds, this 2-day operation demonstrated that jointly trained civilian and military units become well prepared for the conduct of joint relief and rescue operations.

  2. Billions for biodefense: federal agency biodefense funding, FY2001-FY2005.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Ari

    2004-01-01

    Over the past several years, the United States government has spent substantial resources on preparing the nation against a bioterrorist attack. This article analyzes the civilian biodefense funding by the federal government from fiscal years 2001 through 2005, specifically analyzing the budgets and allocations for biodefense at the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Defense, the Department of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of State. In total, approximately $14.5 billion has been funded for civilian biodefense through FY2004, with an additional $7.6 billion in the President's budget request for FY2005. PMID:15225402

  3. 32 CFR 169a.13 - CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian... DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.13 CAs involving forty-five... Appendix C to this part, CAs involving 11 to 45 DoD civilian employees may be competed based on...

  4. 32 CFR 169a.13 - CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian... DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.13 CAs involving forty-five... Appendix C to this part, CAs involving 11 to 45 DoD civilian employees may be competed based on...

  5. Child Care: Availability for Civilian Dependents at Selected DOD Installations. Report to the Honorable Vic Fazio, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) reviewed the need for child care facilities for civilian employees at seven Department of Defense installations. The GAO was charged with: (1) determining the current availability of work-site child care services for civilian employees at the installations; and (2) surveying employees at McClellan Air Force Base…

  6. 32 CFR 901.11 - Children of deceased or disabled veterans and children of military or civilian personnel in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... children of military or civilian personnel in a missing status category. 901.11 Section 901.11 National... deceased or disabled veterans and children of military or civilian personnel in a missing status category... disease aggravated by active service. (b) The child of a parent who is in “missing status” is eligible...

  7. 32 CFR 901.11 - Children of deceased or disabled veterans and children of military or civilian personnel in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... children of military or civilian personnel in a missing status category. 901.11 Section 901.11 National... deceased or disabled veterans and children of military or civilian personnel in a missing status category... disease aggravated by active service. (b) The child of a parent who is in “missing status” is eligible...

  8. 32 CFR 901.11 - Children of deceased or disabled veterans and children of military or civilian personnel in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... children of military or civilian personnel in a missing status category. 901.11 Section 901.11 National... deceased or disabled veterans and children of military or civilian personnel in a missing status category... disease aggravated by active service. (b) The child of a parent who is in “missing status” is eligible...

  9. 32 CFR 901.11 - Children of deceased or disabled veterans and children of military or civilian personnel in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... children of military or civilian personnel in a missing status category. 901.11 Section 901.11 National... deceased or disabled veterans and children of military or civilian personnel in a missing status category... disease aggravated by active service. (b) The child of a parent who is in “missing status” is eligible...

  10. 32 CFR 901.11 - Children of deceased or disabled veterans and children of military or civilian personnel in a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... children of military or civilian personnel in a missing status category. 901.11 Section 901.11 National... deceased or disabled veterans and children of military or civilian personnel in a missing status category... disease aggravated by active service. (b) The child of a parent who is in “missing status” is eligible...

  11. Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This is a list of aerospace organizations and other groups that provides educators with assistance and information in specific areas. Both government and nongovernment organizations are included. (Author/SA)

  12. Opportunities for policy historians: The evolution of the US civilian space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, J.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of U.S. civilian space policy and the institutional framework through which that policy was implemented are discussed. Space policy principles the governed decision making between 1957 and 1962 are identified. The government/industry relations regarding space related research and development are discussed.

  13. 10 CFR 217.52 - Controlling the general distribution of a material in the civilian market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Controlling the general distribution of a material in the civilian market. 217.52 Section 217.52 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ENERGY PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS... a written finding that: (1) Such material is a scarce and critical material essential to...

  14. 10 CFR 217.52 - Controlling the general distribution of a material in the civilian market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Controlling the general distribution of a material in the civilian market. 217.52 Section 217.52 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ENERGY PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS... a written finding that: (1) Such material is a scarce and critical material essential to...

  15. 10 CFR 217.52 - Controlling the general distribution of a material in the civilian market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Controlling the general distribution of a material in the civilian market. 217.52 Section 217.52 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ENERGY PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS... a written finding that: (1) Such material is a scarce and critical material essential to...

  16. THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS AND AMERICAN EDUCATION--THREAT TO LOCAL CONTROL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOWER, CALVIN W.

    THE HISTORY OF THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS (CCC) AND ITS CONTROVERSIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IS REVIEWED. CREATED IN MARCH, 1933, THE CCC PROVIDED WORK FOR UNEMPLOYED YOUTH (18-25). THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RECRUITED THEM, THE DEPARTMENT OF WAR RAN THE CAMPS, AND THE DEPARTMENTS OF INTERIOR AND AGRICULTURE DIRECTED THE CONSERVATION WORK. IN JULY…

  17. United States Civilian Nuclear Power Policy, 1954-1984: a summary history

    SciTech Connect

    Holl, J.M.; Anders, R.M.; Buck, A.L.

    1986-02-01

    This review covers US civilian nuclear power policy under Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan administrations covering Atomic Energy Commission, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and Department of Energy tenures. Public opinion, domestic order cancellations for uranium fuels, institutional origins, and the nuclear power plant diagrams are included in appendices. (PSB)

  18. Making Europe unconquerable: The potential of civilian-based deterrence and defense

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, G.

    1986-01-01

    This book explores civilian-based defense as a far-reaching new policy to meet Western Europe's security needs. This policy looks beyond military technology to a deliberate refinement and use of the power of a society's people and institutions in order to prevent and defend against both invasions and internal takeovers.

  19. Personnel Requirements, Education, and Training for Civilian Nuclear Activities, 1984-2000. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Wayne

    This report provides projections of the employment of scientists, engineers, technicians, and other occupations for the civilian nuclear industry through the year 2000. Low, medium, and high projections are provided. In all cases, a substantial number of job openings are anticipated to fill needs created by employment growth, retirement, death,…

  20. 32 CFR 728.45 - Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents. 728.45 Section 728.45 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY...

  1. 32 CFR 728.45 - Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents. 728.45 Section 728.45 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY...

  2. 32 CFR 728.45 - Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents. 728.45 Section 728.45 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY...

  3. 32 CFR 728.45 - Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents. 728.45 Section 728.45 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY...

  4. Mental Health Symptoms among Student Service Members/Veterans and Civilian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Sandi D.; Branscum, Adam J.; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate if and to what extent student service members/veterans differ from civilian college students in the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of poor mental health. Participants: The Fall 2011 implementation of the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment included 27,774…

  5. 32 CFR 727.10 - Fees, compensation, solicitation, and representation in civilian courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fees, compensation, solicitation, and representation in civilian courts. 727.10 Section 727.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL LEGAL ASSISTANCE § 727.10 Fees, compensation, solicitation,...

  6. 32 CFR 720.23 - Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in civilian courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in... Service of Process and Subpoenas Upon Personnel § 720.23 Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in civilian courts. (a) Criminal actions. When Federal or State authorities desire the attendance of a...

  7. 32 CFR 720.23 - Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in civilian courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in... Service of Process and Subpoenas Upon Personnel § 720.23 Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in civilian courts. (a) Criminal actions. When Federal or State authorities desire the attendance of a...

  8. Process of Converting Military Training Materials to Competency-Based Modules for Civilian Use. A Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organization and Human Resources Development Associates, Inc., Austin, TX.

    This document outlines the steps in the process of converting military training materials in physician and dental assistant education to competency-based learning modules for use in the civilian sector. Subsections discuss the activity and any problems or issues involved for 14 steps. The 14 steps are as follow: establish liaison to obtain…

  9. Army Civilian Leadership Development: Self-Efficacy, Choice, and Learning Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godinez, Eileen; Leslie, Barry B.

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the Army Management Staff College (AMSC) is to provide leader development educational experiences for Army civilians. To develop as leaders, students must recognize they have a choice to take action that influences their work environment. The authors suggest the learning environment at AMSC is intentionally designed to be…

  10. Art Therapy Services to Support Veterans' Transition to Civilian Life: The Studio and the Gallery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLucia, Jennifer Marie

    2016-01-01

    Beyond having knowledge of the treatment of combat-related trauma, art therapists need to understand veterans' experiences of transition from military to civilian life in order to offer effective interventions. This article reviews the literature on veteran transition and the challenges common to transition difficulty and describes two major…

  11. 75 FR 49913 - Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups SUMMARY: On... at Then `American Camp,' Now Named `Burma Camp,' Ghana' '' shall not be considered ``active...

  12. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 14 - Affidavit and Agreement by Civilian Defense Counsel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Affidavit and Agreement by Civilian Defense Counsel B Appendix B to Part 14 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE... following: A. I will notify the Chief Defense Counsel and, as applicable, the relevant Presiding...

  13. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 14 - Affidavit and Agreement by Civilian Defense Counsel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Affidavit and Agreement by Civilian Defense Counsel B Appendix B to Part 14 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE... following: A. I will notify the Chief Defense Counsel and, as applicable, the relevant Presiding...

  14. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 14 - Affidavit and Agreement by Civilian Defense Counsel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Affidavit and Agreement by Civilian Defense Counsel B Appendix B to Part 14 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE... following: A. I will notify the Chief Defense Counsel and, as applicable, the relevant Presiding...

  15. Winds of War: Enhancing Civilian and Military Partnerships to Assure Readiness: White Paper.

    PubMed

    Schwab, C William

    2015-08-01

    This White Paper summarizes the state of readiness of combat surgeons and provides action recommendations that address the problems of how to train, sustain, and retain them for future armed conflicts. As the basis for the 2014 Scudder Oration, I explored how to secure an improved partnership between military and civilian surgery, which would optimize learning platforms and embed military trauma personnel at America's academic medical universities for trauma combat casualty care (TCCC). To craft and validate these recommendations, I conducted an integrative and iterative process of literature reviews, interviews of military and civilian leaders, and a survey of military-affiliated surgeons. The recommended action points advance the training of combat surgeons and their trauma teams by creating an expanded network of TCCC training sites and sourcing the cadre of combat-seasoned surgeons currently populating our civilian and military teaching hospitals and universities. The recommendation for the establishment of a TCCC readiness center or command within the Medical Health System of the Department of Defense includes a military and civilian advisory board, with the reformation of a think tank of content experts to address high-level solutions for military medicine, readiness, and TCCC. PMID:26206632

  16. Protecting into Emotion: Therapeutic Enactments with Military Veterans Transitioning Back into Civilian Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfoura, Michael; Westwood, Marvin; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2014-01-01

    Over 18.5% of military personnel returning from war zones to civilian life suffer mental health issues, which can lead to family breakdown, homelessness and other problems. Almost 4000 Australian soldiers have returned home from active service in the last decade suffering from combat stress and mental health conditions. A 2009 Australian…

  17. Winds of War: Enhancing Civilian and Military Partnerships to Assure Readiness: White Paper.

    PubMed

    Schwab, C William

    2015-08-01

    This White Paper summarizes the state of readiness of combat surgeons and provides action recommendations that address the problems of how to train, sustain, and retain them for future armed conflicts. As the basis for the 2014 Scudder Oration, I explored how to secure an improved partnership between military and civilian surgery, which would optimize learning platforms and embed military trauma personnel at America's academic medical universities for trauma combat casualty care (TCCC). To craft and validate these recommendations, I conducted an integrative and iterative process of literature reviews, interviews of military and civilian leaders, and a survey of military-affiliated surgeons. The recommended action points advance the training of combat surgeons and their trauma teams by creating an expanded network of TCCC training sites and sourcing the cadre of combat-seasoned surgeons currently populating our civilian and military teaching hospitals and universities. The recommendation for the establishment of a TCCC readiness center or command within the Medical Health System of the Department of Defense includes a military and civilian advisory board, with the reformation of a think tank of content experts to address high-level solutions for military medicine, readiness, and TCCC.

  18. Implications of Posttraumatic Stress among Military-Affiliated and Civilian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Adam E.; Whiteman, Shawn D.; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms are associated with problem drinking and alcohol-related consequences, as well as academic correlates among military-affiliated and civilian students. Participants: The final sample (n = 248) included 78 combat-exposed student service members/veterans, 53 non-combat-exposed…

  19. Suicidal or Self-Harming Ideation in Military Personnel Transitioning to Civilian Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Alyssa J.; Bender, Randall H.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Larson, Gerald E.

    2011-01-01

    Suicides have markedly increased among military personnel in recent years. We used path analysis to examine factors associated with suicidal/self-harming ideation among male Navy and Marine Corps personnel transitioning to civilian life. Roughly 7% of men (Sailors = 5.3%, Marines = 9.0%) reported ideation during the previous 30 days. Results…

  20. Factors of Non-Persistence in Civilian Helicopter Flight Training: A Narrative Inquiry of Pilot Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Previous literature on retention of student helicopter pilots shows a gap in research of civilian schools and qualitative studies. To address this gap in the literature and to help helicopter flight schools better understand the incidents of attrition from flight training, this qualitative study investigated student and school-based factors…

  1. Factors associated with civilian drivers involved in crashes with emergency vehicles.

    PubMed

    Drucker, Christopher; Gerberich, Susan G; Manser, Michael P; Alexander, Bruce H; Church, Timothy R; Ryan, Andrew D; Becic, Ensar

    2013-06-01

    Motor vehicle crashes involving civilian and emergency vehicles (EVs) have been a known problem that contributes to fatal and nonfatal injuries; however, characteristics associated with civilian drivers have not been examined adequately. This study used data from The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Fatality Analysis Reporting System and the National Automotive Sampling System General Estimates System to identify driver, roadway, environmental, and crash factors, and consequences for civilian drivers involved in fatal and nonfatal crashes with in-use and in-transport EVs. In general, drivers involved in emergency-civilian crashes (ECCs) were more often driving: straight through intersections (vs. same direction) of four-points or more (vs. not at intersection); where traffic signals were present (vs. no traffic control device); and at night (vs. midday). For nonfatal ECCs, drivers were more often driving: distracted (vs. not distracted); with vision obstructed by external objects (vs. no obstruction); on dark but lighted roads (vs. daylight); and in opposite directions (vs. same directions) of the EVs. Consequences included increased risk of injury (vs. no injury) and receiving traffic violations (vs. no violation). Fatal ECCs were associated with driving on urban roads (vs. rural), although these types of crashes were less likely to occur on dark roads (vs. daylight). The findings of this study suggest drivers may have difficulties in visually detecting EVs in different environments.

  2. Occurrence of hearing loss in a cohort of civilians employed at a US Navy industrial facility. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Helmkamp, J.C.; Bone, C.M.; Blood, C.G.; Kelley, J.B.; Seidman, J.H.

    1986-12-18

    Although hearing loss has been the focus of national surveys in the civilian population, these surveys typically do not include occupational exposure information. Furthermore, very few studies have addressed this problem in the military, particularly in industrial settings. Audiometric data, including hearing loss information, recorded and stored in the prototype application of the Navy's Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS) has not been systematically evaluated to identify military and civilian populations that are at high risk for hearing loss. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in a cohort of Navy civilian workers employed at an industrialized facility. It is both appropriate and timely to look at hearing loss among civilian workers, as well as among the military, especially in relation to the recent Presidential initiative that established a government-wide five year goal of reducing civilian workplace injury/illness 3% per year.

  3. The COSMO-SkyMed ground and ILS and OPS segments upgrades for full civilian capacity exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, L.; De Luca, G. F.; Cardone, M.; Loizzo, R.; Sacco, P.; Daraio, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    COSMO-SkyMed (CSK), is an Earth Observation joint program between Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (Italian Space Agency, ASI) and Italian Ministry of Defense (It-MoD). It consists of a constellation of four X Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) whose first satellite of has been launched on June 2007. Today the full constellation is fully qualified and is in an operative phase. The COSMO-SkyMed System includes 3 Segments: the Space Segment, the Ground Segment and the Integrated Logistic Support and Operations Segment (ILS and OPS) As part of a more complex re-engineering process aimed to improve the expected constellation lifetime, to fully exploit several system capabilities, to manage the obsolescence, to reduce the maintenance costs and to exploit the entire constellation capability for Civilian users a series of activities have been performed. In the next months these activities are planned to be completed and start to be operational so that it will be possible the programming, planning, acquisition, raw processing and archiving of all the images that the constellation can acquire.

  4. Global Space Safety Regulations and Standards: The Conflicting Perspectives of the 'Merchants', the 'Guardians' and the 'Civilian' Space Agencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    2010-09-01

    This article seek to explore the difference in viewpoint and approach to space safety that is now developing with regard to those that wish to exploit space commercially(i.e. the Merchants) versus those that see space as an extension of national defense and area of strategic interest(i.e. the Guardians), and those that pursue space as an area of civil governmental activity and oversight(i.e. the Civil Space Advocates ).1 These “actors” in the field of space and the key “definers” of space policy in future decades often see the purpose and goals related to outer space activities in fundamentally different ways. They also have quite different views as to how best to regulate and develop space safety standards and practices. With the recent shift in U.S. space policy toward commercial human flight development these issues become of even greater import to the future of space safety development and its regulation. New technological, political, defense and economic opportunities may well likely lead to increasing conflicts over best forms of management practices, appropriate regulations and standards, best ways to finance and implement new space initiatives, and even the best way to establish priorities for new projects and initiatives. This article seeks to analyze in some detail the differences in perspective and approach for all three types of actors in the field of space safety.

