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Sample records for agencies pharmaceutical companies

  1. Why are pharmaceutical companies gradually abandoning vaccines?

    PubMed

    Offit, Paul A

    2005-01-01

    During the past fifty years, the number of pharmaceutical companies making vaccines has decreased dramatically, and those that still make vaccines have reduced resources to make new ones. Pharmaceutical companies are gradually abandoning vaccines because the research, development, testing, and manufacture of vaccines are expensive and because the market to sell vaccines is much smaller than the market for other drug products. Congressional action could assure both a steady supply of existing vaccines and the promise of vaccines for the future.

  2. Measuring the efficiency of large pharmaceutical companies: an industry analysis.

    PubMed

    Gascón, Fernando; Lozano, Jesús; Ponte, Borja; de la Fuente, David

    2016-06-25

    This paper evaluates the relative efficiency of a sample of 37 large pharmaceutical laboratories in the period 2008-2013 using a data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach. We describe in detail the procedure followed to select and construct relevant inputs and outputs that characterize the production and innovation activity of these pharmaceutical firms. Models are estimated with financial information from Datastream, including R&D investment, and the number of new drugs authorized by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considering the time effect. The relative performances of these firms-taking into consideration the strategic importance of R&D-suggest that the pharmaceutical industry is a highly competitive sector given that there are many laboratories at the efficient frontier and many inefficient laboratories close to this border. Additionally, we use data from S&P Capital IQ to analyze 2071 financial transactions announced by our sample of laboratories as an alternative way to gain access to new drugs, and we link these transactions with R&D investment and DEA efficiency. We find that efficient laboratories make on average more financial transactions, and the relative size of each transaction is larger. However, pharmaceutical companies that simultaneously are more efficient and invest more internally in R&D announce smaller transactions relative to total assets.

  3. Jordanian pharmaceutical companies: are their marketing efforts paying off?

    PubMed

    Al-Shaikh, Mustafa S; Torres, Ivonne M; Zuniga, Miguel A; Ghunaim, Ayman

    2011-04-01

    The pharmaceuticals industry is one of the main industries in Jordan. Jordanian pharmaceuticals rank third in the export industry of this country. This study aims to examine the strengths that Jordanian pharmaceutical companies have, which, in turn, form their competitiveness base. In addition, this study aims to identify their weaknesses and the effects of marketing their products in the local market. What is the relationship between Jordanian pharmaceutical product quality, price and value, and the competitiveness of pharmaceutical companies in the local market? Our study aims to answer this and other questions. Our results and practical implications are discussed.

  4. [Response of Pharmaceutical Companies to the Crisis of Post-Marketing Clinical Trials of Anti-Cancer Agents -- Results of Questionnaires to Pharmaceutical Companies].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshifusa

    2016-04-01

    Investigator-oriented post-marketing clinical trials of anti-cancer agents are faced to financial crisis due to drastic decrease in research-funds from pharmaceutical companies caused by a scandal in 2013. In order to assess the balance of research funds between 2012 and 2014, we made queries to 26 companies manufacturing anti-cancer agents, and only 10 of 26 responded to our queries. Decrease in the fund was observed in 5 of 10, no change in 1, increase in 3 and no answer in 1. Companies showed passive attitude to carry out doctor-oriented clinical trials of off-patent drugs or unapproved drugs according to advanced medical care B program, though some companies answered to proceed approved routines of these drugs if clinical trials showed good results. Most companies declined to make comments on the activity of Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), but some insisted to produce good corroboration between AMED and pharmaceutical companies in order to improve the quality of trials. Further corroboration must be necessary for this purpose among researchers, governmental administrative organs, pharmaceutical companies, patients' groups, and mass-media.

  5. Solar process steam for a pharmaceutical company in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, M.; Mokhtar, M.; Zahler, C.; Al-Najami, M. M. R.; Krüger, D.; Hennecke, K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents details of the recent installation of a linear Fresnel collector to provide saturated steam for process heat usage through Direct Steam Generation (DSG) for industrial use in the Jordanian pharmaceuticals manufacturing company RAM Pharma, where first solar steam has been provided in March 2015. This commercial DSG project also represents the first solar DSG plant in MENA. During sunshine, the system achieves a solar fraction of 100 %, and the conventional steam boiler is not needed. In the evening the fossil fired backup takes over automatically and replaces the solar collector in operation. Operational experience, details of the control strategy, and measurement data are presented in the paper.

  6. Drug and drug-related supply promotion by pharmaceutical company representatives at VA facilities. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-03-05

    This final rule amends the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations regarding access to VA facilities by pharmaceutical company representatives. The purposes of the rule are to reduce or eliminate any potential for disruption in the patient care environment, manage activities and promotions at VA facilities, and provide pharmaceutical company representatives with a consistent standard of permissible business practice at VA facilities. The amendments will facilitate mutually beneficial relationships between VA and pharmaceutical company representatives.

  7. Doctors’ opinions of information provided by Libyan pharmaceutical company representatives

    PubMed Central

    Alssageer, Mustafa A.; Kowalski, Stefan R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the opinions of Libyan doctors regarding the quality of drug information provided by pharmaceutical company representatives (PCRs) during detailing visits. Method An anonymous survey was conducted among 1,000 doctors from selected institutes in Tripoli, Benghazi and Sebha. Doctors were asked questions regarding the quality of information provided during drug-detailing visits. Results A questionnaire return rate of 61% (608 returned questionnaires out of 1,000) was achieved. The majority (n=463, 76%) of surveyed participants graded the quality of information provided as average. Approximately, 40% of respondents indicated that contraindications, precautions, interactions and adverse effects of products promoted by PCRs were never or rarely mentioned during promotional visits, and 65% of respondents indicated that an alternative drug to the promoted product was never or rarely mentioned by the representatives. More than 50% of respondents (n=310, 51%) reported that PCRs were not always able to answer all questions about their products. Only seven respondents (1%) believed that PCRs never exaggerated the uniqueness, efficacy or safety of their product. The majority of respondents (n=342, 56%) indicated that verbal information was not always consistent with written information provided. Seven per cent of respondents (n=43) admitted that they did not know whether or not the verbal information provided by PCRs was consistent with written information. Conclusion Doctors believe that the provision of drug information by PCRs in Libya is incomplete and often exaggerated. Pharmaceutical companies should ensure that their representatives are trained to a standard to provide reliable information regarding the products they promote. PMID:23205141

  8. Human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in relation to access to medicines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hunt, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Although access to medicines is a vital feature of the right to the highest attainable standard of health ("right to health"), almost two billion people lack access to essential medicines, leading to immense avoidable suffering. While the human rights responsibility to provide access to medicines lies mainly with States, pharmaceutical companies also have human rights responsibilities in relation to access to medicines. This article provides an introduction to these responsibilities. It briefly outlines the new UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and places the human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in this context. The authors draw from the work of the first UN Special Rapporteur on the right to the highest attainable standard of health, in particular the Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in Relation to Access to Medicines that he presented to the UN General Assembly in 2008, and his UN report on GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). While the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights are general human rights standards applicable to all business entities, the Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies consider the specific human rights responsibilities of one sector (pharmaceutical companies) in relation to one area of activity (access to medicines). The article signals the human rights responsibilities of all pharmaceutical companies, with particular attention to patent-holding pharmaceutical companies. Adopting a right-to-health "lens," the article discusses GSK and accountability. The authors argue that human rights should shape pharmaceutical companies' policies, and provide standards in relation to which pharmaceutical companies could, and should, be held accountable. They conclude that it is now crucial to devise independent, accessible, transparent, and effective mechanisms to monitor pharmaceutical companies and hold them publicly accountable for their human rights responsibilities.

  9. Trade secrets in life science and pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Nealey, Tara; Daignault, Ronald M; Cai, Yu

    2014-11-20

    Trade secret protection arises under state common law and state statutes. In general, a trade secret is information that is not generally known to the public and is maintained as a secret, and it provides a competitive advantage or economic benefit to the trade secret holder. Trade secrets can be worth tens or hundreds of millions of dollars, and damage awards in trade secret litigation have been high; often, there is a lot at stake. Obtaining a trade secret through "improper means" is misappropriation. If the alleged trade secret, however, was developed independently, known publicly, or not maintained as a secret, then those defenses may successfully overcome a claim for trade secret misappropriation. With today's interconnectedness in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields, more collaborations, joint ventures, and outsourcing arrangements among firms, and increased mobility of employees' careers, life science companies need to not only understand how to protect their trade secrets, but also know how to defend against a claim for trade secret theft.

  10. Trade Secrets in Life Science and Pharmaceutical Companies

    PubMed Central

    Nealey, Tara; Daignault, Ronald M.; Cai, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Trade secret protection arises under state common law and state statutes. In general, a trade secret is information that is not generally known to the public and is maintained as a secret, and it provides a competitive advantage or economic benefit to the trade secret holder. Trade secrets can be worth tens or hundreds of millions of dollars, and damage awards in trade secret litigation have been high; often, there is a lot at stake. Obtaining a trade secret through “improper means” is misappropriation. If the alleged trade secret, however, was developed independently, known publicly, or not maintained as a secret, then those defenses may successfully overcome a claim for trade secret misappropriation. With today’s interconnectedness in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields, more collaborations, joint ventures, and outsourcing arrangements among firms, and increased mobility of employees’ careers, life science companies need to not only understand how to protect their trade secrets, but also know how to defend against a claim for trade secret theft. PMID:25414378

  11. Pharmaceutical innovation by the seven UK-owned pharmaceutical companies (1964-1985).

    PubMed Central

    Prentis, R A; Lis, Y; Walker, S R

    1988-01-01

    1 A total of three hundred and nineteen new chemical entities (NCEs) were investigated in man for the first time between 1964 and 1985 by seven UK-owned pharmaceutical companies. The majority (96.2%), were self-originated by the UK company or one of its overseas subsidiaries. 2 There was an increase in the number of NCEs investigated each year in man, doubling from an average of 12 per year up to 1980, to over 20 per year between 1981 and 1985. The majority of first drug evaluations in human volunteers were carried out in the UK (92.2%), in contrast to evaluation of new medicines in patients, where 42.9% were first tested outside the UK. 3 The majority of NCEs evaluated in man (78%), were in four therapeutic classes: anti-infectives (32%), anti-allergics (22%), drugs acting on the central nervous system (13%) and cardiovascular system agents (11%). 4 By the end of 1985, 49 (15.4%) of these NCEs had been marketed in the UK and 198 (62.0%) discontinued from further development. The main reasons for termination were inappropriate pharmacokinetics in man (39.4%), and lack of clinical efficacy (29.3%). 5 Average development times increased from less than 2 years between 1964 and 1965, to around 8 years in the 1980s with a consequent reduction in the effective patent life. PMID:3358900

  12. The effect of capital structure on the profitability of pharmaceutical companies the case of iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Mehdi; Rahimi, Farimah; Rahimi, Forough; Aarabi, Seyed Mohammad; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    Funding combination is the most important issue for the companies while they know the amount of required capital. Companies should be careful regarding the appliance of financial providing methods compatible with the investment strategy of company and profitability. This study seeks to examine the relationship between the capital structure and the profitability of pharmaceutical companies in Iran. For this purpose, top 30 Iranian pharmaceutical companies defined as study samples and their financial data were gathered for the period of 2001-2010. In this study, the net margin profit and debts to asset ratio were used as indicators of profitability and capital structure, respectively and sales growth was used as a control variable. Results showed that there was significant negative relationship between the profitability and the capital structure which means that the pharmaceutical companies have established a Pecking Order Theory and the internal financing has led to more profitability.

  13. Legislative, educational, policy and other interventions targeting physicians’ interaction with pharmaceutical companies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alkhaled, Lina; Kahale, Lara; Nass, Hala; Brax, Hneine; Fadlallah, Racha; Badr, Kamal; Akl, Elie A

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical company representatives likely influence the prescribing habits and professional behaviour of physicians. Objective The objective of this study was to systematically review the effects of interventions targeting practising physicians’ interactions with pharmaceutical companies. Eligibility criteria We included observational studies, non-randomised controlled trials (non-RCTs) and RCTs evaluating legislative, educational, policy or other interventions targeting the interactions between physicians and pharmaceutical companies. Data sources The search strategy included an electronic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE. Two reviewers performed duplicate and independent study selection, data abstraction and assessment of risk of bias. Appraisal and synthesis methods We assessed the risk of bias in each included study. We summarised the findings narratively because the nature of the data did not allow a meta-analysis to be conducted. We assessed the quality of evidence by outcome using the GRADE methodology. Results Of 11 189 identified citations, one RCT and three observational studies met the eligibility criteria. All four studies specifically targeted one type of interaction with pharmaceutical companies, that is, interactions with drug representatives. The RCT provided moderate quality evidence of no effect of a ‘collaborative approach’ between the pharmaceutical industry and a health authority. The three observational studies provided low quality evidence suggesting a positive effect of policies aiming to reduce interaction between physicians and pharmaceutical companies (by restricting free samples, promotional material, and meetings with pharmaceutical company representatives) on prescription behaviour. Limitations We identified too few studies to allow strong conclusions. Conclusions Available evidence suggests a potential impact of policies aiming to reduce interaction between physicians and drug representatives on physicians

  14. Dynamic Learning Capability and Actionable Knowledge Creation: Clinical R&D in a Pharmaceutical Company.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingelgard, Anders; Roth, Jonas; Shani, A. B. (Rami); Styhre, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with participants in research and development in a pharmaceutical company explored the use of organizational learning mechanisms to create knowledge. Results indicate that dynamic learning capability is embedded in and influenced by company culture, existing skills and competence, capacity for continuous change, and leadership.…

  15. Off-label use of medicine: Perspective of physicians, patients, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory authorities.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Nayak, Roopa Prasad

    2014-04-01

    Off-label prescribing of medicines is prevalent worldwide because it gives freedom to physicians to apply new therapeutic options based on the latest evidence. Although physicians may lawfully prescribe approved drugs for any use consistent with available scientific data and proper medical practice, but unfortunately, usually this is done without adequate scientific data. Often, when the best available therapeutic option fails, patients demand new approach or new treatment which ultimately leads to off-label uses. Major concerns about efficacy and safety have been raised by inappropriate use of off-label drugs because it leads to drug being used without risk-benefit analysis by the regulatory agency. Although the regulatory approval process requires ample proof of efficacy and safety for granting approval for specific indications of prescription drugs but unfortunately, more clarity is required about regulations governing off-label use of medicine. Above all because of the financial aspects involved it is highly impractical to expect that pharmaceutical companies will restrict or stop off-label promotion. Off-label use might be compared to double-edged sword which might be very useful for some patients while it can also expose them to unrestricted experimentation, unknown health risks, or ineffective medicine. Hence, there is an urgent need for guidance to encourage proper off-label use of medicine by the distribution of scientifically valid and authentic information from the pharmaceutical companies. In fact, few countries such as the USA and France have taken an initiative and have come up with the regulations about off-label use of medicine.

  16. Off-label use of medicine: Perspective of physicians, patients, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory authorities

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Nayak, Roopa Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Off-label prescribing of medicines is prevalent worldwide because it gives freedom to physicians to apply new therapeutic options based on the latest evidence. Although physicians may lawfully prescribe approved drugs for any use consistent with available scientific data and proper medical practice, but unfortunately, usually this is done without adequate scientific data. Often, when the best available therapeutic option fails, patients demand new approach or new treatment which ultimately leads to off-label uses. Major concerns about efficacy and safety have been raised by inappropriate use of off-label drugs because it leads to drug being used without risk-benefit analysis by the regulatory agency. Although the regulatory approval process requires ample proof of efficacy and safety for granting approval for specific indications of prescription drugs but unfortunately, more clarity is required about regulations governing off-label use of medicine. Above all because of the financial aspects involved it is highly impractical to expect that pharmaceutical companies will restrict or stop off-label promotion. Off-label use might be compared to double-edged sword which might be very useful for some patients while it can also expose them to unrestricted experimentation, unknown health risks, or ineffective medicine. Hence, there is an urgent need for guidance to encourage proper off-label use of medicine by the distribution of scientifically valid and authentic information from the pharmaceutical companies. In fact, few countries such as the USA and France have taken an initiative and have come up with the regulations about off-label use of medicine. PMID:24799811

  17. Pharmaceutical Company Corruption and the Moral Crisis in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Batt, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    A much-debated series of articles in the New England Journal of Medicine in May 2015 labeled the pharmaceutical industry's critics "pharmascolds." Having followed the debate for two decades, I count myself among the scolds. The weight of the evidence overwhelmingly supports the claim that pharmaceutical policy no longer serves the public interest; the central questions now are how this happened and what to do about it. I approached three of the most recent books on the industry with these questions in mind. Deadly Medicine and Organized Crime (CRC Press, 2013), by Peter Gøtzsche, Bad Pharma (Faber & Faber, 2013), by Ben Goldacre, and Good Pharma (Palgrave MacMillan, 2015), by Donald Light and Antonio Maturo, all situate their critical assessments in high-income countries globally, depicting the problem of pharmaceuticals as too many drugs approved with too little evidence, causing too many needless deaths, and prices spiraling to heights unimaginable just a decade ago. Light and Maturo, while no less critical of the status quo than Gøtzsche and Goldacre, take a different tack: they detail the success of an alternative model for pharmaceutical research, the Mario Negri Institute in Italy, citing it as proof positive that we can indeed defy capitalism's profit imperative.

  18. "Insuring" the continued solvency of pharmaceutical companies in the face of product liability class actions.

    PubMed

    Chodock, Rochelle; Yolkut, David; Connolly, Dennis R

    2005-01-01

    Costly product liability lawsuits continue to plague the pharmaceutical industry, and insurance to cover these losses is severely inadequate. Furthermore, questionable regulation of drugs exists once a pharmaceutical has passed FDA approval. This article describes a plan that uses a capitalistic, rather than a governmental, approach to solve both the insurance and the quality control problems. Although the proposed plan has never been used to insure pharmaceutical companies, different permutations of it have been used to insure other litigation-prone industries. Success from the proposed insurance entity results from the combined knowledge of scientists and actuaries to provide both protection from product liability lawsuits for the pharmaceutical industry and enhanced post-market surveillance of pharmaceuticals.

  19. Changing R&D models in research-based pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Alexander; Gassmann, Oliver; Hinder, Markus

    2016-04-27

    New drugs serving unmet medical needs are one of the key value drivers of research-based pharmaceutical companies. The efficiency of research and development (R&D), defined as the successful approval and launch of new medicines (output) in the rate of the monetary investments required for R&D (input), has declined since decades. We aimed to identify, analyze and describe the factors that impact the R&D efficiency. Based on publicly available information, we reviewed the R&D models of major research-based pharmaceutical companies and analyzed the key challenges and success factors of a sustainable R&D output. We calculated that the R&D efficiencies of major research-based pharmaceutical companies were in the range of USD 3.2-32.3 billion (2006-2014). As these numbers challenge the model of an innovation-driven pharmaceutical industry, we analyzed the concepts that companies are following to increase their R&D efficiencies: (A) Activities to reduce portfolio and project risk, (B) activities to reduce R&D costs, and (C) activities to increase the innovation potential. While category A comprises measures such as portfolio management and licensing, measures grouped in category B are outsourcing and risk-sharing in late-stage development. Companies made diverse steps to increase their innovation potential and open innovation, exemplified by open source, innovation centers, or crowdsourcing, plays a key role in doing so. In conclusion, research-based pharmaceutical companies need to be aware of the key factors, which impact the rate of innovation, R&D cost and probability of success. Depending on their company strategy and their R&D set-up they can opt for one of the following open innovators: knowledge creator, knowledge integrator or knowledge leverager.

  20. 75 FR 26160 - Drug and Drug-Related Supply Promotion by Pharmaceutical Company Sales Representatives at VA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 1 RIN 2900-AN42 Drug and Drug-Related Supply Promotion by Pharmaceutical Company Sales... eliminate any potential for disruption in the patient care environment, manage activities and promotions at... response to ``RIN 2900-AN42--Drug and Drug-Related Supply Promotion by Pharmaceutical Company...

  1. Dramaturgical study of meetings between general practitioners and representatives of pharmaceutical companies

    PubMed Central

    Somerset, Maggie; Weiss, Marjorie; Fahey, Tom

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To examine the interaction between general practitioners and pharmaceutical company representatives. Design Qualitative study of 13 consecutive meetings between general practitioner and pharmaceutical representatives. A dramaturgical model was used to inform analysis of the transcribed verbal interactions. Setting Practice in south west England. Participants 13 pharmaceutical company representatives and one general practitioner. Results The encounters were acted out in six scenes. Scene 1 was initiated by the pharmaceutical representative, who acknowledged the relative status of the two players. Scene 2 provided the opportunity for the representative to check the general practitioner's knowledge about the product. Scene 3 was used to propose clinical and cost benefits associated with the product. During scene 4, the general practitioner took centre stage and challenged aspects of this information. Scene 5 involved a recovery strategy as the representative fought to regain equilibrium. In the final scene, the representative tried to ensure future contacts. Conclusion Encounters between general practitioners and pharmaceutical representatives follow a consistent format that is implicitly understood by each player. It is naive to suppose that pharmaceutical representatives are passive resources for drug information. General practitioners might benefit from someone who can provide unbiased information about prescribing in a manner that is supportive and sympathetic to the demands of practice. What is already known on this topicPharmaceutical representatives influence physicians' prescribing in ways that are often unacknowledged by the physicians themselvesMeetings with pharmaceutical representatives are associated with increased prescribing costs and less rational prescribingWhat this study addsMeetings between pharmaceutical representatives and general practitioners follow a consistent format that is implicitly understood by each playerGeneral practitioners

  2. Challenges of access to medicine and the responsibility of pharmaceutical companies: a legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Ahmadiani, Saeed; Nikfar, Shekoufeh

    2016-05-04

    The right to health as a basic human right- and access to medicine as a part of it- have been a matter of attention for several decades. Also the responsibilities of different parties- particularly pharmaceutical companies- in realization of this right has been emphasized by World Health Organization. This is while many companies find no incentive for research and development of medicines related to rare diseases. Also some legal structures such as "patent agreements" clearly cause huge difficulties for access to medicine in many countries. High prices of brand medicine and no legal production of generics can increase the catastrophic costs- as well as morbidity-mortality of medication in lower income countries. Here we evidently review the current challenges in access to medicine and critically assess its legal roots. How societies/governors can make the pharmaceutical companies responsible is also discussed to have a look on possible future and actions that policy makers- in local or global level- can take.

  3. Pharmaceutical policies used by private health insurance companies in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Bawazir, Saleh A.; Alkudsi, Mohammed A.; Al Humaidan, Abdullah S.; Al Jaser, Maher A.; Sasich, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, the Council of Cooperative Health Insurance (CCHI) is the body responsible for regulating health insurance in the KSA. While the cooperative health insurance schedule (i.e., model policy for health insurance) is available on the CCHI web site, policies related to pharmaceuticals are ambiguous. Aims The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of health insurance policies provided by health insurance companies in KSA on access to medication and its use. Settings and Design This study was descriptive in design and used a survey, which was conducted through face-to-face interviews with the medical managers of health insurance companies. Methods and Material The survey took place between March and June, 2011. All 25 insurance companies accredited by CCHI were eligible to be included in the study. Out of these 25 companies, three were excluded from this survey as no response was received. Results All the 16 companies responded “Yes” that they had a prior authorization policy; however, their reasons varied. Eight (50%) of the companies were concerned about the duration of treatment. While 10 (62.5%) did not offer additional coverage over the CCHI model policy, the other 6 (37.5%) reported that they could reconcile certain conditions. The survey also demonstrated that 10 insurance companies allowed refilling of medication but with certain limitations. Six out of the 10 permitted refilling within a maximum time of three months, whereas the other four companies did not have any time-based limits for refilling. The other six companies did not allow refilling without prescription. Conclusions Although this paper was primarily descriptive, the findings revealed a substantial scope for improvement in terms of pharmaceutical policy standards and regulation in the health insurance companies in KSA. Additionally, the study highlighted such areas to augment the overall quality use of medication, over-prescribing and irrational use of

  4. Situation Analysis of R & D Activities: An Empirical Study in Iranian Pharmaceutical Companies

    PubMed Central

    Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Mehralian, Gholamhossein; Vatankhah-Mohammadabadi, Abbas Ali

    2012-01-01

    As global competition intensifies, research and development (R & D) organizations need to enhance their strategic management in order to become goal-directed communities for innovation and allocate their resources consistent with their overall R & D strategy. The world pharmaceutical market has undergone fast, unprecedented, tremendous and complex changes in the last several years. The pharmaceutical industry is today still one of the most inventive, innovative and lucrative of the so-called “high-tech” industries. This industry serves a dual role in modern society. On one hand, it is a growing industry, and its output makes a direct contribution to gross domestic product (GDP). On the other side, drugs, this industry’s major output, are an input in the production of good health. The purpose of this study is to evaluate R & D activities of pharmaceutical companies, and also to highlight critical factors which have influential effect on results of these activities. To run this study a valid questionnaire based on literature review and experts’ opinion was designed and delivered to 11 pharmaceutical companies. Empirical data show there is not acceptable situations considering of the factors that should be taken in to account by managers including; management commitment, human resource management, information technology and financial management. Furthermore, we concluded some interesting results related to different aspects of R & D management. In conclusion, managers must be aware about their performance in R & D activities, accordingly they will able to take a comprehensive policy in both national and within the company. PMID:24250532

  5. Pharmaceutical companies and Italian Regional Governments: managing relationships in an increasing institutional complexity.

    PubMed

    Compagni, Amelia; Cavalli, Laura; Jommi, Claudio

    2008-09-01

    In Italy, the process of power decentralization to Regional Governments has particularly affected pharmaceutical care policies. Regions are experimenting with various strategies to govern drugs utilization and expenditure, and differentiating their approaches, leading to an ever-changing and complex institutional scenario. Pharmaceutical companies have created new professional roles, the Regional Affairs Managers (RAM), with the mandate to monitor the different regional contexts and measures, and to establish relationships with the public actors in charge of pharmaceutical policies. This analysis shows how public affairs/lobbying actions at regional level and the creation of a solid political competence within companies are still in an early phase. The activities carried out by RAMs remain limited to an exchange of information and only rarely are perceived by Regional public servants (RRs) as giving support to their work or influence decisions. The interaction with RAMs is often seen as little relevant and still too concentrated on products and a marketing/commercial approach rather than on broader issues of interest to RRs who need to manage the pharmaceutical care system at large. The level of acceptance of this type of activity is also variable and RRs' attitudes alternate between diffidence, polite tolerance, and openness to a constructive dialogue about pharmaceuticals and their management in a regional healthcare system.

  6. Evaluation of productivity in Iranian pharmaceutical companies: A DEA-based Malmquist approach and panel data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Varmaghani, Mehdi; Meshkini, Amir Hashemi; Farzadfar, Farshad; Yousefi, Mehdi; Yaghoubifard, Saeed; Varahrami, Vida; Darzi, Ehsan Rezaei; Anabi, Majid; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Zekri, Hedieh-Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to assess comparative productivity of 21 pharmaceutical companies in Iran during 2000–2013. Methods: To evaluate the productivity trend of pharmaceutical companies in Iran, we used data envelopment analysis-based Malmquist index. “Total assets” and “capital stock” as inputs and “net sales” and “net profit” as outputs extracted from Tehran stock exchange, were selected to be included in the analysis. This method provides the possibility for analyzing the performance of each company in term of productivity changes over time. We also used an estimation generalized least square panel data model to identify the factors that might affect productivity of pharmaceutical companies in Iran using EViews 7 and Deep 2.1 software. Findings: The mean total productivity during all years of the study was 0.9829, which indicates the improvement in their overall productivity. The results, over the 13-year period, indicated that the range of productivity changes in pharmaceutical companies, that were included in this study, was between 0.884 and 1.098. Panel data model indicated that age of company could positively (t = 4.765978, P < 0.001) and being located in cities other than Tehran (the capital) could negatively (t = −5.369549, P < 0.001) affect the productivity of pharmaceutical companies. The analysis showed the new policy (brand-generic scheme) and also the type of ownership did not have a significant effect on the productivity of pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: In this study, pharmaceutical productivity trends were fluctuated that could be due to the sub-optimal attention of policy makers and managers of pharmaceutical companies toward long-term strategic planning, focusing on productivity improvement. PMID:25984541

  7. What is missing on their web sites? An evaluation of national and international pharmaceutical companies in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yegenoglu, Selen; Aslan, Dilek; Acar, Aylin; Calgan, Zeynep

    2005-12-01

    The Turkish Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association-Ilaç Endüstrisi Isverenler Sendikasi (IEIS) set guidelines for pharmaceutical companies when designing their websites in 2003. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether pharmaceutical company websites comply with these guidelines. The list of all the national and international pharmaceutical companies active in Turkey is obtained from Farmalist Vademecum. We evaluated each site in terms of availability of drug advertisement, mail address, e-mail address, telephone number, fax number, update information, indication of target group, links, references, information, appropriate content for the intended target group, disclaimer stating the given information is only for health care professionals, disclaimer stating the given information cannot replace a health care professional, responsible body for the website design. The search was done throughout February 2005. We used x(2) test and Fisher's exact x(2) tests for statistical analysis. Of the 82 pharmaceutical companies active in Turkey, 51 had a website eligible for evaluation. Of the 51 companies, 34 (66.7%) were national and 17 (33.3%) were international. Eighteen companies had drug advertisement on the home page of their websites (64.7%). Of the total companies majority had mail address (89.2%); telephone number (89.2%); fax number (84.3%); links (66.7%); and appropriate content for the health care professionals (62.7%). The frequency of having update information and a separate pharmacist/physician information part was higher among international pharmaceutical company websites compared to the national ones. These differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). As a result of the evaluation, the majority of the pharmaceutical companies failed to comply wholly with the guidelines set by IEIS when designing their website on the Internet.

  8. [Approval of drugs by national and European agencies--sequelae for the pharmaceutical industry].

    PubMed

    Zierenberg, O

    1997-11-01

    The research-based pharmaceutical industry supports the European harmonization process for the granting of pharmaceutical registrations. In order to improve consumer protection and the therapeutic options available to physicians in comparison to nationally registered products, the harmonization must be carried out on schedule and transparently a high scientific standard. It must not lead to the adoption of all national restrictions regarding data sheets and patient leaflets. Pharmaceutical products with the same ingredients can be registered either through the national or through the European procedure. This situation can only be remedied by the harmonization of core SPCs. This process must be agreed in consultation between pharmaceutical companies and regulatory authorities. With regard to measures to avert drug risks, professional associations and the pharmaceutical companies affected should be heard by the national authorities and their arguments given due consideration. In addition, national authorities and the CPMP must coordinate their decisions before they are published. In particular, the basis of these decisions should be made clear and therapeutic alternatives should be known.

  9. Analysis of 70 Environmental Protection Agency priority pharmaceuticals in water by EPA Method 1694.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Imma; Zweigenbaum, Jerry A; Thurman, E Michael

    2010-09-03

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1694 for the determination of pharmaceuticals in water recently brought a new challenge for treatment utilities, where pharmaceuticals have been reported in the drinking water of 41-million Americans. This proposed methodology, designed to address this important issue, consists of solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) using triple quadrupole. Under the guidelines of Method 1694, a multi-residue method was developed, validated, and applied to wastewater, surface water and drinking water samples for the analysis of 70 pharmaceuticals. Four distinct chromatographic gradients and LC conditions were used according to the polarity and extraction of the different pharmaceuticals. Positive and negative ion electrospray were used with two MRM transitions (a quantifier and a qualifier ion for each compound), which adds extra confirmation not included in the original Method 1694. Finally, we verify, for the first time, EPA Method 1694 on water samples collected in several locations in Colorado, where positive identifications for several pharmaceuticals were found. This study is a valuable indicator of the potential of LC/MS-MS for routine quantitative multi-residue analysis of pharmaceuticals in drinking water and wastewater samples and will make monitoring studies much easier to develop for water utilities across the US, who are currently seeking guidance on analytical methods for pharmaceuticals in their water supplies.

  10. Narrowing the gap: access to HIV treatments in developing countries. A pharmaceutical company's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, J.

    2000-01-01

    The advent of new antiretroviral medicines means that the effects of HIV can now be curbed, but only one in twenty infected people have so far benefited. For those living in developing countries, the new treatments are practically unattainable. Governments, UNAIDS and pharmaceutical companies recognise this only too well and have rethought established assumption in order to try and overcome the challenges posed by cost, inadequate health services and unreliable local supply of medicines. Key Words: AIDS • treatment gap • developing countries • Glaxo Wellcome • access to medicines • public health PMID:10701172

  11. Cardiovascular Drug Discovery: A Perspective from a Research-Based Pharmaceutical Company

    PubMed Central

    Gromo, G.; Mann, J.; Fitzgerald, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    The theme of this review is to summarize the evolving processes in cardiovascular drug discovery and development within a large pharmaceutical company. Emphasis is placed on the contrast between the academic and industrial research operating environments, which can influence the effectiveness of research collaboration between the two constituencies, but which plays such an important role in drug innovation. The strategic challenges that research directors face are also emphasized. The need for improved therapy in many cardiovascular indications remains high, but the feasibility in making progress, despite the advances in molecular biology and genomics, is also assessed. PMID:24890831

  12. From generic scheme to brand-generic scheme: Have new policy influenced the efficiency of Iranian pharmaceutical companies?

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Varmaghani, Mehdi; Yousefi, Mehdi; Yaghoubifard, Saeed; Zekri, Hedieh-Sadat; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Brand-generic scheme was implemented in Iran to improve the competition in the pharmaceutical market. In this study, we aim to assess if this policy had any positive effect on efficiency of Iranian pharmaceutical companies. Methods: We used data envelopment analysis to evaluate the relative efficiency of pharmaceutical companies during 1999-2008. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank and sign tests were used to assess the difference between mean technical efficiency of companies before and after implementation of the new policy. Findings: Although the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank tests did not show any significant differences in favor of the new policy in terms of both relative and pure (managerial) technical efficiency for included companies (P = 0.079 and 0.07, respectively), but the one-sided sign test indicated that only relative pure (managerial) efficiency has been improved after this policy (P = 0.031). Conclusion: The “brand-generic scheme” does not seem to be a successful policy to improve efficiency level and prompt competition in pharmaceutical companies in Iran. To achieve this aim, consideration of infrastructural requirements including transparent and non-discriminating laws and regulations to support competition, the competitive pricing policies, the presence of international companies in the market, and full privatization of companies had to be also deeming by policy makers. PMID:25328898

  13. Drug recall: An incubus for pharmaceutical companies and most serious drug recall of history.

    PubMed

    Nagaich, Upendra; Sadhna, Divya

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing trend in the number of prescribed and over-the-counter drug recall over the last few years. The recall is usually due to company's discovery, customer's complaint or Food and Drug Administration (FDA) observation. The process of recall involves a planned specific course of action, which addresses the depth of recall, need for public warning, and the extent of effectiveness checks for the recall. The FDA review and/or recommend changes to the firm's recall strategy, as appropriate. The critical recall information list includes the identity of the product; summary of the failure; amount of product produced in the distribution chain and direct account. Product recalls clashes thousands of companies every year affecting: sales, testing customer relationships and disrupting supply chains. Drug recall is incubus for pharmaceutical companies. It effects the reputation of the company. The reason for the recall can be divided into two categories: manufacturing affined and safety/efficacy affined. It is essential to follow all the guidelines related to drug development and manufacturing procedure so as to minimize drug recall.

  14. Drug recall: An incubus for pharmaceutical companies and most serious drug recall of history

    PubMed Central

    Nagaich, Upendra; Sadhna, Divya

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing trend in the number of prescribed and over-the-counter drug recall over the last few years. The recall is usually due to company's discovery, customer's complaint or Food and Drug Administration (FDA) observation. The process of recall involves a planned specific course of action, which addresses the depth of recall, need for public warning, and the extent of effectiveness checks for the recall. The FDA review and/or recommend changes to the firm's recall strategy, as appropriate. The critical recall information list includes the identity of the product; summary of the failure; amount of product produced in the distribution chain and direct account. Product recalls clashes thousands of companies every year affecting: sales, testing customer relationships and disrupting supply chains. Drug recall is incubus for pharmaceutical companies. It effects the reputation of the company. The reason for the recall can be divided into two categories: manufacturing affined and safety/efficacy affined. It is essential to follow all the guidelines related to drug development and manufacturing procedure so as to minimize drug recall. PMID:25599028

  15. Pharmaceutical companies and global lack of access to medicines: strengthening accountability under the right to health.

    PubMed

    Grover, Anand; Citro, Brian; Mankad, Mihir; Lander, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Many medicines currently available on the market are simply too expensive for millions around the world to afford. Many medicines available in the developing world are only available to a small percentage of the population due to economic inequities. The profit-seeking behavior of pharmaceutical companies exacerbates this problem. In most cases, the price reductions required to make drugs affordable to a broader class of people in the developing world are not offset by the resultant increase in sales volume. Simply stated, in most of the developing world, it is more profitable to sell drugs to the very wealthy at high prices than it is to sell cheaper drugs to a greater number of people. As a result, medicines remain unaffordable for the vast majority of people in many parts of the world. While this might be an acceptable outcome for certain commodities, such as luxury goods, it is completely unacceptable for life-saving medicines. Therefore, in order to effectively address the global lack of access to medicines, the role pharmaceutical companies play in the international intellectual property regime must be critically examined.

  16. A Collaborative Assessment Among 11 Pharmaceutical Companies of Misinformation in Commonly Used Online Drug Information Compendia

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Amarita S.; Babalola, Olakiitan; Henney, Zachary; Miller, Michele; Nelson, Tanya; Oza, Meerat; Patel, Chandni; Randhawa, Anupma S.; Riley, Joyce; Snyder, Scott; So, Sherri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Online drug information compendia (ODIC) are valuable tools that health care professionals (HCPs) and consumers use to educate themselves on pharmaceutical products. Research suggests that these resources, although informative and easily accessible, may contain misinformation, posing risk for product misuse and patient harm. Objective: Evaluate drug summaries within ODIC for accuracy and completeness and identify product-specific misinformation. Methods: Between August 2014 and January 2015, medical information (MI) specialists from 11 pharmaceutical/biotechnology companies systematically evaluated 270 drug summaries within 5 commonly used ODIC for misinformation. Using a standardized approach, errors were identified; classified as inaccurate, incomplete, or omitted; and categorized per sections of the Full Prescribing Information (FPI). On review of each drug summary, content-correction requests were proposed and supported by the respective product’s FPI. Results: Across the 270 drug summaries reviewed within the 5 compendia, the median of the total number of errors identified was 782, with the greatest number of errors occurring in the categories of Dosage and Administration, Patient Education, and Warnings and Precautions. The majority of errors were classified as incomplete, followed by inaccurate and omitted. Conclusion: This analysis demonstrates that ODIC may contain misinformation. HCPs and consumers should be aware of the potential for misinformation and consider more than 1 drug information resource, including the FPI and Medication Guide as well as pharmaceutical/biotechnology companies’ MI departments, to obtain unbiased, accurate, and complete product-specific drug information to help support the safe and effective use of prescription drug products. PMID:26917822

  17. Gateway to the Future. Skill Standards for the Bioscience Industry for Technical Workers in Pharmaceutical Companies, Biotechnology Companies, and Clinical Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    The Bioscience Industry Skills Standards Project (BISSP) is developing national, voluntary skill standards for technical jobs in biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies and clinical laboratories in hospitals, universities, government, and independent settings. Research with employees and educators has pinpointed three issues underscoring the…

  18. Pharmaceutical Companies and Their Drugs on Social Media: A Content Analysis of Drug Information on Popular Social Media Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Many concerns have been raised about pharmaceutical companies marketing their drugs directly to consumers on social media. This form of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) can be interactive and, because it is largely unmonitored, the benefits of pharmaceutical treatment could easily be overemphasized compared to the risks. Additionally, nonexpert consumers can share their own drug product testimonials on social media and illegal online pharmacies can market their services on popular social media sites. There is great potential for the public to be exposed to misleading or dangerous information about pharmaceutical drugs on social media. Objective Our central aim was to examine how pharmaceutical companies use social media to interact with the general public and market their drugs. We also sought to analyze the nature of information that appears in search results for widely used pharmaceutical drugs in the United States on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube with a particular emphasis on the presence of illegal pharmacies. Methods Content analyses were performed on (1) social media content on the Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube accounts of the top 15 pharmaceutical companies in the world and (2) the content that appears when searching on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube for the top 20 pharmaceutical drugs purchased in the United States. Notably, for the company-specific analysis, we examined the presence of information similar to various forms of DTCA, the audience reach of company postings, and the quantity and quality of company-consumer interaction. For the drug-specific analysis, we documented the presence of illegal pharmacies, personal testimonials, and drug efficacy claims. Results From the company-specific analysis, we found information similar to help-seeking DTCA in 40.7% (301/740) of pharmaceutical companies’ social media posts. Drug product claims were present in only 1.6% (12/740) of posts. Overall, there was a substantial amount of consumers

  19. Compliance of scored tablet halves produced by Palestinian Pharmaceutical Companies with the new European Pharmacopoeia requirements.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Abdel Naser; Ghosh, Abeer Abu

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the weight uniformity of commonly divided tablets produced by Palestinian Pharmaceutical Companies and to evaluate the importance of both patient- and formulation-related variables on the splitting results. Eighty-four volunteers were enrolled in this study; their age, gender and occupation were documented in order, and the effect of these variables on the tablet splitting results was evaluated. Each volunteer was asked to divide six scored tablets of each product tested and was given clear instructions on how to conduct the splitting process. The split units were individually weighed and the RSD for each product was calculated as instructed in the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur. 5.5). Only one scored tablet product passed the Ph. Eur. test of mass uniformity, while the remaining 13 products failed; this indicates that the splitting of these tablet products is not a reliable means for the provision of accurate doses to patients. Age, gender and occupation of volunteers were not found to be predictive of any variability noted in the splitting results. The only factors that were suspected to be linked to passing the splitting test, as per the European Pharmacopoeia, were the shape, friability and hardness of the tablets. As a result of this study, we believe that the practice of dividing tablets, which should provide therapeutic and economic benefits for the patient, may potentially cause significant problems, especially in drugs with low therapeutic indices. Tablets produced by Palestinian Pharmaceutical Companies should comply with the new Ph. Eur. splitting regulations to reduce this potential for complications.

  20. [Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA)'s new action for Pharmaceutical Affairs Consultation on Research and Development (R&D) Strategy].

    PubMed

    Masuyama, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Universities, research institutions, and venture capitals that possess promising "seed" research or technologies in Japan, are not always familiar with development strategies that lead to commercialization of the products in spite of their excellent science and research. In order to create innovative pharmaceuticals and medical devices originating from Japan, Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) launched new scientific consultation service, named 'Pharmaceutical Affairs Consultation on R&D Strategy' for universities, research institutions, and venture capitals on July 1, 2011. Through these consultations, the guidance and advice on the tests needed in the early development stage and the necessary clinical trials would be provided toward commercialization.

  1. 77 FR 12997 - Drug and Drug-Related Supply Promotion by Pharmaceutical Company Representatives at VA Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 1 RIN 2900-AN42 Drug and Drug-Related Supply Promotion by Pharmaceutical Company... disruption in the patient care environment, manage activities and promotions at VA facilities, and provide..., VA must continue to maintain strict adherence to its criteria-for-use and prevent undesired...

  2. [The pharmaceutical company Choay: an history linked to research and commercialization of biological products].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Eugène Choay, when he created his own company in 1911, had already a large experience in pharmaceutical industry obtained with Maison Frère where he discovered the famous Dentol, well known thank to Poulbot's publicity drawings for this product. But, convinced of the future of biological products and Opotherapy, he decided to invest himself in this area with a totally new process for cold desiccation of organs. The success will be there and several pharmacists from Choay family will take care of the company and bring it to the top of its specialty in Opotherapy. At the beginning of the 1970's, Choay in in full development and has the products, the sites and the human resources for the future. In 1975, 4 therapeutic areas are covered by Choay's products: coagulation, inflammation, dermatology and hepatology. After more than 65 years of independence, Choay group will be finally bought partially and then totally by Sanofi. With the support of Sanofi, Choay created, in 1981, their US subsidiary called Choay Laboratories Inc;, after the NDA approval of sub-cutaneous Calciparine by the FDA. In 1985 Fraxiparine, a low molecular weight heparin discovered by Jean Choay's team, is lauched on the market. All these developments represent an outstanding record a longevity which indicates how perceptive was Eugène Choay and his successors when choosing to invest totally in the therapeutic use of hormones and products acting on coagulation factors.

  3. The role of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency and healthcare professionals in post-marketing safety.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Meguru; Horiuchi, Naoya; Tamura, Atsushi; Kutsumi, Hiromu

    2014-04-01

    The development of drugs and medical devices is necessary for medical progress; however, safety measures need to be put in place to protect the health of the population. In order to ensure the safety of drugs and medical devices, it is important to determine measures for appropriate management of risks at any time during the development phase, the regulatory review and the post-marketing phase. Adverse events detected in clinical trials are limited due to the restricted numbers of patients enrolled in the trials. Therefore, it is almost impossible to predict rare serious adverse events during the post-marketing phase. The revised Pharmaceutical Affairs Act was established in Japan in November 20, 2013. The new act focuses on increased safety of drugs and medical devices. The Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) is the regulatory authority in Japan that promotes safety measures from the development phase through to the post-marketing phase. In the post-marketing phase, the PMDA collects information from the medical product companies and healthcare professionals, as well as instructing and advising them with regard to post-marketing safety measures for each drug and medical device. Since Japan has a national health insurance system, a new drug or a medical device is available throughout the country when the drug price or medical fee is listed in the National Health Insurance price list. Healthcare professionals in medical institutions must learn about the drugs and medical devices they handle, and should make an effort to maintain patient safety. The PMDA medi-navi is a very useful electronic mail delivery service that provides critical information for protecting patients from health hazards caused by adverse events. The 'risk management plan' is also important as it contains important information about safety profile and post-marketing measures of a new drug.

