Science.gov

Sample records for agencies community relations

  1. Creating a Community Capacity Assessment to Identify Agency Outcomes Related to Occupational Therapy Student Community Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Kramlinger, Anne; Strecker Neufeld, Peggy; Berg, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Service-learning experiences immerse students in authentic situations and build partnerships with community agencies to support the health of those we serve in practice. Most occupational therapy curriculum evaluations do not systematically capture community agency benefits. Through the use of qualitative interviews and Q Methodology, the Community Agency Capacity Questionnaire (CACQ) was developed to capture the agency experience in these partnerships. This paper describes the iterative analytic process that resulted in the CACQ with 29 statements covering 6 domains: programming, evaluation, partnership, staff, funding, and marketing. The CACQ offers a means to identify outcomes from the service-learning partners' perspective. PMID:27044639

  2. Doctoral Students' Sense of Relational Agency in Their Scholarly Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyhältö, Kirsi; Keskinen, Jenni

    2012-01-01

    The literature emphasizes the importance of integrating doctoral students into scholarly communities and practices at the very beginning of their studies. Although the importance of student participation in a scholarly community has been recognized empirical evidence concerning the quality of participation that promotes such engagement is scarce.…

  3. Survey of Community Agencies [with Home Economics Related Programs--Central Quadrant].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewar, Margaret A.; And Others

    The survey was designed to identify home economics related programs in community agencies in the central quadrant of the Syracuse City School District. Factual information and descriptive information about the programs and perceived program needs were gathered using the interview method. A grid was set up with four subject areas (food and…

  4. Community Agency Survey Formative Research Results From the TAAG Study

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Ruth P.; Moody, Jamie

    2008-01-01

    School and community agency collaboration can potentially increase physical activity opportunities for youth. Few studies have examined the role of community agencies in promoting physical activity, much less in collaboration with schools. This article describes formative research data collection from community agencies to inform the development of the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) intervention to provide out-of-school physical activity programs for girls. The community agency survey is designed to assess agency capacity to provide physical activity programs for girls, including resources, programs, and partnerships. Most agency respondents (n = 138) report operations during after-school hours, adequate facilities, and program options for girls, although most are sport oriented. Agency resources and programming vary considerably across the six TAAG field sites. Many agencies report partnerships, some involving schools, although not necessarily related to physical activity. Implications for the TAAG intervention are presented. PMID:16397156

  5. Community Agency Voice and Benefit in Service-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miron, Devi; Moely, Barbara E.

    2006-01-01

    Supervisors from 40 community agencies working with a university-based service-learning program were interviewed regarding the extent of their input in service-learning program planning and implementation "(Agency Voice), Interpersonal Relations" with service-learning students, "Perceived Benefit" of the service-learning program to the agency, and…

  6. School-Community Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    1969-01-01

    This review examines 18 selected documents processed through the ERIC system dealing with research findings, procedures, and innovations in school-community relations. Although documents reviewed emphasize a variety of issues bearing on school-community relations--including citizen participation, mass media, public relations, voter support, power…

  7. Community and Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Harold W.

    This brief presentation describes public relations projects of Dubuque schools to popularize athletics. Among the activities cited which are used to promote community interest in sports events are public school-private school informal matches, talks, swim-a-thons, travel and adventure nights, class banquets with popular speakers, booster clubs,…

  8. Community Relations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Volunteers, Inc., Syracuse, NY.

    A handbook for a community relations coordinator for Literacy Volunteers of America, Inc. is presented. An explanation of placement and advance planning is included. Information on flyers, posters, and newsletters; advance preparation of photographs, identifying them, and getting releases; and examples of news releases and steps in preparing them…

  9. Social Responsibility of the Board of Community Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Nelson

    1976-01-01

    This article discusses the role of the Board of Community Relations of the City of Toledo in helping families resolve their conflicts with social service agencies, utility companies, businesses, and other agencies. Available from: PS 504 969. (JMB)

  10. The New Struggle for the Paraprofessional: Between the Community and the Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riessman, Frank

    Despite the difficulties emerging in relationships between paraprofessionals and agency professionals--difficulties related to basic social cleavages (black-white, community-professional, and participation-authority)--the utilization of paraprofessionals will continue to increase because of community desire to influence the staffs of the agency or…

  11. Battered Agency Syndrome: The Challenge to Agencies Serving Low-Income Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Diane; Lally, J. Ronald; Quiett, Douglas

    Community-based social service agencies working in low-income communities increasingly function with inadequate support and encounter numerous oppressive external and internal conditions that compromise organizational and staff well-being. Working with many such agencies, WestEd identified stressors that included funding problems, unrealistic…

  12. Wyoming Community College Commission Agency Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

    This paper reports on outcomes of community college programs monitored by the Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC). The document covers the following WCCC objectives: (1) Study of tuition rates for the community colleges; (2) Negotiation of contracts and provision of financial support for administrative computing system components and…

  13. Student Agency Experience in Public Relations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Becky A.; Carrick, Tonya

    This study examined the existence and use of student-operated public relations/advertising agencies which operate outside the classroom as well as in conjunction with a class. Journalism programs in the United States which were listed as having a public relations sequence, major, emphasis, or concentration were surveyed; of these 110 responded for…

  14. Salaries in Community Health Agencies--1977

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Presents the National League of Nursings' annual report of salaries of registered nurses employed by official and nonofficial agencies and boards of education; data is given for type of agency, position classification, geographic area, population size, and other personnel. (Editor/TA)

  15. 78 FR 24226 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Community Drill...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... information collection notice in the Federal Register at 78 FR 23276. In the ADDRESSES section, FEMA...; Comment Request: Community Drill Day Registration AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS....

  16. School and community relations in North America: Creative tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughran, E.; Reed, H. B.

    1980-09-01

    School and community relations in North America reflect creative tensions between the conserving forces of schooling and the changing forces of community. During crisis periods community development needs may modify the school's focus on individual learner growth, but generally schools use the community to extend and enrich the traditional modes. School and community interactions are chiefly characterized by such settings as community schools, community education, adult education, home and school (PTA) associations, work-study programs, curriculum-community resource programs. Recent social forces are creating heightened tensions: cultural pluralism, reduced resources, Third World influences, international conflicts, personal alienation, population concerns, energy problems, community power issues. These forces are gradually shifting school and community concepts towards ones of education and community. Education goes well beyond schooling, including all agencies having an organized influence on community development: libraries, voluntary groups, unions, business, human service agencies, government units, as well as schools. This shift requires research to develop nonformal concepts and practices, along with formal pedagogy, to increase the positive impacts of educational networks on community, as well as individual, development. These new directions have not yet significantly modified the traditional meaning of school and community relations.

  17. Community relations 2.0.

    PubMed

    Kane, Gerald C; Fichman, Robert G; Gallaugher, John; Glaser, John

    2009-11-01

    Before the Internet, organizations had far more time to monitor and respond to community activity, but that luxury is long gone, leaving them in dire need of a coherent outreach strategy, fresh skills, and adaptive tactics. Drawing on the authors' study of more than two dozen firms, this article describes the changes wrought by social media in particular and shows managers how to take advantage of them--lessons that Kaiser Permanente, Domino's, and others learned the hard way. Social media platforms enhance the power of communities by promoting deep relationships, facilitating rapid organization, improving the creation and synthesis of knowledge, and enabling robust filtering of information. The authors cite many examples from the health care industry, where social media participation is vigorous and influential. For instance, members of Sermo, an online network exclusively for doctors, used the site to call attention to and organize against insurers' proposed reimbursement cuts. And on PatientsLikeMe, where people share details about their chronic diseases and the treatments they've pursued, charts and progress curves help members visualize their own complex histories and allow comparisons and feedback among peers. As you modernize your company's approach to community outreach, you'll need to assemble a social media team equipped to identify new opportunities for engagement and prevent brand damage. In the most successful firms the authors studied, community management was a dedicated function, combining marketing, public relations, and information technology skills. PMID:19891388

  18. Linking community, parenting, and depressive symptom trajectories: testing resilience models of adolescent agency based on race/ethnicity and gender.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amanda L; Merten, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Family stress models illustrate how communities affect youth outcomes through effects on parents and studies consistently show the enduring effects of early community context. The present study takes a different approach identifying human agency during adolescence as a potentially significant promotive factor mediating the relationship between community, parenting, and mental health. While agency is an important part of resilience, its longitudinal effects are unknown, particularly based on gender and race/ethnicity. The purpose of this research was to model the long-term effects of community structural adversity and social resources as predictors of adolescent depressive symptom trajectories via indirect effects of parental happiness, parent-child relationships, and human agency. Latent growth analyses were conducted with 1,796 participants (53% female; 56% White) across four waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health spanning adolescence (Wave 1) through adulthood (Wave 4). The results identified agency as an important promotive factor during adolescence with long-term mental health benefits, but only for White and male participants. For these individuals, community social resources and the quality of the parent-child relationship were related to higher levels of agency and more positive mental health trajectories. Although community social resources similarly benefitted parenting and agency among females and non-White participants, there were no significant links between agency and depressive symptoms for these youth. The results suggest that agency remains an important, but poorly understood concept and additional work is necessary to continue unpacking its meaning for diverse groups of youth. PMID:24907892

  19. 78 FR 23775 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... FEMA Community Preparedness and Participation Survey used to identify progress and gaps in citizen and...; Comment Request: Community Preparedness and Participation Survey AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management...-Management@dhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Community Preparedness and Participation Survey...

  20. 76 FR 5207 - Office of Community Oriented Policing Services; Agency Information Collection Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Review: Community Policing Self-Assessment (CP-SAT). The Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of Community...: Community Policing Self- Assessment (CP-SAT). (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable...

  1. Mental health training and development needs of community agency staff.

    PubMed

    Secker, Jenny; Hill, Kathryn

    2002-09-01

    Emphasis has long been placed in UK national policy on providing 'seamless' mental health services to meet both the health and social care needs of service users. While attention has been paid to the training required by specialist mental health and primary care staff in order to achieve this, the needs of other community agency staff have received less attention. The present article describes a study designed to identify the training needs of staff working within a broad range of agencies. Focus group discussions were used to explore participants' experiences of mental health problems amongst clients, their confidence in dealing with these, current sources of support and perceived training needs. The results indicate that participants in all agencies routinely encountered a range of problems. Colleagues were the main source of support, followed by line managers, but supervision structures and wider organisational support were lacking in some cases. Joint working with specialist mental health services was almost universally problematic and all groups identified a range of training needs. On the basis of the results, the present authors put forward suggestions as to how these needs might be met. PMID:12390218

  2. Effective Strategies for State Education Agencies in Community Education Development: A National Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLellis, Anthony J.; Semple, Barry F.

    This study focused on successful strategies employed by state education agencies (SEAs) to encourage the development of community education programs and on the priority local education agencies (LEAs) place on community education. Questionnaires were returned from representatives of 51 state education agencies. The top ranked strategy for…

  3. 40 CFR 300.155 - Public information and community relations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Public information and community... responsible party. (b) An on-scene news office may be established to coordinate media relations and to issue... the lead agency. The OSC/RPM determines the location of the on-scene news office, but every...

  4. Agency Social Workers Could Monitor Hypertension in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Francoeur, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension is highly prevalent, presents without symptoms, and constitutes a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Several factors impede individuals from adhering to treatment, while others work against physician monitoring and medication adjustment as the condition changes. As family counselors and leaders of self-help and mutual aid groups, social workers are among the best positioned professionals to help individuals, couples, and families improve psychosocial dynamics associated with hypertension, secure support, and overcome barriers to lifestyle changes or medication adherence. An important case is made for training social workers from community social service agencies to engage and guide their clients in accurate self-screenings for hypertension and to refer those with elevated blood pressure for follow-up care. PMID:20521206

  5. Old and Young Dogs Teaching Each Other Tricks: The Importance of Developing Agency for Community Partners in Community Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    This article covers the importance of creating and developing agency in community partners when engaging in community-based learning. Often when faculty incorporate service- or community-based learning into their classes, we measure the "learning" part but not the "service" or "community." Focusing more on the latter involves working "with"…

  6. Agency attribution: event-related potentials and outcome monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bednark, Jeffery G; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    Knowledge about the effects of our actions is an underlying feature of voluntary behavior. Given the importance of identifying the outcomes of our actions, it has been proposed that the sensory outcomes of self-made actions are inherently different from those of externally caused outcomes. Thus, the outcomes of self-made actions are likely to be more motivationally significant for an agent. We used event-related potentials to investigate the relationship between the perceived motivational significance of an outcome and the attribution of agency in the presence of others. In our experiment, we assessed agency attribution in the presence of another agent by varying the degree of contiguity between participants' self-made actions and the sensory outcome. Specifically, we assessed the feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP) and the novelty P3 measures of an outcome's motivational significance and unexpectedness, respectively. Results revealed that both the fCRP and participants' agency attributions were significantly influenced by action-outcome contiguity. However, when action-outcome contiguity was ambiguous, novelty P3 amplitude was a reliable indicator of agency attribution. Prior agency attributions were also found to influence attribution in trials with ambiguous and low action-outcome contiguity. Participants' use of multiple cues to determine agency is consistent with the cue integration theory of agency. In addition to these novel findings, this study supports growing evidence suggesting that reinforcement processes play a significant role in the sense of agency. PMID:24504195

  7. School Community Relations and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, John E., Jr.

    This research examined the relationship between effective school-community relations and student achievement. The purpose of the study was to determine how the five variables of access, communication, involvement, participation, and resolution interact with a measure of effective school-community relations, how the five variables related to…

  8. 78 FR 23276 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Community Drill...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ...; Comment Request: Community Drill Day Registration AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION... Community Drill Day. DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before June 17, 2013. ADDRESSES: To avoid... for submitting comments. (2) Mail. Submit written comments to Docket Manager, Office of Chief...

  9. Work-Based Learning in Health: Evaluating the Experience of Learners, Community Agencies and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Wendy

    2002-01-01

    This paper evaluates a case-study work-based learning (WBL) programme for final year health studies undergraduates, analysing key characteristics, and reporting benefits and tensions that result. It triangulates evidence from learners, community agencies and teachers. Cross-fertilisation of ideas between the academy and community agencies, and the…

  10. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  11. 76 FR 73582 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request-Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Collection; Comment Request--Community Eligibility Option Evaluation AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service (FNS... collection for the Community Eligibility Option Evaluation. DATES: Written comments on this notice must be...: john.endahl@fns.usda.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Community Eligibility Option...

  12. UFM: A Community Learning Center. Agency Report [1982-83].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan. University for Man.

    During 1982-83, University for Man (UFM) focused on three areas: the Manhattan, Kansas, community where over 1,000 course programs and community service projects, led by more than 1,000 volunteers ranging in age from 8 to 80, involved over 10,000 participants; the state of Kansas where UFM served 46 communities with rural development/community…

  13. External Communities of Practice and Relational Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewhurst, Frank W.; Navarro, Juan G. Cegarra

    2004-01-01

    External communities of practice are groups formed by company clients and employees based on common interests, commitment, mutual trust and collaboration whose members regularly share knowledge and learning. This paper examines how external communities of practice contribute to the creation of relational capital through an empirical investigation…

  14. New Careers Police-Community Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Development Corp., Washington, DC.

    Prepared under authority of the Economic Opportunity Act, this New Careers report offers suggestions on how police departments can improve relations with inner city disadvantaged residents (usually minority groups) by using hard core unemployed community members to close the information gap on both sides, provide community services, relieve the…

  15. Community Relations: A Practical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Ronald J.

    For junior colleges that cannot support a full-time public-relations director, the author suggests a program using the resources at hand. A flow chart must be made so that the faculty or administration member handling the program knows where to collect his information. (If possible, he should receive released time or extra pay.) Faculty members…

  16. 7 CFR 650.21 - Working relations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and related State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Protection Agency (EPA) and related State environmental agencies. 650.21 Section 650.21 Agriculture... with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and related State environmental agencies. (a) Background. The authorities and missions of NRCS, EPA, and state environmental agencies make it...

  17. 7 CFR 650.21 - Working relations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and related State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Protection Agency (EPA) and related State environmental agencies. 650.21 Section 650.21 Agriculture... with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and related State environmental agencies. (a) Background. The authorities and missions of NRCS, EPA, and state environmental agencies make it...

  18. 7 CFR 650.21 - Working relations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and related State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Protection Agency (EPA) and related State environmental agencies. 650.21 Section 650.21 Agriculture... with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and related State environmental agencies. (a) Background. The authorities and missions of NRCS, EPA, and state environmental agencies make it...

  19. 7 CFR 650.21 - Working relations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and related State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Protection Agency (EPA) and related State environmental agencies. 650.21 Section 650.21 Agriculture... with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and related State environmental agencies. (a) Background. The authorities and missions of NRCS, EPA, and state environmental agencies make it...

  20. 76 FR 44582 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Community Right...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... in 5 CFR 1320.12. On February 14, 2011 (76 FR 8363), EPA sought comments on this ICR pursuant to 5...-Know Reporting Requirements Under Sections 311 and 312 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) (Renewal) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  1. Learners' Agency in a Facebook-Mediated Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Greg Chung-Hsien; Chao, Yu-Chuan Joni

    2015-01-01

    Agency, defined by Gao (2013) as learners' "dynamic strategic behavior" (p. 29) in response to contextual realities, has been central to educational undertakings. While the affordances of social networking sites like Facebook have been extensively examined in a number of educational studies, there has been a scarcity of research on…

  2. Disability Competency in Community Relations and Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    It is essential for a school public relations professional to be familiar with disability competency as it relates to counseling programs within the schools and community. This article is an introduction to disability competency in such settings. The initial discussion highlights a historical perspective of the treatment of persons with…

  3. Community drug abuse agencies: an effective approach to the drug abuse problem.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M; Zitter, S; Savarese, R; Kern, J

    1976-01-01

    Community-based drug agencies were established as a means for confronting the drug abuse dilemma. However, due to the traditional guidelines that were followed in developing CBDA programs, the unique aspects of the problem were overlooked. This uniqueness relates to the ability of the drug culture to satisfy basic human needs. To be effective CBDA must be able to satisfy the same needs that clients previously met through participation in the drug culture. This article examines three areas of weakness which limit the effectiveness of CBDA: (1) fragment delivery of services; (2) perpetuation of minimal client involvement, commitment, and responsibility; and (3) motivational considerations of board members. The alternative family structure is described as an innovative CBDA approach that directly relates to the uniqueness of the drug abuse problem. PMID:10316884

  4. Teachers' Professional Agency and Learning--From Adaption to Active Modification in the Teacher Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyhältö, Kirsi; Pietarinen, Janne; Soini, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine teacher learning in terms of teachers' professional agency in the professional community of the school. Altogether 2310 Finnish comprehensive school teachers completed a survey. Results showed that teachers' active efforts to learn in the professional community and to promote school development cannot be…

  5. Inter-Agency Partnerships and Integrated Community Schools a Scottish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tett, Lyn

    2005-01-01

    Integrated Community Schools (ICS) in Scotland provide a focus for studying the role of inter-agency partnerships in supporting more inclusive schools and their communities. In this article, Lyn Tett examines two types of intervention, those designed to coordinate supportive programmes within and outside schools, and those that have acted as a…

  6. 77 FR 50719 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ...: Community Partnership Grants Management System (GMS) ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection Under...: Community Partnership Grants Management System (GMS). (3) The Agency Form Number, if any, and the Applicable... OJP web-based grants applications system and award management system. GMS provides automated...

  7. Community-company relations in gold mining in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Theresa; McGee, Tara K; Smoyer-Tomic, Karen E; Aubynn, Emmanuel Ato

    2009-01-01

    As a result of Structural Adjustment Programme from the 1980s, many developing countries have experienced an increase in resource extraction activities by international and transnational corporations. The work reported here examines the perceived impacts of gold mining at the community level in the Wassa West District of Ghana, Africa and discusses those perceived impacts in the context of globalization processes and growing multinational corporate interest in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Interview data compared community members' perceptions with those of company representatives in three communities. The results indicate that communities held companies responsible for a series of economic, social, and environmental changes. While recognizing some of the benefits brought by the mines, communities felt that the companies did not live up to their responsibility to support local development. Companies responded by denying, dismissing concerns, or shifting blame. Findings from this work show that lack of engagement and action by government agencies at all levels resulted in companies acting in a surrogate governmental capacity. In such situations, managing expectations is key to community-company relations. PMID:18242818

  8. Instructional Decision Making and Agency of Community College Mathematics Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lande, Elaine; Mesa, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the rationale for instructional decisions proposed by two groups of community college mathematics faculty (full-time and part-time), as they discussed animations of trigonometry classes that breached several classroom norms. Although both groups of faculty justify their decisions in similar ways, the way in which they talk differs.…

  9. Relational agency from a teacher as researcher perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Shequana

    2015-09-01

    This essay responds to a selection of ideas and theoretical frameworks Sharada Gade uses to conduct her study. The ideas raised by Sharada are placed in the context of the changes and experiences taking place in today's public school system. Her ideas also provide new insights into the construct of relational agency in accordance with expansive learning activity from a teacher as researcher perspective. The purpose of this response is to shed light on the collaboration that needs to exist between teachers and researchers as curriculum is designed and implemented.

  10. Implementation of a Reverse Colocation Model: Lessons from Two Community Behavioral Health Agencies in Rural Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Gerolamo, Angela M; Kim, Jung Y; Brown, Jonathan D; Schuster, James; Kogan, Jane

    2016-07-01

    This qualitative study examined the implementation of a reverse colocation pilot program that sought to integrate medical care in two community behavioral health agencies. To accomplish this, each agency hired a registered nurse, provided training for its staff to function as wellness coaches, and implemented a web-based tool for tracking consumer outcomes. The findings from two rounds of stakeholder discussions and consumer focus groups suggested that agencies successfully trained their staffs in wellness coaching, integrated nurses into agency functions, developed integrated care planning processes, and increased awareness of wellness among staff and consumers. Similar to other complex interventions, the agencies experienced challenges including difficulty establishing new procedures and communication protocols, discomfort among staff in addressing physical health concerns, difficulty building collaborative relationships with primary care providers, and modest uptake of the web-based tool. The study offers insights into the practical aspects of integrating care and makes recommendations for future efforts. PMID:24981219

  11. Child Maltreatment and Disaster Prevention: A Qualitative Study of Community Agency Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Self-Brown, Shannon; Anderson, Page; Edwards, Shannan; McGill, Tia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Child maltreatment (CM) is a significant public health problem that increases following natural disasters. Ecological approaches have been used to study these complex phenomena, and the current research fits within this perspective by conducting qualitative interviews with disaster response and family-serving community agencies. The purpose of the study was to identify whether or not community agencies identified CM as an issue that is relevant for disaster planning and response and their perspectives on risk and protective factors for CM risk following disaster. Methods: Agencies (n=16) from 2 geographical areas participated - one that recently experienced a natural disaster (Louisiana (LA), n=7) and one that had not (Georgia (GA), n=9). Agency representatives completed semi-structured telephone interviews (n=16) and follow up in person focus groups (n=14). Theory-driven, thematic analyses were completed. Results: Results suggested that community agencies agree that post-disaster environments increase the risk for CM and that CM prevention has a role in disaster response planning. Risk and protective factors were identified according to Bronfenbrenner’ s ecological framework. Conclusion: Study results support the need to include CM prevention efforts within disaster planning and provide guidance for future research to inform such efforts. PMID:23997850

  12. How Does Community Service Promote Prosocial Behavior? Examining the Role of Agency and Ideology Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoph, Gabriela; Gniewosz, Burkhard; Reinders, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    This study examines community service effects on adolescents' prosocial behaviors as mediated through experiences made during service. Based on theoretical assumptions by Youniss and Yates, we suggest that personal agency experiences and being confronted with situations that can challenge the own world views (ideology experiences) serve as…

  13. Assets for Employment in Aboriginal Community-Based Human Services Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jason; Fraehlich, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the prior educational and employment experiences of staff members in urban Aboriginal human services agencies. A total of 44 individuals employed by one of three community sites within one Canadian inner city generated 85 unique responses to the question: "What were your employment and education…

  14. Identity, Agency and Community: Reconsidering the Pedagogic Responsibilities of Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moate, Josephine; Ruohotie-Lyhty, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a model for teacher education based on an ongoing action research project at a Finnish university. This model draws on the educational theory of Dewey and the pedagogical sensibility of Bakhtin to critically consider the concepts of teacher identity and agency and to highlight the role of community in teacher development. Our…

  15. 75 FR 77904 - Office of Community Oriented Policing Services; Agency Information Collection Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... Review: COPS Non Hiring Progress Report. The Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) will be submitting the following information collection request to the Office of... Form/Collection: COPS Progress Report. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component...

  16. 75 FR 75697 - Office of Community Oriented Policing Services; Agency Information Collection Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... Collection Under Review: COPS Application Package. The Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), has submitted the following information collection request to the Office... requested. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: COPS Application Package. (3) Agency form number, if any,...

  17. 36 CFR 1237.10 - How must agencies manage their audiovisual, cartographic, and related records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How must agencies manage... RELATED RECORDS MANAGEMENT § 1237.10 How must agencies manage their audiovisual, cartographic, and related records? Each Federal agency must manage its audiovisual, cartographic and related records as required...

  18. 36 CFR 1237.10 - How must agencies manage their audiovisual, cartographic, and related records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How must agencies manage... RELATED RECORDS MANAGEMENT § 1237.10 How must agencies manage their audiovisual, cartographic, and related records? Each Federal agency must manage its audiovisual, cartographic and related records as required...

  19. 36 CFR 1237.10 - How must agencies manage their audiovisual, cartographic, and related records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How must agencies manage... RELATED RECORDS MANAGEMENT § 1237.10 How must agencies manage their audiovisual, cartographic, and related records? Each Federal agency must manage its audiovisual, cartographic and related records as required...

  20. Collaborating for breast health education and research. A university, industry, and community agency partnership.

    PubMed

    Thomas, B; Stamler, L L; Malinowski, A

    1999-11-01

    Initiating a collaborative health education program about breast health required talent, expertise, and workload contributions from all involved including university researchers, a regional breast screening agency, and local industries. The credibility and opinions of liaisons or key informants were valued highly, and their support was critical to the success of the project. Participation in any collaborative project is predicated on benefits perceived by each of the partners. The community agency reaped the benefits of greater dissemination of their educational materials through the interventions. The project increased corporate and union awareness of the resources of this agency and in this community. Throughout the project, meetings and telephone conferences were held on a weekly or biweekly basis with the liaisons. Liaisons disseminated updates to management and union representatives. PMID:10865537

  1. An Analysis of Valencia Community College's Policy Response to Local Community Agencies' Need for Student Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Lula M.

    A study was conducted at Valencia Community College (VCC) to evaluate VCC's success in meeting the community's need for volunteers, to determine the needs of student volunteers, and to discover what kinds of students were participating in the student volunteer program. Results of a questionnaire completed by 72 student volunteers indicated that…

  2. 36 CFR 1237.10 - How must agencies manage their audiovisual, cartographic, and related records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How must agencies manage their... RECORDS MANAGEMENT § 1237.10 How must agencies manage their audiovisual, cartographic, and related records? Each Federal agency must manage its audiovisual, cartographic and related records as required in...

  3. Agency-Community Partnership in Landcare: Lessons for State-Sponsored Citizen Resource Management

    PubMed

    Curtis

    1998-07-01

    / With over 2500 Australian Landcare groups, 65,000 volunteer members, and considerable evidence of program impact, Landcare is an important example of state-sponsored rural development in a developed nation. The agency-community partnership is a fundamental element of Landcare and getting the partnership right is vital to long-term program success. After reviewing the emergence of Landcare in the state of Victoria, the author reports research from a 1995 survey of Victorian Landcare groups. Survey information highlighted the extent of agency-group contact, the important roles agency staff played in many Landcare groups, and the positive impact of agency contact and government funding upon group activity. Large majorities of groups reported they were satisfied with their relationship with agency staff. However, a majority of groups reported money or materials provided to manage land and water degradation was inadequate. Recently proposed changes to the Landcare program will provide government funding of work on private property and may address this concern. A majority of groups also reported support for leadership and management training was inadequate and respondents emphasized the need to revise program guidelines that limit funding for group coordinators. This information highlighted the importance of articulating a practical model of community participation in Australia and adopting a systematic approach to providing agency support for Landcare groups. Reflecting upon the Landcare experience, the author suggests some of the key elements of a practical model of state-sponsored citizen resource management contributing to rural development.KEY WORDS: Landcare; Australia; Community participation; Rural development; Citizen resource management; Sustainable agriculture PMID:9582392

  4. 75 FR 77956 - Agency Information Collection (Annual Certification of Veteran Status and Veteran-Relatives...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Annual Certification of Veteran Status and Veteran-Relatives) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs....

  5. Community matrons: inter-professional and inter-agency working (part five).

    PubMed

    Masterson, Abigail

    2007-10-01

    This is the penultimate article developed from a series of masterclasses organised and funded by the Department of Health for community matrons during summer 2006. The articles synthesise the masterclass content in order to describe the areas of practice that are common to the community matron role and which have to be practiced with high levels of knowledge and skill if community matrons are to deliver the expected benefits to patients and to the NHS. It uses a case study to explore the fundamental concepts of accountability, teamwork; knowing the system; assertiveness; advocacy and empowerment which community matrons identified consistently as being significant in ensuring successful interprofessional and inter-agency working. PMID:17972784

  6. Small Community Needs: A Study of Small Community Needs as Related to Federal Housing and Community Development Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate programs of the Department of Housing and Urban Development and other specified Federal agencies regarding their responsiveness to the problems and needs of small communities. A major objective was to define a "small" community and to determine how its problems and needs differ from those of a large…

  7. 20 CFR 638.543 - Community relations program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Community relations program. 638.543 Section... PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.543 Community relations program. Each center operator shall establish a community relations program, which shall...

  8. 20 CFR 638.543 - Community relations program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Community relations program. 638.543 Section... PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.543 Community relations program. Each center operator shall establish a community relations program, which shall...

  9. 20 CFR 638.543 - Community relations program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Community relations program. 638.543 Section... PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.543 Community relations program. Each center operator shall establish a community relations program, which shall...

  10. 7 CFR 650.21 - Working relations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and related State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Working relations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and related State environmental agencies. 650.21 Section 650.21 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE SUPPORT ACTIVITIES COMPLIANCE WITH NEPA Related Environmental Concerns § 650.21 Working...

  11. Primary Health Care and partnerships: collaboration of a community agency, health department, and university nursing program.

    PubMed

    Leonard, L G

    1998-03-01

    Health care reform proposals emphasize health care that is essential, practical, scientifically sound, coordinated, accessible, appropriately delivered, and affordable. One route to achievement of improved health outcomes within these parameters is the formation of partnerships. Partnerships adopting the philosophy and five principles of Primary Health Care (PHC) focus on health promotion and prevention of illness and disability, maximum community participation, accessibility to health and health services, interdisciplinary and intersectoral collaboration, and use of appropriate technologies such as resources and strategies. A community service agency serving a multicultural population initiated a partnership with a health department and a university undergraduate nursing program. The result was a preschool health fair and there were benefits for each partner-benefits which could not have been realized without the collaboration. The health fair partnership planning, implementation, and evaluation process was guided by a framework shaped by the philosophy and five principles of PHC. The educational process described can be applied to other learning experiences where the goal is to help students understand and apply the concepts of PHC, develop myriad nursing competencies, and form collaborative relationships with the community and health agencies. Community health care dilemmas and nursing education challenges can be successfully addressed when various disciplines and sectors form effective partnerships. PMID:9535233

  12. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relations with community groups. 705.22 Section... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.22 Relations with community groups. (a) Naval commands will cooperate with and assist community groups within their capabilities, to the...

  13. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relations with community groups. 705.22 Section... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.22 Relations with community groups. (a) Naval commands will cooperate with and assist community groups within their capabilities, to the...

  14. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relations with community groups. 705.22 Section... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.22 Relations with community groups. (a) Naval commands will cooperate with and assist community groups within their capabilities, to the...

  15. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relations with community groups. 705.22 Section... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.22 Relations with community groups. (a) Naval commands will cooperate with and assist community groups within their capabilities, to the...

  16. Joining Forces Between National Scientific Community and National Agencies: The Spanish GEOSS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maso, J.; Díaz, P.; Pons, X.; Serral, I.; Belda, F.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, 86 countries are Group on Earth Observations (GEO) members. Mainly, GEO points are relevant national agencies that ensure the national participation in the GEOSS implementation efforts. AEMet (the Spanish Meteorological Office) is the direct responsible for GEOSS in Spain and they participate in GEO Committees and tasks. Also, the European Commission is actively funding European research projects to develop GEOSS using innovative conceptual frameworks and technologies. The success of GEO strongly depends on the contributions from science communities. Unfortunately, difficulties in the development and use of GEOSS resources have been identified in these communities including the earth observation one. Furthermore, up to now, these activities resemble a bottom-up approach, and depend on the initiative of national groups and individuals. There is a lack of a comprehensive outreach and engagement program, to which these activities could be linked, and there is a lack of top-down activities. The 7th framework program project "Coordinating Earth and Environmental cross-disciplinary projects to promote GEOSS" (EGIDA) will coordinate and cooperate with national agencies and existing research projects and will provide network methodologies. CREAF is EGIDA partner and will facilitate the implementation of the EGIDA methodology in Spain. Official Spanish representatives in GEOSS were contacted to explore the possibility of creating a permanent GEOSS-Spain network formed by both national administration bodies and relevant research initiatives. Also to assess the situation, CREAF prepared a questionnaire based on 5 simple questions that are conceived to start a dialog. 14 interviews were done so far by phone to public, private organizations and universities from 9 different European funded projects (EARLINETASOS, EuroSITES, ENVIROGRIDS, EuroGEOSS, ECOOP, GeoViQua, GFG2, HEREPLUS, and HERMIONE) and will be extended to other relevant communities in the near future

  17. Doorways II: Community Counselor Training Manual on School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Doorways training program was designed by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Safe Schools Program (Safe Schools) to enable teachers, community members and students to prevent and respond to school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV). Doorways II was designed for community counselors to prevent and respond to…

  18. Doorways II: Community Counselor Reference Materials. On School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Doorways training program was designed by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Safe Schools Program (Safe Schools) to enable teachers, community members and students to prevent and respond to school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV). This booklet, "Doorways II: Community Counselor Reference Materials on…

  19. Building Common Knowledge at the Boundaries between Professional Practices: Relational Agency and Relational Expertise in Systems of Distributed Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The article develops an earlier account of relational agency ("IJER" 2005). Its starting point is a view of practices as knowledge-laden and emotionally freighted sites of purposeful and expert activity. Arguments therefore draw on cultural historical analyses of activities, practices and the institutions that shape them. Relational agency in…

  20. Power-law relations in random networks with communities.

    PubMed

    Stegehuis, Clara; van der Hofstad, Remco; van Leeuwaarden, Johan S H

    2016-07-01

    Most random graph models are locally tree-like-do not contain short cycles-rendering them unfit for modeling networks with a community structure. We introduce the hierarchical configuration model (HCM), a generalization of the configuration model that includes community structures, while properties such as the size of the giant component, and the size of the giant percolating cluster under bond percolation can still be derived analytically. Viewing real-world networks as realizations of HCM, we observe two previously undiscovered power-law relations: between the number of edges inside a community and the community sizes, and between the number of edges going out of a community and the community sizes. We also relate the power-law exponent τ of the degree distribution with the power-law exponent of the community-size distribution γ. In the case of extremely dense communities (e.g., complete graphs), this relation takes the simple form τ=γ-1. PMID:27575143

  1. Power-law relations in random networks with communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegehuis, Clara; van der Hofstad, Remco; van Leeuwaarden, Johan S. H.

    2016-07-01

    Most random graph models are locally tree-like—do not contain short cycles—rendering them unfit for modeling networks with a community structure. We introduce the hierarchical configuration model (HCM), a generalization of the configuration model that includes community structures, while properties such as the size of the giant component, and the size of the giant percolating cluster under bond percolation can still be derived analytically. Viewing real-world networks as realizations of HCM, we observe two previously undiscovered power-law relations: between the number of edges inside a community and the community sizes, and between the number of edges going out of a community and the community sizes. We also relate the power-law exponent τ of the degree distribution with the power-law exponent of the community-size distribution γ . In the case of extremely dense communities (e.g., complete graphs), this relation takes the simple form τ =γ -1 .

  2. Project FIND: a profile of a community-based senior services agency.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Andrée

    2007-01-01

    Project FIND has been providing innovative supportive housing, nutrition, and social support to homeless and low- and moderate-income seniors on New York City's West Side since 1967. This article profiles this nonprofit, community-based agency, which was established to meet the needs of the frail and isolated elderly, and has continued to grow and evolve in response to changing demographics, neighborhood gentrification, and needs of both the homeless as well as the active "younger old." The article describes creative programming that has distinguished Project FIND's response to seniors' needs beyond basic housing and nutrition. It also explores what it takes to successfully provide senior services using limited resources and examines challenges for the future both nationally and for the agency. PMID:18236959

  3. 77 FR 38307 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition, Extension, Without...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Refugee/Asylee... Information Collection Under Review: Form I- 730, Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition; OMB Control No. 1615-0037.... (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition. (3) Agency form number, if...

  4. Relational Agency and Disposition in Sociocultural Accounts of Learning to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Anne; D'arcy, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    We draw on two studies of student teachers as they learn about learning while interacting with pupils. We argue that the affective notion of relational agency needs to become more central to understanding pedagogy if we are to prepare learners for the demands of the knowledge age. Here relational agency is defined as a capacity to engage with the…

  5. 40 CFR 300.155 - Public information and community relations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public information and community...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES... community relations. (a) When an incident occurs, it is imperative to give the public prompt,...

  6. 40 CFR 300.155 - Public information and community relations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public information and community...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES... community relations. (a) When an incident occurs, it is imperative to give the public prompt,...

  7. A Program in Community Relations: Face-to-Face Confrontations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Philip G.; O'Connell, Walter E.

    One of the sources of conflict in our urban centers today is the distrust that exists between the community and the police. In an effort to improve relations between community members and the police, so that both groups might work together more effectively in solving community problems, the Houston Cooperative Crime Prevention Program was…

  8. INFORMAL ADULT EDUCATION BY ORGANIZATIONS, AGENCIES, AND CHURCHES IN THE NORTHEAST JOHNSON COUNTY COMMUNITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KAY, MARION E.

    A SURVEY WAS MADE OF INFORMAL ADULT EDUCATION BY AGENCIES, ORGANIZATIONS, AND CHURCHES IN NORTHEAST JOHNSON COUNTY, KANSAS (PART OF GREATER KANSAS CITY). RECREATION, LEADERSHIP TRAINING, HUMAN RELATIONS, ACADEMIC SUBJECTS, CREATIVE ARTS, PUBLIC AFFAIRS, AND BIBLE STUDY AND RELIGIOUS TRAINING WERE THE LEADING PROGRAM AREAS. ALL GROUPS BUT ONE CHOSE…

  9. Factors Associated with the Severity of Gambling Problems in a Community Gambling Treatment Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namrata, Raylu; Oei, Tian P. S.

    2009-01-01

    Factors (demographics, gambling behaviors and comorbid problems) that may be related to the severity of gambling problems were investigated among 440 problem gamblers seeking treatment in an Australian outpatient treatment agency. The participants were divided into sub-threshold pathological gamblers (SPGs; N = 104) and pathological gamblers (PGs;…

  10. Analysing collaboration among HIV agencies through combining network theory and relational coordination.

    PubMed

    Khosla, Nidhi; Marsteller, Jill Ann; Hsu, Yea Jen; Elliott, David L

    2016-02-01

    Agencies with different foci (e.g. nutrition, social, medical, housing) serve people living with HIV (PLHIV). Serving needs of PLHIV comprehensively requires a high degree of coordination among agencies which often benefits from more frequent communication. We combined Social Network theory and Relational Coordination theory to study coordination among HIV agencies in Baltimore. Social Network theory implies that actors (e.g., HIV agencies) establish linkages amongst themselves in order to access resources (e.g., information). Relational Coordination theory suggests that high quality coordination among agencies or teams relies on the seven dimensions of frequency, timeliness and accuracy of communication, problem-solving communication, knowledge of agencies' work, mutual respect and shared goals. We collected data on frequency of contact from 57 agencies using a roster method. Response options were ordinal ranging from 'not at all' to 'daily'. We analyzed data using social network measures. Next, we selected agencies with which at least one-third of the sample reported monthly or more frequent interaction. This yielded 11 agencies whom we surveyed on seven relational coordination dimensions with questions scored on a Likert scale of 1-5. Network density, defined as the proportion of existing connections to all possible connections, was 20% when considering monthly or higher interaction. Relational coordination scores from individual agencies to others ranged between 1.17 and 5.00 (maximum possible score 5). The average scores for different dimensions across all agencies ranged between 3.30 and 4.00. Shared goals (4.00) and mutual respect (3.91) scores were highest, while scores such as knowledge of each other's work and problem-solving communication were relatively lower. Combining theoretically driven analyses in this manner offers an innovative way to provide a comprehensive picture of inter-agency coordination and the quality of exchange that underlies

  11. Development of a Strategy for Transition for State Community College from a State Agency to an Independent College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Timothy D.

    In preparation for a 1996 restructuring at State Community College, in Illinois, from a state agency to an independent community college, a project was undertaken to develop a strategic plan to guide the transition. Specifically, the project sought to determine the necessary elements of and functions and activities required by the plan,…

  12. Faculty/Administration Relations in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennett, Joyce A.

    The community college professoriate is characterized by a large reliance on part-time faculty, faculty unionization, a drive for educational technology, and the tendency to become part of a practitioner's culture and undervalue intellectual exchange. College administrators and governing boards, for their part, may see themselves as making…

  13. Project TEACH: A Capacity-Building Training Program for Community-Based Organizations and Public Health Agencies.

    PubMed

    Sauaia, Angela; Tuitt, Nicole R; Kaufman, Carol E; Hunt, Cerise; Ledezma-Amorosi, Mariana; Byers, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Project TEACH (Teaching Equity to Advance Community Health) is a capacity-building training program to empower community-based organizations and regional public health agencies to develop data-driven, evidence-based, outcomes-focused public health interventions. TEACH delivers training modules on topics such as logic models, health data, social determinants of health, evidence-based interventions, and program evaluation. Cohorts of 7 to 12 community-based organizations and regional public health agencies in each of the 6 Colorado Area Health Education Centers service areas participate in a 2-day training program tailored to their specific needs. From July 2008 to December 2011, TEACH trained 94 organizations and agencies across Colorado. Training modules were well received and resulted in significant improvement in knowledge in core content areas, as well as accomplishment of self-proposed organizational goals, grant applications/awards, and several community-academic partnerships. PMID:23480898

  14. A relational approach to health practices: towards transcending the agency-structure divide.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Gerry; Burnett, Patrick John

    2014-02-01

    Many health scholars find that Pierre Bourdieu's theory of practice leaves too little room for individual agency. We contend that, by virtue of its relational, field-theoretic underpinnings, the idea of leaving room for agency in Bourdieu's theory of practice is misguided. With agency manifested in interactions and social structures consisting of relations built upon relations, the stark distinction between agency and structure inherent to substantialist thinking is undermined, even dissolved, in a relational field-theoretic context. We also contend that, when treated as relationally bound phenomena, Bourdieu's notions of habitus, doxa, capital and field illuminate creative, adaptive and future-looking practices. We conclude by discussing difficulties inherent to implementing a relational theory of practice in health promotion and public health. PMID:24443790

  15. Principals and School-Community Relations: A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, David S.; Lows, Raymond L.

    1982-01-01

    Perceptions of school-community relations by 104 building principals (from a sample of 177 in selected Illinois school districts) reveal ambiguity in support for and direction of school-community relations by school districts, policies and procedures manuals, written guidelines, and budgetary provisions. (Author/MLF)

  16. Public Policy and State Education Agency Roles in Teacher Labor Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jon, Ed.