  5. The Organization and Continuing Education; A Study of Agency Factors Relating to Attendance and Support of Continuing Education in Public Health in California. A Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlaw, Raymond W.; And Others

    A survey of continuing education of health personnel in Southern and Northern California was made to determine if there were differences in attendance, expressed interests, attitudes of health agency directors, recognition of employee participation, presentation of courses, or in financial support. A random sample was drawn from each area…

  6. Handling of Nuclear Information; Proceedings of the Symposium... Organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, and Held in Vienna, 16-20 February 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    An international nuclear information system (INIS) which applies computer techniques to the management of the world's nuclear literature is about to come into operation. This prompted the International Atomic Energy Agency to hold a symposium to provide a comprehensive review of the facilities and services available in the world for providing…

  7. 14 CFR Sfar No. 100 - 2-Relief for U.S. Military and Civilian Personnel Who are Assigned Outside the United States in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false 2-Relief for U.S. Military and Civilian...-2—Relief for U.S. Military and Civilian Personnel Who are Assigned Outside the United States in... served in a U.S. military or civilian capacity outside the United States in support of the U.S....

  8. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a specific…

  10. 28 CFR 800.5 - Agency components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency components. 800.5 Section 800.5 Judicial Administration COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 800.5 Agency components. (a) CSOSA. (1) Office of the Director (including...

  11. 28 CFR 800.5 - Agency components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agency components. 800.5 Section 800.5 Judicial Administration COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 800.5 Agency components. (a) CSOSA. (1) Office of the Director (including...

  12. 28 CFR 800.5 - Agency components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agency components. 800.5 Section 800.5 Judicial Administration COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 800.5 Agency components. (a) CSOSA. (1) Office of the Director (including...

  13. 28 CFR 800.5 - Agency components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agency components. 800.5 Section 800.5 Judicial Administration COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 800.5 Agency components. (a) CSOSA. (1) Office of the Director (including...

  14. On the future of civilian plutonium: An assessment of technological impediments to nuclear terrorism and proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avedon, Roger Edmond

    This dissertation addresses the value of developing diversion- and theft-resistant nuclear power technology, given uncertain future demand for nuclear power, and uncertain risks of nuclear terrorism and of proliferation from the reprocessing of civilian plutonium. The methodology comprises four elements: Economics. An economic growth model coupled with market penetration effects for plutonium and for the hypothetical new technology provides a range of estimates for future nuclear demand. A flow model accounts for the longevity of capital assets (nuclear plants) over time. Terrorism. The commercial nuclear fuel cycle may provide a source of fissile material for terrorists seeking to construct a crude nuclear device. An option value model is used to estimate the effects of the hypothetical new technology on reducing the probability of theft. A game theoretic model is used to explore the deterrence value of physical security and then to draw conclusions about how learning on the part of terrorists or security forces might affect the theft estimate. The principal uncertainties in the theft model can be updated using Bayesian techniques as new data emerge. Proliferation. Access to fissile material is the principal technical impediment to a state's acquisition of nuclear weapons. A game theoretic model is used to determine the circumstances under which a state may proliferate via diversion. The model shows that the hypothetical new technology will have little value for counter-proliferation if diversion is not a preferred proliferation method. A technology policy analysis of the choice of proliferation method establishes that diversion is unlikely to be used because it has no constituency among the important parties to the decision, namely the political leadership, the scientific establishment, and the military. Value. The decision whether to develop a diversion- and theft-resistant fuel cycle depends on the perceived value of avoiding nuclear terrorism and proliferation

  15. A decade of civilian vascular trauma in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We sought to analyze the results of arterial injury management in a busy metropolitan vascular unit and risk factors associated with mortality and morbidity. Patients and methods We analyzed 120 patient with arterial injury treated between year 2000 and 2010 at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Seven of these years were prospective and three retrospective study. Results The mechanism of arterial injury was stabbing 46.66%, gunshot wounds in 31.66%, blunt in 13.33%, and landmine in 8.33%. The most frequently injured vessel was the superficial femoral artery (25%), followed by the brachial artery (20.9%), crural arteries (13.1%), forearm arteries (14.3%), iliac arteries (7.5%), abdominal aorta (3.3%), common femoral artery (3.3%) and popliteal artery (3.3%). Associated injuries including bone, nerve and remote injury (affecting the head, chest, or abdomen) were present in 24.2% of patients. The decision to operate was made based on the presence of “hard signs” of vascular trauma. Arterial reconstruction was performed in 90.8% of patients, 5.8% of patients underwent primary amputation and 3.2% died on the operation table. Overall survival rate was 95.8%. Conclusion Injuries to the arteries are associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Mechanism of injury (blunt, gunshot, landmine or stub), hemodynamic stability at the admission, localization of injury, time from injury to flow restitution, associated injuries to the structures in the region and remote organs are critical factors influencing outcome. PMID:22817978

  16. OCRWM annual report to Congress FY 1999 [USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    2000-05-01

    During Fiscal Year 1999, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) continued to make significant progress in its characterization of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, candidate geologic repository site. Although OCRWM's appropriation for Fiscal Year 1999 was lower than requested, the Program accomplished all three success measures in the Secretary's Fiscal Year 1999 Performance Agreement with the President and completed important work in many other areas. This Annual Report reviews this work and looks toward future activities.

  17. 1989 OCRWM [Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management] Bulletin compilation and index

    SciTech Connect

    1990-02-01

    The OCRWM Bulletin is published by the Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management to provide current information about the national program for managing spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This document is a compilation of issues from the 1989 calendar year. A table of contents and one index have been provided to assist in finding information contained in this year`s Bulletins. The pages have been numbered consecutively at the bottom for easy reference. 7 figs.

  18. A novel civilian granary temperature and humidity monitoring device based on C8051F020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Li; Li, Yuelong; Meng, Xiangjie

    The control to temperature and humidity of small civilian granary is great important to grain storage. In this paper, we propose a smart surveillance device to monitor temperature and humidity in real-time to ensure high quality food storage. This simple and small size device could achieve good anti-jamming at extremely low power consumption. It could automatically trigger the sound-light alarm when either temperature or humidity is higher than a preset threshold value.

  19. The changing tide: Federal support of civilian-sector R and D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusfeld, H. I.; Langlois, R. N.; Nelson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    The involvement of the Federal government in civilian sector research and development is discussed. Relevant policies are put in an historical perspective. The roles played by industrial research and public funding are reveiwed. Government support of basic an generic research, clientele-oriented applied research, and research with commercial ends is studied. Procurement, anti-trust, and patent policies, all of which affect the climate for private research and development, are examined.

  20. Vasopressin for hemorrhagic shock management: revisiting the potential value in civilian and combat casualty care.

    PubMed

    Voelckel, Wolfgang G; Convertino, Victor A; Lurie, Keith G; Karlbauer, Alois; Schöchl, Herbert; Lindner, Karl-Heinz; Trimmel, Helmut

    2010-07-01

    The evolution of trauma care is driven by a synergistic relationship between civilian and military medical systems. Although the characteristics of civilian injuries differ from those encountered on the battlefield, the pathophysiologic process of dying is the same and dominated by exsanguination and central nervous trauma. As such, therapies that interfere with the physiologic ability to compensate hemorrhage may play a key role to buy time until hemostatic surgery can be initiated. From a variety of remedies with the potential to prolong the compensation phase or to reverse the decompensation phase of shock, arginine vasopressin (AVP) is one of the most promising and best-evaluated drugs. Animal studies and various case report series provide some evidence that AVP may improve blood pressure even when conventional therapies fail, thus preventing hypovolemic cardiac arrest and enabling resuscitation from fatal hemorrhage. On the basis of this civilian experience, it seems reasonable to consider AVP for hypotensive resuscitation in the austere, resource-constrained battlefield environment. However, the significance of AVP as a rescue medication for life-threatening hemorrhage has yet to be proven.

  1. 75 FR 5843 - Agency Information Collection Activity Seeking OMB Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... authorizes certification of civilian schools giving instruction in flying. Information collected is used for.... Abstract: 49 CFR part 44707 authorizes certification of civilian schools giving instruction in...

  2. Reactions to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami: a preliminary matching study comparing nurses and civilians.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ezra, Menachem; Palgi, Yuval; Hamama-Raz, Yaira; Soffer, Yechiel; Shrira, Amit

    2013-06-01

    The research of reactions to disasters is uncommon. Moreover, most studies target a specific population, whether civilians or professionals. The aim of this study was to compare the reactions of hospital personnel and civilians after exposure to a unique disaster that combines natural and nuclear disaster. A matching sample of nurses and civilians was compared using a brief questionnaire tapping into posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, subjective health, perceived coping, life satisfaction, and meaning in life. The results revealed that the nurses had a lower level of PTSD symptoms and higher self-rated health, life satisfaction, and perceived coping in comparison with the civilians. These results are discussed in light of work characteristics that include exposure to traumatic events as part of their work and coping that is partially based on training.

  3. Safely Enabling Civilian Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Operations in Low-Altitude Airspace by Unmanned Aerial System Traffic Management (UTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal Hemchandra

    2015-01-01

    Many UAS will operate at lower altitude (Class G, below 2000 feet). There is an urgent need for a system for civilian low-altitude airspace and UAS operations. Stakeholders want to work with NASA to enable safe operations.

  4. Safely Enabling Civilian Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Operations In Low-Altitude Airspace By Unmanned Aerial System Traffic Management (UTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2015-01-01

    Many UAS will operate at lower altitude (Class G, below 2000 feet)There is urgent need for a system for civilian low-altitude airspace and UAS operations. Stakeholders want to work with NASA to enable safe operations.

  5. 32 CFR 48.602 - Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organization. 48.602 Section 48.602 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Miscellaneous § 48.602 Organization. (a) The Joint Board for the...

  6. 32 CFR 48.602 - Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Organization. 48.602 Section 48.602 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Miscellaneous § 48.602 Organization. (a) The Joint Board for the...

  7. 32 CFR 48.602 - Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organization. 48.602 Section 48.602 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Miscellaneous § 48.602 Organization. (a) The Joint Board for the...

  8. 32 CFR 48.602 - Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organization. 48.602 Section 48.602 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Miscellaneous § 48.602 Organization. (a) The Joint Board for the...

  9. 32 CFR 48.602 - Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organization. 48.602 Section 48.602 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Miscellaneous § 48.602 Organization. (a) The Joint Board for the...

  10. 78 FR 59036 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Cogent Patient Safety Organization, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Cogent Patient Safety Organization, Inc. AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality... Patient Safety Organizations (PSOs), which collect, aggregate, and analyze confidential...

  11. The Effects on Children of the Organization and the Design of the Day Care Physical Environment: Appropriateness of the Federal Inter-Agency Day Care Requirements. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruvant, Charito; And Others

    This paper presents a discussion of the impact of the physical design of day care settings on children and adults. Specifically addressed is the question of how the location and design of the facility, the arrangement of indoor and outdoor space, and the organization of the furniture and materials affect the behavior of the adults and children who…

  12. [The external quality assessment schemes for lead in blood organized by the French national agency for medicine and health product safety: a synthesis of 15 years of activity].

    PubMed

    Pineau, Alain; Otz, Jocelyne; Guillard, Olivier; Fauconneau, Bernard; Dumont, Gilles; François-Burg, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    In 1992, at the request of the French labor ministry following questions on the ability of medical biology laboratories to satisfactorily measure blood lead level (PbB), a national PbB quality control came into being. Only in 1996 did this external quality control include a number of laboratories sufficient to allow for a significant retrospective evaluation. After fifteen years (1996-2011), The French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety wished to exploit the database collected. The number of participating laboratories went down from 73 to 41. On the other hand, the key finding pertained to the highly improved performance of the laboratories, which was associated with a spread decrease of the results over the entire range of tested PbBs (9 to 700 μg/L). Since 2006, we have observed increasing use of the inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometry and decreasing use of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Provided that they rely on identical metrology expertise, the two analytical techniques lead to results on all the tested concentrations that are not statistically different. PMID:24492097

  13. [The external quality assessment schemes for lead in blood organized by the French national agency for medicine and health product safety: a synthesis of 15 years of activity].

    PubMed

    Pineau, Alain; Otz, Jocelyne; Guillard, Olivier; Fauconneau, Bernard; Dumont, Gilles; François-Burg, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    In 1992, at the request of the French labor ministry following questions on the ability of medical biology laboratories to satisfactorily measure blood lead level (PbB), a national PbB quality control came into being. Only in 1996 did this external quality control include a number of laboratories sufficient to allow for a significant retrospective evaluation. After fifteen years (1996-2011), The French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety wished to exploit the database collected. The number of participating laboratories went down from 73 to 41. On the other hand, the key finding pertained to the highly improved performance of the laboratories, which was associated with a spread decrease of the results over the entire range of tested PbBs (9 to 700 μg/L). Since 2006, we have observed increasing use of the inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometry and decreasing use of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Provided that they rely on identical metrology expertise, the two analytical techniques lead to results on all the tested concentrations that are not statistically different.

  14. Office Civilian Waste Management Transportation Institutional Program Update on Collaborative Efforts with Key Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect

    E. Saris; P. Austin; J.J. Offner

    2004-12-29

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) created the Office of National Transportation in 2003 recognizing the need to revitalize and accelerate development of the transportation system. The Department has made a commitment to work through a collaborative planning process before developing specific policies and procedures and making transportation decisions. OCRWM has begun to build the institutional framework to support development of this transportation system. Interactions with stakeholders have been initiated. The authors describe the key stakeholders, identified issues, regional and national planning activities, and mechanisms for interaction.

  15. A science and technology initiative within the office of civilian radioactive waste management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budnitz, R.J.; Kiess, T.E.; Peters, M.; Duncan, D.

    2003-01-01

    In 2002, by following a national decision-making process that had been specified in the 1982 Nuclear Waste Policy Act, Yucca Mountain (YM) was designated as the site for the nation's geologic repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) must now obtain regulatory approval to construct and operate a repository there, and to develop transportation and infrastructure needed to support operations. The OCRWM has also recently begun a separate Science and Technology (S&T) initiative, whose purposes, beginnings, current projects, and future plans are described here.

  16. Analysis of civilian processing programs in reduction of excess separated plutonium and high-enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this preliminary investigation is to explore alternatives and strategies aimed at the gradual reduction of the excess inventories of separated plutonium and high-enriched uranium (HEU) in the civilian nuclear power industry. The study attempts to establish a technical and economic basis to assist in the formation of alternative approaches consistent with nonproliferation and safeguards concerns. The analysis addresses several options in reducing the excess separated plutonium and HEU, and the consequences on nonproliferation and safeguards policy assessments resulting from the interacting synergistic effects between fuel cycle processes and isotopic signatures of nuclear materials.

  17. Ethical considerations in embedding a surgeon in a military or civilian tactical team.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Lewis J; Siegel, Mark D; Eastman, Alexander L; Flynn, Lisa M; Rosenbaum, Stanley H; Cone, David C; Blake, David P; Mulhern, Jonathan

    2012-12-01

    Tactical emergency medical services (TEMS) bring immediate medical support to the inner perimeter of special weapons and tactics team activations. While initially envisioned as a role for an individual dually trained as a police officer and paramedic, TEMS is increasingly undertaken by physicians and paramedics who are not police officers. This report explores the ethical underpinnings of embedding a surgeon within a military or civilian tactical team with regard to identity, ethically acceptable actions, triage, responsibility set, training, certification, and potential future refinements of the role of the tactical police surgeon. PMID:22985714

  18. Integration of the military and civilian nuclear fuel cycles in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Bukharin, O. )

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the close integration of the civil and military nuclear fuel cycles in Russia. Individual processing facilities, as well as the flow of nuclear material, are described as they existed in the 1980s and as they exist today. The end of the Cold War and the breakup of the Soviet Union weakened the ties between the two nuclear fuel cycles, but did not separate them. Separation of the military and civilian nuclear fuel cycles would facilitate Russia's integration into the world's nuclear fuel cycle and its participation in international non-proliferation regimes.

  19. Civilian residential fire fatality rates: Six high-rate states versus six low-rate states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. R., Jr.; Helzer, S. G.

    1983-08-01

    Results of an analysis of 1,600 fire fatalities occurring in six states with high fire-death rates and six states with low fire-death rates are presented. Reasons for the differences in rates are explored, with special attention to victim age, sex, race, and condition at time of ignition. Fire cause patterns are touched on only lightly but are addressed more extensively in the companion piece to this report, "Rural and Non-Rural Civilian Residential Fire Fatalities in Twelve States', NBSIR 82-2519.

  20. Drug Testing. Federal Agency Plans for Testing Employees. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Treasury, Postal Service, and General Government, Committee on Appropriations, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    The drug-testing plans covering 11 of the 12 civilian federal cabinet-level agencies met the requirements of U.S. Department of Health and Human Services guidelines, and the guidelines themselves were found to contain the elements required by Public Law 100-71. However, the drug-testing plans differ, so employees may find different circumstances…

  1. Comment response document for the Secretary of Energy`s ``Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program``

    SciTech Connect

    1990-11-01

    On November 29, 1989, the Secretary of Energy published his ``Report to Congress on the Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program`` (Report), and sent copies to numerous interested parties for their review and comment. This document summarizes comments received on the Report and presents the DOE`s current responses to those comments as a basis for further discussions. Included as appendixes are a list of commenters, a crosswalk showing where each comment is addressed, the comment letters themselves with specific comments delineated, and the DOE`s response to those letters. Twenty-five individuals or organizations submitted comments on the Report. The DOE identified 130 individual comments and classified them into the following seven categories: Management, Institutional, Regulatory, Transportation, Monitored Retrievable Storage, Scheduling, and Yucca Mountain. For the responses, comments were than grouped into more specific topics under each of the major headings. The DOE attempted to respond to all comments.