  4. Animals on drugs: understanding the role of pharmaceutical companies in the animal-industrial complex.

    PubMed

    Twine, Richard

    2013-12-01

    In this paper I revisit previous critiques that I have made of much, though by no means all, bioethical discourse. These pertain to faithfulness to dualistic ontology, a taken-for-granted normative anthropocentrism, and the exclusion of a consideration of how political economy shapes the conditions for bioethical discourse (Twine Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8(3):285-295, 2005; International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food 16(3):1-18, 2007, 2010). Part of my argument around bioethical dualist ontology is to critique the assumption of a division between the "medical" (human) and "agricultural" (nonhuman) and to show various ways in which they are interrelated. I deepen this analysis with a focus on transnational pharmaceutical companies, with specific attention to their role in enhancing agricultural production through animal drug administration. I employ the topical case of antibiotics in order to speak to current debates in not only the interdisciplinary field of bioethics but also that of animal studies. More generally, the animal-industrial complex (Twine Journal for Critical Animal Studies 10(1):12-39, 2012) is underlined as a highly relevant bioethical object that deserves more conceptual and empirical attention.

  5. R&D implementation in a department of laboratory medicine and pathology: a systematic review based on pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Feulefack, Joseph; Sergi, Consolato

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review on pharmaceutical companies may be a tool for guiding some procedures of R&D implementation in a department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. The use of pharmaceutical companies for this specific analysis arises from less variability of standards than healthcare facilities. In this qualitative and quantitative analysis, we focused on three useful areas of implementation, including R&D productivity, commercialization strategies, and expenditures determinants of pharmaceutical companies. Studies and reports of online databases from 1965 to 2014 were reviewed according to specific search terms. Initially, 218 articles and reports were found and examined, but only 91 were considered appropriate and used for further analysis.  We identified some suggested implementation strategies relevant for marketing to enhance companies' own R&D strategies; such as reliability of companies on "sourcing-in" R&D facilities and "think-tank" events. Regardless of the study and of the country, cash flow and profitability always positively influenced R&D expenditure, while sales and firm size did not. We consider that handling R&D determinants should require caution. It seems critical that implementation of R&D systems is directly related with productivity, if it reflects dual embodiment of efficiency and effectiveness. Scrutinizing the determinants of R&D expenditures emphasizes significant factors that are worth to highlight when planning an R&D investment strategy. Although there is no receipt fitting every situation, we think that health care plan makers may find relevant data in this systematic review in creating an initial implementation framework.

  6. The FDA guidance for industry on PROs: the point of view of a pharmaceutical company.

    PubMed

    Arpinelli, Fabio; Bamfi, Francesco

    2006-10-31

    The importance of the patients point of view on their health status is widely recognised. Patient-reported outcomes is a broad term encompassing a large variety of different health data reported by patients, as symptoms, functional status, Quality of Life and Health-Related Quality of Life. Measurements of Health-Related Quality of Life have been developed during many years of researches, and a lot of validated questionnaires exist. However, few attempts have been made to standardise the evaluation of instruments characteristics, no recommendations are made about interpretation on Health-Related Quality of Life results, especially regarding the clinical significance of a change leading a therapeutic approach. Moreover, the true value of Health-Related Quality of Life evaluations in clinical trials has not yet been completely defined. An important step towards a more structured and frequent use of Patient-Reported Outcomes in drug development is represented by the FDA Guidance, issued on February 2006. In our paper we aim to report some considerations on this Guidance. Our comments focus especially on the characteristics of instruments to use, the Minimal Important Difference, and the methods to calculate it. Furthermore, we present the advantages and opportunities of using the Patient-Reported Outcomes in drug development, as seen by a pharmaceutical company. The Patient-Reported Outcomes can provide additional data to make a drug more competitive than others of the same pharmacological class, and a well demonstrated positive impact on the patient' health status and daily life might allow a higher price and/or the inclusion in a reimbursement list. Applying extensively the FDA Guidance in the next trials could lead to a wider culture of subjective measurement, and to a greater consideration for the patient's opinions on his/her care. Moreover, prescribing doctors and payers could benefit from subjective information to better define the value of drugs.

  7. The Effects of Technology Entrepreneurship on Customers and Society: A Case Study of a Spanish Pharmaceutical Distribution Company

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Rosa M.; Sánchez de Pablo, Jesús D.; Peña, Isidro; Salinero, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding, within the field of corporate entrepreneurship, of the various factors that enable technology entrepreneurship in established firms and its principal effects on customers and society. The paper reports on a case study regarding technology entrepreneurship in a Spanish company whose activity is pharmaceutical distribution. This company has been able to overcome the consequences of the worldwide crisis and start an innovative process which includes the installation of new information technology (IT) and an investment of 6 million Euros. It is, in this respect, a model to imitate and the objective of this paper is therefore to discover the managers’ entrepreneurial orientation (EO) characteristics which have made this possible, along with the organizational and social effects resulting from the process. We verify that EO is present in this company and that the development of new IT has important effects on customers and the population. PMID:27445938

  8. The Effects of Technology Entrepreneurship on Customers and Society: A Case Study of a Spanish Pharmaceutical Distribution Company.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Rosa M; Sánchez de Pablo, Jesús D; Peña, Isidro; Salinero, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding, within the field of corporate entrepreneurship, of the various factors that enable technology entrepreneurship in established firms and its principal effects on customers and society. The paper reports on a case study regarding technology entrepreneurship in a Spanish company whose activity is pharmaceutical distribution. This company has been able to overcome the consequences of the worldwide crisis and start an innovative process which includes the installation of new information technology (IT) and an investment of 6 million Euros. It is, in this respect, a model to imitate and the objective of this paper is therefore to discover the managers' entrepreneurial orientation (EO) characteristics which have made this possible, along with the organizational and social effects resulting from the process. We verify that EO is present in this company and that the development of new IT has important effects on customers and the population.

  9. The impact of generic substitution on the activities of pharmaceutical companies - a survey from the companies' perspective one year and five years after the introduction of generic substitution in finland

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mandatory generic substitution (GS) was introduced in Finland on 1 April 2003. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the impacts of GS on the activities of pharmaceutical companies representing mainly original or generic pharmaceutical products in Finland. The self-reported impact of GS from pharmaceutical companies' perspective was explored with a focus on the number of employees, the range of sales packages on the market, the marketing activities, the research and development of new pharmaceutical products and storage of pharmaceuticals. Methods A cross-sectional postal survey was conducted among pharmaceutical companies with an office in Finland and substitutable medicines in the Finnish pharmaceutical market one year (2004) and five years (2008) after the introduction of GS. Completed questionnaires were returned by 16 original and 7 generic product companies in 2004 (response rate 56%, n = 41) and by 16 original and 6 generic product companies in 2008 (response rate 56%, n = 39). Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Results The number of employees (2004: n = 6/16, 2008: n = 7/16) and the amount of prescription medicine marketing (2004: n = 7/16, 2008: n = 8/16) decreased in many of the original product companies after the introduction of GS. GS resulted in problems related to the storage of pharmaceuticals in the original product companies shortly after GS was introduced (p = 0.032 between 2004 and 2008). In the generic product companies, the prescription medicine representatives' visits to pharmacies increased at the beginning of GS (p = 0.021 between 2004 and 2008). In addition, GS caused problems with the storage of pharmaceuticals one year and five years after the reform (2004: n = 4/7, 2008: n = 3/6). The differences between original and generic product companies regarding the impacts of GS were not, however, statistically significant. GS did not affect on the range of sales packages on the market or the research

  10. 77 FR 12898 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Midwest Securities Trust Company; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Midwest Securities Trust Company; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency... the event any self-regulatory organization is no longer in existence or has ceased to do business...

  11. 78 FR 64290 - Intermountain Power Agency v. Union Pacific Railroad Company-Oral Argument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Surface Transportation Board Intermountain Power Agency v. Union Pacific Railroad Company-- Oral Argument The Surface Transportation Board will hold oral argument on Thursday, November 14, 2013, at 9:30 a.m... facilities at Lynndyl, Utah. The oral argument will be open for public observation, but only counsel for...

  12. R&D Implementation in a Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology: A Systematic Review Based on Pharmaceutical Companies

    PubMed Central

    Feulefack, Joseph; Sergi, Consolato

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review on pharmaceutical companies may be a tool for guiding some procedures of R&D implementation in a department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. The use of pharmaceutical companies for this specific analysis arises from less variability of standards than healthcare facilities. In this qualitative and quantitative analysis, we focused on three useful areas of implementation, including R&D productivity, commercialization strategies, and expenditures determinants of pharmaceutical companies. Studies and reports of online databases from 1965 to 2014 were reviewed according to specific search terms. Initially, 218 articles and reports were found and examined, but only 91 were considered appropriate and used for further analysis. We identified some suggested implementation strategies relevant for marketing to enhance companies’ own R&D strategies; such as reliability of companies on “sourcing-in” R&D facilities and “think-tank” events. Regardless of the study and of the country, cash flow and profitability always positively influenced R&D expenditure, while sales and firm size did not. We consider that handling R&D determinants should require caution. It seems critical that implementation of R&D systems is directly related with productivity, if it reflects dual embodiment of efficiency and effectiveness. Scrutinizing the determinants of R&D expenditures emphasizes significant factors that are worth to highlight when planning an R&D investment strategy. Although there is no receipt fitting every situation, we think that health care plan makers may find relevant data in this systematic review in creating an initial implementation framework. PMID:25946935

  13. Pharmaceutical companies' variation of drug prices within and among countries can improve long-term social well-being.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Frank R

    2011-08-01

    Drug prices vary considerably across and within countries. On average, pharmaceutical companies charge lower prices in low-income countries than in industrialized nations. Manufacturers' ability to price products differently for different markets--a practice known as price discrimination--increases their profits overall. But it is also likely to result in greater investment in research and development, and therefore in more new drugs on the market. Although reducing price discrimination in order to cut costs might benefit consumers in the short run, it would harm them in the long run by reducing the number of new drugs developed.

  14. [The attractive position of France in international clinical research: 2006 survey assessed by Leem (French pharmaceutical companies)].

    PubMed

    Courcier, Soizic; Sibenaler, Claire; Couderc, Monique; Trinquet, Françoise; Plétan, Yannick; Lassale, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    In order to evaluate the attractiveness of France for conducting international clinical trials, a survey is performed every two years among pharmaceutical companies that are based in France or have affiliates in France. Initiated in 2006, the current survey was much more representative than the previous ones with 20 companies accounting for 61% of the French market. This survey included 352 international phase II and III clinical studies carried out in 2004 and 2005, 74 countries, 17 345 centres and 137 989 patients. France has participated to half of the overall number of international clinical trials. France ranked among the best European recruiters (0,19 patient/1000 inhabitants) at the second position behind Scandinavian countries, taking in account numbers of inhabitants. Protocols are now to be given the go-ahead by Ethics Committee (CCPPRB) within 60 days. With a high productivity in phase IIb and in oncology, France is still an attractive place to locate clinical research.

  15. Main Reasons for Registration Application Refusal of Generic and Similar Pharmaceutical Drug Products by the Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency (ANVISA)

    PubMed Central

    do Carmo, Ana Cerúlia Moraes; Piras, Stefânia Schimaneski; Rocha, Nayrton Flávio Moura

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The marketing authorization of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products involves the analysis of proposing company's administrative aspects as well as drug product technical description and scientific evaluations. This study evaluated the main reasons for registration refusal of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products in Brazil. The aim is to help future applicants to better organize the proposal. Methods. A retrospective search of drug products registration processes was performed on the Brazilian Government Official Gazette from January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2015. Results. Drug product quality control, drug product stability study, deadline accomplishment, API quality control made by drug manufacturer, active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and production report were the main reasons for marketing authorization application refusal of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products in 2015. Conclusion. Disclosure of the reasons behind failed applications is a step forward on regulatory transparency. Sharing of experiences is essential to international regulatory authorities and organizations to improve legislation requirements for the marketing authorization of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products. PMID:28280742

  16. Pharmaceutical companies vs. the State: who is responsible for post-trial provision of drugs in Brazil?

    PubMed

    Wang, Daniel Wei L; Ferraz, Octavio Luiz Motta

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the post-trial access to drugs for patients who participated in clinical trials in Brazil. The ethical guidance for clinical trials in Brazil is arguably one of the clearest in the world in attributing to research sponsors the responsibility for providing post-trial drugs to patients who participated in their experiments. The Federal Constitution recognizes health as a fundamental right to be fulfilled by the State. Based on the Brazilian constitution and on the National Health Council resolutions, courts have been accepting patients' claims and ordering the State and the pharmaceutical companies to provide these patients with the tested treatment in the quantity and duration they need it. This generous interpretation of the duties of the pharmaceutical companies and the State makes the Brazilian model for post-trial access unique when compared to the experience of other countries and thus should be followed with attention by future research in order to assess its consequences for patients, research sponsors, and the public health system.

  17. An analysis of the relationship between staff qualification and export readiness of pharmaceutical companies: the case of iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Export and the readiness to export constitute the first step of international marketing, which are affected by both internal and external factors of firms. One of the most important internal factors is the presence of skilled personnel. The purpose of this study was to define the relationship between staff qualification and encouragment with the readiness level of Iranian pharmacuetical firms for engagement in export marketing. The research was based on a single case study on a basket of seven leading domestic firms. For the bias reduction, questionnaires as well as interviews with managers were used. The performance of the studied factor was lower than the desired level for export readiness and there was much scope for improvement in staff qualifications to achieve such readiness. The results of this research enable small and medium-sized pharmaceutical companies to evaluate their staff qualification levels needed for export readiness and to detect their shortcomings in order to improve them.

  18. An Analysis of the Relationship Between Staff Qualification and Export Readiness of Pharmaceutical Companies: The Case of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Export and the readiness to export constitute the first step of international marketing, which are affected by both internal and external factors of firms. One of the most important internal factors is the presence of skilled personnel. The purpose of this study was to define the relationship between staff qualification and encouragment with the readiness level of Iranian pharmacuetical firms for engagement in export marketing. The research was based on a single case study on a basket of seven leading domestic firms. For the bias reduction, questionnaires as well as interviews with managers were used. The performance of the studied factor was lower than the desired level for export readiness and there was much scope for improvement in staff qualifications to achieve such readiness. The results of this research enable small and medium-sized pharmaceutical companies to evaluate their staff qualification levels needed for export readiness and to detect their shortcomings in order to improve them. PMID:24250528

  19. Menstrual disturbances and hormonal changes in women workers exposed to a mixture of organic solvents in a pharmaceutical company

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Somayeh; Namvar, Mohamad; Ghoreishvandi, Maryam; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Golabadi, Majid; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Khodarahmian, Mahshad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chemicals are among risk factors that can affect women's reproductive system. This study is aimed to investigate the association of occupational exposure to a mixture of organic solvents with menstruation disturbances and hormonal changes among female workers. Methods: Female workers of a pharmaceutical company were divided into three groups of non-exposed, lowexposed and highly-exposed to a mixture of organic solvents (formaldehyde, phenol, N-hexane, and chloroform) based on workplace measurements. Menstrual disturbances (in terms of short cycles, long cycles, irregular cycles, and bleeding or spotting between periods) and mean of hormone levels (including follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, prolactin, estrogen and progesterone levels) were compared between these three groups. For investigating associations, logistic regression was performed. Results: Our study showed that mean length of cycles, duration of bleeding, and amount of flow and also prevalence of long cycles, irregular cycles, and bleeding or spotting between periods were higher in exposed groups (p≤0.05). Odds ratio for prevalence of menstrual disturbances in the low exposure group and high exposure group were 9.69 (p=0.001) and 3.40 (p=0.002) respectively compared to the reference group. Estrogen and progesterone levels were not affected (p> 0.05), but other hormones levels were significantly disturbed in the exposed groups compared with the non-exposed group (p=0.001). Conclusion: Occupational exposure to the mixture of organic solvents may be associated with the increase of menstrual disorders and hormonal changes in female workers. Based on our findings, periodic evaluation of reproductive system of female workers in pharmaceutical companies is recommended. PMID:25695014

  20. [Sponsoring of medical conferences, workshops and symposia by pharmaceutical companies. Physicians must be wary of this!].

    PubMed

    Warntjen, M

    2009-12-01

    The longstanding conventional forms of cooperation between medical organizations and physicians on the one hand and the pharmaceutical industry and manufacturers of medical products on the other hand nowadays hold the risk of coming into conflict with the public prosecutor. Typical circumstances which are taken up by the investigating authorities are financial supports of medical conferences, workshops and symposia. To understand the problem under criminal law it is important to become acquainted with the protective aim of the statutory offences of the acceptance of benefits according to section sign 331 of the Penal Code (Strafgesetzbuch, StGB) and of corruption according to section sign 332 of the Penal Code. The "trust of the general public in the objectivity of governmental decisions" must be protected and the "evil appearance of the corruptibility of official acts" must be counteracted. A basic differentiation is made between physicians with and without office-bearing functions. By paying attention to the recommendations and basic principles of cooperation between the medical profession and the healthcare industry presented in this article (transparency principle, equivalence principle, documentation principle and separation principle) the emergence of any suspicious factors can be effectively avoided.

  1. Confessions of a pharmaceutical company: voice, narrative, and gendered dialectics in the case of Gardasil.

    PubMed

    Malkowski, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that both men and women carry the human papillomavirus (HPV) and jointly contribute to its status as an epidemic, the promotion of Gardasil, a vaccine that blocks infection from four strains of HPV, has largely been designated as a women's-only health issue. The following case study contributes to ongoing efforts in the field of health communication to identify problematic assumptions informing contemporary health policy and practices. Specifically, I analyze how Merck Pharmaceuticals, the creator of Gardasil, strategically imbues direct-to-consumer advertisements with contradiction to preserve traditional notions of both women and medicine. I found that three gendered dialectics characterize Merck's efforts to invoke complacency among female consumers: public/secret, education/ignorance, and structured/individualist. In the case of the HPV vaccination, the implications of these dialectics are the perpetuation of complacency among female audiences that threatens both the success of this particular technology and the overall status of women and health. In line with conclusions offered by Thompson (2010a), this study extends a call for health and communication scholars to continue to deconstruct dominant medical discourses and presents possibilities for re-storying narratives that mediate women's experiences with health.

  2. A study on the interactions of doctors with medical representatives of pharmaceutical companies in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital of South India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Nayak, Roopa P.; Sivaranjani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The promotional activities by medical representatives (MRs) of the pharmaceutical companies can impact the prescribing pattern of doctors. Hence, the interaction between doctors and the pharmaceutical industry is coming under increasing scrutiny. Objective: The primary objective was to assess the attitude of the doctors toward the interaction with the MRs of the pharmaceutical company. The secondary objective was to assess the awareness of the doctors about regulations governing their interaction with the pharmaceutical company. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. This study was carried out using a pretested questionnaire containing 10 questions between June and September 2014. The doctors working in the Dhanalakshmi Srinivasan Medical College and Hospital, Perambalur (Tamil Nadu) during the study period was included. Results: A total of 100 pretested questionnaires were distributed, and 81 doctors responded (response rate 81%). 37% doctors responded that they interacted with MR once a week whereas 25.9% told that they interact with MRs twice a month. About 69.1% doctors think that MR exaggerate the benefits of medicines and downplays the risks and contraindications of medicine(P = 0.000). 61.7% doctors think that MR has an impact on their prescribing (P = 0.000). 63% doctors stated that they had received promotional tools such as stationery items, drug sample, textbooks or journal reprints from MR in last 12 months (P = 0.0012). Unfortunately, 70.4% doctors have not read the guidelines about interacting with the pharmaceutical industry or its representative (P = 0.000). Conclusion: Rather than forbidding any connection between doctors and industry, it is better to establish ethical guidelines. The Medical Council of India code is a step in the right direction, but the majority of doctors in this study have not read the guidelines about interacting with the pharmaceutical industry or its representative. PMID:26957869

  3. 76 FR 77024 - In the Matter of Carolina Power & Light Company North Carolina Eastern, Municipal Power Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... Company (CP&L, the licensee) and North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency are the owners of Brunswick... and an ISFSI located in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The facility operating licenses authorize CP... facility operating licenses for Brunswick, to the extent held by CP&L. The proposed indirect transfer...

  4. Factors to consider in developing individual pharmaceutical product quality risk profiles useful to government procurement agencies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Boehm, Garth; Zheng, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Governments that procure pharmaceutical products from an Essential Medicine List (EML) bear special responsibility for the quality of these products. In this article we examine the possibility of developing a pharmaceutical product quality risk assessment scheme for use by government procurement officials. We use the Chinese EML as a basis, and US recall data is examined as it is publically available.This is justified as the article is only concerned with inherent product quality risks. After establishing a link between Chinese essential medicines and those available in the US, we examine US recall data to separate product specific recalls. We conclude that, in addition to existing manufacturing based risks, there are two other product specific risks that stand out from all others, degradation and dissolution failure. Methodology for relative product risk for degradation is needed to be developed and further work is required to better understand dissolution failures which largely occur with modified-release solid oral products. We conclude that a product specific quality risk profile would be enhanced by including a risk assessment for degradation for all products, and in the case of solid oral products, dissolution.

  5. Factors to consider in developing individual pharmaceutical product quality risk profiles useful to government procurement agencies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Boehm, Garth; Zheng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Governments that procure pharmaceutical products from an Essential Medicine List (EML) bear special responsibility for the quality of these products. In this article we examine the possibility of developing a pharmaceutical product quality risk assessment scheme for use by government procurement officials. We use the Chinese EML as a basis, and US recall data is examined as it is publically available.This is justified as the article is only concerned with inherent product quality risks. After establishing a link between Chinese essential medicines and those available in the US, we examine US recall data to separate product specific recalls. We conclude that, in addition to existing manufacturing based risks, there are two other product specific risks that stand out from all others, degradation and dissolution failure. Methodology for relative product risk for degradation is needed to be developed and further work is required to better understand dissolution failures which largely occur with modified-release solid oral products. We conclude that a product specific quality risk profile would be enhanced by including a risk assessment for degradation for all products, and in the case of solid oral products, dissolution. PMID:26904402

  6. Legal and ethical obligations to conduct a clinical drug trial in Australia as an investigator initiated and sponsored study for an overseas pharmaceutical company.

    PubMed

    Beran, Roy G

    2004-01-01

    Most multi-centre trials are both financed and sponsored by the pharmaceutical company involved. What follows will map the path adopted for an investigator initiated and sponsored study for a new indication of an established medication. The chief investigators of a company-sponsored, investigator-initiated, multi-centre, placebo-controlled study of an established medication, Pharmaceutical Benefit Scheme (PBS) listed for treatment of one condition but trialled in the management of another condition (trial of off-label use), were approached to submit a protocol to repeat the type of study with a different compound. The new study would test a different agent, also PBS listed, for the same condition as in the initial study and with the same off-licence application. The company would finance the study, provide the medication and matched placebo but only review the investigator-initiated protocol which would be sponsored by the principal investigator. This required the investigator to implement the trial, as would normally be done by the pharmaceutical company, yet also act as its principal investigator. The principal investigator, with colleagues and a Clinical Research Organisation (CRO), developed a protocol, adapted for the new agent, and submitted it for approval. Upon acceptance a contract was negotiated with the pharmaceutical company which had to overcome jurisdictional conflicts between common law and civil law legal systems. A CRO was contracted to undertake administrative functions which dictated special contractual agreements to overcome possible conflicts of interest for a sponsor/investigator to protect patient interests. There was need to find indemnification insurance with jurisdictional problems, co-investigators, ethics committee approvals and finance management as just some of the difficulties encountered. The paper will outline how these obstacles were overcome and how ethical and legal issues were respected through compromise. The ethical and legal

  7. 78 FR 62942 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Company-Run...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ...; Comment Request; Company-Run Annual Stress Test Reporting Template and Documentation for Covered..., ``Company-Run Annual Stress Test Reporting Template and Documentation for Covered Institutions with Total... information to OMB for review and clearance. Company-Run Annual Stress Test Reporting Template...

  8. Need of the regulation for profit percentage investment by pharmaceutical companies in new drug discovery research from the various local traditional medicinal and plant systems.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, M D

    2012-01-01

    In the modern medical systems the active pharmacological ingredients, effective against any disease is identified, purified and studied for its various effects and side-effects whereas it is not so in the traditional systems. Therefore, it is not surprising that safety concerns have often been raised about the traditional medical products. The major issue now, is to make appropriate situation with basic supports to bring all the available experts and resources together for the identification, purification, and study of efficacy and safety of the active molecules of the popular traditional medicines. Government and public sectors in the countries with such rich traditional medicinal and plant systems have related experts, but they also have much hurdle regarding recruitment and retention of expert human resources, getting fund, purchase and maintenance of equipment, bureaucratic formalities and others. The pharmaceutical companies have basic laboratories with related infrastructure and human resources as well as interest about bringing the drug molecules. To bridge the gap, there is a need of the regulation which will make the pharmaceutical companies to invest certain percentage of their profit in the field of research to identify new drug molecules and to study their effects. It is just not an issue of discovering the active molecule but also of creating the concept and culture of research, purity and quality of drugs, safety of people, and future direction of the human society.

  9. Developing a Suitable Model for Supplier Selection Based on Supply Chain Risks: An Empirical Study from Iranian Pharmaceutical Companies

    PubMed Central

    Mehralian, Gholamhossein; Rajabzadeh Gatari, Ali; Morakabati, Mohadese; Vatanpour, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The supply chain represents the critical link between the development of new product and the market in pharmaceutical industry. Over the years, improvements made in supply chain operations have focused largely on ways to reduce cost and gain efficiencies in scale. In addition, powerful regulatory and market forces have provided new incentives for pharmaceutical firms to basically rethink the way they produce and distribute products, and also to re-imagine the role of the supply chain in driving strategic growth, brand differentiation and economic value in the health continuum. The purpose of this paper is to formulate basic factors involved in risk analysis of pharmaceutical industry, and also determine the effective factors involved in suppliers selection and their priorities. This paper is based on the results of literature review, experts’ opinion acquisition, statistical analysis and also using MADM models on data gathered from distributed questionnaires. The model consists of the following steps and components: first factors involved in to supply chain risks are determined. Based on them a framework is considered. According the result of statistical analysis and MADM models the risk factors are formulated. The paper determines the main components and influenceial factors involving in the supply chain risks. Results showed that delivery risk can make an important contribution to mitigate the risk of pharmaceutical industry. PMID:24250442

  10. Developing a suitable model for supplier selection based on supply chain risks: an empirical study from Iranian pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Mehralian, Gholamhossein; Rajabzadeh Gatari, Ali; Morakabati, Mohadese; Vatanpour, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The supply chain represents the critical link between the development of new product and the market in pharmaceutical industry. Over the years, improvements made in supply chain operations have focused largely on ways to reduce cost and gain efficiencies in scale. In addition, powerful regulatory and market forces have provided new incentives for pharmaceutical firms to basically rethink the way they produce and distribute products, and also to re-imagine the role of the supply chain in driving strategic growth, brand differentiation and economic value in the health continuum. The purpose of this paper is to formulate basic factors involved in risk analysis of pharmaceutical industry, and also determine the effective factors involved in suppliers selection and their priorities. This paper is based on the results of literature review, experts' opinion acquisition, statistical analysis and also using MADM models on data gathered from distributed questionnaires. The model consists of the following steps and components: first factors involved in to supply chain risks are determined. Based on them a framework is considered. According the result of statistical analysis and MADM models the risk factors are formulated. The paper determines the main components and influenceial factors involving in the supply chain risks. Results showed that delivery risk can make an important contribution to mitigate the risk of pharmaceutical industry.

  11. Defense Logistics Agency Aviation Generally Purchased SoleSource Spare Parts From the General Electric Company at Fair and Reasonable Prices, but Improvements Could Be Made (Redacted)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-24

    Defense Logistics Agency Aviation Generally Purchased Sole‑Source Spare Parts From the General Electric Company at Fair and Reasonable Prices, but...USE ONLY FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY DODIG-2015-153 (Project No. D2015-D000AT-0064.000) │ i Results in Brief Defense Logistics Agency Aviation Generally...www.dodig.mil Objective Our audit objective was to determine whether the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Aviation was purchasing sole-source spare parts at

  12. Current practice and perspectives in CRO oversight based on a survey performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa)

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Michael; Hundt, Ferdinand; Busta, Susanne; Mikus, Stefan; Sanden, Per-Holger; Sörgel, Andrea; Ruppert, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the number and scope of outsourced activities in the pharmaceutical industry have increased heavily. In addition, also the type of outsourcing has changed significantly in that time. This raises the question of whether and how sponsors retain the capability to select and to control the contract research organizations (CROs) involved and what expertise still has to be present in the development department as well as other relevant departments to ensure adequate oversight, also in line with the expectations of regulators and health authorities. In order to answer these questions, a survey was conducted among the German vfa member companies. The survey describes the latest developments and experiences in outsourcing by 18 German vfa member companies. It concentrates on measures how to implement Quality Assurance (QA) when performing outsourced clinical studies. This study shows that the majority of companies apply a full-outsourcing, preferred-provider model of clinical trial services, with the clinical research department playing the major role in this process. A large amount of guiding documents, processes and tools are used to ensure an adequate oversight of the services performed by the CRO(s). Finally the guiding principles for all oversight processes should be transparent communication, a clearly established expectation for quality, a precise definition of accountability and responsibility while avoiding silo mentality, and a comprehensive documentation of the oversight’s evidence. For globally acting and outsourcing sponsors, oversight processes need to be aligned with regards to local and global perspectives. This survey shows that the current implementation of oversight processes in the participating companies covers all relevant areas to ensure highest quality and integrity of the data produced by the outsourced clinical trial. PMID:28163667

  13. Silvanus Bevan the 'Quaker FRS' (1691-1765) apothecary with a note on his contribution to the founding of the pharmaceutical company Allen and Hanbury.

    PubMed

    Morris, John S

    2011-02-01

    Silvanus Bevan was born in Swansea, South Wales, moved to London where he trained as an apothecary, and then in 1715 opened a business at Plough Court off Lombard Street in London. As a committed Quaker he was renowned for honesty and fair-trading and consequently he prospered. In the 1730s he took his brother Timothy as a partner. Silvanus Bevan had practised medicine at his Plough Court pharmacy and, with the arrival of his brother became less involved in pharmacy and increasingly interested in medicine. In 1725 he became a Fellow of the Royal Society. Within the family the pharmacy at Plough Court continued to prosper and became the forerunner of the pharmaceutical company Allen and Hanbury. Marriage into other Quaker families linked Silvanus Bevan with the banking firm Barclays.

  14. [Cancer: Is it really so different? Particularities of oncologic drugs from the perspective of the pharmaceutical regulatory agency].

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Harald; Broich, Karl

    2013-01-01

    For innovative oncological medicines the centralised procedure at the European Medicines Agency is mandatory for a marketing authorisation application for the European Union. As with other medical drugs, the marketing authorisation decision is based on the assessment of its efficacy, safety and pharmaceutical quality but does not consider price or reimbursement. More sophisticated diagnostic methods drive an increasing stratification of cancer into a multitude of different diseases. Regardless of their different pathogenesis and therapeutic options the most relevant clinical endpoints remain cure, overall survival and progression free survival. These endpoints include both efficacy and safety, as patient survival reflects the sum of the beneficial anti-tumour effects (increasing survival) AND the adverse effects (decreasing survival). The benefit of an anticancer medicine should be evident from both overall survival and progression free survival (e.g. used as primary and secondary endpoints). Mature data on overall survival may not be needed for marketing authorisation if a clear increase in progression free survival convincingly predicts a beneficial effect on overall survival. In these exceptional cases treatment of patients with an obviously beneficial medicine must not be delayed - possibly for years - until the exact size of the benefit has been established. The continued stratification of the disease cancer results in a lower prevalence for each of the newly distinguished disease entities and an ever increasing number of orphan designations for medicines for rare diseases. Incentives for the development of orphan medicines include market exclusivity for up to ten years. In specific circumstances, however, the orphan legislation may restrict the authorisation and marketing of competing generic products even beyond these ten years. Conditional approval and approval under exceptional circumstances may accelerate patients' access to a new medicine. Both postulate

  15. Effect of mergers and acquisitions on drug discovery: perspective from a case study of a Japanese pharmaceutical company.

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Sotaro; Tanikawa, Kunihiro; Fujimoto, Ryuhei; Kimura, Hiromichi

    2008-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has experienced intermittent waves of mergers and acquisitions (M&As) since the 1980s and recently appeared to be in yet another wave. Previous studies indicated rather negative impacts of consolidation on research and development, suggesting that they do not necessarily lead to long-term reinforcement of research capabilities, although they may enrich the drug pipeline in the short term. However, recent studies have implied a positive side in terms of knowledge-base transfer. Further micro-organizational studies suggested that scientists learned new knowledge and approaches from partner scientists and improved their performance and innovation. These findings imply that measures for the scientist-level integration after M&As would reinforce fundamental research capabilities in the long term.

  16. 41 CFR 302-12.7 - What expenses will my agency pay if I use a relocation services company to sell or purchase a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What expenses will my agency pay if I use a relocation services company to sell or purchase a residence for which I and/or a... Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  17. 41 CFR 302-12.6 - What expenses will my agency pay if I use a relocation services company to ship household goods...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What expenses will my agency pay if I use a relocation services company to ship household goods in excess of the maximum weight allowance? 302-12.6 Section 302-12.6 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel...

  18. 41 CFR 302-12.6 - What expenses will my agency pay if I use a relocation services company to ship household goods...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What expenses will my agency pay if I use a relocation services company to ship household goods in excess of the maximum weight allowance? 302-12.6 Section 302-12.6 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel...

  19. 41 CFR 302-12.7 - What expenses will my agency pay if I use a relocation services company to sell or purchase a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What expenses will my agency pay if I use a relocation services company to sell or purchase a residence for which I and/or a... Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  20. 41 CFR 302-12.7 - What expenses will my agency pay if I use a relocation services company to ship household goods...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What expenses will my agency pay if I use a relocation services company to ship household goods in excess of the maximum weight allowance? 302-12.7 Section 302-12.7 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel...

  1. Create a translational medicine knowledge repository - Research downsizing, mergers and increased outsourcing have reduced the depth of in-house translational medicine expertise and institutional memory at many pharmaceutical and biotech companies: how will they avoid relearning old lessons?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pharmaceutical industry consolidation and overall research downsizing threatens the ability of companies to benefit from their previous investments in translational research as key leaders with the most knowledge of the successful use of biomarkers and translational pharmacology models are laid off or accept their severance packages. Two recently published books may help to preserve this type of knowledge but much of this type of information is not in the public domain. Here we propose the creation of a translational medicine knowledge repository where companies can submit their translational research data and access similar data from other companies in a precompetitive environment. This searchable repository would become an invaluable resource for translational scientists and drug developers that could speed and reduce the cost of new drug development. PMID:21569250

  2. Create a translational medicine knowledge repository--research downsizing, mergers and increased outsourcing have reduced the depth of in-house translational medicine expertise and institutional memory at many pharmaceutical and biotech companies: how will they avoid relearning old lessons?

    PubMed

    Littman, Bruce H; Marincola, Francesco M

    2011-05-10

    Pharmaceutical industry consolidation and overall research downsizing threatens the ability of companies to benefit from their previous investments in translational research as key leaders with the most knowledge of the successful use of biomarkers and translational pharmacology models are laid off or accept their severance packages. Two recently published books may help to preserve this type of knowledge but much of this type of information is not in the public domain. Here we propose the creation of a translational medicine knowledge repository where companies can submit their translational research data and access similar data from other companies in a precompetitive environment. This searchable repository would become an invaluable resource for translational scientists and drug developers that could speed and reduce the cost of new drug development.

  3. [Fraud in the health-care system from the perspective of the public health insurance companies. Empirical findings on the work of anti-fraud agencies].

    PubMed

    Meier, B D; Homann, D

    2010-07-01

    The article summarises the results of a study on the activities of the German public health insurance companies to fight fraudulent behaviour in the system. The study is based on the analysis of 140 activity reports of the years 2004 and 2005 which the companies had to deliver to the Federal Social Insurance Authority as well as on the results of an additional survey. The article deals with the number of cases, the phenomenology of the delinquent acts, the referral of the suspicious cases to the law enforcement agencies, and the cooperation with other insurance companies. Finally, the article presents some considerations on an improved prevention of fraud in the public health care system.

  4. Pharmaceutical market access in emerging markets: concepts, components, and future.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Juluru, Karthaveerya; Thimmaraju, Phani Kishore; Reddy, Jayachandra; Patil, Anand

    2014-01-01

    This article intends to consolidate the concepts of pharmaceutical market access and highlight its growing importance in emerging markets. Market access has gained considerable attention worldwide as countries try to contain their escalating healthcare expenditures amidst the global economic slowdown. This has resulted in governments adopting stricter measures for new product approval. Thus, pharmaceutical companies are finding it increasingly difficult to successfully address the specific challenges posed by various government and regulatory agencies and stakeholders. There is an increasing need to establish market access functions, especially in emerging markets, where the complex, dynamic healthcare landscape confounds product approval and uptake. Moreover, emerging markets are the engines of growth today, and, thus, performing in these markets is critical for the majority of pharmaceutical companies. To address the challenges posed by regulatory agencies and diverse stakeholders, a customized market access strategy is the need of the hour. A market access framework with specific tools and tactics will help companies to plan, implement, and monitor stakeholder engagement activities.

  5. Pharmaceutical market access in emerging markets: concepts, components, and future

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anuj; Juluru, Karthaveerya; Thimmaraju, Phani Kishore; Reddy, Jayachandra; Patil, Anand

    2014-01-01

    This article intends to consolidate the concepts of pharmaceutical market access and highlight its growing importance in emerging markets. Market access has gained considerable attention worldwide as countries try to contain their escalating healthcare expenditures amidst the global economic slowdown. This has resulted in governments adopting stricter measures for new product approval. Thus, pharmaceutical companies are finding it increasingly difficult to successfully address the specific challenges posed by various government and regulatory agencies and stakeholders. There is an increasing need to establish market access functions, especially in emerging markets, where the complex, dynamic healthcare landscape confounds product approval and uptake. Moreover, emerging markets are the engines of growth today, and, thus, performing in these markets is critical for the majority of pharmaceutical companies. To address the challenges posed by regulatory agencies and diverse stakeholders, a customized market access strategy is the need of the hour. A market access framework with specific tools and tactics will help companies to plan, implement, and monitor stakeholder engagement activities. PMID:27226834

  6. Defense Contract Audit Agency: Additional Guidance Needed Regarding DCAA’s Use of Companies’ Internal Audit Reports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    DEFENSE CONTRACT AUDIT AGENCY Additional Guidance Needed Regarding DCAA’s Use of Companies’ Internal Audit Reports...COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defense Contract Audit Agency: Additional Guidance Needed Regarding DCAA’s Use of...Companies’ Internal Audit Reports 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  7. 75 FR 54627 - Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... AGENCY Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities AGENCY... guidance document entitled, Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities... been studying unused pharmaceutical disposal practices at health care facilities, prompted by...

  8. Sulfite-containing Canadian pharmaceutical products available in 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, M; Schuster, B; Schellenberg, R

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compile an inclusive list of Canadian pharmaceutical products available in 1991 that contained sulfites. DATA SOURCES: Written and oral responses from 94 pharmaceutical companies selected from the 1989 Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties. RESULTS: A list of sulfite-containing pharmaceutical products was compiled from data supplied by the 90 responding companies. Companies whose products contained no sulfites were separately identified. CONCLUSIONS: Sulfites are present in many pharmaceutical products and are one of many excipients and additives that have been reported to cause severe adverse reactions. The provided list should be a useful aid for health care practitioners when prescribing pharmaceutical products for sulfite-sensitive patients. PMID:1483237

  9. Pharmaceutical Education and the Translation of Pharmaceutical Care into Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Gail D.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic approach to reform of pharmaceutical education is seen as necessary to link intended outcomes of reform to a progressive and generally accepted mission of professional practice. Cooperation between pharmaceutical education, professional organizations, and regulatory agencies is viewed as necessary and refinement of professional…

  10. European pharmacovigilance: increasingly outsourced to drug companies.

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    New regulations reorganising pharmacovigilance at the European level were adopted in late 2010, then revised in 2012 in the wake of the Mediator (benfluorex) disaster. The European Commission's original proposals, released in 2008, would have represented a major step backwards in the protection afforded to European citizens, in particular by facilitating earlier marketing authorisations. Thanks to the mobilisation of civil society, the Members of the European Parliament have improved these proposals, supported by EU health ministers. The role of the new European Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) has been strengthened. Patients in every Member State have the right to report adverse drug effects directly to health authorities. EU drug regulatory agencies are required to provide greater transparency, and public access to information about adverse effects has been improved. However, one major regression persists: the central role given to pharmaceutical companies in the collection and interpretation of reports of adverse drug effects, despite their conflicts of interest. Drug companies are asked to record the adverse effect reports of which they are aware in a vast European centralised database, Eudravigilance, without going through drug regulatory agencies. Pharmaceutical companies remain responsible for producing "a scientific evaluation of the risk-benefit balance" of their drug, as part of the periodic benefit-risk assessment reports they are required to submit to drug regulatory agencies. These reports are analysed for the entire EU by two Member States (one rapporteur and one co-rapporteur), so that harmonised decisions can be taken. But these decisions are based on data preanalysed by the drug companies. In addition, the independence of the European Medicines Agency is undermined by its financial reliance on the fees paid by pharmaceutical companies in exchange for these assessments. In 2012, following France's Mediator disaster, several modest

  11. 75 FR 60865 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Allied World Reinsurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Allied World Reinsurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Allied World Reinsurance Company (NAIC 22730). Business Address:...

  12. 76 FR 14746 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds Change in State of Incorporation; Western Bonding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... Bonding Company; Western Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service... Bonding Company (NAIC 13191) and Western Insurance Company (NAIC 10008) have redomesticated from the...

  13. [Early achievements of the Danish pharmaceutical industry-6 Pharmacia].

    PubMed

    Grevsen, Jørgen V; Kruse, Edith; Kruse, Poul R

    2014-01-01

    The article series provides a written and pictorial account of the Danish pharmaceutical industry's products from their introduction until about 1950. Part 6 deals with products from A/S Pharmacia. A/S Pharmacia was established in Copenhagen in 1922 as a Danish limited company by the enterprising pharmacist Edward Jacobsen. Pharmacia was not Jacobsen's first pharmaceutical company as previously he had established a pharmaceutical agency already in 1913 which in 1919 was reorganized to a limited company by the name of A/S Edward Jacobsen. This agency was later extended to include a production of generics. Jacobsen remained the co-owner and manager of Pharmacia until 1934 where he resigned and established another company, A/S Ejco, for the manufacture of generics. It is worth mentioning that already in 1911 a Swedish pharmaceutical company was established named AB Pharmacia. Today we do not know whether Edward Jacobsen knew about this Swedish company. Later on in 1936 AB Pharmacia and A/S Pharmacia made a contract concerning mutual market sharing, and a research cooperation was brought about between the two companies which resulted in an increase of turnover for A/S Pharmacia. In 1955 the cooperation between the two companies was increased as the Swedish company joined as principal shareholder with the purpose of continuing and developing the Danish company as an independent pharmaceutical company with its own research and development as well as manufacture, control and marketing. Therefore Pharmacia in Denmark was able to establish a synthesis factory in Koge and move the domicile to new premises in Hillered. In 1993 Pharmacia was presented in a printed matter as "The largest Nordic pharmaceutical company" as a result of the merger between the Swedish Kabi Pharmacia, formerly established by a merger between Kabi Vitrum and AB Pharmacia, and the Italian Farmitalia Carlo Erba. Only two years later in 1995 Pharmacia merged with the American pharmaceutical company The

  14. [Pharmaceuticals: a strategic national industry].

    PubMed

    Hollender, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Asked by Mme Nicole Fontaine, Delegate Minister of Industry, to help the government with its ongoing reflections on pharmaceutical industrial strategy, and the necessary autonomy of our country in the face of major commercial threats, a working group of the French National Academy of Medicine consulted representatives of five French and two foreign major drug companies. Their statements can be classified in four categories:--the first concerns new medications, which must be approved successively by three commissions, whose opinions are often delayed and influenced by economic considerations;--second, public and private research are both insufficient and are sometimes hindered by procedural restrictions,--third, the pharmaceutical industry is unable to deal with frequent and unforseeable political upheavals,--France does not adequately recognize the strategic importance of the pharmaceutical industry in the national economy. The Academy makes several recommendations: the French pharmaceutical industry should be considered as a national priority, the strategic importance of national pharmaceutical companies should be recognized, a multi-annual contract should be signed with manufacturers, clinical trials should be facilitated in France, relationships between the national pharmaceutical industry and public research structures should be reinforced, and an inter-ministerial Council on Pharmaceuticals should be created. This study was supplemented by a survey of veterinary medications, the results and conclusions of which are very similar to those outlined above for human medicines.

  15. Agreements at the Pharmaceutical/University Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Katherine

    1987-01-01

    Specific agreements that arise at the interface between universities and pharmaceutical companies are described including sponsored research agreements, license agreements, clinical study agreements, material transfer agreements, and patient consent forms with respect to commercialization rights. (Author/MLW)

  16. 78 FR 24754 - Guidance for Industry on Regulatory Classification of Pharmaceutical Co-Crystals; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Pharmaceutical Co-Crystals; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... ``Regulatory Classification of Pharmaceutical Co-Crystals.'' This guidance provides applicants of new drug... Research's (CDER's) current thinking on the appropriate regulatory classification of pharmaceutical...

  17. 75 FR 33824 - Pharmaceutical Products and Chemical Intermediates, Fourth Review: Advice Concerning the Addition...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Pharmaceutical Products and Chemical Intermediates, Fourth Review: Advice Concerning the Addition of Certain Products to the Pharmaceutical Appendix to the HTS AGENCY: United States International... (Commission) instituted investigation No. 332-520, Pharmaceutical Products and Chemical Intermediates,...

