Science.gov

Sample records for agencies native american

  1. Native Americans in Cold War Public Diplomacy: Indian Politics, American History, and the US Information Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This essay examines the depiction of Native Americans by the US Information Agency (USIA), the bureau charged with explaining American politics to the international public during the Cold War. In the 1950s and 1960s, the USIA broadcast the message that Americans had begun to acknowledge their nation's history of conquest and were working to…

  2. 78 FR 32243 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Native American Career and Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Native American Career and Technical Education... Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP) Performance Reports. OMB Control Number: 1830-0573. Type... Annual Burden Hours: 1,200. Abstract: The Native American Career and Technical Education Program...

  3. Native Americans in Cold War Public Diplomacy: Indian Politics, American History, and the US Information Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This essay examines the depiction of Native Americans by the US Information Agency (USIA), the bureau charged with explaining American politics to the international public during the Cold War. In the 1950s and 1960s, the USIA broadcast the message that Americans had begun to acknowledge their nation's history of conquest and were working to…

  4. The Drafting and Submission of an HIV/AIDS Policy Draft for a Native American Child Welfare Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzemer, Daniel Pete

    An Indian child welfare agency realized the need for an HIV/AIDS policy when a diabetic child possibly exposed to the HIV virus was placed in one of the agency's licensed foster homes. A focus-group interview process was selected for policy development because this method appeared to parallel the Native American cultural approach toward consensus…

  5. Reactions by Native American Parents to Child Protection Agencies: Cultural and Community Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horejsi, Charles; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Explains characteristics and behaviors of Native American parents who react to child protection services with extreme aggressiveness, passivity, or avoidance. Discusses appropriate behaviors for social workers to use with such parents. (BG)

  6. Education and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannucilli, Mary V.

    Traditionally, Native Americans educated their children through the oral transmission of beliefs and values. Christian missions dominated Indian education from the 16th to the 19th century and began the process of erasing Native American identity and culture. After the Civil War, control of 73 Indian agencies was assigned to 13 religious…

  7. Native American Healing Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell A. A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous healing practices among Native Americans have been documented in the United States since colonisation. Cultural encapsulation has deterred the acknowledgement of Native American medicinal practices as a precursor to folk medicine and many herbal remedies, which have greatly influenced modern medicine. Understanding Native American…

  8. Native American Discursive Tactic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jason Edward

    2013-01-01

    This essay derives from a course called ‘"The Rhetoric of Native America,’" which is a historical-critical survey of Native American primary texts. The course examines the rhetoric employed by Natives to enact social change and to build community in the face of exigencies. The main goal of exploring a native text (particularly, Simon Pokagon's…

  9. Native American Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horse, Perry G.

    2005-01-01

    Many issues and elements--including ethnic nomenclature, racial attitudes, and the legal and political status of American Indian nations and Indian people--influence Native American identity. (Contains 3 notes.)

  10. Legends of Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Presents a theme unit that includes elementary-level, cross-curricular lessons about lifestyle, belief systems, traditions, and history of Native Americans. The unit includes a poster which offers a traditional Cherokee story, literature on Native American legends, and a variety of cross-curricular activities. The unit ends with students writing…

  11. Native American Preparatory School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Preparatory School, Rowe, NM.

    This booklet provides information on the Native American Preparatory School, a residential secondary school in Rowe, New Mexico, for high-achieving Native American students. The school sponsors two programs: a 5-week rigorously academic summer school for junior high school students and, beginning in fall 1995, a 4-year college preparatory program.…

  12. Native American Entrepreneurship. Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Nicole

    Although Native Americans have owned and started the fewest small businesses of all U.S. minority groups, entrepreneurship is considered to be an efficient tool for alleviating their economic problems. Barriers to Native American entrepreneurship include poverty, scarce start-up capital, poor access to business education and technical assistance,…

  13. Native American Tribal Websites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Eric L.

    1999-01-01

    Lists Web sites maintained by 38 different Native American nations that deal with topics ranging from tribal history, news, arts and crafts, tourism, entertainment, and commerce. Represented nations include Apache, Blackfeet, Creek, Iroquois, Mohegan, and Sioux. (CMK)

  14. Native American Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from: Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect Native Americans.

  15. Native American Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Carl D., Comp.; And Others

    Focusing on the Southeastern American Indian cultures, this Native American resource guide is designed for use in the elementary and secondary schools of the East Baton Rouge Parish and is a product of a 1975 Indian Advisory Committee composed of Indian parents, teachers, and staff members. Objectives of these materials require the Indian student,…

  16. Native American Cultural Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    Part of a larger report on the Four Directions Project, an American Indian technology innovation project, this section includes 13 "pathfinders" to locating information on Native American and other indigenous cultural groups. The pathfinders were designed by students in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of…

  17. Stennis Space Center celebrates Native American culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Famie Willis (left), 2009-2010 Choctaw Indian Princess, displays artifacts during Native American Heritage Month activities at Stennis Space Center on Nov. 24. The celebration featured various Native American cultural displays for Stennis employees to view. Shown above are (l to r): Willis, Elaine Couchman of NASA Shared Services Center, John Cecconi of NSSC and Lakeisha Robertson of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  18. Native American medicine.

    PubMed

    Cohen, K

    1998-11-01

    This article summarizes common principles, practices, and ethics of Native American healing, the traditional medicine of North America. Native American healing, spirituality, culture, and, in modern times, political, social, and economic concerns are closely intertwined. Intuition and spiritual awareness are a healer's most essential diagnostic tools. Therapeutic methods include prayer, music, ritual purification, herbalism, massage, ceremony, and personal innovations of individual healers. A community of friends, family, and helpers often participate in the healing intervention and help to alleviate the alienation caused by disease. A healthy patient has a healthy relationship with his or her community and, ultimately, with the greater community of nature known as "All Relations." The goal of Native American healing is to find wholeness, balance, harmony, beauty, and meaning. "Healing," making whole, is as important as curing disease; at times they are identical.

  19. Native Agency and the Making of "The North American Indian": Alexander B. Upshaw and Edward S. Curtis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamir, Shamoon

    2007-01-01

    The twenty volumes of ethnographic text and pictorial photography and the twenty portfolios of large, finely printed photogravures that together comprise "The North American Indian" were the product of an extraordinary labor by Edward S. Curtis, an extensive and shifting team of co-workers, and the participation of hundreds of Native Americans. By…

  20. The Native American Speaks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromberg, Walter; And Others

    This publication is the product of several workshops and is aimed at multi-ethnic integration of teacher attitudes, curriculum content, and teaching techniques. The 7 articles and 3 bibliographies, contributed by Native American consultants, emphasize recognition and alteration of bias in teacher attitudes, curriculum content, and teaching…

  1. Native Americans: Subject Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonanni, Mimmo; Etter, Patricia A.

    This annotated subject guide lists reference material that deals with Native Americans and is available in the Arizona State University Libraries. Entries were published 1933-98, but mostly in the 1980s-90s. The guide is not comprehensive, but rather a selective list of resources useful for researching a topic in a variety of fields. The guide…

  2. Rebuilding Native American Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyhis, Don; Simonelli, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The Wellbriety Movement in Native American communities draws on the wisdom and participation of traditional elders. Beginning with a basic community teaching called the Four Laws of Change and the Healing Forest Model, the Wellbriety Movement blends Medicine Wheel knowledge with the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous to provide culture-specific…

  3. Native American Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, C. Fayne; And Others

    Designed to accommodate a semester course in Native American Literature for secondary students, this teacher's guide includes a general introduction, a statement of the philosophy and goals upon which it is predicated, a nine-week block on post-Columbian literature, a nine-week block on oral literature, separate appendices for each block, a…

  4. Exploring Native American Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Phoebe

    This paper described the events and results of a workshop on Native American symbolism presented to educators and held in Kansas City, Missouri. The presenter maintained that some of the most crucial problems facing U.S. educators and students are caused by racial misunderstandings, and that the universality of artistic expression can be a vehicle…

  5. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  6. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  7. Native Americans Today: An Outer View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    Considers two primary aspects of the Native American situation in contemporary society: the rediscovery of the Native American and how the Native American is viewed by non-Native Americans. Notes positive attitude change among non-Native Americans concerning Native Americans, but stresses that political and social change also are needed. (NB)

  8. Native American Loanwords in American English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Ginny

    1997-01-01

    Examines the history of White-Indian relationships in Latin America and North America and the corresponding fluctuations in loanword borrowing into English from Native American languages. Explores 20th-century attitudes toward Native Americans and the impact of these attitudes on borrowing today, particularly in Alaska where Natives are resisting…

  9. 75 FR 65030 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Nomination Solicitation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Nomination Solicitation AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Native American Graves Protection and... nominations for two members of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee....

  10. General Information about Native Americans. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    The first in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet introduces elementary students to the culture and history of woodland, plains, desert, and coastal Indians. It presents an overview of philosophies common to most Native American cultures, differentiates the four Indian culture areas, and guides students in identifying…

  11. Native American Foods and Cookery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Tom; Potter, Eloise F.

    Native Americans had a well-developed agriculture long before the arrival of the Europeans. Three staples--corn, beans, and squash--were supplemented with other gathered plants or cultivated crops such as white potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts. Native Americans had no cows, pigs, or domesticated chickens; they depended almost…

  12. Earth's Caretakers: Native American Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyberg, Lisa M., Ed.

    Written by Native American teachers and by teachers of Native Americans, this book presents examples of ways to learn respect for the Earth and its people. The hope is that students will learn to walk softly upon the Earth and to respect all living things. Lessons and activities engage elementary and middle school students in a four-step…

  13. Native American Professional Resource Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honahni, Daniel

    The "Native American Professional Resource Directory" contains 1,076 Indian individuals representing various tribes and academic degree backgrounds. The directory is divided into three major categories: (1) academic degree index, (2) individual information index, and (3) tribal index. Criteria for selection are: (1) Native Americans of Indian or…

  14. Native Americans: The First Campers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Bonnie; Frebertshauser, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Questions are presented to help camps determine if their usage of American Indian culture truly honors Native Americans. Camps that plan to use Indian lore should research the tribe's name, location, symbols, legends, and living habits. A 5-day program is presented for enhancing campers' understanding of Native peoples and their relationship to…

  15. Native American Curriculum Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Melanie, Ed.

    This guide aims to assist the faculty member who wishes to integrate Native American materials into core courses of the curriculum. The first section is a bibliography of over 350 entries, primarily books and journal articles, arranged in the following categories: Native American bibliographies and general sources, history, economics,…

  16. Counseling Native Americans: Guidelines for Group Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Phoebe M.; Coleman, Victoria D.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses how group counseling professionals can best serve Native Americans using traditional Native American healing and spirituality. Highlights implications for counseling and development professionals. Discusses Native Americans' background, relationship with the federal government, regional considerations, psychological and sociological…

  17. Vanishing native American dog lineages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dogs were an important element in many native American cultures at the time Europeans arrived. Although previous ancient DNA studies revealed the existence of unique native American mitochondrial sequences, these have not been found in modern dogs, mainly purebred, studied so far. Results We identified many previously undescribed mitochondrial control region sequences in 400 dogs from rural and isolated areas as well as street dogs from across the Americas. However, sequences of native American origin proved to be exceedingly rare, and we estimate that the native population contributed only a minor fraction of the gene pool that constitutes the modern population. Conclusions The high number of previously unidentified haplotypes in our sample suggests that a lot of unsampled genetic variation exists in non-breed dogs. Our results also suggest that the arrival of European colonists to the Americas may have led to an extensive replacement of the native American dog population by the dogs of the invaders. PMID:21418639

  18. Native Americans in Physical Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Three Native American physical therapists share stories of their careers, including educational background; motivation to enter the field; and experiences as a volunteer in Vietnam and working with the Indian Health Service and various rehabilitation programs. Advice on appropriate preparation in the sciences is offered to Native students…

  19. 76 FR 46832 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Assessment of Native American...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Housing Needs AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer... American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian populations with respect to both their housing conditions and... similar assessment in 1996, prior to the passage of the Native American Housing Assistance and...

  20. Native American College Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosholder, Richard; Goslin, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Native American students are the most likely racial/ethnic group tracked in post-secondary American education to be affected by poverty and limited access to educational opportunities. In addition, they are the most likely to be required to take remedial course work and are the least likely to graduate from college. A review of the literature was…

  1. Native American Adult Reader I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lovern Root, Ed.

    Aspects of Native American history and culture as well as issues and concerns of American Indians are presented in the twelve short articles in this reader for adults. Intended for use in an adult basic education/GED program, the reader features simply written stories (for grades 0-3), illustrations, vocabulary lists and student study questions.…

  2. 78 FR 70259 - Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of Tribal Relations, USDA. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of The Council for Native American Farming and Ranching (CNAFR) a public advisory committee of the Office of Tribal Relations...

  3. Contemporary Native American Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestas, John R., Ed.

    A compilation of 58 representative speeches from the American Indian Community, this book is divided into 2 parts; Part I deals with issues of contemporary concern and Part II illustrates speech types and styles. All speeches are classified by issue as follows: sovereignty (2 speeches, 1 on the rise and fall of Indian sovereignty); trust…

  4. Native American Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabokov, Peter; Easton, Robert

    This book presents building traditions of the major Indian tribes in nine regions of the North American continent, from the huge, plankhouse villages of the Northwest Coast, to the moundbuilder towns and temples of the Southeast, to the Navajo hogans and adobe pueblos of the Southwest. Indian buildings are a central element of Indian culture, the…

  5. Sterilization of Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillingham, Brint

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. State Department's Agency for International Development (AID) is spending more than $143 million this year for population control measures in over 70 nations around the world and it is estimated that as much as $10 million was spent in one year for surgical sterilization procedures. (JC)

  6. Rethinking Native American Language Revitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    As many linguists continue to work with and analyze First Nations/Native American languages, the consensus opinion usually direly predicts the loss of daily use for almost all of the extant Indigenous languages. Tremendous efforts are being expended for renewing, revitalizing, and restoring these languages to everyday use. The model upon which…

  7. Learning Styles and Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Dauna B.

    This paper summarizes research on learning styles, then examines the cognitive style of Native American primary school students. Five theories of cognitive style (Dunn and Dunn, Gregorc, Kagan, Witkin, and Cohen) are examined along with the test instruments these theories have fostered. A sixth concept of cognitive style, brain hemispheric…

  8. Native Americans in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Dauna B.; Evans, Wayne H.

    Colleges and universities have failed to meet the unique educational needs of Native American students, whose attrition rates are far in excess of those of other students. These students must come to terms with their cultural identity while functioning within the culturally alien framework presented by the school. Federally funded programs have…

  9. Studies in Native American Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ok, Jong-seok, Ed.; Taneri, Mubeccel, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Eight original research papers on Native American languages by faculty and students of the Linguistics Department and other related departments of the University of Kansas are presented. The titles and authors include the following: "Comanche Consonant Mutation: Initial Association or Feature Spread?" (James L. Armagost); "The Alsea Noun Phrase"…

  10. Resiliency and Native American Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Driving-Hawk, Christopher; Baartman, Jyl

    2009-01-01

    The term resiliency is used to describe the "human capacity and ability to face, overcome, be strengthened by, and even be transformed by experiences of adversity." Native American culture provides a framework for fostering resiliency. The Lakota Sioux society identifies four core needs that foster resiliency and motivate individuals to reach…

  11. NABS Program: (Native Americans in Biological Science).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettys, Nancy, Comp.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the four-week summer program of the Native Americans in Biological Sciences Program that engages Native American eighth- and ninth-grade students in studying the problems related to the waste water treatment plant in Cushing, Oklahoma. (MDH)

  12. Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native

    MedlinePlus

    ... million American Indians and Alaska Natives. Typically, this urban clientele has less accessibility to hospitals; health clinics ... IHS and tribal health programs. Studies on the urban American Indian and Alaska Native population have documented ...

  13. Significant Literature by and about Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Cecilia A., Comp.; Travis, M. Eunice, Comp.

    Significant literature about Native Americans, some written by Native Americans, comprises this bibliography. Materials relevant to Native Americans found at Kansas State University are listed. Over 850 books, articles on microfiche, studies, documents, and publications arranged by subject categories are contained in this bibliography. The subject…

  14. Education and Attitudes toward Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugaj, Albert M.

    A survey of 123 students enrolled in Introduction to Social Psychology at the University of Wisconsin--Green Bay examined attitudes toward Native Americans. The research assessed the effects of educational programs at the secondary and postsecondary level on attitudes toward Native Americans and Native American treaty rights, and also measured the…

  15. Counseling Native Americans: An Introduction for Non-Native American Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Timothy C.

    1991-01-01

    Provides primer on counseling Native American clients for non-Native American counselors and psychotherapists. Describes diversity of population and presents general model of healing from traditional Native American perspective. Reviews relevant research and offers practical suggestions for providing counseling services to Native Americans.…

  16. 77 FR 15043 - Request for Tribal Consultation on the Minority Business Development Agency's (MBDA) Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... Minority Business Development Agency Request for Tribal Consultation on the Minority Business Development...) Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) seeks to redesign its Native American Business Center (NABEC... promotes the growth and competitiveness of eligible Native American and minority- owned businesses. As...

  17. The State of Native American Youth Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Div. of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health.

    This survey on the health status of Native American adolescents living on or near reservations was completed by 14,000 American Indian and Alaska Native youths from 50 tribes attending 200 schools in 12 states. Results indicate that most Native teenagers felt their family cared about them a great deal, and many would go to a family member first…

  18. Native American Children in Michigan. [Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Native American Children in Michigan," provides a historical context for the tenuous relationship between Michigan's 12 federally recognized tribes and the state government, paying particular attention to the erosion of Native American education programs and the disproportionate number of Native children who find themselves in both the child…

  19. Native Americans and Wage Labor: Ethnohistorical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Alice, Ed.; Knack, Martha C., Ed.

    This book reconsiders a largely ignored fact of North American Indian economic life--the place of wage labor in the culture and history of Native Americans. Case studies examine social networks of Native agricultural laborers, the decline of Native communities from self-sufficient producers to lower-class wage laborers, vocational education in…

  20. 10 CFR 440.11 - Native Americans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Native Americans. 440.11 Section 440.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.11 Native... involved as the population of all low-income Native Americans for whom a determination under paragraph...

  1. Reconstructing Native American population history.

    PubMed

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C; Bravi, Claudio M; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, Maria José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana A; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Di Rienzo, Anna; Freimer, Nelson B; Price, Alkes L; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2012-08-16

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred by means of a single migration or multiple streams of migration from Siberia. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at a higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Here we show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call 'First American'. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan speakers on both sides of the Panama isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America. PMID:22801491

  2. 78 FR 21410 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meetings AGENCY... Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), of two meetings of the Native American Graves... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), of two meetings of the Native American Graves...

  3. 77 FR 7180 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting AGENCY... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), of two meetings of the Native American Graves Protection... of Native American human remains determined to be culturally unidentifiable; presentations by...

  4. 76 FR 69282 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting AGENCY... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), of a meeting of the Native American Graves Protection and... effect the agreed-upon disposition of Native American human remains determined to be...

  5. 77 FR 74874 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting AGENCY... Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), of a telephonic meeting of the Native American... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), of a telephonic meeting of the Native American...

  6. 75 FR 9429 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meetings AGENCY... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), of three meetings of the Native American Graves... agreement, of Native American human remains determined to be culturally unidentifiable; and presentations...

  7. 78 FR 23206 - Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of Tribal Relations, USDA. ACTION: Notice... American Farming and Ranching (CNAFR) a public advisory committee of the Office of Tribal Relations (OTR... farming and ranching opportunities created through the farm loan program through enhanced extension...

  8. American Indian & Alaska Native Sources of Health Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Minority Health (PHS/DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This brief directory lists 28 agencies providing culturally sensitive printed health materials for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Each entry provides the agency's address; telephone number; fax number; and annotated titles available, with price. Many materials are free. There is also a subject index with these categories: adolescent…

  9. 76 FR 56815 - Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ...-FR-P ... Employment and Training Administration Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, U. S. Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice...

  10. Reconstructing Native American Population History

    PubMed Central

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V.; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F.; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C.; Bravi, Claudio M.; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M.; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Ángel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B.; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I.; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Rienzo, Anna Di; Freimer, Nelson B.; Price, Alkes L.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved1–5. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred via a single6–8 or multiple streams of migration from Siberia9–15. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. We show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call “First American”. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan-speakers on both sides of the Panama Isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America. PMID:22801491

  11. Genetic Research and Native American Cultural Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Francine; Bemis, Lynne T.; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Dignan, Mark

    Cultural issues relevant to genetic education and research arc the focus of a new and innovative curriculum being developed for Native American college students and health professionals. Genetic Education for Native Americans (GENA) is funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute of the National Institutes of Health. The goal of the GENA project is to provide a balance of scientific and cultural information about genetic research, genetic testing, and careers in genetics for Native American students. This article describes issues related to the implementation of GENA and provides an example of an innovative approach to teaching about genetic research among Native American populations.

  12. Native American medicine and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nauman, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Native American medicine provides an approach to the treatment of cardiovascular disease that is unique and that can complement modern medicine treatments. Although specific practices among the various Native American tribes (Nations) can vary, there is a strong emphasis on the power of shamanism that can be supplemented by the use of herbal remedies, sweat lodges, and special ceremonies. Most of the practices are passed down by oral tradition, and there is specific training regarding the Native American healer. Native American medicine has strong testimonial experiences to suggest benefit in cardiac patients; however, critical scientific scrutiny is necessary to confirm the validity of the benefits shown to date.

  13. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders among Native Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... factor in many problems, including alcohol abuse. 7 Poverty and inadequate access to health care also play ... 32 percent of Native Americans live below the poverty level, compared with 13 percent of all Americans. ...

  14. Native American History in a Box: A New Approach to Teaching Native American Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Emory C.; Hitt, Austin M.; Schipper, Jason A.; Jones, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Native American History in a Box curriculum which is designed to introduce elementary and middle-level students to Native American cultures. The curriculum consists of a five day unit addressing the following concepts pertaining to Native American Nations: settlements, tools, sustenance, pottery, and contact with…

  15. Native American Music and Curriculum: Controversies and Cultural Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyea, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Native American music and curricula, the differences in Western and Native American perspectives of music, the role of music in Native American life, and music as art. Considers how Native Americans live in two worlds (the preserved and lived cultures) and how Native American music should be taught. (CMK)

  16. Reading Native American Literature: A Teacher's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goebel, Bruce A.

    2004-01-01

    High school and college teachers interested in offering units or courses on Native American literature have often had to carve out new teaching strategies because ready resources and guides are scarce. In "Reading Native American Literature: A Teacher's Guide," Bruce A. Goebel offers innovative and practical suggestions about how to introduce…

  17. In Search of Native American Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Leroy N.

    2001-01-01

    The Native American Church meeting is one contemporary inter-tribal form of the ancient peyote spiritual tradition, represented throughout much of North America. With its deeply integrated elements of artistic expression, the cultural context of the peyote ceremony affords an approach to the major issues of Native American aesthetics. Is some…

  18. 1994 State Legislation on Native American Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Kimberly A.

    This report includes state-by-state summaries of 1994 legislation pertaining to Native American issues. Of 344 bills introduced in the state legislatures in 1994, 92 were enacted and 20 are still pending. Major issues addressed in 1994 legislation included Native American education; history, language, and culture preservation; sovereignty; law…

  19. Native American Recipes for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen D., Comp.

    This collection of recipes is intended to assist teachers in using food in the classroom to enhance the study of Native American people. Several concepts are identified to guide teachers in developing instructional units centering around food as a means of understanding the Native American culture: (1) the impact of physical environment and…

  20. Native American Biographies. Multicultural Biographies Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Virginia, Ed.; And Others

    This book, appropriate for secondary students, includes brief biographies of 21 Native Americans of the 20th century. The biographies focus on childhood experiences, cultural heritage, and career goals. The book is divided into four units that feature Native Americans with successful careers in the fields of literature and drama; fine arts and…

  1. Exploring Aesthetics: Focus on Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarrazin, Natalie

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that effectively presenting another culture in the classroom is one of the most fundamental problems facing teachers using a multicultural curriculum. Discusses the role of music and the arts in Native American culture. Provides suggestions for presenting traditional Native American music in Western classrooms. (CFR)

  2. Brain Hemispheric Functions and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Allen Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Uses brain research conducted by Dr. Roger Sperry to show that traditional Native Americans are more dominant in right hemisphere thinking, setting them apart from a modern left hemisphere-oriented society (especially emphasized in schools). Describes some characteristics of Native American thinking that illustrate a right hemisphere orientation…

  3. Nature Study Tips: Native American Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Helen Ross

    1984-01-01

    Discusses Native American foods, focusing on Native American cultivated crops, methods of cooking, and methods of preserving food. Includes suggestions for 19 classroom activities, including collecting wild plants used as food, gathering/drying and eating various wild plants and plant products (such as acorns and corn), and making a garden. (JN)

  4. The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society helps over 200 tribes and Alaska Native villages implement best management practices, informs them about wildlife issues, provides hazardous materials training, trains game wardens, and conducts a summer practicum for Native youth on environmental issues and careers in natural resource fields.…

  5. 78 FR 16295 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting AGENCY... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), of a meeting of the Native American... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), of a meeting of the Native...

  6. 76 FR 12132 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting AGENCY... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix (1988), of a meeting of the Native American Graves Protection and... the Interior, as required by law, in order to effect the agreed-upon disposition of Native...

  7. Gallstones in American Indian/Alaska Native Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asian-Americans Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders American Indians/Alaska Natives Immigrant and migrant issues Taking care ... Enter email address Submit Home > Minority Women's Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health Gallstones Health conditions ...

  8. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How to Talk to ... disease. Return to top Health conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug ...

  9. 77 FR 65407 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Notice of Nomination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Notice of Nomination Solicitation AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Nomination Solicitation... American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee, National NAGPRA Program, National...

  10. Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27

    This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

  11. 77 FR 71396 - Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of Tribal Relations Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of Tribal Relations, USDA. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a... rules that are applicable to the public. Notices of hearings #0;and investigations, committee...

  12. 78 FR 49444 - Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... rules that are applicable to the public. Notices of hearings #0;and investigations, committee meetings...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of Tribal Relations, USDA. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of...