  2. 12 CFR 1200.1 - Federal Housing Finance Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Federal Housing Finance Agency. 1200.1 Section 1200.1 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1200.1 Federal Housing Finance Agency. (a) Scope and authority. The Federal Housing...

  3. 75 FR 56501 - Information Collection; Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... agency #0;statements of organization and functions are examples of documents #0;appearing in this section...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection; Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys... organizations on the new information collection, the Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys. DATES:...

  4. Pain in an era of armed conflicts: Prevention and treatment for warfighters and civilian casualties.

    PubMed

    George, E; Elman, I; Becerra, L; Berg, Sheri; Borsook, D

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is a common squealae of military- and terror-related injuries. While its pathophysiology has not yet been fully elucidated, it may be potentially related to premorbid neuropsychobiological status, as well as to the type of injury and to the neural alterations that it may evoke. Accordingly, optimized approaches for wounded individuals should integrate primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in the form of thorough evaluation of risk factors along with specific interventions to contravene and mitigate the ensuing chronicity. Thus, Premorbid Events phase may encompass assessments of psychological and neurobiological vulnerability factors in conjunction with fostering preparedness and resilience in both military and civilian populations at risk. Injuries per se phase calls for immediate treatment of acute pain in the field by pharmacological agents that spare and even enhance coping and adaptive capabilities. The key objective of the Post Injury Events is to prevent and/or reverse maladaptive peripheral- and central neural system's processes that mediate transformation of acute to chronic pain and to incorporate timely interventions for concomitant mental health problems including post-traumatic stress disorder and addiction We suggest that the proposed continuum of care may avert more disability and suffering than the currently employed less integrated strategies. While the requirements of the armed forces present a pressing need for this integrated continuum and a framework in which it can be most readily implemented, this approach may be also instrumental for the care of civilian casualties. PMID:27084355

  5. State institutions and social identity: National representation in soldiers' and civilians' interview talk concerning military service.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Stephen; Condor, Susan

    2009-06-01

    Theory and research deriving from social identity or self-categorization perspectives often starts out with the presumption that social actors necessarily view societal objects such as nations or states as human categories. However, recent work suggests that this may be only one of a number of forms that societal representation may take. For example, nations may be understood variously as peoples, places, or institutions. This paper presents findings from a qualitative interview study conducted in England, in which soldiers and civilians talked about nationhood in relation to military service. Analysis indicated that, in this context, speakers were often inclined to use the terms 'Britain', 'nation', and 'country' as references to a political institution as opposed to a category of people. In addition, there were systematic differences between the ways in which the two samples construed their nation in institutional terms. The civilians were inclined to treat military service as a matter of obedience to the dictates of the Government of the day. In contrast, the soldiers were more inclined to frame military service as a matter of loyalty to state as symbolically instantiated in the body of the sovereign. Implications for work adopting a social identity perspective are discussed.

  6. Enabling civilian applications of unmanned teams through collaboration, cooperation, and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Christopher; Dityam, Tanarat; Girwar-Nath, Jonathan; Kanistras, Konstantinos; Martins, Goncalo; Moses, Allistair; Samonas, Ioannis; St. Amour, Joseph L.; Rutherford, Matthew J.; Valavanis, Kimon P.

    2012-06-01

    Hardware platforms for unmanned aerial and ground vehicles are becoming increasingly commoditized, leading to low prices and high-quality equipment. This, in turn, is enabling the use of low-cost unmanned vehicles for a broadening array of civilian and commercial applications. In this paper we consider a heterogeneous group consisting of three ground vehicles and two aerial vehicles. Using this standard "team," we describe and analyze four different civilian applications to which the team is well suited, and for which existing solutions are either too costly or not effective. The applications are representative of a broad spectrum of applications in the areas of customs and border protection, infrastructure surveillance, early fire detection, and public safety incident response. For each application, we describe the overall team function, the application-specific sensor suite, the data processing and communication requirements, and any ground / operator station requirements. The focus is on solutions that require collaboration and cooperation between vehicles, and synthesis of the heterogeneous sensor data they provide.

  7. Civilian PTSD symptoms and risk for involvement in the criminal justice system.

    PubMed

    Donley, Sachiko; Habib, Leah; Jovanovic, Tanja; Kamkwalala, Asante; Evces, Mark; Egan, Glenn; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has received considerable attention with regard to the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In studies of veterans, behavioral sequelae of PTSD can include hostile and violent behavior. Rates of PTSD found in impoverished, high-risk urban populations within U.S. inner cities are as high as in returning veterans. The objective of this study was to determine whether civilian PTSD is associated with increased risk of incarceration and charges related to violence in a low-income, urban population. Participants (n = 4,113) recruited from Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, completed self-report measures assessing history of trauma, PTSD symptoms, and incarceration. Both trauma exposure and civilian PTSD remained strongly associated with increased risk of involvement in the criminal justice system and charges of a violent offense, even after adjustment for sex, age, race, education, employment, income, and substance abuse in a regression model. Trauma and PTSD have important implications for public safety and recidivism.

  8. Police shootings against civilians in Portugal: Contextual, forensic medical and judicial characterization.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ezequiel; Faria, Paula; Santos, Agostinho; Fraga, Sílvia

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the circumstances, the forensic assessment and the legal assessment of police shootings of civilians, according to the severity of the victim's injuries. Sixty-nine cases tried in Portuguese criminal courts were analysed. Of the 32 cases that resulted in death, 16 were on the public thoroughfare and 13 were in the victim's vehicle or in third-party vehicles. The majority of the lethal cases occurred when the region of the body hit was the thorax/abdomen. The firearm most frequently used was a semi-automatic 9 mm pistol. In cases resulting in death police officers involved were convicted whilst those involved in non-lethal cases were acquitted. The results of this study can be taken into account by Portuguese authorities for the implementation of policies that will allow the restriction of firearms use by police officers to situations of imminent danger of death or serious injury and that will make it possible to avoid shooting at fleeing civilians.

  9. State institutions and social identity: National representation in soldiers' and civilians' interview talk concerning military service.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Stephen; Condor, Susan

    2009-06-01

    Theory and research deriving from social identity or self-categorization perspectives often starts out with the presumption that social actors necessarily view societal objects such as nations or states as human categories. However, recent work suggests that this may be only one of a number of forms that societal representation may take. For example, nations may be understood variously as peoples, places, or institutions. This paper presents findings from a qualitative interview study conducted in England, in which soldiers and civilians talked about nationhood in relation to military service. Analysis indicated that, in this context, speakers were often inclined to use the terms 'Britain', 'nation', and 'country' as references to a political institution as opposed to a category of people. In addition, there were systematic differences between the ways in which the two samples construed their nation in institutional terms. The civilians were inclined to treat military service as a matter of obedience to the dictates of the Government of the day. In contrast, the soldiers were more inclined to frame military service as a matter of loyalty to state as symbolically instantiated in the body of the sovereign. Implications for work adopting a social identity perspective are discussed. PMID:18793493

  10. Post-traumatic headaches in civilians and military personnel: a comparative, clinical review.

    PubMed

    Theeler, Brett; Lucas, Sylvia; Riechers, Ronald G; Ruff, Robert L

    2013-06-01

    Post-traumatic headache (PTH) is the most frequent symptom after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We review the epidemiology and characterization of PTH in military and civilian settings. PTH appears to be more likely to develop following mild TBI (concussion) compared with moderate or severe TBI. PTH often clinically resembles primary headache disorders, usually migraine. For migraine-like PTH, individuals who had the most severe headache pain had the highest headache frequencies. Based on studies to date in both civilian and military settings, we recommend changes to the current definition of PTH. Anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are frequently associated with TBI, especially in military populations and in combat settings. PTSD can complicate treatment of PTH as a comorbid condition of post-concussion syndrome. PTH should not be treated as an isolated condition. Comorbid conditions such as PTSD and sleep disturbances also need to be treated. Double-blind placebo-controlled trials in PTH population are necessary to see whether similar phenotypes in the primary headache disorders and PTH will respond similarly to treatment. Until blinded treatment trials are completed, we suggest that, when possible, PTH be treated as one would treat the primary headache disorder(s) that the PTH most closely resembles.

  11. Police shootings against civilians in Portugal: Contextual, forensic medical and judicial characterization.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ezequiel; Faria, Paula; Santos, Agostinho; Fraga, Sílvia

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the circumstances, the forensic assessment and the legal assessment of police shootings of civilians, according to the severity of the victim's injuries. Sixty-nine cases tried in Portuguese criminal courts were analysed. Of the 32 cases that resulted in death, 16 were on the public thoroughfare and 13 were in the victim's vehicle or in third-party vehicles. The majority of the lethal cases occurred when the region of the body hit was the thorax/abdomen. The firearm most frequently used was a semi-automatic 9 mm pistol. In cases resulting in death police officers involved were convicted whilst those involved in non-lethal cases were acquitted. The results of this study can be taken into account by Portuguese authorities for the implementation of policies that will allow the restriction of firearms use by police officers to situations of imminent danger of death or serious injury and that will make it possible to avoid shooting at fleeing civilians. PMID:26048497

  12. 76 FR 24476 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Volatile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Manufacturing''. Title: National Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings (40 CFR... volatile organic compounds emissions from the use of consumer and commercial products. Pursuant to...

  13. Rhetorical Agency as Emergent and Enacted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marilyn M.

    2011-01-01

    Individual agency is necessary for the possibility of rhetoric, and especially for deliberative rhetoric, which enables the composition of what Latour calls a good common world. Drawing on neurophenomenology, this essay defines individual agency as the process through which organisms create meanings through acting into the world and changing their…

  14. 77 FR 48987 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... statistical data are routinely requested by CMS, Department agencies, the Congress and their research offices, state Medicaid agencies, research organizations, social service interest groups, universities...

  15. The U.S. Army Person-Event Data Environment: A Military-Civilian Big Data Enterprise.

    PubMed

    Vie, Loryana L; Scheier, Lawrence M; Lester, Paul B; Ho, Tiffany E; Labarthe, Darwin R; Seligman, Martin E P

    2015-06-01

    This report describes a groundbreaking military-civilian collaboration that benefits from an Army and Department of Defense (DoD) big data business intelligence platform called the Person-Event Data Environment (PDE). The PDE is a consolidated data repository that contains unclassified but sensitive manpower, training, financial, health, and medical records covering U.S. Army personnel (Active Duty, Reserve, and National Guard), civilian contractors, and military dependents. These unique data assets provide a veridical timeline capturing each soldier's military experience from entry to separation from the armed forces. The PDE was designed to afford unprecedented cost-efficiencies by bringing researchers and military scientists to a single computerized repository rather than porting vast data resources to individual laboratories. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Positive Psychology Center joined forces with the U.S. Army Research Facilitation Laboratory, forming the scientific backbone of the military-civilian collaboration. This unparalleled opportunity was necessitated by a growing need to learn more about relations between psychological and health assets and health outcomes, including healthcare utilization and costs-issues of major importance for both military and civilian population health. The PDE represents more than 100 times the population size and many times the number of linked variables covered by the nation's leading sources of population health data (e.g., the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). Following extensive Army vetting procedures, civilian researchers can mine the PDE's trove of information using a suite of statistical packages made available in a Citrix Virtual Desktop. A SharePoint collaboration and governance management environment ensures user compliance with federal and DoD regulations concerning human subjects' protections and also provides a secure

  16. The U.S. Army Person-Event Data Environment: A Military-Civilian Big Data Enterprise.

    PubMed

    Vie, Loryana L; Scheier, Lawrence M; Lester, Paul B; Ho, Tiffany E; Labarthe, Darwin R; Seligman, Martin E P

    2015-06-01

    This report describes a groundbreaking military-civilian collaboration that benefits from an Army and Department of Defense (DoD) big data business intelligence platform called the Person-Event Data Environment (PDE). The PDE is a consolidated data repository that contains unclassified but sensitive manpower, training, financial, health, and medical records covering U.S. Army personnel (Active Duty, Reserve, and National Guard), civilian contractors, and military dependents. These unique data assets provide a veridical timeline capturing each soldier's military experience from entry to separation from the armed forces. The PDE was designed to afford unprecedented cost-efficiencies by bringing researchers and military scientists to a single computerized repository rather than porting vast data resources to individual laboratories. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Positive Psychology Center joined forces with the U.S. Army Research Facilitation Laboratory, forming the scientific backbone of the military-civilian collaboration. This unparalleled opportunity was necessitated by a growing need to learn more about relations between psychological and health assets and health outcomes, including healthcare utilization and costs-issues of major importance for both military and civilian population health. The PDE represents more than 100 times the population size and many times the number of linked variables covered by the nation's leading sources of population health data (e.g., the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). Following extensive Army vetting procedures, civilian researchers can mine the PDE's trove of information using a suite of statistical packages made available in a Citrix Virtual Desktop. A SharePoint collaboration and governance management environment ensures user compliance with federal and DoD regulations concerning human subjects' protections and also provides a secure

  17. Gender-based violence against civilian women in postinvasion Iraq: (re)politicizing George W. Bush's silent legacy.

    PubMed

    Lee-Koo, Katrina

    2011-12-01

    This article explores the increase in gender-based violence against civilian women in Iraq since 2003 and connects it to the U.S.-led invasion of that country. It outlines the complex nature of the gender-based violence and the impact that it has had on civilian women in Iraq. It then analyzes the links between this violence and the politics of the postinvasion period. This article also explores how this violence has been politicized. Ultimately, the article (re)politicizes gender-based violence through a feminist lens and argues that the security of Iraq's women is fundamental to the stability of Iraq as a whole. PMID:22410774

  18. The Persian Gulf War: civilian war-related stress and the influence of age, religious faith, and war attitudes.

    PubMed

    Plante, T G; Manuel, G M

    1992-03-01

    This study examined the stress response of 86 civilian subjects at the onset of the Persian Gulf War. The Impact of Events Scale (IES) and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) were used to measure participants' subjective stress response and symptoms of psychological distress. Subjects also completed a demographic questionnaire that included questions that ranged from religious affiliation to approval of the war effort. The study describes war-related stress and the influence of age, religious faith, and attitudes about war on reported levels of stress. Results indicate measurable levels of war-related stress in this civilian population.

  19. Precipitating circumstances of suicide among active duty U.S. Army personnel versus U.S. civilians, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents' military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  20. Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide among Active Duty U.S. Army Personnel Versus U.S. Civilians, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents’ military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  1. Exposure to the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment: studies on Icelandic and Italian civilian aviation flight personnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Caldora, M.; Santaquilani, M.; Scipione, R.; Verdecchia, A.; Rafnsson, V.; Hrafnkelsson, J.; Sulem, P.; Gudjonsdottir, A. J.

    The largest source of data on human exposure to low dose rate radiation may be airline flight personnel, if enrolled for studies on health effects induced by the cosmic-ray-generated atmospheric ionizing radiation, whose total dose, increasing over the years, may cause delayed radiation-induced health effects, with the high-LET and highly ionizing neutron component typical of atmospheric radiation. With regards to this, the Italian civilian airline flight personnel have been studied by analyzing the atmospheric ionizing radiation exposure and associated effects. The study population includes all Italian civilian airline flight personnel, both cockpit and cabin crewmembers, whose work history records and actual flights (route, aircraft type, and date for each individual flight for each person where possible) were available. The dose calculations were performed along specific flight legs, taking into account the actual flight profiles for all different routes and the variations with time of solar and geomagnetic parameters, in order to take into account the whole atmospheric neutron spectrum. Dose values for each flight are applied to the flight history of study participants in order to estimate the individual annual and lifetime occupational radiation dose. Following the same protocols for both cohorts in terms of dose evaluation, a comparative study has been performed between the radiation exposure patterns of the Icelandic and the Italian civilian aviation flight personnel. These two populations represent two extremes within the group of worldwide airline personnel. The Icelandic crewmembers, like only in the world their Canadian colleagues, always fly over or very close to the geomagnetic pole, and are this way exposed to high doses within each flight leg, whereas the Italian crewmembers, apart from transatlantic flights, are always flying close to the geomagnetic equator or anyhow quite far from the geomagnetic pole, receiving a small dose rates for each flight

  2. Trends in suicidal behaviour and use of mental health services in Canadian military and civilian populations

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Jitender; Afifi, Tracie O.; Taillieu, Tamara; Cheung, Kristene; Turner, Sarah; Bolton, Shay-Lee; Erickson, Julie; Stein, Murray B.; Fikretoglu, Deniz; Zamorski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the context of the Canadian mission in Afghanistan, substantial media attention has been placed on mental health and lack of access to treatment among Canadian Forces personnel. We compared trends in the prevalence of suicidal behaviour and the use of mental health services between Canadian military personnel and the general population from 2002 to 2012/13. Methods: We obtained data for respondents aged 18–60 years who participated in 4 nationally representative surveys by Statistics Canada designed to permit comparisons between populations and trends over time. Surveys of the general population were conducted in 2002 (n = 25 643) and 2012 (n = 15 981); those of military personnel were conducted in 2002 (n = 5153) and 2013 (n = 6700). We assessed the lifetime and past-year prevalence of suicidal ideation, plans and attempts, as well as use of mental health services. Results: In 2012/13, but not in 2002, military personnel had significantly higher odds of both lifetime and past-year suicidal ideation than the civilian population (lifetime: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–1.50; past year: adjusted OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.09–1.66). The same was true for suicidal plans (lifetime: adjusted OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.35–1.99; past year: adjusted OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.18–2.33). Among respondents who reported past-year suicidal ideation, those in the military had a significantly higher past-year utilization rate of mental health services than those in the civilian population in both 2002 (adjusted OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.31–3.13) and 2012/13 (adjusted OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.86–5.28). Interpretation: Canadian Forces personnel had a higher prevalence of suicidal ideation and plans in 2012/13 and a higher use of mental health services in 2002 and 2012/13 than the civilian population. PMID:27221270

  3. [Impact of war on civilian population health. Republic of the Congo, December 1998-February 2000].