  18. 75 FR 15642 - Schedules of Controlled Substances: Exempted Prescription Product; River Edge Pharmaceutical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Prescription Product; River Edge Pharmaceutical, Servira AGENCY: Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA... one new application for exemption for River Edge Pharmaceutical's Servira . Having reviewed this... Pharmaceutical's Servira (NDC Code 68032-256) tablets containing 48.6 mg phenobarbital in combination...

  19. Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, Graham S.; Pendri, Yadagiri; Snyder, Lawrence B.; Yevich, Joseph P.; Deshpande, Milind

    This chapter will discuss the role of chemistry within the pharmaceutical industry. Although the focus will be upon the industry within the United States, much of the discussion is equally relevant to pharmaceutical companies based in other first world nations such as Japan and those in Europe. The major objective of the pharmaceutical industry is the discovery, development, and marketing of efficacious and safe drugs for the treatment of human disease. Of course drug companies do not exist as altruistic, charitable organizations but like other share-holder owned corporations within our capitalistic society must achieve profits in order to remain viable and competitive. Thus, there exists a conundrum between the dual goals of enhancing the quality and duration of human life and that of increasing stock-holder equity. Much has been written and spoken in the lay media about the high prices of prescription drugs and the hardships this places upon the elderly and others of limited income.

  20. Recognizing misleading pharmaceutical marketing online.

    PubMed

    De Freitas, Julian; Falls, Brian A; Haque, Omar S; Bursztajn, Harold J

    2014-01-01

    In light of decision-making psychology, this article details how drug marketing operates across established and novel web domains and identifies some common misleading trends and influences on prescribing and patient-initiated medication requests. The Internet has allowed pharmaceutical marketing to become more salient than ever before. Although the Internet's growth has improved the dissemination of pharmaceutical information, it has also led to the increased influence of misleading pharmaceutical marketing. Such mismarketing is of concern, especially in psychiatry, since psychotropics generate considerable revenue for drug companies. In a climate of resource-limited drug regulation and time-strapped physicians, we recommend improving both independent monitoring and consumer awareness of Internet-enabled, potentially misleading, pharmaceutical marketing influences.

  1. 77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Grange Mutual Casualty Company (NAIC 14060). Business Address: 671 South... long as the companies remain qualified (see 31 CFR part 223). A list of qualified companies...

  2. 75 FR 22689 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Regent Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Regent Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial... following company: Regent Insurance Company (NAIC 24449) Business Address: One General Drive, Sun Prairie... renewal as long as the companies remain qualified (see 31 CFR part 223). A list of qualified companies...

  3. Risk Communication and the Pharmaceutical Industry: what is the reality?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian; Chakraborty, Sweta

    2012-11-01

    Risk communication is central to the risk management strategy of a pharmaceutical company. Pharmaceutical companies primarily communicate risk through labelling tools such as the Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC), package insert, patient information leaflet (PIL) and the carton, which are currently regulated based on templates such as those of the EU. Recent research raises concern about how effective the SmPC is alone in communicating risk. There is some evidence that carton design can influence risk comprehension. Processes to check new trade names cannot be confused with existing names is a simple measure to mitigate one form of risk. Given the central role and the vast amount of resource that is consumed, it is surprising there has not been extensive original research to see whether product information such as the SmPC is a good tool for communicating risk. Recently, EU agencies have assessed the communication value of the PIL and revised the template and guidelines. However, no evaluation of user testing has been conducted at European level since the introduction of these new requirements. As regards 'Dear Healthcare Professional Communications', there is inconsistent evidence about their ability to change patient and physician behaviour. There is a dearth of evidence about what sort of communications materials are the most effective under which circumstances. The use of templates restricts the flexibility of companies to adapt their risk messages to their targets. Effective communication requires understanding how different audiences perceive the message and what the fundamental drivers are for altering patient and prescriber behaviour to be safer. This requires careful consideration of the relationship between risk communication, perception and management. However, the focus of a company's risk communication plan is normally on the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) regions and their regulations. Although the same regulatory tools are

  4. Mergers and innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Comanor, William S; Scherer, F M

    2013-01-01

    Conflicting trends confound the pharmaceutical industry. The productivity of pharmaceutical innovation has declined in recent years. At the same time, the cohort of large companies who are the leading engines of pharmaceutical R&D has become increasingly concentrated. The concurrent presence of these trends is not sufficient to determine causation. In response to lagging innovation prospects, some companies have sought refuge in mergers and acquisitions to disguise their dwindling prospects or gain R&D synergies. On the other hand, the increased concentration brought on by recent mergers may have contributed to the declining rate of innovation. In this paper, we consider the second of these causal relationships: the likely impact of the recent merger wave among the largest pharmaceutical companies on the rate of innovation. In other words, have recent mergers, which may have been taken in response to lagging innovation, represented a self-defeating strategy that only made industry outcomes worse?

  5. Pharmaceutical new product development: the increasing role of in-licensing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nancy V

    2008-12-01

    Many pharmaceutical companies are facing a pipeline gap because of the increasing economic burden and uncertainty associated with internal research and development programs designed to develop new pharmaceutical products. To fill this pipeline gap, pharmaceutical companies are increasingly relying on in-licensing opportunities. New business development identifies new pharmaceuticals that satisfy unmet needs and are a good strategic fit for the company, completes valuation models and forecasts, evaluates the ability of the company to develop and launch products, and pursues in-licensing agreements for pharmaceuticals that cannot be developed internally on a timely basis. These agreements involve the transfer of access rights for patents, trademarks, or similar intellectual property from an outside company in exchange for payments. Despite the risks, in-licensing is increasingly becoming the preferred method for pharmaceutical companies with pipeline gaps to bring new pharmaceuticals to the clinician.

  6. [The Korean Pharmaceutical Industry and the Expansion of the General Pharmaceuticals Market in the 1950-1960s].

    PubMed

    Sihn, Kyu-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    vitamins and health tonics showed particularly explosive growth. As Korean industrial workers worked night and day to increase exports in the 1960s, they needed vitamins and health tonics for recovery from fatigue and to support vitality. The expansion of the general pharmaceuticals market was accompanied by increases in numbers of pharmaceutical companies. Competition intensified between pharmaceutical companies, leading some companies to search for new survival plans. The pharmaceutical industry underwent structural reform in 1960s, replacing imported medical substances with local products and inventing the new market of general pharmaceuticals. The market for vitamins and health tonics was increased, and a successful product could support a pharmaceutical company. On the contrary, a general pharmaceutical could affect the very existence of the company: if a company chased a popular product and the imitation bubble burst, then the company have lost its competitiveness in the world market.

  7. The epiphany of data warehousing technologies in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J S; Koprowski, S P

    2002-03-01

    The highly competitive pharmaceutical industry has seen many external changes to its landscape as companies consume each other increasing their pipelines while removing redundant functions and processes. Internally, companies have sought to streamline the discovery and development phases in an attempt to improve candidate selection and reduce the time to regulatory filing. In conjunction with efforts to screen and develop more compounds faster and more efficiently, database management systems (DBMS) have been developed for numerous groups supporting various R&D efforts. An outgrowth of DBMS evolution has been the birth of data warehousing. Often confused with DBMS, data warehousing provides a conduit for data residing across platforms, networks, and in different data structures. Through the use of metadata, the warehouse establishes connectivity of varied data stores (operational detail data, ODD) and permits identification of data ownership, location and transaction history. This evolution has closely mirrored and in some ways been driven by the electronic submission (formerly CANDA). The integration of the electronic submissions and document management with R&D data warehousing initiatives should provide a platform by which companies can address compliance with 21 CFR Part 11. Now more than ever "corporate memory" is being extended to the data itself. The when, why and how of successes and failures are constantly being probed by R&D management teams. The volume of information being generated by today's pharmaceutical companies requires mining of historical data on a routine basis. Data warehousing represents a core technology to assist in this endeavor. New initiatives in this field address the necessity of data portals through which warehouse data can be web-enabled and exploited by diverse data customers both internal and external to the company. The epiphany of data warehousing technologies within the pharmaceutical industry has begun and promises to change

  8. Pharmacovigilance in pharmaceutical companies: An overview.

    PubMed

    Mammì, Maria; Citraro, Rita; Torcasio, Giovanni; Cusato, Gennaro; Palleria, Caterina; di Paola, Eugenio Donato

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacovigilance is responsible for monitoring the safety of medicines in normal clinical use and during clinical trials. In the light of the experience acquired and following an assessment by the Commission of the Union system of pharmacovigilance, it has become clear that it is necessary to take measures in order to improve the operation of Union law on the pharmacovigilance of medicinal products for human use. Regulation (EU) No 1235/2010 and Directive 2010/84/EU introduced new legislation on pharmacovigilance. The marketing authorization holder should be responsible for continuously monitoring the safety of its medicinal products for human use, for informing the authorities of any changes that might have an impact on the marketing authorization, and for ensuring that the product information is kept up-to-date. Marketing authorization holders (MAH) record all suspected adverse reactions occurring in the European Union or in the third countries, and which are brought to their attention spontaneously by the patients or their health care, or occurring in the context of post-authorization study. For all medicinal products is mandatory to maintain a pharmacovigilance system master file (PSMF). According to the Legislative Decree 219/2006 the MAH must submit to the competent authorities the information on suspected adverse reactions of a medicinal product, in form of a periodic safety update reports (PSURs).

  9. Vulnerabilities to misinformation in online pharmaceutical marketing.

    PubMed

    De Freitas, Julian; Falls, Brian A; Haque, Omar S; Bursztajn, Harold J

    2013-05-01

    Given the large percentage of Internet users who search for health information online, pharmaceutical companies have invested significantly in online marketing of their products. Although online pharmaceutical marketing can potentially benefit both physicians and patients, it can also harm these groups by misleading them. Indeed, some pharmaceutical companies have been guilty of undue influence, which has threatened public health and trust. We conducted a review of the available literature on online pharmaceutical marketing, undue influence and the psychology of decision-making, in order to identify factors that contribute to Internet users' vulnerability to online pharmaceutical misinformation. We find five converging factors: Internet dependence, excessive trust in the veracity of online information, unawareness of pharmaceutical company influence, social isolation and detail fixation. As the Internet continues to change, it is important that regulators keep in mind not only misinformation that surrounds new web technologies and their contents, but also the factors that make Internet users vulnerable to misinformation in the first place. Psychological components are a critical, although often neglected, risk factor for Internet users becoming misinformed upon exposure to online pharmaceutical marketing. Awareness of these psychological factors may help Internet users attentively and safely navigate an evolving web terrain.

  10. Company profile: Athersys.

    PubMed

    Van Bokkelen, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Athersys (Nasdaq: ATHX) is a biopharmaceutical company engaged in the discovery and development of novel therapies designed to treat significant unmet medical needs. The company is heavily focused on the regenerative medicine area, with multiple clinical and preclinical stage programs. The most advanced programs at the company are focused on the development of MultiStem®, a clinical stage allogeneic stem cell therapy that has demonstrated potential for treating a range of conditions and is believed to have widespread application in the field of regenerative medicine. The company has internal programs applying MultiStem across multiple therapeutic areas including cardiovascular, neurological, immune dysfunction and other disease areas, and partnered programs with Pfizer (applying MultiStem to treat inflammatory bowel disease) and Angiotech Pharmaceuticals (acute myocardial infarction). Athersys has a broad network of collaborative relationships with leading research and clinical institutions and is committed to developing a pipeline of novel 'best-in-class' medicines.

  11. 76 FR 37194 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds; Change in State of Incorportation, Business Address...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    .... Paul Mercury Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the... Company (24767), St. Paul Guardian Insurance Company (24775) and St. Paul Mercury Insurance (24791)...

  12. Homochiral drugs: a demanding tendency of the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Núñez, María C; García-Rubiño, M Eugenia; Conejo-García, Ana; Cruz-López, Olga; Kimatrai, María; Gallo, Miguel A; Espinosa, Antonio; Campos, Joaquín M

    2009-01-01

    The issue of drug chirality is now a major theme in the design and development of new drugs, underpinned by a new understanding of the role of molecular recognition in many pharmacologically relevant events. In general, three methods are utilized for the production of a chiral drug: the chiral pool, separation of racemates, and asymmetric synthesis. Although the use of chiral drugs predates modern medicine, only since the 1980's has there been a significant increase in the development of chiral pharmaceutical drugs. An important commercial reason is that as patents on racemic drugs expire, pharmaceutical companies have the opportunity to extend patent coverage through development of the chiral switch enantiomers with desired bioactivity. Stimulated by the new policy statements issued by the regulatory agencies, the pharmaceutical industry has systematically begun to develop chiral drugs in enantiometrically enriched pure forms. This new trend has caused a tremendous change in the industrial small- and large-scale production to enantiomerically pure drugs, leading to the revisiting and updating of old technologies, and to the development of new methodologies of their large-scale preparation (as the use of stereoselective syntheses and biocatalyzed reactions). The final decision whether a given chiral drug will be marketed in an enantiomerically pure form, or as a racemic mixture of both enantiomers, will be made weighing all the medical, financial and social proficiencies of one or other form. The kinetic, pharmacological and toxicological properties of individual enantiomers need to be characterized, independently of a final decision.

  13. Pharmaceutical virtue.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily

    2006-06-01

    In the early history of psychopharmacology, the prospect of developing technologically sophisticated drugs to alleviate human ills was surrounded with a fervor that could be described as religious. This paper explores the subsequent history of the development of psychopharmacological agents, focusing on the ambivalent position of both the industry and its employees. Based on interviews with retired pharmaceutical employees who were active in the industry in the 1950s and 1960s when the major breakthroughs were made in the development of MAOIs and SSRIs, the paper explores the initial development of educational materials for use in sales campaigns. In addition, based on interviews with current employees in pharmaceutical sales and marketing, the paper describes the complex perspective of contemporary pharmaceutical employees who must live surrounded by the growing public vilification of the industry as rapacious and profit hungry and yet find ways to make their jobs meaningful and dignified. The paper will contribute to the understudied problem of how individuals function in positions that require them to be part of processes that on one description constitute a social evil, but on another, constitute a social good.

  14. Pharmaceutical lobbying in Brazil: a missing topic in the public health research agenda.

    PubMed

    Paumgartten, Francisco José Roma

    2016-12-22

    In the US, where registration of lobbyists is mandatory, the pharmaceutical industry and private health-care providers spend huge amounts of money seeking to influence health policies and government decisions. In Brazil, where lobbying lacks transparency, there is virtually no data on drug industry expenditure to persuade legislators and government officials of their viewpoints and to influence decision-making according to commercial interests. Since 1990, however, the Associação da Indústria Farmacêutica de Pesquisa (Interfarma - Pharmaceutical Research Industry Association), Brazilian counterpart of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), main lobbying organization of the US pharmaceutical industry, has played a major role in the advocacy of interests of major drug companies. The main goals of Interfarma lobbying activities are: shortening the average time taken by the Brazilian regulatory agency (ANVISA) to approve marketing authorization for a new drug; making the criteria for incorporation of new drugs into SUS (Brazilian Unified Health System) more flexible and speeding up technology incorporation; changing the Country's ethical clearance system and the ethical requirements for clinical trials to meet the need of the innovative drug industry, and establishing a National Policy for Rare Diseases that allows a prompt incorporation of orphan drugs into SUS. Although lobbying affects community health and well-being, this topic is not in the public health research agenda. The impacts of pharmaceutical lobbying on health policies and health-care costs are of great importance for SUS and deserve to be investigated.

  15. 77 FR 25349 - Mutual Insurance Holding Company Treated as Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... 380 RIN 3064-AD89 Mutual Insurance Holding Company Treated as Insurance Company AGENCY: Federal... (``Final Rule'') that treats a mutual insurance holding company as an insurance company for purposes of...''). The Final Rule clarifies that the liquidation and rehabilitation of a covered financial company...

  16. 77 FR 25536 - Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Endurance American Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Endurance American Insurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Endurance American Insurance Company (NAIC 10641). Business Address: 333... subsequent annual renewal as long as the companies remain qualified (see 31 CFR part 223). A list...

  17. 78 FR 19366 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Ohio Security Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Ohio Security Insurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Ohio Security Insurance Company (NAIC 24082). BUSINESS ADDRESS: 62 Maple... subject to subsequent annual renewal as long as the companies remain qualified (see 31 CFR part 223)....

  18. 76 FR 77591 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Aspen American Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Aspen American Insurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Aspen American Insurance Company (NAIC 43460). Business Address: 175... subject to subsequent annual renewal as long as the companies remain qualified (see 31 CFR part 223)....

  19. 75 FR 61246 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Darwin National Assurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Darwin National Assurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Darwin National Assurance Company (NAIC 16624). Business Address: 9 Farm... subsequent annual renewal as long as the companies remain qualified ] (see 31 CFR part 223). A list...

  20. 76 FR 77442 - Mutual Insurance Holding Company Treated as Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... CORPORATION 12 CFR Part 380 RIN 3064-AD89 Mutual Insurance Holding Company Treated as Insurance Company AGENCY... insurance holding company as an insurance company for the purpose of Section 203(e) of the Dodd-Frank Wall... clarifies that the liquidation and rehabilitation of a covered financial company that is a mutual...

  1. 77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Integrity Mutual Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Integrity Mutual Insurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Integrity Mutual Insurance Company (NAIC 14303). Business Address: P.O... Certificates are subject to subsequent annual renewal as long as the companies remain qualified (see 31...

  2. 78 FR 15123 - Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Atlantic Specialty Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Atlantic Specialty Insurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Atlantic Specialty Insurance Company (NAIC 27154). BUSINESS ADDRESS: 150... Certificates are subject to subsequent annual renewal as long as the companies remain qualified (see 31...

  3. Paying for On-Patent Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Goldfield, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    In this article we propose a new approach to pricing for patent-protected (on-patent) pharmaceuticals. We describe and define limit pricing as a method for drug companies to maximize revenue for their investment by offering budget-neutral pricing to encourage early adoption by payers. Under this approach, payers are incentivized to adopt innovative but expensive drugs more quickly if drug companies provide detailed analyses of the net impact of the new pharmaceutical upon total health budgets. For payers to adopt use of a new pharmaceutical, they would require objective third-party evaluation and pharmaceutical manufacturer accountability for projected outcomes efficacy of their treatments on population health. The pay for outcomes underpinning of this approach falls within the wider aspirations of health reform. PMID:26945298

  4. Ethical dilemma of mandated contraception in pharmaceutical research at catholic medical institutions.

    PubMed

    Casey, Murray Joseph; O'Brien, Richard; Rendell, Marc; Salzman, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The Catholic Church proscribes methods of birth control other than sexual abstinence. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognizes abstinence as an acceptable method of birth control in research studies, some pharmaceutical companies mandate the use of artificial contraceptive techniques to avoid pregnancy as a condition for participation in their studies. These requirements are unacceptable at Catholic health care institutions, leading to conflicts among institutional review boards, clinical investigators, and sponsors. Subjects may feel coerced by such mandates to adopt contraceptive techniques inconsistent with their personal situation and beliefs; women committed to celibacy or who engage exclusively in non-heterosexual activities are negatively impacted. We propose principles to insure informed consent to safeguard the rights of research subjects at Catholic institutions while mitigating this ethical conflict. At the same time, our proposal respects the interests of pharmaceutical research agencies and Catholic moral precepts, and fully abides by regulatory guidance.

  5. 78 FR 69710 - Luminant Generation Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Luminant Generation Company, LLC AGENCY: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION... consecutive weeks of a combined license (COL) application from Luminant Generation Company, LLC....

  6. 78 FR 66785 - Luminant Generation Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Luminant Generation Company, LLC AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of receipt... consecutive weeks of ] a combined license (COL) application from Luminant Generation Company, LLC....

  7. 78 FR 68100 - Luminant Generation Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Luminant Generation Company, LLC AGENCY: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION... consecutive weeks of a combined license (COL) application from Luminant Generation Company, LLC....

  8. The Utilization of Project Management in the Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krusko, Diane; Cangemi, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of 99 pharmaceutical companies concerning their organization and use of project management techniques for research and development found that the industry is using project management increasingly in a variety of ways for better business planning and operations. (MSE)

  9. Pharmaceutical supply chain risks: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Supply of medicine as a strategic product in any health system is a top priority. Pharmaceutical companies, a major player of the drug supply chain, are subject to many risks. These risks disrupt the supply of medicine in many ways such as their quantity and quality and their delivery to the right place and customers and at the right time. Therefore risk identification in the supply process of pharmaceutical companies and mitigate them is highly recommended. Objective In this study it is attempted to investigate pharmaceutical supply chain risks with perspective of manufacturing companies. Methods Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science bibliographic databases and Google scholar scientific search engines were searched for pharmaceutical supply chain risk management studies with 6 different groups of keywords. All results found by keywords were reviewed and none-relevant articles were excluded by outcome of interests and researcher boundaries of study within 4 steps and through a systematic method. Results Nine articles were included in the systematic review and totally 50 main risks based on study outcome of interest extracted which classified in 7 categories. Most of reported risks were related to supply and supplier issues. Organization and strategy issues, financial, logistic, political, market and regulatory issues were in next level of importance. Conclusion It was shown that the majority of risks in pharmaceutical supply chain were internal risks due to processes, people and functions mismanagement which could be managed by suitable mitigation strategies. PMID:24355166

  10. Drug Information Residency Rotation with Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Program objectives of a drug information rotation at the Upjohn Company include improving communication between the pharmaceutical industry and hospital pharmacy/academia, exposing the resident to the challenges the industry encounters, improving proficiency in drug information practice, and providing insight into the working relationships of…

  11. Pharmaceutical strategy and innovation: an academics perspective.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Ian R; Hayward, John J; Ley, Steven V; Tranmer, Geoffrey K

    2007-06-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is under increasing pressure on many fronts, from investors requiring larger returns to consumer groups and health authorities demanding cheaper and safer drugs. It is also feeling additional pressure from the infringement upon its profit margins by generic drug producers. Many companies are aggressively pursuing outsourcing contracts in an attempt to counter many of the financial pressures and streamline their operations. At the same time, the productivity of the pharmaceutical industry at its science base is being questioned in terms of the number of products and the timeframes required for each company to deliver them to market. This has generated uncertainties regarding the current corporate strategies that have been adopted and the levels of innovation being demonstrated. In this essay we discuss these topics in the context of the global pharmaceutical market, investigating the basis for many of these issues and highlighting the hurdles the industry needs to overcome, especially as they relate to the chemical sciences.

  12. 77 FR 75263 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; ULLICO Casualty Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; ULLICO Casualty Company AGENCY... Company (NAIC 37893) under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to qualify as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is... bonds, including continuous bonds, currently in force with above listed Company, bond-approving...

  13. 77 FR 25535 - Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Pacific Employers Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Pacific Employers Insurance Company AGENCY....C. 9305 to the following company: Pacific Employers Insurance Company (NAIC 22748). Business Address... prior to that date. The Certificates are subject to subsequent annual renewal as long as the...

  14. 77 FR 553 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company AGENCY... Company (NAIC 13191) under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to qualify as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds is... bonds, including continuous bonds, currently in force with above listed Company, bond-approving...

  15. 78 FR 2719 - BNSF Railway Company-Lease Exemption-Norfolk Southern Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board BNSF Railway Company--Lease Exemption--Norfolk Southern Railway Company AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Notice of exemption. SUMMARY: Under 49 U.S.C.... 11323-25 for BNSF Railway Company (BNSF) to lease from Norfolk Southern Railway Company approximately...

  16. Exposure of Medical Students to Pharmaceutical Marketing in Primary Care Settings: Frequent and Influential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarikaya, Ozlem; Civaner, Murat; Vatansever, Kevser

    2009-01-01

    It is known that interaction between pharmaceutical companies and medical professionals may lead to corruption of professional values, irrational use of medicine, and negative effects on the patient-physician relationship. Medical students frequently interact with pharmaceutical company representatives and increasingly accept their gifts.…

  17. 77 FR 18883 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds; Change in Business Address and Redomestication...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds; Change in Business Address and Redomestication; First National Insurance Company of America (NAIC 24724); General Insurance Company of America (NAIC 24732); SAFECO Insurance Company of America (NAIC 24740) AGENCY: Financial Management...

  18. Information flow in the pharmaceutical supply chain.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Nazila; Alibabaei, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Managing the supply chain plays an important role in creating competitive advantages for companies. Adequate information flow in supply chain is one of the most important issues in SCM. Therefore, using certain Information Systems can have a significant role in managing and integrating data and information within the supply chain. Pharmaceutical supply chain is more complex than many other supply chains, in the sense that it can affect social and political perspectives. On the other hand, managing the pharmaceutical supply chain is difficult because of its complexity and also government regulations in this field. Although, Iran has progressed a lot in pharmaceutical manufacturing, still there are many unsolved issues in managing the information flow in the pharmaceutical supply chain. In this study, we reviewed the benefits of using different levels of an integrated information system in the supply chain and the possible challenges ahead.

  19. Information flow in the pharmaceutical supply chain

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Nazila; Alibabaei, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Managing the supply chain plays an important role in creating competitive advantages for companies. Adequate information flow in supply chain is one of the most important issues in SCM. Therefore, using certain Information Systems can have a significant role in managing and integrating data and information within the supply chain. Pharmaceutical supply chain is more complex than many other supply chains, in the sense that it can affect social and political perspectives. On the other hand, managing the pharmaceutical supply chain is difficult because of its complexity and also government regulations in this field. Although, Iran has progressed a lot in pharmaceutical manufacturing, still there are many unsolved issues in managing the information flow in the pharmaceutical supply chain. In this study, we reviewed the benefits of using different levels of an integrated information system in the supply chain and the possible challenges ahead. PMID:26664401

  20. Pharmaceutical technology management--profitable business avenue.

    PubMed

    Puthli, Shivanand P

    2010-01-01

    Growing research expenditure, regulatory framework and generic erosion have forced pharmaceutical companies globally to resort to pharmaceutical technology management (PTM). Indeed, the pharmaceutical industry has witnessed the impact of innovative drug delivery and device technologies and their influence on business. PTM has given a new business insight with greater profits and enhancement of product franchise. Promising breakthrough technologies have not been able to reach a commercial platform largely owing to lack of capital at the preliminary stages of the product development program. Intellectual property plays a considerable role in protecting innovative technologies. Joint ventures and strategic alliances also become important for commercializing a new technology. The synergy of PTM with options of in-licensing is expected to infuse newer opportunities to the pharmaceutical business.

  1. Smart Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galagan, Patricia A.

    1997-01-01

    Capturing and leveraging knowledge is an important new management trend that is as yet undefined. Some companies are accounting for their intellectual capital and applying it to the company balance sheets. (JOW)

  2. 77 FR 29472 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Termination: Atlantic Bonding Company, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Termination: Atlantic Bonding Company, Inc. AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice....

  3. 75 FR 33897 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Terminations: Commercial Alliance Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Terminations: Commercial Alliance Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION:...

  4. 77 FR 73114 - BNSF Railway Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-Union Pacific Railroad Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board BNSF Railway Company--Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption--Union Pacific Railroad Company AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Notice, correction. SUMMARY:...

  5. 76 FR 21426 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-BNSF Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... Surface Transportation Board Union Pacific Railroad Company--Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption--BNSF Railway Company AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Partial Revocation of Exemption... protective conditions set forth in Oregon Short Line Railroad--Abandonment Portion Goshen Branch...

  6. 75 FR 81331 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination-Penn Millers Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination--Penn Millers Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice....

  7. 76 FR 66361 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Western National Mutual Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Western National Mutual Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice....

  8. 77 FR 11194 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Name Change: Chrysler Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Name Change: Chrysler Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice....

  9. 76 FR 38459 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds; Termination American Reliable Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds; Termination American Reliable Insurance Company AGENCY: Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury, Financial Management Service. ACTION:...

  10. 77 FR 553 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment-Evergreen National Indemnity Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment-- Evergreen National Indemnity Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION:...

  11. 75 FR 38188 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Termination: Stonebridge Casualty Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Termination: Stonebridge Casualty Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION:...

  12. 77 FR 42554 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Termination: Peerless Insurance Company (NAIC #24198)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Termination: Peerless Insurance Company (NAIC 24198) AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury....

  13. The Development of a Generic Pharmaceutical Training Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Lynn William; Boerner, Hank

    The manufacture of generic drugs is a growing industry, generally composed of small companies that are more dependent than brand-name companies on hiring entry-level workers. To provide standardized training for employees in the generic drug manufacturing field, the Generic Pharmaceutical Training Institute (GPTI) was established by a partnership…

  14. Neuromarketing techniques in pharmaceutical drugs advertising. A discussion and agenda for future research.

    PubMed

    Orzan, G; Zara, I A; Purcarea, V L

    2012-12-15

    Recent years have seen an "explosion" in the abilities of scientists to use neuroscience in new domains. Unfortunately, it is little known and reported on how advertising companies make more effective pharmaceutical drugs commercials. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how neuromarketing techniques may impact the consumer response to pharmaceutical advertising campaigns. The result shows that using neuromarketing methods a pharmaceutical company can better understand the conscious and unconscious consumer's thoughts and tailor specific marketing messages.

  15. RFID in the pharmaceutical industry: addressing counterfeits with technology.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    The use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) in the pharmaceutical industry has grown in recent years. The technology has matured from its specialized tracking and retail uses to a systemic part of supply chain management in international pharmaceutical production and distribution. Counterfeit drugs, however, remain a significant challenge for governments, pharmaceutical companies, clinicians, and patients and the use of RFID to track these compounds represents an opportunity for development. This paper discusses the medical, technological, and economic factors that support widespread adoption of RFID technology in the pharmaceutical industry in an effort to prevent counterfeit medicines from harming patients and brand equity.

  16. Financing pharmaceuticals in transition economies.

    PubMed

    Kanavos, P

    1999-06-01

    This paper (a) provides a methodological taxonomy of pricing, financing, reimbursement, and cost containment methodologies for pharmaceuticals; (b) analyzes complex agency relationships and the health versus industrial policy tradeoff; (c) pinpoints financing measures to balance safety and effectiveness of medicines and their affordability by publicly funded systems in transition; and (d) highlights viable options for policy-makers for the financing of pharmaceuticals in transition. Three categories of measures and their implications for pharmaceutical policy cost containing are analyzed: supply-side measures, targeting manufacturers, proxy demand-side measures, targeting physicians and pharmacists, and demand-side measures, targeting patients. In pursuing supply side measures, we explore free pricing for pharmaceuticals, direct price controls, cost-plus and cost pricing, average pricing and international price comparisons, profit control, reference pricing, the introduction of a fourth hurdle, positive and negative lists, and other price control measures. The analysis of proxy-demand measures includes budgets for physicians, generic policies, practice guidelines, monitoring the authorizing behavior of physicians, and disease management schemes. Demand-side measures explore the effectiveness of patient co-payments, the impact of allowing products over-the-counter and health promotion programs. Global policies should operate simultaneously on the supply, the proxy demand, and the demand-side. Policy-making needs to have a continuous long-term planning. The importation of policies into transition economy may require extensive and expensive adaptation, and/or lead to sub-optimal policy outcomes.

  17. The Effect of Blending HRM Transformational Leadership Style with HRM ICT Expertise Leadership Style on Creating New HRM Strategy That Enable National Companies to Go Global. Evidence from Jordan: Sayegh Group and Hikma Pharmaceutical Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khudeir, Hamzeh

    2016-01-01

    There is no single HRM strategy that can cure all HRM problems and complicated issues. Thus, most companies go by the book in this regard; however, the majorities have their own policies and strategies they use to achieve their objectives in general and competitive advantage in particular. One of the strategies used in HRM is blending HRM…

  18. 75 FR 71417 - 2010 Company Organization Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... Bureau of the Census 2010 Company Organization Survey AGENCY: Bureau of the Census, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of determination. SUMMARY: The Bureau of the Census (Census Bureau) is conducting the 2010 Company Organization Survey. The survey's data are needed, in part, to update the multilocation companies in...

  19. 76 FR 36625 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  20. 78 FR 64911 - 2013 Company Organization Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... Bureau of the Census 2013 Company Organization Survey AGENCY: Bureau of the Census, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Determination. SUMMARY: The Bureau of the Census (Census Bureau) is conducting the 2013 Company Organization Survey. The survey's data are needed, in part, to update the multilocation companies in...

  1. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  2. 76 FR 62759 - 2011 Company Organization Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... Bureau of the Census 2011 Company Organization Survey AGENCY: Bureau of the Census, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of determination. SUMMARY: The Bureau of the Census (Census Bureau) is conducting the 2011 Company Organization Survey. The survey's data are needed, in part, to update the multilocation companies in...

  3. Vendor qualification for pharmaceutical excipients--GMP requirements and approach.

    PubMed

    Patel, K T; Chotal, N P

    2010-11-01

    Excipients are, in the large majority of cases, not made specifically for pharmaceutical use. Most pharmaceutical excipient manufacturers supply less than 10% of the total production of that particular material for pharmaceutical use. Excipient product portfolio consists of hundreds of products differing in chemistry, origin and functionality and they are used in many different applications. The days of treating excipients like commodities and buying them without fully qualifying the source and the entire distribution chain have gone by as GMP regulations demands to ensure quality of other materials used in the manufacturing process. The paradigm that exists in some pharmaceutical companies today where excipients are sourced from distributors without knowing the actual manufacturer, manufacturing site and full distribution lifecycle chain to be changed. The present contribution gives an overview about the current moves on GMP requirements for pharmaceutical excipient and approach for qualification of pharmaceutical excipient manufacturers.

  4. [E-commerce of pharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Shani, Segev

    2003-05-01

    The emergence of the Internet as a new communications and information technology caused major social and cultural changes. The dramatic increase in accessibility and availability of information empowered the consumer by closing the information gap between the consumer and different suppliers. The objective of this article is to review many new internet-supported applications related to the pharmaceutical market. E-commerce is divided into two major components: Business to Consumer (B to C), and Business to Business (B to B). The main applications in B to C are dissemination of medical and drug information, and the sale of drugs through the Internet. Medical information on the Internet is vast and very helpful for patients, however, its reliability is not guaranteed. Online pharmacies increase the accessibility and availability of drugs. Nevertheless, several obstacles such as security of the data provided (both financial and clinical) prevent the widespread use of online pharmacies. Another risk is the health authorities' inability to regulate Internet sites effectively. Therefore, unregulated sale of prescription drugs, fake or substandard, often occurs on the Internet. B to B relates to physicians, clinics, hospitals, HMO's and pharmaceutical companies. There is a vast number of applications ranging from clinical research, marketing and sales promotion, to drug distribution and logistics. In conclusion, the Internet is dynamic and has contributed to the development of numerous new applications in the field of pharmaceuticals. Regulatory authorities should be active in developing new policies that will deal with those new Internet-based applications.

  5. Inspection Checklist for Pharmaceuticals MACT Standard 40 CFR Part 63

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This checklist is a compliance tool and/or a guidance document to be used by USEPA, State and Local agency inspectors, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, for the purposes of a facility compliance inspection or a self audit.

  6. Pharmaceutical lobbying in Brazil: a missing topic in the public health research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Paumgartten, Francisco José Roma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the US, where registration of lobbyists is mandatory, the pharmaceutical industry and private health-care providers spend huge amounts of money seeking to influence health policies and government decisions. In Brazil, where lobbying lacks transparency, there is virtually no data on drug industry expenditure to persuade legislators and government officials of their viewpoints and to influence decision-making according to commercial interests. Since 1990, however, the Associação da Indústria Farmacêutica de Pesquisa (Interfarma – Pharmaceutical Research Industry Association), Brazilian counterpart of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), main lobbying organization of the US pharmaceutical industry, has played a major role in the advocacy of interests of major drug companies. The main goals of Interfarma lobbying activities are: shortening the average time taken by the Brazilian regulatory agency (ANVISA) to approve marketing authorization for a new drug; making the criteria for incorporation of new drugs into SUS (Brazilian Unified Health System) more flexible and speeding up technology incorporation; changing the Country’s ethical clearance system and the ethical requirements for clinical trials to meet the need of the innovative drug industry, and establishing a National Policy for Rare Diseases that allows a prompt incorporation of orphan drugs into SUS. Although lobbying affects community health and well-being, this topic is not in the public health research agenda. The impacts of pharmaceutical lobbying on health policies and health-care costs are of great importance for SUS and deserve to be investigated. PMID:28099661

  7. Pharmaceutical Cocrystals: Regulatory and Strategic Aspects, Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Gadade, Dipak Dilip; Pekamwar, Sanjay Sudhakar

    2016-12-01

    Cocrystal is a concept of the supramolecular chemistry which is gaining the extensive interest of researchers from pharmaceutical and chemical sciences and of drug regulatory agencies. The prominent reason of which is its ability to modify physicochemical properties of active pharmaceutical ingredients. During the development of the pharmaceutical product, formulators have to optimize the physicochemical properties of active pharmaceutical ingredients. Pharmaceutical cocrystals can be employed to improve vital physicochemical characteristics of a drug, including solubility, dissolution, bioavailability and stability of pharmaceutical compounds while maintaining its therapeutic activity. It is advantageous being a green synthesis approach for production of pharmaceutical compounds. The formation polymorphic forms, solvates, hydrates and salts of cocrystals during the synthesis reported in the literature which can be a potential issue in the development of pharmaceutical cocrystals. The approaches like hydrogen bonding rules, solubility parameters, screening through the CSD database or thermodynamic characteristics can be utilized for the rational design of cocrystals and selection of coformers for synthesis multi-component cocrystals. Considering the significance of pharmaceutical cocrystals pharmaceutical regulatory authorities in the United States and Europe issued guidance documents which may be helpful for pharmaceutical product registration in these regions. In this article, we deal with the design, synthesis, strategic aspects and characteristics of cocrystals along perspectives on its regulatory and intellectual property considerations.

  8. Pharmaceutical Cocrystals: Regulatory and Strategic Aspects, Design and Development

    PubMed Central

    Gadade, Dipak Dilip; Pekamwar, Sanjay Sudhakar

    2016-01-01

    Cocrystal is a concept of the supramolecular chemistry which is gaining the extensive interest of researchers from pharmaceutical and chemical sciences and of drug regulatory agencies. The prominent reason of which is its ability to modify physicochemical properties of active pharmaceutical ingredients. During the development of the pharmaceutical product, formulators have to optimize the physicochemical properties of active pharmaceutical ingredients. Pharmaceutical cocrystals can be employed to improve vital physicochemical characteristics of a drug, including solubility, dissolution, bioavailability and stability of pharmaceutical compounds while maintaining its therapeutic activity. It is advantageous being a green synthesis approach for production of pharmaceutical compounds. The formation polymorphic forms, solvates, hydrates and salts of cocrystals during the synthesis reported in the literature which can be a potential issue in the development of pharmaceutical cocrystals. The approaches like hydrogen bonding rules, solubility parameters, screening through the CSD database or thermodynamic characteristics can be utilized for the rational design of cocrystals and selection of coformers for synthesis multi-component cocrystals. Considering the significance of pharmaceutical cocrystals pharmaceutical regulatory authorities in the United States and Europe issued guidance documents which may be helpful for pharmaceutical product registration in these regions. In this article, we deal with the design, synthesis, strategic aspects and characteristics of cocrystals along perspectives on its regulatory and intellectual property considerations. PMID:28101455

  9. 75 FR 54232 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Report of Covered Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Request for Report of Covered Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Importers (Form-8947) AGENCY: Internal... Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Importers. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before November 2... INFORMATION: Title: Report of Covered Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Importers. OMB Number: 1545-XXXX....

  10. GMK (Progenics Pharmaceuticals).

    PubMed

    Knutson, Keith L

    2002-01-01

    Progenics Pharmaceuticals is developing GMK vaccine (a ganglioside conjugate vaccine coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and formulated with the adjuvant QS-21), licensed from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, for the potential treatment of melanoma and other cancers [194258], [325284]. It was previously under co-development with Bristol-Myers Squibb, but in May 2001, all rights to the GMK vaccine were returned to Progenics [409168]. It was the first of a new class of ganglioside conjugate vaccine evaluated by Progenics [194258]. GMK vaccination induces antibodies against GM2 ganglioside capable of specifically killing melanoma cells. Melanoma patients with antibodies against GM2 ganglioside have significantly improved disease-free and overall survival compared to antibody-negative subjects. The vaccine is undergoing two phase III trials, the first comparing GMK to high-dose IFNalpha in melanoma patients with more serious disease and at a high risk of relapse, and the second, in collaboration with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, comparing GMK (14 doses of GMK over three years) to no treatment other than close monitoring of malignant melanoma patients at immediate risk of relapse [409168]. In February 1999, Lehman Brothers predicted that the vaccine had a 50% probability of reaching market, with an estimated first launch date in 2002. The analysts predicted potential peak sales in 2008 of $150 million in the US and $100 million in the rest of the world at that time [319225]. In January 2000, Lehman Brothers expected that an NDA filing would take place in 2002, with possible launch of the vaccine in 2003. In addition, Lehman Brothers estimated potential peak sales at $500 million [357788]. In August 2000, Punk, Ziegel & Company predicted that Progenics Pharmaceuticals will become sustainably profitable in 2003 following the launch of GMK and PRO-542 in 2002 [390063]. In July 2001, Ladenburg Thalmann predicted a $257 million

  11. 78 FR 52802 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Morton Grove Pharmaceuticals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substance for distribution to its customers. No... Pharmaceuticals to ensure that the company's registration is consistent with the public interest. The investigation has included inspection and testing of the company's physical security systems; verification...

  12. Strategic of Applying Free Chemical Usage In Purified Water System For Pharmaceutical Industry Toward CPOB (Cara Pembuatan Obat yang Baik) Indonesia To Reducing Environmental Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartono, R.; Basuki, Y. T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the sets of model and literature review to prove that strategy of applying free chemical usage in purified water system for pharmaceutical industry would be help the existing and new pharmaceutical companies to comply with part of Natioanal Agency of Drug and Food Control / Badan Pengawas Obat dan Makanan (NADFC/BPOM) regulation in order to achieve "Cara Pembuatan Obat yang Baik" (CPOB) of Indonesia pharmaceutical industry. One of the main reasons is when we figured out the number of Indonesian pharmaceutical industries in 2012 are kept reducing compare to the increasing numbers of Indonesian population growth. This strategy concept also might help the industries to reducing environmental pollution, and operational cost in pharmaceutical industries, by reducing of the chemical usage for water treatment process in floculation and cougulation and chlorination for sterillization. This new model is free usage of chemicals for purified water generation system process and sterilization. The concept offering of using membrane technology- Reverse Osmosis (RO) membrane base treatment to replace traditional chemical base treatment, following enhance Electrodeionization (EDI) as final polisher for controlling conductivity, and finally Ultra Violet (UV) disinfectant technology as final guard for bacteria controls instead of chemical base system in purified water generation system.

  13. Global gene mining and the pharmaceutical industry

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2005-09-01

    Worldwide efforts are ongoing in optimizing medical treatment by searching for the right medicine at the right dose for the individual. Metabolism is regulated by polymorphisms, which may be tested by relatively simple SNP analysis, however requiring DNA from the test individuals. Target genes for the efficiency of a given medicine or predisposition of a given disease are also subject to population studies, e.g., in Iceland, Estonia, Sweden, etc. For hypothesis testing and generation, several bio-banks with samples from patients and healthy persons within the pharmaceutical industry have been established during the past 10 years. Thus, more than 100,000 samples are stored in the freezers of either the pharmaceutical companies or their contractual partners at universities and test institutions. Ethical issues related to data protection of the individuals providing samples to bio-banks are several: nature and extent of information prior to consent, coverage of the consent given by the study person, labeling and storage of the sample and data (coded or anonymized). In general, genetic test data, once obtained, are permanent and cannot be changed. The test data may imply information that is not beneficial to the patient and his/her family (e.g., employment opportunities, insurance, etc.). Furthermore, there may be a long latency between the analysis of the genetic test and the clinical expression of the disease and wide differences in the disease patterns. Consequently, information about some genetic test data may stigmatize patients leading to poor quality of life. This has raised the issue of 'genetic exceptionalism' justifying specific regulation of use of genetic information. Discussions on how to handle sampling and data are ongoing within the industry and the regulatory sphere, the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) having issued a position paper, the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) having a working

  14. Scientific misconduct, the pharmaceutical industry, and the tragedy of institutions.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kohler, Jillian Clare; Esmail, Laura C

    2007-09-01

    This paper examines how current legislative and regulatory models do not adequately govern the pharmaceutical industry towards ethical scientific conduct. In the context of a highly profit-driven industry, governments need to ensure ethical and legal standards are not only in place for companies but that they are enforceable. We demonstrate with examples from both industrialized and developing countries how without sufficient controls, there is a risk that corporate behaviour will transgress ethical boundaries. We submit that there is a critical need for urgent drug regulatory reform. There must be robust regulatory structures in place which enforce corporate governance mechanisms to ensure that pharmaceutical companies maintain ethical standards in drug research and development and the marketing of pharmaceuticals. What is also needed is for the pharmaceutical industry to adopt authentic "corporate social responsibility" policies as current policies and practices are insufficient.

  15. Institutional mistrust in the organization of pharmaceutical clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I explore the politics of trust in the clinical testing of pharmaceuticals in the US. Specifically, I analyze trust in terms of its institutional manifestations in the pharmaceutical clinical trials industry. In the process of testing new drugs, pharmaceutical companies must (1) protect their proprietary information from the clinicians who conduct their studies, and (2) find a way to ensure human subjects' compliance to study protocols. Concern with these two critical issues leads drug companies to approach clinicians and research subjects with an attitude of mistrust and the desire to exert control over their activities. This orientation results in an institutionalization of mistrust that structures the relationships and activities required for the clinical development of new pharmaceutical products. PMID:18633728

  16. Microcap pharmaceutical firms: linking drug pipelines to market value.

    PubMed

    Beach, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article examines predictors of the future market value of microcap pharmaceutical companies. This is problematic since the large majority of these firms seldom report positive net income. Their value comes from the potential of a liquidity event such as occurs when a key drug is approved by the FDA. The typical scenario is one in which the company is either acquired by a larger pharmaceutical firm or enters into a joint venture with another pharmaceutical firm. Binary logistic regression is used to determine the impact of the firm's drug treatment pipeline and its investment in research and development on the firm's market cap. Using annual financial data from 2007 through 2010, this study finds that the status of the firm's drug treatment pipeline and its research and development expenses are significant predictors of the firm's future stock value relative to other microcap pharmaceutical firms.