    This publication contains the edited transcripts of presentations made at the National Symposium on Public Policy and State Education Agency Roles in Teacher Labor Relations in May 1974. The symposium explored various aspects of teacher collective bargaining and the present and possible roles of state education agencies. Included in the booklet…

  17. 78 FR 1220 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Regulations Relating to Recordation and Enforcement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... previously published in the Federal Register (77 FR 64533) on October 22, 2012, allowing for a 60-day comment... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Regulations Relating to Recordation and Enforcement of Trademarks and Copyrights AGENCY: U.S. Customs and...

  18. Relative resource abundance explains butterfly biodiversity in island communities

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naoaki; Yokoyama, Jun; Kawata, Masakado

    2007-01-01

    Ecologists have long been intrigued by the factors that control the pattern of biodiversity, i.e., the distribution and abundance of species. Previous studies have demonstrated that coexisting species partition their resources and/or that the compositional similarity between communities is determined by environmental factors, lending support to the niche-assembly model. However, no attempt has been made to test whether the relative amount of resources that reflects relative niche space controls relative species abundance in communities. Here, we demonstrate that the relative abundance of butterfly species in island communities is significantly related to the relative biomasses of their host plants but not to the geographic distance between communities. In the studied communities, the biomass of particular host plant species positively affected the abundance of the butterfly species that used them, and consequently, influenced the relative abundance of the butterfly communities. This indicated that the niche space of butterflies (i.e., the amount of resources) strongly influences butterfly biodiversity patterns. We present this field evidence of the niche-apportionment model that propose that the relative amount of niche space explains the pattern of the relative abundance of the species in communities. PMID:17553963

  19. More closely related plants have more distinct mycorrhizal communities

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Kurt O.; Anacker, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Neighbouring plants are known to vary from having similar to dissimilar arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities. One possibility is that closely related plants have more similar AMF communities than more distantly related plants, an indication of phylogenetic host specificity. Here, we investigated the structure of AMF communities among dominant grassland plants at three sites in the Northern Great Plains to test whether the pairwise phylogenetic distance among plant species was correlated with pairwise AMF community dissimilarity. For eight dominant and co-occurring grassland plant species, we reconstructed a phylogeny based on DNA data and characterized the AMF communities of their roots at each site. Community analyses revealed that AMF communities varied among sites and among plant species. Contrary to expectations for phylogenetic host specificity, we found that within a site more closely related plants had more distinct AMF communities despite their having similar phenologies. Associations with unique AMF communities may enhance the functional complementarity of related species and promote their coexistence. PMID:25165062

  20. Community Colleges, Health-Related Social Problems, and the Community Services Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Donald Dean

    The major objective of the persent research was to determine the degree of commitment to community service in the area of health related social problems on the part of public community colleges. Specifically, the study sought to determine if these institutions have a responsibility for assisting in the amelioration of health-related problems. The…

  1. Responding to the deaf in disasters: establishing the need for systematic training for state-level emergency management agencies and community organizations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deaf and hard-of-hearing (Deaf/HH) individuals have been underserved before and during emergencies. This paper will assess Deaf/HH related emergency preparedness training needs for state emergency management agencies and deaf-serving community-based organizations (CBOs). Methods Four approaches were used: 1) a literature review; 2) results from 50 key informant (KI) interviews from state and territorial-level emergency management and public health agencies; 3) results from 14 KI interviews with deaf-serving CBOs in the San Francisco Bay Area; and 4) a pilot program evaluation of an emergency responder training serving the Deaf/HH in one urban community. Results Results from literature review and state and territorial level KIs indicate that there is a substantive gap in emergency preparedness training on serving Deaf/HH provided by state agencies. In addition, local KI interviews with 14 deaf-serving CBOs found gaps in training within deaf-serving CBOs. These gaps have implications for preparing for and responding to all-hazards emergencies including weather-related or earthquake-related natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and nuclear-chemical disasters. Conclusion Emergency preparedness trainings specific to responding to or promoting preparedness of the Deaf/HH is rare, even for state agency personnel, and frequently lack standardization, evaluation, or institutionalization in emergency management infrastructure. This has significant policy and research implications. Similarly, CBOs are not adequately trained to serve the needs of their constituents. PMID:23497178

  2. A Workshop on Improving Community Relations through Increased Faculty Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetsch, David L.

    Prepared for use in an instructor workshop, this booklet suggests ways community college instructors can become more actively involved in community relations. After a statement of purpose and a delineation of participant objectives, the booklet describes how the workshop is to be conducted (i.e., using a lecture, discussion, and…

  3. Networking Relations of Using ICT within a Teacher Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryymin, Essi; Palonen, Tuire; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the network structure of a teacher community in relation to their use of information and communication technology (ICT). The participants in the study were the 33 members of the teacher community of an upper comprehensive school from a suburban area of Helsinki, Finland. The methodology of the study…

  4. Relational Trust: The Glue that Binds a Professional Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how principals describe the nature of relationships and presence (or absence) of relational trust among teachers, and between the teachers and the principal in the discourse of professional learning communities. Participants were 12 school principals from urban, suburban, and rural communities in Manitoba. In the discourse of…

  5. Sources and Information: Media Relations in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobolowsky, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of recent ERIC documents that provide insight into the public perception of community colleges, the potential influence of the media on public opinion regarding community colleges, institutional relations with the media, and the role that Web pages play in strategic marketing. (VWC)

  6. 40 CFR 300.155 - Public information and community relations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public information and community... POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Responsibility and Organization for Response § 300.155 Public information and community relations. (a) When an incident occurs, it is imperative to give the public prompt,...

  7. School Community Relations and Resources in Effective Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, George J.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses resources available to schools operating as open and closed systems. Examines school/community relations and school effectiveness, schools as resource machines, and resources offered by teachers and parents. Stresses that broad concepts of community, good communication, and citizen involvement can utilize resources at high levels of…

  8. Effective Community Relations: A Handbook for Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    If readers want to improve ties with their local community, government, town, or civic groups, then this is the handbook to read. This guide focuses on how to conduct a community relations audit, develop a CR strategy, build a CR team, communicate more effectively with neighbors, and handle crises well. The handbook also includes a sample economic…

  9. Managing Community College Public Relations: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romine, Larry

    1982-01-01

    Since planning is a continual process, the college public relations manager plans for what could occur and prepares for it. The manager's responsibilities include working with the board and president, budgeting, setting objectives, innovating, representing, staffing, coordinating, and directing. (MSE)

  10. Results of a Pragmatic Effectiveness–Implementation Hybrid Trial of the Family Check-Up in Community Mental Health Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justin D.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.; Kavanagh, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the results of a pragmatic effectiveness–implementation hybrid trial of the Family Check-Up (FCU) conducted in 3 community mental health agencies with 40 participating therapists. Seventy-one families with children between 5 and 17 years of age participated. Intervention fidelity and level of adoption were acceptable; families reported high service satisfaction; and therapists reported high acceptability. Families in the FCU condition experienced significantly reduced youth conduct problems in comparison to usual care and completion of the FCU resulted in larger effects. This study provides promising evidence that implementing the FCU in community mental health agencies has the potential to improve youth behavior outcomes. PMID:24927926

  11. Engaging the Community in the Dissemination, Implementation, and Improvement of Health-Related Research.

    PubMed

    Bodison, Stefanie C; Sankaré, Ibrahima; Anaya, Henry; Booker-Vaughns, Juanita; Miller, Aria; Williams, Pluscedia; Norris, Keith

    2015-12-01

    To help maximize the real-world applicability of available interventions in clinical and community healthcare practice, there has been greater emphasis over the past two decades on engaging local communities in health-related research. While there have been numerous successful community-academic partnered collaborations, there continues to be a need to articulate the common barriers experienced during the evolution of these partnerships, and to provide a roadmap for best practices that engage healthcare providers, patients, families, caregivers, community leaders, healthcare systems, public agencies and academic medical centers. To this end, this paper presents a summary of a forum discussion from the 2014 Southern California Dissemination, Implementation and Improvement (DII) Science Symposium, sponsored by the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Clinical Translational Science Institute (CTSI), University of Southern California (USC) CTSI, and Kaiser Permanente. During this forum, a diverse group of individuals representing multiple constituencies identified four key barriers to success in community-partnered participatory research (CPPR) and discussed consensus recommendations to enhance the development, implementation, and dissemination of community health-related research. In addition, this group identified several ways in which the over 60 NIH funded Clinical and Translational Science Institutes across the country could engage communities and researchers to advance DII science. PMID:26546337

  12. Community Relations--A Tool in Your Program's Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redington, Scott

    1975-01-01

    The author discusses the planning and organizational aspects of publicity, advertising, radio programs, and public appearance that are necessary to provide continuous public and community relations programs for agricultural education. (EA)

  13. The relation between the sense of agency and the experience of flow.

    PubMed

    Vuorre, Matti; Metcalfe, Janet

    2016-07-01

    This article investigates the relation between people's feelings of agency and their feelings of flow. In the dominant model describing how people are able to assess their own agency-the comparator model of agency-when the person's intentions match perfectly to what happens, the discrepancy between intention and outcome is zero, and the person is thought to interpret this lack of discrepancy as being in control. The lack of perceived push back from the external world seems remarkably similar to the state that has been described as a state of flow. However, when we used a computer game paradigm to investigate the relation between people's feelings of agency and their feelings of flow, we found a dissociation between these two states. Although these two states may, in some ways, seem to be similar, our data indicate that they are governed by different principles and phenomenology. PMID:27288822

  14. Linking the levels: network and relational perspectives for community psychology.

    PubMed

    Neal, Jennifer Watling; Christens, Brian D

    2014-06-01

    In this article, we assert that relationships and networks are of paramount importance for understanding and improving settings, neighborhoods, communities, and larger social systems. Despite previous acknowledgements of their relevance, relational and social network perspectives and analyses remain underrepresented in community psychological research and action. Here, we claim that network and relational perspectives can provide conceptual and empirical 'links' between levels of analysis, more fully reflecting a transactional view. We also describe some of the sophisticated methodologies that can be employed in empirical studies drawing on these perspectives. Additionally, we contend that core concepts in community psychology such as health promotion, empowerment, coalition building, and dissemination and implementation can be better understood when employing relational and network perspectives. As an introduction to this special issue of American Journal of Community Psychology, we draw out themes and key points from the articles in the issue, and offer recommendations for future advancement of these perspectives in the field. PMID:24752731

  15. Serving the Community and Training Students: Challenges and Lessons from a University-Sponsored Human Service Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulin, John; Silver, Paula; Kauffman, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the process of developing and sustaining a University-sponsored human service agency aimed at providing enriched internship opportunities for students in University-based professional programs while at the same time addressing the pressing needs of under resourced communities. Student learning outcomes, challenges and lessons…

  16. Individualized Family Supports and Community Living for Adults: A Case Study of a For-Profit Agency in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racino, Julie Ann

    This report is based on a site visit to a private, for-profit agency that provides community support services to people with severe disabilities in six counties in Minnesota. The organization supports 25 families in its in-home program and 35 people in supportive and semi-independent living services. Services offered include minor physical…

  17. 22 CFR 120.5 - Relation to regulations of other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... foreign countries by persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction (27 CFR part 447). In carrying out such... Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 through 799). ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Relation to regulations of other agencies....

  18. 36 CFR 1237.10 - How must agencies manage their audiovisual, cartographic, and related records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must agencies manage their audiovisual, cartographic, and related records? 1237.10 Section 1237.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT AUDIOVISUAL, CARTOGRAPHIC, AND RELATED RECORDS MANAGEMENT § 1237.10 How...

  19. 22 CFR 120.5 - Relation to regulations of other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... foreign countries by persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction (27 CFR part 447). In carrying out such... Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 through 799). ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Relation to regulations of other agencies....

  20. 40 CFR 300.155 - Public information and community relations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... responsible party. (b) An on-scene news office may be established to coordinate media relations and to issue... the lead agency. The OSC/RPM determines the location of the on-scene news office, but every effort... interest warrants the issuance of statements and an on-scene news office has not been established,...

  1. Enhancing Your Public Relations. A Guide for Designing Effective Communication Strategies for Community-Based Vocational Rehabilitation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePoint, Beth

    This document is intended to assist agencies in formulating and initiating a financially realistic public relations plan specifically designed for their community-based vocational rehabilitation organizations. The document consists of 6 chapters, a 43-item bibliography, a glossary, and information about the author. Chapter 1 defines public…

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.296 - When may a landholding agency other than GSA be the disposal agency for real and related personal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When may a landholding agency other than GSA be the disposal agency for real and related personal property? 102-75.296 Section... is not being disposed; or (3) Standing timber, embedded gravel, sand, stone, and underground...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.296 - When may a landholding agency other than GSA be the disposal agency for real and related personal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When may a landholding agency other than GSA be the disposal agency for real and related personal property? 102-75.296 Section 102-75.296 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations...

  4. Charter Starters Leadership Training Workbook 5: Community Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ley, Joyce

    This workbook is part of a series devoted to all areas of charter-school development. Fifth in the series, this volume focuses on community relations and how school founders can handle public relations, market their school, and deal with controversy. The text is divided into three sections. Section one examines why schools should engage in public…

  5. Comparative community physiology: nonconvergence in water relations among three semi-arid shrub communities.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Anna L; Pratt, R Brandon; Davis, Stephen D; Ewers, Frank W

    2008-01-01

    Plant adaptations to the environment are limited, and therefore plants in similar environments may display similar functional and physiological traits, a pattern termed functional convergence. Evidence was examined for functional convergence among 28 evergreen woody shrubs from three plant communities of the semi-arid winter rainfall region of southern California. Both leaf and water relations traits were examined, including seasonal stomatal conductance (gs), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf specific conductivity (Kl), seasonal water potential (Psi w), stem cavitation resistance (Psi 50), and xylem density. Species display community-specific suites of xylem and leaf traits consistent with different patterns of water use among communities, with coastal sage scrub species utilizing shallow pulses of water, Mojave Desert scrub species relying on deeper water reserves, and chaparral species utilizing both shallow and deep moisture reserves. Communities displayed similar degrees of water stress, with a community-level minimum Psi w (Psi wmin) of c. -4.6 Mpa, similar to other arid communities. Pooled across sites, there was a strong correlation between Psi wmin and xylem density, suggesting that these traits are broadly related and predictive of one another. This comparative community physiology approach may be useful in testing hypotheses of functional convergence across structurally similar semi-arid communities. PMID:18627498

  6. Reviewing HIV-Related Research in Emerging Economies: The Role of Government Reviewing Agencies.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Patrina; Hui, Katrina; Hanrahan, Donna; Barnes, Mark; Sugarman, Jeremy; London, Alex John; Klitzman, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Little research has explored the possible effects of government institutions in emerging economies on ethical reviews of multinational research. We conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 15 researchers, Research Ethics Committees (RECs) personnel, and a government agency member involved in multinational HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) research in emerging economies. Ministries of Health (MOH) or other government agencies often play pivotal roles as facilitators or barriers in the research ethics approval process. Government agency RECs reviewing protocols may face particular challenges, as they can lack resources, be poorly organized, have inconsistent review processes and limited expertise, and use differing definitions of national interests, including upholding national reputation and avoiding potential exploitation and stigma of the country's population. The MOH/governmental review body may be affected by power dynamics and politics in study reviews; may consider issues both related and unrelated to research ethics as understood elsewhere; and may prioritize particular diseases, treatments, or interventions over other topics/types of research. Poor communication and deeply-rooted tensions may exist between sponsor and host countries, impeding optimal interactions and reviews. Investigators must understand and plan for the potential effects of governmental agencies on multinational collaborative research, including preserving adequate time for agency review, and contacting these agencies beforehand to address issues that may arise. Better understanding of these issues can aid and advance appropriate global scientific collaboration. PMID:25388003

  7. Disturbances of Agency and Ownership in Schizophrenia: An Auditory Verbal Event Related Potentials Study.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Tim; Kindler, Jochen; Schneider, Rahel C; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas; Hubl, Daniela; Koenig, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A 'sense of self' is essentially the ability to distinguish between self-generated and external stimuli. It consists of at least two very basic senses: a sense of agency and a sense of ownership. Disturbances seem to provide a basic deficit in many psychiatric diseases. The aim of our study was to manipulate those qualities separately in 28 patients with schizophrenia (14 auditory hallucinators and 14 non-hallucinators) and 28 healthy controls (HC) and to investigate the effects on the topographies and the power of the event-related potential (ERP). We performed a 76-channel EEG while the participants performed the task as in our previous paper. We computed ERPs and difference maps for the conditions and compared the amount of agency and ownership between the HC and the patients. Furthermore, we compared the global field power and the topographies of these effects. Our data showed effects of agency and ownership in the healthy controls and the hallucinator group and to a lesser degree in the non-hallucinator group. We found a reduction of the N100 during the presence of agency, and a bilateral temporal negativity related to the presence of ownership. For the agency effects, we found significant differences between HC and the patients. Contrary to the expectations, our findings were more pronounced in non-hallucinators, suggesting a more profoundly disturbed sense of agency compared to hallucinators. A contemporary increase of global field power in both patient groups indicates a compensatory recruitment of other mechanisms not normally associated with the processing of agency and ownership. PMID:27209172

  8. 77 FR 64533 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Regulations Relating to Recordation and Enforcement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ...As part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, CBP invites the general public and other Federal agencies to comment on an information collection requirement concerning the: Regulations Relating to Recordation and Enforcement of Trademarks and Copyrights (Part 133 of the CBP Regulations). This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act......

  9. 32 CFR 775.10 - Relations with state, local and regional agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... which have been established pursuant to Executive Order 12372 of July 14, 1982 (3 CFR, 1982 Comp., p... agencies. 775.10 Section 775.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 775.10 Relations...

  10. 78 FR 6347 - Agency Information Collection Activities Under Review: Related Unfair Employment Practices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Special Counsel for Immigration- Related Unfair Employment Practices Charge Form (OSC Charge Form) ACTION... Employment Practices Charge Form [OSC Charge Form]. (3) The agency form number and applicable component of..., where reasonable cause is found, litigates charges alleging discrimination. OSC also...

  11. 42 CFR 431.610 - Relations with standard-setting and survey agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and suppliers of services to participate in Medicare (see 42 CFR 405.1902). The requirement for... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Relations with standard-setting and survey agencies. 431.610 Section 431.610 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  12. Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Dicks, Norman D. [D-WA-6

    2009-06-23

    10/30/2009 Became Public Law No: 111-88. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: Division A is the Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010. Division B is the Further Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2010, continuing appropriations through 12/18/2009. Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Learning throughout Working Life: A Relational Interdependence between Personal and Social Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Individuals actively and continually construct the knowledge required for their working lives. Two outcomes arise from this constructive process: (i) individual change (i.e. learning) and (ii) the remaking of culturally-derived practices comprising work. These arise through a relational interdependence between the contributions and agency of the…

  14. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.22 Relations with community groups. (a... in general are the responsibility of the officer in command, with the assistance of his public... Information) and from the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs). (3) Commands will maintain the...

  15. THE RELATIVE FATE OF CARBON AMONG DIFFERENT INTERTIDAL MARSH COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of marsh production determines the functional role of marshes in estuarine carbon dynamics. Differences in the physicochemical environment, largely related to the mixing of fresh water and seawater, result in a variety of degradational settings and plant communities. It...

  16. Community College Enrollment Projection Study: A National Survey of Approaches Used by State Agencies for Community/Junior Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Louis W.

    As part of an effort to reassess its enrollment forecasting methodology and techniques, the Florida Division of Community Colleges conducted a national survey of state directors of community/junior colleges to identify successful forecasting practices. A conceptual framework for analyzing responses was developed from a review of the literature on…

  17. Mission impossible? - Government Agencies And Public Relations For Nuclear Waste Disposal In Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Landsmann, B.; Brauer, V.

    2007-07-01

    Analyzing the opinion of European Union citizens on the management of radioactive waste a survey of 2005 shows that European citizens are almost unanimous in the need to set up a national strategy for high-level radioactive waste disposal without any delay. While 45% of respondents consider that deep underground disposal represents the most appropriate solution for long-term management of highly radioactive waste, 38% disagree. In Germany, the divergence of opinion in this respect is very distinctive and it shows that, although experts believe that selected sites represent the best solution, this information does not yet seem to have reached the public. The reason therefore is both the lack of interesting and comprehensible information of issues related to nuclear waste disposal and negative media reporting always coupled with the negative public opinion about atomic energy in Germany. In Germany the siting, construction, and operation of a repository for radioactive waste is a national task. The Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) as a government agency is a praxis oriented science institution and works on all geo-scientific and geotechnical issues in the German repository projects. According to its guidance BGR feels responsible for the future generations and is acting as a neutral and anticipatory partner for ministries and public authorities as well as a partner for industry, society and scientific bodies. BGR therefore is able to accomplish an essential contribution for the creation of public confidence for radioactive waste disposal due to precise public relations strategies. Sending the following messages is BGR's communication goal: - Radioactive waste can safely be disposed of in deep geological formations; - BGR is capable to handle this duty and delivers reliable results. Thereby, the BGR is in particular interested in passing on the information about nuclear waste disposal in a current and comprehensible way as well as

  18. Shifting contours of boundaries: an exploration of inter-agency integration between hospital and community interprofessional diabetes programs.

    PubMed

    Wong, Rene; Breiner, Petra; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2014-09-01

    This article reports on research into the relationships that emerged between hospital-based and community-based interprofessional diabetes programs involved in inter-agency care. Using constructivist grounded theory methodology we interviewed a purposive theoretical sample of 21 clinicians and administrators from both types of programs. Emergent themes were identified through a process of constant comparative analysis. Initial boundaries were constructed based on contrasts in beliefs, practices and expertise. In response to bureaucratic and social pressures, boundaries were redefined in a way that created role uncertainty and disempowered community programs, ultimately preventing collaboration. We illustrate the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of social and symbolic boundaries in inter-agency diabetes care and the tacit ways in which hospitals can maintain a power position at the expense of other actors in the field. As efforts continue in Canada and elsewhere to move knowledge and resources into community sectors, we highlight the importance of hospitals seeing beyond their own interests and adopting more altruistic models of inter-agency integration. PMID:24766617

  19. That community becomes you? An examination of community differences in self-objectification and related variables.

    PubMed

    Shepler, Desire; Lupfer-Johnson, Gwen; Chaudoir, Stephenie; Boeckmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The authors surveyed women from 2 communities: Anchorage, Alaska (N =51), an urban area, and Haines, Alaska (N=41), an isolated rural community. Participants from Haines scored lower on measures of self-objectification, internalization of sociocultural attitudes toward appearance, participation in beauty enhancement behaviors, and perceived normative beauty enhancement behaviors. Women from Haines also engaged in more empowering exercise (i.e., yoga and outdoor exercise). Internalization of sociocultural attitudes toward appearance mediated the relation between perceived normative beauty enhancement behaviors and self-objectification for women living in both communities. The current study suggests that communities may present opportunities to engage in activities that influence one's predisposition to self-objectify. The nonexperimental nature of this study, however, prevents the definitive establishment of the direction of causality between variables. PMID:21842622

  20. How therapeutic communities work: Specific factors related to positive outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Steve; Pickard, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Background Therapeutic communities (TCs) are becoming increasingly widespread as a form of treatment for entrenched mental health problems, particularly addictions and personality disorders, and are equally used in educational, prison and learning disability settings. Despite growing evidence for their effectiveness, little research has been conducted to establish how TCs work to produce positive outcomes. We hypothesize that there are two specific factors that in combination contribute to TC effectiveness: the promotion of a sense of belongingness and the capacity for responsible agency. Although both factors are found in other therapeutic approaches and are important to the psychosocial aspects of psychiatric care more generally, we argue that their combination, extent and emphasis are unique to TCs. Material Drawing on social and experimental psychology, we: (1) review research on a sense of belongingness and the capacity for responsible agency; (2) establish the mechanisms by which TCs appear to promote them; (3) draw lessons for TC practice; and (4) suggest why they may contribute to positive outcome. Discussion A sense of belongingness is correlated with improved self-esteem and overall well-being. The capacity for responsible agency is central to behavioural change. TCs are typically used in fields where positive outcome requires both personal growth and behavioural change. We suggest that TCs are uniquely placed to demand such growth and change of their members because the sense of belongingness engendered by TC methods protects against the risks engendered by this demand. Conclusion Empirically informed, evidence-driven research is necessary to understand how TCs work and how TC practice can be improved. This understanding may offer lessons for the improvement of psychosocial aspects of psychiatric care more generally. PMID:22820178

  1. 75 FR 30061 - Office of Community Oriented Policing Services; Agency Information Collection Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... collection; comments requested ACTION: 30 Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review: COPS' Rural Law... the Form/Collection: COPS' Rural Law Enforcement National Training Assessment. (3) Agency form number... or required to respond, as well as a brief abstract: Primary: Law enforcement agencies. (5)...

  2. THE STRUCTURE AND PROCESS OF SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS. VOLUME III, THE STRUCTURE OF SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARTER, RICHARD F.; AND OTHERS

    TO EVALUATE STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS OF SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS, 860 VARIABLES WERE DEFINED FROM THE LITERATURE AND GROUPED INTO 26 DIVISIONS FOR ASSESSMENT AGAINST FOUR SUMMARY CRITERION VARIABLES--(1) ACQUIESCENCE, THE DEGREE TO WHICH VOTERS IN A SCHOOL DISTRICT VIEW FINANCIAL ISSUES FAVORABLY, (2) PARTICIPATION, THE DEGREE TO WHICH VOTERS…

  3. Relative species richness and community completeness: avian communities and urbanization in the mid-Atlantic states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cam, E.; Nichols, J.D.; Sauer, J.R.; Hines, J.E.; Flather, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    The idea that local factors govern local richness has been dominant for years, but recent theoretical and empirical studies have stressed the influence of regional factors on local richness. Fewer species at a site could reflect not only the influence of local factors, but also a smaller regional pool. The possible dependency of local richness on the regional pool should be taken into account when addressing the influence of local factors on local richness. It is possible to account for this potential dependency by comparing relative species richness among sites, rather than species richness per se. We consider estimation of a metric permitting assessment of relative species richness in a typical situation in which not all species are detected during sampling sessions. In this situation, estimates of absolute or relative species richness need to account for variation in species detection probability if they are to be unbiased. We present a method to estimate relative species richness based on capture-recapture models. This approach involves definition of a species list from regional data, and estimation of the number of species in that list that are present at a site-year of interest. We use this approach to address the influence of urbanization on relative richness of avian communities in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. There is a negative relationship between relative richness and landscape variables describing the level of urban development. We believe that this metric should prove very useful for conservation and management purposes because it is based on an estimator of species richness that both accounts for potential variation in species detection probability and allows flexibility in the specification of a 'reference community.' This metric can be used to assess ecological integrity, the richness of the community of interest relative to that of the 'original' community, or to assess change since some previous time in a community.

  4. 77 FR 55485 - Agency Information Collection Activities: H-2 Petitioner's Employment Related or Fee Related...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... published in the Federal Register on June 1, 2012, at 77 FR 106, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS did receive 1 comment in connection with the 60-day notice. The one comment USCIS received was regarding the extension of H-2 Petitioner's Employment Related or Fee Related Notification. The comment...

  5. Sense of Community and Interethnic Relations: Comparing Local Communities Varying in Ethnic Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellini, Federica; Colombo, Monica; Maffeis, Daniele; Montali, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the sense of community and interethnic relations in two different metropolitan areas that vary in ethnic heterogeneity. The study was conducted in Milan, Italy using a sample of 318 participants living in different city districts that vary in ethnic heterogeneity (low vs. high). The participants completed a questionnaire…

  6. Positive Community Relations: The Keystone to the CEMP

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Karr, L.

    2006-07-01

    evolved into a program that currently includes 28 environmental and radiation monitoring stations located in communities around the NTS. Although the capabilities of the off-site monitoring program at NTS have and will continue to evolve, the fundamental keystone of the program continues to be positive community relations, expressed through operation of stations by local residents, dissemination of near-real time monitoring data through on-site displays and a CEMP web site, annual training of station operators, public outreach programs and, most importantly, the maintenance of personal relationships. (authors)

  7. 76 FR 79212 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Information Collection for Community Harvest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... subsistence activities. A survey will be used to estimate subsistence harvests and to describe community subsistence economies. This project will survey residents of several communities in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve and Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve on these topics. The...

  8. Established Independent School Collaborates with Social Service Agency to Launch New School: Community Partnership School, Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Community Partnership School (CPS) serves 90 to 95 students annually in preK-5th grade. Of these, 100 percent are African American or multiracial, and all qualify for free or reduced-price lunch. Community Partnership School began as a collaboration between Germantown Academy, which had trouble recruiting low-income students to its suburban…

  9. Bilingual Education: A Collaborative Process Between Institutions of Higher Education, Local Educational Agencies and the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt-Diaz, Joseph O.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The six articles in this issue demonstrate how collaborative education efforts can be useful in meeting the needs of bilingual communities. The first article describes a Community Based Education model derived from experience in developing, implementing, and evaluating it. The article details the collaborative efforts between a bilingual school…

  10. Traumatizing Aspects of Providing Counselling in Community Agencies to Survivors of Sexual Violence: A Concept Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadambi, Michaela A.; Truscott, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Concept mapping (a combined qualitative/quantitative approach) was used to clarify and understand 72 Canadian professionals' experience of what they found to be traumatizing about their work with sexual violence survivors in community settings. A sample of 30 professionals providing community-based treatment to survivors of sexual violence sorted…

  11. Stressor-Response Models Relating Nutrient Enrichment to Algal Communities in Pacific Northwest Streams and Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobota, D. J.; Hubler, S.; Paul, M. J.; Labiosa, R.

    2015-12-01

    Excessive algal growth in streams and rivers from nutrient enrichment can cause costly human health and environmental problems. As part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Nutrient Scientific Technical Exchange Partnership and Support (N-STEPS) program, we have been developing stressor-response (S-R) models relating nutrients to attached algal (periphyton) communities to help prioritize monitoring for water quality impairments in Oregon (Pacific Northwest, USA) streams and rivers. Existing data from the state and neighboring states were compiled and standardized from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, US Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Geological Survey. To develop S-R models, algal community and biomass metrics were compared with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentration data, including total, dissolved, and inorganic forms of these nutrients. In total, 928 paired algal-nutrient samples were compiled from the 8 Level-III Ecoregions occurring in Oregon. Relationships between algal biomass metrics and nutrient concentrations were weak, with only ash-free dry mass and standing stock of chlorophyll a showing slight positive relationships across gradients of total N and soluble reactive P concentrations, respectively. In contrast, metrics describing algal community composition, including percent diatoms and abundance of nutrient-sensitive species, showed very strong nonlinear relationships with total N or P concentrations. This suggests that data describing algal community composition can help identify specific nutrient stressors across environmentally-diverse streams and rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Future analyses will examine if nutrient-algal S-R models vary across different hydrological, physiographical, and ecological settings in the region.

  12. Religion-Related Child Maltreatment: A Profile of Cases Encountered by Legal and Social Service Agencies.

    PubMed

    Bottoms, Bette L; Goodman, Gail S; Tolou-Shams, Marina; Diviak, Kathleen R; Shaver, Phillip R

    2015-08-01

    Religion can foster, facilitate, and be used to justify child maltreatment. Yet religion-related child abuse and neglect have received little attention from social scientists. We examined 249 cases of religion-related child maltreatment reported to social service agencies, police departments, and prosecutors' offices nationwide. We focused on cases involving maltreatment perpetrated by persons with religious authority, such as ministers and priests; the withholding of medical care for religious reasons; and abusive attempts to rid a child of supposed evil. By providing a descriptive statistical profile of the major features of these cases, we illustrate how these varieties of religion-related child maltreatment occur, who the victims and perpetrators are, and how religion-related child abuse and neglect are reported and processed by the social service and criminal justice systems. We end with a call for greater research attention to these important offenses against children. PMID:26294386

  13. Unscrambling Cyanobacteria Community Dynamics Related to Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bertos-Fortis, Mireia; Farnelid, Hanna M.; Lindh, Markus V.; Casini, Michele; Andersson, Agneta; Pinhassi, Jarone; Legrand, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Future climate scenarios in the Baltic Sea project an increase of cyanobacterial bloom frequency and duration, attributed to eutrophication and climate change. Some cyanobacteria can be toxic and their impact on ecosystem services is relevant for a sustainable sea. Yet, there is limited understanding of the mechanisms regulating cyanobacterial diversity and biogeography. Here we unravel successional patterns and changes in cyanobacterial community structure using a 2-year monthly time- series during the productive season in a 100 km coastal-offshore transect using microscopy and high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. A total of 565 cyanobacterial OTUs were found, of which 231 where filamentous/colonial and 334 picocyanobacterial. Spatial differences in community structure between coastal and offshore waters were minor. An “epidemic population structure” (dominance of asingle cluster) was found for Aphanizomenon/Dolichospermum within the filamentous/colonial cyanobacterial community. In summer, this clusters imultaneously occurred with opportunistic clusters/OTUs, e.g., Nodularia spumigena and Pseudanabaena. Picocyanobacteria, Synechococcus/Cyanobium, formeda consistent but highly diverse group. Overall, the potential drivers structuring summer cyanobacterial communities were temperature and salinity. However, the different responses to environmental factors among and within genera suggest high niche specificity for individual OTUs. The recruitment and occurrence of potentially toxic filamentous/colonial clusters was likely related to disturbance such as mixing events and short-term shifts in salinity, and not solely dependent on increasing temperature and nitrogen-limiting conditions. Nutrients did not explain further the changes in cyanobacterial community composition. Novel occurrence patterns were identified as a strong seasonal succession revealing a tight coupling between the emergence of opportunistic picocynobacteria and the bloom

  14. Meaningful Engagement of Organizational and Agency Partnerships to Enhance Diversity within the Earth System Science Community: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrtle, A. J.; Whitney, V. W.; Powell, J. M.; Bailey, K. L.

    2006-12-01

    The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science Initiative (MS PHD'S) was established by and for underrepresented minorities to facilitate increased and sustained participation in Earth system science community. The MS PHD'S launched its pilot program in 2003 with twenty professional organizations, agencies and institutions as partners. Each year partnership alliances have grown. In the second year or programming, thirty-one partnering agencies/institutions supported involvement of MS PHD'S student participants and for 2005-2006, representatives from forty-five agencies and institutions have provided similar support and exposure to the third cohort of student participants. Nineteen scientists served as meeting mentors during the MS PHD'S pilot program in 2003. By the following year, twenty-two additional scientists partnered with MS PHD'S mentees. During 2005-2006, twenty-one new scientists served as program mentors. Thus far, the MS PHD'S program has successfully engaged sixty-two minority and non-minority scientists as mentors to MS PHD'S student participants. AGU, AMS, ASLO, ESA, TOS, NAS OSB and JOI continue to serve as MS PHD'S Society Partners and hosts for MS PHD'S student activities in conjunction with their meetings. Each of the five professional society partners provided assistance in identifying mentors, provided complimentary memberships and meeting registrations for MS PHD'S student participants. AGU, AMS, ASLO, JOI and TOS have sponsored more than 90 conference registration and travel awards for the purpose of student participants engaging in MS PHD'S Professional Development Program Phase 2 activities at their international meetings. How did MS PHD'S establish meaningful engagement of organizational and agency partnerships to enhance diversity within the Earth system science community? This case study reveals replicable processes and constructs to enhance the quality of meaningful collaboration and engagement

  15. Accessibility and Responsiveness Review Tool: community agency capacity to respond to survivors with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Jenson, Ronda J; Peterson-Besse, Jana; Fleming, Lisa; Blumel, Angie; Day, Arden

    2015-01-01

    For persons with disabilities who have experienced trauma in the forms of abuse and violence, options for accessible and trauma-informed services are often limited. Using a self-assessment and planning process, disability service providers and victim/survivor service providers are able to strategize ways of addressing the needs of survivors with disabilities. The Accessibility and Responsiveness Review Tool (Review Tool) incorporates the principles of universal design and trauma-informed practices into an agency-wide discussion tool leading to increases in knowledge, reduction in barriers, and overall improved programs for survivors with disabilities. Results of agencies that participated in the Review Tool process are presented. PMID:26016999

  16. The CES Case Competition: A Valuable Resource for Community-Based Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Natasha; Welsh, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Illustrates the contribution that the Student Case Competition of the Canadian Evaluation Society can make to agencies with evaluation needs by describing the experience of an addiction and family services program whose gambling addiction treatment program used as the case in the qualifying round of the 1998 competition. (SLD)

  17. Agency in Borderland Discourses: Examining Language Use in a Community Center With Black Queer Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Mollie V.

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways in which a small group consisting mostly of Black queer youth makes sense of their use of language to assert agency in a world that is often heterosexist, homophobic, ageist, and racist. The author draws from the work of Gee and Anzalda to identify what youth call Gaybonics, as a Borderland Discourse that is…

  18. Student Agency: an Analysis of Students' Networked Relations Across the Informal and Formal Learning Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappa, Natasha Anne; Tang, Kok-Sing

    2016-05-01

    Agency is a construct facilitating our examination of when and how young people extend their own learning across contexts. However, little is known about the role played by adolescent learners' sense of agency. This paper reports two cases of students' agentively employing and developing science literacy practices—one in Singapore and the other in the USA. The paper illustrates how these two adolescent learners in different ways creatively accessed, navigated and integrated in-school and out-of-school discourses to support and nurture their learning of physics. Data were gleaned from students' work and interviews with students participating in a physics curricular programme in which they made linkages between their chosen out-of-school texts and several physics concepts learnt in school. The students' agentive moves were identified by means of situational mapping, which involved a relational analysis of the students' chosen artefacts and discourses across time and space. This relational analysis enabled us to address questions of student agency—how it can be effected, realised, construed and examined. It highlights possible ways to intervene in these networked relations to facilitate adolescents' agentive moves in their learning endeavours.

  19. The Importance of Audience and Agency for Representation: A Case Study of an Urban Youth Media Community

    PubMed Central

    Charmaraman, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Urban youths' agency to represent their realities through media has been largely unexplored in the youth development literature. In this qualitative case study of an after-school youth media program in the Bay Area, expressions of youth agency and the role of audiences are explored during the process of producing videos for public consumption. Methodology As participant observer of 14 ethnically diverse youth participants aged between 15 and 18 years over 18 months, I documented (a) the kind of agencies participants engaged in and (b) the impact of live and imagined future audiences on youths' creative processes. Analyses of field notes, semi-structured interviews, and media projects were conducted using thematic analysis to inductively generate emerging categories. Findings Themes included an agentive sense of self-efficacy, commitment, and responsibility, as well as perceived contributions to local audiences and an emerging collective identity. The youth demonstrated their increased sense of a social or civic duty to realistically represent youth of color to familiar and unfamiliar audiences. Implications This case study demonstrated how one youth media organization fostered agency through youth authorship, production, distribution, and local community dialogue. By documenting the impact of audiences from conception to public reception, this study provides valuable insight into the agentive process of publicly “performing” a commitment to complete a social change video project. Contribution This chapter underscores the value of performance within youth development programs and the critical component of audiences as one form of authentic assessment in order to foster individual and collective agency. PMID:20671812

  20. Detecting network communities beyond assortativity-related attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Murata, Tsuyoshi; Wakita, Ken

    2014-07-01

    In network science, assortativity refers to the tendency of links to exist between nodes with similar attributes. In social networks, for example, links tend to exist between individuals of similar age, nationality, location, race, income, educational level, religious belief, and language. Thus, various attributes jointly affect the network topology. An interesting problem is to detect community structure beyond some specific assortativity-related attributes ρ, i.e., to take out the effect of ρ on network topology and reveal the hidden community structures which are due to other attributes. An approach to this problem is to redefine the null model of the modularity measure, so as to simulate the effect of ρ on network topology. However, a challenge is that we do not know to what extent the network topology is affected by ρ and by other attributes. In this paper, we propose a distance modularity, which allows us to freely choose any suitable function to simulate the effect of ρ. Such freedom can help us probe the effect of ρ and detect the hidden communities which are due to other attributes. We test the effectiveness of distance modularity on synthetic benchmarks and two real-world networks.

  1. 77 FR 72686 - HACCP Plan Reassessment for Not-Ready-To-Eat Comminuted Poultry Products and Related Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... serotype information can be used to better focus food safety efforts to protect public health. For example... Food Safety and Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 417 HACCP Plan Reassessment for Not-Ready-To-Eat Comminuted Poultry Products and Related Agency Verification Procedures AGENCY: Food Safety and...

  2. Federal agencies active in chemical industry-related research and development

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-29

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 calls for a program to further the commercialization of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies for the industrial sector.. The primary objective of the Office of Industrial Technologies Chemical Industry Team is to work in partnership with the US chemical industry to maximize economic, energy, and environmental benefits through research and development of innovative technologies. This document was developed to inventory organizations within the federal government on current chemical industry-related research and development. While an amount of funding or number of projects specifically relating to chemical industry research and development was not defined in all organizations, identified were about 60 distinct organizations representing 7 cabinet-level departments and 4 independent agencies, with research efforts exceeding $3.5 billion in fiscal year 1995. Effort were found to range from less than $500 thousand per year at the Departments of Agriculture and the Interior to over $100 million per year at the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and Health and Human Services and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The total number of projects in these programs exceeded 10,000. This document is complete to the extent that agencies volunteered information. Additions, corrections, and changes are encouraged and will be incorporated in future revisions.

  3. Stigma Related to HIV among Community Health Workers in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Cianelli, Rosina; Ferrer, Lilian; Norr, Kathleen F.; McCreary, Linda; Irarrázabal, Lisette; Bernales, Margarita; Miner, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose When healthcare workers have stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV it may lead to discriminatory behavior that interferes with prevention, treatment, and care. This research examined the HIV-related stigmatizing attitudes reported by health workers in Santiago, Chile. Methods The study used focus group data from the first phase of a larger study to develop and test a HIV prevention intervention for Chilean health workers. Ten focus groups were conducted with Health workers in two communities in Santiago, Chile. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Two central themes emerged: Societal stigma and discrimination towards people living with HIV and healthcare system’s policies related to HIV. Both inaccurate fears of transmission among the general public and Chilean Health workers and societal prejudices against homosexuals contributed to stigmatization and discrimination. Conclusions Health workers did not recognize their own stigmatizing attitudes or discriminatory behaviors, but their discussion indicated that these behaviors and attitudes did exist. Healthcare system issues identified included problems with confidentiality due to the desire to inform other health workers about client HIV status. Health workers must be sensitized to the current stigmatization and misinformation associated with HIV and its negative impacts on persons living with HIV and the general community. Implications All clinical and non-clinical workers at community clinics need mandatory education for HIV prevention that focuses on changing attitudes as well as sharing knowledge. Also, the Chilean law protecting people living with HIV and the confidentiality of their medical care needs to be publicized, along with guidelines for its enactment in clinics and other health facilities. PMID:21687824

  4. 76 FR 8363 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Community Right...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (iii) enhance the quality... time required to read and understand the regulations, to determine which chemicals meet or exceed...-Know Reporting Requirements Under Sections 311 and 312 of the Emergency Planning and Community...