    PubMed

    Salignon, P; Legros, D

    2002-01-01

    Congo Brazzaville was racked by civil war between 1998 and 2000. Fighting forced a large part of the population to flee from the capital, Brazzaville. Starting in 1999 many people began coming back to the city in dire physical and psychological condition. With little or no press coverage, this return went largely unnoticed by the general public. Volunteers from Médecins Sans Frontières were present not only to provide assistance and care to these war victims but also as to bear witness so that this tragedy should not be forgotten. By means of epidemiological surveys in the field, workers were able to paint a "picture of suffering" and to document the violence and deprivation inflicted mainly on the civilian population. This article summarizes the findings of this investigation.

  4. Dual loyalty of physicians in the military and in civilian life.

    PubMed

    Benatar, Solomon R; Upshur, Ross E G

    2008-12-01

    The concept of the dual loyalty physicians may have to both a patient and a third party is important in elucidating the obligations of physicians. The extent to which loyalty may be deflected from a patient to a third party (e.g., an insurance company or a prison commander) is greatly underestimated and has not attracted significant scholarly analysis. We examined dual loyalty in civilian and military contexts and used the principles of public health ethics to construct a framework for determining the legitimacy of physicians' obligations. We illustrate the application of these principles to problems physicians encounter regarding communicable diseases, elder abuse, and driving fitness. In the complex military context, independent ethics tribunals should be created to adjudicate loyalty conflicts. PMID:18923128

  5. Civilian nuclear incidents: An overview of historical, medical, and scientific aspects

    PubMed Central

    Rojavin, Yuri; Seamon, Mark J; Tripathi, Ravi S; Papadimos, Thomas J; Galwankar, Sagar; Kman, Nicholas; Cipolla, James; Grossman, Michael D; Marchigiani, Raffaele; Stawicki, Stanislaw P A

    2011-01-01

    Given the increasing number of operational nuclear reactors worldwide, combined with the continued use of radioactive materials in both healthcare and industry, the unlikely occurrence of a civilian nuclear incident poses a small but real danger. This article provides an overview of the most important historical, medical, and scientific aspects associated with the most notable nuclear incidents to date. We have discussed fundamental principles of radiation monitoring, triage considerations, and the short- and long-term management of radiation exposure victims. The provision and maintenance of adequate radiation safety among first responders and emergency personnel are emphasized. Finally, an outline is included of decontamination, therapeutic, and prophylactic considerations pertaining to exposure to various radioactive materials. PMID:21769214

  6. Discrimination of Nuclear Explosions against Civilian Sources Based on Atmospheric Radioiodine Isotopic Activity Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, Martin B.; Liao, Yen-Yo; Pistner, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    A global monitoring system for atmospheric radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System that will verify compliance with the comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty (CTBT) once the treaty has entered into force. This paper studies isotopic activity ratios to support the interpretation of observed atmospheric concentrations of 135I, 133I and 131I. The goal is to distinguish nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulated nuclear explosion releases along with observational data of radioiodine releases from historic nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site are compared to simulated light water reactor releases in order to provide a proof of concept for source discrimination based on radioiodine isotopic activity ratios.

  7. Simultaneous multisystem surgery: An important capability for the civilian trauma hospital.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin M; Thomas, Piers A W; Gruen, Russell L; Chan, Patrick; Rosenfled, Jeffrey V

    2016-09-01

    Head injury commonly presents in association with torso or limb injuries, especially in blunt trauma mechanisms. Stopping life-threatening thoraco-abdominal hemorrhage and preventing secondary brain injury are time critical priorities. Although simultaneous operative management by multiple teams has been common practice in the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, simultaneous surgery is rare in most civilian settings. Nevertheless, situations arise whereby simultaneous craniotomy and chest or abdominal surgery is necessary to prevent mortality or reduce severe morbidity. We discuss two recent cases at our level one trauma centre, the challenges that surgeons and the operating room staff face and propose that with appropriate planning this surgical capability can be integrated into the systems of contemporary advanced trauma units. PMID:27359088

  8. The NPOESS data exploitation project and how it will serve the civilian user community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, James; Schott, Tom; Bunin, Stacy; Cutler, Stan

    2006-08-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is responsible for receiving and processing environmental satellite observations and disseminating the products to NOAA's user community. NOAA's NPOESS Data Exploitation (NDE) Project will link the civilian environmental satellite information users to NPOESS data. NDE enables essential system upgrades to prepare NESDIS for NPOESS and provide a continuing capability throughout the NPOESS life cycle. NDE will employ an enterprise project approach, developing functionality to be shared across NOAA systems to reduce costs, risks, and to minimize redundancy. NDE will use the latest proven methods, tools and techniques to establish key elements of NOAA's 21st Century satellite data management capability. NDE activities include plans to serve the user community through the delivery of tailored products, NOAA-Unique products, and training.

  9. Education activities of the US Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.P. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that science education has long been a critical element in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. OCRWM has developed educational programs aimed at improving the science literacy of students from kindergarten through college and post-graduate levels, enhancing the skills of teachers, encouraging careers in science and engineering, and developing a keener awareness of science issues among the general population. Activities include interaction with educators in the development of curricula material; workshops for elementary and secondary students; cooperative agreements and projects with universities; OCRWM exhibit showings at technical and non-technical meetings and at national and regional teacher/educator conferences; the OCRWM Fellowship Program; and support for Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

  10. Head-and-face shape variations of U.S. civilian workers.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Shu, Chang; Xi, Pengcheng; Bergman, Michael; Joseph, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify head-and-face shape variations of U.S. civilian workers using modern methods of shape analysis. The purpose of this study was based on previously highlighted changes in U.S. civilian worker head-and-face shape over the last few decades - touting the need for new and better fitting respirators - as well as the study's usefulness in designing more effective personal protective equipment (PPE) - specifically in the field of respirator design. The raw scan three-dimensional (3D) data for 1169 subjects were parameterized using geometry processing techniques. This process allowed the individual scans to be put in correspondence with each other in such a way that statistical shape analysis could be performed on a dense set of 3D points. This process also cleaned up the original scan data such that the noise was reduced and holes were filled in. The next step, statistical analysis of the variability of the head-and-face shape in the 3D database, was conducted using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) techniques. Through these analyses, it was shown that the space of the head-and-face shape was spanned by a small number of basis vectors. Less than 50 components explained more than 90% of the variability. Furthermore, the main mode of variations could be visualized through animating the shape changes along the PCA axes with computer software in executable form for Windows XP. The results from this study in turn could feed back into respirator design to achieve safer, more efficient product style and sizing. Future study is needed to determine the overall utility of the point cloud-based approach for the quantification of facial morphology variation and its relationship to respirator performance.

  11. Almonte's great train disaster: Shaping nurses' roles and the civilian use of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Toman, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    Blood transfusion was initially a small-scale, labour-intensive therapy administered by physicians. Through the first decades of the 20th century, transfusion comprised a "last resort" measure used and tested primarily in the context of war. Media accounts of the Almonte train disaster on the night of 27 December 1942 linked survival to the newly established blood bank located 42 km east in Ottawa, Ontario. This event did not constitute a "first time" occurrence or a "great discovery" in the history of blood. But it did illustrate in a very visible and public manner that blood transfusion technology was now readily available for use in general hospitals and civilian populations. Canada had an infrastructure for the collection, processing, storage, and transportation of blood products, and for the recruitment of blood donors by the mid-1940s. As the need for blood declined toward the end of World War II, transfusion became a technology in need of application. The extension of transfusion to civilian populations, however, would require a ready source of labour-increased numbers of health care workers who were available continuously with the necessary knowledge and skills to assume the responsibility. Nurses were well situated for this technological role by a convergence of scientific, economic, labour, gender, professional, and educational influences that both facilitated and constrained blood transfusion as a nursing competency. This paper examines how the expanded use of one medical technology shaped related roles for nurses. Transfusion ultimately influenced nurses' work and the composition of the workforce as the first medical act "delegated" to nurses in Ontario (1947), setting a precedent for the delegation of further technologies over the next four decades.

  12. The Development and Implications of Peer Emotional Support for Student Service Members/Veterans and Civilian College Students

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; Barry, Adam E.; Mroczek, Daniel K.; Wadsworth, Shelley MacDermid

    2013-01-01

    Student service members/veterans represent a growing population on college campuses. Despite this growth, scholarly investigations into their health- and adjustment-related issues are almost nonexistent. The limited research that is available suggests that student service members/veterans may have trouble connecting with their civilian counterparts and be at risk for social isolation. The present study compared the development and implications of emotional support from peers among 199 student service members/veterans and 181 civilian students through 3 distinct occasions over the course of 1 calendar year. Data were collected via electronic survey. Measured constructs included perceived emotional support from university friends, mental health, alcohol use, and academic functioning. A series of multilevel models revealed that student service members/veterans reported less emotional support from their peers compared with their civilian counterparts; yet, emotional support from peers increased similarly for both groups over time. Although, increasing peer emotional support was generally related to better academic and mental health outcomes for both groups, the links between emotional support and mental health were stronger for civilian students. Results suggest that mental health practitioners, particularly those on college campuses, should be prepared to deal with veteran-specific experiences that occur before and during college. PMID:23421774

  13. 20 CFR 404.1018a - Work by civilians for the United States Government or its instrumentalities-remuneration paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Work by civilians for the United States...' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950... the retirement system. (e) Work as a Peace Corps Volunteer—remuneration paid prior to 1984....

  14. 20 CFR 404.1018a - Work by civilians for the United States Government or its instrumentalities-remuneration paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Work by civilians for the United States...' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950... the retirement system. (e) Work as a Peace Corps Volunteer—remuneration paid prior to 1984....

  15. 20 CFR 404.1018a - Work by civilians for the United States Government or its instrumentalities-remuneration paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Government or its instrumentalities-remuneration paid prior to 1984. 404.1018a Section 404.1018a Employees... 1984. (a) General—remuneration paid prior to 1984. If you worked as a civilian employee of the United... by a retirement system—remuneration paid prior to 1984. Work you did as an employee of the...

  16. Mental Health, Quality of Life, and Health Functioning in Women Veterans: Differential Outcomes Associated with Military and Civilian Sexual Assault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suris, Alina; Lind, Lisa; Kashner, T. Michael; Borman, Patricia D.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined psychiatric, physical, and quality-of-life functioning in a sample of 270 women veterans receiving outpatient treatment at a Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants were interviewed regarding their civilian (CSA) and military sexual assault (MSA) histories, and data regarding quality of life and health outcomes…

  17. The development and implications of peer emotional support for student service members/veterans and civilian college students.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, Shawn D; Barry, Adam E; Mroczek, Daniel K; Macdermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2013-04-01

    Student service members/veterans represent a growing population on college campuses. Despite this growth, scholarly investigations into their health- and adjustment-related issues are almost nonexistent. The limited research that is available suggests that student service members/veterans may have trouble connecting with their civilian counterparts and be at risk for social isolation. The present study compared the development and implications of emotional support from peers among 199 student service members/veterans and 181 civilian students through 3 distinct occasions over the course of 1 calendar year. Data were collected via electronic survey. Measured constructs included perceived emotional support from university friends, mental health, alcohol use, and academic functioning. A series of multilevel models revealed that student service members/veterans reported less emotional support from their peers compared with their civilian counterparts; yet, emotional support from peers increased similarly for both groups over time. Although, increasing peer emotional support was generally related to better academic and mental health outcomes for both groups, the links between emotional support and mental health were stronger for civilian students. Results suggest that mental health practitioners, particularly those on college campuses, should be prepared to deal with veteran-specific experiences that occur before and during college.

  18. An Analysis of Department of Defense Medical Corpsmen Training Programs and Possible Contributions to Civilian Physician's Assistant Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabral, William R.; Stewart, Wendell L.

    The general Medical Corpsmen Training Programs of the Army, Navy, and Air Force are presented and analyzed. These programs are compared with the Civilian Physician's Assistant Programs at Duke University and the University of Washington Medex Program. The purpose was to determine whether additional academic credit could be granted for Military…

  19. 32 CFR 169a.13 - CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees. 169a.13 Section 169a.13 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.13 CAs involving...

  20. 32 CFR 169a.13 - CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees. 169a.13 Section 169a.13 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.13 CAs involving...

  1. 75 FR 19877 - Relief for U.S. Military and Civilian Personnel Who Are Assigned Outside the United States in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... effective date for the direct final rule that published in the Federal Register on March 4, 2010 (75 FR 9763... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 61, 63, and 65 [Docket No. FAA-2009-0923; Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 100- 2] RIN 2120-AJ54 Relief for U.S. Military and Civilian Personnel Who...

  2. National Service Programs and Their Effects on Military Manpower and Civilian Youth Problems. Budget Issue Paper for Fiscal Year 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huck, Daniel F.; Mundel, David S.

    Discussing the related problems of military recruitment and civilian youth unemployment and inadequate education and training, this paper is intended to provide a framework for the consideration and analysis of alternative approaches to these problems. Without offering recommendations, the paper also reports the effects of three prototypical…

  3. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news...

  4. A Study of the Problems Facing Vietnam Era Veterans on their Readjustment to Civilian Life. Senate Committee Print Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Veteran's Affairs.

    This study was conducted to: (1) examine the extent of the problems Vietnam era veterans face in readjusting to civilian life after their separation from the armed forces, (2) determine whether they differ from those experienced by returning servicemen of past wars, and (3) suggest ways that the process might be made easier for veterans not yet…

  5. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 104 - Civilian Employment and Reemployment Rights, Benefits and Obligations for Applicants for, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civilian Employment and Reemployment Rights... Uniformed Services A Appendix A to Part 104 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... other than honorable conditions. e. An officer dismissed from any Armed Force or dropped from the...

  6. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 104 - Civilian Employment and Reemployment Rights, Benefits and Obligations for Applicants for, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civilian Employment and Reemployment Rights... Uniformed Services A Appendix A to Part 104 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... other than honorable conditions. e. An officer dismissed from any Armed Force or dropped from the...

  7. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 104 - Civilian Employment and Reemployment Rights, Benefits and Obligations for Applicants for, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civilian Employment and Reemployment Rights... Uniformed Services A Appendix A to Part 104 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... other than honorable conditions. e. An officer dismissed from any Armed Force or dropped from the...

  8. 5 CFR 831.206 - Continuation of coverage for former Federal employees of the Civilian Marksmanship Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuation of coverage for former Federal employees of the Civilian Marksmanship Program. 831.206 Section 831.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT...

  9. 5 CFR 831.206 - Continuation of coverage for former Federal employees of the Civilian Marksmanship Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Continuation of coverage for former Federal employees of the Civilian Marksmanship Program. 831.206 Section 831.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT...

  10. 5 CFR 831.206 - Continuation of coverage for former Federal employees of the Civilian Marksmanship Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Continuation of coverage for former Federal employees of the Civilian Marksmanship Program. 831.206 Section 831.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT...

  11. 5 CFR 831.206 - Continuation of coverage for former Federal employees of the Civilian Marksmanship Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Continuation of coverage for former Federal employees of the Civilian Marksmanship Program. 831.206 Section 831.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1018a - Work by civilians for the United States Government or its instrumentalities-remuneration paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Work by civilians for the United States Government or its instrumentalities-remuneration paid prior to 1984. 404.1018a Section 404.1018a Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment,...

  13. Military return to duty and civilian return to work factors following burns with focus on the hand and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Ted T; Richard, Reg L; Hedman, Travis L; Chisholm, Gary B; Quick, Charles D; Baer, David G; Dewey, William S; Jones, John S; Renz, Evan M; Barillo, David J; Cancio, Leopold C; Chung, Kevin K; Holcomb, John B; Wolf, Steven E

    2008-01-01

    Functional recovery and outcome from severe burns is oftentimes judged by the time required for a person to return to work (RTW) in civilian life. The equivalent in military terms is return to active duty. Many factors have been described in the literature as associated with this outcome. Hand function, in particular, is thought to have a great influence on the resumption of preburn activities. The purpose of this investigation was to compare factors associated with civilian RTW with combat injured military personnel. A review of the literature was performed to assimilate the many factors reported as involved with RTW or duty. Additionally, a focus on the influence of hand burns is included. Thirty-four different parameters influencing RTW have been reported inconsistently in the literature. In a military population of combat burns, TBSA burn, length of hospitalization and intensive care and inhalation injury were found as the most significant factors in determining return to duty status. In previous RTW investigations of civilian populations, there exists a scatter of factors reported to influence patient disposition with a mixture of conflicting results. In neither military nor civilian populations was the presence of a hand burn found as a dominant factor. Variety in patient information collected and statistical approaches used to analyze this information were found to influence the results and deter comparisons between patient populations. There is a need for a consensus data set and corresponding statistical approach used to evaluate RTW and duty outcomes after burn injury.