  13. Native American Religious Freedom and Federal Land Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Eric William

    1990-01-01

    Explains the importance of specific locations to the performance of ceremonies and rituals in traditional Native American religions. Discusses recent court decisions in favor of federal land management agencies denying protection to sacred sites because of economic or development considerations. Contains 15 references. (SV)

  14. Wild Plants Used by the Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nature Study, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes 10 wild plants used by Native Americans. They include: rose hips; the common milkweed; cattails; elderberries; cactus fruits; lamb's quarters pigweeds (Chenopodium sp.); persimmons; mints (Monardo sp.); the yucca; and the hawthorn. Illustrations of each plant are included. (JN)

  15. The State of Native American Youth Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Div. of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health.

    Between 1988 and 1990, nearly 14,000 American Indian and Alaska Native adolescents living in rural areas and on reservations participated in the Adolescent Health Survey of health and risk behaviors. Although the findings may not be representative of Native adolescents, as a convenience sample was used, some findings of the survey were: (1) less…

  16. American Indians and Alaska Natives with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marilyn J.

    American Indian and Alaska Native children with special needs experience the same ineffective and inefficient services as other minority language children. This paper discusses the special needs of Native children, assessment and curriculum issues, and recommendations for improvement. It provides statistics for various categories of handicaps and…

  17. Gifted Native American Students: Underperforming, Under-Identified, and Overlooked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Marcia; Fugate, C. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    There has been limited focus among researchers on the nature and needs of gifted Native American students in the past 30 years, and the work that has been done frequently generalizes findings across Native American cultures. This article reviews recent literature on Native American youth and on gifted Native American students; examines the current…

  18. Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives American Indian/Alaska Natives have 1.5 times the ... Cause of Death (By rank) # American Indian/Alaska Native Deaths American Indian/Alaska Native Death Rate #Non- Hispanic White ...

  19. Native American Loyalists and Patriots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsh, Russel Lawrence

    1977-01-01

    Many American Indians experienced the American Revolution differently; Western tribes fearful of American expansionism tended to become loyalists, while east coast tribes already submerged in English society generally saw the rebellion as an opportunity to prove themselves deserving of full political equality via loyalty to their patriot…

  20. Roots of Contemporary Native American Activism. Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Troy R.

    1996-01-01

    Traces the foundations and development of Native American activism, 1950s-90s. Discusses relocation of reservation American Indians to urban areas in the 1950s without promised aid or vocational training, changing aspirations of Indian veterans and college students, lessons of the civil rights movement, occupations of Alcatraz Island and Wounded…

  1. Two Native American Near-Death Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorer, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses two tales of near-death experiences from the Chippewas in Michigan during the 1820s with reference to local origin, influence of White American culture, and universality. One tale has autoscopic, specifically Native American elements while the other contains elements of the transcendental type. (Author/NRB)

  2. Native Americans in Oklahoma, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Patricia; And Others

    The study unit on American Indians in Oklahoma for grades K-6 provides suggested multi-curriculum activities and resources for educators to use as an introduction for all students, Indian and non-Indian. Goals of the multi-curriculum based study unit include: (1) developing an awareness of the origin of Native American culture; (2) making the…

  3. 78 FR 70956 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American... Title of Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian... American and Alaskan Native populations, most notably through the Indian Housing Block Grant. The level...

  4. The American Native Press and American Indian Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    As product and process, the Native American press has a long history. The establishment of the first native-run press in 1828 began a press history that continues today. That history is represented by more than 2,000 periodical titles alone, two-thirds of which have been established during the past 20 years. Impressive collections of these…

  5. 76 FR 76120 - Establishment of the Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... Establishment of the Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, USDA... establishment of the Council for Native American Farming and Ranching (Council). The purpose of the Council is... farming and ranching opportunities created through the farm loan program through enhanced extension...

  6. 78 FR 25292 - Announcement of Funding Awards; Office of Native American Programs Training and Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Technical Assistance; Fiscal Year 2012 AGENCY: Office of Native American Programs, Office of Public and... Year 2012 (FY 2012) Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Office of Native American Programs... opportunities primarily for persons with low and moderate incomes as defined in 24 CFR 1003.4. The FY...

  7. Cancer Risks and Native Americans: The "Healthy Living in Two World's" Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, H.; Jackson, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This project collected data on cancer risk factors among urban Native American youth in the northeast to inform development of a prevention initiative. Design: Face to face interviews were conducted. Setting: Interviews were conducted in homes, at a social service agency, and in a private space at a Native American cultural event in…

  8. Native Americans in Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane

    2003-01-01

    The Family Spirit Project provides health and parenting education and in-home support to Navajo and Apache teen parents. The public-health careers of Native professionals allied with the project are described, including a public health administrator, a trainer of field workers, and a medical researcher specializing in communicable diseases that…

  9. Physical activity and Native Americans: a review.

    PubMed

    Coble, James D; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2006-07-01

    The physical activity behaviors of Native-American populations in the United States and Canada have received little attention in the health literature. The purpose of this review was to unite the literature regarding the physical activity behaviors of Native Americans. A majority of the literature was obtained using online databases. Reference lists were also reviewed to gain further access to the literature. Key-word searches included various combinations of Aboriginal, Native Indian, American Indian, Native American, First Nation, Métis, or Alaska Native with physical activity, exercise, and health behavior. Articles included were those published in English-language, peer-reviewed journals from 1990 until November 2005 that focused on participants aged 18 years and older. This review is organized according to ecologic models of health behavior, which take into account several correlates to explain human behavior, including demographic, personal health, environmental, and psychosocial. Correlates were included if they appeared at least three times in the literature. As a result of these inclusion criteria, the number of reviewed articles includes 28 quantitative, 4 qualitative, and 3 intervention studies. Results indicate that age, gender, and social support are important factors associated with physical activity. The remaining correlates show inconsistent or indeterminate results due in part to the paucity of research. It is suggested that an increase in the number of studies, especially those using longitudinal designs, is needed. Further, the application of psychosocial models to understand physical activity motivations as well as culturally appropriate and validated measurement tools are largely absent in the Native-American physical activity literature. PMID:16777541

  10. 75 FR 7524 - Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    .... BILLING CODE 4510-FR-P\\ ... Employment and Training Administration Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice...

  11. 78 FR 69879 - Workforce Investment Act: Native American Employment and Training Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    .... BILLING CODE 4501-FR-P ... Employment and Training Administration Workforce Investment Act: Native American Employment and Training Council AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice...

  12. 78 FR 36598 - Workforce Investment Act: Native American Employment and Training Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Administration. BILLING CODE 4501-FR-P ... Employment and Training Administration Workforce Investment Act: Native American Employment and Training Council AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, U. S. Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice...

  13. 76 FR 8380 - Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Administration. BILLING CODE 4510-FR-P ... Employment and Training Administration Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, U. S. Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice...

  14. 78 FR 3031 - Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... Secretary, Employment and Training Administration. BILLING CODE 4501-FR-P ... Employment and Training Administration Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, U. S. Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice...

  15. 77 FR 59990 - Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ...-FR-P ... Employment and Training Administration Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council Meeting AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. ACTION:...

  16. 77 FR 65406 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Notice of Nomination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Notice of Nomination Solicitation AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of nomination solicitation... Protection and Repatriation Review Committee, National NAGPRA Program, National Park Service, 1201 Eye...

  17. The Geoscience Alliance--A National Network for Broadening Participation of Native Americans in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Berthelote, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Geoscience Alliance is a national alliance of individuals committed to broadening participation of Native Americans in the geosciences. Native Americans in this case include American Indians, Alaska Natives and people of Native Hawai'ian ancestry. Although they make up a large percentage of the resource managers in the country, they are underrepresented in degrees in the geosciences. The Geoscience Alliance (GA) members are faculty and staff from tribal colleges, universities, and research centers; native elders and community members; industry, agency, and corporate representatives; students (K12, undergraduate, and graduate); formal and informal educators; and other interested individuals. The goals of the Geoscience Alliance are to 1) create new collaborations in support of geoscience education for Native American students, 2) establish a new research agenda aimed at closing gaps in our knowledge on barriers and best practices related to Native American participation in the geosciences, 3) increase participation by Native Americans in setting the national research agenda on issues in the geosciences, and particularly those that impact Native lands, 4) provide a forum to communicate educational opportunities for Native American students in the geosciences, and 5) to understand and respect indigenous traditional knowledge. In this presentation, we look at the disparity between numbers of Native Americans involved in careers related to the geosciences and those who are receiving bachelors or graduate degrees in the geosciences. We address barriers towards degree completion in the geosciences, and look at innovative programs that are addressing those barriers.

  18. Desert Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    One in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet introduces elementary students to the history and culture of the Navajo, Pueblo, and other Indian tribes of the southwest desert. Written in simple language, the booklet provides background information, activities, legends, and illustrations. Topics include the climate of the…

  19. Anthropological Studies of Native American Place Names.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Thomas F.

    1997-01-01

    Traces development of Native American place name studies from Boas (1880s) to the present. Argues that place names convey information about physical environments but also reveal how people perceive, conceptualize, and utilize their environment. Suggests the utility of place names as a framework for cultural analysis and describes recent…

  20. Native American Media Needs: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuerman, Laurell E.; And Others

    Twenty five urban centers, 70 Indian tribes, and 60 public television stations responded to questionnaires in an attempt to collect information useful to the process of making programmatic decisions about future goals and activities of the Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium (NAPBC). The Tribal and Urban Center questionnaires were…

  1. Academic Persistence among Native American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Smith, Steven A.; Hill, Curtis L.

    2003-01-01

    Qualitative interviews with 15 successful Native American college students who grew up on reservations identified the following themes related to their persistence in college: (a) family support, (b) structured social support, (c) faculty/staff warmth, (d) exposure to college and vocations, (e) developing independence and assertiveness, (f)…

  2. Native American Housing: The Solar Hogan Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonelli, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Describes development of a hybrid modern-traditional Navajo hogan that meets religious and cultural needs and the needs of modern Southwestern living, and uses passive and active solar technologies. Discusses housing problems on the Navajo Reservation, and plans for a Native American Housing Center at University of Colorado, Boulder. (SV)

  3. Native American Career Education Unit. Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    One of twelve instructional units in the Native American Career Education (NACE) program, this unit is intended to help Indian junior high school students develop cooperative group interaction skills, particularly those needed to resolve group conflicts, and to realize the importance of understanding values. Focus is on the subject areas of social…

  4. Exploring Native American Students' Perceptions of Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laubach, Timothy A.; Crofford, Geary Don; Marek, Edmund A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore Native American (NA) students' perceptions of scientists by using the Draw-A-Scientist Test and to determine if differences in these perceptions exist between grade level, gender, and level of cultural tradition. Data were collected for students in Grades 9-12 within a NA grant off-reservation…

  5. Woodland Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    One in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet introduces elementary students to the tribes of the woodland culture area, extending from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean and from Florida to the Great Lakes. Written in simple language, the booklet provides an overview of the regional culture, as well as,…

  6. Native American Rights Fund: 1982 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Rights Fund, Boulder, CO.

    The 1982 annual report of the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), a non-profit organization specializing in the protection of Indian rights, explains the organization, its structure, its priorities, its activities, and its financial status. Opening statements by the chairman, Roger Jim, and the executive director, John Echohawk, note that despite…

  7. Southwestern Native American Studies: A Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stabler, Karen, Comp.

    Conducting research in the field of Native American studies requires the use of many different materials in the library. This guide provides a bibliography of useful tools as well as a basic strategy to follow when researching the topic. The types of documents listed include: dictionaries and encyclopedias, guides and handbooks, journal articles,…

  8. Growing Up Native American. An Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Patricia, Ed.

    This anthology contains 22 essays and fictional writings about childhood by well-known Native American writers of the United States and Canada, from the 19th century to the 1990s. Selections include short stories, excerpts from novels, autobiographical sketches, and essays about the relationship between language and culture, family relationships,…

  9. Learning Science by Studying Native American Pottery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zastrow, Leona M.

    Principles of science and art are found in all phases of daily life. This book helps teachers and students in grades 7 and 8 discover specific scientific information as they experience "making pottery" using Native American pottery techniques. Lessons are built upon discover techniques--observation followed by conclusion--and begin with hands-on…

  10. Influence of Family on Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    "Native American"* postsecondary education students encounter several barriers to academic persistence including cultural assimilation issues, limited access to career information services, and an individual sense of duty and responsibility to remain tied to traditional spiritual values and beliefs systems, joined with family pressure to…

  11. Stylized Figures: Inspired by Native American Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Susie B.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching elementary-level art in the Pacific Northwest makes it natural for the author to develop a lesson based on Native American art of the area. The designs of the Northwest Indians can sometimes be a bit too sophisticated for the students to grasp, however, and it can be frustrating when developing such a project. Over a Labor Day weekend,…

  12. Self-Development for Native American Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevo, Dana; Wiese, Dorene

    This instructional package consists of activity guides, materials, and background information on selected areas pertinent to the self-development of a native American Indian participant group. Covered in its six units are the following topics: self-image and success (motivation and success, personal discovery, tools and assessment instruments,…

  13. Native American Languages as Heritage Mother Tongues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Teresa L.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines current efforts to revitalise, stabilise, and maintain Indigenous languages in the USA. Most Native American languages are no longer acquired as a first language by children. They are nonetheless languages of identity and heritage, and in this sense can and should be considered mother tongues. The article begins with a…

  14. State Legislation Relating to Native Americans, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, James B.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes legislative activities in states that enacted bills and resolutions relating to Native Americans in 1991. Conflicts between states and the Indian tribes within their borders were the subject of significant legislation in 1991. In all, 220 bills and resolutions were introduced in state legislatures; 77 passed and 20 are still…

  15. Plains Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    One in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet introduces elementary students to the tribes of the plains culture area, extending from the Rocky Mountains to the Mississippi River and from Texas to Canada. Written in simple language, the booklet begins with a brief description of the region--its extreme climate and the…

  16. Native American Culture: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troisi, Andrea

    1995-01-01

    Provides suggestions for a literature-based approach when integrating Native American culture into the middle school curriculum. Recommends resources in the following subjects: language arts, mathematics, physical education, health, home and career skills, technology, art, music, and second language. (AEF)

  17. Studies in Native American Languages 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, John, Ed.; Khym, Hangyoo, Ed.; Kookiattikoon, Supath, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Four papers on Native American languages include these: "Reduplicated Numerals in Salish" (Gregory D. S. Anderson), which analyzes these patterns in Salish and compares them with other Salish languages; "Unitariness and Partial Identification in the Bella Coola Middle Voice" (David Beck), which argues for a single morpheme, instead of several, for…

  18. Wisdomkeepers: Meetings with Native American Spiritual Elders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arden, Harvey; Wall, Steve

    This book documents meetings with Native American elders who shared their tribal stories of origin, sacred traditions, social life and customs, and traditional wisdom. The idea for the book began when a Cherokee medicine man requested that his tribal knowledge be documented for future generations. For the past 10 years, the spiritual elders of…

  19. Coastal Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    Background information, legends, games, illustrations, and art projects are provided in this booklet introducing elementary students to the history and culture of Indian tribes of the North Pacific Coast and Pacific Northwest. One in a series of Native American instructional materials, the booklet provides an overview of the coastal culture area,…

  20. Psychological and Vocational Assessment of Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Timothy C.

    This paper introduces important issues in the psychological and vocational assessment of Native Americans in schools, mental health clinics, counseling centers, and rehabilitation programs. A primary concern is to conduct such assessment in a fair and unbiased manner. Various methods are used to gather information: interviewing the client, family…

  1. Preventing School Failure: The Native American Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nel, Johanna

    1993-01-01

    Special needs of the Native American child in school are addressed including adjustment problems in the "white" school and value conflicts concerning competition, individualism, acquisitiveness; personal praise; generosity; concept of time; nonverbal and verbal communication; individual freedom and independence; eye contact, humility, respect; and…

  2. Compliment Responses: Comparing American Learners of Japanese, Native Japanese Speakers, and American Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatsumi, Naofumi

    2012-01-01

    Previous research shows that American learners of Japanese (AJs) tend to differ from native Japanese speakers in their compliment responses (CRs). Yokota (1986) and Shimizu (2009) have reported that AJs tend to respond more negatively than native Japanese speakers. It has also been reported that AJs' CRs tend to lack the use of avoidance or…

  3. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is ... 54. 1 At a glance – Cancer Rates for American Indian/Alaska Natives (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 – ...

  4. Recruitment of Native American Parents: Ideas for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodluck, Charlotte

    Recruitment of Native Americans to be foster or adoptive parents for Native American children involves careful planning, preparation, and work. In addition to making standard administrative decisions and maintaining required records, social workers must be sensitive to the attitudes, lifestyle, and culture of Native Americans recruited as adoptive…

  5. 75 FR 67907 - National Native American Heritage Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8595 of October 29, 2010 National Native American Heritage Month, 2010 By the... rich traditions, which continue to thrive in Native American communities across our country today. During National Native American Heritage Month, we honor and celebrate their importance to our...

  6. The Use of Public Libraries by Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Susan K.

    2007-01-01

    Library services to Native Americans have expanded greatly in the past several decades, but more work still needs to be done to provide for the information needs of Native Americans. Data from the U.S. Current Population Survey were used to compare library use rates of Native American households to rates of Anglo households. Results show that…

  7. Cultural Strengths to Persevere: Native American Women in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterman, Stephanie J.; Lindley, Lorinda S.

    2013-01-01

    Beginning with an overview of historical perspectives of Native American women, this article includes some discussion of values and practices of contemporary Native American women, data pertaining to Native American women's participation in higher education, and an introduction of familial cultural capital, community cultural wealth, Native…

  8. Adapting Manualized Treatments: Treating Anxiety Disorders among Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Coteau, Tami; Anderson, Jessiline; Hope, Debra

    2006-01-01

    Although there is a small but growing body of literature examining the psychopathology of anxiety among Native Americans, no data are available regarding the efficacy of empirically supported treatments for anxiety disorders among Native Americans. Moreover, exceptional challenges arise in adapting mainstream approaches to Native Americans, such…

  9. Injury Prevention Awareness in an Urban Native American Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, James S. J.; Williams, Scott D.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 50 Native American and 100 other families assessed injury prevention awareness and practices among urban Native Americans in Salt Lake City (Utah). Native American families were less aware of and less likely to practice prevention than others. These characteristics are more likely caused by low-income status than culture. (SLD)

  10. End State Renal Disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jeffrey M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Determines the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States from 1983-86. Findings indicate 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of White cases were attributed to diabetes. (JS)

  11. Native Americans: traditional healing.

    PubMed

    Broome, Barbara; Broome, Rochelle

    2007-04-01

    There are an estimated 4.1 million people who are classified as American Indian and Alaska Native alone or in combination with one or more other races. This racial group composes 1.5% of the total U.S. population. The leading causes of illness and death among American Indians are heart disease, cancer, unintentional injuries (accidents), diabetes, and stroke. American Indians also have a high prevalence of obesity, chronic renal failure, alcoholism, and are at increased risk for mental health issues and suicide. In an effort to build a trusted relationship with these patients and become an active participant in their care, the health care provider must demonstrate respect for the traditions of the American Indian. PMID:17494460

  12. Franz Boas and Native American biological variability.

    PubMed

    Jantz, R L

    1995-06-01

    The contributions to physical anthropology with which Franz Boas is usually credited are in the areas of growth, plasticity of head and body form, and biometric genetics. Such a listing of Boas's contributions overlooks the tremendous amount of research he did with biological variability of Native American populations. The rediscovery of his anthropometric data documents the tremendous investment in time, money, and effort Boas devoted to the topic and provides the opportunity to rediscover his insights into a subject that is of continuing interest. The design of his massive anthropometric survey of native North Americans reveals a concern for population analyses and a rejection of the typological framework of the time. If Boas's ideas had been adopted at the turn of the century, the development of physical anthropology in America might have been much different. PMID:7607632

  13. Franz Boas and Native American biological variability.

    PubMed

    Jantz, R L

    1995-06-01

    The contributions to physical anthropology with which Franz Boas is usually credited are in the areas of growth, plasticity of head and body form, and biometric genetics. Such a listing of Boas's contributions overlooks the tremendous amount of research he did with biological variability of Native American populations. The rediscovery of his anthropometric data documents the tremendous investment in time, money, and effort Boas devoted to the topic and provides the opportunity to rediscover his insights into a subject that is of continuing interest. The design of his massive anthropometric survey of native North Americans reveals a concern for population analyses and a rejection of the typological framework of the time. If Boas's ideas had been adopted at the turn of the century, the development of physical anthropology in America might have been much different.

  14. Report to the Legislature by the Native American Heritage Commission on Protection of Native American Sacred Places in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Heritage Commission, Sacramento, CA.

    Created by act of the California Legislature in September of 1976, the Native American Heritage Commission seeks to identify and protect places of cultural significance to California Native Americans and to safeguard Indian religious rights. The Commission, which is composed entirely of Native Americans, provides community services to solve the…

  15. Native american related materials in elementary science instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Catherine E.; Smith, Walter S.

    The low achievement of Native American students, as measured by standardized tests, results from a number of factors, including the lack of cultural relevance of curriculum materials used in their instruction. Using a pretest-posttest control group design, Native American students in Bureau of Indian Affairs schools in Grades 4-8 who were taught science using culturally relevant materials achieved significantly higher and displayed a significantly more positive attitude toward Native Americans and science than comparable students who were taught science without the culturally relevant materials. It is suggested that when educators of Native Americans teach science, they should use materials that incorporate frequent reference to Native Americans and science.

  16. Native American Education: A Reference Handbook. Contemporary Education Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Lorraine

    This handbook presents information and resource materials on various aspects of Native American education. Chapters 1-2 trace the history of Native education in the 18th-20th centuries, including the loss of Indian lands and movement west, Christian conversion and acculturation as the main motivations for providing Native American education,…

  17. A Model for Promoting Native American Language Preservation and Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlebear, Richard E.; Martinez, Alicia, Ed.

    The Interface Alaska Multifunctional Resource Center developed a model for training Native American language teachers to effectively teach Native languages. The model provides Native American paraprofessional language teachers with basic knowledge of classroom techniques and effective teaching strategies. The training introduces the Total Physical…

  18. 21 CFR 1307.31 - Native American Church.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Native American Church. 1307.31 Section 1307.31... Persons § 1307.31 Native American Church. The listing of peyote as a controlled substance in Schedule I does not apply to the nondrug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native...

  19. Native American Student Resiliency within Southwestern Tribal Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralez, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which Native American culture impacts the resiliency of Native American students earning degrees at three tribal colleges in the southwestern part of the United States. This study was a qualitative case study that was based on the following research question: "How does Native American…

  20. The Development of "New" Languages in Native American Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodfellow, Anne

    This paper examines the belief that as English rapidly infiltrates Native American cultures, school programs for teaching and maintaining native languages are not working. It suggests that Native American children who learn English first and their heritage languages second have difficulty learning the structures of their ancestral languages…

  1. Communication and the Power of Native American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torson, Dianna

    This thesis focuses on the effects of the language of patriarchy on the power of Native American women, how these women have retained power in their own societies, and how an understanding of Native women's values can aid feminists. An examination of Native American women's literature provides a connecting bridge back to a time before patriarchy…

  2. Natives and Academics: Researching and Writing about American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihesuah, Devon A., Ed.

    This anthology provides Native perspectives on the ethics of researching, writing about, and teaching about American Indians, and may be used as a text for discussion in American Indian Studies classes. Leading Native scholars discuss the representativeness of Native informants, the merits of various data collection methods, the role and veracity…

  3. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a pre-launch Native American ceremony, Radmilla Cody, the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, sings the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  4. Toward comprehensive obesity prevention programs in Native American communities.

    PubMed

    Broussard, B A; Sugarman, J R; Bachman-Carter, K; Booth, K; Stephenson, L; Strauss, K; Gohdes, D

    1995-09-01

    Obesity is a particularly important challenge to the health status of Native Americans. This challenge is manifest in the increasing rates of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus among Native Americans. Most studies of Native American infants, preschool children, schoolchildren, and adults have confirmed a high prevalence of overweight. Historical studies suggest that for many Native American communities the high rates of obesity are a relatively recent phenomenon. The specific reasons for the increase in obesity among Native Americans have not been determined, although it has been hypothesized that Native Americans have a genetic predisposition to overweight in a "westernized" environment of abundant food and decreased energy expenditure. Few detailed studies of diet or of physical activity levels of contemporary Native Americans have been published. Community-based interventions to modify diet and activity levels to prevent obesity in Native American communities are needed. Preliminary evidence from two formative school-based programs in the Southwest suggest that Native American communities are receptive to school-based interventions, and that such programs may be able to slow the rate of excess weight gain and to improve fitness in school children. Because of the cultural diversity among Native Americans, future studies should focus on collecting community- and region-specific data, and should emphasize the need for obesity prevention through culturally appropriate community- and school-based behavioral interventions. PMID:8581789

  5. Cancer Education Resources for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Supplement to Native American Monograph No. 1: Documentation of the Cancer Research Needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burhansstipanov, Linda, Comp.; Barry, Kathleen Cooleen, Comp.

    This directory provides information on cancer education materials that have been developed specifically for American Indians and Alaska Natives. The goal is to develop and implement culturally appropriate cancer prevention and control programs for Native Americans. The directory includes a matrix of cancer education materials that identifies…

  6. 78 FR 55114 - Native American Employment and Training Council (Council) Charter; Notice of Intent To Renew

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... needs of American Indians and Native Americans, as well as enhance the quality of life in accordance... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...; Notice of Intent To Renew AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice of...

  7. Profiles of Native American and/or Alaska Native English Learners (ELs). Fast Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of English Language Acquisition, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA) has synthesized key data on English learners (ELs) into two-page PDF sheets, by topic, with graphics, plus key contacts. The topics for this report on profiles of Native American and/or Alaska Native English Learners (ELs) include: (1) Largest Percentage of ELs Who Were Native American and/or…

  8. Current Conditions in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szasz, Margaret Connell

    The school experience of American Indian and Alaska Native children hinges on the context in which their schooling takes place. This context includes the health and well-being of their families, communities, and governments, as well as the relationship between Native and non-Native people. Many Native children are in desperate straits because of…

  9. Native Americans: We Are Here. Newsweek Social Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Beverly

    This teaching guide contains objectives, activities, vocabulary, suggested readings, visuals, and readings divided into four units of instruction about Native Americans. Unit I examines the history of Native Americans on the North American continent from the precolonial period to the present. Unit II explores representative tribes of the eastern…

  10. Teaching Young Children about Native Americans. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Debbie

    Noting that the terms "Native American" and "American Indian" are both legitimately used to refer to the indigenous people of North America, this digest identifies stereotypes about Native Americans that children gain from media portrayals and classroom role playing, and suggests strategies for teachers to use to counter stereotyped portrayals and…

  11. 40 CFR 255.33 - Inclusion of Federal facilities and Native American Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Native American Reservations. 255.33 Section 255.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT... treated for the purposes of these guidelines as though they are incorporated municipalities, and...