  17. 76 FR 55237 - Use of Derivatives by Investment Companies Under the Investment Company Act of 1940

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Company Act of 1940 AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Concept release; request for... the use of derivatives by management investment companies registered under the Investment Company Act..., the Commission is issuing this concept release and request for comments on a wide range of...

  18. 77 FR 64185 - BNSF Railway Company-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Nebraska Northeastern Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... Surface Transportation Board BNSF Railway Company--Acquisition and Operation Exemption-- Nebraska Northeastern Railway Company AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of exemption. SUMMARY: The.... 11323-25 for BNSF Railway Company (BNSF), a Class I rail carrier, to acquire and operate a 120.4-...

  19. 75 FR 12329 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-BNSF Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... Surface Transportation Board Union Pacific Railroad Company--Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption--BNSF Railway Company AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Partial revocation of exemption... Railway Company (BNSF) to extend to December 18, 2010, the expiration date of the local trackage...

  20. 75 FR 1683 - Application and Renewal Fees Imposed on Surety Companies and Reinsuring Companies; Increase in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... Management Service, is increasing the fees it imposes on and collects from surety companies and reinsuring... Fiscal Service Application and Renewal Fees Imposed on Surety Companies and Reinsuring Companies; Increase in Fees Imposed AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the...

  1. 76 FR 416 - Application and Renewal Fees Imposed on Surety Companies and Reinsuring Companies Increase in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Management Service, is increasing the fees it imposes on and collects from surety companies and reinsuring... Fiscal Service Application and Renewal Fees Imposed on Surety Companies and Reinsuring Companies Increase in Fees Imposed AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the...

  2. 78 FR 35360 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Terminations-Safeco Insurance Company of Illinois...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Terminations-- Safeco Insurance Company of Illinois (NAIC 39012); Safeco National Insurance Company (NAIC 24759) AGENCY: Bureau of the Fiscal Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is Supplement No. 8 to...

  3. Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

  4. 75 FR 55699 - Series LLCs and Cell Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BI69 Series LLCs and Cell Companies AGENCY: Internal... limited liability company (LLC), a cell of a domestic cell company, or a foreign series or cell that... domestic series LLC, a cell of a domestic cell company, or a foreign series or cell that conducts...

  5. 76 FR 17720 - American Family Life Insurance Company, et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... COMMISSION American Family Life Insurance Company, et al. March 24, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange... Company Act of 1940, as amended (the ``1940 Act''). Applicants: American Family Life Insurance Company (the ``Company''), American Family Variable Account I (the ``Life Account''), and American...

  6. Pharmaceutical cocrystals: an overview.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Ning; Li, Mingzhong; Schlindwein, Walkiria; Malek, Nazneen; Davies, Angela; Trappitt, Gary

    2011-10-31

    Pharmaceutical cocrystals are emerging as a new class of solid drugs with improved physicochemical properties, which has attracted increased interests from both industrial and academic researchers. In this paper a brief and systematic overview of pharmaceutical cocrystals is provided, with particular focus on cocrystal design strategies, formation methods, physicochemical property studies, characterisation techniques, and recent theoretical developments in cocrystal screening and mechanisms of cocrystal formations. Examples of pharmaceutical cocrystals are also summarised in this paper.

  7. 78 FR 59991 - Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission... on Small and Emerging Companies. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Johanna Losert, Special Counsel, Office of Small Business Policy, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE., Washington...

  8. 76 FR 79230 - Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission... Securities and Exchange Commission Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies is providing...

  9. 77 FR 2102 - Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission... Securities and Exchange Commission Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies is providing...

  10. 76 FR 70379 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...-033-AD; RIN 2120-AA64] Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal... supersede an existing airworthiness directive (AD) that applies to certain Cessna Aircraft Company...

  11. 78 FR 23866 - Airworthiness Directives; the Boeing Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... Directives; the Boeing Company AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation... (NPRM) that proposed a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 777-200...

  12. 78 FR 44559 - Effective Date of Revised Company Registration Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Effective Date of Revised Company Registration Requirements AGENCY: Federal... of the Revised Company Registration Requirements. The Commission issued a Notice in the Federal..., anthony.barracchini@ferc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice of Effective Date of Revised...

  13. Four Washington companies resolve violations of federal chemical storage laws

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle-July 13, 2015) Four Washington companies have signed settlements for violations of federal chemical storage laws, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. EPA's investigations found that the companies failed to properly report storag

  14. Authentication of gold nanoparticle encoded pharmaceutical tablets using polarimetric signatures.

    PubMed

    Carnicer, Artur; Arteaga, Oriol; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-10-01

    The counterfeiting of pharmaceutical products represents concerns for both industry and the safety of the general public. Falsification produces losses to companies and poses health risks for patients. In order to detect fake pharmaceutical tablets, we propose producing film-coated tablets with gold nanoparticle encoding. These coated tablets contain unique polarimetric signatures. We present experiments to show that ellipsometric optical techniques, in combination with machine learning algorithms, can be used to distinguish genuine and fake samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report using gold nanoparticles encoded with optical polarimetric classifiers to prevent the counterfeiting of pharmaceutical products.

  15. The UK pharmaceutical market. An overview.

    PubMed

    Towse, A

    1996-01-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) accounts for more than 98% of the UK prescription medicines market, which is the sixth largest pharmaceutical market in the world. Most of this market is driven by the UK's approximately 35,000 general practitioners (GPs). It is an open market, with most leading foreign pharmaceutical companies having a strong presence. While the growth rate of this market has been decelerating, it remains one of the fastest growing components of NHS expenditure. The NHS does not operate any kind of national reimbursement list, but the UK government has adopted several means to keep medicines expenditure under control. These include cash incentives and constraints for GPs relating to expenditure on medicines, individual quarterly updates on GP prescribing, the publication of a list of medicines that cannot be prescribed by GPs, the switching of some prescription-only medicines to over-the-counter medicines, and a co-payment system. The main form of economic regulation in the UK, however, remains the Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme (PPRS). This limits the rate-of-return on capital attributable to medicines sales to the NHS, with the intended rate-of-return being equal to that of UK industry overall. The pharmaceutical industry has generally performed relatively well in the UK market, managing to preserve incentives to innovation. This reflects the fact that UK GPs have been able to maintain their clinical freedom, as well as government recognition of the economic contribution made by the pharmaceutical industry. Current issues of interest in the UK pharmaceutical market context include the future of the PPRS, the debates over the imposition of a national formulary and generic substitution, and over parallel trade, the potential impact of managed-care protocols and computer-based prescribing on pharmaceutical expenditures, and possible political changes.

  16. Performance and data interpretation of the in vivo comet assay in pharmaceutical industry: EFPIA survey results.

    PubMed

    van der Leede, Bas-Jan; Doherty, Ann; Guérard, Melanie; Howe, Jonathan; O'Donovan, Mike; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Thybaud, Véronique

    2014-12-01

    In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by the ICH S2(R1) guideline. This paper summarizes a survey suggested by the Safety Working Party of European Medicines Agency (EMA), and conducted by the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) to investigate the experience among European pharmaceutical companies by conducting the in vivo comet assay for regulatory purpose. A special focus was given on the typology of the obtained results and to identify potential difficulties encountered with the interpretation of study data. The participating companies reported a total of 147 studies (conducted in-house or outsourced) and shared the conclusion on the comet assay response for 136 studies. Most of the studies were negative (118/136). Only about 10% (14/136 studies) of the comet assays showed a positive response. None of the positive comet assay results were clearly associated with organ toxicity indicating that the positive responses are not due to cytotoxic effects of the compound in the tissue examined. The number of comet assays with an equivocal or inconclusive response was rare, respectively <1% (1/147 studies) and 2% (3/147 studies). In case additional information (e.g. repeat assay, organ toxicity, metabolism, tissue exposure) would have been available for evaluation, a final conclusion could most probably have been drawn for most or all of these studies. All (46) negative in vivo comet assays submitted alongside with a negative in vivo micronucleus assay were accepted by the regulatory authorities to mitigate a positive in vitro mammalian cell assay following the current ICH S2 guidance. The survey results demonstrate the robustness of the comet assay and the regulatory acceptance of the current ICH S2 guidance.

  17. 76 FR 14968 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Eugenio Painting Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Eugenio Painting Company AGENCY... following settling party: Eugenio Painting Company. The settlement requires the settling party to pay...

  18. [Study thought of pharmaceutical preparations quality standards by dynamic quality control technology].

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan-Hong; Mao, Chen-Mei; Lv, Cheng-Zhe; Jin, Hui-Zhen; Yao, Xin; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical preparations, particularly as a "secret recipe" of traditional Chinese medicine in medical institutions, are the product of China's medical and health industry, and they are also an important means of competing of different medical institutions. Although pharmaceutical preparations have advantages and characteristics than institutes for drug and pharmaceutical companies, the quality standards of pharmaceutical preparations in medical institutions has not reached the desired level over the years. As we all know, the quality of pharmaceutical preparations is important to ensure the efficacy, especially under the environment of people pay more sttention on drug safety and effectiveness and contry increase emphasis on the stste of pharmaceutical preparations. In view of this, we will improve the grade, stability, and clinical efficacy of pharmaceutical preparations by the advanced equipment, testing instruments and the process dynamic quality control technology. Finally, we hope we can provide new ideas for the quality control of pharmaceutical preparations.

  19. Development of an Integrated Performance Measurement (PM) Model for Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Shabaninejad, Hosein; Mirsalehian, Mohammad Hossein; Mehralian, Gholamhossein

    2014-01-01

    With respect to special characteristics of pharmaceutical industry and lack of reported performance measure, this study tries to design an integrated PM model for pharmaceutical companies. For generating this model; we first identified the key performance indicators (KPIs) and the key result indicators (KRIs) of a typical pharmaceutical company. Then, based on experts᾽ opinions, the identified indicators were ranked with respect to their importance, and the most important of them were selected to be used in the proposed model; In this model, we identified 25 KPIs and 12 KRIs. Although, this model is mostly appropriate to measure the performances of pharmaceutical companies, it can be also used to measure the performances of other industries with some modifications. We strongly recommend pharmaceutical managers to link these indicators with their payment and reward system, which can dramatically affect the performance of employees, and consequently their organization`s success. PMID:24711848

  20. 77 FR 3483 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request, Write Your...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ...; Comment Request, Write Your Own (WYO) Company Participation Criteria; New Applicant AGENCY: Federal...: Collection of Information Title: Write Your Own (WYO) Company Participation Criteria; New Applicant. Type...

  1. Pharmaceutical Education in Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyegbile, F. Rachel

    1988-01-01

    Nigeria has six pharmacy schools, most offering graduate programs. The undergraduate program is being expanded from four to five years. Although behavioral and clinical sciences are offered, emphasis is on the pharmaceutical sciences. Overall, pharmaceutical education is oriented toward hospice practice. (Author/MSE)

  2. Radiation treatment of pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dám, A. M.; Gazsó, L. G.; Kaewpila, S.; Maschek, I.

    1996-03-01

    Product specific doses were calculated for pharmaceuticals to be radiation treated. Radio-pasteurization dose were determined for some heat sensitive pharmaceutical basic materials (pancreaton, neopancreatin, neopancreatin USP, duodenum extract). Using the new recommendation (ISO standards, Method 1) dose calculations were performed and radiation sterilization doses were determined for aprotinine and heparine Na.

  3. Marketing concepts for pharmaceutical service development.

    PubMed

    Grauer, D W

    1981-02-01

    Marketing concepts as a mechanism to help pharmacy develop, communicate, and sell future pharmaceutical services to consumers are discussed. Pharmacy as a profession must define itself broadly to take advantage of future growth opportunities. These growth opportunities will be realized from unmet health-care needs and changing consumer life style trends and values. New services must therefore be oriented toward consumers (i.e., patients, health professionals, and third-party agencies) to gain acceptance. Dispensing and drug-knowledge-distribution pharmaceutical services are reviewed by a product life cycle analysis of sales profits versus time. A marketing mix for new pharmaceutical services is developed consisting of service, price, distribution, and promotion strategies. Marketing can encompass those key elements necessary to meet the organizational goals of pharmacy and provide a systematic, disciplined approach for presenting a new service to consumers.

  4. FDA pharmaceutical quality oversight.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lawrence X; Woodcock, Janet

    2015-08-01

    The launch of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) Office of Pharmaceutical Quality (OPQ) is a milestone in FDA's efforts to assure that quality medicines are available to the American public. As a new super-office within CDER, OPQ is strategically organized to streamline regulatory processes, advance regulatory standards, align areas of expertise, and originate surveillance of drug quality. Supporting these objectives will be an innovative and systematic approach to product quality knowledge management and informatics. Concerted strategies will bring parity to the oversight of innovator and generic drugs as well as domestic and international facilities. OPQ will promote and encourage the adoption of emerging pharmaceutical technology to enhance pharmaceutical quality and potentially reinvigorate the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector in the United States. With a motto of "One Quality Voice," OPQ embodies the closer integration of review, inspection, surveillance, policy, and research for the purpose of strengthening pharmaceutical quality on a global scale.

  5. Effective executive management in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hoang; Kleiner, Brian H

    2005-01-01

    Along with the boom in information technology and vast development in genomic and proteomic discoveries, the pharmaceutical and biotech industries have been provided the means and tools to create a new page in medicinal history. They are now able to alter the classic ways to cure complex diseases thanks to the completion of the human genome project. To be able to compete in this industry, pharmaceutical management has to be effective not only internally but also externally in socially acceptable conduct. The first department that requires focus is marketing and sales. As the main driving force to increase revenues and profits, marketing and sales employees should be highly motivated by compensation. Also, customer relationships should be maintained for long-term gain. As important as marketing, research and development requires the financial support as well as the critical decision making to further expand the product pipeline. Similarly, finance and technologies should be adequately monitored and invested to provide support as well as prepare for future expansion. On top of that, manufacturing processes and operations are operated per quality systems and FDA guidelines to ensure high quality. Human Resources, on the other hand, should carry the managing and motivation from upper management through systematic recruitment, adequate training, and fair compensation. Moreover, effective management in a pharmaceutical would also require the social welfare and charity to help patients who cannot afford the treatment as well as improving the organization's image. Last but not least, the management should also prepare for the globalization of the industry. Inevitably, large pharmaceutical companies are merging with each other or acquiring smaller companies to enhance the competitive advantages as well as expand their product mix. For effectiveness in a pharmaceutical industry, management should focus more than just the daily routine tasks and short-term goals. Rather, they

  6. 78 FR 70964 - Luminant Generation Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Luminant Generation Company, LLC AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Combined license... for four consecutive weeks of a combined license (COL) application from Luminant Generation...

  7. The Joys of Clinical Trials: A Case Study of a Multicenter Pharmaceutical Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soronson, Bryan M.; Shaw, Diana V.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of clinical trials in the pharmaceutical industry describes typical processes and administrative issues, then presents a case in which a foreign pharmaceutical company negotiated with a university for sponsorship of a multicenter clinical trial of a new drug therapy. Problems and important considerations in clinical trials are…

  8. 76 FR 78258 - Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc.; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Order to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... emollient cream. The proposed Consent Agreement remedies the loss of competition that would result from the... rights to two pharmaceutical products, Refissa, a branded tretinoin emollient cream, and a generic tretinoin emollient cream, to Spear Pharmaceuticals (``Spear''), the company that owns both products....

  9. Psychiatric Training Program Engagement with the Pharmaceutical Industry: An Educational Issue, Not Strictly an Ethical One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Paul C.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the educational and ethical issues involved in interactions between departments of psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry. METHODS: The author analyzes the history of attitudes toward pharmaceutical companies, various conflicting ethical principles that apply, and areas of confluence and conflict of interest between…

  10. WHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations works towards clear, independent and practical standards and guidelines for the quality assurance of medicines. Standards are developed by the Committee through worldwide consultation and an international consensus-building process. The following new guidelines were adopted and recommended for use: procedure for adoption of International Chemical Reference Substances; WHO good practices for pharmaceutical microbiology laboratories; good manufacturing practices: main principles for pharmaceutical products; good manufacturing practices for blood establishments (jointly with the Expert Committee on Biological Standardization); guidelines on good manufacturing practices for heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems for non-sterile pharmaceutical dosage forms; good manufacturing practices for sterile pharmaceutical products; guidelines on transfer of technology in pharmaceutical manufacturing; good pharmacy practice: standards for quality of pharmacy services (joint FIP/WHO); model guidance for the storage and transport of time- and temperature-sensitive pharmaceutical products (jointly with the Expert Committee on Biological Standardization); procedure for prequalification of pharmaceutical products; guide on submission of documentation for prequalification of innovator finished pharmaceutical products approved by stringent regulatory authorities; prequalification of quality control laboratories: procedure for assessing the acceptability, in principle, of quality control laboratories for use by United Nations agencies; guidelines for preparing a laboratory information file; guidelines for drafting a site master file; guidelines on submission of documentation for a multisource (generic) finished product: general format: preparation of product dossiers in common technical document format.

  11. External referencing and pharmaceutical price negotiation.

    PubMed

    Garcia Mariñoso, Begoña; Jelovac, Izabela; Olivella, Pau

    2011-06-01

    External referencing (ER) imposes a price cap for pharmaceuticals, based on prices of identical or comparable products in foreign countries. Suppose a foreign country (F) negotiates prices with a pharmaceutical firm, whereas a home country (H) can either negotiate prices independently or implement ER, based on the foreign price. We show that country H prefers ER if copayments in H are relatively high. This preference is reinforced when H's population is small. Irrespective of relative country sizes, ER by country H harms country F. Our model is inspired by the wide European experience with this cost-containment policy. Namely, in Europe, drug authorization and price negotiations are carried out by separate agencies. We confirm our main results in two extensions. The first one allows for therapeutic competition between drugs. In the second one, drug authorization and price negotiation take place in a single agency.

  12. 78 FR 48667 - Revised Company Registration System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Revised Company Registration System AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This document revises the effective date of the Revised Company... in Docket No. RM07-16-000, et al. (February 7, 2013 Order) directing revisions to the...

  13. WHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations works towards clear, independent and practical standards and guidelines for the quality assurance of medicines. Standards are developed by the Committee through worldwide consultation and an international consensus-building process. The following new guidelines were adopted and recommended for use, in addition to 20 monographs and general texts for inclusion in The International Pharmacopoeia and 11 new International Chemical Reference Substances. The International Pharmacopoeia--updating mechanism for the section on radiopharmaceuticals; WHO good manufacturing practices for pharmaceutical products: main principles; Model quality assurance system for procurement agencies; Assessment tool based on the model quality assurance system for procurement agencies: aide-memoire for inspection; Guidelines on submission of documentation for prequalification of finished pharmaceutical products approved by stringent regulatory authorities; and Guidelines on submission of documentation for a multisource (generic) finished pharmaceutical product: quality part.

  14. The impact of mergers on pharmaceutical R&D.

    PubMed

    LaMattina, John L

    2011-08-01

    Mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical industry have substantially reduced the number of major companies over the past 15 years. The short-term business rationale for this extensive consolidation might have been reasonable, but at what cost to research and development productivity?

  15. Intellectual Property and the Pharmaceutical Scientist: An Industry Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, William J., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Three issues are discussed: (1) conflict between the pharmaceutical industry and academe; (2) how and why some companies contract their research efforts to colleges; and (3) how colleges can increase their percentage of industry monies available for contract research. (Author/MSE)

  16. Generics market in Greece: the pharmaceutical industry's beliefs.

    PubMed

    Geitona, Mary; Zavras, Dimitrios; Hatzikou, Magda; Kyriopoulos, John

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the beliefs and perspectives of the pharmaceutical industry on generic medication in Greece. Questionnaires were mailed to all 58 members of the Hellenic Association of Pharmaceutical Companies from November 2002 to February 2003. The response rate was 52%, namely 30 questionnaires were completed and returned. The questionnaire requested information on companies' involvement in generics, their opinion on generics' characteristics and on public policies affecting the demand and supply of generic medication. A descriptive analysis of the outcomes, that is percentage comparison through binomial tests and Fisher tests, was performed. According to our findings, 43% of the respondents were involved in the production and distribution of generics and the mean period of their involvement was 12 years. The majority of the respondents were in favor of their companies' involvement in generics, despite the relatively small market share of generics in Greece; 9.7% of total pharmaceutical market in 2003. Bearing in mind that in Greece the promotion of generics is not encouraged, pharmaceutical companies believe that the mandatory introduction of bioequivalence studies is an indirect promotional strategy towards generics. Additionally, the majority declared that their main competitive advantages are their safety, efficacy and effectiveness as well as their economic benefit to the society. Finally, the respondents expressed their preference for the introduction of pharmacoeconomic submissions for drugs' reimbursement by social insurance funds.

  17. Approval times and the safety of new pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Rudholm, Niklas

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between the approval times for new pharmaceuticals and the number of adverse drug reactions reported to the Swedish Medical Products Agency. Yearly time-series data concerning the number of adverse drug reactions, as well as data concerning prices and quantities sold for 25 pharmaceutical substances during the period 1972-1996 were used. The results show that shorter approval times are associated with more adverse drug reactions, but also that the effects are quite small.

  18. Amorphous pharmaceutical solids.

    PubMed

    Vranić, Edina

    2004-07-01

    Amorphous forms are, by definition, non-crystalline materials which possess no long-range order. Their structure can be thought of as being similar to that of a frozen liquid with the thermal fluctuations present in a liquid frozen out, leaving only "static" structural disorder. The amorphous solids have always been an essential part of pharmaceutical research, but the current interest has been raised by two developments: a growing attention to pharmaceutical solids in general, especially polymorphs and solvates and a revived interest in the science of glasses and the glass transition. Amorphous substances may be formed both intentionally and unintentionally during normal pharmaceutical manufacturing operations. The properties of amorphous materials can be exploited to improve the performance of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but these properties can also give rise to unwanted effects that need to be understood and managed in order for the systems to perform as required.

  19. Ethical pharmaceutical promotion and communications worldwide: codes and regulations.

    PubMed

    Francer, Jeffrey; Izquierdo, Jose Zamarriego; Music, Tamara; Narsai, Kirti; Nikidis, Chrisoula; Simmonds, Heather; Woods, Paul

    2014-03-29

    The international pharmaceutical industry has made significant efforts towards ensuring compliant and ethical communication and interaction with physicians and patients. This article presents the current status of the worldwide governance of communication practices by pharmaceutical companies, concentrating on prescription-only medicines. It analyzes legislative, regulatory, and code-based compliance control mechanisms and highlights significant developments, including the 2006 and 2012 revisions of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA) Code of Practice.Developments in international controls, largely built upon long-established rules relating to the quality of advertising material, have contributed to clarifying the scope of acceptable company interactions with healthcare professionals. This article aims to provide policy makers, particularly in developing countries, with an overview of the evolution of mechanisms governing the communication practices, such as the distribution of promotional or scientific material and interactions with healthcare stakeholders, relating to prescription-only medicines.

  20. Ethical pharmaceutical promotion and communications worldwide: codes and regulations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The international pharmaceutical industry has made significant efforts towards ensuring compliant and ethical communication and interaction with physicians and patients. This article presents the current status of the worldwide governance of communication practices by pharmaceutical companies, concentrating on prescription-only medicines. It analyzes legislative, regulatory, and code-based compliance control mechanisms and highlights significant developments, including the 2006 and 2012 revisions of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA) Code of Practice. Developments in international controls, largely built upon long-established rules relating to the quality of advertising material, have contributed to clarifying the scope of acceptable company interactions with healthcare professionals. This article aims to provide policy makers, particularly in developing countries, with an overview of the evolution of mechanisms governing the communication practices, such as the distribution of promotional or scientific material and interactions with healthcare stakeholders, relating to prescription-only medicines. PMID:24679064

  1. Legal considerations for social media marketing by pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Chen, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Social media marketing is the next frontier for direct-to-consumer advertising of pharmaceutical products, but represents an unchartered territory for regulatory action. With explosive growth in the use of social media, along with pharmaceutical companies' increasing adeptness at taking advantage of opportunities for social media marketing, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) faces an urgent need to develop its own capacities to monitor and engage with social media marketing. In response to potential FDA action, pharmaceutical companies' marketing, regulatory compliance and legal staffs must work closely to design initiatives that are sensitive to FDA concerns. This article will address the current status of FDA regulations on social media advertising, their historical origins, challenges to implementation, and their likely future direction.

  2. Ecotoxicology of human pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Fent, Karl; Weston, Anna A; Caminada, Daniel

    2006-02-10

    Low levels of human medicines (pharmaceuticals) have been detected in many countries in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents, surface waters, seawaters, groundwater and some drinking waters. For some pharmaceuticals effects on aquatic organisms have been investigated in acute toxicity assays. The chronic toxicity and potential subtle effects are only marginally known, however. Here, we critically review the current knowledge about human pharmaceuticals in the environment and address several key questions. What kind of pharmaceuticals and what concentrations occur in the aquatic environment? What is the fate in surface water and in STP? What are the modes of action of these compounds in humans and are there similar targets in lower animals? What acute and chronic ecotoxicological effects may be elicited by pharmaceuticals and by mixtures? What are the effect concentrations and how do they relate to environmental levels? Our review shows that only very little is known about long-term effects of pharmaceuticals to aquatic organisms, in particular with respect to biological targets. For most human medicines analyzed, acute effects to aquatic organisms are unlikely, except for spills. For investigated pharmaceuticals chronic lowest observed effect concentrations (LOEC) in standard laboratory organisms are about two orders of magnitude higher than maximal concentrations in STP effluents. For diclofenac, the LOEC for fish toxicity was in the range of wastewater concentrations, whereas the LOEC of propranolol and fluoxetine for zooplankton and benthic organisms were near to maximal measured STP effluent concentrations. In surface water, concentrations are lower and so are the environmental risks. However, targeted ecotoxicological studies are lacking almost entirely and such investigations are needed focusing on subtle environmental effects. This will allow better and comprehensive risk assessments of pharmaceuticals in the future.

  3. Private versus social incentives for pharmaceutical innovation.

    PubMed

    González, Paula; Macho-Stadler, Inés; Pérez-Castrillo, David

    2016-12-01

    We provide a theoretical framework to contribute to the current debate regarding the tendency of pharmaceutical companies to direct their R&D toward marketing products that are "follow-on" drugs of already existing drugs, rather than toward the development of breakthrough drugs. We construct a model with a population of patients who can be treated with drugs that are horizontally and vertically differentiated. In addition to a pioneering drug, a new drug can be marketed as the result of an innovative process. We analyze physician prescription choices and the optimal pricing decision of an innovative firm. We also characterize the incentives of the innovative firm to conduct R&D activities, disentangling the quest for breakthrough drugs from the firm effort to develop follow-on drugs. Our results offer theoretical support for the conventional wisdom that pharmaceutical firms devote too many resources to conducting R&D activities that lead to incremental innovations.

  4. Neuromarketing techniques in pharmaceutical drugs advertising. A discussion and agenda for future research

    PubMed Central

    Orzan, G; Zara, IA; Purcarea, VL

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen an “explosion" in the abilities of scientists to use neuroscience in new domains. Unfortunately, it is little known and reported on how advertising companies make more effective pharmaceutical drugs commercials. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how neuromarketing techniques may impact the consumer response to pharmaceutical advertising campaigns. The result shows that using neuromarketing methods a pharmaceutical company can better understand the conscious and unconscious consumer’s thoughts and tailor specific marketing messages. PMID:23346245

  5. Customer relationship management in the contract pharmaceutical industry: an exploratory study for measuring success.

    PubMed

    Kros, John F; Nadler, Scott; Molis, Justin

    2007-01-01

    Managing customer relationships is a very important issue in business-to-business markets. This research investigates the growing number of available resources defining Customer Relationship Management (CRM) efforts, and how they are being applied within the Contract Pharmaceutical Manufacturing industry. Exploratory study results using face-to-face and telephone questionnaires based on four criteria for rating a company's CRM efforts are presented. Data was collected from large Contract Pharmaceutical Manufacturing companies in the US market. The results and conclusions are discussed relating how the Contract Pharmaceutical Manufacturing industry is implementing CRM including some potential steps to take when considering a CRM initiative.

  6. Characteristics of physicians targeted by the pharmaceutical industry to participate in e-detailing.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M; Khanfar, Nile M; Doucette, William R; Loudon, David

    2009-01-01

    Electronic detailing (e-detailing) has been introduced in the last few years by the pharmaceutical industry as a new communication channel through which to promote pharmaceutical products to physicians. E-detailing involves using digital technology, such as Internet, video conferencing, and interactive voice response, by which drug companies target their marketing efforts toward specific physicians with pinpoint accuracy. A mail survey of 671 Iowa physicians was used to gather information about the physician characteristics and practice setting characteristics of those who are usually targeted by pharmaceutical companies to participate in e-detailing. A model is developed and tested to explain firms' targeting strategy for targeting physicians for e-detailing.

  7. Do cost-sharing and entry deregulation curb pharmaceutical innovation?

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Volker

    2013-09-01

    This paper examines the role of both cost-sharing schemes in health insurance systems and the regulation of entry into the pharmaceutical sector for pharmaceutical R&D expenditure and drug prices. The analysis suggests that both an increase in the coinsurance rate and stricter price regulations adversely affect R&D spending in the pharmaceutical sector. In contrast, entry deregulation may lead to higher R&D spending of pharmaceutical companies. The relationship between R&D spending per firm and the number of firms may be hump-shaped. In this case, the number of rivals which maximizes R&D expenditure per firm is decreasing in the coinsurance rate and increasing in labor productivity.

  8. Impacts of international sanctions on Iranian pharmaceutical market.

    PubMed

    Cheraghali, Abdol Majid

    2013-07-31

    Iran in recent decade faced several regional and international sanctions in foreign trade, financial and banking services. Iran national pharmaceutical industry has always played a major role in providing medicines to the Iranian patients. However, following the sanctions it has faced profound difficulties for importing of both finished products and pharmaceutical raw materials. Although medicines are exempted from sanctions, due to restriction on money transaction and proper insurance Iranian pharmaceutical companies have to pay cash in advance for imports of medicines and raw materials or to secure offshore funds at very high risks. Current situation in Iran pharmaceutical market confirms that the sanctions against Iran are affecting ordinary citizens and national health sector which resulted to reduction of availability of lifesaving medicines in the local market and has caused increasing pain and suffering for Iranian patients.

  9. Impacts of international sanctions on Iranian pharmaceutical market

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Iran in recent decade faced several regional and international sanctions in foreign trade, financial and banking services. Iran national pharmaceutical industry has always played a major role in providing medicines to the Iranian patients. However, following the sanctions it has faced profound difficulties for importing of both finished products and pharmaceutical raw materials. Although medicines are exempted from sanctions, due to restriction on money transaction and proper insurance Iranian pharmaceutical companies have to pay cash in advance for imports of medicines and raw materials or to secure offshore funds at very high risks. Current situation in Iran pharmaceutical market confirms that the sanctions against Iran are affecting ordinary citizens and national health sector which resulted to reduction of availability of lifesaving medicines in the local market and has caused increasing pain and suffering for Iranian patients. PMID:23902642

  10. Differential pricing of new pharmaceuticals in lower income European countries.

    PubMed

    Kaló, Zoltán; Annemans, Lieven; Garrison, Louis P

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical companies adjust the pricing strategy of innovative medicines to the imperatives of their major markets. The ability of payers to influence the ex-factory price of new drugs depends on country population size and income per capita, among other factors. Differential pricing based on Ramsey principles is a 'second-best' solution to correct the imperfections of the global market for innovative pharmaceuticals, and it is also consistent with standard norms of equity. This analysis summarizes the boundaries of differential pharmaceutical pricing for policymakers, payers and other stakeholders in lower-income countries, with special focus on Central-Eastern Europe, and describes the feasibility and implications of potential solutions to ensure lower pharmaceutical prices as compared to higher-income countries. European stakeholders, especially in Central-Eastern Europe and at the EU level, should understand the implications of increased transparency of pricing and should develop solutions to prevent the limited accessibility of new medicines in lower-income countries.

  11. The Role of Entrepreneurial Activities in Academic Pharmaceutical Science Research

    PubMed Central

    Stinchcomb, Audra L.

    2010-01-01

    Academic pharmaceutical science research is expanding further and further from the University setting to encompass the for-profit private company setting. This parallels the National Institutes of Health momentum to include multiple funding opportunities for University and private company collaboration. It has been recognized that the non-profit and for-profit combination research model can accelerate the commercialization of pharmaceutical products, and therefore more efficiently improve human health. Entrepreneurial activities require unique considerations in the University environment, but can be modeled after the commercialization expansion of the academic healthcare enterprise. Challenges and barriers exist to starting a company as an entrepreneurial faculty member, but the rewards to one's personal and professional lives are incomparable. PMID:20017206

  12. [The pharmaceutical industry and the sustainability of healthcare systems in developed countries and in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Iñesta, Antonio; Oteo, Luis Angel

    2011-06-01

    The global economic crisis and its impact on public finances in most developed countries are giving rise to cost-containment policies in healthcare systems. Prevailing legislation on medication requires the safety, quality, and efficacy of these products. A few countries include efficiency criteria, primarily for new medication that they wish to include in public financing. The appropriate use of generic and "biosimilar medication" is very important for maintaining the financial equilibrium of the Health Services. The problem in Latin America is that not all multisource products are bioequivalent and not all countries have the resources to conduct bioequivalence studies in vivo. The European Medicines Agency in 2005 adopted guidelines on "biosimilar medicines" and thirteen of them were subsequently approved for general release. Benchmarking of this model by other countries would be important. The influence of the pharmaceutical industry on political and administrative areas is enormous and control is necessary. The pharmaceutical companies claim that they act with corporate social responsibility, therefore, they must ensure this responsibility toward society.

  13. Involving the pharmaceutical and biotech communities in medication development for substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Gorodetzky, Charles W; Grudzinskas, Charles

    2005-10-01

    Pharmacotherapy as adjunctive treatment is an integral part of the strategy for treating substance abuse. Although there are several approved drugs for the treatment of opioid, alcohol, and nicotine dependence, the pharmaceutical industry, for a variety of reasons, has been reluctant to enter this area to develop medications for substance abuse indications. Therefore, in 1990, a Medication Development Program was established by NIDA to carry out and assist in stimulating development of new pharmacotherapies. It is vital for NIDA to provide clear leadership and establish a collaborative working relationship with the pharmaceutical industry, providing scientific, development, and financial assistance, depending on the size, resources, and expertise of the company. An important NIDA role in this effort is setting standards, such as establishing Target Product Profiles (TPPs), predictive decision trees for selection of clinical candidates, and animal models to evaluate safety and potential effectiveness prior to human studies. NIDA can further establish standards for clinical studies, including Proof of Concept (PoC), Phase 2 (or Learning) trials to establish initial proof of safety and effectiveness, and Phase 3 (or Confirming) trials to validate Phase 2 findings. NIDA and other government agencies need to work to improve industry incentives to participate in medication development for substance abuse. Specific incentives, such as market exclusivity and patent extension, as provided in BioShield and pediatric drug legislation, should be strongly considered. NIDA can further assist industry to navigate the regulatory and, if needed, controlled substance scheduling processes, by establishing a true Federal partnership between NIDA, FDA, and DEA.

  14. [Pharmaceutical marketers: professional and informative aspects].

    PubMed

    Hevia, A; López-Valpuesta, F J; Vázquez, J A; Castellanos, A

    1993-10-01

    This study tries to know the opinion of pharmaceutical detailers about their profession, as well as their pharmacological knowledge. 75 questionnaires were distributed to an equal number of detailers. The questionnaires were composed of two parts. In the first one, several questions about their profession were posed. In the second one, the questions were about Pharmacology. The main results were that most of them have got only lower degrees; however, they all have carried out training courses in their companies. With regard to pharmacological questions, percentage of success was 61%.

  15. Technology evaluation: ISIS-2503, Isis Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Morse, M A

    2001-12-01

    ISIS-2503, a 20-mer antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits Ha-Ras expression, is being developed by Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc as a potential treatmentfor cancer, particularly tumors that commonly have abnormalities of Ras function. It is in phase II trials. According to an April 2001 report by Bear Stearns & Co, Elan Corp plc had an unspecified collaboration with Isis for the development of ISIS-2503 [419357], but Isis later clarified that there was no agreement between the two companies and that ISIS-2503 had merely been used for the 'OraSense' joint venture that explores the use of antisense oligonucleotidesfor oral administration [419673].

  16. Financial Times Global Pharmaceutical & Biotechnology Conference 2009.

    PubMed

    Scattereggia, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The Financial Times Global Pharmaceutical & Biotechnology conference, held in London, included topics covering the current and future challenges confronting the pharma and biotech industry, and presented possible solutions to those challenges. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the industry challenges for big pharma companies, diversification as a solution to industry problems, overcoming challenges with collaborations and M&As, and the role of emerging markets in the pharma industry. Other subjects discussed included the expected impact of personalized medicine on the industry, the entry of big pharma into the generics market and the problems that are confronting the small pharma and biotech industry.

  17. 77 FR 19531 - 7(a) Loan Program; Eligible Passive Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 120 RIN 3245-AG48 7(a) Loan Program; Eligible Passive Companies AGENCY: U.S. Small... received, SBA will publish a timely withdrawal of the rule in the Federal Register. ADDRESSES: You may... Operating Company to be a guarantor or a co-borrower (with the Eligible Passive Company) on the loan. In a...

  18. 75 FR 17796 - American Vantage Companies; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... Companies on Form N-CSR (``Form N-CSR''), each for the reporting period ended December 31, 2009. The amended...: 1. The Company will, by January 31, 2011, file Forms N-SAR, N-CSR and any other reports required by... COMMISSION American Vantage Companies; Notice of Application April 1, 2010. AGENCY: Securities and...

  19. 78 FR 12648 - Airworthiness Directives; Robinson Helicopter Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... Company AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: We propose to supersede an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for Robinson Helicopter Company... identified in this proposed AD, contact Robinson Helicopter Company, 2901 Airport Drive, Torrance, CA...

  20. 78 FR 38552 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Aircraft Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are superseding AD 2000-04-01 that applies to certain Cessna Aircraft Company (Cessna) Models 172R... in this AD, contact Cessna Aircraft Company, Product Support, P.O. Box 7706, Wichita, Kansas...

  1. 78 FR 72567 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain General Electric Company (GE) GE90... Proposed AD The Boeing Company and FedEx Express agreed with the AD as proposed. Request To Change...

  2. 77 FR 32881 - Supervised Securities Holding Company Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... 81 Supervised Securities Holding Company Registration AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal...'' or ``Act''), which permits nonbank companies that own at least one registered securities broker or... Board. The final rule outlines the requirements that a securities holding company must satisfy to...

  3. 78 FR 72552 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain General Electric Company model GEnx..., contact General Electric Company, GE Aviation, Room 285, 1 Neumann Way, Cincinnati, OH 45215; phone:...

  4. 78 FR 38413 - American Family Life Insurance Company, et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... COMMISSION American Family Life Insurance Company, et al. June 20, 2013. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange...''). Applicants: American Family Life Insurance Company (the ``Company''), American Family Variable Account I (the ``Life Account''), and American Family Variable Account II (the ``Annuity Account'') (together,...

  5. When School Management Companies Fail: Righting Educational Wrongs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Reviews public school system of education; describes school management companies (nonprofit, for profit) and their fiduciary duties; discusses monitoring the performance of school management companies; describes legal mechanisms and remedies (tort, contract, agency, and constitutional law) for holding school management companies accountable.…

  6. 76 FR 60603 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Minnesota Surety and Trust Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice... of the Treasury, Financial Management Service, Financial Accounting and Services Division, Surety... Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division, Financial Management Service. BILLING...

  7. [Chapter 5. The internationalization of the Japanese pharmaceutical industry (1980-2010)].

    PubMed

    Yongue, Julia S

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese pharmaceutical industry experienced a period of rapid and economic growth following the introduction of the national healthcare system in 1961. Triggered by a major revision in Japanese legislation from process to substance patents, leading Japanese pharmaceutical companies began to invest in research and development (R&D). By the mid-1980s, some had managed to develop their first internationally marketable drugs, many of which were antibiotics. The emergence of novel drugs gave companies the impetus to engage in progressively more appreciable investments in Asia, Europe and the United States. In the 1980s, internationalization was mainly inwardly focused so as to limit firms' exposure to risk. However, as profits increased in the 1990s from the sale of new drugs, Japanese pharmaceutical companies were able to engage in even more sizeable, outwardly focused investments. By 2010, Japan's leading pharmaceutical enterprises had succeeded in putting place three types of global operations: manufacturing, marketing and R&D.

  8. Strategic imperatives for globalization of industries in developing countries: an Indian pharmaceutical industry example.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rajesh; Chandra, Ashish; Kumar, Girish

    2004-01-01

    The annual global pharmaceutical sales have grown over 466 billion dollars, almost 50% of which comes from North America. Among developing countries, India, with 16% of the world population, accounts for only a small percentage of the global pharmaceutical industry. Until recently, India has had virtually no pharmaceutical industry worth the name producing drugs from basic raw materials and it used to rely mostly on the imports from countries like the USA and England for all its requirements of drugs. On the other hand, India has seen a plethora of multinational pharmaceutical companies come and do business in India. This paper develops a matrix which provides a broad guidance to the mid- to large-size Indian pharmaceutical domestic companies, which should embark on the path to global expansion to establish their might as well.

  9. Is the pharmaceutical market in Bulgaria innovative?

    PubMed

    Stoimenova, A; Stankova, M; Samev, K; Petrova, G

    2003-09-01

    After the turn to market oriented economy a lot of drugs were authorized for sale in the East European countries. Because of the limited resources of these countries, mainly generic or brand generic products were licensed. The number of the patented drugs on the market could be used as measure of the market attractiveness to the R&D producers. The study shows the analysis of the innovativeness of the Bulgarian drug market comparing the registration and the patient activity of the producers. The number of the authorized products for five years period (1990-2000) and share of the patented products were investigated. During the observed period the number of newly authorized pharmaceuticals increased almost seven times from 800 (650 INN) to 6000 (2000 INN) dosage forms. The prevailing part of the newly registered drugs was found to be brand generics and possess only trade name protection. The share of drugs that are patented is less than five percent of all newly registered medicines, and among the fifty most commonly prescribed and sold medicines between 1996-2000, only 0.5 percent of drugs were patented. Obviously the Bulgarian pharmaceutical market is very competitive but not that attractive for most of the R&D producers. In general the registration of the patent protected products is increasing during the years and especially after harmonization of the related legislation with the EU requirements. The patent activity of the pharmaceutical companies regarding newly authorized drugs is influenced by the structure of morbidity and population. During the last two years the patent activity is increasing and is oriented mainly towards the protection of newly authorized drugs or pharmaceutical forms and obligatory registration of trademarks for the privatized Bulgarian pharmaceutical manufacturers.

  10. 78 FR 45987 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to the Primary Sampling System AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Exemption and combined... COLs were issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company,...

  11. 78 FR 45989 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to the Primary Sampling System AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Exemption and combined... COLs were issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company,...

  12. Report raises questions about drug companies advertising budgets.

    PubMed

    1999-08-06

    A report by AIDS Action cites that data, indicates the pharmaceutical industry is spending more resources on marketing and advertising than on research and development (R&D). The pharmaceutical industry blames the high cost of AIDS drugs on R&D information compiled from annual reports and industry publications show excessive marketing as the source. A spokesman for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) disputes the information in the AIDS Action report as misleading. According to PhRMA, research spending has been steadily increasing, and at a greater rate than any other industry. In addition, PhRMA noted that pharmaceutical companies have already dedicated money to fund initiatives in developing countries. Solutions proposed by AIDS Action include lowering drug prices or transferring funds from marketing to research, and reestablishing the "reasonable pricing clause" between National Institutes of Health and those companies seeking tax breaks for R&D.

  13. Tractor Supply Company Agrees to Implement Company-Wide Compliance Program to Resolve Clean Air Act Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Justice today announced a settlement with Tractor Supply Company Inc. and Tractor Supply Company of Texas L.P., that resolves allegations that the companies impor

  14. [Fourcroy and pharmaceutical journals].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2011-04-01

    Cadet de Gassicourt wrote a brief Eloge of Fourcroy in January 1810 as he died in December of 1809. Fourcroy had a major role concerning the new ideas on the place of pharmacy at the beginning of the 19th century. Fourcroy has had a key influence for the start of several pharmaceutical journals that wanted to emphasize the link between the new chemistry and pharmacy. None of these journals created with him will survive and one has to wait for 1909 to see the creation, without Fourcroy, of a new pharmaceutical journal, the "Journal de Pharmacie" that will become "Journal de Pharmacie et des Sciences accessoires", then "Journal de Pharmacie et de Chimie", before taking the name of"Annales Pharmaceutiques Françaises", the present official journal of the French Academy of Pharmacy. In spite of the essential role of Fourcroy at the start of pharmaceutical journals, Cadet did not even mention it in his Eloge of 1810.

  15. 78 FR 35359 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment-Safeco Insurance Company of America

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment--Safeco Insurance Company of America AGENCY: Bureau of the Fiscal Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice... of the Fiscal Service, Financial Accounting and Services Division, Surety Bond Branch, 3700...

  16. 78 FR 35359 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment-Liberty Mutual Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment--Liberty Mutual Insurance Company AGENCY: Bureau of the Fiscal Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Fiscal Service, Financial Accounting and Services Division, Surety Bond Branch, 3700 East-West...