  14. Beacon of Hope? Lessons Learned from Efforts to Reduce Civilian Deaths from Police Shootings in an Australian State.

    PubMed

    Saligari, Jessica; Evans, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In the 1990s, the police service in Victoria, Australia, faced a crisis of community confidence due to a spate of civilian deaths from police shootings. In that decade, twice as many civilians died at the hands of the police in Victoria than in every other Australian state combined. Most of those killed were mentally ill and affected by drugs and alcohol, and were rarely a serious threat except to themselves. The problem was also almost entirely an urban phenomenon. Shootings in rural communities, where mentally ill people were more likely to be personally known to local police, were (and remain) almost unknown. The large number of fatalities was recognised as a serious threat to public confidence, and Victoria Police introduced a ground-breaking training programme, Operation Beacon. Operating procedures and weapons training were fundamentally changed, to focus on de-escalation of conflict and avoiding or minimising police use of force. In the short term, Operation Beacon was successful. Shooting incidents were dramatically reduced. However, during the first decade of the new century, the number of civilians being killed again increased. This article examines Operation Beacon, both as a successful model for reducing civilian deaths at the hand of police and as a cautionary tale for police reform. We argue that the lessons of Operation Beacon have been gradually forgotten and that old habits and attitudes resurfaced. Fatal shootings of mentally ill civilians can be prevented, but if success is to be other than temporary, the Beacon philosophy must be continually reemphasised by police management. PMID:26666251

  15. Beacon of Hope? Lessons Learned from Efforts to Reduce Civilian Deaths from Police Shootings in an Australian State.

    PubMed

    Saligari, Jessica; Evans, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In the 1990s, the police service in Victoria, Australia, faced a crisis of community confidence due to a spate of civilian deaths from police shootings. In that decade, twice as many civilians died at the hands of the police in Victoria than in every other Australian state combined. Most of those killed were mentally ill and affected by drugs and alcohol, and were rarely a serious threat except to themselves. The problem was also almost entirely an urban phenomenon. Shootings in rural communities, where mentally ill people were more likely to be personally known to local police, were (and remain) almost unknown. The large number of fatalities was recognised as a serious threat to public confidence, and Victoria Police introduced a ground-breaking training programme, Operation Beacon. Operating procedures and weapons training were fundamentally changed, to focus on de-escalation of conflict and avoiding or minimising police use of force. In the short term, Operation Beacon was successful. Shooting incidents were dramatically reduced. However, during the first decade of the new century, the number of civilians being killed again increased. This article examines Operation Beacon, both as a successful model for reducing civilian deaths at the hand of police and as a cautionary tale for police reform. We argue that the lessons of Operation Beacon have been gradually forgotten and that old habits and attitudes resurfaced. Fatal shootings of mentally ill civilians can be prevented, but if success is to be other than temporary, the Beacon philosophy must be continually reemphasised by police management.

  16. Accounting for Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Kylie

    2011-01-01

    Children are increasingly described as agents and agency is important to arguments for children's rights and participation. Yet agency is rarely defined or theorised in childhood studies. This article reviews common uses and meanings of agency and argues that critical, social conceptualisations have yet to be extensively taken up in childhood…

  17. 40 CFR 36.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency or agency. 36.645 Section 36.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... Federal agency or agency. Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department,...

  18. Federal Agency Biodefense Funding, FY2013-FY2014

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Since 2001, the United States government has spent substantial resources on preparing the nation against a bioterrorist attack. Earlier articles in this series have analyzed civilian biodefense funding by the federal government for fiscal years (FY) 2001 through proposed funding for FY2013. This article updates those figures with budgeted amounts for FY2014, specifically analyzing the budgets and allocations for biodefense at the Departments of Health and Human Services, Defense, Homeland Security, Agriculture, Commerce, Veterans Affairs, and State; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the National Science Foundation. This article also includes an updated assessment of the proportion of biodefense funding provided for programs that address multiple scientific, public health, healthcare, national security, and international security issues in addition to biodefense. The FY2014 federal budget for civilian biodefense totals $6.69 billion. Of that total, $5.86 billion (88%) is budgeted for programs that have both biodefense and nonbiodefense goals and applications, and $835 million (12%) is budgeted for programs that have objectives solely related to biodefense. PMID:23906009

  19. 28 CFR 31.102 - State agency structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State agency structure. 31.102 Section 31... Applicants § 31.102 State agency structure. The State agency may be a discrete unit of State government or a... unit of State government. Details of organization and structure are matters of State...

  20. 28 CFR 31.102 - State agency structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State agency structure. 31.102 Section 31... Applicants § 31.102 State agency structure. The State agency may be a discrete unit of State government or a... unit of State government. Details of organization and structure are matters of State...

  1. 28 CFR Appendix A to Part 800 - Agency Addresses

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS Pt. 800, App. A Appendix A to Part 800—Agency Addresses I. Central Offices Court... Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia/Community...

  2. 28 CFR Appendix A to Part 800 - Agency Addresses

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS Pt. 800, App. A Appendix A to Part 800—Agency Addresses I. Central Offices Court... Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia/Community...

  3. 28 CFR Appendix A to Part 800 - Agency Addresses

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS Pt. 800, App. A Appendix A to Part 800—Agency Addresses I. Central Offices Court... Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia/Community...

  4. 28 CFR Appendix A to Part 800 - Agency Addresses

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS Pt. 800, App. A Appendix A to Part 800—Agency Addresses I. Central Offices Court... Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia/Community...

  5. [Workshop of military reconstructive surgery in Conakry May 1999: example of civilian-military cooperation in responding to medical-surgical crisis emergencies].

    PubMed

    Amblard, J; Rigal, S; Diakite, S K; Bagarry, E; Seye

    2002-01-01

    During the period from 1998 to 1999, civil wars broke out in number of west African countries including Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea Bissau. Due to the situation in surrounding countries, Guinea Conakry was forced to accept nearly 650000 refugees whose presence represented a major risk for the socio-political stability of the country. International organizations and NGOs condemned the atrocities inflicted on civilian populations by the children serving as soldiers in the RUF rebels organizations of Sierra Leone and Liberia. These attacks included murders, gang rapes, abduction of children and young people, and mutilation of extremities of people of all ages ranging from infants to elderly. Treatment of mutilation victims requires the availability of facilities for surgical treatment and prosthetic fitting in Guinea Conakry. The humanitarian action division of the French Foreign Affairs Department and the NGO Handicap International decided to provide specialized training in the management of mutilation injuries to surgical groups in hospitals of Guinea and Sierra Leone. The program consisted in a workshop on reconstructive surgery for war-related injuries to allow optimal prosthetic fitting for reinsertion of mutilation victims into society. PMID:12534180

  6. 77 FR 72351 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... and Part D sponsoring organizations (Medicare Advantage Organizations , Cost Plans, and Medicare Part... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, HHS....

  7. "I Serve 2": Meeting the needs of military children in civilian practice.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Alicia Gill; Dumas, Mary Anne; Wilmoth, Margaret C; Patrician, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    The American Academy of Nursing launched the "Have You Ever Served in the Military?" campaign in 2013 in conjunction with the Joining Forces campaign spearheaded by First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden. The "Have You Ever Served in the Military?" campaign provides guidance and resources for nurses outside the Military Health System and Veterans Health Administration where upwards of 80% of veterans receive care. However, most military personnel do not serve alone. More than half of the 2.2 million active duty, National Guard, and Reserve service members currently serving in the armed forces have families and many military children experience stress and anxiety secondary to parental military service. Although strides have been made to improve identification and treatment of the visible and invisible wounds of war for service members, little to no information exists regarding the impact parental service has on the physical, psychological, and behavioral health of military children. In addition, there is no mechanism in place to identify military children in civilian practice nor resources providing evidence-based best practices when caring for these children. PMID:27477834

  8. Joint Polar Satellite System: The United States next generation civilian polar-orbiting environmental satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Kilcoyne, Heather; Cikanek, Harry; Mehta, Ajay

    2013-12-01

    next generation polar-orbiting environmental satellite system, designated as the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), was proposed in February 2010, as part of the President's Fiscal Year 2011 budget request, to be the Civilian successor to the restructured National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). Beginning 1 October 2013, the JPSS baseline consists of a suite of five instruments: advanced microwave and infrared sounders critical for short- and medium-range weather forecasting; an advanced visible and infrared imager needed for environmental assessments such as snow/ice cover, droughts, volcanic ash, forest fires and surface temperature; ozone sensor primarily used for global monitoring of ozone and input to weather and climate models; and an Earth radiation budget sensor for monitoring the Earth's energy budget. NASA will fund the Earth radiation budget sensor and the ozone limb sensor for the second JPSS operational satellite--JPSS-2. JPSS is implemented through a partnership between NOAA and the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NOAA is responsible for overall funding; maintaining the high-level requirements; establishing international and interagency partnerships; developing the science and algorithms, and user engagement; NOAA also provides product data distribution and archiving of JPSS data. NASA's role is to serve as acquisition Center of Excellence, providing acquisition of instruments, spacecraft and the multimission ground system, and early mission implementation through turnover to NOAA for operations.

  9. Cranes, crops and conservation: understanding human perceptions of biodiversity conservation in South Korea's Civilian Control Zone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Oh; Steiner, Frederick; Mueller, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    South Korea's Civilian Control Zone (CCZ), a relatively untouched area due to tight military oversight since the end of Korean War, has received considerable attention nationally and internationally for its rich biodiversity. However, the exclusion of local communities from the process of defining problems and goals and of setting priorities for biodiversity conservation has halted a series of biodiversity conservation efforts. Through qualitative research, we explored CCZ farmers' views of key problems and issues and also the sources of their opposition to the government-initiated conservation approaches. Key findings include the farmers' concerns about the impact of conservation restrictions on their access to necessary resources needed to farm, wildlife impacts on the value of rice and other agricultural goods they produce, and farmers' strong distrust of government, the military, and planners, based on their experiences with past conservation processes. The findings regarding farmers' perceptions should prove useful for the design of future participatory planning processes for biodiversity conservation in the CCZ. This case highlights how conservative measures, perceived to be imposed from above--however scientifically valuable--can be undermined and suggests the value that must be placed on communication among planners and stakeholders.

  10. Development of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management National Transportation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Macaluso, C.; Offner, J.; Patric, J.

    2008-07-01

    The Director of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) designated development of the National Transportation Plan (NTP) as one of his four strategic objectives for the program. The Office of Logistics Management (OLM) within OCRWM was tasked to develop the plan, which will accommodate state, local, and tribal concerns and input to the greatest extent practicable. The plan will describe each element of the national transportation system that OCRWM is developing for shipping spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The plan will bring together OCRWM's approach for acquiring capital assets (casks, rail cars, and a rail line in Nevada) and its operational planning efforts in a single, comprehensive document. It will also provide a timetable for major transportation decisions and milestones needed to support a 2017 start date for shipments to the Yucca Mountain repository. The NTP will be revised to incorporate new developments and decisions as they are finalized. This paper will describe the elements of the NTP, its importance in providing a comprehensive overview of the national transportation system, and the role of stakeholders in providing input on the NTP and the national transportation system. (authors)

  11. Variations in Head-and-Face Shape of Chinese Civilian Workers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuewei; Xi, Pengcheng; Joseph, Michael; Zhuang, Ziqing; Shu, Chang; Jiang, Luman; Bergman, Michael; Chen, Weihong

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to elucidate variations in head-and-face shape among the Chinese civilian workers. Most respirator manufacturers are using outdated, Western anthropometric data to design respirators for the Chinese workers. Therefore, newly acquired anthropometric data specific to the Chinese population are needed to create more effective personal protective equipment. The three-dimensional (3D) head scans of 350 participants, who were selected from the 3000 participants in the 2006 Chinese Anthropometric Survey, were processed using geometric processing techniques. Each scan was then linked with the others, making statistical shape analysis on a dense set of 3D points possible. Furthermore, this provided for the reduction of scan noise as well as for the patching of holes. Following general scan correspondence and fine tuning, principal component analysis was used to analyze the variability in head-and-face shape of the 3D images. More than 90% of the variability among head-and-face shapes was accounted for with 26 principal components. Future study is recommended so the overall usefulness of the point cloud-based approach for the quantification of variations in facial morphology may be determined.

  12. An Assessment of Gas Foil Bearing Scalability and the Potential Benefits to Civilian Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several years the term oil-free turbomachinery has been used to describe a rotor support system for high speed turbomachinery that does not require oil for lubrication, damping, or cooling. The foundation technology for oil-free turbomachinery is the compliant foil bearing. This technology can replace the conventional rolling element bearings found in current engines. Two major benefits are realized with this technology. The primary benefit is the elimination of the oil lubrication system, accessory gearbox, tower shaft, and one turbine frame. These components account for 8 to 13 percent of the turbofan engine weight. The second benefit that compliant foil bearings offer to turbofan engines is the capability to operate at higher rotational speeds and shaft diameters. While traditional rolling element bearings have diminished life, reliability, and load capacity with increasing speeds, the foil bearing has a load capacity proportional to speed. The traditional applications for foil bearings have been in small, lightweight machines. However, recent advancements in the design and manufacturing of foil bearings have increased their potential size. An analysis, grounded in experimentally proven operation, is performed to assess the scalability of the modern foil bearing. This analysis was coupled to the requirements of civilian turbofan engines. The application of the foil bearing to larger, high bypass ratio engines nominally at the 120 kN (approx.25000 lb) thrust class has been examined. The application of this advanced technology to this system was found to reduce mission fuel burn by 3.05 percent.

  13. Cranes, crops and conservation: understanding human perceptions of biodiversity conservation in South Korea's Civilian Control Zone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Oh; Steiner, Frederick; Mueller, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    South Korea's Civilian Control Zone (CCZ), a relatively untouched area due to tight military oversight since the end of Korean War, has received considerable attention nationally and internationally for its rich biodiversity. However, the exclusion of local communities from the process of defining problems and goals and of setting priorities for biodiversity conservation has halted a series of biodiversity conservation efforts. Through qualitative research, we explored CCZ farmers' views of key problems and issues and also the sources of their opposition to the government-initiated conservation approaches. Key findings include the farmers' concerns about the impact of conservation restrictions on their access to necessary resources needed to farm, wildlife impacts on the value of rice and other agricultural goods they produce, and farmers' strong distrust of government, the military, and planners, based on their experiences with past conservation processes. The findings regarding farmers' perceptions should prove useful for the design of future participatory planning processes for biodiversity conservation in the CCZ. This case highlights how conservative measures, perceived to be imposed from above--however scientifically valuable--can be undermined and suggests the value that must be placed on communication among planners and stakeholders. PMID:20924581

  14. Cranes, Crops and Conservation: Understanding Human Perceptions of Biodiversity Conservation in South Korea's Civilian Control Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Oh; Steiner, Frederick; Mueller, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    South Korea's Civilian Control Zone (CCZ), a relatively untouched area due to tight military oversight since the end of Korean War, has received considerable attention nationally and internationally for its rich biodiversity. However, the exclusion of local communities from the process of defining problems and goals and of setting priorities for biodiversity conservation has halted a series of biodiversity conservation efforts. Through qualitative research, we explored CCZ farmers' views of key problems and issues and also the sources of their opposition to the government-initiated conservation approaches. Key findings include the farmers' concerns about the impact of conservation restrictions on their access to necessary resources needed to farm, wildlife impacts on the value of rice and other agricultural goods they produce, and farmers' strong distrust of government, the military, and planners, based on their experiences with past conservation processes. The findings regarding farmers' perceptions should prove useful for the design of future participatory planning processes for biodiversity conservation in the CCZ. This case highlights how conservative measures, perceived to be imposed from above—however scientifically valuable—can be undermined and suggests the value that must be placed on communication among planners and stakeholders.

  15. Risk factors for DSM 5 PTSD symptoms in Israeli civilians during the Gaza war

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Sharon; Weinberg, Michael; Or-Chen, Keren; Harel, Hila

    2015-01-01

    Background In light of the current modifications presented in the diagnostic criteria of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the DSM 5, this study aimed at revalidating well-known PTSD risk factors, including gender, peritraumatic dissociation, social support, level of threat, and trait tendency for forgiveness. Method Five hundred and one Israeli civilians were assessed during real-time exposure to missile and rocket fire at the eruption of the Gaza war. Assessments took place approximately one to 2 weeks after the beginning of this military operation, relying on web administration of the study, which allowed simultaneous data collection from respondents in the three regions in Israel that were under attack. Results A structural equation model design revealed that higher levels of forgiveness toward situations were associated with fewer PTSD symptoms, whereas peritraumatic dissociation and high levels of objective and subjective threat were positively associated with PTSD symptoms. Additionally, females were at higher risk for PTSD symptoms than males. Conclusions The findings of this study provide further evidence for the importance of directing preventive attention to those vulnerable to the development of elevated levels of PTSD symptoms. Theoretical and clinical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25905028

  16. Military perspective on the civilian response to the London bombings July 2005.

    PubMed

    Bland, S A; Lockey, D J; Davies, G E; Kehoe, A D

    2006-03-01

    With the break up of the Warsaw Pact and changing global relations, current military deployments are becoming smaller and more expeditionary (e.g. Afghanistan, East Timor and Sierra Leone). During the Cold War, the use of weapons of mass effect was highly likely to have been seen on the battlefield. Ironically, the proliferation of CBRN agents and the knowledge of their application, as well as the manufacture of improvised explosive devices, have lead to the targeting of civilian populations by extremist groups. One of the benefits of military clinicians embedded in NHS hospital trusts, as well as a strong reservist cadre, is a greater understanding of the implications and management of asymmetric attacks against the U.K. The experience and skills of military clinicians may be of benefit to NHS trusts while this type of threat exists. Military clinicians are also likely to benefit from the experience that they get in certain NHS posts that provide skills that are readily transferable to military medicine. The events of 7th July highlighted the dynamic use of deployable medical resources and a rapid return to normal service provision. This type of 'Health Resilience' can only be achieved with a combination of effective emergency planning, on scene clinical risk management and clinical leadership. PMID:16749464

  17. Assessment of thermal analysis software for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Graham, R.F.; Lagerberg, G.N.; Chung, T.C.