  12. 40 CFR 255.33 - Inclusion of Federal facilities and Native American Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Native American Reservations. 255.33 Section 255.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT... treated for the purposes of these guidelines as though they are incorporated municipalities, and...

  13. 40 CFR 255.33 - Inclusion of Federal facilities and Native American Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Native American Reservations. 255.33 Section 255.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT... treated for the purposes of these guidelines as though they are incorporated municipalities, and...

  14. 40 CFR 255.33 - Inclusion of Federal facilities and Native American Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Native American Reservations. 255.33 Section 255.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT... treated for the purposes of these guidelines as though they are incorporated municipalities, and...

  15. Reflections of Native American Teen Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Janelle; Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2010-01-01

    Objective To understand the previously lived experience of early childbearing among adult Native American women. Design A community-based participatory research approach. Setting The first interview took place at a mutually agreed upon time and place and averaged 120 minutes. Second interviews were conducted 1 to 3 months later. Participants A convenience sample of 30 self-identified Native American adult women was recruited, and a semi-structured interview explored their early childbearing experiences. Method An interpretive phenomenological study was conducted with a Northwestern tribe. Results All of the women in the study described stressful childhoods. Two primary themes were identified: “Chaotic childhoods,” represented stressful events in youth that introduced or resulted in ongoing chaos in women’s lives. “Diminished childhoods” was used to describe early maturity as a result of assuming extensive responsibilities at a young age. Conclusions The findings suggest that the childhood experiences described by participants may be related to the risk for early childbearing. Prospective research should examine the relationship between young women’s lives and early childbearing in order to design interventions to support them in postponing pregnancy and when they do become pregnant. PMID:20629929

  16. Wind Power on Native American Lands: Process and Progress (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, A.; Flowers, L.; Gough, R.; Taylor, R.

    2005-05-01

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development. This poster describes the process and progress of Wind Powering America's involvement with Native American wind energy projects.

  17. Exploring Native American Students' Perceptions of Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, Timothy A.; Crofford, Geary Don; Marek, Edmund A.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore Native American (NA) students' perceptions of scientists by using the Draw-A-Scientist Test and to determine if differences in these perceptions exist between grade level, gender, and level of cultural tradition. Data were collected for students in Grades 9-12 within a NA grant off-reservation boarding school. A total of 133 NA students were asked to draw a picture of a scientist at work and to provide a written explanation as to what the scientist was doing. A content analysis of the drawings indicated that the level of stereotype differed between all NA subgroups, but analysis of variance revealed that these differences were not significant between groups except for students who practised native cultural tradition at home compared to students who did not practise native cultural tradition at home (p < 0.05). The results suggest that NA students who practise cultural traditions at home are more able to function fluidly between indigenous knowledge and modern western science than their non-practising counterparts. Overall, these NA students do not see themselves as scientists, which may influence their educational and career science, technology, engineering, and mathematics paths in the future. The educational implication is that once initial perceptions are identified, researchers and teachers can provide meaningful experiences to combat the stereotypes.

  18. 78 FR 10636 - Task Force on Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Force on Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women; Meeting AGENCY: Office on Violence Against Women, United States Department of Justice. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: This... Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women(hereinafter ``the Task Force'')....

  19. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students; Overview... Secretary and Director, Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and...

  20. Socioeconomic profiles of native American communities: Duckwater Shoshone Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, M.

    1991-10-01

    This report presents socioeconomic aspects of Native Americans of the Duckwater Shoshone Reservation. A survey is included concerning their views on the proposed Yucca Mountain waste repository. (CBS)

  1. New native South American Y chromosome lineages.

    PubMed

    Jota, Marilza S; Lacerda, Daniela R; Sandoval, José R; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Ohasi, Dominique; Santos-Júnior, José E; Acosta, Oscar; Cuellar, Cinthia; Revollo, Susana; Paz-Y-Miño, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Schurr, Theodore G; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo M; Pena, Sergio Dj; Ayub, Qasim; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santos, Fabrício R

    2016-07-01

    Many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the non-recombining region of the human Y chromosome have been described in the last decade. High-coverage sequencing has helped to characterize new SNPs, which has in turn increased the level of detail in paternal phylogenies. However, these paternal lineages still provide insufficient information on population history and demography, especially for Native Americans. The present study aimed to identify informative paternal sublineages derived from the main founder lineage of the Americas-haplogroup Q-L54-in a sample of 1841 native South Americans. For this purpose, we used a Y-chromosomal genotyping multiplex platform and conventional genotyping methods to validate 34 new SNPs that were identified in the present study by sequencing, together with many Y-SNPs previously described in the literature. We updated the haplogroup Q phylogeny and identified two new Q-M3 and three new Q-L54*(xM3) sublineages defined by five informative SNPs, designated SA04, SA05, SA02, SA03 and SA29. Within the Q-M3, sublineage Q-SA04 was mostly found in individuals from ethnic groups belonging to the Tukanoan linguistic family in the northwest Amazon, whereas sublineage Q-SA05 was found in Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon ethnic groups. Within Q-L54*, the derived sublineages Q-SA03 and Q-SA02 were exclusively found among Coyaima individuals (Cariban linguistic family) from Colombia, while Q-SA29 was found only in Maxacali individuals (Jean linguistic family) from southeast Brazil. Furthermore, we validated the usefulness of several published SNPs among indigenous South Americans. This new Y chromosome haplogroup Q phylogeny offers an informative paternal genealogy to investigate the pre-Columbian history of South America.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 31 March 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2016.26.

  2. New native South American Y chromosome lineages.

    PubMed

    Jota, Marilza S; Lacerda, Daniela R; Sandoval, José R; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Ohasi, Dominique; Santos-Júnior, José E; Acosta, Oscar; Cuellar, Cinthia; Revollo, Susana; Paz-Y-Miño, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Schurr, Theodore G; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo M; Pena, Sergio Dj; Ayub, Qasim; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santos, Fabrício R

    2016-07-01

    Many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the non-recombining region of the human Y chromosome have been described in the last decade. High-coverage sequencing has helped to characterize new SNPs, which has in turn increased the level of detail in paternal phylogenies. However, these paternal lineages still provide insufficient information on population history and demography, especially for Native Americans. The present study aimed to identify informative paternal sublineages derived from the main founder lineage of the Americas-haplogroup Q-L54-in a sample of 1841 native South Americans. For this purpose, we used a Y-chromosomal genotyping multiplex platform and conventional genotyping methods to validate 34 new SNPs that were identified in the present study by sequencing, together with many Y-SNPs previously described in the literature. We updated the haplogroup Q phylogeny and identified two new Q-M3 and three new Q-L54*(xM3) sublineages defined by five informative SNPs, designated SA04, SA05, SA02, SA03 and SA29. Within the Q-M3, sublineage Q-SA04 was mostly found in individuals from ethnic groups belonging to the Tukanoan linguistic family in the northwest Amazon, whereas sublineage Q-SA05 was found in Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon ethnic groups. Within Q-L54*, the derived sublineages Q-SA03 and Q-SA02 were exclusively found among Coyaima individuals (Cariban linguistic family) from Colombia, while Q-SA29 was found only in Maxacali individuals (Jean linguistic family) from southeast Brazil. Furthermore, we validated the usefulness of several published SNPs among indigenous South Americans. This new Y chromosome haplogroup Q phylogeny offers an informative paternal genealogy to investigate the pre-Columbian history of South America.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 31 March 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2016.26. PMID:27030145

  3. Native Americans and state and local governments

    SciTech Connect

    Rusco, E.R.

    1991-10-01

    Native Americans` concerns arising from the possibility of establishment of a nuclear repository for high level wastes at Yucca Mountain fall principally into two main categories. First, the strongest objection to the repository comes from traditional Western Shoshones. Their objections are based on a claim that the Western Shoshones still own Yucca Mountain and also on the assertion that putting high level nuclear wastes into the ground is a violation of their religious views regarding nature. Second, there are several reservations around the Yucca Mountain site that might be affected in various ways by building of the repository. There is a question about how many such reservations there are, which can only be decided when more information is available. This report discusses two questions: the bearing of the continued vigorous assertion by traditionalist Western Shoshones of their land claim; and the extent to which Nevada state and local governments are able to understand and represent Indian viewpoints about Yucca Mountain.

  4. Preserving Native American petroglyphs on porous sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grisafe, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    A new method of chemical treatment is proposed to improve the durability of soft, porous sandstones onto which Native American petroglyphs have been carved. Cores of Dakota Sandstone from the Faris Cave site, located along the Smoky Hill River in Ellsworth County, Kansas, were treated with ethyl silicate dissolved in a lightweight ketone carrier, and some cores were subsequently treated with a combination of ethyl silicate and silane using the same solvent. Measurement of the resulting physical properties, when compared to untreated cores, indicate the treatments substantially increased the compressive strength and freeze-thaw resistance of the stone without discoloring the stone or completely sealing the pore system. The treatment increases the durability of the stone and provides a method for preserving the petroglyphs at the site. After treating test panels at the site, the petroglyphs were treated in like manner.

  5. Job Training Partnership Act: Native American Status for American Samoans Appears Unwarranted. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This report is the result of a study to assess whether American Samoans should be designated as Native Americans under the Job Training Partnership Act. The finding is that there is insufficient evidence in favor of such a change in designation. To designate American Samoans as Native Americans may set a precedent for amending numerous other…

  6. Anglo-American Jurisprudence and the Native American Tribal Quest for Religious Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftin, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Argues that Native American tribes encounter major legal problems in the practice of traditional religions due to differences between Native and Anglo American worldviews. Examines the ideology of civilization underlying values in American jurisprudence, foundations of American Indian law, and relevant constitutional law. Contains over 200…

  7. The Geoscience Alliance--A National Network for Broadening Participation of Native Americans in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Berthelote, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Geoscience Alliance is a national alliance of individuals committed to broadening participation of Native Americans in the geosciences. Native Americans in this case include American Indians, Alaska Natives and people of Native Hawai'ian ancestry. Although they make up a large percentage of the resource managers in the country, they are underrepresented in degrees in the geosciences. The Geoscience Alliance (GA) members are faculty and staff from tribal colleges, universities, and research centers; native elders and community members; industry, agency, and corporate representatives; students (K12, undergraduate, and graduate); formal and informal educators; and other interested individuals. The goals of the Geoscience Alliance are to 1) create new collaborations in support of geoscience education for Native American students, 2) establish a new research agenda aimed at closing gaps in our knowledge on barriers and best practices related to Native American participation in the geosciences, 3) increase participation by Native Americans in setting the national research agenda on issues in the geosciences, and particularly those that impact Native lands, 4) provide a forum to communicate educational opportunities for Native American students in the geosciences, and 5) to understand and respect indigenous traditional knowledge. In this presentation, we look at the disparity between numbers of Native Americans involved in careers related to the geosciences and those who are receiving bachelors or graduate degrees in the geosciences. We address barriers towards degree completion in the geosciences, and look at innovative programs that are addressing those barriers.

  8. Following Their Dreams: Native American Students Pursuing Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, Evelyn

    1997-01-01

    Four Native American first-year medical school students from Montana discuss their career choice and their goals for establishing medical practices in Native American communities. A regional program has enabled the students to take their first year of classes at Montana State University-Bozeman and to complete their studies at the University of…

  9. Unemployed Native Americans in a Work Orientation Program in Phoenix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Billie Jane

    The unemployment rate for Native Americans is 49% nationwide and 54% in Arizona. The Job Training Partnership Act (JPTA) program at the Phoenix Indian Center trains Native American adults to enter the urban work force. The Center offers work orientation programs, individual counseling, and work experience programs. The majority of the participants…

  10. Native American Visual Vocabulary: Ways of Thinking and Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyc, Gloria; Milligan, Carolyn

    Visual literacy is a culturally-derived strength of Native American students. On a continent with more than 200 languages, Native Americans relied heavily on visual intelligence for trade and communication between tribes. Tribal people interpreted medicine paint, tattoos, and clothing styles to determine the social roles of those with whom they…

  11. Gifted Native American Students: Literature, Lessons, and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Marcia; Fugate, C. Matthew; Wu, Jiaxi; Castellano, Jaime A.

    2014-01-01

    A national research agenda focused on gifted/creative/talented Native American students is needed, as this population remains one of the least researched, most overlooked, and most underserved in the field. Literature-based assumptions surrounding Native American students' talent development, culture and traditions, cognitive styles and…

  12. Native American Community Academy: The Power of Embracing Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The value that Native American nations place on deliberative experiential learning and oral reflection often is opposed to traditional practices in US schools. The inherent differences between those cultural approaches to learning have contributed to the large achievement gap between Native American schools and traditional public schools. In 2006…

  13. Native American Drinking: A Neglected Subject of Study and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Notes that, although Native Americans show high rates of alcoholism, violence, suicide, and early death, these problems are seldom covered well in textbooks. Conducted content analysis of 26 textbooks on alcoholism and substance misuse. Found that only four provided detailed discussion of Native American drinking. Suggests need for greater…

  14. Trials and Triumphs of Teaching Introduction to Native American Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansen, Bruce Elliott

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to Native American Studies has been, paradoxically, the author's most satisfying and most challenging teaching assignment in more than two decades as a university-level faculty member. As a former coordinator of the Native American Studies Program at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO), he has heard many other faculty air their…

  15. American Indian/Alaska Native College Student Retention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Raphael M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents findings from a qualitative study examining the similarities and differences between American Indian/Alaska Native student perceptions and the perceptions of state representatives, university presidents, and faculty about persistence factors and barriers to degree completion specific to American Indian/Alaska Native students…

  16. Smoking during pregnancy among northwest Native Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R L; Helgerson, S D; Waller, P

    1992-01-01

    There is little available information on the smoking habits of Native Americans. The authors used data from the Washington State birth certificate to determine the prevalence of smoking during pregnancy among Native American mothers in Washington State. From 1984 through 1988, 39.8 percent of all Native Americans smoked during their pregnancy. Smoking patterns during pregnancy differed markedly between Native Americans and whites according to maternal age and marital status. The smoking prevalence in Native Americans, adjusted for maternal age and marital status, was 1.3 times higher than that found in Washington State white women. This is the first analysis of statewide smoking rates during pregnancy among Native Americans. The birth certificate can serve as a readily accessible and low cost surveillance system for populations such as Native Americans, who are otherwise difficult to study. Smoking intervention programs need to be targeted at Native Americans, and how their smoking patterns differ from those of the general population needs to be recognized. PMID:1738811

  17. Faculty as Contributors to Learning for Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Carol A.; Lowe, Shelly C.

    2016-01-01

    With a national sample of 700 Native American students who took the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), this study tested the ways faculty interaction and inclusion of diverse perspectives in the classroom contributed to learning for Native American students. Significant predictors of learning were quality academic advising, faculty…

  18. The Way It Is Today. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    The final issue in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet for elementary students discusses contemporary Indian leaders and issues, the survival of traditions, and the effects of Indian stereotyping. Designed to help students understand the problems that have faced Native Americans since the first Europeans settled on…

  19. The Native American Studies Program at the University of Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    2001-01-01

    Begun in 1994, the Native American Studies program at the University of Oklahoma is an interdisciplinary B.A. program with a liberal arts orientation and strong emphasis on contemporary American Indian policy. Program strengths include the number and diversity of the faculty involved, the four Native languages taught, connections to tribal…

  20. The Guide for Choosing Native American Parenting Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingo, Robin R.; Mertensmeyer, Carol

    This guide is designed to help professionals working with Native American parents to be better prepared to select culturally sensitive materials, to program more effectively, and to draw from the richness within the Native American culture. The guide is one in a series of culturally specific guides produced as part of ParentLink's Review of…

  1. Give It Your Best! Profiles of Native American Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Russell; Kast, Sherry

    The purpose of this publication is to encourage and enhance the participation of American Indian and Alaska Native athletes in organized sports at the secondary, collegiate, and professional levels. Profiles are given of 37 young Native American women and men who are succeeding in competitive athletics, as well as in the classroom. One page is…

  2. Social Work Practice with Native American Families: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wintemute, Ginger, Ed.; Messer, Bonnie, Ed.

    A handbook on social work practice with Native American families, developed for use by students in undergraduate social work programs and by social service practitioners who work with Native American people, is divided into four sections. The first section contains four articles, written by Joseph A. Dudley (Methodist minister and Yankton Sioux)…

  3. New Social Learning from Two Spirit Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, J. B., Jr.; Sheppard, Maia

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors highlight connections between research on Two Spirit Native Americans and standard social studies curriculum. Two Spirit is a Pan-Indian term describing Native Americans who believe they embody both masculine and feminine characteristics/traits in one physical body. Findings from this research expand the field's…

  4. 76 FR 42713 - Notice of Meeting; Administration for Native Americans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lillian A. Sparks, Commissioner, Administration for Native Americans... for Native Americans, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW., Washington, DC 20447, anacommissioner@acf.hhs.gov... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Notice of Meeting; Administration for...

  5. It's about Family: Native American Student Persistence in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Raphael M.; Wolverton, Mimi

    2008-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study examining the similarities and differences between Native American student perceptions and the perceptions of state representatives, university presidents, and faculty about persistence factors and barriers to degree completion specific to Native American students at three land-grant universities in…

  6. Native American Youth and Culturally Sensitive Interventions: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kelly F.; Hodge, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of culturally sensitive interventions (CSIs) with Native American youth was conducted. Method: Electronic bibliographic databases, Web sites, and manual searches were used to identify 11 outcome studies that examined CSI effectiveness with Native American youth. Results: This review found…

  7. Your Rights: A Handbook for Native American Youth in Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Michael; And Others

    A handbook for Arizona Native Americans under 18 years old explains rights and responsibilities as young people, Native Americans, tribal members, and residents of Arizona. Rights are defined, ways of protecting rights outlined, and the fact that young people's rights are changing noted. Rights as a family member are discussed, as well as changes…

  8. Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention in a Rural Native American Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Janet W.; Skenandore, Alice H.; Scow, Beverly M.; Schanen, Jennifer G.; Clary, Frieda Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Nationally, the United States has a higher rate of teen pregnancy than any other industrialized nation. Native American youth have a higher birth rate than the national rate. A full-year healthy relationship program, based on Native American teachings, traditions, and cultural norms, was delivered to all eighth-grade students at a rural tribal…

  9. Native American Studies in the Laboratory School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersey, Harry A., Jr.; And Others

    A study was undertaken to determine students' attitudes toward Native Americans before and after they took the Native American studies course developed through an ESEA Title IV-C Curriculum Development Grant by the Alexander D. Henderson University School (ADHUS), a laboratory school on the campus of Florida Atlantic University. To comply with…

  10. Dimensions of Acculturation in Native American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Amy L.; Sodano, Sandro M.; Ecklund, Timothy R.; Guyker, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were applied to the responses of two respective independent samples of Native American college students on the Native American Acculturation Scale (NAAS). Three correlated dimensions were found to underlie NAAS items and these dimensions may also comprise a broader higher order dimension of Native…

  11. Native Americans in California Surveyed on Diets, Nutrition Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Joanne; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A survey of the diets of 51 Native Americans in California's Yosemite-Mariposa region was undertaken to develop a culturally relevant nutrition education and counseling program. Native Americans in this region have limited opportunities to obtain the foods they need for a healthy diet and also need information on obtaining help from federally…

  12. Native American Education Program, 1982-83. OEE Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Deborah

    During 1982-83, the Native American Education Program provided after-school and summer session instruction and supportive services to approximately 450 Native American grade K-12 students scattered throughout New York City. Goals of visiting and interviewing 50% of the target population were realized, with 220 home visits made. Materials and…

  13. Teaching Native American Music with Story for Multicultural Ends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyea, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    States that the alliance between story and music within Native American culture can be carried over into the curriculum. Provides a rationale for utilizing story while teaching Native American music, specifically related to the multicultural curriculum. Discusses the value of cultural music to the multicultural curriculum. (CMK)

  14. Health Education Interventions among Native Americans: A Review and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMaster, Pamela L.; Connell, Cathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    A review of 19 studies on Native Americans examined 12 focused on chronic conditions (diabetes, heart disease, substance abuse, fetal alcohol syndrome) and 7 on prevention (dental disease, prenatal/infant health, nutrition, HIV prevention, health promotion). Results showed Native Americans particularly at risk for diabetes and alcohol abuse and…

  15. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Chickasaw Dance troupe member Tim Harjo (second from left) leads Joyce and James Herrington in a dance honoring their son, STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington. The dance was part of a Native American ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex commemorating Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission.

  16. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chickasaw Dance Troupe performs an Honor Dance during the Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  17. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Joyce and James Herrington, parents of John Herrington, accept a gift during a pre-launch Native American ceremony. They are the parents of John Herrington, mission specialist on mission STS-113. Herrington is the first Native American to be going into space.

  18. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chickasaw Dance Troupe performs an Honor Dance for John Herrington's parents during the Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  19. The Native American Learner and Bicultural Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cajete, Gregory A.

    Explanations of natural phenomena within a traditional Native American context are often at odds with Western scientific philosophy and what is taught in school science. Herein lies a very real conflict between two distinctly different worldviews: the mutualistic/holistic-oriented worldview of Native American cultures and the…

  20. Laughing It Up: Native American Humor as Spiritual Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta; Garrett, J. T.; Torres-Rivera, Edil; Wilbur, Michael; Roberts-Wilbur, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Native American humor is explored through a brief discussion of the current literature regarding the use of humor in counseling and descriptions of various forms and communication styles of Native humor as spiritual tradition. Implications for multicultural awareness in the use of humor and possible use of Native humor in counseling with Native…

  1. Science education with or for Native Americans? An analysis of the Native American Science Outreach Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Kathryn Wells

    1998-09-01

    Science Education With or For Native Americans?: An Analysis of the Native American Science Outreach Network (NASON), is the study of a summer institute for science teachers and Native American para-professionals and students in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Washington (UW) from 1992-1996. The study determines effects of NASON in schools, in tribal communities and on Native American students. It clarifies processes through which tribal communities and academic institutions can jointly design and implement education programs and curricula that reflect values and traditions of tribal communities and western education. Incorporated in the study is also an analysis of meanings of "Indian" identity, "Indian" education vis a vis education in general, and "Indian" science and "western" science, explored against the background of school experiences for Indian students. This research study examines NASON with regard to principles that are basic to applied anthropology, considering the following issues: (1) How well did NASON reflect an understanding of tribal and school values and cultures? (2) How effectively were the needs, wants and values of the people reflected in the program? (3) What cultural patterns were reflected in NASON's structure? (4) How did NASON consider the impact of its program on whole communities? (5) How did NASON ascertain and address motivations of its participants? (6) How did tribal community members or secondary teachers participate in planning and implementing NASON? (7) How were key tribal and academic community leaders involved? (8) What procedures were used? (9) Did NASON's structure discourage ethnocentrism? (10) How did NASON leadership work with rather than for Indian people and teachers? The study concludes that educational programs must be designed and monitored by an Advisory Board that includes equal representation of Tribes and Elders, Families, School personnel, and University representatives, considering the effect

  2. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a pre-launch Native American ceremony, Radmilla Cody (right) , the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, sings the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language. With her is her grandmother. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  3. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An elder of her Navaho tribe, Dorothy Cody shares the stage with her granddaughter Radmilla Cody (not shown), the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, who is singing the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language during a pre-launch Native American ceremony. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  4. 77 FR 72832 - Applications for New Awards; Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... English Language Acquisition, Department of Education. Overview Information Native American and Alaska... English among English learners (ELs),\\1\\ and to promote parental and community participation in language... amended (ESEA), may support the teaching and studying of Native American languages, but must have, as...

  5. Women of the Native Struggle. Portraits & Testimony of Native American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Ronnie, Ed.

    This book portrays images and views of approximately 45 Native American women in their roles as mothers, grandmothers, tribal elders, teachers, preservers of traditional beliefs and practices, and leaders in the continuing struggle for survival. An introduction by Anna Lee Walter presents an overview of the modern Native American woman. In the…

  6. Native American Studies in Higher Education: Models for Collaboration between Universities and Indigenous Nations. Contemporary Native American Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane, Ed.; Stauss, Jay, Ed.

    This book compiles stories about the formation of American Indian/Native American studies in 12 mainstream university settings. Common elements of these successful programs include a highly committed core of Indian and non-Indian faculty and students who believe in the intellectual and nation-building agenda of Indian/Native studies; a strong…

  7. 94-A13 Native American Initiative Short Course Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27

    A training program conducted in Bartlesville by BDM-Oklahoma technical staff, which included geologists, geophysicists, exploration and drilling specialists, and environmental policy experts. The proposed training schedule offered four courses per year and included those coursed identified by the tribes in the survey. The training program was outlined for members of Native American Tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The proposed program contributed to meeting the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Domestic Oil and Gas Initiative to help Native American tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing their resources through training in cost-effective, improved technologies for hydrocarbon production that will meet environmental regulations. The training program outlined was for adult tribal representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings or setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry. The course content is in response to a survey that was developed by BDM-Oklahoma and sent in the Spring of 1995 to 26 tribal agencies identified through previous contact with DOE. Tribes were asked to indicate course content needs, levels, preferred time of year, and location. Six tribes responded with specific recommendations and needs. These tribes, were the Creek, Pueblo, Cherokee, St. Regis Mohawk, Northern Arapho, and Ute Mountain Ute.