  5. Insurance Agencies' Organizational Learning in a Turbulent Time: A Community of Practice Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Wen-Bing; Wen, Chen-Hao

    2011-01-01

    In a turbulent time, communities of practice (CoPs) have become an important mechanism to develop organizational learning. Because of the rapid changes of global market and population structure, organizations in the private sector keep examining their leaning processes to adjust themselves to different challenges. However, few studies try to…

  6. Heritage Agency in a Transnational California Community: Latino Parents and Bilingual Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farruggio, Pete

    2009-01-01

    Latino immigrant parents were interviewed in a transnational urban community in California after passage of a law intended to abolish bilingual education (BE). Approximately half had English learner children in bilingual classes; the others in English-only classes. Guided by a macrocultural psychological interpretive framework, the study used a…

  7. Community Engagement as Catalyst for Professional Learning, Reflection, and Agency in Preservice-Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klehr, Mary

    2015-01-01

    I am a public elementary teacher currently serving as a school-based supervisor for a Professional Development School (PDS) undergraduate elementary-teacher-education program in Madison, Wisconsin, where our charge is to leverage the intersecting contexts of school, university, and community to prepare skilled and caring teachers for urban…

  8. An Evaluation of the McDowell County Community Action Agency Home Economics Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jeanne

    The document reports on the activities of the home economics component of the community action program of McDowell County as falling within socialization and training emphasis and consisting of services to promote an eventual attainment of independence. The stated basis is assistance in the integration of the members of the target population into…

  9. Shadow Bowl 2003: a collaborative exercise in community readiness, agency cooperation, and medical response.

    PubMed

    Balch, David; Taylor, Carl; Rosenthal, David; Bausch, Chris; Warner, Dave; Morris, Ray

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a model for homeland security, community readiness, and medical response that was applied during an operational exercise around Super Bowl XXXVII. In addition, it describes the products provided by private companies involved in the exercise and how they would have contributed to a medical disaster had one occurred. The purpose of Shadow Bowl was to demonstrate community readiness and medical response to a mass casualty event. The goals of the project were to: (1) provide enhanced public safety using an advanced communication network and sensor grid; (2) develop mass casualty surge capabilities through medical reach-back; and (3) build a collaboration model between civilian, military, public, and private partners. The results of the Shadow Bowl Exercise accentuated the value of new telehealth and disaster medicine tools in treating large numbers of patients when infrastructure overload occurs. PMID:15650528

  10. Beyond agency: sources of knowing and learning in children's science- and technology-related problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mijung; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2016-02-01

    In (science) education, primacy is given to agency, the human capability to act and, in this, to learn. However, phenomenological philosophers and societal-historical psychologists point out that agency, the purposeful (intentional) engagement with the world, is only the effect of a much more profound capacity: passibility, the capacity to be affected. In this study, we begin with what has been recognized as a fundamental condition of learning: learners cannot intentionally orient to the learning outcome because they inherently do not know it so that that knowledge cannot be the object of intention. In this study, we provide evidence for three empirically grounded assertions: (a) children do not intend new knowledge and understanding, which instead give themselves in and through materials and material configurations; (b) knowing-how is received (as unintended gifts) because our bodies are endowed with passibility, the capability to be affected; and (c) the new knowledge and understanding exists as and in social relation first. We suggest implications for engineering design in science classrooms.

  11. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Community Mental Health Agencies: A Multiple Stakeholder Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Rebecca S.; Zagursky, Karen; Fettes, Danielle L.; Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to identify factors believed to facilitate or hinder evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation in public mental health service systems as a step in developing theory to be tested in future studies. Methods. Focusing across levels of an entire large public sector mental health service system for youths, we engaged participants from 6 stakeholder groups: county officials, agency directors, program managers, clinical staff, administrative staff, and consumers. Results. Participants generated 105 unique statements identifying implementation barriers and facilitators. Participants rated each statement on importance and changeability (i.e., the degree to which each barrier or facilitator is considered changeable). Data analyses distilled statements into 14 factors or dimensions. Descriptive analyses suggest that perceptions of importance and changeability varied across stakeholder groups. Conclusions. Implementation of EBP is a complex process. Cross-system–level approaches are needed to bring divergent and convergent perspectives to light. Examples include agency and program directors facilitating EBP implementation by supporting staff, actively sharing information with policymakers and administrators about EBP effectiveness and fit with clients' needs and preferences, and helping clinicians to present and deliver EBPs and address consumer concerns. PMID:19762654

  12. Evaluation of Changes in Individual Community-Related Empowerment in Community Health Promotion Interventions in Estonia

    PubMed Central

    Kasmel, Anu; Tanggaard, Pernille

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed changes in community members’ ratings of the dimensions of individual community related empowerment (ICRE) before and two years after the implementation of an empowerment expansion framework in three community health promotion initiatives within the Estonian context. We employed a self-administered questionnaire, the adapted mobilisation scale–individual. As the first step, we investigated the multidimensional nature of the ICRE construct and explored the validity and reliability (internal consistency) of the ICRE scale. Two datasets were used. The first dataset comprised a cross-sectional random sample of 1,000 inhabitants of Rapla County selected in 2003 from the National Population Register, which was used to confirm the composition of the dimensions of the scale and to examine the reliability of the dimensions. The second dataset comprised two waves of data: 120 participants from three health promotion programs in 2003 (pre-test) and 115 participants in 2005 (post-test), and the dataset was used to compare participants’ pre-test and post-test ratings of their levels of empowerment. The content validity ratio, determined using Lawshe’s formula, was high (0.98). Five dimensions of ICRE, self-efficacy, intention, participation, motivation and critical awareness, emerged from the factor analysis. The internal consistency (α) of the total empowerment scale was 0.86 (subscales self-efficacy α = 0.88, intention α = 0.83, participation α = 0.81 and motivation α = 0.69; critical awareness comprised only one item). The levels of ICRE dimensions measured after the application of the empowerment expansion framework were significantly more favourable for the dimensions self-efficacy, participation, intention and motivation to participate. We conclude that for Rapla community workgroups and networks, their ICRE was rendered more favourable after the implementation of the empowerment expansion framework. PMID:21776201

  13. Identification of Job Coach Competencies, Staff Roles and Agency Administrative Patterns. Summary Report from the Community-Based Supported Employment Symposium (St. Cloud, Minnesota, June 10-11, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Association for Rehabilitation, Education, and Training.

    A symposium on community-based supported employment for developmentally disabled adults in Minnesota was attended by agency direct service staff who provide job training, executive directors and administrators of agencies, and personnel who refer clients to agencies providing supported work and other types of community-based training and…

  14. Employment-Related Health Insurance: Federal Agencies' Roles in Meeting Data Needs

    PubMed Central

    Wiatrowski, William; Harvey, Holly; Levit, Katharine R.

    2002-01-01

    Employer-sponsored health insurance accounts for almost one-third of all health care spending. As health care cost growth accelerates affecting the availability of employer-sponsored insurance and depth of coverage, the importance of timely and accurate information for measuring and monitoring these changes and formulating policy options increases. Identifying a growing gap between the need for and availability of data to inform policy on employment-related health insurance issues, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) established a committee of Federal agency representatives to evaluate and advise data collection efforts. This article reports on the committee's current efforts, focusing on evaluation of results from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Insurance Component (MEPS-IC) and the National Compensation Survey (NCS). PMID:12500352

  15. Employment-related health insurance: federal agencies' roles in meeting data needs.

    PubMed

    Wiatrowski, William; Harvey, Holly; Levit, Katharine R

    2002-01-01

    Employer-sponsored health insurance accounts for almost one-third of all health care spending. As health care cost growth accelerates affecting the availability of employer-sponsored insurance and depth of coverage, the importance of timely and accurate information for measuring and monitoring these changes and formulating policy options increases. Identifying a growing gap between the need for and availability of data to inform policy on employment-related health insurance issues, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) established a committee of Federal agency representatives to evaluate and advise data collection efforts. This article reports on the committee's current efforts, focusing on evaluation of results from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Insurance Component (MEPS-IC) and the National Compensation Survey (NCS). PMID:12500352

  16. Rethinking School and Community Relations in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Frank Wai-ming

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to look at the development of schools in their communities and the tension within it. Existing theories in social development and school administration suggest that community is a place where individuals construct identity, and that a school needs to form partnerships with its community, so that together,…

  17. 42 CFR 431.615 - Relations with State health and vocational rehabilitation agencies and title V grantees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Relations with State health and vocational... & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Relations With Other Agencies § 431.615 Relations with State health...

  18. 42 CFR 431.615 - Relations with State health and vocational rehabilitation agencies and title V grantees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Relations with State health and vocational... & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Relations With Other Agencies § 431.615 Relations with State health...

  19. 42 CFR 431.615 - Relations with State health and vocational rehabilitation agencies and title V grantees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Relations with State health and vocational... & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Relations With Other Agencies § 431.615 Relations with State health...

  20. 42 CFR 431.615 - Relations with State health and vocational rehabilitation agencies and title V grantees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Relations with State health and vocational... & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Relations With Other Agencies § 431.615 Relations with State health...

  1. Agency, access, and Anopheles: neighborhood health perceptions and the implications for community health interventions in Accra, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska, Marta M.; Stoler, Justin; Ofiesh, Caetlin; Rain, David; Weeks, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Social and environmental factors are increasingly recognized for their ability to influence health outcomes at both individual and neighborhood scales in the developing urban world. Yet issues of spatial heterogeneity in these complex environments may obscure unique elements of neighborhood life that may be protective or harmful to human health. Resident perceptions of neighborhood effects on health may help to fill gaps in our interpretation of household survey results and better inform how to plan and execute neighborhood-level health interventions. Objective We evaluate differences in housing and socioeconomic indicators and health, environment, and neighborhood perceptions derived from the analysis of a household survey and a series of focus groups in Accra, Ghana. We then explore how neighborhood perceptions can inform survey results and ultimately neighborhood-level health interventions. Design Eleven focus groups were conducted across a socioeconomically stratified sample of neighborhoods in Accra, Ghana. General inductive themes from the focus groups were analyzed in tandem with data collected in a 2009 household survey of 2,814 women. In-depth vignettes expand upon the three most salient emergent themes. Results Household and socioeconomic characteristics derived from the focus groups corroborated findings from the survey data. Focus group and survey results diverged for three complex health issues: malaria, health-care access, and sense of personal agency in promoting good health. Conclusion Three vignettes reflecting community views about malaria, health-care access, and sense of personal agency in promoting good health highlight the challenges facing community health interventions in Accra and exemplify how qualitatively derived neighborhood-level health effects can help shape health interventions. PMID:25997424

  2. 76 FR 16039 - Agency Information Collection (Statement of Person Claiming To Have Stood in Relation of a Parent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Statement of Person Claiming To Have Stood in Relation of a Parent.... 2900-0059.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Statement of Person Claiming to Have Stood in Relation... 2755. Affected Public: Individuals or households. Estimated Annual Burden: 800 hours. Estimated...

  3. Community Relations and Communication in the Cardinal School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David P.

    This study examined the interactions between a school board and school district leadership and the community it served. The case study focused on the choices made by the board and central administration when conferring with the community. The study examined a southern Ohio school district with approximately 5,700 students enrolled in K-12. It…

  4. Maximizing the Impact of the NASA Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) Project: Building a Community of Project Evaluators, Collaborating Across Agencies & Evaluating a 71-Project Portfolio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. M.; Chambers, L. H.; Pippin, M. R.; Spruill, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ann Martin, Lin Chambers, Margaret Pippin, & Kate Spruill, NASA The NASA Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) project at Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA, has funded 71 climate education initiatives since 2008. An evaluator was added to the team in mid-2011 to undertake an evaluation of the portfolio. The funded initiatives span across the nation and contribute to the development of a climate-literate public and the preparation of a climate-related STEM workforce through research experiences, professional development opportunities, development of data access and modeling tools, and educational opportunities in both K-12 and higher education. The portfolio of projects also represents a wide range of evaluation questions, approaches, and methodologies. The evaluation of the NICE portfolio has encountered context-specific challenges, including the breadth of the portfolio, the need to build up capacity for electronic project monitoring, and government-wide initiatives to align evaluations across Federal agencies. Additionally, we have contended with the difficulties of maintaining compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA), which constrains the ability of NICE to gather data and approach interesting evaluative questions. We will discuss these challenges and our approaches to overcoming them. First, we have committed to fostering communication and partnerships among our awardees and evaluators, facilitating the sharing of expertise, resources, lessons learned and practices across the individual project evaluations. Additionally, NICE has worked in collaboration with NOAA's Environmental Literacy Grants (ELG) and NSF's Climate Change Education Partnerships (CCEP) programs to foster synergy, leverage resources, and facilitate communication. NICE projects, and their evaluators, have had the opportunity to work with and benefit from colleagues on projects funded by other agencies, and to orient their work within the context of the broader tri-agency goals

  5. Relating Anaerobic Digestion Microbial Community and Process Function

    PubMed Central

    Venkiteshwaran, Kaushik; Bocher, Benjamin; Maki, James; Zitomer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) involves a consortium of microorganisms that convert substrates into biogas containing methane for renewable energy. The technology has suffered from the perception of being periodically unstable due to limited understanding of the relationship between microbial community structure and function. The emphasis of this review is to describe microbial communities in digesters and quantitative and qualitative relationships between community structure and digester function. Progress has been made in the past few decades to identify key microorganisms influencing AD. Yet, more work is required to realize robust, quantitative relationships between microbial community structure and functions such as methane production rate and resilience after perturbations. Other promising areas of research for improved AD may include methods to increase/control (1) hydrolysis rate, (2) direct interspecies electron transfer to methanogens, (3) community structure–function relationships of methanogens, (4) methanogenesis via acetate oxidation, and (5) bioaugmentation to study community–activity relationships or improve engineered bioprocesses. PMID:27127410

  6. Multi-Relational Characterization of Dynamic Social Network Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ru; Sundaram, Hari; Kelliher, Aisling

    The emergence of the mediated social web - a distributed network of participants creating rich media content and engaging in interactive conversations through Internet-based communication technologies - has contributed to the evolution of powerful social, economic and cultural change. Online social network sites and blogs, such as Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and LiveJournal, thrive due to their fundamental sense of "community". The growth of online communities offers both opportunities and challenges for researchers and practitioners. Participation in online communities has been observed to influence people's behavior in diverse ways ranging from financial decision-making to political choices, suggesting the rich potential for diverse applications. However, although studies on the social web have been extensive, discovering communities from online social media remains challenging, due to the interdisciplinary nature of this subject. In this article, we present our recent work on characterization of communities in online social media using computational approaches grounded on the observations from social science.

  7. Runoff-related agricultural impact in relation to macroinvertebrate communities of the Lourens River, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Thiere, Geraldine; Schulz, Ralf

    2004-07-01

    A field study at the Lourens River, South Africa, was undertaken during the pesticide application period between November 2001 and January 2002 in order to investigate the potential relation of agricultural pollution to the aquatic macroinvertebrate fauna. The upper regions of the Lourens River were free of contamination (LR1), whereas subsequent stretches flowing through a 400-ha orchard area (LR2) received transient insecticide peaks. Continuously operating suspended-particle samplers as well as flood samplers operating during runoff events were used to measure pesticide contamination. In addition, various physicochemical and morphological parameters were examined. A survey of the macroinvertebrate communities associated with the rocky substrates was carried out every three weeks. Community indices were calculated using the South African Scoring System (SASS 5) for bioassessment of water quality in rivers. The two sites differed in pesticide pollution as well as in average turbidity levels (LR1 5.5 mg/L; LR2 64.3 mg/L), but were similar in bottom substrate composition and most other abiotic factors. At the downstream site (LR2), pesticide values of 0.05 microg/L azinphos-methyl in water as well as 49 microg/kg azinphos-methyl, 94 microg/kg chlorpyrifos and 122 microg/kg total endosulfan in suspended particles were found during runoff conditions. The macroinvertebrate communities of the two sampling sites were similar in terms of number of total individuals, but differed significantly (ANOVA) in average number of taxa (LR1 11.7, LR2 8.9). Seven out of 17 investigated taxa occurred in significantly reduced numbers or were even absent at the downstream site LR2. The community characteristics determined by SASS 5 showed a significantly less sensitive community structure at the downstream site (TS 41; ASPT 4.6), indicating continuously lower water quality compared to site LR1 (TS 80; ASPT 6.9). It is concluded that the Lourens River macroinvertebrate communities are

  8. The School in Its Relations with the Community. Research Projects EUDISED 1975-1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Documentation Centre for Education in Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    The document presents abstracts of 40 research projects dealing with the relationship between school and community in Europe. These have been compiled by the European Documentation and Information System for the Education Project, (EUDISED). The aim of the EUDISED project is to create a computer-based network of national agencies dealing with…

  9. State Civil Service Law--Civil Service Restrictions on Contracting Out by State Agencies--Washington Federation of State Employees v Spokane Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Timothy P.

    1980-01-01

    A ruling preventing state agencies, such as the community college in question, from contracting outside the institution for services that school civil service employees can and customarily do provide is criticized. (Journal availability: Washington Law Review, 1100 N.E. Campus Parkway, University of Washington, Condon Hall, JB-20, Seattle, WA…

  10. An Exploration of Communities of Practice: From Lave and Wenger's Seminal Work to a U.S. Government Agency's Knowledge Sharing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chindgren, Tina M.

    2005-01-01

    The communities of practice model for knowledge sharing is examined in this conceptual paper. Key themes reflected in the literature--the linkage between knowledge and activity and the importance of relationships--are explored within the context of programs and practices within the National Aeronautics and Aerospace Agency (NASA) learning…

  11. 77 FR 32593 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Notice of Intent To Renew Collection: Rules Relating To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... Member Responsibility Actions AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the...

  12. 77 FR 477 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Rules Relating to Regulation of Domestic Exchange...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... Options AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Extension of an existing collection. SUMMARY: The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) is announcing an opportunity for public comment on...

  13. Comment and Response: A Relation of Agency to Act in Dramatism: A Comment on "Burke's Act."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College English, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a criticism of Clayton W. Lewis's analysis of Burke's "A Rhetoric of Motives" arguing that Lewis risks overstressing act and neglecting the necessary connection between agency and act in Burke's theory of dramatism. Includes Lewis's response. (HTH)

  14. Information needs related to extension service and community outreach.

    PubMed

    Bottcher, Robert W

    2003-06-01

    Air quality affects everyone. Some people are affected by air quality impacts, regulations, and technological developments in several ways. Stakeholders include the medical community, ecologists, government regulators, industries, technology providers, academic professionals, concerned citizens, the news media, and elected officials. Each of these groups may perceive problems and opportunities differently, but all need access to information as it is developed. The diversity and complexity of air quality problems contribute to the challenges faced by extension and outreach professionals who must communicate with stakeholders having diverse backgrounds. Gases, particulates, biological aerosols, pathogens, and odors all require expensive and relatively complex technology to measure and control. Economic constraints affect the ability of regulators and others to measure air quality, and industry and others to control it. To address these challenges, while communicating air quality research results and concepts to stakeholders, three areas of information needs are evident. (1) A basic understanding of the fundamental concepts regarding air pollutants and their measurement and control is needed by all stakeholders; the Extension Specialist, to be effective, must help people move some distance up the learning curve. (2) Each problem or set of problems must be reasonably well defined since comprehensive solution of all problems simultaneously may not be feasible; for instance, the solution of an odor problem associated with animal production may not address atmospheric effects due to ammonia emissions. (3) The integrity of the communication process must be preserved by avoiding prejudice and protectionism; although stakeholders may seek to modify information to enhance their interests, extension and outreach professionals must be willing to present unwelcome information or admit to a lack of information. A solid grounding in fundamental concepts, careful and fair problem

  15. SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS--A NEW APPROACH. ADMINISTRATION IN EDUCATION SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ENGSTROM, YVONNE; SUMPTION, MERLE R.

    THIS BOOK PRESENTS A VIEW OF SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS BASED ON THE CONCEPT OF THE CHANGING SCHOOL IN THE CHANGING COMMUNITY. TO DEVELOP AND MAINTAIN A DESIRABLE AND ADEQUATE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY, FOUR ESSENTIAL PRINCIPLES MUST BE OPERATIVE--(1) RECOGNITION THAT THE SCHOOL IS A PUBLIC ENTERPRISE, (2) UNDERSTANDING THAT THE…

  16. Public Relationship Building in Grassroots Community Organizing: Relational Intervention for Individual and Systems Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christens, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    Building relationships among participants has become a strategic lynchpin of many community organizing initiatives. Although the relational work of organizing is often mentioned in studies on community change, it has not been studied as a process or model for community intervention. This article positions the development of a specific type of…

  17. Contribution of the Japan International Cooperation Agency health-related projects to health system strengthening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) has focused its attention on appraising health development assistance projects and redirecting efforts towards health system strengthening. This study aimed to describe the type of project and targets of interest, and assess the contribution of JICA health-related projects to strengthening health systems worldwide. Methods We collected a web-based Project Design Matrix (PDM) of 105 JICA projects implemented between January 2005 and December 2009. We developed an analytical matrix based on the World Health Organization (WHO) health system framework to examine the PDM data and thereby assess the projects’ contributions to health system strengthening. Results The majority of JICA projects had prioritized workforce development, and improvements in governance and service delivery. Conversely, there was little assistance for finance or medical product development. The vast majority (87.6%) of JICA projects addressed public health issues, for example programs to improve maternal and child health, and the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Nearly 90% of JICA technical healthcare assistance directly focused on improving governance as the most critical means of accomplishing its goals. Conclusions Our study confirmed that JICA projects met the goals of bilateral cooperation by developing workforce capacity and governance. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that JICA assistance could be used to support financial aspects of healthcare systems, which is an area of increasing concern. We also showed that the analytical matrix methodology is an effective means of examining the component of health system strengthening to which the activity and output of a project contributes. This may help policy makers and practitioners focus future projects on priority areas. PMID:24053583

  18. The Sense of Agency Is More Sensitive to Manipulations of Outcome than Movement-Related Feedback Irrespective of Sensory Modality

    PubMed Central

    David, Nicole; Skoruppa, Stefan; Gulberti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The sense of agency describes the ability to experience oneself as the agent of one's own actions. Previous studies of the sense of agency manipulated the predicted sensory feedback related either to movement execution or to the movement’s outcome, for example by delaying the movement of a virtual hand or the onset of a tone that resulted from a button press. Such temporal sensorimotor discrepancies reduce the sense of agency. It remains unclear whether movement-related feedback is processed differently than outcome-related feedback in terms of agency experience, especially if these types of feedback differ with respect to sensory modality. We employed a mixed-reality setup, in which participants tracked their finger movements by means of a virtual hand. They performed a single tap, which elicited a sound. The temporal contingency between the participants’ finger movements and (i) the movement of the virtual hand or (ii) the expected auditory outcome was systematically varied. In a visual control experiment, the tap elicited a visual outcome. For each feedback type and participant, changes in the sense of agency were quantified using a forced-choice paradigm and the Method of Constant Stimuli. Participants were more sensitive to delays of outcome than to delays of movement execution. This effect was very similar for visual or auditory outcome delays. Our results indicate different contributions of movement- versus outcome-related sensory feedback to the sense of agency, irrespective of the modality of the outcome. We propose that this differential sensitivity reflects the behavioral importance of assessing authorship of the outcome of an action. PMID:27536948

  19. The Sense of Agency Is More Sensitive to Manipulations of Outcome than Movement-Related Feedback Irrespective of Sensory Modality.

    PubMed

    David, Nicole; Skoruppa, Stefan; Gulberti, Alessandro; Schultz, Johannes; Engel, Andreas K

    2016-01-01

    The sense of agency describes the ability to experience oneself as the agent of one's own actions. Previous studies of the sense of agency manipulated the predicted sensory feedback related either to movement execution or to the movement's outcome, for example by delaying the movement of a virtual hand or the onset of a tone that resulted from a button press. Such temporal sensorimotor discrepancies reduce the sense of agency. It remains unclear whether movement-related feedback is processed differently than outcome-related feedback in terms of agency experience, especially if these types of feedback differ with respect to sensory modality. We employed a mixed-reality setup, in which participants tracked their finger movements by means of a virtual hand. They performed a single tap, which elicited a sound. The temporal contingency between the participants' finger movements and (i) the movement of the virtual hand or (ii) the expected auditory outcome was systematically varied. In a visual control experiment, the tap elicited a visual outcome. For each feedback type and participant, changes in the sense of agency were quantified using a forced-choice paradigm and the Method of Constant Stimuli. Participants were more sensitive to delays of outcome than to delays of movement execution. This effect was very similar for visual or auditory outcome delays. Our results indicate different contributions of movement- versus outcome-related sensory feedback to the sense of agency, irrespective of the modality of the outcome. We propose that this differential sensitivity reflects the behavioral importance of assessing authorship of the outcome of an action. PMID:27536948

  20. [Community participation in health agencies in an urban health district of Bukavu (Democratic Republic of the Congo)].

    PubMed

    Munyanshongore, Cyprien; Milabyo Kyamusugulwa, Patrick; Witumbula Katambwe, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the level of community participation in health agencies in the Bukavu urban health district, an alternative approach to assessing primary health care that can be especially useful in combating poverty. Accordingly we conducted a transversal survey of a population including 113 members of 12 functional health committees and the chief of the Bukavu Urban Health District, a physician. Subjects were most often 35 to 65 years of age, male, salaried employees, married, and Roman Catholic, and had not completed secondary school. Means were compared with Anova (analysis of variance). The level of participation by these health committee members is poor (29.0%), and very similar regardless of the health sector: Bagira (26.5%), Ibanda (25.9%), and Kadutu (32.6%). Relevant factors include the weak commitment of district health authorities, the poor participation by committee members in performing their roles, and their low level of motivation to participate. The results showed no significant difference between the three health sectors in the motivating power of roles and attributions. The authors recommend that health district authorities commit themselves to the selection, training and supervision of health committees. PMID:16478702

  1. 42 CFR 431.615 - Relations with State health and vocational rehabilitation agencies and title V grantees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Relations with State health and vocational rehabilitation agencies and title V grantees. 431.615 Section 431.615 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS...

  2. 45 CFR 1321.7 - Mission of the State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.7 Mission of the State agency. (a) The Older Americans Act intends that the State agency on aging shall be the leader relative to...

  3. 45 CFR 1321.7 - Mission of the State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.7 Mission of the State agency. (a) The Older Americans Act intends that the State agency on aging shall be the leader relative to...

  4. 45 CFR 1321.7 - Mission of the State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.7 Mission of the State agency. (a) The Older Americans Act intends that the State agency on aging shall be the leader relative to...

  5. 45 CFR 1321.7 - Mission of the State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.7 Mission of the State agency. (a) The Older Americans Act intends that the State agency on aging shall be the leader relative to...

  6. 45 CFR 1321.7 - Mission of the State agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.7 Mission of the State agency. (a) The Older Americans Act intends that the State agency on aging shall be the leader relative to...

  7. Mapping Heat-related Risks for Community-based Adaptation Planning under Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yingjiu; Kaneko, Ikuyo; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Kurihara, Kazuo; Sasaki, Hidetaka; Murata, Akihiko; Takayabu, Izuru

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is leading to more frequent and intense heat waves. Recently, epidemiologic findings on heat-related health impacts have reinforced our understanding of the mortality impacts of extreme heat. This research has several aims: 1) to promote climate prediction services with spatial and temporal information on heat-related risks, using GIS (Geographical Information System), and digital mapping techniques; 2) to propose a visualization approach to articulating the evolution of local heat-health responses over time and the evaluation of new interventions for the implementation of valid community-based adaptation strategies and reliable actionable planning; and 3) to provide an appropriate and simple method of adjusting bias and quantifying the uncertainty in future outcomes, so that regional climate projections may be transcribed into useful forms for a wide variety of different users. Following the 2003 European heat wave, climatologists, medical specialists, and social scientists expedited efforts to revise and integrate risk governance frameworks for communities to take appropriate and effective actions themselves. Recently, the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) methodology has made projections possible for anyone wanting to openly access state-of-the-art climate model outputs and climate data to provide the backbone for decisions. Furthermore, the latest high-solution regional climate model (RCM) has been a huge increase in the volumes of data available. In this study, we used high-quality hourly projections (5-km resolution) from the Non-Hydrostatic Regional Climate Model (NHRCM-5km), following the SRES-A1B scenario developed by the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) and observational data from the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System, Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The NHRCM-5km is a dynamic downscaling of results from the MRI-AGCM3.2S (20-km resolution), an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) driven by the

  8. Professional Learning Community in Relation to School Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdardottir, Anna Kristin

    2010-01-01

    This is a study of schools as professional learning communities, defined by nine characteristics and their relationship with the schools' level of effectiveness. The study was conducted within three schools in Iceland. It was designed as a mixed methods study, conducted in two phases: a correlational study of survey data on schools as professional…

  9. Marketing and Public Relations Needs Assessment for Glendale Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood-Canter, Collene

    A description is provided of a study undertaken by Glendale Community College (GCC-Arizona) to determine what marketing and information dissemination activities could be undertaken by the college information office to increase enrollments among target markets. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to GCC and its college information office, looking at…

  10. Social Relation Networks in UT-Online Community Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farisi, Mohammad Imam

    2012-01-01

    So far, the existence of a virtual community forum has become a reality and social necessity in an era cybertech. It was also viewed as the electronic frontier of 21st century society that was undoubtedly for reorganizing and redefining to awareness of human being, that ways of their perceptions and explorations no longer limited by time, space,…

  11. Child Development Associate. Parent/Teacher Community Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oscar Rose Junior Coll., Midwest City, OK.

    One of a series of 18, this Child Development Associate (CDA) training module provides a guide to establishing effective working relationships among parents, teachers and community members. Upon completion of the module the CDA trainee is expected to be able to communicate with parents through telephone, letters, home visits, conferences, bulletin…

  12. WATER RELATED UTILITIES FOR SMALL COMMUNITIES IN RURAL ALASKA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 'Alaska Village Demonstration Projects' were authorized by Section 113, P.O. 92-500 (86 STAT 816), for the purpose of demonstrating methods to improve sanitary conditions in native villages of Alaska. Central community facilities have been constructed in the native villages o...

  13. Relating methanogen community structure and anaerobic digester function.

    PubMed

    Bocher, B T W; Cherukuri, K; Maki, J S; Johnson, M; Zitomer, D H

    2015-03-01

    Much remains unknown about the relationships between microbial community structure and anaerobic digester function. However, knowledge of links between community structure and function, such as specific methanogenic activity (SMA) and COD removal rate, are valuable to improve anaerobic bioprocesses. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) to predict SMA using methanogen community structure descriptors for 49 cultures. Community descriptors were DGGE demeaned standardized band intensities for amplicons of a methanogen functional gene (mcrA). First, predictive accuracy of MLR QSARs was assessed using cross validation with training (n = 30) and test sets (n = 19) for glucose and propionate SMA data. MLR equations correlating band intensities and SMA demonstrated good predictability for glucose (q(2) = 0.54) and propionate (q(2) = 0.53). Subsequently, data from all 49 cultures were used to develop QSARs to predict SMA values. Higher intensities of two bands were correlated with higher SMA values; high abundance of methanogens associated with these two bands should be encouraged to attain high SMA values. QSARs are helpful tools to identify key microorganisms or to study and improve many bioprocesses. Development of new, more robust QSARs is encouraged for anaerobic digestion or other bioprocesses, including nitrification, nitritation, denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal. PMID:25562581

  14. Tri-Agency Coordination: Challenges and Successes in Creating a Community of Practice among Climate Change Education Principal Investigators funded by NASA, NOAA, and NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoedinger, S. E.; McDougall, C.; Karsten, J. L.; Campbell, D.; Pippin, M. R.; Chambers, L. H.

    2013-12-01

    The effort needed for comprehensive climate change education is far greater than any one institution, education sector, or even federal agency can handle. Recognizing a need to synergistically combine efforts, NSF, NASA, and NOAA have created a collaborative community of their climate change education principal investigators (PIs) through tri-agency coordination. The goals of this tri-agency collaboration are to leverage existing resources, minimize duplicate efforts, and facilitate communication among this emergent community of scientists and educators. NASA, NOAA, and NSF work together to strategically coordinate and support a portfolio of projects focused on climate literacy and education in formal and informal learning environments. The activities of the tri-agency collaboration, including annual meetings for PIs, a catalog of the agencies collective investments in climate change education and the ongoing development of a nascent common evaluation framework, have created a strong national network for effectively engaging diverse audiences with the principles of climate literacy (see Eos Vol. 92, No. 24, 14 June 2011). Last year, after 3 years of active collaboration, similar programs underway at other U.S. Global Change Research Program agencies: the EPA, National Institutes for Environmental Health Sciences, and USDA, were engaged in the collaboration. And, in an attempt to understand the interests of the private sector in this arena, conversations have begun with private philanthropic organizations. This year, as many of the funded projects are maturing, the PI meeting will have a focus on bringing this community together to create a science-theme based tangible outcome that can move the field of climate change education forward. Additional outcomes from this PI meeting will be presented as well as the challenges that were encountered in bringing together institutions with diverse missions, and approaches developed to ensure all parties feel they

  15. 77 FR 5778 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Rules Relating to Regulation of Domestic Exchange...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... INFORMATION: In the notice of Extension of an Existing Collection, FR Doc. 2011-33841, on page 477 in the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... Options AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Extension of an Existing...

  16. 78 FR 77439 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Part 41, Relating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ..., 1981. See 46 FR 63035 (Dec. 30, 1981). The Commission would like to solicit comments to: Evaluate... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... to Security Futures Products AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Notice....

  17. 75 FR 56511 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Part 41, Relating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... December 30, 1981. See 46 FR 63035 (Dec. 30, 1981). The Commission would like to solicit comments to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... to Security Futures Products AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Notice....

  18. 75 FR 69688 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related Forms That Will Be Included in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ..., DHS FORM 0700-04 AGENCY: Office of Chief Procurement Officer, Acquisition Policy and Legislation... Legislation Office, will submit the following Information Collection Request (ICR) to the Office of Management... Officer, Acquisition Policy and Legislation Office, DHS Attn.: Camara Francis, Department of...

  19. 28 CFR 58.21 - Minimum requirements to become and remain approved agencies relating to fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... income is less than 150 percent of the poverty guidelines updated periodically in the Federal Register by... the United States Trustee to charge such a fee; (2) A fee exceeding $50 for credit counseling services is not presumed to be reasonable and an agency must obtain prior approval from the United...

  20. 28 CFR 58.21 - Minimum requirements to become and remain approved agencies relating to fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... income is less than 150 percent of the poverty guidelines updated periodically in the Federal Register by... the United States Trustee to charge such a fee; (2) A fee exceeding $50 for credit counseling services is not presumed to be reasonable and an agency must obtain prior approval from the United...

  1. 77 FR 65709 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Petition To Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283. Written comments and suggestions... adult member (age 18 and older), who lives in the home of the prospective adoptive parent(s), except for... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Petition...

  2. Community Relationships and the Practice of Public Relations in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantanen, Helena

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 the Finnish Universities Act was amended to include a third strand as an essential part of research and teaching. This paper focuses on relationship building to explore whether this approach would be helpful in developing university-community relationships and educational public relations. By means of a dialogic community relations model…

  3. Universal Instructional Design: A Community Relations Plan for K-12 Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Karen A.; Wood, Jo Nell; Pousson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a community relations professional the rationale and background regarding the use of Universal Instructional Design in classrooms. It also provides community relations specialists with a communication plan for educating the public on Universal Instructional Design via a teaching and modeling approach. Results of a recent…

  4. Institutional objectives for medical education that relates to the community.

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W. W.; Beaulieu, M.

    1984-01-01

    The graduate of most medical schools in North America is described as an "undifferentiated physician", but there is no universally agreed upon definition of the term. With the proliferation of subspecialties during the past 30 years, each division or department has its own concept of the undifferentiated physician. The result is strong pressure on curriculum committees to increase curriculum content. The medical faculty of the University of Ottawa used an approach to developing institutional objectives for medical schools that was based on the premise that graduates should possess the knowledge, skills and attitudes of a primary care practitioner in the community, and they accepted an institutional goal and 10 institutional objectives after five revisions of the original proposal. An essential element in the development of the objectives was the use of a list of common medical problems, ranked in order of frequency, as guidelines. The resulting institutional objectives are relevant to current community needs and may be used to project the future needs of the community. PMID:6697276

  5. Community, Junior, and Technical Colleges: A Public Relations Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, William A.

    This nine-chapter monograph suggests public relations strategies for two-year colleges. After Chapter I sets forth the need for public relations programs to communicate with various audiences, Chapter II examines the terminology, objectives, and nature of public relations, considers the advisory role of the public relations officer, and identifies…

  6. Putting the first audience first: conducting useful evaluation for a risk-related government agency.

    PubMed

    Balch, G I; Sutton, S M

    1995-04-01

    The risk communication practitioner in a government agency has two essential, interdependent tasks. One is to help develop and monitor effective communication programs with various external public audiences. The other task is to do the same thing for the senior government managers whose support is a prerequisite to addressing the first audience. Hence, the second audience--the manager--is really the first. This paper addresses ways in which communication practitioners can satisfy this crucial audience. A profile of these managers suggests that they would find it highly beneficial to have more control over the public problems they encounter, especially in view of the growing pressures to do more with less and demonstrate "customer satisfaction." They would rather avoid crises than manage them. And they would rather have their bosses praise their successes than challenge their budgets or punish their perceived difficulties or failures. Communication practitioners who can help them attain such benefits will find their efforts in great demand. They would be helpful team members who provide timely insights that can make and show agency success. We offer ten ways for communication practitioners to be more useful which focus their current strengths on satisfying senior managers' needs by becoming more valuable members of the program team. By becoming more useful to the senior manager they serve both the agency and its publics. PMID:7597254

  7. The Teacher and the Community: A Case Study of Teacher-Community Relations among the Zapotec and Mixtec Indians of Oaxaca, Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Kathleen

    1998-01-01

    Studies teacher-community relations in a community where teachers are becoming more involved in indigenous community issues. Argues that formal teacher education tends to emphasize modernity and consumer culture at the expense of distinct local customs. Draws connections between the case study and low-income minority communities in the United…

  8. 149 Cong. Rec. H6609 - AGRICULTURE, RURAL DEVELOPMENT, FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2003-07-14

    ... metropolitan areas. I think that is a very backward-looking cut. What about water and wastewater disposal... communities with homeownership, so essential to helping move our economy out of recession; water and sewer... or in the case of this bill whether we are talking about rural sewer and water grants,...

  9. Community College Finance: A Cost Analysis of Community College Expenditures Related to Maintenance and Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a costing model for maintenance and operations expenditures among 16 single-campus California community college districts and assess the impact of a variety of variables including size of student enrollment, physical plant age, acreage, gross square footage, and general obligation facility bonds on district…

  10. Professional identities and interprofessional relations: evaluation of collaborative community schemes.

    PubMed

    King, Nigel; Ross, Angela

    2003-01-01

    Despite the widespread support for integrated community care in the U.K., interdisciplinary working between health and social service staff remains complex and tentative. This paper represents the findings of an evaluative research study of two collaborative community nursing schemes at differing stages of project development within West Yorkshire, England. The studies set out to explore in depth the ways social and health care professionals construe their identity and relationships within the changing context of collaborative projects. The research adopted a constructivist phenomenological approach, conducting focus groups with social workers and district nurses; supplemented by in-depth individual interviews. Using template analysis enabled the researchers to explore themes and issues generated from the groups and individuals. A number of areas associated with professional identity and the development of roles in response to changing situations were identified as pertinent including; role ambiguity, role erosion and extension. In cases where joint working required a reconstructing of professional identity, individuals were constrained by their personal meanings, organizational arrangements and public perceptions. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:15022734

  11. A Relational Model of the Financial Data Collected from Local Education Agencies by a State Department of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Richard P.

    The educational community is recognizing that it has had little direct control over or knowledge of educational data collection. The objective of this paper is to present a description of presently collected financial data collected by a state education department. An entity set model is used to create a relational view of the data to facilitate…

  12. A global meta-analysis of the relative extent of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities.

    PubMed

    Siefert, Andrew; Violle, Cyrille; Chalmandrier, Loïc; Albert, Cécile H; Taudiere, Adrien; Fajardo, Alex; Aarssen, Lonnie W; Baraloto, Christopher; Carlucci, Marcos B; Cianciaruso, Marcus V; de L Dantas, Vinícius; de Bello, Francesco; Duarte, Leandro D S; Fonseca, Carlos R; Freschet, Grégoire T; Gaucherand, Stéphanie; Gross, Nicolas; Hikosaka, Kouki; Jackson, Benjamin; Jung, Vincent; Kamiyama, Chiho; Katabuchi, Masatoshi; Kembel, Steven W; Kichenin, Emilie; Kraft, Nathan J B; Lagerström, Anna; Bagousse-Pinguet, Yoann Le; Li, Yuanzhi; Mason, Norman; Messier, Julie; Nakashizuka, Tohru; Overton, Jacob McC; Peltzer, Duane A; Pérez-Ramos, I M; Pillar, Valério D; Prentice, Honor C; Richardson, Sarah; Sasaki, Takehiro; Schamp, Brandon S; Schöb, Christian; Shipley, Bill; Sundqvist, Maja; Sykes, Martin T; Vandewalle, Marie; Wardle, David A

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that accounting for intraspecific trait variation (ITV) may better address major questions in community ecology. However, a general picture of the relative extent of ITV compared to interspecific trait variation in plant communities is still missing. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relative extent of ITV within and among plant communities worldwide, using a data set encompassing 629 communities (plots) and 36 functional traits. Overall, ITV accounted for 25% of the total trait variation within communities and 32% of the total trait variation among communities on average. The relative extent of ITV tended to be greater for whole-plant (e.g. plant height) vs. organ-level traits and for leaf chemical (e.g. leaf N and P concentration) vs. leaf morphological (e.g. leaf area and thickness) traits. The relative amount of ITV decreased with increasing species richness and spatial extent, but did not vary with plant growth form or climate. These results highlight global patterns in the relative importance of ITV in plant communities, providing practical guidelines for when researchers should include ITV in trait-based community and ecosystem studies. PMID:26415616

  13. Short-Term Community Education/Training for Communities/Regions Anticipating Energy Development-Related Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gary

    It is the intent of this paper to demonstrate the role of a short-term (approximiately 4-14 hours), populace-based education/training approach in the preparation of rural communities and/or regions anticipating energy development-related impact. The approach is presented in comparison with other models and is defined and outlined through the…

  14. Community Mobilization and the Framing of Alcohol-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Herd, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to describe how activists engaged in campaigns to change alcohol policies in inner city areas framed alcohol problems, and whether or not their frameworks reflected major models used in the field, such as the alcoholism as a disease model, an alcohol problems perspective, or a public health approach to alcohol problems. The findings showed that activists’ models shared some aspects with dominant approaches which tend to focus on individuals and to a lesser extent on regulating alcohol marketing and sales. However, activists’ models differed in significant ways by focusing on community level problems with alcohol; on problems with social norms regarding alcohol use; and on the relationship of alcohol use to illicit drugs. PMID:20617029

  15. The Power of Competing Narratives: A New Interpretation of Rural School-Community Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHenry-Sorber, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Often considered harmonious places, rural communities are in reality spaces often fragmented along class lines, with political factions promoting competing values and interests regarding the purpose of schooling. Using an exemplar case, this study affords us a new interpretation of rural school-community relations in times of conflict. It…

  16. Community Colleges and Labor Market Conditions: How Does Enrollment Demand Change Relative to Local Unemployment Rates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Nicholas W.; Orians, Erica Lee

    2013-01-01

    This study uses fixed-effects panel data techniques to estimate the elasticity of community college enrollment demand relative to local unemployment rates. The findings suggest that community college enrollment demand is counter-cyclical to changes in the labor market, as enrollments rise during periods of weak economic conditions. Using national…

  17. Factors Related to Communication of Forest Fire Prevention Messages, a Study of Selected Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griessman, B. Eugene; Bertrand, Alvin L.

    Two rural Louisiana communities were selected to evaluate the effectiveness of certain types of communication in preventing man-caused forest fires. The communities were selected on the basis of differences in fire occurrence rates and other factors related to conservation. Questionnaires and personal interviews were utilized to determine views of…

  18. Women Leaders in High-Poverty Community Schools: Work-Related Stress and Family Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Jennifer E.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the experiences of women administrators in high-poverty community schools, investigating four women's perspectives on work demands and the impact on their families. Their work demands are related to the characteristics of impoverished communities, whereas their work resources are based on intrinsic rewards and…

  19. The Role of Family Conflict in the Relation between Exposure to Community Violence and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Rochelle J.; Roberts, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the role of family conflict as a mediator in the relation between exposure to community violence and depressive symptoms. Two hundred thirty-two early adolescents (aged 11-16 years) completed a demographics questionnaire, the Survey of Exposure to Community Violence, the 9-item conflict subscale of the Family Environment…

  20. The relation of mixed-layer net community production to phytoplankton community composition in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassar, Nicolas; Wright, Simon W.; Thomson, Paul G.; Trull, Thomas W.; Westwood, Karen J.; Salas, Miguel; Davidson, Andrew; Pearce, Imojen; Davies, Diana M.; Matear, Richard J.