    1989-07-01

    This assessment uses several recent assessments and the more general code compilations that have been completed to produce a list of 116 codes that can be used for thermal analysis. This list is then compared with criteria prepared especially for the Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE/OCRWM). Based on these criteria, fifteen codes are narrowed to three primary codes and four secondary codes for use by the OCRWM thermal analyst. The analyst is cautioned that since no single code is sufficient for all applications, a code must be selected based upon the predominate heat transfer mode of the problem to be solved, but the codes suggested in this report have been used successfully for a range of OCRWM applications. The report concludes with a series of recommendations for additional work of which the major points include the following: The codes suggested by this report must be benchmarked with the existing US and international problems and validated when possible; An interactive code selection tool could be developed or, perhaps even more useful, a users group could be supported to ensure the proper selection of thermal codes and dissemination of information on the latest version; The status of the 116 codes identified by this report should be verified, and methods for maintaining the still active codes must be established; and special capabilities of each code in phase change, convection and radiation should be improved to better enable the thermal analyst to model OCRWM applications. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Estimates of auditory risk from outdoor impulse noise. II: Civilian firearms.

    PubMed

    Flamme, Gregory A; Wong, Adam; Liebe, Kevin; Lynd, James

    2009-01-01

    Firearm impulses are common noise exposures in the United States. This study records, describes and analyzes impulses produced outdoors by civilian firearms with respect to the amount of auditory risk they pose to the unprotected listener under various listening conditions. Risk estimates were obtained using three contemporary damage risk criteria (DRC) including a waveform parameter-based approach (peak SPL and B-duration), an energy-based criterion (A-weighted SEL and equivalent continuous level) and a physiological model (AHAAH). Results from these DRC were converted into a number of maximum permissible unprotected exposures to facilitate interpretation. Acoustic characteristics of firearm impulses differed substantially across guns, ammunition, and microphone location. The type of gun, ammunition and the microphone location all significantly affected estimates of auditory risk from firearms. Vast differences in maximum permissible exposures were observed; the rank order of the differences varied with the source of the impulse. Unprotected exposure to firearm noise is not recommended, but people electing to fire a gun without hearing protection should be advised to minimize auditory risk through careful selection of ammunition and shooting environment. Small-caliber guns with long barrels and guns loaded with the least powerful ammunition tend to be associated with the least auditory risk. PMID:19805933

  19. Agency and intervention.

    PubMed

    Roskies, Adina L

    2015-09-19

    Novel ways to intervene on brain function raise questions about agency and responsibility. Here, I discuss whether direct brain interventions, and in particular, deep brain stimulation, pose a threat to agency in individual cases, or to our general conceptualization of what it is to be a responsible agent. While I do not currently see evidence that these interventions constitute a global challenge to our concept of agency, they do have the potential to diminish agency in individuals. I consider whether the lack of evidence for a global challenge ratifies our folk conceptions, or is a necessary consequence of them. In closing, I propose that our theoretical understanding of agency and our therapeutic approaches could be improved with a more nuanced, multidimensional view of agency. PMID:26240430

  20. Agency and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Roskies, Adina L.

    2015-01-01

    Novel ways to intervene on brain function raise questions about agency and responsibility. Here, I discuss whether direct brain interventions, and in particular, deep brain stimulation, pose a threat to agency in individual cases, or to our general conceptualization of what it is to be a responsible agent. While I do not currently see evidence that these interventions constitute a global challenge to our concept of agency, they do have the potential to diminish agency in individuals. I consider whether the lack of evidence for a global challenge ratifies our folk conceptions, or is a necessary consequence of them. In closing, I propose that our theoretical understanding of agency and our therapeutic approaches could be improved with a more nuanced, multidimensional view of agency. PMID:26240430

  1. Long-term outcomes of war-related death of family members in Kosovar civilian war survivors.

    PubMed

    Morina, Nexhmedin; Reschke, Konrad; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to war-related experiences can comprise a broad variety of experiences and the very nature of certain war-related events has generally been neglected. To examine the long-term outcomes of war-related death of family members, the authors investigated the prevalence rates of major depressive episode (MDE), anxiety disorders, and quality of life among civilian war survivors with or without war-related death of first-degree family members 9 years after the war in Kosovo. Compared to participants without war-related death of family members, those who had experienced such loss had signficantly higher prevalence rates of MDE, posttraumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder, and reported a lower quality of life 9 years after the war. These results indicate that bereaved civilian survivors of war experience significant mental health problems many years after the war.

  2. State participation in the creation of fuel-cell-based power plants to meet civilian demand in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Pekhota, F.N.

    1996-04-01

    At present, up to 70% of Russian territory is not covered by central electrical distribution systems. In the field of fuel cell power plants, Russia is at parity with the leading foreign countries with respect to both technical and economic performance and the level of research being conducted. Civilian use of these generating systems on a broad scale, however, demands that a number of problems be solved, particularly those relating to the need for longer plant service life, lower unit cost of electricity, etc. The Ministry of Science and technical Policy of the Russian Federation issued a decree creating a new are of concentration, `Fuel Cell Based Power Plants for Civilian Needs,` in the GNTPR `Environmentally Clean Power Industry,` which will form the basis for financial support in this area out of the federal budget.

  3. Conversion From Limb Salvage to Late Amputation: Lessons Learned From Recent Battlefields With Application to Civilian Trauma.

    PubMed

    Covey, D C

    2015-01-01

    Battlefield injuries and high-energy civilian trauma present orthopaedic surgeons with treatment challenges. Despite efforts at limb salvage, some patients elect late amputation. This article reviews risk factors that predispose to late amputation. Using a MEDLINE search, English language peer-reviewed articles from 1993 to 2013 having data on late amputation following limb salvage were included. Late lower extremity amputation after limb salvage varied from 3.9% to 40% in civilian patients and from 5.2% to 15.2% in military patients. Factors influencing a patient's decision to undergo late amputation included a combination of complex pain symptoms with neurologic dysfunction, infection, a desire for improved limb functionality, and unwillingness to endure an often complicated and lengthy course of treatment. In military patients, rank was a significant risk factor since officers were 2.5 times more likely to elect late amputation (p < .05) than enlisted personnel. Despite often extraordinary efforts towardlimb salvage, results maybe disappointing.

  4. Survey of US Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology Program activities applicable to civilian manufacturing industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Azimi, S.A.; Conrad, J.L.; Reed, J.E.

    1985-03-01

    Intent of the survey was to identify and characterize activities potentially applicable to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in the civilian manufacturing industries. The civilian industries emphasized were the general manufacturing industries (including fabricated metals, glass, machinery, paper, plastic, textile, and transportation equipment manufacturing) and the primary metals industries (including primary aluminum, copper, steel, and zinc production). The principal steps in the survey were to: develop overview taxonomies of the general manufacturing and primary metals industries as well as specific industry taxonomies; identify needs and opportunities for improving process energy efficiency and productivity in the industries included; identify federal programs, capabilities, and special technical expertise that might be relevant to industry's needs and opportunities; contact federal laboratories/facilities, through visits and other forms of inquiry; prepare formatted profiles (descriptions) potentially applicable work efforts; review findings with industry; and compile and evaluate industry responses.

  5. Staying Strong With Schools: A Civilian School-Based Intervention to Promote Resilience for Military-Connected Children.

    PubMed

    Ohye, Bonnie; Kelly, Hope; Chen, Yang; Zakarian, Rebecca J; Simon, Naomi M; Bui, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Since September 11, 2001, over 2 million U.S. service members have been deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, resulting in hundreds of thousands of military-connected children (MCC) having experienced a parental deployment. Although parental deployments have significantly burdened these children, few evidence-based interventions designed to support their resilience to these stressors are available. To address this gap, we developed a civilian school-based intervention to promote resilience in MCC living in the community. Our intervention, Staying Strong With Schools (SSWS), aims to deliver: a training to all school professionals early in the school year to educate them about challenges for children and families experiencing parental deployment and signs of deployment-related distress; and a year-long training for the school guidance counselor who coordinates communication and provides psychosocial support to MCC within the school community. We piloted SSWS in two civilian elementary schools and found promising feasibility and acceptability. PMID:27483526

  6. 76 FR 9350 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Delisting From Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization: AHRQ has accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization,...

  7. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: development of perchlorate-free green-light illuminants for military and civilian applications.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Raab, James M; Hann, Ronald K; Damavarapu, Reddy; Klapötke, Thomas M

    2012-06-01

    The development of perchlorate-free hand-held signal illuminants for the US Army's M195 green star parachute is described. Compared with the perchlorate-containing control, the optimized perchlorate-free illuminants were less sensitive toward various ignition stimuli while offering comparable burn times and visible-light outputs. The results were also important from the perspective of civilian fireworks because the development of perchlorate-free illuminants remains an important objective of the commercial fireworks industry.

  8. Approaches to nutritional support for battle casualties and trauma: current military practice and lessons learned from the civilian sector.

    PubMed

    Shikora, S A

    1995-06-01

    In conflict, military medicine differs greatly from its civilian counterpart. Treatment strategies are designed to manage a potentially large number of severely wounded and function in an often hostile and poorly equipped environment. The most severely injured are stabilized and prepared for transport away from the war zone to a larger, better-equipped facility. At present no formal military policy exists concerning nutrition support. Traditionally, it has not been employed until the wounded arrived at a major medical center. Factors including the limited capacity to transport formula, lack of sophistication of battle zone facilities, and the rapid movement of wounded have been major drawbacks to providing early nutrition. The care of the urban trauma patient is relevant for the battle wounded of the military. There is ample evidence in the literature to support the use of nutrition support soon after injury. This article briefly describes the limitations of the military medical system in reference to nutrition support and the role of nutrition support for the civilian trauma patient. The lessons learned from the civilian experience may help formulate a nutrition strategy for the battle wounded that may become included into the standardized care policy.

  9. Prospective open-label study of add-on and monotherapy topiramate in civilians with chronic nonhallucinatory posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Berlant, Jeffrey L

    2004-01-01

    Background In order to confirm therapeutic effects of topiramate on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) observed in a prior study, a new prospective, open-label study was conducted to examine acute responses in chronic, nonhallucinatory PTSD. Methods Thirty-three consecutive newly recruited civilian adult outpatients (mean age 46 years, 85% female) with DSM-IV-diagnosed chronic PTSD, excluding those with concurrent auditory or visual hallucinations, received topiramate either as monotherapy (n = 5) or augmentation (n = 28). The primary measure was a change in the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) score from baseline to 4 weeks, with response defined as a ≥ 30% reduction of PTSD symptoms. Results For those taking the PCL-C at both baseline and week 4 (n = 30), total symptoms declined by 49% at week 4 (paired t-test, P < 0.001) with similar subscale reductions for reexperiencing, avoidance/numbing, and hyperarousal symptoms. The response rate at week 4 was 77%. Age, sex, bipolar comorbidity, age at onset of PTSD, duration of symptoms, severity of baseline PCL-C score, and monotherapy versus add-on medication administration did not predict reduction in PTSD symptoms. Median time to full response was 9 days and median dosage was 50 mg/day. Conclusions Promising open-label findings in a new sample converge with findings of a previous study. The use of topiramate for treatment of chronic PTSD, at least in civilians, warrants controlled clinical trials. PMID:15315714

  10. Black and blue: Exploring racial bias and law enforcement in the killings of unarmed black male civilians.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alison V; Hall, Erika V; Perry, Jamie L

    2016-04-01

    In late 2014, a series of highly publicized police killings of unarmed Black male civilians in the United States prompted large-scale social turmoil. In the current review, we dissect the psychological antecedents of these killings and explain how the nature of police work may attract officers with distinct characteristics that may make them especially well-primed for negative interactions with Black male civilians. We use media reports to contextualize the precipitating events of the social unrest as we ground our explanations in theory and empirical research from social psychology and industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology. To isolate some of the key mechanisms at play, we disentangle racial bias (e.g., stereotyping processes) from common characteristics of law enforcement agents (e.g., social dominance orientation), while also addressing the interaction between racial bias and policing. By separating the moving parts of the phenomenon, we provide a more fine-grained analysis of the factors that may have contributed to the killings. In doing so, we endeavor to more effectively identify and develop solutions to eradicate excessive use of force during interactions between "Black" (unarmed Black male civilians) and "Blue" (law enforcement).

  11. Black and blue: Exploring racial bias and law enforcement in the killings of unarmed black male civilians.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alison V; Hall, Erika V; Perry, Jamie L

    2016-04-01

    In late 2014, a series of highly publicized police killings of unarmed Black male civilians in the United States prompted large-scale social turmoil. In the current review, we dissect the psychological antecedents of these killings and explain how the nature of police work may attract officers with distinct characteristics that may make them especially well-primed for negative interactions with Black male civilians. We use media reports to contextualize the precipitating events of the social unrest as we ground our explanations in theory and empirical research from social psychology and industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology. To isolate some of the key mechanisms at play, we disentangle racial bias (e.g., stereotyping processes) from common characteristics of law enforcement agents (e.g., social dominance orientation), while also addressing the interaction between racial bias and policing. By separating the moving parts of the phenomenon, we provide a more fine-grained analysis of the factors that may have contributed to the killings. In doing so, we endeavor to more effectively identify and develop solutions to eradicate excessive use of force during interactions between "Black" (unarmed Black male civilians) and "Blue" (law enforcement). PMID:27042881

  12. Negotiating with Subscription Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQueen, Judy; Basch, N. Bernard

    1991-01-01

    This first in a two-part series on how librarians can negotiate services and prices with subscription agencies focuses on how vendors operate. Factors that influence agency costs, revenues, and service charges are described, including economies of scale, discounts from publishers, and prepayment and cash flow. (seven references) (LRW)

  13. Agency, communion and entitlement.

    PubMed

    Żemojtel-Piotrowska, Magdalena A; Piotrowski, Jarosław P; Clinton, Amanda

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the relationship between agency, communion, and the active, passive, and revenge forms of entitlement is examined. Results indicate that active entitlement was positively related to agency, negatively to communion (Study 1), and unrelated to unmitigated agency and communion (Study 2). Passive entitlement was positively related to communion (in regular and unmitigated forms) and negatively related to agency (in both forms). Revenge entitlement was positively related to agency (unmitigated and regular), and negatively related to both regular and unmitigated communal orientations. Detected relationships were independent from self-esteem (Study 1). The findings are discussed in relation to distinctions between narcissistic and healthy entitlement, and within the context of the three-dimensional model of entitlement. PMID:25594535

  14. [One hundred and forty years of Turkish civilian and Turkish military hospital in Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Masić, Izet

    2006-01-01

    This year BIH health celebrates two anniversaries: One hundred and forty years of Turkish civilian and Turkish military hospital in Sarajevo. During Ottoman period in Bosnian pasha region, Oman authorities have founded several military (in each bigger center it has been established military hospital of the Turkish Army) and five civil hospitals, mostly financed from vakuf (Islamic charity) funds. However, first hospital institution in BIH was located in Hadzi Sinan tekija at Mihrivode in Sarajevo, where was located special room for treatment, of mostly physiological patients, using zikr (spiritual ritual). By second half of 19th century civil populations were cured in homes, and wealthy citizens had their own private physicians who used to come with purpose or temporary from Dalmatian or neighboring countries bringing with them appropriate medications. By establishment of mentioned hospitals, other populations were treated by barbers, ranar (specialist for wounds), travar (person who treats patients with grass), and attars who had attar shops with medications purchased from Osman imperia or neighboring western countries. Drugs were prescribed to patients from Ijekarusa (drug prescription book), who were copied from generations and religion books, religion authorities of all confessions or from originals and copies of Arabic medical books which were brought by individuals going to Arabic countries (Mecca, Istanbul, Cairo, etc.). Mentioned hospitals, founded during Osman period (Sarajevo, Tuzla, Mostar, Travnik, Bihac) had key role in the history of BIH health, and they were basis for latter established regional and municipality hospitals founded in the Austria-Hungarian period. In the paper are described Turkish military and Turkish civil hospital established in June 1866 and in October 1866. PMID:16528939

  15. Long-term pulmonary complications of chemical warfare agent exposure in Iraqi Kurdish civilians.

    PubMed

    Ghanei, Mostafa; Naderi, Mostafa; Kosar, Ali Morad; Harandi, Ali Amini; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Poursaleh, Zohreh

    2010-08-01

    The Iraqi government used a range of chemical weapons, including blistering and nerve agents, against Iraqi Kurdish civilians in the 1980s. Few data exist about the long-term respiratory consequences of this exposure. In this study, Kurdish subjects with a history of exposure to chemical weapons were invited to attend a clinical assessment, including a review of their history, physical examination, and a high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of the thorax. Blistering at the time of exposure was used to define significant exposure to mustard gas. Results were compared between two groups of blistering and nonblistering. Four hundred seventy-nine subjects were studied; 45.7% male and 54.3% female. The mean age and standard deviation (mean +/- SD) of the cases was 43.1 +/- 13.7. Spirometry was abnormal in 15.2% of subjects and air trapping was present on CT scan in 46.6% and did not differ between patients with (n = 278) or without a history of blistering. Respiratory symptoms, including dyspnea, cough, and sputum production, were more common in subjects with a history of blistering (all p < .005) and blistering was also associated with a lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) (p < .0001). Severe complications were most common in subjects from Halabja who also made up the majority of participants. These results show that objective abnormalities are common in people with symptoms attributed to prior exposure to chemical agent. Blistering at the time of exposure was associated with more respiratory symptoms and worse lung function, but not with CT appearances. The high proportion of severe cases in comparison to reports from Iran may reflect the historical absence of effective early treatment, including strategies to reduce prolonged early exposure in this population. PMID:20560732

  16. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S PM SUPERSITES PROGRAM - A MAJOR SUCCESSFUL COLLABORATIVE AIR QUALITY PROGRAM SUPPORTING STATES AND REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS IN THEIR APPROACHES TO REDUCE PM LEVELS IN AIR ON URBAN AND REGIONAL SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Particulate Matter (PM) Supersites Program (Program) is a nationwide air quality methods, measurement, modeling, and data analysis program initiated through cooperative agreements with leading universities in the United States. The Progr...