  8. Bilingualism (Ancestral Language Maintenance) among Native American, Vietnamese American, and Hispanic American College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharry, Cheryl

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 21 Hispanic, 22 Native American, and 10 Vietnamese American college students found that adoption or maintenance of ancestral language was related to attitudes toward ancestral language, beliefs about parental attitudes, and integrative motivation (toward family and ancestral ethnic group). There were significant differences by gender…

  9. 75 FR 13595 - Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Employment and Training Administration Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training... of the next meeting of the Native American Employment and Training Council (Council), as constituted... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mrs. Campbell, DFO, Indian and Native American Program, Employment and...

  10. 77 FR 22003 - Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration Workforce Investment Act; Native American Employment and Training... given of the next meeting of the Native American Employment and Training Council (Council), as..., DFO, Division of Indian and Native American Programs, Employment and Training Administration,...

  11. 77 FR 12875 - Proposed Information Collection; Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation... Number ``1024- 0144, Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Regulations'' in the subject line... entire ICR package free of charge. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Native American...

  12. Free classification of American English dialects by native and non-native listeners

    PubMed Central

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2009-01-01

    Most second language acquisition research focuses on linguistic structures, and less research has examined the acquisition of sociolinguistic patterns. The current study explored the perceptual classification of regional dialects of American English by native and non-native listeners using a free classification task. Results revealed similar classification strategies for the native and non-native listeners. However, the native listeners were more accurate overall than the non-native listeners. In addition, the non-native listeners were less able to make use of constellations of cues to accurately classify the talkers by dialect. However, the non-native listeners were able to attend to cues that were either phonologically or sociolinguistically relevant in their native language. These results suggest that non-native listeners can use information in the speech signal to classify talkers by regional dialect, but that their lack of signal-independent cultural knowledge about variation in the second language leads to less accurate classification performance. PMID:20161400

  13. Sexual assault services coverage on Native American land.

    PubMed

    Juraska, Ashley; Wood, Lindsey; Giroux, Jennifer; Wood, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Native American women experience higher rates of sexual assault than other women in the United States, yet there is limited information on the accessibility of forensic services for Native American victims of sexual violence. This study used geographic information systems technology to map known sexual assault examiner (SAE) and sexual assault response team (SART) programs in the United States (n = 873) in proximity to 650 census-designated Native American lands. Analysis was repeated for 29 Indian Health Service and tribal-operated facilities that self-identified that they provide sexual assault examinations. Network analysis showed that 30.7% of Native American land is within a 60-minute driving distance of a facility offering SAE or SART services. Indian Health Service and tribal-operated facilities increased accessibility to SAE services on 35 Native American lands. This study shows gaps in coverage for more than two thirds of Native American lands, including 381 lands with no coverage, highlighting the need for expanded SAE and SART services near or on Native American land.

  14. Sexual assault services coverage on Native American land.

    PubMed

    Juraska, Ashley; Wood, Lindsey; Giroux, Jennifer; Wood, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Native American women experience higher rates of sexual assault than other women in the United States, yet there is limited information on the accessibility of forensic services for Native American victims of sexual violence. This study used geographic information systems technology to map known sexual assault examiner (SAE) and sexual assault response team (SART) programs in the United States (n = 873) in proximity to 650 census-designated Native American lands. Analysis was repeated for 29 Indian Health Service and tribal-operated facilities that self-identified that they provide sexual assault examinations. Network analysis showed that 30.7% of Native American land is within a 60-minute driving distance of a facility offering SAE or SART services. Indian Health Service and tribal-operated facilities increased accessibility to SAE services on 35 Native American lands. This study shows gaps in coverage for more than two thirds of Native American lands, including 381 lands with no coverage, highlighting the need for expanded SAE and SART services near or on Native American land. PMID:24847872

  15. Source Document of Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban Indian Council, Denver, CO.

    A source document on American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas, produced by the National Urban Indian Council, provides historical background on relocation to cities, comments on the trust relationship for off-reservation American Indians, discusses urban Indian organizations, and gives statistical information on American Indian…

  16. Custodial evaluations of Native American families: implications for forensic psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Wills, Cheryl D; Norris, Donna M

    2010-01-01

    Native American children in the United States have been adopted by non-Indian families at rates that threaten the preservation of their Indian history, traditions, and culture. The Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), which established restrictive parameters that govern the placement of Native American children into foster care and adoptive homes, was ratified in an effort to keep American Indian families intact. This article addresses matters of importance to psychiatrists who conduct custody evaluations of Native American children and families. A summary of events that preceded enactment of the ICWA is given, along with guidelines for forensic psychiatrists who conduct foster and adoptive care evaluations of Native American children. We use clinical vignettes to illustrate how the ICWA informs the custody evaluation process as well as approaches to cultural concerns, including biases that forensic evaluators may encounter during these evaluations.

  17. Glacial geography and native North American languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Richard A.

    1985-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the number and distribution of some native American languages may be related to ice-margin changes of the Wisconsin glaciation. The analysis indicated that the number of languages per unit area is much greater in unglaciated areas of the last glacial maximum than in glaciated areas. The pattern of languge overlap between land areas sequentially exposed during deglaciation appears to indicate the direction of movement of populations from the periphery toward the core of the area once covered by the Wisconsin Ice Sheet. The data strongly indicate that North America was inhabited prior to the Wisconsin glacial maximum, because glacial maximum conditions apparently influenced linguistic distributions. Evidence suggests that ancestral Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene speakers occupied the northwestern edge of the continental ice mass, and that ancestral Algonquian speakers were south of the ice mass during the Wisconsin glacial maximum (approximately 18,000 yr ago). These three linguistic groups were the principal ones to spreas into areas exposed by the recession of the Wisconsin ice.

  18. Cultural Models of Education and Academic Performance for Native American and European American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryberg, Stephanie A.; Covarrubias, Rebecca; Burack, Jacob A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the role of cultural representations of self (i.e., interdependence and independence) and positive relationships (i.e., trust for teachers) in academic performance (i.e., self-reported grades) for Native American ("N"?=?41) and European American ("N"?=?49) high school students. The Native American students endorsed…

  19. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Seminole Native American Veterans serve as color guard during a pre-launch Native American ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. David Nunez, U.S. Navy, carries the State of Florida Flag; David Stephen Bowers, U.S. Army, carries the Flag of the United States of America; Charles Billie Hiers, U.S. Marine Corps., carries the Seminole Tribe of Florida Flag. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  20. NCES Studies on American Indian and Alaska Native Education. NCES 2005-535

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Office of Indian Education (OIE) helps support local education agencies, Indian tribes and organizations, postsecondary institutions, and other entities in their efforts to address the unique educational and culturally related academic needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) so that these students can meet the same challenging…

  1. Indian Health Service: A Comprehensive Health Care Program for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Health Service (PHS/HSA), Rockville, MD.

    Comprehensive health care (preventive, curative, rehabilitative, and environmental) for more than 930,000 eligible American Indians and Alaska Natives is the responsibility of the Indian Health Service (IHS). Since 1955, this agency of the U.S. Public Health Service has made notable progress in raising the health status of Indians and Alaska…

  2. Nutrient composition of selected traditional native American plant foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten wild plants (cattail narrow leaf shoots, chokecherries, beaked hazelnuts, lambsquarters, plains pricklypear, prairie turnips, stinging nettles, wild plums, raspberries, rose hips) from three Native American reservations in North Dakota were analyzed to expand composition information of tradition...

  3. Book Bonanza: Long before Columbus: Native American Culture and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Lee Bennett

    1980-01-01

    Presented are a wide variety of current and older titles that teachers and students can use to better understand Native Americans. The following are included in the bibliography: planning aids, music, poetry, art, and fiction. (KC)

  4. American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES) Programs: Outreach to Native Americans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacourse, S.

    2003-12-01

    AISES is a national non-profit organization which nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. Through its educational programs, AISES provides opportunities for American Indians and Native Alaskans to pursue studies in science, engineering, and technology arenas. The trained professionals then become technologically informed leaders within the Indian community. AISES' ultimate goal is to be a catalyst for the advancement of American Indians and Native Alaskans as they seek to become self-reliant and self-determined members of society. AISES' Higher Education Program consists of scholarships, college relations, leadership development, and internships. This session will focus on the value and impact of AISES internships for AISES students, including hands-on experience in the student's field of study, co-op opportunities, and entrance into graduate school. AISES currently offers internship placements with NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, the U.S. State Department, the Departments of Commerce and Veterans Affairs, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2004, AISES will also be offering placements at the Central Intelligence Agency.

  5. American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES) Programs: Outreach to Native Americans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacourse, S.

    2003-12-01

    AISES is a national non-profit organization which nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. Through its educational programs, AISES provides opportunities for American Indians and Native Alaskans to pursue studies in science, engineering, and technology arenas. The trained professionals then become technologically informed leaders within the Indian community. AISES' ultimate goal is to be a catalyst for the advancement of American Indians and Native Alaskans as they seek to become self-reliant and self-determined members of society. AISES' Higher Education Program consists of scholarships, college relations, leadership development, and internships. This session will focus on the value and impact of AISES internships for AISES students, including hands-on experience in the student's field of study, co-op opportunities, and entrance into graduate school. AISES currently offers internship placements with NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, the U.S. State Department, the Departments of Commerce and Veterans Affairs, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2004, AISES will also be offering placements at the Central Intelligence Agency.

  6. Native Generations: A campaign addressing infant mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Rutman, Shira; Loughran, Julie; Tanner, Leah; Randall, Leslie L

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of Native Generations, a campaign addressing high rates of infant mortality (IM) among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in urban areas. Campaign development included reviews of literature and previous campaigns, an advisory council, and focus groups. Campaign messages are strength-based, encouraging AI/AN caregivers to utilize available Native-specific resources, including health care, support services, and programming as IM protective factors. The primary campaign material is an 11-minute video. Pilot survey data indicate the video may help increase awareness of IM and Native-specific resources, and increase connection to Native identity, culture, and community.

  7. Native Generations: A campaign addressing infant mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Rutman, Shira; Loughran, Julie; Tanner, Leah; Randall, Leslie L

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of Native Generations, a campaign addressing high rates of infant mortality (IM) among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in urban areas. Campaign development included reviews of literature and previous campaigns, an advisory council, and focus groups. Campaign messages are strength-based, encouraging AI/AN caregivers to utilize available Native-specific resources, including health care, support services, and programming as IM protective factors. The primary campaign material is an 11-minute video. Pilot survey data indicate the video may help increase awareness of IM and Native-specific resources, and increase connection to Native identity, culture, and community. PMID:27668594

  8. Ancient Fermilab: The Mier Collection of Native American Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wiant, Michael D.

    2002-09-25

    August Mier's collection of artifacts from Fermilab property and elsewhere in the Fox River valley provides perspective on ancient lifeways in this area. This slide-illustrated lecture explores the development of Native American culture in the region and how archaeologists use technology developed in other fields to explore the past. From hunting now-extinct Ice-Age mastodon to the development of agriculture, the history of Native American culture sheds light on the development of humanity in general.

  9. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Chickasaw Indian princesses 'sign' the Lord's Prayer during a Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The princesses are Crystal Underwood, Julie Underwood and Tamela Alexander. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  10. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Indian princesses seen here contributed to a pre-launch Native American ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex by leading a prayer. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  11. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Indian princesses pose with folk singer Buffy Saint- Marie (center) during a Native American ceremony held in the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. Several days of activities were held at KSC and in Orlando commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  12. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Singer Buffy Sainte-Marie sings during a pre-launch Native American ceremony in the Rocket Garden of the KSC Visitor Complex. She herself is a Cree. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  13. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Tribal Elder Lee Frazier leads the dedication to the astronauts of STS-113 during the Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  14. Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management

    SciTech Connect

    A. David Lester

    2008-10-17

    The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

  15. 45 CFR 1336.30 - Eligibility under sections 804 and 805 of the Native American Programs Act of 1974.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Native American Programs Act of 1974. 1336.30 Section 1336.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... THE ADMINISTRATION FOR NATIVE AMERICANS, NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS Native American Projects § 1336.30 Eligibility under sections 804 and 805 of the Native American Programs Act...

  16. Native Americans of California and Nevada. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Jack D.

    This book is designed to provide an introductory synthesis of the history and sociocultural evolution of Native American peoples in the Far West, with strong emphasis on California and Nevada. The book focuses particularly on those historical and cultural experiences likely to have contributed to the present conditions of Native communities and…

  17. The Status of Native American Women in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    A study of the status of Native American women in higher education obtained questionnaires from 61 undergraduate women at 4 colleges and 9 women with advanced degrees, interviewed 6 women in or about to enter graduate programs, and reviewed previous research and available statistical data. Results indicated that: relatively few Native American…

  18. Women of Hope: Native American/Hawaiian. Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschfelder, Arlene; Molin, Paulette Fairbanks; Oneita, Kathryn; Wakim, Yvonne B.

    This study guide accompanies a poster series and documentary video about 12 American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian "women of hope." The women vary by age, education, profession, and geographic locale, but they share an unwavering commitment and dedication to their people's struggle to survive and flourish as distinct cultures. The…

  19. Native American Hunting Traditions as a Basis for Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses Native American hunting practices and beliefs applicable to an outdoor education curriculum, focusing on respect and reverence for the earth, animals, and the natural world. Suggests that Native hunting rationales could form a philosophical foundation for environmental education and outdoor education programs. (LP)

  20. American Indian and Alaska Native Cancer Data Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Tenney, Martha J.; Hampton, James W.

    1999-01-01

    Data on cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives are sparse and riddled with misclassification errors, resulting in underreporting of cancer incidence and mortality. Incidence rates are discussed for various cancer types in seven Native nations. Barriers to participation in cancer prevention and control programs are examined. Contains…

  1. Getting Past Our Myths and Stereotypes about Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Walter C.

    2007-01-01

    Most Americans are not very familiar with the first peoples of the Americas. Though some might argue that it is wholly unnecessary to have any knowledge about Native peoples, most would probably agree that some exposure to Native perspectives is a good thing for students. In this article, the author offers his perspective on the most important…

  2. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies. PMID:26501420

  3. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies.

  4. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D.; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies. PMID:26501420

  5. American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Education in the States. StateNotes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinth, Kyle

    2006-01-01

    State policies pertaining to the education of American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian students vary considerably in their scope and type among the states. This StateNote report examines policies found in state statutes. Additionally, states that have tribal colleges--independent colleges that are operated by the tribes--within their…

  6. Exemplar of Liberty: Native America and the Evolution of Democracy. Native American Politics Series No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinde, Donald A., Jr.; Johansen, Bruce E.

    Drawing on the historical record and primary sources, this book portrays how Native American political confederacies of the colonial era operated and how their organization and underlying principles influenced the founding fathers of U.S. political institutions. A complementary theme of this book is the intense debate about Native American…

  7. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in native Americans: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J L; Campos-Outcalt, D

    1994-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become the leading cause of death for Native Americans and Alaska Natives. CVD risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and sedentary lifestyle) have been studied in a number of Native American tribes, and such studies are increasing as the CVD mortality rate rises. This article reviews the literature between 1980 and 1991 concerning the prevalence of CVD risk factors in this population. In addition to summarizing the data, we describe limitations inherent in comparison and address the need for standardization of methodology in future studies. PMID:7848673

  8. How Native American Success and Leadership Is Cultivated at the Corporate Level: A Native American Employee Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One Feather, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    A Chippewa-Cree engineer helps educate Native American college students on how to adjust to the corporate environment and become successful employees and leaders. Issues include differences between Native and corporate cultures, impact of cultural differences on group dynamics, business etiquette, and the importance of workplace mentors. Corporate…

  9. Understanding the "Medicine" of Native American Traditional Values: An Integrative Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta

    1999-01-01

    Jointly discusses the cultural values of Native Americans, presents an integrative review of value studies conducted on Native Americans, and describes a traditional Native-American view of wellness with implications for counseling. Stresses that it is important for counselors to informally assess and more fully understand Native-American cultural…

  10. Native Americans in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane; Blue Spruce, George, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Blue Spruce, Jr., who became the first American Indian dentist in 1956, shares his views on health professions for Indian young people, as well as his own experiences. Resources for prospective dental students, information on the Society of American Indian Dentists, and inspiring stories of American Indian healers are provided. (CDS)

  11. For the Administrator: Realities for the Native American and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bold Warrior, Sherman

    For historical, cultural and sociological reasons, the American Indian's own perspective has been missing from the discussion on Indian education. Historically, White American government, education, literature, and entertainment have all played roles in the annihilation of Native communities and cultures. As children, Midwestern Indians born…

  12. Returning the Gift: A Festival of North American Native Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaeser, Kimberly M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses (1) the place of Native American literature in the literary canon; (2) who determines Indian identity and images, and the emerging inter-American indigenous identity; and (3) children's literature as a means of portraying true Indian culture and identity, thereby improving self-esteem and school success of Indian children. (SV)

  13. Correlates and Predictors of Binge Eating among Native American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Julie Dorton; Winterowd, Carrie

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and being overweight, as determined by body mass index (BMI), each continues to be of concern for many Native American/American Indians (NA/AI). According to the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders," binge eating is excessive eating or consuming large quantities of food over a short period of time and has been associated…

  14. Teaching Native American Students: What Every Teacher Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Hani

    2010-01-01

    Many Native American students have problems in traditional American schools--the dropout rate of these students indicates this. Research suggests that one reason may be a school district's neglect for the learning style or culture of this group. Research also suggests that traditional classroom environments often interfere with the way Native…

  15. Promoting Resiliency among Native American Students to Prevent Dropouts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Bill; Sanchez, Jafeth E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the literature on resiliency and highlights aspects from a resiliency of American Indian high school students. Current efforts to promote student resiliency for successful educational outcomes are addressed in light of educational outcomes, such as dropout rates, for Native American students. Further, a…

  16. Encouraging Post-Secondary Native American Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosholder, Richard; Waite, Bryan; Goslin, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Native American students are the most likely racial/ethnic group tracked in post-secondary American education to be affected by poverty and limited access to educational opportunities. In addition, they are the most likely to be required to take remedial course work and are the least likely to graduate from college. A review of the literature was…

  17. The Guardian Program for Native Americans: A Historiographic Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Lance

    This report, written for the Americans for Indian Opportunity "Ambassador Program," addresses the need to research the detrimental effects of the guardianship program on Native Americans. The guardianship program was established by the United States government during the early 1900s to protect monies that Indians received from mineral and oil…

  18. Native Americans: The People and How They Lived.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Eloise F.; Funderburg, John B.

    This large format book with many color illustrations describes native American history on the American continents from the Ice Age to the present, concentrating on Indian history in North Carolina. The book examines living arrangements, objects of daily use, animal husbandry and agriculture, tribal leagues, and architecture. It describes the 28…

  19. Easy Guide to Breastfeeding for American Indian and Alaska Native Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Indian Community Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona, WIC Native American Community Health Center, Phoenix, Arizona William Daychild, the ... sensitive at first. • Since before anyone can remember, American Native and Alaska Native women have made enough breast ...

  20. The Peoples Multicultural Almanac: America from the 1400s to Present. 365 Days of Contributions by African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, European Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Earl J., Jr.; And Others

    The Peoples Multicultural Almanac provides five entries for each day in the school year, September through May, organized for the following ethnic groups: (1) African Americans; (2) Asian Americans; (3) European Americans; (4) Hispanic Americans; and (5) Native Americans. The entries highlight significant social, political, historical, cultural,…

  1. 78 FR 75365 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... list are eligible for the homestead benefit (that is, people who are at least 50% blood quantum Native... the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will...

  2. Empowering Our Youth: The National Native American Youth Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Nicole G.

    2003-01-01

    A week-long program sponsored by the Association of American Indian Physicians brings American Indian high school students to Washington DC to introduce them to careers in health, biomedical research, and policy development. Visits with American Indian government agency personnel, congressional leaders, and physicians show students available…

  3. Native American Kids: American Indian Children's Well-Being Indicators for the Nation and Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willeto, Angela A. A.

    2007-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Native well-being, survival-based data are rare. This study explores the question of whether or not it is possible to produce such well-being information using secondary data sources. The answer is yes, with some limitations. Hence, Native American data for 10 well-being indicators nationally and for New Mexico and South…

  4. A Student's Guide to Native American Genealogy. Oryx American Family Tree Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavasch, E. Barrie

    This book provides a step-by-step guide to genealogical research in North America for Native Americans. The book also contains information on the history of Native Americans and their relationships with the United States. Chapters include: (1) "Grandmother Spider's Tangled Web"; (2) "Why Trace Your Roots?"; (3) "Celebrating Heritage and…

  5. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Saint, Sanjay; Saha, Som; Fendrick, A Mark; Kelley, Keith; Ramsey, Scott D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND While the efficacy and safety of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has been established in several clinical trials, little is known about its outcomes in Native Americans. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS We assessed clinical outcomes associated with CABG in 155 Native Americans using a national database of 18,061 patients from 25 nongovernmental, not-for-profit U.S. health care facilities. Patients were classified into five groups: 1) Native American, 2) white, 3) African American, 4) Hispanic, and 5) Asian. We evaluated for ethnic differences in in-hospital mortality and length of stay, and after adjusting for age, gender, surgical priority, case-mix severity, insurance status, and facility characteristics (volume, location, and teaching status). Overall, we found the adjusted risk for in-hospital death to be higher in Native Americans when compared to whites (odds ratio [OR], 3.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5 to 9.8), African Americans (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 9.9), Hispanics (OR, 7.1; 95% CI, 2.5 to 20.3), and Asians (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 7.0). No significant differences were found in length of stay after adjustment across ethnic groups. CONCLUSIONS The risk of in-hospital death following CABG may be higher in Native Americans than in other ethnic groups. Given the small number of Native Americans in the database (n = 155), however, further research will be needed to confirm these findings. PMID:11556933

  6. Upper Palaeolithic Siberian genome reveals dual ancestry of Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Maanasa; Skoglund, Pontus; Graf, Kelly E; Metspalu, Mait; Albrechtsen, Anders; Moltke, Ida; Rasmussen, Simon; Stafford, Thomas W; Orlando, Ludovic; Metspalu, Ene; Karmin, Monika; Tambets, Kristiina; Rootsi, Siiri; Mägi, Reedik; Campos, Paula F; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Litvinov, Sergey; Osipova, Ludmila P; Fedorova, Sardana A; Voevoda, Mikhail I; DeGiorgio, Michael; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Demeshchenko, Svetlana; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Nielsen, Rasmus; Jakobsson, Mattias; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-01-01

    The origins of the First Americans remain contentious. Although Native Americans seem to be genetically most closely related to east Asians, there is no consensus with regard to which specific Old World populations they are closest to. Here we sequence the draft genome of an approximately 24,000-year-old individual (MA-1), from Mal'ta in south-central Siberia, to an average depth of 1×. To our knowledge this is the oldest anatomically modern human genome reported to date. The MA-1 mitochondrial genome belongs to haplogroup U, which has also been found at high frequency among Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic European hunter-gatherers, and the Y chromosome of MA-1 is basal to modern-day western Eurasians and near the root of most Native American lineages. Similarly, we find autosomal evidence that MA-1 is basal to modern-day western Eurasians and genetically closely related to modern-day Native Americans, with no close affinity to east Asians. This suggests that populations related to contemporary western Eurasians had a more north-easterly distribution 24,000 years ago than commonly thought. Furthermore, we estimate that 14 to 38% of Native American ancestry may originate through gene flow from this ancient population. This is likely to have occurred after the divergence of Native American ancestors from east Asian ancestors, but before the diversification of Native American populations in the New World. Gene flow from the MA-1 lineage into Native American ancestors could explain why several crania from the First Americans have been reported as bearing morphological characteristics that do not resemble those of east Asians. Sequencing of another south-central Siberian, Afontova Gora-2 dating to approximately 17,000 years ago, revealed similar autosomal genetic signatures as MA-1, suggesting that the region was continuously occupied by humans throughout the Last Glacial Maximum. Our findings reveal that western Eurasian genetic signatures in modern-day Native

  7. Upper Palaeolithic Siberian genome reveals dual ancestry of Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Maanasa; Skoglund, Pontus; Graf, Kelly E; Metspalu, Mait; Albrechtsen, Anders; Moltke, Ida; Rasmussen, Simon; Stafford, Thomas W; Orlando, Ludovic; Metspalu, Ene; Karmin, Monika; Tambets, Kristiina; Rootsi, Siiri; Mägi, Reedik; Campos, Paula F; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Litvinov, Sergey; Osipova, Ludmila P; Fedorova, Sardana A; Voevoda, Mikhail I; DeGiorgio, Michael; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Demeshchenko, Svetlana; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Nielsen, Rasmus; Jakobsson, Mattias; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-01-01

    The origins of the First Americans remain contentious. Although Native Americans seem to be genetically most closely related to east Asians, there is no consensus with regard to which specific Old World populations they are closest to. Here we sequence the draft genome of an approximately 24,000-year-old individual (MA-1), from Mal'ta in south-central Siberia, to an average depth of 1×. To our knowledge this is the oldest anatomically modern human genome reported to date. The MA-1 mitochondrial genome belongs to haplogroup U, which has also been found at high frequency among Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic European hunter-gatherers, and the Y chromosome of MA-1 is basal to modern-day western Eurasians and near the root of most Native American lineages. Similarly, we find autosomal evidence that MA-1 is basal to modern-day western Eurasians and genetically closely related to modern-day Native Americans, with no close affinity to east Asians. This suggests that populations related to contemporary western Eurasians had a more north-easterly distribution 24,000 years ago than commonly thought. Furthermore, we estimate that 14 to 38% of Native American ancestry may originate through gene flow from this ancient population. This is likely to have occurred after the divergence of Native American ancestors from east Asian ancestors, but before the diversification of Native American populations in the New World. Gene flow from the MA-1 lineage into Native American ancestors could explain why several crania from the First Americans have been reported as bearing morphological characteristics that do not resemble those of east Asians. Sequencing of another south-central Siberian, Afontova Gora-2 dating to approximately 17,000 years ago, revealed similar autosomal genetic signatures as MA-1, suggesting that the region was continuously occupied by humans throughout the Last Glacial Maximum. Our findings reveal that western Eurasian genetic signatures in modern-day Native

  8. Native American Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kathryn Elizabeth; Cornelius, Carol

    1993-01-01

    Reviews 11 children's books, published 1990-93, suitable for elementary and middle school students, covering Native riddles; Hiawatha as founder of the Iroquois confederacy; Chief Seattle's famous speech; stories about Inuit life and Mexican village life during the 1500s; Sequoyah and the Cherokee alphabet; the Iroquois creation myth; Wampanoag…

  9. Native Americans and Aboriginal Australian Stereotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Sharon Pray

    Aboriginal Australians represent 1.5% of Australia's population, nearly double the percentage of native people in the U.S. population. While indigenous peoples throughout the world share common similarities, particularly contemporary issues and their spiritual regard for nature, many aspects of their lifestyles are different, such as governance,…

  10. 38 CFR 36.4527 - Direct housing loans to Native American veterans on trust lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Native American veterans on trust lands. 36.4527 Section 36.4527 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... Native American veterans on trust lands. (a) The Secretary may make a direct housing loan to a Native... with a tribal organization shall provide for the following: (i) That each Native American veteran...