    2015-04-01

    Surface ocean productivity mediates the transfer of carbon to the deep ocean and in the process regulates atmospheric CO2 levels. A common axiom in oceanography is that large phytoplankton contribute disproportionally to the transfer of carbon to the deep ocean because of their greater ability to escape grazing pressure, build biomass, and sink. In the present study, we assessed the relationship of net community production to phytoplankton assemblages and plankton size distribution in the Sub-Antarctic Zone and northern reaches of the Polar Frontal Zone in the Australian sector of the Southern Ocean. We reanalyzed and synthesized previously published estimates of O2/Ar net community oxygen production (NCP) and triple-O2 isotopes gross primary oxygen production (GPP) along with microscopic and pigment analyses of the microbial community. Overall, we found that the axiom that large phytoplankton drive carbon export was not supported in this region. Mixed-layer-depth-integrated NCP was correlated to particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration in the mixed layer. While lower NCP/GPP and NCP/POC values were generally associated with communities dominated by smaller plankton size (as would be expected), these communities did not preclude high values for both properties. Vigorous NCP in some regions occurred in the virtual absence of large phytoplankton (and specifically diatoms) and in communities dominated by nanoplankton and picoplankton. We also observed a positive correlation between NCP and the proportion of the phytoplankton community grazed by microheterotrophs, supporting the mediating role of grazers in carbon export. The novel combination of techniques allowed us to determine how NCP relates to upper ocean ecosystem characteristics and may lead to improved models of carbon export.

  1. Community-acquired pneumonia related to intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cillóniz, Catia; Torres, Antoni; Niederman, Michael; van der Eerden, Menno; Chalmers, James; Welte, Tobias; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide; the annual incidence of CAP among adults in Europe has ranged from 1.5 to 1.7 per 1000 population. Intracellular bacteria are common causes of CAP. However, there is considerable variation in the reported incidence between countries and change over time. The intracellular pathogens that are well established as causes of pneumonia are Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydophila psittaci, and Coxiella burnetii. Since it is known that antibiotic treatment for severe CAP is empiric and includes coverage of typical and atypical pathogens, microbiological diagnosis bears an important relationship to prognosis of pneumonia. Factors such as adequacy of initial antibiotic or early de-escalation of therapy are important variables associated with outcomes, especially in severe cases. Intracellular pathogens sometimes appear to cause more severe disease with respiratory failure and multisystem dysfunction associated with fatal outcomes. The clinical relevance of intracellular pathogens in severe CAP has not been specifically investigated. We review the prevalence, general characteristics, and outcomes of severe CAP cases caused by intracellular pathogens. PMID:27276986

  2. A Coordinated Approach to Communicating Pediatric-Related Information on Pandemic Influenza at the Community Level

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2009-12-16

    The purpose of this document is to provide a suggested approach, based on input from pediatric stakeholders, to communicating pediatric-related information on pandemic influenza at the community level in a step-by-step manner.

  3. Using a relational DBMS in the scientific community. [FRAMIS

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.

    1980-10-02

    Examples of use of the relational DBMS FRAMIS in a scientific environment are reported. FRAMIS was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory specifically to addresss data handling needs of scientists and engineers. It is used directly in a timesharing system by users who are not necessarily computer professionals. Several examples of FRAMIS usage are described. In order to identify the types of problems for which FRAMIS is best suited, successful applications are characterized with regard to mode of use, type of data, volume of update, and other factors. The relational approach is judged to be very effective for a broad range of scientific applications. 3 figures.

  4. Community How To Guide On Underage Drinking Prevention: Media Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Governors' Highway Safety Representatives.

    One of the most effective ways to raise awareness about a problem and generate support for solutions is through the media. This guide describes the basic principles of media relations that can help organizations develop an effective media strategy for underage drinking prevention. The tools that are necessary for this strategy, including news…

  5. State-Local Agency and Community College Cooperation for Community Improvement: A Conference of State and Local Officials in the Middle Atlantic States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martorana, S. V., Ed.; Hammons, James O., Ed.

    This report presents papers presented at a conference designed to provide insight into the specific ways in which community college personnel can collaborate with state and local planners to improve the quality of life in their communities. The introductory addresses presented in Session I discuss educational trends; among the trends discussed is…

  6. Examining women's agency in managing intimate partner violence and the related risk of homelessness: The role of harm minimisation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) has a detrimental impact on women and children's emotional, physical and social well-being and has been identified as one of the most common contributors to women's experiences of housing instabilities and homelessness. Women affected by IPV often experience a great level of uncertainty around housing solutions when trying to leave an abusive partner. This study explores women's responses to IPV and the related risk of homelessness through women's narratives (n = 22) in Queensland, Australia. Of particular interest are women's decisions and actions to minimise the impact of IPV as well as homelessness on their and their children's safety and well-being. Findings reveal that women's agency in relation to harm minimisation can take various forms, including the decision to stay with, leave or return to an abusive partner. The data offer insights into women's strategic attempts to manage IPV and the related risk of homeless while trying to minimise the harm associated with one and the other. Implications for understanding women's agency in managing IPV and the related risk of homelessness and providing adequate support mechanisms to improve women and children's social, emotional and physical well-being are discussed. PMID:26110781

  7. Addressing the Spectrum of Adolescent Weight-Related Problems: Engaging Parents and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2007-01-01

    Weight-related problems, including eating disorders, disordered eating, and obesity, are prevalent among adolescents. School and community-based educators and health care providers have an important role to play in the prevention of weight-related problems in youth. This article includes: 1) a brief overview of weight-related problems in…

  8. Community Participation in School Policy and Practice in Malawi: Balancing Local Knowledge, National Policies and International Agency Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    Explores the extent to which public policy commitments toward community participation are realized in Malawi. Finds that the main motivation for participation is extractive rather than genuine attempts to encourage local ownership and accountability. Argues that marketization of community participation signifies the entrenchment of individual…

  9. NASA in Crisis: The Space Agency's Public Relations Efforts Regarding the Hubble Space Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James

    1997-01-01

    Examines the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) public relations efforts concerning the Hubble telescope. Proposes that NASA's poor public relations exacerbated problems: NASA oversold the telescope before it was deployed, failed to develop a plan for release of images, provided misleading flight reports, and reported…

  10. Relational Architectures: Recovering Solidarity and Agency as Living Practices in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards-Groves, Christine; Kemmis, Roslin Brennan; Hardy, Ian; Ponte, Petra

    2010-01-01

    This article will explore education, pedagogy and praxis (morally informed and committed action oriented by tradition, and "history-making action") through the lens of the "relational". The article brings together empirical investigations of professional development and classroom teaching to explicate the role of this relational dimension, via the…

  11. Quantifying the relative roles of selective and neutral processes in defining eukaryotic microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Morrison-Whittle, Peter; Goddard, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    We have a limited understanding of the relative contributions of different processes that regulate microbial communities, which are crucial components of both natural and agricultural ecosystems. The contributions of selective and neutral processes in defining community composition are often confounded in field studies because as one moves through space, environments also change. Managed ecosystems provide an excellent opportunity to control for this and evaluate the relative strength of these processes by minimising differences between comparable niches separated at different geographic scales. We use next-generation sequencing to characterize the variance in fungal communities inhabiting adjacent fruit, soil and bark in comparable vineyards across 1000 kms in New Zealand. By compartmentalizing community variation, we reveal that niche explains at least four times more community variance than geographic location. We go beyond merely demonstrating that different communities are found in both different niches and locations by quantifying the forces that define these patterns. Overall, selection unsurprisingly predominantly shapes these microbial communities, but we show the balance of neutral processes also have a significant role in defining community assemblage in eukaryotic microbes. PMID:25756681

  12. Quantifying the relative roles of selective and neutral processes in defining eukaryotic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Morrison-Whittle, Peter; Goddard, Matthew R

    2015-09-01

    We have a limited understanding of the relative contributions of different processes that regulate microbial communities, which are crucial components of both natural and agricultural ecosystems. The contributions of selective and neutral processes in defining community composition are often confounded in field studies because as one moves through space, environments also change. Managed ecosystems provide an excellent opportunity to control for this and evaluate the relative strength of these processes by minimising differences between comparable niches separated at different geographic scales. We use next-generation sequencing to characterize the variance in fungal communities inhabiting adjacent fruit, soil and bark in comparable vineyards across 1000 kms in New Zealand. By compartmentalizing community variation, we reveal that niche explains at least four times more community variance than geographic location. We go beyond merely demonstrating that different communities are found in both different niches and locations by quantifying the forces that define these patterns. Overall, selection unsurprisingly predominantly shapes these microbial communities, but we show the balance of neutral processes also have a significant role in defining community assemblage in eukaryotic microbes. PMID:25756681

  13. Technical Integration of Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Location Related Funded Projects into the DOE Knowledge Base

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, C.A.; Bhattacharyya, J.; Flanaga, M.; Goldstein, P.; Myers, S.; Swenson, J.

    2000-03-14

    This document directly reviews the current Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) PRDA contracts and describes how they can best be integrated with the DOE CTBT R&D Knowledge Base. Contract descriptions and numbers listed below are based on the DOE CTBT R&D Web Site - http://www.ctbt.rnd.doe.gov. More detailed information on the nature of each contract can be found through this web site. In general, the location related PRDA contracts provide products over a set of categories. These categories can be divided into five areas, namely: Contextual map information; Reference event data; Velocity models; Phase detection/picking algorithms; and Location techniques.

  14. 22 CFR 120.5 - Relation to regulations of other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... foreign countries by persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction (27 CFR part 447). In carrying out such... Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 through 799). ....5 Section 120.5 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS...

  15. 22 CFR 120.5 - Relation to regulations of other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... foreign countries by persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction (27 CFR part 447). In carrying out such... Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 through 799). ....5 Section 120.5 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS...

  16. Links Between Workplace Spirituality, Job-Related Attitudes, and Value Fit in a Non-Profit Agency.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kimberly T; DeSouza, Eros R; Durst, Renee N

    2015-01-01

    We examined perceptions of spirituality and meaning among 192 employees (77% female) from a non-profit organization in a mid-sized Midwestern city in the United States. We hypothesized that employees' values related to workplace spirituality would be positively related to various measures of job satisfaction and general meaning in life. We also examined employees' perceptions of the fit of their co-workers' values with the agency mission and predicted that these perceptions would act as a moderator of the relationship between employees' workplace spirituality and job satisfaction. Our hypotheses were generally supported. Spirituality predicted work contributing to the meaning of life and various facets of job satisfaction. Implications of the importance of employees' perceptions of organizational fit related to spirituality and the perceived fit of co-workers' values with the organizational mission are discussed. PMID:26151169

  17. Community Characteristics and Mortality: The Relative Strength of Association of Different Community Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Eric; McCleary, Rachael; Buttorff, Christine; Gaskin, Darrell J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We compared the strength of association between average 5-year county-level mortality rates and area-level measures, including air quality, sociodemographic characteristics, violence, and economic distress. Methods. We obtained mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System and linked it to socioeconomic and demographic data from the Census Bureau, air quality data, violent crime statistics, and loan delinquency data. We modeled 5-year average mortality rates (1998–2002) for all-cause, cancer, heart disease, stroke, and respiratory diseases as a function of county-level characteristics using ordinary least squares regression models. We limited analyses to counties with population of 100 000 or greater (n = 458). Results. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, particularly the percentage older than 65 years and near poor, were top predictors of all-cause and condition-specific mortality, as were a high concentration of construction and service workers. We found weaker associations for air quality, mortgage delinquencies, and violent crimes. Protective characteristics included the percentage of Hispanics, Asians, and married residents. Conclusions. Multiple factors influence county-level mortality. Although county demographic and socioeconomic characteristics are important, there are independent, although weaker, associations of other environmental characteristics. Future studies should investigate these factors to better understand community mortality risk. PMID:25033152

  18. Coping styles moderate the relationships between exposure to community violence and work-related outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cox, Cody B; Johnson, Jennie; Coyle, Tom

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify coping strategies used by employees exposed to community violence and their relationships to work-related outcomes. In study 1, Mexican Maquiladora employees who experienced community violence reported their coping strategies. Results identified 3 strategies: social, solitary, and maladaptive coping. In study 2, another sample completed measures of violence exposure, strain, coping, and turnover intention. Supervisors provided performance evaluations. Community violence predicted the use of all 3 strategies. Social coping lessened the effects of community violence on turnover while maladaptive strategies predicted increased psychological strain. Results indicate that workers use a variety of coping strategies in response to community violence that both lessen and magnify the effects of violence exposure and impact their psychological strain, turnover intention, and job performance. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25528686

  19. ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: USING SOUND SCIENCE FOR RISK MANAGEMENT AND ASSISTING COMMUNITY DECISION-MAKERS - A MULTI-AGENCY, COMMUNITY-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have indicated that arsenic concentrations greater than the new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) concentration of 10 micrograms per liter (ug/L) occur in numerous aquifers around the United States. One such aquifer is the Cen...

  20. 41 CFR 102-75.825 - Who must the disposal agency notify when surplus real and related personal property is available...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... that surplus real property is available for the development or operation of a port facility. The... agency notify when surplus real and related personal property is available for port facility use? 102-75... Real Property Disposal Property for Port Facility Use § 102-75.825 Who must the disposal agency...

  1. 41 CFR 102-75.825 - Who must the disposal agency notify when surplus real and related personal property is available...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that surplus real property is available for the development or operation of a port facility. The... agency notify when surplus real and related personal property is available for port facility use? 102-75... Real Property Disposal Property for Port Facility Use § 102-75.825 Who must the disposal agency...

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.825 - Who must the disposal agency notify when surplus real and related personal property is available...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... that surplus real property is available for the development or operation of a port facility. The... agency notify when surplus real and related personal property is available for port facility use? 102-75... Real Property Disposal Property for Port Facility Use § 102-75.825 Who must the disposal agency...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.825 - Who must the disposal agency notify when surplus real and related personal property is available...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... that surplus real property is available for the development or operation of a port facility. The... agency notify when surplus real and related personal property is available for port facility use? 102-75... Real Property Disposal Property for Port Facility Use § 102-75.825 Who must the disposal agency...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 211 - Statement of Agency Policy Concerning Waivers Related to Shared Use of Trackage or Rights-of-Way...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... whose operations constitute commuter service (see appendix A of 49 CFR part 209 for relevant definitions... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statement of Agency Policy Concerning Waivers... of Agency Policy Concerning Waivers Related to Shared Use of Trackage or Rights-of-Way by Light...

  5. Health-Related Hot Topic Detection in Online Communities Using Text Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingjie; Zhang, Pengzhu; Liu, Jingfang; Li, Jia; Deng, Shasha

    2013-01-01

    Recently, health-related social media services, especially online health communities, have rapidly emerged. Patients with various health conditions participate in online health communities to share their experiences and exchange healthcare knowledge. Exploring hot topics in online health communities helps us better understand patients’ needs and interest in health-related knowledge. However, the statistical topic analysis employed in previous studies is becoming impractical for processing the rapidly increasing amount of online data. Automatic topic detection based on document clustering is an alternative approach for extracting health-related hot topics in online communities. In addition to the keyword-based features used in traditional text clustering, we integrate medical domain-specific features to represent the messages posted in online health communities. Three disease discussion boards, including boards devoted to lung cancer, breast cancer and diabetes, from an online health community are used to test the effectiveness of topic detection. Experiment results demonstrate that health-related hot topics primarily include symptoms, examinations, drugs, procedures and complications. Further analysis reveals that there also exist some significant differences among the hot topics discussed on different types of disease discussion boards. PMID:23457530

  6. Changes in communities of Fusarium and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi as related to different asparagus cultural factors.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Vujanovic, Vladimir; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2006-07-01

    Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a high-value perennial vegetable crop that has shown a marked decline in productivity after many years of continuous harvesting. This decline is caused by an increase in both abiotic (autotoxicity, harvesting pressure) and biotic stresses [fungal infections, mainly Fusarium crown and root rot (FCRR)]. To gain insight into disease development and possible mitigation strategies, we studied the effects of harvesting, time in the growing season, and field age on FCRR development, Fusarium species composition, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities in both a controlled field experiment and an ecological survey of commercial fields. In one experiment, a 3-year-old asparagus field was subdivided into plots that were harvested or not and sampled throughout the growing season to assess short-term dominant Fusarium species shifts. In addition, diseased and healthy asparagus plants sampled from six commercial fields in the same geographical region were used to assess Fusarium and AMF communities in relation to different parameters. Fusarium and AMF communities were described by using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approach, and results were analyzed by mainly correspondence analysis and canonical correspondence analysis. Results showed that dominant Fusarium taxa assemblages changed throughout the growing season. Harvested plots had significantly more FCRR symptomatic plants at the end of the growing season, but this effect was not related with any trend in Fusarium community structure. Sampling site and plant age significantly influenced AMF community structure, whereas only sampling site consistently influenced the Fusarium community. Diseased and healthy plants harbored similar Fusarium and AMF communities. Shifts in Fusarium community might not be responsible for different disease incidence because they are ubiquitous regardless of plant health status or harvesting regime

  7. Beyond Compartmentalization: A Relational Approach towards Agency and Vulnerability of Young Migrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huijsmans, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Based on fieldwork material from Lao People's Democratic Republic, this paper introduces an analytical framework that transcends compartmentalized approaches towards migration involving young people. The notions of fluid and institutionalized forms of migration illuminate key differences and commonalities in the relational fabric underpinning…

  8. 22 CFR 120.5 - Relation to regulations of other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Justice has been separately labeled the U.S. Munitions Import List (27 CFR part 447) to distinguish it... proliferation activities, under the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) (15 CFR parts 730 through 774). For....5 Section 120.5 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS...

  9. Effects of an Organizational Linkage Intervention on Inter-Organizational Service Coordination Between Probation/Parole Agencies and Community Treatment Providers.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Wayne N; Knudsen, Hannah K; Knight, Kevin; Ducharme, Lori; Pankow, Jennifer; Urbine, Terry; Lindsey, Adrienne; Abdel-Salam, Sami; Wood, Jennifer; Monico, Laura; Link, Nathan; Albizu-Garcia, Carmen; Friedmann, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Weak coordination between community correctional agencies and community-based treatment providers is a major barrier to diffusion of medication-assisted treatment (MAT)--the inclusion of medications (e.g., methadone and buprenorphine) in combination with traditional counseling and behavioral therapies to treat substance use disorders. In a multisite cluster randomized trial, experimental sites (j = 10) received a 3-h MAT training plus a 12-month linkage intervention; control sites (j = 10) received the 3-h training alone. Hierarchical linear models showed that the intervention resulted in significant improvements in perceptions of interagency coordination among treatment providers, but not probation/parole agents. Implications for policy and practice are discussed. PMID:25559124

  10. Developing Teachers' Health-Related Fitness Knowledge through a Community of Practice: Impact on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunuk, Deniz; Ince, Mustafa Levent; Tannehill, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study were twofold: to examine the effects of a community of practice (CoP) on (1) physical educators' and their students' health-related fitness content knowledge and (2) the physical educators' health-related fitness pedagogical content knowledge construction process. Twelve experienced physical education teachers (six in…

  11. Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Gastrointestinal Microbial Community Dynamics in Relation to Digesta Properties and Diet.

    PubMed

    Zarkasi, Kamarul Zaman; Taylor, Richard S; Abell, Guy C J; Tamplin, Mark L; Glencross, Brett D; Bowman, John P

    2016-04-01

    To better understand salmon GI tract microbial community dynamics in relation to diet, a feeding trial was performed utilising diets with different proportions of fish meal, protein, lipid and energy levels. Salmon gut dysfunction has been associated with the occurrence of casts, or an empty hind gut. A categorical scoring system describing expressed digesta consistency was evaluated in relation to GI tract community structure. Faster growing fish generally had lower faecal scores while the diet cohorts showed minor differences in faecal score though the overall lowest scores were observed with a low protein, low energy diet. The GI tract bacterial communities were highly dynamic over time with the low protein, low energy diet associated with the most divergent community structure. This included transiently increased abundance of anaerobic (Bacteroidia and Clostridia) during January and February, and facultatively anaerobic (lactic acid bacteria) taxa from February onwards. The digesta had enriched populations of these groups in relation to faecal cast samples. The majority of samples (60-86 %) across all diet cohorts were eventually dominated by the genus Aliivibrio. The results suggest that an interaction between time of sampling and diet is most strongly related to community structure. Digesta categorization revealed microbes involved with metabolism of diet components change progressively over time and could be a useful system to assess feeding responses. PMID:26780099

  12. Relative importance of evolutionary dynamics depends on the composition of microbial predator-prey community.

    PubMed

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Dupont, Alessandra; Bass, David; Murrell, David J; Bell, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Community dynamics are often studied in subsets of pairwise interactions. Scaling pairwise interactions back to the community level is, however, problematic because one given interaction might not reflect ecological and evolutionary outcomes of other functionally similar species interactions or capture the emergent eco-evolutionary dynamics arising only in more complex communities. Here we studied this experimentally by exposing Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 prey bacterium to four different protist predators (Tetrahymena pyriformis, Tetrahymena vorax, Chilomonas paramecium and Acanthamoeba polyphaga) in all possible single-predator, two-predator and four-predator communities for hundreds of prey generations covering both ecological and evolutionary timescales. We found that only T. pyriformis selected for prey defence in single-predator communities. Although T. pyriformis selection was constrained in the presence of the intraguild predator, T. vorax, T. pyriformis selection led to evolution of specialised prey defence strategies in the presence of C. paramecium or A. polyphaga. At the ecological level, adapted prey populations were phenotypically more diverse, less stable and less productive compared with non-adapted prey populations. These results suggest that predator community composition affects the relative importance of ecological and evolutionary processes and can crucially determine when rapid evolution has the potential to change ecological properties of microbial communities. PMID:26684728

  13. Community off-sales provision and the presence of alcohol-related detritus in residential neighbourhoods.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Alasdair J M; Davidson, Neil

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between community off-sales premises and alcohol-related detritus (litter/remains) in residential neighbourhoods. This was accomplished by photographing all brand-identifiable alcohol product detritus (glass, packaging, etc.) where they lay and mapping these against the presence of off-sales outlets (licensed convenience stores) in the community. It was hypothesised that alcohol-related detritus would be greatest near to such alcohol outlets. However, although there was some evidence of a "broken bottles effect", accumulations of alcohol-related detritus near some off-sales premises, it is concluded that local area deprivation is a better predictor of such alcohol-related incivility than is outlet provision. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to current social responsibility policy developments which are designed to make the alcohol industry liable for alcohol-related incivilities. PMID:20004129

  14. 45 CFR 1230.200 - Agency and legislative liaison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Agency and legislative liaison. 1230.200 Section 1230.200 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Activities by Own Employees § 1230.200 Agency and legislative liaison. (a) The prohibition on...

  15. 45 CFR 1230.200 - Agency and legislative liaison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Agency and legislative liaison. 1230.200 Section... COMMUNITY SERVICE NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Activities by Own Employees § 1230.200 Agency and legislative... legislative liaison activities not directly related to a covered Federal action. (b) For purposes of...

  16. 45 CFR 1211.1-9 - Access to agency records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Access to agency records. 1211.1-9 Section 1211.1-9 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE VOLUNTEER GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES § 1211.1-9 Access to agency records. (a) A volunteer is entitled to review any material in his or...

  17. Examining Classroom Science Practice Communities: How Teachers and Students Negotiate Epistemic Agency and Learn Science-as-Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroupe, David

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards and other reforms call for students to learn science-as-practice, which I argue requires students to become epistemic agents--shaping the knowledge and practice of a science community. I examined a framework for teaching--ambitious instruction--that scaffolds students' learning of science-as-practice as…

  18. Agency, Isolation, and the Coming of New Technologies: Exploring "Dependency" in Coastal Communities of Newfoundland Through Participatory Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene; Harris, Carol E.

    2005-01-01

    How does one effectively and ethically conduct research with community members who are steeped in histories of economic and social dependency, so that the people themselves take charge of their futures? This question is explored in a Canadian context as the authors study the potential of new technologies to bring hope to traditional coastal…

  19. Patterns of relative diversity within riparian small mammal communities, Platte River Watershed, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, T.E.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1988-01-01

    Relative diversity within and between small mammal assemblages of riparian and upland vegetation was evaluated at 6 study areas across an elevational gradient. In contrast to avian diversity analyses conducted at the same sites, species richness, relative diversity, and faunal similarity of small mammals were greater among upland rather than riparian communities across the cline. Beta diversity between riparian and upland small mammal communities is greater at higher elevations within the watershed. These higher elevation portions of watersheds must be emphasized in management strategies to conserve regional integrity of native small mammal faunas.

  20. Rebuilding TRUST: A Community, Multi-Agency, State, and University Partnership to Improve Behavioral Health Care for American Indian Youth, their Families, and Communities

    PubMed Central

    Goodkind, Jessica R.; Ross-Toledo, Kimberly; John, Susie; Lee Hall, Janie; Ross, Lucille; Freeland, Lance; Colleta, Ernest; Becenti-Fundark, Twila

    2014-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Native youth represent the strength and survival of many Nations and Tribes. However, the aftermath of colonialism has resulted in numerous health disparities and challenges for Native youth, including the highest rate of suicide in the United States. With the aims of elucidating the causes of behavioral health disparities, eliminating them, and improving behavioral health care for Native youth, a partnership of providers, community members, and university faculty and staff completed a comprehensive literature review; conducted advisory meetings with 71 American Indian youth, parents, and elders; surveyed 25 service providers; and engaged in ongoing consultation with traditional practitioners. Results from the multiple sources were synthesized and are reported with 20 policy, provider, and research recommendations that recognize the importance of moving beyond exclusive reliance on western models of care and that seek to foster transformation of individuals, families, communities, behavioral health service systems of care, and social structures. PMID:25076801

  1. Universities and the Intelligence Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratz, Morton S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Statements before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence with regard to the National Intelligence Reorganization and Reform Act and the relations of the intelligence agencies to the academic community are reported. Issues include covert recruitment and operational use of academics by the Central Intelligence Agency. (JMD)

  2. Relations between retired agricultural land, water quality, and aquatic-community health, Minnesota River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Lee, Kathy E.; McLees, James M.; Niemela, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of agricultural land retirement on water quality and aquatic-community health was investigated in the Minnesota River Basin. Eighty-two sites, with drainage areas ranging from 4.3 to 2200 km2, were examined for nutrient concentrations, measures of aquatic-community health (e.g., fish index of biotic integrity [IBI] scores), and environmental factors (e.g., drainage area and amount of agricultural land retirement). The relation of proximity of agricultural land retirement to the stream was determined by calculating the land retirement percent in various riparian zones. Spearman's rho results indicated that IBI score was not correlated to the percentage of agricultural land retirement at the basin scale (p = 0.070); however, IBI score was correlated to retired land percentage in the 50- to 400-m riparian zones surrounding the streams (p < 0.05), indicating that riparian agricultural land retirement may have more influence on aquatic-community health than does agricultural land retirement in upland areas. Multivariate analysis of covariance and analysis of covariance models indicated that other environmental factors (such as drainage area and lacustrine and palustrine features) commonly were correlated to aquatic-community health measures, as were in-stream factors (standard deviation of water depth and substrate type). These results indicate that although agricultural land retirement is significantly related to fish communities as measured by the IBI scores, a combination of basin, riparian, and in-stream factors act together to influence IBI scores.

  3. Relate better and judge less: poverty simulation promoting culturally competent care in community health nursing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyeongra; Woomer, Gail Ratliff; Agbemenu, Kafuli; Williams, Lynne

    2014-11-01

    The study aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a poverty simulation in increasing understanding of and attitudes toward poverty and resulting in changes in clinical practice among nursing seniors. A poverty simulation was conducted using a diverse group of nursing professors and staff from local community agencies assuming the role of community resource providers. Students were assigned roles as members of low-income families and were required to complete tasks during a simulated month. A debriefing was held after the simulation to explore students' experiences in a simulated poverty environment. Students' understanding of and attitude toward poverty pre- and post-simulation were examined. Changes in the students' clinical experiences following the simulation were summarized into identified categories and themes. The poverty simulation led to a greater empathy for the possible experiences of low income individuals and families, understanding of barriers to health care, change in attitudes towards poverty and to those living in poverty, and changes in the students' nursing practice. Use of poverty simulation is an effective means to teach nursing students about the experience of living in poverty. The simulation experience changed nursing students' clinical practice, with students providing community referrals and initiating inter-professional collaborations. PMID:25262065

  4. Assessment of knowledge, attitude, and practice related to epilepsy: a community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Teferi, Jalle; Shewangizaw, Zewdu

    2015-01-01

    Religious and sociocultural beliefs influence the nature of treatment and care received by people with epilepsy. Many communities in Africa and other developing nations believe that epilepsy results from evil spirits, and thus, treatment should be through the use of herbaceous plants from traditional doctors and religious leadership. Community-based cross-sectional study designs were used to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice related to epilepsy and its associated factors by using a pretested, semi-structured questionnaire among 660 respondents living in Sululta Woreda, Oromia, Ethiopia. According to the results of this study, 59.8% of the respondents possessed knowledge about epilepsy, 35.6% had a favorable attitude, and 33.5% of them adopted safe practices related to epilepsy. The following factors had significant association to knowledge, attitude, and practice related to epilepsy: being rural dwellers, living alone, those with more years of formal education, heard information about epilepsy, distance of health facility from the community, had witnessed an epileptic seizure, age range from 46 years to 55 years, had heard about epilepsy, prior knowledge of epilepsy, occupational history of being self-employed or a laborer, history of epilepsy, and history of epilepsy in family member. The findings indicated that the Sululta community is familiar with epilepsy, has an unfavorable attitude toward epilepsy, and unsafe practices related to epilepsy, but has a relatively promising knowledge of epilepsy. PMID:26056455

  5. The case for human agency, well-being, and community reintegration for people aging in prison: a statewide case analysis.

    PubMed

    Maschi, Tina; Morrisey, Mary Beth; Leigey, Margaret

    2013-07-01

    This study profiled 2,913 adults aged 50 and older sentenced to a statewide correctional system and their parole eligibility status with implications for community reintegration, resettlement, and recovery needs. The research team developed the Correctional Tracking Data Extraction Tool to gather official data and personal and legal characteristics from a state department of corrections website. The majority of older prisoners were men from racial/ethnic minorities between the ages of 50 and 59 with a range of minor to serious offenses. Time served in prison ranged from 1 month to 45 years; more than 40% were eligible for parole within 5 years. These findings underscore the need for an intervention that can address the differing typologies and individual-level and systemic issues that gave rise to the aging prisoner population. Promising practices that address elements of a conceptual model in prison and community reintegration and recovery for older adult prisoners are reviewed. PMID:23711801

  6. Uptake of Quality-Related Event Standards of Practice by Community Pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Todd A; Bishop, Andrea C; Overmars, Craig; MacMaster, Kaleigh; Mahaffey, Thomas; Zwicker, Bev; MacKinnon, Neil J

    2015-10-01

    Quality-related events (QREs), including medication errors and near misses, are an inevitable part of community pharmacy practice. As QREs have significant implications for patient safety, pharmacy regulatory authorities across North America are increasing their expectations regarding QRE reporting and learning. Such expectations, commonly encapsulated as standards of practice (SoP), vary greatly between pharmacy jurisdictions and may range from the simple requirement to document QREs occurring within the pharmacy, all the way to requiring that quality improvement plans have been put in place. This research explores the uptake of QRE reporting and learning SoP and how this uptake varies based on pharmacy characteristics including location, prescription volume, and pharmacy type. Secondary data analysis of 91 community pharmacy assessments in Nova Scotia, Canada, was used to explore uptake of QRE standards. Overall, pharmacies are performing relatively well on reporting QREs. However, despite initial success with basic QRE reporting, community pharmacy uptake of QRE learning activities is lagging. PMID:24532822

  7. Relating Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity among Denitrifiers and Quantifying their Capacity to Predict Community Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Joana Falcão; Le Roux, Xavier; Poly, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity of phylogenetic or functional markers is widely used as a proxy of microbial diversity. However, it remains unclear to what extent functional diversity (FD), gene sequence diversity and community functioning are linked. For a range of denitrifying bacteria, we analyzed the relationships between (i) the similarity of functional traits evaluated from metabolic profiles (BIOLOG plates) or from N2O accumulation patterns on different carbon sources and (ii) the similarity of phylogenetic (16S rRNA gene) or functional (nir gene) markers. We also calculated different proxies for the diversity of denitrifier community based on taxa richness, phylogenetic (16S rRNA gene) or functional similarities (based either on metabolic profiles or N2O accumulation patterns), and evaluated their performance in inferring the functioning of assembled denitrifying communities. For individual strains, the variation in the 16S rRNA gene sequence was weakly correlated with the variation in metabolic patterns (ρ = 0.35) and was not related to N2O accumulation. The latter was correlated with the similarity of nitrite reductase residues. When nir genes were analyzed separately, the similarity in amino acids coded by the nirS genes was highly correlated with the observed patterns of N2O accumulation (ρ = 0.62), whereas nirK amino acid residues were unrelated to N2O accumulation. For bacterial assemblages, phylogenetic diversity (average similarity among species in a community) and mean community dissimilarity (average distance between species) calculated using 16S rRNA gene sequences, and FD measures associated with metabolic profiles, poorly predicted the variation in the functioning of assembled communities (≤15%). In contrast, the proxies of FD based on N2O accumulation patterns performed better and explained from 23 to 42% of the variation in denitrification. Amongst those, community niche was the best metric, indicating the importance of complementarity for

  8. Citizens, Businessmen, and Educators: The Elements to Better School-Community Relations. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Development of Educational Activities, Dayton, OH.

    Questions aimed at better school-community relations through identification of problems and courses of positive action were pursued at a seminar. Positive statements were presented by a citizen, a businessman, and an educator; and discussions were launched from the propositions, problems, and points raised in these papers. This report consists of…

  9. Organisational Self-Evaluation and Teacher Education for Community Relations in a Transforming Society?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ron; McCully, Alan

    2013-01-01

    During 2004, the School of Education at the University of Ulster embarked on an innovative three-year project designed to embed community relations objectives within initial teacher education. With the advent of more peaceful times in Northern Ireland, this was a precipitous time for initial teacher educators to review the preparation given to…

  10. Employment, Salary, and Placement Information Related to Career Programs at Johnson County Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This report contains employment, salary, and placement information related to career programs at Johnson County Community College (JCCC, Kansas) as of December 1998. Employment and salary projections for the greater Kansas City area, the state of Kansas, and the nation, as well as salary and placement information for JCCC program completers, are…

  11. Exploring the Development of Conceptual Ecologies: Communities of Concepts Related to Convection and Heat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Carter, Glenda; Rua, Melissa J.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the relationships and development of communities of concepts related to heat and convection among fifth grade students. Discusses the influence of familial and cultural experiences on conceptual development as well as the extent to which competing phenomena affect the development of new conceptual understandings. (Contains 49 references.)…

  12. Binge Drinking and Alcohol-Related Problems among Community College Students: Implications for Prevention Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Felicia D.; Darkes, Jack; Del Boca, Frances K.; Goldman, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    Binge drinking and alcohol-related problems among students at traditional 4-year universities have been well documented. However, little is known about the frequency of their such behaviors and its consequences among community college students, who comprise roughly 44% of all undergraduate students in the United States. The present study examined…

  13. Measuring the Social Relations: Social Distance in Social Structure --- a Study of Prison Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabjan, B.

    2005-08-01

    Social relations and their influence on various phenomena are one of the key issues not only in sociology. The crucial problem, however, is how to measure the social relations and their implications in society. We try to adapt a physical perspective to the ``typical'' sociological analysis and to measure the qualitative nature of human community adapting the category of social distance. This category is used to explore the properties of social relations in the structure and the communication system of prison community. The issues that are discussed: the specific properties of social relations as the constitutive factors for different type of group structure and type of communication. How the elementary social networks (short-range group structures) form the dynamics of prison community? What is the role of the numerical force of the group for prison community? Is there the interplay between the microstructures and macrostructures? The work is based on our research carried out in 17 prisons in Poland in 2003, 2004 and 2005. There were about 2000 prisoners in the sample.

  14. THE STRUCTURE AND PROCESS OF SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS. VOLUME II, BETWEEN CITIZENS AND SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARTER, RICHARD F.; CHAFFEE, STEVEN H.

    FROM A 1964 NATIONAL QUOTA-PROBABILITY SAMPLE OF INTERVIEWS WITH 1,500 CITIZENS 21 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER, MAJOR VARIABLES WERE DEFINED RELATING TO COMMUNICATION BETWEEN PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND THEIR COMMUNITIES. PRIMARY CONTENT OF THE COMMUNICATION PROCESS STUDIED WAS FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR SCHOOLS. FOR PURPOSES OF CORRELATIONAL ANALYSIS, RESPONDENTS…

  15. The Use of Technology in Relation to Community College Faculty Characteristics and Instructional Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the use of a course management system in relation to faculty characteristics and instructional environments at a rural community college in California. The use of the course management system, Blackboard, was the technology studied. This study used a nonexperimental quantitative ex post facto research…

  16. Countering Violent and Hate-Related Materials on the Internet: Strategies for Classrooms and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oravec, Jo Ann

    2000-01-01

    Violent computer games, hate group Web sites, and related Internet activities deliver hostile materials to youth. The Internet is becoming a vehicle for conveying negative messages. Teacher educators can equip future teachers to handle these issues. This paper examines what some schools and communities are doing and proposes ways to integrate…

  17. Beyond the Farmgate: Factors Related to Agricultural Performance in Two Dairy Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruise, James; Lyson, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    In two marginal dairy communities with similar physical environment, ethnic composition, and farm structure, a significant difference in productivity (milk yield per cow) was related to differences in educational attainment of farmers, proximity to an urban area, and availability of marketing outlets and agricultural information sources. Contains…

  18. Why Teach Social Entrepreneurship: Enhance Learning and University-Community Relations through Service-Learning Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessel, Stacy; Godshalk, Veronica M.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on providing a convincing argument for incorporating social entrepreneurship into the business professor's classroom. The outreach provided by social entrepreneurship enhances learning and promotes university-community relations. Service-learning engagement activities, in the form of social entrepreneurship, create a three-way…

  19. Disadvantaged but Different: Variation among Deprived Communities in Relation to Child and Family Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jacqueline; Belsky, Jay; Broomfield, Kate A.; Dave, Sapna; Frost, Martin; Melhuish, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Background: Disadvantaged communities are increasingly the target for interventions. Sure Start was launched in England in 1999 to tackle child poverty and improve child and family services, with Sure Start Local Programmes (SSLPs) targeted at relatively small areas of marked deprivation. However, they are located in a range of different types of…

  20. Intersubjective Structure and Systems of Practice in School-Community Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carspecken, Phil Francis

    Relations between schools and the adults within their surrounding communities are often problematic in inner city, low socioeconomic status neighborhoods. This paper analyzes features of the intersubjective structure of a group of working-class residents who took over and illegally ran their secondary school in Liverpool (England) for the 1982/83…

  1. Human Relations and Community Life in Rural New York State: A Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Legislative Commission on Rural Resources, Albany.

    Trends, strengths and assets, weaknesses and problem areas, goals, and public policy questions in the area of human relations and community life in rural New York state are presented with supporting statistics. Trends considered include rural and elderly rural population increases; suicide, homicide, and domestic violence rate increases; demands…

  2. Dollars and Directives: Issues and Problems Related to Financial Support and Legal Authorizations of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martorana, S. V.; And Others

    This monograph is concerned with the issues and problems raised by recent trends in state legislative activity related to community and junior colleges and in patterns of funding these institutions. The first of two parts discusses legislation directly or indirectly affecting policies for financing postsecondary education in general and community…

  3. An Analysis of Community-School Relations in One Suburban and Four Navajo School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherspoon, Gary Jay

    The primary concern of this research was with community-school relations in American Indian education, particularly Navajo education. Major data on which this study was based came from interviews with 223 parents whose children attended various types of schools in Arizona during 1967-68: Nazlini (Bureau of Indian Affairs), Many Farms (BIA and…

  4. Is benthic food web structure related to diversity of marine macrobenthic communities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokołowski, A.; Wołowicz, M.; Asmus, H.; Asmus, R.; Carlier, A.; Gasiunaité, Z.; Grémare, A.; Hummel, H.; Lesutiené, J.; Razinkovas, A.; Renaud, P. E.; Richard, P.; Kędra, M.

    2012-08-01

    Numerical structure and the organisation of food webs within macrozoobenthic communities has been assessed in the European waters (Svalbard, Barents Sea, Baltic Sea, North Sea, Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea) to address the interactions between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Abundance and classical species diversity indices (S, H', J) of macrofaunal communities were related to principal attributes of food webs (relative trophic level and food chain length, FCL) that were determined from carbon and nitrogen stable isotope values. Structure of marine macrobenthos varies substantially at a geographical scale; total abundance ranges from 63 ind. m-2 to 34,517 ind. m-2, species richness varies from 3 to 166 and the Shannon-Weaver diversity index from 0.26 to 3.26 while Pielou's evenness index is below 0.73. The major source of energy for macrobenthic communities is suspended particulate organic matter, consisting of phytoplankton and detrital particles, sediment particulate organic matter, and microphytobenthos in varying proportions. These food sources support the presence of suspension- and deposit-feeding communities, which dominate numerically on the sea floor. Benthic food webs include usually four to five trophic levels (FCL varies from 3.08 to 4.86). Most species are assigned to the second trophic level (primary consumers), fewer species are grouped in the third trophic level (secondary consumers), and benthic top predators are the least numerous. Most species cluster primarily at the lowest trophic level that is consistent with the typical organization of pyramidal food webs. Food chain length increases with biodiversity, highlighting a positive effect of more complex community structure on food web organisation. In more diverse benthic communities, energy is transferred through more trophic levels while species-poor communities sustain a shorter food chain.

  5. Causes of horse-related injuries in a rural western community.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J. M.; von Hollen, B.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the causes of horse-related injuries in a rural western community. DESIGN: Prospective identification of persons with horse-related injuries and retrospective interviews with patients or witnesses to determine causes. SETTING: A small rural community in Alberta where the western style of riding predominates. PATIENTS: All patients presenting to two family medicine clinics or to the Sundre General Hospital emergency department. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Factors contributing to the injury as recalled by patients or witnesses, and characteristics of the persons, horses, and injuries. RESULTS: Two thirds of the 150 injuries were caused primarily by horses and one third primarily by patients risk taking or inattention. The most common horse behaviour that caused injuries was "spooking," but several other behaviours also were identified as primary causes. The injuries were varied and relatively severe. Only one person was wearing a helmet. CONCLUSIONS: Horse-related injuries often are caused by characteristic horse behaviours. PMID:8704486

  6. Developing a Multicomponent Model of Nutritious Food Access and Related Implications for Community and Policy Practice

    PubMed Central

    FREEDMAN, DARCY A.; BLAKE, CHRISTINE E.; LIESE, ANGELA D.

    2014-01-01

    Access to nutritious foods is limited in disenfranchised communities in the United States. Policies are beginning to focus on improving nutritious food access in these contexts; yet, few theories are available to guide this work. We developed a conceptual model of nutritious food access based on the qualitative responses of food consumers in 2 different regions of the American South. Five domains (economic, service delivery, spatial–temporal, social, and personal) and related dimensions of nutritious food access were identified. The conceptual model provides practical guidance to researchers, policy makers, and practitioners working to improve nutritious food access in communities. PMID:24563605

  7. Public Relations for Physics Departments: Convincing the Community that Quarks are Cool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Alaina G.