  17. [Historical sketch of modern pharmaceutical science and technology (Part 4). Post World War II 50 years].

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, K

    1995-01-01

    A short history of the pharmaceutical science and technology, postwar 50 years is divided into nine sections for the purpose of discussion. 1. Japan's postwar rehabilitation, Japanese pharmaceutical industries and newly developed pharmaceutical sciences and technologies. In 1945, the Japanese pharmaceutical industry was reconstructed. Production of penicillin was carried out with the strong support of the U.S. Occupation Forces. New sciences in pharmacy (biochemistry, biopharmacy, pharmacology, microbiology, physical chemistry, etc.) were introduced in this period. 2. Introduction age of foreign new drugs and technology (1951 to 1960s). Japan gained independence in 1951. Japanese pharmaceutical companies imported many new drugs and new pharmaceutical technologies from the U.S.A. and European countries in this period. Then, these companies were reconstruction rapidly. However, consequently Japanese pharmaceutical companies were formed as an imitation industry. 3. Rapid economic growth period for pharmaceutical companies (1956 to 1970s). In this period, many Japanese pharmaceutical companies grew rapidly at an annual rate of 15-20% over a period of 15 years, especially with regard to the production of active vitamin B1 analog drugs and some OTC (public health drugs). Some major companies made large profits, which were used to construct research facilities. 4. Problems for the harmful effects of medicines and its ethical responsibility. In the 1970s, many public toxic and harmful effects of medicines were caused, especially SMON's disease. In this time, many pharmaceutical companies changed to its security got development of ethical drugs. 5. Self development of new drugs and administration of pharmaceutical rules (1970s). During the 1970s, many pharmaceutical laws (GLP, GCP, GMP, GPMSP etc.) were enacted by the Ministry of Health and Welfare. In 1976, the Japanese Pharmaceutical Affairs Law was revised, which set forth standards regarding the efficacy and safety of

  18. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Rail Yard Company Site in Perry, Iowa. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Rail Yard Company site in Perry, Iowa, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

  19. The Disposable Author: How Pharmaceutical Marketing Is Embraced within Medicine's Scholarly Literature.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Alastair

    2016-07-01

    The best studies on the relationship between pharmaceutical corporations and medicine have recognized that it is an ambiguous one. Yet most scholarship has pursued a simpler, more saleable narrative in which pharma is a scheming villain and medicine its maidenly victim. In this article, I argue that such crude moral framing blunts understanding of the murky realities of medicine's relationship with pharma and, in consequence, holds back reform. My goal is to put matters right in respect to one critical area of scholarly interest, the medical journal publication. Pharma relies on peer advocacy to sell its wares to prescribing doctors. This is an arrangement in which clinicians' qualified colleagues, including "key opinion leaders," are recruited by pharmaceutical corporations and marketing agencies to deliver commercially expedient content to their professional fellows. Precisely how this practice works in the setting of publications is not well understood because ethicists studying the problem have made too much of the narrative of corporate villainy and medical victimhood. Accordingly, criticism of industry publications has been preoccupied with the crudely dishonest practices of ghostwriting, ghost authorship, and "ghost management," vices condemned as "dirty little secrets" perpetrated from "behind the scenes" with the connivance of academic "shills" or "guest authors," in contempt of standards set by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. This account is appealing, and yet it is wrong or, at the very least, seriously incomplete, with only limited relevance to the actualities of contemporary industry practices. In truth, many commercial publications are not developed in secret but fashioned within a culture of open collaboration, where academic authors make substantial, independent contributions; pharmaceutical companies are showcased rather than hidden; and medicine's editorial standards assist rather than impede the workings of commerce.

  20. A Study of Comparative Advantage and Intra-Industry Trade in the Pharmaceutical Industry of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yusefzadeh, Hassan; Rezapour, Aziz; Lotfi, Farhad; Azar, Farbod Ebadifard; Nabilo, Bahram; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Hadian, Mohammad; Shahidisadeghi, Niusha; Karami, Atiyeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Drug costs in Iran accounts for about 30% of the total health care expenditure. Moreover, pharmaceutical business lies among the world’s greatest businesses. The aim of this study was to analyze Iran’s comparative advantage and intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals so that suitable policies can be developed and implemented in order to boost Iran’s trade in this field. Methods: To identify Iran’s comparative advantage in pharmaceuticals, trade specialization, export propensity, import penetration and Balassa and Vollrath indexes were calculated and the results were compared with other pharmaceutical exporting countries. The extent and growth of Iran’s intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals were measured and evaluated using the Grubel-Lloyd and Menon-Dixon indexes. The required data was obtained from Iran’s Customs Administration, Iran’s pharmaceutical Statistics, World Bank and International Trade Center. Results: The results showed that among pharmaceutical exporting countries, Iran has a high level of comparative disadvantage in pharmaceutical products because it holds a small share in world’s total pharmaceutical exports. Also, the low extent of bilateral intra-industry trade between Iran and its trading partners in pharmaceuticals shows the trading model of Iran’s pharmaceutical industry is mostly inter-industry trade rather than intra-industry trade. In addition, the growth of Iran’s intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals is due to its shares of imports from pharmaceutical exporting countries to Iran and exports from Iran to its neighboring countries. Conclusions: The results of the analysis can play a valuable role in helping pharmaceutical companies and policy makers to boost pharmaceutical trade. PMID:26153184

  1. Institutional corruption of pharmaceuticals and the myth of safe and effective drugs.

    PubMed

    Light, Donald W; Lexchin, Joel; Darrow, Jonathan J

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 35 years, patients have suffered from a largely hidden epidemic of side effects from drugs that usually have few offsetting benefits. The pharmaceutical industry has corrupted the practice of medicine through its influence over what drugs are developed, how they are tested, and how medical knowledge is created. Since 1906, heavy commercial influence has compromised congressional legislation to protect the public from unsafe drugs. The authorization of user fees in 1992 has turned drug companies into the FDA's prime clients, deepening the regulatory and cultural capture of the agency. Industry has demanded shorter average review times and, with less time to thoroughly review evidence, increased hospitalizations and deaths have resulted. Meeting the needs of the drug companies has taken priority over meeting the needs of patients. Unless this corruption of regulatory intent is reversed, the situation will continue to deteriorate. We offer practical suggestions including: separating the funding of clinical trials from their conduct, analysis, and publication; independent FDA leadership; full public funding for all FDA activities; measures to discourage R&D on drugs with few, if any, new clinical benefits; and the creation of a National Drug Safety Board.

  2. Reflections on Pharmaceutical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    A discussion of the implications of adopting a new example for pharmaceutical education focuses on the need to develop a new pharmacy college culture and on the faculty's role in addressing stated educational goals. Anticipated changes in staffing and faculty development and difficulties in reorganizing curricula are examined. (MSE)

  3. Evolving role of pharmaceutical physicians in the industry: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Patil, Anant; Rajadhyaksha, Viraj

    2012-01-01

    The Indian pharmaceutical industry, like any other industry, has undergone significant change in the last decade. The role of a Medical advisor has always been of paramount importance in the pharmaceutical companies in India. On account of the evolving medical science and the competitive environment, the medical advisor's role is also increasingly becoming critical. In India, with changes in regulatory rules, safety surveillance, and concept of medical liaisons, the role of the medical advisor is evolving continuously and is further likely to evolve in the coming years in important areas like health economics, public private partnerships, and strategic planning.

  4. Models for open innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Alexander; Germann, Paul-Georg; Trill, Henning; Gassmann, Oliver

    2013-12-01

    The nature of the pharmaceutical industry is such that the main driver for its growth is innovation. In view of the vast challenges that the industry has been facing for several years and, in particular, how to manage stagnating research and development (R&D) productivity, pharmaceutical companies have opened their R&D organizations to external innovation. Here, we identify and characterize four new types of open innovator, which we call 'knowledge creator', 'knowledge integrator', 'knowledge translator' and 'knowledge leverager', and which describe current open R&D models.

  5. Evolving role of pharmaceutical physicians in the industry: Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anant; Rajadhyaksha, Viraj

    2012-01-01

    The Indian pharmaceutical industry, like any other industry, has undergone significant change in the last decade. The role of a Medical advisor has always been of paramount importance in the pharmaceutical companies in India. On account of the evolving medical science and the competitive environment, the medical advisor's role is also increasingly becoming critical. In India, with changes in regulatory rules, safety surveillance, and concept of medical liaisons, the role of the medical advisor is evolving continuously and is further likely to evolve in the coming years in important areas like health economics, public private partnerships, and strategic planning. PMID:22347701

  6. Pharmaceutical industry sponsorship and research outcome and quality: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lexchin, Joel; Bero, Lisa A; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Clark, Otavio

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether funding of drug studies by the pharmaceutical industry is associated with outcomes that are favourable to the funder and whether the methods of trials funded by pharmaceutical companies differ from the methods in trials with other sources of support. Methods Medline (January 1966 to December 2002) and Embase (January 1980 to December 2002) searches were supplemented with material identified in the references and in the authors' personal files. Data were independently abstracted by three of the authors and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results 30 studies were included. Research funded by drug companies was less likely to be published than research funded by other sources. Studies sponsored by pharmaceutical companies were more likely to have outcomes favouring the sponsor than were studies with other sponsors (odds ratio 4.05; 95% confidence interval 2.98 to 5.51; 18 comparisons). None of the 13 studies that analysed methods reported that studies funded by industry was of poorer quality. Conclusion Systematic bias favours products which are made by the company funding the research. Explanations include the selection of an inappropriate comparator to the product being investigated and publication bias. PMID:12775614

  7. Your business in court and at Federal agencies: 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Reiss, John B; Crowder, Dawn; McCabe, Brittany; DeFeo, Marisa; Rifin, Marta; Talbot, Meghan

    2013-01-01

    FDA transparency effort continued, including the Secretary's adopting eight measures to improve access to Agency information and activities. A continuing problem was shortages of prescription drugs, which probably was enhanced by increased manufacturing recalls. FDA issued more device Guidances for regulatory clarity. Enforcement involving drugs and devices increased, including GMP and GLP enforcement and surveillance of internet claims. The Supreme Court decided generic drug manufacturers may cause the FDA to revise incorrectly listed use codes, and pharmaceutical detailers may not receive overtime payments. FDA initiated implementation of the Food Safety and Modernization Act, including two pilot tracking systems for supply chain tracing and to determine how quickly data can be gathered. The Agency issued guidance for new dietary supplements. FDA failed to impose graphic labeling requirements on the tobacco industry, but established it can regulate electronic cigarettes as tobacco. The Agency issued guidelines for the use of nanomaterials in cosmetics, and reviewed the effectiveness of sunscreen products. FDA is being given more authority over larger areas of the U.S. economy, but its resources are not increased proportionately. The pharmaceutical industry made major payments for alleged violations of the Drug Rebate Statute, Anti-Kickback Statute, Wholesale Price and Off-Label Use prohibitions. The government continues using the Responsible Corporate Officer doctrine to make company managers responsible for corporate conduct about which they had no knowledge. Companies should have a robust compliance program in effect. The FTC and the SEC continue their oversight activities, including SEC's enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The defense of product liability litigation continues grappling with federal preemption of state laws.

  8. 75 FR 18208 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Announcement of Board Approval Under Delegated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ...: Census of Finance Companies. Agency form number: FR 3033p. OMB control number: 7100-0277. Frequency: One-time. Reporters: Domestic finance companies and mortgage companies. Estimated annual reporting hours: 6... Census of Finance Companies (FR 3033p) and the Quinquennial Finance Company Survey (FR 3033s). The...

  9. 76 FR 57746 - Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System: A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation... Systems and Processes for Pharmaceutical Manufacturing; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA),...

  10. [Dangerous liaisons--physicians and pharmaceutical sales representatives].

    PubMed

    Granja, Mónica

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between physicians and detailers (even when legitimate ones) raise scientific and ethical questions. In Portugal little thinking and discussion has been done on the subject and the blames for bribery have monopolized the media. This work intended to review what has been said in medical literature about these interactions. How do physicians see themselves when interacting with pharmaceutical companies and their representatives? Do these companies in fact change their prescriptive behaviour, and, if so, how do they change it? How can physicians interact with detailers and still keep their best practice? A Medline research, from 1966 till 2002, was performed using the key-words as follows. A database similar to Medline but concerning medical journals published in Portugal, Index das Revistas Médicas Portuguesas, was also researched from 1992 to 2002. Pharmaceutical companies are profit bound and they allot promoting activities, and detailing in particular, huge amounts of money. Most physicians hold firmly to the belief that they are able to resist and not be influenced by drug companies promotion activities. Nevertheless, all previous works on literature tell us the opposite. Market research also indicates that detailers effectively promote drug sales. Various works also suggest that the information detailers provide to physicians may be largely incorrect, even comparing it to the written information provided by the pharmaceutical companies they work for. The frequency at which portuguese physicians (especially family physicians) contact with pharmaceutical sales representatives is higher than the frequency reported in countries where the available studies come from (namely, Canada and the United States of America). This may put portuguese physicians at a higher risk, making it imperative that work and wide debate are initiated among the class.

  11. WHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of an international group of experts convened by the World Health Organization to consider matters concerning the quality assurance of pharmaceuticals and specifications for drug substances and dosage forms. Of particular relevance to drug regulatory authorities and pharmaceutical manufacturers, the report discusses activities related to the development of The International Pharmacopoeia and basic tests for pharmaceutical substances and dosage forms, as well as quality control of reference materials, good manufacturing practices (GMP), stability studies, inspection, hazard analysis, procurement, storage and other aspects of quality assurance of pharmaceuticals, and regulatory issues. The report is complemented by a number of annexes, including recommendations on the risk of transmitting animal spongiform encephalopathy agents via medicinal products, guidelines on GMP for pharmaceutical products, a model certificate for GMP and guidance on a GMP inspection report. The final annexes provide guidance on the application of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) method to pharmaceuticals, good storage practices and a procedure for assessing acceptability of pharmaceutical products for purchase by United Nations agencies.

  12. 76 FR 31342 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Current Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Current Good Manufacturing Practice Regulations for Finished Pharmaceuticals AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration...

  13. The World Health Organization, the drugs company, and the $10,000 funding offer.

    PubMed

    Day, Michael; Boseley, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    The World Health Organization faces allegations that it attempted to secure a $10,000 donation from a pharmaceutical company by asking a patients' group to act as a covert channel for the funds, an arrangement that would break the WHO's own rules on accepting money from the pharmaceutical industry. The WHO denies attempts to bend its donation rules.

  14. Activities of the Federal Interagency Workgroup on Pharmaceuticals in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2012, four federal agencies signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) establishing a formal mechanism to improve and sustain federal coordination and collaboration on issues related to pharmaceuticals in water. The MOU is in response to the Government Accountability Office re...

  15. Writing Technical Documents for the Global Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonk, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    States that technical writers in the global pharmaceutical industry write for two audiences: regulatory agencies and healthcare practitioners. Contends that information products that address these audiences must balance the competing forces of business interests, market penetration, and the cultural variables of products so tied to people's…

  16. EU pharmaceutical expenditure forecast

    PubMed Central

    Urbinati, Duccio; Rémuzat, Cécile; Kornfeld, Åsa; Vataire, Anne-Lise; Cetinsoy, Laurent; Aballéa, Samuel; Mzoughi, Olfa; Toumi, Mondher

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives With constant incentives for healthcare payers to contain their pharmaceutical budgets, forecasting has become critically important. Some countries have, for instance, developed pharmaceutical horizon scanning units. The objective of this project was to build a model to assess the net effect of the entrance of new patented medicinal products versus medicinal products going off-patent, with a defined forecast horizon, on selected European Union (EU) Member States’ pharmaceutical budgets. This model took into account population ageing, as well as current and future country-specific pricing, reimbursement, and market access policies (the project was performed for the European Commission; see http://ec.europa.eu/health/healthcare/key_documents/index_en.htm). Method In order to have a representative heterogeneity of EU Member States, the following countries were selected for the analysis: France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Poland, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. A forecasting period of 5 years (2012–2016) was chosen to assess the net pharmaceutical budget impact. A model for generics and biosimilars was developed for each country. The model estimated a separate and combined effect of the direct and indirect impacts of the patent cliff. A second model, estimating the sales development and the risk of development failure, was developed for new drugs. New drugs were reviewed individually to assess their clinical potential and translate it into commercial potential. The forecast was carried out according to three perspectives (healthcare public payer, society, and manufacturer), and several types of distribution chains (retail, hospital, and combined retail and hospital). Probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses were carried out. Results According to the model, all countries experienced drug budget reductions except Poland (+€41 million). Savings were expected to be the highest in the United Kingdom (−€9,367 million), France

  17. Gray marketing of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, P E; Walsh, M G

    1995-01-01

    Pharmaceutical marketers in the European Union are constrained by regulated prices, opening up opportunities for gray marketers. The authors investigate the legal framework that regulates gray markets by summarizing and analyzing relevant European Court of Justice decisions that favor gray marketers and actually foster parallel trade. Before marketing managers can develop effective strategies in this marketplace, they must first understand the precedents of the legal system in which they will be operating.

  18. Evaluation of pharmaceutical concerns in Germany: frequency and potential reasons

    PubMed Central

    Gradl, Gabriele; Krieg, Eva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: Generic substitution can have unintended consequences. In Germany, brand name to generic or generic to generic switching is mainly driven by rebate contracts. Frequent switching may raise concerns about bio- and therapeutic equivalence. Expected patient confusion may result in compromised medication adherence or new onset of other drug-related problems. Since 2008, pharmacists are allowed to deviate from rebate contracts by denying substitution due to pharmaceutical concerns on an individual basis. Objectives: To explore the frequency of documented pharmaceutical concerns in Germany between July 2011 and December 2013 and to identify the medicines most frequently related to pharmaceutical concerns in 2013. Methods: We analyzed documented pharmaceutical concerns in all prescribed drugs at the expense of any statutory health insurance company requiring pharmacies’ generic substitution according to rebate contracts. Results: Since July 2011, the frequency of documented pharmaceutical concerns in relation to prescribed drug products with rebate contracts requiring substitution increased consistently and doubled between July 2011 and July 2013. Overall in 2013, the trend of the two previous years continued and reached approximately 1.5%. The most affected drugs/drug classes were thyroid hormones (in particular combinations with iodide; 15.9%) followed by ondansetron (12.5%), and levothyroxine (11.3%). For all drugs/drug classes under investigation, product-, patient- or disease-related aspects could be identified which are potential reasons to deny substitution and to document pharmaceutical concerns. Conclusions: Although there is no electronic recording of the specific reasons for pharmaceutical concerns in claims data, our analyses support the assumption that pharmacists make use of this instrument based on individual clinical decisions and as required by contract. Pharmaceutical concerns are, therefore, an important instrument for pharmacies to refuse

  19. Pharmaceuticals in the environment: scientific evidence of risks and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Küster, Anette; Adler, Nicole

    2014-11-19

    During the past two decades scientists, regulatory agencies and the European Commission have acknowledged pharmaceuticals to be an emerging environmental problem. In parallel, a regulatory framework for environmental risk assessment (ERA) of pharmaceutical products has been developed. Since the regulatory guidelines came into force the German Federal Agency (UBA) has been evaluating ERAs for human and veterinary pharmaceutical products before they are marketed. The results show that approximately 10% of pharmaceutical products are of note regarding their potential environmental risk. For human medicinal products, hormones, antibiotics, analgesics, antidepressants and antineoplastics indicated an environmental risk. For veterinary products, hormones, antibiotics and parasiticides were most often discussed as being environmentally relevant. These results are in good correlation with the results within the open scientific literature of prioritization approaches for pharmaceuticals in the environment. UBA results revealed that prospective approaches, such as ERA of pharmaceuticals, play an important role in minimizing problems caused by pharmaceuticals in the environment. However, the regulatory ERA framework could be improved by (i) inclusion of the environment in the risk-benefit analysis for human pharmaceuticals, (ii) improvement of risk management options, (iii) generation of data on existing pharmaceuticals, and (iv) improving the availability of ERA data. In addition, more general and integrative steps of regulation, legislation and research have been developed and are presented in this article. In order to minimize the quantity of pharmaceuticals in the environment these should aim to (i) improve the existing legislation for pharmaceuticals, (ii) prioritize pharmaceuticals in the environment and (iii) improve the availability and collection of pharmaceutical data.

  20. Pharmaceuticals in the environment: scientific evidence of risks and its regulation

    PubMed Central

    Küster, Anette; Adler, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    During the past two decades scientists, regulatory agencies and the European Commission have acknowledged pharmaceuticals to be an emerging environmental problem. In parallel, a regulatory framework for environmental risk assessment (ERA) of pharmaceutical products has been developed. Since the regulatory guidelines came into force the German Federal Agency (UBA) has been evaluating ERAs for human and veterinary pharmaceutical products before they are marketed. The results show that approximately 10% of pharmaceutical products are of note regarding their potential environmental risk. For human medicinal products, hormones, antibiotics, analgesics, antidepressants and antineoplastics indicated an environmental risk. For veterinary products, hormones, antibiotics and parasiticides were most often discussed as being environmentally relevant. These results are in good correlation with the results within the open scientific literature of prioritization approaches for pharmaceuticals in the environment. UBA results revealed that prospective approaches, such as ERA of pharmaceuticals, play an important role in minimizing problems caused by pharmaceuticals in the environment. However, the regulatory ERA framework could be improved by (i) inclusion of the environment in the risk–benefit analysis for human pharmaceuticals, (ii) improvement of risk management options, (iii) generation of data on existing pharmaceuticals, and (iv) improving the availability of ERA data. In addition, more general and integrative steps of regulation, legislation and research have been developed and are presented in this article. In order to minimize the quantity of pharmaceuticals in the environment these should aim to (i) improve the existing legislation for pharmaceuticals, (ii) prioritize pharmaceuticals in the environment and (iii) improve the availability and collection of pharmaceutical data. PMID:25405974

  1. Trade, TRIPS, and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard D; Correa, Carlos; Oh, Cecilia

    2009-02-21

    The World Trade Organization's Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) set global minimum standards for the protection of intellectual property, substantially increasing and expanding intellectual-property rights, and generated clear gains for the pharmaceutical industry and the developed world. The question of whether TRIPS generates gains for developing countries, in the form of increased exports, is addressed in this paper through consideration of the importance of pharmaceuticals in health-care trade, outlining the essential requirements, implications, and issues related to TRIPS, and TRIPS-plus, in which increased restrictions are imposed as part of bilateral free-trade agreements. TRIPS has not generated substantial gains for developing countries, but has further increased pharmaceutical trade in developed countries. The unequal trade between developed and developing countries (ie, exporting and importing high-value patented drugs, respectively) raises the issue of access to medicines, which is exacerbated by TRIPS-plus provisions, although many countries have not even enacted provision for TRIPS flexibilities. Therefore this paper focuses on options that are available to the health community for negotiation to their advantage under TRIPS, and within the presence of TRIPS-plus.

  2. India's pharmaceutical industry: hype or high tech take-off?

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Prabodh; Lofgren, Hans

    2004-11-08

    India has built a large pharmaceutical industry through an array of measures in support of domestic firms. The absence of product patents enabled Indian companies to become world leading producers of generic versions of patented drugs. Low costs and a strong engineering tradition continue to sustain competitive strength. The implementation of the World Trade Organization patent regime in 2005 is driving a transformation of the industry. Key elements of the present shake-up include the return of 'big pharma' companies on a large scale and the emergence of several Indian firms that aim to become fully-fledged research-based multinationals. This article provides a description of the development and structure of the Indian pharmaceutical industry and explores questions and challenges arising from its integration into global markets.

  3. Creating knowledge structures in the pharmaceutical industry: the increasing significance of virtual organisation.

    PubMed

    Salazar, A; Howells, J

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the specific trend and challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry regarding the exploitation of Internet e-commerce technology and virtual organisation to develop and maintain competitive advantage. There are two important facets of the current trend. One is the rapid development of a complex network of alliances between the established pharmaceutical companies and the specialised biotechnology company start-ups. The other is the rapid growth of internet e-commerce companies dedicated to developing specialised technological platforms for acquiring and selling genetic and biochemical knowledge. The underlying challenge is how big pharmaceutical companies can emulate some of the innovation processes of smaller biotechnology company start-ups, and how they can appropriate and applied new technological knowledge on the development of new drugs. Pharmaceutical companies in order to retain competitive advantage need to continuously monitor all aspects of knowledge management with regard to the R&D and manufacturing process (as well as customer management and marketing). Technological change and organisational restructuring should be aimed at boosting the capacity of large firms to innovate rapidly.

  4. PHARMACEUTICALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: OVERVIEW ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) comprise a large and diverse array of unregulated pollutants that can occur in the environment from the combined activities and actions of multitudes of individuals as well as from veterinary and agricultural use (http://epa.gov/nerlesd1/chemistry/pharma/images/drawing.pdf). Concerted research that began in Europe about two decades ago, and in the u.s. in the late 1990s, has begun escalating in the last few years. Investigation that was originally limited to studying the sources, origins, and occurrence of PPCPs primarily in waters has now expanded to encompass occurrence in other matrices and to consider the complexities involved with the range of unanticipated and subtle effects that might occur from low-dose. chronic exposure of non-target organisms. Risk management options designed around the principles of pollution prevention and environmental stewardship are also under discussion in the healthcare community. This paper will focus on the efforts being coordinated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, much of which is captured on the PPCPs web site: http://epa.gov/nerlesd1/chemistry/pharma/. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth co

  5. Restoring a reputation: invoking the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights to bear on pharmaceutical pricing.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    In public health, the issue of pharmaceutical pricing is a perennial problem. Recent high-profile examples, such as the September 2015 debacle involving Martin Shkreli and Turing Pharmaceuticals, are indicative of larger, systemic difficulties that plague the pharmaceutical industry in regards to drug pricing and the impact it yields on their reputation in the eyes of the public. For public health ethics, the issue of pharmaceutical pricing is rather crucial. Simply, individuals within a population require pharmaceuticals for disease prevention and management. In order to be effective, these pharmaceuticals must be accessibly priced. This analysis will explore the notion of corporate social responsibility in regards to pharmaceutical pricing with an aim of restoring a positive reputation upon the pharmaceutical industry in the public eye. The analysis will utilize the 2005 United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization's Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights (UDBHR) to establish implications regarding the societal responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in a global context. To accomplish this, Article 14 of the UDBHR-social responsibility and health-will be articulated in order to advocate a viewpoint of socially responsible capitalism in which pharmaceutical companies continue as profit-making ventures, yet establish moral concern for the welfare of all their stakeholders, including the healthcare consumer.

  6. EPA Enforcement Ensures that Solar Company Follows Stormwater Discharge Requirements at Warren, Mass. Facility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A settlement signed recently by a company that builds solar power facilities in Massachusetts will remind construction companies that the US Environmental Protection Agency continues to protect the environment from illegal discharges of sto

  7. 75 FR 37881 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Change in Business Address and Redomestication...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Change in Business Address and Redomestication; Safeco National Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury...-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is hereby given by the Treasury that Safeco National...

  8. 77 FR 18883 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Termination and Merger; Pioneer General Insurance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Termination and Merger; Pioneer General Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury....

  9. 75 FR 11229 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Pennsylvania Manufacturers' Association Insurance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Pennsylvania Manufacturers' Association Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury....

  10. 77 FR 42553 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Termination and Merger: Harleysville Mutual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Termination and Merger: Harleysville Mutual Insurance Company (NAIC 14168) AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of...

  11. 76 FR 38459 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Redomestication and Change in Business Address...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Redomestication and Change in Business Address; National Farmers Union Property and Casualty Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service,...

  12. 75 FR 51333 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds; Change in State of Incorporation; National Trust...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds; Change in State of Incorporation; National Trust Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the...

  13. Marketing to the consumer: perspectives from the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    David, C

    2001-01-01

    Individualized health management is one of the most exciting challenges facing health care marketing today. Greater access to health information has empowered consumers to take more control of their health needs, creating a whole new landscape for marketers, manufacturers, and service providers. Customization is the key to creating marketing campaigns that successfully target today's health-conscious consumers. Drawing on individualized market intelligence and available genetic information, pharmaceutical companies are learning to tailor products to meet the needs of this growing market.

  14. Challenges for pharmaceutical industry: new partnerships for sustainable human health.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jackie

    2011-05-13

    The healthcare burden is increasing in both the developed and the developing world and there is widespread acceptance that the historical pharmaceutical business model is not sustainable. In order to meet the healthcare challenge, companies and academia need to develop new business models to increase the probability of success and decrease the cost of failure. New partnerships have already emerged in the area of neglected diseases and other models for diseases of the developed world are emerging.

  15. Common road blocks to national accounts pharmaceutical programs.

    PubMed

    Stanley, N R

    1994-04-01

    The large managed care customer represents concentrated purchasing power and product access to a large patient population. Contracting will continue to grow, and a large portion of product purchases will be under the agreements negotiated, implemented, and supported by the pharmaceutical company's national accounts department. The national accounts department will need to receive support from the organization if it is to do the job successfully.

  16. Improving environmental risk assessment of human pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ågerstrand, Marlene; Berg, Cecilia; Björlenius, Berndt; Breitholtz, Magnus; Brunström, Björn; Fick, Jerker; Gunnarsson, Lina; Larsson, D G Joakim; Sumpter, John P; Tysklind, Mats; Rudén, Christina

    2015-05-05

    This paper presents 10 recommendations for improving the European Medicines Agency's guidance for environmental risk assessment of human pharmaceutical products. The recommendations are based on up-to-date, available science in combination with experiences from other chemical frameworks such as the REACH-legislation for industrial chemicals. The recommendations concern: expanding the scope of the current guideline; requirements to assess the risk for development of antibiotic resistance; jointly performed assessments; refinement of the test proposal; mixture toxicity assessments on active pharmaceutical ingredients with similar modes of action; use of all available ecotoxicity studies; mandatory reviews; increased transparency; inclusion of emission data from production; and a risk management option. We believe that implementation of our recommendations would strengthen the protection of the environment and be beneficial to society. Legislation and guidance documents need to be updated at regular intervals in order to incorporate new knowledge from the scientific community. This is particularly important for regulatory documents concerning pharmaceuticals in the environment since this is a research field that has been growing substantially in the last decades.

  17. Influence of pharmaceutical marketing on prescription practices of physicians.

    PubMed

    Narendran, Roshni; Narendranathan, M

    2013-01-01

    In India same drug molecules are sold under different brand names by different pharmaceuticals. To persuade the physicians to prescribe their brands pharmaceuticals engage in marketing techniques like giving samples, gifts, sponsoring travel etc. Many countries are striving to reduce the impact of incentives on prescription behaviour. This study explores the influence of pharmaceutical marketing on the prescription practices of doctors in India. There were 103 study subjects - 50 doctors and 53 sales personnel. Data collection was done by a self administered questionnaire. Data were collected on 36 variables which were supposed to influence prescription. The effectiveness of the promotional strategies on prescription behaviour was marked in a seven point Likert scale ranging from "not at all effective" (score=1) to "extremely effective" (score=7). Open ended questions were used to collect qualitative data. Good rapport with the doctor, launch meetings, reputation of the company, quality of the drug and brand names significantly influenced prescription behaviour, while direct mailers, advertisements in journals and giving letter pads and other brand reminders were less effective. Commonly used method of giving samples was not among the twenty most effective methods influencing prescription. Product quality and good company are still factors that influence prescription. Pharmaceutical marketing influences the choice of brands by a physician. The more expensive strategies involved in public relations are more effective. Sending mails and journal advertisements are less effective strategies. How expensive marketing strategies affect cost of the medicines has to be explored further.

  18. Pharmaceutical sales representatives and the doctor/patient relationship.

    PubMed

    Wall, L Lewis; Brown, Douglas

    2002-09-01

    As marketing efforts by drug companies become more aggressive, physicians are being asked to provide clinical "preceptorships" to pharmaceutical sales representatives. During a "preceptorship" of this type, the company representative spends a day with the physician seeing patients "as an educational experience," and the physician receives an "honorarium" from the drug company in return. We explore the implications of this practice. First, we examine the nature of the doctor/patient relationship and the fiduciary obligations incumbent upon physicians in their role as healers. Second, we examine four interlocking ethical principles-nonmaleficence, beneficence, respect for patient autonomy, and justice-that should govern doctor/patient encounters. Third, we critique several hypothetical scenarios involving individuals who might put forth a claim to enter the doctor/patient relationship (ie, a pharmacist, a social scientist, the husband of the patient, and a pharmaceutical sales representative). We conclude that the practice of providing clinical "preceptorships" to pharmaceutical sales representatives is unjustifiable, is unethical, and should not be permitted.

  19. Feasibility of commercial space manufacturing, production of pharmaceuticals. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of the commercial manufacturing of pharmaceuticals in space is examined. The method of obtaining pharmaceutical company involvement, laboratory results of the separation of serum proteins by the continuous flow electrophoresis process, the selection and study of candidate products, and their production requirements is presented. Antihemophilic factor, beta cells, erythropoietin, epidermal growth factor, alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon were studied. Production mass balances for antihemophilic factor, beta cells, and erythropoietin were compared for space verus ground operation.

  20. The case for entrepreneurship in R&D in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Frank L; Narayanan, V K; Mitchell, Lesa; Litan, Robert E

    2010-09-01

    A lack of entrepreneurial behaviour has often been highlighted as a contributor to the decline in the research and development (R&D) productivity of the pharmaceutical industry. Here, we present an assessment of entrepreneurship in the industry, based on interviews with 26 former and current leaders of R&D departments at major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Factors are highlighted that could be important in promoting entrepreneurial behaviour, which might serve as a catalyst for revitalizing R&D productivity.

  1. Exposure of medical students to pharmaceutical marketing in primary care settings: frequent and influential.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ozlem; Civaner, Murat; Vatansever, Kevser

    2009-12-01

    It is known that interaction between pharmaceutical companies and medical professionals may lead to corruption of professional values, irrational use of medicine, and negative effects on the patient-physician relationship. Medical students frequently interact with pharmaceutical company representatives and increasingly accept their gifts. Considering the move toward early clinical encounters and community-based education, which expose students early to pharmaceutical representatives, the influence of those gifts is becoming a matter of concern. This study examines the frequency and influence of student exposure to drug marketing in primary care settings, as well as student perceptions of physician-pharmaceutical company relationships. This was a two-phase study consisting of qualitative research followed by a cross-sectional survey. Clinical experience logbooks of 280 second-year students in one school were analysed, and the themes that emerged were used to develop a survey that was administered to 308 third-year students from two medical schools. Survey results showed a 91.2% exposure to any type of marketing, and 56.8% of students were exposed to all classes of marketing methods studied. Deliberate targeting of students by pharmaceutical representatives, in particular, was correlated with being less sensitive to the negative effects of and having positive opinions about interactions with pharmaceutical companies. The vast majority of students are exposed to drug marketing in primary care settings, and may become more vulnerable to that strategy. Considering that medical students are vulnerable and are targeted deliberately by pharmaceutical companies, interventions aimed at developing skills in the rational use of medicines and in strategies for coping with drug marketing should be devised.

  2. Bolaamphiphiles: A Pharmaceutical Review

    PubMed Central

    Fariya, Mayur; Jain, Ankitkumar; Dhawan, Vivek; Shah, Sanket; Nagarsenker, Mangal S.

    2014-01-01

    The field of drug discovery is ever growing and excipients play a major role in it. A novel class of amphiphiles has been discussed in the review. The review focuses on natural as well as synthetic bolaamphiphiles, their chemical structures and importantly, their ability to self assemble rendering them of great use to pharmaceutical industry. Recent reports on their ability to be used in fabrication of suitable nanosized carriers for drug as well as genes to target site, has been discussed substantially to understand the potential of bolaamphiphiles in field of drug delivery. PMID:25671179

  3. How pharmaceutical industry employees manage competing commitments in the face of public criticism.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Wendy; Montgomery, Kathleen; Little, Miles

    2013-10-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has been criticised for pervasive misconduct. These concerns have generally resulted in increasing regulation. While such regulation is no doubt necessary, it tends to assume that everyone working for pharmaceutical companies is equally motivated by commerce, without much understanding of the specific views and experiences of those who work in different parts of the industry. In order to gain a more nuanced picture of the work that goes on in the "medical affairs" departments of pharmaceutical companies, we conducted 15 semi-structured interviews with professionals working in medical departments of companies in Sydney, Australia. We show that this group of pharmaceutical professionals are committed to their responsibilities both to patients, research participants, and the public and to their companies. Despite the discrepancies between these commitments, our participants did not express much cognitive dissonance, and this appeared to stem from their use of two dialectically related strategies, one of which embraces commerce and the other of which resists the commercial imperative. We interpret these findings through the lens of institutional theory and consider their implications for pharmaceutical ethics and governance.

  4. Listening to Lyrica: contested illnesses and pharmaceutical determinism.

    PubMed

    Barker, Kristin K

    2011-09-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a debilitating pain disorder of unknown origins and a paradigmatic contested illness. As with other contested illnesses, the reality of fibromyalgia is disputed by many physicians. Thus, millions of individuals who are diagnosed with fibromyalgia must cope with chronic symptoms as well as medical and public skepticism. In this context, the U.S. Federal Drug Administration's approval of Lyrica, the first prescription medication specifically for the management of fibromyalgia, is of considerable interest. In this paper I examine the cultural logic whereby the existence (and marketing) of an officially approved prescription medication for a condition lends support to the biomedical existence of the condition itself. I label this logic pharmaceutical determinism and argue that it represents an important new phase in the proliferation of contested illness diagnoses. Using the case of Lyrica, I describe the role that pharmaceutical companies and pharmaceuticals themselves play in promoting and legitimating contested diagnoses and validating those who are so diagnosed. Through a narrative analysis of the Lyrica direct-to-consumer advertising campaign and the responses of fibromyalgia sufferers to the introduction and marketing of Lyrica, I demonstrate the symbiotic relationship between the interests of the pharmaceutical industry, contested illness legitimization, and medicalization. I also provide a gender analysis of this relationship, foregrounding how contested illnesses continue to be shaped by their feminization in a cultural context that equates women with irrationality. Finally, I address the consequences and limitations of relying on the pharmaceutical industry for illness validation.

  5. Globalization of the pharmaceutical industry and the growing dependency of developing countries: the case of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Semin, Semih; Güldal, Dilek

    2008-01-01

    In developing countries, the effect of globalization on the pharmaceutical sector has resulted in a decrease in exportation and domestic production, accompanied by an increase in importation of pharmaceuticals and a rise in prices and expenditures. As an example of a developing country, Turkey has been facing the long-standing and increasing pressure of global regulations placed on its pharmaceutical sector. This has led to an increasing dependency on multinational companies and a gradual deterioration of an already weakened domestic pharmaceutical sector. This case study of Turkey offers points to consider in the world of increasing globalization, as it offers lessons on ways of examining the effects of globalization on the pharmaceutical industry of developing countries.

  6. Nationwide reconnaissance of contaminants of emerging concern in source and treated drinking waters of the United States: Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Edward T; Batt, Angela L; Glassmeyer, Susan T; Noriega, Mary C; Kolpin, Dana W; Mash, Heath; Schenck, Kathleen M

    2017-02-01

    Mobile and persistent chemicals that are present in urban wastewater, such as pharmaceuticals, may survive on-site or municipal wastewater treatment and post-discharge environmental processes. These pharmaceuticals have the potential to reach surface and groundwaters, essential drinking-water sources. A joint, two-phase U.S. Geological Survey-U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study examined source and treated waters from 25 drinking-water treatment plants from across the United States. Treatment plants that had probable wastewater inputs to their source waters were selected to assess the prevalence of pharmaceuticals in such source waters, and to identify which pharmaceuticals persist through drinking-water treatment. All samples were analyzed for 24 pharmaceuticals in Phase I and for 118 in Phase II. In Phase I, 11 pharmaceuticals were detected in all source-water samples, with a maximum of nine pharmaceuticals detected in any one sample. The median number of pharmaceuticals for all 25 samples was five. Quantifiable pharmaceutical detections were fewer, with a maximum of five pharmaceuticals in any one sample and a median for all samples of two. In Phase II, 47 different pharmaceuticals were detected in all source-water samples, with a maximum of 41 pharmaceuticals detected in any one sample. The median number of pharmaceuticals for all 25 samples was eight. For 37 quantifiable pharmaceuticals in Phase II, median concentrations in source water were below 113ng/L. For both Phase I and Phase II campaigns, substantially fewer pharmaceuticals were detected in treated water samples than in corresponding source-water samples. Seven different pharmaceuticals were detected in all Phase I treated water samples, with a maximum of four detections in any one sample and a median of two pharmaceuticals for all samples. In Phase II a total of 26 different pharmaceuticals were detected in all treated water samples, with a maximum of 20 pharmaceuticals detected in any one

  7. Deliquescence of pharmaceutical systems.

    PubMed

    Mauer, Lisa J; Taylor, Lynne S

    2010-12-01

    Deliquescence is a first order phase transition from solid to solution that occurs at a relative humidity (RH) that is characteristic to the crystalline compound. Such dissolution of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients can lead to detrimental physical and chemical instabilities. Furthermore, in systems containing more than one deliquescent component, the RH of the solid-solution transition will be lowered, leading to some level of dissolution at unexpectedly low RH conditions. Deliquescence lowering is independent of the ratio of the deliquescent components and therefore is of concern for any formulation containing two or more deliquescent compounds. Because chemical reactions occur much more readily in solution, deliquescence will enhance the degradation of labile APIs. RH fluctuations will lead to cycles of deliquescence and efflorescence (crystallization), which will contribute to particle agglomeration and caking. This review will address the phenomenon of deliquescence, the significance of deliquescence to pharmaceutical systems, measurement techniques, the kinetics and thermodynamics of deliquescence, the behavior of mixtures of deliquescent compounds (including phase diagrams and thermodynamics of binary systems), and consequences of deliquescence on chemical and physical stability.

  8. The Pharmaceutical Commons

    PubMed Central

    Lezaun, Javier

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the organization of pharmaceutical research on neglected tropical diseases has undergone transformative change. In a context of perceived “market failure,” the development of new medicines is increasingly handled by public-private partnerships. This shift toward hybrid organizational models depends on a particular form of exchange: the sharing of proprietary assets in general and of intellectual property rights in particular. This article explores the paradoxical role of private property in this new configuration of global health research and development. Rather than a tool to block potential competitors, proprietary assets function as a lever to attract others into risky collaborative ventures; instead of demarcating public and private domains, the sharing of property rights is used to increase the porosity of that boundary. This reimagination of the value of property is connected to the peculiar timescape of global health drug development, a promissory orientation to the future that takes its clearest form in the centrality of “virtual” business models and the proliferation of strategies of deferral. Drawing on the anthropological literature on inalienable possessions, we reconsider property’s traditional exclusionary role and discuss the possibility that the new pharmaceutical “commons” proclaimed by contemporary global health partnerships might be the precursor of future enclosures. PMID:25866425

  9. Preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and simulation in the pharmaceutical industry: an IQ consortium survey examining the current landscape.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Edgar; Bohnert, Tonika; Chakravarty, Arijit; Damian-Iordache, Valeriu; Gibson, Christopher; Hsu, Cheng-Pang; Heimbach, Tycho; Krishnatry, Anu Shilpa; Liederer, Bianca M; Lin, Jing; Maurer, Tristan; Mettetal, Jerome T; Mudra, Daniel R; Nijsen, Marjoleen Jma; Raybon, Joseph; Schroeder, Patricia; Schuck, Virna; Suryawanshi, Satyendra; Su, Yaming; Trapa, Patrick; Tsai, Alice; Vakilynejad, Majid; Wang, Shining; Wong, Harvey

    2015-03-01

    The application of modeling and simulation techniques is increasingly common in preclinical stages of the drug discovery and development process. A survey focusing on preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) analysis was conducted across pharmaceutical companies that are members of the International Consortium for Quality and Innovation in Pharmaceutical Development. Based on survey responses, ~68% of companies use preclinical PK/PD analysis in all therapeutic areas indicating its broad application. An important goal of preclinical PK/PD analysis in all pharmaceutical companies is for the selection/optimization of doses and/or dose regimens, including prediction of human efficacious doses. Oncology was the therapeutic area with the most PK/PD analysis support and where it showed the most impact. Consistent use of more complex systems pharmacology models and hybrid physiologically based pharmacokinetic models with PK/PD components was less common compared to traditional PK/PD models. Preclinical PK/PD analysis is increasingly being included in regulatory submissions with ~73% of companies including these data to some degree. Most companies (~86%) have seen impact of preclinical PK/PD analyses in drug development. Finally, ~59% of pharmaceutical companies have plans to expand their PK/PD modeling groups over the next 2 years indicating continued growth. The growth of preclinical PK/PD modeling groups in pharmaceutical industry is necessary to establish required resources and skills to further expand use of preclinical PK/PD modeling in a meaningful and impactful manner.

  10. [Chapter 4. Transitions in pharmaceutical market, production and sales in Japan (1980-2010)].

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Ryuzo; Matsumoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the writers reviewed in detail the pharmaceutical market and the shifts in manufacturing and sales including the trade balance in Japan over a thirty-year period from 1980 to 2010. From the 1980s to the 1990s, many innovative pharmaceutical products were developed and launched in the Japanese market. During the same period, some Japanese companies managed to develop their first internationally marketable drugs, which were antibiotics and effective remedies for the digestive and circulatory organs. During this period, Japanese pharmaceutical companies were also able to launch some of blockbuster drugs. For two decades, the pharmaceutical market grew rapidly. For this reason, it can be called "The Growth Period for Pharmaceutical Products" in Japan. After that period, drug development and sales slowed down due to a lack of expertise in genetic engineering and biotechnologies. This situation caused a large deficit in the trade balance for Japanese pharmaceutical products. However, with regard to the trade balance (including technical royalties) for pharmaceutical product technologies, Japan remains in the black even today.