  11. Language of Science as a Bridge to Native American Educators and Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. J.; Angrum, A.; Martin, M.; Ali, N.; Kingfisher, J.; Treuer, A.; Grant, G.; Ciotti, J.

    2010-12-01

    Native American charter schools - interested in working STEM concepts in the native language, and initiation of an essay contest to encourage use and cognitive understanding of the terms. One of our lesson's learned, is that finding people who are bi-lingual, who have an understanding of western science and traditional knowledge are key to making the cross-cultural connections work. STEM language elements in Navajo, Hawaiian, and Ojibwe can be found at the U.S. Rosetta website. Work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, was supported by NASA. The Rosetta mission is a cooperative project of NASA and the European Space Agency.

  12. Self-Control, Native Traditionalism, and Native American Substance Use: Testing the Cultural Invariance of a General Theory of Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Gregory D.; Wood, Peter B.; Dunaway, R. Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Using a sample of White and Native American high school students, the authors provide a test of (a) self-control theory's invariance thesis and (b) native traditionalism as an explanation of Native American substance use. Self-control significantly influenced all forms of substance use when controlling for race and in race-specific analyses.…

  13. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During an administrator's briefing at the IMAX 2 theatre, Lt. Gov. Jefferson Keel of the Chickasaw Nation (far left) presents a blanket with the seal of the Chickasaw Nation to NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (second from right). Next to O'Keefe is Chickasaw Gov. Bill Anoatubby. Next to Gov. Keel is Mrs. Laura O'Keefe. STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington is a tribally enrolled Chickasaw and the world's first Native American astronaut. Kennedy Space Center hosted more than 350 Native Americans in STS-113 prelaunch events surrounding the historic mission assignment of Herrington.

  14. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mr. and Mrs. Sean O'Keefe (center) pose with officials of the Chickasaw Nation. Second from left is Lt. Gov. Jefferson Keel with his wife, Carol (far left). Second from right is Gov. Bill Anoatubby with his wife, Janice (far right). STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington is a tribally enrolled Chickasaw and the world's first Native American astronaut. Kennedy Space Center hosted more than 350 Native Americans in STS-113 prelaunch events surrounding the historic mission assignment of Herrington.

  15. The American Indian Religious Freedom Act: Guidance for compliance by federal agencies: First revision

    SciTech Connect

    Sharples, F.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Background information on Native American religions, the relationship of AIRFA to the First Amendment, and resources belonging to Native Americans is provided in this document to assist project managers in understanding the concerns of Native Americans with regard to federal developments. Since many native religious leaders are unwilling to discuss their religion with outsiders, consultation through intermediaries, such as tribal political leaders and/or private Indian organizations, may often be needed to ensure that appropriate input is received from the religious leaders. It is this consultation with the traditional religious leaders, either directly or through surrogates, that is the ultimate objective in complying with AIRFA. When a federal agency finds, upon consultation, that its proposed action would deny the free exercise of religion and yet determines that there is a compelling need for the action, the decision to proceed may be made, but appropriate mitigation measures to reduce religious interference to the lowest possible level must be included.

  16. The Decrease in the Unintentional Injury Mortality Disparity Between American Indians/Alaska Natives and Non–American Indians/Alaska Natives in New Mexico, 1980 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, Pallavi; Nielsen, Larry; Landen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We tracked the unintentional injury death disparity between American Indians/Alaska Natives and non–American Indians/Alaska Natives in New Mexico, 1980 to 2009. Methods. We calculated age-adjusted rates and rate ratios for unintentional injury deaths and their external causes among American Indians/Alaska Natives and non–American Indians/Alaska Natives. We tested trend significance with the Mann–Kendall test. Results. The unintentional injury death rate ratio of American Indians/Alaska Natives to non–American Indians/Alaska Natives declined from 2.9 in 1980–1982 to 1.5 in 2007–2009. The rate among American Indians/Alaska Natives decreased 47.2% from 1980–1982 to 1995–1997. Among non–American Indians/Alaska Natives, the rate declined 25.3% from 1980–1982 to 1992–1994, then increased 31.9% from 1992–1994 to 2007–2009. The motor vehicle traffic and pedestrian death rates decreased 57.8% and 74.6%, respectively, among American Indians/Alaska Natives from 1980–1982 to 2007–2009. Conclusions. The unintentional injury death rate disparity decreased substantially from 1980–1982 to 2007–2009 largely because of the decrease in motor vehicle crash and pedestrian death rates among American Indians/Alaska Natives and the increase in the poisoning death rate among non–American Indians/Alaska Natives. PMID:22994193

  17. 76 FR 47228 - Redelegation of Authority to Office of Native American Program (ONAP) Area Office Administrators...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Redelegation of Authority to Office of Native American Program (ONAP) Area Office..., to Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Office of Native American Programs to perform program... Americans, and authorizes the Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Office of Native American Programs...

  18. Passing the Totem: Successful High School Graduation of Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Cherie T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine obstacles Native American students, of American Indian ancestry, faced while they were attending high school and how they were able to overcome those obstacles. Eight Native American students, four male and four female, who attended schools on or near a Native American tribal reservation in Washington…

  19. Task 5. Native [American] Tribes Training Initiative and Outreach Work Authorization 97-A02: Field Demonstrations in High Priority Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-27

    Twenty-seven Native American tribal members, council members, and other interested parties gathered in Santa Fe, New Mexico, to attend the Native American Workshop on Petroleum Energy on August 11 and 12, 1997, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and presented by BDM-Oklahoma, Inc, staff. Tribes represented at the workshop included the Jicarilla Apache, Pueblo of Acoma and Ute. Representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Minerals Management Service (MMS) also attended. BDM-Oklahoma developed and organized the Native American Workshop on Petroleum Energy to help meet the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Domestic Gas and Oil Initiative to help Native American tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing petroleum resources.

  20. Strategies for Teaching Composition to Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barwell, Jay

    Although the needs of American Indian college students in writing classes are very similar to those of Anglo basic writers, Indian writers often bring cultural and linguistic differences into the writing classroom. Indians are oriented only in the present, which affects their use of verb constructions; they are oriented toward sharing, which…

  1. Profile of the Montana Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban Management Consultants of San Francisco, Inc., CA.

    Designed to provide statistical information on the socioeconomic status of Montana American Indians and to document the extent of their participation in government service programs, this statistical handbook is based on data derived from the 1970 U.S. Census, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Indian Health Service (150 state and Federal…

  2. Career Opportunities for Native American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV.

    Designed for American Indian students planning to enter college following high school graduation, the handbook offers information on admission procedures, financial assistance, and programs. Helpful information offered includes a checklist and time line of activities to complete when applying for college; sample letters requesting information on…

  3. Indian Giving: Federal Programs for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Johnston, William B.

    Aimed at highlighting American Indian reservation conditions, outlining the scope of Federal aid to Indians, and suggesting the nature of future Indian problems and choices, this book attempts to assess the current socioeconomic status of the Indian community and its relationship with the Federal Government. Specifically, this book provides both…

  4. 75 FR 38817 - Administration for Native Americans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... by the tsunami that seriously damaged American Samoa on September 29, 2009. As a result of the devastating tsunami, 32 people were killed and 277 homes, schools, businesses, and transportation systems were... the recording of accounts of the tsunami experience, developing a recovery plan, organizing...

  5. The Blackout of Native American Cultural Achievements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    1987-01-01

    Notes that American Indian achievements are overlooked and even specifically denied in the face of overwhelming evidence of their reality. Examines the denials of Indian originality in three specific matters that have been controversial in recent decades: medicine, the manufacture of maple syrup, and the use of fertilizer. (JHZ)

  6. Native Americans, New Voices: American Indian History, 1895-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, R. David

    1995-01-01

    Explains that, until the decay of the post-World War II consensus on U.S. history, the history of American Indians remained in academic limbo. Contends that the events of the 1960s, including the civil rights and antiwar movements, resulted in a strong interest in American Indian studies. (CFR)

  7. Fostering Indigenous Earth Science: Increasing Native American Participation in the Earth Science Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, E. M.

    2004-12-01

    Attracting Native American students into the geosciences is one of the priorities of diversity efforts, but success remains limited and local. The need for geoscientific expertise on American Indian reservations continues to grow as Native populations and economic development on and around reservations expands. Typically tribal governments respond by hiring outside consultants to meet their scientific needs, but these relationships can sometimes be problematic. The solution is to increase the amount of Native American people who have sufficient geoscience education and training to manage tribal resources. However, there are multiple barriers to doing this created by a combination of economic, political, and cultural forces. Many Native American nations are enjoying a modest increase in prosperity, but tribes are still relatively poor compared with the non-Native population, even on gaming reservations. Furthermore, the legal status of Indian reservations as domestic dependent nations creates a unique and complex relationship between tribes, outside agencies and geoscientists, as data from tribal lands is considered proprietary and is guarded closely by tribal governments. There is a clear history of geoscience data collected on tribal lands often being used to drive subsequent instances of natural resources being taken out of tribal hands. These violations of tribal sovereignty make tribes cautious and wary of geoscience, slowing efforts to enhance geoscience education on reservations. Attracting young Native students to geoscience is also beset by difficulties in cross-cultural science instruction, poor understanding of the relevance of geoscience, and logistical problems related to the remote location of most reservations. Despite these problems, real progress is being made through close partnerships between geoscientists and tribal environmental professionals and other tribal organizations. A number of successful, but local, efforts are beginning to draw Native

  8. The Language of Science as a bridge to the Native American Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Claudia J.; Angrum, A.; Martin, M.; Ali, N. A.

    2010-10-01

    In this talk we will present a concept for building on Native American languages and incorporating STEM concepts. Recently, a student from the Navajo Dine community took it upon himself to define 28 "NASA" terms in the Navajo language. These terms included such words as space telescope, weather satellite, space suit, and the planets including Neptune and Uranus. We hope to add to this word list with geology and astronomy (comet-related) terms, just as we will in Rosetta public engagement for English-speakers. The U.S. Rosetta project will host these words on a web-site, and provide translation into both Navajo and English. A clickable map will allow the user to move through all the words, see Native artwork related to the word, and hear audio translation. The initiative will be expanded into other Native communities such as Hawaiian with the objective of drawing Native American students to the marvelous images, and other data, returned from NASA space missions. Native Americans emphasize the need to know themselves and their own culture when teaching their students. One of the most important near-term problems is the preservation of Native American language. In some communities, small numbers of native speakers remain. The retention of language, and need to make it relevant to the technological age, represents a large and urgent challenge. The U.S. Rosetta Project is NASA's contribution to the International Rosetta Mission. Rosetta is expected to provide the keys to the primordial solar system the way the original Rosetta Stone provided a key to ancient language. STEM language elements in Navajo, Hawaiian, and Ojibwe can be found at the U.S. Rosetta website: http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov. Work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, was supported by NASA. The Rosetta mission is a cooperative project of NASA and the European Space Agency.

  9. Seasons: The National Native American AIDS Prevention Center Quarterly. 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Andrea Green, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The three 1993 issues of "Seasons" (the Spring/Summer issues are combined) address various aspects of dealing with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among Native Americans. The Winter issue focuses on tuberculosis (TB) and its incidence and treatment among HIV-positive individuals. "Remembering…

  10. The Native American Sweat Lodge as Metaphor for Group Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael Walkingstick; Osborne, W. Larry

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how the interrelationship and growth emphasized by the Native American sweat lodge ceremony and "the talking circle" can provide a richer understanding of group counseling. Details each ceremony and explores the implications of practices that are based on cultural traditions, arguing that such traditions can enrich the group experience.…

  11. Native American Students: Affordability and Access. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Native American students in Washington attend more than 40 postsecondary institutions and participate in college at a rate greater than their proportional presence in the population. They are just as likely to apply for and receive financial aid as other groups, a little less likely to borrow to attend college, and experience a greater gap than…

  12. Financial Aid for Native Americans, 1997-99. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlachter, Gail Ann; Weber, R. David

    This directory contains information on programs open primarily or exclusively to Native Americans including scholarships, fellowships, loans, grants, awards, internships, state sources of educational benefits, and general financial aid directories for minorities. The directory is divided into six sections. Within sections, each entry lists program…

  13. Oregon American Indian/Alaska Native Education State Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The Oregon State Plan for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) education was developed by AI/AN communities and educators, the State Board of Education, and the State Department of Education. The plan includes 11 major educational goals: (1) the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) should promote effective education for AI/AN children; (2)…

  14. Oregon American Indian Alaska Native Education State Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Susan

    This state plan presents Oregon's 11 educational goals for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) education, which have been revised and detailed by the statewide Indian Education Council. The goals support the policy of the Oregon Department of Education (ODE), the educational philosophy of the AI/AN community, and the Indian Student Bill of…

  15. Meetings with Elaine, an African and Native American Woman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Melanie Merola

    2006-01-01

    The author, a Caucasian doctoral student of clinical psychology, examined her ongoing interaction with Elaine, an adult woman of African and Native American descent. Incidents of learning during the interaction process are reviewed and qualitative and quantitative assessments are provided to examine the effectiveness of such interactions in a…

  16. 75 FR 65611 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Native American Tribal Insignia Database ACTION: Proposed collection; comment... recommendations made in the report was that the USPTO create and maintain an accurate and comprehensive database... database. The USPTO database of official tribal insignias assists trademark attorneys in their...

  17. Mobility of Native American Students Can Pose Challenges to Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on an obstacle to achievement that seems particularly pronounced among Native American students high mobility. The turnover rate for one school, North Middle School in Rapid City, South Dakota, was 50 percent overall last year--meaning that half the school's 468 students came or went after the start of the school year. Many of…

  18. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. Career Barriers among Native American Students Living on Reservations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Laura L.; Jackson, Aaron P.; Smith, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    Patterns of educational achievement and employment indicate that Native American students face considerable barriers to career development. This is particularly true for those who live on reservations. This study used a hermeneutic analysis of qualitative interview data to identify and describe these barriers from the perspective of 29 Native…

  20. CRitical Issues Bibliography (CRIB) Sheet: Native American College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education, Washington, DC.

    This CRitical Issues Bibliography describes resources that provide an overview of the issues involved for Native American college students, a minority group that is among the least likely to attend college and one that has a low graduation rate. The bibliography concentrates on cultural influences that affect the participation and success of…

  1. Native Americans and Augmentative and Alternative Communication Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Sheela; Parette, Howard P., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Professional sensitivity to cultural issues during augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) design and implementation has gained increasing attention in the professional literature. This article describes four cultural domains in which core values characteristic of Native American tribes are discernable: spirituality, trustworthiness,…

  2. Revitalizing Hispanic and Native American Communities: Four Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Paul; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes locally controlled economic development strategies used by Native American and Hispanic cooperatives and organizations: Ganados del Valle, Madera Forest Products Association, Seventh Generation Fund, and Ramah Navajo Weavers Association. Discusses the issues of cultural and economic survival in isolated rural communities. (SV)

  3. Cancer Prevention and Control in American Indians/Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Examines differences among American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives with regard to incidence and mortality rates for various types of cancer, particularly lung, cervix, breast, biliary, gastric, colorectal, prostate, and primary hepatic cancer. Discusses the influence of genetic and environmental factors, smoking, and inadequate medical…

  4. 78 FR 60861 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Native American Tribal Insignia Database ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), as part of its...: Susan K. Fawcett, Records Officer, Office of the Chief Information Officer, United States Patent...

  5. Native American Career Education Unit. Living with the Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    One of twelve instructional units in the Native American Career Education (NACE) program, this unit is intended to help Indian junior high school students understand concepts involved in the management of natural resources, especially as they relate to traditional Indian values; understand the relationship between basic needs, resources, and waste…

  6. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Racially Based Trust Expectancies of Native American and Caucasian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotenberg, Ken J.; Cerda, Carrie

    1994-01-01

    Reports on a study of trust expectancies among 113 Native American and Caucasian intermediate grade students in same-race and mixed-race schools. Finds that both racial groups had more trust expectancy of their own race. Also finds that this trust expectancy pattern was somewhat less evident in mixed-race schools. (CFR)

  8. Career Barriers and Coping Efficacy among Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Mindi N.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between career barriers (low perceived social status [PSS], experiences with personal and systemic classism, and general ethnic discrimination) and college outcome expectations (COEs) among a sample of 121 Native American postsecondary students. Self-efficacy for coping with career barriers was tested as a…

  9. Peer Mentoring: Encouraging Persistence in Native American Postsecondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Susan D.

    2013-01-01

    Native Americans have endured historical and contemporary challenges that have adversely affected their achievement, including in the realm of postsecondary education. The difficulties have included, but are not limited to, the problems inherent in the process of assimilation into Caucasian culture, the repercussions of Indian Boarding Schools,…

  10. Equitable Distribution of Educational Information for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavers, Dean

    Isolation, the legal status of Indian tribes, and structural barriers impede full participation in the educational process by Native American Indians and thus create a time lag between the adoption of the best educational practices in schools serving Indian students and the adoption of those practices in other schools. While physical isolation is…

  11. Family Issues. Native American Rehabilitation: A Bibliographic Series, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Joanne Curry; Johnson, Marilyn J.

    Family issues are the main focus of this document, one in a series of seven bibliographies dealing with rehabilitation of disabled Native Americans. The 23 annotated entries were identified through a comprehensive search of relevant data bases covering the years 1966-1986 and were selected to be of use to consumers, policy makers, direct service…

  12. Learning about Assessment from Native American Schools: Advocacy and Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Carolyn M.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the usefulness of accountability measures for student achievement as empowerment tools for all students, providing examples from Native American schools. The paper posits the need for understanding current standardized testing, demonstrates how content currently tested can help increase the utility of instructional programs, and advocates…

  13. Magic of Community: The Telecommunications Revolution and Native American Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Lauren

    1994-01-01

    Describes the California Indian Subject Specialist librarians, a voluntary organization that uses electronic mail to conduct its work and to build community. The potential of computer-mediated communication to build community among Native Americans is discussed. Information about the development of a global network for indigenous peoples is given.…

  14. Narrative Chance. Postmodern Discourse on Native American Indian Literatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vizenor, Gerald, Ed.

    Native American literary works have often been ignored by serious critics or examined by social scientists in ways that rob them of their effectiveness as works of art. The emphasis of postmodern theory on the creative power of language, on narrative discourse, and on signs and semiotics allows an original and perceptive approach to Native…

  15. Native Americans in the Health Professions: Two Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with Dr. Joseph Bell, president of the American Association of Indian Physicians (AAIP), and Wabanang Kuczek, physician assistant, discuss health-care services needed by Native people, AAIP efforts to recruit Indian students into medicine, links to traditional healing, key health issues facing Indian people, and career opportunities as…

  16. Native American Career Education Unit. From Idea to Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    One of twelve instructional units in the Native American Career Education (NACE) program, this unit is intended to help Indian junior high school students understand the steps involved in making a product. Focus is on the subject areas of economics, lumber and furniture industries, and woodworking. The first two activities concern the nature of…

  17. Resource Guide of American Indian and Alaska Native Women, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Owanah P., Comp.; Verble, Sedelta D., Comp.

    A resource listing of 678 prominent American Indian and Alaska Native women representing 159 tribes throughout the United States provides the following information: name, address, date and place of birth, tribal membership, field of interest, current occupation, Indian activities, women's advocacy, educational background and professional interest.…

  18. Native American Traditional Economic Values and Systems: Some Dispersed Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, L. Mayland

    In order to test the hypothesis which states "the economic values of traditional tribal cultures are essentially the same", seven culturally and geographically diversified Native American tribes were investigated via library research. The tribes studied were: Mohawk and/or Iroquois (microthermal climate); Maricopa (tropical desert environment);…

  19. Forced Relocation and Assimilation: Dillon Myer and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joe, Jennie R.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between Native Americans and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is ambivalent. Most BIA commissioners, like Dillon Myer, have been assimilationists who have tried to get the government "out of Indian business." Recent policies stressing self-determination are in jeopardy as pressure mounts for decreased federal domestic spending.…

  20. Promoting Books and Media: A Native American Indian Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses children's literature on Native American Indians and suggests ideas for using the literature in the school library media center or classroom by the library media specialist or by the classroom teacher. Activities and appropriate materials are suggested for the topics of housing, poetry, food, biography, crafts and music, and traditional…

  1. This Path We Travel: Celebrations of Contemporary Native American Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Pena, Frank

    1994-01-01

    An exhibition at the opening of the George Gustav Heye Center in New York City presents the talents of 15 contemporary Native American artists who during the past several years met at four different locations representing the cardinal directions. The exhibit combines sculpture, performance, poetry, music, and video to portray Indian world views…

  2. Internet Public Library: Native American Authors. Web Site Review Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walent, Jane Hurley

    1998-01-01

    The Native American Authors Internet Library, hosted by the Internet Public Library (an award-winning site maintained by the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), presents five administrative and reference sections with numerous links, and three browsers covering 400 authors, 700 titles, and 200 tribes. Authenticity, accountability, credibility,…

  3. Native American Career Education Unit. Putting Your Money to Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    One of twelve instructional units in the Native American Career Education (NACE) program, this unit is intended to help Indian junior high school students understand how to manage money resources, both on a personal level and in the world of work. In five activities, students do exercises and small group activities in which they consider how money…

  4. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Nation Cultural Resources Director Haskell Alexander (left) presents a gift to Joyce and James Herrington, parents of John Herrington, mission specialist on mission STS-113. Herrington is the first Native American to be going into space.

  5. U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives: Fiscal Year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcus, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This report describes the activities that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted with American Indian and Alaska Native governments, educational institutions, and individuals during Federal fiscal year (FY) 2005. Most of these USGS activities were collaborations with Tribes, Tribal organizations, or professional societies. Others were conducted cooperatively with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) or other Federal entities. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). The USGS does not have regulatory or land management responsibilities. As described in this report, there are many USGS activities that are directly relevant to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and to Native lands. A USGS website, dedicated to making USGS more accessible to American Indians, Alaska Natives, their governments, and institutions, is available at www.usgs.gov/indian. This website includes information on how to contact USGS American Indian/Alaska Native Liaisons, training opportunities, and links to other information resources. This report and previous editions are also available through the website. The USGS realizes that Native knowledge and cultural traditions of living in harmony with nature result in unique Native perspectives that enrich USGS studies. USGS seeks to increase the sensitivity and openness of its scientists to the breadth of Native knowledge, expanding the information on which their research is based. USGS scientific studies include data collection, mapping, natural resource modeling, and research projects. These projects typically last 2 or 3 years, although some are parts of longer-term activities. Some projects are funded cooperatively, with USGS funds matched or supplemented by individual Tribal governments, or by the BIA. These projects may also receive funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Indian Health Service (part of the Department of Health and Human Services

  6. American Indian Religious Freedom Act: guidance for compliance by federal agencies

    SciTech Connect

    Sharples, F.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1985-05-01

    The American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978 (AIRFA) requires federal agencies to ensure that none of their actions interfere with the inherent right of individual Native Americans (including American Indians, Eskimos, Aleuts, and Native Hawaiians) to believe, express, and exercise their traditional religions. These rights include access to religious sites, use and possession of sacred objects, and the freedom to worship through traditional ceremonials and rites. Since regulations have not been developed to implement the law, many federal agencies have integrated consultation under AIRFA with the existing environmental assessment process required for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Background information on Native American religions, the relationship of AIRFA to the First Amendment, and resources belonging to Native Americans is provided in this document to assist project managers in understanding the concerns of Native Americans with regard to federal developments. Since many native religious leaders are unwilling to discuss their religion with outsiders, consultation through intermediaries, such as tribal political leaders and/or private Indian organizations, may often be needed to ensure that appropriate input is received from the religious leaders. It is this consultation with the traditional religious leaders, either directly or through surrogates, that is the ultimate objective in complying with AIRFA. When a federal agency finds, upon consultation, that its proposed action would deny the free exercise of religion and yet determines that there is a compelling need for the action, the decision to proceed may be made, but appropriate mitigation measures to reduce religious interference to the lowest possible level must be included. 28 refs.

  7. Ininatig's Gift of Sugar: Traditional Native Sugarmaking. We Are Still Here: Native Americans Today Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittstock, Laura Waterman

    This book describes the traditional method of making maple syrup and maple sugar as practiced by the Anishinabe people in Minnesota. It begins with the Ojibway story of Ininatig "the man tree" and how Native Americans have relied on the sugar maple tree for food. It then tells how an Anishinabe man named Porky White continues his people's…

  8. Empirical Recommendations to Help Broaden Native American Participation in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semken, S.