    2002-03-01

    A strong public relations program can be of great importance to a physics department. Not only can effective PR improve the reputation of an individual department, but it can also serve the greater physics community by convincing the public that quarks, quantum dots, and nanostructures are cool. Building a solid reputation with the many constituents that a physics department serves can lead to greater media exposure, improved quality of student applicants, community and industrial partnerships, and even financial support. It isn’t difficult to create a strategic PR program, but it does take planning and commitment of resources. I will discuss the techniques and tactics of effective media, community, alumni, and internal relations, with special emphasis placed on establishing connections with media outlets, creating and publicizing outreach programs for the community, initiating a newsletter, organizing an external board of advisors, and developing an effective alumni relations program. The University of Arizona Physics Department serves as a case study, but other physics departments with similar communications programs will also be incorporated.

  8. Separating natural and contaminant related gradients in estuarine macrobenthic community structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rakocinski, C.; Heard, R.; Walker, W.; Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Summers, J.K.

    1995-12-31

    Using whole-community macrobenthic responses to assess pollution impacts in estuaries presents a difficult challenge due to dynamic natural conditions that may impose their own physical limitations on the biota. For example, the recognition of bioindicator taxa becomes confounded when correlations exist between gradients in natural environmental variables, such as salinity, and gradients in contaminants, such as trace metals. The authors used partial Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) to separate natural and contaminant related gradients in macrobenthic community structure across 319 EMAP sites dispersed throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico. Residual variation in macrobenthic community structure was examined with respect to gradients in contaminant levels to identify responses by positive and negative bioindicator taxa. Gradients in concentrations of trace metals do not coincide completely with those in other chemical contaminants, and responses by characteristic bioindicator taxa reveal information regarding effects of specific contaminants. Several indigenous taxa serve as good negative bioindicators, whereas other opportunistic taxa serve as positive bioindicators of estuarine contamination.

  9. Influence of Host Community on Industrial Relations Practices and Policies: A Survey of Agbara Community and Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chidi, Christopher O.; Shadare, Oluseyi A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of host community on industrial relations practices and policies using Agbara community and Power Holding Company of Nigeria PLC as a case. The study adopted both the qualitative and quantitative methods. A total of 120 samples were drawn from the population using the simple random sampling technique in which…

  10. Community Oriented Educational Planning for Programs and Facilities in a Community College. Model-Cities-Related Comprehensive Planning Project, July 1, 1972-June 30, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Technical and Community Coll., Wilmington.

    This final report of the Model-Cities-Related Planning Project discusses its development direction and performance with regard to services and programming for the Urban Campus of Delaware Technical and Community College. The project activities were focused on the following objectives: (1) developing a comprehensive community college with strong…

  11. The role of maternal acceptance in the relation between community violence exposure and child functioning.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Beth Nordstrom; Hannigan, John H; Delaney-Black, Virginia; Covington, Chandice; Sokol, Robert J

    2006-02-01

    Children in the United States are exposed to considerable community violence that has been linked to child functioning. However, not all those exposed, experience negative outcomes. Recent research has focused on factors that "buffer" or protect children from negative consequences of violence exposure. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the potential buffering or moderating role of maternal acceptance in the relationship between community violence exposure and internalizing and externalizing problems. Subjects were 268 urban African American first graders. Community violence exposure was significantly related to symptoms of post-traumatic stress, but did not correlate with either internalizing or externalizing problems for all children, after control for demographics, maternal mental health, and general life stress. However, children's perceptions of maternal acceptance moderated the relationship between violence exposure and internalizing and externalizing problems which included being withdrawn, anxious-depressed, and demonstrating delinquent behavior. Children with the lowest levels of self-reported maternal acceptance were most impacted by community violence. In this sample of urban first graders, low levels of maternal acceptance placed children at greater risk for adverse outcomes associated with community violence exposure compared to moderate and high levels of maternal acceptance. PMID:16468089

  12. Investigating the Role of State Permitting and Agriculture Agencies in Addressing Public Health Concerns Related to Industrial Food Animal Production

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Jillian P.; Laestadius, Linnea I.; Grechis, Clare; Nachman, Keeve E.; Neff, Roni A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Industrial food animal production (IFAP) operations adversely impact environmental public health through air, water, and soil contamination. We sought to determine how state permitting and agriculture agencies respond to these public health concerns. Methods We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with staff at 12 state agencies in seven states, which were chosen based on high numbers or rapid increase of IFAP operations. The interviews served to gather information regarding agency involvement in regulating IFAP operations, the frequency and type of contacts received about public health concerns, how the agency responds to such contacts, and barriers to additional involvement. Results Permitting and agriculture agencies’ responses to health-based IFAP concerns are constrained by significant barriers including narrow regulations, a lack of public health expertise within the agencies, and limited resources. Conclusions State agencies with jurisdiction over IFAP operations are unable to adequately address relevant public health concerns due to multiple factors. Combining these results with previously published findings on barriers facing local and state health departments in the same states reveals significant gaps between these agencies regarding public health and IFAP. There is a clear need for regulations to protect public health and for public health professionals to provide complementary expertise to agencies responsible for regulating IFAP operations. PMID:24587087

  13. 41 CFR 102-75.820 - Which Federal agency is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the development or operation of a port... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Port Facility Use § 102-75.820 Which Federal agency is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the development or operation of a...

  14. 41 CFR 102-75.820 - Which Federal agency is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the development or operation of a port... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Port Facility Use § 102-75.820 Which Federal agency is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the development or operation of a...

  15. 41 CFR 102-75.820 - Which Federal agency is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the development or operation of a port... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Port Facility Use § 102-75.820 Which Federal agency is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the development or operation of a...

  16. Acción Mutua (Shared Action): a multipronged approach to delivering capacity-building assistance to agencies serving Latino communities in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ayala, George; Chión, Miguel; Díaz, Rafael M; Heckert, Andrea L; Nuño, Monica; del Pino, Homero E; Rodríguez, Claudia; Schroeder, Kurt; Smith, Terry

    2007-01-01

    Culturally appropriate, theory-based capacity-building assistance can serve a vital role in helping HIV prevention providers remain up-to-date, effective, and responsive to those they serve. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), AIDS Project Los Angeles, in collaboration with San Francisco State University's César E. Chávez Institute, conducted full-day site visits and qualitative interviews in 2005 with mid-level management staff of CDC-funded community-based organizations delivering HIV prevention services to Latino communities in the western region of the United States. We found that agencies we visited (1) had not yet adapted the evidence-based interventions they were using at the time of our visit and (2) requested technical assistance and training in the areas of program development, evaluation, group facilitation techniques, consumer recruitment, client retention, intervention adaptation, and materials development. Findings from this needs assessment were used to inform our seven-pronged approach to delivering capacity-building assistance entitled "Acción Mutua" (Shared Action). The approach emphasizes strategic partnerships, stakeholder involvement, organizational self-assessment, culturally appropriate materials development, interactive training, tailored onsite technical assistance, and professional networking opportunities. This article describes our approach in detail, the assessment process we used to develop it, and its implications for capacity-building practice. PMID:17159465

  17. Falls and Fall-Related Injuries among Community-Dwelling Adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Santosh K.; Willetts, Joanna L.; Corns, Helen L.; Marucci-Wellman, Helen R.; Lombardi, David A.; Courtney, Theodore K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Falls are the leading cause of unintentional injuries in the U.S.; however, national estimates for all community-dwelling adults are lacking. This study estimated the national incidence of falls and fall-related injuries among community-dwelling U.S. adults by age and gender and the trends in fall-related injuries across the adult life span. Methods Nationally representative data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 2008 Balance and Dizziness supplement was used to develop national estimates of falls, and pooled data from the NHIS was used to calculate estimates of fall-related injuries in the U.S. and related trends from 2004–2013. Costs of unintentional fall-related injuries were extracted from the CDC’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System. Results Twelve percent of community-dwelling U.S. adults reported falling in the previous year for a total estimate of 80 million falls at a rate of 37.2 falls per 100 person-years. On average, 9.9 million fall-related injuries occurred each year with a rate of 4.38 fall-related injuries per 100 person-years. In the previous three months, 2.0% of older adults (65+), 1.1% of middle-aged adults (45–64) and 0.7% of young adults (18–44) reported a fall-related injury. Of all fall-related injuries among community-dwelling adults, 32.3% occurred among older adults, 35.3% among middle-aged adults and 32.3% among younger adults. The age-adjusted rate of fall-related injuries increased 4% per year among older women (95% CI 1%–7%) from 2004 to 2013. Among U.S. adults, the total lifetime cost of annual unintentional fall-related injuries that resulted in a fatality, hospitalization or treatment in an emergency department was 111 billion U.S. dollars in 2010. Conclusions Falls and fall-related injuries represent a significant health and safety problem for adults of all ages. The findings suggest that adult fall prevention efforts should consider the entire adult lifespan to ensure a

  18. Relations between water physico-chemistry and benthic algal communities in a northern Canadian watershed: defining reference conditions using multiple descriptors of community structure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kathryn E; Hall, Roland I; Scrimgeour, Garry J

    2015-09-01

    Defining reference conditions is central to identifying environmental effects of anthropogenic activities. Using a watershed approach, we quantified reference conditions for benthic algal communities and their relations to physico-chemical conditions in rivers in the South Nahanni River watershed, NWT, Canada, in 2008 and 2009. We also compared the ability of three descriptors that vary in terms of analytical costs to define algal community structure based on relative abundances of (i) all algal taxa, (ii) only diatom taxa, and (iii) photosynthetic pigments. Ordination analyses showed that variance in algal community structure was strongly related to gradients in environmental variables describing water physico-chemistry, stream habitats, and sub-watershed structure. Water physico-chemistry and local watershed-scale descriptors differed significantly between algal communities from sites in the Selwyn Mountain ecoregion compared to sites in the Nahanni-Hyland ecoregions. Distinct differences in algal community types between ecoregions were apparent irrespective of whether algal community structure was defined using all algal taxa, diatom taxa, or photosynthetic pigments. Two algal community types were highly predictable using environmental variables, a core consideration in the development of Reference Condition Approach (RCA) models. These results suggest that assessments of environmental impacts could be completed using RCA models for each ecoregion. We suggest that use of algal pigments, a high through-put analysis, is a promising alternative compared to more labor-intensive and costly taxonomic approaches for defining algal community structure. PMID:26255271

  19. Home-School-Community Relations as a Political Process: Four Exploratory Case Studies of the Implementation of Individually Guided Education (IGE) and Home-School-Community Relations. Technical Report No. 360, Parts 1, 2, and 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, William R.

    The research had four objectives: (1) to describe home-school-community relations in selected IGE schools; (2) to explain the home-school-community relations and the implementation of IGE political terms using issue analysis and policy acceptance analysis; (3) to generate hypotheses from the data gathered through objectives 1 and 2, and relate…

  20. Dealing with Alcohol-related problems in the Night-Time Economy: A Study Protocol for Mapping trends in harm and stakeholder views surrounding local community level interventions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This project will provide a comprehensive investigation into the prevalence of alcohol-related harms and community attitudes in the context of community-based interventions being implemented to reduce harm in two regional centres of Australia. While considerable experimentation and innovation to address these harms has occurred in both Geelong and Newcastle, only limited ad-hoc documentation and analysis has been conducted on changes in the prevalence of harm as a consequence, leaving a considerable gap in terms of a systematic, evidence-based analysis of changes in harm over time and the need for further intervention. Similarly, little evidence has been reported regarding the views of key stakeholder groups, industry, government agencies, patrons or community regarding the need for, and the acceptability of, interventions to reduce harms. This project will aim to provide evidence regarding the impact and acceptability of local initiatives aimed at reducing alcohol-related harms. Methods/Design This study will gather existing police data (assault, property damage and drink driving offences), Emergency Department presentations and Ambulance attendance data. Further, the research team will conduct interviews with licensed venue patrons and collect observational data of licensed venues. Key informant interviews will assess expert knowledge from key industry and government stakeholders, and a community survey will assess community experiences and attitudes towards alcohol-related harm and harm-reduction strategies. Overall, the project will assess: the extent of alcohol-related harm in the context of harm-reduction interventions, and the need for and acceptability of further intervention. Discussion These findings will be used to improve evidence-based practice both nationally and internationally. Ethical Approval This project has been approved by Deakin University HREC. PMID:21682908

  1. Is coral richness related to community resistance to and recovery from disturbance?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Stacy Y; Speare, Kelly E; Long, Zachary T; McKeever, Kimberly A; Gyoerkoe, Megan; Ramus, Aaron P; Mohorn, Zach; Akins, Kelsey L; Hambridge, Sarah M; Graham, Nicholas A J; Nash, Kirsty L; Selig, Elizabeth R; Bruno, John F

    2014-01-01

    More diverse communities are thought to be more stable-the diversity-stability hypothesis-due to increased resistance to and recovery from disturbances. For example, high diversity can make the presence of resilient or fast growing species and key facilitations among species more likely. How natural, geographic biodiversity patterns and changes in biodiversity due to human activities mediate community-level disturbance dynamics is largely unknown, especially in diverse systems. For example, few studies have explored the role of diversity in tropical marine communities, especially at large scales. We tested the diversity-stability hypothesis by asking whether coral richness is related to resistance to and recovery from disturbances including storms, predator outbreaks, and coral bleaching on tropical coral reefs. We synthesized the results of 41 field studies conducted on 82 reefs, documenting changes in coral cover due to disturbance, across a global gradient of coral richness. Our results indicate that coral reefs in more species-rich regions were marginally less resistant to disturbance and did not recover more quickly. Coral community resistance was also highly dependent on pre-disturbance coral cover, probably due in part to the sensitivity of fast-growing and often dominant plating acroporid corals to disturbance. Our results suggest that coral communities in biodiverse regions, such as the western Pacific, may not be more resistant and resilient to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Further analyses controlling for disturbance intensity and other drivers of coral loss and recovery could improve our understanding of the influence of diversity on community stability in coral reef ecosystems. PMID:24711964

  2. Is coral richness related to community resistance to and recovery from disturbance?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Stacy Y.; Speare, Kelly E.; Long, Zachary T.; McKeever, Kimberly A.; Gyoerkoe, Megan; Ramus, Aaron P.; Mohorn, Zach; Akins, Kelsey L.; Hambridge, Sarah M.; Graham, Nicholas A.J.; Nash, Kirsty L.; Selig, Elizabeth R.

    2014-01-01

    More diverse communities are thought to be more stable—the diversity–stability hypothesis—due to increased resistance to and recovery from disturbances. For example, high diversity can make the presence of resilient or fast growing species and key facilitations among species more likely. How natural, geographic biodiversity patterns and changes in biodiversity due to human activities mediate community-level disturbance dynamics is largely unknown, especially in diverse systems. For example, few studies have explored the role of diversity in tropical marine communities, especially at large scales. We tested the diversity–stability hypothesis by asking whether coral richness is related to resistance to and recovery from disturbances including storms, predator outbreaks, and coral bleaching on tropical coral reefs. We synthesized the results of 41 field studies conducted on 82 reefs, documenting changes in coral cover due to disturbance, across a global gradient of coral richness. Our results indicate that coral reefs in more species-rich regions were marginally less resistant to disturbance and did not recover more quickly. Coral community resistance was also highly dependent on pre-disturbance coral cover, probably due in part to the sensitivity of fast-growing and often dominant plating acroporid corals to disturbance. Our results suggest that coral communities in biodiverse regions, such as the western Pacific, may not be more resistant and resilient to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Further analyses controlling for disturbance intensity and other drivers of coral loss and recovery could improve our understanding of the influence of diversity on community stability in coral reef ecosystems. PMID:24711964

  3. Medication Incidents Related to Automated Dose Dispensing in Community Pharmacies and Hospitals - A Reporting System Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A. G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. Methods The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR) reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. Main Outcome Measures Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. Results From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4%) incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6%) incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8%) were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2%) were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%). The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. Conclusion A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an incident

  4. Community relations and child-led microfinance: a case study of caregiving children in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Skovdal, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Rampant levels of AIDS and poverty have made many children in sub-Saharan Africa the primary caregivers of their ageing or ailing guardians. This paper reports on a social action fund initiative that brought caregiving children together to set-up and run income generating activities as a group with the aim of strengthening their coping capabilities. To further our understanding of child-led microfinance activities, this paper explores how intra-community relations can both facilitate and undermine child-led activities, and how these activities in turn can further strengthen some intra-community relations. Twenty-one children (aged 12-17) and six guardians participated in this study. Data included draw-and-write compositions (n=21), essays (n=16), workshop notes and proposals (n=8) and in-depth interviews (n=16). A thematic analysis revealed that the children actively drew on the expertise and involvement of some guardians in the project as well as on each other, developing supportive peer relations that helped strengthen their coping capabilities. However, the children's disenfranchised position in the community meant that some adults took advantage of the child-led activities for their own personal gain. Some children also showed a lack of commitment to collective work, undermining the morale of their more active peers. Nevertheless, both guardians and the children themselves began to look at caregiving children differently as their engagement in the project began to earn them respect from the community - changing guardian/child relations. The paper concludes that microfinance interventions targeting children and young people must consider children's relationships with each other and with adults as key determinants of Project success. PMID:21161771

  5. Relating microbial community structure to functioning in forest soil organic carbon transformation and turnover.

    PubMed

    You, Yeming; Wang, Juan; Huang, Xueman; Tang, Zuoxin; Liu, Shirong; Sun, Osbert J

    2014-03-01

    Forest soils store vast amounts of terrestrial carbon, but we are still limited in mechanistic understanding on how soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization or turnover is controlled by biotic and abiotic factors in forest ecosystems. We used phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as biomarker to study soil microbial community structure and measured activities of five extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of cellulose (i.e., β-1,4-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase), chitin (i.e., β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase), and lignin (i.e., phenol oxidase and peroxidase) as indicators of soil microbial functioning in carbon transformation or turnover across varying biotic and abiotic conditions in a typical temperate forest ecosystem in central China. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was performed to determine the interrelationship between individual PFLAs and biotic and abiotic site factors as well as the linkage between soil microbial structure and function. Path analysis was further conducted to examine the controls of site factors on soil microbial community structure and the regulatory pathway of changes in SOC relating to microbial community structure and function. We found that soil microbial community structure is strongly influenced by water, temperature, SOC, fine root mass, clay content, and C/N ratio in soils and that the relative abundance of Gram-negative bacteria, saprophytic fungi, and actinomycetes explained most of the variations in the specific activities of soil enzymes involved in SOC transformation or turnover. The abundance of soil bacterial communities is strongly linked with the extracellular enzymes involved in carbon transformation, whereas the abundance of saprophytic fungi is associated with activities of extracellular enzymes driving carbon oxidation. Findings in this study demonstrate the complex interactions and linkage among plant traits, microenvironment, and soil physiochemical properties in affecting SOC via microbial regulations. PMID

  6. Regime Shift in an Exploited Fish Community Related to Natural Climate Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Auber, Arnaud; Travers-Trolet, Morgane; Villanueva, Maria Ching; Ernande, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the various drivers of marine ecosystem regime shifts and disentangling their respective influence are critical tasks for understanding biodiversity dynamics and properly managing exploited living resources such as marine fish communities. Unfortunately, the mechanisms and forcing factors underlying regime shifts in marine fish communities are still largely unknown although climate forcing and anthropogenic pressures such as fishing have been suggested as key determinants. Based on a 24-year-long time-series of scientific surveys monitoring 55 fish and cephalopods species, we report here a rapid and persistent structural change in the exploited fish community of the eastern English Channel from strong to moderate dominance of small-bodied forage fish species with low temperature preferendum that occurred in the mid-1990s. This shift was related to a concomitant warming of the North Atlantic Ocean as attested by a switch of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation from a cold to a warm phase. Interestingly, observed changes in the fish community structure were opposite to those classically induced by exploitation as larger fish species of higher trophic level increased in abundance. Despite not playing a direct role in the regime shift, fishing still appeared as a forcing factor affecting community structure. Moreover, although related to climate, the regime shift may have been facilitated by strong historic exploitation that certainly primed the system by favoring the large dominance of small-bodied fish species that are particularly sensitive to climatic variations. These results emphasize that particular attention should be paid to multidecadal natural climate variability and its interactions with both fishing and climate warming when aiming at sustainable exploitation and ecosystem conservation. PMID:26132268

  7. Observational and Methodological Issues in a Multi-Agency Community-Based Intervention to Reduce Excessive Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Simon; Shepherd, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the methodology and observational data from a project that sought to, first, investigate the prevalence of alcohol related harm and alcohol misuse in Cardiff's night-time economy and, second, deliver a targeted server training intervention to premises identified as at risk of misselling alcohol. The bulk of the work is…

  8. DEVELOPMENTS IN NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE METEOROLOGICAL DATA COLLECTION PROGRAMS AS RELATED TO EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) AIR POLLUTION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the next decade, the National Weather Service (NWS) will be upgrading its meteorological instrumentation and data dissemination procedures. Because these changes will affect the operation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) air pollution models, the project...

  9. 26 CFR 1.6050M-1 - Information returns relating to persons receiving contracts from certain Federal executive agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR 1.6050M-1(d)(5) to make, on the agency's behalf, the required returns for such contracts for that... entered into by the Small Business Administration (SBA) under a prime contract between the SBA and...

  10. 76 FR 53933 - Delegation Authority for the Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Delegation Authority for the Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities AGENCY... Housing and Communities (OSHC), relating to improving regional planning efforts that integrate housing...

  11. Habitat- and host-related variation in sponge bacterial symbiont communities in Indonesian waters.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel F R; Becking, Leontine E; de Voogd, Nicole J; Pires, Ana C C; Polónia, Ana R M; Egas, Conceição; Gomes, Newton C M

    2013-09-01

    Marine lakes are unique ecosystems that contain isolated populations of marine organisms. Isolated from the surrounding marine habitat, many lakes house numerous endemic species. In this study, microbial communities of sponges inhabiting these lakes were investigated for the first time using barcoded pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Our main goals were to compare the bacterial richness and composition of two sponge species (Suberites diversicolor and Cinachyrella australiensis) inhabiting both marine lakes and adjacent open coastal systems. Host species and habitat explained almost 59% of the variation in bacterial composition. There was a significant difference in composition between both host species. Within S. diversicolor, there was little discernible difference between bacterial communities inside and outside lakes. The bacterial community of this species was, furthermore, dominated (63% of all sequences) by three very closely related alphaproteobacterial taxa identified as belonging to the recently described order Kiloniellales. Cinachyrella australiensis, in contrast, hosted markedly different bacterial communities inside and outside lakes with very few shared abundant taxa. Cinachyrella australiensis in open habitat only shared 9.4% of OTUs with C. australiensis in lake habitat. Bacteria were thus both highly species specific and, in the case of C. australiensis, habitat specific. PMID:23607753

  12. A Framework for Classifying Online Mental Health-Related Communities With an Interest in Depression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Budhaditya; Nguyen, Thin; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2016-07-01

    Mental illness has a deep impact on individuals, families, and by extension, society as a whole. Social networks allow individuals with mental disorders to communicate with others sufferers via online communities, providing an invaluable resource for studies on textual signs of psychological health problems. Mental disorders often occur in combinations, e.g., a patient with an anxiety disorder may also develop depression. This co-occurring mental health condition provides the focus for our work on classifying online communities with an interest in depression. For this, we have crawled a large body of 620 000 posts made by 80 000 users in 247 online communities. We have extracted the topics and psycholinguistic features expressed in the posts, using these as inputs to our model. Following a machine learning technique, we have formulated a joint modeling framework in order to classify mental health-related co-occurring online communities from these features. Finally, we performed empirical validation of the model on the crawled dataset where our model outperforms recent state-of-the-art baselines. PMID:27008680

  13. Rethinking the learning space at work and beyond: The achievement of agency across the boundaries of work-related spaces and environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersh, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the notion of the learning space at work and discusses the extent to which its different configurations allow employees to exercise personal agency within a range of learning spaces. Although the learning space at work is already the subject of extensive research, the continuous development of the learning society and the development of new types of working spaces calls for further research to advance our knowledge and understanding of the ways that individuals exercise agency and learn in the workplace. Research findings suggest that the current perception of workplace learning is strongly related to the notion of the learning space, in which individuals and teams work, learn and develop their skills. The perception of the workplace as a site only for work-specific training is gradually changing, as workplaces are now acknowledged as sites for learning in various configurations, and as contributing to the personal development and social engagement of employees. This paper argues that personal agency is constructed in the workplace, and this process involves active interrelations between agency and three dimensions of the workplace (individual, spatial and organisational), identified through both empirical and theoretical research. The discussion is supported by data from two research projects on workplace learning in the United Kingdom. This paper thus considers how different configurations of the learning space and the boundaries between a range of work-related spaces facilitate the achievement of personal agency.

  14. The Behavior Problems Inventory (BPI-01) in Community-Based Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Reliability and Concurrent Validity vis-a-vis the Inventory for Client and Agency Planning (ICAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ingen, Daniel J.; Moore, Linda L.; Zaja, Rebecca H.; Rojahn, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Reliability and concurrent validity of the Behavior Problems Inventory (BPI-01; Rojahn et al., 2001) was examined in a sample of 130 community residing adults with mild to profound intellectual disabilities with high rates of behavior problems and concurrent mental health problems. The BPI-01 and the Inventory for Client and Agency Planning (ICAP;…

  15. Student Absenteeism--School Dropouts: The Cause--How To Resolve? Interviews with 205 Persons Representing Students, Educational and Community Agencies. READ: A Resource Handbook for School Administrators, Volume XIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Terry, Ed.

    This resource handbook was designed to assist constituent school district personnel with the critical issues of student absenteeism and dropouts. From July 1982 through February 1983 and in May 1986, members of the Oakland County (Michigan) Attendance/Dropout Task Force met with educational and community agency personnel, graduating high school…

  16. Relations of fish community composition to environmental variables in streams of central Nebraska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, S.A.; Swanson, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    Nine sites on streams in the Platte River Basin in central Nebraska were sampled as part of the US Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Program during 1993-1994. A combination of canonical correspondence analysis and an index of biotic integrity determined from fish community data produced complementary evaluations of water quality conditions. Results of the canonical correspondence analysis were useful in showing which environmental variables were significant in differentiating fish communities at the nine sites. Five environmental variables were statistically significant in the analysis. Median specific conductance of water samples collected at a site accounted for the largest amount of variability in the species data. Although the percentage of the basin as cropland was not the first variable chosen in a forward selection process, it was the most strongly correlated with the first ordination axis. A rangeland- dominated site was distinguished from all others along that axis. Median orthophosphate concentration of samples collected in the year up to the time of fish sampling was most strongly correlated with the second ordination axis. The index of biotic integrity produced results that could be interpreted in terms of the relative water quality between sites. Sites draining nearly 100% cropland had the lowest scores for two individual metrics of the index of biotic integrity that were related to species tolerance. Effective monitoring of water quality could be achieved by coupling methods that address both the ecological components of fish communities and their statistical relationships to environmental factors.

  17. Speedy Recovery - Stream Macroinvertebrate Communities Show Extraordinary Recovery from Mining-Related Acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, D. A.

    2005-05-01

    An area in northern Ontario, Wawa, was severely damaged by a century of iron mining and smelting with exceptional acidification (pH 3-4) and the accumulation of arsenic and other toxins. No formal restoration occurred following cessation of operations in 1998, but natural recovery began. In May 2004 we sampled the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of 20 stream riffles within and around the former fume kill area with the goal of estimating the state of community recovery. Despite watercourse colonization routes being blocked by waterfalls and the short time available for recovery, the macroinvertebrate communities showed remarkable recovery with both taxon richness and abundances being well within the range found in nearby reference streams belonging to the same watershed. Even relatively slow colonizers such as Pisidium bivalve mollusks and Orconectes crayfish, were found in the fume kill area streams. The biological recovery has been matched only by the chemical recovery of the systems. We attribute the rapid recovery firstly to the underlying calcium-rich geology, which apparently led to a quick decrease of acidity, thus facilitating re-colonization of the streams. Secondly, stream orientation relative to the acidic deposition zone facilitated rapid re-colonization from upstream areas.

  18. Longitudinal Relations between Sectarian and non-Sectarian Community Violence and Child Adjustment in Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, E. Mark; Merrilees, Christine E.; Taylor, Laura K.; Shirlow, Peter; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Cairns, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Although relations between political violence and child adjustment are well-documented, long-term longitudinal research is needed to adequately address the many questions remaining about the contexts and developmental trajectories underlying the effects on children in areas of political violence. The present study examined relations between sectarian and non-sectarian community violence and adolescent adjustment problems over four consecutive years for mother-child dyads (total N = 1015, 485 boys, 517 girls) living in socially deprived neighborhoods in a context of historical and ongoing political violence, that is, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Both sectarian and non-sectarian community violence predicted youth adjustment across four years, consistent with the hypothesis that both of these elements of the social ecology merit consideration with regard to children's well-being in contexts of political violence. The impact of sectarian community violence on adolescent adjustment was further accentuated in neighborhoods characterized by higher crime rates. Discussion considers the implications for evaluating social ecologies pertinent to the impact of political violence on children. PMID:23880380

  19. The relative importance of seed competition, resource competition and perturbations on community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, K.; Dyke, J. G.; Pavlick, R.; Reineking, B.; Reu, B.; Kleidon, A.

    2011-05-01

    While the regional climate is the primary selection pressure for whether a plant strategy can survive, however, competitive interactions strongly affect the relative abundances of plant strategies within communities. Here, we investigate the relative importance of competition and perturbations on the development of vegetation community structure. To do so, we develop DIVE (Dynamics and Interactions of VEgetation), a simple general model that links plant strategies to their competitive dynamics, using growth and reproduction characteristics that emerge from climatic constraints. The model calculates population dynamics based on establishment, mortality, invasion and exclusion in the presence of different strengths of perturbations, seed and resource competition. The highest levels of diversity were found in simulations without competition as long as mortality is not too high. However, reasonable successional dynamics were only achieved when resource competition is considered. Under high levels of competition, intermediate levels of perturbations were required to obtain coexistence. Since succession and coexistence are observed in plant communities, we conclude that the DIVE model with competition and intermediate levels of perturbation represents an adequate way to model population dynamics. Because of the simplicity and generality of DIVE, it could be used to understand vegetation structure and functioning at the global scale and the response of vegetation to global change.

  20. Relations of fish community composition to environmental variables in streams of central Nebraska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, Steven A.; Swanson, Robert B.

    1996-09-01

    Nine sites on streams in the Platte River Basin in central Nebraska were sampled as part of the US Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program during 1993-1994. A combination of canonical correspondence analysis and an index of biotic integrity determined from fish community data produced complementary evaluations of water-quality conditions. Results of the canonical correspondence analysis were useful in showing which environmental variables were significant in differentiating fish communities at the nine sites. Five environmental variables were statistically significant in the analysis. Median specific conductance of water samples collected at a site accounted for the largest amount of variability in the species data. Although the percentage of the basin as cropland was not the first variable chosen in a forward selection process, it was the most strongly correlated with the first ordination axis. A rangeland-dominated site was distinguished from all others along that axis. Median orthophosphate concentration of samples collected in the year up to the time of fish sampling was most strongly correlated with the second ordination axis. The index of biotic integrity produced results that could be interpreted in terms of the relative water quality between sites. Sites draining nearly 100% cropland had the lowest scores for two individual metrics of the index of biotic integrity that were related to species tolerance. Effective monitoring of water quality could be achieved by coupling methods that address both the ecological components of fish communities and their statistical relationships to environmental factors.

  1. Influence of global change-related impacts on the mercury toxicity of freshwater algal communities.

    PubMed

    Val, Jonatan; Muñiz, Selene; Gomà, Joan; Navarro, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The climatic-change related increase of temperatures, are expected to alter the distribution and survival of freshwater species, ecosystem functions, and also the effects of toxicants to aquatic biota. This study has thus assessed, as a first time, the modulating effect of climate-change drivers on the mercury (Hg) toxicity of freshwater algal photosynthesis. Natural benthic algal communities (periphyton) have been exposed to Hg under present and future temperature scenarios (rise of 5 °C). The modulating effect of other factors (also altered by global change), as the quality and amount of suspended and dissolved materials in the rivers, has been also assessed, exposing algae to Hg in natural river water or a synthetic medium. The EC50 values ranged from the 0.15-0.74 ppm for the most sensitive communities, to the 24-40 ppm for the most tolerant. The higher tolerance shown by communities exposed to higher Hg concentrations, as Jabarrella was in agreement with the Pollution Induced Community Tolerance concept. In other cases, the dominance of the invasive diatom Didymosphenia geminata explained the tolerance or sensitivity of the community to the Hg toxicity. Results shown that while increases in the suspended solids reduced Hg bioavailability, changes in the dissolved materials - such as organic carbon - may increase it and thus its toxic effects on biota. The impacts of the increase of temperatures on the toxicological behaviour of periphyton (combining both changes at species composition and physiological acclimation) would be certainly modulated by other effects at the land level (i.e., alterations in the amount and quality of dissolved and particulate substances arriving to the rivers). PMID:26024757

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.820 - Which Federal agency is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Which Federal agency is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the development or operation of a port facility? 102-75.820 Section 102-75.820 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.825 - Who must the disposal agency notify when surplus real and related personal property is available...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who must the disposal agency notify when surplus real and related personal property is available for port facility use? 102-75.825 Section 102-75.825 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL...

  4. 41 CFR 102-75.820 - Which Federal agency is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Which Federal agency is eligible to receive surplus real and related personal property for the development or operation of a port facility? 102-75.820 Section 102-75.820 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...

  5. The Influence of Lived Experience with Addiction and Recovery on Practice-Related Decisions among Professionals Working in Addiction Agencies Serving Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotna, Gabriela; Dobbins, Maureen; Jack, Susan M.; Sword, Wendy; Niccols, Alison; Brooks, Sandy; Henderson, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The study objectives were to: (1) understand the value attributed to the lived experience of addiction and recovery among professionals working in addiction agencies serving women in Canada and (2) describe how lived experience influence practice-related decision-making. Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was conducted with a…

  6. La Rusa Lingvo en la Novaj Rilatoj de Europa Spac-Agentejo (The Russian Language in the New Relations of the European Space Agency).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Wim

    1992-01-01

    In view of the opportunities made possible by the Framework Agreement between the European Space Agency and the Soviet Union, this article examines the linguistic aspects of the agreement and its implementation. Many communication problems are related to Western concepts of project management and control that are difficult to translate into…

  7. Community perceptions of air pollution and related health risks in Nairobi slums.

    PubMed

    Egondi, Thaddaeus; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Ng, Nawi; Muindi, Kanyiva; Oti, Samuel; van de Vijver, Steven; Ettarh, Remare; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2013-10-01

    Air pollution is among the leading global risks for mortality and responsible for increasing risk for chronic diseases. Community perceptions on exposure are critical in determining people's response and acceptance of related policies. Therefore, understanding people' perception is critical in informing the design of appropriate intervention measures. The aim of this paper was to establish levels and associations between perceived pollution and health risk perception among slum residents. A cross-sectional study of 5,317 individuals aged 35+ years was conducted in two slums of Nairobi. Association of perceived score and individual characteristics was assessed using linear regression. Spatial variation in the perceived levels was determined through hot spot analysis using ArcGIS. The average perceived air pollution level was higher among residents in Viwandani compared to those in Korogocho. Perceived air pollution level was positively associated with perceived health risks. The majority of respondents were exposed to air pollution in their place of work with 66% exposed to at least two sources of air pollution. Less than 20% of the respondents in both areas mentioned sources related to indoor pollution. The perceived air pollution level and related health risks in the study community were low among the residents indicating the need for promoting awareness on air pollution sources and related health risks. PMID:24157509

  8. Evaluation of Cholangiocarcinoma Risk and its Related Factors in Wetland Geographical Communities of Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Songserm, Nopparat; Woradet, Somkiattiyos; Bureelerd, Onanong; Charoenbut, Pattaraporn

    2016-01-01

    Wetland geographical areas have a higher incidence of Opisthorchis viverrini-associated cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), confirmed by data from geographic information systems, than other areas. Behavioral data also indicate that people in these areas traditionally eat uncooked freshwater fish dishes, a vehicle for O. viverrini infection. The best approach to reducing CCA incidence is decreasing risk factors together with behavior alteration. Evaluation of CCA risk and its related factors are first needed for planning the prevention and control programs in the future. We therefore aimed to evaluate the CCA risk and explore its related factors among people in wetland communities of Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand. A cross-sectional study was conducted between July and August 2014. In total 906 participants, with informed consent, completed questionnaires. Overall risk of CCA was determined by multiplying odds ratios (ORs) of the risk factors for CCA from literature reviews. A mean score of 5.95 was applied as the cut-off point. Assessment of factors related to overall risk of CCA was accomplished using conditional logistic regression. Of all participants, 60.15% had a high level of the overall risk of CCA. Factors related to the overall risk of CCA were gender (<0.001), marital status (<0.001), perceived susceptibility (p=0.043) and prevention behavior for CCA (<0.001). In conclusion, most participants in this community had a high level of overall risk of CCA. Therefore, integrated prevention and control programs continue to be urgently required. PMID:27221857

  9. Temporal and depth-related differences in prokaryotic communities in abyssal sediments associated with particulate organic carbon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeseneder, M. M.; Smith, K. L.; Ruhl, H. A.; Jones, D. O. B.; Witte, U.; Prosser, J. I.

    2012-12-01

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) flux is hypothesized to be the most important parameter influencing activity and biomass of prokaryotic and faunal communities in the abyssal seafloor, but there is little evidence of POC-related changes in community composition of prokaryotes. This hypothesis was tested by 16S rRNA-gene-based analysis of prokaryotic DNA and RNA extracted from abyssal seafloor sediments during periods of low and high POC flux. Fingerprint analysis of prokaryotic communities indicated that approximately 50% of the phylotypes were identical at each sediment horizon, regardless of the temporal variations in POC flux. However, phylotypes were also detected that represented a relatively dynamic component of these communities and were probably strongly influenced by the prevalent POC flux regime. These patterns were also detected in deeper sediment horizons. DNA- and RNA-based community profiles differed, although both approaches had similar community dynamics. Crenarchaeota showed the strongest shift in community composition in response to availability of labile POC, indicating that POC flux may have a more pronounced impact on crenarchaeal communities than on bacterial communities. The high number of phylotypes common to each sample time suggests that both standing stock and active prokaryotic communities are stable.

  10. Dysmorphic concern is related to delusional proneness and negative affect in a community sample.

    PubMed

    Keating, Charlotte; Thomas, Neil; Stephens, Jessie; Castle, David J; Rossell, Susan L

    2016-06-30

    Body image concerns are common in the general population and in some mental illnesses reach pathological levels. We investigated whether dysmorphic concern with appearance (a preoccupation with minor or imagined defects in appearance) is explained by psychotic processes in a community sample. In a cross-sectional design, two hundred and twenty six participants completed an online survey battery including: The Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire; the Peters Delusional inventory; the Aberrant Salience Inventory; and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale. Participants were native English speakers residing in Australia. Dysmorphic concern was positively correlated with delusional proneness, aberrant salience and negative emotion. Regression established that negative emotion and delusional proneness predicted dysmorphic concern, whereas, aberrant salience did not. Although delusional proneness was related to body dysmorphia, there was no evidence that it was related to aberrant salience. Understanding the contribution of other psychosis processes, and other health related variables to the severity of dysmorphic concern will be a focus of future research. PMID:27085667

  11. Study of Risk Assessment Programs at Federal Agencies and Commercial Industry Related to the Conduct or Regulation of High Hazard Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.; Rosenbloom, S.; O'Brien, J.

    2011-03-13

    In the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board's Recommendation 2009-1, the DOE committed to studying the use of quantitative risk assessment methodologies at government agencies and industry. This study consisted of document reviews and interviews of senior management and risk assessment staff at six organizations. Data were collected and analyzed on risk assessment applications, risk assessment tools, and controls and infrastructure supporting the correct usage of risk assessment and risk management tools. The study found that the agencies were in different degrees of maturity in the use of risk assessment to support the analysis of high hazard operations and to support decisions related to these operations. Agencies did not share a simple, 'one size fits all' approach to tools, controls, and infrastructure needs. The agencies recognized that flexibility was warranted to allow use of risk assessment tools in a manner that is commensurate with the complexity of the application. The study also found that, even with the lack of some data, agencies application of the risk analysis structured approach could provide useful insights such as potential system vulnerabilities. This study, in combination with a companion study of risk assessment programs in the DOE Offices involved in high hazard operations, is being used to determine the nature and type of controls and infrastructure needed to support risk assessments at the DOE.

  12. Gender differences on osteoporosis health beliefs and related behaviors in non-academic community Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin-Ping; Xia, Ru-Yi; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Xin-Shuang; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Li, Hao

    2014-06-01

    Osteoporosis represents the major public health concern worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess osteoporosis beliefs and actual performance of osteoporosis preventive behaviors in non-academic community Chinese population and to explore whether the differences exist in community females and males. A cross sectional study including 137 females and 122 males was conducted in four non-academic communities of Xi'an city during November 2012, selected by multi-stage sampling method. Self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. The respondents' mean age was 56.06 ± 5.81 years. 35.5% of the participants had a bone mineral density test. The participants exhibit relatively low osteoporosis health beliefs. The total health belief score was 63.30 ± 8.55 and 64.13 ± 6.47 in females and males respectively. There was significant gender differences in the subscales of Perceived seriousness (p = 0.03), Perceived barriers to exercise (p = 0.004) and Perceived motivation (p = 0.01). Participants had low frequencies of preventive practices. Gender differences were revealed in current smoking and alcohol intake, soybean food intake, smoking history (p < 0.001), alcohol intake history (p = 0.001), meat or egg intake (p = 0.019). The findings from the study suggest an increased awareness of this major public health problem in non-academic Chinese and the scope for enhancing osteoporosis intervention considering the gender difference. PMID:24399160

  13. Using public relations strategies to prompt populations at risk to seek health information: the Hanford Community Health Project.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory D; Smith, Stephen M; Turcotte, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The Hanford Community Health Project (HCHP) addressed health concerns among "downwinders" exposed to releases of radioactive iodine (I-131) from the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in the 1940s and 1950s. After developing educational materials and conducting initial outreach, HCHP had to decide whether to apply its limited resources to an advertising or public relations approach. The decision to apply public relations strategies was effective in driving awareness of the risk communication message at the community level, reinvigorating the affected community, and ultimately increasing the number of people who sought information about their risk of exposure and related health issues. HCHP used a series of communication tools to reach out to local and regional media, medical and health professionals, and community organizations. The campaign was successful in increasing the number of unique visitors to HCHP Web site and educating and activating the medical community around the releases of I-131 and patient care choices. PMID:18353906

  14. A Case Study of a Student-Run Advertising/Public Relations Agency: The Oregon State University Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, B. G.