  11. 76 FR 57769 - Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission... Commission intends to establish the Securities and Exchange Commission Advisory Committee on Small and... Chief, Office of ] Small Business Policy, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street,...

  12. 78 FR 24371 - Airworthiness Directives; Robinson Helicopter Company (Robinson)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Robinson Helicopter Company (Robinson) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed..., Aerospace Engineer, Los Angeles Aircraft Certification Office, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA,...

  13. Lowell Company Settles with EPA for Hazardous Waste Concerns

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A Lowell, Mass., manufacturer of fiber products has come into compliance with hazardous waste laws after the US Environmental Agency found the company was violating federal and state environmental laws.

  14. How much cash does your company need?

    PubMed

    Passov, Richard

    2003-11-01

    In late 2001, the directors of Pfizer asked that very question. And with good reason. After its 2000 merger with rival Warner-Lambert, the New York-based pharmaceutical giant found itself sitting on a net cash position of $8 billion, which seemed extraordinarily conservative for a company whose products generated $30 billion in revenues. Most large companies with revenues that healthy would increase leverage, thereby unlocking tremendous value for shareholders. But knowledge-intensive companies like Pfizer, this author argues, are in a class apart. Because their largely intangible assets (like R&D) are highly volatile and cannot easily be valued, they are more vulnerable to financial distress than are firms with a preponderance of tangible assets. To insure against that risk, they need to maintain large positive cash balances. These companies' decisions to run large cash balances is one of the key reasons their shares sustain consistent premiums. Only by investing in their intangible assets can knowledge-based companies hope to preserve the value of those assets. A company that finds itself unable to do so because unfavorable market conditions reduce its operating cash flows will see its share price suffer almost as much as if it were to default on its debts. By the same token, with the right balance sheet, knowledge companies can profitably insure against the risk of failing to sustain value-added investments in difficult times. An optimal capital structure that calls for significant cash balances is certainly at odds with the results of a traditional capital structure analysis, the author demonstrates, but it explains the financial policies of many well-run companies, from Pfizer to Intel to ChevronTexaco.

  15. 'Get with the Program!': pharmaceutical marketing, symptom checklists and self-diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Mary

    2011-09-01

    During more than a decade of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTC) of pharmaceuticals in the United States, several highly controversial and contested disease states have been promoted to affect diagnostic and prescribing outcomes that are favorable to a company's branded drug. Influencing medical diagnosis is essential to the branding of a disease, which helps to protect pharmaceutical intellectual property and assures higher profits for drug companies. Enormous marketing as well as medical resources are deployed to ensure that new diagnoses of disease states are recognized. While much work has been done investigating the marketing processes necessary to shape and define diagnoses for many of these new disease states, such as Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD), the promotion of self-diagnosis within pharmaceutical marketing campaigns garner little sociological attention. This article reviews and analyzes branded disease awareness campaigns sponsored by pharmaceutical companies that employ self-diagnostic "tools". By using the example of one specific disease state, PMDD, I illustrate how the marketing of self-diagnosis transforms the patient into a consumer in order to achieve the aims of a drug company. This example is contextualized within the larger theoretical framework on the sociology of diagnosis. Consideration is given to how the marketing of self-diagnosis goes beyond Jutel's (2009) description of diagnosis as being the "classification tool of medicine" and becomes a marketing tool to construct a well-educated consumer who will demand medical diagnoses inline with a drug company's objectives.

  16. Innovation strategies for generic drug companies: moving into supergenerics.

    PubMed

    Ross, Malcolm S F

    2010-04-01

    Pharmaceutical companies that market generic products generally are not regarded as innovators, but rather as companies that produce copies of originator products to be launched at patent expiration. However, many generics companies have developed excellent scientific innovative skills in an effort to circumvent the defense patents of originator companies. More patents per product, in terms of both drug substances (process patents and polymorph patents) and formulations, are issued to generics companies than to companies that are traditionally considered to be 'innovators'. This quantity of issued patents highlights the technical knowledge and skill sets that are available in generics companies. In order to adopt a completely innovative model (ie, the development of NCEs), a generics company would require a completely new set of skills in several fields, including a sufficient knowledge base, project and risk management experience, and capability for clinical data evaluation. However, with relatively little investment, generics companies should be able to progress into the so-called 'supergeneric' drug space - an area of innovation that reflects the existing competencies of both innovative and generics companies.

  17. Technology evaluation: PRO-542, Progenics Pharmaceuticals inc.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, M; Parveen, Z; Pomerantz, R J

    2000-12-01

    Progenics's rCD4-IgG2 (PRO-542) is a recombinant fusion protein, which has been developed using the company's Universal Antiviral Binding (UnAB) technology, and is in phase I/II clinical trials for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) infection [273391]. At the beginning of 1997, Progenics received a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious diseases (NIAID) to fund the development of PRO-542 [236048]. A further grant of $2.7 million was awarded in August 1998 for the clinical evaluation of PRO-542 and other anti-HIV therapies [294200]. Progenics is collaborating with the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center (ADARC) in New York and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta [178410]. In February 2000, Progenics and Genzyme Transgenics Corp signed an agreement to continue the development of a transgenic source of PRO-542. Genzyme will develop transgenic goats that produce PRO-542 in their milk in exchange for undisclosed fees and milestone payments. Genzyme will supply PRO-542 to Progenics for clinical trials with a possibility for eventual commercial supply [357291]. Following on from this, in October 2000, Progenics received an SBIR grant to fund a two-year project with Genzyme Transgenics into the development of cost-effective methods for the manufacture of PRO-542, by optimization of the production of the drug in the milk of transgenic dairy animals [385982]. In August 2000, Punk, Ziegel & Company predicted that Progenics Pharmaceuticals will become sustainably profitable in 2003 following the launch of PRO-542 and GMK (Progenics Pharmaceuticals) in 2002 [390063].

  18. Government Agencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    manufacturers. The Navy has a major in- house design capability for ships; the government does not possess such a capability for aircraft or other weapon systems...the Coast Guard, government agencies acquire a wide variety of ships, ranging from sophisticated submarines and nuclear aircraft carriers to much...the initial phase a review was made of written material relating to government procedures in U.S. Government agencies for acquiring vessels, aircraft

  19. TDR collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, W E

    2006-12-01

    TDR's research programme was initiated in 1976 at the same time that the pharmaceutical industry began to withdraw from the discovery and development of new drugs for tropical diseases. TDR collaborated with the industry right from the start, its prime objective initially being to ensure that candidate drugs already in the development pipeline, such as praziquantel, mefloquine, ivermectin, halofantrine and atovaquone/proguanil, were not shelved. It became clear during the 1980s that once candidate drugs in these existing pipelines had been processed, that would be it. TDR therefore developed a number of other ways for collaboration, including testing compounds already in development in companies for other therapeutic areas. One candidate identified in this way was an oral formulation of miltefosine, in development in Asta Medica for an antitumour indication. A joint Asta Medica (later Zentaris)/TDR development project was agreed, and despite its fair share of traumas during the development process, miltefosine is now registered for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in India, Germany and Colombia. This example of a successful TDR/pharmaceutical industry collaboration lives on in the various Public Private Partnerships such as the new Medicines for Malaria Venture that TDR helped to spawn.

  20. UPLC: a preeminent technique in pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Saini, Gautam; Nair, Anroop; Sharma, Rishbha

    2012-01-01

    The pharmaceutical companies today are driven to create novel and more efficient tools to discover, develop, deliver and monitor the drugs. In this contest the development of rapid chromatographic method is crucial for the analytical laboratories. In precedent decade, substantial technological advances have been done in enhancing particle chemistry performance, improving detector design and in optimizing the system, data processors and various controls of chromatographic techniques. When all was blended together, it resulted in the outstanding performance via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), which holds back the principle of HPLC technique. UPLC shows a dramatic enhancement in speed, resolution as well as the sensitivity of analysis by using particle size less than 2 pm and the system is operational at higher pressure, while the mobile phase could be able to run at greater linear velocities as compared to HPLC. This technique is considered as a new focal point in field of liquid chromatographic studies. This review focuses on the basic principle, instrumentation of UPLC and its advantages over HPLC, furthermore, this article emphasizes various pharmaceutical applications of this technique.

  1. 77 FR 5089 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Name Change: American Hardware Mutual Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION... directed to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Financial Management Service, Financial Accounting and...: January 17, 2012. Laura Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division,...

  2. Two Northwest companies settle with the EPA for hazardous chemical release reporting violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (SEATTLE - August 26, 2015) Two Pacific Northwest companies have settled with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency after failing to report the release of extremely hazardous substances to federal, state, and local agencies in violation of federal laws

  3. 77 FR 30522 - Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc.; ALLETE, Inc.; Ameren Illinois Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ...; Central Minnesota Municipal Power Agency; City of Columbia, Missouri, Water & Light Company; City Water, Light & Power (Springfield, Illinois); Dairyland Power Cooperative; Great River Energy; Hoosier Energy Rural Electric Cooperative, Inc; Indiana Municipal Power Agency; Indianapolis Power & Light...

  4. [Clinical researchers and the pharmaceutic industry. The research contract is not an addendum].

    PubMed

    Cohen, A F

    1999-06-26

    The relation between a pharmaceutical company and a clinical investigator combines a certain form of entrepreneurship with scientific endeavour. Both parties are concerned with the content of the clinical study as well as with its business aspects. A good contract is essential for the project to succeed. In three cases based on actual experience the contract failed. In the first case, dosage miscalculation in the hospital pharmacy led to side effects in patients as a consequence of which the study was stopped. The pharmaceutical company sued the investigator. In the second case the investigator published data in a congress abstract, which prevented a patent by the company. In the third case scientific information was published by the company with the principal investigator featuring in the acknowledgement section of the article only. Investigators should have their own standard contract ready, and they should invest time and energy in understanding the contracts of the research they are carrying out.

  5. Designing a Pharmaceutical Care Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrier, Donald G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Guidelines for developing a pharmacy school curriculum based on the principle of pharmaceutical care and professional responsibility are offered, beginning with mission statements for profession, practice, and pharmaceutical education in general. The University of Toronto experience in designing such a curriculum is chronicled as an illustration…

  6. 77 FR 3088 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...-10] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal... directive (AD) for General Electric Company (GE) CF34-10E series turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by a... center vent tube) support ring and on the inside diameter of the fan drive shaft at the mating...

  7. 78 FR 44899 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and -115B turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by multiple... AD to prevent failure of the affected fuel supply tube, fuel leakage, engine fire, and damage to...

  8. 77 FR 21420 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Cessna Aircraft Company Model 680 airplanes. This...-feed wiring, and revising the airplane flight manual to include procedures to use when the left...

  9. 76 FR 68666 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 737-100, -200, -200C, and -300 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report from the airplane manufacturer that airplanes were assembled with...

  10. 77 FR 54621 - Pruco Life Insurance Company, et al;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ...; File No. 812-13990] Pruco Life Insurance Company, et al; Notice of Application August 29, 2012. AGENCY... the Act from Section 17(a) of the Act. Applicants: Pruco Life Insurance Company (``Pruco Life''), Pruco Life Flexible Premium Variable Annuity Account (``Pruco Life Variable Annuity Account''),...

  11. 76 FR 63679 - Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-26441] SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release Nos. 33-9266; 34-65512, File No. 265-27] Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission... Securities and Exchange Commission Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies is providing...

  12. 77 FR 48110 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... certain General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2 series turbofan engines. The existing AD requires... additional reports of fuel leaks and two reports of engine fire due to mis-assembled supporting brackets...

  13. 78 FR 19628 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Electric Company (GE) GE90-76B, -85B, -90B, -94B, - 110B1, and -115B turbofan engines. This proposed AD was... prevent failure of the stage 1 HPT stator shrouds, resulting in in-flight shutdown of one or more...

  14. 77 FR 76977 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Supplemental... proposed airworthiness directive (AD) for certain General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2 series turbofan engines. That NPRM proposed to supersede an AD that required replacement of fuel tubes connected to...

  15. 77 FR 72250 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF... Aircraft Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Aircraft Company Models 172R and 172S airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of chafing of...

  16. 77 FR 50054 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office #0; #0;Proposed Rules #0... Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... certain Cessna Aircraft Company Models 172R and 172S airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by...

  17. 78 FR 32349 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Cessna Aircraft Company Model 500, 501, 550, 551... by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): 2013-09-11 Cessna Aircraft...

  18. 75 FR 6736 - FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company, FirstEnergy Nuclear Generation Corp., Ohio Edison Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ..., the Toledo Edison Company, Beaver Valley Power Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...-73, issued to FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company (licensee), for operation of the Beaver Valley... Beaver Valley Power Station, Units 1 and 2, Supplement 36, Final Report'' (NUREG-1437). Agencies...

  19. EPA Announces 2015 ENERGY STAR Certified Manufacturing Plants, Allergan Pharmaceuticals facility in Waco, TX, among those recognized

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Feb. 24, 2016) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today that the Allergan Pharmaceuticals facility in Waco, TX, is among the 70 manufacturing plants across the nation that achieved ENERGY STAR certification for their

  20. [Pharmaceutical logistic in turnover of pharmaceutical products of Azerbaijan].

    PubMed

    Dzhalilova, K I

    2009-11-01

    Development of pharmaceutical logistic system model promotes optimal strategy for pharmaceutical functioning. The goal of such systems is organization of pharmaceutical product's turnover in required quantity and assortment, at preset time and place, at a highest possible degree of consumption readiness with minimal expenses and qualitative service. Organization of the optimal turnover chain in the region is offered to start from approximate classification of medicaments by logistic characteristics. Supplier selection was performed by evaluation of timeliness of delivery, quality of delivered products (according to the minimum acceptable level of quality) and time-keeping of time spending for orders delivery.

  1. Regulatory approval of pharmaceuticals without a randomised controlled study: analysis of EMA and FDA approvals 1999–2014

    PubMed Central

    Hatswell, Anthony J; Baio, Gianluca; Berlin, Jesse A; Irs, Alar; Freemantle, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of pharmaceuticals is most often demonstrated by randomised controlled trials (RCTs); however, in some cases, regulatory applications lack RCT evidence. Objective To investigate the number and type of these approvals over the past 15 years by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Methods Drug approval data were downloaded from the EMA website and the ‘Drugs@FDA’ database for all decisions on pharmaceuticals published from 1 January 1999 to 8 May 2014. The details of eligible applications were extracted, including the therapeutic area, type of approval and review period. Results Over the period of the study, 76 unique indications were granted without RCT results (44 by the EMA and 60 by the FDA), demonstrating that a substantial number of treatments reach the market without undergoing an RCT. The majority was for haematological malignancies (34), with the next most common areas being oncology (15) and metabolic conditions (15). Of the applications made to both agencies with a comparable data package, the FDA granted more approvals (43/44 vs 35/44) and took less time to review products (8.7 vs 15.5 months). Products reached the market first in the USA in 30 of 34 cases (mean 13.1 months) due to companies making FDA submission before EMA submissions and faster FDA review time. Discussion Despite the frequency with which approvals are granted without RCT results, there is no systematic monitoring of such treatments to confirm their effectiveness or consistency regarding when this form of evidence is appropriate. We recommend a more open debate on the role of marketing authorisations granted without RCT results, and the development of guidelines on what constitutes an acceptable data package for regulators. PMID:27363818

  2. Section 1: Company directory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This is a 1992 directory of those companies doing business in all areas of the independent power producers industry. The listing includes the company name, address, telephone and FAX numbers, and the name of a company contact. The listing is international in scope.

  3. Naming, labeling, and packaging of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, J W; Stein, G C

    2001-11-01

    The problem of medical errors associated with the naming, labeling, and packaging of pharmaceuticals is discussed. Sound-alike and look-alike drug names and packages can lead pharmacists and nurses to unintended interchanges of drugs that can result in patient injury or death. The existing medication-use system is flawed because its safety depends on human perfection. Simplicity, standardization, differentiation, lack of duplication, and unambiguous communication are human factors concepts that are relevant to the medication-use process. These principles have often been ignored in drug naming, labeling, and packaging. Instead, current methods are based on long-standing commercial considerations and bureaucratic procedures. The process for naming a marketable drug is lengthy and complex and involves submission of a new chemical entity and patent application, generic naming, brand naming, FDA review, and final approval. Drug companies seek the fastest possible approval and may believe that the incremental benefit of human factors evaluation is small. "Trade dress" is the concept that underlies labeling and packaging issues for the drug industry. Drug companies are resistant to changing trade dress and brand names. Although a variety of private-sector organizations have called for reforms in drug naming, labeling, and packaging standards have been proposed, the problem remains. Drug names, labels, and packages are not selected and designed in accordance with human factors principles. FDA standards do not require application of these principles, the drug industry has struggled with change, and private-sector initiatives have had only limited success.

  4. PBT assessment and prioritization of contaminants of emerging concern: Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sangion, Alessandro; Gramatica, Paola

    2016-05-01

    The strong and widespread use of pharmaceuticals, together with incorrect disposal procedures, has recently made these products contaminants of emerging concern (CEC). Unfortunately, little is known about pharmaceuticals' environmental behaviour and ecotoxicity, so that EMEA (European Medicines Agency) released guidelines for the pharmaceuticals' environmental risk assessment. In particular, there is a severe lack of information about persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity (PBT) of the majority of the thousands of substances on the market. Computational tools, like QSAR (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) models, are the only way to screen large sets of chemicals in short time, with the aim of ranking, highlighting and prioritizing the most environmentally hazardous for focusing further experimental studies. In this work we propose a screening method to assess the potential persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity of more than 1200 pharmaceutical ingredients, based on the application of two different QSAR models. We applied the Insubria-PBT Index, a MLR (Multiple Linear Regression) QSAR model based on four simple molecular descriptors, implemented in QSARINS software, and able to synthesize the PBT potential in a unique cumulative value and the US-EPA PBT Profiler that assesses the PBT behaviour evaluating separately P, B and T. Particular attention was given to the study of Applicability Domain in order to provide reliable predictions. An agreement of 86% was found between the two models and a priority list of 35 pharmaceuticals, highlighted as potential PBTs by consensus, was proposed for further experimental validation. Moreover, the results of this computational screening are in agreement with preliminary experimental data in the literature. This study shows how in silico models can be applied in the hazard assessment to perform preliminary screening and prioritization of chemicals, and how the identification of the structural features, mainly

  5. WHO expert committee on specifications for pharmaceutical preparations. Fortieth report.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of an international group of experts convened by the World Health Organization to consider matters concerning the quality assurance of pharmaceuticals and specifications for drug substances and dosage forms. The report is complemented by a number of annexes. These include: a list of available International Chemical Reference Substances and International Infrared Spectra; supplementary guidelines on good manufacturing practices for heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems for non-sterile pharmaceutical dosage forms; updated supplementary guidelines on good manufacturing practices for the manufacture of herbal medicines; supplementary guidelines on good manufacturing practices for validation; good distribution practices for pharmaceutical products; a model quality assurance system for procurement agencies (recommendations for quality assurance systems focusing on prequalification of products and manufacturers, purchasing, storage and distribution of pharmaceutical products); multisource (generic) pharmaceutical products: guidelines on registration requirements to establish interchangeability; a proposal to waive in vivo bioequivalence requirements for WHO Model List of Essential Medicines immediate-release, solid oral dosage forms; and additional guidance for organizations performing in vivo bioequivalence studies.

  6. [An analysis of the pharmaceuticals market in Vietnam].

    PubMed

    Simonet, D

    2001-01-01

    This article sheds a light on the Vietnamese pharmaceutical market. The progress that has been made in the recent years following the opening of the Vietnamese regime to the western world, although not easy, brought a certain number of opportunities for domestic firms and foreign investors. The pharmaceutical Vietnamese industry started to emerge at the beginning of the 1990s. Although, the consumption of drugs is low, it does reach the sum of $ 5.5 per capita. As the majority of these products are imported, foreign companies tend to dominate the market both in volume and in diversity. The state has always played an important role with the implementation of a strict price control strategy and most national drug companies remain state-owned. The production and consumption of drugs were also largely influenced by state policies as the latter also control hospitals. In the second half of the eighties, the progressive liberalisation of the country allowed private drug pharmacies to appear and advertisement campaigns became legal. Because the lack of specific products like antibiotics was clear, the government increased the flow of imports, including private imports by citizens. Sources of imports have become more diverse, although France remains an important source of supply. Fournier, Lipha and Pierre Fabre are among the French drug manufacturers located in Vietnam. Other foreign companies include from India, South Korea, Thailand and Germany. Joint ventures were also created with French and Japanese companies. The import of medical materials is subjected to authorisations from the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Foreign Trade as it is necessary to obtain a licence to do so. Licences are issued on the basis of the production of drugs that do not currently exist on the local market. But Vietnam also exports pharmaceutical products to Laos, Cambodia, and Cuba. Local resources constitute an important source of new products and have stirred a strong interest among

  7. [Development of pharmaceutical expenses in German private health insurance].

    PubMed

    Böcking, W; Tidelski, O; Skuras, B; Kitzmann, F; Zuehlke, L

    2012-06-01

    Health Insurance costs in Germany have grown by 3 % p. a. over the last ten years and amount to approx. 280 bn EUR in 2009. While costs for stationary treatment as the largest cost category have been intensely analyzed over the past years, pharmaceutical expenses have been analyzed in less detail, mostly focusing on the Statutory Health Insurance side, even though pharmaceutical expenses have grown almost twice as much as costs for ambulant treatments. This research article therefore focuses on the question how pharmaceutical expenses in a large German private health insurance company are allocated with respect to age and indication groups, and how those have developed during the past four years. Therefore, the data of a private health insurance company with more than 600.000 customers was split into price and volume effects per age group to understand if price or volume drives the cost development. Additionally, the two largest indication groups are analyzed in detail. As a result, both price and volume effects drive an overall cost increase of 7,3 %. These effects are even stronger in older age groups. This strong cost increase is not sustainable for the German health insurance system over a longer period of time and will even further increase due to the ageing of the German population.

  8. [Pharmaceutical industry and "New German Medicine" ("Neue Deutsche Heilkunde")].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    THe so-called "New German Medicine", initially propagated in the health policy of the National Socialist Party, promoted greater use of phytotherapeutic and homeopathic drugs by the medical community. In response, the "Reichsfachschaft der pharmazeutischen Industrie e. V." (Association of Pharmaceutical Industry of the Reich") was obliged to pursue a carefully chosen double strategy, given that the members of the Association were both manufacturers of natural remedies and manufacturers of allopathic drugs.However, the fact that I.G. Farben completely ignored the "New German Medicine" suggests that the large chemical-pharmaceutical manufacturers did not take this policy very seriously. The only documents pertaining to increased research in the area of natural remedies stem from the medium-sized manufacturers Knoll and Schering. In the case of both companies it is noteworthy that they worked towards obtaining a scientific foundation for the developed preparates, and that they employed conventional methods of chemical analysis and proof of activity. THe growth of the classical manufacturers of natural remedies, such as the company Willmar Schwabe was, as far as any growth at all could be observed, significantly smaller than had been theoretically postulated. There is no casual relationship between any commercial success during the period in which the Nazis were in power and today's commercial prosperity.Moreover, from the viewpoint of the pharmaceutical industry, the "New German Medicine" seems to have passed its zenith before 1936, when the 4-year plan for war preparation entered into force.

  9. Regulatory beneficiaries and informal agency policymaking.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Nina A

    2007-03-01

    Administrative agencies frequently use guidance documents to set policy broadly and prospectively in areas ranging from Department of Education Title IX enforcement to Food and Drug Administration regulation of direct-to- consumer pharmaceutical advertising. In form, these guidances often closely resemble the policies agencies issue in ordinary notice-and-comment rulemaking. However, guidances are generally developed with little public participation and are often immune from judicial review. Nonetheless, guidances can prompt significant changes in behavior from those the agencies regulate. A number of commentators have guardedly defended the current state of affairs. Though guidances lack some important procedural safeguards, they can help agencies supervise low-level employees and supply valuable information to regulated entities regarding how an agency will implement a program. Thus far, however, the debate has largely ignored the distinct and substantial interests of regulatory beneficiaries--those who expect to benefit from government regulation of others. Regulatory beneficiaries include, among others, pharmaceutical consumers, environmental users, and workers seeking safe workplaces. When agencies make policy informally, regulatory beneficiaries suffer distinctive losses to their ability to participate in the agency's decision and to invoke judicial review. This Article argues that considering the interests of regulatory beneficiaries strengthens the case for procedural reform. The Article then assesses some possible solutions.

  10. Method to evaluate the dustiness of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Boundy, Maryanne; Leith, David; Polton, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The trend among pharmaceutical companies to develop selective drugs of high potency has pushed the industry to consider the potential of each hazardous ingredient to become airborne. Dustiness issues are not unique to the pharmaceutical industry, but are relevant to any industry where powdered materials are mixed, transferred and handled. Interest in dustiness is also driven by concerns for worker health, the potential for plant explosions and the prevention of product loss. Unlike other industries, the pharmaceutical industry is limited by the milligram quantity of powdered material available for testing during product development. These needs have led to the development of a bench-top dustiness tester that requires only 10 mg of powder and fully contains the generated aerosol. The powder is dispersed within a 5.7 liter glass chamber that contains a respirable mass sampler and a closed-face sampler to quantify the respirable and total dust that are generated with a given energy input. The tester distinguished differences in dustiness levels of five different powders. Finer powders were dustier, and the respirable dust percentage was always less than that for total dust. Four testers have been built and evaluated using pharmaceutical grade lactose. Dustiness measurements determined using all four testers were comparable. The pharmaceutical industry uses surrogates such as lactose to represent active compounds in tests that estimate the dust concentration likely to occur in a new manufacturing operation. Differences between the dustiness of the active compound and its surrogate challenge the relevance of the surrogate tests to represent true exposures in the workplace. The tester can determine the dustiness of both the active compound and its surrogate, and the resultant ratio can help to interpret dust concentrations from surrogate tests. Further, dustiness information may allow the pharmaceutical researcher to select powder formulations that present low airborne

  11. Assessing the Factors Associated With Iran’s Intra-Industry Trade in Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Yusefzadeh, Hassan; Hadian, Mohammad; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Ghaderi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pharmaceutical industry is a sensitive and profitable industry. If this industry wants to survive, it should be able to compete well in international markets. So, study of Iran’s intra-industry trade (IIT) in pharmaceuticals is essential in order to identify competitiveness potential of country and boost export capability in the global arena. Methods: This study assessed the factors associated with Iran’s intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals with the rest of the world during the 2001–2012 periods using seasonal time series data at the four-digit SITC level. The data was collected from Iran’s pharmaceutical Statistics, World Bank and International Trade Center. Finally, we discussed a number of important policy recommendations to increase Iran’s IIT in pharmaceuticals. Results: The findings indicated that economies of scale, market structure and degree of economic development had a significantly positive impact on Iran’s intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals and tariff trade barriers were negatively related to IIT. Product differentiation and technological advancement didn’t have the expected signs. In addition, we found that Iran’s IIT in pharmaceuticals have shown an increasing trend during the study period. Thus, the composition of Iran trade in pharmaceuticals has changed from inter-industry trade to intra-industry trade. Conclusions: In order to get more prepared for integration into the global economy, the development of Iran’s IIT in pharmaceuticals should be given priority. Therefore, paying attention to IIT could have an important role in serving pharmaceutical companies in relation to pharmaceutical trade. PMID:26156931

  12. The use of atomic spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical industry for the determination of trace elements in pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lewen, Nancy

    2011-06-25

    The subject of the analysis of various elements, including metals and metalloids, in the pharmaceutical industry has seen increasing importance in the last 10-15 years, as modern analytical instrumentation has afforded analysts with the opportunity to provide element-specific, accurate and meaningful information related to pharmaceutical products. Armed with toxicological data, compendial and regulatory agencies have revisited traditional approaches to the testing of pharmaceuticals for metals and metalloids, and analysts have begun to employ the techniques of atomic spectroscopy, such as flame- and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS, Flame AA or FAA and GFAAS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), to meet their analytical needs. Newer techniques, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation ICP-MS (LAICP-MS) are also beginning to see wider applications in the analysis of elements in the pharmaceutical industry.This article will provide a perspective regarding the various applications of atomic spectroscopy in the analysis of metals and metalloids in drug products, active pharmaceutical ingredients (API's), raw materials and intermediates. The application of atomic spectroscopy in the analysis of metals and metalloids in clinical samples, nutraceutical, metabolism and pharmacokinetic samples will not be addressed in this work.

  13. Megestrol acetate NCD oral suspension -- Par Pharmaceutical: megestrol acetate nanocrystal dispersion oral suspension, PAR 100.2, PAR-100.2.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Par Pharmaceutical has developed megestrol acetate (Megace ES) oral suspension for the treatment of anorexia, cachexia and a significant weight loss associated with AIDS. Par Pharmaceutical used Elan Corporation's NanoCrystal Dispersion (NCD) technology to develop an advanced, concentrated formulation of megestrol acetate with improved bioavailability, more rapid onset of action, more convenient dosing and a lower dosing regimen compared with the original marketed formulation of megestrol acetate oral suspension. Patients are administered a teaspoon (5mL) of the new NCD formulation once daily, compared with a daily 20mL dosage cup of the original formulation. The new megestrol acetate NCD formulation represents a line-extension of Par's megestrol acetate oral suspension (800mg/20mL, Megace O/S) that has been marketed for anorexia, cachexia and AIDS-related weight loss since July 2001. Par's megestrol acetate is the generic version of Bristol-Myers Squibb's Megace Oral Suspension. NanoCrystal Dispersion (NCD) is a trademark of Elan Corporation. Par Pharmaceutical will market megestol acetate NCD oral suspension under the Megace brand name. The company licensed the Megace name from Bristol-Myers Squib in August 2003. The US FDA approved megestrol acetate oral suspension (625 mg/mL) in July 2005 for the treatment of anorexia, cachexia or a significant, unexplained weight loss in patients with AIDS. The NDA for the product was accepted for review by the agency in September 2004, following its submission in June of that year.Par Pharmaceutical commenced the first of two phase III clinical trials of megestrol acetate oral suspension (PAR 100.2) in cancer-induced anorexia in the first quarter of 2006. However, this trial was discontinued in September 2006 because of slow patient enrolment. The company intends to discuss future development options in this indication with the FDA.New formulations or dosage forms of megestrol acetate concentrated suspension are also in

  14. Megestrol acetate NCD oral suspension--Par Pharmaceutical: megestrol acetate nanocrystal dispersion oral suspension, PAR 100.2, PAR-100.2.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Par Pharmaceutical has developed megestrol acetate (Megace ES) oral suspension for the treatment of anorexia, cachexia and a significant weight loss associated with AIDS. Par Pharmaceutical used Elan Corporation's NanoCrystal Dispersion (NCD) technology to develop an advanced, concentrated formulation of megestrol acetate with improved bioavailability, more rapid onset of action, more convenient dosing and a lower dosing regimen compared with the original marketed formulation of megestrol acetate oral suspension. Patients are administered a teaspoon (5mL) of the new NCD formulation once daily, compared with a daily 20mL dosage cup of the original formulation. The new megestrol acetate NCD formulation represents a line-extension of Par's megestrol acetate oral suspension (800mg/20mL, Megace O/S) that has been marketed for anorexia, cachexia and AIDS-related weight loss since July 2001. Par's megestrol acetate is the generic version of Bristol-Myers Squibb's Megace Oral Suspension. NanoCrystal Dispersion (NCD) is a trademark of Elan Corporation. Par Pharmaceutical will market megestol acetate NCD oral suspension under the Megace brand name. The company licensed the Megace name from Bristol-Myers Squib in August 2003. The US FDA approved megestrol acetate oral suspension (625 mg/mL) in July 2005 for the treatment of anorexia, cachexia or a significant, unexplained weight loss in patients with AIDS. The NDA for the product was accepted for review by the agency in September 2004, following its submission in June of that year.Par Pharmaceutical commenced the first of two phase III clinical trials of megestrol acetate oral suspension (PAR 100.2) in cancer-induced anorexia in the first quarter of 2006. However, this trial was discontinued in September 2006 because of slow patient enrolment. The company intends to discuss future development options in this indication with the FDA.New formulations or dosage forms of megestrol acetate concentrated suspension are also in

  15. Pharmaceutical marketing in a new age. Effective campaigns still need to focus on what customers want.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sanjay K

    2002-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has focused heavily on marketers' ability to market new products more efficiently. However, a more streamlined marketing approach can help address customers' needs and ease the pressure on drug companies to discover new drugs with blockbuster appeal. Through discussion and a detailed example, this article describes a stream-lined approach to creating more effective marketing and sales force strategies.

  16. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry--a case study approach.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Alexandru; Kuokkanen, Katja; Heier, Annabelle

    2011-10-09

    This commentary offers an overview of some current trends of the pharmaceutical industry drawing on examples taken from the analysis of four companies (Pfizer, Merck, Novo Nordisk, Crucell). The very brief analysis looks at diversification paths, pipeline management strategies, generic competition as well as corporate social responsibility policies.

  17. Towards novel processes for the fine-chemical and pharmaceutical industries.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Gjalt W; Gray, David

    2002-08-01

    In response to the need in the pharmaceutical industry for more complex, chiral molecules, fine-chemical companies are embracing new manufacturing technologies to produce compounds of these specifications. In particular, recent developments in biocatalysis combined with novel process engineering are providing improved methods for the production of valuable chemical intermediates.

  18. Is Industry-University Interaction Promoting Innovation in the Brazilian Pharmaceutical Industry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paranhos, Julia; Hasenclever, Lia

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses industry-university interaction and its characteristics in the Brazilian pharmaceutical system of innovation, taking account of the relevance of company strategies, the approach of the universities and the actions of government. By analysing primary and secondary data the authors show that, for as long as corporate investment…

  19. Manufacturing Menopause: An Analysis of the Portrayal of Menopause and Information Content on Pharmaceutical Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charbonneau, Deborah Hile

    2010-01-01

    Consumer-targeted prescription drug advertising serves as an interesting lens through which we can examine the portrayal of menopause in online drug advertisements. The aim of this study was to explore the portrayal of menopause on web sites sponsored by pharmaceutical companies for hormone therapies (HT). To unravel this question, a qualitative…

  20. Use and practice of achiral and chiral supercritical fluid chromatography in pharmaceutical analysis and purification.

    PubMed

    Lemasson, Elise; Bertin, Sophie; West, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The interest of pharmaceutical companies for complementary high-performance chromatographic tools to assess a product's purity or enhance this purity is on the rise. The high-throughput capability and economic benefits of supercritical fluid chromatography, but also the "green" aspect of CO2 as the principal solvent, render supercritical fluid chromatography very attractive for a wide range of pharmaceutical applications. The recent reintroduction of new robust instruments dedicated to supercritical fluid chromatography and the progress in stationary phase technology have also greatly benefited supercritical fluid chromatography. Additionally, it was shown several times that supercritical fluid chromatography could be orthogonal to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and could efficiently compete with it. Supercritical fluid chromatography is an adequate tool for small molecules of pharmaceutical interest: synthetic intermediates, active pharmaceutical ingredients, impurities, or degradation products. In this review, we first discuss about general chromatographic conditions for supercritical fluid chromatography analysis to better suit compounds of pharmaceutical interest. We also discuss about the use of achiral and chiral supercritical fluid chromatography for analytical purposes and the recent applications in these areas. The use of preparative supercritical fluid chromatography by pharmaceutical companies is also covered.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP OF PHARMACEUTICALS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry) and apply them to studying the sources and fate of a select list of PPCPs. Application and improvement of analytical methodologies that can detect non-volatile, polar, water-soluble pharmaceuticals in source waters at levels that could be environmentally significant (at concentrations less than parts per billion, ppb). IAG with USGS ends in FY05. APM 20 due in FY05.Subtask 2: Coordination of interagency research and public outreach activities for PPCPs. Participate on NSTC Health and Environment subcommittee working group on PPCPs. Web site maintenance and expansion, invited technical presentations, invited articles for peer-reviewed journals, interviews for media, responding to public inquiries. S

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP OF PHARMACEUTICALS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) as environmental pollutants is a multifaceted issue whose scope continues to become better delineated since the escalation of conceited attention beginning in the 1980s. PPCPs typically occur as trace environmental pollutants (primarily in surface but also in ground waters) as a result of their widespread, continuous, combined usage in a broad range of human and veterinary therapeutic activities and practices. With respect to the risk-assessment paradigm the growing body of published work has focused primarily on the origin and occurrence of these substances. Comparatively less is known about human and ecological exposure, and even less about the documented or potential hazards associated with trace exposure to these anthropogenic substances, many of which are highly bioactive and perpetually present in many aquatic locales. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/m

  3. Biricodar. Vertex Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Dey, Saibal

    2002-05-01

    Vertex is developing biricodar as a chemosensitizing agent designed to restore the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents in tumor multidrug resistance. By November 1998, phase II trials had commenced for biricodar, in combination with chemotherapy, for five common cancer indications: breast, ovarian, soft-tissue sarcomas, small cell lung cancer and prostate cancer. Phase II trials were ongoing in January 2002. By March 2000, Vertex was the sole developer of biricodar, as an agreement made in 1996 with BioChem Pharma (now Shire Pharmaceuticals), for the development and marketing of biricodar in Canada was terminated. Biricodar is the free base compound, which also has a citrate salt analog known as VX-710-3. Vertex has published three patents, WO-09615101, WO-09636630 and WO-09736869, disclosing derivatives of biricodar that are claimed for the treatment of multidrug resistant protein and P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistant tumors. In January 2002, a Banc of America analyst report forecast that biricodar had a 30% chance of reaching the market with a launch date in the second half of 2005, with peak sales estimated at $250 million.

  4. OSI-774 OSI Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Norman, P

    2001-02-01

    OSI-774 (formerly CP-358774), a quinazoline derivative, is an orally active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor which was originally under joint development by Pfizer and OSI Pharmaceuticals (formerly Oncogene Science) for the potential treatment of cancer (eg, ovarian, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck). It is being evaluated in phase II trials [304305], [372201]. On 8 January 2001, OSI announced that it had signed an agreement with Roche and Genentech for the global co-development and marketing of OSI-774. The agreement with Genentech covers the United States, that with Roche the rest of the world [395371], [395526]. In June 2000, OSI gained all development and marketing rights for OSI-774 following Pfizer's merger with Warner-Lambert [371439]. In September 2000, Pfizer transferred the IND dossierfor OSI-774 to OSI ahead of the timeline agreed in the June 2000 development and marketing rights agreement [383786]. The phase II trials will assess OSI-774 both as a single agent and in combination with existing chemotherapy regimens [347783]. Phase III trials are expected to be initiated in 2001 [347783]. In October 2000, Lehman Brothers predicted that OSI-774 would move into pivotal trials in thefirst half of 2001 and that the drug would be launched in 2003. The analysts also estimated worldwide sales of US $66 million, $285 million and $461 million in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively, and peak sales in excess of US $500 million [395189].

  5. PHARMACEUTICALS AS ENVIRONMENTAL ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry) and apply them to studying the sources and fate of a select list of PPCPs. Application and improvement of analytical methodologies that can detect non-volatile, polar, water-soluble pharmaceuticals in source waters at levels that could be environmentally significant (at concentrations less than parts per billion, ppb). IAG with USGS ends in FY05. APM 20 due in FY05.Subtask 2: Coordination of interagency research and public outreach activities for PPCPs. Participate on NSTC Health and Environment subcommittee working group on PPCPs. Web site maintenance and expansion, invited technical presentations, invited articles for peer-reviewed journals, interviews for media, responding to public inquiries. S

  6. PHARMACEUTICALS AS UBIQUITOUS POLLUTANTS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Those chemical pollutants that are regulated under various international, federal, and state programs represent but a small fraction of the universe of chemicals that occur in the environment as a result of both natural processes and human influence. Although this galaxy of targeted chemicals might be minuscule compared with the universe of both known and yet-to-be identified chemicals, an implicit assumption is that these selective lists of chemicals are responsible for the most significant share of risk with respect to environmental or economic impairment or to human health. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) comprise a particularly large and diverse array of unregulated pollutants that occur in the environment from the combined activities and actions of multitudes of individuals as well as from veterinary and agricultural use. Although the concentration of any individual PPCP rarely ever exceeds the sub-ppm level (if present in drinking water, concentrations of individual PPCPs are generally less than the ppt-ppb level), evidence is accumulating that these trace-Ievel pollutants are ubiquitous, they can have a continuous presence regardless of environmental half-lives ( e.g., where sanitary wastewaters enter the environment), and the numbers of distinct and varied chemical entities could be extremely large (given that thousands are in commercial use). The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-ar

  7. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in drug discovery and development: a pharmaceutical industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Jones, H M; Chen, Y; Gibson, C; Heimbach, T; Parrott, N; Peters, S A; Snoeys, J; Upreti, V V; Zheng, M; Hall, S D

    2015-03-01

    The application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling has developed rapidly within the pharmaceutical industry and is becoming an integral part of drug discovery and development. In this study, we provide a cross pharmaceutical industry position on "how PBPK modeling can be applied in industry" focusing on the strategies for application of PBPK at different stages, an associated perspective on the confidence and challenges, as well as guidance on interacting with regulatory agencies and internal best practices.

  8. Perceptions and Attitudes of Egyptian Health Professionals and Policy-Makers towards Pharmaceutical Sales Representatives and Other Promotional Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Susan; Holmberg, Christine; Russell, Jean; Bochenek, Tomasz; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Fischer, Christiane; Tinnemann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical promotion activities in low and middle-income countries are often neither regulated nor monitored. While Egypt has the highest population and per capita use of medicines in the Arab world, we know very little about pharmaceutical companies promotional activities in the country. Aim To explore and analyze the perceptions of physicians towards promotional and marketing activities of pharmaceutical companies among physicians and pharmacists in Egypt. Methodology Perspectives of different healthcare system stakeholders were explored through semi-structured, in-depth interviews conducted in 2014 in Cairo, Egypt. Interviewees were chosen via purposive sampling and snowball technique. Each interview was recorded and transcribed. Then qualitative, thematic analysis was conducted with the help of NVIVO software. Findings The majority of physicians and pharmacists acknowledged exposure to pharmaceutical promotion. It was commonly believed that interaction with the pharmaceutical industry is necessary and both associated risks and benefits were acknowledged. The interviewed physicians considered themselves competent enough to minimize risks and maximize benefits to their prescribing habits. Views diverged on the extent and magnitude of the risks and benefits of pharmaceutical promotion, especially in regard to the influence on patients’ health. Conclusions Pharmaceutical promotion in Egypt is intensely directed at prescribers and dispensers. Physicians, pharmacists and policymakers expressed little skepticism to the influence of promotion towards their individual prescribing. Raising awareness of the pitfalls of pharmaceutical promotion is necessary, especially among the less experienced physicians. PMID:26473484

  9. 12 CFR 225.109 - “Services” under section 4(c)(1) of Bank Holding Company Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... holding company engages in writing comprehensive automobile insurance (fire, theft, and collision) which... usual agency commissions on all comprehensive automobile insurance written for customers of the bank. (c... only activity of the insurance company (writing comprehensive automobile insurance and credit...

  10. 12 CFR 225.109 - “Services” under section 4(c)(1) of Bank Holding Company Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... holding company engages in writing comprehensive automobile insurance (fire, theft, and collision) which... usual agency commissions on all comprehensive automobile insurance written for customers of the bank. (c... only activity of the insurance company (writing comprehensive automobile insurance and credit...

  11. [The pharmaceutical industry in France: the turning point of 1915].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    For several convergent reasons, 1915 was a key period for the pharmaceutical industry in France. The overall realization that France was dependent on Germany for chemical and pharmaceutical products came from shortages of key drugs but also from massive use of poison gas for which France was not able to face this unexpected event. France's shortage for chemists properly trained to answer the needs of industry, the weak relationship between industry and faculty, the uncomfortable situation of specialty drugs, the regulations on patents and trademarks were many subjects of controversies which will contribute to the analysis of the source of this French dependence to Germany. It will be at the origin of new orientations after the war for the pharmaceutical industry and the French society. The objective was to be independent for drugs and consequently to resolve the identified issues, as well as to have a dynamic industrial research. The creation and development of several pharmaceutical companies after the war was a more or less direct benefit from the considerations starting in 1915.

  12. Regulating pharmaceutical advertising: what will work?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M F

    1997-02-01

    As Dr. Joel Lexchin makes painfully obvious in this issue (see pages 351 to 356), regulatory processes governing pharmaceutical advertising in Canada and elsewhere are seriously compromised. However, the remedial measures Lexchin proposes are not sufficient. Financial sanctions against improper advertising are likely to be regarded by manufacturers as the cost of doing business, and any regulatory body that includes drug industry representatives or individuals receiving financial support from the drug industry cannot be genuinely independent. Moreover, manufacturers are now using promotional strategies that are particularly difficult to regulate. These include providing drugs at lower than the usual cost to ensure their inclusion in managed-care formularies, and using direct-to-consumer advertising to take advantage of the public's lack of sophistication in interpreting scientific evidence. Our best hope of counteracting the power and influence of the drug industry lies in regulation by government agencies, whose interest is the protection of the public.

  13. Prioritizing pharmaceuticals in municipal wastewater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oral presentation at SETAC North America 32nd annual meeting, describing our prioritization of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), based on estimates of risks posed by API residues originating from municipal wastewater. Goals of this project include prioritization of APIs f...

  14. [PICS: pharmaceutical inspection cooperation scheme].

    PubMed

    Morénas, J

    2009-01-01

    The pharmaceutical inspection cooperation scheme (PICS) is a structure containing 34 participating authorities located worldwide (October 2008). It has been created in 1995 on the basis of the pharmaceutical inspection convention (PIC) settled by the European free trade association (EFTA) in1970. This scheme has different goals as to be an international recognised body in the field of good manufacturing practices (GMP), for training inspectors (by the way of an annual seminar and experts circles related notably to active pharmaceutical ingredients [API], quality risk management, computerized systems, useful for the writing of inspection's aide-memoires). PICS is also leading to high standards for GMP inspectorates (through regular crossed audits) and being a room for exchanges on technical matters between inspectors but also between inspectors and pharmaceutical industry.