    2008-12-01

    Participation of Native Americans in the geoscience community remains limited in spite of the oft-cited environmentally based nature of Indigenous cultures and lifeways, and the potential contribution of Indigenous ways of knowing to the global scientific enterprise. Multiple sociocultural and socioeconomic forces are at play here; some are now better understood through research, and not all are amenable to interventions by geoscientists. After two decades of professional and familial ties to the largest Native American nation, this geoscientist recommends these approaches to the problem: (1) Mitigate cultural discontinuity between worldviews with meaningful integration of relevant content and pedagogy into geoscience curricula for Native American students. This is best done by peer collaboration among Indigenous and mainstream scholars, ideally within or in close association with Tribal Colleges. The nature and level of possible incorporation range from the use of place-based and locally relevant geological examples and environmental case studies to socioculturally appropriate use of Indigenous pedagogy and traditional knowledge. Our 16-year experiment with Tsé na alkaah (Diné/Navajo ethnogeology) in formal and informal learning is cautiously offered as a template for this approach. It has drawn approval from cultural experts and interest from Diné teachers, but has yet to be widely disseminated or expanded upon by practitioners. (2) Nurture research infrastructure and expertise in situ, through partnerships that bring funding and collaborators to Native American students and educators on their lands and address Earth system problems of local significance and interest. Again, Tribal Colleges are particularly appropriate venues for such interaction. Research questions in Earth surface and climate change, hydrogeology, and energy are appropriate and timely for Native nations and funding agencies. Investigators should propose more projects that bring universities

  9. The Native American Persistence in Higher Education: A Journey through Story to Identify the Family Support to Native American Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisbee, Yolanda J. Guzman

    2013-01-01

    This Indigenous Framed Research will utilize counter-storytelling through shared collaborator stories provided by Nez Perce Native American Graduates. The methodology is shaped by an Indigenous Framework as this form of research promotes and develops a culturally resonant environment for constructing, analyzing and sharing information. The…

  10. Native American Perceptions of the National Association for Native American Children of Alcoholics: In Their Own Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeannette L.; Plemons, Bradford W.; Starr, Edward; Reyes, Raymond; Fleming, Candace; Latimer, Anna; Trimble, Joseph E.

    The National Association for Native American Children of Alcoholics (NANACOA) initiated a strategy in 1995 to evaluate their programs and prevention efforts. The design and methodology of the project incorporated a "naturalistic" approach to help preserve cultural integrity and respect multiple perspectives. Data were gathered from archival…

  11. 75 FR 13140 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Nomination Solicitation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Nomination... Repatriation Review Committee; Notice of Nomination Solicitation. The National Park Service is soliciting nominations for one member of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee....

  12. Language Preservation: the Language of Science as a bridge to the Native American Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. J.; Martin, M.; Grant, G.

    2009-12-01

    Many Native American communities recognize that the retention of their language, and the need to make the language relevant to the technological age we live in, represents one of their largest and most urgent challenges. Almost 70 percent of Navajos speak their tribal language in the home, and 25 per cent do not know English very well. In contrast, only 30 percent of Native Americans as a whole speak their own tribal language in the home. For the Cherokee and the Chippewa, less than 10 percent speak the native language in the home. And for the Navajo, the number of first graders who solely speak English is almost four times higher than it was in 1970. The U.S. Rosetta Project is the NASA contribution to the International Rosetta Mission. The Rosetta stone is the inspiration for the mission’s name. As outlined by the European Space Agency, Rosetta is expected to provide the keys to the primordial solar system the way the original Rosetta Stone provided a key to ancient language. The concept of ancient language as a key provides a theme for this NASA project’s outreach to Native American communities anxious for ways to enhance and improve the numbers of native speakers. In this talk we will present a concept for building on native language as it relates to STEM concepts. In 2009, a student from the Dine Nation interpreted 28 NASA terms for his senior project at Chinle High School in Chinle, AZ. These terms included such words as space telescope, weather satellite, space suit, and the planets including Neptune and Uranus. This work represents a foundation for continued work between NASA and the Navajo Nation. Following approval by the tribal elders, the U.S. Rosetta project would host the newly translated Navajo words on a web-site, and provide translation into both Navajo and English. A clickable map would allow the user to move through all the words, see Native artwork related to the word, and hear audio translation. Extension to very remote teachers in the

  13. American Ethnic Literatures. Native American, African American, Chicano/Latino, and Asian American Writers and Their Backgrounds. An Annotated Bibliography. Magill Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, David R.

    This volume is a serious effort to provide a guide to the range of creative and scholarly work in the four major American ethnic literatures. The burst in creative energy among Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans has made it difficult for teachers to keep up with the primary literature, let alone the…

  14. Crying for a Vision: The Native American Sweat Lodge Ceremony as Therapeutic Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta; Torres-Rivera, Edil; Brubaker, Michael; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe; Brotherton, Dale; West-Olatunji, Cirecie; Conwill, William; Grayshield, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The Native American sweat lodge ceremony or sweat therapy is being used increasingly in various medical, mental health, correctional, and substance abuse treatment centers serving both Native and non-Native clients. This article explores the sweat lodge ceremony's background, elements of Native American spirituality, origin story, cultural…

  15. Native American Student Participation in Study Abroad: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanger, Stephen P.; Minthorn, Robin Starr; Weinland, Kathryn A.; Appleman, Boomer; James, Michael; Arnold, Allen

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory case study examines the participation of Native American students in study abroad and institutional policies and practices that either impede or enhance participation. The study surveys all Native students enrolled at the American university that produces the most Native graduates with bachelor's degrees. Although Native students…

  16. Factors that Influence Career Choice among Native American and African American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett-Smith, Keisha K.

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for research in the area of career choice of minority students in the United States. This descriptive study examined the factors that may influence Native American and African American high school students' career choices. These factors include such variables as parental educational level, family composition, and potential grade…

  17. Genetic Variation and Population Structure in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sohini; Ray, Nicolas; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rojas, Winston; Parra, Maria V; Molina, Julio A; Gallo, Carla; Mazzotti, Guido; Poletti, Giovanni; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, Ana M; Labuda, Damian; Klitz, William; Barrantes, Ramiro; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Tsuneto, Luiza T; Llop, Elena; Rothhammer, Francisco; Excoffier, Laurent; Feldman, Marcus W; Rosenberg, Noah A; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    We examined genetic diversity and population structure in the American landmass using 678 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 422 individuals representing 24 Native American populations sampled from North, Central, and South America. These data were analyzed jointly with similar data available in 54 other indigenous populations worldwide, including an additional five Native American groups. The Native American populations have lower genetic diversity and greater differentiation than populations from other continental regions. We observe gradients both of decreasing genetic diversity as a function of geographic distance from the Bering Strait and of decreasing genetic similarity to Siberians—signals of the southward dispersal of human populations from the northwestern tip of the Americas. We also observe evidence of: (1) a higher level of diversity and lower level of population structure in western South America compared to eastern South America, (2) a relative lack of differentiation between Mesoamerican and Andean populations, (3) a scenario in which coastal routes were easier for migrating peoples to traverse in comparison with inland routes, and (4) a partial agreement on a local scale between genetic similarity and the linguistic classification of populations. These findings offer new insights into the process of population dispersal and differentiation during the peopling of the Americas. PMID:18039031

  18. Genetic variation and population structure in native Americans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sijia; Lewis, Cecil M; Jakobsson, Mattias; Ramachandran, Sohini; Ray, Nicolas; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rojas, Winston; Parra, Maria V; Molina, Julio A; Gallo, Carla; Mazzotti, Guido; Poletti, Giovanni; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, Ana M; Labuda, Damian; Klitz, William; Barrantes, Ramiro; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Tsuneto, Luiza T; Llop, Elena; Rothhammer, Francisco; Excoffier, Laurent; Feldman, Marcus W; Rosenberg, Noah A; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2007-11-01

    We examined genetic diversity and population structure in the American landmass using 678 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 422 individuals representing 24 Native American populations sampled from North, Central, and South America. These data were analyzed jointly with similar data available in 54 other indigenous populations worldwide, including an additional five Native American groups. The Native American populations have lower genetic diversity and greater differentiation than populations from other continental regions. We observe gradients both of decreasing genetic diversity as a function of geographic distance from the Bering Strait and of decreasing genetic similarity to Siberians--signals of the southward dispersal of human populations from the northwestern tip of the Americas. We also observe evidence of: (1) a higher level of diversity and lower level of population structure in western South America compared to eastern South America, (2) a relative lack of differentiation between Mesoamerican and Andean populations, (3) a scenario in which coastal routes were easier for migrating peoples to traverse in comparison with inland routes, and (4) a partial agreement on a local scale between genetic similarity and the linguistic classification of populations. These findings offer new insights into the process of population dispersal and differentiation during the peopling of the Americas. PMID:18039031

  19. Cancer mortality in a northeastern native American population.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, M C; Michalek, A M; Cummings, K M; Nasca, P C; Emrich, L J

    1989-07-01

    This study compared cancer mortality among the Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) between 1955 and 1984 with cancer patterns exhibited by the general population of New York State (NYS), exclusive of New York City. Cancer mortality among the SNI was compared with cancer mortality in NYS using age and sex standardized mortality ratios (SMR). Deficits in overall cancer mortality were noted among both SNI males (SMR = 78) and females (SMR = 73). Results from this investigation will contribute to the understanding of patterns of malignant disease mortality among native peoples and may be of benefit for monitoring the impact of cancer mortality among the SNI and other Native American groups.

  20. Red as an Apple: Native American Acculturation and Counseling with or without Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta; Pichette, Eugene F.

    2000-01-01

    Examines how counselors must assess a Native American client's level of acculturation rather than make assumptions based on the limited information offered by appearance or other personal characteristics. Presents the Native American Acculturation Scale as an operationalized means of formally or informally assessing a Native American client's…

  1. 77 FR 23196 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... Office of the Secretary 43 CFR Part 10 RIN 1024-AD99 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation... Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) is responsible for implementation of the Native American Graves... implementing the Native American ] Graves Protection and Repatriation Act for purposes of factual accuracy...

  2. 77 FR 57544 - Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 1996: Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 1000 Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination... Housing Block Grant program authorized by the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act...

  3. 75 FR 36022 - Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008: Negotiated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 1000 Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination... to the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008. The... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rodger J. Boyd, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Native American...

  4. 20 CFR 632.75 - General responsibilities of Native American grantees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General responsibilities of Native American... LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management § 632.75 General responsibilities of Native American grantees. This subpart sets out program operation...

  5. Native American Women Perceptions in Pk-12 Administrative Positions in North Dakota Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoteau, Lanelia Irene

    2012-01-01

    Historically Native American women have experienced barriers in their rise to Pk-12 educational leadership positions. There is limited research available on Native American women in educational leadership. Therefore, the purpose for this survey study was to discover what inspired current Pk-12 Native American women educational leaders to choose…

  6. 20 CFR 632.35 - Native American grantee contracts and subgrants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Native American grantee contracts and... LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Administrative Standards and Procedures § 632.35 Native American grantee contracts and subgrants. (a) Contracts may be entered...

  7. 40 CFR 255.33 - Inclusion of Federal facilities and Native American Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inclusion of Federal facilities and Native American Reservations. 255.33 Section 255.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... and Native American Reservations. Major Federal facilities and Native American Reservations should...

  8. 75 FR 29964 - Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008: Negotiated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 1000 Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination... pursuant to the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008. The.... Boyd, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Native American Programs, Office of Public and Indian...

  9. 75 FR 19920 - Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008: Negotiated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 1000 Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination... Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008. The primary... CONTACT: Rodger J. Boyd, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Native American Programs, Office of Public...

  10. 48 CFR 352.242-72 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Native American Graves... and Clauses 352.242-72 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. As prescribed in 342.302(c)(4), the Contracting Officer shall insert the following clause: Native American...

  11. 75 FR 14390 - Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008: Negotiated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 1000 Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination... of the Native American Housing Assistance & Self-Determination Negotiated Rulemaking Committee. The... CONTACT: Rodger J. Boyd, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Native American Programs, Office of Public...

  12. 75 FR 13243 - Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008: Negotiated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 1000 Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination... Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008. The primary... CONTACT: Rodger J. Boyd, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Native American Programs, Office of Public...

  13. 75 FR 7559 - Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008: Negotiated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 1000 Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination... Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Reauthorization Act of 2008. The primary.... Boyd, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Native American Programs, Office of Public and Indian...

  14. Native American Education Program, 1981-82: O.E.E. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Sheila

    During 1981-82, the Native American Education Program, based in a lower working class neighborhood in Manhattan, served 360 Native American children (K-12) scattered throughout New York City. Goals of visiting and interviewing 50% of the target population of 500 Native American students in the city were substantially realized. Materials and…

  15. Infant Feeding Practices: Perceptions of Native American Mothers and Health Paraprofessionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horodynski, Mildred A; Calcatera, Mary; Carpenter, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain infant feeding practices and to explore the feasibility of an in-home feeding intervention with Native American Indian (NAI) mothers in six Native American communities in the United States (US). Design: Qualitative focus group study. Setting: Six Native American communities in the Midwest region of the United States.…

  16. Native America: American Indian Geoscientists & Earth System Science Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolman, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    We are living in a definite time of change. Distinct changes are being experienced in our most sacred and natural environments. This is especially true on Native lands across the Americas. Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways. The knowledge of balancing the needs of people with the needs of our natural environments is paramount in all Tribal societies. These changes have accelerated the momentum to ensure the future of American Indian Geoscientists and Earth Systems Science Leaders. The presentation will bring to prominence the unique recruitment and mentoring necessary to achieve success that emerged through working with Tribal people. The presentation will highlight: 1) past and present philosophies on recruitment and mentoring of Native/Tribal students in geoscience and earth systems science; 2) current Native leadership and research development; 3) unique collaborations "bridging" Native people across geographic areas (International) in developing educational/research experiences which integrate the distinctive geoscience and earth systems science knowledge of Tribal peoples throughout the Americas. The presentation will highlight currently funded projects and initiatives as well as success stories of emerging Native geoscientists and earth systems science leaders.

  17. 75 FR 75641 - Advance Notification to Native American Tribes of Transportation of Certain Types of Nuclear Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... notification to Native American Tribes of transportation of certain types of nuclear waste (64 FR 71331... Tribes of Transportation of Certain Types of Nuclear Waste AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION...'s designee, of certain shipments of irradiated reactor fuel and certain nuclear waste...

  18. Native American Women Leaders' Use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) for Work-Life Balance (WLB) and Capacity Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Crystal C.

    2013-01-01

    Native American women's leadership, information communication technologies (ICTs), work-life balance (WLB) and human capacity building (HCB) are grounded in social justice issues due to their long history of overall cultural decimation, inequitable access to technology, monetary resources, and social power (agency), and influence. Currently, there…

  19. Providing psychiatric-mental health care for Native Americans: lessons learned by a non-Native American PMHNP.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Amy G

    2007-05-01

    Providing culturally sensitive psychiatric-mental health nursing care to Native Americans requires a unique set of understandings. Traditional tribal customs and beliefs, historical events of the past 500 years, and acculturation and enculturation have affected Native Americans' health and well-being. In 2004, I had the opportunity to practice as a psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner with a Native American tribe in the southwestern United States. This article describes the lessons I learned while practicing on the reservation and suggests ways other non-Native American practitioners can best serve this population. PMID:17526328

  20. Suicide notes among Native Americans, Hispanics, and Anglos.

    PubMed

    Olson, Lenora M; Wahab, Stéphanie; Thompson, Cheryl W; Durrant, Lynne

    2011-11-01

    Suicide is a significant health problem, yet many questions regarding suicide remain unanswered. One of the most frequently asked questions is related to motive: "Why did that person complete suicide?" We explored motivations for completing suicide, especially with regard to cultural differences, by analyzing suicide notes written by Native Americans, Hispanics, and Anglos in New Mexico. Five categories emerged describing motivation: feelings of (a) alienation, (b) failure or inadequacy, (c) being psychologically overwhelmed; (d) the desire to leave problems behind, and (e) reunification in an afterlife. The largest difference to emerge between ethnic groups was in the alienation category, which included more Hispanics and Native Americans than Anglos. The overall lack of differences in motivation among the ethnic groups suggests that commonalities in suicidal behavior outweigh the differences. Practical implications for research and practice are discussed, along with strengths and limitations of the study. PMID:21685312

  1. Qualitative Systematic Review of Intimate Partner Violence among Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Finfgeld-Connett, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of intimate partner violence (IPV) among Native Americans is high, and a full understanding of how to prevent it is unclear. Based on this qualitative systematic review of 13 research reports, a model of IPV among Native Americans was developed. IPV appears to be grounded within a history of upheaval and loss, and is entrenched and repressed within families. Victims are reluctant to seek assistance, and when they do, they often experience barriers within the service system. To prevent and resolve IPV, service providers are urged to establish trust with individuals who seek assistance and to leverage cultural strengths. They also are encouraged to adapt theoretical models to optimize care. PMID:26514253

  2. The health challenge of stress experienced by Native American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Melessa; Lowe, John

    2012-02-01

    Little is known about how Native American youth experience or manage stress. The purpose of this study was to describe the health challenge of stress experienced by Cherokee-Keetoowah adolescents and to identify approaches used to manage stress. All adolescents regardless of ethnicity face normative sources of stress, such as daily hassles and transition experiences like moving to a new school. Native American youth are known to have significantly greater stress, related to social and economic factors, than their white peers. They are exposed to a variety of continuous stressors including poverty and family disruption. A qualitative story-theory-guided approach was used to conduct a secondary analysis of existing data collected from a larger study where written stories of stress were gathered from 50 Cherokee-Keetoowah adolescents ranging in ages from 14 to 18 years. The data analysis was guided by the story inquiry method to identify dimensions of the health challenge of stress and approaches used to resolve the health challenge. Three health challenge groups were identified: burden of expectations, relationship disruption, and imposing feelings and the actions of others. The most frequently described stories of stress expressed were the burden of expectation of self or from others (n=33). Connecting with valued others, engaging in meaningful activities, and choosing a positive attitude about change were themes that characterized ways that these adolescents managed stress. It is essential to understand how Native American adolescents experience stress and what they do to manage it if we wish to deter the physical and mental consequences of stress. The development of stress-reducing culturally competent interventions that are built on a foundation such as story sharing is a culturally congruent approach for intervening with Native American adolescents. PMID:22284082

  3. The Relevancy of Community-Based Methods: Using Diet within Native American and Alaska Native Adult Populations as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Fialkowski, Marie K.; Okoror, Titilayo A.; Boushey, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    The rates of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease in Native Americans and Alaska Natives far exceed that of the general US population. There are many postulating reasons for these excessive rates including the transition from a traditional to a contemporary diet. Although information on the dietary intakes of Native American and Alaska Native communities are limited, there seems to be a consensus that the Native American and Alaska Native diet is high in total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. Further information on the diet needs to be attained so that dietary interventions can effectively be implemented in these communities. An approach that is community based is proposed as the best solution to understanding the Native diet and developing culturally tailored interventions to sustainably improve diet. PMID:22686210

  4. The future of Indian Health Services for native Americans in the United States: an analysis of policy options and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Henley, Tiffany; Boshier, Maureen

    2016-10-01

    The passage of the Affordable Care Act in the United States has opened a policy window for the establishment of an independent Medicaid agency for the Navajo Nation. This article explores several policy options to improve health care services for Native Americans. Although there is a lack of scholarly research on the impact of healthcare reform and the effectiveness of current health care programs for American Indians, policymakers should utilize evidence-based research to inform policy decisions. PMID:27150047

  5. The NHLBI workshop on Hypertension in Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and Asian/Pacific Islander Americans.

    PubMed

    Havas, S; Fujimoto, W; Close, N; McCarter, R; Keller, J; Sherwin, R

    1996-01-01

    In June 1994, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute held a workshop entitled "Epidemiology of Hypertension in Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and Asian/Pacific Islander Americans." The studies that served as the basis for the workshop along with a summary of two workshop panel discussions are being published as a supplement by Public Health Reports. In this article, the authors present graphs that compare results across these studies with data for non-Hispanic whites, blacks, and Hispanics from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The graphs indicate differences in mean blood pressure levels within and among these three population groups; such differences are also apparent in comparisons of these groups with the U.S. white and black populations. Although they appear modest, these differences are sufficient to result in increased mortality rates in populations with higher levels of hypertension. Environmental influences appear to underlie most of these differences. In all of these populations, blood pressure control rates are poor. Based on these studies, hypertension prevention and control programs should be undertaken. Special emphasis should be placed on the underserved minority populations that were the focus of the workshop.

  6. Beringian Standstill and Spread of Native American Founders

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, Erika; Kivisild, Toomas; Reidla, Maere; Metspalu, Mait; Smith, David Glenn; Mulligan, Connie J.; Bravi, Claudio M.; Rickards, Olga; Martinez-Labarga, Cristina; Khusnutdinova, Elsa K.; Fedorova, Sardana A.; Golubenko, Maria V.; Stepanov, Vadim A.; Gubina, Marina A.; Zhadanov, Sergey I.; Ossipova, Ludmila P.; Damba, Larisa; Voevoda, Mikhail I.; Dipierri, Jose E.; Villems, Richard; Malhi, Ripan S.

    2007-01-01

    Native Americans derive from a small number of Asian founders who likely arrived to the Americas via Beringia. However, additional details about the intial colonization of the Americas remain unclear. To investigate the pioneering phase in the Americas we analyzed a total of 623 complete mtDNAs from the Americas and Asia, including 20 new complete mtDNAs from the Americas and seven from Asia. This sequence data was used to direct high-resolution genotyping from 20 American and 26 Asian populations. Here we describe more genetic diversity within the founder population than was previously reported. The newly resolved phylogenetic structure suggests that ancestors of Native Americans paused when they reached Beringia, during which time New World founder lineages differentiated from their Asian sister-clades. This pause in movement was followed by a swift migration southward that distributed the founder types all the way to South America. The data also suggest more recent bi-directional gene flow between Siberia and the North American Arctic. PMID:17786201

  7. Science education with or for Native Americans? An analysis of the Native American Science Outreach Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Kathryn Wells

    1998-09-01

    Science Education With or For Native Americans?: An Analysis of the Native American Science Outreach Network (NASON), is the study of a summer institute for science teachers and Native American para-professionals and students in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Washington (UW) from 1992-1996. The study determines effects of NASON in schools, in tribal communities and on Native American students. It clarifies processes through which tribal communities and academic institutions can jointly design and implement education programs and curricula that reflect values and traditions of tribal communities and western education. Incorporated in the study is also an analysis of meanings of "Indian" identity, "Indian" education vis a vis education in general, and "Indian" science and "western" science, explored against the background of school experiences for Indian students. This research study examines NASON with regard to principles that are basic to applied anthropology, considering the following issues: (1) How well did NASON reflect an understanding of tribal and school values and cultures? (2) How effectively were the needs, wants and values of the people reflected in the program? (3) What cultural patterns were reflected in NASON's structure? (4) How did NASON consider the impact of its program on whole communities? (5) How did NASON ascertain and address motivations of its participants? (6) How did tribal community members or secondary teachers participate in planning and implementing NASON? (7) How were key tribal and academic community leaders involved? (8) What procedures were used? (9) Did NASON's structure discourage ethnocentrism? (10) How did NASON leadership work with rather than for Indian people and teachers? The study concludes that educational programs must be designed and monitored by an Advisory Board that includes equal representation of Tribes and Elders, Families, School personnel, and University representatives, considering the effect

  8. College Pride, Native Pride: A Portrait of a Culturally Grounded Precollege Access Program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Adrienne J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article Adrienne J. Keene employs the portraiture methodology to explore the story of College Horizons. She examines this precollege access program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students to understand how a program rooted in Native cultures and identities can not only provide a space to create knowledge…

  9. Native American Indian child welfare system change: implementation of a culturally appropriate practice model across three tribal child welfare systems.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, Maria; Iannone, Mary A

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there are 565 federally recognized tribes in the United States who are independent sovereign nations. These tribes have varying capacities to manage and administer child welfare programs. Most provide some type of child welfare service to the children and families within their tribal land. However, there are no national resources to document the number of children in foster care or the extent of abuse and neglect in the families served by tribal child welfare agencies. Information is only known about those Native American/Alaska Native families and children who are reported to state child protection agencies. Native American children represented 0.9% of all children in the United States in the late 1990s, but they comprised 3.1% of the substitute care population in state-run child welfare systems (Morrison, et al., 2010). Incident rates of child welfare referrals, substantiated referrals, and foster care placement among Native American children and families are relatively high compared to other ethnic groups (Earle & Cross, 2001) but precise interpretation of Native American status is difficult due to variations in child welfare reporting systems (Magruder & Shaw, 2008).

  10. School Boards and the Process of Native American Influence on the Education of Native American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Frank W.; Barlow, Donald A.

    1981-01-01

    Using Becker's sacred/secular community type continuum and Bailey's concepts of elite/arena council behavior, examined the educational decision making process on the Coeur d'Alene Indian reservation in Idaho. Discusses implications for American Indian education. (GC)

  11. Native American Language Education as Policy-in-Practice: An Interpretative Policy Analysis of the Native American Languages Act of 1990/1992

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warhol, Larisa

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from an interpretive policy analysis of the development and impacts of landmark federal legislation in support of Native American languages: the 1990/1992 Native American Languages Act (NALA). Overturning more than two centuries of federal Indian policy, NALA established the federal role in preserving and protecting…

  12. The Need for a National Alliance for Broadening Participation of Native Americans in the Geosciences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbotten, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    The continuing underrepresentation of Native Americans in the Geosciences can only mean that Native voices go unheard in setting research agendas and priorities. This is particularly significant where issues such as global climate change impact the land and livelihood of Native American communities. This talk will outline the need for a national alliance for broadening participation of Native Americans in the Geosciences. Our focus will be on defining goals for this alliance, i.e., new research in Geoscience education, defining best practices, inclusion of Native voices in Geoscience research, the potential for new collaborations, and promotion of opportunities for Native students and communities.

  13. Multi-generational perspectives on health, cancer, and biomedicine: Northeastern Native American perspectives shaped by mistrust.

    PubMed

    Canales, Mary K; Weiner, Diane; Samos, Markos; Wampler, Nina S

    2011-08-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death among Native Americans, who have-some of the poorest cancer survival rates of any race/ethnicity nationwide. Considering the cancer burden experienced by Native Americans and the lack of research exploring Northeastern tribal communities' cancer experiences, a qualitative investigation of Native Americans' cancer coping strategies and health education needs was undertaken. Data were collected through group (74) and individual (17) interviews with 91 Native Americans from the Northeast. Relationships between intergenerational mistrust, individual mistrust, and utilization of biomedical health care systems for Northeastern Native Americans are presented. Trust is central to the provider-patient relationship and the foundation for developing and maintaining connections to Native American communities. Intergenerational mistrust, shaped by historical and contemporary issues of prejudice and miscommunication, affect cancer health experiences and views. Approaches for reducing mistrust and building relationships between health care providers and Native communities are highlighted.