    Perhaps the most important course in an advertising curriculum is the student-run agency. This paper describes a program instituted and carried out at Oregon State University from 1985 to 1989 which provided students with experiential training resulting in valuable real-client contact and strong portfolios, making students "hot commodities" on the…

  15. "It's the Way They Do It": Expressions of Agency in Child-Adult Relations at Home and School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerke, Havard

    2011-01-01

    This article examines children's (8-9 years) and young people's (14-15 years) views about their own participation in decision-making processes with adults, within the context of home and school in Norway. A difference-centred theoretical perspective is used to identify children's participation as expressions of agency embedded in intricate…

  16. Increased influenza-related healthcare utilization by residents of an urban aboriginal community.

    PubMed

    Charland, K M; Brownstein, J S; Verma, A; Brewer, T; Jones, S; Hoen, A Gatewood; Buckeridge, D L

    2011-12-01

    Most studies describing high rates of acute respiratory illness in aboriginals have focused on rural or remote communities. Hypothesized causes include socioeconomic deprivation, limited access to healthcare, and a high prevalence of chronic disease. To assess influenza rates in an aboriginal community while accounting for healthcare access, deprivation and chronic disease prevalence, we compared rates of influenza-related outpatient and emergency-department visits in an urban Mohawk reserve (Kahnawá:ke) to rates in neighbouring regions with comparable living conditions and then restricted the analysis to a sub-population with a low chronic disease prevalence, i.e. those aged <20 years. Using medical billing claims from 1996 to 2006 we estimated age-sex standardized rate ratios. The rate in Kahnawá:ke was 58% greater than neighbouring regions and 98% greater in the analysis of those aged <20 years. Despite relatively favourable socioeconomic conditions and healthcare access, rates of influenza-related visits in Kahnawá:ke were elevated, particularly in the younger age groups. PMID:21251347

  17. Validation of 2 Spanish-Language Scales to Assess HIV-Related Stigma in Communities.

    PubMed

    Franke, Molly F; Nelson, Adrianne K; Muñoz, Maribel; Cruz, Janeth Santa; Atwood, Sidney; Lecca, Leonid; Shin, Sonya S

    2015-01-01

    We report the psychometric properties of 2 Spanish-language scales designed to measure (1) opinions about HIV in the community and particularly among health care workers and (2) observed acts of stigma toward people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) by health care workers. The Opinions about HIV Scale included 3 components (policy, avoidance, and empathy) and 9 items, while an adapted version of the HIV/AIDS Stigma Instrument-Nurse, designed to capture acts of stigma, included 2 components (discrimination related to clinical care and refusal to share or exchange food/gifts). Scales demonstrated good reliability and construct validity. Relative to community health workers, treatment supporters were more likely to have stigmatizing opinions related to avoidance and empathy. We offer 2 Spanish-language scales that could be used to identify populations with high levels of stigmatizing opinions and behaviors toward PLWHA. Formal training of health care workers, especially treatment supporters, may raise awareness and reduce stigma toward HIV. PMID:25294853

  18. Exposures and health outcomes in relation to bioaerosol emissions from composting facilities: a systematic review of occupational and community studies.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Clare; Littlewood, Emma; Douglas, Philippa; Robertson, Sarah; Gant, Timothy W; Hansell, Anna L

    2015-01-01

    The number of composting sites in Europe is rapidly increasing, due to efforts to reduce the fraction of waste destined for landfill, but evidence on possible health impacts is limited. This article systematically reviews studies related to bioaerosol exposures within and near composting facilities and associated health effects in both community and occupational health settings. Six electronic databases and bibliographies from January 1960 to July 2014 were searched for studies reporting on health outcomes and/or bioaerosol emissions related to composting sites. Risk of bias was assessed using a customized score. Five hundred and thirty-six papers were identified and reviewed, and 66 articles met the inclusion criteria (48 exposure studies, 9 health studies, 9 health and exposure studies). Exposure information was limited, with most measurements taken in occupational settings and for limited time periods. Bioaerosol concentrations were highest on-site during agitation activities (turning, shredding, and screening). Six studies detected concentrations of either Aspergillus fumigatus or total bacteria above the English Environment Agency's recommended threshold levels beyond 250 m from the site. Occupational studies of compost workers suggested elevated risks of respiratory illnesses with higher bioaerosol exposures. Elevated airway irritation was reported in residents near composting sites, but this may have been affected by reporting bias. The evidence base on health effects of bioaerosol emissions from composting facilities is still limited, although there is sufficient evidence to support a precautionary approach for regulatory purposes. While data to date are suggestive of possible respiratory effects, further study is needed to confirm this and to explore other health outcomes. PMID:25825807

  19. Exploring safety systems for dispensing in community pharmacies: Focusing on how staff relate to organizational components☆

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jasmine; Avery, Anthony J.; Ashcroft, Darren; Boyd, Matthew; Phipps, Denham L.; Barber, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying risk is an important facet of a safety practice in an organization. To identify risk, all components within a system of operation should be considered. In clinical safety practice, a team of people, technologies, procedures and protocols, management structure and environment have been identified as key components in a system of operation. Objectives To explore risks in relation to prescription dispensing in community pharmacies by taking into account relationships between key components that relate to the dispensing process. Methods Fifteen community pharmacies in England with varied characteristics were identified, and data were collected using non-participant observations, shadowing and interviews. Approximately 360 hours of observations and 38 interviews were conducted by the team. Observation field notes from each pharmacy were written into case studies. Overall, 52,500 words from 15 case studies and interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic and line-by-line analyses. Validation techniques included multiple data collectors co-authoring each case study for consensus, review of case studies by members of the wider team including academic and practicing community pharmacists, and patient safety experts and two presentations (internally and externally) to review and discuss findings. Results Risks identified were related to relationships between people and other key components in dispensing. This included how different levels of staff communicated internally and externally, followed procedures, interacted with technical systems, worked with management, and engaged with the environment. In a dispensing journey, the following categories were identified which show how risks are inextricably linked through relationships between human components and other key components: 1) dispensing with divided attention; 2) dispensing under pressure; 3) dispensing in a restricted space or environment; and, 4) managing external influences. Conclusions

  20. [Role of the community pharmacist in the management of drug related problems in home care patients].

    PubMed

    Van de Putte, M; Appels, S; Boone, T; Collienne, S; Daems, T; De Lepeleire, J; Foulon, V

    2012-09-01

    Medication management in home care is an error prone process. In a small pilot project in Flanders, community pharmacists collaborated with physicians and home care nurses through a shared electronic care plan, to optimize the medication management of their home care patients. The pilot project shows that GPs and nurses are positive about the possible contribution of the pharmacist in medication management of home care patients. A larger follow up study is necessary to further identify possible roles of pharmacists in home care and to show related health benefits. PMID:23697093

  1. Depth-Related Effects on a Meiofaunal Community Dwelling in the Periphyton of a Mesotrophic Lake

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzinger-Janik, Bianca; Schroeder, Fabian; Majdi, Nabil; Traunspurger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Periphyton is a complex assemblage of micro- and meiofauna embedded in the organic matrix that coats most submerged substrate in the littoral of lakes. The aim of this study was to better understand the consequences of depth-level fluctuation on a periphytic community. The effects of light and wave disturbance on the development of littoral periphyton were evaluated in Lake Erken (Sweden) using an experimental design that combined in situ shading with periphyton depth transfers. Free-living nematodes were a major contributor to the meiofaunal community. Their species composition was therefore used as a proxy to distinguish the contributions of light- and wave-related effects. The periphyton layer was much thicker at a depth of 30 cm than at 200 cm, as indicated by differences in the amounts of organic and phototrophic biomass and meiofaunal and nematode densities. A reduction of the depth-level of periphyton via a transfer from a deep to a shallow location induced rapid positive responses by its algal, meiofaunal, and nematode communities. The slower and weaker negative responses to the reverse transfer were attributed to the potentially higher resilience of periphytic communities to increases in the water level. In the shallow littoral of the lake, shading magnified the effects of phototrophic biomass erosion by waves, as the increased exposure to wave shear stress was not compensated for by an increase in photosynthesis. This finding suggests that benthic primary production will be strongly impeded in the shallow littoral zones of lakes artificially shaded by construction or embankments. However, regardless of the light constraints, an increased exposure to wave action had a generally positive short-term effect on meiofaunal density, by favoring the predominance of species able to anchor themselves to the substrate, especially the Chromadorid nematode Punctodora ratzeburgensis. PMID:26353016

  2. Developing a guide for community-based groups to reduce alcohol-related harm among African migrants.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Alison; Brown, Tony; Norman, Catherine; Hata, Kiri; Toohey, Mark; Vasiljevic, Dubravka; Rowe, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Alcohol-related harm is an issue of concern for African migrant communities living in Australia. However, there has been little information available to guide workers in developing culturally sensitive health promotion strategies. Methods A three-step approach, comprising a literature review, community consultations and an external review, was undertaken to develop a guide to assist organisations and health promotion groups working with African migrant communities to address alcohol-related harms. Discussion There was a high level of agreement between the three steps. Addressing alcohol harms with African migrant communities requires approaches that are sensitive to the needs, structures and experiences of communities. The process should incorporate targeted approaches that enable communities to achieve their resettlement goals as well as strengthening mainstream health promotion efforts. Conclusions The resource produced guides alcohol harm prevention coalitions and workers from the first steps of understanding the influences of acculturation and resettlement on alcohol consumption, through to planning, developing and evaluating an intervention in partnership with communities. So what? This paper advances knowledge by providing a precise summary of Australian African migrant focused alcohol and other drug research to date. It also describes a three-step approach that aimed to incorporate a diversity of community views in the creation of a health promotion and community capacity-building resource. PMID:26726816

  3. Know your public: the importance of the EMS provider in community and media relations.

    PubMed

    Silvester, A

    1997-10-01

    In the hundreds, and even the thousands, of hours that are spent in EMS training, none of the time is dedicated to community relations and public information. You have learned how to provide a service, but not how to sell the product. We relate to stories about physicians who were unsuccessful because of a poor "bedside manner." The patient's perception of you has very little to do with your score on the final exam or the terminology used as you explain an illness. You are judged by the same rules by which store clerks, telephone operators, waitresses and all others in the field of public service are gauged everyday. You may never do great things, but you can do small things in a great way. Just calling 911 is not enough to save a life. The very idea that we can get everywhere in the nick of time to snatch victims from the jaws of death is a fallacy. You most be concerned with the training provided for the lay public as you are with your own continuing education. There is no better way to make your service more effective than to train your entire community to save lives. There are many reasons why you should know how to deal with the media. A strong relationship can be formed simply by knowing how to make their job easier. Following the golden rules for news releases and interviews help us all appear more professional. The career of an EMT is in metamorphosis. You have been accepted by the patients you served and your fellow members of the medical community. Now you must continue to evolve as practitioners; your skills must change to meet the demands of modern medicine, and your knowledge base must continue to increase as new information becomes available. The one thing that must remain the same is your total commitment to patient care. PMID:10175292

  4. 77 FR 18799 - Proposed Agency Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    .... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored questions related to water use on the 2007 CBECS. The water.... Energy Information Administration Proposed Agency Information Collection AGENCY: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Agency Information Collection Activities:...

  5. The impact of aid chains: relations of dependence or supportive partnerships for community-led responses to HIV/AIDS?

    PubMed

    Aveling, E L

    2010-01-01

    In the context of increasing global emphasis on partnerships between international, governmental and civil society organisations in the distribution of international aid, this paper examines the ways in which the resulting aid chains promote and undermine community-led responses to HIV/AIDS. The impact of the aid-granting system is examined using an ethnographic case study of an HIV/AIDS prevention programme with Cambodian military families. The case study draws on observations of stakeholder meetings and programme activities, interviews with stakeholders (the donor, NGOs and military community) and textual materials (programme guidelines, policies and reports). Campbell et al.'s interrelated concepts of relational, symbolic and material context are used to frame the analysis. The establishment of a relationship with a more powerful international NGO is shown to be beneficial to the military community and civil society groups. The international NGO uses its significant material and economic leverage to improve the community's relational context (by ensuring the support of the military high command), symbolic context (by strengthening the position of community and civil society partners in relation to government bodies) and material context (through increasing access to health services). However, material and symbolic asymmetries between partners in the aid chain persist, curtailing the community's involvement and leadership. At the material and relational levels, the hierarchical flow of aid encourages accountability to the demands of the donor while excluding grassroots groups from directly accessing funding. At the symbolic level, problem-focused representations of the military further reinforce the community's position as recipients of intervention, which undermines recognition for the community's knowledge, strengths and right to fully participate. Thus while aid chains can be supportive of community-led responses, this analysis highlights how the structures

  6. 76 FR 81472 - National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Forest Service National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council will meet... input related to urban and community forestry. DATES: The meeting will be held on January 25 and...

  7. 75 FR 27703 - National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Forest Service National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council will meet... and community forestry, work on Council administrative items and hear public input related to...

  8. A SURVEY OF EXERCISE‐RELATED LEG PAIN IN COMMUNITY RUNNERS

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Tricia M.; Hayes, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Exercise‐related leg pain (ERLP) is a common problem in runners. The purposes of this study were to 1) report ERLP occurrence among adult community runners; 2) determine ERLP impact on daily activities; and 3) determine if there is a relationship between ERLP occurrence and selected potential risk factors including sex, age, years of running, ERLP history, body mass index (BMI), orthotic use, menstrual function, and training variables. Methods: Community runners registered for a local race were invited to complete a questionnaire including demographics and potential risk factors. Analyses of differences (t‐test) and relationships (Chi‐square) were conducted and relative risk (RR) values were calculated. Results: 225 registered runners (105 male, 120 female) participated; 63.6% reported ERLP history, and 35.1% reported ERLP in the 3 months preceding the race with bilateral medial ERLP as the most common presentation. Of the 79 runners who experienced ERLP during the 3 months preceding the race, ERLP caused 41.8% to reduce their running and interfered with walking or stair climbing in < 10%. Chi square analyses showed no significant association of sex, menstrual function, orthotic use, or BMI with ERLP occurrence. Significant associations were observed between ERLP history and ERLP occurrence in the previous year (RR=3.39; 2.54‐4.52 95% CI), and between ERLP in the 3 months preceding the race and both years running and training mileage. Greater ERLP occurrence was observed in runners with less than 3 years experience (RR = 1.53; 1.08‐2.17 95% CI) and runners who ran fewer than 15 miles/week (RR = 1.47; 1.04‐2.08 95% CI). Those runners with < 3 years running experience and a race pace of 9 min/mile or > were at greater risk for ERLP when compared to other participants (RR=1.53; 1.07‐2.18 95% CI). Conclusion: Interfering ERLP was common among this group of community runners. Risk factors included ERLP history, training mileage < 15

  9. Agency, communion and entitlement.

    PubMed

    Żemojtel-Piotrowska, Magdalena A; Piotrowski, Jarosław P; Clinton, Amanda

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the relationship between agency, communion, and the active, passive, and revenge forms of entitlement is examined. Results indicate that active entitlement was positively related to agency, negatively to communion (Study 1), and unrelated to unmitigated agency and communion (Study 2). Passive entitlement was positively related to communion (in regular and unmitigated forms) and negatively related to agency (in both forms). Revenge entitlement was positively related to agency (unmitigated and regular), and negatively related to both regular and unmitigated communal orientations. Detected relationships were independent from self-esteem (Study 1). The findings are discussed in relation to distinctions between narcissistic and healthy entitlement, and within the context of the three-dimensional model of entitlement. PMID:25594535

  10. STEM-related, Student-led Service Learning / Community Engagement Projects: Examples and Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swap, R. J.; Wayland, K.

    2015-12-01

    Field-based, STEM-related service learning / community engagement projects present an opportunity for undergraduate students to demonstrate proficiencies related to the process of inquiry. These proficiencies include: appreciation of the larger project context, articulation of an informed question/hypothesis, project proposal development, interdisciplinary collaboration, project management (including planning, implementation reconfiguration and synthesis) and lastly the generation and handing off of acquired knowledge. Calls for these types of proficiencies have been expressed by governmental, non-governmental as well as the private sector. Accordingly, institutions of higher learning have viewed such activities as opportunities for enriching the learning experience for undergraduate students and for making such students more marketable, especially those from STEM-related fields. This institutional interest has provided an opportunity to support and expand field-based learning. Here we present examples of student-led/faculty-mentored international service learning and community engagement projects along the arc of preparation, implementation and post-field process. Representative examples that draw upon environmental science and engineering knowledge have been selected from more than 20 international undergraduate student projects over past decade and include: slow-sand water filtration, rainwater harvesting, methane biodigesters, water reticulation schemes and development and implementation of rocket stoves for communal cooking. We discuss these efforts in terms of the development of the aforementioned proficiencies, the utility of such proficiencies to the larger enterprise of STEM and the potential for transformative student learning outcomes. We share these experiences and lessons learned with the hope that others may intelligently borrow from our approach in a manner appropriate for their particular context.

  11. Duration-Related Variations in Archaeal Communities after a Change from Upland Fields to Paddy Fields.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Wei, Kai; Chen, Lijun; Chen, Rui

    2016-05-28

    Archaea substantially contribute to global geochemical cycling and energy cycling and are impacted by land-use change. However, the response of archaeal communities to a change from upland field to paddy field has been poorly characterized. Here, soil samples were collected at two depths (0-20 cm and 20-40 cm) from one upland field and six paddy fields that were established on former upland fields at different times (1, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 years before the study). Barcoded pyrosequencing was employed to assess the archaeal communities from the samples at taxonomic resolutions from phylum to genus levels. The total archaeal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness showed a significant positive correlation with the land-use change duration. Two phyla, Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, were recorded throughout the study. Both the relative abundance and OTU richness of Euryarchaeota increased at both depths but increased more steadily at the subsurface rather than at the surface. However, these data of Crenarchaeota were the opposite. Additionally, the archaeal composition exhibited a significant relationship with C/N ratios, total phosphorus, soil pH, Olsen phosphorus, and the land-use change duration at several taxonomic resolutions. Our results emphasize that after a change from upland fields to paddy fields, the archaeal diversity and composition changed, and the duration is an important factor in addition to the soil chemical properties. PMID:26869602

  12. Relative Importance of Individual Climatic Drivers Shaping Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Communities.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dan; Veresoglou, Stavros D; Rillig, Matthias C; Xu, Tianle; Li, Huan; Hao, Zhipeng; Chen, Baodong

    2016-08-01

    The physiological tolerance hypothesis (PTH) postulates that it is the tolerance of species to climatic factors that determines overall community richness. Here, we tested whether a group of mutualistic microbes, Glomeromycota, is distributed in semi-arid environments in ways congruent with the PTH. For this purpose, we modeled with climatic predictors the niche of each of the four orders of Glomeromycota and identified predictors of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness. Our dataset consisted of 50 paired grassland and farmland sites in the farming-pastoral ecotone of northern China. We observed shifts in the relative abundance of AM fungal orders in response to climatic variables but also declines in OTU richness in grassland sites that had experienced high precipitation during the preceding year which was incongruous with the PTH. We found pronounced differences across groups of Glomeromycotan fungi in their responses to climatic variables and identified strong dependencies of AM fungal communities on precipitation. Given that precipitation is expected to further decline in the farming-pastoral ecotone over the coming years and that mycorrhiza represents an integral constituent of ecosystem functioning, it is likely that the ecosystem services in the region will change accordingly. PMID:27117797

  13. The murine lung microbiome in relation to the intestinal and vaginal bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This work provides the first description of the bacterial population of the lung microbiota in mice. The aim of this study was to examine the lung microbiome in mice, the most used animal model for inflammatory lung diseases such as COPD, cystic fibrosis and asthma. Bacterial communities from broncho-alveolar lavage fluids and lung tissue were compared to samples taken from fecal matter (caecum) and vaginal lavage fluid from female BALB/cJ mice. Results Using a customized 16S rRNA sequencing protocol amplifying the V3-V4 region our study shows that the mice have a lung microbiome that cluster separately from mouse intestinal microbiome (caecum). The mouse lung microbiome is dominated by Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria overlapping the vaginal microbiome. We also show that removal of host tissue or cells from lung fluid during the DNA extraction step has an impact on the resulting bacterial community profile. Sample preparation needs to be considered when choosing an extraction method and interpreting data. Conclusions We have consistently amplified bacterial DNA from mouse lungs that is distinct from the intestinal microbiome in these mice. The gut microbiome has been extensively studied for its links to development of disease. Here we suggest that also the lung microbiome could be important in relation to inflammatory lung diseases. Further research is needed to understand the contribution of the lung microbiome and the gut-lung axis to the development of lung diseases such as COPD and asthma. PMID:24373613

  14. Spatial variation in the littoral vertebrate community of a reservoir relative to physical and biological gradients

    PubMed Central

    Soski, Jessica J.; Roosenburg, Willem M.

    2014-01-01

    Reservoirs possess gradients in conditions and resources along their long (deep-shallow) axis, but the response of littoral vertebrates (fish and turtles) to these gradients is poorly understood. We have quantified the littoral vertebrate communities throughout a small reservoir in Southeastern Ohio during July and August using traps, and related community composition to environmental variables using NMDS ordination. Ordination revealed that fish and turtles were broadly separated in ordination space, and three distinctly different environmental gradients were significantly associated with the underlying observed species abundances. Observed turtle abundance was explained by measurements of bathymetry, turbidity, and benthic resources, but none of these environmental variables were a reliable predictor of observed fish abundance. Temperature was a poor predictor of observed abundance for both fish and turtles independently, but when fish and turtles were considered together, it became apparent that there were cold areas of the reservoir where observed fish and turtle abundances were different than in other areas of the reservoir. These results suggest that the predictor (environmental) variables we used were appropriate for investigating turtle ecology in reservoirs, but that observed fish abundance is mediated by factors that were not modeled. The efficacy of using traps, the ecological implications of considering fish and turtles together as sympatric and potentially competing species, and directions for future study are discussed. PMID:25538870

  15. Relation between fish communities and riparian zone conditions at two spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, K.E.; Goldstein, R.M.; Hanson, P.E.

    2001-01-01

     The relation offish community composition to riparian cover at two spatial scales was compared at 18 streams in the agricultural Minnesota River Basin. The two spatial scales were: (1) local riparian zone (a 200 meter wide buffer extending 2 to 3 kilometers upstream of the sampling reach); and (2) the upstream riparian zone (a 200 m wide buffer on the mainstem and all perennial tributaries upstream of the sampling reach). Analysis of variance indicated that streams with wooded-local riparian zones had greater fish species richness (means = 20 and 15, respectively) and Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) scores (means = 40 and 26, respectively) than streams with open-local riparian zones. Streams with wooded-upstream riparian zones tended (were not statistically significant) to have greater numbers of species (means = 19 and 15, respectively) and IBI scores (means = 33 and 28, respectively) than streams with open-upstream riparian zones. There was no significant interaction between the riparian zone conditions at the two scales. This study suggests that maintenance of wooded riparian cover along streams could be effective in maintaining or improving fish community composition in streams draining heavily agricultural areas.

  16. Even Better Next Time: Making Effective Slide Shows for Rural Social Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace-Whitaker, Virginia

    Practical, detailed steps for producing a slide/tape show are presented in this paper directed to rural social agencies wishing to communicate more effectively with the communities they serve. The paper begins with background information about advertising in relation to the needs and characteristics of rural social agencies and concludes that a…

  17. Assessing water quality at large geographic scales: relations among land use, water physicochemistry, riparian condition, and fish community structure.

    PubMed

    Meador, Michael R; Goldstein, Robert M

    2003-04-01

    Data collected from 172 sites in 20 major river basins between 1993 and 1995 as part of the US Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program were analyzed to assess relations among basinwide land use (agriculture, forest, urban, range), water physicochemistry, riparian condition, and fish community structure. A multimetric approach was used to develop regionally referenced indices of fish community and riparian condition. Across large geographic areas, decreased riparian condition was associated with water-quality constituents indicative of nonpoint source inputs-total nitrogen and suspended sediment and basinwide urban land use. Decreased fish community condition was associated with increases in total dissolved solids and rangeland use and decreases in riparian condition and agricultural land use. Fish community condition was relatively high even in areas where agricultural land use was relatively high (>50% of the basin). Although agricultural land use can have deleterious effects on fish communities, the results of this study suggest that other factors also may be important, including practices that regulate the delivery of nutrients, suspended sediments, and total dissolved solids into streams. Across large geographic scales, measures of water physicochemistry may be better indicators of fish community condition than basinwide land use. Whereas numerous studies have indicated that riparian restorations are successful in specific cases, this analysis suggests the universal importance of riparian zones to the maintenance and restoration of diverse fish communities in streams. PMID:12677296

  18. Assessing water quality at large geographic scales: Relations among land use, water physicochemistry, riparian condition, and fish community structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meador, M.R.; Goldstein, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Data collected from 172 sites in 20 major river basins between 1993 and 1995 as part of the US Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program were analyzed to assess relations among basinwide land use (agriculture, forest, urban, range), water physicochemistry, riparian condition, and fish community structure. A multimetric approach was used to develop regionally referenced indices of fish community and riparian condition. Across large geographic areas, decreased riparian condition was associated with water-quality constituents indicative of nonpoint source inputs-total nitrogen and suspended sediment and basin-wide urban land use. Decreased fish community condition was associated with increases in total dissolved solids and rangeland use and decreases in riparian condition and agricultural land use. Fish community condition was relatively high even in areas where agricultural land use was relatively high (>50% of the basin). Although agricultural land use can have deleterious effects on fish communities, the results of this study suggest that other factors also may be important, including practices that regulate the delivery of nutrients, suspended sediments, and total dissolved solids into streams. Across large geographic scales, measures of water physicochemistry may be better indicators of fish community condition than basinwide land use. Whereas numerous studies have indicated that riparian restorations are successful in specific cases, this analysis suggests the universal importance of riparian zones to the maintenance and restoration of diverse fish communities in streams.

  19. Proximity to Traffic, Ambient Air Pollution, and Community Noise in Relation to Incident Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Koehoorn, Mieke; Tamburic, Lillian; Davies, Hugh W.; Brauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background: The risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been associated with living near traffic; however, there is evidence suggesting that air pollution may not be responsible for this association. Noise, another traffic-generated exposure, has not been studied as a risk factor for RA. Objectives: We investigated proximity to traffic, ambient air pollution, and community noise in relation to RA in the Vancouver and Victoria regions of British Columbia, Canada. Methods: Cases and controls were identified in a cohort of adults that was assembled using health insurance registration records. Incident RA cases from 1999 through 2002 were identified by diagnostic codes in combination with prescriptions and type of physician (e.g., rheumatologist). Controls were matched to RA cases by age and sex. Environmental exposures were assigned to each member of the study population by their residential postal code(s). We estimated relative risks using conditional logistic regression, with additional adjustment for median income at the postal code. Results: RA incidence was increased with proximity to traffic, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.68) for residence ≤ 50 m from a highway compared with residence > 150 m away. We found no association with traffic-related exposures such as PM2.5, nitrogen oxides, or noise. Ground-level ozone, which was highest in suburban areas, was associated with an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.26; 95% CI: 1.18, 1.36 per interquartile range increase). Conclusions: Our study confirms a previously observed association of RA risk with proximity to traffic and suggests that neither noise levels nor traffic-related air pollutants are responsible for this relationship. Additional investigation of neighborhood and individual correlates of residence near roadways may provide new insight into risk factors for RA. Citation: De Roos AJ, Koehoorn M, Tamburic L, Davies HW, Brauer M. 2014. Proximity to traffic, ambient air pollution, and community

  20. Mediators of the Relation Between Community Violence and Sexual Risk Behavior Among Adults Attending a Public Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic.

    PubMed

    Senn, Theresa E; Walsh, Jennifer L; Carey, Michael P

    2016-07-01

    Prior research shows that violence is associated with sexual risk behavior, but little is known about the relation between community violence (i.e., violence that is witnessed or experienced in one's neighborhood) and sexual risk behavior. To better understand contextual influences on HIV risk behavior, we asked 508 adult patients attending a publicly funded STI clinic in the U.S. (54 % male, M age = 27.93, 68 % African American) who were participating in a larger trial to complete a survey assessing exposure to community violence, sexual risk behavior, and potential mediators of the community violence-sexual risk behavior relation (i.e., mental health, substance use, and experiencing intimate partner violence). A separate sample of participants from the same trial completed measures of sexual behavior norms, which were aggregated to create measures of census tract sexual behavior norms. Data analyses controlling for socioeconomic status revealed that higher levels of community violence were associated with more sexual partners for men and with more episodes of unprotected sex with non-steady partners for women. For both men and women, substance use and mental health mediated the community violence-sexual risk behavior relation; in addition, for men only, experiencing intimate partner violence also mediated this relation. These results confirm that, for individuals living in communities with high levels of violence, sexual risk reduction interventions need to address intimate partner violence, substance use, and mental health to be optimally effective. PMID:27000155

  1. Nutrient, Habitat, and Basin-Characteristics Data and Relations with Fish and Invertebrate Communities in Indiana Streams, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frey, Jeffrey W.; Caskey, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of existing nutrient, habitat, basin-characteristics, and biological-community (fish and invertebrate) data assessed significant relations between nutrients and biological data. Data from 1998 through 2000 for 58 sites in the Upper Wabash River Basin, Lower Wabash River Basin, and tributaries to the Great Lakes and Ohio River Basins were analyzed. Correspondence analysis was used to assess significant relations among nutrients, habitat, basin-characteristics, and biological-community data. Canonical correspondence analysis was used to identify which environmental parameters most influenced the biological communities. When all 58 sites were assessed, six biological-community attributes, metric scores, or site scores were statistically sigificant but weak. When a subset of data was analyzed for eight headwater streams in one ecoregion to minimize the naturally occurring variability associated with the 58 sites, the strength of the relations increased and 24 attributes, metric scores, or site scores were significantly related. Fish-community composition in the 58 sites was most influenced by habitat and land use but not by nutrients. The invertebrate-community composition in the 58 sites was most influenced by habitat, land use, soils, and one nutrient (total Kjeldahl nitrogen [TKN]).

  2. Capacity-Related Innovations Resulting from the Implementation of a Community Collaboration Model for School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Butcher, Dawn; Lawson, Hal A.; Iachini, Aidyn; Bean, Gerald; Flaspohler, Paul D.; Zullig, Keith

    2010-01-01

    A new genus of district and school improvement models entails partnerships with other organizations and new working relationships with families, community leaders, and youths. The Ohio Community Collaboration Model for School Improvement (OCCMSI) is one such model. It enables partners to leverage family and community resources for learning,…

  3. Seasonal Transition of Active Bacterial and Archaeal Communities in Relation to Water Management in Paddy Soils

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hideomi; Ishii, Satoshi; Shiratori, Yutaka; Oshima, Kenshiro; Otsuka, Shigeto; Hattori, Masahira; Senoo, Keishi

    2013-01-01

    Paddy soils have an environment in which waterlogging and drainage occur during the rice growing season. Fingerprinting analysis based on soil RNA indicated that active microbial populations changed in response to water management conditions, although the fundamental microbial community was stable as assessed by DNA-based fingerprinting analysis. Comparative clone library analysis based on bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNAs (5,277 and 5,436 clones, respectively) revealed stable and variable members under waterlogged or drained conditions. Clones related to the class Deltaproteobacteria and phylum Euryarchaeota were most frequently obtained from the samples collected under both waterlogged and drained conditions. Clones related to syntrophic hydrogen-producing bacteria, hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea, rice cluster III, V, and IV, and uncultured crenarchaeotal group 1.2 appeared in greater proportion in the samples collected under waterlogged conditions than in those collected under drained conditions, while clones belonging to rice cluster VI related to ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) appeared at higher frequency in the samples collected under drained conditions than in those collected under waterlogged conditions. These results suggested that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis may become active under waterlogged conditions, whereas ammonia oxidation may progress by rice cluster VI becoming active under drained conditions in the paddy field. PMID:24005888

  4. Community trial on heat related-illness prevention behaviors and knowledge for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noriko; Nakao, Rieko; Ueda, Kayo; Ono, Masaji; Kondo, Masahide; Honda, Yasushi; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to explore whether broadcasting heat health warnings (HHWs), to every household and whether the additional home delivery of bottled water labeled with messages will be effective in improving the behaviors and knowledge of elderly people to prevent heat-related illness. A community trial on heat-related-illness-prevention behaviors and knowledge for people aged between 65 and 84 years was conducted in Nagasaki, Japan. Five hundred eight subjects were selected randomly from three groups: heat health warning (HHW), HHW and water delivery (HHW+W), and control groups. Baseline and follow-up questionnaires were conducted in June and September 2012, respectively. Of the 1524 selected subjects, the 1072 that completed both questionnaires were analyzed. The HHW+W group showed improvements in nighttime AC use (p=0.047), water intake (p=0.003), cooling body (p=0.002) and reduced activities in heat (p=0.047) compared with the control, while the HHW group improved hat or parasol use (p=0.008). An additional effect of household water delivery was observed in water intake (p=0.067) and cooling body (p=0.095) behaviors. HHW and household bottled water delivery improved heat-related-illness-prevention behaviors. The results indicate that home water delivery in addition to a HHW may be needed to raise awareness of the elderly. PMID:25789456

  5. Community Trial on Heat Related-Illness Prevention Behaviors and Knowledge for the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Noriko; Nakao, Rieko; Ueda, Kayo; Ono, Masaji; Kondo, Masahide; Honda, Yasushi; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore whether broadcasting heat health warnings (HHWs), to every household and whether the additional home delivery of bottled water labeled with messages will be effective in improving the behaviors and knowledge of elderly people to prevent heat-related illness. A community trial on heat-related-illness-prevention behaviors and knowledge for people aged between 65 and 84 years was conducted in Nagasaki, Japan. Five hundred eight subjects were selected randomly from three groups: heat health warning (HHW), HHW and water delivery (HHW+W), and control groups. Baseline and follow-up questionnaires were conducted in June and September 2012, respectively. Of the 1524 selected subjects, the 1072 that completed both questionnaires were analyzed. The HHW+W group showed improvements in nighttime AC use (p = 0.047), water intake (p = 0.003), cooling body (p = 0.002) and reduced activities in heat (p = 0.047) compared with the control, while the HHW group improved hat or parasol use (p = 0.008). An additional effect of household water delivery was observed in water intake (p = 0.067) and cooling body (p = 0.095) behaviors. HHW and household bottled water delivery improved heat-related-illness-prevention behaviors. The results indicate that home water delivery in addition to a HHW may be needed to raise awareness of the elderly. PMID:25789456

  6. A Study of Persistence in the Northeast State Community College Health-Related Programs of Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Allana R.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify factors that were positively associated with persistence to graduation by students who were admitted to Health-Related Programs leading to the degree associate of applied science at Northeast State Community College. The criterion variable in this study was persistence, which was categorized into two groups the persister group (program completers) and the nonpersister (program noncompleters) group. The predictor variables included gender, ethnic origin, first- (or nonfirst-) generation-student status, age, specific major program of study, number of remedial and/or developmental courses taken, grades in selected courses (human anatomy and physiology I and II, microbiology, probability and statistics, composition I, clinical I, clinical II), and number of mathematics and science credit hours earned prior to program admission. The data for this ex post facto nonexperimental design were located in Northeast State's student records database, Banner Information System. The subjects of the study were students who had been admitted into Health-Related Programs of study at a 2-year public community college between the years of 1999 and 2008. The population size was 761. Health-Related Programs of study included Dental Assisting, Cardiovascular Technology, Emergency Medical Technology -- Paramedic, Medical Laboratory Technology, Nursing, and Surgical Technology. A combination of descriptive and inferential statistics was used in the analysis of the data. Descriptive statistics included measures of central tendency, standard deviations, and percentages, as appropriate. Independent samples t-tests were used to determine if the mean of a variable on one group of subjects was different from the mean of the same variable with a different group of subjects. It was found that gender, ethnic origin, first-generation status, and age were not significantly associated with persistence to graduation. However, findings did reveal a statistically

  7. Community health nurses’ learning needs in relation to the Canadian community health nursing standards of practice: results from a Canadian survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Canadian Community health nurses (CHNs) work in diverse urban, rural, and remote settings such as: public health units/departments, home health, community health facilities, family practices, and other community-based settings. Research into specific learning needs of practicing CHNs is sparsely reported. This paper examines Canadian CHNs learning needs in relation to the 2008 Canadian Community Health Nursing Standards of Practice (CCHN Standards). It answers: What are the learning needs of CHNs in Canada in relation to the CCHN Standards? What are differences in CHNs’ learning needs by: province and territory in Canada, work setting (home health, public health and other community health settings) and years of nursing practice? Methods Between late 2008 and early 2009 a national survey was conducted to identify learning needs of CHNs based on the CCHN Standards using a validated tool. Results Results indicated that CHNs had learning needs on 25 of 88 items (28.4%), suggesting CHNs have confidence in most CCHN Standards. Three items had the highest learning needs with mean scores > 0.60: two related to epidemiology (means 0.62 and 0.75); and one to informatics (application of information and communication technology) (mean = 0.73). Public health nurses had a greater need to know about “…evaluating population health promotion programs systematically” compared to home health nurses (mean 0.66 vs. 0.39, p <0.010). Nurses with under two years experience had a greater need to learn “… advocating for healthy public policy…” than their more experienced peers (p = 0.0029). Also, NPs had a greater need to learn about “…using community development principles when engaging the individual/community in a consultative process” compared to RNs (p = 0.05). Many nurses were unsure if they applied foundational theoretical frameworks (i.e., the Ottawa Charter of Health Promotion, the Jakarta Declaration, and the Population Health Promotion Model) in

  8. ADHD Symptoms and Peer Relations of Children in a Community Sample: Examining Associated Problems, Self-Perceptions, and Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamantopoulou, Sofia; Henricsson, Lisbeth; Rydell, Ann-Margret

    2005-01-01

    This study examined children's peer relations in relation to gender, symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), associated behaviour problems, prosociality, and self-perceptions, in a community sample. Six hundred and thirty-five 12-year-old children (314 girls) provided peer nominations and rated feelings of loneliness and…

  9. Energy-Related Technology Programs in Community and Junior Colleges: An Analysis of Existing and Planned Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doggette, John R.

    This study was conducted to provide a basis for planning for needed energy-related occupational technology programs in two-year educational institutions. A questionnaire was sent to 1,152 junior, community, and technical colleges in fall 1975; 774 (67%) responded. The survey identified 62 existing one- and two-year energy-related programs and 132…

  10. Relative Importance of Biotic and Abiotic Forces on the Composition and Dynamics of a Soft-Sediment Intertidal Community

    PubMed Central

    Barbeau, Myriam A.

    2016-01-01

    Top-down, bottom-up, middle-out and abiotic factors are usually viewed as main forces structuring biological communities, although assessment of their relative importance, in a single study, is rarely done. We quantified, using multivariate methods, associations between abiotic and biotic (top-down, bottom-up and middle-out) variables and infaunal population/community variation on intertidal mudflats in the Bay of Fundy, Canada, over two years. Our analysis indicated that spatial structural factors like site and plot accounted for most of the community and population variation. Although we observed a significant relationship between the community/populations and the biotic and abiotic variables, most were of minor importance relative to the structural factors. We suggest that community and population structure were relatively uncoupled from the structuring influences of biotic and abiotic factors in this system because of high concentrations of resources that sustain high densities of infauna and limit exploitative competition. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the infaunal community primarily reflects stochastic spatial events, namely a “first come, first served” process. PMID:26790098

  11. A Loss of Moral Experience: Understanding HIV-Related Stigma in the New York City House and Ball Community

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. I incorporated qualitative methods to explore how HIV-related stigma functions in New York City’s House and Ball Community (HBC). Methods. From January through March 2009, I conducted 20 in-depth 1-on-1 interviews with a diverse sample of New York City HBC members. Interviews addressed perceptions of HIV-related stigma, the treatment of HIV-positive members in the community, and the potential impact of HIV-related stigma on risk behaviors. Results. HIV-related stigma contributes to a loss of moral experience for HBC members. Moral experience (i.e., threats to what really matters in a community) disrupts established social connections and hinders the attainment of “ball status” (i.e., amassing social recognition) in the local world of these individuals. Conclusions. My recommendations address HIV-related stigma in the New York City HBC from the vantage of moral experience and highlight the need for longitudinal studies of individual house members and for the implementation of stigma-focused interventions in the community that utilize the unique ball status hierarchy and HBC network to influence social norms surrounding the treatment of HIV-positive community members. PMID:23237182

  12. Klebsiella pneumoniae related community-acquired acute lower respiratory infections in Cambodia: Clinical characteristics and treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In many Asian countries, Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is the second pathogen responsible for community-acquired pneumonia. Yet, very little is known about KP etiology in ALRI in Cambodia, a country that has one of the weakest medical infrastructures in the region. We present here the first clinico-radiological description of KP community-acquired ALRI in hospitalized Cambodian patients. Methods Through ALRI surveillance in two provincial hospitals, KP was isolated from sputum and blood cultures, and identified by API20E gallery from patients ≥ 5 years-old with fever and respiratory symptoms onset ≤14 days. Antibiotics susceptibility testing was provided systematically to clinicians when bacteria were isolated. We collected patients' clinical, radiological and microbiological data and their outcome 3 months after discharge. We also compared KP-related with other bacteria-related ALRI to determine risk factors for KP infection. Results From April 2007 to December 2009, 2315 ALRI patients ≥ 5 years-old were enrolled including 587 whose bacterial etiology could be assigned. Of these, 47 (8.0%) had KP infection; their median age was 55 years and 68.1% were females. Reported prior medication was high (42.5%). Patients' chest radiographs showed pneumonia (61.3% including 39% that were necrotizing), preexisting parenchyma lesions (29.5%) and pleural effusions alone (4.5%) and normal parenchyma (4.5%). Five patients had severe conditions on admission and one patient died during hospitalization. Of the 39 patients that were hospital discharged, 14 died including 12 within 1 month after discharge. Only 13 patients (28%) received an appropriate antibiotherapy. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) - producing strains were found in 8 (17.0%) patients. Female gender (Odds ratio (OR) 2.1; p = 0.04) and diabetes mellitus (OR 3.1; p = 0.03) were independent risk factors for KP-related ALRI. Conclusions KP ALRI in Cambodia has high fatality rate, are more

  13. Mouse Social Network Dynamics and Community Structure are Associated with Plasticity-Related Brain Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Cait M.; Franks, Becca; Curley, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory studies of social behavior have typically focused on dyadic interactions occurring within a limited spatiotemporal context. However, this strategy prevents analyses of the dynamics of group social behavior and constrains identification of the biological pathways mediating individual differences in behavior. In the current study, we aimed to identify the spatiotemporal dynamics and hierarchical organization of a large social network of male mice. We also sought to determine if standard assays of social and exploratory behavior are predictive of social behavior in this social network and whether individual network position was associated with the mRNA expression of two plasticity-related genes, DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3a. Mice were observed to form a hierarchically organized social network and self-organized into two separate social network communities. Members of both communities exhibited distinct patterns of socio-spatial organization within the vivaria that was not limited to only agonistic interactions. We further established that exploratory and social behaviors in standard behavioral assays conducted prior to placing the mice into the large group was predictive of initial network position and behavior but were not associated with final social network position. Finally, we determined that social network position is associated with variation in mRNA levels of two neural plasticity genes, DNMT1 and DNMT3a, in the hippocampus but not the mPOA. This work demonstrates the importance of understanding the role of social context and complex social dynamics in determining the relationship between individual differences in social behavior and brain gene expression. PMID:27540359

  14. Mouse Social Network Dynamics and Community Structure are Associated with Plasticity-Related Brain Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Cait M; Franks, Becca; Curley, James P

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory studies of social behavior have typically focused on dyadic interactions occurring within a limited spatiotemporal context. However, this strategy prevents analyses of the dynamics of group social behavior and constrains identification of the biological pathways mediating individual differences in behavior. In the current study, we aimed to identify the spatiotemporal dynamics and hierarchical organization of a large social network of male mice. We also sought to determine if standard assays of social and exploratory behavior are predictive of social behavior in this social network and whether individual network position was associated with the mRNA expression of two plasticity-related genes, DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3a. Mice were observed to form a hierarchically organized social network and self-organized into two separate social network communities. Members of both communities exhibited distinct patterns of socio-spatial organization within the vivaria that was not limited to only agonistic interactions. We further established that exploratory and social behaviors in standard behavioral assays conducted prior to placing the mice into the large group was predictive of initial network position and behavior but were not associated with final social network position. Finally, we determined that social network position is associated with variation in mRNA levels of two neural plasticity genes, DNMT1 and DNMT3a, in the hippocampus but not the mPOA. This work demonstrates the importance of understanding the role of social context and complex social dynamics in determining the relationship between individual differences in social behavior and brain gene expression. PMID:27540359

  15. Relation between malodor, ambient hydrogen sulfide, and health in a community bordering a landfill

    PubMed Central

    Heaney, Christopher D.; Wing, Steve; Campbell, Robert L.; Caldwell, David; Hopkins, Barbara; Richardson, David; Yeatts, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Background Municipal solid waste landfills are sources of air pollution that may affect the health and quality of life of neighboring communities. Objectives To investigate health and quality of life concerns of neighbors related to landfill air pollution. Methods Landfill neighbors were enrolled and kept twice-daily diaries for 14 d about odor intensity, alteration of daily activities, mood states, and irritant and other physical symptoms between Jan–Nov, 2009. Concurrently, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) air measurements were recorded every 15-min. Relationships between H2S, odor, and health outcomes were evaluated using conditional fixed effects regression models. Results Twenty-three participants enrolled and completed 878 twice-daily diary entries. H2S measurements were recorded over a period of 80 d and 1-hr average H2S = 0.22 ppb (SD = 0.27; range: 0–2.30 ppb). Landfill odor increased 0.63 points (on 5-point Likert-type scale) for every 1 ppb increase in hourly average H2S when the wind was blowing from the landfill towards the community (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.29, 0.91). Odor was strongly associated with reports of alteration of daily activities (odds ratio (OR) = 9.0; 95% CI: 3.5, 23.5), negative mood states (OR = 5.2; 95% CI: 2.8, 9.6), mucosal irritation (OR = 3.7; 95% CI = 2.0, 7.1) and upper respiratory symptoms (OR = 3.9; 95% CI: 2.2, 7.0), but not positive mood states (OR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.5) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (OR = 1.0; 95% CI: 0.4, 2.6). Conclusions Results suggest air pollutants from a regional landfill negatively impact the health and quality of life of neighbors. PMID:21679938

  16. The significance of employing depth-related community replacement models in Carboniferous-Permian sequence stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, D.R. . School of Geology); Mapes, R.H. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    Paleoecological analysis is essential for accurate Carboniferous-Permian sequence-stratigraphic modeling. Employing depth-related community replacement paleoecological models (such as proposed by Boardman and others, 1984) is crucial for delineation of transgressive, highstand, and regressive deposits; locating and calibrating highstands and determination of degree of accommodation space utilization within the cycle succession. Early transgressive deposits are often exceedingly thin or absent in middle to inner shelf regions, and are commonly associated with mixed biofacies representing rapid sea-level rise accompanied by excessively slow net sedimentation rate. Because of the highly discontinuous and poorly developed nature of transgressive deposits, maximum highstand deposits as determined by the onshore-offshore paleoecological model, are shown to commonly be in direct contact with non-marine or marginal marine deposits, the result of facies dislocation. The amount of accommodation space utilized during a particular transgressive and regressive sedimentary sequence is directly related to the rates of sea-level rise, duration of stillstand, as well as the rates of sea-level fall. The author's work suggests that the rates of sea-level rises and falls have varied significantly during the Upper Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian. Sea-Level fluctuation curves have thusfar aided in interbasinal correlations of upper Desmoinesian-lower Virgilian strata from the Midcontinent to the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin, Pedregosa Basin of Arizona, the Illinois Basin, and the Appalachian Basin.