  15. The pharmaceutical industry's responsibility for protecting human subjects of clinical trials in developing nations.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Finnuala

    2004-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies increasingly perform clinical trials in developing nations. Governments of host nations see the trials as a way to provide otherwise unaffordable medical care, while trial sponsors are drawn to those countries by lower costs, the prevalence of diseases rare in developed nations, and large numbers of impoverished patients. Local governments, however, fail to police trials, and the FDA does not monitor trials in foreign countries, resulting in the routine violation of international standards for the protection of human subjects. This Note proposes independent accreditation of those institutions involved in clinical trials--the institutional review boards which oversee trial protocol; the organizations, such as pharmaceutical companies, which sponsor the trials; and the research organizations that conduct the trials. Accreditation, similar to that used in the footwear and apparel industries, would increase the transparency of pharmaceutical trials and would enable the United States government and consumers to hold trial sponsors accountable for their actions.

  16. Marketing the use of the space environment for the processing of biological and pharmaceutical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The perceptions of U.S. biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies concerning the potential use of the space environment for the processing of biological substances was examined. Physical phenomena that may be important in space-base processing of biological materials are identified and discussed in the context of past and current experiment programs. The capabilities of NASA to support future research and development, and to engage in cooperative risk sharing programs with industry are discussed. Meetings were held with several biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to provide data for an analysis of the attitudes and perceptions of these industries toward the use of the space environment. Recommendations are made for actions that might be taken by NASA to facilitate the marketing of the use of the space environment, and in particular the Space Shuttle, to the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries.

  17. 77 FR 47840 - American Drum and Pallet Company Site; Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee; Notice of settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... the settlement are available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name American... AGENCY American Drum and Pallet Company Site; Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee; Notice of settlement... Company Superfund Site located in Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee. DATES: The Agency will...

  18. 76 FR 14970 - National Starch and Chemical Company, Salisbury, Rowan County, NC; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... AGENCY National Starch and Chemical Company, Salisbury, Rowan County, NC; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... National Starch and Chemical Company Site located in Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama for publication. DATES..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2011-0278 or Site name National Starch and Chemical...

  19. Rasagiline. Teva Pharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Kupsch, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    Rasagiline is a selective and potent irreversible MAO(B) inhibitor which is under development by Teva for the treatment of neurological diseases. Rasagiline is in phase III trials in the US, Canada and Europe for Parkinson's disease (PD) and has completed phase II trials in Israel and Hungary. Teva planned to submit a filing in 2002 and expected to launch rasagiline in 2003. Lundbeck acquired European development and commercialization rights to rasagiline in November 1999 and, in September 2001, the company reported that it planned to file an NDA in 2003. In March 2002, analysts at Morgan Stanley Dean Witter predicted that H Lundbeck would make sales of rasagiline of DKr 100 million in 2003, rising to DKr 300 million in 2008. In the same month, launch was predicted in 2004/2005 for the PD indication, and 2005/2006 for the AD indication, by analysts at Deutsche Banc Alex Brown.

  20. 76 FR 48049 - Airworthiness Directives; Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model L...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model L-1011 Series Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Airworthiness Office, Dept. 6A0M, Zone 0252... Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company: Docket No. FAA-2011-0723; Directorate...

  1. 77 FR 9708 - Pacific Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... COMMISSION Pacific Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application February 13, 2012. AGENCY... rule 12d1-2 under the Act to invest in certain financial instruments. Applicants: Pacific Life Insurance Company (``Pacific Life''), Pacific Life & Annuity Company (``PL&A,'' and collectively...

  2. 78 FR 75581 - Minnesota Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... COMMISSION Minnesota Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application December 6, 2013. AGENCY: The.... Applicants: Minnesota Life Insurance Company (``Minnesota Life'' or ``Insurance Company''), Variable Annuity...., Washington, D.C. 20549- 1090. Applicants, c/o Daniel P. Preiner, Counsel, Minnesota Life Insurance...

  3. 75 FR 39994 - AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... COMMISSION AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application July 7, 2010. AGENCY... Act. APPLICANTS: AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company (``AXA Equitable''), Separate Account 45 of AXA... (``Separate Account FP'') (together, ``AXA Equitable Separate Accounts''), MONY Life Insurance Company...

  4. 78 FR 5841 - Symetra Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Symetra Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application January 22, 2013. AGENCY: Securities... rule 12d1-2 under the Act to invest in certain financial instruments. Applicants: Symetra Life Insurance Company (``Symetra''), First Symetra National Life Insurance Company of New York (``First...

  5. 77 FR 22516 - Certain Transfers of Property to Regulated Investment Companies [RICs] and Real Estate Investment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Companies and Real Estate Investment Trusts AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice... transfers of property from a C corporation to a Regulated Investment Company (RIC) or a Real Estate... may not be circumvented * * * through the use of a regulated investment company, a real...

  6. 78 FR 37222 - Columbia Organic Chemical Company Site, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... AGENCY Columbia Organic Chemical Company Site, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina; Notice of... Columbia Organic Chemical Company Superfund Site located in Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina. The.... Submit your comments by site name Columbia Organic Chemical Company by one of the following methods:...

  7. [Advertising and Zeitgeist. The advertising of Schwabe Pharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Cornelia; Riha, Ortrun

    2015-01-01

    This contribution explores the advertisements for homeopathic products in magazines in the first half of the twentieth century, focusing on the period between 1933 and 1945 and based on the example of the pharmaceutical company Dr Willmar Schwabe. In the first half of the twentieth century, Schwabe Pharmaceuticals was market leader for homeopathic and other complementary medical products (phytotherapy, biochemicals). The example chosen as well as the time frame complement the existing research. We searched three German publications (the homeopathy journal Leipziger Populäre Zeitschrift für Homöopathie, the medical weekly Münchner Medizinische Wochenschrift and the pharma magazine Pharmazeutische Zeitung) and collected target-group-specific results for laypersons, physicians and pharmacists. Analysis of the images and texts in the selected advertisements often reflected the historical background and the respective health policies (wartime requirements, times of need, "Neue Deutsche Heilkunde"). The history of this traditional company was seen as an important point in advertising, as were the recognisability of the brand through the company logo, the emphasis on the high quality of their products and the reference to the company's own research activities. We furthermore found the kind of argumentation that is typical of natural medicine (naturalness, the power of the sun, prominent representatives). Schwabe met the expectations of its clients, who were interested in complementary medicine, whilst pursuing an approach to homeopathy that was compatible with natural science, and it presented itself as a modern, scientifically oriented enterprise. The company did not lose credibility as a result, but increased its clientele by expanding to include the whole naturopathic market.

  8. Elemental Impurities in Pharmaceutical Excipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Schoneker, Dave; Ulman, Katherine L; Sturm, Jason J; Thackery, Lisa M; Kauffman, John F

    2015-12-01

    Control of elemental impurities in pharmaceutical materials is currently undergoing a transition from control based on concentrations in components of drug products to control based on permitted daily exposures in drug products. Within the pharmaceutical community, there is uncertainty regarding the impact of these changes on manufactures of drug products. This uncertainty is fueled in part by a lack of publically available information on elemental impurity levels in common pharmaceutical excipients. This paper summarizes a recent survey of elemental impurity levels in common pharmaceutical excipients as well as some drug substances. A widely applicable analytical procedure was developed and was shown to be suitable for analysis of elements that are subject to United States Pharmacopoeia Chapter <232> and International Conference on Harmonization's Q3D Guideline on Elemental Impurities. The procedure utilizes microwave-assisted digestion of pharmaceutical materials and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of these elements. The procedure was applied to 190 samples from 31 different excipients and 15 samples from eight drug substances provided through the International Pharmaceutical Excipient Council of the Americas. The results of the survey indicate that, for the materials included in the study, relatively low levels of elemental impurities are present.

  9. 76 FR 29744 - Monongahela Power Company, West Penn Power Company, The Potomac Edison Company, PJM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... Edison Company, PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 13, 2011, Monongahela Power Company, West Penn Power Company, The Potomac Edison Company (collectively, the...

  10. [The pharmaceutical industry in the industrial chemical group: the National Union of Chemical-Pharmaceutical Laboratories (1919-1936)].

    PubMed

    Nozal, Raúl Rodríquez

    2011-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry associations, as it happened with other businesses, had a significant rise during the dictatorship of Primo de Rivera and II Republic. The 'Cámara Nacional de Industrias Químicas', in Barcelona, represented the national chemical industry to its ultimate assimilation by the 'Organización Sindical' in 1939. In this association, matters relating to pharmaceutical products -- which we will especially deal with in this work -- were managed by the 'Unión Nacional de Laboratorios Químico-Farmacéuticos', which defended the interests of pharmaceutical companies in the presence of government authorities, using the resources and mechanisms also managed by business pressure groups. The inclusion of industrial pharmacy in the Chemical lobby separated the pharmaceutical industry from traditional exercise and its corporate environment. this created ups and downs, conflicts of interests and finally, love and hate relationships with their colleagues of the pharmacy work placement and, of course, with the association that represented them: the 'Unión Farmacéutica Nacional'.

  11. Pharmaceutical penetration of new drug and pharmaceutical market structure in Taiwan: hospital-level prescription of thiazolidinediones for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Wen; Wen, Yu-Wen; Huang, Weng-Foung; Kuo, Ken N; Chen, Pei-Fen; Shih, Hsin-Wei; Lee, Yue-Chune

    2010-06-01

    This study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance claim database (years 2000-2005) to examine how thiazolidinediones (TZD), a new class of drugs for diabetes, penetrated into Taiwan's hospitals, and its association with the concentration of all diabetes drugs at the hospital level. We collected 72 monthly summaries of diabetes prescriptions from all hospitals in Taiwan. Hospital-level pharmaceutical concentration was measured by penetration of TZD, defined as monthly market share of TZD in each hospital. Concentration of diabetes drugs was measured by Herfindahl-Hirschman indices. We found a negative association (coefficient = -0.3610) between TZD penetration and concentration of diabetes drug but a positive association between penetration of TZD and the volume of prescribed diabetes drugs (coefficient = 0.4088). In conclusion, hospital characteristics and volume of services determined the concentration of pharmaceuticals at the institution level, reflecting the heterogeneous competition between pharmaceutical companies within each hospital. Institution-level pharmaceutical concentration influences the adoption and penetration of new drugs.

  12. Pharmaceutical and industrial protein engineering: where we are?

    PubMed

    Amara, Amro Abd-Al-Fattah

    2013-01-01

    The huge amount of information, the big number of scientists and their efforts, labs, man/hrs, fund, companies all and others factors build the success of the amazing new branch of genetic engineering the 'protein engineering' (PE). It concerns with the modification of protein structure/function(s) or building protein from scratch. The engineered proteins usually have new criteria(s). Engineering proteins can be mediated on the level of genes or proteins. PE fined its way in different important sectors including industrial, pharmaceutical and medicinal ones. Aspects about PE and its applications will be discussed with this review. The concept, tools, and the industrial applications of the protein, engineered proteins and PE will be under focus. In order to get up to date knowledge about the applications of PE in basic protein and molecular biology, several examples are discussed. PE can play a significant role in different industrial and pharmaceutical sectors if used wisely and selectively.

  13. Considering the Future of Pharmaceutical Promotions in Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Francesca Renee Dillman

    2016-01-01

    This commentary explores the implications of increased social media marketing by drug manufacturers, based on findings in Hyosun Kim’s article of the major themes in recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warning letters and notices of violation regarding online direct-to-consumer promotions of pharmaceuticals. Kim’s rigorous analysis of FDA letters over a 10-year span highlights a relative abundance of regulatory action toward marketer-controlled websites and sponsored advertisements, compared to branded and unbranded social media messaging. However, social media marketing efforts are increasing, as is FDA attention to these efforts. This commentary explores recent developments and continuing challenges in the FDA’s attempts to provide guidance and define pharmaceutical company accountability in marketer-controlled and -uncontrolled claims disseminated through social media. PMID:27239874

  14. Cannabis-based medicines--GW pharmaceuticals: high CBD, high THC, medicinal cannabis--GW pharmaceuticals, THC:CBD.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    GW Pharmaceuticals is undertaking a major research programme in the UK to develop and market distinct cannabis-based prescription medicines [THC:CBD, High THC, High CBD] in a range of medical conditions. The cannabis for this programme is grown in a secret location in the UK. It is expected that the product will be marketed in the US in late 2003. GW's cannabis-based products include selected phytocannabinoids from cannabis plants, including D9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). The company is investigating their use in three delivery systems, including sublingual spray, sublingual tablet and inhaled (but not smoked) dosage forms. The technology is protected by patent applications. Four different formulations are currently being investigated, including High THC, THC:CBD (narrow ratio), THC:CBD (broad ratio) and High CBD. GW is also developing a specialist security technology that will be incorporated in all its drug delivery systems. This technology allows for the recording and remote monitoring of patient usage to prevent any potential abuse of its cannabis-based medicines. GW plans to enter into agreements with other companies following phase III development, to secure the best commercialisation terms for its cannabis-based medicines. In June 2003, GW announced that exclusive commercialisation rights for the drug in the UK had been licensed to Bayer AG. The drug will be marketed under the Sativex brand name. This agreement also provides Bayer with an option to expand their license to include the European Union and certain world markets. GW was granted a clinical trial exemption certificate by the Medicines Control Agency to conduct clinical studies with cannabis-based medicines in the UK. The exemption includes investigations in the relief of pain of neurological origin and defects of neurological function in the following indications: multiple sclerosis (MS), spinal cord injury, peripheral nerve injury, central nervous system damage, neuroinvasive

  15. Paying for On-Patent Pharmaceuticals: Limit Prices and the Emerging Role of a Pay for Outcomes Approach.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Richard L; Goldfield, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    In this article we propose a new approach to pricing for patent-protected (on-patent) pharmaceuticals. We describe and define limit pricing as a method for drug companies to maximize revenue for their investment by offering budget-neutral pricing to encourage early adoption by payers. Under this approach, payers are incentivized to adopt innovative but expensive drugs more quickly if drug companies provide detailed analyses of the net impact of the new pharmaceutical upon total health budgets. For payers to adopt use of a new pharmaceutical, they would require objective third-party evaluation and pharmaceutical manufacturer accountability for projected outcomes efficacy of their treatments on population health. The pay for outcomes underpinning of this approach falls within the wider aspirations of health reform.

  16. 75 FR 6791 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Termination: Trinity Universal Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice... the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Financial Management Service, Financial Accounting and Services..., 2010. Vivian L. Cooper, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division. BILLING CODE 4810-35-M...

  17. 75 FR 5075 - Coalinga Cogeneration Company, Kern River Cogeneration Company, Mid-Set Cogeneration Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ...-612-000; ER10-611-000] Coalinga Cogeneration Company, Kern River Cogeneration Company, Mid-Set Cogeneration Company, Salinas River Cogeneration Company, Sargent Canyon Cogeneration Company, Sycamore Cogeneration Company; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

  18. Company Administration Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-01-01

    iTRATION CENTER AND FORT BENJAMIN HARRISON FORT BENJAMIN HARRISON. INDIANA 46216 ATZI -XO 16 October 1973 SUBJECT: Letter of Instruction - Company...Mail, files, records management* publications, voting, etc.). ... AnnexA II ATZI -XO 18 October 1973 SUBJECT: Letter of Instruction - Company...administration as follows: A. 2 I * * " " " ’+ " " ’ ’ ’ ’’ ’ , ’" I ATZI -XO 18 October 1973 SUBJECT: Letter of Instruction - Company Administration Study tea

  19. A vision of the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Muñio, S

    1998-01-01

    As the financial resources available for looking after the health of an aging population are limited, generic drugs (drugs that are no longer covered by a patent and marketed at a lower price) have come to be used in western countries as a means for meeting growing demand while leaving resources in the health budget for new drugs. In Spain, a law on product patents was introduced in 1992, which is much later than in other countries, and created difficulties in the definition and procedure for gaining approval for generic drugs. Circular 3/97 from the Ministry of Health finally resolved these issues. In this circular, generic pharmaceutical products (GPPs) are clearly defined and identified with a positive commitment towards guaranteeing the ability to interchange original drugs for other cheaper generic products and towards clarifying the Spanish vade mecum. The position of the pharmaceutical industry on generic drugs varies widely and consequently, it is impossible to make a general statement on the view of the industry. However, the commitment of Novartis, given the issues described above and in line with the company's global strategy, is to offer innovation and services to society. This is perfectly compatible with offering health professionals both innovative drugs and generic drugs of a high quality at a lower price, given that registering genetics requires less investment in research and development. In any case, GPPs face an uncertain future in Spain and market forecasts also differ widely, ranging from 15 billion to 80 billion pesetas in the year 2000. It will be necessary to get doctors and pharmacists positively involved, to set up fast structural measures, and to avoid rejection by patients through successful information and marketing.

  20. Bioinformatics, target discovery and the pharmaceutical/biotechnology industry.

    PubMed

    Fagan, R; Swindells, M

    2000-12-01

    With the first draft of the human genome now available a directed genome-wide mining strategy is being implemented by many pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies in order to identify novel members of the most therapeutically relevant target families. At the same time there is an increasing amount of annotation relevant to the human genome sequence entering into the public domain. The ability to identify protein families on a genome-wide scale can only be done at speed by using high-throughput computational approaches. This review describes many of the latest algorithmic developments in this field and shows how they can be best put to use for target identification and prioritization.

  1. Antibiotics: the changing regulatory and pharmaceutical industry paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bax, Richard; Green, Samantha

    2015-05-01

    Drug licensing is changing. Previously, regulators prioritized the licensing of innovative drugs that fulfilled a high unmet medical need for a small number of patients, including orphan, cancer and HIV medicines. Alternatives to large and costly prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trials have led to a more bespoke development, such as adaptive design studies. Regulators have recently agreed to include much-needed narrow-spectrum antibiotics, active against certain MDR bacteria, in this paradigm. The background to why big pharmaceutical companies have largely deserted the antibacterial research arena, and the proposals that are hoped to reinvigorate their interest, are presented.

  2. Oxymoron no more: the potential of nonprofit drug companies to deliver on the promise of medicines for the developing world.

    PubMed

    Hale, Victoria G; Woo, Katherine; Lipton, Helene Levens

    2005-01-01

    Although some pharmaceutical company efforts to develop and distribute drugs in developing countries have been successful, many fall short of meeting needs in resource-poor nations. In the context of public-private partnerships, we discuss the concept of a nonprofit pharmaceutical company dedicated to developing and distributing drugs for diseases endemic in developing countries. Using the experience of the Institute for OneWorld Health, we present the vision, core elements of the product development model, and challenges confronting this model. Despite limitations, early successes raise hopes that a nonprofit drug company can exist successfully both as a global health organization and as a business.

  3. Subscription Agencies: A New Look at an Old Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basch, N. Bernard; Warner, Alice Sizer

    1988-01-01

    Provides a historical overview of subscription agencies and describes the current situation. The largest companies are identified and issues for the future--computers and integrated systems, pricing, budgeting, optical technology, and printing technology--are discussed. (MES)

  4. Guidelines for Analysis of Pharmaceutical Supply System Planning in Developing Countries. Volume 7: Pharmaceutical Supply System Planning. International Health Planning Methods Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaumann, Leif; And Others

    Intended to assist Agency for International Development (AID) officers, advisors, and health officials in incorporating health planning into national plans for economic development, this seventh of ten manuals in the Interational Health Planning Methods Series deals with pharmaceutical supply systems planning in developing countries. Following an…

  5. [Bioequivalence studies of pharmaceutical preparations].

    PubMed

    Vetchý, D; Frýbortová, K; Rabisková, M; Danecková, H

    2007-01-01

    Bioequivalence studies are very important for the development of a pharmaceutical preparation in the pharmaceutical industry. Their rationale is the monitoring of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters after the administration of tested drugs. The target of such study is to evaluate the therapeutic compatibility of tested drugs (pharmaceutical equivalents or pharmaceutical alternatives). The importance of bioequivalence studies is increasing also due to the large growth of the production and consumption of generic products. Generic products represent approximately 50 % of the whole consumption in many European countries and USA. The search output of bioequivalence study is together with the pharmaceutical quality data of medical product one of the main part of the registration file submitted to a national regulatory authorities. The registration of generic products does not demand complicated and expensive clinical study contrary to original product. The comparison of the original and the generic product via bioequivalence study is suggested as sufficient. The aim of this article is to provide to a medical public a summary about the types of bioequivalence studies, their range, rules of their practise and let them gain their own attitude to this question.

  6. Medical Representatives' Intention to Use Information Technology in Pharmaceutical Marketing

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Eun-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Electronic detailing (e-detailing), the use of electronic devices to facilitate sales presentations to physicians, has been adopted and expanded in the pharmaceutical industry. To maximize the potential outcome of e-detailing, it is important to understand medical representatives (MRs)' behavior and attitude to e-detailing. This study investigates how information technology devices such as laptop computers and tablet PCs are utilized in pharmaceutical marketing, and it analyzes the factors influencing MRs' intention to use devices. Methods This study has adopted and modified the theory of Roger's diffusion of innovation model and the technology acceptance model. To test the model empirically, a questionnaire survey was conducted with 221 MRs who were working in three multinational or eleven domestic pharmaceutical companies in Korea. Results Overall, 28% and 35% of MRs experienced using laptop computers and tablet PCs in pharmaceutical marketing, respectively. However, the rates were different across different groups of MRs, categorized by age, education level, position, and career. The results showed that MRs' intention to use information technology devices was significantly influenced by perceived usefulness in general. Perceived ease of use, organizational and individual innovativeness, and several MR characteristics were also found to have significant impacts. Conclusions This study provides timely information about e-detailing devices to marketing managers and policy makers in the pharmaceutical industry for successful marketing strategy development by understanding the needs of MRs' intention to use information technology. Further in-depth study should be conducted to understand obstacles and limitations and to improve the strategies for better marketing tools. PMID:27895967

  7. Container-content compatibility studies: a pharmaceutical team's integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Laschi, Alda; Sehnal, Natacha; Alarcon, Antoine; Barcelo, Beatrice; Caire-Maurisier, François; Delaire, Myriam; Feuilloley, Marc; Genot, Stéphanie; Lacaze, Catherine; Pisarik, Luc; Smati, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    . Consequently, a decision tree based mainly on the toxicity aspect is proposed in order to support the pharmaceutical companies' container-content interaction approach and filing.

  8. How to revive breakthrough innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Munos, Bernard H; Chin, William W

    2011-06-29

    Over the past 20 years, pharmaceutical companies have implemented conservative management practices to improve the predictability of therapeutics discovery and success rates of drug candidates. This approach has often yielded compounds that are only marginally better than existing therapies, yet require larger, longer, and more complex trials. To fund them, companies have shifted resources away from drug discovery to late clinical development; this has hurt innovation and amplified the crisis brought by the expiration of patents on many best-selling drugs. Here, we argue that more breakthrough therapeutics will reach patients only if the industry ceases to pursue "safe" incremental innovation, re-engages in high-risk discovery research, and adopts collaborative innovation models that allow sharing of knowledge and costs among collaborators.

  9. Marketing norm perception among medical representatives in Indian pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Nagashekhara, Molugulu; Agil, Syed Omar Syed; Ramasamy, Ravindran

    2012-03-01

    Study of marketing norm perception among medical representatives is an under-portrayed component that deserves further perusal in the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this study is to find out the perception of marketing norms among medical representatives. The research design is quantitative and cross sectional study with medical representatives as unit of analysis. Data is collected from medical representatives (n=300) using a simple random and cluster sampling using a structured questionnaire. Results indicate that there is no difference in the perception of marketing norms among male and female medical representatives. But there is a difference in opinion among domestic and multinational company's medical representatives. Educational back ground of medical representatives also shows the difference in opinion among medical representatives. Degree holders and multinational company medical representatives have high perception of marketing norms compare to their counterparts. The researchers strongly believe that mandatory training on marketing norms is beneficial in decision making process during the dilemmas in the sales field.

  10. Recent trends in the impurity profile of pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Pilaniya, Kavita; Chandrawanshi, Harish K.; Pilaniya, Urmila; Manchandani, Pooja; Jain, Pratishtha; Singh, Nitin

    2010-01-01

    Various regulatory authorities such as the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH), the United States Food and Drug administration (FDA), and the Canadian Drug and Health Agency (CDHA) are emphasizing on the purity requirements and the identification of impurities in Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs). The various sources of impurity in pharmaceutical products are — reagents, heavy metals, ligands, catalysts, other materials like filter aids, charcoal, and the like, degraded end products obtained during \\ after manufacturing of bulk drugs from hydrolysis, photolytic cleavage, oxidative degradation, decarboxylation, enantiomeric impurity, and so on. The different pharmacopoeias such as the British Pharmacopoeia, United State Pharmacopoeia, and Indian Pharmacopoeia are slowly incorporating limits to allowable levels of impurities present in APIs or formulations. Various methods are used to isolate and characterize impurities in pharmaceuticals, such as, capillary electrophoresis, electron paramagnetic resonance, gas–liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, high performance liquid chromatography, solid-phase extraction methods, liquid–liquid extraction method, Ultraviolet Spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, supercritical fluid extraction column chromatography, mass spectrometry, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and RAMAN spectroscopy. Among all hyphenated techniques, the most exploited techniques for impurity profiling of drugs are Liquid Chromatography (LC)-Mass Spectroscopy (MS), LC-NMR, LC-NMR-MS, GC-MS, and LC-MS. This reveals the need and scope of impurity profiling of drugs in pharmaceutical research. PMID:22247862

  11. Pharmaceuticals in Australia: developments in regulation and governance.

    PubMed

    Lofgren, Hans; Boer, Rebecca de

    2004-06-01

    The pharmaceutical domain represents a type of internationalised policy network theorised in recent writings on neo-liberalism, neo-corporatism and governance. This article presents an analysis of developments in prescription drug regulation in Australia. A relatively stable, state-managed pattern of interaction has been superseded by less closed exchange, and the government itself has fragmented into agencies pursuing different objectives. Developments in the three core regulatory areas are described: safety and efficacy controls, social policy (access and equity), and state support for industry (economic) development. Consensus-building occurs within the context of the National Medicines Policy. The pharmaceutical industry, represented by Medicines Australia, has a stake in all aspects of pharmaceutical policy and regulation, and draws upon unique resources (expertise and lobbying capacity). The context for the developments described is Australia's abandonment of a protectionist version of the Keynesian welfare national state in favour of the model of the competition state, which is oriented towards support for the growth of high technology industries such as pharmaceuticals, premised on partnerships with business.

  12. The occurrence of selected human pharmaceutical compounds in UK estuaries.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kevin V; Hilton, Martin J

    2004-09-01

    This report describes a scoping study conducted in order to establish whether pharmaceutical compounds may be present in UK estuaries. Surface water samples collected from five UK estuaries were analysed for the presence of 14 pharmaceutical compounds selected from the priority lists of the UK Environment Agency and the Oslo and Paris Commission (OSPAR). The pharmaceutical compounds/metabolites clofibric acid, clotrimazole, dextropropoxyphene, diclofenac, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid, propranolol, tamoxifen and trimethoprim were detected at measurable concentrations in the samples collected. The concentrations of erythromycin, lofepramine, paracetamol, sulfamethoxazole and acetyl-sulfamethoxazole were all below the limits of detection of the methods used (between 4 and 20 ng l(-1)). The anti-fungal agent clotrimazole was the most frequently detected at a maximal concentration of 22 ng l(-1) and a median concentration of 7 ng l(-1). The analgesic compound ibuprofen was detected at a maximal concentration of approximately 930 ng l(-1) and a median concentration of 48 ng l(-1), whilst the other pharmaceutical compounds were detected between the limits of detection of the method used and 570 ng l(-1).

  13. Utility company views of geothermal development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichs, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The views of geothermal development from a utility company standpoint are presented. The impediments associated with such developments as required reliability and identification of risks are discussed. The utility industry historically is not a risk-taking industry. Support of rapid geothermal development by the utility industry requires identification and elimination of risks or absorption of the risks by other agencies. Suggestions as to the identification and minimization of risks are made.

  14. Macro trends in pharmaceutical innovation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Fredric J

    2005-04-01

    Extract: A lately recycled criticism of the pharmaceutical industry is that it is failing in its mission to innovate. In particular, critics question the industry's incentives to innovate, and they deride those innovations the industry makes as imitative. Industry advocates contend the opposite. The truth is that there are no generally accepted measures of innovation that would conclusively prove either side's point. However, I have found trends in several measures that support both sides of the innovation debate. Overall, the bulk of evidence suggests that the pharmaceutical industry continues to regard pioneering innovations as important (evidenced by the motivation, effort and ability of the industry to create such innovations). However, like other mature manufacturing industries, the pharmaceutical industry relies heavily on incremental innovations (what critics call "me-too" drugs) to sustain its profits. To a large extent, these incremental innovations are themselves medically beneficial and should be encouraged rather than dismissed as merely imitative.

  15. Planning and coordinating pharmaceutical purchasing.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, E C

    1984-09-01

    The planning and coordination of the pharmaceutical purchasing process are discussed. Planning for pharmaceutical purchasing should begin with decisions regarding why a purchasing policy is needed, what the institution's purchasing policy will be, and what departments will be involved in purchasing. General goals of purchasing and procedures for revising purchasing functions are presented, and the role of the pharmacy department, materials management, and other hospital departments in purchasing is discussed. Coordinating input on purchasing decisions from medical staff, administration, and clinical and technical pharmacy personnel to achieve purchasing goals and objectives is discussed. A well-designed pharmaceutical purchasing system provides for planned and scheduled purchases, competitive bidding, product standardization, group purchasing, information sharing, internal accountability, and quality assurance.

  16. The mortality of companies

    PubMed Central

    Daepp, Madeleine I. G.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; West, Geoffrey B.; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The firm is a fundamental economic unit of contemporary human societies. Studies on the general quantitative and statistical character of firms have produced mixed results regarding their lifespans and mortality. We examine a comprehensive database of more than 25 000 publicly traded North American companies, from 1950 to 2009, to derive the statistics of firm lifespans. Based on detailed survival analysis, we show that the mortality of publicly traded companies manifests an approximately constant hazard rate over long periods of observation. This regularity indicates that mortality rates are independent of a company's age. We show that the typical half-life of a publicly traded company is about a decade, regardless of business sector. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of births and deaths of publicly traded companies and identify some of the necessary ingredients of a general theory of firms. PMID:25833247

  17. Metabolic engineering: the ultimate paradigm for continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikramaditya G; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-07-01

    Research and development (R&D) expenditures by pharmaceutical companies doubled over the past decade, yet candidate attrition rates and development times rose markedly during this period. Understandably, companies have begun downsizing their pipelines and diverting investments away from R&D in favor of manufacturing. It is estimated that transitioning to continuous manufacturing could enable companies to compete for a share in emerging markets. Accordingly, the model for continuous manufacturing that has emerged commences with the conversion of late-stage intermediates into the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in a series of continuous flow reactors, followed by continuous solid processing to form finished tablets. The use of flow reactions for API synthesis will certainly generate purer products at higher yields in shorter times compared to equivalent batch reactions. However, transitioning from batch to flow configuration simply alleviates transport limitations within the reaction milieu. As the catalogue of reactions used in flow syntheses is a subset of batch-based chemistries, molecules such as natural products will continue to evade drug prospectors. Also, it is uncertain whether flow synthesis can deliver improvements in the atom and energy economies of API production at the scales that would achieve the levels of revenue growth targeted by companies. Instead, it is argued that implementing metabolic engineering for the production of oxidized scaffolds as gateway molecules for flow-based addition of electrophiles is a more effective and scalable strategy for accessing natural product chemical space. This new paradigm for manufacturing, with metabolic engineering as its engine, would also permit rapid optimization of production variables and allow facile scale-up from gram to ton scale to meet material requirements for clinical trials, thus recasting manufacturing as a tool for discovery.

  18. Transparency in Nigeria's public pharmaceutical sector: perceptions from policy makers

    PubMed Central

    Garuba, Habibat A; Kohler, Jillian C; Huisman, Anna M

    2009-01-01

    Background Pharmaceuticals are an integral component of health care systems worldwide, thus, regulatory weaknesses in governance of the pharmaceutical system negatively impact health outcomes especially in developing countries [1]. Nigeria is one of a number of countries whose pharmaceutical system has been impacted by corruption and has struggled to curtail the production and trafficking of substandard drugs. In 2001, the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC) underwent an organizational restructuring resulting in reforms to reduce counterfeit drugs and better regulate pharmaceuticals [2]. Despite these changes, there is still room for improvement. This study assessed the perceived level of transparency and potential vulnerability to corruption that exists in four essential areas of Nigeria's pharmaceutical sector: registration, procurement, inspection (divided into inspection of ports and of establishments), and distribution. Methods Standardized questionnaires were adapted from the World Health Organization assessment tool and used in semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders in the public and private pharmaceutical system. The responses to the questions were tallied and converted to scores on a numerical scale where lower scores suggested greater vulnerability to corruption and higher scores suggested lower vulnerability. Results The overall score for Nigeria's pharmaceutical system was 7.4 out of 10, indicating a system that is marginally vulnerable to corruption. The weakest links were the areas of drug registration and inspection of ports. Analysis of the qualitative results revealed that the perceived level of corruption did not always match the qualitative evidence. Conclusion Despite the many reported reforms instituted by NAFDAC, the study findings suggest that facets of the pharmaceutical system in Nigeria remain fairly vulnerable to corruption. The most glaring deficiency seems to be the absence of conflict of

  19. Science, politics, and health in the brave new world of pharmaceutical carcinogenic risk assessment: technical progress or cycle of regulatory capture?

    PubMed

    Abraham, John; Ballinger, Rachel

    2012-10-01

    The carcinogenicity (cancer-inducing potential) of pharmaceuticals is an important risk factor for health when considering whether thousands of patients on drug trials or millions/billions of consumers in the marketplace should be exposed to a new drug. Drawing on fieldwork involving over 50 interviews and documentary research spanning 2002-2010 in Europe and the US, and on regulatory capture theory, this article investigates how the techno-regulatory standards for carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals have altered since 1998. It focuses on the replacement of long-term carcinogenicity tests in rodents (especially mice) with shorter-term tests involving genetically-engineered mice (GEM). Based on evidence regarding financial/organizational control, methodological design, and interpretation of the validation and application of these new GEM tests, it is argued that regulatory agencies permitted the drug industry to shape such validation and application in ways that prioritized commercial interests over the need to protect public health. Boundary-work enabling industry scientists to define some standards of public-health policy facilitated such capture. However, as the scientific credibility of GEM tests as tools to protect public health by screening out carcinogens became inescapably problematic, a regulatory resurgence, impelled by reputational concerns, exercised more control over industry's construction and use of the tests, The extensive problems with GEM tests as public-health protective regulatory science raises the spectre that alterations to pharmaceutical carcinogenicity-testing standards since the 1990s may have been boundary-work in which the political project of decreasing the chance that companies' products are defined as carcinogenic has masqueraded as techno-science.

  20. Examination of Electric Utility CEO Compensation 2000-2011 and its significance to Company Earnings, Company Revenue, Company Stock and the Dow Jones Utility Average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labovitch, Andrew

    This dissertation examined electric utility CEO compensation during the years 2000 through 2011 for United States owned and operated companies. To determine the extent to which agency theory may apply to electric utility CEO compensation, this examination segmented the industry by four types of company financial metrics: revenue, earnings, stock price and the Dow Jones Utility Average; by five categories of CEO compensation: base salary, bonus, stock grants, all other compensation and total compensation; and by four categories of company size as measured by revenue: large, medium, small and the industry as a whole. Electric utility CEO compensation data was analyzed with the financial metrics to determine correlations. No type of compensation was highly correlated to any of the financial metrics for any size industry segment indicating that there was little agency. CEO compensation in large electric utility companies was higher than compensation in medium and smaller companies even though the CEOs at larger companies earned less per dollar of revenue and per dollar of earnings than their counterparts in smaller companies.

  1. A Pharmaceutical Bioethics Consultation Service: Six-Year Descriptive Characteristics and Results of a Feedback Survey.

    PubMed

    Van Campen, Luann E; Allen, Albert J; Watson, Susan B; Therasse, Donald G

    2015-04-03

    Background: Bioethics consultations are conducted in varied settings, including hospitals, universities, and other research institutions, but there is sparse information about bioethics consultations conducted in corporate settings such as pharmaceutical companies. The purpose of this article is to describe a bioethics consultation service at a pharmaceutical company, to report characteristics of consultations completed by the service over a 6-year period, and to share results of a consultation feedback survey. Methods: Data on the descriptive characteristics of bioethics consultations were collected from 2008 to 2013 and analyzed in Excel 2007. Categorical data were analyzed via the pivot table function, and time-based variables were analyzed via formulas. The feedback survey was administered to consultation requesters from 2009 to 2012 and also analyzed in Excel 2007. Results: Over the 6-year period, 189 bioethics consultations were conducted. The number of consultations increased from five per year in 2008 to approximately one per week in 2013. During this time, the format of the consultation service was changed from a committee-only approach to a tiered approach (tailored to the needs of the case). The five most frequent topics were informed consent, early termination of a clinical trial, benefits and risks, human biological samples, and patient rights. The feedback survey results suggest the consultation service is well regarded overall and viewed as approachable, helpful, and responsive. Conclusions: Pharmaceutical bioethics consultation is a unique category of bioethics consultation that primarily focuses on pharmaceutical research and development but also touches on aspects of clinical ethics, business ethics, and organizational ethics. Results indicate there is a demand for a tiered bioethics consultation service within this pharmaceutical company and that advice was valued. This company's experience indicates that a bioethics consultation service raises

  2. A Pharmaceutical Bioethics Consultation Service: Six-Year Descriptive Characteristics and Results of a Feedback Survey

    PubMed Central

    Van Campen, Luann E.; Allen, Albert J.; Watson, Susan B.; Therasse, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bioethics consultations are conducted in varied settings, including hospitals, universities, and other research institutions, but there is sparse information about bioethics consultations conducted in corporate settings such as pharmaceutical companies. The purpose of this article is to describe a bioethics consultation service at a pharmaceutical company, to report characteristics of consultations completed by the service over a 6-year period, and to share results of a consultation feedback survey. Methods: Data on the descriptive characteristics of bioethics consultations were collected from 2008 to 2013 and analyzed in Excel 2007. Categorical data were analyzed via the pivot table function, and time-based variables were analyzed via formulas. The feedback survey was administered to consultation requesters from 2009 to 2012 and also analyzed in Excel 2007. Results: Over the 6-year period, 189 bioethics consultations were conducted. The number of consultations increased from five per year in 2008 to approximately one per week in 2013. During this time, the format of the consultation service was changed from a committee-only approach to a tiered approach (tailored to the needs of the case). The five most frequent topics were informed consent, early termination of a clinical trial, benefits and risks, human biological samples, and patient rights. The feedback survey results suggest the consultation service is well regarded overall and viewed as approachable, helpful, and responsive. Conclusions: Pharmaceutical bioethics consultation is a unique category of bioethics consultation that primarily focuses on pharmaceutical research and development but also touches on aspects of clinical ethics, business ethics, and organizational ethics. Results indicate there is a demand for a tiered bioethics consultation service within this pharmaceutical company and that advice was valued. This company's experience indicates that a bioethics consultation service raises

  3. 75 FR 13524 - Northern Natural Gas Company, Southern Natural Gas Company, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northern Natural Gas Company, Southern Natural Gas Company, Florida Gas... of Application March 16, 2010. Take notice that on March 5, 2010, Northern Natural Gas Company... other owners, Southern Natural Gas Company, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC, Transcontinental...

  4. 78 FR 11638 - Michigan Consolidated Gas Company, DTE Gas Company, DTE Gas Company; Notice of Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Michigan Consolidated Gas Company, DTE Gas Company, DTE Gas Company; Notice... Docket Nos. PR13-29-000, and PR13-30-000 (not consolidated), Michigan Consolidated Gas Company (MichCon) and DTE Gas Company (DTE Gas) filed to institute a name change to both itself from MichCon to DTE...

  5. Endocrine-Active Pharmaceuticals: An Environmental Concern?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, there has been growing interest in pharmaceuticals that are specifically designed to have endocrine activity, such as the estrogens used in birth control pills, exerting unintended effects on fish and other aquatic organisms. These pharmaceuticals may not be persistent...

  6. Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing Sector (NAICS 3254)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find environmental regulatory and compliance information for the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector, including essential uses of CFCs, NESHAP for pharmaceutical production, effluent guidelines for wastewater and management of hazardous waste.

  7. Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... The New Era of Medicine SHARE THIS The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, PhRMA, represents the ... PhRMA Privacy Policy Terms of Service Site Map Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America® 950 F Street, ...

  8. Modeling picking on pharmaceutical tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Shrikant

    Tablets are the most popular solid dosage form in the pharmaceutical industry because they are cheap to manufacture, chemically and mechanically stable and easy to transport and fairly easy to control dosage. Pharmaceutical tableting operations have been around for decades however the process is still not well understood. One of the common problems faced during the production of pharmaceutical tablets by powder compaction is sticking of powder to the punch face, This is known as 'sticking'. A more specialized case of sticking is picking when the powder is pulled away form the compact in the vicinity of debossed features. In the pharmaceutical industry, picking is solved by trial and error which is an expensive, labor intensive and time consuming affair. The objective of this work was to develop, validate, and implement a modeling framework for predicting picking in powder compacts. The model was developed in Abaqus a commercially available finite element package. The resulting model was used to investigate the influence of debossed feature geometry viz. the stroke angle and degree of pre-pick, and, influence of lubricant on picking. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  9. Bioremediation of industrial pharmaceutical drugs.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Hedi Ben; Mosrati, Ridha; Barillier, Daniel; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2012-07-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn toward the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in the environment. In recent years, many reports have been made on the occurrence of the large, differentiated group of pharmaceuticals in wastewater (PW), surface water, ground water, and in soil. The pharmaceutical sector is currently expanding in Tunisia, with more than 34 industries. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 to treat PW. P. putida was very efficient in reducing chemical oxygen demand (COD), total dissolved solids (TDS), and turbidity of solution (85.5, 89.1, and 81.5%, respectively). Genotoxicity of effluent, before and after biodegradation, was evaluated in vivo in mouse bone marrow by assessing the percentage of cells bearing different chromosome aberrations. Results indicated that PW showed a significant ability to induce DNA damage. In addition, PW induced a remarkable lipid peroxidation (LPO) effect, however, activities of both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) were unchanged when treated with PW, compared to nontreated PW. This toxicity was imputed to the presence of pharmaceutical compounds in wastewater. However, chromosome aberration, as well as LPO of PW, were significantly reduced after bioremediation. Thus, the use of this strain for testing on the industrial scale seems possible and advantageous.

  10. Pharmaceutical care in smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Marín Armero, Alicia; Calleja Hernandez, Miguel A; Perez-Vicente, Sabina; Martinez-Martinez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    As a determining factor in various diseases and the leading known cause of preventable mortality and morbidity, tobacco use is the number one public health problem in developed countries. Facing this health problem requires authorities and health professionals to promote, via specific programs, health campaigns that improve patients’ access to smoking cessation services. Pharmaceutical care has a number of specific characteristics that enable the pharmacist, as a health professional, to play an active role in dealing with smoking and deliver positive smoking cessation interventions. The objectives of the study were to assess the efficacy of a smoking cessation campaign carried out at a pharmaceutical care center and to evaluate the effects of pharmaceutical care on patients who decide to try to stop smoking. The methodology was an open, analytical, pre–post intervention, quasi-experimental clinical study performed with one patient cohort. The results of the study were that the promotional campaign for the smoking cessation program increased the number of patients from one to 22, and after 12 months into the study, 43.48% of the total number of patients achieved total smoking cessation. We can conclude that advertising of a smoking cessation program in a pharmacy increases the number of patients who use the pharmacy’s smoking cessation services, and pharmaceutical care is an effective means of achieving smoking cessation. PMID:25678779

  11. Immunotoxicology in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed Central

    Norbury, K C

    1982-01-01

    Development of an immunotoxicology program within the pharmaceutical industry is described. With few guidelines in the area and a multitude of factors to consider, a basic screen for evaluating immune competence in species routinely used in toxicologic studies has been proposed. The future of immunotoxicology depends upon the ability of the selected immune function tests to be predictive of human risk. PMID:7037389

  12. Patrick Couvreur: inspiring pharmaceutical innovation.

    PubMed

    Stanwix, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    Patrick Couvreur speaks to Hannah Stanwix, Managing Comissioning Editor: Professor Patrick Couvreur received his pharmacy degree from the Université Catholique de Louvain (Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) in 1972. He holds a PhD in pharmaceutical technology from the same university and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (Zürich, Switzerland). Since 1984, Professor Couvreur has been Full Professor of Pharmacy at the Paris-Sud University (Paris, France) and was holder of the Chair of Innovation Technologique at the prestigious Collège de France (Paris, France). He has published more than 450 peer-reviewed articles and has an H-index of 73, with over 19,000 citations. Professor Coureur has been recognized by numerous national and international awards, including the 2004 Pharmaceutical Sciences World Congress Award, the prestigious Host Madsen Medal, the Prix Galien, the European Pharmaceutical Scientist Award 2011 from the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Sciences, the Médaille de l'Innovation from the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, and recently the European Inventor Award 2013 from the European Patent Office.