  17. 34 CFR 84.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency or agency. 84.645 Section 84.645 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.645 Federal agency or agency. Federal agency or...

  18. 28 CFR 83.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency or agency. 83.645 Section 83.645 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.645 Federal agency or agency. Federal agency or...

  19. 32 CFR 705.36 - Government transportation of civilians for public affairs purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Services and Agencies. (iii) Travel in connection with any public affairs program arranged by the Navy... command concerned in connection with a public affairs program of local interest only. (For air travel... is that conducted in connection with a public affairs program affecting more than one...

  20. 76 FR 23479 - Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Young Adult

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Young Adult AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, DoD. ACTION: Interim final rule with... Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (NDAA for FY11). It establishes the TRICARE Young Adult... age of 26 of uniformed services sponsors. The TRICARE Young ] Adult program is a premium-based...

  1. 76 FR 79192 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From HSMS Patient Safety Organization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From HSMS Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ... relinquishment from the HSMS Patient Safety Organization of its status as a Patient Safety Organization...

  2. The Severity of Injury in Children Resulting From Acts Against Civilian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Lisa D.; Aharonson-Daniel, Limor; Peleg, Kobi; Waisman, Yehezkel

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the injuries to children by acts against civilian populations (AACP). Summary Background Data: Only 2 articles have focused on the spectrum and severity of injuries to children by AACP. Methods: A retrospective case study of children 0 to 18 years old who were entered into the Israel National Trauma Registry as a result of AACP between September 29, 2000, and June 30, 2002. Results: A total of 158 children were hospitalized for injuries caused by AACP, accounting for 1.4% of all hospitalized injured children but for 10.9% of all in-hospital deaths for trauma. Explosions injured 114 (72.2%); shootings, 34 (21.5%); and other mechanisms such as stoning or stabbing, 10 (6.3%). Older children were injured by explosions more frequently than younger children (86.1% of 15- to 18-year-olds, 73.7% of 10- to 14-year-olds, 63.2% of 0- to 9-year-olds, P = 0.02). A higher percentage of children injured by explosions rather than by shootings were severely or critically injured (33.9% versus 18.8%, P = 0.10). The most frequently injured body regions were extremities (62.8%), head/face (47.3%), chest and abdomen (37.2%), and brain (18.2%). More than 1 body region was injured in 63.0%. Children injured by explosions as compared with shootings had a lower incidence of abdominal trauma (14.9% versus 20.6%), a similar incidence of chest trauma (16.7% versus 14.7%), but a higher incidence of extremity trauma (65.8% versus 53.0%). There were 7 in-hospital deaths, 6 due to severe head injury and 1 due to severe abdominal trauma; 6 of the 7 deaths were caused by explosions, and all but 1 occurred in children 15 to 18 years old. Conclusions: AACP cause significant morbidity and mortality in children, especially adolescents. Injury severity is significantly higher among children who are injured by explosions rather than by shootings. PMID:15798470

  3. Diphtheria toxin IgG levels in military and civilian blood donors in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Speranza, F A B; Ishii, S K; Hirata, R; Mattos-Guaraldi, A L; Milagres, L G

    2010-01-01

    Serologic data on diseases that are preventable by vaccines are necessary to evaluate the success of immunization programs and to identify susceptible subgroups. In the present study, we determined serum IgG levels against diphtheria toxin of military and civilian blood donors (N = 75; 69.3% males and 30.7% females) aged 18-64 years, from the Brazilian Army Biology Institute, Rio de Janeiro, using a commercial diphtheria kit (Diphtheria IgG ELISA; IBL, Germany). Most (63%) unprotected military donors were from the older age group of 41 to 64 years. In contrast, the majority (71%) of young military donors (18 to 30 years) were fully protected. About half of the military donors aged 31 to 40 years were protected against diphtheria. Among the civilians, about 50% of persons aged 18 to 30 years and 31 to 40 years had protective antibody levels against diphtheria as also did 64% of individuals aged 41 to 64 years. All civilians had a similar antibody response (geometric mean = 0.55 IU/mL) independent of age group. Military donors aged 18-30 years had higher IgG levels (geometric mean = 0.82 IU/mL) than military donors of 41-64 years (geometric mean = 0.51 IU/mL; P > 0.05). In conclusion, the existence of a considerable proportion of susceptible adults supports the position that reliable data on the immune status of the population should be maintained routinely and emphasizes the importance of adequate immunization during adulthood.

  4. National outbreak of Yersinia enterocolitica infections in military and civilian populations associated with consumption of mixed salad, Norway, 2014.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Emily; Einöder-Moreno, Margot; Borgen, Katrine; Thorstensen Brandal, Lin; Diab, Lore; Fossli, Øivind; Guzman Herrador, Bernardo; Hassan, Ammar Ali; Johannessen, Gro S; Johansen, Eva Jeanette; Jørgensen Kimo, Roger; Lier, Tore; Paulsen, Bjørn Leif; Popescu, Rodica; Tokle Schytte, Charlotte; Sæbø Pettersen, Kristin; Vold, Line; Ørmen, Øyvind; Wester, Astrid Louise; Wiklund, Marit; Nygård, Karin

    2016-08-25

    In May 2014, a cluster of Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) O9 infections was reported from a military base in northern Norway. Concurrently, an increase in YE infections in civilians was observed in the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases. We investigated to ascertain the extent of the outbreak and identify the source in order to implement control measures. A case was defined as a person with laboratory-confirmed YE O9 infection with the outbreak multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA)-profile (5-6-9-8-9-9). We conducted a case-control study in the military setting and calculated odds ratios (OR) using logistic regression. Traceback investigations were conducted to identify common suppliers and products in commercial kitchens frequented by cases. By 28 May, we identified 133 cases, of which 117 were linked to four military bases and 16 were civilians from geographically dispersed counties. Among foods consumed by cases, multivariable analysis pointed to mixed salad as a potential source of illness (OR 10.26; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85-123.57). The four military bases and cafeterias visited by 14/16 civilian cases received iceberg lettuce or radicchio rosso from the same supplier. Secondary transmission cannot be eliminated as a source of infection in the military camps. The most likely source of the outbreak was salad mix containing imported radicchio rosso, due to its long shelf life. This outbreak is a reminder that fresh produce should not be discounted as a vehicle in prolonged outbreaks and that improvements are still required in the production and processing of fresh salad products. PMID:27588690

  5. OCRWM Bulletin: A report from the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document, entitled the OCRWM Bulletin, is a report from the U.S Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). This issue contains articles describing the following subjects: regulatory drop tests for spent nuclear fuel transportation casks; Environmental Impact Statement for a multi-purpose canister system for spent nuclear fuels; an update from the nuclear waste technical review board; a dry transfer system for spent nuclear fuels and other miscellaneous articles about spent nuclear fuels. Half of the publication is also devoted to articles involving the Yucca Mountain Project.

  6. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VII. International perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is to assess the proliferation vulnerabilities of the present deployment of civilian nuclear-power systems within the current nonproliferation regime and, in light of their prospective deployment, to consider technical and institutional measures and alternatives which may contribute to an improved regime in which nuclear power could play a significant part. An assessment of these measures must include consideration of their nonproliferation effectiveness as well as their bearing upon energy security, and their operational, economic, and political implications. The nature of these considerations can provide some measure of their likely acceptability to various nations.

  7. Agency-Sponsored Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, James S.

    1976-01-01

    Sponsors of these programs include nonprofit organizations, proprietary agencies, wholly owned subsidiaries of U.S. corporations, and foreign-based institutions catering to North American students. Problems arising from their non-accredited status are examined and a criterion instrument for evaluating them is developed. (LBH)

  8. 29 CFR 1960.37 - Committee organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Committee organization. 1960.37 Section 1960.37 Labor... MATTERS Occupational Safety and Health Committees § 1960.37 Committee organization. (a) For agencies which... organization of the agency and its collective bargaining configuration. The agency shall form committees at...

  9. 29 CFR 1960.37 - Committee organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Committee organization. 1960.37 Section 1960.37 Labor... MATTERS Occupational Safety and Health Committees § 1960.37 Committee organization. (a) For agencies which... organization of the agency and its collective bargaining configuration. The agency shall form committees at...

  10. 29 CFR 1960.37 - Committee organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Committee organization. 1960.37 Section 1960.37 Labor... MATTERS Occupational Safety and Health Committees § 1960.37 Committee organization. (a) For agencies which... organization of the agency and its collective bargaining configuration. The agency shall form committees at...

  11. 29 CFR 1960.37 - Committee organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Committee organization. 1960.37 Section 1960.37 Labor... MATTERS Occupational Safety and Health Committees § 1960.37 Committee organization. (a) For agencies which... organization of the agency and its collective bargaining configuration. The agency shall form committees at...

  12. 29 CFR 1960.37 - Committee organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Committee organization. 1960.37 Section 1960.37 Labor... MATTERS Occupational Safety and Health Committees § 1960.37 Committee organization. (a) For agencies which... organization of the agency and its collective bargaining configuration. The agency shall form committees at...

  13. 78 FR 11618 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Tennessee: Revisions to Volatile Organic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Organic Compound Definition AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... from the definition of ``Volatile Organic Compound''. EPA is approving this SIP revision because...

  14. Development of a Real-Time GPS/Seismic Displacement Meter: Applications to Civilian Infrastructure in Orange and Western Riverside Counties, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Yehuda

    2005-01-01

    We propose a three-year applications project that will develop an Integrated Real-Time GPS/Seismic System and deploy it in Orange and Western Riverside Counties, spanning three major strike-slip faults in southern California (San Andreas, San Jacinto, and Elsinore) and significant populations and civilian infrastructure. The system relying on existing GPS and seismic networks will collect and analyze GPS and seismic data for the purpose of estimating and disseminating real-time positions and total ground displacements (dynamic, as well as static) during all phases of the seismic cycle, from fractions of seconds to years. Besides its intrinsic scientific use as a real-time displacement meter (transducer), the GPS/Seismic System will be a powerful tool for local and state decision makers for risk mitigation, disaster management, and structural monitoring (dams, bridges, and buildings). Furthermore, the GPS/Seismic System will become an integral part of California's spatial referencing and positioning infrastructure, which is complicated by tectonic motion, seismic displacements, and land subsidence. Finally, the GPS/Seismic system will also be applicable to navigation in any environment (land, sea, or air) by combining precise real-time instantaneous GPS positioning with inertial navigation systems. This development will take place under the umbrella of the California Spatial Reference Center, in partnership with local (Counties, Riverside County Flood and Water Conservation District, Metropolitan Water District), state (Caltrans), and Federal agencies (NGS, NASA, USGS), the geophysics community (SCIGN/SCEC2), and the private sector (RBF Consulting). The project will leverage considerable funding, resources, and R&D from SCIGN, CSRC and two NSF-funded IT projects at UCSD and SDSU: RoadNet (Real-Time Observatories, Applications and Data Management Network) and the High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network (HPWREN). These two projects are funded to

  15. Federal Law on Consumer Deception: An Agency by Agency Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweibel, George J.

    A comprehensive analysis of statutes and regulations on consumer deception administered by thirty government agencies is provided in this report. Each agency's chapter includes a brief description of the agency, and a detailed listing of all deceptive trade practices prohibited by that agency's enabling legislation, regulations, or other sources…

  16. 10 CFR 607.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal agency or agency. 607.645 Section 607.645 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 607.645 Federal agency or agency. Department of Energy means the...

  17. 2 CFR 182.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 182.645 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS NATIONAL POLICY... Federal agency or agency. Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department,...

  18. 2 CFR 182.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 182.645 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS NATIONAL POLICY... Federal agency or agency. Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department,...

  19. Military to civilian questionnaire: a measure of postdeployment community reintegration difficulty among veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs medical care.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Nina A; Frazier, Patricia; Orazem, Robert J; Murdoch, Maureen; Gravely, Amy; Carlson, Kathleen F; Hintz, Samuel; Noorbaloochi, Siamak

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the development, reliability, and construct validity of scores on the Military to Civilian Questionnaire (M2C-Q), a 16-item self-report measure of postdeployment community reintegration difficulty. We surveyed a national, stratified sample of 1,226 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who used U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical care; 745 completed the M2C-Q and validated mental health screening measures. All analyses were based on weighted estimates. The internal consistency of the M2C-Q was .95 in this sample. Factor analyses indicated a single total score was the best-fitting model. Total scores were associated with measures theoretically related to reintegration difficulties including perception of overall difficulty readjusting back into civilian life (R(2) = .49), probable PTSD (d = 1.07), probable problem drug or alcohol use (d = 0.34), and overall mental health (r = -.83). Subgroup analyses revealed a similar pattern of findings in those who screened negative for PTSD. Nonwhite and unemployed veterans reported greater community reintegration difficulty (d = 0.20 and 0.45, respectively). Findings offer preliminary support for the reliability and construct validity of M2C-Q scores.

  20. World Trade Center disaster exposure-related probable posttraumatic stress disorder among responders and civilians: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bian; Tarigan, Lukman H; Bromet, Evelyn J; Kim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster on September 11, 2001 was an unprecedented traumatic event with long-lasting health consequences among the affected populations in the New York metropolitan area. This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the risk of probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with specific types of WTC exposures. Meta-analytical findings from 10 studies of 3,271 to 20,294 participants yielded 37 relevant associations. The pooled summary odds ratio (OR) was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.82, 2.32), with substantial heterogeneity linked to exposure classification, cohort type, data source, PTSD assessment instrument/criteria, and lapse time since 9/11. In general, responders (e.g. police, firefighters, rescue/recovery workers and volunteers) had a lower probable PTSD risk (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.39, 1.87) compared to civilians (e.g. residents, office workers, and passersby; OR = 2.71, 95% CI: 2.35, 3.12). The differences in ORs between responders and civilians were larger for physical compared to psychosocial exposure types. We also found that injury, lost someone, and witnessed horror were the three (out of six) most pernicious exposures. These findings suggest that these three exposures should be a particular focus in psychological evaluation and treatment programs in WTC intervention and future emergency preparedness efforts.

  1. World Trade Center Disaster Exposure-Related Probable Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Responders and Civilians: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bian; Tarigan, Lukman H.; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Kim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster on September 11, 2001 was an unprecedented traumatic event with long-lasting health consequences among the affected populations in the New York metropolitan area. This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the risk of probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with specific types of WTC exposures. Meta-analytical findings from 10 studies of 3,271 to 20,294 participants yielded 37 relevant associations. The pooled summary odds ratio (OR) was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.82, 2.32), with substantial heterogeneity linked to exposure classification, cohort type, data source, PTSD assessment instrument/criteria, and lapse time since 9/11. In general, responders (e.g. police, firefighters, rescue/recovery workers and volunteers) had a lower probable PTSD risk (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.39, 1.87) compared to civilians (e.g. residents, office workers, and passersby; OR = 2.71, 95% CI: 2.35, 3.12). The differences in ORs between responders and civilians were larger for physical compared to psychosocial exposure types. We also found that injury, lost someone, and witnessed horror were the three (out of six) most pernicious exposures. These findings suggest that these three exposures should be a particular focus in psychological evaluation and treatment programs in WTC intervention and future emergency preparedness efforts. PMID:25047411

  2. World Trade Center disaster exposure-related probable posttraumatic stress disorder among responders and civilians: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bian; Tarigan, Lukman H; Bromet, Evelyn J; Kim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster on September 11, 2001 was an unprecedented traumatic event with long-lasting health consequences among the affected populations in the New York metropolitan area. This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the risk of probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with specific types of WTC exposures. Meta-analytical findings from 10 studies of 3,271 to 20,294 participants yielded 37 relevant associations. The pooled summary odds ratio (OR) was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.82, 2.32), with substantial heterogeneity linked to exposure classification, cohort type, data source, PTSD assessment instrument/criteria, and lapse time since 9/11. In general, responders (e.g. police, firefighters, rescue/recovery workers and volunteers) had a lower probable PTSD risk (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.39, 1.87) compared to civilians (e.g. residents, office workers, and passersby; OR = 2.71, 95% CI: 2.35, 3.12). The differences in ORs between responders and civilians were larger for physical compared to psychosocial exposure types. We also found that injury, lost someone, and witnessed horror were the three (out of six) most pernicious exposures. These findings suggest that these three exposures should be a particular focus in psychological evaluation and treatment programs in WTC intervention and future emergency preparedness efforts. PMID:25047411

  3. CCSDS - A forum to facilitate international cooperation among space agencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Edward P.; Delmas, Georges

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) in its role as a promoter the development and utilization of compatible data-systems standards among the principal space agencies of the world. Attention is also given to the CCSDS affiliation categories comprising member agencies, observer agencies, and associates. Consideration is given to the CCSDS organization, the technical panels, and current CCSDS recommendations.