  17. Community-academic partnerships in HIV-related research: a systematic literature review of theory and practice

    PubMed Central

    Brizay, Ulrike; Golob, Lina; Globerman, Jason; Gogolishvili, David; Bird, Mara; Rios-Ellis, Britt; Rourke, Sean B; Heidari, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Community involvement in HIV research has increased over recent years, enhancing community-academic partnerships. Several terms have been used to describe community participation in research. Clarification is needed to determine whether these terms are synonymous or actually describe different research processes. In addition, it remains unclear if the role that communities play in the actual research process follows the recommendations given in theoretical frameworks of community-academia research. Objectives The objective of this study is to review the existing terms and definitions regarding community-academic partnerships and assess how studies are implementing these in relation to conceptual definitions. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed. Two reviewers independently assessed each article, applying the following inclusion criteria: the article must be published in English before 2013; it must provide an explicit definition and/or defining methodology for a term describing research with a community component; and it has to refer to HIV or AIDS, reproductive health and/or STDs. When disagreements about the relevance of an article emerged, a third reviewer was involved until concordance was reached. Data were extracted by one reviewer and independently verified by a second. Qualitative data were analyzed using MaxQDA for content and thematic analyses while quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Community feedback on data analysis and presentation of results was also incorporated. Results In total, 246 articles were retrieved, 159 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The number of studies that included community participation in the field of HIV research increased between 1991 and 2012, and the terms used to describe these activities have changed, moving away from action research (AR) to participatory action research (PAR), community-based research (CBR) and community-based participatory research

  18. Social capital in a lower socioeconomic palliative care population: a qualitative investigation of individual, community and civic networks and relations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lower socioeconomic populations live and die in contexts that render them vulnerable to poorer health and wellbeing. Contexts of care at the end of life are overwhelmingly determined by the capacity and nature of formal and informal networks and relations to support care. To date, studies exploring the nature of networks and relations of support in lower socioeconomic populations at the end of life are absent. This qualitative study sought to identify the nature of individual, community and civic networks and relations that defined the contexts of care for this group. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 patients and 6 informal carers who identified that they had social and economic needs and were from a lower socioeconomic area. A social capital questionnaire identifying individual, community and civic networks and relations formed the interview guide. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and analysed using framework analysis. Results Participants identified that individual and community networks and relations of support were mainly inadequate to meet care needs. Specifically, data revealed: (1) individual (informal caregivers) networks and relations were small and fragile due to the nature of conflict and crisis; (2) community trust and engagement was limited and shifted by illness and caregiving; (3) and formal care services were inconsistent and provided limited practical support. Some transitions in community relations for support were noted. Levels of civic and government engagement and support were overall positive and enabled access to welfare resources. Conclusion Networks and relations of support are essential for ensuring quality end of life care is achieved. Lower socioeconomic groups are at a distinct disadvantage where these networks and relations are limited, as they lack the resources necessary to augment these gaps. Understanding of the nature of assets and limitations, in networks and relations of

  19. Three faces of integrative coordination: a model of interorganizational relations in community-based health and human services.

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, J M; Wilson, J V

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study develops a theoretically justified, network-based model of integrative coordination in community-based health and human services, and it uses this model to measure and compare coordination in six elder service systems. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. We collected data between 1989 and 1991 in six Alabama counties, including two major MSAs, two small MSAs, and two rural areas. STUDY DESIGN AND DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Our measurement of coordination is based on patterns of interorganizational relationships connecting the agencies constituting a community-based health and human services system. Within each site, we interviewed representatives from these agencies, asking them to indicate client referral, generalized support, and agenda-setting relationships they had developed with each of the other agencies in the system. Using network analysis procedures we then identified the network associated with each of these organizational functions (i.e., service delivery, administration, and planning) in each site, and we assessed levels of coordination in each network. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Our measure of integrative coordination is consistent with other indicators of coordination we derive from our data, suggesting its validity. In addition, levels of integrative coordination across sites for each organizational function are generally comparable. Comparisons across sites show integrative coordination to be consistently highest for service delivery networks and lowest for planning networks. CONCLUSIONS. Previous attempts to assess interorganizational coordination without regard to organizational function are subject to misinterpretation. The differing interorganizational dynamics involved in service delivery, administration, and planning appear to generate different patterns of interorganizational relationships, and different levels of coordination. PMID:8063569

  20. Knowledge Distribution and Power Relations in HIV-Related Education and Prevention for Gay Men: An Application of Bernstein to Australian Community-Based Pedagogical Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnes, David; Murphy, Dean

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to make a theoretical and analytic intervention into the field of HIV-related education and prevention by applying the pedagogy framework of Basil Bernstein to a series of pedagogical devices developed and used in community-based programmes targeting gay men in Australia. The paper begins by outlining why it is such an…

  1. Relative role of deterministic and stochastic determinants of soil animal community: a spatially explicit analysis of oribatid mites.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Tancredi; Taormina, Mauro; Migliorini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    1. Ecologists are debating the relative role of deterministic and stochastic determinants of community structure. Although the high diversity and strong spatial structure of soil animal assemblages could provide ecologists with an ideal ecological scenario, surprisingly little information is available on these assemblages. 2. We studied species-rich soil oribatid mite assemblages from a Mediterranean beech forest and a grassland. We applied multivariate regression approaches and analysed spatial autocorrelation at multiple spatial scales using Moran's eigenvectors. Results were used to partition community variance in terms of the amount of variation uniquely accounted for by environmental correlates (e.g. organic matter) and geographical position. Estimated neutral diversity and immigration parameters were also applied to a soil animal group for the first time to simulate patterns of community dissimilarity expected under neutrality, thereby testing neutral predictions. 3. After accounting for spatial autocorrelation, the correlation between community structure and key environmental parameters disappeared: about 40% of community variation consisted of spatial patterns independent of measured environmental variables such as organic matter. Environmentally independent spatial patterns encompassed the entire range of scales accounted for by the sampling design (from tens of cm to 100 m). This spatial variation could be due to either unmeasured but spatially structured variables or stochastic drift mediated by dispersal. Observed levels of community dissimilarity were significantly different from those predicted by neutral models. 4. Oribatid mite assemblages are dominated by processes involving both deterministic and stochastic components and operating at multiple scales. Spatial patterns independent of the measured environmental variables are a prominent feature of the targeted assemblages, but patterns of community dissimilarity do not match neutral predictions

  2. Making the links between community structure and individual well-being: community quality of life in Riverdale, Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Raphael, D; Renwick, R; Brown, I; Steinmetz, B; Sehdev, H; Phillips, S

    2001-09-01

    An inquiry into community quality of life was carried out within a framework that recognizes the complex relationship between community structures and individual well-being. Through use of focus groups and key informant interviews, community members, service providers, and elected representatives in a Toronto community considered aspects of their community that affected quality of life. Community members identified strengths of access to amenities, caring and concerned people, community agencies, low-cost housing, and public transportation. Service providers and elected representatives recognized diversity, community agencies and resources, and presence of culturally relevant food stores and services as strengths. At one level, findings were consistent with emerging concepts of social capital. At another level, threats to the community were considered in relation to the hypothesized role neo-liberalism plays in weakening the welfare state. PMID:11439254

  3. HIV in the Leather Community: Rates and Risk-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, David A.; Seal, David W.; Rintamaki, Lance; Rieger, Gerulf

    2014-01-01

    There exist many subcultures of men who have sex with men (MSM), all with differing values and health behaviors. The Leathermen comprise one such subculture, which is characterized by a heightened valuation of hypersexuality and adherence to sexual control dynamics (i.e., submission and dominance). No previous research has specifically examined this community for differences in sexual health (e.g., HIV rates) and sexual health behaviors (e.g., condom use). We conducted a large survey of men (N = 1,554) at one leather and non-leather event, collecting data from 655 Submissives, Dominants, Switches, and non-orienting Leathermen. Leathermen were 61% more likely to be HIV-positive than non-Leathermen. Decreased condom use found in HIV-positive Leathermen (relative to HIV-positive non-Leathermen) was a potential factor contributing to heightened HIV rates. Universal low condom use in Submissives engaging in receptive, and Dominants engaging in insertive, anal intercourse was an additional trend that potentially contributed to increased numbers of HIV-positive Leathermen. Our recommendation is for heightened awareness of the risks associated with sex among Leathermen, especially unprotected anal intercourse with sero-uncertain Submissives. PMID:19904599

  4. Aging Chart: a community resource for rapid exploratory pathway analysis of age-related processes

    PubMed Central

    Moskalev, Alexey; Zhikrivetskaya, Svetlana; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Dobrovolskaya, Evgenia; Gurinovich, Roman; Kuryan, Oleg; Pashuk, Aleksandr; Jellen, Leslie C.; Aliper, Alex; Peregudov, Alex; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Aging research is a multi-disciplinary field encompassing knowledge from many areas of basic, applied and clinical research. Age-related processes occur on molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, system, organismal and even psychological levels, trigger the onset of multiple debilitating diseases and lead to a loss of function, and there is a need for a unified knowledge repository designed to track, analyze and visualize the cause and effect relationships and interactions between the many elements and processes on all levels. Aging Chart (http://agingchart.org/) is a new, community-curated collection of aging pathways and knowledge that provides a platform for rapid exploratory analysis. Building on an initial content base constructed by a team of experts from peer-reviewed literature, users can integrate new data into biological pathway diagrams for a visible, intuitive, top-down framework of aging processes that fosters knowledge-building and collaboration. As the body of knowledge in aging research is rapidly increasing, an open visual encyclopedia of aging processes will be useful to both the new entrants and experts in the field. PMID:26602690

  5. Relation of Habitual Chocolate Consumption to Arterial Stiffness in a Community-Based Sample: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Georgina E.; Elias, Merrill F.; Alkerwi, Ala'a; Stranges, Saverio; Abhayaratna, Walter P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The consumption of chocolate and cocoa has established cardiovascular benefits. Less is known about the effects of chocolate on arterial stiffness, a marker of subclinical cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chocolate intakes are independently associated with pulse wave velocity (PWV), after adjustment for cardiovascular, lifestyle and dietary factors. Methods Prospective analyses were undertaken on 508 community-dwelling participants (mean age 61 years, 60% women) from the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (MSLS). Habitual chocolate intakes, measured using a food frequency questionnaire, were related to PWV, measured approximately 5 years later. Results Chocolate intake was significantly associated with PWV in a non-linear fashion with the highest levels of PWV in those who never or rarely ate chocolate and lowest levels in those who consumed chocolate once a week. This pattern of results remained and was not attenuated after multivariate adjustment for diabetes, cardiovascular risk factors and dietary variables (p = 0.002). Conclusions Weekly chocolate intake may be of benefit to arterial stiffness. Further studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms that may mediate the observed effects of habitual chocolate consumption on arterial stiffness. PMID:27493901

  6. Traffic-related air pollution and sleep in the Boston Area Community Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shona C; Schwartz, Joel; Yang, May; Yaggi, H Klar; Bliwise, Donald L; Araujo, Andre B

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about environmental determinants of sleep. We investigated the association between black carbon (BC), a marker of traffic-related air pollution, and sleep measures among participants of the Boston Area Community Health Survey. We also sought to assess the impact of sociodemographic factors, health conditions, and season on associations. Residential 24-h BC was estimated from a validated land-use regression model for 3821 participants and averaged over 1-6 months and 1 year. Sleep measures included questionnaire-assessed sleep duration, sleep latency, and sleep apnea. Linear and logistic regression models controlling for confounders estimated the association between sleep measures and BC. Effect modification was tested with interaction terms. Main effects were not observed between BC and sleep measures. However, in stratified models, males experienced 0.23 h less sleep (95% CI: -0.42, -0.03) and those with low SES 0.25 h less sleep (95% CI: -0.48, -0.01) per IQR increase in annual BC (0.21 μg/m(3)). In blacks, sleep duration increased with annual BC (β=0.34 per IQR; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.57). Similar findings were observed for short sleep (≤5 h). BC was not associated with sleep apnea or sleep latency, however, long-term exposure may be associated with shorter sleep duration, particularly in men and those with low SES, and longer sleep duration in blacks. PMID:24984980

  7. Developing Community-Level Policy and Practice to Reduce Traffic-Related Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Brugge, Doug; Patton, Allison P.; Bob, Alex; Reisner, Ellin; Lowe, Lydia; Bright, Oliver-John M.; Durant, John L.; Newman, Jim; Zamore, Wig

    2016-01-01

    The literature consistently shows associations of adverse cardiovascular and pulmonary outcomes with residential proximity to highways and major roadways. Air monitoring shows that traffic-related pollutants (TRAP) are elevated within 200–400 m of these roads. Community-level tactics for reducing exposure include the following: 1) HEPA filtration; 2) Appropriate air-intake locations; 3) Sound proofing, insulation and other features; 4) Land-use buffers; 5) Vegetation or wall barriers; 6) Street-side trees, hedges and vegetation; 7) Decking over highways; 8) Urban design including placement of buildings; 9) Garden and park locations; and 10) Active travel locations, including bicycling and walking paths. A multidisciplinary design charrette was held to test the feasibility of incorporating these tactics into near-highway housing and school developments that were in the planning stages. The resulting designs successfully utilized many of the protective tactics and also led to engagement with the designers and developers of the sites. There is a need to increase awareness of TRAP in terms of building design and urban planning. PMID:27413416

  8. Aging Chart: a community resource for rapid exploratory pathway analysis of age-related processes.

    PubMed

    Moskalev, Alexey; Zhikrivetskaya, Svetlana; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Dobrovolskaya, Evgenia; Gurinovich, Roman; Kuryan, Oleg; Pashuk, Aleksandr; Jellen, Leslie C; Aliper, Alex; Peregudov, Alex; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Aging research is a multi-disciplinary field encompassing knowledge from many areas of basic, applied and clinical research. Age-related processes occur on molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, system, organismal and even psychological levels, trigger the onset of multiple debilitating diseases and lead to a loss of function, and there is a need for a unified knowledge repository designed to track, analyze and visualize the cause and effect relationships and interactions between the many elements and processes on all levels. Aging Chart (http://agingchart.org/) is a new, community-curated collection of aging pathways and knowledge that provides a platform for rapid exploratory analysis. Building on an initial content base constructed by a team of experts from peer-reviewed literature, users can integrate new data into biological pathway diagrams for a visible, intuitive, top-down framework of aging processes that fosters knowledge-building and collaboration. As the body of knowledge in aging research is rapidly increasing, an open visual encyclopedia of aging processes will be useful to both the new entrants and experts in the field. PMID:26602690

  9. The relation between circadian asynchrony, functional redundancy, and trophic performance in tropical ant communities.

    PubMed

    Houadria, Mickal; Blüthgen, Nico; Salas-Lopez, Alex; Schmitt, Mona-Isabel; Arndt, Johanna; Schneider, Eric; Orivel, Jérôme; Menzel, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The diversity-stability relationship has been under intense scrutiny for the past decades, and temporal asynchrony is recognized as an important aspect of ecosystem stability. In contrast to relatively well-studied interannual and seasonal asynchrony, few studies investigate the role of circadian cycles for ecosystem stability. Here, we studied multifunctional redundancy of diurnal and nocturnal ant communities in four tropical rain forest sites. We analyzed how it was influenced by species richness, functional performance, and circadian asynchrony. In two neotropical sites, species richness and functional redundancy were lower at night. In contrast, these parameters did not differ in the two paleotropical sites we studied. Circadian asynchrony between species was pronounced in the neotropical sites, and increased circadian functional redundancy. In general, species richness positively affected functional redundancy, but the effect size depended on the temporal and spatial breadth of the species with highest functional performance. Our analysis shows that high levels of trophic performance were only reached through the presence of such high-performing species, but not by even contributions of multiple, less-efficient species. Thus, these species can increase current functional performance, but reduce overall functional redundancy. Our study highlights that diurnal and nocturnal ecosystem properties of the very same habitat can markedly differ in terms of species richness and functional redundancy. Consequently, like the need to study multiple ecosystem functions, multiple periods of the circadian cycle need to be assessed in order to fully understand the diversity-stability relationship in an ecosystem. PMID:27008791

  10. Ghosts from the Past: Exploring Community Cultures and School Cultures in Relation to Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivinson, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    This article explores poverty from the perspective of the intergenerational transmission. That is, it suggests that communities, and specifically a post-industrial community in South Wales, had developed coping strategies to manage the precarious character of employment associated with the mining and steel industries. These post-industrial…

  11. Suicide Intervention Skills and Related Factors in Community and Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerder, Gert; Reynders, Alexandre; Andriessen, Karl; Van Audenhove, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Health and community professionals have considerable exposure to suicidal people and need to be well skilled to deal with them. We assessed suicide intervention skills with a Dutch version of the SIRI in 980 health and community professionals and psychology students. Suicide intervention skills clearly differed among professional groups and were…

  12. Balancing Head and Heart: The Importance of Relational Accountability in Community-University Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajner, Tania; Fletcher, Fay; Makokis, Pat

    2012-01-01

    In this article we introduce a "head and heart" approach to community-engaged scholarship. Through the literatures of Aboriginal scholarship and engaged scholarship we reflect on a community-university research and program development project undertaken in response to health and education concerns of Aboriginal people in Canada. We suggest that…

  13. Intensity and Attachment: How the Chaotic Enrollment Patterns of Community College Students Relate to Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between community college enrollment patterns and student outcomes--credential completion and transfer to a 4-year institution--introducing a new way of visualizing the various attendance patterns of community college students. Patterns of enrollment intensity (full- or part-time status) and continuity…

  14. Community ChoiceWork: Citizen Deliberations on Issues Related to HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Chanya

    This guide describes Community ChoiceWork, an approach to directly involving citizens in issues that affect them (in this case, HIV/AIDS). It is intended help citizens frame and deliberate on an issue of concern that has no clear solution. After explaining what Community ChoiceWork is, the guide discusses what it has to do with HIV/AIDS. Next, it…

  15. Beyond the Bake Sale: A Community-Based Relational Approach to Parent Engagement in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Mark R.; Hong, Soo; Rubin, Carolyn Heang; Uy, Phitsamay Sychitkokhong

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Parent involvement in education is widely recognized as important, yet it remains weak in many communities. One important reason for this weakness is that urban schools have grown increasingly isolated from the families and communities they serve. Many of the same neighborhoods with families who are disconnected from public…

  16. Public Higher Education Funding, Budget Drivers, and Related Issues: The State Community College Director Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.; D'Amico, Mark M.; Friedel, Janice N.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents results from the 2012 National Survey of Access and Finance Issues conducted by the National Council of State Directors of Community Colleges (NCSDCC), an affiliated council of the American Association of Community Colleges, and includes a comparison of survey results from previous years dating back to 2003, with the…

  17. An Exploration of Community Relations between a Public High School District and Faith-Based Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beerbower, John David

    2013-01-01

    An effective school leader explores better ways to communicate with the community stakeholder their district serves. Often, some of the strongest groups in a community are the faith-based organizations (FBOs). A qualitative, action research design was used to explore three primary questions. The study provided an example for exploring perceptions…

  18. Is the onset of influenza in the community age-related?

    PubMed

    Fleming, D M; Durnall, H; Warburton, F; Ellis, J S; Zambon, M C

    2016-08-01

    We studied the spread of influenza in the community between 1993 and 2009 using primary-care surveillance data to investigate if the onset of influenza was age-related. Virus detections [A(H3N2), B, A(H1N1)] and clinical incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI) in 12·3 million person-years in the long-running Royal College of General Practitioners-linked clinical-virological surveillance programme in England & Wales were examined. The number of days between symptom onset and the all-age peak ILI incidence were compared by age group for each influenza type/subtype. We found that virus detection and ILI incidence increase, peak and decrease were in unison. The mean interval between symptom onset to peak ILI incidence in virus detections (all ages) was: A(H3N2) 20·5 [95% confidence interval (CI) 19·7-21·6] days; B, 18·8 (95% CI 15·8·0-21·7) days; and A(H1N1) 17·0 (95% CI 15·6-18·4) days. Differences by age group were examined using the Kruskal-Wallis test. For A(H3N2) and A(H1N1) viruses the interval was similar in each age group. For influenza B there were highly significant differences by age group (P = 0·0001). Clinical incidence rates of ILI reported in the 8 weeks preceding the period of influenza virus activity were used to estimate a baseline incidence and threshold value (upper 95% CI of estimate) which was used as a marker of epidemic progress. Differences between the age groups in the week in which the threshold was reached were small and not localized to any age group. In conclusion we found no evidence to suggest that influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1) occurs in the community in one age group before another. For influenza B, virus detection was earlier in children aged 5-14 years than in persons aged ⩾25 years. PMID:27350234

  19. 41 CFR 102-73.15 - What real estate acquisition and related services may Federal agencies provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What real estate... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 73-REAL ESTATE ACQUISITION General Provisions § 102-73.15 What real estate... provide real estate acquisition and related services, including leasing (with or without purchase...

  20. 41 CFR 102-73.15 - What real estate acquisition and related services may Federal agencies provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What real estate... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 73-REAL ESTATE ACQUISITION General Provisions § 102-73.15 What real estate... provide real estate acquisition and related services, including leasing (with or without purchase...

  1. 41 CFR 102-73.15 - What real estate acquisition and related services may Federal agencies provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What real estate... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 73-REAL ESTATE ACQUISITION General Provisions § 102-73.15 What real estate... provide real estate acquisition and related services, including leasing (with or without purchase...

  2. 41 CFR 102-73.15 - What real estate acquisition and related services may Federal agencies provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What real estate... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 73-REAL ESTATE ACQUISITION General Provisions § 102-73.15 What real estate... provide real estate acquisition and related services, including leasing (with or without purchase...

  3. Working with Organized Groups. Section 2, Improving Your School-Community Relations Program. Successful School Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusco, Gene C.

    Working with organized groups can be an effective way of improving school-community relations. Under proper conditions two types of organized efforts have proved to be successful -- parent-teacher groups and citizens' committees for better schools. Basic to the wise use of organized citizens groups is the need for the school staff to have…

  4. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED): A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSousa, Diogo Araujo; Salum, Giovanni Abrahao; Isolan, Luciano Rassier; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional community-based study was to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) to the diagnosis of anxiety disorders (AD). Participants were 119 students aged 9-18. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed by a psychiatrist throughout a structural clinical…

  5. Social Studies: Economics, International Relations, and Political Science. Latin American Curriculum Units for Junior and Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glade, William P.; Baldwin, Emily

    These three self-contained units of study will help community college students learn about the economics, international relations, and politics of Latin America. Each unit can be used independently and contains introductory notes for instructors, student materials, and a bibliography. Students are expected to read and discuss the reading…

  6. Gender Differences in Posttraumatic Stress and Related Symptoms among Inner-City Minority Youth Exposed to Community Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Jennifer D.; Kuperminc, Gabriel P.; Price, Ann W.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in levels of violence exposure, and in levels of posttraumatic stress (PTS) and related symptomatology in a sample of inner-city predominantly African American youth. Because such youth are at risk for exposure to chronic community violence, they are likely to experience considerable distress and clinical or…

  7. Viruses in non-disinfected drinking water from municipal wells are related to community rates of acute gastrointestinal illness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundwater supplies for drinking water are frequently contaminated with low-levels of human enteric virus genomes, yet evidence for waterborne disease transmission is lacking. We related qPCR-measured enteric viruses in the tap water of 14 non-chlorinating communities in the U.S. to acute gastroint...

  8. A Life-Span, Relational, Public Health Model of Self-Regulation: Impact on Individual and Community Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maniar, Swapnil; Zaff, Jonathan F.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors extend the ideas around the development of self-regulation and its impact on development by proposing a life-span, relational, public health model. They propose that the role of self-regulation should be understood across transitions from childhood to adulthood and through an individual and community perspective,…

  9. Examining Behavioral, Relational, and Cognitive Engagement in Smaller Learning Communities: A Case Study of Reform in One Suburban District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Heather A.; Chang, Mei-Lin; Andrzejewski, Carey E.; Poirier, Ryan R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the impact of Smaller Learning Community reform on students' behavioral, relational, and cognitive engagement in a suburban school district experiencing urbanization. We describe a project in which we evaluated the engagement of a cohort of 8th grade students as they transitioned to high school (n = 605).…

  10. Examining the Self-Efficacy of Community College STEM Majors: Factors Related to Four-Year Degree Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amelink, Catherine T.; Artis, Sharnnia; King Liu, Tsu-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Despite the awareness of the importance of self-efficacy, this concept has been studied in a limited sense among community college students (Collins & Bissell, 2004), but it has been shown to be significantly related to career decisions among enrollees (Kelly & Hatcher, 2013). The literature does not address what types of experiences can…

  11. Development of the Environmental Strategies Instrument to Measure Adolescent Alcohol Prevention-Related Outcomes in Community Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervantes, Richard C.; Goldbach, Jeremy; Yeung, Albert; Rey, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Recently, evidence-based community policy approaches to preventing substance use and alcohol abuse, called environmental strategies, have gained in popularity. The environmental survey instrument (ESI) was developed to evaluate perceptions around drinking and related problems. Specifically, the authors were interested in assessing community…

  12. Towards Educational Inclusion in a Transforming Society: Some Lessons from Community Relations and Special Needs Education in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Sean; Smith, Ron

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the socially constructed ideas that have come to be given the status of taken-for-granted knowledge within not one, but two, fields of professional practice in Northern Irish schools; community relations and special needs education. Dominant discourses were viewed as constructing norms around which educational professionals…

  13. Enhancing the many-to-many relations across IHE document sharing communities.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Luís S; Costa, Carlos; Oliveira, José Luís

    2012-01-01

    The Integrating Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative is an ongoing project aiming to enable true inter-site interoperability in the health IT field. IHE is a work in progress and many challenges need to be overcome before the healthcare Institutions may share patient clinical records transparently and effortless. Configuring, deploying and testing an IHE document sharing community requires a significant effort to plan and maintain the supporting IT infrastructure. With the new paradigm of cloud computing is now possible to launch software devices on demand and paying accordantly to the usage. This paper presents a framework designed with purpose of expediting the creation of IHE document sharing communities. It provides semi-ready templates of sharing communities that will be customized according the community needs. The framework is a meeting point of the healthcare institutions, creating a favourable environment that might converge in new inter-institutional professional relationships and eventually the creation of new Affinity Domains. PMID:22874270

  14. Medicaid program; relation with other agencies and miscellaneous Medicaid definitions--Health Care Financing Administration. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1983-03-11

    We proposed to amend the Medicaid regulations to allow States the option of paying cost sharing amounts for Medicaid beneficiaries who are covered under Medicare Part B "Buy-in" agreements. We also propose to revise several definitions and clarify ambiguities in existing Medicaid regulations. The proposed definition changes are related to private duty nursing services, inpatient psychiatric services, inpatient and outpatient and outpatient. All changes are a part of the Department's regulatory reform effort which targets for revision those regulations that are ambiguous or that have been identified as problematic. PMID:10298970

  15. Neighborhood perceptions and health-related outcomes among Latinos with diabetes from a rural agricultural community.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Gerardo; Morales, Leo S; Nuñez de Jaimes, Fatima; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Isiordia, Marilu; Noguera, Christine; Mangione, Carol M

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about how neighborhood perceptions are related to diabetes outcomes among Latinos living in rural agricultural communities. Our objective was to examine the association between perceived neighborhood problems and diabetes outcomes. This is a cross-sectional survey study with medical record reviews of a random sample of 250 adult Latinos with type 2 diabetes. The predictor was a rating of patient ratings of neighborhood problems (crime, trash and litter, lighting at night, and access to exercise facilities, transportation, and supermarkets). The primary outcomes were the control of three intermediate outcomes [LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c) < 100 mg/dl, AlC < 9.0 %, and blood pressure (BP) < 140/80 mmHg], and body mass index (BMI) < 30 kg/m(2). Secondary outcomes were participation in self-care activities (physical activity, healthy eating, medication adherence, foot checks, and glucose checks). We used regression analysis and adjusted for age, gender, education, income, years with diabetes, insulin use, depressive symptoms, and co-morbidities. Forty-eight percent of patients perceived at least one neighborhood problem and out of the six problem areas, crime was most commonly perceived as a problem. Perception of neighborhood problems was independently associated with not having a BP < 140/80 [Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.45; 95 % CI 0.22, 0.92], and BMI < 30 (AOR = 0.43; 95 % CI 0.24, 0.77), after controlling for covariates. Receipt of recommended processes of care was not associated with perception of neighborhood. Perception of neighborhood problems among low-income rural Latinos with diabetes was independently associated with a higher BMI and BP. PMID:24599665

  16. Neighborhood Perceptions and Health-Related Outcomes among Latinos with Diabetes from a Rural Agricultural Community

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Gerardo; Morales, Leo S.; de Jaimes, Fatima Nunez; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Isiordia, Marilu; Noguera, Christine; Mangione, Carol M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how neighborhood perceptions are related to diabetes outcomes among Latinos living in rural agricultural communities. Our objective was to examine the association between perceived neighborhood problems and diabetes outcomes. This is a cross-sectional survey study with medical record reviews of a random sample of 250 adult Latinos with type 2 diabetes. The predictor was a rating of patient ratings of neighborhood problems (crime, trash and litter, lighting at night, and access to exercise facilities, transportation, and supermarkets). The primary outcomes were the control of three intermediate outcomes (LDL-c <100 mg/dl, AlC < 9.0%, and blood pressure (BP) < 140/80 mmHg), and body mass index (BMI) < 30 kg/m2. Secondary outcomes were participation in self-care activities (physical activity, healthy eating, medication adherence, foot checks, and glucose checks). We used regression analysis and adjusted for age, gender, education, income, years with diabetes, insulin use, depressive symptoms, and co-morbidities. Forty-eight percent of patients perceived at least one neighborhood problem and out of the six problem areas, crime was most commonly perceived as a problem. Perception of neighborhood problems was independently associated with not having a BP < 140/80 (Adjusted odds ratio [AOR]= 0.45; 95% CI: 0.22, 0.92), and BMI < 30 (AOR=0.43; 95% CI: 0.24, 0.77), after controlling for covariates. Receipt of recommended processes of care was not associated with perception of neighborhood. Perception of neighborhood problems among low-income rural Latinos with diabetes was independently associated with a higher BMI and BP. PMID:24599665

  17. Linkage between bacterial and fungal rhizosphere communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is related to plant phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Terrence H; El-Din Hassan, Saad; Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Al-Otaibi, Fahad; Hijri, Mohamed; Yergeau, Etienne; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to excavating and chemically treating contaminated soils. Certain plants can directly bioremediate by sequestering and/or transforming pollutants, but plants may also enhance bioremediation by promoting contaminant-degrading microorganisms in soils. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region to compare the community composition of 66 soil samples from the rhizosphere of planted willows (Salix spp.) and six unplanted control samples at the site of a former petrochemical plant. The Bray–Curtis distance between bacterial communities across willow cultivars was significantly correlated with the distance between fungal communities in uncontaminated and moderately contaminated soils but not in highly contaminated (HC) soils (>2000 mg kg−1 hydrocarbons). The mean dissimilarity between fungal, but not bacterial, communities from the rhizosphere of different cultivars increased substantially in the HC blocks. This divergence was partly related to high fungal sensitivity to hydrocarbon contaminants, as demonstrated by reduced Shannon diversity, but also to a stronger influence of willows on fungal communities. Abundance of the fungal class Pezizomycetes in HC soils was directly related to willow phylogeny, with Pezizomycetes dominating the rhizosphere of a monophyletic cluster of cultivars, while remaining in low relative abundance in other soils. This has implications for plant selection in phytoremediation, as fungal associations may affect the health of introduced plants and the success of co-inoculated microbial strains. An integrated understanding of the relationships between fungi, bacteria and plants will enable the design of treatments that specifically promote effective bioremediating communities. PMID:23985744

  18. Relative influence of chemical and non-chemical stressors on invertebrate communities: a case study in the Danube River.

    PubMed

    Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J; Leitner, Patrick; Graf, Wolfram; Focks, Andreas

    2016-11-15

    A key challenge for the ecological risk assessment of chemicals has been to evaluate the relative contribution of chemical pollution to the variability observed in biological communities, as well as to identify multiple stressor groups. In this study we evaluated the toxic pressure exerted by >200 contaminants to benthic macroinvertebrates in the Danube River using the Toxic Unit approach. Furthermore, we evaluated correlations between several stressors (chemical and non-chemical) and biological indices commonly used for the ecological status assessment of aquatic ecosystems. We also performed several variation partitioning analyses to evaluate the relative contribution of contaminants and other abiotic parameters (i.e. habitat characteristics, hydromorphological alterations, water quality parameters) to the structural and biological trait variation of the invertebrate community. The results of this study show that most biological indices significantly correlate to parameters related to habitat and physico-chemical conditions, but showed limited correlation with the calculated toxic pressure. The calculated toxic pressure, however, showed little variation between sampling sites, which complicates the identification of pollution-induced effects. The results of this study show that the variation in the structure and trait composition of the invertebrate community are mainly explained by habitat and water quality parameters, whereas hydromorphological alterations play a less important role. Among the water quality parameters, physico-chemical parameters such as suspended solids, nutrients or dissolved oxygen explained a larger part of the variation in the invertebrate community as compared to metals or organic contaminants. Significant correlations exist between some physico-chemical measurements (e.g. nutrients) and some chemical classes (i.e. pharmaceuticals, chemicals related to human presence) which constitute important multiple stressor groups. This study

  19. What is `Agency'? Perspectives in Science Education Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Jenny; Clarke, David John

    2014-03-01

    The contemporary interest in researching student agency in science education reflects concerns about the relevance of schooling and a shift in science education towards understanding learning in science as a complex social activity. The purpose of this article is to identify problems confronting the science education community in the development of this new research agenda and to argue that there is a need for research in science education that attends to agency as a social practice. Despite increasing interest in student agency in educational research, the term 'agency' has lacked explicit operationalisation and, across the varied approaches, such as critical ethnography, ethnographies of communication, discourse analysis and symbolic interactionism, there has been a lack of coherence in its research usage. There has also been argument concerning the validity of the use of the term 'agency' in science education research. This article attempts to structure the variety of definitions of 'student agency' in science education research, identifies problems in the research related to assigning intentionality to research participants and argues that agency is a kind of discursive practice. The article also draws attention to the need for researchers to be explicit in the assumptions they rely upon in their interpretations of social worlds. Drawing upon the discursive turn in the social sciences, a definition of agency is provided, that accommodates the discursive practices of both individuals and the various functional social groups from whose activities classroom practice is constituted. The article contributes to building a focused research agenda concerned with understanding and promoting student agency in science.

  20. Guidelines for Community Relations Personnel. Criminal Justice Research. Prevention and Control of Collective Violence, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, W. Thomas; Knoblauch, Richard L.

    The objective of this study is to provide local law enforcement agencies with guidelines for the collection and dissemination of elements of information required for sound decision making in response to the threat or actual initiation of collective violence. Informal, semi-structured interviews in fourteen selected cities and six State police…

  1. Relation between selected water-quality variables and lake level in Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Tamara M.; Fuhrer, Gregory J.; Morace, Jennifer L.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the analysis of data that they have been collecting for several years, the Klamath Tribes recently recommended that the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) modify the operating plan for the dam to make the minimum lake levels for the June-August period more closely resemble pre-dam conditions (Jacob Kann, written commun., 1995). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was asked to analyze the available data for the lake and to assess whether the evidence exists to conclude that year-to-year differences in certain lake water-quality variables are related to year-to-year differences in lake level. The results of the analysis will be used as scientific input in the process of developing an operating plan for the Link River Dam.

  2. Community-academia partnerships to promote nutrition in the Lower Mississippi Delta: community members' perceptions of effectiveness, barriers, and factors related to success

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Community members from a Lower Mississippi Delta community and university representatives used the Comprehensive Participatory Planning and Evaluation (CPPE) model to identify and prioritize three nutrition and physical activity problems in their community. These were intake of unhealthy foods, lack...

  3. HIV-related stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean communities in the Netherlands: manifestations, consequences and coping.

    PubMed

    Stutterheim, Sarah E; Bos, Arjan E R; Shiripinda, Iris; de Bruin, Marijn; Pryor, John B; Schaalma, Herman P

    2012-01-01

    HIV-related stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean diaspora communities in the Netherlands was investigated. Interviews with HIV-positive and HIV-negative community members demonstrated that HIV-related stigma manifests as social distance, physical distance, words and silence. The psychological consequences of HIV-related stigma among those diagnosed with HIV reported were emotional pain, sadness, loneliness, anger, frustration and internalised stigma. The social consequences included decreased social network size, limited social support and social isolation, and resulted from not only enacted stigma but also self-imposed social withdrawal. Also, poor treatment adherence was a health-related consequence. People living with HIV employed both problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies to mitigate the negative consequences of stigma. Problem-focused coping strategies included selective disclosure, disengagement, affiliating with similar others, seeking social support and, to a lesser extent, activism. Emotion-focused strategies included distraction, positive reappraisal, religious coping, external attributions, disidentification and acceptance. HIV-related stigma clearly permeates African and Afro-Caribbean communities in the Netherlands, and should be targeted for intervention. PMID:21678184

  4. Assessing the Relative Effects of Geographic Location and Soil Type on Microbial Communities Associated with Straw Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Decomposition of plant residues is largely mediated by soil-dwelling microorganisms whose activities are influenced by both climate conditions and properties of the soil. However, a comprehensive understanding of their relative importance remains elusive, mainly because traditional methods, such as soil incubation and environmental surveys, have a limited ability to differentiate between the combined effects of climate and soil. Here, we performed a large-scale reciprocal soil transplantation experiment, whereby microbial communities associated with straw decomposition were examined in three initially identical soils placed in parallel in three climate regions of China (red soil, Chao soil, and black soil, located in midsubtropical, warm-temperate, and cold-temperate zones). Maize straws buried in mesh bags were sampled at 0.5, 1, and 2 years after the burial and subjected to chemical, physical, and microbiological analyses, e.g., phospholipid fatty acid analysis for microbial abundance, community-level physiological profiling, and 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, respectively, for functional and phylogenic diversity. Results of aggregated boosted tree analysis show that location rather soil is the primary determining factor for the rate of straw decomposition and structures of the associated microbial communities. Principal component analysis indicates that the straw communities are primarily grouped by location at any of the three time points. In contrast, microbial communities in bulk soil remained closely related to one another for each soil. Together, our data suggest that climate (specifically, geographic location) has stronger effects than soil on straw decomposition; moreover, the successive process of microbial communities in soils is slower than those in straw residues in response to climate changes. PMID:23524671

  5. Findings from the Community Health Intervention Program in South Carolina: Implications for Reducing Cancer-Related Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, James Lyndon; Friedman, Daniela B.; Brandt, Heather M.; Adams, Swann Arp; Xirasagar, Sudha; Ureda, John R.; Mayo, Rachel M.; Comer, Kimberly; Evans, Miriam; Fedrick, Delores; Talley, Jacqueline; Broderick, Madeline; Hebert, James R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The South Carolina Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (SC-CPCRN) implemented the Community Health Intervention Program (CHIP) mini-grants initiative to address cancer-related health disparities and reduce the cancer burden among high-risk populations across the state. The mini-grants project implemented evidence-based health interventions tailored to the specific needs of each community. OBJECTIVE To support the SC-CPCRN’s goals of moving toward greater dissemination and implementation of evidence-based programs in the community to improve public health, prevent disease, and reduce the cancer burden. METHODS Three community-based organizations were awarded $10,000 each to implement one of the National Cancer Institute’s evidence-based interventions. Each group had 12 months to complete their project. SC-CPCRN investigators and staff provided guidance, oversight, and technical assistance for each project. Grantees provided regular updates and reports to their SC-CPCRN liaisons to capture vital evaluation information. RESULTS The intended CHIP mini-grant target population reach was projected to be up to 880 participants combined. Actual combined reach of the three projects reported upon completion totaled 1,072 individuals. The majority of CHIP participants were African-American females. Participants ranged in age from 19 to 81 years. Evaluation results showed an increase in physical activity, dietary improvements, and screening participation. CONCLUSIONS The success of the initiative was the result of a strong community-university partnership built on trust. Active two-way communication and an honest open dialogue created an atmosphere for collaboration. Communities were highly motivated. All team members shared a common goal of reducing cancer-related health disparities and building greater public health capacity across the state. PMID:23645547

  6. Community Knowledge about Water: Who Has Better Knowledge and Is This Associated with Water-Related Behaviors and Support for Water-Related Policies?