  14. Broadening the Participation of Native Americans in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno Watts, Nievita

    Climate change is not a thing of the future. Indigenous people are being affected by climate changes now. Native American Earth scientists could help Native communities deal with both climate change and environmental pollution issues, but are noticeably lacking in Earth Science degree programs. The Earth Sciences produce the lowest percentage of minority scientists when compared with other science and engineering fields. Twenty semi-structured interviews were gathered from American Indian/ Alaska Native Earth Scientists and program directors who work directly with Native students to broaden participation in the field. Data was analyzed using qualitative methods and constant comparison analysis. Barriers Native students faced in this field are discussed, as well as supports which go the furthest in assisting achievement of higher education goals. Program directors give insight into building pathways and programs to encourage Native student participation and success in Earth Science degree programs. Factors which impede obtaining a college degree include financial barriers, pressures from familial obligations, and health issues. Factors which impede the decision to study Earth Science include unfamiliarity with geoscience as a field of study and career choice, the uninviting nature of Earth Science as a profession, and curriculum that is irrelevant to the practical needs of Native communities or courses which are inaccessible geographically. Factors which impede progress that are embedded in Earth Science programs include educational preparation, academic information and counseling and the prevalence of a Western scientific perspective to the exclusion of all other perspectives. Intradepartmental relationships also pose barriers to the success of some students, particularly those who are non-traditional students (53%) or women (80%). Factors which support degree completion include financial assistance, mentors and mentoring, and research experiences. Earth scientists

  15. Tribal Colleges and Universities in the 21st Century: Native American Female Leadership in Tribal Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitting Crow, Karen Paetz

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of Native American female leadership is becoming a more prevalent topic in the scholarly literature as more educated Native American women become visible in tribal higher education. This qualitative case study explored Native American female leadership, as a growing number of Native American women enter higher education and earn…

  16. Risk and Protective Factors for HIV/AIDS in Native Americans: Implications for Preventive Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Mary Kate

    2009-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has steadily increased in Native American and Alaska Native populations, and despite efforts at control many challenges remain. This article examines historical, biological, social, and behavioral cofactors related to the spread of HIV/AIDS within the context of Native American culture. Special attention is given to vulnerable subgroups…

  17. Native American Educational Leader Preparation: The Design and Delivery of an Online Interdisciplinary Licensure Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Linda R.; Rude, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    In a 1991 report, the Indian Nations at Risk Task Force documented a lack of Native educators as role models for Native American students and set a goal of doubling their number by the year 2000. Under-representation of Native American educators remains an issue today particularly with regard to school leaders (Planty et al. 2009; Snyder and…

  18. Native American Students' Experiences of Cultural Differences in College: Influence and Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Leslie E.

    2012-01-01

    The culture of most colleges and universities is very different for Native American students with close ties to their traditional communities. "Traditional," in a Native American sense, means multiple interconnections of emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual identity that combine to define expectations for the Native American…

  19. Native American Indians and the Counseling Process: Culture, Adaptation, and Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skouras, Thomas J.

    Native Americans constitute a significant population that is growing and has great need for mental health and counseling services. Social problems in Native communities include high rates of alcoholism, alcohol-related deaths, drug use, youth suicide, and sexually transmitted diseases. Despite their mental health needs, Native Americans are…

  20. Durations of American English vowels by native and non-native speakers: acoustic analyses and perceptual effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Jin, Su-Hyun; Chen, Chia-Tsen

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this study was to examine durations of American English vowels produced by English-, Chinese-, and Korean-native speakers and the effects of vowel duration on vowel intelligibility. Twelve American English vowels were recorded in the /hVd/ phonetic context by native speakers and non-native speakers. The English vowel duration patterns as a function of vowel produced by non-native speakers were generally similar to those produced by native speakers. These results imply that using duration differences across vowels may be an important strategy for non-native speakers' production before they are able to employ spectral cues to produce and perceive English speech sounds. In the intelligibility experiment, vowels were selected from 10 native and non-native speakers and vowel durations were equalized at 170 ms. Intelligibility of vowels with original and equalized durations was evaluated by American English native listeners. Results suggested that vowel intelligibility of native and non-native speakers degraded slightly by 3-8% when durations were equalized, indicating that vowel duration plays a minor role in vowel intelligibility.

  1. Sociocultural Influences on Gambling and Alcohol Use Among Native Americans in the United States.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Silver Wolf Adelv Unegv Waya, David A; Welte, John W; Barnes, Grace M; Tidwell, Marie-Cecile O; Spicer, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Gambling opportunities on and near Native American lands have increased in recent decades; yet there is a lack of research examining the patterns of problem gambling and alcohol abuse among Native Americans in the US. Traditional Native American cultural identity may be a protective factor for problem gambling and alcohol abuse among Native Americans. Telephone interviews were conducted with 415 Native American adults aged 18 years and older across the US. The past-year prevalence of gambling among Native Americans is similar to the rate for non-Native Americans in the US (80 vs. 77%). However, Native Americans have over twice the rate of problem gambling as the US sample (18 vs. 8%). Although Native Americans have a lower rate of past-year alcohol use than the US population (47 vs. 68%), they have a somewhat higher rate of alcohol abuse than their US counterparts (5.5 vs. 4.3%). Logistic regression analysis, with problem gambling as the dependent variable, revealed that lower socioeconomic status is significantly associated with an increased odds of problem gambling for Native Americans. Counter to the hypothesis, the higher the score on the Native American orientation, the higher the odds of being a problem gambler. Further, living by the "White way of life" was associated with a decreased odds of being a problem gambler; and perceived gambling convenience was associated with an increased odds of being a problem gambler. None of the Native American factors was significant in predicting alcohol abuse. These findings highlight the need for further investigation into the influence of cultural factors on Native American gambling.

  2. Sociocultural Influences on Gambling and Alcohol Use Among Native Americans in the United States.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Silver Wolf Adelv Unegv Waya, David A; Welte, John W; Barnes, Grace M; Tidwell, Marie-Cecile O; Spicer, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Gambling opportunities on and near Native American lands have increased in recent decades; yet there is a lack of research examining the patterns of problem gambling and alcohol abuse among Native Americans in the US. Traditional Native American cultural identity may be a protective factor for problem gambling and alcohol abuse among Native Americans. Telephone interviews were conducted with 415 Native American adults aged 18 years and older across the US. The past-year prevalence of gambling among Native Americans is similar to the rate for non-Native Americans in the US (80 vs. 77%). However, Native Americans have over twice the rate of problem gambling as the US sample (18 vs. 8%). Although Native Americans have a lower rate of past-year alcohol use than the US population (47 vs. 68%), they have a somewhat higher rate of alcohol abuse than their US counterparts (5.5 vs. 4.3%). Logistic regression analysis, with problem gambling as the dependent variable, revealed that lower socioeconomic status is significantly associated with an increased odds of problem gambling for Native Americans. Counter to the hypothesis, the higher the score on the Native American orientation, the higher the odds of being a problem gambler. Further, living by the "White way of life" was associated with a decreased odds of being a problem gambler; and perceived gambling convenience was associated with an increased odds of being a problem gambler. None of the Native American factors was significant in predicting alcohol abuse. These findings highlight the need for further investigation into the influence of cultural factors on Native American gambling. PMID:25408467

  3. Experiential Learning for Native American Students at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauve, M. L.; Moore, K.

    2003-12-01

    In reaffirming its commitment to Indian tribes and Alaska Native entities, the Federal Government issued Executive Order 13270 of July 3, 2002, stating the policy that " this Nation's commitment to education excellence and opportunity must extend as well to the tribal colleges and universities." Further, the Federal Government has called on the private sector to contribute to these colleges' educational and cultural mission. American University, through its American Indian Internship Program, has responded to this call. American University, a private liberal arts institution of higher education in the Nation's capital, has long ago recognized the importance of experiential learning in undergraduate education. For over 50 years, its Washington Semester Program brings students from other universities around the country and the world to American University's campus and to Washington, D.C. for a unique academic experience. The Washington Semester Program combines academic seminars in various fields of concentration with internship work in government agencies, congressional offices, non-profit organizations, foundations and research institutions in the Nation's capital. Students in this Program get to meet the Nation's leaders, experts in the field, and notable newsmakers while incorporating their academic skills and courses in practice at their internship assignments. The American Indian Internship Program (also knows as Washington Internship for Native Students-WINS) is one of the programs in Washington Semester. This program is designed to give American Indian students the chance to study issues of interest to the Native community and to gain valuable work experience through an internship in the Nation's capital. All costs to attend the program are paid by the internship sponsors and American University, including transportation between the students' home and Washington, DC, tuition and program fees for 6 credit hours in the summer and 12 credit hours in fall

  4. The Process of Native American Influence on the Education of Native American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Frank W.; Barlow, Donald A.

    The vast majority of American Indian students are educated in public school districts controlled by locally elected school boards. If Indian parents are to influence the education of their children they must become knowledgeable in political methods of influencing local school boards. The process of Indian influence in educational decisions was…

  5. Issues in Cross-Cultural Assessment: American Indian and Alaska Native Students. Knowledge Brief, Number Twelve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrin, Elise Trumbull; Nelson-Barber, Sharon

    This brief focuses on assessment issues for American Indian and Alaska Native (collectively referred to as "Native") students, as well as other pedagogical issues related to improved teaching and educational outcomes. Although traditional Native educational strategies emphasize cooperation, experiential learning, and reflection, Native students…

  6. Disney's "Pocahontas": Conversations with Native American and Euro-American Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aidman, Amy

    This study analyzed girls' reactions to Disney's animated feature film "Pocahontas" in light of conclusions drawn from a previous critical textual analysis of the movie. The research addressed three questions: (1) how do Disney's claims to creation of positive prosocial representations of women and Native Americans in the movie "Pocahontas" hold…

  7. The Depiction of Native Americans in Recent (1991-1998) Secondary American History Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Antonio R.

    As a follow-up to studies by R. Costo and J. Henry (1970) and J. Loewen (1995), this study examined 12 current secondary level U.S. history textbooks to evaluate their accuracy in depicting Native Americans. The criteria embodied an authenticity guideline based upon the "Five Great Values" (generosity and sharing, respect for elders and women,…

  8. 76 FR 18202 - Applications for New Awards; Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... the Federal Register on December 15, 2010 (75 FR 78486) (Supplemental NFP). Competitive Preference... subcontinent (including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine... October 30, 1997 (62 FR 58789)). Native American Pacific Islander means any descendant of the...

  9. American Indians and the Urban Experience. Contemporary Native American Communities 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Susan, Ed.; Peters, Kurt, Ed.

    Over half of all American Indian people living in the United States now live in urban areas, but few books and little research have addressed urban Indian themes. This book compiles research, scholarly writing, poetry, prose, and artwork concerned with the Native urban experience. Of specific educational interest are chapters on the role of…

  10. Native American Calendric Orientation at Town Creek Indian Mound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiede, V. R.

    2005-12-01

    Evidence is presented for a newly discovered set of interior solar alignments - the equinox and summer solstice meridian transits - at a prehistoric Native American structure in the Southeast United States. Because North Carolina's Town Creek Indian Mound is the only Mississippian temple-mound accurately reconstructed from overhead photo-mosaics, the site is uniquely suited for applying the techniques of astro-archaeology (G. S. Hawkins 1983). Implications of the new findings for interpreting Muskogean ethnographic literature as well as future archaeoastronomical research at other Southeastern sites (e.g., Ocmulgee National Monument Earth Lodge, Georgia) are discussed.

  11. Dermatology in the North American Indian/Alaska Native population.

    PubMed

    Kryatova, Maria S; Okoye, Ginette A

    2016-02-01

    Dermatology is greatly understudied in the American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) population. This topic deserves attention in light of the changing demographics of the United States and the healthcare disparities faced by AIAN, including access to dermatologic care. In this review, we discuss disorders that are more prevalent or otherwise important in the AIAN population, such as cutaneous malignancies, photodermatoses, acanthosis nigricans, connective tissue disorders, cutaneous infections, hypertrophic scar formation, and Heck's disease. We aim to provide an updated review and increase awareness of the dermatologic needs of the AIAN population.

  12. FLAVONOL GLYCOSIDES FROM THE NATIVE AMERICAN PLANT GAURA LONGIFLORA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Hui; Jacob, Melissa R.; Agarwal, Ameeta K.; Clark, Alice M.; Liang, Zong-Suo; Li, Xing-Cong

    2013-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the native American plant Gaura longiflora led to the isolation of three new and eight known flavonol glycosides. The structures of the new compounds were established primarily by spectroscopic data as quercetin 3-O-(2″-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-6″-O-E-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), kaempferol 3-O-(2″-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-6″-O-E-p-coumaroyl)-β-d-gluco-pyranoside (2) and quercetin 3-O-(2″-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-6″-O-Z-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyrano-side (3). PMID:24371369

  13. Out of the Melting Pot, into the Nationalist Fires: Native American Literary Studies in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to overestimate the differences between Native American studies in Europe and the United States. In Europe there are no dedicated university programs in Native American studies; instead, disciplinary units such as American studies or departments such as English, history, development studies, and anthropology house teaching and…

  14. Remapping Place and Narrative in Native American Literature: David Treuer's "The Hiawatha"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirwan, Padraig

    2007-01-01

    David Treuer's 1997 novel, "The Hiawatha," engages the traditional literary strategies employed by Native American writing, compares those strategies to earlier narratives (Native American and canonically American), offers a reassessment of indigenous novelistic structures, engages critical responses to tribal fiction, and does so in response to…

  15. What Every Teacher Needs to Know to Teach Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Hani

    2009-01-01

    Many Native American students have problems in traditional American schools, and the dropout rate of Native American students indicates this (Lomawaima, 1995; Rhodes, 1988). Researchers often point out that one reason students may encounter difficulties in school has to do with a school district's neglect for the learning style or culture of a…

  16. Utilizing the Arts for Healing from a Native American Perspective: Implications for Creative Arts Therapies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Phoebe

    This report on how Native American healing methods can be utilized in Western creative art therapy emphasizes that for Native Americans, art is an element of life--not a separate aesthetic ideal. Furthermore, American Indian philosophy does not separate healing from art or religion; the belief is that traditional healing, which uses shamanic…

  17. The Importance of Native American Studies in the Social Studies Curriculum. Occasional Paper #8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyfe, Kenneth S.; Elwell, William C., Ed.

    This publication presents guidelines and suggestions for expanding the role of Native American studies in the present K-12 social studies curriculum. A comprehensive understanding of America's past can only be gained when the history of the Native American people is included. American history is still too often presented as the history of European…

  18. 76 FR 56815 - Renewal of the Native American Employment and Training Council (Council) Charter

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... needs of American Indians and Native Americans, as well as enhance the quality of life in accordance... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Renewal of the Native American Employment and Training...

  19. Native Americans and the U.S. Census: A Brief Historical Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, Margaret M.

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the history of the enumeration of American Indians by the U.S. Census Bureau and its predecessors. It considers the social and political background of the census and the reasons that Native Americans were not counted by the census until 1890. It also examines the changes in the enumeration and definition of Native Americans-key…

  20. Sexually transmitted diseases and native Americans: trends in reported gonorrhea and syphilis morbidity, 1984-88.

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, K E; Oberschelp, A G; Greenspan, J R

    1989-01-01

    Native Americans experienced higher reported gonorrhea and syphilis morbidity than did non-Native Americans from 1984 through 1988 in 13 States with large Native American populations. Gonorrhea rates among American Indians and Alaska Natives were approximately twice the rates for non-Indians. The highest gonorrhea rate was reported among Alaska Natives, with a 5-year average of 1,470 cases per 100,000, more than five times the average non-Native rate in Alaska. The average primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis rate from 1984 through 1988 was more than two times higher among Native Americans, largely due to high syphilis morbidity in Arizona and New Mexico. In Arizona the average American Indian P&S syphilis case rate was seven times higher than the non-Indian rate. True rates for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) among Native Americans may be higher than those reported due to racial misclassification of Native American cases, particularly in nonreservation areas. Improved recognition and reporting of STD cases among Native Americans are needed to target STD prevention and education more effectively. PMID:2511589

  1. Years of potential life lost among a Native American population.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, M C; Michalek, A M; Cummings, K M; Hanley, J; Snyder, R L

    1989-01-01

    The determination of years of potential life lost (YPLL) can aid in monitoring changes in premature mortality among various population groups. While premature mortality has been shown to differ among blacks and whites, patterns of YPLL have not been well established among other racial groups. The Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) is a Native American group residing primarily in western New York State (NYS). A review of SNI necrology records revealed that 55 percent (510 of 924) of the deaths between 1955 and 1984 occurred before 65 years of age. The proportion of premature deaths among males exceeded the proportion in females. SNI males demonstrated an increased risk of premature death (odds ratio = 1.43) relative to SNI females. Both the percentage of premature deaths and the number of YPLL per death were greater among SNI members compared with NYS residents. Almost one-half of all YPLL among the SNI were attributable to accidents and injuries. Heart disease, digestive diseases, and malignant neoplasms also represented important contributors to YPLL for both SNI males and females. This investigation identifies important causes of premature death among a Native American population and underscores the preventable nature of premature loss of life.

  2. Years of potential life lost among a Native American population.

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, M C; Michalek, A M; Cummings, K M; Hanley, J; Snyder, R L

    1989-01-01

    The determination of years of potential life lost (YPLL) can aid in monitoring changes in premature mortality among various population groups. While premature mortality has been shown to differ among blacks and whites, patterns of YPLL have not been well established among other racial groups. The Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) is a Native American group residing primarily in western New York State (NYS). A review of SNI necrology records revealed that 55 percent (510 of 924) of the deaths between 1955 and 1984 occurred before 65 years of age. The proportion of premature deaths among males exceeded the proportion in females. SNI males demonstrated an increased risk of premature death (odds ratio = 1.43) relative to SNI females. Both the percentage of premature deaths and the number of YPLL per death were greater among SNI members compared with NYS residents. Almost one-half of all YPLL among the SNI were attributable to accidents and injuries. Heart disease, digestive diseases, and malignant neoplasms also represented important contributors to YPLL for both SNI males and females. This investigation identifies important causes of premature death among a Native American population and underscores the preventable nature of premature loss of life. PMID:2498978

  3. Cancer mortality in Native Americans in North Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, R D

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes age-adjusted mortality from malignant neoplasms for Native Americans in North Carolina for 1968-72 and 1978-82. Sex-specific standardized mortality ratios were calculated from death certificate data, using the cancer mortality experience of White North Carolinians to obtain the number of expected deaths. For most categories and specific sites of cancer, mortality was at or below the expected level, but higher than expected mortality was found for genitourinary cancers in males (SMR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.15, 2.21) for the 1978-82 period; within this category, there was a higher than expected level of mortality from prostate cancer (SMR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.36, 2.83) and cancer of the penis and other male genital organs (SMR = 9.09; 95% CI = 1.10, 32.84). Female Native Americans had an elevated mortality from cervical cancer (SMR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.09, 4.17) for the 1968-72 period only. PMID:2368854

  4. Gene flow across linguistic boundaries in Native North American populations

    PubMed Central

    Hunley, Keith; Long, Jeffrey C.

    2005-01-01

    Cultural and linguistic groups are often expected to represent genetic populations. In this article, we tested the hypothesis that the hierarchical classification of languages proposed by J. Greenberg [(1987) Language in the Americas (Stanford Univ. Press, Stanford, CA)] also represents the genetic structure of Native North American populations. The genetic data are mtDNA sequences for 17 populations gleaned from literature sources and public databases. The hypothesis was rejected. Further analysis showed that departure of the genetic structure from the linguistic classification was pervasive and not due to an outlier population or a problematic language group. Therefore, Greenberg's language groups are at best an imperfect approximation to the genetic structure of these populations. Moreover, we show that the genetic structure among these Native North American populations departs significantly from the best-fitting hierarchical models. Analysis of median joining networks for mtDNA haplotypes provides strong evidence for gene flow across linguistic boundaries. In principle, the language of a population can be replaced more rapidly than its genes because language can be transmitted both vertically from parents to children and horizontally between unrelated people. However, languages are part of a cultural complex, and there may be strong pressure to maintain a language in place whereas genes are free to flow. PMID:15668380

  5. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Summer 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

  6. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Fall 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-12-01

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

  7. State of the science: a cultural view of Native Americans and diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Karethy; Patchell, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature on diabetes type 2 prevention interventions for Native American populations. The interrelation of the cultural role of food in Native American diets, educational policies related to food, outcomes of federal policies, and the historical background of diabetes are addressed. In addition, published studies of diabetes prevention interventions with Native American populations are examined. Lastly, exemplars of programs that represent best practices in the prevention of diabetes are described. PMID:20640191

  8. State of the Science: A Cultural View of Native Americans and Diabetes Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Karethy (Kay); Patchell, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature on diabetes type 2 prevention interventions for Native American populations. The interrelation of the cultural role of food in Native American diets, educational policies related to food, outcomes of federal policies, and the historical background of diabetes are addressed. In addition, published studies of diabetes prevention interventions with Native American populations are examined. Lastly, exemplars of programs that represent best practices in the prevention of diabetes are described. PMID:20640191

  9. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Spring 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-03-01

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

  10. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Summer 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

  11. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Summer 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

  12. The National Library of Medicine's Native American outreach portfolio: a descriptive overview*

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Frederick B.; Siegel, Elliot R.; Dutcher, Gale A.; Ruffin, Angela; Logan, Robert A.; Scott, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This paper provides the most complete accounting of the National Library of Medicine's (NLM's) Native outreach since 1995, when there were only a few scattered projects. Method: The descriptive overview is based on a review of project reports, inventories, and databases and input from the NLM Specialized Information Services Division, National Network Office of the Library Operations Division, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, and Office of Health Information Programs Development of the Office of the NLM Director. The overview focuses on NLM-supported or sponsored outreach initiatives involving Native peoples: American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Results: The review of NLM's relevant activities resulted in a portfolio of projects that clustered naturally into the following areas: major multisite projects: Tribal Connections and related, Native American Information Internship Project: Sacred Root, tribal college outreach and tribal librarianship projects, collaboration with inter-tribal and national organizations, participation in Native American Powwows, Native American Listening Circle Project, Native American Health Information, and other Native American outreach projects. Implications: NLM's Native American Outreach reached programmatic status as of late 2004. The companion paper identifies several areas of possible new or enhanced Native outreach activities. Both papers highlight the importance of solid reporting and evaluation to optimize project results and programmatic balance and priorities. PMID:16239955

  13. Brain Potentials to Native and Non-Native Speech Contrasts in 7- and 11-Month-Old American Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Gaxiola, Maritza; Silva-Pereyra, Juan; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2005-01-01

    Behavioral data establish a dramatic change in infants' phonetic perception between 6 and 12 months of age. Foreign-language phonetic discrimination significantly declines with increasing age. Using a longitudinal design, we examined the electrophysiological responses of 7- and 11-month-old American infants to native and non-native consonant…

  14. Native American Admixture in the Quebec Founder Population

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Claudia; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Jomphe, Michèle; Bhérer, Claude; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Vézina, Hélène; Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène; Labuda, Damian

    2013-01-01

    For years, studies of founder populations and genetic isolates represented the mainstream of genetic mapping in the effort to target genetic defects causing Mendelian disorders. The genetic homogeneity of such populations as well as relatively homogeneous environmental exposures were also seen as primary advantages in studies of genetic susceptibility loci that underlie complex diseases. European colonization of the St-Lawrence Valley by a small number of settlers, mainly from France, resulted in a founder effect reflected by the appearance of a number of population-specific disease-causing mutations in Quebec. The purported genetic homogeneity of this population was recently challenged by genealogical and genetic analyses. We studied one of the contributing factors to genetic heterogeneity, early Native American admixture that was never investigated in this population before. Consistent admixture estimates, in the order of one per cent, were obtained from genome-wide autosomal data using the ADMIXTURE and HAPMIX software, as well as with the fastIBD software evaluating the degree of the identity-by-descent between Quebec individuals and Native American populations. These genomic results correlated well with the genealogical estimates. Correlations are imperfect most likely because of incomplete records of Native founders’ origin in genealogical data. Although the overall degree of admixture is modest, it contributed to the enrichment of the population diversity and to its demographic stratification. Because admixture greatly varies among regions of Quebec and among individuals, it could have significantly affected the homogeneity of the population, which is of importance in mapping studies, especially when rare genetic susceptibility variants are in play. PMID:23776491

  15. Blood Politics, Ethnic Identity, and Racial Misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    Haozous, Emily A.; Strickland, Carolyn J.; Palacios, Janelle F.; Solomon, Teshia G. Arambula

    2014-01-01

    Misclassification of race in medical and mortality records has long been documented as an issue in American Indian/Alaska Native data. Yet, little has been shared in a cohesive narrative which outlines why misclassification of American Indian/Alaska Native identity occurs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the current state of the science in racial misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives. We also provide a historical context on the importance of this problem and describe the ongoing political processes that both affect racial misclassification and contribute to the context of American Indian and Alaska Native identity. PMID:24669226

  16. NAWIG News: The Native American Wind Interest Group Newsletter, Spring 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    DOE's Wind Powering America program has initiated a quarterly NAWIG newsletter to present Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events.

  17. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Summer 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-06-01

    DOE's Wind Powering America program has initiated a quarterly NAWIG newsletter to present Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events.

  18. Blood politics, ethnic identity, and racial misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Haozous, Emily A; Strickland, Carolyn J; Palacios, Janelle F; Solomon, Teshia G Arambula

    2014-01-01

    Misclassification of race in medical and mortality records has long been documented as an issue in American Indian/Alaska Native data. Yet, little has been shared in a cohesive narrative which outlines why misclassification of American Indian/Alaska Native identity occurs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the current state of the science in racial misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives. We also provide a historical context on the importance of this problem and describe the ongoing political processes that both affect racial misclassification and contribute to the context of American Indian and Alaska Native identity.