  4. Strengthening Career Human Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    Rooted in A. Bandura's (1982, 2001b) social cognitive theory, the notion of human agency has received considerable attention in vocational and career psychology for the last 2 decades, especially with the recent emergence of social constructivist thinking in the field. This article continues in the same direction. In reviewing the notion of human…

  5. Metacognition of Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Janet; Greene, Matthew Jason

    2007-01-01

    The feeling that we are agents, intentionally making things happen by our own actions, is foundational to our understanding of ourselves as humans. People's metacognitions of agency were investigated in 4 experiments. Participants played a game in which they tried to touch downward scrolling Xs and avoid touching Os. Variables that affected…

  6. Understanding collective agency in bioethics.

    PubMed

    Beier, Katharina; Jordan, Isabella; Wiesemann, Claudia; Schicktanz, Silke

    2016-09-01

    Bioethicists tend to focus on the individual as the relevant moral subject. Yet, in highly complex and socially differentiated healthcare systems a number of social groups, each committed to a common cause, are involved in medical decisions and sometimes even try to influence bioethical discourses according to their own agenda. We argue that the significance of these collective actors is unjustifiably neglected in bioethics. The growing influence of collective actors in the fields of biopolitics and bioethics leads us to pursue the question as to how collective moral claims can be characterized and justified. We pay particular attention to elaborating the circumstances under which collective actors can claim 'collective agency.' Specifically, we develop four normative-practical criteria for collective agency in order to determine the conditions that must be given to reasonably speak of 'collective autonomy'. For this purpose, we analyze patient organizations and families, which represent two quite different kinds of groups and can both be conceived as collective actors of high relevance for bioethical practice. Finally, we discuss some practical implications and explain why the existence of a shared practice of trust is of immediate normative relevance in this respect. PMID:26948497

  7. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE program; uniform HMO benefit; special health care delivery programs--DoD. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1995-10-01

    This final rule establishes requirements and procedures for implementation of the TRICARE Program, the purpose of which is to implement a comprehensive managed health care delivery system composed of military medical treatment facilities and CHAMPUS. Principal components of the final rule include: establishment of a comprehensive enrollment system; creation of a triple option benefit, including a Uniform HMO Benefit required by law; a series of initiatives to coordinate care between military and civilian delivery systems, including Resource Sharing Agreements, Health Care Finders, PRIMUS and NAVCARE Clinics, and new prescription pharmacy services; and a consolidated schedule of charges, incorporating steps to reduce differences in charges between military and civilian services. This final rule also includes provisions establishing a special civilian provider program authority for active duty family members overseas. The TRICARE Program is a major reform of the MHSS that will improve services to beneficiaries while helping to contain costs. PMID:10151661

  8. Design for a Performance Based Adult Education Community Coordinating Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    A plan is described for a project to establish an adult education coordinating and change agency in the New Haven, Connecticut area to coordinate activities of existing organizations; provide a research staff to establish a computerized data base; disseminate information and provide technological services to local agencies; set up a communications…

  9. 77 FR 34384 - Proposed Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... must be submitted on or before August 10, 2012. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by FR Y-10, FR Y-10 verification, FR Y-10E, FR Y-6, or FR Y-7, by any of the following methods: Agency Web... Banking Organizations. Agency form number: FR Y-10, FR Y-10 verification, FR Y-6, and FR Y-7. OMB...

  10. 16 CFR 4.6 - Cooperation with other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooperation with other agencies. 4.6 Section 4.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE MISCELLANEOUS RULES § 4.6 Cooperation with other agencies. It is the policy of the Commission to cooperate...

  11. Agency theory: new insights into the health care industry.

    PubMed

    Dranove, D; White, W D

    1989-01-01

    The economic theory of agency deals with the relationship that arises when one individual delegates authority to another. It offers powerful insights into the organization of health care delivery systems. This paper examines how relationships between doctors, patients, and hospitals can be explored within an agency framework and applied to institutional, fee-for-service, and HMO settings.

  12. 28 CFR 0.17 - Office of Investigative Agency Policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Office of Investigative Agency Policies. 0.17 Section 0.17 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of the Deputy Attorney General § 0.17 Office of Investigative Agency Policies....

  13. 2 CFR 230.35 - Federal agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal agency responsibilities. 230.35 Section 230.35 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved COST PRINCIPLES FOR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-122) § 230.35 Federal agency responsibilities....

  14. Agency, Constructivism, and Social Constructionism: Evolution or Revolution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wandrei, Mary L.

    Human agency, the ability to organize and direct one's own behavior, has recently been considered, reconsidered, and even abandoned by many psychological perspectives. This paper provides a discussion on the idea that an intelligible concept of agency can be articulated by revolutionizing the perspective on the relation of the individual person to…

  15. 75 FR 341 - FY 2010-FY 2011 Broad Agency Announcement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... associated with the Agency's strategic plan and mission goals, as well as to provide the general public with... proposals for special projects and programs associated with the Agency's strategic plan and mission goals... organizations, applying a systematic approach that links our strategic goals through multi-year plans to...

  16. 28 CFR 0.17 - Office of Investigative Agency Policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 0.17 Section 0.17 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of the Deputy Attorney General § 0.17 Office of Investigative Agency Policies. (a... of the criminal investigative agencies of the Department, i.e., the Federal Bureau of...

  17. 42 CFR 431.10 - Single State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Single State agency. 431.10 Section 431.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Single State Agency §...

  18. 76 FR 49769 - Proposed Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... Holding Companies, and Annual Report of Foreign Banking Organizations. Agency form number: FR Y-10, FR Y-6, and FR Y-7. OMB control number: 7100-0297. Frequency: FR Y-10: Event-generated; FR Y-6 and FR Y-7... to the Report of Changes in Organizational Structure. Agency form number: FR Y-10E. OMB...

  19. 77 FR 24952 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Regional Haze...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... ICR (August 26, 2009; 74 FR 43118). The last collection request anticipated the program progressing... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Regional Haze... organizations and facilities potentially regulated under the regional haze rule. Title: Regional...

  20. 75 FR 5081 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ...-management support, decision support, delivery system design, information systems, and organization of care... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information Collection Activities... (AHRQ) to request that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approve the proposed...

  1. 77 FR 26824 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Reporting Required for International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... soliciting comments on the following collection of information was published on February 29, 2012 (77 FR... Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Reporting Required for International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) AGENCY: Research &...

  2. 75 FR 1060 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Requirements; Use: CMS is assigned responsibility for overseeing all Medicare Advantage Organizations (MAO... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, HHS. In...

  3. 75 FR 68782 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products (Renewal) AGENCY: Environmental...: National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products (Renewal). ICR numbers: EPA ICR... to ensure compliance with Federal standards for volatile organic compounds in consumer...

  4. 75 FR 37432 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings (Renewal) AGENCY... . Title: National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings (Renewal... regulate volatile organic compound emissions from the use of consumer and commercial products. Pursuant...

  5. Medical Evidence of Human Rights Violations against Non-Arabic-Speaking Civilians in Darfur: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Sondra S.; Sirkin, Susannah; Heisler, Michele; Leaning, Jennifer; Iacopino, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Background Ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of Sudan has resulted in a severe humanitarian crisis. We sought to characterize the nature and geographic scope of allegations of human rights violations perpetrated against civilians in Darfur and to evaluate their consistency with medical examinations documented in patients' medical records. Methods and Findings This was a retrospective review and analysis of medical records from all 325 patients seen for treatment from September 28, 2004, through December 31, 2006, at the Nyala-based Amel Centre for Treatment and Rehabilitation of Victims of Torture, the only dedicated local provider of free clinical and legal services to civilian victims of torture and other human rights violations in Darfur during this time period. Among 325 medical records identified and examined, 292 (89.8%) patients from 12 different non-Arabic-speaking tribes disclosed in the medical notes that they had been attacked by Government of Sudan (GoS) and/or Janjaweed forces. Attacks were reported in 23 different rural council areas throughout Darfur. Nearly all attacks (321 [98.8%]) were described as having occurred in the absence of active armed conflict between Janjaweed/GoS forces and rebel groups. The most common alleged abuses were beatings (161 [49.5%]), gunshot wounds (140 [43.1%]), destruction or theft of property (121 [37.2%]), involuntary detainment (97 [29.9%]), and being bound (64 [19.7%]). Approximately one-half (36 [49.3%]) of all women disclosed that they had been sexually assaulted, and one-half of sexual assaults were described as having occurred in close proximity to a camp for internally displaced persons. Among the 198 (60.9%) medical records that contained sufficient detail to enable the forensic medical reviewers to render an informed judgment, the signs and symptoms in all of the medical records were assessed to be consistent with, highly consistent with, or virtually diagnostic of the alleged abuses. Conclusions

  6. Agency, time, and causality

    PubMed Central

    Widlok, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive Scientists interested in causal cognition increasingly search for evidence from non-Western Educational Industrial Rich Democratic people but find only very few cross-cultural studies that specifically target causal cognition. This article suggests how information about causality can be retrieved from ethnographic monographs, specifically from ethnographies that discuss agency and concepts of time. Many apparent cultural differences with regard to causal cognition dissolve when cultural extensions of agency and personhood to non-humans are taken into account. At the same time considerable variability remains when we include notions of time, linearity and sequence. The article focuses on ethnographic case studies from Africa but provides a more general perspective on the role of ethnography in research on the diversity and universality of causal cognition. PMID:25414683

  7. 2 CFR 902.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY Reserved REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 902.645 Federal agency or agency. Department of Energy means the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the...

  8. 2 CFR 182.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 182.645 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS GOVERNMENTWIDE.... Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department, military department,...

  9. Spanish and English Versions of the PTSD Checklist – Civilian Version (PCL-C): Testing for Differential Item Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Jeremy N.V.; Marshall, Grant N.; Schell, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Interpretation of ethnic differences in PTSD is predicated on demonstration that differences are not due to measurement bias. This is difficult when multiple languages are used in the assessment. This study used confirmatory factor analysis to examine possible differential item functioning (DIF) across English and Spanish versions of the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C). Data were derived from two assessments of Hispanics (Ns = 304, 213), who were hospitalized with physical injuries. After correction for multiple testing, univariate tests revealed no statistically significant DIF effects; multivariate tests revealed some indication of DIF at the initial assessment only. This bias was inconsistent across waves and unlikely to be substantively consequential, indicating that the two versions of the PCL-C were generally equivalent. PMID:18720394

  10. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities.

  11. Evaluating the effectiveness of reasoning training in military and civilian chronic traumatic brain injury patients: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals who sustain traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) often continue to experience significant impairment of cognitive functions mediated by the prefrontal cortex well into chronic stages of recovery. Traditional brain training programs that focus on improving specific skills fall short of addressing integrative functions that draw upon multiple higher-order processes critical for social and vocational integration. In the current study, we compare the effects of two short-term, intensive, group-based cognitive rehabilitation programs for individuals with chronic TBI. One program emphasizes learning about brain functions and influences on cognition, while the other program adopts a top-down approach to improve abstract reasoning abilities that are largely reliant on the prefrontal cortex. These treatment programs are evaluated in civilian and military veteran TBI populations. Methods/design One hundred individuals are being enrolled in this double-blinded clinical trial (all measures and data analyses will be conducted by blinded raters and analysts). Each individual is randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions, with each condition run in groups of five to seven individuals. The primary anticipated outcomes are improvement in abstract reasoning and everyday life functioning, measured through behavioral tasks and questionnaires, and attention modulation, as measured by functional neuroimaging. Secondary expected outcomes include improvements in the cognitive processes of working memory, attention, and inhibitory control. Discussion Results of this trial will determine whether cognitive rehabilitation aimed at teaching TBI-relevant information about the brain and cognition versus training in TBI-affected thinking abilities (e.g., memory, attention, and executive functioning) can improve outcomes in chronic military and civilian TBI patient populations. It should shed light on the nature of improvements and the characteristics of patients most

  12. The Challenges of Afghanistan and Iraq Veterans’ Transition from Military to Civilian Life and Approaches to Reconnection

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, Jennifer; Worthen, Miranda; Masters, Jackson; Lippman, Sheri A.; Ozer, Emily J.; Moos, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Afghanistan and Iraq veterans experienced traumas during deployment, and disrupted connections with friends and family. In this context, it is critical to understand the nature of veterans’ transition to civilian life, the challenges navigated, and approaches to reconnection. We investigated these issues in a qualitative study, framed by homecoming theory, that comprised in-depth interviews with 24 veterans. Using an inductive thematic analysis approach, we developed three overarching themes. Military as family explored how many veterans experienced the military environment as a “family” that took care of them and provided structure. Normal is alien encompassed many veterans experiences of disconnection from people at home, lack of support from institutions, lack of structure, and loss of purpose upon return to civilian life. Searching for a new normal included strategies and supports veterans found to reconnect in the face of these challenges. A veteran who had successfully transitioned and provided support and advice as a peer navigator was frequently discussed as a key resource. A minority of respondents—those who were mistreated by the military system, women veterans, and veterans recovering from substance abuse problems—were less able to access peer support. Other reconnection strategies included becoming an ambassador to the military experience, and knowing transition challenges would ease with time. Results were consistent with and are discussed in the context of homecoming theory and social climate theory. Social support is known to be protective for veterans, but our findings add the nuance of substantial obstacles veterans face in locating and accessing support, due to disconnection and unsupportive institutions. Larger scale work is needed to better understand how to foster peer connection, build reconnection with family, and engage the broader community to understand and support veterans; interventions to support reconnection for veterans

  13. 76 FR 79192 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Georgia Hospital Association...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Georgia Hospital Association Research and Education Foundation Patient Safety Organization (GHA-PSO) AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice...

  14. 78 FR 70560 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Morgridge Institute for Research PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Morgridge Institute for Research PSO AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ... Safety Organizations (PSOs), which collect, aggregate, and analyze confidential information regarding...

  15. 31 CFR 20.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency or agency. 20.645 Section 20.645 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.645 Federal agency or...

  16. 38 CFR 48.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency or agency. 48.645 Section 48.645 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... executive branch (including the Executive Office of the President), or any independent regulatory agency....

  17. 22 CFR 208.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 208.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  18. 22 CFR 208.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 208.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  19. 21 CFR 1404.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 1404.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  20. 31 CFR 19.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the...

  1. 21 CFR 1404.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 1404.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  2. 21 CFR 1404.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 1404.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  3. 22 CFR 1508.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 1508.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  4. 21 CFR 1404.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 1404.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  5. 22 CFR 1508.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 1508.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  6. 31 CFR 19.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the...

  7. 31 CFR 19.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the...

  8. 31 CFR 19.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the...

  9. 22 CFR 1508.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 1508.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  10. 22 CFR 1508.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 1508.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  11. 21 CFR 1404.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 1404.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  12. 31 CFR 19.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the...

  13. 22 CFR 1508.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Definitions § 1508.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department, military department, defense agency, or any other agency of the executive branch. Other agencies of the Federal government...

  14. Development of a planning methodology for the medical protection of European civilian populations in time of war or major civil disasters. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, P.B.

    1983-12-30

    This is a preliminary investigation of the feasibility of using simulation models to develop plans for the medical protection of European civilian populations in time of war or other major disasters. First, the functions required of a planning methodology were identified, such as estimating resource requirements, predicting casualty dispositions, and evaluating alternative disaster response procedures. Next, for each of two disaster management scenarios, the study described the basic elements or factors which describe the disaster management system: the primary action required of the system, criteria of success, quantifiable measures of success, and relevant data. Both scenarios considered ground and air assault by the enemy, using conventional weapons. In the first scenario, the civilian response is to stay-put, i.e., the civilian population remains in place. The second scenario considers the controlled temporary dispersal or relocation of civilians residing in high-risk areas. Both scenarios appear to be amenable to detailed study using the concepts of the U.S. Navy's NAMES (Navy Amphibious Medical Evacuation Simulation) model and WWMMSS (World-Wide Military Medical Support System) model, in concert with wargaming models and traffic network models.

  15. Prairie North: a joint civilian/military mass casualty exercise highlights the role of the National Guard in community disaster response.

    PubMed

    Vukotich, George; Bayram, Jamil D; Miller, Miriam I

    2012-01-01

    In a joint military/civilian exercise conducted in June 2010, military National Guard medical and decontamination response efforts proved to be paramount in supporting hospital resources to sustain an adequate response during a simulated terrorist event. Traditionally, hospitals include local responders in their disaster preparedness but overlook other available state and federal resources such as the National Guard. Lessons learned from the exercise included the value of regular joint disaster planning and training between the military and civilian medical sectors. Additionally, military communication and medical equipment compatibility with the civilian infrastructure was identified as one of the top areas for the improvement of this joint exercise. Involving the National Guard in community disaster planning provides a valuable medical support asset that can be critical in responding to multiple casualty events. National Guard response is inherently faster than its federal counterpart. Based on the findings from our joint exercise, states are encouraged to incorporate their corresponding National Guard in civilian critical medical infrastructure disaster preparedness activities, as the National Guard can be an integral part of the disaster response efforts in real multiple casualty events.

  16. 22 CFR 123.18 - Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian employees of the U.S...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S... DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.18 Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian... not apply to dependents. (a) Firearms. Port Directors of U.S. Customs and Border Protection...

  17. 22 CFR 123.18 - Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian employees of the U.S...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S... § 123.18 Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian employees of the U.S... dependents. (a) Firearms. Port Directors of U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall permit...

  18. 22 CFR 123.18 - Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian employees of the U.S...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S... § 123.18 Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian employees of the U.S... dependents. (a) Firearms. Port Directors of U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall permit...

  19. 22 CFR 123.18 - Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian employees of the U.S...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S... § 123.18 Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian employees of the U.S... dependents. (a) Firearms. Port Directors of U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall permit...

  20. 22 CFR 123.18 - Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian employees of the U.S...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S... § 123.18 Firearms for personal use of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian employees of the U.S... dependents. (a) Firearms. Port Directors of U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall permit...