    PubMed

    Dean, Angela J; Fielding, Kelly S; Newton, Fiona J

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable approaches to water management require broad community acceptance of changes in policy, practice and technology, which in turn, requires an engaged community. A critical first step in building an engaged community is to identify community knowledge about water management, an issue rarely examined in research. To address this, we surveyed a representative sample of Australian adults (n = 5172). Knowledge was assessed using 15 questions about impact of household activities on waterways, the urban water cycle, and water management. This survey also examined demographics, psychosocial characteristics, exposure to water-related information, and water-related behaviors and policy support. Participants correctly answered a mean of 8.0 questions (Range 0-15). Most respondents knew that household actions can reduce water use and influence waterway health, whereas less than one third correctly identified that domestic wastewater is treated prior to entering waterways, urban stormwater is not treated, and that these are carried via different pipes. Higher water knowledge was associated with older age, higher education and living in non-urban areas. Poorer water knowledge was associated with speaking a language other than English in the home. Garden size, experience of water restrictions, satisfaction, waterway use for swimming, and certain information sources were also associated with knowledge. Greater water knowledge was associated with adoption of water-saving and pollution-reduction behaviors, and support for both alternative water sources and raingardens. These findings confirm the importance of community knowledge, and identify potential subgroups who may require additional targeting to build knowledge and support for water management initiatives. PMID:27428372

  7. Community Knowledge about Water: Who Has Better Knowledge and Is This Associated with Water-Related Behaviors and Support for Water-Related Policies?

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Kelly S.; Newton, Fiona J.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable approaches to water management require broad community acceptance of changes in policy, practice and technology, which in turn, requires an engaged community. A critical first step in building an engaged community is to identify community knowledge about water management, an issue rarely examined in research. To address this, we surveyed a representative sample of Australian adults (n = 5172). Knowledge was assessed using 15 questions about impact of household activities on waterways, the urban water cycle, and water management. This survey also examined demographics, psychosocial characteristics, exposure to water-related information, and water-related behaviors and policy support. Participants correctly answered a mean of 8.0 questions (Range 0–15). Most respondents knew that household actions can reduce water use and influence waterway health, whereas less than one third correctly identified that domestic wastewater is treated prior to entering waterways, urban stormwater is not treated, and that these are carried via different pipes. Higher water knowledge was associated with older age, higher education and living in non-urban areas. Poorer water knowledge was associated with speaking a language other than English in the home. Garden size, experience of water restrictions, satisfaction, waterway use for swimming, and certain information sources were also associated with knowledge. Greater water knowledge was associated with adoption of water-saving and pollution-reduction behaviors, and support for both alternative water sources and raingardens. These findings confirm the importance of community knowledge, and identify potential subgroups who may require additional targeting to build knowledge and support for water management initiatives. PMID:27428372

  8. Community structure of fleas within and among populations of three closely related rodent hosts: nestedness and beta-diversity.

    PubMed

    VAN DER Mescht, Luther; Krasnov, Boris R; Matthee, Conrad A; Matthee, Sonja

    2016-09-01

    We studied nestedness and its relationships with beta-diversity in flea communities harboured by three closely related rodent species (Rhabdomys pumilio, Rhabdomys intermedius, Rhabdomys dilectus) at two spatial scales (within and among host populations) in South Africa and asked (a) whether variation in species composition of flea communities within and among host populations follows a non-random pattern; if yes, (b) what are the contributions of nestedness and species turnover to dissimilarity (= beta-diversity) among flea communities at the two scales; and (c) do the degree of nestedness and its contribution to beta-diversity differ among host species (social vs solitary) and between scales. We found that nestedness in flea assemblages was more pronounced (a) in social than solitary host species and (b) at lower (among host individuals within populations) than at higher scale (among host populations). We also found that higher degree of nestedness was associated with its higher contribution to beta-diversity. Our findings support earlier ideas that parasite community structure results from the processes of parasite accumulation by hosts rather than from the processes acting within parasite communities. PMID:27172891

  9. Developing Moral Agency through Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasupathi, Monisha; Wainryb, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    This paper poses the following question: When, in spite of knowing that it is wrong, people go on to hurt others, what does this mean for the development of moral agency? We begin by defining moral agency and briefly sketching relations between moral agency and other concepts. We then outline what three extant literatures suggest about this…

  10. Pyrosequencing reveals shifts in the bacterial epimural community relative to dietary concentrate amount in goats.

    PubMed

    Wetzels, S U; Mann, E; Metzler-Zebeli, B U; Wagner, M; Klevenhusen, F; Zebeli, Q; Schmitz-Esser, S

    2015-08-01

    Ecological balance in the rumen is highly sensitive to concentrate-rich diets. Yet the effects of these feeding practices on the caprine bacterial epimural microbiome (CBEM), a microbial community with putative important physiological functions in the rumen, are largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the effect of dietary concentrate amount on ruminal CBEM. Seventeen growing goats were fed diets with 0 [n=5; 6.2MJ of metabolizable energy (ME)/d], 30 (n=6; 7.3MJ of /d), or 60% (n=6; 10.2MJ of ME/d) concentrate for 6 wk. Two hours after their last feeding, goats were euthanized and tissue samples of the ventral rumen wall were collected, washed in phosphate-buffered saline to detach loosely attached bacteria, and stored at -20°C for further processing. Genomic DNA was isolated from thawed rumen mucosa samples and used for Roche/454 Life Science (Branford, CT) 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing yielding 122,458 reads. Pyrosequencing data were clustered into 1,879 operational taxonomic units (OTU; 0.03 distance level). Pyrosequencing revealed Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Spirochaetes as the most abundant phyla (97.7%). Compared with the 30% group, both the 60 and 0% concentrate groups harbored significantly more Firmicutes and SR1, respectively. On an OTU level, a Bergeriella-related OTU was most abundant in the CBEM, followed by 2 Campylobacter OTU, which responded differently to diets: 1 OTU was significantly increased whereas the other significantly decreased with highest concentrate amount in the diet. At the genus level, the 0% concentrate group harbored increased Kingella-like sequences compared with the other feeding groups. Furthermore, the 0% concentrate group tended to have more Bergeriella than the 30 and 60% concentrate groups. The genus Bergeriella was significantly decreased in the 60% feeding group compared with the other diets. In conclusion, this is the first report of CBEM using deep-sequencing methods on the genus

  11. Zooplankton community structure of the lower Xingu River (PA) related to the hydrological cycle.

    PubMed

    Matsumura-Tundisi, T; Tundisi, J G; Souza-Soares, F; Tundisi, J E M

    2015-08-01

    The zooplankton community of the lower Xingu River shows strong fluctuations in species richness and number of organisms during periods of water level fluctuation. Pulses of density and species richness are adapted to the pulses in water flows and water level. This is conected with reproductive strategies of some zooplankton groups. The spatial heterogeneity of the lower Xingu River consisting of braided channels, bedrocks, macrophyte stands, is probably a relevant factor for the species richness of the zooplankton communities, and may be a fundamental factor for the overall aquatic biodiversity of the lower Xingu River. PMID:26691075

  12. Health promotion outcomes associated with a community-based program to reduce pesticide-related risks among small farm households.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Fadya A; Cole, Donald C; Ibrahim, Selahadin; Wanigaratne, Susitha

    2011-12-01

    A range of determinants at multiple socio-ecological levels operate in small farm households' use and handling of hazardous pesticides, suggesting the need for integrated health and agriculture promotion approaches. The aim is to assess changes in health promotion outcomes relevant to highly hazardous pesticide use associated with a multi-component community program. A longitudinal evaluation design using mixed methods was employed in 18 agricultural communities in Ecuador. Over a 7-month period, health education and agricultural interventions focused upon: health risks associated with hazardous pesticides, more adequate use and handling of pesticides, and better crop management techniques. Data collection included field forms, focus groups, structured observations and repeat surveys. In the qualitative analysis, communities were compared by extent of leadership and involvement with the interventions. For the quantitative analysis, hypothesized paths were constructed including factors relevant to pesticide-related practices and use. Testing involved gender-role stratified (household and crop manager) multivariable regression models. Information on pesticide health impacts and the pesticide use and handling, shared in focus groups, showed substantial improvement, as a result of health promotion activities though people were still observed to engage in risky practices in the field. In path models, community leadership and intervention intensity lead to changes in the household managers' pesticide-related knowledge and practices and to reduction in farm use of hazardous pesticides (both significant, p < 0.05). Integrated, community programs can promote pesticide-related risk reduction among small farm households. Changing practices in the use and management of pesticides among crop managers appears limited by deeper structural and cultural factors. PMID:21330308

  13. THE STRUCTURE AND PROCESS OF SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS. VOLUME I, INFORMAL COMMUNICATION ABOUT SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARTER, RICHARD F.; AND OTHERS

    FROM AN ANALYSIS OF OVER 2,000 RECONSTRUCTED CONVERSATIONS HELD BY 50 ADULTS IN EACH OF FIVE SCHOOL DISTRICTS, QUESTIONNAIRE RESPONSE DATA WERE OBTAINED TO MEASURE FLOWS OF INFORMATION AND INFLUENCE FROM THE SCHOOL TO THE COMMUNITY FOR OBTAINING PUBLIC SUPPORT. THE STUDY ATTEMPTED TO DESCRIBE (1) PERSONS WHO TALK ABOUT SCHOOLS, (2) THE KINDS OF…

  14. Community Resource Development: A Preliminary Bibliography of Extension-Related Material in the Northeast. Publication 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Clifford R., Comp.; Hyde, Leslie C., Comp.

    Compiled as part of an inventory of current rural development-community resource development resources and activities in 12 Northeastern states, this preliminary bibliography presents 103 publication citations and 12 Pennsylvania State University correspondence course citations. Citations are organized by state as follows: Connecticut (6);…

  15. Women in Community College: Factors Related to Intentions to Pursue Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denner, Jill; Werner, Linda; O'Connor, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges (CC) are obvious places to recruit more women into computer science. Enrollment at CCs has grown in response to a struggling economy, and students are more likely to be from underrepresented groups than students enrolled in 4-year universities (National Center for Education Statistics, 2008). However, we know little about why so…

  16. Age-Related Differences in Technology Usage among Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Kaay, Christopher D.; Young, William H.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on technology usage among community college faculty. Overall technology use among older faculty was slightly less than younger faculty; older faculty were no less likely than younger respondents to use technology. Both age groups used similar technologies and reported equivalent degrees of perceived skill with those…

  17. Perceived Community Disorder Moderates the Relation between Victimization and Fear of Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roccato, Michele; Russo, Silvia; Vieno, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    In a representative sample of the Italian population (N=2,002), surveyed in January 2008, we studied the direct and interactive effects exerted on fear of crime by direct and indirect victimization, on the one hand, and perceived level of disorder of participants' community, on the other hand. Indirect victimization fostered fear of crime among…

  18. What Factors Are Related to the Satisfaction of Online Instructors at Rural Community Colleges?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Kristie G.

    2011-01-01

    Student enrollment in online classes has witnessed a significant growth over the past decade. Higher education institutions, in particular, rural community colleges recognize both the need and demand for online classes and have taken great strides to incorporate them into their course curriculum. However, with the growth of online courses there…

  19. Employment, Salary and Placement Information Related to Career Programs at Johnson County Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    Johnson County Community College (JCCC), in Kansas, offers formal career programs for 12 of the 20 fastest growing occupations requiring postsecondary training, and for 13 of the 30 occupations projected to be the fastest growing between 1990 and 2005. Following an introduction to general trends and data sources, this guide presents profiles of…

  20. How Social Network Position Relates to Knowledge Building in Online Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lu

    2010-01-01

    Social Network Analysis, Statistical Analysis, Content Analysis and other research methods were used to research online learning communities at Capital Normal University, Beijing. Analysis of the two online courses resulted in the following conclusions: (1) Social networks of the two online courses form typical core-periphery structures; (2)…

  1. The Development of Cross-Cultural Relations with a Canadian Aboriginal Community through Sport Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schinke, Robert J.; Hanrahan, Stephanie J.; Eys, Mark A.; Blodgett, Amy; Peltier, Duke; Ritchie, Stephen Douglas; Pheasant, Chris; Enosse, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    When sport psychology researchers from the mainstream work with people from marginalized cultures, they can be challenged by cultural differences as well as mistrust. For this article, researchers born in mainstream North America partnered with Canadian Aboriginal community members. The coauthors have worked together for 5 years. What follows is…

  2. The Role of Maternal Acceptance in the Relation between Community Violence Exposure and Child Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Beth Nordstrom; Hannigan, John H.; Delaney-Black, Virginia; Covington, Chandice; Sokol, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Children in the United States are exposed to considerable community violence that has been linked to child functioning. However, not all those exposed, experience negative outcomes. Recent research has focused on factors that "buffer" or protect children from negative consequences of violence exposure. The purpose of this investigation was to…

  3. Community Violence, School-Related Protective Factors, and Psychosocial Outcomes in Urban Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Kristy A.; Warren, Jared S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of two putative school-based protective factors--student identification with school and perceived teacher support--to psychosocial outcomes in a sample of urban youth exposed to community violence. Participants were 175 high school students ages 14-19 in grades 9-12 from a large urban school district. Results…

  4. Are Special Administrative Skills Required in the Community College Administrators' Relations with the Minority Constituencies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Malcolm

    To be effective in dealing with minority constituencies, the community college administrator needs special personality traits and communication skills: he/she must be tough-minded, articulate, aware of different life-styles, and empathetic; he/she should be able to withstand criticism, confront problems directly, accept compromise, and tolerate…

  5. Identification of Tasks in Home Economics Related Occupations: Family and Community Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Home Economics Education.

    The study of task identification in family and community services presents statistical correlations of task frequencies obtained by questionnaire for the occupations of visiting homemaker or homemaker home/health aide, family planning health aide, counselor on alcoholism, management aide in low-income housing projects, deputy juvenile probation…

  6. Leveraging Alumni and Business Community Relations to Assess the Information Systems Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plice, Robert K.; Reinig, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    A recent Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (2006) task force called for increased interaction between business schools and the business community to identify essential skill sets and help with the curriculum-management process. An information systems curriculum-assessment study solicited input from recent alumni working in the…

  7. A Study of Community College Student Attitudes Related to Service Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Dana Lee

    The fourfold purpose of this study was to determine if student attitudes toward community service, student attitudes toward civic involvement, student attitudes about life skills, and student attitudes toward civic engagement and service learning differed based on enrollment in a course with a service learning component or enrollment in a course…

  8. The Governmentality of Reconciliation: Adult Education as a Community Relations Technique in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smala, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Despite a successfully negotiated peace agreement in Belfast in 1998, tensions between different community groups continue to exist in Northern Ireland. This situation creates a governmental need to find solutions to problems such as segregation, inter- and intra-group violence and other forms of sectarian antagonisms. On the one hand, this is…

  9. The Relative Benefits and Cost of Medicaid Home- and Community-Based Services in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Glenn, II; Salmon, Jennifer R.; Polivka, Larry; Soberon-Ferrer, Horacio

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We compared inpatient days, nursing home days, and total Medicaid claims for five Medicaid-funded home- and community-based services (HCBS) programs for in-home and assisted living services in Florida. Design and Methods: We studied a single cohort of Medicaid enrollees in Florida aged 60 and older, who were enrolled for the first time in…

  10. Team Learning: Through the Relational Dynamics of Co-operation and Rivalry in Team Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz, Maja

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the constructive links between cooperation, rivalry, and learning within the structure of team communities. Drawing upon social learning theory and qualitative data from case studies conducted in Danish team-based firms, the main purpose is to argue that both cooperation and rivalry are important triggers for mobilizing…

  11. Commission Work Programme Relating to the Promotion of Innovation in Secondary Education in the European Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    The Commission of the European Communities (CEC) has proposed a program for practical cooperation among Member States in secondary education. The strategies and methods of cooperation developed in two previous action programs must be adapted to the evolving situation of the 1990s. Factors of particular importance are continuing structural change…

  12. Is School Community Readiness Related to Physical Activity before and after the Ready for Recess Intervention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlers, Diane K.; Huberty, Jennifer L.; Beseler, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine: (i) the effect of schools' baseline community readiness (CR) on youth physical activity (PA) at recess prior to the Ready for Recess intervention; (ii) if changes in PA due to the intervention were explained by baseline CR and (iii) if specific components of the intervention altered an association…

  13. Teaching Approaches of Community College Mathematics Faculty: Do They Relate to Classroom Practices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa, Vilma; Celis, Sergio; Lande, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    We report on a qualitative investigation of the ways in which 14 faculty members in the mathematics department at a community college described their approaches to teaching and contrasted those with analyses of their mathematics lessons. We characterized instructors' teaching approaches as traditional, meaning-making, or student-support and…

  14. Relative Effectiveness of Dissemination Practices Used by Illinois Public Community Colleges in Adult and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardig, Robert J.

    In a broad-based survey to determine what community colleges are doing to publicize adult and continuing education programs and the effectiveness of that publicity, administrators ranked the following dissemination methods in order of importance: course schedules, newspaper advertisements, newspaper stories, program flyers, and word of mouth. Word…

  15. The Impact of the ENSI Project on School-Community Relations: Issues and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posch, Peter

    Developments in schools that redefine the relationship between school and community are described in this paper. The Environment and School Initiatives (ENSI) project seeks to combine two apparently contradictory aims of education: to develop "environmental sensitivity" and to promote students'"dynamic qualities" by involving them in coping with…

  16. Participation As Relational Process: Unpacking Involvement in Social Action and Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeffrey N.; Bench, Joshua H.; Warnaar, Bethany L.; Stroup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Educators, policymakers, and other concerned adults share an interest in promoting lifelong patterns of community service in youth. Practitioners and researchers alike highlight the importance of youth participation in afterschool service activities so the author's focus in this paper is on youth involved in PeaceJam, an innovative service…

  17. An Investigation of the Relative Effectiveness of the Basic Mathematics Review Program at Essex Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomberg, Jerome

    Basic Mathematics Review (BMR) is a remedial non-credit course at Essex Community College (Maryland) being taught on an individualized basis. Following diagnostic testing and placement, instruction utilizes programmed materials, tutors, and self-tests. Evaluation of the new individualized BMR and comparison with the traditional remedial course…

  18. [Community structure characteristics of phytoplankton and related affecting factors in Hengshan Reservoir, Zhejiang, China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang-Jie; Yu, Peng-Fei; Zhu, Jun-Quan; Xu, Zhen; Lü, Guang-Han; Jin, Chun-Hua

    2014-02-01

    In order to reveal the community structure characteristics of phytoplankton and the relationships with environmental factors in Hengshan Reservoir, the phytoplankton species composition, abundance, biomass and 12 environmental factors at 4 sampling sites were analyzed from March 2011 to February 2012. A total of 246 phytoplankton species were identified, which belong to 78 genera and 7 phyla. The dominant species were Melosira varians, M. granulate, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Asterianella formosa, Synedra acus, Achnanthes exigua, Ankistrodesmus falcatus, Oscillatoria lacustris, Cryptomonas erosa, Chroomonas acuta, Phormidium tenue and Microcystis aeruginosa, etc. Seasonal variations of species were obvious. The annual abundance and biomass of the phytoplankton were 0.51 x 10(5)-14.22 x 10(5) ind x L(-1) and 0.07-1.27 mg x L(-1), respectively. The values of the Margelef index, Pielou index and Shannon index of the phytoplankton community were 1.10-3.33, 0.26-0.81 and 0.51-2.38, respectively. The phytoplankton community structure was of Bacillariophyta-Cryptophyta type in spring and winter, of Chlorophyta-Cyanophyta type in summer, and of Bacillariophyta type in autumn. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) showed that temperature, transparency, chemical oxygen demand and pH had the closest relationships with the phytoplankton community structure in the reservoir. Water quality evaluation showed that Hengshan Reservoir was in a secondary pollution with a meso-trophic level. PMID:24830259

  19. Factors Related to Predicting Grade Point Averages of Dislocated Workers at a Rural Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, James Brent

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine relationships which existed between selected demographics and college grade point averages "GPAs" for dislocated workers and non dislocated workers enrolled in career-technical courses at a rural community college. The variables included in the study are age, gender, and marital status. The study also…

  20. Variations in macrobenthic community structure in relation to changing environmental conditions in sandy beaches of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcedo, M. Cecilia; Fiori, Sandra M.; Piccolo, M. Cintia; López Abbate, M. Celeste; Bremec, Claudia S.

    2015-12-01

    This study describes for the first time the intertidal macrobenthic community of exposed sandy beaches located near the Bahía Blanca Estuary (38°S) and reports the physical characterization of this coastal fringe. The main objective of the study was to link environmental variables to biotic information, analyzing the results in the context of the Swash Exclusion Hypothesis (SEH) and possible estuarine influence. Four beaches were sampled seasonally at different distances from the mouth of the Bahía Blanca Estuary. To characterize the morphodynamic state of the beaches, the Dean parameter (Ω) was calculated. Multivariate analyses were used to assess benthic community structures and their relationships with physical variables. The two beaches located closest to the Bahía Blanca Estuary were classified as intermediate and those located further from the estuary as dissipative. Richness, diversity and biomass of intertidal macrobenthic communities varied with the SEH, increasing towards the dissipative beaches. However, total density was higher on intermediate beaches, possibly because of nutrient-rich silt-clay sediment input from the estuary, enabling them to maintain a higher density of organisms than dissipative beaches. The estuary acts as a moderator of habitat hardness, which together with the morphodynamic state of the beaches is an important factor in the structuring of the macrobenthic community along this coastal fringe.

  1. Identity and Spatial Experience of Community Youth in Relation to Career Guidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yong; Han, Minghua

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the self identity and vocational identity among community youth in Shanghai and their associated spatial experience, 4 focus groups, made up of 14 individuals were interviewed. We assigned numbers to indicate each interviewee as well as the general theme of each transcription of the interview. Results are as follows:…

  2. Making a Difference in Poor Communities: Relations among Actors in Mexican Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silas-Casillas, Juan Carlos; Perales-Franco, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Even in marginalized towns it is possible to find school communities that have developed relationships that encourage the construction of institutional cultures and management structures prone to superior academic performance compared to others within the same context. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative research project conducted in…

  3. The Impact of a Community Mobilization Project on Health-Related Knowledge and Practices in Cameroon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babalola, Stella; Sakolsky, Natasha; Vondrasek, Claudia; Mounlom, Damaris; Brown, Jane; Tchupo, Jean-Paul

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the impact of a reproductive health community mobilization initiative in Cameroon. Baseline and followup survey data indicated that at a rural site, the intervention positively influenced family planning knowledge and practices, HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted disease knowledge and attitudes, and use of health services. At an urban…

  4. COMMUNITY PLANNING FOR HEALTH EDUCATION AND WELFARE, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TAYLOR, KANARDY L.

    THE ANNOATATED BIBLIOGRAPHY IS PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR STATE AND LOCAL PUBLIC WELFARE AGENCIES RESPONSIBLE FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING. IT MAY ALSO BE OF ASSISTANCE TO OTHERS INTERESTED IN HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE. THE SELECTED REFERENCES ON BASIC CONCEPTS AND APPROACHES IN COMMUNITY PLANNING AND RELATED SUBJECTS ARE GENERALLY AVAILABLE IN PUBLIC…

  5. Phytoplankton community structure in the Lena Delta (Siberia, Russia) in relation to hydrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraberg, A. C.; Druzhkova, E.; Heim, B.; Loeder, M. J. G.; Wiltshire, K. H.

    2013-11-01

    The Lena Delta in Northern Siberia is one of the largest river deltas in the world. During peak discharge, after the ice melt in spring, it delivers between 60-8000 m3 s-1 of water and sediment into the Arctic Ocean. The Lena Delta and the Laptev Sea coast also constitute a continuous permafrost region. Ongoing climate change, which is particularly pronounced in the Arctic, is leading to increased rates of permafrost thaw. This has already profoundly altered the discharge rates of the Lena River. But the chemistry of the river waters which are discharged into the coastal Laptev Sea have also been hypothesized to undergo considerable compositional changes, e.g. by increasing concentrations of inorganic nutrients such as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and methane. These physical and chemical changes will also affect the composition of the phytoplankton communities. However, before potential consequences of climate change for coastal arctic phytoplankton communities can be judged, the inherent status of the diversity and food web interactions within the delta have to be established. In 2010, as part of the AWI Lena Delta programme, the phyto- and microzooplankton community in three river channels of the delta (Trofimov, Bykov and Olenek) as well as four coastal transects were investigated to capture the typical river phytoplankton communities and the transitional zone of brackish/marine conditions. Most CTD profiles from 23 coastal stations showed very strong stratification. The only exception to this was a small, shallow and mixed area running from the outflow of Bykov channel in a northerly direction parallel to the shore. Of the five stations in this area, three had a salinity of close to zero. Two further stations had salinities of around 2 and 5 throughout the water column. In the remaining transects, on the other hand, salinities varied between 5 and 30 with depth. Phytoplankton counts from the outflow from the Lena were dominated by diatoms (Aulacoseira species

  6. 77 FR 56663 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, Citizen Corps...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, Citizen Corps Council Registration AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS... online registration process for Citizen Corps Councils and Community Emergency Response Team...

  7. Divestment of Beds and Related Ambulatory Services to Other Communities While Maintaining a Patient- and Family-Centred Approach.

    PubMed

    Corring, Deborah J; Gibson, Deborah; MustinPowell, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Individuals living with serious mental illness who require acute and/or tertiary mental healthcare services represent one of the most complex patient groups in the healthcare service delivery system. Provincial mental health policy has been committed to providing services closer to home and in the community rather than an institution wherever possible for some time. This paper articulates the strategies used by one organization to ensure the successful transfer of beds and related ambulatory services to four separate communities. In addition a case study is also provided to describe in more detail the complex changes that took place in order to accomplish the divestments of beds and related ambulatory services to one of the partner hospitals. PMID:26854542

  8. Trajectories of change in sagebrush steppe vegetation communities in relation to multiple wildfires

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, G. M.; Bakker, J. D.; Dettweiler-Robinson, E.; Dunwiddie, Peter W.; Hall, S. A.; Downs, Janelle L.; Evans, J.

    2012-07-01

    Repeated perturbations, both biotic and abiotic, can lead to fundamental changes in the nature of ecosystems including changes in state. Sagebrush-steppe communities provide important habitat for wildlife and grazing for livestock. Fire is an integral part of these systems, but there is concern that increased ignition frequencies and invasive species are fundamentally altering these systems. Despite these issues, the majority of studies of fire effects in Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis-dominated systems have focused on the effects of single burns. The Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), in south-central Washington (U.S.A.), was one of the largest areas of continuous shrub-steppe habitat in the state until large wildfires burnt the majority of it in 2000 and 2007. We analysed data from permanent vegetation transects established in 1996 and resampled in 2002 and 2009. Our objective was to describe how the fires, and subsequent post-fire restoration efforts, affected communities successional pathways. Plant communities differed in response to repeated fire and restoration; these differences could largely be ascribed to the functional traits of the dominant species. Low elevation communities, previously dominated by obligate seeders, moved farthest from their initial composition and were dominated by weedy, early successional species in 2009. Higher elevation sites with resprouting shrubs, native bunchgrasses and few invasive species were generally more resilient to the effects of repeated disturbances. Shrub cover has been almost entirely removed from ALE, though there is evidence of recovery where communities were dominated by re-sprouters. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominance was reduced by herbicide application in areas where it was previously abundant but increased significantly in untreated areas. Several re-sprouting species, notably Phlox longifolia and Poa secunda, expanded remarkably following competitive release from shrub canopies and/or abundant

  9. Phytoplankton community structure in the Lena Delta (Siberia, Russia) in relation to hydrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraberg, A. C.; Druzhkova, E.; Heim, B.; Loeder, M. J. G.; Wiltshire, K. H.

    2013-02-01

    The Lena Delta in Northern Siberia is one of the largest river deltas in the world. During peak discharge, after the ice melt in spring, it delivers between 60-8000 m3s-1 of water and sediment into the Arctic Ocean. The Lena Delta and the Laptev Sea coast also constitute a~continuous permafrost region. Ongoing climate change, which is particularly pronounced in the Arctic, is leading to increased rates of permafrost thaw. This is likely to profoundly change the discharge rates of the Lena River and the chemistry of the river waters which are discharged into the coastal Laptev Sea, e.g. by increasing concentrations of inorganic nutrients, DOC and importantly methane. These physical and chemical changes will also affect the composition of and interactions between phytoplankton and zooplankton communities, forming the basis of the food web. However, before potential consequences of climate change for coastal arctic plankton communities can be judged, the inherent status of the diversity and linked foodweb interactions within the delta need to be established. As part of the AWI Lena Delta Programme in 2010 the phyto- and microzooplankton community in three river channels as well as four coastal transects were investigated to capture the typical river phytoplankton communities and the transitional zone of brackish/marine conditions. Most CTD profiles from 23 coastal stations showed very strong stratification. The only exception to this was a small a shallow and mixed area running from the outflow of Bykovskaya channel in a northerly direction parallel to the shore (transect 3). Of the five stations in this area three had a salinity of close to zero. Two further stations had salinities of around 2 and 5 throughout the water column. In the remaining transects on the other hand salinities varied between 5-30 with depth. Phytoplankton counts from the outflow from the Lena were dominated by diatoms (Aulacoseira species) cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon, Pseudanabaena) and

  10. Soil bacterial and fungal community dynamics in relation to Panax notoginseng death rate in a continuous cropping system

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Linlin; Xu, Jiang; Feng, Guangquan; Li, Xiwen; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Notoginseng (Panax notoginseng), a valuable herbal medicine, has high death rates in continuous cropping systems. Variation in the soil microbial community is considered the primary cause of notoginseng mortality, although the taxa responsible for crop failure remains unidentified. This study used high-throughput sequencing methods to characterize changes in the microbial community and screen microbial taxa related to the death rate. Fungal diversity significantly decreased in soils cropped with notoginseng for three years. The death rate and the fungal diversity were significantly negatively correlated, suggesting that fungal diversity might be a potential bioindicator of soil health. Positive correlation coefficients revealed that Burkholderiales, Syntrophobacteraceae, Myrmecridium, Phaeosphaeria, Fusarium, and Phoma were better adapted to colonization of diseased plants. The relative abundance of Fusarium oxysporum (R = 0.841, P < 0.05) and Phaeosphaeria rousseliana (R = 0.830, P < 0.05) were positively associated with the death rate. F. oxysporum was a pathogen of notoginseng root-rot that caused seedling death. Negative correlation coefficients indicated that Thermogemmatisporaceae, Actinosynnemataceae, Hydnodontaceae, Herpotrichiellaceae, and Coniosporium might be antagonists of pathogens, and the relative abundance of Coniosporium perforans was negatively correlated with the death rate. Our findings provide a dynamic overview of the microbial community and present a clear scope for screening beneficial microbes and pathogens of notoginseng. PMID:27549984

  11. Soil bacterial and fungal community dynamics in relation to Panax notoginseng death rate in a continuous cropping system.

    PubMed

    Dong, Linlin; Xu, Jiang; Feng, Guangquan; Li, Xiwen; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Notoginseng (Panax notoginseng), a valuable herbal medicine, has high death rates in continuous cropping systems. Variation in the soil microbial community is considered the primary cause of notoginseng mortality, although the taxa responsible for crop failure remains unidentified. This study used high-throughput sequencing methods to characterize changes in the microbial community and screen microbial taxa related to the death rate. Fungal diversity significantly decreased in soils cropped with notoginseng for three years. The death rate and the fungal diversity were significantly negatively correlated, suggesting that fungal diversity might be a potential bioindicator of soil health. Positive correlation coefficients revealed that Burkholderiales, Syntrophobacteraceae, Myrmecridium, Phaeosphaeria, Fusarium, and Phoma were better adapted to colonization of diseased plants. The relative abundance of Fusarium oxysporum (R = 0.841, P < 0.05) and Phaeosphaeria rousseliana (R = 0.830, P < 0.05) were positively associated with the death rate. F. oxysporum was a pathogen of notoginseng root-rot that caused seedling death. Negative correlation coefficients indicated that Thermogemmatisporaceae, Actinosynnemataceae, Hydnodontaceae, Herpotrichiellaceae, and Coniosporium might be antagonists of pathogens, and the relative abundance of Coniosporium perforans was negatively correlated with the death rate. Our findings provide a dynamic overview of the microbial community and present a clear scope for screening beneficial microbes and pathogens of notoginseng. PMID:27549984

  12. Barriers and Opportunities: A Community-Based Participatory Research Study of Health Beliefs Related to Diabetes in a US Marshallese Community

    PubMed Central

    Hallgren, Emily Ann; McElfish, Pearl Anna; Rubon-Chutaro, Jellesen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the beliefs and perceptions related to type 2 diabetes (diabetes) that influence diabetes self-management behaviors for Marshallese in the U.S. Utilizing the Health Belief Model as a theoretical framework, researchers seek to better understand the underlying beliefs that motivate or impede diabetes self-management behaviors. Methods The community-based participatory research (CBPR) collaborative engaged in 14 months of preliminary fieldwork and conducted two tiers of focus groups for this project as part of our long-term commitment to reducing health inequalities in the Marshallese community. The CBPR team conducted an initial round of two exploratory focus groups (n=15). Based on the knowledge gained, researchers held a second round of focus groups (n=13) focused on health beliefs regarding diabetes. All participants were Marshallese, aged 18 and older, and included men and women. Participants either had a diagnosis of diabetes or were a caretaker of someone with diabetes. Results The findings elucidate the structural and non-structural barriers to successful diabetes self-management for Marshallese in the US. Barriers include: eating differently than the rest of the family, social stigma of diabetes, transportation, cost, lack of access to healthcare, as well as cultural and language barriers. Conclusions While there are significant barriers to improving diabetes self-management, there are also areas of opportunity including family and peer reinforcement to encourage proper diabetes management behaviors and a growing community desire to lift the stigma of diabetes. The CBPR team offers recommendations to make diabetes management interventions more culturally appropriate and effective for the Marshallese population. PMID:25398722

  13. Establishing effective working relations with a potential user community - NASA Lewis Research Center experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, P.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has held a series of six major and unique technology utilization conferences which were major milestones in planned structured efforts to establish effective working relationships with specific technology user communities. These efforts were unique in that the activities undertaken prior to the conference were extensive, and effectively laid the groundwork for productive technology transfer following, and as a direct result of, the conferences. The effort leading to the conference was in each case tailored to the characteristics of the potential user community, however, the common factors comprise a basic framework applicable to similar endeavors. The process is essentially a planned sequence of steps that constitute a technical market survey and a marketing program for the development of beneficial applications of aerospace technology beyond the aerospace field.

  14. 60 million non-facility births: Who can deliver in community settings to reduce intrapartum-related deaths?

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, Gary L.; Lee, Anne CC; Cousens, Simon; Sibley, Lynn; Bhutta, Zulqar A.; Donnay, France; Osrin, Dave; Bang, Abhay; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Wall, Steve N.; Baqui, Abdullah; Lawn, Joy E.

    2012-01-01

    Background For the world’s 60 million non-facility births, addressing who is currently attending these births and what effect they have on birth outcomes is a key starting point toward improving care during childbirth. Objective We present a systematic review of evidence for the effect of community-based cadres–community-based skilled birth attendants (SBAs), trained traditional birth attendants (TBAs), and community health workers (CHWs)–in improving perinatal and intrapartum-related outcomes. Results The evidence for providing skilled birth attendance in the community is low quality, consisting of primarily before-and-after and quasi-experimental studies, with a pooled 12% reduction in all cause perinatal mortality (PMR) and a 22%–47% reduction in intrapartum-related neonatal mortality (IPR-NMR). Low/moderate quality evidence suggests that TBA training may improve linkages with facilities and improve perinatal outcomes. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) of TBA training showed a 30% reduction in PMR, and a meta-analysis demonstrated an 11% reduction in IPR-NMR. There is moderate evidence that CHWs have a positive impact on perinatal-neonatal outcomes. Meta-analysis of CHW packages (2 cluster randomized controlled trials, 2 quasi-experimental studies) showed a 28% reduction in PMR and a 36% reduction in early neonatal mortality rate; one quasi-experimental study showed a 42% reduction in IPR-NMR. Conclusion Skilled childbirth care is recommended for all pregnant women, and community strategies need to be linked to prompt, high-quality emergency obstetric care. CHWs may play a promising role in providing pregnancy and childbirth care, mobilizing communities, and improving perinatal outcomes in low-income settings. While the role of the TBA is still controversial, strategies emphasizing partnerships with the health system should be further considered. Innovative community-based strategies combined with health systems strengthening may improve childbirth

  15. 22 CFR 901.11 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Agency. 901.11 Section 901.11 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD GENERAL Meanings of Terms As Used in This Chapter § 901.11 Agency. Agency means the Department of State, the Agency for International Development, the U.S. Information...

  16. A Unimodal Species Response Model Relating Traits to Environment with Application to Phytoplankton Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jamil, Tahira; Kruk, Carla; ter Braak, Cajo J. F.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to explain observed niche differences among species (i.e. differences in their distribution along environmental gradients) by differences in trait values (e.g. volume) in phytoplankton communities. For this, we propose the trait-modulated Gaussian logistic model in which the niche parameters (optimum, tolerance and maximum) are made linearly dependent on species traits. The model is fitted to data in the Bayesian framework using OpenBUGS (Bayesian inference Using Gibbs Sampling) to identify according to which environmental variables there is niche differentiation among species and traits. We illustrate the method with phytoplankton community data of 203 lakes located within four climate zones and associated measurements on 11 environmental variables and six morphological species traits of 60 species. Temperature and chlorophyll-a (with opposite signs) described well the niche structure of all species. Results showed that about 25% of the variance in the niche centres with respect to chlorophyll-a were accounted for by traits, whereas niche width and maximum could not be predicted by traits. Volume, mucilage, flagella and siliceous exoskeleton are found to be the most important traits to explain the niche centres. Species were clustered in two groups with different niches structures, group 1 high temperature-low chlorophyll-a species and group 2 low temperature-high chlorophyll-a species. Compared to group 2, species in group 1 had larger volume but lower surface area, had more often flagella but neither mucilage nor siliceous exoskeleton. These results might help in understanding the effect of environmental changes on phytoplankton community. The proposed method, therefore, can also apply to other aquatic or terrestrial communities for which individual traits and environmental conditioning factors are available. PMID:24835582

  17. Epibiota communities of the introduced and indigenous macroalgal relatives Sargassum muticum and Halidrys siliquosa in Limfjorden (Denmark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernberg, Thomas; Thomsen, Mads S.; Staehr, Peter A.; Pedersen, Morten F.

    2004-10-01

    Sargassum muticum (Phaeophyceae, Fucales) has recently been introduced to Limfjorden (Denmark) where its closest relative is the indigenous Halidrys siliquosa. Previous studies have demonstrated large quantitative (canopy biomass) and qualitative (canopy persistence) differences in the habitat available to epibiota within the canopies of these two macroalgae. We therefore hypothesised that these algae would support different epibiota communities and tested this by sampling the epibiota of S. muticum and H. siliquosa on seven occasions throughout 1997 by enclosing entire thalli in mesh bags. We found 53 epibiota taxa and, with only one exception, they were all recorded on both host species. Species richness and abundance of epibiota exhibited clear seasonal variation on both host species, although epibiota biomass was seasonally constant on H. siliquosa but not on S. muticum. These patterns were consistent with the different life histories of the host species. There was a weakly negative correlation between thallus size and epibiota biomass for both host species. When taking species-specific seasonal variation in thallus size into consideration, S. muticum and H. siliquosa were found to support significantly different epibiota biomasses. Multivariate analyses showed that epibiota community structure was different, although highly overlapping, between the two species, whereas there was an almost parallel temporal development in epibiota community structure. We conclude that it is unlikely that the introduction of S. muticum to Limfjorden has caused major changes in local epibiota community structure. However, the standing stock of epibiota is likely to have increased.

  18. Is Abuse Causally Related to Urologic Symptoms? Results from the Boston Area Community Heath (BACH) Survey

    PubMed Central

    Link, Carol L.; Lutfey, Karen E.; Steers, William D.; McKinlay, John B.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated (1) whether sexual, physical, or emotional abuse experienced either as a child or as an adolescent/adult is associated with symptoms of urinary frequency, urgency, and nocturia, and (2) the extent to which the observed association between abuse and urologic symptoms may be causal. Methods: Analyses are based on data from the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) survey, a community-based epidemiologic study of many different urologic symptoms and risk factors. BACH used a multistage stratified cluster sample to recruit 5506 adults, aged 30[en]79 yr (2301 men, 3205 women; 1770 black [African American], 1877 Hispanic, and 1859 white respondents). Results: The symptoms considered are common, with 33% of BACH respondents reporting urinary frequency, 12% reporting urgency, and 28% reporting nocturia. All three symptoms are positively associated with childhood and adolescent/adult sexual, physical, and emotional abuse (p < 0.05), with abuse significantly increasing the odds of urinary frequency by a factor ranging from 1.6 to 1.9, the odds of urgency by a factor from 2.0 to 2.3, and the odds of nocturia by a factor from 1.3 to 1.5. Conclusions: Our analyses extend previous work. First, we show a strong association between abuse and urinary frequency, urgency, and nocturia in a community-based random sample. Second, we move beyond discussion of statistical association and find considerable evidence to suggest that the relationship between abuse and these symptoms may be causal. PMID:17383083

  19. Gender-related traits in the dioecious shrub Empetrum rubrum in two plant communities in the Magellanic steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Barradas, Mari Cruz; Zunzunegui, María; Collantes, Marta; Álvarez-Cansino, Leonor; García Novo, Francisco

    2014-10-01

    Following the theory on costs of reproduction, sexually dimorphic plants may exhibit several trade-offs in energy and resources that can determine gender dimorphism in morphological or physiological traits, especially during the reproductive period. In this study we assess whether the sexes of the dioecious species Empetrum rubrum differ in morphological and ecophysiological traits related to water economy and photochemical efficiency and whether these differences change in nearby populations with contrasting plant communities. We conducted physiological, morphological, sex ratio, and cover measurements in E. rubrum plants in the Magellanic steppe, North-Eastern part of Tierra del Fuego (Argentina), from two types of heathlands with differing community composition. We found differences between sites in soil pH and wind speed at the canopy level. E. rubrum plants exhibited lower photosynthetic height and higher LAI (leaf area index), lower RWC (relative water content) and higher water-use efficiency (lower Δ13C) in the heathland with harsher environmental conditions. Gender dimorphism in the physiological response was patent for photochemical efficiency and water use (RWC and Δ13C discrimination), with males showing a more conservative strategy in relation to females. Accordingly, male-biased sex ratio in the stress-prone community suggested a better performance of male plants under stressful environmental conditions. The integrated analysis of all variables (photochemical efficiency, RWC, leaf dry matter content (LDMC), pigments, and Δ13C) indicated an interaction between gender and heathland community effects in the physiological response. We suggest that female plants may exhibit compensatory mechanisms to face their higher reproductive costs.

  20. Measuring HIV- and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination in Nicaragua: results from a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, William J; Högberg, Ulf; Valladares, Eliette C; Essén, Birgitta

    2013-04-01

    Psychometric properties of external HIV-related stigma and discrimination scales and their predictors were investigated. A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out among 520 participants using an ongoing health and demographic surveillance system in León, Nicaragua. Participants completed an 18-item HIV stigma scale and 19 HIV and AIDS discrimination-related statements. A factor analysis found that 15 of the 18 items in the stigma scale and 18 of the 19 items in the discrimination scale loaded clearly into five- and four-factor structures, respectively. Overall Cronbach's alpha of .81 for the HIV stigma scale and .91 for the HIV discrimination scale provided evidence of internal consistency. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis identified that females, rural residents, people with insufficient HIV-related transmission knowledge, those not tested for HIV, those reporting an elevated self-perception of HIV risk, and those unwilling to disclose their HIV status were associated with higher stigmatizing attitudes and higher discriminatory actions towards HIV-positive people. This is the first community-based study in Nicaragua that demonstrates that overall HIV stigma and discrimination scales were reliable and valid in a community-based sample comprised of men and women of reproductive age. Stigma and discrimination were reported high in the general population, especially among sub-groups. The findings in the current study suggest community-based strategies, including the monitoring of stigma and discrimination, and designing and implementing stigma reduction interventions, are greatly needed to reduce inequities and increase acceptance of persons with HIV. PMID:23514083