  19. Experiences of African American Empowerment: A Jamesian Perspective on Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis-Tweed, Phyllis

    2003-01-01

    This essay draws from the work of William James and three African American pragmatists, W.E.B. Du Bois, Ralph Ellison and Cornel West, to explore the moral relevance of the self as an empowered agent among African American youth. The focus is on Jamesian agency as a function of the individual's awareness of options in context, the self-empowerment…

  20. LATIN--Latin American Regional News Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, John Spicer

    The establishment of a regional news agency for Latin America to improve the balance of news flow and increase the transmission of news more applicable to regional problems has often been proposed. Despite wide acceptance of the concept, the birth of the Third World's first regional news agency, Agencia Latinoamericana de Informacion (LATIN), has…

  1. Advances in the dental search for Native American origins.

    PubMed

    Turner, C G

    1984-01-01

    The Sinodont dental morphology pattern of NE Asia is today more complex and was so by 20,000 years ago, than the simplified Sundadonty of SE Asia-Oceania, and the very simplified pattern that evolved greater than 20,000 B.P. All Native Americans are Sinodonts. Intra--and inter-hemispheric statistical analyses of 28 dental traits in greater than 6000 N & S American and greater than 1100 NE Asian crania reveal three temporally stable American sub-patterns, suggesting prior evolution in Sino-Siberia. The hypothesized biocultural associations and migration episodes are: (1) "Upper Cave" Sinodonts with the generalized Chinese Microlithic Tradition reach the Arctic steppe via the Lena basin to become Paleo--and most later Indians. (2) Smaller-game-hunting Siberian Diuktaians cross to Alaska at forest-forming terminal land bridge times to become Paleo-Arctic and subsequent Na-Dene-speaking NW forest Indians. (3) Lower Amur basin-N Japan blade-makingfolk evolve a coastal culture on the way to the land bridge's SE terminus at Anangula-Umnak where the oldest skeletons of the dentally distinctive but variable Aleut-Eskimos have been found.

  2. Kidney disease in Native Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Narva, Andrew S.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the disease burden among American Indians and Alaska Natives (Al/AN) has shifted from acute infectious diseases to chronic illnesses, particularly type 2 diabetes and its complications. AI/ANs experience high rates of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), mainly driven by the increase in diabetes. The prevalence of ESRD is 3.5 times greater than that in white Americans. The burden of ESRD has become a community-wide problem among many tribes, and significant efforts have gone into establishing dialysis services on reservations. Reservation-based dialysis services have improved the access of patients to renal replacement therapy, but enormous barriers to improving care remain. These include: the rural and frequently isolated locations that make traveling to facilities difficult owing to distance and road conditions; high rates of poverty; difficulty in recruiting and retaining staff in outlying areas; language and cultural differences; and the high numbers of patients with diabetes and extra-renal diabetic complications. Disparities exist in access to kidney transplantation, with AI/ANs waiting longer for organs than their white counterparts. However, once transplanted, they have comparable survival rates to white Americans. An aggressive approach to intervention, which includes prevention and optimal therapy, is required to slow the growth of ESRD amongst AI/ANs. PMID:12152933

  3. Physical Abuse of Urban Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Buchwald, Dedra; Tomita, Sue; Hartman, Suzanne; Furman, Richard; Dudden, Matthew; Manson, Spero M

    2000-01-01

    To ascertain the extent of, and risk factors for, physical abuse among older urban American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs), we conducted a chart review of 550 urban AI/AN primary care patients ≥50 years old seen during 1 year. Mistreatment was documented in 10%. A logistic regression found younger age (P < .001), female gender (P < .001), current depression (P < .001), and dependence on others for food (P < .05) to be significant correlates of physical abuse. In only 31% of instances of definite abuse were the authorities notified. We conclude that providers should be alert to the possibility of physical mistreatment among older urban AI/ANs. Improvements in detection and management are sorely needed. PMID:10940148

  4. Native American prehistory of the middle Savannah River Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Sassaman, K.E.; Brooks, M.J.; Hanson, G.T.; Anderson, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Archaeological investigations on the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina span 17 years and continue today through a cooperative agreement between DOE and the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA), University of South Carolina. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of SCIAA has been and continues to be the sole archaeological consultant for DOE-SRS. This report documents technical aspects of all prehistoric archaeological research conducted by the SRARP between 1973 and 1987. Further, this report provides interpretative contexts for archaeological resources as a basis for an archaeological resource plan reported elsewhere (SRARP 1989), and as a comprehensive statement of our current understanding of Native American prehistory. 400 refs., 130 figs., 39 tabs.

  5. Culture sensitivity in assessing urban Native American parenting.

    PubMed

    Seideman, R Y; Williams, R; Burns, P; Jacobson, S; Weatherby, F; Primeaux, M

    1994-04-01

    Assessing urban Native American (NA) parenting remains a challenge for public health nurses. This study explored the effectiveness of using the NCATS and HOME instruments with urban NA mothers and their children. Scores for 63 sets of mothers and their children age 3 months to 3 years on the home observation for measurement of the environment (HOME) and nursing child assessment teaching scale (NCATS) instruments were compared with norms for those instruments. Scores were lower than the norms on the play and involvement subscales of the HOME, and higher than the norms on the total parent, clarity of cues, response to parent, and total child subscales of the NCATS. Analysis of responses to specific items indicated that these mothers were unlikely to structure and intervene in children's activities and likely to use nonverbal parenting techniques. Findings supported the usefulness of these instruments with NA parents when accompanied by discussion of findings with them, and nurse awareness of common family structures and traditional values.

  6. Principles for Establishing Trust When Developing a Substance Abuse Intervention With a Native American Community

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, John; Riggs, Cheryl; Henson, Jim

    2011-01-01

    This article traces the development of a research project with a Native American community. Four principles were used to guide the development of the “Community Partnership to Affect Cherokee Adolescent Substance Abuse” project using a community-based participatory research approach. The principles suggest that establishing trust is key when developing and conducting research with a Native American community. PMID:21563633

  7. 36 CFR 219.15 - Interaction with American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PLANNING National Forest System Land and Resource Management Planning Collaborative Planning for Sustainability § 219.15 Interaction with American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives... recognized American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. (b) During planning, the responsible official...

  8. Pathways to Excellence: A Report on Improving Library and Information Services for Native American Peoples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, Washington, DC.

    The U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science began in early 1989 to study library and information services for Native American peoples. This report is the culmination of the evaluation, which included site visits and field hearings. The largely undocumented knowledge base of Native American experience must be recorded and…

  9. National Archives and Records Service Resources for the Study of Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grim, Ronald E.

    Serving as an introduction to the various resources currently available in the National Archives and Records Service for geographic study of Native Americans, this paper describes the arrangement of National Archives records, identifies the major records pertaining to Native Americans, and presents an annotated bibliography of pertinent published…

  10. Embracing Intercultural Diversification: Teaching Young Adult Literature with Native American Themes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Kenan; Box, Andrea; Blasingame, James

    2013-01-01

    According to the most recent census, there are five million Native Americans in the United States. Of these, there are at least 500,000 Native Americans attending public schools. However, the educational system does not fully serve this population and in fact often ignores them. More importantly, each tribe and clan has its own distinct cultural…

  11. Silence as Weapons: Transformative Praxis among Native American Students in the Urban Southwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Pedro, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the benefits of verbal conflicts--contested storied spaces--in a Native American literature classroom composed of a multi-tribal and multicultural urban student body. Students in this course engage in whole-class verbal discussions focusing on contemporary and historical issues concerning Native American tribes and…

  12. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Winter 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-11-01

    This newsletter, part of Wind Powering America's outreach to Native Americans, features Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events. This newsletter will both inform and elucidate comments and input on wind development in Indian Country.

  13. A Family Systems Approach for Serving Rural, Reservation Native American Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Joanne C.

    1985-01-01

    Presents model for delivering early intervention services to families of young, handicapped Native American children on rural reservations which considers Native American cultural values and beliefs. Defines model components in terms of Family Systems Model under development at University of Kansas. Describes implementation approach with Arizona…

  14. The Internal Colonialism Model: What the Model Has Done to the Education of Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Christopher

    This paper explores the shortcomings of the internal colonialism model of education that has persisted in North America throughout the history of Native American education. Since the arrival of Europeans in North America, their colonizing societies have attempted to repress the values and ways of life of Native Americans. Internal colonialism…

  15. Strategies for the Recruitment and Retention of Native American Students. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Timothy C.; Thurber, Hanna J.

    This paper describes issues involved in increasing the number of Native American students in higher education, with a specific focus on psychology and rehabilitation training programs. The paper also describes many specific strategies for use by colleges and universities to recruit, retain, and graduate Native American students. Three sections…

  16. Principles for establishing trust when developing a substance abuse intervention with a Native American community.

    PubMed

    Lowe, John; Riggs, Cheryl; Henson, Jim

    2011-01-01

    This article traces the development of a research project with a Native American community. Four principles were used to guide the development of the "Community Partnership to Affect Cherokee Adolescent Substance Abuse" project using a community-based participatory research approach. The principles suggest that establishing trust is key when developing and conducting research with a Native American community. PMID:21563633

  17. New Social Learning from Two Spirit Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, J. B., Jr.; Sheppard, Maia

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors highlight connections between research on Two Spirit Native Americans and standard social studies curriculum. Two Spirit is a Pan-Indian term describing Native Americans who believe they embody both masculine and feminine characteristics/traits in one physical body. Findings from this research expand the field's…

  18. Geographical Perspectives on Native Americans: Topics and Resources. Publication No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Jerry N., Ed.; Lazewski, Tony, Ed.

    Emphasizing human geography, this collection of 10 papers is designed to constitute basic lecture topics for a college level course concerned with Native American human geography and to serve as a guide to published materials and primary data/documentary sources on Native Americans. Comprised of three sections, this publication includes an…

  19. A Community-Based Treatment for Native American Historical Trauma: Prospects for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gone, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Nineteen staff and clients in a Native American healing lodge were interviewed regarding the therapeutic approach used to address the legacy of Native American historical trauma. On the basis of thematic content analysis of interviews, 4 components of healing discourse emerged. First, clients were understood by their counselors to carry pain,…

  20. Native American High School Seniors' Perceptions of Higher Education: Motivating and Demotivating Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krogman, Calvin

    2013-01-01

    For many Native American students, particularly those from reservations, the pursuit of higher education is a formidable concept to grasp. Poverty, rural isolation, and a myriad of social ills all take a role as demotivational factors that act as barriers between Native American students and a college education. On the other hand, family,…

  1. Pathway to Self-Sufficiency: Social and Economic Development Strategies of Native American Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Human Development Services (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    In fiscal year (FY) 1984 the Administration for Native Americans awarded 227 grants for social and economic development strategies (SEDS) which would help Native American communities move toward self-sufficiency. More than half the grants were primarily for economic development; approximately one-third were for improving tribal governments, and…

  2. Identifying Strategies for Native American Student Success in Community Colleges: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Paula Jean

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study attempted to analyze the educational goals and achievements of successful present and former Native American students at San Juan College (SJC) in Farmington, NM. It considered a systemic approach to educating Native American students by taking into account their suggestions of how to improve the educational framework to…

  3. Thus the Old Ones Have Taught; Native Americans: A Commentary and Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada Univ., Reno. Research and Educational Planning Center.

    Addressed to non-Indian teachers and teachers-in-training, this commentary and guide about education of Native American children is intended to instill awareness of the Indian child's perspective and provide direction for teaching about Native American history, art, literature, and governance. Some essays and articles are edited versions of…

  4. Encyclopedia of Native American Jewelry: A Guide to History, People, and Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Paula A.

    A current guide to significant people, techniques, design motifs, materials, and forms, this comprehensive encyclopedia covers Native American jewelry making from the first contact with the Europeans to the present, focusing primarily on the last 150 years of Native American jewelry making. The encyclopedia contains 350 cross-referenced entries…

  5. Critical Contexts for Biomedical Research in a Native American Community: Health Care, History, and Community Survival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahota, Puneet Chawla

    2012-01-01

    Native Americans have been underrepresented in previous studies of biomedical research participants. This paper reports a qualitative interview study of Native Americans' perspectives on biomedical research. In-depth interviews were conducted with 53 members of a Southwest tribal community. Many interviewees viewed biomedical research studies as a…

  6. Gaps in Data for American Indians and Alaska Natives in the National Healthcare Disparities Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moy, Ernest; Smith, Colleen Ryan; Johansson, Patrik; Andrews, Roxanne

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify gaps in health care data for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Findings indicate that only 42% of measures of health care quality and access tracked in the National Healthcare Disparities Report could be used to assess disparities among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Patient safety data…

  7. Worldviews of Urban Iroquois Faculty: A Case Study of a Native American Resource Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollowell, Mary Nix; Jeffries, Rhonda Baynes

    2004-01-01

    This article highlights the Native American Magnet School, also known as P.S. #19, in Buffalo, NY, a unique public school for kindergarten through eighth-grade students. The school?s Native American population constitutes one-third of the entire student body and comes from the six Iroquois tribes: Oneida, Seneca, Mohawk, Cayuga, Onondaga, and…

  8. From Cradleboard to Motherboard: Buffy Sainte-Marie's Interactive Multimedia Curriculum Transforms Native American Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Claire

    2000-01-01

    Describes "Science: Through Native American Eyes," an interactive multimedia CD-ROM for middle school that is part of the Cradleboard Teaching Project developed by musician and teacher Buffy Sainte-Marie. The Cradleboard joins Native American tradition and high-tech innovation to explore the core curriculum of the National Content Standards. (SLD)

  9. Native American Mobilization and the Power of Recognition: Theorizing the Effects of Political Acknowledgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, DaShanne

    2012-01-01

    How recognition may empower or restrain Native American mobilization has not received sufficient scholarly attention and remains largely unexplored and under-theorized. This paper contributes a partial remedy to this oversight by explicitly theorizing how political recognition can mediate Native American collective action and lead to differential…

  10. A Qualitative Study of a Native American Mascot at "Public University"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brune, Michelle Lyn

    2010-01-01

    At the time this study began, there were approximately 60 senior colleges and universities using Native American mascots or nicknames to represent their athletic teams (Fournier, 2003). Many Native Americans, coalitions, organizations, and researchers (Connolly, 2000; Davis, 2002; King & Springwood, 2000; NCAA, 2001) believe that these mascots are…

  11. Perceived Factors Influencing the Retention Rate of Native American College Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom, Tamara Louise

    2012-01-01

    The number of Native Americans entering college is higher now than it has been over the past 40 years; however, the degree completion rate has been less than half that of White students. This research study was a bounded case study of Native American students enrolled in the teacher education program. The purpose of this qualitative case study was…

  12. Toward Emancipatory Education: An Application of Habermasian Theory to Native American Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Fred Edward

    2012-01-01

    This piece is an examination of the efficacy of the use of Habermasian models of communication and education in developing an effective emancipatory model of education for Native American populations. The general field of epistemology, from the dominant and Native American perspectives, will be explored to determine the overlap between the…

  13. A Native American Voice in Multicultural Psychology: Finding Healing in an Interpersonal Tapestry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Rockey R.

    2012-01-01

    The tribal-cultural milieu in which the author was raised incited awareness that Native American people live in a great tapestry of life where everything and everyone is interconnected. It is an awareness that cannot be taught through lectures or books. It is an awareness of connectedness that Native American people had in early childhood but was…

  14. Institutional Support and Interpersonal Climate as Predictors of Learning for Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    A national sample of 647 Native American students who took the National Survey of Student Engagement was used to test a path model to predict learning for Native American students. Institutional support for students' success and a positive interpersonal environment contributed both to engagement and learning. Support for student success was…

  15. Participation and Performance for Native American Students in the 2007 SAT® Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, John

    2008-01-01

    Presented at the Native American Student Advocacy Institute (NASAI) in Tsaile, AZ in May 2008. This presentation explores the participation and performance of Native American students in the SAT program and attempt to find a way to find how to better support and encourage students to ensure postsecondary access and excellence.

  16. Native American Mascots in Contemporary Higher Education: Part 1--Politically Acceptable or Ethnically Objectionable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamey, Becky Avery

    2009-01-01

    The battle of the Little Big Horn in 1876 was one of the last great wars fought by Native Americans on a grassy battlefield. The battle was fought over territory and the right to live in the Dakota and Montana territories. The Native Americans won the battle of Little Big Horn but eventually lost the war and were forced to live on a reservation…

  17. Re-Envisioning Literacy in a Teacher Inquiry Group in a Native American Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes a yearlong collaborative inquiry involving six teachers and their professional discussions about literacy instruction as they developed a curriculum to support the cultural and linguistic needs of their school's 88% Native American student population. Participants in this study were four Native American teachers and two…

  18. A Rationale for Native American Studies in a Secondary School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, James F.

    This paper offers reasons why Native American culture and history should be included in the secondary school curriculum based on the fact that many ideas and products that are taken for granted today have Native American roots, and on the definition of social studies as the study of individual and group behaviors of a people, and of how those…

  19. Native American Indian Adolescents: Response to a Culturally Tailored, School-Based Substance Abuse Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patchell, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    Native American Indian adolescent substance abuse has been a longstanding health concern. There are few culturally tailored interventions for mild to moderate substance users. The purpose of this study was to measure the response of Native American Indian adolescents from the Plains tribal groups to a school-based culturally tailored substance…

  20. American Indian/Alaska Native Alcohol-Related Incarceration and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldstein, Sarah W.; Venner, Kamilla L.; May, Philip A.

    2006-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Natives have high rates of alcohol-related arrests and are overrepresented in justice systems. To understand the relationship between alcohol dependence, treatment, and alcoholrelated incarceration, this study queried American Indian/Alaska Natives currently in remission from alcohol dependence. Participants reported…

  1. North America as Contact Zone: Native American Literary Nationalism and the Cross-Cultural Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    In Native American literary studies today there is a gap between the variety of criticism being produced and the metacritical debate about what Native literary criticism should look like. A review of recent issues of "Studies in American Indian Literatures", for example, will discover a wide variety of approaches, some relating literary works to…

  2. Being There: The Importance of a Field Experience in Teaching Native American Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Roberta

    2000-01-01

    A Native American literature professor's account of college students' cross-cultural field experience on two Indian reservations near the Grand Canyon shows how the experience enhanced student understanding of the Native American belief in the people and land as one, storytelling and a sense of the sacred, and the history and impact of…

  3. 3 CFR 8595 - Proclamation 8595 of October 29, 2010. National Native American Heritage Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Proclamation 8595 of October 29, 2010. National... Proclamation 8595 of October 29, 2010 Proc. 8595 National Native American Heritage Month, 2010By the President.... During National Native American Heritage Month, we honor and celebrate their importance to our...

  4. Teaching about Native Americans. National Council for the Social Studies Bulletin No. 84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen D.; And Others

    The aims and goals of this guide and the accompanying lesson plans include teaching about Native Americans with historical accuracy and fairness, the promotion of an awareness of moral and ethical values in the study of Native Americans, and the cultivation of a sensitivity to the needs and concerns of a dominated, displaced, and threatened…

  5. Perceptions of Stress among Native American and Hispanic K-5 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz-Drlik, Jane Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Within the context of a nationwide shortage of teachers of color, stable enrollment of Native American students, and increasing enrollments of Hispanic students, the purpose of this study was to examine self-reported stress among Native American, Hispanic, and Caucasian K-5 teachers. This was a mixed-methods study, with both quantitative and…

  6. Adaptation of Consultation Planning for Native American and Latina Women with Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkora, Jeffrey; Franklin, Lauren; O'Donnell, Sara; Ohnemus, Julie; Stacey, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Context: Resource centers in rural, underserved areas are implementing Consultation Planning (CP) to help women with breast cancer create a question list before a doctor visit. Purpose: To identify changes needed for acceptable delivery of CP to rural Native Americans and Latinas. Methods: We interviewed and surveyed 27 Native American and Latino…

  7. Social and Individual Predictors of Substance Use for Native American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliher, Renee V.; Evans, Colette M.; Weiser, Desmond

    2007-01-01

    Substance abuse is a primary concern for youth worldwide and increasingly so for Native American youth. Guided by theoretical models of the socialization of substance use in children and adolescents, we conducted a preliminary examination of socialization factors specific to Native American youth. Strong, pro-social bonds with three primary…

  8. 20 CFR 632.125 - Responsibilities of Native American grantees, subgrantees and contractors for preventing fraud...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and for general program management. (a) Each Native American grantee shall establish and use internal..., subgrantees and contractors for preventing fraud and program abuse and for general program management. 632.125... NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Prevention of Fraud and Program Abuse §...

  9. 20 CFR 632.10 - Eligibility requirements for designation as a Native American grantee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... JTPA and other human resource development programs, including but not limited to those providing for... provision of human resource development services to Indians or Native Americans within the organization's... Native American grantee. 632.10 Section 632.10 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING...

  10. The Use of Humor as a Counselor Strategy with Native American Indian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Roger D.; Meggert, Sandra S.

    1994-01-01

    Advocates that counselors incorporate humor in their work with Native Americans. Discusses psychological theories of humor and explores Native American humor. Examines humor's implications for counseling and suggests specific strategies for the use of humor, such as storytelling, imagination, puppets, clowns, games, word games, and other devices.…

  11. "Our culture is medicine": perspectives of Native healers on posttrauma recovery among American Indian and Alaska Native patients.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Deborah; Tsosie, Ursula; Nannauck, Sweetwater

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (Native) people experience more traumatic events and are at higher risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder compared with the general population. We conducted in-depth interviews with six Native healers about their perspectives on traumatic injury and healing. We analyzed the interviews using an inductive approach to identify common themes. We categorized these themes into four categories: causes and consequences of traumatic injury, risk factors, protective factors, and barriers to care. The implications of our study include a need for improving cultural competence among health care and social services personnel working with Native trauma patients. Additional cumulative analyses of Native healers and trauma patients would contribute to a much-needed body of knowledge on improving recovery and promoting healing among Native trauma patients.

  12. “Our Culture Is Medicine”: Perspectives of Native Healers on Posttrauma Recovery Among American Indian and Alaska Native Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Deborah; Tsosie, Ursula; Nannauck, Sweetwater

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (Native) people experience more traumatic events and are at higher risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder compared with the general population. We conducted in-depth interviews with six Native healers about their perspectives on traumatic injury and healing. We analyzed the interviews using an inductive approach to identify common themes. We categorized these themes into four categories: causes and consequences of traumatic injury, risk factors, protective factors, and barriers to care. The implications of our study include a need for improving cultural competence among health care and social services personnel working with Native trauma patients. Additional cumulative analyses of Native healers and trauma patients would contribute to a much-needed body of knowledge on improving recovery and promoting healing among Native trauma patients. PMID:22529755

  13. American Indian Policy Review Commission Special Joint Task Force Report on Alaskan Native Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S. Washington, DC. American Indian Policy Review Commission.

    Impact of the Alaskan Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) on Alaskan Natives, particularly at village levels, is the focus of a joint task force report on Alaskan Native issues. Prepared for the American Indian Policy Review Commission, the report is the work of representatives from task forces on tribal government, federal, state, and tribal…

  14. Fragmenting and Reconstructing Identity: Struggles of Appalachian Women Attempting To Reconnect to Their Native American Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trollinger, Linda Burcham

    This qualitative study drew on the stories and reflections of six Appalachian women of Native American descent to explore their experiences of reconnecting with their lost Native identity. This paper visualizes those experiences in light of the relationships between personal realities and structural influences. Historically, Native identities have…

  15. Teaching American Indian and Alaska Native Languages in the Schools: What Has Been Learned. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Thomas D.; Day, Donald R.

    This digest considers issues, possible solutions, and successful efforts in dealing with Native language loss, maintenance, and restoration in American Indian and Alaska Native communities and schools. The preservation and maintenance of the remaining 210 tribal languages is a major cultural and education concern in Native communities. The problem…

  16. Children of the Dragonfly: Native American Voices on Child Custody and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensen, Robert, Ed.

    This collection of works by Native American writers reveals the political use by the U.S. and Canadian governments of schooling, adoption, and child welfare services to erase tribal identity and sovereignty. Seven tales in part 1 reflect various Native perspectives about the value and place of children in Native cultures. They provide background…

  17. Mental Health: Healing Deep Wounds from the Inside Out. Native Americans in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane

    2000-01-01

    Interviews with Native American mental health and social workers discuss how Native mental health problems are related to historical trauma and chronically inadequate mental health services. Elements of culturally relevant mental health services include locally delivered workshops, kinship foster care, tribal elders, spirituality, and Native care…

  18. Population, Ecology, and the American Indian: A Native American Curriculum Unit for Middle and High School. NATAM XII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raveling, Ronald R.

    As one of the units on Native Americans developed by public school teachers enrolled in a University of Minnesota extension course on American Indian education, this middle- and high-school unit has as its overall objective to illustrate 2 concepts: (1) the need for careful population planning and (2) how the American Indian--a model of…

  19. Women finding the way: American Indian women leading intervention research in Native communities.

    PubMed

    Brave Heart, Maria Yellow Horse; Chase, Josephine; Elkins, Jennifer; Martin, Jennifer; Nanez, Jennifer; Mootz, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Although there is literature concentrating on cross-cultural approaches to academic and community partnerships with Native communities, few address the process and experiences of American Indian women leading federally funded and culturally grounded behavioral health intervention research in Native communities. This paper summarizes relevant literature on community-engaged research with Native communities, examines traditional roles and modern challenges for American Indian women, describes the culturally grounded collaborative process for the authors' behavioral health intervention development with Native communities, and considers emergent themes from our own research experiences navigating competing demands from mainstream and Native communities. It concludes with recommendations for supporting and enhancing resilience.

  20. A Native American View of Western Water Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloria, Sam

    1985-11-01

    This paper presents an individual Native American, or American Indian, view of western water development and not necessarily the view of a particular tribe or its government. A disclaimer of this kind is necessary because there has been a historical tendency in this society to look for a single Indian spokesman and search for that spokesman among the Indians who says what society wants to hear. However, the Indian community, while sharing many characteristics and problems, is culturally and politically diverse, and there are no real shortcuts to dealing with it in all its diversity. Indian water rights, as they relate to western water development, must be seen against the backdrop of the history of the hemisphere. Ever since the arrival of the Europeans on the continent, an important current in the development of the legal system has been to define Indian rights and then develop an orderly process for taking them away. From the formulation of the doctrine of discovery itself, this two-step exercise has served the humanitarian purpose of attempting to accord some fairness to the Indians while providing discipline to the competition among non-Indians for the right to use Indian resources. Recognition of full and natural rights of Indian sovereignty and ownership in the hemisphere is commonly viewed as having been a historical impossibility, just as denying them all rights was not practically and morally feasible. The problem then, was and is to balance the two historical necessities appropriately.