  13. The CTSA Pharmaceutical Assets Portal – a public–private partnership model for drug repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Marusina, Kate; Welsch, Dean J.; Rose, Lynn; Brock, Doug; Bahr, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The Pharmaceutical Assets Portal aims to facilitate industry-academic collaborations for discovery of new indications for compounds no longer being developed by pharmaceutical companies, through eliminating barriers to access such compounds. The Portal’s enabling infrastructure includes a national investigator database; a Foci-of-Expertise browser; a material transfer agreement template; and a funding partner. Whereas the goal of creating a shared compound repository remains to be achieved, the Portal has established a mechanism to facilitate future drug repositioning opportunities. PMID:22768020

  14. Feasibility of commercial space manufacturing, production of pharmaceuticals. Volume 2: Technical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A technical analysis on the feasibility of commercial manufacturing of pharmaceuticals in space is presented. The method of obtaining pharmaceutical company involvement, laboratory results of the separation of serum proteins by the continuous flow electrophoresis process, the selection and study of candidate products, and their production requirements is described. The candidate products are antihemophilic factor, beta cells, erythropoietin, epidermal growth factor, alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon. Production mass balances for antihemophelic factor, beta cells, and erythropoietin were compared for space versus ground operation. A conceptual description of a multiproduct processing system for space operation is discussed. Production requirements for epidermal growth factor of alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon are presented.

  15. Your business in court and at federal agencies: 2010 - 2011.

    PubMed

    Reiss, John B; Crowder, Dawn; Simons, Brian; Pleskov, Igor; Davis, Tiffany; Nugent, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This year the government aggressively pursued Manufacturers under the enhanced provisions of the False Claims Act (FCA), as well as under the provisions of the Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act (FDCA). In addition, the government pursued actions against individual executives under the Responsible Corporate Officer Doctrine ("RCO Doctrine") because it does not believe sanctions against the companies provide sufficient deterrence to inappropriate behavior. Companies need to focus on implementing effective compliance programs in order to prevent the occurrence of allegedly improper activity. It should be noted that the existence of an effective program will not protect executives from liability under the RCO Doctrine if improper behavior takes place. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) has undertaken a number of initiatives during the past year in an attempt to counter claims that its review processes for domestic products is driving the development of drugs and devices to overseas markets. The Agency also has improved its capacity to review products imported from overseas by undertaking initiatives with foreign agencies and stationing more FDA employees in foreign countries. The FDA increased the number of warning letters and other enforcement actions. The FDA added two new topics of enhanced authority during the year. One was an expansion of its regulatory authority over foods, and the second was new authority to regulate certain tobacco products. The former is being subjected to some review by the courts, and the scope of its authority over tobacco is the subject of ongoing major litigation. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) are unlikely to experience significant change regarding their regulation of Manufacturers. The FTC, as it has for many years, continues to try to prevent "reverse" payments to generic drug manufacturers by Innovator Manufacturers to diminish generic drug competition, and proposed legislation is

  16. Who Has Used Internal Company Documents for Biomedical and Public Health Research and Where Did They Find Them?

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, L. Susan; Rutkow, Lainie; Vedula, S. Swaroop; Kaufmann, Christopher N.; Rosman, Lori M.; Twose, Claire; Mahendraratnam, Nirosha; Dickersin, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the sources of internal company documents used in public health and healthcare research. Methods We searched PubMed and Embase for articles using internal company documents to address a research question about a health-related topic. Our primary interest was where authors obtained internal company documents for their research. We also extracted information on type of company, type of research question, type of internal documents, and funding source. Results Our searches identified 9,305 citations of which 357 were eligible. Scanning of reference lists and consultation with colleagues identified 4 additional articles, resulting in 361 included articles. Most articles examined internal tobacco company documents (325/361; 90%). Articles using documents from pharmaceutical companies (20/361; 6%) were the next most common. Tobacco articles used documents from repositories; pharmaceutical documents were from a range of sources. Most included articles relied upon internal company documents obtained through litigation (350/361; 97%). The research questions posed were primarily about company strategies to promote or position the company and its products (326/361; 90%). Most articles (346/361; 96%) used information from miscellaneous documents such as memos or letters, or from unspecified types of documents. When explicit information about study funding was provided (290/361 articles), the most common source was the US-based National Cancer Institute. We developed an alternative and more sensitive search targeted at identifying additional research articles using internal pharmaceutical company documents, but the search retrieved an impractical number of citations for review. Conclusions Internal company documents provide an excellent source of information on health topics (e.g., corporate behavior, study data) exemplified by articles based on tobacco industry documents. Pharmaceutical and other industry documents appear to have been less used for

  17. "Does organizational culture influence the ethical behavior in the pharmaceutical industry?".

    PubMed

    Nagashekhara, Molugulu; Agil, Syed Omar Syed

    2011-12-01

    Study of ethical behavior among medical representatives in the profession is an under-portrayed component that deserves further perusal in the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of organizational culture on ethical behavior of medical representatives. Medical representatives working for both domestic and multinational companies constitutes the sample (n=300). Data is collected using a simple random and cluster sampling through a structured questionnaire. The research design is hypothesis testing. It is a cross-sectional and correlational study, conducted under non-contrived settings. Chi-square tests were shows that there is an association between the organizational culture and ethical behavior of medical representatives. In addition, the strength of the association is measured which report to Cramer's V of 63.1% and Phi Value of 2.749. Results indicate that multinational company medical reps are more ethical compared to domestic company medical representatives vast difference in both variance and in t test results. Through better organizational culture, pharmaceutical companies can create the most desirable behavior among their employees. Authors conclude that apart from organizational culture, the study of additional organizational, individual and external factors are imperative for better understanding of ethical behavior of medical representatives in the pharmaceutical industry in India.

  18. The productivity crisis in pharmaceutical R&D.

    PubMed

    Pammolli, Fabio; Magazzini, Laura; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2011-06-01

    Advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of diseases have expanded the number of plausible therapeutic targets for the development of innovative agents in recent decades. However, although investment in pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) has increased substantially in this time, the lack of a corresponding increase in the output in terms of new drugs being approved indicates that therapeutic innovation has become more challenging. Here, using a large database that contains information on R&D projects for more than 28,000 compounds investigated since 1990, we examine the decline of R&D productivity in pharmaceuticals in the past two decades and its determinants. We show that this decline is associated with an increasing concentration of R&D investments in areas in which the risk of failure is high, which correspond to unmet therapeutic needs and unexploited biological mechanisms. We also investigate the potential variations in productivity with regard to the regional location of companies and find that although companies based in the United States and Europe differ in the composition of their R&D portfolios, there is no evidence of any productivity gap.

  19. The ethics of pharmaceutical research funding: a social organization approach.

    PubMed

    Gray, Garry C

    2013-01-01

    This paper advances a social organization approach to examining unethical behavior. While unethical behaviors may stem in part from failures in individual morality or psychological blind spots, they are both generated and performed through social interactions among individuals and groups. To illustrate the value of a social organization approach, a case study of a medical school professor's first experience with pharmaceutical-company-sponsored research is provided in order to examine how funding arrangements can constrain research integrity. The case illustrates three significant ways that institutional corruption can occur in the research process. First, conflicts of norms between pharmaceutical companies, universities, and affiliated teaching hospitals can result in compromises and self-censorship. Second, normal behavior is shaped through routine interactions. Unethical behaviors can be (or can become) normal behaviors when they are produced and reproduced through a network of social interactions. Third, funding arrangements can create networks of dependency that structurally distort the independence of the academic researcher in favor of the funder's interests. More broadly, the case study demonstrates how the social organization approach deepens our understanding of the practice of ethics.

  20. [Pharmaceutical and parapharmaceutical advertising of Annales vertes in 1927].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2007-10-01

    The journal Les Annales, under the direction of Adolphe Brisson, was deeply modified by Pierre (Adolphe's son) who decided to publish in 1927 the first issue of Les Annales with a green cover, so called Les Annales vertes. This journal contained a lot of pharmaceutical as well as parapharmaceutical advertising. It is the useful to make an analysis of it at a period which is just preceding the 1929 financial krasch and which is characterized by large advertising budgets in the pharmaceutical industry. Directed toward the general population, advertising was mainly targeting women and patients suffering from anaemia, intestinal transit diseases, or corn. It is also an opportunity to observe the dynamism of some pharmaceutical companies, most of which have disappeared since then. This very large amount of advertising, indeed in excess, will drive ultimately to change the law a few years later in order to control more and more tightly this activity of advertising that targeted the general population as well as medical doctors and pharmacists.

  1. Regulatory constraints as seen from the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Galligani, G; David-Andersen, I; Fossum, B

    2005-01-01

    In Chile, Canada, Europe, Japan, and the USA, which are the main geographical areas for fish farming of high value fish such as salmonids, sea bass, sea bream, yellowtail and catfish, vaccination has been established as an important method for the prevention of infectious diseases. To make new vaccines available to the fish farming industry, pharmaceutical companies must comply with the regulatory framework for licensing of fish vaccines, which in recent years has become more regulated. Considerable scientific and regulatory skills are thus required to develop, document and license vaccines in accordance with the requirements in the different geographical areas. International co-operation to harmonise requirements for the licensing documentation is ongoing. Even though there are obvious benefits to the pharmaceutical industry from the harmonisation process, it may sometimes impose unreasonable requirements. The regulatory framework for fish vaccines clearly has an impact on the time for bringing a new fish vaccine to the market. Several hurdles need to be passed to complete the regulatory process, i.e. obtain a licence. Fulfilment of the rather detailed and extensive requirements for documentation of the production and controls, as well as safety and efficacy of the vaccine, represent a challenge to the pharmaceutical industry, as do the different national and regional licensing procedures. This paper describes regulatory constraints related to the documentation, the licensing process, the site of production and the continuing international harmonisation work, with emphasis on inactivated conventional fish vaccines.

  2. In silico prediction of pharmaceutical degradation pathways: a benchmarking study.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Mark H; Baertschi, Steven W; Alsante, Karen M; Reid, Darren L; Mowery, Mark D; Shimanovich, Roman; Foti, Chris; Smith, William K; Reynolds, Dan W; Nefliu, Marcela; Ott, Martin A

    2014-11-03

    Zeneth is a new software application capable of predicting degradation products derived from small molecule active pharmaceutical ingredients. This study was aimed at understanding the current status of Zeneth's predictive capabilities and assessing gaps in predictivity. Using data from 27 small molecule drug substances from five pharmaceutical companies, the evolution of Zeneth predictions through knowledge base development since 2009 was evaluated. The experimentally observed degradation products from forced degradation, accelerated, and long-term stability studies were compared to Zeneth predictions. Steady progress in predictive performance was observed as the knowledge bases grew and were refined. Over the course of the development covered within this evaluation, the ability of Zeneth to predict experimentally observed degradants increased from 31% to 54%. In particular, gaps in predictivity were noted in the areas of epimerizations, N-dealkylation of N-alkylheteroaromatic compounds, photochemical decarboxylations, and electrocyclic reactions. The results of this study show that knowledge base development efforts have increased the ability of Zeneth to predict relevant degradation products and aid pharmaceutical research. This study has also provided valuable information to help guide further improvements to Zeneth and its knowledge base.

  3. 46 CFR 308.8 - War risk insurance underwriting agency agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... companies or groups of domestic insurance companies authorized to do a marine insurance business in any... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false War risk insurance underwriting agency agreement. 308.8... INSURANCE General § 308.8 War risk insurance underwriting agency agreement. Standard form MA-355...

  4. JWB Companies, LLC Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    JWB Companies, LLC (the Company) is located in Jacksonville, Florida. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Jacksonville, Florida.

  5. The Internal Agency Approach to Managing and Developing Marketing Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruell, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    Argues that the internal agency model of a marketing communications department forces the department to compete with outside sources for work, while department members sharpen their skills and improve their knowledge of their company's business. Describes the process for creating such an internal agency, including initiating, implementing, and…

  6. 76 FR 38188 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration...

  7. Pharmaceuticals: pharmaceutical cost controls--2005. End of Year Issue Brief.

    PubMed

    Seay, Melicia; Varma, Priya

    2005-12-31

    The enactment of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA '90) gave states the option of offering pharmaceutical benefits within their Medicaid programs. But the law placed restrictions on states' flexibility to control what prescriptions they would cover and required the states to reimburse outpatient prescription drugs from manufacturers that signed rebate agreements with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Forty-nine states--Arizona is excluded, based on its program structure--and the District of Columbia currently offer prescription drug coverage under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program. During the past four years, states all over the country have been plagued with revenue shortfalls in their state Medicaid budgets. While the fiscal situation improved for most states in the 2004 legislative session, many states still face budget pressures in 2005. Compounding existing budget pressures are threats from the Bush Administration to shift increased costs of the Medicaid program on to the states. All things considered, the economic pressure of funding Medicaid is at the top of legislative agendas in 2005. As in previous years, states are attempting to reduce costs to their Medicaid programs by seeking savings in their pharmaceutical programs. Prescription drug costs are highly attributed as a contributing factor to the fiscal climate of state Medicaid programs. Currently, prescription drug spending outpaces that of every other category of health care and drug prices are rising faster than inflation. In response, states are instituting a variety of pharmaceutical cost control measures such as creating preferred drug lists (PDLs), negotiating supplemental rebates, forming bulk purchasing pools, promoting generic drug substitution and implementing price controls. As prescription drug cost containment tools have gained acceptance and momentum, they continue to be controversial. This issue brief explores the debate, history, methodology, utilization

  8. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and... concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and money market instruments. (a) Purpose of financial contract positions....

  9. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and... policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and money market instruments. (a) Purpose of financial contract...

  10. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and... concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and money market instruments. (a) Purpose of financial contract positions....

  11. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and... concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and money market instruments. (a) Purpose of financial contract positions....

  12. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and... policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and money market instruments. (a) Purpose of financial contract...

  13. 2015 White Paper on recent issues in bioanalysis: focus on new technologies and biomarkers (Part 2 - hybrid LBA/LCMS and input from regulatory agencies).

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Brad; Neubert, Hendrik; Hughes, Nicola; Garofolo, Fabio; Abberley, Lee; Alley, Stephen C; Brown-Augsburger, Patricia; Bustard, Mark; Chen, Lin-Zhi; Heinrich, Julia; Katori, Noriko; Kaur, Surinder; Kirkovsky, Leo; Laterza, Omar F; Le Blaye, Olivier; Lévesque, Ann; Santos, Gustavo Mendes Lima; Olah, Timothy; Savoie, Natasha; Skelly, Michael; Spitz, Susan; Szapacs, Matthew; Tampal, Nilufer; Wang, Jian; Welink, Jan; Wieling, Jaap; Haidar, Sam; Vinter, Stephen; Whale, Emma; Witte, Bärbel

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 9th Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (9th WRIB) took place in Miami, Florida with participation of over 600 professionals from pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies, biotechnology companies, contract research organizations and regulatory agencies worldwide. It is once again a 5-day week long event - a full immersion bioanalytical week - specifically designed to facilitate sharing, reviewing, discussing and agreeing on approaches to address the most current issues of interest in bioanalysis. The topics covered included both small and large molecules, and involved LCMS, hybrid LBA/LCMS, LBA approaches including the focus on biomarkers and immunogenicity. This 2015 White Paper encompasses recommendations that emerged from the extensive discussions held during the workshop, and is aimed at providing the bioanalytical community with key information and practical solutions on topics and issues addressed, in an effort to advance scientific excellence, improve quality and deliver better regulatory compliance. Due to its length, the 2015 edition of this comprehensive White Paper has been divided into three parts. Part 2 covers the recommendations for hybrid LBA/LCMS and regulatory agencies' inputs. Part 1 (small molecule bioanalysis using LCMS) and Part 3 (large molecule bioanalysis using LBA, biomarkers and immunogenicity) will be published in volume 7 of Bioanalysis, issues 22 and 24, respectively.

  14. Curing the disobedient patient: medication adherence programs as pharmaceutical marketing tools.

    PubMed

    Lamkin, Matt; Elliott, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies have long focused their marketing strategies on getting doctors to write more prescriptions. But they lose billions in potential sales when patients do not take their prescribed drugs. Getting patients to "adhere" to drug therapies that have unpleasant side effects and questionable efficacy requires more than mere ad campaigns urging patients to talk to their doctors. It requires changing patients' beliefs and attitudes about their medications through repeated contact from people patients trust. Since patients do not trust drug companies, these companies are delivering their marketing messages through nurses, pharmacists, and even other patients--leveraging patients' trust in these intermediaries to persuade them to consume more brand name drugs. Armed with the premise that better adherence improves patients' health, drug companies justify manipulating patients by reframing reasonable decisions to decline therapy as pathological, and promote brand loyalty in the guise of offering medical care.

  15. The superefficient company.

    PubMed

    Hammer, M

    2001-09-01

    Most companies do a great job promoting efficiency within their own walls, streamlining internal processes wherever possible. But they have less success coordinating cross-company business interactions. When data pass between companies, inconsistencies, errors, and misunderstandings routinely arise, leading to wasted work--for instance, the same sales, order entry, and customer data may be entered repeatedly into different systems. Typically, scores of employees at each company manage these cumbersome interactions. The costs of such inefficiencies are very real and very large. In this article, Michael Hammer outlines the activities and goals used in streamlining cross-company processes. He breaks down the approach into four stages: scoping--identifying the business process for redesign and selecting a partner; organizing--establishing a joint committee to oversee the redesign and convening a design team to implement it; redesigning--taking apart and reassembling the process, with performance goals in mind; and implementing--rolling out the new process and communicating it across the collaborating companies. The author describes how several companies have streamlined their supply-chain and product development processes. Plastics compounder Geon integrated its forecasting and fulfillment processes with those of its main supplier after watching inventories, working capital, and shipping times creep up. General Mills coordinated the delivery of its yogurt with Land O'Lakes; butter and yogurt travel cost effectively in the same trucks to the same stores. Hammer says this new kind of collaboration promises to change the traditional vocabulary of corporate relationships. What if you and I sell different products to the same customer? We're not competitors, but what are we? In the past, we didn't care. Now, we should, the author says.

  16. Companies commit to emergency contraception -- have you?

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    Despite the efforts of the medical community, as well as promotional efforts by pharmaceutical companies, relatively few women in the US have heard of emergency contraceptives (ECs). Gynetics, marketer of Preven, plans to file a new drug application for a levonorgestrel EC by the end of 1999, with an anticipated approval in the second half of 2000. Women's Capital Corp., marketer of Plan B, is also aiming for a national commercial launch of its product. According to a recently published acceptability study, women will use ECs when they are made available. A survey among 235 women at 13 Kaiser Permanente medical offices in San Diego, California, regarding their experiences with ECs showed that 91% were satisfied with ECs, and 97% said they would use ECs for emergencies only--dispelling fears that women would forego use of ongoing contraception. About 70% of the women who participated in the study were using a contraceptive method when they requested ECs.

  17. Public policy and pharmaceutical innovation.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, H G

    1982-09-01

    Historically, new drug introductions have played a central role in medical progress and the availability of cost-effective therapies. Nevertheless, public policy toward pharmaceuticals has been characterized in recent times by increasingly stringent regulatory controls, shorter effective patent terms, and increased encouragement of generic product usage. This has had an adverse effect on the incentives and capabilities of firms to undertake new drug research and development activity. The industry has experienced sharply rising research and development costs, declining annual new drug introductions, and fewer independent sources of drug development. This paper considers the effects of government regulatory policies on the pharmaceutical innovation process from several related perspectives. It also examines the merits of current public policy proposals designed to stimulate drug innovation including patent restoration and various regulatory reform measures.

  18. Public Policy and Pharmaceutical Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, Henry G.

    1982-01-01

    Historically, new drug introductions have played a central role in medical progress and the availability of cost-effective therapies. Nevertheless, public policy toward pharmaceuticals has been characterized in recent times by increasingly stringent regulatory controls, shorter effective patent terms, and increased encouragement of generic product usage. This has had an adverse effect on the incentives and capabilities of firms to undertake new drug research and development activity. The industry has experienced sharply rising research and development costs, declining annual new drug introductions, and fewer independent sources of drug development. This paper considers the effects of government regulatory policies on the pharmaceutical innovation process from several related perspectives. It also examines the merits of current public policy proposals designed to stimulate drug innovation including patent restoration and various regulatory reform measures. PMID:10309721

  19. Biosafe Nanoscale Pharmaceutical Adjuvant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shubin; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Chongxi; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Paul C.; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to developments in the field of nanotechnology over the past decades, more and more biosafe nanoscale materials have become available for use as pharmaceutical adjuvants in medical research. Nanomaterials possess unique properties which could be employed to develop drug carriers with longer circulation time, higher loading capacity, better stability in physiological conditions, controlled drug release, and targeted drug delivery. In this review article, we will review recent progress in the application of representative organic, inorganic and hybrid biosafe nanoscale materials in pharmaceutical research, especially focusing on nanomaterial-based novel drug delivery systems. In addition, we briefly discuss the advantages and notable functions that make these nanomaterials suitable for the design of new medicines; the biosafety of each material discussed in this article is also highlighted to provide a comprehensive understanding of their adjuvant attributes. PMID:25429253

  20. The impact of the cox-2 inhibitor issue on perceptions of the pharmaceutical industry: content analysis and communication implications.

    PubMed

    Lofstedt, Ragnar E

    2007-01-01

    The field of risk communication has its roots in the environmental, chemical, space, and nuclear arenas. As a number of these sectors have now vastly improved their communication strategies, attention is being placed on sectors that have been more problematic as of late. Examples of such sectors, include the food industries and the pharmaceutical/health sector. This article focuses on how large, multinational pharmaceutical companies can better communicate risks by analysis of one specific case, namely, that of the Cox-2 controversy.(1) For purposes of this article, risk communication is best described as "the flow of information and risk evaluations back and forth between academic experts, regulatory practitioners, interest groups and the general public," and "big pharma" refers to the more traditional R & D-based, innovative pharmaceutical companies.

  1. Examining pharmaceuticals using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulovská, Kateřina; Křesálek, Vojtěch

    2015-10-01

    Pharmaceutical trafficking is common issue in countries where they are under stricter dispensing regime with monitoring of users. Most commonly smuggled pharmaceuticals include trade names Paralen Plus, Modafen, Clarinase repetabs, Aspirin complex, etc. These are transported mainly from Eastern Europe (e.g. Poland, Ukraine, Russia) to countries like Czech Republic, which is said to have one of the highest number of methamphetamine producers in Europe. The aim of this paper is to describe the possibility of terahertz spectroscopy utilization as an examining tool to distinguish between pharmaceuticals containing pseudoephedrine compounds and those without it. Selected medicaments for experimental part contain as an active ingredient pseudoephedrine hydrochloride or pseudoephedrine sulphate. Results show a possibility to find a pseudoephedrine compound spectra in samples according to previously computed and experimentally found ones, and point out that spectra of same brand names pills may vary according to their expiration date, batch, and amount of absorbed water vapours from ambience. Mislead spectrum also occurs during experimental work in a sample without chosen active ingredient, which shows persistent minor inconveniences of terahertz spectroscopy. All measurement were done on the TPS Spectra 3000 instrument.

  2. Understanding pharmaceutical quality by design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lawrence X; Amidon, Gregory; Khan, Mansoor A; Hoag, Stephen W; Polli, James; Raju, G K; Woodcock, Janet

    2014-07-01

    This review further clarifies the concept of pharmaceutical quality by design (QbD) and describes its objectives. QbD elements include the following: (1) a quality target product profile (QTPP) that identifies the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the drug product; (2) product design and understanding including identification of critical material attributes (CMAs); (3) process design and understanding including identification of critical process parameters (CPPs), linking CMAs and CPPs to CQAs; (4) a control strategy that includes specifications for the drug substance(s), excipient(s), and drug product as well as controls for each step of the manufacturing process; and (5) process capability and continual improvement. QbD tools and studies include prior knowledge, risk assessment, mechanistic models, design of experiments (DoE) and data analysis, and process analytical technology (PAT). As the pharmaceutical industry moves toward the implementation of pharmaceutical QbD, a common terminology, understanding of concepts and expectations are necessary. This understanding will facilitate better communication between those involved in risk-based drug development and drug application review.

  3. Stability of Pharmaceuticals in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Y-Uyen

    2009-01-01

    Stability testing is a tool used to access shelf life and effects of storage conditions for pharmaceutical formulations. Early research from the International Space Station (ISS) revealed that some medications may have degraded while in space. This potential loss of medication efficacy would be very dangerous to Crew health. The aim of this research project, Stability of Pharmacotherapeutic Compounds, is to study how the stability of pharmaceutical compounds is affected by environmental conditions in space. Four identical pharmaceutical payload kits containing medications in different dosage forms (liquid for injection, tablet, capsule, ointment and suppository) were transported to the ISS aboard a Space Shuttle. One of the four kits was stored on that Shuttle and the other three were stored on the ISS for return to Earth at various time intervals aboard a pre-designated Shuttle flight. The Pharmacotherapeutics laboratory used stability test as defined by the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), to access the degree of degradation to the Payload kit medications that may have occurred during space flight. Once these medications returned, the results of stability test performed on them were compared to those from the matching ground controls stored on Earth. Analyses of the results obtained from physical and chemical stability assessments on these payload medications will provide researchers additional tools to promote safe and efficacious medications for space exploration.

  4. PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Modern sanitary practices result in large volumes of human waste, as well as domestic and industrial sewage, being collected and treated at common collection points, wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). In recognition of the growing use of sewage sludges as a fertilizers and as soilamendments, and the scarcity of current data regarding the chemical constituents in sewage sludges, the United States National Research Council (NRC) in 2002 produced a report on sewage sludges. Among the NRC's recommendations was the need for investigating the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in sewage sludges. PPCPsare a diverse array of non-regulated contaminants that had not been studied in previous sewage sludges surveys but which are likely to be present. The focus of this paper will be to review the current analytical methodologies available for investigating whether pharmaceuticals are present in WWTP-produced sewage sludges, to summarize current regulatory practices regarding sewage sludges, and to report on the presence of pharmaceuticals in sewage sludges. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subta

  5. Current issues in clinical research and the development of new pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Goldhammer, A

    2001-01-01

    As a normal part of the drug development process, U.S. pharmaceutical companies conduct many thousands of clinical trials each year. Only after a reasonable assurance of safety is made can the drug be given to patients who have the underlying medical condition that the drug is designed to treat. Patient welfare is assured by adhering to the Food and Drug Administration's interpretation of the "common rule" if the data will be used to support a licensing application. 21 CFR Part 50 sets forth the regulations along with the principles of informed consent and the use of institutional review boards (IRBs) that assure patients' rights are protected. Any potential conflict of interest on the part of a clinical investigator must be reported to the FDA. Pharmaceutical companies extensively monitor ongoing clinical trials for compliance with appropriate regulations. The recent revision of the Declaration of Helsinki governing placebo-controlled clinical trials may adversely impact drug development.

  6. [Innovation in pharmaceutical and health biotechnology industries: challenges for a virtuous agenda].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Marco; Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois; Costa, Laís Silveira; Maldonado, José

    2012-12-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries comprise a major production subsystem of the health industrial complex in Brazil. It stands out for both its economic importance and its prominent role in developing new technologies in strategic areas. Strengthening the local production of generic drugs in the last decade has significantly increased the number of Brazilian companies in the local pharmaceutical market and has been an important turning point for this industry's growth. However, there remain major structural bottlenecks both in terms of production and continuous innovation. These bottlenecks reveal the high vulnerability of the Brazilian National Health System and point to the need of public policies that promote strengthening the production base and innovation in the pharmaceutical industry and that at the same time meet health-related social demands in health in Brazil.

  7. Cost containment through pharmaceutical procurement: a Caribbean case study.

    PubMed

    Huff-Rousselle, M; Burnett, F

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses the potential for health sector cost containment in developing countries through improved pharmaceutical procurement. By describing the specific example of the Eastern Caribbean Drug Service (ECDS), which provides a pooled procurement service to nine ministries of health in the small island nations of the Caribbean, it examines the elements of the procurement operation that allowed ECDS to reduce unit costs for pharmaceuticals by over 50 per cent during its first procurement cycle. The analysis of ECDS considers: (1) political will, institutional alliances, and the creation of a public sector monopsony; (2) pooling demand; (3) restricted international tendering and the pharmaceutical industry; (4) estimating demand and supplier guarantees; (5) reducing variety and increasing volume through standardizing pack sizes, dosage forms and strengths; (6) generic bidding and therapeutic alternative bidding; (7) mode of transport from foreign suppliers; (8) financing mechanisms, including choice of currency, foreign exchange, and terms of payment; (9) market conditions and crafting and enforcing supplier contracts; and, (10) the adjudication process, including consideration of suppliers' past performance, precision requirements in the manufacturing process, number of products awarded to suppliers, and issues of judgment. The authors consider the relevance of this agency's experience to other developing countries by providing a blueprint that can be adopted or modified to suit other situations.

  8. Biosafety, risk assessment and regulation of plant-made pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Penelope A C; Twyman, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    The technology for plant-made pharmaceuticals (PMPs) has progressed significantly over the last few years, with the first commercial products for human use expected to reach the market by 2009 (see Note 1). As part of the 'next generation' of genetically modified (GM) crops, PMPs will be subject to additional biosafety considerations and are set to challenge the complex and overlapping regulations that currently govern GM plants, plant biologics (see Note 2) and 'conventional' pharmaceutical production. The areas of responsibility are being mapped out between the different regulatory agencies (Sparrow, P.A.C., Irwin, J., Dale, P., Twyman, R.M., and Ma, J.K.C. (2007) Pharma-Planta: Road testing the developing regulatory guidelines for plant-made pharmaceuticals. Transgenic Res., 2007), with specific guidelines currently being drawn up for the regulation of PMPs. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the biosafety (see Note 3), risk assessment (see Note 4) and regulation of this emerging technology. While reference will be made to EU regulations, the underlying principles of biosafety and risk assessment are generic to most countries.

  9. Prevalence and Determinants of Physician Participation in Conducting Pharmaceutical-sponsored Clinical Trials and Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Ashar, Bimal H; Miller, Redonda G; Getz, Kelly J; Powe, Nell R

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND The relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry is controversial because of the potential for conflicts of interest. However, little empirical evidence exists on the extent of physician participation in activities sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. OBJECTIVES To determine the prevalence of participation of internal medicine physicians in clinical trials and lectures sponsored by pharmaceutical companies and to describe factors that are associated with such participation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We conducted a cross-sectional regional survey of 1,000 Maryland internal medicine physicians between February 2000 and January 2001 in order to measure the prevalence of physician participation in pharmaceutical-sponsored clinical trials and lectures. We also collected economic and demographic information to examine potential associations between physician characteristics and engagement in such activities. RESULTS Of 835 eligible physicians 444 (53%) responded, of whom 37% reported engaging in pharmaceutical-sponsored clinical trials and/or lectures to supplement their incomes. In our multivariable analysis, subspecialists versus generalist physicians (odds ratio [OR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14 to 2.99), physicians in private group-single specialty and academic practice versus physicians in solo practice (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.19 to 4.44 and OR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.17 to 5.61, respectively), and physicians with higher versus lower annual incomes (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.44) had a greater odds of participation in these activities. Additionally, physicians dissatisfied with their income had a 140% greater odds of participation (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.45 to 3.83) than those who were satisfied with their income. CONCLUSIONS A substantial number of internists engage in pharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials and/or lectures in an effort to supplement their incomes. Physician dissatisfaction with income appears to

  10. An Export-Marketing Model for Pharmaceutical Firms (The Case of Iran)

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Mehdi; Aryanpour, Narges

    2013-01-01

    Internationalization is a matter of committed decision-making that starts with export marketing, in which an organization tries to diagnose and use opportunities in target markets based on realistic evaluation of internal strengths and weaknesses with analysis of macro and microenvironments in order to gain presence in other countries. A developed model for export and international marketing of pharmaceutical companies is introduced. The paper reviews common theories of the internationalization process, followed by examining different methods and models for assessing preparation for export activities and examining conceptual model based on a single case study method on a basket of seven leading domestic firms by using mainly questionares as the data gathering tool along with interviews for bias reduction. Finally, in keeping with the study objectives, the special aspects of the pharmaceutical marketing environment have been covered, revealing special dimensions of pharmaceutical marketing that have been embedded within the appropriate base model. The new model for international activities of pharmaceutical companies was refined by expert opinions extracted from result of questionnaires. PMID:24250597

  11. An export-marketing model for pharmaceutical firms (the case of iran).

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Mehdi; Aryanpour, Narges

    2013-01-01

    Internationalization is a matter of committed decision-making that starts with export marketing, in which an organization tries to diagnose and use opportunities in target markets based on realistic evaluation of internal strengths and weaknesses with analysis of macro and microenvironments in order to gain presence in other countries. A developed model for export and international marketing of pharmaceutical companies is introduced. The paper reviews common theories of the internationalization process, followed by examining different methods and models for assessing preparation for export activities and examining conceptual model based on a single case study method on a basket of seven leading domestic firms by using mainly questionares as the data gathering tool along with interviews for bias reduction. Finally, in keeping with the study objectives, the special aspects of the pharmaceutical marketing environment have been covered, revealing special dimensions of pharmaceutical marketing that have been embedded within the appropriate base model. The new model for international activities of pharmaceutical companies was refined by expert opinions extracted from result of questionnaires.

  12. Drug discovery market exclusivity after KSR: the challenge to pharmaceutical scientists and the US congress.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Manfred E

    2011-08-01

    The Hatch-Waxman Act provides 180 days of market exclusivity to encourage generic companies to challenge the validity of pharmaceutical patents issued to innovator pharmaceutical companies. The consequent patent losses have been exacerbated owing to the application of holdings of the 2007 Supreme Court KSR decision to questions of pharmaceutical patentability by the judiciary and the US Patent Office. The resulting negative effect on support for new drug and formulation discovery by pharmaceutical scientists is discussed. To counteract the societal detriment of this negative effect, the adoption of a 12-year US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) market exclusivity paradigm for all approved new chemical entities including prodrugs is proposed. Such market exclusivities have already been enacted in the United States for follow-on biologicals and are in substantial harmony with those of the European Union, Japan, and Canada. An extension of the existing 3-year FDA market exclusivity for new formulations under 21 U.S.C. (United States Code) §505(b)(2) to 5 years should also be considered.

  13. 78 FR 17763 - Housatonic Railroad Company, Inc., Maybrook Railroad Company, and Housatonic Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Surface Transportation Board Housatonic Railroad Company, Inc., Maybrook Railroad Company, and Housatonic Transportation Company--Intra-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption Housatonic Railroad Company, Inc. (HRRC), Maybrook Railroad Company (MRC), and Housatonic Transportation Company (HTC) (collectively,...

  14. [Early achievements of the Danish pharmaceutical industry-7].

    PubMed

    Grevsen, Jørgen V; Kirkegaard, Hanne; Kruse, Edith; Kruse, Poul R

    2014-01-01

    A/S GEA Farmaceutisk Fabrik was established as a family business in 1927 by the pharmacist Knud L. Gad Andresen who until then had been employed in the pharmaceutical industry. Gad Andresen wanted to run a company focusing on the development of generics, and he wanted this development to take place in a close cooperation with Danish physicians. This has indeed been achieved with success. In 1995 GEA was purchase'd by the American pharmaceutical company Bristol-Myers Squibb who in a press release characterized GEA as Denmark's second largest manufacturer of generics. Immediately after this takeover GEA's R&D department ceased the research in innovative products and from now on exclusively focused on the development of generics. Three years later GEA was sold to the German generic company Hexal who later on resold GEA to the Swiss generic company Sandoz. GEA changed ownership another couple of times until the last owner went bankrupt in 2011. GEA is yet again a model example of an early Danish pharmaceutical company which was established as an individual company, and which had a long commercial success with the production and marketing of generics. GEA's earliest products, the organotherapeutics, were not innovations. The innovative products were developed already in the 1890s in Denmark by Alfred Benzon, and later on copies followed a.o. from Medicinalco and from foreign companies before GEA marketed their generics. Therefore GEA had to promote their preparations as especially qualified medicinal products and to intimate that the products of the competitors were less "active'". At the end of the 1920s the Ministry of Health became aware of the fact that there might be health problems related to the none-existing control of both the or- ganotherapeutic preparations and actually also the other medicinal products of the pharmaceutical industry. Therefore the Ministry had requested the National Board of Health for a statement regarding this problem. The National Board

  15. 75 FR 24993 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Early...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... COMMISSION Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Early Site Permit, Proposed No Significant Hazards Consideration Determination, and Opportunity for a Hearing AGENCY... staff must also determine that the amendment request involves no significant hazards...

  16. 78 FR 53175 - The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application Agency: Securities and Exchange Commission (``SEC'' or ``Commission'') August 22, 2013. ACTION: Notice of application...

  17. 77 FR 59873 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes; Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes; Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Availability of an Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis... Flexibility Analysis for the previously published proposed airworthiness directive (AD) on Cessna...

  18. U.S. EPA orders companies in Visalia, Calif., to protect Mill Creek from polluted wastewater

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced the resolution of a series of enforcement actions for Clean Water Act violations at three manufacturing companies located in Visalia, Calif. The facilities owned by Univar USA, Advan

  19. 78 FR 53489 - SEC Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION SEC Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Securities and Exchange Commission Advisory Committee on...

  20. 77 FR 50187 - Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies; Meeting AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Securities and Exchange Commission Advisory Committee on Small...

  1. 78 FR 21432 - SEC Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION SEC Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: The Securities and Exchange Commission Advisory Committee on...

  2. 77 FR 31409 - Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies; Meeting AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Securities and Exchange Commission Advisory Committee on Small...

  3. 77 FR 33004 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; Clinton Power Station, Unit 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Exelon Generation Company, LLC; Clinton Power Station, Unit 1 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... request for partial site release to Facility Operating License No. NPF-62 issued to Exelon...

  4. EPA Resolves Violations with Newport Beach, Calif. Company for Failure to Report Imported Agricultural Chemicals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    LOS ANGELES -The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency settled its case against American Vanguard Corporation, located in Newport Beach, Calif., for failure to report toxic chemical substances imported by two of its subsidiary companies. American Vang

  5. 75 FR 39678 - Meeting of Energy Services Companies and the Federal Energy Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... ESPC policies. Using the Best Commercially Available Energy-Efficient Technology. Using New and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Meeting of Energy Services Companies and the Federal Energy Management Program AGENCY: Department...

  6. 75 FR 62879 - Individual Exemption Involving General Motors Company, General Motors Holdings LLC, and General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... Benefits Security Administration Individual Exemption Involving General Motors Company, General Motors Holdings LLC, and General Motors LLC, Located in Detroit, MI AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security... ERISA (the Notice).\\2\\ The proposed exemption was requested in an application filed by General...

  7. 77 FR 10806 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; First Sealord Surety, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; First Sealord Surety, Inc. AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice....

  8. Taunton, Mass. Company Enters Settlement with EPA for Hazardous Waste Allegations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A Taunton, Mass. company that manufactures materials used in laboratory analysis has agreed to pay $199,500 to settle claims by the US Environmental Protection Agency that it violated state and federal hazardous waste laws.

  9. Actor modelling and its contribution to the development of integrative strategies for management of pharmaceuticals in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Titz, Alexandra; Döll, Petra

    2009-02-01

    Widespread presence of human pharmaceuticals in water resources across the globe is documented. While some, but certainly not enough, research on the occurrence, fate and effect of pharmaceuticals in water resources has been carried out, a holistic risk management strategy is missing. The transdisciplinary research project "start" aimed to develop an integrative strategy by the participation of experts representing key actors in the problem field "pharmaceuticals in drinking water". In this paper, we describe a novel modelling method, actor modelling with the semi-quantitative software DANA (Dynamic Actor Network Analysis), and its application in support of identifying an integrative risk management strategy. Based on the individual perceptions of different actors, the approach allows the identification of optimal strategies. Actors' perceptions were elicited by participatory model building and interviews, and were then modelled in perception graphs. Actor modelling indicated that an integrative strategy that targets environmentally-responsible prescription, therapy, and disposal of pharmaceuticals on one hand, and the development of environmentally-friendly pharmaceuticals on the other hand, will likely be most effective for reducing the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in drinking water (at least in Germany where the study was performed). However, unlike most other actors, the pharmaceutical industry itself does not perceive that the production of environmentally-friendly pharmaceuticals is an action that helps to achieve its goals, but contends that continued development of highly active pharmaceutical ingredients will help to reduce the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in the water cycle. Investment in advanced waste or drinking water treatment is opposed by both the wastewater treatment company and the drinking water supplier, and is not mentioned as appropriate by the other actors. According to our experience, actor modelling is a useful method to suggest effective

  10. Financial Aspects and the Future of the Pharmaceutical Industry in the United States of America

    PubMed Central

    Karamehic, Jasenko; Ridic, Ognjen; Ridic, Goran; Jukic, Tomislav; Coric, Jozo; Subasic, Djemo; Panjeta, Mirsad; Saban, Aida; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The U.S. pharmaceutical industry is defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as “companies engaged in researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing of medicines and biological for human or veterinary use”. Besides its main role in improving human health, the US pharmaceutical industry represents one of the most critical, key decision makers’ lobbying prone and competitive sectors in the economy. The cost in the environment of very limited government price regulation remains one of the major problems fuelling aggregate health care cost inflation. Pharmaceuticals have created huge benefits for public health and economic productivity by the means of saving lives, increasing life expectancy, reducing illness related suffering, preventing surgeries and decreasing hospital stays. Purpose: The goal of this review paper is to show the present conditions and future trends of the pharmaceutical industry in the U.S. Methodology: This paper represents a thorough literature review of the multifaceted sources including: studies, books, peer reviewed journals, U.S. government sources (i.e. U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, etc.). Discussion: In the thirty years pharmaceutical companies have consistently developed and launched new medicines, bringing hope to sick or – at risk patients. They also usually provide above the average financial returns for its shareholders. U.S. pharmaceutical companies had as their goal to discover blockbuster drugs. Blockbuster drugs are generally defined as drugs that solve medical problems common to hundreds of millions of people and, at the same time generate large sales increases and profits for the pharmaceutical companies. The main approach of these companies includes huge investments in research and development (R&D), innovation, marketing and sales. The trend analysis shows that for the most part the era of blockbuster drugs is nearing an end. Conclusion: Numerous blockbuster drugs will be coming off

  11. Company Town Shutdown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnage, Martha A.

    Saltville, Virginia, is a former company town whose main employer, a soda ash plant, shut down on July 1, 1971. The closure of the chemical plant displaced 700 workers, and created a crisis that threatened not only the existence of the town, but of the entire region. In response, Virginia Highlands Community College (VHCC), in cooperation with the…

  12. Smart customers, dumb companies.

    PubMed

    Locke, C

    2000-01-01

    Customers today are being bombarded with an overwhelming array of choices. To alleviate customer frustration, say Steven Cristol and Peter Sealey in Simplicity Marketing, companies should stop creating new brands and product extensions. Better to consolidate product and service functions by following a four R approach: replace, repackage, reposition, and replenish. That's an outmoded, dictatorial view of markets, says Christopher Locke. Far from being stymied by choices, customers are rapidly becoming smarter than the companies that pretend to serve them. In this networked economy, people are talking among themselves, and that changes everything. Locke predicts we'll see a growing number of well-defined micromarkets--groups of customers converging in real time around entertaining and knowledgeable voices--such as NPR's car guys and the Motley Fool investment site. "Micromedia" Web sites will replace traditional advertising because they'll provide credible user-supplied news about products and services. Locke contends that an open exchange of information solves the "problem" of choice much better than manipulative strategies like simplicity or even permission marketing. Companies can participate in micromarkets through what Locke dubs "gonzo marketing." If Ford, for example, discovers that a subset of its employees are organic gardeners, it may offer support to a big independent organic-gardening Web site with donations and employee volunteers. This marketing effort would be driven not by advertising managers but by people with genuine interest in each micromarket, so it would have credibility with customers. With gonzo marketing, both companies and their markets will benefit.

  13. The Electric Company.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Television Workshop, New York, NY.

    This book is intended as an introduction to the television program, "The Electric Company," designed to help teach reading to children in grades 2-4 who are experiencing difficulty. Contents include: Sidney P. Marland, Jr.'s preface, "A Significant New Teaching Tool"; Joan Ganz Cooney's "Television and the Teaching of…

  14. What Companies Look For.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Ronald

    1985-01-01

    Examines reasons why technology companies are locating new facilities in various areas across the country. Also explains a microelectronics firm's paramount concern of selecting a site with proximity to university research and technical education, a criterion recognized as essential by industry when selecting a potential site. (DH)

  15. Introduction: Institutional corruption and the pharmaceutical policy.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Today, the goals of pharmaceutical policy and medical practice are often undermined due to institutional corruption - that is, widespread or systemic practices, usually legal, that undermine an institution's objectives or integrity. In this symposium, 16 articles investigate the corruption of pharmaceutical policy, each taking a different look at the sources of corruption, how it occurs, and what is corrupted. We will see that the pharmaceutical industry's own purposes are often undermined. Furthermore, pharmaceutical industry funding of election campaigns and lobbying skews the legislative process that sets pharmaceutical policy. Moreover, certain practices have corrupted medical research, the production of medical knowledge, the practice of medicine, drug safety, the Food and Drug Administration's oversight of the pharmaceutical market, and the trustworthiness of patient advocacy organizations.

  16. 78 FR 76045 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request... (GE) GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B turbofan engines with certain high pressure compressor (HPC) rotor stage... are issuing this AD to prevent failure of a critical life-limited rotating engine part, which...

  17. 77 FR 58471 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request... GEnx-2B67B turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive ultrasonic inspections (UI) of... resulting in one or more engine failure(s) and possible loss of the airplane. DATES: This AD is...

  18. 77 FR 55681 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Material of the Components of the Horizontal Stabilizer For airplanes identified in Boeing 707 Alert...-17176; AD 2012-17-13] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes AGENCY... -100B short body series airplanes; Model 707-300, -300B, -300C, and - 400 series airplanes; and...

  19. 77 FR 21429 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 777 airplanes. This AD was... these airplanes. DATES: This AD is effective May 15, 2012. The Director of the Federal Register...

  20. 76 FR 53308 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for... airplanes. That AD currently requires either installing a placard prohibiting spins and other acrobatic maneuvers in the airplane or replacing the rudder stop, the rudder stop bumper, and the attachment...